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Sample records for knee chondral lesions

  1. Reduced Anterior Cruciate Ligament Vascularization Is Associated With Chondral Knee Lesions.

    PubMed

    Hetsroni, Iftach; Manor, Amir; Finsterbush, Alex; Lowe, Joseph; Mann, Gideon; Palmanovich, Ezequiel

    2016-07-01

    This study tested the association between periligamentous vascularization of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the presence of chondral knee lesions via retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 702 consecutive knee arthroscopic procedures. In each case, the ACL periligamentous envelope was documented as follows: (1) vascular, where the ACL was covered with blood vessels along its entire length; (2) centrally avascular, where the central third of the ACL was not covered but peripheral vascularized coverage was present; and (3) avascular, where there was no blood vessel coverage of the ACL. Inclusion criteria for the study were as follows: (1) age older than 18 years and (2) normal knee ligament laxity. Univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression were used to test the association between chondral lesions and each of the variables: sex, age, meniscus tear, decreased ACL vascularity, and concomitant chondral lesion in another knee compartment. The cohort included 516 knees. In the univariate analysis, all variables were associated with a chondral lesion, but only older age and decreased ACL vascularity were associated with chondral lesions in each knee compartment. In the regression model, only decreased ACL vascularity was associated with chondral lesions in each knee compartment. For avascular knees, the odds ratio was 2.84 for medial femoral condyle lesions (95% confidence interval, 1.73-4.68; P=.000), 2.44 for lateral femoral condyle lesions (95% confidence interval, 1.19-5.03; P=.015), and 2.48 for patellofemoral lesions (95% confidence interval, 1.55-3.97; P=.000). The findings showed that decreased ACL periligamentous vascularization is associated with chondral lesions of the femoral condyles in knees with preserved ACL laxity. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e737-e743.]. PMID:27111071

  2. Does location of patellofemoral chondral lesion influence outcome after Oxford medial compartmental knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Konan, S.; Haddad, F. S.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is associated with successful outcomes in carefully selected patient cohorts. We hypothesised that severity and location of patellofemoral cartilage lesions significantly influences functional outcome after Oxford medial compartmental knee arthroplasty. Patients and Methods We reviewed 100 consecutive UKAs at minimum eight-year follow-up (96 to 132). A single surgeon performed all procedures. Patients were selected based on clinical and plain radiographic assessment. All patients had end-stage medial compartment osteoarthritis (OA) with sparing of the lateral compartment and intact anterior cruciate ligaments. None of the patients had end-stage patellofemoral OA, but patients with anterior knee pain or partial thickness chondral loss were not excluded. There were 57 male and 43 female patients. The mean age at surgery was 69 years (41 to 82). At surgery the joint was carefully inspected for patellofemoral chondral loss and this was documented based on severity of cartilage loss (0 to 4 Outerbridge grading) and topographic location (medial, lateral, central, and superior or inferior). Functional scores collected included Oxford Knee Score (OKS), patient satisfaction scale and University College Hospital (UCH) knee score. Intraclass correlation was used to compare chondral damage to outcomes. Results All patients documented significant improvement in pain and improved functional scores at mid-term follow-up. There were four revisions (mean 2.9 years, 2 to 4; standard deviation (sd) 0.9) in this cohort, three for tibial loosening and one for femoral loosening. There was one infection that was treated with debridement and insert exchange. The mean OKS improved from 23.2 (sd 7.1) to 39.1 (sd 6.9); p < 0.001. The cohort with central and lateral grade 3 patellofemoral OA documented lower mean satisfaction with pain (90, sd 11.8) and function (87.5, sd 10.3) on the patient satisfaction scale. On the UCH scale, patients

  3. Photoactivated platelet-rich plasma therapy for a traumatic knee chondral lesion.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Julien; Barnard, Adele; Rotstein, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of combining photoactivation therapy with platelet-rich plasma injections in the treatment of a traumatic chondral lesion of the knee. A 38-year-old man presented with left-knee pain and swelling following a basketball injury. MRI demonstrated a full-thickness lateral tibial plateau chondral flap with subchondral cyst formation and marrow oedema. The patient underwent a course of photoactivated platelet-rich plasma (PAPRP) injections. Patient outcome measures included the numerical pain rating scale and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index 3.0 (WOMAC). Following treatment, the patient reported improvement in both pain and function as measured by the numerical pain-rating scale and WOMAC. MRI showed resolution of subchondral bone marrow bruising/oedema. No complications were noted. In this case report, PAPRP injections demonstrated improvement in all recorded outcome measures. Recognising the limitations of a single case report, the results highlight the need for more formal controlled trials to determine the potential use of PAPRP in the treatment of chondral lesions.

  4. UPDATING ON DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF CHONDRAL LESION OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha Cavalcanti, Filho Marcantonio Machado; Doca, Daniel; Cohen, Moisés; Ferretti, Mário

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTS The treatment of chondral knee injuries remains a challenge for the orthopedic surgeon, mainly owing to the characteristics of the cartilage tissue, which promote low potential for regeneration. Chondral lesions can be caused by metabolic stimulation, or by genetic, vascular and traumatic events, and are classified according to the size and thickness of the affected cartilage. Clinical diagnosis can be difficult, especially due to insidious symptoms. Additional tests, as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), may be needed. The treatment of these lesions usually starts with non-operative management. Surgery should be reserved for patients with detached chondral fragments, blocked range of motion, or the failure of non-operative treatment. The surgical techniques used for the treatment of partial thickness defects are Debridement and Ablation. These techniques aim to improve symptoms, since they do not restore normal structure and function of the cartilage. For full-thickness defects (osteochondral lesion), available treatments are Abrasion, Drilling, Microfracture, Osteochondral Autologous and Allogeneic Transplantation, and biological techniques such as the use of Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation, Minced Cartilage and stem cells. PMID:27027078

  5. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the treatment of isolated knee chondral lesions: design of a randomised controlled pilot study comparing arthroscopic microfracture versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative mesenchymal stem cell injections

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Julien; Ford, Jon; Bates, Dan; Boyd, Richard; Hahne, Andrew; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cicuttini, Flavia; Huguenin, Leesa; Norsworthy, Cameron; Shah, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The management of intra-articular chondral defects in the knee remains a challenge. Inadequate healing in areas of weight bearing leads to impairment in load transmission and these defects predispose to later development of osteoarthritis. Surgical management of full thickness chondral defects include arthroscopic microfracture and when appropriate autologous chondrocyte implantation. This latter method however is technically challenging, and may not offer significant improvement over microfracture. Preclinical and limited clinical trials have indicated the capacity of mesenchymal stem cells to influence chondral repair. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a pilot randomised controlled trial comparing arthroscopic microfracture alone for isolated knee chondral defects versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative autologous adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell injections. Methods and analysis A pilot single-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. 40 participants aged 18–50 years, with isolated femoral condyle chondral defects and awaiting planned arthroscopic microfracture will be randomly allocated to a control group (receiving no additional treatment) or treatment group (receiving postoperative adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment). Primary outcome measures will include MRI assessment of cartilage volume and defects and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Secondary outcomes will include further MRI assessment of bone marrow lesions, bone area and T2 cartilage mapping, a 0–10 Numerical Pain Rating Scale, a Global Impression of Change score and a treatment satisfaction scale. Adverse events and cointerventions will be recorded. Initial outcome follow-up for publication of results will be at 12 months. Further annual follow-up to assess long-term differences between the two group will occur. Ethics and dissemination This trial has received prospective ethics approval through

  6. OSTEOCHONDRAL AUTOLOGOUS TRANSPLANTATION FOR TREATING CHONDRAL LESIONS IN THE PATELLA

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Moises; Amaro, Joicemar Tarouco; Fernandes, Ricardo de Souza Campos; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Astur, Diego da Costa; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Skaf, Abdalla

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The primary aim of this study was to assess the clinical and functional evolution of patients with total-thickness symptomatic cartilaginous injury of the patellar joint surface, treated by means of osteochondral autologous transplantation. Methods: This prospective study was conducted from June 2008 to March 2011 and involved 17 patients. The specific questionnaires of Lysholm, Kujala and Fulkerson were completed preoperatively and one year postoperatively in order to assess the affected knee, and SF-36 was used to assess these patients’ general quality of life. The nonparametric paired Wilcoxon test was used for statistical analysis on the pre and postoperative questionnaires. The data were analyzed using the SPSS for Windows software, version 16.0, and a significance level of 5% was used. Results: The Lysholm preoperative and postoperative average scores were 54.59 and 75.76 points (p < 0.05). The Fulkerson pre and postoperative average scores were 52.53 and 78.41 points (p < 0.05). Conclusions: We believe that autologous osteochondral transplantation is a good treatment method for total-thickness symptomatic chondral lesions of the joint surface of the patella. PMID:27042645

