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Sample records for klystron output cavity

  1. Design of a C-band relativistic extended interaction klystron with coaxial output cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wu; Zhao, De-Kui; Chen, Yong-Dong

    2015-07-01

    In order to overcome the disadvantages of conventional high frequency relativistic klystron amplifiers in power capability and RF conversion efficiency, a C-band relativistic extended interaction klystron amplifier with coaxial output cavity is designed with the aid of PIC code MAGIC. In the device, disk-loaded cavities are introduced in the input and intermediate cavity to increase the beam modulation depth, and a coaxial disk-loaded cavity is employed in the output cavity to enhance the RF conversion efficiency. In PIC simulation, when the beam voltage is 680 kV and current is 4 kA, the device can generate 1.11 GW output power at 5.64 GHz with an efficiency of 40.8%.

  2. Characteristic impedances in output cylindrical coaxial cavity resonator of klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yuhe; Xie, Xingjuan; Huang, Chuanlu

    2011-07-01

    Cylindrical coaxial cavity resonator with shift-tubes coupled with rectangular waveguide is designed. The gap characteristic impedance and external quality factor of higher order transverse magnetic mode TM{sub 310} in the cavity are simulated with high frequency electromagnetic simulator ISFEL-3D. The ununiformity of the characteristic impedance resulted from the coupling aperture is reduced through introduction of concave delves on peripheral wall of the cavity. (author)

  3. Stability analysis of a C-band 500-kW klystron with a multi-cell output cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jihyun; Park, Sung-Ju; Namkung, Won; Cho, Moohyun

    2016-09-01

    A prototype 5-GHz 500-kW CW klystron (model E3762 provided by Toshiba Electron Tubes & Devices Co. Ltd.) has been operating as the RF source for the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system in the KSTAR tokamak. A cavity design study is being carried out with a simulation code based on the main klystron's operation parameters in order to investigate how the efficiency of the 5-GHz 500-kW CW klystron prototype can be enhanced. This is being done by simulating the klystron's performances for various cavity parameters, including the number of cavities, the inter-cavity distance, and the cavity's tuning frequencies. The simulation has been done with the FCI (field charge interaction) code aided by a matlab script for scanning input parameters. The initial set of scan parameters was obtained by benchmarking the E3762 klystron, and we are able to obtain optimized design parameters for a cavity system with better efficiency by adopting a multi-cell output cavity. However, the multi-cell output cavity is prone to self-oscillations due to the prolonged (several half RF periods) beam-field interaction along its multiple gaps. We have checked the feasibility of the optimization by evaluating the stability of the output cavity system. The stability is given by the ratio of a beam-loading conductance to the circuit conductance.

  4. Nonlinear, nonlaminar-3D computation of electron motion through the output cavity of a klystron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, L. U.; Kosmahl, H. G.

    1971-01-01

    The equations of motion used in the computation are discussed along with the space charge fields and the integration process. The following assumptions were used as a basis for the computation: (1) The beam is divided into N axisymmetric discs of equal charge and each disc into R rings of equal charge. (2) The velocity of each disc, its phase with respect to the gap voltage, and its radius at a specified position in the drift tunnel prior to the interaction gap is known from available large signal one dimensional programs. (3) The fringing rf fields are computed from exact analytical expressions derived from the wave equation assuming a known field shape between the tunnel tips at a radius a. (4) The beam is focused by an axisymmetric magnetic field. Both components of B, that is B sub z and B sub r, are taken into account. (5) Since this integration does not start at the cathode but rather further down the stream prior to entering the output cavity it is assumed that each electron moved along a laminar path from the cathode to the start of integration.

  5. Automatic network analyzer procedures for 5045 klystron cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, J.G.

    1991-07-01

    This Note describes the results of using Automatic Network Analyzers in measuring SLAC 5045 klystron cavities. Two different analyzers were compared; the HP8753 and HP8510. Both analyzers have frequency synthesizer accuracy and stability to perform the measurement without the need for a frequency counter. The klystron has six cavities which can be put into three categories; input, gain and output. The input and output cavities require an external Q measurement (Qe) to determine coupling ({beta}) and center frequency (f{sub o}). The gain cavities require a resonant frequency measurement only.

  6. RF breakdown studies in X-Band klystron cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Callin, R.S.; Fowkes, W.R.

    1997-05-01

    RF breakdown studies are presently being carried out at SLAC with klystron cavities in a traveling wave resonator (TWR). Different kinds of fabrication methods and several kinds of semiconducting and insulating coatings have been applied to X-Band TM{sub 010} cavities. RF breakdown thresholds up to 250 MV/m have been obtained. Dark current levels were found to be depressed on TiN-coated and single-point diamond turned cavities. A new TM{sub 020} cavity with demountable electrodes has been designed and will be used to test a variety of materials, coatings, and processes. Recent tests of klystron output windows at 119 MW are also presented in this paper.

  7. High efficiency coaxial klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator with a premodulation cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Renzhen; Teng Yan; Chen Changhua; Sun Jun

    2011-11-15

    The klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) combines the transition radiation with Cerenkov radiation and has demonstrated microwave output of high power and high efficiency. The coaxial slow wave structure device can produce microwave with a lower frequency in a smaller cross section. For the purpose of high efficiency, low frequency, and miniaturization, a coaxial klystron-like RBWO with a premodulation cavity is presented. Particle-in-cell simulations show that a microwave with power of 1.15 GW and frequency of 2.1 GHz is generated with conversion efficiency of 48%, whereas for the device with a reflector, the efficiency is 38%.

  8. Improving the efficiency of microwave devices with a double output cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Lee, T.G.

    1986-05-01

    Double output cavities have been used experimentally to increase the efficiency of high-power klystrons. We have used particle-in-cell simulations with the 2 + 1/2 dimensional code MASK to optimize the design of double output cavities for the lasertron and the 50 MW klystron under development at SLAC. We discuss design considerations for double output cavities (e.g., optimum choice of voltages and phases, efficiency, wall interception, breakdown). We describe how one calculates the cavity impedance matrix from the gap voltages and phases. Simulation results are compared to experience with the 150 MW klystron.

  9. Mode control in a high gain relativistic klystron amplifier with 3 GW output power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yang; Xie, Hong-Quan; Xu, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Higher mode excitation is very serious in the relativistic klystron amplifier, especially for the high gain relativistic amplifier working at tens of kilo-amperes. The mechanism of higher mode excitation is explored in the PIC simulation and it is shown that insufficient separation of adjacent cavities is the main cause of higher mode excitation. So RF lossy material mounted on the drift tube wall is adopted to suppress higher mode excitation. A high gain S-band relativistic klystron amplifier is designed for the beam current of 13 kA and the voltage of 1 MV. PIC simulation shows that the output power is 3.2 GW when the input power is only 2.8 kW.

  10. A study on the high-order mode oscillation in a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying-Hui; Niu, Xin-Jian; Jia, Nan; Li, Zheng-Hong; Wang, Hui; Cheng, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Chuan; Duan, Yaoyong

    2016-07-01

    The high-order mode oscillation is studied in designing a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier. The reason for the oscillation caused by high-order modes and a method to suppress these kinds of spurious modes are found through theoretical analyses and the study on the influence of major parameters of a high frequency structure (such as the oscillation frequency of cavities, the cavity Q value, the length of drift tube section, and the characteristic impedance). Based on much simulation, a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier with a superior performance has been designed, built, and tested. An output power of 2.22 GW corresponding to 27.4% efficiency and 61 dB gain has been obtained. Moreover, the high-order mode oscillation is suppressed effectively, and an output power of 1.95 GW corresponding to 26% efficiency and 62 dB gain has been obtained in our laboratory.

  11. Design of inductively detuned RF extraction cavities for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Li, H.

    1995-04-01

    An inductively detuned traveling wave cavity for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator expected to extract high RF power at 11. 424 GHz for the 1 TeV Center of Mass Next Linear Collider has been designed. Longitudinal beam dynamics studies led to the following requirements on cavity design: (a) Extraction of 360 MW of RF power with RF component of the current being 1.15 kAmps at 11.424 GHz, (b) Inductively detuned traveling wave cavity with wave phase velocity equal to 4/3 the speed of light, (c) Output cavity with appropriate Q{sub ext} and eigenfrequency for proper matching. Furthermore, transverse beam dynamics require low shunt impedances to avoid the beam break-up instability. We describe the design effort to meet these criteria based on frequency-domain and time-domain computations using 2D- and 3D- electromagnetic codes.

  12. Computer control of the energy output of a klystron in the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, R.K.; Browne, M.J.; Flores, M.; Phinney, N.; Schwarz, H.D.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1987-02-01

    Hardware and software have been developed to permit computer control of the output of high power klystrons on a pulsed basis. Control of the klystron output is accomplished by varying the input drive via a pulsed rf attenuator. Careful power calibrations permit accurate calculation of the available energy, as seen by the beam, over the full range of the klystron output. The ability to control precisely the energy output allows for energy feed-forward as well as energy feedback applications. Motivation for this work has been the need to adjust the energy of beams launched into various regions of the SLC. Vernier klystrons play a crucial role in the energy delivered from the SLC injector, linac, and positron source. This paper discusses the hardware development, energy calculations, and software implementation. Operational results are presented.

  13. Design of a multi beam klystron cavity from its single beam parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, Deepender; Joshi, L. M.; Janyani, Vijay

    2016-03-01

    The klystron is a well-known microwave amplifier which uses kinetic energy of an electron beam for amplification of the RF signal. There are some limitations of conventional single beam klystron such as high operating voltage, low efficiency and bulky size at higher power levels, which are very effectively handled in Multi Beam Klystron (MBK) that uses multiple low purveyance electron beams for RF interaction. Each beam propagates along its individual transit path through a resonant cavity structure. Multi-Beam klystron cavity design is a critical task due to asymmetric cavity structure and can be simulated by 3D code only. The present paper shall discuss the design of multi beam RF cavities for klystrons operating at 2856 MHz (S-band) and 5 GHz (C-band) respectively. The design approach uses some scaling laws for finding the electron beam parameters of the multi beam device from their single beam counter parts. The scaled beam parameters are then used for finding the design parameters of the multi beam cavities. Design of the desired multi beam cavity can be optimized through iterative simulations in CST Microwave Studio.

  14. Design of a multi beam klystron cavity from its single beam parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Kant, Deepender Joshi, L. M.; Janyani, Vijay

    2016-03-09

    The klystron is a well-known microwave amplifier which uses kinetic energy of an electron beam for amplification of the RF signal. There are some limitations of conventional single beam klystron such as high operating voltage, low efficiency and bulky size at higher power levels, which are very effectively handled in Multi Beam Klystron (MBK) that uses multiple low purveyance electron beams for RF interaction. Each beam propagates along its individual transit path through a resonant cavity structure. Multi-Beam klystron cavity design is a critical task due to asymmetric cavity structure and can be simulated by 3D code only. The present paper shall discuss the design of multi beam RF cavities for klystrons operating at 2856 MHz (S-band) and 5 GHz (C-band) respectively. The design approach uses some scaling laws for finding the electron beam parameters of the multi beam device from their single beam counter parts. The scaled beam parameters are then used for finding the design parameters of the multi beam cavities. Design of the desired multi beam cavity can be optimized through iterative simulations in CST Microwave Studio.

  15. A study on the high-order mode oscillation in a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying-Hui; Niu, Xin-Jian; Wang, Hui; Jia, Nan; Duan, Yaoyong; Li, Zheng-Hong; Cheng, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Chuan

    2016-07-15

    The high-order mode oscillation is studied in designing a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier. The reason for the oscillation caused by high-order modes and a method to suppress these kinds of spurious modes are found through theoretical analyses and the study on the influence of major parameters of a high frequency structure (such as the oscillation frequency of cavities, the cavity Q value, the length of drift tube section, and the characteristic impedance). Based on much simulation, a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier with a superior performance has been designed, built, and tested. An output power of 2.22 GW corresponding to 27.4% efficiency and 61 dB gain has been obtained. Moreover, the high-order mode oscillation is suppressed effectively, and an output power of 1.95 GW corresponding to 26% efficiency and 62 dB gain has been obtained in our laboratory.

  16. A novel technique for tuning of co-axial cavity of multi-beam klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sukalyan; Bandyopadhyay, Ayan Kumar; Pal, Debashis; Kant, Deepender; Joshi, Lalit Mohan; Kumar, Bijendra; Meena, Rakesh; Rawat, Vikram

    2016-03-01

    Multi-beam Klystrons (MBKs) have gained wide acceptances in the research sector for its inherent advantages. But developing a robust tuning technique for an MBK cavity of coaxial type has still remained a challenge as these designs are very prone to suffer from asymmetric field distribution with inductive tuning of the cavity. Such asymmetry leads to inhomogeneous beam-wave interaction, an undesirable phenomenon. Described herein is a new type of coaxial cavity that has the ability to suppress the asymmetry, thereby allowing tuning of the cavity with a single tuning post.

  17. A novel technique for tuning of co-axial cavity of multi-beam klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Sukalyan Bandyopadhyay, Ayan Kumar; Pal, Debashis; Kant, Deepender; Joshi, Lalit Mohan; Kumar, Bijendra; Meena, Rakesh; Rawat, Vikram

    2016-03-09

    Multi-beam Klystrons (MBKs) have gained wide acceptances in the research sector for its inherent advantages. But developing a robust tuning technique for an MBK cavity of coaxial type has still remained a challenge as these designs are very prone to suffer from asymmetric field distribution with inductive tuning of the cavity. Such asymmetry leads to inhomogeneous beam-wave interaction, an undesirable phenomenon. Described herein is a new type of coaxial cavity that has the ability to suppress the asymmetry, thereby allowing tuning of the cavity with a single tuning post.

  18. RF Feedback Analysis for 4 cavities per klystron in PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.; Tighe, R.

    1994-06-01

    Lattice changes in the PEP-II high energy ring have made the concept of driving four cavities with a single klystron an attractive option. This paper examines the topology from a RF feedback point of view. Sources of error are identified and their magnitudes are estimated. The effect on the performance of the longitudinal impedance reducing feedback loops is calculated using control theory and Mathematica.

  19. The Klynac: An Integrated Klystron and Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J. M.; Schwellenbach, D.

    2013-04-01

    The Klynac concept integrates an electron gun, a radio frequency (RF) power source, and a coupled-cavity linear accelerator into a single resonant system. The klystron is essentially a conventional klystron structure with an input cavity, some number of intermediate cavities and an output cavity. The accelerator structure is, likewise, a conventional on-axis coupled structure. The uniqueness is the means of coupling the klystron output cavity to the accelerator. The coupler is a resonant coupler rather than an ordinary transmission line. The geometry of such a system need not be coaxial. However, if the klystron and accelerator are coaxial we can eliminate the need for a separate cathode for the accelerator by injecting some of the klystron beam into the accelerator. Such a device can be made cylindrical which is ideal for some applications.

  20. The Klynac: An integrated klystron and linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, James M.; Schwellenbach, David; Meidinger, Alfred

    2013-04-19

    The Klynac concept integrates an electron gun, a radio frequency (RF) power source, and a coupled-cavity linear accelerator into a single resonant system. The klystron is essentially a conventional klystron structure with an input cavity, some number of intermediate cavities and an output cavity. The accelerator structure is, likewise, a conventional on-axis coupled structure. The uniqueness is the means of coupling the klystron output cavity to the accelerator. The coupler is a resonant coupler rather than an ordinary transmission line. The geometry of such a system need not be coaxial. However, if the klystron and accelerator are coaxial we can eliminate the need for a separate cathode for the accelerator by injecting some of the klystron beam into the accelerator. Such a device can be made cylindrical which is ideal for some applications.

  1. Design and 3D simulation of a two-cavity wide-gap relativistic klystron amplifier with high power injection

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xianchen; Yang Jianhua; Zhang Jiande

    2012-08-15

    By using an electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code, an S-band two-cavity wide-gap klystron amplifier (WKA) loaded with washers/rods structure is designed and investigated for high power injection application. Influences of the washers/rods structure on the high frequency characteristics and the basic operation of the amplifier are presented. Generally, the rod structure has great impacts on the space-charge potential depression and the resonant frequency of the cavities. Nevertheless, if only the resonant frequency is tuned to the desired operation frequency, effects of the rod size on the basic operation of the amplifier are expected to be very weak. The 3-dimension (3-D) PIC simulation results show an output power of 0.98 GW corresponding to an efficiency of 33% for the WKA, with a 594 keV, 5 kA electron beam guided by an external magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla. Moreover, if a conductive plane is placed near the output gap, such as the electron collector, the beam potential energy can be further released, and the RF power can be increased to about 1.07 GW with the conversion efficiency of about 36%.

  2. Computer-aided design of the RF-cavity for a high-power S-band klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, D.; Bandyopadhyay, A. K.; Pal, D.; Meena, R.; Nangru, S. C.; Joshi, L. M.

    2012-08-01

    This article describes the computer-aided design of the RF-cavity for a S-band klystron operating at 2856 MHz. State-of-the-art electromagnetic simulation tools SUPERFISH, CST Microwave studio, HFSS and MAGIC have been used for cavity design. After finalising the geometrical details of the cavity through simulation, it has been fabricated and characterised through cold testing. Detailed results of the computer-aided simulation and cold measurements are presented in this article.

  3. CONDOR simulation of an 11.4-GHz traveling wave output cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Yu, D.

    1991-12-31

    The CONDOR code is used to simulate the cold test and the beam-induced microwave amplification of an 11.4-GHz, six-cell, disk-loaded, traveling wave cavity. Cold test simulation results are in agreement with a modified Slater`s theory. Power extraction at the output port is calculated by launching a train of Gaussian electron bunches through the structure. Results are consistent with recent relativistic klystron experiments using a similar TW output cavity. It is further shown that, depending on operating beam parameters, the power extraction efficiency can be maximized by modification of various cells in the TW structure.

  4. PEP-II prototype klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Fowkes, W.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Lee, T.G.; Pearson, C.; Wright, E.L.

    1993-04-01

    A 540-kW continuous-wave (cw) klystron operating at 476 MHz was developed for use as a power source for testing PEP-II rf accelerating cavities and rf windows. It also serves as a prototype for a 1.2 MW cw klystron presently being developed as a potential rf source for asymmetric colliding ring use. The design incorporates the concepts and many of the parts used in the original 353 MHz PEP klystron developed sixteen years ago. The superior computer simulation codes available today result in improved performance with the cavity frequencies, drift lengths, and output circuit optimized for the higher frequency.The design and operating results of this tube are described with particular emphasis on the factors which affect efficiency and stability.

  5. Relativistic klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Azuma, O.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.

    1989-03-01

    Experimental work is underway by a SLAC-LLNL-LBL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of using relativistic klystrons as a power source for future high gradient accelerators. Two different relativistic klystron configurations have been built and tested to date: a high grain multicavity klystron at 11.4 GHz and a low gain two cavity subharmonic buncher driven at 5.7 GHz. In both configurations power is extracted at 11.4 GHz. In order to understand the basic physics issues involved in extracting RF from a high power beam, we have used both a single resonant cavity and a multi-cell traveling wave structure for energy extraction. We have learned how to overcome our previously reported problem of high power RF pulse shortening, and have achieved peak RF power levels of 170 MW with the RF pulse of the same duration as the beam current pulse. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Two and three dimensional simulation of disk-loaded travelling-wave output structures for high-power klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1994-12-31

    The authors have developed algorithms for designing disk-loaded travelling-wave output structures for X-band klystrons to be used in the SLAC NLC. They use either a four or five cell structure in a {pi}/2 mode. The disk radii are tapered to produce an approximately constant gradient. The matching calculation is not performed on the tapered structure, but rather on a coupler whose input and output cells are the same as the final cell of the tapered structure, and whose interior cells are the same as the penultimate cell in the tapered structure. 2-D calculations using CONDOR model the waveguide as a radial transmission line of adjustable impedance. 3-D calculations with MAFIA model the actual rectangular waveguide and coupling slot. A good match is obtained by adjusting the impedance of the final cell. In 3-D, this requires varying both the radius of the cell and the width of the aperture. When the output cell with the best match is inserted in the tapered structure, they obtain excellent cold-test agreement between the 2-D and 3-D models. They use hot-test simulations with CONDOR to design the structure with maximum efficiency and minimum surface fields. The azimuthal asymmetry due to the coupling iris can increase the peak fields by 20 to 30 percent. They can reduce this problem by making the final cavity with a non-circular cross section. With proper dimensions, they can keep a good match while reducing the azimuthal asymmetry to 6 percent. They have designed circuits at 11.424 Ghz for several different perveances. At 440 kV, microperveance 1.2, they calculate 83 MW, 54 percent efficiency, peak surface field 76 MV/m. At microperveance 0.8, they calculate 60 MW, 58 percent efficiency, peak field 67 MV/m. At 465 kV, microperveance 0.6, they calculate 55 MW, 62 percent efficiency, peak field 63 MV/m.

  7. Multi-frequency klystron designed for high efficiency

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Aaron

    2017-07-04

    A multi-frequency klystron has an electron gun which generates a beam, a circuit of bunch-align-collect (BAC) tuned cavities that bunch the beam and amplify an RF signal, a collector where the beam is collected and dumped, and a standard output cavity and waveguide coupled to a window to output RF power at a fundamental mode to an external load. In addition, the klystron has additional bunch-align-collect (BAC) cavities tuned to a higher harmonic frequency, and a harmonic output cavity and waveguide coupled via a window to an additional external load.

  8. Reference klystron output phase values for the first ten linac sectors

    SciTech Connect

    Millich, A.

    1984-06-08

    The purpose of this note is to provide phase reference values for klystrons in the first ten linac sectors to be used as tentative start-up values next September and to point out the degree of long term phase stability of the klystrons as well as the possibility of implementing closed loop feedback stabilization.

  9. A PPM-focused klystron at X-band with a traveling-wave output structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1995-07-05

    We have developed algorithms for designing disk-loaded traveling-wave output structures for X-band klystrons to be used in the SLAC NLC. We use either a four- or five-cell structure in a {pi}/2 mode. The disk radii are tapered to produce an approximately constant gradient. The matching calculation is not performed on the tapered structure, but rather on a coupler whose input and output cells are the same as the final cell of the tapered structure, and whose interior cells are the same as the penultimate cell in the tapered structure. 2-D calculations using CONDOR model the waveguide as a radial transmission line of adjustable impedance. 3-D calculations with MAFIA model the actual rectangular waveguide and coupling slot. A good match is obtained by adjusting the impedance of the final cell. In 3-D, this requires varying both the radius of the cell and the width of the aperture. When the output cell with the best match is inserted in the tapered structure, we obtain excellent cold-test agreement between the 2-D and 3-D models. We use hot-test simulations with CONDOR to design a structure with maximum efficiency and minimum surface fields. We have designed circuits at 11.424 Ghz for different perveances. At 440 kV, microperveance 1.2, we calculated 81 MW, 53 percent efficiency, with peak surface field 76 MV/m. A microperveance 0.6 design was done using a PPM stack for focusing. At 470 kV, 193 amps, we calculated 58.7 MW, 64.7 percent efficiency, peak surface field 62.3 MV/m. At 500 kV, 212 amps, we calculated 67.1 MW, 63.3 percent efficiency, peak surface field 66.0 MV/m. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  10. Experimental Study of a Gyrotron with a Sectioned Klystron-Type Cavity Operated at Higher Cyclotron Harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Kalynov, Yu. K.; Savilov, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    We are planning to use extended cavities in order to excite gyrotrons with large electron orbits, which are operated at higher cyclotron harmonics in the terahertz frequency range. This is determined by both the weakness of the electron-wave interaction, and relatively low operating currents. Since the diffraction Q-factor of such cavities is high, a significant part of the highfrequency power produced by the electron beam is lost due to the ohmic loss in the cavity walls. As a way to solve this problem, we proposed a sectioned klystron-type cavity, where an extended length of the electron-wave interaction region can be combined with a relatively low diffraction Q-factor of the system. This work presents the results of the first experiment on a gyrotron with a sectioned cavity, where selective excitation of higher (second and third) cyclotron harmonics was observed in the terahertz frequency range (0 .55 and 0 .74 THz).

  11. MM-Wave Cavity/Klystron Developments Using Deep X-Ray Lithography at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.; Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.; Mancini, D.C.; Nassiri, A.; Lai, B.; Jongwaard, E.N.; Caryotakis, G.; Feinerman, A.D.; White, V.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-10-25

    Recent microfabrication technologies based on LIGA (German acronym for Lithographe, Galvanoformung, und Abformung) have been applied to build high-aspect-ratio, metallic or dielectric, planar structures suitable for high-frequency rf cavity structures. The cavity structures would be used as parts of linear accelerators, microwave undulators, and mm-wave amplifiers. The microfabrication process includes manufacturing of precision x-ray masks, exposure of positive resist by x-rays through the mask, resist development, and electroforming of the final microstructure. Prototypes of a 32-cell, 108-GHz constant impedance cavity and a 66-cell, 94-GHz constant-gradient cavity were fabricated using the synchrotron radiation sources at APS. Preliminary design parameters for a 91-GHz modulator klystron along with an overview of the new technology are discussed.

  12. A non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity with suppression of transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun Zhong, Huihuang; Zhu, Danni; Qiu, Yongfeng

    2014-01-15

    The triaxial klystron amplifier is an efficient high power relativistic klystron amplifier operating at high frequencies due to its coaxial structure with large radius. However, the coaxial structures result in coupling problems among the cavities as the TEM mode is not cut-off in the coaxial tube. Therefore, the suppression of the TEM mode leakage, especially the leakage from the buncher cavity to the input cavity, is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier. In this paper, a non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage. The cold cavity analysis shows that the non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity can significantly suppress the TEM mode generation compared to a uniform three-gap buncher cavity. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the power leakage to the input cavity is less than 1.5‰ of the negative power in the buncher cavity and the buncher cavity can efficiently modulate an intense relativistic electron beam free of self-oscillations. A fundamental current modulation depth of 117% is achieved by employing the proposed non-uniform buncher cavity into an X-band triaxial amplifier, which results in the high efficiency generation of high power microwave.

  13. A non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity with suppression of transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhu, Danni; Qiu, Yongfeng

    2014-01-01

    The triaxial klystron amplifier is an efficient high power relativistic klystron amplifier operating at high frequencies due to its coaxial structure with large radius. However, the coaxial structures result in coupling problems among the cavities as the TEM mode is not cut-off in the coaxial tube. Therefore, the suppression of the TEM mode leakage, especially the leakage from the buncher cavity to the input cavity, is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier. In this paper, a non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage. The cold cavity analysis shows that the non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity can significantly suppress the TEM mode generation compared to a uniform three-gap buncher cavity. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the power leakage to the input cavity is less than 1.5‰ of the negative power in the buncher cavity and the buncher cavity can efficiently modulate an intense relativistic electron beam free of self-oscillations. A fundamental current modulation depth of 117% is achieved by employing the proposed non-uniform buncher cavity into an X-band triaxial amplifier, which results in the high efficiency generation of high power microwave.

  14. Development of a 50 MW Multiple Beam Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R Lawrence; Ferguson, Patrick; Read, Michael; Collins, George

    2007-10-31

    The goal of this program was to develop a 50 MW, multiple beam klystron at 11.424 GHz. The device uses eight electron guns and beam lines to achieve the required power level at a beam voltage of 190 kV, consistent with solid state power supplies. The electron gun operates with confined flow focusing, which is unique among current multiple beam sources, and allows operation at power levels consistent with producing 10s of MWs of pulsed RF power. The circuit consists of a ring resonator input cavity, eight sets of buncher cavities, and a ring resonator output cavity. The RF output power is coupled into four rectangular waveguides equally spaced around the klystron. Eight individual collectors absorb the spent beam power in each beam. The klystron operates in a solenoid. The principle challenges in the design included development of the beam optics using confined flow focusing, shaping of the magnetic field in the gun region to avoid beam spiraling, coupling input power equally to all eight beam lines from a single input, and obtaining the required frequency and Q in the output cavity. The mechanical design was particularly complex due to the large parts count, number of braze and weld joints, and close proximity of the beam lines that limited access. Addressing vacuum leaks and cold testing the complex structures was particularly troublesome. At the conclusion of the program, the klystron is experiencing several vacuum leaks that are under repair. Efforts will continue to seal and test the klystron.

  15. Klystron power specifications based on transient beam loading analysis in damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.G.; Siemann, R.H.

    1995-06-01

    A useful diagram is presented and used to study rf cavity voltage regulation in a damping ring or other circular accelerator where large beam currents are injected and extracted rapidly. With conventional feedback systems and high particle beam currents, the maximum beam current can be limited by the ability of the klystron to maintain constant gap voltage at high currents, low currents, or in the absence of beam. Techniques for storing high current beams are suggested when the maximum klystron output power is predetermined. Alternately, these techniques may be applied and used to specify the performance requirements of the klystron if the desired particle beam current and nominal rf cavity voltage are known.

  16. Klystron 'efficiency loop' for the ALS storage ring RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Julian, Jim; Baptiste, Kenneth

    2002-05-20

    The recent energy crisis in California has led us to investigate the high power RF systems at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to decrease the energy consumption and power costs. We found the Storage Ring Klystron Power Amplifier system operating as designed but with significant power waste. A simple proportional-integrator (PI) analog loop, which controls the klystron collector beam current, as a function of the output RF power, has been designed and installed. The design considerations, besides efficiency improvement, were to interface to the existing system without major expense. They were to also avoid the klystron cathode power supply filter's resonance in the loop's dynamics, and prevent a conflict with the existing Cavity RF Amplitude Loop dynamics. This efficiency loop will allow us to save up to 700 MW-hours of electrical energy per year and increase the lifetime of the klystron.

  17. Triggering Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Kelton D.; /Purdue U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    To determine if klystrons will perform to the specifications of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) project, a new digital trigger controller is needed for the Klystron/Microwave Department Test Laboratory. The controller needed to be programmed and Windows based user interface software needed to be written to interface with the device over a USB (Universal Serial Bus). Programming the device consisted of writing logic in VHDL (VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated Circuits) hardware description language), and the Windows interface software was written in C++. Xilinx ISE (Integrated Software Environment) was used to compile the VHDL code and program the device, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 was used to compile the C++ based Windows software. The device was programmed in such a way as to easily allow read/write operations to it using a simple addressing model, and Windows software was developed to interface with the device over a USB connection. A method of setting configuration registers in the trigger device is absolutely necessary to the development of a new triggering system, and the method developed will fulfill this need adequately. More work is needed before the new trigger system is ready for use. The configuration registers in the device need to be fully integrated with the logic that will generate the RF signals, and this system will need to be tested extensively to determine if it meets the requirements for low noise trigger outputs.

  18. A 12 GHZ 50 MW Klystron for Support of Accelerator Research

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, Daryl; Haase, Andrew; Jensen, Aaron; Jongewaard, Erik; Nantista, Christopher; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC

    2011-05-31

    A 12 GHz 50MW X-band klystron is under development at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Klystron Department. The klystron will be fabricated to support programs currently underway at three European Labs; CERN, PSI, and INFN Trieste. The choice of frequency selection was due to the CLIC RF frequency changing from 30 GHz to the European X-band frequency of 11.99 GHz in 2008. Since the Klystron Department currently builds 50MW klystrons at 11.424 GHz known collectively as the XL4 klystrons, it was deemed cost-effective to utilize many XL4 components by leaving the gun, electron beam transport, solenoid magnet and collector unchanged. To realize the rf parameters required, the rf cavities and rf output hardware were necessarily altered. Some improvements to the rf design have been made to reduce operating gradients and increase reliability. Changes in the multi-cell output structure, waveguide components, and the window will be discussed along with testing of the devices. Five klystrons known as XL5 klystrons are scheduled for production over the next two years.

  19. A ppM-focused klystron at X-band with a travelling-wave output structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1994-10-01

    We have developed algorithms for designing disk-loaded travelling-wave output structures for X-band klystrons to be used in the SLAC NLC. We use either a four- or five-cell structure in a {pi}/2 mode. The disk radii are tapered to produce an approximately constant gradient. The matching calculation is not performed on the tapered structure, but rather on a coupler whose input and output cells are the same as the final cell of the tapered structure, and whose interior cells are the same as the penultimate cell in the tapered structure. 2-D calculations using CONDOR model the waveguide as a radial transmission line of adjustable impedance. 3-D calculations with MAFIA model the actual rectangular waveguide and coupling slot. A good match is obtained by adjusting the impedance of the final cell. In 3D, this requires varying both the radius of the cell and the width of the aperture. When the output cell with the best match is inserted in the tapered structure, we obtain excellent cold-test agreement between the 2-D and 3-D models. We use hot-test simulations with CONDOR to design a structure with maximum efficiency and minimum surface fields. We have designed circuits at 11.424 GHz for different perveances. At 440 kV, microperveance 1.2, we calculated 81 MW, 53 percent efficiency, with peak surface field 76 MV/m. A microperveance 0.6 design was done using a ppM stack for focusing. At 470 kV, 193 amps, we calculated 58.7 MW, 64.7 percent efficiency, peak surface field 62.3 MV/m. At 500 kV, 212 amps, we calculated 67.1 MW, 63.3 percent efficiency, peak surface field 66.0 MV/m.

  20. Breakdown phenomena in high power klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoyt, E.W.; Lebacqz, J.V.; Lee, T.G.

    1988-03-01

    In the course of developing new high peak power klystrons at SLAC, high electric fields in several regions of these devices have become an important source of vacuum breakdown phenomena. In addition, a renewed interest in breakdown phenomena for nanosecond pulse, multi-megavolt per centimeter fields has been sparked by recent R and D work in the area of gigawatt RF sources. The most important regions of electrical breakdown are in the output cavity gap area, the RF ceramic windows, and the gun ceramic insulator. The details of the observed breakdown in these regions, experiments performed to understand the phenomena and solutions found to alleviate the problems will be discussed. Recently experiments have been performed on a new prototype R and D klystron. Peak electric fields across the output cavity gaps of this klystron exceed 2 MV/cm. The effect of peak field duration (i.e. pulse width) on the onset of breakdown have been measured. The pulse widths varied from tens of nanoseconds to microseconds. Results from these experiments will be presented. The failure of ceramic RF windows due to multipactor and puncturing was an important problem to overcome in order that our high power klystrons would have a useful life expectancy. Consequently many studies and tests were made to understand and alleviate window breakdown phenomena. Some of the results in this area, especially the effects of surface coatings, window materials and processing techniques and their effects on breakdown will be discussed. Another important source of klystron failure in the recent past at SLAC has been the puncturing of the high voltage ceramic insulator in the gun region. A way of alleviating this problem has been found although the actual cause of the puncturing is not yet clear. The ''practical'' solution to this breakdown process will be described and a possible mechanism for the puncturing will be presented. 9 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R D effort here at SLAC.

  2. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R&D effort here at SLAC.

  3. An X-band overmoded relativistic klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Renzhen; Chen, Changhua; Deng, Yuqun; Li, Jiawei; Bai, Xianchen

    2014-11-01

    An X-band overmoded relativistic klystron is proposed, the operation mode of which is the TM02 mode. The drift tube could not cut off the TM01 mode; isolating the buncher cavity from the input cavity is achieved by introducing a sectional RF lossy material. Microwaves are extracted from the modulated electron beam using a cylindrical waveguide, rather than a coaxial waveguide; thereby, the output structure is significantly simplified. Particle-in-cell simulations show that microwaves with power of 1.28 GW and frequency of 9.30 GHz can be obtained, corresponding to an efficiency of 32% and relative bandwidth of about 8%.

  4. An improved suppression method of the transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage with two reflectors in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhang, Qiang; Zhu, Danni

    2014-07-15

    Suppression of the transverse-electromagnetic (TEM) mode leakage is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier with high gain, because a small microwave leakage from the buncher or the output cavity could overwhelm the input signal with low power. In this paper, a specially designed reflector is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage, whose axial electric field is approximately zero at the beam radial position. Theoretical analysis indicates that the reflector introduces little influence on the normal modulation of the beam while keeping a high reflection coefficient. By using two such reflectors with different eigen frequencies located in front of the buncher cavity and the output cavity, respectively, an improved triaxial klystron amplifier is presented. The simulation results show that the reflectors substantially decrease the TEM mode leakage power and achieve very good isolation among the cavities. The improved triaxial klystron amplifier can operate normally with 10's kW microwave injection without self-oscillations.

  5. An improved suppression method of the transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage with two reflectors in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhang, Qiang; Zhu, Danni

    2014-07-01

    Suppression of the transverse-electromagnetic (TEM) mode leakage is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier with high gain, because a small microwave leakage from the buncher or the output cavity could overwhelm the input signal with low power. In this paper, a specially designed reflector is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage, whose axial electric field is approximately zero at the beam radial position. Theoretical analysis indicates that the reflector introduces little influence on the normal modulation of the beam while keeping a high reflection coefficient. By using two such reflectors with different eigen frequencies located in front of the buncher cavity and the output cavity, respectively, an improved triaxial klystron amplifier is presented. The simulation results show that the reflectors substantially decrease the TEM mode leakage power and achieve very good isolation among the cavities. The improved triaxial klystron amplifier can operate normally with 10's kW microwave injection without self-oscillations.

  6. Solar power satellite 50 kW VKS-7773 cw klystron evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larue, A. D.

    1977-01-01

    A test program for evaluating the electrical characteristics of a cw, 50 kW power output klystron at 2.45 GHz is described. The tube tested was an 8-cavity klystron, the VKS-7773 which had been in storage for seven years. Tests included preliminary testing of the tube, cold tests of microwave components, tests of the electromagnet, and first and second hot tests of the tube. During the second hot test, the tuner in the fifth cavity went down to air, preventing any further testing. Cause of failure is not known, and recommendations are to repair and modify the tube, then proceed with testing as before to meet program objectives.

  7. METHOD FOR STABILIZING KLYSTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Magnuson, D.W.; Smith, D.F.

    1959-04-14

    High-frequency oscillators for the generation of microwaves, particularly a system for stabilizing frequency-modulated klystron oscillators of the reflex type, are described. The system takos advantage of the fact that a change in oscillator frequency will alter the normal phase displacement between the cavity and its modulator, creating an error voltage which is utilized to regulate the frequency of the oscillator and stabilize it.

  8. Low Beam Voltage, 10 MW, L-Band Cluster Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Teryaev, V.; Yakovlev, V.P.; Kazakov, S.; Hirshfield, J.L.; /Yale U. /Omega-P, New Haven

    2009-05-01

    Conceptual design of a multi-beam klystron (MBK) for possible ILC and Project X applications is presented. The chief distinction between this MBK design and existing 10-MW MBK's is the low operating voltage of 60 kV. There are at least four compelling reasons that justify development at this time of a low-voltage MBK, namely (1) no pulse transformer; (2) no oil tank for high-voltage components and for the tube socket; (3) no high-voltage cables; and (4) modulator would be a compact 60-kV IGBT switching circuit. The proposed klystron consists of four clusters containing six beams each. The tube has common input and output cavities for all 24 beams, and individual gain cavities for each cluster. A closely related optional configuration, also for a 10 MW tube, would involve four totally independent cavity clusters with four independent input cavities and four 2.5 MW output ports, all within a common magnetic circuit. This option has appeal because the output waveguides would not require a controlled atmosphere, and because it would be easier to achieve phase and amplitude stability as required in individual SC accelerator cavities.

  9. Test results of 3.7 GHz 500kW CW klystron for SST1 LHCD system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Promod Kumar; Ambulkar, Kiran K.; Dalakoti, Shefali; Rajan Babu, N.; Parmar, Pramod R.; Virani, Chetan G.; Thakur, Arvind L.

    2012-10-01

    A 3.7 GHz, LHCD system aims to driving non inductive plasma current for SST1 machine. Its capability has been enhanced up to 2 MW by adding two additional klystrons, each rated for 500kW, CW power. The additional klystrons are installed and commissioned at site, for rated power, for more than 1000 seconds, before connecting them to main LHCD system. The auxiliary systems, like supporting power supply system (magnet, filament, ion pump, etc.), active heat management system, slow and fast interlock system, transmission line pressurization system, low power rf drive system, etc. are inter-connected with klystron system through VME based data acquisition and control system for remote CW operation of klystron at rated power. The calorimetric measurements, employing Pt-100 sensors, suggests that the maximum rf power (˜500kW CW) extracted from klystron is dissipated on water cooled dummy loads. The unspent DC power (˜800 kW CW) is dissipated in collector which is heavily cooled with water flowing at ˜1300 litres/min (lpm). The power loss in the klystron body remained within 20 kW. The cavity temperature, measured using J-type thermocouple, remained below 150 ^oC. The output rf power, sampled through directional couplers and measured by rf detectors shows good agreement with calorimetric measurements. A detailed description of the klystron test set up and the test results obtained during its commissioning is presented in this paper.

  10. Theoretical and experimental research on multi-beam klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaogen, Ding; Jun, Peng; Yunshu, Zhu; Shaoming, Shi

    1999-05-01

    Theoretical and experimental research work on multi-beam klystron (MBK) conducted in Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) is described in this paper. Research progress on Interaction between multi-electron beam and microwave electric field, multi-beam cavity, filter loaded double gap cavity broadband output circuit, multi-beam electron gun, and periodic reversal focusing system is presented. Performance and measurement results of five types of MBK are also given out. The key technical problems for present MBK are discussed in this paper.

  11. W-band micro-fabricated modular klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.; Jongewaard, E.; Scheitrum, G.; Vlieks, A.; Kustom, R.L.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Petelin, M.I.

    1997-08-01

    Conventional millimeter amplifiers (coupled-cavity TWTs or gyro-klystrons) are limited in power by the maximum current that can be accommodated in a single beam. Cathode current density, beam optics, and the magnetic field necessary to confine the beam, combine to limit beam current and add cost and bulk to the device. If the microwave source is designed as a pulsed klystron operating at a high voltage, larger lateral as well as axial dimensions can be employed. Beam optics become easier and permanent magnet periodic (PPM) focusing is possible. A high efficiency also results, because of the low perveance. A number of klystrons can then be fabricated on single substrate, using a deep-etch lithography technique. They can be water-cooled individually, and operated in parallel. Several such modules can be stacked to form a klystron brick, requiring a relatively low voltage for the peak and average power produced. The brick can be provided with a single output, or with individual, spatially -combined radiators. The design of a 4 x 10 x 1.5-inch module producing 500 kW peak, 500 W average at 91 GHz, and operating at 120kV, 10 A, is described.

  12. An X-band overmoded relativistic klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Renzhen; Chen, Changhua; Li, Jiawei; Bai, Xianchen; Deng, Yuqun

    2014-11-15

    An X-band overmoded relativistic klystron is proposed, the operation mode of which is the TM{sub 02} mode. The drift tube could not cut off the TM{sub 01} mode; isolating the buncher cavity from the input cavity is achieved by introducing a sectional RF lossy material. Microwaves are extracted from the modulated electron beam using a cylindrical waveguide, rather than a coaxial waveguide; thereby, the output structure is significantly simplified. Particle-in-cell simulations show that microwaves with power of 1.28 GW and frequency of 9.30 GHz can be obtained, corresponding to an efficiency of 32% and relative bandwidth of about 8%.

  13. W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Fowkes, W.R.; Smithe, D.N.; /Mission Res., Newington

    2005-09-12

    With the development of ever higher energy particle accelerators comes the need for compactness and high gradient, which in turn require very high frequency high power rf sources. Recent development work in W-band accelerating techniques has spurred the development of a high-power W-band source. Axisymmetric sources suffer from fundamental power output limitations (P{sub sat} {approx} {lambda}{sup 2}) brought on by the conflicting requirements of small beam sizes and high beam current. The sheet beam klystron allows for an increase in beam current without substantial increase in the beam current density, allowing for reduced cathode current densities and focusing field strengths. Initial simulations of a 20:1 aspect ratio sheet beam/cavity interaction using the 3 dimensional particle-in-cell code Magic3D have demonstrated a 35% beam-power to RF power extraction efficiency. Calculational work and numerical simulations leading to a prototype W-band sheet beam klystron will be presented, together with preliminary cold test structure studies of a proposed RF cavity geometry.

  14. Development of an X-Band 50 MW Multiple Beam Klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liqun; Ferguson, Patrick; Ives, R. Lawrence; Miram, George; Marsden, David; Mizuhara, Max

    2003-12-01

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. is developing an X-band 50 MW multiple beam klystron (MBK) on a DOE SBIR Phase II grant. The electrical design and preliminary mechanical design were completed on the Phase I. This MBK consists of eight discrete klystron circuits driven by eight electron beams located symmetrically on a circle with a radius of 6.3 cm. Each beam operates at 190 kV and 66 A. The eight beam electron gun is in development on a DOE SBIR Phase II grant. Each circuit consists of an input cavity, two gain cavities, three penultimate cavities, and a three cavity output circuit operating in the PI/2 mode. Ring resonators were initially proposed for the complete circuit; however, low beam — wave interaction resulted in the necessity to use discrete cavities for all eight circuits. The input cavities are coupled via hybrid waveguides to ensure constant drive power amplitude and phase. The output circuits can either be combined using compact waveguide twists driving a TE01 high power window or combined into a TM04 mode converter driving the same TE01 window. The gain and efficiency for a single circuit has been optimized using KLSC, a 2 1/2D large signal klystron code. Simulations for a single circuit predict an efficiency of 53% for a single output cavity and 55% for the three cavity output resonator. The total RF output power for this MBK is 55 MW. During the Phase II emphasis will be given to cost reduction techniques resulting in a robust — high efficient — long life high power amplifier.

  15. Comparison of CONDOR, FCI and MAFIA Calculations for a 150MW S-Band Klystron with Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, Daryl W

    2003-06-11

    To facilitate the design of high power klystrons an investigation into the reliability and accuracy of three modern particle-in-cell codes was performed. A 150 MW S-band klystron for which measurements were available was used for this comparison. The field calculations of the particle-in-cell codes are based on a finite difference time domain scheme, and use a port approximation to speed up the convergence to steady state. However, they differ in many details (e.g. calculation of E, B or A, {psi}; space charge correction; 2D or 3D modeling of output cavity).

  16. Periodic permanent magnet focused klystron

    DOEpatents

    Ferguson, Patrick; Read, Michael; Ives, R Lawrence

    2015-04-21

    A periodic permanent magnet (PPM) klystron has beam transport structures and RF cavity structures, each of which has permanent magnets placed substantially equidistant from a beam tunnel formed about the central axis, and which are also outside the extent of a cooling chamber. The RF cavity sections also have permanent magnets which are placed substantially equidistant from the beam tunnel, but which include an RF cavity coupling to the beam tunnel for enhancement of RF carried by an electron beam in the beam tunnel.

  17. Design of a 100 MW X-band klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.

    1989-02-01

    Future linear colliders will require klystrons with higher peak power at higher frequency than are currently in use. SLAC is currently designing a 100 MW klystron at 11.4 GHz as a prototype for such a tube. The gun has been designed for 440 KV and 510 amps. Transporting this beam through a 5 mm radius X-band drift tube presents the major design problem. The area convergence ratio of 190 to one is over ten times higher than is found in conventional klystrons. Even with high magnetic fields of 6 to 7 kilogauss careful matching is required to prevent excessive scalloping. Extensive EGUN and CONDOR simulations have been made to optimize the transmission and rf efficiency. The EGUN simulations indicate that better matching is possible by using resonant magnetic focusing. CONDOR calculations indicate efficiencies of 45 percent are possible with a double output cavity. We will discuss the results of the simulations and the status of the experimental program. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Two-klystron Binary Pulse Compression at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.

    1993-04-01

    The Binary Pulse Compression system installed at SLAC was tested using two klystrons, one with 10 MW and the other with 34 MW output. By compressing 560 ns klystron pulses into 70 ns, the measured BPC output was 175 MW, limited by the available power from the two klystrons. This output was used to provide 100-MW input to a 30-cell X-band structure in which a 100-MV/m gradient was obtained. This system, using the higher klystron outputs expected in the future has the potential to deliver the 350 MW needed to obtain 100 MV/m gradients in the 1.8-m NLC prototype structure. This note describes the timing, triggering, and phase coding used in the two-klystron experiment, and the expected and measured net-work response to three- or two-stage modulation.