  7. Association Between Previous Meniscal Surgery and the Incidence of Chondral Lesions at Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Robert H.; Wright, Rick W.; David, Tal S.; McCormack, Robert G.; Sekiya, Jon K.; Svoboda, Steven J.; Huston, Laura J.; Haas, Amanda K.; Steger-May, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Background Knees undergoing revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction typically have more intra-articular injuries than do knees undergoing primary reconstruction. Hypothesis Previous partial meniscectomy (PM) is associated with a higher rate of chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction, whereas previous meniscal repair (MR) is not associated with a higher rate of chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction, compared with knees undergoing revision ACL with no previous meniscal surgery. Study design Cohort study (Prevalence); Level of evidence, 2. Methods Data from a multicenter cohort was reviewed to determine the history of prior meniscal surgery (PM/MR) and the presence of grade II/III/IV chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction. The association between previous meniscal surgery and the incidence of chondral lesions was examined. Patient age was included as a covariate to determine if surgery type contributes predictive information independent of patient age. Results The cohort included 725 ACL revision surgeries. Chondrosis was associated with patient age (P < .0001) and previous meniscal surgery (P < .0001). After adjusting for patient age, knees with previous PM were more likely to have chondrosis than knees with previous MR (P = .003) or no previous meniscal surgery (P < .0001). There was no difference between knees without previous meniscal surgery and knees with previous MR (P = .7). Previous partial meniscectomy was associated with a higher rate of chondrosis in the same compartment compared with knees without previous meniscal surgery (P < .0001) and knees with previous MR (P ≤ .03). Conclusion The status of articular cartilage at the time of revision ACL reconstruction relates to previous meniscal surgery independent of the effect of patient age. Previous partial meniscectomy is associated with a higher incidence of articular cartilage lesions, whereas previous meniscal repair is not. Although this association may

  8. Pilot Study of Cartilage Repair in the Knee Joint with Multiply Incised Chondral Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Vancsodi, Jozsef; Farkas, Boglarka; Fazekas, Adam; Nagy, Szilvia Anett; Bogner, Peter; Vermes, Csaba; Than, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Focal cartilage lesions in the knee joint have limited capacity to heal. Current animal experiments show that incisions of the deep zone of a cartilage allograft allow acceptable integration for the graft. Questions/Purposes We performed this clinical study to determine (1) if the multiply incised cartilage graft is surgically applicable for focal cartilage lesions, (2) whether this allograft has a potential to integrate to the repair site, and (3) if patients show clinical improvement. Patients and Methods Seven patients with 8 chondral lesions were enrolled into the study. Symptomatic lesions between 2 and 8 cm2 were accepted. Additional injuries were allowed but were addressed simultaneously. Grafts were tailored to match and the deep zone of the cartilage was multiply incised to augment the basal integration before securing in place. Rigorous postoperative physiotherapy followed. At 12 and 24 months the patients’ satisfaction were measured and serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 6 patients. Results Following the implantations no adverse reaction occurred. MRI evaluation postoperatively showed the graft in place in 5 out of 6 patients. In 1 patient, MRI suggested partial delamination at 1 year and graft degeneration at 2 years. Short Form–36 health survey and the Lysholm knee score demonstrated a significant improvement in the first year; however, by 2 years there was a noticeable drop in the scores. Conclusions. Multiply incised pure chondral allograft used for cartilage repair appears to be a relatively safe method. Further studies are necessary to assess its potential in cartilage repair before its clinical use. PMID:26069710

  9. Association Between Meniscal and Chondral Lesions and Timing of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    de Campos, Gustavo Constantino; Nery, Wilton; Teixeira, Paulo Eduardo Portes; Araujo, Paulo Henrique; Alves, Wilson de Mello

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common sports injury and is known to be associated with an increased risk of knee osteoarthritis. Several studies have indicated that the risk of additional injuries to the menisci and articular cartilage increases with delays in the treatment of ACL tears. However, no consensus has been reached regarding the ideal timing for ACL reconstruction in terms of preventing secondary lesions. Purpose: To determine how the time elapsed between an ACL lesion and its reconstruction affects the incidence of meniscal and chondral lesions. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Medical records of 764 patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction were reviewed. Data from arthroscopic findings that included information about meniscal lesions and full-thickness articular cartilage lesions at the time of surgery were collected. The association between time elapsed between ACL lesion and reconstruction surgery and incidence of articular cartilage and meniscal lesions was analyzed by chi-square or Fisher exact test. The risk of secondary lesion was calculated by odds ratios (ORs) obtained from simple logistic regression analysis. Results: A positive correlation was observed between time after injury and the presence of any articular lesions (P = .003), cartilage lesions (P = .01), and medial meniscus lesions (P < .001). When analyzing the risk of secondary lesion relative to the reference period (<2 months), it was observed that the odds of finding any articular injury at the time of ACL reconstruction increased when the time from ACL injury to surgery was between 12 and 24 months (OR = 2.62) and >24 months (OR = 5.88). Furthermore, the odds of lesions on the medial meniscus increased when the timing between injury and surgery was 6 to 12 months (OR = 2.71) and continued to increase when the timing was 12 to 24 months (OR = 3.78) and >24 months (OR = 9.07). Conclusion: Associated articular lesions

  10. Concentrated Bone Marrow Aspirate for the Treatment of Chondral Injuries and Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Serra Cruz, Raphael; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) has emerged as a novel treatment for pathology of the knee. Despite containing a limited number of stem cells, BMAC serves as a source of growth factors that are thought to play an important role as a result of their anabolic and anti-inflammatory effects. To our knowledge, there is no systematic review regarding the outcomes of bone marrow aspirate concentrate used for the treatment of chondral defects and osteoarthritis of the knee. Purpose: To perform a systematic review on the outcomes of bone marrow aspirate concentrate for the treatment of chondral defects and osteoarthritis of the knee. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was performed using the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, and MEDLINE from 1980 to present. Inclusion criteria were as follows: use of BMAC for treatment of chondral defects and osteoarthritis of the knee, English language, and human studies. We excluded cadaveric studies, animal studies, basic science articles, editorial articles, surveys, and studies that did not include the knee. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, studies were evaluated for efficacy and safety of BMAC for treatment of articular cartilage knee pathologies. Results: Eleven studies were considered. Of these, 5 were prospective studies, 1 was a retrospective study, 2 were case series, and 3 were case reports. Three comparative studies (2 with level 2 evidence, 1 with level 3 evidence) were found in our search; none of them were randomized. Three studies investigated the clinical efficacy of BMAC in the treatment of osteoarthritis, and 8 studies evaluated the efficacy of BMAC on focal cartilage injuries. All 3 studies regarding osteoarthritis and all 8 studies regarding focal chondral defects reported good to excellent overall outcomes with the use of BMAC. Conclusion: Although a

  11. Up-to-date Review and Cases Report on Chondral Defects of Knee Treated by ACI Technique: Clinical-instrumental and Histological Results.

    PubMed

    Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Ghilardi, Marco; Bottai, Vanna; Bugelli, Giulia; Guido, Giulio; Giannotti, Stefano

    2015-05-01

    The limited regenerative potential of a full thickness defect of the knee joint cartilage has certainly conditioned the development of therapeutic strategies that take into account all the aspects of the healing process. The most common treatments to repair chondral and osteochondral lesions are bone marrow stimulation, osteochondral autograft transplantation, autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis, and autologous chondrocyte implantation. We like to emphasize the difference between a chondral and an osteochondral lesion because the difference is sometimes lost in the literature. In the context of treatment of injuries of the knee joint cartilage, the second-generation autologous chondrocyte transplant is a consolidated surgical method alternative to other techniques. Our experience with the transplantation of chondrocytes has had exceptional clinical results. We report 2 complete cases of a group of 22 in knee and ankle. These 2 cases had histological and instrumental evaluation. We cannot express conclusions, but can only make considerations, stating that, with the clinical functional result being equal, we obtained an excellent macroscopic result in both cases of second look. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a multiple surgical procedure with expensive chondrocyte culture, but even with this limitation, we think that it must be the choice in treating chondral lesions, especially in young patients. PMID:26055026

  12. Chondral Injury in Patellofemoral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lustig, Sébastien; Servien, Elvire; Neyret, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Patellofemoral instability is common and affects a predominantly young age group. Chondral injury occurs in up to 95%, and includes osteochondral fractures and loose bodies acutely and secondary degenerative changes in recurrent cases. Biomechanical abnormalities, such as trochlear dysplasia, patella alta, and increased tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance, predispose to both recurrent dislocations and patellofemoral arthrosis. Design: In this article, we review the mechanisms of chondral injury in patellofemoral instability, diagnostic modalities, the distribution of lesions seen in acute and episodic dislocation, and treatments for articular cartilage lesions of the patellofemoral joint. Results: Little specific evidence exists for cartilage treatments in patellofemoral instability. In general, the results of reparative and restorative procedures in the patellofemoral joint are inferior to those observed in other compartments of the knee. Conclusion: Given the increased severity of chondral lesions and progression to osteoarthritis seen with recurrent dislocations, careful consideration should be given to early stabilisation in patients with predisposing factors. PMID:26069693

  13. Editorial Commentary: Risk Factors for Chondral Lesions in the Hip-There Is More to It Than Cam and Pincer.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Age has been cited in a recent article as the largest predictor of both chondral and labral lesions in patients with hip dysplasia. But it was not surprising that there is also a direct relation between a small lateral center-edge angle, acetabular head index, and cartilage degeneration and an increased acetabular index and labral tears in patients with hip dysplasia. The severity of the congenital disease determines the severity of the intra-articular lesions. PMID:27495863

  14. COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN RADIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION AND MACRO AND MICROSCOPIC ANALYSIS ON OSTEOARTHRITIS LESIONS OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Carlos Antônio; Sampaio, Tania Clarete Fonseca Vieira Sales; Ferreira, Frederico de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the modified Ahlbäck radiological classification with macroscopic analysis of knee injuries and locate a chondral lesion in the tibial plateau, and to correlate this with integrity or lack of integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament. Material and Methods: Between July and December 2009, 40 patients of mean age 67.1 years with an indication for total knee arthroplasty were selected. The modified Ahlbäck radiological classification was used. The International Cartilage Repair Society classification was used for macroscopic analysis of the lesions. Chondral injuries were correlated with the integrity or lack of integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament. Results: Regarding the radiological classification of the knees, three (7.5%) were classified as grade 1, two (5%) as grade 2, 17 (42.5%) as grade 3, 16 (40%) as grade 4 and two (5%) as grade 5. The macroscopic analysis of the knee showed that 25 patients (62.5%) had very severe injury and 15 (37.5%), severe. In eight knees (20%) with ruptured ACL, the lesion extended to the posterior region of the medial tibial plateau. When the ACL was intact, the lesion was located in the anterior-central region. Conclusion: Knee osteoarthritis of grades 4 and 5 in the radiological classification, showed agreement with the macroscopic analysis, i.e. very severe chondral injury. However, grades 1, 2 and 3 were discordant. In the cases of osteoarthritis with intact ACL, the lesion was located in the anterior-central region of the medial tibial plateau, and those with ruptured ACL had the lesion extending to the posterior region of the plateau. PMID:27027004

  15. Pediatric Knee Osteochondritis Dissecans Lesions.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Aristides I; Shea, Kevin G; Ganley, Theodore J

    2016-10-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) can cause knee pain and dysfunction in children. The etiology of OCD remains unclear; theories on causes include inflammation, ischemia, ossification abnormalities, genetic factors, and repetitive microtrauma. Most OCD lesions in skeletally immature patients will heal with nonoperative treatment. The success of nonoperative treatment decreases once patients reach skeletal maturity. The goals of surgical treatment include maintenance of articular cartilage congruity, rigid fixation of unstable fragments, and repair of osteochondral defects with cells or tissues that can adequately replace lost or deficient cartilage. Unsalvageable OCD lesions can be treated with various surgical techniques. PMID:27637663

  16. Delay in surgery predisposes to meniscal and chondral injuries in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi; Masih, Gladson David; Chander, Gaurav; Bachhal, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite improvements in instability after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, associated intraarticular injuries remain a major cause of concern and important prognostic factor for long term results as it may lead to osteoarthritis. Delay in ACL reconstruction has been in variably linked to increase in these injuries but there is lack of consensus regarding optimal timing of reconstruction. The goal of this study was to investigate delay in surgery and other factors, associated with intraarticular injuries in ACL deficient knees. Materials and Methods: A total of 438 patients (42 females; 396 males) enrolled for this prospective observational study. The average age of patients was 26.43 (range 17–51 years) years with a mean surgical delay of 78.91 (range 1 week - 18 years) weeks after injury. We analyzed the factors of age, sex, surgical delay, instability, and level of activity for possible association with intraarticular injuries. Results: Medial meniscus injuries had a significant association with surgical delay (P = 0.000) after a delay of 6 months. Lateral meniscus injuries had a significant association with degree of instability (P = 0.001). Medial-sided articular injuries were significantly affected by age (0.005) with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.048 (95% confidence interval [CI] of 1.014–1.082) reflecting 4.8% rise in incidence with each year. Lateral-sided injuries were associated with female sex (P = 0.018) with OR of 2.846 (95% CI of 1.200–6.752). The level of activity failed to reveal any significant associations. Conclusion: Surgical delay predicts an increase in medial meniscal and lateral articular injuries justifying early rather than delayed reconstruction in ACL deficient knees. Increasing age is positively related to intraarticular injuries while females are more susceptible to lateral articular injuries. PMID:27746491

  17. Sustained five-year benefit of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis for femoral acetabular impingement-induced chondral lesions compared with microfracture treatment.

    PubMed

    Fontana, A; de Girolamo, L

    2015-05-01

    The repair of chondral lesions associated with femoroacetabular impingement requires specific treatment in addition to that of the impingement. In this single-centre retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of patients we compared treatment with microfracture (MFx) with a technique of enhanced microfracture autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC). Acetabular grade III and IV chondral lesions measuring between 2 cm(2) and 8 cm(2) in 147 patients were treated by MFx in 77 and AMIC in 70. The outcome was assessed using the modified Harris hip score at six months and one, two, three, four and five years post-operatively. The outcome in both groups was significantly improved at six months and one year post-operatively. During the subsequent four years the outcome in the MFx group slowly deteriorated, whereas that in the AMIC group remained stable. Six patients in the MFx group subsequently required total hip arthroplasty, compared with none in the AMIC group We conclude that the short-term clinical outcome improves in patients with acetabular chondral damage following both MFx and AMIC. However, the AMIC group had better and more durable improvement, particularly in patients with large (≥ 4 cm(2)) lesions.

  18. Refixation of large chondral fragments on the weight-bearing area of the knee joint: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Maletius, W; Lundberg, M

    1994-12-01

    In most cases of cartilage avulsion, the chondral fragments are severely damaged, and refixation is therefore impossible. We present two cases with large intact cartilage fragments from the weight-bearing area of the femoral condyle after patellar dislocation. We tried refixation using fibrin sealant (Tisseel-Kit, Immuno AG, Vienna, Austria) and polydioxanone-pins (Bio-fix-Pins, Miracon AB, Helsingborg, Sweden). At second look arthroscopy, we found only one third to one half of the defects healed. Due to these results, the refixation of chondral fragments without attached bone seems to be questionable.

  19. Treatment of chondral defects of the knee with one step matrix-assisted technique enhanced by autologous concentrated bone marrow: in vitro characterisation of mesenchymal stem cells from iliac crest and subchondral bone.

    PubMed

    de Girolamo, Laura; Bertolini, Giulia; Cervellin, Matteo; Sozzi, Gabriella; Volpi, Piero

    2010-11-01

    Cartilage repair is still an unsolved problem. In the last years many cell-based treatments have been proposed, in order to obtain good regeneration of cartilage defects. The Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis technique (AMIC(®)) combines the micro-fracture procedure with the use of a specific biological membrane. The phenotypic feature of bone marrow cell population, harvested from iliac crest and knee subchondral bone of patients treated with the AMIC(®) technique, enhanced by autologous concentrated bone marrow, was analysed to evaluate potential variations of the cell population. Samples of eleven patients, with isolated chondral lesions grade III or IV were treated with the AMIC(®) technique, enhanced by the use of autologous concentrated bone marrow. A small fraction of bone marrow samples, both from iliac crest and from the created micro-fractures, was analysed by FACS analysis and then cultured to verify their proliferative and differentiation potential. An average of 0.04% of concentrated bone marrow cells harvested from the iliac crest, presented mesenchymal stem cell phenotype (CD34(-)/CD45(low)/CD271(high)), whereas just 0.02% of these cells were identified from the samples harvested during the creation of micro-fractures at the knee. After two passages in culture, cells expressed a peculiar profile for MSC. Only MSC from bone marrow could be long-term propagated and were able to efficiently differentiate in the cultures. Although the AMIC(®) approach has many advantages, the surgical technique in the application of the microfracture technique remains essential and affects the final result.

  20. Adolescent Femoral Chondral Fragment Fixation With Poly-L-Lactic Acid Chondral Darts.

    PubMed

    Morris, John K; Weber, Alexander E; Morris, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Large chondral injuries without attached bone are uncommon. This report describes a 14-year-old boy who had a unique stress reaction between the bone and the overlying cartilage, predominantly of the anterior lateral femoral condyle, during a week-long basketball camp, resulting in complete displacement of a 2.5 × 2.5-cm full-thickness articular cartilage lesion. There was a 6-day interval from the time of the injury to the first office appointment. Scheduling of magnetic resonance imaging and insurance approval took another week, and then surgery scheduling, including insurance approval and arranging for surgical supplies, took another week. Three weeks after the initial injury, the patient underwent diagnostic arthroscopy and open arthrotomy, and the cartilage-free fragment was returned to the donor site and fixed with poly-L-lactic acid chondral darts. Considerable delamination of the shoulders of the defect was noted on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and at the time of surgery, suggesting an unusual prodromal stress reaction. Although there was no underlying subchondral bone on the free cartilage fragment, the injury healed. The patient had return of full knee range of motion and strength. Magnetic resonance imaging performed 3 months postoperatively showed healed cartilage. At 1 year of clinical follow-up, the patient had no clinical sequelae from the initial injury and had returned to competitive basketball. Prompt recognition of this injury pattern and subsequent surgical repair are necessary because the window of opportunity closes as fibrous healing occurs and the cartilage fragment deforms. The poly-L-lactic acid chondral dart system was instrumental to the success of this case. PMID:26840696

  1. Adolescent Femoral Chondral Fragment Fixation With Poly-L-Lactic Acid Chondral Darts.

    PubMed

    Morris, John K; Weber, Alexander E; Morris, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Large chondral injuries without attached bone are uncommon. This report describes a 14-year-old boy who had a unique stress reaction between the bone and the overlying cartilage, predominantly of the anterior lateral femoral condyle, during a week-long basketball camp, resulting in complete displacement of a 2.5 × 2.5-cm full-thickness articular cartilage lesion. There was a 6-day interval from the time of the injury to the first office appointment. Scheduling of magnetic resonance imaging and insurance approval took another week, and then surgery scheduling, including insurance approval and arranging for surgical supplies, took another week. Three weeks after the initial injury, the patient underwent diagnostic arthroscopy and open arthrotomy, and the cartilage-free fragment was returned to the donor site and fixed with poly-L-lactic acid chondral darts. Considerable delamination of the shoulders of the defect was noted on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and at the time of surgery, suggesting an unusual prodromal stress reaction. Although there was no underlying subchondral bone on the free cartilage fragment, the injury healed. The patient had return of full knee range of motion and strength. Magnetic resonance imaging performed 3 months postoperatively showed healed cartilage. At 1 year of clinical follow-up, the patient had no clinical sequelae from the initial injury and had returned to competitive basketball. Prompt recognition of this injury pattern and subsequent surgical repair are necessary because the window of opportunity closes as fibrous healing occurs and the cartilage fragment deforms. The poly-L-lactic acid chondral dart system was instrumental to the success of this case.