  19. Beam dynamics studies for the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidia, Steven M.

    2001-04-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band \\(~8-12 GHz\\) through Ka-band \\(~30-35 GHz\\) frequency regions. The relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator project, whose aim is to study TBAs based upon extended relativistic klystrons, is described, and a new simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed, self-consistent calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed together with a beam line design that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 rf cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficiently capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beam line.

  20. Suppression of higher mode excitation in a high gain relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Jin, X.; Li, Z. H.; Tang, C. X.

    2012-02-01

    Suppressing higher mode excitation is very important in the high gain relativistic klystron amplifier because higher mode can seriously degrade klystron performance and cause pulse shortening. The mechanism of higher mode self-excitation is explored in the PIC simulation, and it is shown the coupling between cavities is the main cause of higher mode self-excitation. The coupling forms the positive feedback loop for higher mode to be excited just like that in the oscillator circuit. The formula for startup current of higher mode self-excitation is developed based on the coupling between cavities. And the corresponding methods are taken to avoid higher mode self-excitation. Finally, mode control is realized in the RKA with output power up to 1.02 GW when driven power is only few kilowatts.

  1. Design of a wiggler-focused, sheet beam X band klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Miller, R.H.

    1987-02-01

    An X band klystron using a sheet beam and wiggler focusing was simulated using the 2 + 1/2 dimensional particle in cell code MASK. Simulation of the rf cavities was by means of the port approximation used in modelling of standard klystrons. The wigglers, which would need permanent magnets to achieve the required field strengths, were modelled using an idealized analytic expression with an exponential rise and a linear taper superimposed on a sinusoidal variation. Cavity locations and tunings were varied for maximum output power. Beam voltage and current were also varied to explore the effect on efficiency. Both an idealized laminar beam and a more realistic beam from a gun design code were studied. For a voltage of 200 kV and current of 20 amp per linear cm efficiencies of approximately 50% were calculated.

  2. Output field-quadrature measurements and squeezing in ultrastrong cavity-QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassi, Roberto; Savasta, Salvatore; Garziano, Luigi; Spagnolo, Bernardo; Nori, Franco

    2016-12-01

    We study the squeezing of output quadratures of an electro-magnetic field escaping from a resonator coupled to a general quantum system with arbitrary interaction strengths. The generalized theoretical analysis of output squeezing proposed here is valid for all the interaction regimes of cavity-quantum electrodynamics: from the weak to the strong, ultrastrong, and deep coupling regimes. For coupling rates comparable or larger then the cavity resonance frequency, the standard input-output theory for optical cavities fails to calculate the variance of output field-quadratures and predicts a non-negligible amount of output squeezing, even if the system is in its ground state. Here we show that, for arbitrary interaction strength and for general cavity-embedded quantum systems, no squeezing can be found in the output-field quadratures if the system is in its ground state. We also apply the proposed theoretical approach to study the output squeezing produced by: (i) an artificial two-level atom embedded in a coherently-excited cavity; and (ii) a cascade-type three-level system interacting with a cavity field mode. In the latter case the output squeezing arises from the virtual photons of the atom-cavity dressed states. This work extends the possibility of predicting and analyzing the results of continuous-variable optical quantum-state tomography when optical resonators interact very strongly with other quantum systems.

  3. High power operation of an X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Jin, Xiao; Zhao, Yucong; He, Hu; Lei, Lurong; Chen, Zhaofu

    2013-11-15

    An X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is designed in order to increase output microwave power and operating frequency of the amplifier tube. The experiment is performed on a Tesla-type accelerator. The amplifier is driven by an electron beam of 2.8 kA at 720 kV, and a microwave power of 30 kW and frequency of 9.384 GHz is injected into an input cavity by means of an external source, then a microwave power of over 800 MW is extracted, the amplifier gain is about 44 dB, and conversion efficiency is 40%. The experiment proves that output power of nearly GWs can be generated with the X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier driven by a kW-level input power.

  4. High power operation of an X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Jin, Xiao; Zhao, Yucong; He, Hu; Lei, Lurong; Chen, Zhaofu

    2013-11-01

    An X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is designed in order to increase output microwave power and operating frequency of the amplifier tube. The experiment is performed on a Tesla-type accelerator. The amplifier is driven by an electron beam of 2.8 kA at 720 kV, and a microwave power of 30 kW and frequency of 9.384 GHz is injected into an input cavity by means of an external source, then a microwave power of over 800 MW is extracted, the amplifier gain is about 44 dB, and conversion efficiency is 40%. The experiment proves that output power of nearly GWs can be generated with the X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier driven by a kW-level input power.

  5. The mutual synchronization of coupled delayed feedback klystron oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanov, V. V.; Emelianova, Yu. P.; Ryskin, N. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the results of a numerical investigation of the synchronization of two coupled klystron oscillators with an external feedback circuit. Simulation has been carried out using the particle-in-cell method. We have also considered the results of a numerical analysis of an amplifier klystron and an isolated klystron oscillator, which make it possible to choose the optimal values of parameters of coupled klystrons. The structure of the synchronization domain for various parameters has been analyzed. The possibility of increasing the total output power with an appropriate choice of parameter of coupling between the oscillators has been revealed.

  6. Design and Construction of a 500 kW CW, 400 MHz Klystron to be used as RF Power Source for LHC/RF Component Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischholz, H.; Fowkes, W. R.; Pearson, C.

    1997-05-01

    A 500 kW CW klystron operating at 400 MHz was jointly developed and constructed by CERN and SLAC for use as a high power source at CERN for testing LHC/RF components such as circulators, RF absorbers and superconducting cavities with their input couplers. The design is a modification of the 353 MHz SLAC PEP-I klystron which resulted in lower engineering costs as well as reduced development and construction time. More than 80% of the original PEP-I tube parts could be incorporated in the LHC test klystron. The physical length between cathode plane and upper pole plate was kept unchanged so that a PEP-I tube focusing frame, available at CERN, could be re-used. With the aid of the klystron simulation codes JPNDISK and CONDOR, the design of the LHC tube was accomplished, which resulted in a tube with noticeably higher efficiency than its predecessor, the PEP-I klystron. The integrated cavities were redesigned by using SUPERFISH and the output coupling circuit, which also required redesigning, was done with the aid of MAFIA. Details of the tube development and test results are presented. Finally the set-up of the LHC/RF test stand and the features of its auxiliary high-power RF equipment, such as circulator and absorber, are described.

  7. Design and Construction of a 500 KW CW, 400 MHZ Klystron To Be Used As RF Power Source For LHC/RF Component Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Chris

    2003-05-05

    A 500 kW cw klystron operating at 400 MHz was developed and constructed jointly by CERN and SLAC for use as a high-power source at CERN for testing LHC/RF components such as circulators, RF absorbers and superconducting cavities with their input couplers. The design is a modification of the 353 MHz SLAC PEP-I klystron. More than 80% of the original PEP-I tube parts could thus be incorporated in the LHC test klystron which resulted in lower engineering costs as well as reduced development and construction time. The physical length between cathode plane and upper pole plate was kept unchanged so that a PEP-I tube focusing solenoid, available at CERN, could be re-used. With the aid of the klystron simulation codes JPNDISK and CONDOR, the design of the LHC tube was accomplished, which resulted in a tube with noticeably higher efficiency than its predecessor, the PEP-I klystron. The integrated cavities were redesigned using SUPERFISH and the output coupling circuit, which also required redesigning, was done with the aid of MAFIA. Details of the tube development and test results are presented.

  8. Klystron-linac combination

    DOEpatents

    Stein, W.E.

    1980-04-24

    A combination klystron-linear accelerator which utilizes anti-bunch electrons generated in the klystron section as a source of electrons to be accelerated in the accelerator section. Electron beam current is controlled by second harmonic bunching, constrictor aperture size and magnetic focusing. Rf coupling is achieved by internal and external coupling.

  9. Bistable output from a coupled-resonator vertical-cavity laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, A. J.; Choquette, K. D.; Chow, W. W.; Allerman, A. A.; Geib, K. M.

    2000-11-01

    We report a monolithic coupled-resonator vertical-cavity laser with an ion-implanted top cavity and a selectively oxidized bottom cavity which exhibits bistable behavior in the light output versus injection current. Large bistability regions over current ranges as wide as 18 mA have been observed with on/off contrast ratios of greater than 20 dB. The position and width of the bistability region can be varied by changing the bias to the top cavity. Switching between on and off states can be accomplished with changes as small as 250 μW to the electrical power applied to the top cavity. The bistable behavior is the response of the nonlinear susceptibility in the top cavity to the changes in the bottom intracavity laser intensity as the bottom cavity reaches the thermal rollover point.

  10. Bistable Output from a Coupled-Resonator Vertical-Cavity Laser Diode

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,ARTHUR J.; CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; CHOW,WENG W.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; GEIB,KENT M.

    2000-07-20

    The authors report a monolithic coupled-resonator vertical-cavity laser with an ion-implanted top cavity and a selectively oxidized bottom cavity which exhibits bistable behavior in the light output versus injection current. Large bistability regions over current ranges as wide as 18 mA have been observed with on/off contrast ratios of greater than 20 dB. The position and width of the bistability region can be varied by changing the bias to the top cavity. Switching between on and off states can be accomplished with changes as small as 250 {micro}W to the electrical power applied to the top cavity. Theoretical analysis suggests that the bistable behavior is the response of the nonlinear susceptibility in the top cavity to the changes in the bottom intracavity laser intensity as the bottom cavity reaches the thermal rollover point.

  11. High efficiency SPS klystron design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalos, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    The most likely compact configuration to realize both high efficiency and high gain (approx. 40 dB) is a 5-6 cavity design focused by an electromagnet. The basic klystron efficiency cannot be expected to exceed 70-75% without collector depression. It was estimated that the net benefit of a 5 stage collector over a 2 stage collector is between 1.5 and 3.5 kW per tube. A modulating anode is incorporated in the design to enable rapid shutoff of the beam current in case the r.f. drive should be removed.

  12. A high efficiency Ku-band radial line relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Fangchao; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhang, Jun; Ju, Jinchuan

    2016-07-01

    To achieve the gigawatt-level microwave amplification output at Ku-band, a radial-line relativistic klystron amplifier is proposed and investigated in this paper. Different from the annular electron beam in conventional axial relativistic klystron amplifiers, a radial-radiated electron beam is employed in this proposed klystron. Owing to its radially spreading speciality, the electron density and space charge effect are markedly weakened during the propagation in the radial line drift tube. Additionally, the power capacity, especially in the output cavity, is enhanced significantly because of its large volume, which is profitable for the long pulse operation. Particle-in-cell simulation results demonstrate that a high power microwave with the power of 3 GW and the frequency of 14.25 GHz is generated with a 500 kV, 12 kA electron beam excitation and the 30 kW radio-frequency signal injection. The power conversion efficiency is 50%, and the gain is about 50 dB. Meanwhile, there is insignificant electron beam self-excitation in the proposed structure by the adoption of two transverse electromagnetic reflectors. The relative phase difference between the injected signals and output microwaves keeps stable after the amplifier saturates.

  13. A high efficiency Ku-band radial line relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Fangchao; Zhang, Xiaoping Zhong, Huihuang; Zhang, Jun; Ju, Jinchuan

    2016-07-15

    To achieve the gigawatt-level microwave amplification output at Ku-band, a radial-line relativistic klystron amplifier is proposed and investigated in this paper. Different from the annular electron beam in conventional axial relativistic klystron amplifiers, a radial-radiated electron beam is employed in this proposed klystron. Owing to its radially spreading speciality, the electron density and space charge effect are markedly weakened during the propagation in the radial line drift tube. Additionally, the power capacity, especially in the output cavity, is enhanced significantly because of its large volume, which is profitable for the long pulse operation. Particle-in-cell simulation results demonstrate that a high power microwave with the power of 3 GW and the frequency of 14.25 GHz is generated with a 500 kV, 12 kA electron beam excitation and the 30 kW radio-frequency signal injection. The power conversion efficiency is 50%, and the gain is about 50 dB. Meanwhile, there is insignificant electron beam self-excitation in the proposed structure by the adoption of two transverse electromagnetic reflectors. The relative phase difference between the injected signals and output microwaves keeps stable after the amplifier saturates.

  14. Upper-limit on the Advanced Virgo output mode cleaner cavity length noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnand, R.; Ducrot, M.; Gouaty, R.; Marion, F.; Masserot, A.; Mours, B.; Pacaud, E.; Rolland, L.; Was, M.

    2017-09-01

    The Advanced Virgo detector uses two monolithic optical cavities at its output port to suppress higher order modes and radio frequency sidebands from the carrier light used for gravitational wave detection. These two cavities in series form the output mode cleaner. We present a measured upper limit on the length noise of these cavities that is consistent with the thermo-refractive noise prediction of 8×10-16~m~Hz-1/2 at 15 Hz. The cavity length is controlled using Peltier cells and piezo-electric actuators to maintain resonance on the incoming light. A length lock precision of 3.5×10-13 m is achieved. These two results are combined to demonstrate that the broadband length noise of the output mode cleaner in the 10-60 Hz band is at least a factor 10 below other expected noise sources in the Advanced Virgo detector design configuration.

  15. 250-kW CW klystron amplifier for planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, Reginald A.; Mizuhara, Albert

    1992-01-01

    The design, construction, and performance testing is described of two Varian klystrons, model VKX-7864A, which replaced the aging and less efficient VA-949J klystrons in the X band planetary radar transmitter on the Goldstone, CA, 70 meter antenna. The project was carried out jointly by the JPL and Varian Assoc. Output power was increased from 200 to 250 kW continuous wave per klystron, and full dc beam power is dissipated in the collector (it was not possible to operate the VA-949J klystrons without RF drive because of limited collector dissipation capability). Replacement were made with a minimum of transmitter modifciations. The planetary radar transmitter is now operating successfully with these two klystrons.

  16. Study of Cavity and Output Window for High Power Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaria, M. K.; Mukherjee, P.; Das, S.; Sinha, A. K.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper Eigen mode analysis has been carried out using Ansoft HFSS for high frequency 42, 120 and 140 GHz Gyrotron cavity. The design of RF window for 42 GHz, 200 kW Gyrotron has also been carried out using the Ansoft HFSS and CST microwave studio. In 42 GHz gyrotron double disc of diameter 85 mm and thickness 3.2 mm sapphire window and spacing (Coolant FC-75) of discs 2.5 mm has been used in the simulation. The return loss (S11) and transmission loss (S21) of the 42 GHz gyrotron window have been found -47.3 and -0.04 dB, respectively. The return loss and transmission loss of the S-band single disc sapphire window have also been found -27.3 and -0.07 dB, respectively at cylindrical waveguide length 33 mm. The simulated result has been validated through experimental results for pill-box S-band sapphire window.

  17. Design and Operation of a 100 kW CW X-band Klystron for Spacecraft Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balkcum, Adam; Mizuhara, Al; Stockwell, Brad; Begum, Rasheda; Cox, Lydia; Forrest, Scott; Perrin, Mark; Zitelli, Lou; Hoppe, Dan; Britcliffe, Mike; Vodonos, Yakov; Liou, R. Roland; Stone, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    A 7.19 GHz klystron producing 100 kW CW of output power over 90 MHz of bandwidth has been designed and three klystrons manufactured for use in a new JPL/NASA transmitter for spacecraft communications. The klystron was fully characterized including its phase pushing figures.

  18. 10 MW, L-Band Klystron for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Michael; Ives, Robert L.; Ferguson, Patrick

    2016-03-07

    This program developed a 10 MW, pulsed, Annular Beam Klystron (ABK) for accelerator applications. This is an alternative RF source to multiple beam klystrons MBKs), which are more complex and considerably more expensive. The ABK uses a single, annular cathode and a single beam tunnel with fundamental mode cavities. The operating specifications (voltage, efficiency, power, bndwidth, duty, etc.) are the same as for comparable MBKs.

  19. Influence of the cavity parameters on the output intensity in incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Sven E; Hese, Achim; Heitmann, Uwe

    2007-07-01

    The incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy is a technique in measuring small absorptions over a broad wavelength range. The setup consists of a conventional absorption spectrometer using an incoherent lamp and a charge coupled device detector, as well as a linear optical cavity placed around the absorbing sample, which enhances the effective path length through the sample. In this work the consequences of cavity length, mirror curvature, reflectivity, different light injection geometries, and spot size of the light source on the output intensity are studied and the implications to the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement are discussed. The symmetric confocal resonator configuration is identified as a special case with optimum imaging characteristics but with higher requirements for mechanical stability. Larger spot sizes of the light source were found to be favorable in order to reduce the negative effects of aberrations on the intensity.

  20. Feedback control of two-mode output entanglement and steering in cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asjad, Muhammad; Tombesi, Paolo; Vitali, David

    2016-11-01

    We show that the closed-loop control obtained by feeding back the derivative of the signal from the homodyne measurement of one mode of the light exiting a two-mode optical cavity interacting with a mechanical resonator permits us to control and increase optical output entanglement. In particular, the proposed feedback-enhanced setup allows us to achieve a fidelity of coherent-state teleportation greater than the threshold value of 2/3 for secure teleportation and two-way steering between the two cavities' output modes down the line in the presence of loss, which otherwise would not be possible without feedback.

  1. Dual-cavity Nd:YAG laser with Laguerre-Gaussian (LG0n) mode output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. W.

    2017-01-01

    Direct excitation of an arbitrary Laguerre-Gaussian (LG0n) mode with helical wavefronts in a diode-end-pumped solid state laser employing a dual-cavity configuration is reported. Through simple adjustments of the intra-cavity apertures in the dual-cavity laser configuration, the spatial gain distribution and the cavity loss could be optimized for the targeted LG0 n mode. This approach has been applied to a diode-pumped Nd: YAG laser to achieve selective lasing of the LG01, LG02, and LG03 modes. Also, an optical vortex laser beam was produced directly from the laser resonator by determining the wavefront handedness of each LG mode output using an intra-cavity etalon. The prospects of further power scaling and laser performance improvements will be discussed.

  2. Recent experimental results from a long-pulse J-band relativistic klystron amplifier developmental effort

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, K.G.; Crouch, D.D.; Sar, D.R.; Speciale, R.A.; Carlsten, B.E.; Fazio, M.V.; Haynes, W.B.; Stringfield, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Recent experimental results, supporting simulations, and design modeling are presented from a developmental effort to a produce a long pulse ({approximately}1{mu}s) J-band (5.85-8.2 GHz) relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) of the high current NRL genealogy. This RKA is designed to operate at approximately 6.6 GHz, with a desired RF output {approximately}700 MW. Conversion of electron beam energy to microwave energy is obtained by a mock magnetically insulated coaxial converter which, in various incarnations, can be made to be either a cavity gap extractor or an inverse cathode.

  3. Adaptive control system for pulsed megawatt klystrons

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, Victor W.

    1992-01-01

    The invention provides an arrangement for reducing waveform errors such as errors in phase or amplitude in output pulses produced by pulsed power output devices such as klystrons by generating an error voltage representing the extent of error still present in the trailing edge of the previous output pulse, using the error voltage to provide a stored control voltage, and applying the stored control voltage to the pulsed power output device to limit the extent of error in the leading edge of the next output pulse.

  4. A New Method for Increasing Output Power of a Three-Cavity Transit-Time Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun-Tao; Zhong, Hui-Huang; Qian, Bao-Liang; Liu, Yong-Gui

    2004-07-01

    We propose a new method to increase the output power of a three-cavity transit-time oscillator (TC-TTO). Conventional transit-time effect oscillators, such as the split-cavity oscillator (SCO), super-Reltron, and TC-TTO (or double-foil SCO), etc., have a common feature that the span of any modulating cavity is uniform. The new method is to vary the three-cavity spans from uniform to nonuniform. Its configuration is called the nonuniform three-cavity transit-time oscillator (NTC-TTO). Numerical simulations show that the electron-beam is modulated more deeply in certain NTC-TTOs than that in the TC-TTO with the same whole modulating length, and the output microwave power in certain NTC-TTOs is higher than that in the TC-TTO. The experimental results are in agreement with those of the numerical simulations. The results show that the new method can increase the output power of a microwave tube based on the TC-TTO.

  5. Development and Production of a 201 MHz, 5.0 MW Peak Power Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, Galen; Eisen, Edward; Stockwell, Brad; Begum, rasheda; Lenci, Steve; Eisner, Rick; Cesca, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Communications & Power Industries LLC has designed and manufactured the VKP-8201A, a high peak power, high gain, VHF band klystron. The klystron operates at 201.25 MHz, with 5.0 MW peak output power, 34 kW average output power, and a gain of 36 dB. The klystron is designed to operate between 1.0 MW and 4.5 MW in the linear range of the transfer curve. The klystron utilizes a unique magnetic field which enables the use of a proven electron gun design with a larger electron beam requirement. Experimental and predicted performance data are compared.

  6. Beam Dynamics Experiments in Support of Relativistic Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T; Lidia, S

    2001-06-03

    Experiments to study beam dynamics for Relativistic Klystrons (RK) are being performed with a 1-MeV, 600-A induction accelerator beam. The RK is a RF Power source based on induction accelerator technology and conventional resonant output structures. Capable of generating 100's of MW/m at frequencies up to K-band, the RK has been proposed as a driver for a future linear collider in one version of a Two-Beam Accelerator. A critical feasibility issue remaining to be demonstrated is suppression of the transverse instability of the drive beam. This kiloampere beam must transit about a hundred resonance output structures and many hundreds of induction accelerator cavities for the RK to achieve competitive efficiency and cost with respect to other proposed power sources. The RK's strong focusing used to contain the beam in the small aperture resonant structures, repetitive geometry, and reacceleration allow the resonant output structures to be spaced at a betatron phase advance of 360{sup o}. This phase advance (or any integral multiple of 180{sup o}) is beneficial in linear accelerators as the instability growth changes from exponential to linear. In our experiment the beam is contained in a solenoidal focusing channel, RF cavities are spaced every 60 cm, and growth in the transverse motion is measured as a function of phase advance. Details of the experiments and results are presented.

  7. FPGA-based klystron linearization implementations in scope of ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omet, M.; Michizono, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Miura, T.; Qiu, F.; Chase, B.; Varghese, P.; Schlarb, H.; Branlard, J.; Cichalewski, W.

    2014-12-01

    We report the development and implementation of four FPGA-based predistortion-type klystron linearization algorithms. Klystron linearization is essential for the realization of ILC, since it is required to operate the klystrons 7% in power below their saturation. The work presented was performed in international collaborations at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA and the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Germany. With the newly developed algorithms, the generation of correction factors on the FPGA was improved compared to past algorithms, avoiding quantization and decreasing memory requirements. At FNAL, three algorithms were tested at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), demonstrating a successful implementation for one algorithm and a proof of principle for two algorithms. The functionality of the algorithm implemented at DESY was demonstrated successfully in a simulation. Besides this, a proof of principle of an FPGA-based klystron and cavity simulator implemented at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan, was demonstrated. Its purpose is to allow the development and test of digital LLRF control systems including klystron linearization algorithms when no actual klystron and cavity are available.

  8. FPGA-based klystron linearization implementations in scope of ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omet, M.; Michizono, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Miura, T.; Qiu, F.; Chase, B.; Varghese, P.; Schlarb, H.; Branlard, J.; Cichalewski, W.

    2015-04-01

    We report the development and implementation of four FPGA-based predistortion-type klystron linearization algorithms. Klystron linearization is essential for the realization of ILC, since it is required to operate the klystrons 7% in power below their saturation. The work presented was performed in international collaborations at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA and the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Germany. With the newly developed algorithms, the generation of correction factors on the FPGA was improved compared to past algorithms, avoiding quantization and decreasing memory requirements. At FNAL, three algorithms were tested at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), demonstrating a successful implementation for one algorithm and a proof of principle for two algorithms. The functionality of the algorithm implemented at DESY was demonstrated successfully in a simulation. Besides this, a proof of principle of an FPGA-based klystron and cavity simulator implemented at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan was demonstrated. Its purpose is to allow the development and test of digital LLRF control systems including klystron linearization algorithms when no actual klystron and cavity are available.

  9. The 5K70SK automatically tuned, high power, S-band klystron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A.

    1977-01-01

    Primary objectives include delivery of 44 5K70SK klystron amplifier tubes and 26 remote tuner assemblies with spare parts kits. Results of a reliability demonstration on a klystron test cavity are discussed, along with reliability tests performed on a remote tuning unit. Production problems and one design modification are reported and discussed. Results of PAT and DVT are included.

  10. Relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.A.; Houck, T.L. )

    1994-10-01

    Relativistic klystrons (RKs) are being developed as an RF power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron-positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. In a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA), the drive beam passes through a large number of RF output structures. High conversion efficiency of electron beam energy to RF energy is achieved in this concept by reacceleration of the modulated drive beam between output structures. The authors have conducted experiments studying the RF power extracted from various RK structures driven by modulated induction accelerator current pulses; the studies include work on improving the transport dynamics of the drive beam. They have started a demonstration in which the modulated induction beam current is reaccelerated by passage through subsequent induction accelerator cells.

  11. Synchronization of chaotic outputs in multi-transverse-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong; Valles, Matthew M.; Zhang, Yu

    2013-11-01

    We have experimentally explored synchronization of chaotic outputs in unidirectionally coupled vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers in the multi-transverse mode regime. The beam from the transmitter is orthogonally injected into the receiver. High cross correlation between the injection and the Y polarization of the receiver can be achieved for appropriate frequency detuning and injection power. The modal property in synchronization is examined as well.

  12. Optimum signal-to-noise ratio in off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dyroff, Christoph

    2011-04-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) is investigated and compared to direct absorption spectroscopy using multipass absorption cells [tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)]. Applying measured noise characteristics of a near-IR tunable diode laser and detector, it is shown that the optimum SNR is not generally reached at the highest effective absorption path length. Simulations are used to determine the parameters for maximized SNR of OA-ICOS.

  13. The Klystron Engineering Model Development (KEMD) Task - A New Design for the Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teitelbaum, L.; Liou, R.; Vodonos, Y.; Velazco, J.; Andrews, K.; Kelley, D.

    2017-08-01

    The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) is one of the world's great planetary radar facilities. The heart of the GSSR is its high-power transmitter, which radiates 450 kW from DSS-14, the Deep Space Network's 70-m antenna at Goldstone, by combining the output from two 250-kW klystrons. Klystrons are vacuum tube electron beam devices that are the key amplifying elements of most radio frequency telecommunications and radar transmitter systems. NASA's Science Mission Directorate sponsored the development of a new design for a 250-kW power, 50-MHz bandwidth, reliable klystron, intended to replace the aging operational devices that were developed in the mid-1990s. The design, developed in partnership with Communications & Power Industries, was verified by implementing and testing a first article prototype, the engineering model. Key elements of the design are new beam optics and focusing magnet, a seven-cavity RF body, and a modern collector able to reliably dissipate the full power of the electron beam. The first klystron based on the new VKX-7864C design was delivered to the DSN High-Power Transmitter Test Facility on November 1, 2016, the culmination of a six-year effort initiated to explore higher-resolution imaging of potentially hazardous near-Earth asteroids. The new design met or exceeded all requirements, including supporting advanced GSSR ranging modulations. The first article prototype was placed into operational service on July 26, 2017, after failure of one of the older klystrons, restoring the GSSR to full-power operations.

  14. W-band LiGA fabricated klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liqun

    2002-01-01

    Klystrino-W-band klystron was proposed by scientists at SLAC to satisfy recent applications in advanced accelerators, medical treatment, radars and communications. LiGA (a German acronym for lithographe, galvanoformung, and abformung) is introduced in the fabrication of klystrino for the first time in the history of microwave tube fabrication. The cold test experiments show that LiGA fabrication yields best surface smoothness compared with an alternative way EDM (Electrical Discharge Machining). Resultantly LiGA fabricated klystrino has the smallest wall loss which maximizes the circuit efficiency of the output structure. A multiple-gap coupled cavity is motivated to be employed as the klystrino output cavity for maximizing the efficiency. Klytrino is simulated by 1-D, 2-D and 3-D simulation codes. Particularly a complete klystrino is simulated intensively using 2-D MAGIC Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code either for beam absence or beam presence. Many simulation techniques are developed such as model transformation from 3-D to 2-D, circuit parameter simulation, dispersion characteristic analysis, pre bunched electron beam mode and so on. Klystrino, as a 3-D structure, is modeled by 3-D MAFIA for analyzing the cold circuit properties. 3-D MAGIC is explored to simulate klystrino for the actual structure analysis and actual beam interaction process observation.

  15. Spurious Oscillations in High Power Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Kwok

    2003-06-11

    Spurious oscillations in high power klystrons are found to occur in the gun region, in the cavities in the main body of the tube, or in the drift tunnel. The criteria that determine whether a mode will oscillate is that its beam loading be negative, and that the power it extracts from the beam exceeds its losses to external loading and wall dissipation. Using the electromagnetic and particle-in-cell modules of MAFIA, we have devised numerical techniques with which the quality factors Q{sub b} Q{sub c} and Q{sub o} can be evaluated and compared. Simulations involving a gun oscillation observed in the SLAC/DESY S-Band klystron will be reported.

  16. Relativistic klystrons for high-gradient accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.A.; Aalberts, D.P.; Boyd, J.K.; Deis, G.A.; Houck, T.L.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Ryne, R.D.; Yu, S.S. ); Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, T.L.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W. ); Haimson, J.; Mecklen

    1990-09-05

    Experimental work is being performed by collaborators at LLNL, SLAC, and LBL to investigate relativistic klystrons as a possible rf power source for future high-gradient accelerators. We have learned how to overcome or previously reported problem of high power rf pulse shortening and have achieved peak rf power levels of 330 MW using an 11.4-GHz high-gain tube with multiple output structures. In these experiments the rf pulse is of the same duration as the beam current pulse. In addition, experiments have been performed on two short sections of a high-gradient accelerator using the rf power from a relativistic klystron. An average accelerating gradient of 84 MV/m has been achieved with 80-MW of rf power.

  17. Pulsed semiconductor lasers with higher optical strength of cavity output mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Petrunov, A. N.; Podoskin, A. A.; Shashkin, I. S.; Slipchenko, S. O.; Pikhtin, N. A. Nalet, T. A.; Fetisova, N. V.; Vavilova, L. S.; Lyutetskiy, A. V.; Alekseev, P. A.; Titkov, A. N.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2010-06-15

    Asymmetric heterostructures with an ultrathick waveguide based on an AlGaAs/GaAs alloy system that allow lasing at a wavelength of 905 nm have been developed and fabricated by hydride metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. The internal optical loss and internal quantum efficiency of semiconductor lasers based on such structures were 0.7 cm{sup -1} and 97%, respectively. It is shown that the highest output optical power of laser diodes with antireflecting (SiO{sub 2}) and reflecting (Si/SiO{sub 2}) coatings deposited on untreated Fabry-Perot cavity facets obtained by cleaving in an oxygen atmosphere reached 67 W in the pulsed mode and is limited by mirror damage. Treatment of Fabry-Perot cavity facets by etching in argon plasma and the formation of coatings with passivating and oxygen-blocking GaN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layers allowed an increase in the maximum output optical power to 120 W. Mirror damage was not observed at the attained output optical power.

  18. Mechanism of phase control in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator by an input signal

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Renzhen; Song, Zhimin; Deng, Yuqun; Chen, Changhua

    2014-09-15

    Theoretical analyses and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are carried out to understand the mechanism of microwave phase control realized by the external RF signal in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO). Theoretical calculations show that a modulated electron beam can lead the microwave field with an arbitrary initial phase to the same equilibrium phase, which is determined by the phase factor of the modulated current, and the difference between them is fixed. Furthermore, PIC simulations demonstrate that the phase of input signal has a close relation to that of modulated current, which initiates the phase of the irregularly microwave during the build-up of oscillation. Since the microwave field is weak during the early time of starting oscillation, it is easy to be induced, and a small input signal is sufficient to control the phase of output microwave. For the klystron-like RBWO with two pre-modulation cavities and a reentrant input cavity, an input signal with 100 kW power and 4.21 GHz frequency can control the phase of 5 GW output microwave with relative phase difference less than 6% when the diode voltage is 760 kV, and beam current is 9.8 kA, corresponding to a power ratio of output microwave to input signal of 47 dB.

  19. Mechanism of phase control in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator by an input signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Renzhen; Song, Zhimin; Deng, Yuqun; Chen, Changhua

    2014-09-01

    Theoretical analyses and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are carried out to understand the mechanism of microwave phase control realized by the external RF signal in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO). Theoretical calculations show that a modulated electron beam can lead the microwave field with an arbitrary initial phase to the same equilibrium phase, which is determined by the phase factor of the modulated current, and the difference between them is fixed. Furthermore, PIC simulations demonstrate that the phase of input signal has a close relation to that of modulated current, which initiates the phase of the irregularly microwave during the build-up of oscillation. Since the microwave field is weak during the early time of starting oscillation, it is easy to be induced, and a small input signal is sufficient to control the phase of output microwave. For the klystron-like RBWO with two pre-modulation cavities and a reentrant input cavity, an input signal with 100 kW power and 4.21 GHz frequency can control the phase of 5 GW output microwave with relative phase difference less than 6% when the diode voltage is 760 kV, and beam current is 9.8 kA, corresponding to a power ratio of output microwave to input signal of 47 dB.

  20. W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Design

    SciTech Connect

    Scheitrum, G.; Caryotakis, G.; Burke, A.; Jensen, A.; Jongewaard, E.a Krasnykh, A.; Neubauer, M.; Phillips, R.; Rauenbuehler, K.; /SLAC

    2011-11-11

    Sheet beam devices provide important advantages for very high power, narrow bandwidth RF sources like accelerator klystrons [1]. Reduced current density and increased surface area result in increased power capabi1ity, reduced magnetic fields for focusing and reduced cathode loading. These advantages are offset by increased complexity, beam formation and transport issues and potential for mode competition in the ovennoded cavities and drift tube. This paper will describe the design issues encountered in developing a 100 kW peak and 2 kW average power sheet beam k1ystron at W-band including beam formation, beam transport, circuit design, circuit fabrication and mode competition.

  1. Cavity quantum electro-optics. II. Input-output relations between traveling optical and microwave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Mankei

    2011-10-01

    In a previous paper [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.81.063837 81, 063837 (2010)], I proposed a quantum model of the cavity electro-optic modulator, which can coherently couple an optical cavity mode to a microwave resonator mode and enable quantum operations on the two modes, including laser cooling of the microwave resonator, electro-optic entanglement, and backaction-evading optical measurement of a microwave quadrature. In this sequel, I focus on the quantum input-output relations between traveling optical and microwave fields coupled to the cavity electro-optic modulator. With red-sideband optical pumping, the relations are shown to resemble those of a beam splitter for the traveling fields, so that in the ideal case of zero parasitic loss and critical coupling, microwave photons can be coherently up converted to “flying” optical photons with unit efficiency, and vice versa. With blue-sideband pumping, the modulator acts as a nondegenerate parametric amplifier, which can generate two-mode squeezing and hybrid entangled photon pairs at optical and microwave frequencies. These fundamental operations provide a potential bridge between circuit quantum electrodynamics and quantum optics.

  2. Cavity quantum electro-optics. II. Input-output relations between traveling optical and microwave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Mankei

    2011-10-15

    In a previous paper [Phys. Rev. A 81, 063837 (2010)], I proposed a quantum model of the cavity electro-optic modulator, which can coherently couple an optical cavity mode to a microwave resonator mode and enable quantum operations on the two modes, including laser cooling of the microwave resonator, electro-optic entanglement, and backaction-evading optical measurement of a microwave quadrature. In this sequel, I focus on the quantum input-output relations between traveling optical and microwave fields coupled to the cavity electro-optic modulator. With red-sideband optical pumping, the relations are shown to resemble those of a beam splitter for the traveling fields, so that in the ideal case of zero parasitic loss and critical coupling, microwave photons can be coherently up converted to ''flying'' optical photons with unit efficiency, and vice versa. With blue-sideband pumping, the modulator acts as a nondegenerate parametric amplifier, which can generate two-mode squeezing and hybrid entangled photon pairs at optical and microwave frequencies. These fundamental operations provide a potential bridge between circuit quantum electrodynamics and quantum optics.

  3. FPGA Trigger System to Run Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Darius; /Texas A-M /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The Klystron Department is in need of a new trigger system to update the laboratory capabilities. The objective of the research is to develop the trigger system using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology with a user interface that will allow one to communicate with the FPGA via a Universal Serial Bus (USB). This trigger system will be used for the testing of klystrons. The key materials used consists of the Xilinx Integrated Software Environment (ISE) Foundation, a Programmable Read Only Memory (Prom) XCF04S, a Xilinx Spartan 3E 35S500E FPGA, Xilinx Platform Cable USB II, a Printed Circuit Board (PCB), a 100 MHz oscillator, and an oscilloscope. Key considerations include eight triggers, two of which have variable phase shifting capabilities. Once the project was completed the output signals were able to be manipulated via a Graphical User Interface by varying the delay and width of the signal. This was as planned; however, the ability to vary the phase was not completed. Future work could consist of being able to vary the phase. This project will give the operators in the Klystron Department more flexibility to run various tests.

  4. Quantum theory of spontaneous emission in a one-dimensional optical cavity with two-side output coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiao-Ping; Ujihara, Kikuo

    1990-03-01

    A quantum theory of spontaneous emission from an initially excited two-level atom in a one-dimensional optical cavity with output coupling from both sides is developed. Orthonormal mode functions with a continuous spectrum are employed, which are derived by imposing a periodic boundary condition on the whole space with a period much larger than the cavity length. The delay differential equation of the atomic state of Cook and Milonni [Phys. Rev. A 35, 5081 (1987)] is re-derived in a strict manner, where the reflectivity of the cavity mirrors is included naturally in the mode functions. An approximate solution at a single-resonant-mode limit shows the results of ``vacuum'' Rabi oscillation in an underdamped cavity and enhanced spontaneous emission rate in an overdamped cavity. For the latter case, it is found that in the optical range the spontaneous emission rate is enhanced by a factor F (finesse of the cavity).

  5. Optical parametric oscillator based off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy for rapid chemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Arslanov, Denis D; Cristescu, Simona M; Harren, Frans J M

    2010-10-01

    An optical parametric oscillator (OPO), pumped by a fiber-amplified diode laser, is combined with off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS). The cw OPO (power 1.2 W, tunability 3-4 μm, 5 cm(-1) mode-hop-free tuning) has a tuning speed of 100 THz/s, which is ideal for rapid and sensitive trace gas detection. Combined with OA-ICOS, a detection limit of 50 parts per trillion by volume (1×10(12)) of ethane (C(2)H(6)) in nitrogen was obtained in 0.25s at 2997 cm(-1), corresponding to a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 4.8×10(-11) cm(-1) Hz(-1/2). The system demonstrates real-time measurements of methane and water in exhaled human breath.

  6. The 250-kW CW klystron amplifier for planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, R.; Mizuhara, A.

    1992-01-01

    The design, construction, and performance testing is described of two Varian klystrons, model VKX-7864A, which replaced the aging and less efficient VA-949J klystrons in the X band planetary radar transmitter on the Goldstone, CA, 70 meter antenna. The project was carried out jointly by the JPL and Varian Assoc. Output power was increased from 200 to 250 kW continuous wave per klystron, and full dc beam power is dissipated in the collector (it was not possible to operate the VA-949J klystrons without RF drive because of limited collector dissipation capability). Replacements were made with a minimum of transmitter modifications. The planetary radar transmitter is now operating successfully with these two klystrons.

  7. Wavelength switching in an optical klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, K.W.; Smith, T.I.

    1995-12-31

    A symmetric optical klystron consists of two identical undulator sections separated a dispersive section. For a device of a given length, an optical klystron is capable of producing much more bunching, and therefore more gain, than a traditional undulator. Another consequence of introducing dispersion between two undulator sections is that the overall spontaneous radiation pattern results from the interference between the two undulator sections, and as such resembles a standard undulator radiation pattern modulated by a sinusoidal interference term. The presence of several wavelength peaks in the spontaneous lineshape implies an equal number of peaks in the gain spectrum. If the strength of the dispersion section is adjusted to provide nearly equal gain on the two largest of these peaks, then they will compete, and the FEL may switch wavelengths based on noise, cavity length, or other perturbations. We provide the first observations of this behavior, using the FIREFLY system at the Stanford Picosecond FEL Center. In FIREFLY, relative wavelength switching by more than 3%--more than twice the laser linewidth-has been observed by varying dispersion section strength, while at intermediate points stable switching has also been observed as a function of cavity length.

  8. Development of X-band klystron technology at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.

    1997-05-01

    The SLAC design for a 1-TeV collider (NLC) requires klystrons with a performance which is well beyond the state-of-the-art for microwave tubes in the United States or abroad. The electrical specifications for the NLC klystrons are not fully established, but they are approximately as follows: Frequency, 11.4 GHz; Peak Power, 75 MW; Pulse Length, 1.5 {mu}s; Repetition Rate, 180 Hz; Gain, 50 dB; Efficiency, (including beam focusing) 50%. SLAC is in the seventh year of a program to develop these klystrons. The choice of X-band as the operating frequency, along with the sheer size of the NLC, have resulted in some new, most demanding standards for the klystrons which may power this future machine. These are related to the overall efficiency required, to the high rf gradients that must be supported at the output circuit without vacuum breakdown, and to the manufacturing cost of the 5,000-10,000 klystrons needed for the collider.

  9. X-Band klystron development at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.W.

    2000-03-24

    X-band klystrons capable of 75 MW and utilizing either solenoidal or Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing are undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The klystron development is part of an effort to realize components necessary for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). SLAC has completed a solenoidal-focused X-band klystron development effort to study the design and operation of tubes with beam microperveances of 1.2. As of early 2000, nine 1.2{micro}K klystrons have been tested to 50 MW at 1.5{micro}s. The first 50 MW PPM klystron, constructed in 1996, was designed with a 0.6 {micro}K beam at 465 kV and uses a 5-cell traveling-wave output structure. Recent testing of this tube at wider pulsewidths has reached 50 MW at 55% efficiency, 2.4{micro}s and 60 Hz. A 75 MW PPM klystron prototype was constructed in 1998 and has reached the NLC design target of 75 MW at 1.5 {micro}s. A new 75 MW PPM klystron design, which is aimed at reducing the cost and increasing the reliability of multi-megawatt PPM klystrons, is under investigation. The tube is scheduled for testing during early 2001.

  10. 50-MW X-band klystron sources for the next generation of linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.; Fant, K.; Fowkes, R.; Phillips, R.; Tantawi, S.; Vlieks, A.; Wright, E.

    1994-06-01

    The first in a new series of high-power pulsed klystrons has been tested with the following results: Frequency = 11.4 GHz, beam voltage = 415 kV, power output = 51 MW, pulse length = 1.5 {mu}s, and efficiency = 37%. Several tubes of this type will be used in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The rf performance of the klystron, which employs a standing-wave extended-interaction output circuit, is closely approximated by simulations performed with the SLAC CONDOR code. The same code predicts considerably higher efficiency, using a traveling-wave output circuit. A klystron with such a circuit will be constructed in the future. Another klystron is also planned in which beam confinement is accomplished by a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) stack, for which simulations also predict good performance.

  11. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE041-like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code "CST Particle Studio" has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ˜108 kW with ˜15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE041-like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  12. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE{sub 041}–like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code “CST Particle Studio” has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ∼108 kW with ∼15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE{sub 041}–like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  13. Factors affecting the output pulse flatness of the linear transformer driver cavity systems with 5th harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeenko, V. M.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Kim, A. A.; Kondratiev, S. S.; Sinebryukhov, V. A.; Volkov, S. N.; Cuneo, M. E.; Kiefer, M. L.; Leckby, J. J.; Oliver, B. V.; Maloney, P. D.

    2016-09-19

    Here, we describe the study we have undertaken to evaluate the effect of component tolerances in obtaining a voltage output flat top for a linear transformer driver (LTD) cavity containing 3rd and 5th harmonic bricks [A. A. Kim et al., in Proc. IEEE Pulsed Power and Plasma Science PPPS2013 (San Francisco, California, USA, 2013), pp. 1354–1356.] and for 30 cavity voltage adder. Our goal was to define the necessary component value precision in order to obtain a voltage output flat top with no more than ±0.5% amplitude variation.

  14. Factors affecting the output pulse flatness of the linear transformer driver cavity systems with 5th harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeenko, V. M.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Kim, A. A.; Kondratiev, S. S.; Sinebryukhov, V. A.; Volkov, S. N.; Cuneo, M. E.; Kiefer, M. L.; Leckby, J. J.; Oliver, B. V.; Maloney, P. D.

    2016-09-01

    We describe the study we have undertaken to evaluate the effect of component tolerances in obtaining a voltage output flat top for a linear transformer driver (LTD) cavity containing 3rd and 5th harmonic bricks [A. A. Kim et al., in Proc. IEEE Pulsed Power and Plasma Science PPPS2013 (San Francisco, California, USA, 2013), pp. 1354-1356.] and for 30 cavity voltage adder. Our goal was to define the necessary component value precision in order to obtain a voltage output flat top with no more than ±0.5 % amplitude variation.

  15. The space-dependent model and output characteristics of intra-cavity pumped dual-wavelength lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin-Qi; Dong, Yuan; Zhang, Feng-Dong; Yu, Yong-Ji; Jin, Guang-Yong; Liu, Li-Da

    2016-01-01

    The intra-cavity pumping scheme which is used to simultaneously generate dual-wavelength lasers was proposed and published by us and the space-independent model of quasi-three-level and four-level intra-cavity pumped dual-wavelength lasers was constructed based on this scheme. In this paper, to make the previous study more rigorous, the space-dependent model is adopted. As an example, the output characteristics of 946 nm and 1064 nm dual-wavelength lasers under the conditions of different output mirror transmittances are numerically simulated by using the derived formula and the results are nearly identical to what was previously reported.

  16. Factors affecting the output pulse flatness of the linear transformer driver cavity systems with 5th harmonics

    DOE PAGES

    Alexeenko, V. M.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Kim, A. A.; ...

    2016-09-19

    Here, we describe the study we have undertaken to evaluate the effect of component tolerances in obtaining a voltage output flat top for a linear transformer driver (LTD) cavity containing 3rd and 5th harmonic bricks [A. A. Kim et al., in Proc. IEEE Pulsed Power and Plasma Science PPPS2013 (San Francisco, California, USA, 2013), pp. 1354–1356.] and for 30 cavity voltage adder. Our goal was to define the necessary component value precision in order to obtain a voltage output flat top with no more than ±0.5% amplitude variation.

  17. Klystron Linearizer for Use with 1.2 MW 476 MHz Klystrons in PEP-II RF Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.; Mastorides, T.; Teytelman, D.; Van Winkle, D.; Zhou, Y.; Gallo, A.; /Frascati

    2005-06-15

    The direct and comb loop feedback around the RF cavities in PEP-II is critical in reducing longitudinal instabilities driven by the cavity impedance. The non-linear 1.2 MW klystron is in the signal path for these feedback loops. As a result, the effective small-signal gain of the klystron at 85% saturation reduces the impedance control by factors of 5 to 20 as compared to a linear power amplifier. A klystron linearizer circuit has been developed which operates in series with the power amplifier and acts to equalize the small and large signal gains through the combination. The technique must implement a 1 MHz linear control bandwidth over roughly 15 dB of RF signal level variation. The dynamics of this system is operating point dependent, and the channel must have dynamic gain compensation to keep the linearity compensation loop stable over changes in operating point. The design of this non-linear signal processing channel (incorporating RF and DSP techniques) and measured results from full-power klystron testing are presented.