  2. Knee microfracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee: a 2-year randomised study. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc . 2010 Apr;18(4):519-27. Hurst JM, Steadman JR, O'Brien L, Rodkey WG, Briggs KK. Rehabilitation following microfracture for chondral injury in the knee. ...

  3. Diagnosis of Knee Osteochondral Lesions With Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Penttilä, Pekko; Liukkonen, Jukka; Joukainen, Antti; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha; Kröger, Heikki

    2015-10-01

    Evaluation of articular cartilage and subchondral bone is essential in the diagnosis of joint diseases and injuries. Interobserver and intraobserver reproducibilities of arthroscopic grading are only poor to moderate. Thus, for quantitative and objective evaluation of cartilage and subchondral bone, ultrasound arthroscopy (UA) has been introduced to clarify this dilemma. Assessment of the clinical feasibility of high-frequency ultrasonography (US) during 6 knee arthroscopies was conducted, and the surgical technique is presented. US imaging was conducted with a flexible 9-MHz US catheter inserted into the joint through conventional portals. US and arthroscopy videos were synchronously recorded, and US parameters for cartilage and subchondral bone characteristics were measured. Arthroscopy and US imaging were combined to perform cartilage grading. UA produced quantitative data on lesion size, as well as cartilage quality, and showed subchondral bone changes. Visualization of an osteochondritis dissecans lesion not detected by conventional arthroscopy and US-guided retrograde drilling were possible with UA. To conclude, UA proved to be clinically feasible and aided in the diagnosis when assessing knee osteochondral lesions. PMID:26697300

  4. Diagnosis of Knee Osteochondral Lesions With Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Penttilä, Pekko; Liukkonen, Jukka; Joukainen, Antti; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha; Kröger, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of articular cartilage and subchondral bone is essential in the diagnosis of joint diseases and injuries. Interobserver and intraobserver reproducibilities of arthroscopic grading are only poor to moderate. Thus, for quantitative and objective evaluation of cartilage and subchondral bone, ultrasound arthroscopy (UA) has been introduced to clarify this dilemma. Assessment of the clinical feasibility of high-frequency ultrasonography (US) during 6 knee arthroscopies was conducted, and the surgical technique is presented. US imaging was conducted with a flexible 9-MHz US catheter inserted into the joint through conventional portals. US and arthroscopy videos were synchronously recorded, and US parameters for cartilage and subchondral bone characteristics were measured. Arthroscopy and US imaging were combined to perform cartilage grading. UA produced quantitative data on lesion size, as well as cartilage quality, and showed subchondral bone changes. Visualization of an osteochondritis dissecans lesion not detected by conventional arthroscopy and US-guided retrograde drilling were possible with UA. To conclude, UA proved to be clinically feasible and aided in the diagnosis when assessing knee osteochondral lesions. PMID:26697300

  5. Clinical outcome of internal fixation of unstable juvenile osteochondritis dissecans lesions of the knee.

    PubMed

    Webb, Jonathan E; Lewallen, Laura W; Christophersen, Christy; Krych, Aaron J; McIntosh, Amy L

    2013-11-01

    Juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions of the knee are a common cause of knee pain in skeletally immature patients.The authors sought to determine lesion healing rates, the risk factors associated with failure to heal, and the clinical outcomes for patients who underwent internal fixation for unstable OCD lesions. A retrospective review was conducted of all patients who underwent internal fixation of OCD lesions from 1999 to 2009. Using validated scoring systems, clinical outcome and functional activity were evaluated at the follow-up. The study group comprised 19 patients (20 knees). Mean patient age was 14.5 years (range, 12-17 years). Mean clinical follow-up was 7 years (range, 2-13 years). Mean radiographic follow-up was 2.5 years (range, 0.5-9 years). Fourteen (70%) lesions were grade 3 and 6 (30%) were grade 4. Eleven knees had lateral condyle lesions and 9 had medial lesions. Bioabsorbable fixation was used in 13 knees, metal fixation was used in 5 knees, and 2 knees were fixed with a combination of methods. Osseous integration was evident in 15 (75%) of 20 knees at final follow-up. The 5 unhealed lesions were lateral condylar lesions. Mean Tegner activity scores improved from 3.3 preoperatively to 5.6 at final follow-up. Mean Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee scores were 86.8 and 88.7, respectively, at final follow-up. Further operative intervention was required in 11 knees, with 50% of patients undergoing removal of hardware and 15% requiring subsequent osteochondral allograft transplantation. The authors recommend bioabsorbable fixation for symptomatic stable lesions and metal compression screws with staged removal for unstable lesions.

  6. Monoarthritis of the knee with unusual lesions in adults associated with varicella-zoster virus infection.

    PubMed

    Luna-Pizarro, Daniel; Rodríguez-Castillo, Araceli; Pérez-Hernández, Elizabeth; Pérez-Hernández, Jorge; Hernández-Salgado, Armando; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus-associated arthritis has not been well documented in adults. We present the case of a 27-year-old female patient with monoarthritis of the knee associated with clinical symptoms typical of varicella. Arthroscopic examination showed unusual oval and circular lesions in cartilage, some of which measured 5 +/- 3 mm in diameter in weight-supporting zones. Such lesions have not been described previously and were type III-A lesions on the Noyes scale or grade IV on the Outerbridge scale. On microscopic observation, synovial fluid cultures and hemocultures were negative for the presence of bacteria. A biopsy sample and synovial liquid from the affected knee produced a positive polymerase chain reaction for varicella-zoster virus, genotype E. These findings suggest a strong relation between clinical varicella infection and important lesion invasion in the knee articulation of such a young adult, probably related to the virus. However, it remains necessary to corroborate this relation between cartilage destruction and clinical symptoms of varicella associated with monoarthritis of an adult knee. Nevertheless, it is advisable to initiate the appropriate antiviral treatment in adults with varicella-related gonalgia because the lesions produce the most severe effects on exposure to the knee bone.

  7. Chondral fracture of the lateral trochlea of the femur occurring in an adolescent: mechanism of injury.

    PubMed

    Oohashi, Yoshikazu; Oohashi, Yoshinori

    2007-11-01

    The trochlea of the femur is a very unusual site for chondral fracture. Little is known of the mechanism of injuries confined to the articular cartilage of the trochlea of the femur. A very unusual case of chondral fracture of the lateral trochlea of the femur occurring in an adolescent is reported here. The mechanism by which this injury occurred could be evaluated in this patient. The cartilage on the convex surface of the lateral trochlea was likely avulsed proximally by shear force of the patella during rapid extension of the weight-bearing knee from a flexed position. From a viewpoint of mechanism, this injury differs from the more usual osteochondral or chondral fractures of the weight bearing area of the femoral condyle, which are usually accompanied by twisting forces.

  8. In vivo diagnostics of human knee cartilage lesions using delayed CBCT arthrography.

    PubMed

    Kokkonen, Harri T; Suomalainen, Juha-Sampo; Joukainen, Antti; Kröger, Heikki; Sirola, Joonas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Salo, Jari; Töyräs, Juha

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of delayed cone beam (CBCT) arthrography for clinical diagnostics of knee cartilage lesions. Knee joints with cartilage lesions were imaged using native radiography, MRI, and delayed CBCT arthrography techniques in vivo. The joints were imaged three times with CBCT, just before, immediately after (arthrography) and 45 min after the intra-articular injection of contrast agent. The arthrographic images enabled sensitive detection of the cartilage lesions. Use of arthrographic and delayed images together with their subtraction image enabled also detection of cartilage with inferior integrity. The contrast agent partition in intact cartilage (ICRS grade 0) was lower (p < 0.05) than that of cartilage surrounding the ICRS grade I-IV lesions. Delayed CBCT arthrography provides a novel method for diagnostics of cartilage lesions. Potentially, it can also be used in diagnostics of cartilage degeneration. Due to shorter imaging times, higher resolution, and lower costs of CT over MRI, this technique could provide an alternative for diagnostics of knee pathologies. However, for comprehensive evaluation of the clinical potential of the technique a further clinical study with a large pool of patients having a wide range of cartilage pathologies needs to be conducted.