  18. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of 300 GHz reflex klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, S. G.; Jin, Y. S.; Kim, J. I.; Kim, G. J.; Shon, C. H.

    2007-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulations of 300 GHz reflex klystrons are presented. 300 GHz electromagnetic wave generation in a resonant cavity is analyzed by using a 3D simulation model in which all the geometric parameters (such as the grid thickness, repeller shape, beam radius, etc.) are described. When an electron beam of an energy of 1.0 keV and a net current of 8.9 mA is used, the maximum electronic efficiency of energy transfer is observed when the gap transit angle is 0.7{pi} rad, and the efficiency saturates when the beam current is over 10 mA. Space charge forces produce a shift in the optimum repeller voltage. It is also shown that the effect of the beam temperature is not critical, even though the bunching wavelength of the electron beam is several times smaller than that in conventional vacuum electron devices. Our simulation results show that a microfabricated 300 GHz reflex klystron can directly generate electromagnetic waves with output power levels of several tens of milliwatts.

  19. High Power Amplifier Harmonic Output Level Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Khan, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented for the measurement of the harmonic output power of high power klystron amplifiers, involving coherent hemispherical radiation pattern measurements of the radiated klystron output. Results are discussed for the operation in saturated and unsaturated conditions, and with a waveguide harmonic filter included.

  20. High Power Amplifier Harmonic Output Level Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Khan, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented for the measurement of the harmonic output power of high power klystron amplifiers, involving coherent hemispherical radiation pattern measurements of the radiated klystron output. Results are discussed for the operation in saturated and unsaturated conditions, and with a waveguide harmonic filter included.

  1. Quantum cascade laser-based integrated cavity output spectroscopy of exhaled nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, M. R.; Bakhirkin, Y. A.; Tittel, F. K.

    2006-11-01

    A nitric oxide (NO) sensor employing a thermoelectrically cooled, continuous-wave, distributed feedback quantum cascade laser operating at 5.47 μm (1828 cm-1) and off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy was used to measure NO concentrations in exhaled breath. A minimum measurable concentration (3σ) of 3.6 parts-per-billion by volume (ppbv) of NO with a data-acquisition time of 4 s was demonstrated. Five prepared gas mixtures and 15 exhaled breath samples were measured with both the NO sensor and for intercomparison with a chemiluminescence-based NO analyzer and were found to be in agreement within 0.6 ppbv. Exhaled NO flow-independent parameters, which may provide diagnostic and therapeutic information in respiratory diseases where single-breath measurements are equivocal, were estimated from end-tidal NO concentration measurements collected at various flow rates. The results of this work indicate that a laser-based exhaled NO sensor can be used to measure exhaled nitric oxide at a range of exhalation flow rates to determine flow-independent parameters in human clinical trials.

  2. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two- beam accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidia, Steven Michael

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band (~8-12 GHz) through Ka-band (~30-35 GHz) frequency regions. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. A mapping algorithm is used so that tens or hundreds of thousands of macroparticles can be pushed from the solution of a few hundreds of differential equations. This is a great cost-savings device from the standpoint of CPU cycles. It can increase by several orders of magnitude the number of macroparticles that take place in the simulation, enabling more accurate modeling of the evolution of the beam distribution and enhanced sensitivity to effects due to the beam's halo. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split- operator algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The beam-cavity interaction is analyzed and divided naturally into two distinct times scales. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 TW of power from 40 input, gain

  3. Advanced Klystrons for High Efficiency Accelerator Systems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Michael; Ives, Robert Lawrence

    2014-03-26

    This program explored tailoring of RF pulses used to drive accelerator cavities. Simulations indicated that properly shaping the pulse risetime to match accelerator cavity characteristics reduced reflected power and increased total efficiency. Tailoring the pulse requires a high power, gridded, klystron to shape the risetime while also controlling the beam current. The Phase I program generated a preliminary design of a gridded electron gun for a klystron producing 5-10 MW of RF power. This required design of a segmented cathode using Controlled Porosity Reservoir cathodes to limit power deposition on the grid. The program was successful in computationally designing a gun producing a high quality electron beam with grid control. Additional analysis of pulse tailoring indicated that technique would only be useful for cavity drive pulses that were less than approximately 2-3 times the risetime. Otherwise, the efficiency gained during the risetime of the pulse became insignificant when considering the efficiency over the entire pulse. Consequently, it was determined that a Phase II program would not provide sufficient return to justify the cost. Never the less, other applications for a high power gridded gun are currently being pursued. This klystron, for example, would facilitate development inverse Comptom x-ray sources by providing a high repetition rate (10 -100 kHz) RF source.

  4. Spectral contaminant identifier for off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy measurements of liquid water isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brian Leen, J.; Berman, Elena S. F.; Liebson, Lindsay; Gupta, Manish

    2012-04-01

    Developments in cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry have made it possible to measure water isotopes using faster, more cost-effective field-deployable instrumentation. Several groups have attempted to extend this technology to measure water extracted from plants and found that other extracted organics absorb light at frequencies similar to that absorbed by the water isotopomers, leading to δ2H and δ18O measurement errors (Δδ2H and Δδ18O). In this note, the off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) spectra of stable isotopes in liquid water is analyzed to determine the presence of interfering absorbers that lead to erroneous isotope measurements. The baseline offset of the spectra is used to calculate a broadband spectral metric, mBB, and the mean subtracted fit residuals in two regions of interest are used to determine a narrowband metric, mNB. These metrics are used to correct for Δδ2H and Δδ18O. The method was tested on 14 instruments and Δδ18O was found to scale linearly with contaminant concentration for both narrowband (e.g., methanol) and broadband (e.g., ethanol) absorbers, while Δδ2H scaled linearly with narrowband and as a polynomial with broadband absorbers. Additionally, the isotope errors scaled logarithmically with mNB. Using the isotope error versus mNB and mBB curves, Δδ2H and Δδ18O resulting from methanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 0.93 ‰ and 0.25 ‰ respectively, while Δδ2H and Δδ18O from ethanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 1.22 ‰ and 0.22 ‰. Large variation between instruments indicates that the sensitivities must be calibrated for each individual isotope analyzer. These results suggest that the properly calibrated interference metrics can be used to correct for polluted samples and extend off-axis ICOS measurements of liquid water to include plant waters, soil extracts, wastewater, and alcoholic beverages. The general technique

  5. Spectral contaminant identifier for off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy measurements of liquid water isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Leen, J.; Berman, Elena S. F.; Gupta, Manish; Liebson, Lindsay

    2012-04-15

    Developments in cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry have made it possible to measure water isotopes using faster, more cost-effective field-deployable instrumentation. Several groups have attempted to extend this technology to measure water extracted from plants and found that other extracted organics absorb light at frequencies similar to that absorbed by the water isotopomers, leading to {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O measurement errors ({Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O). In this note, the off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) spectra of stable isotopes in liquid water is analyzed to determine the presence of interfering absorbers that lead to erroneous isotope measurements. The baseline offset of the spectra is used to calculate a broadband spectral metric, m{sub BB}, and the mean subtracted fit residuals in two regions of interest are used to determine a narrowband metric, m{sub NB}. These metrics are used to correct for {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O. The method was tested on 14 instruments and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O was found to scale linearly with contaminant concentration for both narrowband (e.g., methanol) and broadband (e.g., ethanol) absorbers, while {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H scaled linearly with narrowband and as a polynomial with broadband absorbers. Additionally, the isotope errors scaled logarithmically with m{sub NB}. Using the isotope error versus m{sub NB} and m{sub BB} curves, {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O resulting from methanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 0.93 per mille and 0.25 per mille respectively, while {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O from ethanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 1.22 per mille and 0.22 per mille . Large variation between instruments indicates that the sensitivities must be calibrated for each individual isotope analyzer. These results suggest that the

  6. Spectral contaminant identifier for off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy measurements of liquid water isotopes.

    PubMed

    Brian Leen, J; Berman, Elena S F; Liebson, Lindsay; Gupta, Manish

    2012-04-01

    Developments in cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry have made it possible to measure water isotopes using faster, more cost-effective field-deployable instrumentation. Several groups have attempted to extend this technology to measure water extracted from plants and found that other extracted organics absorb light at frequencies similar to that absorbed by the water isotopomers, leading to δ(2)H and δ(18)O measurement errors (Δδ(2)H and Δδ(18)O). In this note, the off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) spectra of stable isotopes in liquid water is analyzed to determine the presence of interfering absorbers that lead to erroneous isotope measurements. The baseline offset of the spectra is used to calculate a broadband spectral metric, m(BB), and the mean subtracted fit residuals in two regions of interest are used to determine a narrowband metric, m(NB). These metrics are used to correct for Δδ(2)H and Δδ(18)O. The method was tested on 14 instruments and Δδ(18)O was found to scale linearly with contaminant concentration for both narrowband (e.g., methanol) and broadband (e.g., ethanol) absorbers, while Δδ(2)H scaled linearly with narrowband and as a polynomial with broadband absorbers. Additionally, the isotope errors scaled logarithmically with m(NB). Using the isotope error versus m(NB) and m(BB) curves, Δδ(2)H and Δδ(18)O resulting from methanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 0.93 [per thousand] and 0.25 [per thousand] respectively, while Δδ(2)H and Δδ(18)O from ethanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 1.22 [per thousand] and 0.22 [per thousand]. Large variation between instruments indicates that the sensitivities must be calibrated for each individual isotope analyzer. These results suggest that the properly calibrated interference metrics can be used to correct for polluted samples and extend off-axis ICOS measurements of liquid water to include plant

  7. Multi-output Q-switched solid-state laser using an intra-cavity MEMS micromirror array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Ralf; Lubeigt, Walter; Clark, Caspar; McBrearty, Euan; Uttamchandani, Deepak

    2013-03-01

    Multiple individually-controllable Q-switched laser outputs from a single diode-pumped Nd:YAG module are presented by using an electrostatic MEMS scanning micromirror array as cavity end-mirror. The gold coated, 700 μm diameter and 25 μm thick, single-crystal silicon micromirrors possess resonant tilt frequencies of ~8 kHz with optical scan angles of up to 78°. Dual laser output resulting from the actuation of two neighboring mirrors was observed resulting in a combined average output power of 125 mW and pulse durations of 30 ns with resulting pulse energies of 7.9 μJ and 7.1 μJ. The output power was limited by thermal effects on the gold-coated mirror surface. Dielectric coatings with increased reflectivity and therefore lower thermal stresses are required to power-scale this technique. An initial SiO2/Nb2O5 test coating was applied to a multi-mirror array with individual optical scan angles of 14° at a resonant tilt frequency of 10.4 kHz. The use of this dielectric coated array inside a 3-mirror Nd:YAG laser cavity led to a single mirror output with average Q-switched output power of 750 mW and pulse durations of 295 ns resulting in pulse energies of 36 μJ.

  8. Optimization of output coupling ratio on the performance of a ring-cavity Brillouin-erbium fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Hambali, Nor Azura Malini A; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir; Al-Mansoori, Mohammed Hayder; Saripan, M Iqbal; Abas, Ahmad Fauzi

    2009-09-20

    The operation of a single-wavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser (BEFL) system with a Brillouin pump preamplified technique for different output coupling ratios in a ring cavity is experimentally demonstrated. The characteristics of Brillouin Stokes power and tunability were investigated in this research. The efficiency of the BEFL operation was obtained at an optimum output coupling ratio of 95%. By fixing the Brillouin pump wavelength at 1550 nm while its power was set at 1.6 mW and the 1480 pump power was set to its maximum value of 135 mW, the Brillioun Stokes power was found to be 28.7 mW. The Stokes signal can be tuned within a range of 60 nm from 1520 to 1580 nm without appearances of the self-lasing cavity modes in the laser system.

  9. Dual-cavity mode converter for a fundamental mode output in an over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiawei; Huang, Wenhua; Xiao, Renzhen; Bai, Xianchen; Zhang, Yuchuan; Zhang, Xiaowei; Shao, Hao; Chen, Changhua; Zhu, Qi

    2015-03-16

    A dual-cavity TM{sub 02}–TM{sub 01} mode converter is designed for a dual-mode operation over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator. With the converter, the fundamental mode output is achieved. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the efficiency of beam-wave conversion was over 46% and a pureTM{sub 01} mode output was obtained. Effects of end reflection provided by the mode converter were studied. Adequate TM{sub 01} mode feedback provided by the converter enhances conversion efficiency. The distance between the mode converter and extraction cavity critically affect the generation of microwaves depending on the reflection phase of TM{sub 01} mode feedback.

  10. Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator Simulation Code Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidia, Steven; Ryne, Robert

    1997-05-01

    We present recent work on the development and testing of a 3-D simu- lation code for relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators (RK-TBAs). This new code utilizes symplectic integration techniques to push macro- particles, coupled to a circuit equation framework that advances the fields in the cavities. Space charge effects are calculated using a Green's function approach, and pipe wall effects are included in the electrostatic approximation. We present simulations of the LBNL/LLNL RK-TBA device, emphasizing cavity power development and beam dynamics, including the high- and low-frequency beam break-up instabilities.

  11. Design of a Ku band miniature multiple beam klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, Ayan Kumar Pal, Debasish; Kant, Deepender; Saini, Anil; Saha, Sukalyan; Joshi, Lalit Mohan

    2016-03-09

    The design of a miniature multiple beam klystron (MBK) working in the Ku-band frequency range is presented in this article. Starting from the main design parameters, design of the electron gun, the input and output couplers and radio frequency section (RF-section) are presented. The design methodology using state of the art commercial electromagnetic design tools, analytical formulae as well as noncommercial design tools are briefly presented in this article.

  12. Design of a Ku band miniature multiple beam klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Ayan Kumar; Pal, Debasish; Saini, Anil; Kant, Deepender; Saha, Sukalyan; Joshi, Lalit Mohan

    2016-03-01

    The design of a miniature multiple beam klystron (MBK) working in the Ku-band frequency range is presented in this article. Starting from the main design parameters, design of the electron gun, the input and output couplers and radio frequency section (RF-section) are presented. The design methodology using state of the art commercial electromagnetic design tools, analytical formulae as well as noncommercial design tools are briefly presented in this article.

  13. Atomic entanglement purification and concentration using coherent state input-output process in low-Q cavity QED regime.

    PubMed

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Chuan; He, Ling-Yan; Zhang, Ru

    2013-02-25

    We investigate an atomic entanglement purification protocol based on the coherent state input-output process by working in low-Q cavity in the atom-cavity intermediate coupling region. The information of entangled states are encoded in three-level configured single atoms confined in separated one-side optical micro-cavities. Using the coherent state input-output process, we design a two-qubit parity check module (PCM), which allows the quantum nondemolition measurement for the atomic qubits, and show its use for remote parities to distill a high-fidelity atomic entangled ensemble from an initial mixed state ensemble nonlocally. The proposed scheme can further be used for unknown atomic states entanglement concentration. Also by exploiting the PCM, we describe a modified scheme for atomic entanglement concentration by introducing ancillary single atoms. As the coherent state input-output process is robust and scalable in realistic applications, and the detection in the PCM is based on the intensity of outgoing coherent state, the present protocols may be widely used in large-scaled and solid-based quantum repeater and quantum information processing.

  14. Operating Experience and Reliability Improvements on the 5 kW CW Klystron at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R.; Holben, S.

    1997-05-01

    With substantial operating hours on the RF system, considerable information on reliability of the 5 kW CW klystrons has been obtained. High early failure rates led to examination of the operating conditions and failure modes. Internal ceramic contamination caused premature failure of gun potting material and ultimate tube demise through arcing or ceramic fracture. A planned course of repotting and reconditioning of approximately 300 klystrons, plus careful attention to operating conditions and periodic analysis of operational data, has substantially reduced the failure rate. It is anticipated that implementation of planned supplemental monitoring systems for the klystrons will allow most catastrophic failures to be avoided. By predicting end of life, tubes can be changed out before they fail, thus minimizing unplanned downtime. Initial tests have also been conducted on this same klystron operated at higher voltages with resultant higher output power. The outcome of these tests will provide information to be considered for future upgrades to the accelerator.

  15. Operating experience and reliability improvements on the 5 kW CW klystron at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.; Holben, S.

    1997-06-01

    With substantial operating hours on the RF system, considerable information on reliability of the 5 kW CW klystrons has been obtained. High early failure rates led to examination of the operating conditions and failure modes. Internal ceramic contamination caused premature failure of gun potting material and ultimate tube demise through arcing or ceramic fracture. A planned course of reporting and reconditioning of approximately 300 klystrons, plus careful attention to operating conditions and periodic analysis of operational data, has substantially reduced the failure rate. It is anticipated that implementation of planned supplemental monitoring systems for the klystrons will allow most catastrophic failures to be avoided. By predicting end of life, tubes can be changed out before they fail, thus minimizing unplanned downtime. Initial tests have also been conducted on this same klystron operated at higher voltages with resultant higher output power. The outcome of these tests will provide information to be considered for future upgrades to the accelerator.

  16. Continuous measurements of water vapor isotopic compositions using an integrated cavity output spectrometer: calibrations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Caylor, K.; Dragoni, D.

    2009-04-01

    The 18O and 2H of water vapor can be used to investigate couplings between biological processes (e.g., photosynthesis or transpiration) and hydrologic processes (e.g., evaporation) and therefore serve as powerful tracers in hydrological cycles. A typical method for determining δ18O and δ2H fluxes in landscapes is a "Keeling Plot" approach, which uses field-collected vapor samples coupled with a traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometer to infer the isotopic composition of evapotranspiration. However, fractionation accompanying inefficient vapor trapping can lead to large measurement uncertainty and the intensive laboring involved in cold-trap make it almost impossible for continuous measurements. Over the last 3-4 years a few groups have developed continuous approaches for measuring δ18O and δ2H that use laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) to achieve accuracy levels similar to lab-based mass spectrometry methods. Unfortunately, most LAS systems need cryogenic cooling, constant calibration to a reference gas, and substantial power requirements, which make them unsuitable for long-term field deployment at remote field sites. In this research, we tested out a new LAS-based water vapor isotope analyzer (WVIA, Los Gatos Research, Inc, Mountain View, CA) based on Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (ICOS) and coupled this instrument with a flux gradient system. The WVIA was calibrated bi-weekly using a dew point generator and water with known δ18O and δ2H signatures. The field work was performed at Morgan-Monroe State Forest Ameriflux tower site (central Indiana) between August 8 and August 27, 2008. The combination method was able to produce hourly δ18O and δ2H fluxes data with reproducibility similar to lab-based mass spectrometry methods. Such high temporal resolution data were also able to capture signatures of canopy and bare soil evaporation to individual rainfall events. The use of the ICOS water vapor analyzer within a gradient system has the

  17. A high-order mode extended interaction klystron at 0.34 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongyang; Wang, Guangqiang; Wang, Jianguo; Li, Shuang; Zeng, Peng; Teng, Yan

    2017-02-01

    We propose the concept of high-order mode extended interaction klystron (EIK) at the terahertz band. Compared to the conventional fundamental mode EIK, it operates at the TM31-2π mode, and its remarkable advantage is to obtain a large structure and good performance. The proposed EIK consists of five identical cavities with five gaps in each cavity. The method is discussed to suppress the mode competition and self-oscillation in the high-order mode cavity. Particle-in-cell simulation demonstrates that the EIK indeed operates at TM31-2π mode without self-oscillation while other modes are well suppressed. Driven by the electron beam with a voltage of 15 kV and a current of 0.3 A, the saturation gain of 43 dB and the output power of 60 W are achieved at the center frequency of 342.4 GHz. The EIK operating at high-order mode seems a promising approach to generate high power terahertz waves.

  18. Klystron Gun Arcing and Modulator Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S

    2004-05-04

    The demand for 500 kV and 265 amperes peak to power an X-Band klystron brings up protection issues for klystron faults and the energy dumped into the arc from the modulator. This situation is made worse when more than one klystron will be driven from a single modulator, such as the existing schemes for running two and eight klystrons. High power pulsed klystrons have traditionally be powered by line type modulators which match the driving impedance with the load impedance and therefore current limit at twice the operating current. Multiple klystrons have the added problems of a lower modulator source impedance and added stray capacitance, which converts into appreciable energy at high voltages like 500kV. SLAC has measured the energy dumped into klystron arcs in a single and dual klystron configuration at the 400 to 450 kV level and found interesting characteristics in the arc formation. The author will present measured data from klystron arcs powered from line-type modulators in several configurations. The questions arise as to how the newly designed solid-state modulators, running multiple tubes, will react to a klystron arc and how much energy will be dumped into the arc.

  19. JLab High Efficiency Klystron Baseline Design for 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Hovater, J.; Delayen, Jean; Harwood, Leigh; Nelson, Richard; Wang, Haipeng

    2003-05-01

    A computer design of a 13.5 kW, 1497 MHz, CW type, 55% efficiency, 0.8 microPv beam perveance, ~40 dB gain, 5-cavity klystron has been developed for JLab 12 GeV Upgrade project.The design uses TRICOMP codes to simulate the gun, mod-anode section, solenoid focus channel and beam dump. The klystron tube was designed by JPNDISK (1D) code initially and then optimized by MASK (2D) code for the baseline parameters. All of these codes have been bunch marked by JLab 5 kW operational klystrons. The details of design parameters and the simulations by MAFIA (3D) for the cavity couplings tuners, and window are also going to be presented.

  20. Performance of the SLAC Linear Collider klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Fowkes, W.R.; Koontz, R.F.; Schwarz, H.D.; Seeman, J.T.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    There are now 200 new, high power 5045 klystrons installed on the two-mile Stanford Linear Accelerator. Peak power per klystron averages over 63 MW. Average energy contribution is above 240 MeV per station. Electron beam energy has been measured as high as 53 GeV. Energy instability due to klystron malfunction is less than 0.2%. The installed klystrons have logged over one million operating hours with close to 20,000 klystron hours cumulative operating time between failures. Data are being accumulated on klystron operation and failure modes with failure signatures starting to become apparent. To date, no wholesale failure modes have surfaced that would impair the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) program.

  1. Experimental study on parasitic mode suppression using FeSiAl in relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zehai

    2015-03-15

    Experimental study of parasitic mode suppression using electromagnetic attenuate material FeSiAl in an S-band Relativistic Klystron Amplifier (RKA) is presented in this paper. The FeSiAl powder is coated and sintered onto the inner surface of a drift tube which locates between the input and the middle cavity of the RKA. Cold tests show that the attenuate rate of the tube against parasitic mode TE{sub 11} is about 50%. Experiments carried out on the Torch-01 accelerator present that the tube is effective in suppressing the parasitic mode. Two typical outputs are obtained. When the diode voltage is on a moderate level, the RKA operates well and the parasitic mode is totally suppressed. The pulse length of the High Power Microwave (HPM) almost equals the electron beam pulse length and the HPM average output power is about 300 MW, with a power efficiency of 10%. When the diode voltage is on a higher level, the output power and efficiency rise but the parasitic mode oscillation occurred and the pulse length is shortened. By contrast, the parasitic mode oscillation is too strong for the RKA to operate normally with un-sintered drift tube. The experimental study implies that FeSiAl is effective in suppressing the parasitic mode oscillation in a certain extent. However, total suppression needs a deeper attenuate rate and further investigation.

  2. Experimental study on parasitic mode suppression using FeSiAl in relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zehai

    2015-03-01

    Experimental study of parasitic mode suppression using electromagnetic attenuate material FeSiAl in an S-band Relativistic Klystron Amplifier (RKA) is presented in this paper. The FeSiAl powder is coated and sintered onto the inner surface of a drift tube which locates between the input and the middle cavity of the RKA. Cold tests show that the attenuate rate of the tube against parasitic mode TE11 is about 50%. Experiments carried out on the Torch-01 accelerator present that the tube is effective in suppressing the parasitic mode. Two typical outputs are obtained. When the diode voltage is on a moderate level, the RKA operates well and the parasitic mode is totally suppressed. The pulse length of the High Power Microwave (HPM) almost equals the electron beam pulse length and the HPM average output power is about 300 MW, with a power efficiency of 10%. When the diode voltage is on a higher level, the output power and efficiency rise but the parasitic mode oscillation occurred and the pulse length is shortened. By contrast, the parasitic mode oscillation is too strong for the RKA to operate normally with un-sintered drift tube. The experimental study implies that FeSiAl is effective in suppressing the parasitic mode oscillation in a certain extent. However, total suppression needs a deeper attenuate rate and further investigation.

  3. Beam dynamics issues in an extended relativistic klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, G.; Li, H.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.; Sessler, A.; Yu, S.

    1995-04-01

    Preliminary studies of beam dynamics in a relativistic klystron were done to support a design study for a 1 TeV relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA), 11.424 GHz microwave power source. This paper updates those studies. An induction accelerator beam is modulated, accelerated to 10 MeV, and injected into the RK with a rf current of about 1.2 kA. The main portion of the RK is the 300-m long extraction section comprise of 150 traveling-wave output structures and 900 induction accelerator cells. A periodic system of permanent quadrupole magnets is used for focusing. One and two dimensional numerical studies of beam modulation, injection into the main RK, transport and longitudinal equilibrium are presented. Transverse beam instability studies including Landau damping and the ``Betatron Node Scheme`` are presented.

  4. Efficient continuous-wave eye-safe region signal output from intra-cavity singly resonant optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Ding, Xin; Sheng, Quan; Yin, Su-Jia; Shi, Chun-Peng; Li, Xue; Yu, Xuan-Yi; Wen, Wu-Qi; Yao, Jian-Quan

    2012-01-01

    We report an efficient continuous-wave (CW) tunable intra-cavity singly resonant optical parametric oscillator based on the multi-period periodically poled lithium niobate and using a laser diode (LD) end-pumped CW 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 laser as the pump source. A highly efficiency CW operation is realized through a careful cavity design for mode matching and thermal stability. The signal tuning range is 1401-1500 nm obtained by varying the domain period. The maximum output power of 2.2 W at 1500 nm is obtained with a 17.1 W 808 nm LD power and the corresponding conversion efficiency is 12.9%.

  5. Current Status of the Next Linear Collider X-Band Klystron Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.; Haase, A.A.; Jongewaard, E.N.; Pearson, C.; Sprehn, D.W.; /SLAC

    2005-05-09

    Klystrons capable of driving accelerator sections in the Next Linear Collider (NLC) have been developed at SLAC during the last decade. In addition to fourteen 50 MW solenoid-focused devices and a 50 MW Periodic Permanent Magnet focused (PPM) klystron, a 500 kV 75 MW PPM klystron was tested in 1999 to 80 MW with 3 {micro}s pulses, but very low duty. Subsequent 75 MW prototypes aimed for low-cost manufacture by employing reusable focusing structures external to the vacuum, similar to a solenoid electromagnet. During the PPM klystron development, several partners (CPI, EEV and Toshiba) have participated by constructing partial or complete PPM klystrons. After early failures during testing of the first two devices, SLAC has recently tested this design (XP3-3) to the full NLC specifications of 75 MW, 1.6 {micro}s pulse length, and 120 Hz. This 14.4 kW average power operation came with an efficiency of 50%. The XP3-3 average and peak output power, together with the focusing method, arguably makes it the most advanced high power klystron ever built anywhere in the world. Design considerations and test results for these latest prototypes will be presented.

  6. Final Report 200 MW L-Band Annular Beam Klystron for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Michael; Ferguson, Patrick; Ives, Lawrence; Song, Liqun; Carlsten, Bruce; Fazio, Michael

    2009-02-11

    This program developed a 200 MW, 1.3 GHz, Annular Beam Klystron (ABK) for accelerator systems. An ABK provides lower impedance than a conventional klystron, making it possible to produce higher RF powers with lower voltages. With a higher power per unit, fewer klystrons would be required for a large accelerator. Lower voltage also simplifies and reduces the cost of the power supply system. Both features will significantly lower the cost of an RF system. This device operates at 475 kV. The klystron uses a magnetron injection gun producing 1100 A in one microsecond pulses. Power is extracted into fundamental rectangular waveguide through two output windows. The predicted gain is approximately 45 dB with estimated efficiency of 45%. The klystron was assembled, but no facility was available for testing. Consequently, no high power performance measurements are available. Because the assembled klystron is approximately 15 feet long, it was disassembled for storage. It can be reassembled should a use materialize.

  7. An immersed field cluster klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Eppley, K.R.

    1989-08-01

    Future linear colliders have a need for high power, high frequency, and short-pulse radio frequency sources. The proposed ''cluster klystron'' should give over 1 GW of 12 GHz radio frequency power, can employ direct current or a long high-voltage pulse, but can be gated to give pulses down to a few tens of nanoseconds. The device consists of 42 parallel 100 A channels. Each channel is fed from an individual magnetron-type gun employing a common 50 kV mod-anode. The beams are accelerated to 400 kV in common dc accelerating gaps and fed into the 42 separate klystron channels. Focusing of all channels is achieved by a single overall 4 kG magnetic field. Simulations of expected performance suggest that the efficiency could be above 70%. 10 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Quantum computation and entangled state generation through a cavity output process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yan; Hu, Chun; Song, Jie; Song, He-Shan

    2011-10-01

    We propose a protocol to realize quantum phase gates and generate entangled states between two atoms trapped in one cavity. In Lamb-Dick limits, it is not necessary to require coincidence detections, which will relax the conditions for the experimental realization. The protocol can be generalized to generate N-atom entangled states.

  9. The two-beam accelerator and the relativistic klystron power source

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1988-04-01

    This paper discusses the concept of a two-beam accelerator. Two versions are discussed; one employing a free electron laser, the second employing a branched beam sent through ''transfer cavities'' as in a klystron. 14 refs., 26 figs., 1 tab. (LSP)

  10. 100 kW CW highly-efficient multi-beam klystron for a future electron-ion collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teryaev, Vladimir E.; Shchelkunov, Sergey V.; Jiang, Yong; Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2017-03-01

    Initial results are presented for the development of a CW highly-efficient RF source needed for operation of a future electron-ion collider. The design of this compact multi-beam klystron yields high efficiency (above 70%) for the power output of 125 kW at 952.6 MHz. The klystron is to work for the RF systems for ion acceleration in the polarized Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider as being developed at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  11. High sensitivity detection of NO2 employing off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy coupled with multiple line integrated spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Gottipaty N.; Karpf, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    We report on the development of a new sensor for NO2 with ultrahigh sensitivity of detection. This has been accomplished by combining off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) (which can provide large path lengths of the order of several km in a small volume cell) with multiple line integrated absorption spectroscopy (MLIAS) (where we integrate the absorption spectra over a large number of rotational-vibrational transitions of the molecular species to further improve the sensitivity). Employing an external cavity tunable quantum cascade laser operating in the 1601 - 1670 cm-1 range and a high-finesse optical cavity, the absorption spectra of NO2 over 100 transitions in the R-band have been recorded. From the observed linear relationship between the integrated absorption vs. concentration of NO2, we report an effective sensitivity of detection of 10 ppt for NO2. To the best of our knowledge, this is among the most sensitive levels of detection of NO2 to date. A sensitive sensor for the detection of NO2 will be helpful to monitor the ambient air quality, combustion emissions from the automobiles, power plants, aircraft and for the detection of nitrate based explosives (which are commonly used in improvised explosives (IEDs)). Additionally such a sensor would be valuable for the study of complex chemical reactions that undergo in the atmosphere resulting in the formation of photochemical smog, tropospheric ozone and acid rain.

  12. Pulse to pulse klystron diagnosis system

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, J.; Davidson, V.; Genova, L.; Johnson, R.; Reagan, D.

    1981-03-01

    This report describes a system used to study the behavior of SLAC high powered klystrons operating with a twice normal pulse width of 5 ..mu..s. At present, up to eight of the klystrons installed along the accelerator can be operated with long pulses and monitored by this system. The report will also discuss some of the recent findings and investigations.

  13. Design and development of a 6 MW peak, 24 kW average power S-band klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, L.M.; Meena, Rakesh; Nangru, Subhash; Kant, Deepender; Pal, Debashis; Lamba, O.S.; Jindal, Vishnu; Jangid, Sushil Kumar; Chakravarthy, D.P.; Dixit, Kavita

    2011-07-01

    A 6 MW peak, 24 kW average power S-band Klystron is under development at CEERI, Pilani under an MoU between BARC and CEERI. The design of the klystron has been completed. The electron gun has been designed using TRAK and MAGIC codes. RF cavities have been designed using HFSS and CST Microwave Studio while the complete beam wave interaction simulation has been done using MAGIC code. The thermal design of collector and RF window has been done using ANSYS code. A Gun Collector Test Module (GCTM) was developed before making actual klystron to validate gun perveance and thermal design of collector. A high voltage solid state pulsed modulator has been installed for performance valuation of the tube. The paper will cover the design aspects of the tube and experimental test results of GCTM and klystron. (author)

  14. Optimisation of fundamental transverse mode output in electrically pumped vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiao; Ivanov, Pavlo; Childs, David T. D.; Babazadeh, Nasser; Orchard, John; Stevens, Benjamin J.; Hogg, Richard A.

    2015-03-01

    In this work we report on the simulation of electrically pumped vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers (EP-VECSELs). We simulate an etched mesa structure (substrate emission) with the substrate acting as the current spreading layer. The effect of contact misalignment on the carrier distribution within the active element is explored and confirms the validity of the model in describing the carrier distribution. We go on to discuss the effects of the substrate thickness and trench depth on the intensity profile. Simulation results show that a thicker substrate and a trench partially etched into the substrate may improve the intensity profile in future devices.

  15. Simulation of spurious oscillations in high power klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, K.; Becker, U.; Krietenstein, B.; Weiland, T.; Dohlus, M.

    1996-12-31

    Spurious oscillations can seriously limit a klystron`s performance from reaching its design specifications.These are modes with frequencies different form the drive frequency, and have been found to be localized in various regions of the tube. If left unsuppressed, such oscillations can be driven to large amplitudes by the beam, causing the main output signal to suffer from amplitude and phase instabilities that may lead to pulse shortening or reduction in power generation efficiency. The oscillation condition is determining by two factors: the circuit losses and the beam loading due to the mode. The authors describe efficient methods to evaluate the external and beam-loaded Q`s of the circuit, using the electromagnetic and particle-in-cell (PIC) modules of the MAFIA code. Results are presented for spurious modes observed during the testing of the first 150 MW S-band klystron, which was designed and built at the Stanford Linear Acceleration Center (SLAC) as a part of an international collaboration with Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY).

  16. Klystron Cluster Scheme for ILC High Power RF Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2009-07-06

    We present a concept for powering the main linacs of the International Linear Collider (ILC) by delivering high power RF from the surface via overmoded, low-loss waveguides at widely spaced intervals. The baseline design employs a two-tunnel layout, with klystrons and modulators evenly distributed along a service tunnel running parallel to the accelerator tunnel. This new idea eliminates the need for the service tunnel. It also brings most of the warm heat load to the surface, dramatically reducing the tunnel water cooling and HVAC requirements. In the envisioned configuration, groups of 70 klystrons and modulators are clustered in surface buildings every 2.5 km. Their outputs are combined into two half-meter diameter circular TE{sub 01} mode evacuated waveguides. These are directed via special bends through a deep shaft and along the tunnel, one upstream and one downstream. Each feeds approximately 1.25 km of linac with power tapped off in 10 MW portions at 38 m intervals. The power is extracted through a novel coaxial tap-off (CTO), after which the local distribution is as it would be from a klystron. The tap-off design is also employed in reverse for the initial combining.

  17. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-11-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band (~8-12 GHz) through Ka band (~ 30-35 GHz) frequency regions. Provided that further prototyping shows stable beam propagation with minimal current loss and production of good quality, high-power rf fields, this technology is compatible with current schemes for electron-positron colliders in the multi-TeV center-of-mass scale. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split-operation algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 input, gain, and output rv cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable, and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficient capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beamline. Additional experimental efforts are also

  18. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-11-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band (~8-12 GHz) through Ka band (~ 30-35 GHz) frequency regions. Provided that further prototyping shows stable beam propagation with minimal current loss and production of good quality, high-power rf fields, this technology is compatible with current schemes for electron-positron colliders in the multi-TeV center-of-mass scale. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split-operation algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 input, gain, and output rv cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable, and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficient capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beamline. Additional experimental efforts are also

  19. 400mW output power at 445 nm with narrowband emission from an external cavity diode laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhnke, Norman; Müller, André; Eppich, Bernd; Maiwald, Martin; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2015-03-01

    Recently, high-power broad-area laser diodes based on GaN with output powers beyond 1 W have become available. However, their broad spectral emission limits their applicability. Due to a lack of internal grating technology for GaN devices, narrowband emission with several hundreds of milliwatts in the blue-green spectral range has not been achieved with laser diodes thus far. In this work, a high-power external cavity diode laser (ECDL) system at 445 nm is presented. The system is based on a commercially available broad-area GaN laser diode and a surface diffraction grating in Littrow configuration for optical feedback. Using this configuration an output power of 400 mW with a reduced spectral emission bandwidth of 20 pm (FWHM) with a side-mode suppression ratio larger than 40 dB is obtained. With the above presented optical output power and narrowband laser emission at 445 nm, the ECDL is well suited as a pump light source for nonlinear frequency conversion into the deep ultraviolet spectral range.

  20. IKE: An interactive klystron evaluation program for SLAC linear collider klystron performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kleban, S.D.; Koontz, R.F.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1987-03-01

    When the new 65 MW klystrons for the SLC were planned, a computer based interlock and data recording system was implemented in the general electronics upgrade. Significant klystron operating parameters are interlocked and displayed in the SLC central control room through the VAX control computer. A program titled ''IKE'' has been written to record klystron operating data each day, store the data in a database, and provide various sorted operating and statistical information to klystron engineers, and maintenance personnel in the form of terminal listings, bar graphs, and special printed reports. This paper gives an overview of the IKE system, describes its use as a klystron maintenance tool, and explains why it is valuable to klystron engineers.

  1. Waveguide harmonic damper for klystron amplifier.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.

    1998-10-27

    A waveguide harmonic damper was designed for removing the harmonic frequency power from the klystron amplifiers of the APS linac. Straight coaxial probe antennas are used in a rectangular waveguide to form a damper. A linear array of the probe antennas is used on a narrow wall of the rectangular waveguide for damping klystron harmonics while decoupling the fundamental frequency in dominent TE{sub 01} mode. The klystron harmonics can exist in the waveguide as waveguide higher-order modes above cutoff. Computer simulations are made to investigate the waveguide harmonic damping characteristics of the damper.

  2. Relativistic klystron research for high gradient accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.

    1988-06-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron--positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our first klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Relativistic klystron research for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.

    1988-09-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron-positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200 MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our relativistic klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Reliability and lifetime predictions of SLC klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Lee, T.G.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1989-03-01

    The energy upgrade of SLAC, with the first of the new 67 MW SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) klystrons, began over four years ago. Today there are over 200 of these klystrons in operation. As a result, there is a wealth klystron performance and failure information that enables reasonable predictions to be made on life expectancy and reliability. Data from initial tests, follow-up tests and daily operation monitoring on the accelerator is stores for analysis. Presented here are life expectancy predictions with particular emphasis on cathode life. Also, based on this data, we will discuss some of the principal modes of failure. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Simulation of traveling-wave output structures for high power rf tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-04-01

    Travelling wave output structures can in principle provide higher efficiency and lower surface gradients than a single output cavity. We discuss simulations of TW structures designed for X-band klystrons to be used in the SLAC NLC. The PIC Code CONDOR calculated efficiency over 50 percent for one such circuit. When the circuit was built in the SLAC XC7 klystron, the match was so poor that it had to be modified. When tested, the tube produced less than half the efficiency calculated. We subsequently found significant differences between the field distribution calculated by CONDOR versus that from the 3-D code MAFIA. We have now developed a procedure which gives much better agreement between the 2D and 3-D models. We use a {pi}/2 disk-loaded structure, with the waveguide coupling to an output cavity through an iris, rather than directly to the drift tube as in the XC7. The disk radii are tapered to produce an approximately constant gradient. The output coupling is adjusted to match to a uniform structure replicating the cell before the waveguide. The simulations predict 75 MW, 49 percent efficiency, with peak surface fields of 73 MV/m. from a 440 kV, 350 amp beam at 11.424 GHz.

  6. Tuning range and output power optimization of an external-cavity GaN diode laser at 455  nm.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mingjun; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-03-20

    In this paper we discuss how different feedback gratings affect the tuning range and the output power of external feedback diode laser systems. A tunable high-power narrow-spectrum external-cavity diode laser system around 455 nm is investigated. The laser system is based on a high-power GaN diode laser in a Littrow external-cavity. Both a holographic diffraction grating and a ruled diffraction grating are used as feedback elements in the external cavity. The output power, spectral bandwidth, and tunable range of the external cavity diode laser system are measured and compared with the two gratings at different injected currents. When the holographic grating is used, the laser system can be tuned over a range of 1.4 nm with an output power around 530 mW. When the ruled grating is used, the laser system can be tuned over a range of 6.0 nm with an output power around 80 mW. The results can be used as a guide for selecting gratings for external-cavity diode lasers for different requirements.

  7. Ultrasensitive near-infrared integrated cavity output spectroscopy technique for detection of CO at 1.57 μm: new sensitivity limits for absorption measurements in passive optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Gregory S.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Keutsch, Frank N.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Anderson, James G.

    2006-12-01

    A robust absorption spectrometer using the off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) technique in a passive cavity is presented. The observed sensitivity, conceptually the detection threshold for the absorption cross section (cm2) multiplied by the concentration (cm-3) and normalized by the averaging time, is measured to be 1.9×10-12 (1/cm√Hz). This high sensitivity arises from using the optical cavity to amplify the observed path length in the spectrometer while avoiding cavity resonances by careful design of the spot pattern within the cavity. The instrument is ideally suited for routine monitoring of trace gases in the near-infrared region. A spectrum showing ambient carbon monoxide at 1.57 μm is presented.

  8. Relativistic klystron research at SLAC and LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Morton, P.L.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Schwarz, H.D.; Takeuchi, Y.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.; Hopkins, D.B.; Sessler, A.M.; Barletta, W.A.; Birx, D.L.; Boyd, J.K.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We are developing relativistic klystrons as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications such as large linear electron-positron colliders and compact accelerators. We have attained 200 MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here briefly on our experiments so far. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. X-BAND KLYSTRON DEVELOPMENT AT SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, Arnold E.; /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    The development of X-band klystrons at SLAC originated with the idea of building an X-band Linear Collider in the late 1980's. Since then much effort has been expended in developing a reliable X-band Power source capable of delivering >50 MW RF power in pulse widths >1.5 {micro}s. I will report on some of the technical issues and design strategies which have led to the current SLAC klystron designs.

  10. Design And Construction of a W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Scheitrum, G.; /SLAC

    2006-02-14

    The design and construction of a 100 kW peak power, 2% duty, PCM focused, Wband sheet beam klystron is discussed. The elliptical cross section beam is produced by a new electron gun design using a cylindrical cathode and a racetrack shaped focus electrode. The multi-gap cavities produce acceptable values of R/Q and are designed to produce a uniform electric field over the width of the 12:1 aspect ratio beam. The prototype cavities are produced using normal machining however, LIGA will be used to fabricate the cavities in production versions.

  11. 1995 second modulator-klystron workshop: A modulator-klystron workshop for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This second workshop examined the present state of modulator design and attempted an extrapolation for future electron-positron linear colliders. These colliders are currently viewed as multikilometer-long accelerators consisting of a thousand or more RF sources with 500 to 1,000, or more, pulsed power systems. The workshop opened with two introductory talks that presented the current approaches to designing these linear colliders, the anticipated RF sources, and the design constraints for pulse power. The cost of main AC power is a major economic consideration for a future collider, consequently the workshop investigated efficient modulator designs. Techniques that effectively apply the art of power conversion, from the AC mains to the RF output, and specifically, designs that generate output pulses with very fast rise times as compared to the flattop. There were six sessions that involved one or more presentations based on problems specific to the design and production of thousands of modulator-klystron stations, followed by discussion and debate on the material.

  12. Increasing output power of an 850 MHz tetrode with a floating-deck modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, D.; Friedrichs, C.

    1990-01-01

    Designers of high-power amplifiers generally regard the region above 300 MHz as a domain dominated by velocity-modulated (klystron/TWT) devices. However, as the power requirements diminish, there are attractive alternatives. The high-power 850-MHz requirements of the ground test accelerator (GTA) program can be filled by 1-MW klystrons, but it would be more efficient to use a lower-power device for a 50-kW requirement. To meet the 850-MHz medium-power requirements, Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing an 850-MHz tetrode amplifier. These amplifiers will provide rf power to the momentum compactor and bunch rotator cavities of the GTA. Available tubes provide only a limited safety margin for a low-risk design at the power levels and duty factor required for GTA cavities. At 850 MHz, the output power capability of available tubes is reduced because of transit time effects and limited anode voltage holdoff. Pulsing the anode of the output tetrode amplifier will allow higher output power with minimum design risk. A floating-deck modulator acts as a high-voltage/high-current switch, so voltage is applied to the anode of the gridded tube only during the rf pulse. The anode voltage holdoff capability of the tube is substantially enhanced by operating in this mode. This paper will describe the design of the floating deck modulator and its impact on the design risk of the 850-MHz tetrode amplifier.

  13. Optimization,Modeling, and Control: Applications to Klystron Designing and Hepatitis C Virus Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lankford, George Bernard

    In this dissertation, we address applying mathematical and numerical techniques in the fields of high energy physics and biomedical sciences. The first portion of this thesis presents a method for optimizing the design of klystron circuits. A klystron is an electron beam tube lined with cavities that emit resonant frequencies to velocity modulate electrons that pass through the tube. Radio frequencies (RF) inserted in the klystron are amplified due to the velocity modulation of the electrons. The routine described in this work automates the selection of cavity positions, resonant frequencies, quality factors, and other circuit parameters to maximize the efficiency with required gain. The method is based on deterministic sampling methods. We will describe the procedure and give several examples for both narrow and wide band klystrons, using the klystron codes AJDISK (Java) and TESLA (Python). The rest of the dissertation is dedicated to developing, calibrating and using a mathematical model for hepatitis C dynamics with triple drug combination therapy. Groundbreaking new drugs, called direct acting antivirals, have been introduced recently to fight off chronic hepatitis C virus infection. The model we introduce is for hepatitis C dynamics treated with the direct acting antiviral drug, telaprevir, along with traditional interferon and ribavirin treatments to understand how this therapy affects the viral load of patients exhibiting different types of response. We use sensitivity and identifiability techniques to determine which parameters can be best estimated from viral load data. We use these estimations to give patient-specific fits of the model to partial viral response, end-of-treatment response, and breakthrough patients. We will then revise the model to incorporate an immune response dynamic to more accurately describe the dynamics. Finally, we will implement a suboptimal control to acquire a drug treatment regimen that will alleviate the systemic cost

  14. In situ measurement of dissolved methane and carbon dioxide in freshwater ecosystems by off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Valencia, Rodrigo; Magana-Rodriguez, Felipe; Gerardo-Nieto, Oscar; Sepulveda-Jauregui, Armando; Martinez-Cruz, Karla; Anthony, Katey Walter; Baer, Doug; Thalasso, Frederic

    2014-10-07

    A novel low-cost method for the combined, real-time, and in situ determination of dissolved methane and carbon dioxide concentrations in freshwater ecosystems was designed and developed. This method is based on the continuous sampling of water from a freshwater ecosystem to a gas/liquid exchange membrane. Dissolved gas is transferred through the membrane to a continuous flow of high purity nitrogen, which is then measured by an off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer (OA-ICOS). This method, called M-ICOS, was carefully tested in a laboratory and was subsequently applied to four lakes in Mexico and Alaska with contrasting climates, ecologies, and morphologies. The M-ICOS method allowed for the determination of dissolved methane and carbon dioxide concentrations with a frequency of 1 Hz and with a method detection limit of 2.76 × 10(-10) mol L(-1) for methane and 1.5 × 10(-7) mol L(-1) for carbon dioxide. These detection limits are below saturated concentrations with respect to the atmosphere and significantly lower than the minimum concentrations previously reported in lakes. The method is easily operable by a single person from a small boat, and the small size of the suction probe allows the determination of dissolved gases with a minimized impact on shallow freshwater ecosystems.