  9. Adverse local tissue response lesion of the knee associated with Morse taper corrosion.

    PubMed

    McMaster, William C; Patel, Jay

    2013-02-01

    Modularity in arthroplasty components has increased options for solving complex issues in primary and revision procedures. However, this technology introduces the risk of accelerated metal ion release as a result of fretting or passive crevice corrosion within the Morse taper junction. Cobalt toxicity locally and systemically has been described with hip metal bearing surfaces and may be accentuated with ion release from Morse tapers. This is a case report of a knee adverse local tissue response lesion associated with corrosion within the Morse taper of a revision knee arthroplasty in the absence of systemic metal allergy.

  10. Knee cartilage defect: marrow stimulating techniques.

    PubMed

    Mirza, M Zain; Swenson, Richard D; Lynch, Scott A

    2015-12-01

    Painful chondral defects of the knee are very difficult problems. The incidence of these lesions in the general population is not known since there is likely a high rate of asymptomatic lesions. The rate of lesions found during arthroscopic exam is highly variable, with reports ranging from 11 to 72 % Aroen (Aroen Am J Sports Med 32: 211-5, 2004); Curl(Arthroscopy13: 456-60, 1997); Figueroa(Arthroscopy 23(3):312-5, 2007;); Hjelle(Arthroscopy 18: 730-4, 2002). Examples of current attempts at cartilage restoration include marrow stimulating techniques, ostochondral autografts, osteochondral allografts, and autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Current research in marrow stimulating techniques has been focused on enhancing and guiding the biology of microfracture and other traditional techniques. Modern advances in stem cell biology and biotechnology have provided many avenues for exploration. The purpose of this work is to review current techniques in marrow stimulating techniques as it relates to chondral damage of the knee. PMID:26411978

  11. Surgical management of articular cartilage defects in the knee.

    PubMed

    Cole, Brian J; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Grumet, Robert C

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of isolated cartilage lesions of the knee is based on several underlying principles, including a predictable reduction in the patient's symptoms, improvements in function and joint congruence, and prevention of progressive damage. Surgical options for cartilage restoration are described as palliative treatments, such as débridement and lavage; reparative, such as marrow stimulation techniques; or restorative, such as osteochondral grafting and autologous chondrocyte implantation. The choice of an appropriate treatment should be made on an individual basis, with consideration for the patient's specific goals (such as pain reduction or functional improvement), physical demand level, prior treatment history, lesion size and location, and a systematic evaluation of the knee that considers comorbidities, including alignment, meniscal status, and ligament integrity. It is important for the physician to be familiar with the indications, surgical techniques, and clinical outcomes of the available treatment options for chondral defects of the knee. PMID:20415379

  12. Differences in injury pattern and prevalence of cartilage lesions in knee and ankle joints: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Aurich, Matthias; Hofmann, Gunther O; Rolauffs, Bernd; Gras, Florian

    2014-10-27

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is more common in the knee compared to the ankle joint. This can not be explained exclusively by anatomical and biomechanical differences. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare the injury pattern (clinically) and the cartilage lesions (arthroscopically) of knee and ankle joints in a cohort of patients from the same catchment area. A retrospective study of the clinical data of 3122 patients (2139 outpatients and 983 inpatients) was performed, who were treated due to an injury of the knee and ankle joint. Statistical analysis was performed using SigmaStat 3.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA). There is a higher prevalence of injuries in the ankle as compared to the knee joint in this population from the same catchment area. In contrast, high-grade cartilage lesions are more prevalent in the knee, whereas low grade cartilage lesions are equally distributed between knee and ankle. From this data it can be concluded that the frequency of injuries and the injury pattern of knee versus ankle joints do not correlate with the severity of cartilage lesions and may therefore have no direct influence on the differential incidence of OA in those two joints.

  13. Treatment of articular cartilage lesions of the knee joint using a modified AMIC technique.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Antonio; Ciatti, Riccardo; Pascarella, Fabio; Latte, Carmine; Di Salvatore, Mariano Giuseppe; Liguori, Luciano; Iannella, Germano

    2010-04-01

    This study describes a modified AMIC technique consisting of perforations according to Pridie, rather than microfractures, and the covering of the focus of the lesion with a biological collagen patch enriched with bone marrow blood drawn through the knee itself. This technique allows advantages of both the Pridie technique and the in situ proliferation of mesenchymal cells beneath a biological collagen membrane, 'augmented', with bone marrow blood. The collagen membrane forms the roof of a 'biological chamber', and serves to protect and contains the stem cells as they differentiate into chondrocytes, which will form a healthy regenerative cartilage.

  14. Morel-Lavallée Lesion of the Knee in a Recreational Frisbee Player

    PubMed Central

    Shmerling, Alison; Bravman, Jonathan T.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic swelling/effusion in the knee region is a relatively common presenting complaint among athletes and nonathletes. Due to its broad differential diagnosis, a comprehensive evaluation beginning with history and physical examination are recommended. Knee joint effusion can be differentiated from other types of swelling by careful physical examination. Imaging, including plain radiography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is preferred modality. Aspiration of a local fluctuating mass may help with the diagnosis and management of some of these conditions. We present a case of a 26-year-old gentleman with superomedial Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) of the knee with history of a fall during a Frisbee game. His MLL was successfully treated with therapeutic aspiration and compression wrap without further sequelae. MLL is a rare condition consisting of a closed degloving injury caused by pressure and shear stress between the subcutaneous tissue and the superficial fascia or bone. Most commonly, MLL is found over the greater trochanter and sacrum but in rare cases can occur in other regions of the body. In most cases, concurrent severe injury mechanisms and concomitant fractures are present. MLL due to sports injuries are very rare. Therapeutic strategies may vary from compression wraps and aspiration to surgical evacuation. PMID:27493817

  15. Morel-Lavallée Lesion of the Knee in a Recreational Frisbee Player.

    PubMed

    Shmerling, Alison; Bravman, Jonathan T; Khodaee, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic swelling/effusion in the knee region is a relatively common presenting complaint among athletes and nonathletes. Due to its broad differential diagnosis, a comprehensive evaluation beginning with history and physical examination are recommended. Knee joint effusion can be differentiated from other types of swelling by careful physical examination. Imaging, including plain radiography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is preferred modality. Aspiration of a local fluctuating mass may help with the diagnosis and management of some of these conditions. We present a case of a 26-year-old gentleman with superomedial Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) of the knee with history of a fall during a Frisbee game. His MLL was successfully treated with therapeutic aspiration and compression wrap without further sequelae. MLL is a rare condition consisting of a closed degloving injury caused by pressure and shear stress between the subcutaneous tissue and the superficial fascia or bone. Most commonly, MLL is found over the greater trochanter and sacrum but in rare cases can occur in other regions of the body. In most cases, concurrent severe injury mechanisms and concomitant fractures are present. MLL due to sports injuries are very rare. Therapeutic strategies may vary from compression wraps and aspiration to surgical evacuation. PMID:27493817

  16. Advancements in Orthopedic Intervention: Retrograde Drilling and Bone Grafting of Osteochondral Lesions of the Knee Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Seebauer, Christian J.; Bail, Hermann J.; Rump, Jens C. Walter, Thula Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M.

    2010-12-15

    Computer-assisted surgery is currently a novel challenge for surgeons and interventional radiologists. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided procedures are still evolving. In this experimental study, we describe and assess an innovative passive-navigation method for MRI-guided treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the knee. A navigation principle using a passive-navigation device was evaluated in six cadaveric knee joint specimens for potential applicability in retrograde drilling and bone grafting of osteochondral lesions using MRI guidance. Feasibility and accuracy were evaluated in an open MRI scanner (1.0 T Philips Panorama HFO MRI System). Interactive MRI navigation allowed precise drilling and bone grafting of osteochondral lesions of the knee. All lesions were hit with an accuracy of 1.86 mm in the coronal plane and 1.4 mm the sagittal plane. Targeting of all lesions was possible with a single drilling. MRI allowed excellent assessment of correct positioning of the cancellous bone cylinder during bone grafting. The navigation device and anatomic structures could be clearly identified and distinguished throughout the entire drilling procedure. MRI-assisted navigation method using a passive navigation device is feasible for the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the knee under MRI guidance and allows precise and safe drilling without exposure to ionizing radiation. This method may be a viable alternative to other navigation principles, especially for pediatric and adolescent patients. This MRI-navigated method is also potentially applicable in many other MRI-guided interventions.