  15. Design study of longitudinal dynamics of the drive beam in 1 TeV relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Yu, S.S.; Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    In this paper the authors present a design study on the longitudinal dynamics of a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) scheme which has been proposed as a power source candidate for a 1 TeV next linear collider (NLC). They address the issue of maintaining stable power output at desired level for a 300-m long TBA with 150 extraction cavities and present their simulation results to demonstrate that it can be achieved by inductively detuning the extraction cavities to counter the space charge debunching effect on the drive beam. They then carry out simulation study to show that the beam bunches desired by the RK-TBA can be efficiently obtained by first chopping an initially uniform beam of low energy into a train of beam bunches with modest longitudinal dimension and then using the {open_quotes}adiabatic capture{close_quotes} scheme to bunch and accelerate these beam bunches into tight bunches at the operating energy of the drive beam. The authors have also examined the {open_quotes}after burner{close_quotes} scheme which is implemented in their RK-TBA design for efficiency enhancement.

  16. Development of a 402.5 MHz 140 kW Inductive Output Tube

    SciTech Connect

    R. Lawrence Ives; Michael Read, Robert Jackson

    2012-05-09

    This report contains the results of Phase I of an SBIR to develop a Pulsed Inductive Output Tube (IOT) with 140 kW at 400 MHz for powering H-proton beams. A number of sources, including single beam and multiple beam klystrons, can provide this power, but the IOT provides higher efficiency. Efficiencies exceeding 70% are routinely achieved. The gain is typically limited to approximately 24 dB; however, the availability of highly efficient, solid state drivers reduces the significance of this limitation, particularly at lower frequencies. This program initially focused on developing a 402 MHz IOT; however, the DOE requirement for this device was terminated during the program. The SBIR effort was refocused on improving the IOT design codes to more accurately simulate the time dependent behavior of the input cavity, electron gun, output cavity, and collector. Significant improvement was achieved in modeling capability and simulation accuracy.

  17. Pulse modulator developments in support of klystron testing at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.F.; Cassel, R.; de Lamare, J.; Ficklin, D.; Gold, S.; Harris, K.

    1993-04-01

    Several families of high power klystrons in S- and X-Band are being developed in the Klystron Laboratory at SLAC. To support these developments, a number of new pulse modulators are being designed from scratch, or upgraded from existing laboratory test modulators. This paper outlines the modulator parameters available in the SLAC Klystron Laboratory, and discusses two new modulators that are under construction.

  18. Validation of the doubly labeled water method using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Edward L; Swibas, Tracy; Kohrt, Wendy M; Catenacci, Vicki A; Creasy, Seth A; Plasqui, Guy; Wouters, Loek; Speakman, John R; Berman, Elena S F

    2017-10-03

    When the doubly-labeled water (DLW) method is used to measure total daily energy expenditure (TDEE), isotope measurements are typically performed using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). New technologies, such as off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) provide comparable isotopic measurements of standard waters and human urine samples, but the accuracy of carbon dioxide production (VCO2) determined with OA-ICOS has not been demonstrated. We compared simultaneous measurement of VCO2 obtained using whole-room indirect calorimetry (IC) with DLW-based measurements from IRMS and OA-ICOS. 17 subjects (10 female; 22 to 63 yrs.) were studied for 7 consecutive days in the IC. Subjects consumed a dose of 0.25 g H2(18)O (95% APE) and 0.14 g (2)H2O (99.8% APE) per kg of total body water, and urine samples were obtained on days 1 and 8 to measure average daily VCO2 using OA-ICOS and IRMS. VCO2 was calculated using both the plateau and intercept methods. There were no differences in VCO2 or TDEE measured by OA-ICOS or IRMS compared with IC when the plateau method was used. When the intercept method was used, VCO2 measured using OA-ICOS did not differ from IC, but VCO2 measured using IRMS was significantly lower than IC. Accuracy (~1-5%), precision (~8%), intraclass correlation coefficients (R=0.87-90), and root mean squared error (30-40 L/day) of VCO22 measured by OA-ICOS and IRMS were similar. Both OA-ICOS and IRMS produced measurements of VCO2 with comparable accuracy and precision when compared to IC. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism.

  19. Recent progress in relativistic klystron research

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, T.L.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Aalberts, D.P.; Boyd, J.K.; Houck, T.; Ryne, R.D.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.; Hopkins, D.B.; Sessler, A.M.; Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US

    1989-08-01

    Experimental work is now under way by collaborators at LLNL, SLAC, and LBL to investigate relativistic klystrons as a possible rf power source for future high-gradient accelerators. We have learned how to overcome our previously reported problem of high-power rf pulse shortening and have achieved peak rf power levels of 290 MW. We have used the rf from a relativistic klystron to power a short, 11.4-GHz high-gradient accelerator. The measured momentum spectrum of the accelerated electron beam corresponds to an accelerating gradient of 84 MV/m. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  20. A 75 MW S-Band Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Patrick; Read, Michael; Ives, Robert Lawrence; Marsden, David

    2013-12-16

    This program performed computational and preliminary mechanical design for a klystron producing 75 MW at 2.856 GHz using periodic permanent magnet (PPM) focusing. The performance specifications achieved were those for the Matter-Radiation Interactions in the Extremes (MaRIE) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The klystron is designed to provide 10 microsecond pulses at 60 Hz with 56 dB gain. The PPM-Focusing eliminates requirements for solenoids and their associated power supplies, cooling systems, interlocks, control and diagnostic instrumentation, and maintenance. The represents a significant in both acquisition and operating costs. It also increases reliability by eliminating many potential failure modes.

  1. Measuring hourly 18O and 2H fluxes in a mixed hardwood forest using an integrated cavity output spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Caylor, K.; Dragoni, D.

    2008-12-01

    The 18O and 2H of water vapor can be used to investigate couplings between biological processes (e.g., photosynthesis or transpiration) and hydrologic processes (e.g., evaporation) and therefore serve as powerful tracers in hydrological cycles. A typical method for determining δ18O and δ2H fluxes in landscapes is a 'Keeling Plot' approach, which uses field-collected vapor samples coupled with a traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometer to infer the isotopic composition of evapotranspiration. However, fractionation accompanying inefficient vapor trapping can lead to large measurement uncertainty and the intensive laboring involved in cold-trap make it almost impossible for continuous measurements. Over the last 3-4 years a few groups have developed continuous approaches for measuring δ18O and δ2H that use laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) to achieve accuracy levels similar to lab-based mass spectrometry methods. Unfortunately, most LAS systems need cryogenic cooling, constant calibration to a reference gas, and substantial power requirements, which make them unsuitable for long-term field deployment at remote field sites. In this research, we tested out a new LAS--based water vapor isotope analyzer (WVIA, Los Gatos Research, Inc, Mountain View, CA) based on Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (ICOS) and coupled this instrument with a flux gradient system. The WVIA was calibrated bi- weekly using a dew point generator and water with known δ18O and δ2H signatures. The field work was performed at Morgan-Monroe State Forest Ameriflux tower site (central Indiana) between August 8 and August 27, 2008. The combination method was able to produce hourly δ18O and δ2H fluxes data with reproducibility similar to lab-based mass spectrometry methods. Such high temporal resolution data were also able to capture signatures of canopy and bare soil evaporation to individual rainfall events. The use of the ICOS water vapor analyzer within a gradient system has the

  2. A compact and stable eddy covariance set-up for methane measurements using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, D. M. D.; Dolman, A. J.; van der Molen, M. K.; van Huissteden, J.

    2008-01-01

    A Fast Methane Analyzer (FMA) is assessed for its applicability in a closed path eddy covariance field set-up in a peat meadow. The FMA uses off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy combined with a highly specific narrow band laser for the detection of CH4 and strongly reflective mirrors to obtain a laser path length of 2-20×103 m. Statistical testing and a calibration experiment showed high precision (7.8×10-3 ppb) and accuracy (<0.30%) of the instrument, while no drift was observed. The instrument response time was determined to be 0.10 s. In the field set-up, the FMA is attached to a scroll pump and combined with a 3-axis ultrasonic anemometer and an open path infrared gas analyzer for measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapour. The power-spectra and co-spectra of the instruments were satisfactory for 10 Hz sampling rates. Due to erroneous measurements, spikes and periods of low turbulence the data series consisted for 26% of gaps. Observed CH4 fluxes consisted mainly of emission, showed a diurnal cycle, but were rather variable over. The average CH4 emission was 29.7 nmol m-2 s-1, while the typical maximum CH4 emission was approximately 80.0 nmol m-2 s-1 and the typical minimum flux was approximately 0.0 nmol m-2 s-1. The correspondence of the measurements with flux chamber measurements in the footprint was good and the observed CH4 emission rates were comparable with eddy covariance CH4 measurements in other peat areas. Additionally, three measurement techniques with lower sampling frequencies were simulated, which might give the possibility to measure CH4 fluxes without an external pump and save energy. Disjunct eddy covariance appeared to be the most reliable substitute for 10 Hz eddy covariance, while relaxed eddy accumulation gave reliable estimates of the fluxes over periods in the order of days or weeks.

  3. Retrofitting the 5045 Klystron for Higher Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Aaron; Fazio, Michael; Haase, Andy; Jongewaard, Erik; Kemp, Mark; Neilson, Jeff

    2015-04-15

    The 5045 klystron has been in production and accelerating particles at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for over 25 years. Although the design has undergone some changes there are still significant opportunities for improvement in performance. Retrofitting the 5045 for higher efficiencies and a more mono-energetic spent beam profile is presented.

  4. CALCULATION OF POTENTIAL DEPRESSION IN KLYSTRON GAPS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A calculation in cylindrical geometry for the potential depression in klystron gaps is pre sented. The results of this calculation, which takes into...account the mutual effect of depressed potential and increased charge density, is in the form of a series involving Bessel functions of imaginary

  5. High-Efficiency Klystron For Television Transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramins, Peter; Dayton, James; Mccune, Earl, Sr.; Kosmahl, Henry

    1990-01-01

    Improved klystron designed for use as final amplifier in ultrahigh-frequency (UHF) television transmitter. New device incorporates multistage depressed collector (MSDC) of advanced design to increase efficiency by recovering, from spent electron beam, some of residual kinetic energy otherwise dissipated as heat. Concept applied to increase efficiencies of microwave communication, equipment, radar systems, and particle-beam accelerators.

  6. Klystron control software in the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, R.K.; Thompson, K.; Phinney, N.

    1985-05-01

    Triggering, control, and monitoring of 240 high-power klystrons will be supported by the SLC control system this summer. The control software is distributed among a VAX host computer, a local microprocessor cluster, and a dedicated intelligent CAMAC module. The functions performed by these three components and the algorithms used are discussed.

  7. High-Efficiency Klystron For Television Transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramins, Peter; Dayton, James; Mccune, Earl, Sr.; Kosmahl, Henry

    1990-01-01

    Improved klystron designed for use as final amplifier in ultrahigh-frequency (UHF) television transmitter. New device incorporates multistage depressed collector (MSDC) of advanced design to increase efficiency by recovering, from spent electron beam, some of residual kinetic energy otherwise dissipated as heat. Concept applied to increase efficiencies of microwave communication, equipment, radar systems, and particle-beam accelerators.

  8. Design of a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.; Caporaso, G.; Chen, Y.

    1995-10-01

    We are designing an experiment to study physics, engineering, and costing issues of an extended Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA). The experiment is a prototype for an RK-TBA based microwave power source suitable for driving a 1 TeV linear collider. Major components of the experiment include a 2.5-MV, 1.5-kA electron source, a 11.4-GHz modulator, a bunch compressor, and a 8-m extraction section. The extraction section will be comprised of 4 traveling-wave output structures, each generating about 360 MW of rf power. Induction cells will be used in the extraction section to maintain the average beam energy at 5 MeV. Status of the design is presented.

  9. Design of a relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.; Caporaso, G.; Chen, Y.; Houck, T.; Yu, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Henestroza, E.; Li, H.; Peters, C.; Reginato, L.; Sessler, Andrew M.

    1995-04-01

    We are designing an experiment to study physics, engineering, and costing issues of an extended Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA). The experiment is a prototype for an RK-TBA based microwave power source suitable for driving a 1 TeV linear collider. Major components of the experiment include a 2.5-MV, 1.5-kA electron source, a 11.4-GHz modulator, a bunch compressor, and a 8-m extraction section. The extraction section will be comprised of 4 traveling-wave output structures, each generating about 360 MW of rf power. Induction cells will be used in the extraction section to maintain the average beam energy at 5 MeV. Status of the design is presented.

  10. Investigation of an X-band gigawatt long pulse multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Lei, Lurong; Jin, Xiao; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Ganping; He, Hu; Wu, Yao; Ge, Yi; Yuan, Huan; Chen, Zhaofu

    2015-09-01

    To achieve a gigawatt-level long pulse radiation power in X-band, a multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is proposed and studied experimentally. By introducing 18 electron drift tubes and extended interaction cavities, the power capacity of the device is increased. A radiation power of 1.23 GW with efficiency of 41% and amplifier gain of 46 dB is obtained in the particle-in-cell simulation. Under conditions of a 10 Hz repeat frequency and an input RF power of 30 kW, a radiation power of 0.9 GW, frequency of 9.405 GHz, pulse duration of 105 ns, and efficiency of 30% is generated in the experiment, and the amplifier gain is about 45 dB. Both the simulation and the experiment prove that the multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier can generate a long pulse GW-level radiation power in X-band.

  11. Lasing-Polarization-Dependent Output from Orthogonal Waveguides in High-Index-Contrast Subwavelength Grating Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunemi, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2013-09-01

    We propose a high-index-contrast subwavelength grating vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (HCG-VCSEL) incorporating a polarization-independent HCG coupled with two orthogonal in-plane output waveguides and numerically investigate the optical output characteristics from the waveguides using a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method. The light coupled more strongly to the waveguide in the direction perpendicular to the polarization of the resonant mode than to that in the parallel direction. The extinction ratio between the waveguides was 11.9, indicating that the output waveguide can be switched by changing the lasing polarization. The propagating modes in the strongly and weakly coupled waveguides were the TE and TM modes, respectively.

  12. Use of simple x-ray measurement in the performance analysis of cryogenic RF accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    D. Dotson; M. Drury; R. May; C. Reece

    1996-10-01

    X-ray emission by radiofrequency (RF) resonant cavities has long been known to accelerator health physicists as a potentially serious source of radiation exposure. The authors points out the danger of klystrons and microwave cavities by stating that the radiation source term is erratic and may be unpredictable depending on microscopic surface conditions which change with time. He also states the x-ray output is a rapidly increasing function of RF input power. At Jefferson Lab, the RF cavities used to accelerate the electron beam employ superconducting technology. X-rays are emitted at high cavity gradients, and measurements of cavity x-rays are valuable for health physics purposes and provide a useful diagnostic tool for assessing cavity performance. The quality factor (Q) for superconducting RF resonant cavities used at Jefferson Lab, is typically 5 x 10{sup 9} for the nominal design gradient of 5 MVm{sup {minus}1}. This large value for Q follows from the small resistive loss in superconducting technology. The operating frequency is 1,497 MHz. In the absence of beam, the input power for a cavity is typically 750 W and the corresponding dissipated power is 2.6 W. At 5 MWm{sup {minus}1}, the input power is 3 kW fully beam loaded. At higher gradients, performance degradation tends to occur due to the onset of electron field emission from defects in the cavity.

  13. Electron Gun For Multiple Beam Klystron Using Magnetic Focusing

    DOEpatents

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Miram, George; Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2004-07-27

    An RF device comprising a plurality of drift tubes, each drift tube having a plurality of gaps defining resonant cavities, is immersed in an axial magnetic field. RF energy is introduced at an input RF port at one of these resonant cavities and collected at an output RF port at a different RF cavity. A plurality of electron beams passes through these drift tubes, and each electron beam has an individual magnetic shaping applied which enables confined beam transport through the drift tubes.

  14. Highly-efficient continuous-wave intra-cavity frequency-doubled Yb:LuAG thin-disk laser with 1 kW of output power.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Tom; Piehler, Stefan; Rumpel, Martin; Villeval, Philippe; Lupinski, Dominique; Abdou-Ahmed, Marwan; Graf, Thomas

    2017-03-06

    We report on the generation of continuous-wave, intra-cavity frequency-doubled, multi-mode laser radiation in an Yb:LuAG thin-disk laser. Output powers of up to 1 kW at a wavelength of 515 nm were achieved at an unprecedented optical efficiency of 51.6% with respect to the pumping power of the thin-disk laser. The wavelength stabilization and spectral narrowing as well as the polarization selection, which is necessary for a stable and efficient second-harmonic generation, was achieved by the integration of a diffraction grating into the dielectric end mirror of the cavity, which exhibits a diffraction efficiency of 99.8%. At a frequency-doubled output power of 820 W the peak-to-valley power fluctuations measured during 100 minutes of laser operation amounted to only 8.2 W (1.0%). The beam parameter product of the frequency-doubled output was 3.4 mm·mrad (M2 ≈ 20), which is suitable for standard beam delivery using fibers with a core diameter of 100 µm and a NA of 0.2.

  15. Environmental influences contributing to window failure of the SLAC 50 MW klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Krienen, F.

    1984-03-01

    The additional heating of the klystron window is due to the intense x-ray level, produced inside the klystron, illuminating the entrance of the output wave guide. Photo-electric effect, although of low efficiency, produces enough electrons at the right location and right phase to start multipactor, which progresses with increasing intensity towards the window. The intercepted charge and the concomitant x-radiation heat the window, but the heating is not the cause of the breakdown per se. The accumulated charge on the window creates electric stress, which comes in addition to the RF stress. It could therefore be a major cause of electrical breakdown. The coating, which is intended to carry this charge off, should have a relaxation time constant small compared to the pulse duration. Unfortunately the coating can not be made conducting enough because it conflicts with the Joule heating in the RF field.

  16. Suppression of beam induced pulse shortening modes in high power RF generator TW output structures

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.

    1992-12-31

    Several different style 11.4 GHz relativistic klystrons, operating with beam pulse widths of 50 ns and using large aperture, tapered phase-velocity TW structures,` have recently demonstrated output RF power levels in the range of 100 to 300 MW without breakdown or pulse shortening. To extend this performance into the long pulse regime (1 {mu}s) or to demonstrate a threefold increase in output power by using higher currents, the existing TW circuit designs must be modified (a) to reduce the cavity maximum surface E-fields by a factor of 2 to 3, and (b) to elevate the current threshold values of the beam induced higher order modes (HOM) to ensure avoidance of RF pulse shortening and associated instabilities. A technique for substantially elevating this threshold current is described, and microwave data and photographs are presented showing the degree of HOM damping achieved in a recently constructed 11.4 GHz TW structure.

  17. Automation of CO 2 laser output power measurement as a function of the absorber gas pressure in a cell located inside or outside the laser cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, C.; Aghabi, S.

    2011-04-01

    The automation of CO 2 laser output power measurement is discussed in this paper as a function of the absorber gas pressure in a cell located inside or outside the laser cavity. A manually tunable laser was used which can be operated in one of about 44 different laser lines aligned by the user and registered respectively by the acquisition program for further analysis. The voltages representing the absorber gas pressure and the output power were very small (a few hundred μV), therefore a proper voltage amplification circuit was designed to amplify the analog outputs of both the pressure meter and the laser output power meter. These amplified signals were then applied directly to a PCI-9112 ADLINK data acquisition card using a personal computer (PC). A suitable controlling program using LabVIEW graphical programming language was written to measure the pressure and laser power signals, draw the relationship between them and save the results for later processing and analysis; such as, gas absorbance coefficient α, mean absorption cross section σ calculations that can be applied in many areas such as molecular spectroscopy and environmental pollution studies.

  18. Extremely sensitive detection of NO₂ employing off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy coupled with multiple-line integrated absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Gottipaty N; Karpf, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    We report on the development of a new sensor for NO₂ with ultrahigh sensitivity of detection. This has been accomplished by combining off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) (which can provide large path lengths of the order of several kilometers in a small volume cell) with multiple-line integrated absorption spectroscopy (MLIAS) (where we integrate the absorption spectra over a large number of rotational-vibrational transitions of the molecular species to further improve the sensitivity). Employing an external cavity quantum cascade laser operating in the 1601-1670 cm⁻¹ range and a high-finesse optical cavity, the absorption spectra of NO₂ over 100 transitions in the R band have been recorded. From the observed linear relationship between the integrated absorption versus concentration of NO₂ and the standard deviation of the integrated absorption signal, we report an effective sensitivity of detection of approximately 28 ppt (parts in 10¹²) for NO₂ To the best of our knowledge, this is among the most sensitive levels of detection of NO₂ to date.

  19. Design of a 50 MW klystron at X-band

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, E.; Callin, R.; Caryotakis, G.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of the XL-1 klystron; a 50 MW klystron operating at a frequency of 11.424 GHz for use on the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA). Problems associated with the development of high-power rf sources for NLC, and the solutions implemented on XL-1 are discussed.

  20. Beam dynamics studies for the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.

    2001-06-22

    Two-beam accelerators based upon relativistic klystron s (RK s) have been proposed as power sources for future generation linear electron-positron colliders. These drivers are known to suffer from several transverse beam break-up (BBU) instabilities. A program to study a particular technique (the betatron node scheme ) for ameliorating the high frequency BBU is under way at LBNL. Central to this study are the pillbox RF cavities and RF beam position monitors (BPM s) employed. This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of the RF components. Performance details during operation are also discussed.

  1. Computer aided design of three-dimensional waveguide loaded cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Yu, D.U.L.

    1989-02-01

    We have developed two simple methods to calculate the power transport through an external waveguide of a loaded cavity utilizing the RF parameters obtained from the frequency domain codes. In the first method the external power loss through an open waveguide is expressed in terms of equivalent circuit coupling parameters between a closed waveguide and a cavity to which it is connected. As we shall see, this equivalent circuit approach is limited in it applicability only to structures with high loaded Q values, say Q/sub L/ < 200. In the second method, the power flow through an external waveguide is calculated from an analysis of the electromagnetic field components of the standing waves in the closed waveguide-cavity structure. Our models make use of the MAFIA code to obtain values of structural parameters and fields when an external waveguide is abruptly terminated with a metal surface. A typical model consists of an output cavity attached via an iris to a short waveguide section ended with a conducting cap. Our methodologies of calculating the loaded Q/sub L/ in terms of the parameters of the closed waveguide-cavity model are described in the following sections. We have obtained reasonable and encouraging results for several loaded cavities whose values of Q/sub L/ have been experimentally measured. Of particular interest is the application to low-Q structures such as the relativistic klystron output cavities. The electromagnetic field method yields good agreement with experimental measurements. This method has also been successfully applied to high gradient accelerating structures with slots for damping out higher modes as recently proposed by Palmer. 5 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Computer aided design of three-dimensional waveguide loaded cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goren, Yehuda; Yu, David U. L.

    1989-02-01

    We have developed two simple methods to calculate the power transport through an external waveguide of a loaded cavity utilizing the RF parameters obtained from the frequency domain codes. In the first method the external power loss through an open waveguide is expressed in terms of equivalent circuit coupling parameters between a closed waveguide and a cavity to which it is connected. As we shall see, this equivalent circuit approach is limited in it applicability only to structures with high loaded Q values, say Q(sub L) less than 200. In the second method, the power flow through an external waveguide is calculated from an analysis of the electromagnetic field components of the standing waves in the closed waveguide-cavity structure. Our models make use of the MAFIA code to obtain values of structural parameters and fields when an external waveguide is abruptly terminated with a metal surface. A typical model consists of an output cavity attached via an iris to a short waveguide section ended with a conducting cap. Our methodologies of calculating the loaded Q(sub L) in terms of the parameters of the closed waveguide-cavity model are described in the following sections. We have obtained reasonable and encouraging results for several loaded cavities whose values of Q(sub L) have been experimentally measured. Of particular interest is the application to low-Q structures such as the relativistic klystron output cavities. The electromagnetic field method yields good agreement with experimental measurements. This method has also been successfully applied to high gradient accelerating structures with slots for damping out higher modes as recently proposed by Palmer.

  3. The Klystron: A Microwave Source of Surprising Range and Endurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caryotakis, George

    1997-11-01

    The klystron first appeared as a milliwatt-level local oscillator in WWII radars. In less than a decade, it grew into a 30-MW source for the first linear collider at Stanford. The device soon became the high-power microwave source of choice for radar, space communications, and plasma heating. In physics research, it now powers most storage rings, linear accelerators and colliders. Now 60 years old, the klystron has demonstrated remarkable staying power. The development of sophisticated computer programs in the last 10 years has provided an additional quantum jump in performance. Computer codes are now used to design and predict with high accuracy the performance of modern klystrons. At Stanford, a 75-MW X-band klystron is being built with an electron beam focused by periodic permanent magnets. This is the source chosen to power a 1 TeV e+ e- collider, currently in the design stage by American and Japanese scientists. Based on commonly accepted rules of scaling, this is a 20/1 improvement over the klystrons that now power the Stanford Linear Collider. About 7,000 of the new klystrons will be required to power the future collider. In order to meet new, and even more demanding requirements, the latest developments in fabrication technology are being applied to klystron technology. In a concept stage at Stanford, is the most ambitious new klystron project to date, a modular design capable of producing megawatts of power at 92 GHz. In order to fabricate the RF circuitry of these tubes, LIGA, a deep-etch lithography technique is under investigation. Success in this new venture will make synchrotron radiation and semiconductor technology standard tools in the manufacture of millimeter-wave klystrons. The paper will discuss the basic physics of the klystron, outline its history, and describe the recent advances that are giving new life to the device.

  4. Design, construction and evaluation of a 12.2 GHz, 4.0 kW-CW high efficiency klystron amplifier. [for satellite-borne TV broadcast transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishida, J. M.; Brodersen, L. K.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program is described, for studying design techniques for optimizing the conversion efficiency of klystron amplifiers, and to utilize these techniques in the development and fabrication of an X-band 4 kW cw klystron, for use in satellite-borne television broadcast transmitters. The design is based on a technique for increasing the RF beam current by using the second harmonic space charge forces in the bunched beam. Experimental analysis was also made of a method to enhance circuit efficiency in the klystron cavities. The design incorporates a collector which is demountable from the tube to facilitate multistage depressed collector experiments employing an axisymmetric, electrostatic collector for linear beam microwave tubes.

  5. Design of the klystron filament power supply control system for EAST LHCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zege; Wang, Mao; Hu, Huaichuan; Ma, Wendong; Zhou, Taian; Zhou, Faxin; Liu, Fukun; Shan, Jiafang

    2016-09-01

    A filament is a critical component of the klystron used to heat the cathode. There are totally 44 klystrons in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) systems. All klystron filaments are powered by AC power suppliers through isolated transformers. In order to achieve better klystron preheat, a klystron filament power supply control system is designed to obtain the automatic control of all filament power suppliers. Klystron filament current is measured by PLC and the interlock between filament current and klystron high voltage system is also implemented. This design has already been deployed in two LHCD systems and proves feasible completely.

  6. Design of the klystron filament power supply control system for EAST LHCD

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zege; Wang, Mao; Hu, Huaichuan; Ma, Wendong; Zhou, Taian; Zhou, Faxin; Liu, Fukun; Shan, Jiafang

    2016-09-15

    A filament is a critical component of the klystron used to heat the cathode. There are totally 44 klystrons in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) systems. All klystron filaments are powered by AC power suppliers through isolated transformers. In order to achieve better klystron preheat, a klystron filament power supply control system is designed to obtain the automatic control of all filament power suppliers. Klystron filament current is measured by PLC and the interlock between filament current and klystron high voltage system is also implemented. This design has already been deployed in two LHCD systems and proves feasible completely.

  7. Inductive Output Tubes -- Status and Future Direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlen, Heinz

    2002-08-01

    Invented in 1938, at the same time as the klystron, it took the Inductive Output Tube (IOT) more than 40 years to surface as a useful device. Its progress after that event was rapid. Though plagued by teething problems in the beginning, it has since replaced the klystron as a TV amplifier in UHF, and it holds its own against the solid-state competition in that application. The IOT also shows much promise as a high-power amplifier, but early developments in this direction have remained solitary events so far. The paper discusses the causes and the potential of the device for future high-power applications.

  8. Nonlinear harmonic generation in distributed optical klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    H.P. Freund; George R. Neil

    2001-12-01

    A distributed optical klystron has the potential for dramatically shortening the total interaction length in high-gain free-electron lasers (INP 77-59, Novosibirsk, 1977; Nucl. Instr. and Meth A 304 (1991) 463) in comparison to a single-wiggler-segment configuration. This shortening can be even more dramatic if a nonlinear harmonic generation mechanism is used to reach the desired wavelength. An example operating at a 4.5{angstrom} fundamental and a 1.5{angstrom} harmonic is discussed.

  9. The klystron: A microwave source of surprising range and endurance

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.

    1998-04-01

    This year marks the 60th anniversary of the birth of the klystron at Stanford University. The tube was the first practical source of microwaves and its invention initiated a search for increasingly more powerful sources, which continues to this day. This paper reviews the scientific uses of the klystron and outlines its operating principles. The history of the device is traced, from its scientific beginnings, to its role in World War II and the Cold War, and to its current resurgence as the key component in a major accelerator project. Finally, the paper describes the development of a modular klystron, which may someday power future accelerators at millimeter wavelengths.

  10. Phase synchronization of multiple klystrons in RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, S.; Regan, A.; Wang, Y.M.; Rohlev, T.

    1998-12-31

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of the Acceleration Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. The first LEDA RF system includes three, 1.2 MW, 350 MHz, continuous wave, klystrons driving a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). A phase control loop is necessary for each individual klystron in order to guarantee the phase matching of these klystrons. To meet this objective, they propose adaptive PI controllers which are based on simple adaptive control. These controllers guarantee not only phase matching but also amplitude matching.

  11. Utilization of a Vircator to drive a High Power Relativistic Klystron Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardelle, J.; Bardy, J.; Cassany, B.; Desanlis, T.; Eyl, P.; Galtié, A.; Modin, P.; Voisin, L.; Balleyguier, P.; Gouard, P.; Donohue, J.

    2002-11-01

    At CESTA, we have been producing electron beams for some fifteen years by using induction accelerators and pulse diodes. First we had performed Frre-Electron Lasers experiments and we are currently studying the production of High-Power microwaves in the S-band. Among the possible sources we have chosen to perform Relativistic Klystron (RK) experiments with a pulse diode capable of generating a 700kV, 15 kA, 100 ns annular electron beam. In an amplifier configuration, we are testing the idea of using a Vircator as the driver for the first cavity of the klystron. This Vircator uses a simple electrical generator (Marx capacitor bank) which operates in the S-band in the GW class. By reducing the power level to about 100 MW, a 200 ns reliable and reproducible input driver pulse is obtained. First, we present the results of a preliminary experiment for which a coaxial cavity has been built in order to be fed by the Vircator emission at 2.45 GHz. Secondly, we give the experimental results in an oscillator configuration which corresponds to the fisrt step of our RK studies. Comparisons with the results of numerical simulations performed with MAGIC and MAFIA will be given for both experiments.

  12. Recent Upgrade of the Klystron Modulator at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.N.; Burkhart, C.P.; Lam, B.K.; Morris, B.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory employs 244 klystron modulators on its two-mile-long linear accelerator that has been operational since the early days of the SLAC establishment in the sixties. Each of these original modulators was designed to provide 250 kV, 262 A and 3.5 {mu}S at up to 360 pps using an inductance-capacitance resonant charging system, a modified type-E pulse-forming network (PFN), and a pulse transformer. The modulator internal control comprised of large step-start resistor-contactors, vacuum-tube amplifiers, and 120 Vac relays for logical signals. A major, power-component-only upgrade, which began in 1983 to accommodate the required beam energy of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) project, raised the modulator peak output capacity to 360 kV, 420 A and 5.0 {mu}S at a reduced pulse repetition rate of 120 pps. In an effort to improve safety, performance, reliability and maintainability of the modulator, this recent upgrade focuses on the remaining three-phase AC power input and modulator controls. The upgrade includes the utilization of primary SCR phase control rectifiers, integrated fault protection and voltage regulation circuitries, and programmable logic controllers (PLC) -- with an emphasis on component physical layouts for safety and maintainability concerns. In this paper, we will describe the design and implementation of each upgraded component in the modulator control system. We will also report the testing and present status of the modified modulators.

  13. Solid state modulator for klystron power supply XFEL TDS INJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavadtsev, A. A.; Zavadtsev, D. A.; Zybin, D. A.; Churanov, D. V.; Shemarykin, P. V.

    2016-09-01

    The transverse deflecting system XFEL TDS INJ for European X-ray Free Electron Laser includes power supply for the CPI VKS-8262HS klystron. It has been designed for pulse high-voltage, cathode heating, solenoid and klystron ion pump. The klystron power supply includes solid state modulator, pulse transformer, controlled power supply for cathode heating and commercial power supplies for solenoid and ion pump. Main parameters of the modulator are 110 kV of peak voltage, 72 A peak current, and pulse length up to 6 μs. The klystron power supply has been developed, designed, manufactured, tuned, tested and installed in the XFEL building. All designed parameters are satisfied.

  14. Engineering Features: Klystron Tubes and Utilidors Clear Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Engineering Features: Klystron Tubes and Utilidors - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  15. Optical Klystron Enhancement to SASE X-ray FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Emma, Paul; Huang, Zhirong; Kumar, Vinit

    2006-04-07

    The optical klystron enhancement to self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron lasers (FELs) is studied in theory and in simulations. In contrast to a seeded FEL, the optical klystron gain in a SASE FEL is not sensitive to any phase mismatch between the radiation and the microbunched electron beam. The FEL performance with the addition of four optical klystrons located at the undulator long breaks in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) shows significant improvement if the uncorrelated energy spread at the undulator entrance can be controlled to a very small level. In addition, FEL saturation at shorter x-ray wavelengths (around 1.0 A) within the LCLS undulator length becomes possible. We also discuss the application of the optical klystron in a compact x-ray FEL design that employs relatively low electron beam energy together with a shorter-period undulator.

  16. Technological Progress on Multi-Beam Klystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yaogen

    2006-01-01

    The technological progress on Multi-Beam Klystrons (MBKs) at the Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) is presented in this paper. Topics to be discussed include the development of cathodes with high current densities and low evaporation rates; multi-beam electron guns with reduced chances for breakdown; multi-beam electron optics systems with high beam transmission; RF systems with wide bandwidth and high efficiency; the oscillation and broad spectrum noise caused by non-operational modes and reflecting electrons; and computer simulations of the multi-beam electron optics system and beam-wave interaction. In addition, the research progress of several types of MBKs developed in IECAS is reported. These MBKs range in frequency from L- to X-band with corresponding peak powers ranging from several tens to several hundreds of kilowatts, average powers from several kilowatts to tens of kilowatts, and bandwidths from 3% to 12%.

  17. 66. Building 102, view of Klystron tubes located in test ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. Building 102, view of Klystron tubes located in test systems located at first floor level with top of tubes protruding through second floor and ready to be lit and installed through top of Klystron tube vaults to ready position. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  18. Solenoid fringe field compensation for the Cluster Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Fernow, R.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Palmer, R.B.; Zhao, Y.

    1996-04-01

    Optimization of the solenoid pancake currents so as to have a uniform axial magnetic field over an extended volume, is very important for the successful operation of the Cluster Klystron. By boosting the first and the last pancake currents by 35%, a uniform field Br/Bz {le} 0.1% at radius R {le} 2 cm can be extended from {+-} 7 cm to {+-} 16 cm. The result confirms simulations and the requirements for a 3-beam Cluster Klystron Experiment are achieved.

  19. Calibration of δ13C and δ18O measurements in CO2 using Off-axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectrometer (ICOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Jobin; Külls, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The δ13C and δ18O of CO2 has enormous potential as tracers to study and quantify the interaction between the water and carbon cycles. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) being the conventional method for stable isotopic measurements, has many limitations making it impossible for deploying them in remote areas for online or in-situ sampling. New laser based absorption spectroscopy approaches like Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (ICOS) have been developed for online measurements of stable isotopes at an expense of considerably less power requirement but with precision comparable to IRMS. In this research project, we introduce a new calibration system for an Off- Axis ICOS (Los Gatos Research CCIA-36d) for a wide range of varying concentrations of CO2 (800ppm - 25,000ppm), a typical CO2 flux range at the plant-soil continuum. The calibration compensates for the concentration dependency of δ13C and δ18O measurements, and was performed using various CO2 standards with known CO2 concentration and δC13 and δO18 values. A mathematical model was developed after the calibration procedure as a correction factor for the concentration dependency of δ13C and δ18O measurements. Temperature dependency of δ13C and δ18O measurements were investigated and no significant influence was found. Simultaneous calibration of δ13C and δ18O is achieved using this calibration system with an overall accuracy of (~ 0.75±0.24 ‰ for δ13C, ~ 0.81 ±0.26‰ for δ18O). This calibration procedure is found to be appropriate for making Off-Axis ICOS suitable for measuring CO2 concentration and δ13C and δ18O measurements at atmosphere-plant-soil continuum.

  20. No influence of CO2 on stable isotope analyses of soil waters with off‐axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA‐ICOS)

    PubMed Central

    Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Soulsby, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Rationale It was recently shown that the presence of CO2 affects the stable isotope (δ2H and δ18O values) analysis of water vapor via Wavelength‐Scanned Cavity Ring‐Down Spectroscopy. Here, we test how much CO2 is emitted from soil samples and if the CO2 in the headspace influences the isotope analysis with the direct equilibration method by Off‐Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA‐ICOS). Methods The headspace above different amounts of sparkling water was sampled, and its stable isotopic composition (δ2H and δ18O values) and CO2 concentration were measured by direct equilibration and by gas chromatography, respectively. In addition, the headspace above soil samples was analyzed in the same way. Furthermore, the gravimetric water content and the loss on ignition were measured for the soil samples. Results The experiment with the sparkling water showed that CO2 does not influence the stable isotope analysis by OA‐ICOS. CO2 was emitted from the soil samples and correlated with the isotopic fractionation signal, but no causal relationship between the two was determined. Instead, the fractionation signal in pore water isotopes can be explained by soil evaporation and the CO2 can be related to soil moisture and organic matter which both enhance microbial activity. Conclusions We found, despite the high CO2 emissions from soil samples, no need for a post‐correction of the pore water stable isotope analysis results, since there is no relation between CO2 concentrations and the stable isotope results of vapor samples obtained with OA‐ICOS. © 2016 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:28024164

  1. Spontaneous emission and spectral properties of radiation by relativistic electrons in a gyro-klystron and optical-klystron undulator.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Bramha; Mishra, Ganeswar; Khullar, Roma

    2016-03-01

    In this paper spontaneous emission of radiation by relativistic electrons in a gyro-klystron is studied. The scheme consists of two solenoid sections separated by a dispersive section. In the dispersive section the electrons are made non-resonant with the radiation. The dispersive section transforms a small change of the velocity into changes of the phases of the electrons. This leads to enhanced radiation due to klystron-type modulation as compared with a conventional gyrotron-type device driven by cyclotron maser interaction. It is shown that the klystron-modulated spectrum depends on the dispersive field strength, finite perpendicular velocity component and length of the solenoids but is independent of the axial magnetic field strength. A simple scheme to design a gyro-klystron is discussed.

  2. Phase locking of an S-band wide-gap klystron amplifier with high power injection driven by a relativistic backward wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xianchen; Zhang, Jiande; Yang, Jianhua; Jin, Zhenxing

    2012-12-01

    Theoretical analyses and preliminary experiments on the phase-locking characteristics of an inductively loaded 2-cavity wide-gap klystron amplifier (WKA) with high power injection driven by a GW-class relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) are presented. Electric power of the amplifier and oscillator is supplied by a single accelerator being capable of producing dual electron beams. The well phase-locking effect of the RBWO-WKA system requires the oscillator have good frequency reproducibility and stability from pulse to pulse. Thus, the main switch of the accelerator is externally triggered to stabilize the diode voltage and then the working frequency. In the experiment, frequency of the WKA is linearly locked by the RBWO. With a diode voltage of 530 kV and an input power of ˜22 MW, an output power of ˜230 MW with the power gain of ˜10.2 dB is obtained from the WKA. As the main switch is triggered, the relative phase difference between the RBWO and the WKA is less than ±15° in a single shot, and phase jitter of ±11° is obtained within a series of shots with duration of about 40 ns.

  3. Phase locking of an S-band wide-gap klystron amplifier with high power injection driven by a relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xianchen; Zhang Jiande; Yang Jianhua; Jin Zhenxing

    2012-12-15

    Theoretical analyses and preliminary experiments on the phase-locking characteristics of an inductively loaded 2-cavity wide-gap klystron amplifier (WKA) with high power injection driven by a GW-class relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) are presented. Electric power of the amplifier and oscillator is supplied by a single accelerator being capable of producing dual electron beams. The well phase-locking effect of the RBWO-WKA system requires the oscillator have good frequency reproducibility and stability from pulse to pulse. Thus, the main switch of the accelerator is externally triggered to stabilize the diode voltage and then the working frequency. In the experiment, frequency of the WKA is linearly locked by the RBWO. With a diode voltage of 530 kV and an input power of {approx}22 MW, an output power of {approx}230 MW with the power gain of {approx}10.2 dB is obtained from the WKA. As the main switch is triggered, the relative phase difference between the RBWO and the WKA is less than {+-}15 Degree-Sign in a single shot, and phase jitter of {+-}11 Degree-Sign is obtained within a series of shots with duration of about 40 ns.

  4. A 1 MEGAWATT POLYPHASE BOOST CONVERTER-MODULATOR FOR KLYSTRON PULSE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    W.A. REASS; J.D. DOSS; R.F. GRIBBLE

    2001-06-01

    This paper describes electrical design criteria and first operational results a 140 kV, 1 MW average, 11 MW peak, zero-voltage-switching 20 kHz polyphase bridge, boost converter/modulator for klystron pulse application. The DC-DC converter derives the buss voltages from a standard 13.8 kV to 2300 Y substation cast-core transformer. Energy storage and filtering is provided by self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene traction capacitors. Three ''H-Bridge'' Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switching networks are used to generate the polyphase 20 kHz transformer primary drive waveforms. The 20 kHz drive waveforms are chirped the appropriate duration to generate the desired klystron pulse width. PWM (pulse width modulation) of the individual 20 kHz pulses is utilized to provide regulated output waveforms with adaptive feedforward and feedback techniques. The boost transformer design utilizes amorphous nanocrystalline material that provides the required low core loss at design flux levels and switching frequencies. Resonant shunt-peaking is used on the transformer secondary to boost output voltage and resonate transformer leakage inductance. With the appropriate transformer leakage inductance and peaking capacitance, zero-voltage-switching of the IGBT's is attained, minimizing switching losses. A review of these design parameters and the first results of the performance characteristics will be presented.

  5. Design, construction, system integration, and test results of the 1 MW CW RF system for the e-gun cavity in the energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lenci,S.J.; Eisen, E. L.; Dickey, D. L.; Sainz, J. E.; Utay, P. F.; Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2009-05-04

    Brookhaven's ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) requires a 1 MW CW RF system for the superconducting electron gun cavity. The system consists primarily of a klystron tube, transmitter, and High-Voltage Power Supply (HVPS). The 703.75 MHz klystron made by CPl, Inc. provides RF power of 1MW CW with efficiency of 65%. It has a single output window, diode-type electron gun, and collector capable of dissipating the entire beam power. It was fully factory tested including 24-hour heat run at 1.1 MW CWo The solid state HVPS designed by Continental Electronics provides up to 100 kV at low ripple and 2.1 MW CW with over 95% efficiency. With minimal stored energy and a fast shut-down mode no crowbar circuit is needed. Continental 's transmitter includes PLC based user interface and monitoring, RF pre-amplifier, magnet and Vac-Ion pump supplies, cooling water instrumentation, and integral safety interlock system. BNL installed the klystron, HVPS, and transmitter along with other items, such as circulator, water load, and waveguide components. The collaboration of BNL, CPI, and Continental in the design, installation, and testing was essential to the successful operation of the 1MW system.

  6. Off-axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectrometer measurements of HDO/H2O ratio for understanding water transport in the Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clouser, B.; Moyer, E. J.; Sarkozy, L.

    2016-12-01

    The Asian monsoon is one of the main pathways by which water vapor enters the stratosphere. However, the pathways by which water is carried to the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) region and the monsoon contributions to the total stratospheric water budget are not well constrained. We describe here a new instrument for measuring the isotopic composition of water vapor in this region, a useful tracer of the convective and microphysical history of air parcels, and show preliminary results from studies of monsoon outflow in summer 2016. The Chicago Water Isotope Spectrometer (Chi-WIS) is an absorption spectroscopy instrument for measurements of HDO and H2O at 2.65 microns by integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS), designed to sample the 14-21 km range from the M55 Geophysica aircraft. The instrument is rebuilt specifically for the StratoClim campaign to study the Asian monsoon effect on the UTLS region in 2016-2017. We discuss steps taken to maximize signal in this extremely cold and dry environment, explore the instrument's sensitivity limits, and discuss data from test flights sampling monsoon outflow.

  7. The X-band klystron program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.

    1996-04-01

    The X-band rf source development at SLAC can be considered a qualified success. A total of twelve klystrons were built. Six of them are still in use. The latest tube, XL4, produced 75 MW at an efficiency of 47.5 percent. However, victory cannot be declared as yet, since an NLC prototype has not been fully designed and the decision between permanent magnet focusing and a super-conducting solenoid has not been formally made. Daryl Sprehn`s paper will present the status of the PPM klystron development. The authors believe that a PPM X-band source will work, at 50 as well as at 75 megawatts. But they are prepared to adapt the XL4 design to a super-conducting solenoid, should the PPM klystron develop unexpected problems. The SLAC program is now in its seventh year. It may well be the longest and most expensive microwave tube development on record, in a government laboratory or in industry. Direct and related costs for the total effort are probably of the order of $10 million. In these circumstances it is perhaps not surprising that it has been possible to produce a klystron with the performance of XL4. At the same time, it must be said that the necessary leap in technology from the SLAC 60-megawatt S-band production klystrons to a klystron of comparable performance at four times the frequency could not be realized without some very careful experimentation and, most importantly, without the infrastructure for tube fabrication and testing available at SLAC. The design of an 11.4 GHz 50--100 MW klystron, with microsecond pulses and a pulse repetition frequency of 180 Hz presents a number of technical challenges which are listed here.

  8. Investigation of an X-band gigawatt long pulse multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Lei, Lurong; Jin, Xiao; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Ganping; He, Hu; Wu, Yao; Ge, Yi; Yuan, Huan; Chen, Zhaofu

    2015-09-15

    To achieve a gigawatt-level long pulse radiation power in X-band, a multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is proposed and studied experimentally. By introducing 18 electron drift tubes and extended interaction cavities, the power capacity of the device is increased. A radiation power of 1.23 GW with efficiency of 41% and amplifier gain of 46 dB is obtained in the particle-in-cell simulation. Under conditions of a 10 Hz repeat frequency and an input RF power of 30 kW, a radiation power of 0.9 GW, frequency of 9.405 GHz, pulse duration of 105 ns, and efficiency of 30% is generated in the experiment, and the amplifier gain is about 45 dB. Both the simulation and the experiment prove that the multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier can generate a long pulse GW-level radiation power in X-band.