  17. Chondral Rib Fractures in Professional American Football

    PubMed Central

    McAdams, Timothy R.; Deimel, Jay F.; Ferguson, Jeff; Beamer, Brandon S.; Beaulieu, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although a recognized and discussed injury, chondral rib fractures in professional American football have not been previously reported in the literature. There currently exists no consensus on how to identify and treat these injuries or the expected return to play for the athlete. Purpose: To present 2 cases of chondral rib injuries in the National Football League (NFL) and discuss the current practice patterns for management of these injuries among the NFL team physicians. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Two cases of NFL players with chondral rib injuries are presented. A survey regarding work-up and treatment of these injuries was completed by team physicians at the 2014 NFL Combine. Our experience in identifying and treating these injuries is presented in conjunction with a survey of NFL team physicians’ experiences. Results: Two cases of rib chondral injuries were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) and treated with rest and protective splinting. Return to play was 2 to 4 weeks. NFL Combine survey results show that NFL team physicians see a mean of 4 costal cartilage injuries per 5-year period, or approximately 1 case per year per team. Seventy percent of team physicians use CT scanning and 43% use magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of these injuries. An anesthetic block is used acutely in 57% and only electively in subsequent games by 39%. Conclusion: A high index of suspicion is necessary to diagnose chondral rib injuries in American football. CT scan is most commonly used to confirm diagnosis. Return to play can take up to 2 to 4 weeks with a protective device, although anesthetic blocks can be used to potentially expedite return. Clinical Relevance: Chondral rib injuries are common among NFL football players, while there is no literature to support proper diagnosis and treatment of these injuries or expected duration of recovery. These injuries are likely common in other contact sports and levels of

  18. [Biomechanics of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Witzel, U

    1993-01-01

    The capsular and ligamentous structures as control system of a healthy knee-joint supported by the muscular system are responsible for the rolling and gliding motion of the femoral condyles on the tibial plateau. Both the condyles and the tibial plateau have individually developed but to each other adjusted shapes and fine structures thereby. These structures consist of hyaline cartilage at their three-dimensional surfaces and of closely packed fibrils (lamina splendens) as the final gliding zone for tensile load. The orientation of the collagenous fibres can be made visible by split lines. The chondral surfaces are indirectly in contact to each other and orthogonally stressed at the particular point of contact. The indirect contact of the cartilaginous surfaces happens under interposition of the menisci. The meniscus serves to reduce and equalize the surface pressure by its own projected surface on the one hand and by maintaining of a hydraulic pressure of the synovial fluid on the other hand. Deviations of the condylar position as a result on ligamentous instabilities or ruptures with a following occurring loss of congruence, meniscal lesions or traumatic ruptures lead to a rapid discharge of the synovial fluid under load. The result is a hydraulic head loss with direct contact of the chondral surfaces under stress leading to arthrotic deformations. Severe arthrotic deformations or very much every meniscectomy produce intraarticular lumped loads resulting in a hyper-physiologic chondral pressure and malnutrition thereby. Further on there develop subchondral stress concentrations (caused by the lumped loads) leading to osseous damages, too. MR-pictures can make visible these damages. Chondromalacia, fissure or even chondrolysis are arthroscopically detectable sometimes. As after-effects of deficient knee ligaments occur pathological deviations of the femoral condyles and resulting destructions of the articular surfaces under stress enormously intensified by

  19. The Use of All-Arthroscopic Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis for the Management of Humeral and Glenoid Chondral Defects in the Shoulder.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, Adrián; Ruiz-Ibán, Miguel Ángel; Cuéllar, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    Autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) is often used for treating chondral defects in different joints. We describe an all-arthroscopic approach for the treatment of glenoid and humeral chondral lesions with this technique. AMIC starts with the use of microfractures of the damaged cartilage, followed by coverage of the defect with a type I/III collagen matrix (Chondro-Gide; Geistlich Pharma, Wolhusen, Switzerland) that is fixed with fibrin glue (Tissucol; Baxter, Warsaw, Poland). In a 1-step approach, the unstable cartilage is debrided, microfractures that penetrate up to the subchondral bone are performed, and the membranes are pasted to the lesion. Our technique reduces morbidity rates compared with traditional open surgery. The arthroscopic AMIC procedure is a viable, cost-effective treatment for the repair of chondral lesions of the shoulder.

  20. Bone marrow edema pattern around the knee on magnetic resonance imaging excluding acute traumatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Lynne S; Suh, Kyung Jin

    2011-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is very sensitive for the detection of marrow abnormalities. Bone marrow edema on MRI has been defined as an area of low signal intensity on T1-weighted images, associated with intermediate or high signal intensity findings on T2-weighted images. The bone marrow edema pattern is a nonspecific finding with multiple etiologies. The knee is a common place for bone marrow signal abnormalities to appear on MRI. Besides contusions and fractures from acute trauma, there are a variety of other causes of the bone marrow edema pattern. It is important for the interpreter of the study to be aware of the different etiologies responsible for producing these changes and to be able to narrow the differential diagnosis without mistaking such a pattern for acute trauma or infiltrative tumor. This article concentrates on those entities that produce a bone marrow edema pattern not related to acute trauma including red marrow proliferation, stress, osteochondral lesions, osteonecrosis, bone marrow edema syndrome, arthropathy, infection, Paget's disease, and marrow replacement disorders. PMID:21644195

  1. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J.; Matsuda, Nicole A.; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16–41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5–6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface. PMID:27011815

  2. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J; Matsuda, Nicole A; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16-41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5-6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface.

  3. MRI EVALUATION OF KNEE CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Camanho, Gilberto Luís

    2015-01-01

    Through the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to characterize soft tissue noninvasively, it has become an excellent method for evaluating cartilage. The development of new and faster methods allowed increased resolution and contrast in evaluating chondral structure, with greater diagnostic accuracy. In addition, physiological techniques for cartilage assessment that can detect early changes before the appearance of cracks and erosion have been developed. In this updating article, the various techniques for chondral assessment using knee MRI will be discussed and demonstrated. PMID:27022562

  4. The Kinematic Control During the Backward Gait and Knee Proprioception: Insights from Lesions of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Viggiano, Davide; Corona, Katia; Cerciello, Simone; Vasso, Michele; Schiavone-Panni, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    An already existing large volume of work on kinematics documents a reduction of step length during unusual gaits, such as backward walking. This is mainly explained in terms of modifications of some biomechanical properties. In the present study, we propose that the proprioceptive information from the knee may be involved in this change of motor strategy. Specifically, we show that a non-automated condition such as backward walking can elicit different motor strategies in subjects with reduced proprioceptive feedback after anterior cruciate ligament lesion (ACL). For this purpose, the kinematic parameters during forward and backward walking in subjects with ACL deficit were compared to two control groups: a group with intact ACL and a group with surgically reconstructed ACL. The knee proprioception was tested measuring the threshold for detection of passive knee motion. Subjects were asked to walk on a level treadmill at five different velocities (1–5km/h) in forward and backward direction, thereby calculating the cadence and step length. Results showed that forward walking parameters were largely unaffected in subjects with ACL damage. However, they failed to reduce step length during backward walking, a correction that was normally observed in all control subjects and in subjects with normal proprioceptive feedback after ACL reconstruction. The main result of the present study is that knee proprioception is an important signal used by the brain to reduce step length during the backward gait. This can have a significant impact on clinical evaluation and rehabilitation. PMID:25114731

  5. 0.2-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging of internal lesions of the knee joint: a prospective arthroscopically controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Riel, K A; Reinisch, M; Kersting-Sommerhoff, B; Hof, N; Merl, T

    1999-01-01

    The results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compared with those of arthroscopy in a prospective series of 244 patients. A dedicated system for MRI of limbs and peripheral joints--the 0.2-T Artoscan (Esaote, Italy)--was used for imaging knee joint lesions. T1-weighted spin-echo sagittal images, T2-weighted gradient-echo coronal images, and axial views for lesions of the femoropatellar joint were acquired. Paraxial sagittal and oblique coronal views were obtained for imaging of the cruciate ligaments. This protocol allowed excellent visualization of the cruciate ligaments and medial and lateral meniscus in almost all patients. Compared with arthroscopy performed within 48 h after imaging, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were respectively 93%, 97%, and 95% for tears of the medial meniscus; 82%, 96%, and 93% for tears of the lateral meniscus; 100%, 100%, and 100% for tears of the posterior cruciate ligament; 98%, 98%, and 97% for tears of the anterior cruciate ligament; and 72%, 100%, and 92% for full-thickness articular cartilage lesions. The examination can be performed within 30-45 min at lower cost than diagnostic arthroscopy. MRI with a 0.2-T magnet is a safe and valuable adjunct to the clinical examination of the knee and an aid to efficient preoperative planning.

  6. Mammalian limb loading and chondral modeling during ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Ashley S; Ning, Jie; Ward, Carol V; Ravosa, Matthew J

    2010-04-01

    The adaptive growth response of cartilage, or chondral modeling, can result in changes in joint and limb proportions during ontogeny and ultimately contribute to the adult form. Despite Hamrick's (1999) reevaluation of the mechanisms of chondral modeling, the process of chondral modeling remains poorly studied in animal models. Here, we characterize the macro- and microanatomical responses of the femoral growth plate, articular cartilage, and bone in 15 juvenile Sus scrofa domestica subjected to different locomotor activity patterns. The exercised animals exhibit thinner cartilage zones, greater cellularity and larger proliferative chondrocyte areas in the growth plate, as well as larger femoral dimensions and a more elongate femoral head compared with sedentary controls. In general, the growth plate demonstrates greater adaptive changes than articular cartilage. Moreover, chondrocyte hypertrophy and proliferation were found to be responsive to locomotor loading and thus more important factors in chondral modeling than the extracellular matrix variables that were examined herein. In sum, the underlying mechanisms of adaptive chondrogenesis and bone plasticity are key to informing evolutionary and translational studies regarding determinants of variation in joint form and function. Given the disparity between the predictions of chondral modeling theory and our experimental findings, this suggests a need for further evaluation of chondral modeling responses during ontogeny.