  9. Multichannel vector field control module for LLRF control of superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Varghese, P; Chase, B.; Barnes, B.; Branlard, J.; Joireman, P.W.; Klepec, D.; Mavric, U.; Tupikov, V.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The field control of multiple superconducting RF cavities with a single Klystron, such as the proposed RF scheme for the ILC, requires high density (number of RF channels) signal processing hardware so that vector control may be implemented with minimum group delay. The MFC (Multichannel Field Control) module is a 33-channel, FPGA based down-conversion and signal processing board in a single VXI slot, with 4 channels of high speed DAC outputs. A 32-bit, 400MHz floating point DSP provides additional computational and control capability for calibration and implementation of more complex control algorithms. Multiple high speed serial transceivers on the front panel and the backplane bus allow a flexible architecture for inter-module real time data exchanges. An interface CPLD supports the VXI bus protocol for communication to a Slot0 CPU, with Ethernet connections for remote in system programming of the FPGA and DSP as well as data acquisition.

  10. Latest Results in SLAC 75-MW PPM Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Haase, A.; Jongewaard, E.; Laurent, L.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.; /SLAC

    2006-03-06

    75 MW X-band klystrons utilizing Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing have been undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) for almost nine years. The klystron development has been geared toward realizing the necessary components for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The PPM devices built to date which fit this class of operation consist of a variety of 50 MW and 75 MW devices constructed by SLAC, KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) and industry. All these tubes follow from the successful SLAC design of a 50 MW PPM klystron in 1996. In 2004 the latest two klystrons were constructed and tested with preliminary results reported at EPAC2004. The first of these two devices was tested to the full NLC specifications of 75 MW, 1.6 microseconds pulse length, and 120 Hz. This 14.4 kW average power operation came with a tube efficiency >50%. The most recent testing of these last two devices will be presented here. Design and manufacturing issues of the latest klystron, due to be tested by the Fall of 2005, are also discussed.

  11. Common analysis of the relativistic klystron and the standing-wave free-electron laser two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, J.S.; Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.

    1992-07-01

    This paper summarizes a new formalism which makes the analysis and understanding of both the relativistic klystron (RK) and the standing-wave free-electron laser (SWFEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) available to a wide audience of accelerator physicists. A ``coupling impedance`` for both the RK and SWFEL is introduced, which can include realistic cavity features, such as beam and vacuum ports, in a simple manner. The RK and SWFEL macroparticle equations, which govern the energy and phase evolution of successive bunches in the beam, are of identical form, differing only by multiplicative factors. The analysis allows, for the first time, a relative comparison of the RF and SWFEL TBAs.

  12. On the calibration of continuous, high-precision delta18O and delta2H measurements using an off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixin; Caylor, Kelly K; Dragoni, Danilo

    2009-02-01

    The (18)O and (2)H of water vapor serve as powerful tracers of hydrological processes. The typical method for determining water vapor delta(18)O and delta(2)H involves cryogenic trapping and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Even with recent technical advances, these methods cannot resolve vapor composition at high temporal resolutions. In recent years, a few groups have developed continuous laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) approaches for measuring delta(18)O and delta(2)H which achieve accuracy levels similar to those of lab-based mass spectrometry methods. Unfortunately, most LAS systems need cryogenic cooling and constant calibration to a reference gas, and have substantial power requirements, making them unsuitable for long-term field deployment at remote field sites. A new method called Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) has been developed which requires extremely low-energy consumption and neither reference gas nor cryogenic cooling. In this report, we develop a relatively simple pumping system coupled to a dew point generator to calibrate an ICOS-based instrument (Los Gatos Research Water Vapor Isotope Analyzer (WVIA) DLT-100) under various pressures using liquid water with known isotopic signatures. Results show that the WVIA can be successfully calibrated using this customized system for different pressure settings, which ensure that this instrument can be combined with other gas-sampling systems. The precisions of this instrument and the associated calibration method can reach approximately 0.08 per thousand for delta(18)O and approximately 0.4 per thousand for delta(2)H. Compared with conventional mass spectrometry and other LAS-based methods, the OA-ICOS technique provides a promising alternative tool for continuous water vapor isotopic measurements in field deployments.

  13. Direct analysis of δ2H and δ18O in natural and enriched human urine using laser-based, Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Elena S.F.; Fortsona, Susan L.; Snaith, Steven P.; Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas S.; Chery, Isabelle; Blanc, Stephane; Melanson, Edward L.; Thomson, Peter J; Speakman, John R.

    2012-01-01

    The stable isotopes of hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) in human urine are measured during studies of total energy expenditure by the doubly labeled water method, measurement of total body water, and measurement of insulin resistance by glucose disposal among other applications. An ultrasensitive laser absorption spectrometer based on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy was demonstrated for simple and inexpensive measurement of stable isotopes in natural isotopic abundance and isotopically enriched human urine. Preparation of urine for analysis was simple and rapid (approx. 25 samples per hour), requiring no decolorizing or distillation steps. Analysis schemes were demonstrated to address sample-to-sample memory while still allowing analysis of 45 natural or 30 enriched urine samples per day. The instrument was linear over a wide range of water isotopes (δ2H = −454 to +1702 ‰ and δ18O= −58.3 to +265 ‰). Measurements of human urine were precise to better than 0.65 ‰ 1σ for δ2H and 0.09 ‰ 1σ for δ18O for natural urines, 1.1 ‰ 1σ for δ2H and 0.13 ‰ 1σ for δ18O for low enriched urines, and 1.0 ‰ 1σ for δ2H and 0.08 ‰ 1σ for δ18O for high enriched urines. Furthermore, the accuracy of the isotope measurements of human urines was verified to better than ±0.81 ‰ in δ2H and ±0.13 ‰ in δ18O (average deviation) against three independent IRMS laboratories. The ability to immediately and inexpensively measure the stable isotopes of water in human urine is expected to increase the number and variety of experiments which can be undertaken. PMID:23075099

  14. FPGA-based Klystron linearization implementations in scope of ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Omet, M.; Michizono, S.; Varghese, P.; Schlarb, H.; Branlard, J.; Cichalewski, W.

    2015-01-23

    We report the development and implementation of four FPGA-based predistortion-type klystron linearization algorithms. Klystron linearization is essential for the realization of ILC, since it is required to operate the klystrons 7% in power below their saturation. The work presented was performed in international collaborations at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA and the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Germany. With the newly developed algorithms, the generation of correction factors on the FPGA was improved compared to past algorithms, avoiding quantization and decreasing memory requirements. At FNAL, three algorithms were tested at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), demonstrating a successful implementation for one algorithm and a proof of principle for two algorithms. Furthermore, the functionality of the algorithm implemented at DESY was demonstrated successfully in a simulation.

  15. FPGA-based Klystron linearization implementations in scope of ILC

    DOE PAGES

    Omet, M.; Michizono, S.; Matsumoto, T.; ...

    2015-01-23

    We report the development and implementation of four FPGA-based predistortion-type klystron linearization algorithms. Klystron linearization is essential for the realization of ILC, since it is required to operate the klystrons 7% in power below their saturation. The work presented was performed in international collaborations at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA and the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Germany. With the newly developed algorithms, the generation of correction factors on the FPGA was improved compared to past algorithms, avoiding quantization and decreasing memory requirements. At FNAL, three algorithms were tested at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), demonstrating a successfulmore » implementation for one algorithm and a proof of principle for two algorithms. Furthermore, the functionality of the algorithm implemented at DESY was demonstrated successfully in a simulation.« less

  16. Ultra Stable Capacitor charging Power Supply of Klystron-Modulator for PAL XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Y. G.; Kwon, S. J.; Jang, S. D.; Suh, J. H.; Oh, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    The PAL (Pohang Accelerator Laboratory) 2.5-GeV linac is planed to be converted to a SASE-XFEL facility (PAL XFEL) that supplies coherent X-rays down to 0.3-nm wavelength. The electron beams has to have an emittance of 1.0 mm-mrad, a peak current of 3 kA, and a low energy spread of 1.0 MeV. In order to provide reasonably stable SASE output, the RF stability of 0.02% rms is required for both RF phase and amplitude. This stability is mainly determined by a low level RF drive system and klystron-modulators. The stability level of the modulator has to be improved 10 times better to meet the pulse stability of 0.02%. This is a technologically challenging issue for PAL XFEL. An inverter technology is to be applied to charge the PFN of a new modulator. Therefore, a new inverter system should provide very stable charging performances. This paper presents the development of an ultra stable klystron-modulator with an inverter power.

  17. A small-signal theory for the radial-line relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Fangchao; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhang, Jun; Ju, Jinchuan

    2017-02-01

    A small-signal theory describing the electron beam modulation in the radial-line relativistic klystron amplifier (RL-RKA) is developed in this paper. We first derive theoretically the space-charge limited current, the dispersion relation of space-charge waves on the radial-radiated electron beam, and the beam coupling coefficient for the radial-line electromagnetic structure. Then, a small-signal theory is established to analyze the beam current bunching during the initial modulation period. With particle-in-cell simulations, the theoretical analysis is verified through observing the fundamental harmonic current of an input cavity in a previous Ku-band RL-RKA. More importantly, the presented small-signal theory can provide a theoretical guidance for the RL-RKA design.

  18. A new method for compensation of the effect of charging transformer's leakage inductance on PFN voltage regulation in Klystron pulse modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Akhil; Kale, Umesh; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2017-04-01

    The Line type modulators have been widely used to generate high voltage rectangular pulses to power the klystron for high power RF generation. In Line type modulator, the Pulse Forming Network (PFN) which is a cascade combination of lumped capacitors and inductors is used to store the electrical energy. The charged PFN is then discharged into a klystron by firing a high voltage Thyratron switch. This discharge generates a high voltage rectangular pulse across the klystron electrodes. The amplitude and phase of Klystron's RF output is governed by the high voltage pulse amplitude. The undesired RF amplitude and phase stability issues arises at the klystron's output due to inter-pulse and during the pulse amplitude variations. To reduce inter-pulse voltage variations, the PFN is required to be charged at the same voltage after every discharge cycle. At present, the combination of widely used resonant charging and deQing method is used to regulate the pulse to pulse PFN voltage variations but the charging transformer's leakage inductance puts an upper bound on the regulation achievable by this method. Here we have developed few insights of the deQing process and devised a new compensation method to compensate this undesired effect of charging transformer's leakage inductance on the pulse to pulse PFN voltage stability. This compensation is accomplished by the controlled partial discharging of the split PFN capacitor using a low voltage MOSFET switch. Theoretically, very high values of pulse to pulse voltage stability may be achieved using this method. This method may be used in deQing based existing modulators or in new modulators, to increase the pulse to pulse voltage stability, without having a very tight bound on charging transformer's leakage inductance. Given a stable charging power supply, this method may be used to further enhance the inter-pulse voltage stability of modulators which employ the direct charging, after replacing the direct charging with the

  19. High Power Klystrons: Theory and Practice at the Stanford Linear Accelerator CenterPart I

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.

    2004-12-15

    This is Part I of a two-part report on design and manufacturing methods used at SLAC to produce accelerator klystrons. Chapter 1 begins with the history and applications for klystrons, in both of which Stanford University was extensively involved. The remaining chapters review the theory of klystron operation, derive the principal formulae used in their design, and discuss the assumptions that they involve. These formulae are subsequently used in small-signal calculations of the frequency response of a particular klystron, whose performance is also simulated by two different computer codes. The results of calculations and simulations are compared to the actual performance of the klystron.

  20. Measurement of OCS, CO2, CO and H2O aboard NASA's WB-57 High Altitude Platform Using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leen, J. B.; Owano, T. G.; Du, X.; Gardner, A.; Gupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is the most abundant sulfur gas in the atmosphere and has been implicated in controlling the sulfur budget and aerosol loading of the stratosphere. In the troposphere, OCS is irreversibly consumed during photosynthesis and may serve as a tracer for gross primary production (GPP). Its primary sources are ocean outgassing, industrial processes, and biomass burning. Its primary sinks are vegetation and soils. Despite the importance of OCS in atmospheric processes, the OCS atmospheric budget is poorly determined and has high uncertainty. OCS is typically monitored using either canisters analyzed by gas chromatography or integrated atmospheric column measurements. Improved in-situ terrestrial flux and airborne measurements are required to constrain the OCS budget and further elucidate its role in stratospheric aerosol formation and as a tracer for biogenic volatile organics and photosynthesis. Los Gatos Research has developed a flight capable mid-infrared Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) analyzer to simultaneously quantify OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O in ambient air at up to 2 Hz. The prototype was tested on diluted, certified samples and found to be precise (OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O to better than ±4 ppt, ±0.2 ppm, ±0.31 ppb, and ±3.7 ppm respectively, 1s in 1 sec) and linear (R2 > 0.9997 for all gases) over a wide dynamic range (OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O ranging from 0.2 - 70 ppb, 500 - 3000 ppm, 150 - 480 ppb, and 7000 - 21000 ppm respectively). Cross-interference measurements showed no appreciable change in measured OCS concentration with variations in CO2 (500 - 3500 ppm) or CO. We report on high altitude measurements made aboard NASA's WB-57 research aircraft. Two research flights were conducted from Houston, TX. The concentration of OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O were continuously recorded from sea level to approximately 60,000 feet. The concentration of OCS was observed to increase with altitude through the troposphere due to the

  1. In Situ Stable Isotopic Detection of Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane in Monterey Bay Cold Seeps Via Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankel, S. D.; Gupta, M.; Leen, J.; Provencal, R. A.; Parsotam, V.; Girguis, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) plays an important role in global climate change by governing the release of methane from anoxic sediments into the global ocean and ultimately the atmosphere. Thus, gaining an accurate understanding of both the distribution of methane sources and the occurrence of AOM as well as the spatial and temporal variability of cycling pathways is critical. Environmental analyses of methane stable isotopic composition (δ13C-CH4) provide just such an indicator of methane source, whether biogenic or thermogenic, as well as a spatial and temporal integrator of microbial cycling pathways, such as AOM. Here we present results from several deployments of a newly developed in situ methane stable isotope analyzer capable of measuring δ13C-CH4 to full ocean depths. The instrument consisted of a miniaturized Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (Off-Axis ICOS) analyzer housed in a cylindrical titanium pressure vessel for deep sea deployment. Dissolved gas was extracted from seawater using a Teflon AF diffusion membrane inlet. The instrument had an operating wavelength of 1647 nm and used chemometric spectral decomposition to determine the relative concentrations of 13CH4 and 12CH4 with a sensitivity of ± 0.2‰. Deployments to cold seep environments revealed a distinct separation in carbon isotopic composition between methane in advecting fluids as compared with methane from sediment pore fluids. During multiple visits to two different sites at Extrovert Cliff in Monterey Bay (960m), methane in advecting fluids ranged from -70.2‰ to -63.8‰. In contrast, methane-rich fluids sampled directly from pushcore holes taken through seep sediments contained methane with substantially higher δ13C values ranging from -64.2‰ to -50.2‰. These data implicate the influence of anaerobic oxidation of methane within these seep sediments. While the advective flux of methane to the seafloor from the central orifice of the seep is substantial, using

  2. 63. View of Klystron tube cutaway exhibit located at mezzanine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. View of Klystron tube cut-away exhibit located at mezzanine level transmitter building no. 102, directly above RF power generation systems located on first floor. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  3. Inverse Marx modulators for self-biasing klystron depressed collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, Mark A.

    2014-07-31

    A novel pulsed depressed collector biasing scheme is proposed. This topology feeds forward energy recovered during one RF pulse for use on the following RF pulse. The presented ''inverse'' Marx charges biasing capacitors in series, and discharges them in parallel. Simulations are shown along with experimental demonstration on a 62kW klystron.

  4. 65. Building 102, view of Klystron tube in amplifier housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. Building 102, view of Klystron tube in amplifier housing showing top of tube connecting conductors. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  5. 64. Building 102, view of Klystron tube amplifier housing with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. Building 102, view of Klystron tube amplifier housing with tube removed and showing waveguide entrances at top of photograph. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE BEAM MONITOR FOR THE CLUSTER KLYSTRON.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO,Y.

    2001-08-21

    The cluster klystron project required a beam monitor to check the quality of the hollow beam shape. Since the power density of the beam is very large, a common phosphorescent screen doesn't work. We investigated varies types of monitors. The related problems were also discussed.

  7. 72. View of test system showing Klystron tube installed in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. View of test system showing Klystron tube installed in test position on first floor of transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  8. Klystron based high power rf system for proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, Manjiri; Shrotriya, Sandip; Sharma, Sonal; Patel, Niranjan; Handu, Verander E-mail: manjiri08@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    As a part of ADS program a proton accelerator (20 MeV, 30 mA) and its high power RF systems (HPRF) are being developed in BARC. This paper explains design details of this klystron based HPRF system. (author)

  9. Amended proposal for R&D on a cluster klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.; Fischer, J.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Ko, S.K.; Palmer, R.B.; Ulc, S.; Wang, H.

    1993-01-01

    This Proposal is an updated version of FWP submitted in March 1992. Significant work has been done since the original proposal, and much of this is reported on in this update. In addition there have been several changes made, some in response to suggestions made by the three reviews sent to us in December, 1992. The new information and changes include: Technical information on the proposed design of the magnetron gun, the magnet, acceleration gap, and electrical system (including a comment on efficiency loss due to high-voltage leakage current). Modification of the phase I and II tests to allow operation of the gun and klystron off the axis of the magnet, thus simulating the magnet situation when multiple beams are used. Modification of phases III and IV to test a cluster of three beams: first a three beam gun, and then three beams with a klystron on one of them. We have added a phase V which would be the testing of a full three-beam demonstration klystron. The mod-anode pulser would now be located on the high voltage deck instead of externally. Power for the pulser and other high voltage components would now be provided by an isolation transformer instead of from a lead battery. We believe these changes have improved the proposed program and thank the reviewers for their constructive suggestions. The design is still evolving. Relatively little work has been done on the detailed klystron design, and none on the beam dump.

  10. Pulsed klystrons with feedback controlled mod-anode modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, William A; Baca, David M; Jerry, Davis L; Rees, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a fast rise and fall, totem-pole mod-anode modulators for klystron application. Details of these systems as recently installed utilizing a beam switch tube ''on-deck'' and a planar triode ''off-deck'' in a grid-catch feedback regulated configuration will be provided. The grid-catch configuration regulates the klystron mod-anode voltage at a specified set-point during switching as well as providing a control mechanism that flat-top regulates the klystron beam current during the pulse. This flat-topped klystron beam current is maintained while the capacitor bank droops. In addition, we will review more modern on-deck designs using a high gain, high voltage planar triode as a regulating and switching element. These designs are being developed, tested, and implemented for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator refurbishment project, ''LANSCE-R''. An advantage of the planar triode is that the tube can be directly operated with solid state linear components and provides for a very compact design. The tubes are inexpensive compared to stacked semiconductor switching assemblies and also provide a linear control capability. Details of these designs are provided as well as operational and developmental results.

  11. A Gridded Electron Gun for a Sheet Beam Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Read, M.E.; Miram, G.; Ives, R.L.; Ivanov, V.; Krasnykh, A.; /SLAC

    2008-04-25

    This paper describes the development of an electron gun for a sheet beam klystron. Initially intended for accelerator applications, the gun can operate at a higher perveance than one with a cylindrically symmetric beam. Results of 2D and 3D simulations are discussed.

  12. Gigawatt peak power generation in a relativistic klystron amplifier driven by 1 kW seed-power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Xie, H. Q.; Li, Z. H.; Zhang, Y. J.; Ma, Q. S.

    2013-11-01

    An S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier driven by kW-level RF power is proposed and studied experimentally. In the device, the RF lossy material is introduced to suppress higher mode excitation. An output power of 1.95 GW with a gain of 62.8 dB is obtained in the simulation. Under conditions of an input RF power of 1.38 kW, a microwave pulse with power of 1.9 GW, frequency of 2.86 GHz, and duration of 105 ns is generated in the experiment, and the corresponding gain is 61.4 dB.

  13. An S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier with high phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Xu, Z.; Ma, Q. S.; Xie, H. Q.

    2014-11-15

    For the purpose of coherent high power microwave combining, an S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier with high phase stability is presented and studied. By the aid of 3D particle-in-cell code and circuit simulation software, the mechanism of parasitic oscillation in the device is investigated. And the RF lossy material is adopted in the simulation and experiment to suppress the oscillation. The experimental results show that with an input RF power of 10 kW, a microwave pulse with power of 1.8 GW is generated with a gain of 52.6 dB. And the relative phase difference fluctuation between output microwave and input RF signal is less than ±10° in 90 ns.

  14. Development Of Hard X-Ray Sources With High Radiative Power Output At The National Ignition Facility Utilizing Molybdenum and Silver Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmann, Klaus; Benjamin, Russ; May, Mark; Thorn, Daniel; Colvin, Jeff; Barrios, Maria; Kemp, G. Elijah; Fournier, Kevin; Blue, Brent

    2016-10-01

    In our on-going x-ray source development campaign at the National Ignition Facility, we have recently extended the energy range of our laser-driven cavity sources to the 20 keV range by utilizing molybdenum-lined and silver-lined cavity targets. Using a variety of spectroscopic and power diagnostics we determined that almost 1% of the nearly 1 MJ total laser energy used for heating the cavity target was converted to Mo K-shell x rays using our standard cavity design. The same laser drive for silver-lined cavities yielded about 0.4% conversion efficiency for the Ag K-shell emission. Comparison with HYDRA simulations are used to further optimize the x-rays conversion efficiency. The simulations indicate that minor changes in the aspect ratio of the cavity and the layer thickness may double the radiative power of the K-shell emission. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Improved power capacity in a high efficiency klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator by distributed energy extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Renzhen; Chen, Changhua; Cao, Yibing; Sun, Jun

    2013-12-07

    With the efficiency increase of a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator, the maximum axial electric field and harmonic current simultaneously appear at the end of the beam-wave interaction region, leading to a highly centralized energy exchange in the dual-cavity extractor and a very high electric field on the cavity surface. Thus, we present a method of distributed energy extraction in this kind of devices. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with the microwave power of 5.1 GW and efficiency of 70%, the maximum axial electric field is decreased from 2.26 MV/cm to 1.28 MV/cm, indicating a threefold increase in the power capacity.

  16. Improved power capacity in a high efficiency klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator by distributed energy extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Renzhen; Chen, Changhua; Cao, Yibing; Sun, Jun

    2013-12-01

    With the efficiency increase of a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator, the maximum axial electric field and harmonic current simultaneously appear at the end of the beam-wave interaction region, leading to a highly centralized energy exchange in the dual-cavity extractor and a very high electric field on the cavity surface. Thus, we present a method of distributed energy extraction in this kind of devices. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with the microwave power of 5.1 GW and efficiency of 70%, the maximum axial electric field is decreased from 2.26 MV/cm to 1.28 MV/cm, indicating a threefold increase in the power capacity.

  17. The design and performance of 150-MW S-band klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Phillips, R.M.; Caryotakis, G.

    1994-09-01

    As part of an international collaboration, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) klystron group has designed, fabricated and tested a 60 Hz, 3 {mu}s, 150 MW klystron built for Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY). A test diode with a 535 kV, 700 A electron beam was constructed to verify the gun operation. The first klystron was built and successfully met design specifications. This paper discusses design issues and experimental results of the diode and klystron including the suppression of gun oscillations.

  18. OPERATIONAL RESULTS OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) POLYPHASE CONVERTER-MODULATOR FOR THE 140 KV KLYSTRON RF SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    W.A. REASS; J.D. DOSS; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    This paper describes the first operational results of the 140 kV, 1 MW average, 11 MW peak, zero-voltage-switching, 20 kHz polyphase bridge, boost converter-modulator for klystron pulse application. The DC-DC converter derives the buss voltages from a standard 13.8 kV to 2100 Y substation cast-core transformer. Energy storage and filtering is provided by self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene traction capacitors. Three ''H-Bridge'' Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switching networks are used to generate the polyphase 20 kHz transformer primary drive waveforms. The 20 kHz drive waveforms are chirped the appropriate duration to generate the desired klystron pulse width. Pulse-Width Modulation (PWM) of the individual 20 kHz pulses is utilized to provide regulated output waveforms with adaptive feedforward and feedback techniques. The boost transformer design utilizes amorphous nanocrystalline material that provides the required low core loss at design flux levels and switching frequencies. Resonant shunt peaking is used on the transformer secondary to boost output voltage and resonate transformer leakage inductance. With the appropriate transformer leakage inductance and peaking capacitance, zero-voltage-switching of the IGBT's is attained, minimizing switching losses. Reviews of these design parameters and an examination of the first operational results will be performed.

  19. Operational results of the spallation neutron source (SNS) polyphase converter-modulator for the 140 KV klystron RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, W. A.; Doss, James D.; Gribble, R. F.; Lynch, M. T.; Rees, D. E.; Tallerico, P. J.; Borovina, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the first operational results of the 140 kV, 1 MW average, 11 MW peak, zero-voltageswitching, 20 kHz polyphase bridge, boost converter-modulator for klystron pulse application. The DC-DC converter derives the buss voltages from a standard 13.8 kV to 2100 Y substation cast-core transformer. Energy storage and filtering is provided by self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene traction capacitors. Three 'H-Bridge' Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switching networks are used to generate the polyphase 20 kHz transformer primary drive waveforms. The 20 kHz drive waveforms are chirped the appropriate duration to generate the desired klystron pulse width. Pulse-Width Modulation (PWM) of the individual 20 kHz pulses is utilized to provide regulated output waveforms with adaptive feedforward and feedback techniques. The boost transformer design utilizes amorphous nanocrystalline material that provides the required low core loss at design flux levels and switching frequencies. Resonant shunt peaking is used on the transformer secondary to boost output voltage and resonate transformer leakage inductance. With the appropriate transformer leakage inductance and peaking capacitance, zero-voltage-switching of the IGBT's is attained, minimizing switching losses. Reviews of these design parameters and an examination of the first operational results will be performed.

  20. Design for a One-Gigawatt, Annular-Beam Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Arfin, Bernard

    2001-01-23

    A one-gigawatt, annular beam klystron (ABK) is being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The pulse length is 1 {micro}s, the pulse repetition frequency is 5 Hz, and the operating frequency is 1.3 GHz. The beam voltage and current are 800 kV and 4 kA. Since the electron beam parameters are considerably beyond the state-of the-art, an aggressive cathode and electron gun design is required. The magnetron injection gun (MIG) configuration was chosen over the standard Pierce geometry that is typically used in klystrons. The tube design, design issues, and status are presented.

  1. NLC Reliability Analysis Notes: Klystron-Modulator System (LCC-0029)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Z.

    2004-03-23

    This paper address the reliability and availability issues to be faced in deploying and operating the klystron modulator assemblies proposed for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The rf power sources are a major system of the NLC and require a high uptime in order to reach the goal of 0.85 availability. Since the NLC is made up of several systems, not just klystron-modulator assemblies, the availability goal for the assemblies must be higher than 0.85. Currently this goal is at least 0.95. This short paper summarizes the analysis currently under way to determine whether the design of the rf power system will meet the design availability goal.

  2. High power klystrons for efficient reliable high power amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, M.

    1980-11-01

    This report covers the design of reliable high efficiency, high power klystrons which may be used in both existing and proposed troposcatter radio systems. High Power (10 kW) klystron designs were generated in C-band (4.4 GHz to 5.0 GHz), S-band (2.5 GHz to 2.7 GHz), and L-band or UHF frequencies (755 MHz to 985 MHz). The tubes were designed for power supply compatibility and use with a vapor/liquid phase heat exchanger. Four (4) S-band tubes were developed in the course of this program along with two (2) matching focusing solenoids and two (2) heat exchangers. These tubes use five (5) tuners with counters which are attached to the focusing solenoids. A reliability mathematical model of the tube and heat exchanger system was also generated.

  3. Method and apparatus for varying accelerator beam output energy

    DOEpatents

    Young, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    A coupled cavity accelerator (CCA) accelerates a charged particle beam with rf energy from a rf source. An input accelerating cavity receives the charged particle beam and an output accelerating cavity outputs the charged particle beam at an increased energy. Intermediate accelerating cavities connect the input and the output accelerating cavities to accelerate the charged particle beam. A plurality of tunable coupling cavities are arranged so that each one of the tunable coupling cavities respectively connect an adjacent pair of the input, output, and intermediate accelerating cavities to transfer the rf energy along the accelerating cavities. An output tunable coupling cavity can be detuned to variably change the phase of the rf energy reflected from the output coupling cavity so that regions of the accelerator can be selectively turned off when one of the intermediate tunable coupling cavities is also detuned.

  4. Effects of angular misalignment on optical klystron undulator radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, G.; Prakash, Bramh; Gehlot, Mona

    2015-11-01

    In this paper ,we analyze the important effects of optical klystron undulator radiation with an angular offset of the relativistic electron beam in the second undulator section. An anlytical expression for the undulator radiation is obtained through a transparent and simple procedure.It is shown that the effects of the angular offset is more severe for longer undulator lengths and with higher dispersive field strengths.Both these effects are less pronounced for undulators with large K values.

  5. X-Band Multi-Beam Klystron Design and Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Aaron; Neilson, Jeff; Tantawi, Sami

    2015-04-15

    Progress on the development of a 5MW 16 beam x-band multi-beam klystron is presented. The power from each of the 16 klystrons is combined using a matched waveguide network. Mechanical and electric models and simulations are discussed. The status of procuring and assembling parts is presented.

  6. Improvements in X-band transmitter phase stability through Klystron body temperature regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the techniques used and experimental results obtained in improving transmitter stability by control of the klystron body temperature. Related work in the measurement of klystron phase control parameters (pushing factors) is also discussed. The contribution of wave guide temperature excursions to uplink phase stability is presented. Suggestions are made as to the direction of future work in this area.

  7. Improvements in X-band transmitter phase stability through klystron body temperature regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the techniques used and experimental results obtained in improving transmitter stability by control of the klystron body temperature. Related work in the measurement of klystron phase control parameters (pushing factors) is also discussed. The contribution of waveguide temperature excursions to uplink phase stability is presented. Suggestions are made as to the direction of future work in this area.

  8. Coupled resonator vertical cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Chow, W.W.; Hou, H.Q.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    The monolithic integration of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. The authors report the first electrically injected coupled resonator vertical-cavity laser diode and demonstrate novel characteristics arising from the cavity coupling, including methods for external modulation of the laser. A coupled mode theory is used model the output modulation of the coupled resonator vertical cavity laser.

  9. Development of a 10 kW, 2.815 GHz Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, Robert Lawrence; Read, Michael; Patrick, Ferguson

    2015-05-15

    Development of a Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focused klystron is described. The klystron was designed to produce 10 kW CW at 2.815 GHz. The program developed an innovative PPM circuit that provided extremely uniform magnetic fields at the electron beam location while providing unprecedented access to the RF circuit for tuners and water cooling. Simulations indicated the klystron would produce more than 11 kW with an efficiency exceeding 65%. Problems with the mechanical design prevented successful testing of the initial prototype; however, a new design was successfully developed and implemented in a 6 MW klystron developed in a follow-on program. Funding is being pursued to rebuild the 10 kW RF circuit and complete the klystron development.

  10. Development of a 10 MW Sheet Beam Klystron for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Jongewaard, E.; Haase, A.; Jensen, A.; Martin, D.; Burke, A.; /SAIC, Sunnyvale

    2009-05-07

    SLAC is developing a 10 MW, 5 Hz, 1.6 ms, L-band (1.3 GHz) Sheet-Beam Klystron as a less expensive and more compact alternative to the ILC baseline Multiple-Beam Klystron. The Klystron is intended as a plug-compatible device of the same beam current and operating voltage as existing Multiple-Beam Klystrons. At this time, a beam tester has been constructed and currently is in test. The beam tester includes an intercepting cup for making beam quality measurements of the 130 A, 40-to-1 aspect ratio beam. Measurements will be made of the electrostatic beam and of the beam after transporting through a drift tube and magnetic focusing system. General theory of operation, design trade-offs, and manufacturing considerations of both the beam tester and klystron will be discussed.

  11. Prototype microwave source for a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.; Deadrick, F.; Westenskow, G.A.; Giordano, G.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Reginato, L.; Vanecek, D.; Yu, S.

    1996-06-01

    A test facility is established at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study RF power sources for linear colliders based on the Relativistic Klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) concept. A 24-m long prototype source, the RTA, will be constructed in this facility to study physics, engineering, and cost issues related to RK-TBA`s. The RTA will generate 200-ns 180-MW RF (11.4-GHz) pulses from each of eight output ports. The major components of the RTA include a 2.8-MeV 1.2-kA induction injector, transverse beam modulator, adiabatic compressor, and RF extraction section. The beam energy is increased to 4 MeV and the RF bunch length is shortened from 240{degree} to 110{degree} in the adiabatic compressor. The 8-m long extraction section includes 40 induction accelerator cells to maintain beam energy at an average 4 MeV, eight equally spaced RF output structures, and a ppm quadrupole focusing system. In this paper, the authors describe the RTA and present results of component testing and computer simulations.

  12. Investigation of the phase stability of an X-band long pulse multibeam relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Jin, Xiao; Lei, Lurong; Zhu, Lei; Li, Lele; Li, Shifeng; Yan, Wenkang; He, Hu

    2016-09-01

    To realize coherent high power microwave combining, an X-band long pulse multibeam relativistic klystron amplifier is designed, and the relative phase stability is investigated by three dimensions particle in cell simulation and high power microwave experiment. The simulation shows that the relative phase difference can be stabilized at gigawatt level radiation power. But the relative phase jitter increases in the experiment, then some measures are proposed to improve the stability of relative phase difference and avoid pulse shortening. A 0.98 GW radiation power with pulse duration of 160 ns is obtained in the experiment, the pulse shortening is avoided. The relative phase difference fluctuation between output microwave and input RF signal is less than ±25° in a single shot with duration of 100 ns. Then, the experiment of pulse repetition is carried out, and an output microwave with 0.98 GW radiation power at 25 Hz repetition rate is obtained. The power conversion efficiency is about 35% with pulse duration of 160 ns. The relative phase difference is less than ±30° at 25 Hz repetition rate in 100 ns.

  13. Study program for design improvements of the X-3060 klystron. Phase 3: Electron gun fabrication and beam analyzer evaluation. Phase 4: Klystron prototype fabrication and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A.

    1981-01-01

    A full scale model was produced to verify suggested design changes. Through beam analyzer study, the correct electron beam diameter and cross sectional profile were established in conjunction with the desired confining magnetic field. Comparative data on the performance of the X-3060 klystron, design predictions for the improved klystron, and performance data taken during acceptance testing of the prototype VKS-8274 JPL are presented.

  14. A Sheet-Beam Klystron Paper Design Development of a Sheet-Beam Klystron for the NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G

    2004-03-25

    What may be the first detailed cold test and computer simulation analysis of a Double Sheet Beam Klystron (DSBK) was performed at SLAC. The device was conceptually designed mechanically, and evaluated electrically for beam formation, gain, stability and efficiency. It is believed that the DSBK can be built at a relatively low cost for a future NLC collider and can produce at least 150 MW at 11.4 GHz with PPM focusing. Voltage and current are 450 kV and 640 A, respectively.

  15. A unique power supply for the PEP II klystron at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, R.; Nguyen, M.N.

    1997-07-01

    Each of the eight 1.2 MW RF klystrons for the PEP-II storage rings require a 2.5 MVA DC power supply of 83 Kv at 23 amps. The design for the supply was base on three factors, low cost, small size to fit existing substation pads, and good protection against damage to the klystron including klystron gun arcs. The supply uses a 12 pulse 12.5 KV primary thyristor star point controller with primary filter inductor to provide rapid voltage control, good voltage regulation, and fast turn off during klystron tube faults. The supply also uses a unique secondary rectifier, filter capacitor configuration to minimize the energy available under a klystron fault. The voltage control is from 0--90 KV with a regulation of < 0.1% and voltage ripple of < 1% P-P, (< 0.2% RMS) above 60 KV. The supply utilizes a thyristor crowbar, which under a klystron tube arc limits the energy in the klystron arc to < 5 joules. If the thyristor crowbar is disabled the energy supplied is < 40 joules into the arc. The size of the supply was reduced small enough to fit the existing PEP transformer yard pads. The cost of the power supply was < $140 per KVA.

  16. Design and Simulation of Electron Gun for a Multibeam Klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehra, A. K.; Gupta, R. K.; Sharma, S. M.; Panda, P. C.; Choyal, Y.; Sharma, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    This paper represents the design of multi-beam (sixty-beam) electron gun and focusing system for high power, compact klystron. The beam voltage is 4 kV with a total beam current of 513 (8.55 × 60) mA which is equally divided among sixty-beam. Each beam has a perveance of 0.033 μP making a total gun perveance of 2.02 μP corresponding to a total beam power of more than 2 kW. The cathode radius is7 mm and individual emitter radius is 0.2 mm having current density 6.7 A/cm2. The design has been accomplished using OPERA 3D code. All beamlets have individual anode as well as BFE and a common focusing system. Potential difference between cathode and anode is 4 kV. A magnetic field of 1200 Gauss is applied along the beam axis. A major challenge for the development of multi-beam klystron is design and technology for the focusing of off-axis beamlets because off-axis beams are at various azimuths.

  17. Analysis on the mechanism of pulse-shortening in an X-band triaxial klystron amplifier due to the asymmetric mode competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun; Xie, Yongjie; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Zehua; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zi, Yanyong; Zhong, Huihuang

    2016-12-01

    Asymmetric mode competitions are observed in the design of an X-band triaxial klystron amplifier with an asymmetric input cavity, and the generation mechanism of the asymmetric mode competition is analyzed in the paper. The results indicate that the asymmetric modes are excited in the buncher cavity. The asymmetric mode (coaxial TM612 mode) in the buncher cavity with the highest shunt impedance can start up first among the asymmetric modes with negative beam loading conductance. The coupling of the corresponding coaxial TE mode between the buncher and input cavity exacerbates the start oscillation of the asymmetric mode competition. The rationality of the analysis is demonstrated by cutting off the propagation of the corresponding coaxial TE modes between the buncher cavity and the input cavity, and the asymmetric mode competitions are thoroughly suppressed by specially designed reflectors and lossy material. In simulation, a microwave with a power of 1.28 GW and a frequency of 9.375 GHz is generated, and the extraction efficiency and the gain are 34.5% and 41.5 dB, respectively.

  18. Final Design of the SLAC P2 Marx Klystron Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, M.A.; Benwell, A.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; MacNair, D.; Nguyen, M.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    The SLAC P2 Marx has been under development for two years, and follows on the P1 Marx as an alternative to the baseline klystron modulator for the International Linear Collider. The P2 Marx utilizes a redundant architecture, air-insulation, a control system with abundant diagnostic access, and a novel nested droop correction scheme. This paper is an overview of the design of this modulator. There are several points of emphasis for the P2 Marx design. First, the modulator must be compatible with the ILC two-tunnel design. In this scheme, the modulator and klystron are located within a service tunnel with limited access and available footprint for a modulator. Access to the modulator is only practical from one side. Second, the modulator must have high availability. Robust components are not sufficient alone to achieve availability much higher than 99%. Therefore, redundant architectures are necessary. Third, the modulator must be relatively low cost. Because of the large number of stations in the ILC, the investment needed for the modulator components is significant. High-volume construction techniques which take advantage of an economy of scale must be utilized. Fourth, the modulator must be simple and efficient to maintain. If a modulator does become inoperable, the MTTR must be small. Fifth, even though the present application for the modulator is for the ILC, future accelerators can also take advantage of this development effort. The hardware, software, and concepts developed in this project should be designed such that further development time necessary for other applications is minimal.

  19. Investigation of the Long-Term Performance of the 324 MHz Klystrons for Achieving the Efficient Operation of the Linac at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, T.; Shinozaki, S.; Chishiro, E.; Sato, F.; Kawamura, M.; Futatsukawa, K.; Fukui, Y.; Oguri, H.

    As a part of the researches of the reliability and life time of klystrons, the cathode performance test of 324 MHz klystrons operated for 32000 hours on line has been performed at the klystron test stand. The experimental results coincide approximately with the data both reported in the literature for the cathode performance and the one obtained from the data base of RF data acquisition system. In this test, two parameters such as klystron beam perveance and knee-point were used to investigate the emission performance. It turned out that klystron beam perveance is most suitable parameter for understanding the klystron performance under operating condition on line.

  20. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced NMR at 187 GHz/284 MHz using an Extended Interaction Klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Thomas F.; Dannatt, Hugh R. W.; Barrow, Nathan S.; Watts, Anthony; Brown, Steven P.; Newton, Mark E.; Dupree, Ray

    2016-04-01

    A Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation (DNP) enhanced solid-state Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectrometer which uses a 187 GHz (corresponding to 1H NMR frequency of 284 MHz) Extended Interaction Klystron (EIK) amplifier as the microwave source is briefly described. Its performance is demonstrated for a biomolecule (bacteriorhodopsin), a pharmaceutical, and surface functionalised silica. The EIK is very compact and easily incorporated into an existing spectrometer. The bandwidth of the amplifier is sufficient that it obviates the need for a sweepable magnetic field, once set, for all commonly used radicals. The variable power (CW or pulsed) output from the EIK is transmitted to the DNP-NMR probe using a quasi-optic system with a high power isolator and a corrugated waveguide which feeds the microwaves into the DNP-NMR probe. Curved mirrors inside the probe project the microwaves down the axis of the MAS rotor, giving a very efficient system such that maximum DNP enhancement is achieved with less than 3 W output from the microwave source. The DNP-NMR probe operates with a sample temperature down to 90 K whilst spinning at 8 kHz. Significant enhancements, in excess of 100 for bacteriorhodopsin in purple membrane (bR in PM), are shown along with spectra which are enhanced by ≈25 with respect to room temperature, for both the pharmaceutical furosemide and surface functionalised silica. These enhancements allow hitherto prohibitively time consuming experiments to be undertaken. The power at which the DNP enhancement in bR in PM saturates does not change significantly between 90 K and 170 K even though the enhancement drops by a factor of ≈11. As the DNP build up time decreases by a factor 3 over this temperature range, the reduction in T1n is presumably a significant contribution to the drop in enhancement.

  1. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced NMR at 187 GHz/284 MHz using an Extended Interaction Klystron amplifier.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Thomas F; Dannatt, Hugh R W; Barrow, Nathan S; Watts, Anthony; Brown, Steven P; Newton, Mark E; Dupree, Ray

    2016-04-01

    A Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation (DNP) enhanced solid-state Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectrometer which uses a 187 GHz (corresponding to (1)H NMR frequency of 284 MHz) Extended Interaction Klystron (EIK) amplifier as the microwave source is briefly described. Its performance is demonstrated for a biomolecule (bacteriorhodopsin), a pharmaceutical, and surface functionalised silica. The EIK is very compact and easily incorporated into an existing spectrometer. The bandwidth of the amplifier is sufficient that it obviates the need for a sweepable magnetic field, once set, for all commonly used radicals. The variable power (CW or pulsed) output from the EIK is transmitted to the DNP-NMR probe using a quasi-optic system with a high power isolator and a corrugated waveguide which feeds the microwaves into the DNP-NMR probe. Curved mirrors inside the probe project the microwaves down the axis of the MAS rotor, giving a very efficient system such that maximum DNP enhancement is achieved with less than 3 W output from the microwave source. The DNP-NMR probe operates with a sample temperature down to 90K whilst spinning at 8 kHz. Significant enhancements, in excess of 100 for bacteriorhodopsin in purple membrane (bR in PM), are shown along with spectra which are enhanced by ≈25 with respect to room temperature, for both the pharmaceutical furosemide and surface functionalised silica. These enhancements allow hitherto prohibitively time consuming experiments to be undertaken. The power at which the DNP enhancement in bR in PM saturates does not change significantly between 90K and 170 K even though the enhancement drops by a factor of ≈11. As the DNP build up time decreases by a factor 3 over this temperature range, the reduction in T1n is presumably a significant contribution to the drop in enhancement. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Three-dimensional relativistic field-electron interaction in a multicavity high-power klystron. 1: Basic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of three dimensional relativistic klystron action is described. The relativistic axisymmetric equations of motion are derived from the time-dependent Lagrangian function for a charged particle in electromagnetic fields. An analytical expression of the fringing RF electric and magnetic fields within and in the vicinity of the interaction gap and the space-charge forces between axially and radially elastic deformable rings of charges are both included in the formulation. This makes an accurate computation of electron motion through the tunnel of the cavities and the drift tube spaces possible. Method of analysis is based on Lagrangian formulation. Bunching is computed using a disk model of electron stream in which the electron stream is divided into axisymmetric disks of equal charge and each disk is assumed to consist of a number of concentric rings of equal charges. The Individual representative groups of electrons are followed through the interaction gaps and drift tube spaces. Induced currents and voltages in interacting cavities are calculated by invoking the Shockley-Ramo theorem.

  3. A 100 kV, 60 A solid state 4 kHz switching modulator for high power klystron driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortázar, O. D.; Ganuza, D.; De La Fuente, J. M.; Zulaika, M.; Pérez, A.; Anderson, D. E.

    2013-05-01

    A solid state high power modulator capable of delivering 120 kV and 60 A developed in collaboration with the JEMA Corporation, ESS Bilbao, and the SNS (ORNL) for driving high power klystrons is presented. Pulses with less than 10 μs risetime and flatness under 0.1% are obtained with programmable frequency pulses between 2 and 50 Hz. Eight solid state switches combined with custom air-insulated high voltage transformers working at a switching frequency of 4 kHz produce high quality pulses by phase shifting the transformer drives. Each relative high frequency stage pumps a double stage high voltage Marx generator that supplies the output pulse shape and frequency. This merged topology between a Marx generator and direct modulator takes advantage of the strengths of both approaches. Low energy storage in the output stages assures safe operation in case of a load arc discharge. Real time voltage correction during the pulse is also provided to compensate for the droop inherent with the use of low energy storage in the output stages. Data at full power with a dummy resistive load are presented.

  4. A 100 kV, 60 A solid state 4 kHz switching modulator for high power klystron driving.

    PubMed

    Cortázar, O D; Ganuza, D; De La Fuente, J M; Zulaika, M; Pérez, A; Anderson, D E

    2013-05-01

    A solid state high power modulator capable of delivering 120 kV and 60 A developed in collaboration with the JEMA Corporation, ESS Bilbao, and the SNS (ORNL) for driving high power klystrons is presented. Pulses with less than 10 μs risetime and flatness under 0.1% are obtained with programmable frequency pulses between 2 and 50 Hz. Eight solid state switches combined with custom air-insulated high voltage transformers working at a switching frequency of 4 kHz produce high quality pulses by phase shifting the transformer drives. Each relative high frequency stage pumps a double stage high voltage Marx generator that supplies the output pulse shape and frequency. This merged topology between a Marx generator and direct modulator takes advantage of the strengths of both approaches. Low energy storage in the output stages assures safe operation in case of a load arc discharge. Real time voltage correction during the pulse is also provided to compensate for the droop inherent with the use of low energy storage in the output stages. Data at full power with a dummy resistive load are presented.

  5. CAVITY EXCITATION CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Franck, J.V.

    1959-10-20

    An electronic oscillator is described for energizing a resonant cavity and to a system for stabilizing the operatin g frequency of the oscillator at the particular frequency necessary to establish a particular preferred field configuration or mode in the cavity, in this instance a linear accelerator. A freely rnnning oscillator has an output coupled to a resonant cavity wherein a field may be built up at any one of several adjacent frequencies. A pickup loop in the cavity is suitably shielded and positioned in the cavity so that only energy at the panticular desired frequency is fed back to stabilize the oscillator. A phase and gain control is in cluded in the feedback line.

  6. A new method for continuous measurements of oceanic and atmospheric N2O, CO and CO2: performance of off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) coupled to non-dispersive infrared detection (NDIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo-Martínez, D. L.; Beyer, M.; Krumbholz, M.; Piller, I.; Kock, A.; Steinhoff, T.; Körtzinger, A.; Bange, H. W.

    2013-12-01

    A new system for continuous, highly resolved oceanic and atmospheric measurements of N2O, CO and CO2 is described. The system is based upon off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) and a non-dispersive infrared analyzer (NDIR), both coupled to a Weiss-type equilibrator. Performance of the combined setup was evaluated by testing its precision, accuracy, long-term stability, linearity and response time. Furthermore, the setup was tested during two oceanographic campaigns in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean in order to explore its potential for autonomous deployment onboard voluntary observing ships (VOS). Improved equilibrator response times for N2O (2.5 min) and CO (45 min) were achieved in comparison to response times from similar chamber designs used by previous studies. High stability of the OA-ICOS analyzer was demonstrated by low optimal integration times of 2 and 4 min for N2O and CO respectively, as well as detection limits of < 40 ppt and precision better than 0.3 ppb Hz-1/2. Results from a direct comparison of the method presented here and well-established discrete methods for oceanic N2O and CO2 measurements showed very good consistency. The favorable agreement between underway atmospheric N2O, CO and CO2 measurements and monthly means at Ascension Island (7.96° S 14.4° W) further suggests a reliable operation of the underway setup in the field. The potential of the system as an improved platform for measurements of trace gases was explored by using continuous N2O and CO2 data to characterize the development of the seasonal equatorial upwelling in the Atlantic Ocean during two R/V Maria S. Merian cruises. A similar record of high-resolution CO measurements was simultaneously obtained, offering, for the first time, the possibility of a comprehensive view of the distribution and emissions of these climate-relevant gases in the area studied. The relatively simple underway N2O/CO/CO2 setup is suitable for long-term deployment onboard research

  7. A new method for continuous measurements of oceanic and atmospheric N2O, CO and CO2: performance of off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) coupled to non-dispersive infrared detection (NDIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo-Martínez, D. L.; Beyer, M.; Krumbholz, M.; Piller, I.; Kock, A.; Steinhoff, T.; Körtzinger, A.; Bange, H. W.

    2013-07-01

    A new system for continuous, highly-resolved oceanic and atmospheric measurements of N2O, CO and CO2 is described. The system is based upon off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) and a non-dispersive infrared analyzer (NDIR) both coupled to a Weiss-type equilibrator. Performance of the combined setup was evaluated by testing its precision, accuracy, long-term stability, linearity and response time. Furthermore, the setup was tested during two oceanographic campaigns in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean in order to explore its potential for autonomous deployment onboard voluntary observing ships (VOS). Improved equilibrator response times for N2O (2.5 min) and CO (45 min) were achieved in comparison to response times from similar chamber designs used by previous studies. High stability of the OA-ICOS analyzer was demonstrated by low optimal integration times of 2 and 4 min for N2O and CO respectively, as well as detection limits of < 40 ppt and precision better than 0.3 ppb Hz-1/2. Results from a direct comparison of the method presented here and well-established discrete methods for oceanic N2O and CO2 measurements showed very good consistency. The favorable agreement between underway atmospheric N2O, CO and CO2 measurements and monthly means at Ascension Island (7.96° S 14.4° W) further suggests a reliable operation of the underway setup in the field. The potential of the system as an improved platform for measurements of trace gases was explored by using continuous N2O and CO2 data to characterize the development of the seasonal equatorial upwelling in the Atlantic Ocean during two R/V Maria S. Merian cruises. A similar record of high-resolution CO measurements was simultaneously obtained offering for the first time the possibility of a comprehensive view on the distribution and emissions of these climate relevant gases on the area. The relatively simple underway N2O/CO/CO2 setup is suitable for long-term deployment on board of research and

  8. Transient Microphonic Effects In Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Powers; G. Davis; Lawrence King

    2005-07-10

    A number of experiments were performed on an installed and operational 5-cell CEBAF cavity to determine the minimum time required to reestablish stable gradient after a cavity window arc trip. Once it was determined that gradient could be reestablished within 10 ms by applying constant power RF signal in and a voltage controlled Oscillator-phase locked loop based system (VCO-PLL), a second experiment was performed to determine if stable gradient could be reestablished using a fixed frequency RF system with a simple gradient based closed loop control system. During this test, instabilities were observed in the cavity forward power signal, which were determined to be microphonic in nature. These microphonic effects were quantified using a cavity resonance monitor and a VCO{_}PLL RF system. Two types of microphonic effects were observed depending on the type of arc event. If the arc occurred in the vacuum space between the warm and cold windows, the transient frequency shift was about 75 Hz peak-to-peak. If the arc occurred on the cavity side of the cold window the transient frequency shift was about 400 Hz peak-to-peak. The background microphonics level for the tested cavity was approximately 30 Hz peak-to-peak. Experimental results, analysis of the resultant klystron power transients, the decay time of the transients, and the implications with respect to fast reset algorithms will be presented.

  9. An X-band high-impedance relativistic klystron amplifier with an annular explosive cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Danni; Zhang, Jun Zhong, Huihuang; Qi, Zumin

    2015-11-15

    The feasibility of employing an annular beam instead of a solid one in the X-band high-impedance relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) is investigated in theory and simulation. Small-signal theory analysis indicates that the optimum bunching distance, fundamental current modulation depth, beam-coupling coefficient, and beam-loaded quality factor of annular beams are all larger than the corresponding parameters of solid beams at the same beam voltage and current. An annular beam RKA and a solid beam RKA with almost the same geometric parameters are compared in particle-in-cell simulation. Output microwave power of 100 MW, gain of 50 dB, and power conversion efficiency of 42% are obtained in an annular beam RKA. The annular beam needs a 15% lower uniform guiding magnetic field than the solid beam. Our investigations demonstrate that we are able to use a simple annular explosive cathode immersed in a lower uniform magnetic field instead of a solid thermionic cathode in a complicated partially shielding magnetic field for designing high-impedance RKA, which avoids high temperature requirement, complicated electron-optical system, large area convergence, high current density, and emission uniformity for the solid beam. An equivalent method for the annular beam and the solid beam on bunching features is proposed and agrees with the simulation. The annular beam has the primary advantages over the solid beam that it can employ the immersing uniform magnetic field avoiding the complicated shielding magnetic field system and needs a lower optimum guiding field due to the smaller space charge effect.

  10. An X-band high-impedance relativistic klystron amplifier with an annular explosive cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Danni; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Qi, Zumin

    2015-11-01

    The feasibility of employing an annular beam instead of a solid one in the X-band high-impedance relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) is investigated in theory and simulation. Small-signal theory analysis indicates that the optimum bunching distance, fundamental current modulation depth, beam-coupling coefficient, and beam-loaded quality factor of annular beams are all larger than the corresponding parameters of solid beams at the same beam voltage and current. An annular beam RKA and a solid beam RKA with almost the same geometric parameters are compared in particle-in-cell simulation. Output microwave power of 100 MW, gain of 50 dB, and power conversion efficiency of 42% are obtained in an annular beam RKA. The annular beam needs a 15% lower uniform guiding magnetic field than the solid beam. Our investigations demonstrate that we are able to use a simple annular explosive cathode immersed in a lower uniform magnetic field instead of a solid thermionic cathode in a complicated partially shielding magnetic field for designing high-impedance RKA, which avoids high temperature requirement, complicated electron-optical system, large area convergence, high current density, and emission uniformity for the solid beam. An equivalent method for the annular beam and the solid beam on bunching features is proposed and agrees with the simulation. The annular beam has the primary advantages over the solid beam that it can employ the immersing uniform magnetic field avoiding the complicated shielding magnetic field system and needs a lower optimum guiding field due to the smaller space charge effect.

  11. Experimental study of pulsed heating of electromagnetic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Pritzkau, D.P.; Menegat, A.; Siemann, R.H.

    1997-08-01

    An experiment to study the effects of pulsed heating in electromagnetic cavities will be performed. Pulsed heating is believed to be the limiting mechanism of high acceleration gradients at short wavelengths. A cylindrical cavity operated in the TE{sub 011} mode at a frequency of 11.424 GHz will be used. A klystron will be used to supply a peak input power of 20 MW with a pulse length of 1.5 {mu}s. The temperature response of the cavity will be measured by a second waveguide designed to excite a TE{sub 012} mode in the cavity with a low-power CW signal at a frequency of 17.8 GHz. The relevant theory of pulsed heating will be discussed and the results from cold-testing the structure will be presented.

  12. Test Results of a Compact Conventional Modulator for Two-Klystron Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S

    2004-05-04

    Modulator technology has not advanced greatly over the last 30 years. Today, with the advent of the High Voltage, High Power IGBT there are several approaches for a solid state ON/OFF switched modulator. Klystron and accelerator technology is forcing voltages and peak powers higher such as the demand for 500 kV and 500 amperes peak to power two X-Band klystrons. Conventional technology (line-type modulators) were never overly concerned about rise time and efficiency. A few years ago, the klystron department at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) undertook an investigation into what could be done in a conventional modulator at 500 kV. We have reported on test bed measurements and shown both conceptual and hardware pictures during design and construction. We have now completed the modulator tank.

  13. Metasurface external cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Luyao Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo; Chen, Qi-Sheng

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  14. Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor, alternative method of measuring cavity microphonics

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski; G. Davis; Hai Dong; J. Hovater; John Musson; Thomas Powers

    2005-09-20

    As is well known, mechanical vibration or microphonics in a cryomodule causes the cavity resonance frequency to change at the vibration frequency. One way to measure the cavity microphonics is to drive the cavity with a Phase Locked Loop. Measurement of the instantaneous frequency or PLL error signal provides information about the cavity microphonic frequencies. Although the PLL error signal is available directly, precision frequency measurements require additional instrumentation, a Cavity Resonance Monitor (CRM). The analog version of such a device has been successfully used for several cavity tests [1]. In this paper we present a prototype of a Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor designed and built in the last year. The hardware of this instrument consists of an RF downconverter, digital quadrature demodulator and digital processor motherboard (Altera FPGA). The motherboard processes received data and computes frequency changes with a resolution of 0.2 Hz, with a 3 kHz output bandwidth.

  15. Development of high power CW 3.7 GHz klystrons for fusion experiments on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Magne, R.; Armitano, A.; Berger-By, G.; Bouquey, F.; Corbel, E.; Delpech, L.; Mollard, P.; Prou, M.; Samaille, F.; Volpe, D.; Beunas, A.; Kazarian, F.

    2011-07-01

    In the frame of the CIMES project, a collaborative effort between Association Euratom-CEA and Thales Electron Devices (TED) has led to the development of a high power CW klystron TH 2103 C, working at 3.7 GHz, for plasma heating and current drive for the Tokamak Tore Supra. A prototype has been manufactured and thoroughly tested on water load in December 2007 to verify that all the parameters met the specifications. The paper will present in detail the process and results of the test of the klystrons.

  16. Recent performance, lifetime, and failure modes of the 5045 klystron population at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.F.; Lee, T.G.; Pearson, C.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1992-08-01

    The 65 MW S-Band klystrons (5045) used to power SLC have been in service for over seven years. Currently, 244 of these tubes are in place on the accelerator, operating full power at 120 pulses per second. Enough tubes have now reached end of life, or experienced other failures to allow a good analysis of failure modes, and to project average lifetime for this type of tube. This paper describes the various modes of failure seen in klystrons rammed from SLC service, and provides data on expected lifetime from current production based on accumulated SLC operating experience.

  17. Complete Measurement of Stable Isotopes in N2O (δ15N, δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ18O, δ17O) Using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leen, J. B.; Gupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate contamination in water is a worldwide environmental problem and source apportionment is critical to managing nitrate pollution. Fractionation caused by physical, chemical and biological processes alters the isotope ratios of nitrates (15N/14N, 18O/16O and 17O/16O) and biochemical nitrification and denitrification impart different intramolecular site preference (15N14NO vs. 14N15NO). Additionally, atmospheric nitrate is anomalously enriched in 17O compared to other nitrate sources. The anomaly (Δ17O) is conserved during fractionation processes, providing a tracer of atmospheric nitrate. All of these effects can be used to apportion nitrate in soil. Current technology for measuring nitrate isotopes is complicated and costly - it involves conversion of nitrate to nitrous oxide (N2O), purification, preconcentration and measurement by isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Site specific measurements require a custom IRMS. There is a pressing need to make this measurement simpler and more accessible. Los Gatos Research has developed a next generation mid-infrared Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) analyzer to quantify all stable isotope ratios of N2O (δ15N, δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ18O, δ17O). We present the latest performance data demonstrating the precision and accuracy of the OA-ICOS based measurement. At an N2O concentration of 322 ppb, the analyzer quantifies [N2O], δ15N, δ15Na, δ15Nb, and δ18O with a precision of ±0.05 ppb, ±0.4 ‰, ±0.45 ‰, and ±0.6 ‰, and ±0.8 ‰ respectively (1σ, 100s; 1σ, 1000s for δ18O). Measurements of gas standards demonstrate accuracy better than ±1 ‰ for isotope ratios over a wide dynamic range (200 - 100,000 ppb). The measurement of δ17O requires a higher concentration (1 - 50 ppm), easily obtainable through conversion of nitrates in water. For 10 ppm of N2O, the instrument achieves a δ17O precision of ±0.05 ‰ (1σ, 1000s). This performance is sufficient to quantify atmospheric

  18. Discrete wavelength-locked external cavity laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Silver, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An external cavity laser (and method of generating laser light) comprising: a laser light source; means for collimating light output by the laser light source; a diffraction grating receiving collimated light; a cavity feedback mirror reflecting light received from the diffraction grating back to the diffraction grating; and means for reliably tuning the external cavity laser to discrete wavelengths.

  19. Thermal Considerations of Space Solar Power Concepts with 3.5 GW RF Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the thermal challenge of the Space Solar Power (SSP) design concepts with a 3.5 GW radio-frequency (RF) output. High efficiency klystrons are thermally more favored than solid state (butterstick) to convert direct current (DC) electricity to radio-frequency (RF) energy at the transmitters in these concepts. Using klystrons, the heat dissipation is 0.72 GW. Using solid state, the heat dissipation is 2.33 GW. The heat dissipation of the klystrons is 85% at 500C, 10% at 300C, and 5% at 125C. All the heat dissipation of the solid state is at 100C. Using klystrons, the radiator area is 74,500 square m Using solid state, the radiator area is 2,362,200 square m Space constructable heat pipe radiators are assumed in the thermal analysis. Also, to make the SSP concepts feasible, the mass of the heat transport system must be minimized. The heat transport distance from the transmitters to the radiators must be minimized. It can be accomplished by dividing the radiator into a cluster of small radiators, so that the heat transport distances between the klystrons and radiators can be minimized. The area of each small radiator is on the order of 1 square m. Two concepts for accommodating a cluster of small radiators are presented. If the distance between the transmitters and radiators is 1.5 m or less, constant conductance heat pipes (CCHPs) are acceptable for heat transport. If the distance exceeds 1.5 m, loop heat pipes (LHPs) are needed.

  20. A possible pole problem in the formula for klystron gap fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.

    1977-01-01

    In isolated cases a pole may be encountered in a previously published solution for the fields in a klystron gap. Formulas, permitting the critical combinations of parameters to be defined, are presented. It is noted that the region of inaccuracy surrounding the pole is sufficiently small and that a 0.1% change in the field changing parameter is enough to avoid it.

  1. Beam dynamics and rf evolution in a multistage klystron-like free- electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, S. . Inst. for Beam Particle Dynamics); Takayama, K. . Inst. for Beam Particle Dynamics Texas Accelerator Center, The Woodlands, TX )

    1991-01-01

    Current understandings of beam dynamics and RF evolution in a klystron-like free-electron laser are present. Phase sensitiveness to injection jitters estimated by existing two theories is discussed. BBU suppression due to linear detuning is proposed as an alternative of ever proposed techniques. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Design, construction and evaluation of a 12.045 GHz, 2.0 kW-cw permanent-magnet focused klystron amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishida, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a lightweight, high-efficiency, 1-2 kW cw, permanent magnet focused klystron operating at 12.0 GHz was described. The design is based on use of a samarium-cobalt permanent magnet for focusing of the electron beam and choice of the most optimum parameters for maximum efficiency. A filter-loaded output circuit is used for the required bandwidth. The design incorporates a collector which is demountable from the tube to facilitate multistage depressed collector experiments, permitting replacement with a NASA-designed axisymmetric, electrostatic collector for linear beam microwave tubes. A further requirement is that the focusing field between the last interaction gap and the collector decay in a prescribed manner referred to as adiabatic expansion.

  3. Transient ponderomotive effects in superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk Davis; Thomas Powers

    2005-07-10

    A number of experiments were performed on an installed and operational 5-cell CEBAF cavity to determine the minimum time required to re-establish stable gradient after a cavity window arc trip. Once it was determined that gradient could be re-established within 10 ms by applying constant power RF signal in a voltage controlled Oscillator-phase locked loop based system (VCO-PLL), a second experiment was performed to determine if stable gradient could be re-established using a fixed frequency RF system with a simple gradient based closed loop control system. During this test, fluctuations were observed in the cavity forward power signal, the source of which was later determined to be pondero-motive in nature. These ponderomotive induced vibrations were quantified using a cavity resonance monitor and a VCO-PLL RF system. Experimental results, analysis of the resultant klystron power transients, the decay time of the transients, and the implications with respect to fast reset algorithms will be presented.

  4. Beam loading in magnicon deflection cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hafizi, B.; Gold, S.H.

    1997-02-01

    The radio frequency (RF) source for the next linear collider (NLC) is required to generate a power of 1/2--1 GW per tube in a 200-ns pulse, or 100--200 J of energy in a pulse of up to a few {micro}s in duration, at a frequency of 10--20 GHz. A variety of RF sources are under investigation at the present time aimed at fulfilling the needs of the NLC. These include the X-band klystron, Gyroklystron, traveling-wave tube, harmonic convertor, chopper-driven traveling-wave tube, and magnicon. Here, analysis of the beam-deflection cavity interaction in a magnicon is presented and compared with experiment. For a driven cavity a dispersion relation is obtained wherein the interaction modifies the cold-cavity factor and the resonance frequency. In terms of a lumped-parameter equivalent circuit the interaction corresponds to a complex-values beam admittance Y{sub b} in parallel with the cavity admittance. The response of the gain cavities is modified by the same admittance. In a magnicon, Y{sub b} is a sensitive function of the solenoidal focusing magnetic field B{sub 0}, thus providing a convenient means of adjusting the cavity properties in experiments. When the relativistic gyrofrequency is twice the drive frequency, ImY{sub b} = 0 and the beam does not load the cavity. Analytical expressions of the variation of the detuning, instantaneous bandwidth (i.e., loaded quality factor) and gain with B{sub 0} are derived. Simulation results are presented to verify the linear analysis with ideal beams and to illustrate the modifications due to finite beam emittance. Results of the magnicon experiment at the Naval Research Laboratory are examined in the light of the analysis.

  5. Cryogenic RF Material Testing with a High-Q Copper Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Jiquan; Tantawi, Sami; Martin, David; Yoneda, Charles

    2010-11-04

    An X-band RF cryogenic material testing system has been developed in the past few years. This system employs a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom working under a TE{sub 013} like mode. By measuring the cavity Qs with a network analyzer, the system can characterize the surface resistance of different samples at different temperatures. Using a 50 MW 2{mu}s pulsed klystron, the system can measure the quenching H field for superconducting samples, up to 300-400 mT. In this paper, we will present the most recent developments of the system and testing results.

  6. Relativistic klystron driven compact high gradient accelerator as an injector to an X-ray synchrotron radiation ring

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U. L.

    1990-01-01

    A compact high gradient accelerator driven by a relativistic klystron is utilized to inject high energy electrons into an X-ray synchrotron radiation ring. The high gradients provided by the relativistic klystron enables accelerator structure to be much shorter (typically 3 meters) than conventional injectors. This in turn enables manufacturers which utilize high energy, high intensity X-rays to produce various devices, such as computer chips, to do so on a cost effective basis.

  7. Simulation of Proposed 20 KW Klystron Free Electron Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    BEHAVIOR WITHIN THE UNDULATOR 14 C. LOW GAIN DERIVATION 17 D. GAIN DEGRADATION DUE TO ELECTRON BEAM QUALITY 23 E. SHORT PULSE EFFECTS 24 F. THE...axis. As the electrons pass by each magnet, they are deflected slightly from side to side. This periodic action converts the straight electron beam ...electron beam . Between one and ten percent is extracted from the optical cavity to make a weapon! Electron Beam Undulator Electron Dump ► Mirror Figure

  8. Dark Current and X Ray Measurements of an 805 MHz Pillbox Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    J. Norem; P. Gruber; A. Bross; S. Geer; A. Moretti; Z Qian; D. M. Kaplan; Y. Torun; R. Rimmer; Derun Li; M. Zisman

    2003-05-01

    The muon cooling systems proposed for neutrino factories require low frequency (201 MHz) RF cavities with Be windows, at high gradient (Eacc {approx} 16 MV/m), in strong solenoidal magnetic field ({approx} 5 T). For the proposed Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) [1], an experimental demonstration of cooling, we have an additional constraint that we must operate sensitive particle detectors very close to the RF cavities, which produce backgrounds from dark currents and x rays. To understand the processes involved in cavity conditioning and operation near particle detectors, we have constructed a test facility at Lab G of Fermilab, where a 5 Tesla superconducting solenoid, a 14 MW peak power klystron and a pillbox test cavity at 805 MHz are available. We present measurements of dark currents, x rays and surface structure from the pillbox cavity, with both copper and beryllium endplates, and discuss the interaction between surface structure and radiation backgrounds produced.

  9. Antiresonant ring interferometer for laser cavity dumping, mode locking, and other applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegman, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    Applications in lasers for antiresonant ring interferometer include coupled laser cavities, variable laser-output coupling, intercavity harmonic-output coupling, mode locking, cavity dumping, and pulse code modulation.

  10. Transient high-field behavior of niobium superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.; Deruyter, H.; Hogg, H.A.

    1983-03-01

    Tests have been performed on the breakdown behavior of a TM/sub 010/ mode, S-band niobium cavity at low temperatures. Unloaded Q's of 9 x 10/sup 7/ at 4.2 K and of 7 x 10/sup 9/ at 1.35 K were measured during several tests performed using pulses long enough for the cavity to reach steady state. The breakdown field at 1.35 K was increased from 15 to 20 MV/m by processing the cavity at room temperature using 1 MW, 2.5 ..mu..s pulses. The response of the cavity at 4.2 K to 1 MW, 2.5..mu..s pulses was also tested in several cool-downs. In these tests the cavity was heavily overcoupled to lower its time constant to a value of 0.80 times the RF pulse length of 2.5 ..mu..s. This condition maximizes the energy transfer from the klystron source to the cavity. Measurements made during these experiments clearly indicated that fields of about 50 MV/m were being reached in the cavity without breakdown.

  11. RF breakdown of 805 MHz cavities in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bowring, D.; Stratakis, D.; Kochemirovskiy, A.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Peterson, D.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.; Lane, P.; Torun, Y.; Haase, A.

    2015-05-03

    Ionization cooling of intense muon beams requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF structures in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We have measured the breakdown rate in several RF cavities operating at several frequencies. Cavities operating within solenoidal magnetic fields B > 0.25 T show an increased RF breakdown rate at lower gradients compared with similar operation when B = 0 T. Ultimately, this breakdown behavior limits the maximum safe operating gradient of the cavity. Beyond ionization cooling, this issue affects the design of photoinjectors and klystrons, among other applications. We have built an 805 MHz pillbox-type RF cavity to serve as an experimental testbed for this phenomenon. This cavity is designed to study the problem of RF breakdown in strong magnetic fields using various cavity materials and surface treatments, and with precise control over sources of systematic error. We present results from tests in which the cavity was run with all copper surfaces in a variety of magnetic fields.

  12. Active Control of Open Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    UKeiley, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Open loop edge blowing was demonstrated as an effective method for reducing the broad band and tonal components of the fluctuating surface pressure in open cavities. Closed loop has been successfully applied to low Mach number open cavities. Need to push actuators that are viable for closed loop control in bandwidth and output. Need a better understanding of the effects of control on the flow through detailed measurements so better actuation strategies can be developed.

  13. Amplitude Linearizers for PEP-II 1.2 MW Klystrons and LLRF Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Van Winkle, D.; Browne, J.; Fox, J.D.; Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; Teytelman, D.; /SLAC

    2006-07-18

    The PEP-II B-factory has aggressive current increases planned for luminosity through 2008. At 2.2A (HER) on 4A (LER) currents, we estimate that longitudinal growth rates will be comparable to the damping rates currently achieved in the existing low level RF and longitudinal feedback systems. Prior to having a good non-linear time domain model [1] it was postulated that klystron small signal gain non-linearity may be contributing to measured longitudinal growth rates being higher than linearly predicted growth rates. Five prototype klystron amplitude modulation linearizers have been developed to explore improved linearity in the LLRF system. The linearizers operate at 476 MHz with 15 dB dynamic range and 1 MHz linear control bandwidth. Results from lab measurements and high current beam tests are presented. Future development plans, conclusions from beam testing and ideas for future use of this linearization technique are presented.

  14. Study of the emission performance of high-power klystrons: SLAC XK-5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.

    1981-07-01

    There are hundreds of high power klystrons operated in the Linac gallery and about fifty to sixty tubes fail every year. The lifetime ranges from a few thousand up to seventy thousand hours except those which fail during an early period. The overall percentage of failures due to emission problems is approximately 25%. It is also noted that a 10% increase in mean lifetime of klystrons will reduce the overall cost per hour as much as a 10% increase in efficiency. Therefore, it is useful to find some method to predict the expected life of an individual tube. The final goal has not been attained yet, but some useful information was obtained. It is thought that this information might be helpful for those people who will study this subject further.

  15. Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator studies at the RTA test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.A.; Houck, T.L.; Anderson, D.

    1996-08-16

    A prototype rf power source based on the Relativistic Klystron Two- Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept is being constructed at LBNL to study physics, engineering, and costing issues. The prototype, called RTA, is described and compared to a full scale design appropriate for driving the Next Linear Collider. Specific details of the induction core test and pulsed power system are presented. Details of the 1-MeV, 1.2-kA induction gun currently under construction are described.

  16. Optical single photons on-demand teleported from microwave cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzanjeh, Sh; Vitali, D.; Tombesi, P.

    2013-03-01

    We propose a scheme for entangling the optical and microwave output modes of the respective cavities by using a micro mechanical resonator. The micro mechanical resonator, on one side, is capacitively coupled to the microwave cavity and, on the other side, it is coupled to a high-finesses optical cavity. We then show how this continuous variable entanglement can be profitably used to teleport the non-Gaussian number state |1> and the superposition (|0\\rangle +|1\\rangle )/\\sqrt 2 from the microwave cavity output mode onto an output of the optical cavity mode with fidelity much larger than the no-cloning limit.

  17. A 200 MHz 35 MW Multiple Beam Klystron for Accelerator Applications Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Lawrence Ives; Michael Read; Patrick Ferguson; David Marsden

    2011-11-28

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) performed initial development of a compact and reliable 35 MW, multiple beam klystron (MBK) at 200 MHz with a pulse length of 0.125 ms and a 30 Hz repetition rate. The device was targeted for acceleration and ionization cooling of a muon collider, but there are several other potential applications in this frequency range. The klystron uses multiple beams propagating in individual beam tunnels to reduce space charge and allow reduction in the accelerating voltage. This allows a significant reduction in length over a single beam source. More importantly this allows more efficient and less expensive power supplies. At 200 MHz, the interaction circuit for a single beam klystron would be more than six meters long to obtain 50% efficiency and 50 dB gain. This would require a beam voltage of approximately 400 kV and current of 251 A for a microperveance of 1.0. For an eight beam MBK with the same beam perveance, a three meter long interaction circuit achieves the same power and gain. Each beam operates at 142 kV and 70A. The Phase I demonstrated that this device could be fabricated with funding available in a Phase II program and could achieve the program specifications.

  18. Design and development of permanent magnet based focusing lens for J-Band Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Kumud; Itteera, Janvin; Ukarde, Priti; Malhotra, Sanjay; Taly, Y.K.; Bandyopadhay, Ayan; Meena, Rakesh; Rawat, Vikram; Joshi, L.M

    2014-07-01

    Applying permanent magnet technology to beam focusing in klystrons can reduce their power consumption and increase their reliability of operation. Electromagnetic design of the beam focusing elements, for high frequency travelling wave tubes, is very critical. The magnitude and profile of the magnetic field need to match the optics requirement from beam dynamics studies. The rise of the field from cathode gun region to the uniform field region (RF section) is important as the desired transition from zero to peak axial field must occur over a short axial distance. Confined flow regime is an optimum choice to minimize beam scalloping but demands an axial magnetic field greater than 2 - 3 times the Brillouin flow field. This necessitates optimization in the magnet design achieve high magnetic field within given spatial constraints. Electromagnetic design and simulations were done using 3D Finite element method (FEM) analysis software. A permanent magnet based focusing lens for a miniature J-Band klystron has been designed and developed at Control Instrumentation Division, BARC. This paper presents the design, simulation studies, beam transmission and RF tests results for J Band klystron with permanent magnet focusing lens. (author)

  19. Klystron Modulator Design for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, William A.; Baca, David M.; Partridge, Edward R.; Rees, Daniel E.

    2012-06-22

    This paper will describe the design of the 44 modulator systems that will be installed to upgrade the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator RF system. The klystrons can operate up to 86 kV with a nominal 32 Amp beam current with a 120 Hz repetition rate and 15% duty cycle. The klystrons are a mod-anode design. The modulator is designed with analog feedback control to ensure the klystron beam current is flat-top regulated. To achieve fast switching while maintaining linear feedback control, a grid-clamp, totem-pole modulator configuration is used with an 'on' deck and an 'off' deck. The on and off deck modulators are of identical design and utilize a cascode connected planar triode, cathode driven with a high speed MOSFET. The derived feedback is connected to the planar triode grid to enable the flat-top control. Although modern design approaches suggest solid state designs may be considered, the planar triode (Eimac Y-847B) is very cost effective, is easy to integrate with the existing hardware, and provides a simplified linear feedback control mechanism. The design is very compact and fault tolerant. This paper will review the complete electrical design, operational performance, and system characterization as applied to the LANSCE installation.

  20. Cavity magnomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    2016-01-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  1. Klystron modulator operation and upgrades for the APS linac

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, T.J.; Cours, A.

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac requires five 100-MW modulators to achieve its required energy. In-house construction of these modulators was under an extremely compressed time schedule and, while the original design was successful, it had a few shortcomings. The operation of the modulators was hindered by excessively sensitive controls and overheating during the hot summer months. The system underwent minor changes that resulted in major improvements. Additionally, improvements have been made to the high voltage circuits to improve the rise time of the output pulse shape. reduce the initial ringing of the pulse, and enhance the reliability of the system. This paper will outline the changes and explain the results of the improvements.

  2. Coupled Resonator Vertical Cavity Laser Diode

    SciTech Connect

    CHOQUETTE, KENT D.; CHOW, WENG W.; FISCHER, ARTHUR J.; GEIB, KENT M.; HOU, HONG Q.

    1999-09-16

    We report the operation of an electrically injected monolithic coupled resonator vertical cavity laser which consists of an active cavity containing In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As quantum wells optically coupled to a passive GaAs cavity. This device demonstrates novel modulation characteristics arising from dynamic changes in the coupling between the active and passive cavities. A composite mode theory is used to model the output modulation of the coupled resonator vertical cavity laser. It is shown that the laser intensity can be modulated by either forward or reverse biasing the passive cavity. Under forward biasing, the modulation is due to carrier induced changes in the refractive index, while for reverse bias operation the modulation is caused by field dependent cavity enhanced absorption.

  3. 1.5-GW S-band relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Patrick E.

    1992-04-01

    There is a strong symbiotic relationship between a developing technology and its applications. New technologies can generate applications previously either unrealizable or impractical. Conversely, applications can demand the development of new technological capability. Examples of both types of development can be found in the evolution of HPM. The high power and energy output made possible by HPM have created a technology driven interest in directed energy weapons and short pulse radar. On the other hand, the requirements for heating of fusion plasmas have resulted in an application driven program to develop high average power microwave devices. In this paper we address these and other applications such as RF electron linacs, laser pumping, and beaming of power. Emerging applications, such as ionispheric modification and environmental cleanup, are also touched upon. The approach of this paper will be to review each application separately and then compare the requirements of the applications in terms of the power, frequency and other key requirements necessary for HPM to usefully address the application.

  4. Theory and modeling of a relativistic klystron amplifier with high space charge for microsecond applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Fazio, M.V.; Faehl, R.J.; Kwan, T.J.; Rickel, D.G.; Stringfield, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    We discuss basic Relativistic Klystron Amplifier physics. We show that in the intense space-charge regime the maximum power extraction does not coincide with the maximum harmonic bunching. In addition, we show that as the beam is bunched, the additional power stored in the Coulomb fields does not add significantly to the overall power extraction. Because of these effects, the power extraction at 1.3 GHz for a 500 kV, 5 kA beam with reasonable beam-to-wall spacing is limited to around 35%. 3 refs., 17 figs.

  5. Towards a PEBB-Based Design Approach for a Marx-Topology ILC Klystron Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Macken, K

    2009-10-17

    Introduced by the U.S. Navy more than a decade ago, the concept of Power Electronic Building Blocks (PEBBs) has been successfully applied in various applications. It is well accepted within the power electronics arena that this concept offers the potential to achieve increased levels of modularity and compactness. This approach is thus ideally suited for applications where easy serviceability and high availability are key, such as the ILC. This paper presents a building block approach for designing a Marx-topology ILC klystron modulator.

  6. Monopole passband excitation by field emitters in 9-cell TESLA-type cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V.; Knobloch, J.; Matveenko, A.

    2010-08-01

    We present an extension of the calculation of dipole-mode driven beam break-up instabilities, as calculated in [V. Volkov, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 011301 (2009); PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.011301V. Volkov, J. Knobloch, and A. Matveenko, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams (to be published)PRABFM1098-4402], to the monopole fundamental mode passband. The excitation of these modes has been observed in 9-cell TESLA cavities on test stands without beam [G. Kreps , Proceedings of SRF2009 (HZB, Berlin, Germany, 2009), pp. 289-291] and the same effect has been observed in klystrons with high DC currents.

  7. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    1.3 GHz RF test cell capable of operating both at high pressure and in vacuum with replaceable electrodes was designed, built, and power tested in preparation for testing the frequency and geometry effects of RF breakdown at Argonne National Lab. At the time of this report this cavity is still waiting for the 1.3 GHz klystron to be available at the Wakefield Test Facility. (3) Under a contract with Los Alamos National Lab, an 805 MHz RF test cavity, known as the All-Seasons Cavity (ASC), was designed and built by Muons, Inc. to operate either at high pressure or under vacuum. The LANL project to use the (ASC) was cancelled and the testing of the cavity has been continued under the grant reported on here using the Fermilab Mucool Test Area (MTA). The ASC is a true pillbox cavity that has performed under vacuum in high external magnetic field better than any other and has demonstrated that the high required accelerating gradients for many muon cooling beam line designs are possible. (4) Under ongoing support from the Muon Acceleration Program, microscopic surface analysis and computer simulations have been used to develop models of RF breakdown that apply to both pressurized and vacuum cavities. The understanding of RF breakdown will lead to better designs of RF cavities for many applications. An increase in the operating accelerating gradient, improved reliability and shorter conditioning times can generate very significant cost savings in many accelerator projects.

  8. Development of a high-power solid-state switch using static induction thyristors for a klystron modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuchi, Akira; Kamitsukasa, Fumiyoshi; Furukawa, Kazuya; Kawase, Keigo; Kato, Ryukou; Irizawa, Akinori; Fujimoto, Masaki; Osumi, Hiroki; Funakoshi, Sousuke; Tsutsumi, Ryouta; Suemine, Shoji; Honda, Yoshihide; Isoyama, Goro

    2015-01-01

    We developed a solid-state switch with static induction thyristors for the klystron modulator of the L-band electron linear accelerator (linac) at the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University. This switch is designed to have maximum specifications of a holding voltage of 25 kV and a current of 6 kA at the repetition frequency of 10 Hz for forced air cooling. The turn-on time of the switch was measured with a matched resistor to be 270 ns, which is sufficiently fast for the klystron modulator. The switch is retrofitted in the modulator to generate 1.3 GHz RF pulses with durations of either 4 or 8 μs using a 30 MW klystron, and the linac is successfully operated under maximum conditions. This finding demonstrates that the switch can be used as a high-power switch for the modulator. Pulse-to-pulse variations of the klystron voltage are measured to be less than 0.015%, and those of RF power and phase are lower than 0.15% and 0.1°, respectively. These values are significantly smaller than those obtained with a thyratron; hence, the stability of the main RF system is improved. The solid-state switch has been used in normal operation of the linac for more than a year without any serious trouble. Thus, we confirmed the switch's robustness and long-term reliability.

  9. Testing Omega P’s 650 KW, 1.3 GHZ Low-Voltage Multi-Beam Klystron for the Project X Pulsed LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Fermi Research Alliance; Omega-P Inc.

    2014-08-10

    Omega-P Inc. had developed a multi beam 1.3 GHz klystron (MBK) for the Project X pulsed linac application. Testing of the klystron require a special hardware such as a modulator, RF components, control system, power supplies, etc, as well as associated infrastructure( electricity, water, safety). This is an expensive part of klystron development for which Omega-P does not have the required equipment. Fermilab will test the MBK at Fermilab site providing contribution to the project all the necessary facilities, infrastructure and manpower for MBK test performance and analysis.

  10. High power RF test of an 805 MHz RF cavity for a muon cooling channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Rimmer, R.; Wallig, J.

    2002-05-01

    We present recent high power RF test results on an 805 MHz cavity for a muon cooling experiment at Lab G in Fermilab. In order to achieve high accelerating gradient for large transverse emittance muon beams, the cavity design has adopted a pillbox like shape with 16 cm diameter beam iris covered by thin Be windows, which are demountable to allow for RF tests of different windows. The cavity body is made from copper with stiff stainless steel rings brazed to the cavity body for window attachments. View ports and RF probes are available for visual inspections of the surface of windows and cavity and measurement of the field gradient. Maximum of three thermo-couples can be attached to the windows for monitoring the temperature gradient on the windows caused by RF heating. The cavity was measured to have Q0 of about 15,000 with copper windows and coupling constant of 1.3 before final assembling. A 12 MW peak power klystron is available at Lab G in Fermilab for the high power test. The cavity and coupler designs were performed using the MAFIA code in the frequency and the time domain. Numerical simulation results and cold test measurements on the cavity and coupler will be presented for comparisons.

  11. High power RF test of an 805 MHz RF cavity for a muon cooling channel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Rimmer, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Wu, V.; Summers, D.; Norem, J.

    2002-05-30

    We present recent high power RF test results on an 805 MHz cavity for a muon cooling experiment at Lab G in Fermilab. In order to achieve high accelerating gradient for large transverse emittance muon beams, the cavity design has adopted a pillbox like shape with 16 cm diameter beam iris covered by thin Be windows, which are demountable to allow for RF tests of different windows. The cavity body is made from copper with stiff stainless steel rings brazed to the cavity body for window attachments. View ports and RF probes are available for visual inspections of the surface of windows and cavity and measurement of the field gradient. Maximum of three thermo-couples can be attached to the windows for monitoring the temperature gradient on the windows caused by RF heating. The cavity was measured to have Q{sub 0} of about 15,000 with copper windows and coupling constant of 1.3 before final assembling. A 12 MW peak power klystron is available at Lab G in Fermilab for the high power test. The cavity and coupler designs were performed using the MAFIA code in the frequency and the time domain. Numerical simulation results and cold test measurements on the cavity and coupler will be presented for comparisons.

  12. Cavity-Dumped Communication Laser Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. T.

    2003-01-01

    Cavity-dumped lasers have significant advantages over more conventional Q-switched lasers for high-rate operation with pulse position modulation communications, including the ability to emit laser pulses at 1- to 10-megahertz rates, with pulse widths of 0.5 to 5 nanoseconds. A major advantage of cavity dumping is the potential to vary the cavity output percentage from pulse to pulse, maintaining the remainder of the energy in reserve for the next pulse. This article presents the results of a simplified cavity-dumped laser model, establishing the requirements for cavity efficiency and projecting the ultimate laser efficiency attainable in normal operation. In addition, a method of reducing or eliminating laser dead time is suggested that could significantly enhance communication capacity. The design of a laboratory demonstration laser is presented with estimates of required cavity efficiency and demonstration potential.

  13. Subwavelength Nanopatch Cavities for Semiconductor Plasmon Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolatou, Christina; Rana, Farhan

    2008-05-01

    We propose and analyze a family of nanoscale cavities for electrically-pumped surface-emitting semiconductor lasers that use surface plasmons to provide optical mode confinement in cavities which have dimensions in the 100-300 nm range. The proposed laser cavities are in many ways nanoscale optical versions of micropatch antennas that are commonly used at microwave/RF frequencies. Surface plasmons are not only used for mode confinement but also for output beam shaping to realize single-lobe far-field radiation patterns with narrow beam waists from subwavelength size cavities. We identify the cavity modes with the largest quality factors and modal gain, and show that in the near-IR wavelength range (1.0-1.6 microns) cavity losses (including surface plasmon losses) can be compensated by the strong mode confinement in the gain region provided by the surface plasmons themselves and the required material threshold gain values can be smaller than 700 1/cm.

  14. High-Q superconducting niobium cavities for gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, L. A. N.; Furtado, S. R.; Aguiar, O. D.; Oliveira, N. F., Jr.; Castro, P. J.; Barroso, J. J.

    2014-10-01

    The main purpose of this work is to optimize the electric Q-factor of superconducting niobium klystron cavities to be used in parametric transducers of the Mario Schenberg gravitational wave detector. Many cavities were manufactured from niobium with relatively high tantalum impurities (1420 ppm) and they were cryogenically tested to determine their resonance frequencies, unloaded electrical quality factors (Q0) and electromagnetic couplings. These cavities were closed with a flat niobium plate with tantalum impurities below 1000 ppm and an unloaded electrical quality factors of the order of 105 have been obtained. AC conductivity of the order of 1012 S/m has been found for niobium cavities when matching experimental results with computational simulations. These values for the Q-factor would allow the detector to reach the quantum limit of sensitivity of ~ 10-22 Hz-1/2 in the near future, making it possible to search for gravitational waves around 3.2 kHz. The experimental tests were performed at the laboratories of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and at the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv - CTA).

  15. Towards coherent combining of X-band high power microwaves: phase-locked long pulse radiations by a relativistic triaxial klystron amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jinchuan; Zhang, Jun; Qi, Zumin; Yang, Jianhua; Shu, Ting; Zhang, Jiande; Zhong, Huihuang

    2016-01-01

    The radio-frequency breakdown due to ultrahigh electric field strength essentially limits power handling capability of an individual high power microwave (HPM) generator, and this issue becomes more challenging for high frequency bands. Coherent power combining therefore provides an alternative approach to achieve an equivalent peak power of the order of ∼100 GW, which consequently provides opportunities to explore microwave related physics at extremes. The triaxial klystron amplifier (TKA) is a promising candidate for coherent power combing in high frequency bands owing to its intrinsic merit of high power capacity, nevertheless phase-locked long pulse radiation from TKA has not yet been obtained experimentally as the coaxial structure of TKA can easily lead to self-excitation of parasitic modes. In this paper, we present investigations into an X-band TKA capable of producing 1.1 GW HPMs with pulse duration of about 103 ns at the frequency of 9.375 GHz in experiment. Furthermore, the shot-to-shot fluctuation standard deviation of the phase shifts between the input and output microwaves is demonstrated to be less than 10°. The reported achievements open up prospects for accomplishing coherent power combining of X-band HPMs in the near future, and might also excite new development interests concerning high frequency TKAs. PMID:27481661

  16. Prospects for a soft x-ray FEL powered by a relativistic-klystron high-gradient accelerator (RK-HGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, H.D.; Barletta, W.A.; Yu, S.S.; Schlueter, R.; Deis, G.A.

    1989-09-28

    We present here the concept of x-ray FELs using high gain, single-pass amplifiers with electron beams accelerated in high gradient structures powered by relativistic klystrons. Other authors have also considered x-ray FELs; the unique aspect of this paper is the use of high gradient acceleration. One of the authors has previously presented preliminary studies on this concept. The intent in this paper is to display the results of a top level design study on a high gain FEL, to present its sensitivity to a variety of fabrication and tuning errors, to discuss several mechanisms for increasing gain yet more, and to present explicitly the output characteristics of such an FEL. The philosophy of the design study is to find a plausible operating point which employs existing or nearly existing state-of-the-art technologies while minimizing the accelerator and wiggler lengths. The notion is to distribute the technical risk as evenly as possible over the several technologies so that each must advance only slightly in order to make this design feasible. This study entailed no systematic investigation of possible costs so that, for example, the sole criterion for balancing the trade-off between beam energy and wiggler length is that the two components have comparable lengths. 20 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Towards coherent combining of X-band high power microwaves: phase-locked long pulse radiations by a relativistic triaxial klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Jinchuan; Zhang, Jun; Qi, Zumin; Yang, Jianhua; Shu, Ting; Zhang, Jiande; Zhong, Huihuang

    2016-08-01

    The radio-frequency breakdown due to ultrahigh electric field strength essentially limits power handling capability of an individual high power microwave (HPM) generator, and this issue becomes more challenging for high frequency bands. Coherent power combining therefore provides an alternative approach to achieve an equivalent peak power of the order of ∼100 GW, which consequently provides opportunities to explore microwave related physics at extremes. The triaxial klystron amplifier (TKA) is a promising candidate for coherent power combing in high frequency bands owing to its intrinsic merit of high power capacity, nevertheless phase-locked long pulse radiation from TKA has not yet been obtained experimentally as the coaxial structure of TKA can easily lead to self-excitation of parasitic modes. In this paper, we present investigations into an X-band TKA capable of producing 1.1 GW HPMs with pulse duration of about 103 ns at the frequency of 9.375 GHz in experiment. Furthermore, the shot-to-shot fluctuation standard deviation of the phase shifts between the input and output microwaves is demonstrated to be less than 10°. The reported achievements open up prospects for accomplishing coherent power combining of X-band HPMs in the near future, and might also excite new development interests concerning high frequency TKAs.

  18. Solid state high power amplifier for driving the SLC injector klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, J.G.; Clendenin, J.E.; Schwarz, H.D.

    1985-03-01

    The SLC injector klystron rf drive is now provided by a recently developed solid-state amplifier. The high gain of the amplifier permits the use of a fast low-power electronic phase shifter. Thus the SLC computer control system can be used to shift the phase of the high-power rf rapidly during the fill time of the injector accelerator section. These rapid phase shifts are used to introduce a phase-energy relationship in the accelerated electron pulse in conjunction with the operation of the injector bunch compressor. The amplifier, the method of controlling the rf phase, and the operational characteristics of the system are described. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Design and development of collector for C-band 250 kW CW Klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloda, Suman; Lamba, O. S.; Kaushik, Meenu; Richa; Bansal, Prachi; Kumud; Pradeep; Kant, D.; Joshi, L. M.

    2012-11-01

    The paper presents the design and development of collector for C-band 250 kW high power klystron. The design criteria for the collector assembly is selection of material, vacuum and high temperature compatibility, proper electron beam dispersion, minimum back scattering of electrons and thermal design for proper cooling at high power dissipation. All these aspects have been discussed for collector development in details. The collector has been designed in TRAK and then beam propagation has been analyzed in MAGIC 2D software. The thermal simulation has been done using ANSYS 11.0 (multi-physics). The outer surface of the collector has been grooved to facilitate its proper cooling. Design results are presented for water cooling with different flow rates and channel dimensions. OFHC copper material is chosen for collector which is suitable for vacuum and hydrogen brazing operations and good thermal properties for efficient cooling.

  20. Design of a 1-MV induction injector for the Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.E.; Eylon, S.; Lidia, S.; Reginato, L.; Vanecek, D.; Yu, S.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.A.; Henestroza, E.