  7. Indian Hedgehog in Synovial Fluid Is a Novel Marker for Early Cartilage Lesions in Human Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Congming; Wei, Xiaochun; Chen, Chongwei; Cao, Kun; Li, Yongping; Jiao, Qiang; Ding, Juan; Zhou, Jingming; Fleming, Braden C.; Chen, Qian; Shang, Xianwen; Wei, Lei

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether there is a correlation between the concentration of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) in synovial fluid (SF) and the severity of cartilage damage in the human knee joints, the knee cartilages from patients were classified using the Outer-bridge scoring system and graded using the Modified Mankin score. Expression of Ihh in cartilage and SF samples were analyzed with immunohistochemistry (IHC), western blot, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore, we detected and compared Ihh protein levels in rat and mice cartilages between normal control and surgery-induced osteoarthritis (OA) group by IHC and fluorescence molecular tomography in vivo respectively. Ihh expression was increased 5.2-fold in OA cartilage, 3.1-fold in relative normal OA cartilage, and 1.71-fold in OA SF compared to normal control samples. The concentrations of Ihh in cartilage and SF samples was significantly increased in early-stage OA samples when compared to normal samples (r = 0.556; p < 0.001); however, there were no significant differences between normal samples and late-stage OA samples. Up-regulation of Ihh protein was also an early event in the surgery-induced OA models. Increased Ihh is associated with the severity of OA cartilage damage. Elevated Ihh content in human knee joint synovial fluid correlates with early cartilage lesions. PMID:24786088

  8. Bone Marrow Aspirate in the Treatment of Chondral Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Holton, James; Imam, Mohamed A.; Snow, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to transdifferentiate into a desired cell lineage has captured the imagination of scientists and clinicians alike. The limited ability for chondrocytes to regenerate in chondral injuries has raised the concept of using MSCs to help regenerate and repair damaged tissue. The expansion of cells in a laboratory setting to be delivered back to the patient is too costly for clinical use in the present tough economic climate. This process is slow with due to the complexity of trying to imitate the natural environment and biological stimulation of chondral cell replication and proliferation. Bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) has the potential to provide an easily accessible and readily available source of MSCs with key growth factors that can be used in treating chondral injuries. This review summarizes the underlying basic science of MSCs and the therapeutic potential of BMAC. PMID:27379241

  9. Biological Knee Reconstruction With Concomitant Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation and Meniscal Allograft Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Takahiro; Bryant, Tim; Minas, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treating articular cartilage defects and meniscal deficiency is challenging. Although some short- to mid-term follow-up studies report good clinical outcomes after concurrent autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT), longer follow-up is needed. Purpose: To evaluate mid- to long-term outcomes after combined ACI with MAT. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of prospectively gathered data from patients who had undergone ACI with MAT between 1999 and 2013. A single surgeon treated 18 patients for symptomatic full-thickness chondral defects with meniscal deficiency. One patient was lost to follow-up. Thus, 17 patients (18 knees; mean age, 31.7 years) were evaluated over a mean 7.9-year follow-up (range, 2-16 years). A mean 1.8 lesions per knee were treated over a total surface area of 7.6 cm2 (range, 2.3-21 cm2) per knee. Seventeen lateral and 1 medial MATs were performed. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. The modified Cincinnati Knee Rating Scale, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, visual analog scale, and Short Form–36 were used to evaluate clinical outcomes. Patients also self-reported knee function and satisfaction. Standard radiographs were scored for Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade. Results: Both 5- and 10-year survival rates were 75%. Outcomes for 6 knees were considered failures. Of the 6 failures, 4 knees were converted to arthroplasty and the other 2 knees underwent biological revision surgery. Of the 12 successfully operated knees, all clinical measures significantly improved postoperatively. Ten patients representing 11 of the 12 knees rated outcomes for their knees as good or excellent, and 1 rated their outcome as fair. Eight patients representing 9 of the 12 knees were satisfied with the procedure. There was no significant osteoarthritis progression based on K-L grading from preoperatively to a

  10. Mid-term results of Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis for treatment of focal cartilage defects in the knee.

    PubMed

    Gille, J; Schuseil, E; Wimmer, J; Gellissen, J; Schulz, A P; Behrens, P

    2010-11-01

    Articular cartilage defects heal poorly. Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis (AMIC) is an innovative treatment for localized full-thickness cartilage defects combining the well-known microfracturing with collagen scaffold and fibrin glue. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the medium-term results of this enhanced microfracture technique for the treatment of chondral lesions of the knee. Thirty-two chondral lesions in 27 patients were treated with AMIC. Within the context of clinical follow-up, these patients were evaluated for up to 5 years after the intervention. Five different scores (Meyer score, Tegner score, Lysholm score, ICRS score, Cincinnati score) as well as radiographs were used for outcome analysis. Articular resurfacing was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The average age of patients (11 females, 16 males; mean body mass index 26, range 20-32) was 37 years (range 16-50 years). The mean defect size of the chondral lesions was 4.2 cm(2) (range 1.3-8.8 cm(2)). All defects were classified as grade IV according to the Outerbridge classification. The follow-up period was between 24 and 62 months with a mean of 37 months. Twenty out of 23 individuals (87%) questioned were subjectively highly satisfied with the results after surgery. Significant improvement (P < 0.05) of all scores was observed as early as 12 months after AMIC, and further increased values were notable up to 24 months postoperatively. MRI analysis showed moderate to complete filling with a normal to incidentally hyperintense signal in most cases. Results did not show a clinical impact of patient's age at the time of operation, body mass index and number of previous operations (n.s.). In contrast, males showed significant higher values in the ICRS score compared to their female counterparts. AMIC is an effective and safe method of treating symptomatic full-thickness chondral defects of the knee in appropriately selected cases. However, further studies with

  11. Management of articular cartilage defects of the knee.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Asheesh; Feeley, Brian T; Williams, Riley J

    2010-04-01

    Articular cartilage has a poor intrinsic capacity for healing. The goal of surgical techniques to repair articular cartilage injuries is to achieve the regeneration of organized hyaline cartilage. Microfracture and other bone marrow stimulation techniques involve penetration of the subchondral plate in order to recruit mesenchymal stem cells into the chondral defect. The formation of a stable clot that fills the lesion is of paramount importance to achieve a successful outcome. Mosaicplasty is a viable option with which to address osteochondral lesions of the knee and offers the advantage of transplanting hyaline cartilage. However, limited graft availability and donor site morbidity are concerns. Transplantation of an osteochondral allograft consisting of intact, viable articular cartilage and its underlying subchondral bone offers the ability to address large osteochondral defects of the knee, including those involving an entire compartment. The primary theoretical advantage of autologous chondrocyte implantation is the development of hyaline-like cartilage rather than fibrocartilage in the defect, which presumably leads to better long-term outcomes and longevity of the healing tissue. Use of synthetic scaffolds is a potentially attractive alternative to traditional cartilage procedures as they are readily available and, unlike allogeneic tissue transplants, are associated with no risk of disease transmission. Their efficacy, however, has not been proven clinically.

  12. Changes in bone marrow lesions in response to weight-loss in obese knee osteoarthritis patients: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients are susceptible for knee osteoarthritis (KOA) with increasing age and obesity and KOA is expected to become a major disabling disease in the future. An important feature of KOA on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is changes in the subchondral bone, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), which are related to the future degeneration of the knee joint as well as prevalent clinical symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in BMLs after a 16-week weight-loss period in obese subjects with KOA and relate changes in BMLs to the effects of weight-loss on clinical symptoms. Methods This prospective cohort study included patients with a body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2, an age ≥ 50 years and primary KOA. Patients underwent a 16 weeks supervised diet program which included formula products and dietetic counselling (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00655941). BMLs in tibia and femur were assessed on MRI before and after the weight-loss using the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score. Response to weight-loss in BML scores was dichotomised to patients experiencing a decrease in BML scores (responders) and patients who did not (non-responders). The association of BMLs to weight-loss was assessed by logistic regressions and correlation analyses. Results 39 patients (23%) were classified as responders in the sum of all BML size scores whereas 130 patients (77%) deteriorated or remained stable and were categorized as non-responders. Logistic regression analyses revealed no association between weight-loss < or ≥ 10% and response in BMLs in the most affected compartment (OR 1.86 [CI 0.66 to 5.26, p=0.24]). There was no association between weight-loss and response in maximum BML score (OR 1.13 [CI 0.39 to 3.28, p=0.81]). The relationship between changes in BMLs and clinical symptoms revealed that an equal proportion of patients classified as BML responders and non-responders experienced an OMERACT-OARSI response (69 vs. 71%, p=0.86). Conclusions Weight-loss did not