    1997-05-01

    A Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) is envisioned as a rf power source upgrade of the Next Linear Collider. Construction of a prototype, called the RTA, based on the RK-TBA concept has commenced at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This prototype will be used to study physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. The first half of the injector, a 1 MeV, 1.2 kA, 300 ns induction electron gun, has been built and is presently being tested. The design of the injector cells and the pulsed power drive units are presented in this paper.

  1. Experimental Demonstration of Enhanced Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission by an Optical Klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penco, G.; Allaria, E.; De Ninno, G.; Ferrari, E.; Giannessi, L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first experimental evidence of enhancement of self-amplified spontaneous emission, due to the use of an optical klystron. In this free-electron laser scheme, a relativistic electron beam passes through two undulators, separated by a dispersive section. The latter converts the electron-beam energy modulation produced in the first undulator in density modulation, thus enhancing the free-electron laser gain. The experiment has been carried out at the FERMI facility in Trieste. Powerful radiation has been produced in the extreme ultraviolet range, with an intensity a few orders of magnitude larger than in pure self-amplified spontaneous emission mode. Data have been benchmarked with an existing theoretical model.

  2. A New High Power Klystron for the SLAC B-Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Heinz D.

    2003-05-28

    A new klystron for driving the SLAC B-Factory is currently under development at Philips. Detailed numerical analysis has been carried out in order to meet all the requirements. Particular attention is paid to the bandwidth and phase behavior of the tube because the upper limit in group delay is given by the control system of the B-Factory. Although bandwidth and efficiency are competing demands--not easily met by the same design--the simulation predicts very high efficiency. Another important aspect which is being taken into account for the design is operational stability of the tube. The design concept and numerical as well as measurement results will be presented.

  3. Cover slip external cavity diode laser.

    PubMed

    Carr, Adra V; Sechrest, Yancey H; Waitukaitis, Scott R; Perreault, John D; Lonij, Vincent P A; Cronin, Alexander D

    2007-10-01

    A 671 nm diode laser with a mode-hop-free tuning range of 40 GHz is described. This long tuning range is achieved by simultaneously ramping the external cavity length with the laser injection current. The laser output pointing remains fixed, independent of its frequency because of the cover slip cavity design. This system is simple, economical, robust, and easy to use for spectroscopy, as we demonstrate with lithium vapor and lithium atom beam experiments.

  4. Effect of Cavity QED on Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rfifi, Saad; Siyouri, Fatimazahra

    2016-11-01

    We use a quantum electrodynamics model, to study the evolution of maximally entangled bipartite states (Bell states), as well as a maximally entangled tripartite states as a multipartite system. Furthermore, we study the entanglement behaviour of these output states in cavity QED as function of interaction time and the coupling strength. The present study discusses the separability and the entanglement limit of such states after interaction with a cavity QED.

  5. Input-output Gaussian channels: theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufarelli, Tommaso; Retzker, Alex; Plenio, Martin B.; Serafini, Alessio

    2012-09-01

    Setting off from the classic input-output formalism, we develop a theoretical framework to characterize the Gaussian quantum channels relating the initial correlations of an open bosonic system to those of properly identified output modes. We then proceed to apply our formalism to the case of quantum harmonic oscillators, such as the motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions or nanomechanical oscillators, interacting with travelling electromagnetic modes through cavity fields and subject to external white noise. We thus determine the degree of squeezing that can be transferred from an intra-cavity oscillator to light and show that the intra-cavity squeezing can be transformed into distributed optical entanglement if one can access both output fields of a two-sided cavity.

  6. What's a Cavity?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cavity (say: KA-vuh-tee) develops when a tooth decays (say: dih-KAZE), or breaks down. A cavity ... and deeper over time. Cavities are also called dental caries (say: KARE-eez), and if you have a ...

  7. Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum

    DOEpatents

    Beene, James R.; Bemis, Jr., Curtis E.

    1986-01-01

    A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the transducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When such a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

  8. Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum

    DOEpatents

    Beene, J.R.; Bemis, C.E. Jr.

    1984-07-17

    A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the tranducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

  9. SU-E-E-08: Applications of the Quantization of Coupled Circuits in Radiation Physics (design of Klystron, Bremsstrahlung, Synchrotron)

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: During the past decade the quantization of coupled/forced electromagnetic circuits with or without Ohm’s resistance has gained the subject of some fundamental studies, since even problems of quantum electrodynamics can be solved in an elegant manner, e.g. the creation of quantized electromagnetic fields. In this communication, we shall use these principles to describe optimization procedures in the design of klystrons, synchrotron irradiation and high energy bremsstrahlung. Methods: The base is the Hamiltonian of an electromagnetic circuit and the extension to coupled circuits, which allow the study of symmetries and perturbed symmetries in a very apparent way (SU2, SU3, SU4). The introduction resistance and forced oscillators for the emission and absorption in such coupled systems provides characteristic resonance conditions, and atomic orbitals can be described by that. The extension to virtual orbitals leads to creation of bremsstrahlung, if the incident electron (velocity v nearly c) is described by a current, which is associated with its inductivitance and the virtual orbital to the charge distribution (capacitance). Coupled systems with forced oscillators can be used to amplify drastically the resonance frequencies to describe klystrons and synchrotron radiation. Results: The cross-section formula for bremsstrahlung given by the propagator method of Feynman can readily be derived. The design of klystrons and synchrotrons inclusive the radiation outcome can be described and optimized by the determination of the mutual magnetic couplings between the oscillators induced by the currents. Conclusions: The presented methods of quantization of circuits inclusive resistance provide rather a straightforward way to understand complex technical processes such as creation of bremsstrahlung or creation of radiation by klystrons and synchrotrons. They can either be used for optimization procedures and, last but not least, for pedagogical purposes with regard to

  10. New waveguide-type HOM damper for ALS storage ring cavities.

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Baptiste, Kenneth; Julian, James

    2004-06-28

    The ALS storage ring 500 MHz RF system uses two re-entrant accelerating cavities powered by a single 320kW PHILLIPS YK1305 klystron. During several years of initial operation, the RF cavities were not equipped with effective passive HOM damper systems. Longitudinal beam stability was achieved through cavity temperature control and the longitudinal feedback system (LFB), which was often operating at the edge of its capabilities. As a result, longitudinal beam stability was a significant operations issue at the ALS. During two consecutive shutdown periods (April 2002 and 2003) we installed E-type HOM dampers on the main and third harmonic cavities. These devices dramatically decreased the Q-values of the longitudinal anti-symmetric HOM modes. The next step is to damp the rest of the longitudinal HOM modes in the main cavities below the synchrotron radiation damping level. This will hopefully eliminate the need for the LFB and set the stage for a possible increase in beam current. The ''waveguide'' type of HOM damper was the only option that didn't significantly compromise the vacuum performance of the RF cavity. The design process and the results of the low level measurements of the new waveguide dampers are presented in this paper.

  11. Microwave induced plasma discharge in multi-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Shahid; Mammosser, John D.

    2015-07-15

    A R&D effort for in situ cleaning of 1.5 GHz Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities at room temperature using the plasma processing technique has been initiated at Jefferson Lab. This is a step toward the cleaning of cryomodules installed in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). For this purpose, we have developed an understanding of plasma discharge in a 5-cell CEBAF-type SRF cavity having configurations similar to those in the main accelerator. The focus of this study involves the detailed investigations of developing a plasma discharge inside the cavity volume and avoids the breakdown condition in the vicinity of the ceramic RF window. A plasma discharge of the gas mixture Ar–O{sub 2} (90%:10%) can be established inside the cavity volume by the excitation of a resonant 4π/5 TM{sub 010}-mode driven by a klystron. The absence of any external magnetic field for generating the plasma is suitable for cleaning cavities installed in a complex cryomodule assembly. The procedures developed in these experimental investigations can be applied to any complex cavity structure. Details of these experimental measurements and the observations are discussed in the paper.

  12. Microwave induced plasma discharge in multi-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shahid; Mammosser, John D

    2015-07-01

    A R&D effort for in situ cleaning of 1.5 GHz Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities at room temperature using the plasma processing technique has been initiated at Jefferson Lab. This is a step toward the cleaning of cryomodules installed in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). For this purpose, we have developed an understanding of plasma discharge in a 5-cell CEBAF-type SRF cavity having configurations similar to those in the main accelerator. The focus of this study involves the detailed investigations of developing a plasma discharge inside the cavity volume and avoids the breakdown condition in the vicinity of the ceramic RF window. A plasma discharge of the gas mixture Ar-O2 (90%:10%) can be established inside the cavity volume by the excitation of a resonant 4π/5 TM010-mode driven by a klystron. The absence of any external magnetic field for generating the plasma is suitable for cleaning cavities installed in a complex cryomodule assembly. The procedures developed in these experimental investigations can be applied to any complex cavity structure. Details of these experimental measurements and the observations are discussed in the paper.

  13. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Schipper, J.F.

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a T configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  14. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Schipper, John F.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  15. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-01

    A cavity excitation circuit is described for rapidly building up and maintaining high-level oscillations in a resonant cavity. The circuit overcomes oscillation buildup slowing effects such as ion locking in the cavity by providing for the selective application of an amplified accelerating drive signal to the main cavity exciting oscillator during oscillation buildup and a direct drive signal to the oscillator thereafter.

  16. Cavity coherent-state cloning via Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Alexanian, Moorad

    2003-03-01

    The Raman interaction of atoms singly traversing a two-mode cavity constitutes a quantum-cloning machine for coherent states. The quality of the two identical output coherent states is independent of the initial, albeit different, coherent state, initially present inside the cavity. The cloning of nonorthogonal states indicates that the entanglement of the output states for an arbitrary initial state is the essence of the no-cloning theorem.

  17. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  18. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, R.P.; Lott, J.A.

    1994-09-27

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors. 5 figs.

  19. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, Richard P.; Lott, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors.

  20. Reducing space charge tune shift with a barrier cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    1995-12-31

    Implementation of a barrier cavity rf system appears to be a straightforward and relatively inexpensive way to increase the output current of second stage synchrotrons. This note serves as a general introduction to the relevant beam dynamics and addresses the problem of driving a cavity in the short burst mode.

  1. Design Considerations for a PEBB-Based Marx-Topology ILC Klystron Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Macken, K.; Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Kemp, M.A.; Nguyen, M.N.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    The concept of Power Electronic Building Blocks (PEBBs) has its origin in the U.S. Navy during the last decade of the past century. As compared to a more conventional or classical design approach, a PEBB-oriented design approach combines various potential advantages such as increased modularity, high availability and simplified serviceability. This relatively new design paradigm for power conversion has progressively matured since then and its underlying philosophy has been clearly and successfully demonstrated in a number of real-world applications. Therefore, this approach has been adopted here to design a Marx-topology modulator for an International Linear Collider (ILC) environment where easy serviceability and high availability are crucial. This paper describes various aspects relating to the design of a 32-cell Marx-topology ILC klystron modulator. The concept of nested droop correction is introduced and illustrated. Several design considerations including cosmic ray withstand, power cycling capability, fault tolerance, etc., are discussed. Details of the design of a Marx cell PEBB are included.

  2. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidia, S. M.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Houck, T. L.; Westenskow, G. A.; Vanecek, D. L.; Yu, S. S.

    1999-05-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  3. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S.M.; Anderson, D.E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D.L.; Yu, S.S.; Westenskow, G.A.

    1999-05-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1{percent} energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D E; Eylon, S; Henestroza, E; Houck, T L; Lidia, M; Vanecek, D L; Westenskow, G A; Yu, S S

    1998-10-05

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2&A, l-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-n-n. The prototype accelerator will be used to study physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  5. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S. M.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D. L.; Yu, S. S.; Houck, T. L.; Westenskow, G. A.

    1999-05-07

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  6. Electron beam transport analysis of W-band sheet beam klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Barnett, Larry R.; Luhmann, Neville C.; Shin, Young-Min; Humphries, Stanley

    2010-04-01

    The formation and transport of high-current density electron beams are of critical importance for the success of a number of millimeter wave and terahertz vacuum devices. To elucidate design issues and constraints, the electron gun and periodically cusped magnet stack of the original Stanford Linear Accelerator Center designed W-band sheet beam klystron circuit, which exhibited poor beam transmission (≤55%), have been carefully investigated through theoretical and numerical analyses taking advantage of three-dimensional particle tracking solvers. The re-designed transport system is predicted to exhibit 99.76% (cold) and 97.38% (thermal) beam transmission, respectively, under space-charge-limited emission simulations. The optimized design produces the required high aspect ratio (10:1) sheet beam with 3.2 A emission current with highly stable propagation. In the completely redesigned model containing all the circuit elements, more than 99% beam transmission is experimentally observed at the collector located about 160 mm distant from the cathode surface. Results are in agreement of the predictions of two ray-tracing simulators, CST PARTICLE STUDIO and OMNITRAK which also predict the observed poor transmission in the original design. The quantitative analysis presents practical factors in the modeling process to design a magnetic lens structure to stably transport the elliptical beam along the long drift tube.

  7. High Voltage EPC for 94 GHz Klystron for Cloud Profiling Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambarara, Marcello; Ceruti, Luca; Cantamessa, Marco; Bartola, Furio

    2008-09-01

    The Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) operating at 94 GHz is one of the payload instruments to be flown on the EarthCare mission in the time frame of year 2013. An important part of the CPR is the High Power Transmitter (HPT) that is composed by an Electronic Power Conditioner (EPC) and an Extended Interaction Klystron (EIK).The EIK, developed by CPI-Canada, has been selected as promising radio frequency power transmitter. This EIK is already flying on board of the Cloud Sat satellite and is recognised to be reliable for commercial and military applications throughout the world.This paper will be mainly focused on the EPC, developed in the frame of two subsequent ESA contracts, with particular attentions to the presentation of the activities performed, the design solutions adopted, the testing activities and main achieved performances.The activities of the contracts has been concluded on July 2007 with the realization of an elegant breadboard (EBB) of the EPC (see Fig. 1) that has been extensively tested (both alone and integrated with the EIK) and submitted to an accelerated life test.

  8. Maser cavity servo-tuning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, R. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Two collocated, weakly coupled probes, one loop and one dipole, detect the magnetic and electric fields inside a maser cavity. Signals from the probes are compared in phase, and the signal output from the phase detector is applied to a varactor, the reactance of which is coupled into the cavity by a microwave coupler. Alternatively, the varactor may be placed inside the cavity. Any deviation of phase from 90 deg as detected by the phase detector will then produce an error signal that will change the reactance coupled into the resonant cavity to change its reactance, and thus correct its resonance frequency. An alternative to using two probes is to use a single disk probe oriented to detect both the magnetic and electric fields, and thus provide the error signal directly.

  9. Superconducting Materials Testing with a High-Q Copper RF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.; Dolgashev, V.; Bowden, G.; Lewandowski, J.; Nantista, C.D.; Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; Capmpisi, I.E.; /Oak Ridge

    2007-11-07

    Superconducting RF is of increasing importance in particle accelerators. We have developed a resonant cavity with high quality factor and an interchangeable wall for testing of superconducting materials. A compact TE01 mode launcher attached to the coupling iris selectively excites the azimuthally symmetric cavity mode, which allows a gap at the detachable wall and is free of surface electric fields that could cause field emission, multipactor, and RF breakdown. The shape of the cavity is tailored to focus magnetic field on the test sample. We describe cryogenic experiments conducted with this cavity. An initial experiment with copper benchmarked our apparatus. This was followed by tests with Nb and MgB2. In addition to characterizing the onset of superconductivity with temperature, our cavity can be resonated with a high power klystron to determine the surface magnetic field level sustainable by the material in the superconducting state. A feedback code is used to make the low level RF drive track the resonant frequency.

  10. Integrated system modeling analysis of a cryogenic multi-cell deflecting-mode cavity resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Young-Min; Church, Michael

    2013-09-01

    A deflecting mode cavity is the integral element for six-dimensional phase-space beam control in bunch compressors and emittance transformers at high energy beam test facilities. RF performance of a high-Q device is, however, highly sensitive to operational conditions, in particular in a cryo-cooling environment. Using analytic calculations and RF simulations, we examined cavity parameters and deflecting characteristics of TM110,π mode of a 5 cell resonator in a liquid nitrogen cryostat, which has long been used at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector (A0PI). The sensitivity analysis indicated that the cavity could lose 30%-40% of deflecting force due to defective input power coupling accompanying non-uniform field distribution across the cells with 40 ˜ 50 MeV electron beam and 70-80 kW klystron power. Vacuum-cryomodules of the 5 cell cavity are planned to be installed at the Fermilab Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator facility. Comprehensive modeling analysis integrated with multi-physics simulation tools showed that RF loading of 1 ms can cause a ˜5 K maximum temperature increase, corresponding to a ˜4.3 μm/ms deformation and a 1.32 MHz/K maximum frequency shift. The integrated system modeling analysis will improve design process of a high-Q cavity with more accurate prediction of cryogenic RF performance under a high power pulse operation.

  11. Semiconductor cavity QED with squeezed light: Nonlinear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sete, Eyob A.; Eleuch, H.; Das, Sumanta

    2011-11-15

    We present a study of semiconductor cavity QED effects with squeezed light. We investigate the effects of external squeezed light produced by a subthreshold optical parametric down conversion on the quantum features of the cavity as well as output radiation in the presence of exciton-exciton scattering. It turns out that the width of the spectrum of the cavity field strongly depends on the degree of squeezing. This effect is observed both in weak- and strong-coupling regimes. Moreover, we show that the external squeezed light has a profound effect on the amount of squeezing of the output field.

  12. Electromagnetic design of the RF cavity beam position monitor for the LCLS.

    SciTech Connect

    Waldschmidt, G.; Lill, B.; Morrison, L.

    2008-01-01

    A high-resolution X-band cavity BPM has been developed for the LCLS. A dipole mode cavity and a monopole mode reference cavity have been designed in order to achieve micron-level accuracy of the beam position. The rf properties of the BPM as well as beam interaction with the cavities will be discussed including output power and tuning. In addition, methods will be presented for improving the isolation of the output ports to differentiate between horizontal/vertical beam motion and to reject extraneous modes from affecting the output signal. The predicted simulation results will be compared to data collected from low-power experimental tests.

  13. Solid state power amplifier as 805 MHz master source for the LANSCE coupled-cavity linac

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, J.; Davis, J.

    1998-12-31

    From 100 to 800 MeV, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) proton linac receives RF power from forty-four 1.25 MW klystrons at 805 Megahertz (MHz). A single master RF source provides a continuous high level phase reference signal which drives the klystrons along the 731 meter-long linac through a coaxial transmission line. A single point failure of this system can deenergize the entire coupled-cavity linac (CCL) RF plant. The authors replaced a physically large air-cooled tetrode amplifier with a compact water-cooled unit based on modular amplifier pallets developed at LANSCE. Each 600 Watt pallet utilizes eight push-pull bipolar power transistor pairs operated in class AB. Four of these can easily provide the 2000 watt reference carrier from the stable master RF source. A radial splitter and combiner parallels the modules. This amplifier has proven to be completely reliable after two years of operation without failure. A second unit was constructed and installed for redundancy, and the old tetrode system was removed in 1998. The compact packaging for cooling, DC power, impedance matching, RF interconnection, and power combining met the electrical and mechanical requirements. CRT display of individual collector currents and RF levels is made possible with built-in samplers and a VXI data acquisition unit.

  14. 180 MW/180 KW pulse modulator for S-band klystron of LUE-200 linac of IREN installation of JINR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Kim Dong; Sumbaev, A. P.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2014-09-01

    The offer on working out of the pulse modulator with 180 MW pulse power and 180 kW average power for pulse S-band klystrons of LUE-200 linac of IREN installation at the Laboratory of neutron physics (FLNP) at JINR is formulated. Main requirements, key parameters and element base of the modulator are presented. The variant of the basic scheme on the basis of 14 (or 11) stage 2 parallel PFN with the thyratron switchboard (TGI2-10K/50) and six parallel high voltage power supplies (CCPS Power Supply) is considered.

  15. Directional emission micro-cavity lasers with different device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chang-ling; Shi, Jian-wei; Feng, Yuan; Hao, Yong-qin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jian-jia; Li, Peng; Wang, Jia-bin

    2016-10-01

    The micro-cavity lasers support the ultra-low threshold and ultrahigh Q-factor, but several disadvantages impede further development, such as isotropic far-field profile pattern and low optical power output. To overcome the intrinsic problems, several deformed structures were proposed and investigated. In this paper we present directional emission micro-cavity lasers with limason-shaped, triangle-shaped, and ellipse shaped cavity structures. In experiment, mid-infrared InGaAs/InAlAs quantum cascade material was employed to fabricate these micro-cavity lasers, due to its advantages of lack of surface recombination, and inherently in-plane with transverse magnetic (TM) mode emission. The micro-cavity lasers with different device structures were operated and compared at room temperature, and a higher output power was also achieved by increasing the device structure size.

  16. Ultracold Fermions in a Cavity-Induced Artificial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollath, Corinna; Sheikhan, Ameneh; Wolff, Stefan; Brennecke, Ferdinand

    2016-02-01

    We propose how a fermionic quantum gas confined to an optical lattice and coupled to an optical cavity can self-organize into a state where the spontaneously emerging cavity field amplitude induces an artificial magnetic field. The fermions form either a chiral insulator or a chiral liquid carrying chiral currents. The feedback mechanism via the dynamical cavity field enables robust and fast switching in time of the chiral phases, and the cavity output can be employed for a direct nondestructive measurement of the chiral current.

  17. Alignment locking to suspended Fabry-Perot cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagmolen, Bram J. J.; Barton, Mark; Mow-Lowry, Conor; de Vine, Glenn; Rabeling, David S.; Chow, Jong H.; Romann, Albert; Zhao, Chunnong; Gray, Malcolm B.; McClelland, David E.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we report on the alignment locking of an in vacuum 77 m long suspended mirror Fabry-Perot cavity. Lock was achieved by mode-matching a 500 mW Nd:YAG NPRO onto a pre-mode cleaner, the output of which was then mode-matched to the suspended cavity. The longitudinal locking was achieved by feeding back to the laser frequency actuator to follow the cavity resonance. Subsequent implementation of a hybrid auto-alignment system enhanced the stability of the circulating power inside the cavity. Preliminary results are presented.

  18. Integral Cavity Hydrogen Maser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    development on a new microwave cavity for the NASA Research (NR) hydrogen maser for the NASA Crustal Dynamics Program. Also included with the results will be...bulb and all the cavity components bonded together, was developed. The "integral cavity" was installed in the NR maser. This NASA Research Experimental

  19. Application of M-type cathodes to high-power cw klystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isagawa, S.; Higuchi, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Miyake, S.; Ohya, K.; Yoshida, M.

    1999-05-01

    Two types of high-power cw klystrons have been widely used at KEK in both TRISTAN and KEKB e +e - collider projects: one is a 0.8 MW/1.0 MW tube, called YK1302/YK1303 (Philips); the other is a 1.2 MW tube, called E3786/E3732 (Toshiba). Normally, the dispenser cathodes of the `B-type' and the `S-type' have been used, respectively, but for improved versions they have been replaced by low-temperature cathodes, called the `M-type'. An Os/Ru coating was applied to the former, whereas an Ir one was applied to the latter. Until now, all upgraded tubes installing M-type cathodes, 9 and 8 in number, respectively, have worked successfully without any dropout. A positive experience concerning the lifetime under real operation conditions has been obtained. M-type cathodes are, however, more easily poisoned. One tube installing an Os/Ru-coated cathode showed a gradual, and then sudden decrease in emission during an underheating test, although the emission could fortunately be recovered by aging at the KEK test field. Once sufficiently aged, the emission of an Ir-coated cathode proved to be very high and stable, and its lifetime is expected to be very long. One disadvantage of this cathode is, however, susceptibility to gas poisoning and the necessity of long-term initial aging. New techniques, like ion milling and fine-grained tungsten top layers, were not as successful as expected from their smaller scale applications to shorten the initial aging period. A burn-in process at higher cathode loading was efficient to make the poisoned cathode active and to decrease unwanted Wehnelt emission. On top of that, the emission cooling, and thus thermal conductivity near the emitting layer could play an important role in such large-current cathodes as ours.

  20. Governmentally amplified output volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funashima, Yoshito

    2016-11-01

    Predominant government behavior is decomposed by frequency into several periodic components: updating cycles of infrastructure, Kuznets cycles, fiscal policy over business cycles, and election cycles. Little is known, however, about the theoretical impact of such cyclical behavior in public finance on output fluctuations. Based on a standard neoclassical growth model, this study intends to examine the frequency at which public investment cycles are relevant to output fluctuations. We find an inverted U-shaped relationship between output volatility and length of cycle in public investment. This implies that periodic behavior in public investment at a certain frequency range can cause aggravated output resonance. Moreover, we present an empirical analysis to test the theoretical implication, using the U.S. data in the period from 1968 to 2015. The empirical results suggest that such resonance phenomena change from low to high frequency.

  1. Cavity quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, P.R.

    1994-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: perturbative cavity quantum electrodynamics; the micromoser; manipulation of neoclassical field states in a cavity by atom interferometry; quantum optics of driven atoms in colored vacua; structure and dynamics in cavity quantum electrodynamics; on electron in a cavity; spontaneous emission by moving atoms; single atom emission in an optical resonator; nonperturbation atom-photon interactions in an optical cavity; and new aspects of the Casimir effect: fluctuations and radiative reaction. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  2. Numerical simulation of coupler cavities for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.K.; Derutyer, H.; Ko, K.

    1993-04-01

    We present numerical procedures involved in the evaluation of the performance of coupler cavities for linacs. The MAFIA code is used to simulate an X-Band accelerator section in the time domain. The input/output coupler cavities for the structure arc of the symmetrical double-input design. We calculate the transmission properties of the coupler and compare the results with measurements. We compare the performance of the symmetrical double-input design with that of the conventional single-input type by evaluating the field amplitude and phase asymmetries. We also evaluate the peak field gradient in the computer.

  3. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  4. Frequency doubled, cavity dumped feedback laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sipes, Jr., Donald L. (Inventor); Robinson, Deborah L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Higher efficiency in cavity dumping and frequency doubling in a laser used to produce modulated output beam pulses is achieved by deflecting light out of the resonant cavity to a third mirror through a frequency doubler using an electro-optic modulator and a polarizing beamsplitter in the resonant cavity, or using just an acousto-optic modulator to deflect light out of the laser cavity in response to a control signal (electric or acoustic). The frequency doubler in front of the third mirror rotates the frequency doubled light so that it will pass out of the laser cavity through the polarizing beamsplitter, while undoubled frequency light is reflected by the polarizing beamsplitter back into the gain medium of the laser. In the case of using a type-II frequency doubler, a dichroic beamsplitter deflects out the frequency doubled light and passes the undoubled frequency light to the polarizing beamsplitter for return to the laser gain medium. If an acousto-optic modulator is used, it deflects light out of the primary laser cavity, so a polarizing beamsplitter is not needed, and only a dichroic beamsplitter is needed to separate frequency doubled light out of the path from the third mirror.

  5. Parametric resonance in tunable superconducting cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wustmann, Waltraut; Shumeiko, Vitaly

    2013-05-01

    We develop a theory of parametric resonance in tunable superconducting cavities. The nonlinearity introduced by the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) attached to the cavity and damping due to connection of the cavity to a transmission line are taken into consideration. We study in detail the nonlinear classical dynamics of the cavity field below and above the parametric threshold for the degenerate parametric resonance, featuring regimes of multistability and parametric radiation. We investigate the phase-sensitive amplification of external signals on resonance, as well as amplification of detuned signals, and relate the amplifier performance to that of linear parametric amplifiers. We also discuss applications of the device for dispersive qubit readout. Beyond the classical response of the cavity, we investigate small quantum fluctuations around the amplified classical signals. We evaluate the noise power spectrum both for the internal field in the cavity and the output field. Other quantum-statistical properties of the noise are addressed such as squeezing spectra, second-order coherence, and two-mode entanglement.

  6. Multiple-cavity detector for axion dark matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Junu; Ahn, Saebyeok; Youn, Sungwoo; Semertzidis, Yannis

    2017-01-01

    Exploring higher frequency regions in axion dark matter searches using microwave cavity detectors requires a smaller size of the cavity as the TM010 frequency scales inversely with the cavity radius. One of the intuitive ways to make a maximal use of a given magnet volume, and thereby to increase the experimental sensitivity, is to bundle multiple cavities together and combine their individual outputs ensuring phase-matching of the coherent axion signal. The Experiment of Axion Search aT CAPP (EAST-C) is a dedicated project to develop multiple-cavity systems at the Centre for Axion and Precision Physics Research (CAPP) of the Institute for Basic Science (IBS). In this poster, the conceptual design of the phase-matching mechanism and experimental feasibility using a quadruple-cavity system will be presented.

  7. RF Conditioning and Testing of Fundamental Power Couplers for SNS Superconducting Cavity Production

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stirbet; G.K. Davis; M. A. Drury; C. Grenoble; J. Henry; G. Myneni; T. Powers; K. Wilson; M. Wiseman; I.E. Campisi; Y.W. Kang; D. Stout

    2005-05-16

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) makes use of 33 medium beta (0.61) and 48 high beta (0.81) superconducting cavities. Each cavity is equipped with a fundamental power coupler, which should withstand the full klystron power of 550 kW in full reflection for the duration of an RF pulse of 1.3 msec at 60 Hz repetition rate. Before assembly to a superconducting cavity, the vacuum components of the coupler are submitted to acceptance procedures consisting of preliminary quality assessments, cleaning and clean room assembly, vacuum leak checks and baking under vacuum, followed by conditioning and RF high power testing. Similar acceptance procedures (except clean room assembly and baking) were applied for the airside components of the coupler. All 81 fundamental power couplers for SNS superconducting cavity production have been RF power tested at JLAB Newport News and, beginning in April 2004 at SNS Oak Ridge. This paper gives details of coupler processing and RF high power-assessed performances.

  8. VUV free electron laser with a distributed feedback cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Fujita, M.; Asakawa, M.

    1995-12-31

    Development of FEL to the VUV/x-ray regime is looked as one of the possible directions to its success. For eliminating the need for optical cavities, difficult to be built at that regime, we propose a VUV (50nm) SASE FEL. According to Pellegrini`s scaling law, for a 290MeV/200A e-beam passing through a 10.8m long and 2cm period wiggler, a high peak power 85.5MW and a high average brightness 2.44 X 10{sup +21} (photons/[mm{sup 2}.mrad{sup 2}.bw]) can be obtained. However, it requires {epsilon} n=2.3mm.mrad and {Delta}{gamma}/{gamma} = 0.15% about one order above the practical parameters we can realize. For enhancing the efficiency and decreasing the requirements on the e-beam quality and the wiggler length, we put forward a concept of VUV FEL with a distributed feedback cavity. In x-ray region, the natural periodicity of crystals provides strong Bragg coupling and it has been demonstrated as the parametric radiation. In vuv region, current intense research on superlattice can provide a periodical structure with a short period in 250 {Angstrom} order. High-performance vuv multilayer coatings on the inner-wall of the waveguide are used to guide the spontaneous emission and decrease the x-ray ohmic losses on the roundtrip passes. By this DFB cavity structure, it is expected to realize the lasing in a smaller size. Other practical methods such as the optical klystron for shortening the wiggler length and the tapper wiggler for enhancing the saturation power are also considered. The analytical considerations are based on the 1-D FEL equations and 1-D perturbation theory of dielectric waveguide.

  9. Electromagnetic SCRF Cavity Tuner

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.; Borissov, E.; Foster, G.W.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Khabiboulline, T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    A novel prototype of SCRF cavity tuner is being designed and tested at Fermilab. This is a superconducting C-type iron dominated magnet having a 10 mm gap, axial symmetry, and a 1 Tesla field. Inside the gap is mounted a superconducting coil capable of moving {+-} 1 mm and producing a longitudinal force up to {+-} 1.5 kN. The static force applied to the RF cavity flanges provides a long-term cavity geometry tuning to a nominal frequency. The same coil powered by fast AC current pulse delivers mechanical perturbation for fast cavity tuning. This fast mechanical perturbation could be used to compensate a dynamic RF cavity detuning caused by cavity Lorentz forces and microphonics. A special configuration of magnet system was designed and tested.

  10. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-02

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm{sup −2 }sr{sup −1} is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  11. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-01

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm-2 sr-1 is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  12. Hybrid microwave-cavity heat engine.

    PubMed

    Bergenfeldt, Christian; Samuelsson, Peter; Sothmann, Björn; Flindt, Christian; Büttiker, Markus

    2014-02-21

    We propose and analyze the use of hybrid microwave cavities as quantum heat engines. A possible realization consists of two macroscopically separated quantum-dot conductors coupled capacitively to the fundamental mode of a microwave cavity. We demonstrate that an electrical current can be induced in one conductor through cavity-mediated processes by heating up the other conductor. The heat engine can reach Carnot efficiency with optimal conversion of heat to work. When the system delivers the maximum power, the efficiency can be a large fraction of the Carnot efficiency. The heat engine functions even with moderate electronic relaxation and dephasing in the quantum dots. We provide detailed estimates for the electrical current and output power using realistic parameters.

  13. Cavity enhanced terahertz modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Born, N.; Scheller, M.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, M.

    2014-03-10

    We present a versatile concept for all optical terahertz (THz) amplitude modulators based on a Fabry-Pérot semiconductor cavity design. Employing the high reflectivity of two parallel meta-surfaces allows for trapping selected THz photons within the cavity and thus only a weak optical modulation of the semiconductor absorbance is required to significantly damp the field within the cavity. The optical switching yields to modulation depths of more than 90% with insertion efficiencies of 80%.

  14. High power CW red VECSEL with linearly polarized TEM00 output beam.

    PubMed

    Hastie, Jennifer; Calvez, Stephane; Dawson, Martin; Leinonen, Tomi; Laakso, Antti; Lyytikäinen, Jari; Pessa, Markus

    2005-01-10

    High-power, continuous-wave operation at red wavelengths has been achieved with a vertical external cavity surface emitting laser based on the GaInP/AlGaInP/GaAs material system. Output power of 0.4W was obtained in a linearly polarized, circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam. A birefringent filter inserted in the cavity allowed tuning of the laser output spectrum over a 10nm range around 674nm.

  15. Optically measuring interior cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2008-12-21

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  16. Operational parameters for the superconducting cavity maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. T.; Dick, G. J.; Strayer, D. M.

    1989-05-01

    Tests of the superconducting cavity maser (SCM) ultra-stable frequency source have been made for the first time using a hydrogen maser for a frequency reference. In addition to characterizing the frequency stability, the sensitivity of the output frequency to several crucial parameters was determined for various operating conditions. Based on this determination, the refrigeration and thermal control systems of the SCM were modified. Subsequent tests showed substantially improved performance, especially at the longest averaging times.

  17. Operational parameters for the superconducting cavity maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, R. T.; Dick, G. J.; Strayer, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Tests of the superconducting cavity maser (SCM) ultra-stable frequency source have been made for the first time using a hydrogen maser for a frequency reference. In addition to characterizing the frequency stability, the sensitivity of the output frequency to several crucial parameters was determined for various operating conditions. Based on this determination, the refrigeration and thermal control systems of the SCM were modified. Subsequent tests showed substantially improved performance, especially at the longest averaging times.

  18. Development lifts Egyptian output

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Oil revenue is now the largest source of foreign exchange for the Arab Republic of Egypt, and, as such, is of vital importance to the country's plans for industrial and social development. Last year oil exports earned Egypt $2.9 billion, playing a key role in keeping the nation's economy in the black. Oil production in 1980 averaged 585,000 bpd, up from 510,000 bpd in 1979. This year oil output should average 650,000 bpd. While output is increasing, it does not appear to be doing so at a sufficient rate to meet the 1984 government target of 1 million bpd. However, the oil industry view in Egypt is that this target is achievable, though not until the mid to late 1980s. Development work scheduled for completion by 1984 only seems set to lift output to between 750,000 and 800,000 bpd. At the same time, if expansions plans for gas production are taken into account, then total hydrocarbon output measured in oil equivalents will not be too far short of the 1-million-bpd figure.

  19. CMAQ Model Output

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    CMAQ and CMAQ-VBS model outputThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Woody , M., K. Baker , P. Hayes, J. Jimenez, B. Koo, and H. Pye. Understanding sources of organic aerosol during CalNex-2010 using the CMAQ-VBS. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. Copernicus Publications, Katlenburg-Lindau, GERMANY, 16: 4081-4100, (2016).

  20. Diodes stabilize LED output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deters, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Small-signal diodes are placed in series with light-emitting diodes (LED's) to stabilize LED output against temperature fluctuations. Simple inexpensive method compensates for thermal fluctuations over a broad temperature range. Requiring few components, technique is particularly useful where circuit-board space is limited.

  1. Diodes stabilize LED output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deters, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Small-signal diodes are placed in series with light-emitting diodes (LED's) to stabilize LED output against temperature fluctuations. Simple inexpensive method compensates for thermal fluctuations over a broad temperature range. Requiring few components, technique is particularly useful where circuit-board space is limited.

  2. Two-dimensional effects and a comparison of theory and experiment. [klystrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevchik, V. N.

    1982-01-01

    Annular beam models are used to investigate two dimensional processes in axial-symmetrical instruments. One of the versions of an annular model suitable for the design of a grouper and an output resonator is described.

  3. Mini-cavity-dumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, E.

    1981-01-01

    Lasers for use in high precision satellite ranging systems consist typically of an oscillator followed by several amplifier stages. While the shortest optical pulses are achieved by using a mode locked oscillator, such an oscillator is incompatible with the compact design needed in future, highly mobile systems. The laser oscillator achieves pulse lengths approaching those obtainable by mode locking, but in a much more compact and stable design. The oscillator uses two LiNbO3 Pockels cells inside the resonator. One Q-switches the oscillator, and the other is used in a pulse slicing scheme to cavity dump a portion of the circulating optical energy. The length of the optical output pulse measured at 425 + or - 50 picoseconds.

  4. What's a Cavity?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and deeper over time. Cavities are also called dental caries (say: KARE-eez), and if you have a cavity, it's important to get it repaired. But why would your ... and when plaque clings to your teeth, the acids can eat away at the outermost ...

  5. Liquid laser cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, S.; Filipescu, N.; Kellermeyer, G. L.; Mc Avoy, N.

    1969-01-01

    Liquid laser cavities have plenum chambers at the ends of the capillary cell which are terminated in transparent optical flats. By use of these cavities, several new europium chelates and a terbium chelate can provide laser action in solution at room temperature.

  6. A compact chaotic laser device with a two-dimensional external cavity structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sunada, Satoshi Adachi, Masaaki; Fukushima, Takehiro; Shinohara, Susumu; Arai, Kenichi; Harayama, Takahisa

    2014-06-16

    We propose a compact chaotic laser device, which consists of a semiconductor laser and a two-dimensional (2D) external cavity for delayed optical feedback. The overall size of the device is within 230 μm × 1 mm. A long time delay sufficient for chaos generation can be achieved with the small area by the multiple reflections at the 2D cavity boundary, and the feedback strength is controlled by the injection current to the external cavity. We experimentally demonstrate that a variety of output properties, including chaotic output, can be selectively generated by controlling the injection current to the external cavity.

  7. Fiber cavity ring down and gain amplification effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Susana; Magalhães, Regina; Pérez-Herrera, Rosa Ana; Lopez-Amo, Manuel; Marques, M. B.; Frazão, O.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) placed inside the fiber ring of a cavity ring down (CRD) configuration is studied. The limitations and advantages of this configuration are discussed, and the study of the ring-down time as a function of the current applied and gain to the EDFA is also presented. In this case, the power fluctuations in the output signal are strongly dependent on the cavity ring-down time with the EDFA gain.

  8. Passivated niobium cavities

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Yorktown, VA; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin [Lagga Arby, SE; Ciovati, Gianluigi [Newport News, VA

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  9. Low-field permanent magnet quadrupoles in a new relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator design

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Sessler, A.

    1995-02-01

    Permanent magnets play a central role in the new relativistic klystron two-beam-accelerator design. The two key goals of this new design, low cost and the suppression of beam break-up instability are both intimately tied to the permanent magnet quadrupole focusing system. A recently completed systems study by a joint LBL-LLNL team concludes that a power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass Next Linear Collider based on the new TBA design can be as low as $1 billion, and the efficiency (wall plug to rf) is estimated to be 36%. End-to-end simulations of longitudinal and transverse beam dynamics show that the drive beam is stable over the entire TBA unit.

  10. Experimental demonstration of a Ku-band radial-line relativistic klystron oscillator based on transition radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Fangchao; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jun; Ju, Jinchuan; Zhong, Huihuang

    2017-03-01

    We report on a radial-line relativistic klystron oscillator (RL-RKO), which is physically designed to generate gigawatt-level high power microwaves (HPMs) at Ku-band. The 3π/4 mode of a four-gap buncher is selected to highly modulate the radially propagating intense relativistic electron beam (IREB). A three-gap extractor operating at the π mode is employed to extract the radio-frequency energy efficiently. The Ku-band RL-RKO is investigated experimentally on an intense-current electron beam accelerator. The radially propagating IREB is well focused with an axial-width of 2 mm by a radial magnetic field of 0.4 T. Microwaves with a frequency of 14.86 GHz and a power of 1.5 GW are generated, corresponding to an efficiency of 24%, which indicates a significant advance for the research of radial-line HPM sources.

  11. Climate Model Output Rewriter

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K. E.; Doutriaux, C.

    2004-06-21

    CMOR comprises a set of FORTRAN 90 dunctions that can be used to produce CF-compliant netCDF files. The structure of the files created by CMOR and the metadata they contain fulfill the requirements of many of the climate community’s standard model experiments (which are referred to here as "MIPS", which stands for "model intercomparison project", including, for example, AMIP, CMIP, CFMIP, PMIP, APE, and IPCC scenario runs), CMOR was not designed to serve as an all-purpose wfiter of CF-compliant netCDF files, but simply to reduce the effort required to prepare and manage MIP data. Although MIPs encourage systematic analysis of results across models, this is only easy to do if the model output is written in a common format with files structured similarly and with sufficient metadata uniformly stored according to a common standard. Individual modeling groups store their data in different ways. but if a group can read its own data with FORTRAN, then it should easily be able to transform the data, using CMOR, into the common format required by the MIPs, The adoption of CMOR as a standard code for exchanging climate data will facilitate participation in MIPs because after learning how to satisfy the output requirements of one MIP, it will be easy to prepare output for the other MIPs.

  12. Cavity blackbody-pumpd lasers: Present research status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, W.

    1985-01-01

    The basic concept for a blackbody cavity is given. A comparison between the direct solar-pumped laser efficiency and one which is indirectly pumped by a blackbody cavity shows that they are similar to a carnot cycle. The blackbody spectrum used to optically pump the lasant material is shown. Also shown is the physical principle behind the blackbody laser idea. An example of an infrared laser media is given. A system study was conducted to scale cavity blackbody pumped lasers to high output powers.

  13. Optimal feedback in efficient single-cavity optical parametric oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Petnikova, V M; Shuvalov, Vladimir V

    2010-09-10

    An approach based on the description of competition of quadratic processes of merging and decomposition of quanta resulting in the formation of cnoidal waves on an effective cascade cubic Kerr-type nonlinearity is used to optimise the scheme of a single-cavity optical parametric oscillator. It is shown that the use of a feedback circuit (cavity) decreases the period of cnoidal waves produced in a nonlinear crystal, while the optimisation procedure of the transfer constant of this circuit (reflectivity of the output mirror of the cavity) is reduced to matching this period with the nonlinear crystal length. (optical parametric oscillators)

  14. Sequential generation of matrix-product states in cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Schoen, C.; Hammerer, K.; Wolf, M. M.; Cirac, J. I.; Solano, E.

    2007-03-15

    We study the sequential generation of entangled photonic and atomic multiqubit states in the realm of cavity QED. We extend the work of C. Schoen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 110503 (2005)], where it was shown that all states generated in a sequential manner can be classified efficiently in terms of matrix-product states. In particular, we consider two scenarios: photonic multiqubit states sequentially generated at the cavity output of a single-photon source and atomic multiqubit states generated by their sequential interaction with the same cavity mode.

  15. Preliminary performance of the MKII 17 GHz traveling wave relativistic klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.; Stowell, G.; Kreischer, K.E.; Mastovsky, I.

    1999-05-01

    Initial test results are presented of an upgraded RF source developed for high peak power 17 GHz linear accelerator applications. The objectives of this upgrade program were (a) to increase the output capability of the existing vacuum demountable prototype tube so that RF power could also be supplied to a future 2 MeV photoinjector system without appreciable loss of input power to the 17 GHz linac and (b) to investigate the performance of a new design traveling wave output circuit incorporating a racetrack shaped dual output coupler with 5{percent} bandwidth high peak power ceramic RF windows. These recently installed devices are presently being conditioned and tested at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Preliminary performance of the MKII 17 GHz traveling wave relativistic klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.; Stowell, G.; Kreischer, K. E.; Mastovsky, I.

    1999-05-07

    Initial test results are presented of an upgraded RF source developed for high peak power 17 GHz linear accelerator applications. The objectives of this upgrade program were (a) to increase the output capability of the existing vacuum demountable prototype tube so that RF power could also be supplied to a future 2 MeV photoinjector system without appreciable loss of input power to the 17 GHz linac and (b) to investigate the performance of a new design traveling wave output circuit incorporating a racetrack shaped dual output coupler with 5% bandwidth high peak power ceramic RF windows. These recently installed devices are presently being conditioned and tested at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center.

  17. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; ...

    2015-02-27

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with resultsmore » of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV/m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30–35 MV/m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc = 30–35 MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have

  18. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, Peter

    2015-02-27

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV/m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30–35 MV/m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc = 30–35 MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double

  19. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, P.

    2015-02-01

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV /m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV /m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30 - 35 MV /m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV /m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc=30 - 35 MV /m . One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have been

  20. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  1. Lithographic wavelength control of an external cavity laser with a silicon photonic crystal cavity-based resonant reflector.

    PubMed

    Liles, Alexandros A; Debnath, Kapil; O'Faolain, Liam

    2016-03-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a new design for external cavity hybrid lasers consisting of a III-V semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) with fiber reflector and a photonic crystal (PhC)-based resonant reflector on SOI. The silicon reflector is composed of an SU8 polymer bus waveguide vertically coupled to a PhC cavity and provides a wavelength-selective optical feedback to the laser cavity. This device exhibits milliwatt-level output power and side-mode suppression ratios of more than 25 dB.

  2. Tabulated Output from ELLA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    which takes the information stored by the simulator in a history file and outputs it in tabular form. Monitors are displayed horizontally and their...CONTENTS 1. Introduction 2. Simulator Commands 2.1 History 2.2 Tabulate 2.3 mk 3. Tabular Commands 3.1 dp 3.2 cd 3.3 wi 3.4 rn 3.5 ev 3.5.1 Single events...data stored by the simulator in a history file; this includes information about the ELLA TYPEs used and changes in value of the monitor points that

  3. Influence of cavity loss on an extrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity intensity-based pressure sensor.

    PubMed

    Lű, Tao

    2015-09-01

    We present an extrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity intensity-based pressure sensor that mainly comprises a single-mode fiber end and an elastic monocrystalline silicon layer bonded to a silicon diaphragm. We investigated the influence of cavity loss on the performance indexes (PIS) of the intensity-based extrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity optical fiber pressure sensor. A buffer unit made of three incompressible oil cavities attenuated outside pressure and transformed pressure information into cavity length microchange information. Experimental results indicated that, under center quadrature-points within the linear regions of adjacent fringes, for an applied 40 kPa external pressure, cavity length was modulated by pressures of 69.9 kPa-109.9 kPa, 150.1 kPa-190 kPa, 220.1 kPa-259.9 kPa, and 279.9 kPa-319.9 kPa, output intensity ranges increased as 1 μW, 1.02 μW, 1.03 μW, and 1.05 μW, sensitivity increased as 0.01909 μW/kPa, 0.01986 μW/kPa, 0.02127 μW/kPa, and 0.02387 μW/kPa, but linearity degraded, as indicated by the standard deviation of linear fits of 0.02607, 0.02664, 0.02935, and 0.04879 due to cavity loss. Furthermore, the pressure ranges within the same quarter period decreased as 40 kPa, 37.45 kPa, 32.4 kPa, and 30.15 kPa. Consequently, the same lengths of linear regions within adjacent fringes of an approximately sinusoidal curve corresponded to different measurement ranges, linearities, and sensitivities. Initial cavity length must be chosen to optimize both signal strength and the PIS studied here in manufacturing this type sensor.

  4. Influence of cavity loss on an extrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity intensity-based pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lż, Tao

    2015-09-01

    We present an extrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity intensity-based pressure sensor that mainly comprises a single-mode fiber end and an elastic monocrystalline silicon layer bonded to a silicon diaphragm. We investigated the influence of cavity loss on the performance indexes (PIS) of the intensity-based extrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity optical fiber pressure sensor. A buffer unit made of three incompressible oil cavities attenuated outside pressure and transformed pressure information into cavity length microchange information. Experimental results indicated that, under center quadrature-points within the linear regions of adjacent fringes, for an applied 40 kPa external pressure, cavity length was modulated by pressures of 69.9 kPa-109.9 kPa, 150.1 kPa-190 kPa, 220.1 kPa-259.9 kPa, and 279.9 kPa-319.9 kPa, output intensity ranges increased as 1 μW, 1.02 μW, 1.03 μW, and 1.05 μW, sensitivity increased as 0.01909 μW/kPa, 0.01986 μW/kPa, 0.02127 μW/kPa, and 0.02387 μW/kPa, but linearity degraded, as indicated by the standard deviation of linear fits of 0.02607, 0.02664, 0.02935, and 0.04879 due to cavity loss. Furthermore, the pressure ranges within the same quarter period decreased as 40 kPa, 37.45 kPa, 32.4 kPa, and 30.15 kPa. Consequently, the same lengths of linear regions within adjacent fringes of an approximately sinusoidal curve corresponded to different measurement ranges, linearities, and sensitivities. Initial cavity length must be chosen to optimize both signal strength and the PIS studied here in manufacturing this type sensor.

  5. Cavities/Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... minerals in your tooth's hard, outer enamel. This erosion causes tiny openings or holes in the enamel — ... Anorexia and bulimia can lead to significant tooth erosion and cavities. Stomach acid from repeated vomiting (purging) ...

  6. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... centers, and dental providers in the community to foster more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at highest risk of cavities, including those covered ...

  7. CIRCULAR CAVITY SLOT ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Kerley, P.L.

    1959-01-01

    A small-size antenna having a doughnut-shaped field pattern and which can act both as an antenna and a resonant circuit is described. The antenna is of the slotted type and comprises a resonant cavity with a center hole. A circular slot is provided in one wall of the cavity concentric with the hole and a radio frequency source is connected across the slot. The pattern and loading of the antenna are adjusted by varying the position and shape of a center element slidably disposed within the hole and projecting from the slotted side of the resonant cavity. The disclosed structure may also be used to propagate the oscillator signal down a transniission line by replacing the center element with one leg of the transmission line in a spaced relation from the walls of the cavity.

  8. Novel 980-nm and 490-nm light sources using vertical cavity lasers with extended coupled cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, John G.; Mooradian, Aram; Lewis, Alan; Shchegrov, Andrei V.; Strzelecka, Eva M.; Lee, Dicky; Watson, Jason P.; Liebman, Michael K.; Carey, Glen P.; Umbrasas, Arvydas; Amsden, Charles A.; Cantos, Brad D.; Hitchens, William R.; Heald, David L.; Doan, Vincent V.; Cannon, J. L.

    2003-04-01

    We have developed novel electrically pumped, surface-emitting lasers emitting at 980 nm with an extended coupled cavity. The concept is scalable from monolithic low power devices all the way to high power extended cavity lasers. The latter have demonstrated 1W cw multi-mode and 0.5 W cw in a TEM00 mode and a single frequency, with 90% coupling efficiency into a single-mode fiber. By inserting a nonlinear optical medium in the external cavity, efficient and compact frequency doubling has been achieved with CW output powers 5-40 mW demonstrated at 490 nm. The latter devices are especially noteworthy due to their very low noise, sub 10 μrad beam pointing stability combined with small size, low power consumption and high efficiency.

  9. Modulation-free optical locking of an external-cavity diode laser to a filter cavity.

    PubMed

    Hayasaka, Kazuhiro

    2011-06-15

    Optical locking to a filter cavity is an effective method to eliminate the limitations of an external-cavity diode laser, such as broad spontaneous emission backgrounds and frequency jitters. Stable operation of the optical locking requires simultaneous control of the feedback phase and the diode-laser frequency. Frequency dither is usually used to extract the two error signals, but this causes extra frequency modulation in the output beam. A modulation-free method for deriving the error signals by modulating the laser-cavity coupling strength is demonstrated with a violet diode laser. A modulation-free linewidth upper limit of about 7 kHz for a 1 s measurement is realized by the method.

  10. THz wave parametric oscillator with a surface-emitted ring-cavity configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Wang, Yuye; Xu, Degang; Tang, Longhuang; Xu, Wentao; Duan, Pan; Yan, Chao; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-11-01

    A surface-emitted ring-cavity terahertz (THz) wave parametric oscillator has been demonstrated for high-energy THz output and fast frequency tuning. Through the special optical design with a Galvano optical scanner and four-mirror ring-cavity structure, a maximum THz output of 12.9 μJ/pulse is achieved at 1.359 THz under the pump pulse energy of 172.8 mJ with the repetition rate of 10 Hz. A further research on the performance of the SE ring-cavity TPO has done to explore more characteristics of THz output. The THz pulse instability and the influence of cavity loss has analyzed. Moreover, the pump depletion rate of the ring-cavity configuration is much lower than the conventional surface-emitted terahertz wave parametric oscillator at the same experimental conditions.

  11. Design study of beam dynamics issues for a one TeV next linear collider based upon the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Houck, T.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.; Sessler, A.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.

    1995-06-01

    A design study has recently been conducted for exploring the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) system as a rf power source for a 1 TeV linear collider. We present, in this paper, the beam dynamics part of this study. We have achieved in our design study acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties for the resulting high efficiency and low cost RK-TBA. {copyright} 1995 {ital American Institute of Physics}.

  12. Relativistic-klystron two-beam-accelerator as a power source for a 1 TeV next linear collider: A systems study

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Goffeney, N.; Deadrick, F.

    1994-10-01

    A physics, engineering, and costing study has been conducted to explore the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam-accelerator system as a power source candidate for a 1 TeV linear collider. We present a point design example which has acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties. Preliminary ``bottom-up`` cost estimate yields the full power source system at less than 1 billion dollars. The overall efficiency for rf production is estimated to be 36%.

  13. Design study of beam dynamics issues for 1 TeV next linear collider based upon the relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.; Sessler, A.; Yu, S.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.

    1994-11-01

    A design study has recently been conducted for exploring the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) system as a rf power source for a 1 TeV linear collider. The author present, in this paper, the beam dynamics part of this study. They have achieved in their design study acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties for the resulting high efficiency and low cost RK-TBA.

  14. Traveling wave linear accelerator with RF power flow outside of accelerating cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, Valery A.

    2016-06-28

    A high power RF traveling wave accelerator structure includes a symmetric RF feed, an input matching cell coupled to the symmetric RF feed, a sequence of regular accelerating cavities coupled to the input matching cell at an input beam pipe end of the sequence, one or more waveguides parallel to and coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities, an output matching cell coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities at an output beam pipe end of the sequence, and output waveguide circuit or RF loads coupled to the output matching cell. Each of the regular accelerating cavities has a nose cone that cuts off field propagating into the beam pipe and therefore all power flows in a traveling wave along the structure in the waveguide.

  15. HIGH POWER TEST OF A 3.9 GHZ 5-CELL DEFLECTING-MODE CAVITY IN A CRYOGENIC OPERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min; Church, Michael

    2013-11-24

    A 3.9 GHz deflecting mode (S, TM110) cavity has been long used for six-dimensional phase-space beam manipulation tests [1-5] at the A0 Photo-Injector Lab (16 MeV) in Fermilab and their extended applications with vacuum cryomodules are currently planned at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) user facility (> 50 MeV). Despite the successful test results, the cavity, however, demonstrated limited RF performance during liquid nitrogen (LN2) ambient operation that was inferior to theoretical prediction. We have been performing full analysis of the designed cavity by analytic calculation and comprehensive system simulation analysis to solve complex thermodynamics and mechanical stresses. The re-assembled cryomodule is currently under the test with a 50 kW klystron at the Fermilab A0 beamline, which will benchmark the modeling analysis. The test result will be used to design vacuum cryomodules for the 3.9 GHz deflecting mode cavity that will be employed at the ASTA facility for beam diagnostics and phase-space control.

  16. Wavelength-Agile External-Cavity Diode Laser for DWDM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.

    2006-01-01

    A prototype external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been developed for communication systems utilizing dense wavelength- division multiplexing (DWDM). This ECDL is an updated version of the ECDL reported in Wavelength-Agile External- Cavity Diode Laser (LEW-17090), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 11 (November 2001), page 14a. To recapitulate: The wavelength-agile ECDL combines the stability of an external-cavity laser with the wavelength agility of a diode laser. Wavelength is modulated by modulating the injection current of the diode-laser gain element. The external cavity is a Littman-Metcalf resonator, in which the zeroth-order output from a diffraction grating is used as the laser output and the first-order-diffracted light is retro-reflected by a cavity feedback mirror, which establishes one end of the resonator. The other end of the resonator is the output surface of a Fabry-Perot resonator that constitutes the diode-laser gain element. Wavelength is selected by choosing the angle of the diffracted return beam, as determined by position of the feedback mirror. The present wavelength-agile ECDL is distinguished by design details that enable coverage of all 60 channels, separated by 100-GHz frequency intervals, that are specified in DWDM standards.

  17. Pulse shape control in a dual cavity laser: numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashkir, Yuri

    2006-04-01

    We present a numerical model of the laser system for generating a special shape of the pulse: a steep peak at the beginning followed by a long pulse tail. Laser pulses of this nature are required for various applications (laser material processing, optical breakdown spectroscopy, etc.). The laser system consists of two "overlapped" cavities with different round-trip times. The laser crystal, the Q-switching element, the back mirror, and the output coupler are shared. A shorter pulse is generated in a short cavity. A small fraction of this pulse is injected into the long cavity as a seed. It triggers generation of the longer pulse. The output emission from this hybrid laser produces a required pulse shape. Parameters of the laser pulse (ratios of durations and energies of short- and long- pulse components) can be controlled through cavity length and the output coupler reflection. Modelling of the laser system is based on a set of coupled rate equations for dynamic variables of the system: the inverse population in an active laser media and photon densities in coupled cavities. Numerical experiments were provided with typical parameters of a Nd:YAG laser to study the system behaviour for different combinations of parameters.

  18. An Advanced simulation Code for Modeling Inductive Output Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Thuc Bui; R. Lawrence Ives

    2012-04-27

    During the Phase I program, CCR completed several major building blocks for a 3D large signal, inductive output tube (IOT) code using modern computer language and programming techniques. These included a 3D, Helmholtz, time-harmonic, field solver with a fully functional graphical user interface (GUI), automeshing and adaptivity. Other building blocks included the improved electrostatic Poisson solver with temporal boundary conditions to provide temporal fields for the time-stepping particle pusher as well as the self electric field caused by time-varying space charge. The magnetostatic field solver was also updated to solve for the self magnetic field caused by time changing current density in the output cavity gap. The goal function to optimize an IOT cavity was also formulated, and the optimization methodologies were investigated.

  19. Experimental and Numerical Characterization of a Hybrid Fabry-Pérot Cavity for Temperature Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Aldaba, Aitor; Pinto, Ana Margarida Rodrigues; Lopez-Amo, Manuel; Frazão, Orlando; Santos, José Luís; Baptista, José Manuel; Baierl, Hardy; Auguste, Jean-Louis; Jamier, Raphael; Roy, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid Fabry-Pérot cavity sensing head based on a four-bridge microstructured fiber is characterized for temperature sensing. The characterization of this cavity is performed numerically and experimentally in the L-band. The sensing head output signal presents a linear variation with temperature changes, showing a sensitivity of 12.5 pm/°C. Moreover, this Fabry-Pérot cavity exhibits good sensitivity to polarization changes and high stability over time. PMID:25853404

  20. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.; Xie, Jinchun

    1999-01-01

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS).

  1. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.; Xie, J.

    1999-06-15

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). 6 figs.

  2. The standing wave FEL/TBA: Realistic cavity geometry and energy extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Soo, Henke, H.; Sessler, A.M.; Sharp, W.M.

    1993-05-01

    A set of parameters for standing wave free electron laser two beam accelerators (SWFEL/TBA) is evaluated for realistic cavity geometry taking into account beam-break-up and the sensitivity of output power to imperfections. Also given is a power extraction system using cavity coupled wave guides.

  3. Gain and Efficiency of a Superconducting Microwave Compressor with a Switching Cavity in an Interference Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, S. N.; Samoylenko, G. M.

    2016-11-01

    We study the processes of radiation output from a microwave storage cavity through a superconducting interference switch, which is based on a H-junction with a superconducting switching cavity connected to the side branch of the junction for various ways of controlling the parameters of the switching cavity. It is shown that efficient control over radiation output in such a switch can be achieved by varying the resonance frequency or Q-factor of the switching cavity, as well as by varying these parameters simultaneously. It is found that in the case of controlling the resonance frequency of the switching cavity, there exists an optimal interval of the frequency variation, within which the total efficiency and extraction efficiency are maximum. When the Q-factor of the switching cavity changes, the dependence of the total efficiency and extraction efficiency on the Q-factor has the monotonic character. The mixed regime of radiation output control is also studied. The envelopes of the output compressor pulses are plotted on the basis of recurrent relationships between the amplitudes of the waves in the system for three regimes of switch operation. It is shown that pulses with an almost rectangular shape of the envelope can be formed in the regime of controlling the switching cavity by varying the Q-factor. An example of possible realization of the switching cavity is considered.

  4. Circular polarization emission from an external cavity diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Zhang, Fan; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Pursel, Sean M.; Horn, Mark W.

    2008-08-01

    We construct an external cavity diode laser (ECDL) comprising structurally left-handed chiral sculptured-thin-film (STF) mirrors for pure circular-polarized (CP) emission, and observed single mode, left-handed CP lasing performance. The extinction ratio of CP output was found to increase rapidly near the threshold of the injection-current for the laser diodes.

  5. Blue-emitting external cavity laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hong Man; Song, Hong Joo; Park, Jong Hwan; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Jung Ho

    2016-03-01

    An front facet anti-reflection coated solitary laser diode is operated in the external cavity diode laser (ECDL). For wavelength stabilization and narrow spectral width, the diffraction grating is used in a Littrow configuration. At an injection current of 280 mA, a output power of 35mW with a slope efficiency of 0.22 W/A and the bandwidth of 80 pm at a wavelength of 457 nm. In this paper, the tunable external cavity diode laser module is designed with an overall size of 18 mm x 24 mm x 14 mm. ECDL showed excellent wavelength locking behavior without a non-shift of the peak wavelength.

  6. Cavity-modified collective Rayleigh scattering of two atoms.

    PubMed

    Reimann, René; Alt, Wolfgang; Kampschulte, Tobias; Macha, Tobias; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Thau, Natalie; Yoon, Seokchan; Meschede, Dieter

    2015-01-16

    We report on the observation of cooperative radiation of exactly two neutral atoms strongly coupled to the single mode field of an optical cavity, which is close to the lossless-cavity limit. Monitoring the cavity output power, we observe constructive and destructive interference of collective Rayleigh scattering for certain relative distances between the two atoms. Because of cavity backaction onto the atoms, the cavity output power for the constructive two-atom case (N=2) is almost equal to the single-emitter case (N=1), which is in contrast to free-space where one would expect an N^{2} scaling of the power. These effects are quantitatively explained by a classical model as well as by a quantum mechanical model based on Dicke states. We extract information on the relative phases of the light fields at the atom positions and employ advanced cooling to reduce the jump rate between the constructive and destructive atom configurations. Thereby we improve the control over the system to a level where the implementation of two-atom entanglement schemes involving optical cavities becomes realistic.

  7. Dynamics of a vertical cavity quantum cascade phonon laser structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryam, W.; Akimov, A. V.; Campion, R. P.; Kent, A. J.

    2013-07-01

    Driven primarily by scientific curiosity, but also by the potential applications of intense sources of coherent sound, researchers have targeted the phonon laser (saser) since the invention of the optical laser over 50 years ago. Here we fabricate a vertical cavity structure designed to operate as a saser oscillator device at a frequency of 325 GHz. It is based on a semiconductor superlattice gain medium, inside a multimode cavity between two acoustic Bragg reflectors. We measure the acoustic output of the device as a function of time after applying electrical pumping. The emission builds in intensity reaching a steady state on a timescale of order 0.1 μs. We show that the results are consistent with a model of the dynamics of a saser cavity exactly analogous to the models used for describing laser dynamics. We also obtain estimates for the gain coefficient, steady-state acoustic power output and efficiency of the device.

  8. Silicon reflectors for external cavity lasers based on ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Li, Xia; Jin, Hao; Yu, Hui; Yang, Jianyi; Jiang, Xiaoqing

    2017-01-01

    We propose and experimentally investigate types of silicon ring reflectors on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) platform. These reflectors are used for realizing the silicon hybrid external cavity lasers. A suspended edge coupler is used to connect the reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) chip and the reflectors. The properties of the reflectors and the hybrid external cavity lasers with these reflectors are illustrated. The experimental results show that all of those reflectors have a high reflectivity and the highest reflectivity can up to be 95%. The lowest insertion loss can be as low as 0.4 dB. The output power of the hybrid external cavity lasers with these reflectors can reach mW magnitude and the highest output power is 6.1 mW. Over 30 dB side mode suppression ratio is obtained.

  9. Mammalian clock output mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kalsbeek, Andries; Yi, Chun-Xia; Cailotto, Cathy; la Fleur, Susanne E; Fliers, Eric; Buijs, Ruud M

    2011-06-30

    In mammals many behaviours (e.g. sleep-wake, feeding) as well as physiological (e.g. body temperature, blood pressure) and endocrine (e.g. plasma corticosterone concentration) events display a 24 h rhythmicity. These 24 h rhythms are induced by a timing system that is composed of central and peripheral clocks. The highly co-ordinated output of the hypothalamic biological clock not only controls the daily rhythm in sleep-wake (or feeding-fasting) behaviour, but also exerts a direct control over many aspects of hormone release and energy metabolism. First, we present the anatomical connections used by the mammalian biological clock to enforce its endogenous rhythmicity on the rest of the body, especially the neuro-endocrine and energy homoeostatic systems. Subsequently, we review a number of physiological experiments investigating the functional significance of this neuro-anatomical substrate. Together, this overview of experimental data reveals a highly specialized organization of connections between the hypothalamic pacemaker and neuro-endocrine system as well as the pre-sympathetic and pre-parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system.

  10. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  11. Ultrasmall Microfabricated Laser Cavities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-23

    Design of a surface-emitting, subwavelength metal- clad disk laser in the visible spectrum, Optics Express, (08 2010): 0. doi: 10.1364/OE.18.019581 12/08...3.1 Metal- clad disk laser Metal-optic and plasmonic cavities have in recent years been of particular interest. It is well known that metals...metal- clad disk laser cavities that have a room temperature Q-factor of 200 to 300 at the visible red wavelength of λ ~ 670 nm. Non-degenerate

  12. Long wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    DOEpatents

    Choquette, Kent D.; Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting near 1300 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave below, at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al.sub.0.94 Ga.sub.0.06 As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the active region, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55.degree. C.

  13. High-Q resonant cavities for terahertz quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Campa, A; Consolino, L; Ravaro, M; Mazzotti, D; Vitiello, M S; Bartalini, S; De Natale, P

    2015-02-09

    We report on the realization and characterization of two different designs for resonant THz cavities, based on wire-grid polarizers as input/output couplers, and injected by a continuous-wave quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting at 2.55 THz. A comparison between the measured resonators parameters and the expected theoretical values is reported. With achieved quality factor Q ≈ 2.5 × 10(5), these cavities show resonant peaks as narrow as few MHz, comparable with the typical Doppler linewidth of THz molecular transitions and slightly broader than the free-running QCL emission spectrum. The effects of the optical feedback from one cavity to the QCL are examined by using the other cavity as a frequency reference.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics and cavity cooling of levitated nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, P. Z. G.; Aranas, E. B.; Millen, J.; Monteiro, T. S.; Barker, P. F.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate a dynamic nonlinear optomechanical system, comprising a nanosphere levitated in a hybrid electro-optical trap. An optical cavity offers readout of both linear-in-position and quadratic-in-position (nonlinear) light-matter coupling, whilst simultaneously cooling the nanosphere, for indefinite periods of time and in high vacuum. Through the rich sideband structure displayed by the cavity output we can observe cooling of the linear and non-linear particle's motion. Here we present an experimental setup which allows full control over the cavity resonant frequencies, and shows cooling of the particle's motion as a function of the detuning. This work paves the way to strong-coupled quantum dynamics between a cavity and a mesoscopic object largely decoupled from its environment.

  15. Controlled spin pattern formation in multistable cavity-polariton systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, S. S.; Kulakovskii, V. D.

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical studies are performed of planar cavity-polariton systems under resonant optical excitation. We show that if the cavity is spatially anisotropic, the polariton spin is highly sensitive to the pump polarization direction, which can be used to modulate the circular polarization of the output light. In particular, when the right- and left-circular components of the incident wave have equal intensities and mutually opposite angular momenta, the pump has strictly linear yet angle-dependent polarization and as such brings about a periodic angular variation of the polariton spin. Free motion of polaritons is the other factor determining the shape of the cavity-field distribution. Such externally driven and highly tunable spin patterns represent a counterpart of spin shaping in nonresonantly excited Bose-Einstein condensates of cavity polaritons.

  16. Switchable narrow linewidth single-longitudinal mode erbium fiber laser by using saturable-absorber filter and cavity loss control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junfa; Zhang, Cheng; Miao, Changyun; Gu, Hong

    2014-11-01

    A simple single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber ring laser is proposed and demonstrated at first by using an arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) as wavelength filter. Owing to the two sub-ring cavities with different cavity losses, equalized dual-wavelength output can be achieved easily utilizing cavity loss control. The SLM operation is guaranteed by self-injection feedback mechanism under low pump power. In order to improve the dual-wavelength output power, a saturable-absorber (SA) based on a 4 m unpumped EDF is inserted into the main cavity to guarantee the SLM operation under high pump power. The performance of the laser outputs has been experimental studied and all the output wavelengths have a narrow linewidth output.

  17. Development of a pulse modulator to drive 6.19 MW klystron for 15 MeV electron linac

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, Kiran; Pethe, S.N.; Krishnan, R. E-mail: Kiran@sameer.gov.in

    2014-07-01

    We present the design, construction, and characterization of a line-type pulse high-voltage modulator system capable of generating 140-kV, 6 μs pulses width at 150 pulses per second into a Klystron as load. The modulator is used to energize a variety of highpower microwave devices requiring voltage stability and reproducibility. Voltage ripple is less than 0.4% during the flat top, with a shot-to-shot voltage variation of less than 0.2 %. The primary circuit consists of six-stage tuneable pulse-forming networks (PFN's). The PFN is charged by a highly stable charging power supply. The total energy stored is released through a CX-1559 E2V make thyratron into a 1: 11 pulse transformer, which generates 140 kV, 6 μs pulses. The flat-top voltage generated by the modulator is highly desirable for driving RF sources requiring high quality electron beams. Linac is one of the important fields of study in modern technology due its wide applications for medical and industrial purposes in addition to physics research. (author)

  18. High power rf amplifiers for accelerator applications: The large orbit gyrotron and the high current, space charge enhanced relativistic klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfield, R.M.; Fazio, M.V.; Rickel, D.G.; Kwan, T.J.T.; Peratt, A.L.; Kinross-Wright, J.; Van Haaften, F.W.; Hoeberling, R.F.; Faehl, R.; Carlsten, B.; Destler, W.W.; Warner, L.B.

    1990-01-01

    Los Alamos is investigating a number of high power microwave sources for their potential to power advanced accelerators. Included in this investigation are the large orbit gyrotron amplifier and oscillator (LOG) and the relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA). LOG amplifier development is newly underway. Electron beam power levels of 3 GW, 70 ns duration, are planned, with anticipated conversion efficiencies into RF on the order of 20 percent. Ongoing investigations on this device include experimental improvement of the electron beam optics, and computational studies of resonator design and RF extraction. Recent RKA studies have operated at electron beam powers into the device of 1.35 GW in microsecond duration pulses. The device has yielded modulated electron beam power approaching 300 MW using 3--5 kW of RF input drive. RF powers extracted into waveguide have been up to 70 MW, suggesting that more power is available from the device that we have converted to-date in the extractor. We have examined several aspects of operation, including beam bunching phenomena and RF power extraction techniques. In addition, investigations of the amplifier gain as a function of input drive, electron beam parameters and axial magnetic field strength also have been explored. The effect of ions formed during device operation also has been considered.

  19. Development of high-power gyrotrons with gradually tapered cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Chaojun; Yu Sheng; Niu Xinjian; Liu Yinghui; Li Hongfu; Li Xiang

    2012-12-15

    In high power gyrotrons, the parasitic modes coupled with the operating mode cannot be avoided in the beam-wave interaction. These parasitic modes will decrease the efficiency of the gyrotrons. The purity of the operating mode affected by different tapers should be carefully studied. The steady-state self-consistent nonlinear theory for gyrotron with gradually tapered cavity is developed in this paper. A steady-state calculation code including 'cold cavity' and 'hot cavity' is designed. By comparison, a time-domain model analysis of gyrotron operation is also studied by particle-in-cell (PIC). It is found that the tapers of gyrotron have different influences on the modes coupling between the operating mode and the parasitic modes. During the study, an example of 94 GHz gyrotron with pure operating mode TE{sub 03} has been designed. The purity of the operating mode in the optimized cavity is up to -77 dB, and in output waveguide of the cavity is up to -76 dB. At the same time, the beam-wave interaction in the designed cavity has been simulated, too. An output power of 120 kW, corresponding to 41.6% efficiency and an oscillation frequency of 94.099 GHz have been achieved with a 50 kV, 6 A helical electron beam at a guiding magnetic field of 3.5485 T. The results show that the power in spurious modes of the optimized cavity may be kept far below than that of the traditional tapered cavity.

  20. Cavity Nesting Birds

    Treesearch

    Virgil E. Scott; Keith E. Evans; David R. Patton; Charles P. Stone

    1977-01-01

    Many species of cavity-nesting birds have declined because of habitat reduction. In the eastern United States, where primeval forests are gone, purple martins depend almost entirely on man-made nesting structures (Allen and Nice 1952). The hole-nesting population of peregrine falcons disappeared with the felling of the giant trees upon which they depended (Hickey and...

  1. Filling a Conical Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, Kyle; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2016-11-01

    Root canal treatment involves the removal of infected tissue inside the tooth's canal system and filling the space with a dense sealing agent to prevent further infection. A good root canal treatment happens when the canals are filled homogeneously and tightly down to the root apex. Such a tooth is able to provide valuable service for an entire lifetime. However, there are some examples of poorly performed root canals where the anterior and posterior routes are not filled completely. Small packets of air can be trapped in narrow access cavities when restoring with resin composites. Such teeth can cause trouble even after many years and lead the conditions like acute bone infection or abscesses. In this study, the filling of dead-end conical cavities with various liquids is reported. The first case studies included conical cavity models with different angles and lengths to visualize the filling process. In this investigation, the rate and completeness at which a variety of liquids fill the cavity were observed to find ideal conditions for the process. Then, a 3D printed model of the scaled representation of a molar with prepared post spaces was used to simulate the root canal treatment. The results of this study can be used to gain a better understanding of the restoration for endodontically treated teeth.

  2. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers. PMID:22792106

  3. Serial Input Output

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each

  4. CMOS output buffer wave shaper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, L.; Whitaker, S.; Merrell, R.

    1990-01-01

    As the switching speeds and densities of Digital CMOS integrated circuits continue to increase, output switching noise becomes more of a problem. A design technique which aids in the reduction of switching noise is reported. The output driver stage is analyzed through the use of an equivalent RLC circuit. The results of the analysis are used in the design of an output driver stage. A test circuit based on these techniques is being submitted to MOSIS for fabrication.

  5. Inverter communications using output signal

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Patrick L.

    2017-02-07

    Technologies for communicating information from an inverter configured for the conversion of direct current (DC) power generated from an alternative source to alternating current (AC) power are disclosed. The technologies include determining information to be transmitted from the inverter over a power line cable connected to the inverter and controlling the operation of an output converter of the inverter as a function of the information to be transmitted to cause the output converter to generate an output waveform having the information modulated thereon.

  6. Triple optomechanical induced transparency in a two-cavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Chao, Wu; Li-Guo, Qin; Jun, Jing; Guo-Hong, Yang; Zhong-Yang, Wang

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the optomechanical induced transparency (OMIT) phenomenon in a two-cavity system which is composed of two optomechanical cavities. Both of the cavities consist of a fixed mirror and a high-Q mechanical resonator, and they couple to each other via a common waveguide. We show that in the presence of a strong pump field applied to one cavity and a weak probe field applied to the other, a triple-OMIT can be observed in the output field at the probe frequency. The two mechanical resonators in the two cavities are identical, but they lead to different quantum interference pathways. The transparency windows are induced by the coupling of the two cavities and the optical pressure radiated to the mechanical resonators, which can be controlled via the power of the pump field and the coupling strength of the two cavities. Project supported by the Strategic Priority Research Program, China (Grant No. XDB01010200), the Hundred Talents Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. Y321311401), and the National Natural Sciences Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11347147 and 1547035).

  7. Transverse Mode Dynamics and Ultrafast Modulation of Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We show that multiple transverse mode dynamics of VCSELs (Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers) can be utilized to generate ultrafast intensity modulation at a frequency over 100 GHz, much higher than the relaxation oscillation frequency. Such multimode beating can be greatly enhanced by taking laser output from part of the output facet.

  8. Broadband cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiaogang; Wang Yanhua; Zhang Jiepeng; Zhu Yifu

    2011-10-15

    Cavity electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is created in a three-level atomic system confined in a cavity and coupled to a free-space control laser and is manifested as a narrow transmission peak of a probe laser coupled into the cavity mode and tuned to the two-photon Raman resonance with the control laser. Cavity EIT can be observed with a control laser detuned from the atomic transition frequency in a range limited by the vacuum Rabi splitting of two cavity-atom normal modes. This leads to the broadband cavity EIT obtained in the coupled-cavity-atom system with a free-space, broadband control laser. We report an experimental observation of broadband cavity EIT in cold Rb atoms with a frequency-modulated control laser and discuss its application in multichannel and multifrequency light memory.

  9. Polarization characteristics, control, and modulation of vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Lear, K.L.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Figiel, J.J.; Kilcoyne, S.P.; Hagerott-Crawford, M.; Zolper, J.C.; Leibenguth, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    The gain-dependent polarization properties of vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers and methods for polarization control and modulation are discussed. The partitioning of power between the two orthogonal eigen polarizations is shown to depend upon the relative spectral alignment of the nondegenerate polarization cavity resonances with the laser gain spectrum. A dominant polarization can thus be maintained by employing a blue-shifted offset of the peak laser gain relative to the cavity resonance wavelength. Alternatively, the polarization can be controlled through use of anisotropic transverse cavity geometries. The orthogonal eigen polarizations are also shown to enable polarization modulation. By exploiting polarization switching transitions in cruciform lasers, polarization modulation of the fundamental mode up to 50 MHz is demonstrated. At lower modulation frequencies, complementary digital polarized output or frequency doubling of the polarized output is obtained. Control and manipulation of vertical-cavity laser polarization may prove valuable for present and future applications.

  10. Design of interaction cavity for 170 GHz, 1 MW ITER gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Nitin; Khatun, Hasina; Singh, Udaybir; Sinha, A.K. E-mail: aksinha@ceeri.ernet.in; Vyas, V.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper the design of interaction cavity for 170 GHz, 1 MW gyrotron is presented. An in-house developed code GCOMS has been used for operating mode selection and mode competition. For 170 GHz, 1 MW gyrotron interaction cavity TE28, 7 mode excite as a operating mode at the fundamental harmonic number. The electromagnetic simulator-MAGIC, a Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code has been used for the cold cavity analysis and the beam-wave interaction. More than 1MW output power has been achieved at guiding cavity magnetic field 6.77 T. (author)

  11. A 100 Mbps resonant cavity phase modulator for coherent optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Robinson, Deborah L.; Hemmati, Hamid

    1992-01-01

    A resonant cavity electro-optic phase modulator has been designed and implemented to operate at a data rate of 100 Mbps. The modulator consists of an electro-optic crystal located in a highly resonant cavity. The cavity is electro-optically tuned on and off resonance, and the phase dispersion near the cavity resonance provides the output phase modulation. The performance of the modulator was measured by first heterodyne detecting the signal to an intermediate frequency and then measuring the spectral characteristics using an RF spectrum analyzer. The measured phase shift is shown to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  12. External cavity diode laser based upon an FBG in an integrated optical fiber platform.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Stephen G; Holmes, Christopher; Berry, Sam A; Gates, James C; Jantzen, Alexander; Ferreiro, Teresa I; Smith, Peter G R

    2016-04-18

    An external cavity diode laser is demonstrated using a Bragg grating written into a novel integrated optical fiber platform as the external cavity. The cavity is fabricated using flame-hydrolysis deposition to bond a photosensitive fiber to a silica-on-silicon wafer, and a grating written using direct UV-writing. The laser operates on a single mode at the acetylene P13 line (1532.83 nm) with 9 mW output power. The noise properties of the laser are characterized demonstrating low linewidth operation (< 14 kHz) and superior relative intensity noise characteristics when compared to a commercial tunable external cavity diode laser.

  13. External-cavity diode laser in second-order Littrow configuration.

    PubMed

    Britzger, M; Khalaidovski, A; Hemb, B; Kley, E-B; Brückner, F; Rinkleff, R-H; Danzmann, K; Schnabel, R

    2012-08-01

    In this Letter, we propose and demonstrate an external-cavity diode laser in second-order Littrow configuration. This topology utilizes a low-efficiency diffraction grating to establish a high-finesse external cavity, strong optical feedback, a high polarization discrimination, and a circular TEM00 output mode. In our proof-of-concept experiment, we realized a cavity with a finesse of 1855, being, to the best of our knowledge, the highest value ever reported for a three-port-grating-coupled cavity. With optical feedback, the laser threshold of the laser diode employed was reduced by a factor of 4.

  14. [Myxofibrosarcoma in the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Janů, F

    A number of benign and malignant tumors may develop in the abdominal cavity. Sarcomas are rather rare tumors of the abdominal cavity. They are often diagnosed at advanced growth stages as their local growth can cause clinical problems to the patients. The author presents a case report of myxofibrosarcoma in the abdominal cavity.Key words: myxofibrosarcoma.

  15. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  16. Single-cavity SLED device

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, B.A.

    1984-09-01

    The conventional SLED device used at SLAC requires two cavities. However, the same effect can be obtained with a single cavity; the theory and operation of the device is the same, only the hardware is changed. The single-cavity device is described here.

  17. Design study of an S-band RF cavity of a dual-energy electron LINAC for the CIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeong-No; Park, Hyungdal; Song, Ki-baek; Li, Yonggui; Lee, Byung Cheol; Cha, Sung-su; Lee, Jong-Chul; Shin, Seung-Wook; Chai, Jong-seo

    2014-01-01

    The design of a resonance frequency (RF) cavity for the dual-energy S-band electron linear accelerator (LINAC) has been carried out for the cargo inspection system (CIS). This Standing-wave-type RF cavity is operated at a frequency under the 2856-MHz resonance frequency and generates electron beams of 9 MeV (high mode) and 6 MeV (low mode). The electrons are accelerated from the initial energy of the electron gun to the target energy (9 or 6 MeV) inside the RF cavity by using the RF power transmitted from a 5.5-MW-class klystron. Then, electron beams with a 1-kW average power (both high mode and low mode) bombard an X-ray target a 2-mm spot size. The proposed accelerating gradient was 13 MV/m, and the designed Q value was about 7100. On going research on 15-MeV non-destructive inspections for military or other applications is presented.

  18. New output improvements for CLASSY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rassbach, M. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Additional output data and formats for the CLASSY clustering algorithm were developed. Four such aids to the CLASSY user are described. These are: (1) statistical measures; (2) special map types; (3) formats for standard output; and (4) special cluster display method.

  19. Collector-Output Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glandorf, D. R.; Phillips, Robert F., II

    1986-01-01

    Collector-Output Analysis Program (COAP) programmer's aid for analyzing output produced by UNIVAC collector (MAP processor). COAP developed to aid in design of segmentation structures for programs with large memory requirements and numerous elements but of value in understanding relationships among components of any program. Crossreference indexes and supplemental information produced. COAP written in FORTRAN 77.

  20. Enhanced performance CCD output amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Dunham, Mark E.; Morley, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A low-noise FET amplifier is connected to amplify output charge from a che coupled device (CCD). The FET has its gate connected to the CCD in common source configuration for receiving the output charge signal from the CCD and output an intermediate signal at a drain of the FET. An intermediate amplifier is connected to the drain of the FET for receiving the intermediate signal and outputting a low-noise signal functionally related to the output charge signal from the CCD. The amplifier is preferably connected as a virtual ground to the FET drain. The inherent shunt capacitance of the FET is selected to be at least equal to the sum of the remaining capacitances.

  1. CAVITY CONTROL ALGORITHM

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski, J. Hovater

    2010-09-01

    A digital low level radio frequency (RF) system typically incorporates either a heterodyne or direct sampling technique, followed by fast ADCs, then an FPGA, and finally a transmitting DAC. This universal platform opens up the possibilities for a variety of control algorithm implementations. The foremost concern for an RF control system is cavity field stability, and to meet the required quality of regulation, the chosen control system needs to have sufficient feedback gain. In this paper we will investigate the effectiveness of the regulation for three basic control system algorithms: I&Q (In-phase and Quadrature), Amplitude & Phase and digital SEL (Self Exciting Loop) along with the example of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV cavity field control system.

  2. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  3. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  4. Preliminary design report of a relativistic-Klystron two-beam-accelerator based power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass next linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.

    1995-02-22

    A preliminary point design for an 11.4 GHz power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass Next Linear Collider (NLC) based on the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam-Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept is presented. The present report is the result of a joint LBL-LLNL systems study. consisting of three major thrust areas: physics, engineering, and costing. The new RK-TBA point design, together with our findings in each of these areas, are reported.

  5. Using the optical-klystron effect to increase and measure the intrinsic beam energy spread in free-electron-laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, Eduard; Ferrari, Eugenio; Reiche, Sven; Schietinger, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    We present a setup based on the optical klystron concept, consisting of two undulator modules separated by a magnetic chicane, that addresses two issues in free-electron-laser (FEL) facilities. On the one hand, it allows increasing the intrinsic energy spread of the beam at the source, which is useful to counteract the harmful microbunching instability. This represents an alternative method to the more conventional laser heater with the main advantage that no laser system is required. On the other hand, the setup can be used to reconstruct the initial beam energy spread, whose typical values in FEL injectors around 1 keV are very difficult to measure with standard procedures.

  6. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leen, J. Brian; O’Keefe, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10−10 cm−1/\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\sqrt {{\\rm Hz;}}$\\end{document} Hz ; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features. PMID:25273701

  7. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leen, J Brian; O'Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10(-10) cm(-1)/√Hz; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  8. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leen, J. Brian O’Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-15

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10{sup −10} cm{sup −1}/√(Hz;) an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  9. Water clusters in nonpolar cavities

    PubMed Central

    Vaitheeswaran, Subramanian; Yin, Hao; Rasaiah, Jayendran C.; Hummer, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    We explore the structure and thermodynamics of water clusters confined in nonpolar cavities. By calculating the grand-canonical partition function term by term, we show that small nonpolar cavities can be filled at equilibrium with highly structured water clusters. The structural and thermodynamic properties of these encapsulated water clusters are similar to those observed experimentally in the gas phase. Water filling is highly sensitive to the size of the cavity and the strength of the interactions with the cavity wall. Water penetration into pores can thus be modulated by small changes in the polarity and structure of the cavity. Implications on water penetration into proteins are discussed. PMID:15572444

  10. Description and expected performance of flight-model, 12-gigahertz, output stage tube for the communications technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chomos, G. J.; Curren, A. N.

    1976-01-01

    The flight model output stage tube for the Communications Technology Satellite is described. The output stage tube is a 12-GHz, 200-W, coupled cavity traveling wave tube. The tube has a multistage depressed collector for efficiency enhancement. Collector cooling is accomplished by direct radiation to space. Expected rf performance and factors affecting on orbit performance and life are discussed.

  11. Spontaneous emission in cavity QED with a terminated waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Matthew; Shen, Jung-Tsung

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the effects of a nanophotonic boundary on the spontaneous emission properties of an excited two-level atom in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) geometry. We show that a boundary provides temporally delayed interference, which can be either constructive or destructive. Consequently, the decay of the atomic excitation can be either increased or greatly inhibited. As a concrete example, we investigate the spontaneous emission process in cavity QED with a terminated line-defect waveguide, and show the rich behavior of the atomic response due to the boundary. We also show that the output photonic wave form is strongly influenced by the boundary.

  12. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Shulte, D.; Jones, Roger M.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  13. RF Cavity Characterization with VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    C. Nieter, C. Roark, P. Stoltz, C.D. Zhou, F. Marhauser

    2011-03-01

    When designing a radio frequency (RF) accelerating cavity structure various figures of merit are considered before coming to a final cavity design. These figures of merit include specific field and geometry based quantities such as the ratio of the shunt impedance to the quality factor (R/Q) or the normalized peak fields in the cavity. Other important measures of cavity performance include the peak surface fields as well as possible multipacting resonances in the cavity. High fidelity simulations of these structures can provide a good estimate of these important quantities before any cavity prototypes are built. We will present VORPAL simulations of a simple pillbox structure where these quantities can be calculated analytically and compare them to the results from the VORPAL simulations. We will then use VORPAL to calculate these figures of merit and potential multipacting resonances for two cavity designs under development at Jefferson National Lab for Project X.

  14. Multi-output differential technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidare, Srinivas R.

    1997-01-01

    A differential is a very old and proven mechanical device that allows a single input to be split into two outputs having equal torque irrespective of the output speeds. A standard differential is capable of providing only two outputs from a single input. A recently patented multi-output differential technology known as `Plural-Output Differential' allows a single input to be split into many outputs. This new technology is the outcome of a systematic study of complex gear trains (Bidare 1992). The unique feature of a differential (equal torque at different speeds) can be applied to simplify the construction and operation of many complex mechanical devices that require equal torque's or forces at multiple outputs. It is now possible to design a mechanical hand with three or more fingers with equal torque. Since these finger are powered via a differential they are `mechanically intelligent'. A prototype device is operational and has been used to demonstrate the utility and flexibility of the design. In this paper we shall review two devices that utilize the new technology resulting in increased performance, robustness with reduced complexity and cost.

  15. 2-μm numerical analysis of linear-cavity FP structures based on fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhuoya; Yan, Fengping; Zhang, Luna; Bai, Yan; Liu, Shuo; Zhou, Hong; Hou, Yafei; Zhang, Ning

    2017-05-01

    The linewidth performance of all-fiber, linear-cavity Fabry-Perot structures based on fiber Bragg gratings operating at 2-μm band has been investigated numerically. The output linewidth performance of two symmetrical and asymmetrical cavities has been theoretically studied and comprehensively compared. The numerical analysis is based on the transmission matrix method with the simplified parameters. The simulation results show that cavity lengths, cavity lengths ratio, grating lengths, grating lengths ratio, as well as index modulation depths, affect the output linewidth performance. The tolerance ability of the asymmetrical structure is first proposed and investigated under 1 mm accuracy, and single-frequency output can be realized by properly adjusting the properties of the proposed composite linear cavity structure.

  16. Dynamics of bad-cavity-enhanced interaction with cold Sr atoms for laser stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffer, S. A.; Christensen, B. T. R.; Henriksen, M. R.; Thomsen, J. W.

    2017-07-01

    Hybrid systems of cold atoms and optical cavities are promising systems for increasing the stability of laser oscillators used in quantum metrology and atomic clocks. In this paper we map out the atom-cavity dynamics in such a system and demonstrate limitations as well as robustness of the approach. We investigate the phase response of an ensemble of cold 88Sr atoms inside an optical cavity for use as an error signal in laser frequency stabilization. With this system we realize a regime where the high atomic phase shift limits the dynamical locking range. The limitation is caused by the cavity transfer function relating input field to output field. The cavity dynamics is shown to have only little influence on the prospects for laser stabilization, making the system robust towards cavity fluctuations and ideal for the improvement of future narrow linewidth lasers.

  17. Output optics for laser velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Dana H. (Inventor); Gunter, William D. (Inventor); Mcalister, Kenneth W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Space savings are effected in the optical output system of a laser velocimeter. The output system is comprised of pairs of optical fibers having output ends from which a beam of laser light emerges, a transfer lens for each light beam, and at least one final (LV) lens for receiving the light passing through the transfer lenses and for focussing that light at a common crossing point or area. In order to closely couple the transfer lenses to the final lens, each transfer lens is positioned relative to the final lens receiving light therefrom such that the output waist of the corresponding beam received by the final lens from the transfer lens is a virtual waist located before the transfer lens.

  18. Research on output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, Anthony J.

    1988-01-01

    A summary is presented of the main results obtained during the course of research on output feedback control. The term output feedback is used to denote a controller design approach which does not rely on an observer to estimate the states of the system. Thus, the order of the controller is fixed, and can even be zero order, which amounts to constant gain ouput feedback. The emphasis has been on optimal output feedback. That is, a fixed order controller is designed based on minimizing a suitably chosen quadratic performance index. A number of problem areas that arise in this context have been addressed. These include developing suitable methods for selecting an index of performance, both time domain and frequency domain methods for achieving robustness of the closed loop system, developing canonical forms to achieve a minimal parameterization for the controller, two time scale design formulations for ill-conditioned systems, and the development of convergent numerical algorithms for solving the output feedback problem.

  19. Cardiac output after burn injury.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, J. M.; Shakespeare, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    Cardiac output after burn injury has been measured by the non-invasive method of impedance plethysmography. An initial study of 143 normal subjects was undertaken in order to investigate variations in cardiac output with age. Fifteen patients were monitored during resuscitation after extensive burns. Fourteen patients showed a depression of stroke volume below the lower limits of the normal range, derived from the initial study on normal people. PMID:6691694

  20. Cavity optomechanical magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Forstner, S; Prams, S; Knittel, J; van Ooijen, E D; Swaim, J D; Harris, G I; Szorkovszky, A; Bowen, W P; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H

    2012-03-23

    A cavity optomechanical magnetometer is demonstrated. The magnetic-field-induced expansion of a magnetostrictive material is resonantly transduced onto the physical structure of a highly compliant optical microresonator and read out optically with ultrahigh sensitivity. A peak magnetic field sensitivity of 400  nT  Hz(-1/2) is achieved, with theoretical modeling predicting the possibility of sensitivities below 1  pT  Hz(-1/2). This chip-based magnetometer combines high sensitivity and large dynamic range with small size and room temperature operation.