  13. Huge Subchondral Cyst Communicating with Medulary Canal of Femur in OA Knee-Treated by Extension Stem and Bone Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Rajani, Amyn M; Kumar, Ritesh; Shyam, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We report an osteoarthritic patient with huge sub-chondral cyst-like lesions in the Anterior part of distal femur. Deep and large bone defects and severe lateral laxity due to Advanced osteoarthritis was successfully treated with semi-constrained type total knee arthroplasty with long stem. Case Report: A 70yrs old Female was admitted in our institution diagnosed with severe bilateral Osteoarthritis. The x-rays showed bone on bone Tricompartment OA Knee with Varus Malalignment. She was posted for Single Stage Bilateral Total Knee Replacement and as planned the Left Knee Was Operated first. After exposure, Proximal Tibial, Distal Femoral Cuts and measurement of extension gaps the synovium from the anterior Femur was removed and sizing was done. The AP cut was then proceeded with. We spotted a small Osteochondral Cyst in the Anterior Femur which was curretted to remove the cystic material, which is when we realised that the cyst was large and communicating with the medulary canal. The remaining Femoral preparations was done keeping in mind the risk of iatrogenic fracture and extension Stem was used in the femur. The defect was then packed cancellous bone graft. Conclusion: If suspected a Preoperative MRI should be done to exclude any sub-chondral cysts osteochondral defects and any surprise during surgery. Usually one should keep extension stems ready for difficult cases. Operating surgeon should know his implants very well, as in many standard implants extension stems can only be used when distal femur cuts are taken accordingly as 5° Valgus. Mini incision should be avoided because it may fail to reveal such surprises and may land into periprosthetic fractures. PMID:27298967

  14. A review of intra-articular knee injuries in racquet sports diagnosed by arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marans, H J; Kennedy, D K; Kavanagh, T G; Wright, T A

    1988-05-01

    Because of the recent rapid increase in the number of knee injuries related to racquet sports, the authors undertook a retrospective study of such injuries seen over a 5-year period at the Toronto Western Hospital Sports Medicine Institute. The 121 patients who presented over the study period with a racquet-sports-related knee injury requiring arthroscopy represented 30% of all racquet-sports related injuries seen during that period. The mean age at presentation was 32.8 years and two-thirds of the patients were men. All the major racquet sports were represented. In all, 213 lesions (7 bilateral) were seen at 128 arthroscopies, and 165 arthroscopic procedures were performed. The most common lesion was meniscal followed by chondromalacia patellae, anterior cruciate ligament tears, chondral lesions and pathologic plicae. Over 90% of the patients returned to their chosen racquet sport within 3 months of the arthroscopy and most were playing at a similar performance level to that before the initial injury.

  15. In Vivo Kinetics of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplanted into the Knee Joint in a Rat Model Using a Novel Magnetic Method of Localization.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Yasunari; Kamei, Naosuke; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a magnetic system for targeting cells in minimally invasive cell transplantation. Magnetically labeled MSCs (m-MSCs) with nanoscale iron particles can be guided into the desired region by magnetic force from an extracorporeal device. We reported that magnetic targeting of m-MSCs enhances cartilage repair in a mini-pig model. However, the detailed kinetics of these magnetically targeted m-MSCs remain unknown. For clinical use, this aspect should be clarified from a safety standpoint. We therefore investigated the spatial and temporal distribution of the fluorescently-labeled m-MSCs transplanted into the knee joint using in vivo fluorescence combined with three-dimensional computed tomographic imaging in a rat model. Although the intraarticularly injected m-MSCs were spread throughout the joint cavity in the absence of magnetic force, the magnetic force caused the injected m-MSCs to accumulate around the chondral lesion. Further examinations including ex vivo imaging, histological assessments and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that transplanted MSCs were not present in any major organs after intraarticular administration, regardless of magnetic targeting. Our data suggest that m-MSCs can be accumulated efficiently into a chondral lesion using our magnetic targeting system, while none of the intraarticularly transplanted MSCs migrate to other major organs. PMID:25963065

  16. In Vivo Kinetics of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplanted into the Knee Joint in a Rat Model Using a Novel Magnetic Method of Localization.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Yasunari; Kamei, Naosuke; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a magnetic system for targeting cells in minimally invasive cell transplantation. Magnetically labeled MSCs (m-MSCs) with nanoscale iron particles can be guided into the desired region by magnetic force from an extracorporeal device. We reported that magnetic targeting of m-MSCs enhances cartilage repair in a mini-pig model. However, the detailed kinetics of these magnetically targeted m-MSCs remain unknown. For clinical use, this aspect should be clarified from a safety standpoint. We therefore investigated the spatial and temporal distribution of the fluorescently-labeled m-MSCs transplanted into the knee joint using in vivo fluorescence combined with three-dimensional computed tomographic imaging in a rat model. Although the intraarticularly injected m-MSCs were spread throughout the joint cavity in the absence of magnetic force, the magnetic force caused the injected m-MSCs to accumulate around the chondral lesion. Further examinations including ex vivo imaging, histological assessments and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that transplanted MSCs were not present in any major organs after intraarticular administration, regardless of magnetic targeting. Our data suggest that m-MSCs can be accumulated efficiently into a chondral lesion using our magnetic targeting system, while none of the intraarticularly transplanted MSCs migrate to other major organs.

  17. Use of novel chitosan hydrogels for chemical tissue bonding of autologous chondral transplants.

    PubMed

    Gittens, Jamila; Haleem, Amgad M; Grenier, Stephanie; Smyth, Niall A; Hannon, Charles P; Ross, Keir A; Torzilli, Peter A; Kennedy, John G

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of chemical tissue bonding (CTB) on adhesion strength, fluid permeability, and cell viability across a cartilaginous graft-host interface in an in vitro autologous chondral transplant (ACT) model. Chitosan-based cross-linkers; Chitosan-Rose Bengal [Chi-RB (Ch-ABC)], Chitosan-Genipin [Chi-GP (Ch-ABC)], and Chitosan-Rose Bengal-Genipin [Chi-RB-GP (Ch-ABC)] were applied to bovine immature cartilage explants after pre-treatment with surface degrading enzyme, Chondroitinase-ABC (Ch-ABC). Adhesion strength, fluid permeability and cell viability were assessed via mechanical push-out shear testing, fluid transport and live/dead cell staining, respectively. All three chitosan-based cross-linkers significantly increased the adhesion strength at the graft-host interface, however, only a statistically significant decrease in fluid permeability was noted in Chi-GP (Ch-ABC) specimen compared to untreated controls. Cell viability was maintained for 7 days of culture across all three treatment groups. These results show the potential clinical relevance of novel chitosan-based hydrogels in enhancing tissue integration and reducing synovial fluid penetration after ACT procedures in diarthoidal joints such as the knee and ankle. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1139-1146, 2016.

  18. Subchondral Cystlike Lesions Develop Longitudinally in Areas of Bone Marrow Edema–like Lesions in Patients with or at Risk for Knee Osteoarthritis: Detection with MR Imaging—The MOST Study1

    PubMed Central

    Roemer, Frank W.; Zhu, Yanyan; Marra, Monica D.; Niu, Jingbo; Zhang, Yuqing; Lynch, John A.; Javaid, M. Kassim; Lewis, Cora E.; El-Khoury, George Y.; Felson, David T.; Guermazi, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association of prevalent bone marrow edema–like lesions (BMLs) and full-thickness cartilage loss with incident subchondral cyst–like lesions (SCs) in the knee to evaluate the bone contusion versus synovial fluid intrusion theories of SC formation. Materials and Methods: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis study is a longitudinal study of individuals who have or are at risk for knee osteoarthritis. The HIPAA-compliant protocol was approved by the institutional review boards of all participating centers, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Magnetic resonance images were acquired at baseline and 30-month follow-up and read semiquantitatively by using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score system. The tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints were subdivided into 14 subregions. BMLs and SCs were scored from 0 to 3. Cartilage morphology was scored from 0 to 6. The association of prevalent BMLs and full-thickness cartilage loss with incident SCs in the same subregion was assessed by using logistic regression with mutual adjustment for both predictors. Results: A total of 1283 knees were included. After adjustment for full-thickness cartilage loss, prevalent BMLs showed a strong and significant association with incident SCs in the same subregion, with an odds ratio of 12.9 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.9, 18.6). After adjustment for BMLs, prevalent full-thickness cartilage loss showed a significant but much less important association with incident SCs in the same subregion (odds ratio, 1.4; 95% CI: 1.0, 2.0). There was no apparent relationship between severity of full-thickness cartilage loss at baseline and incident SCs. Conclusion: Prevalent BMLs strongly predict incident SCs in the same subregion, even after adjustment for full-thickness cartilage loss, which supports the bone contusion theory of SC formation. © RSNA, 2010 PMID:20530753

  19. Platelet Rich Plasma and Knee Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Mikel; Sánchez, Pello; Orive, Gorka; Anitua, Eduardo; Padilla, Sabino

    2014-01-01

    In orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, the knee joint has traditionally been considered the workhorse. The reconstruction of every damaged element in this joint is crucial in achieving the surgeon's goal to restore the knee function and prevent degeneration towards osteoarthritis. In the last fifteen years, the field of regenerative medicine is witnessing a boost of autologous blood-derived platelet rich plasma products (PRPs) application to effectively mimic and accelerate the tissue healing process. The scientific rationale behind PRPs is the delivery of growth factors, cytokines, and adhesive proteins present in platelets and plasma, as well as other biologically active proteins conveyed by the plasma such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, and fibronectin; with this biological engineering approach, new perspectives in knee surgery were opened. This work describes the use of PRP to construct and repair every single anatomical structure involved in knee surgery, detailing the process conducted in ligament, meniscal, and chondral surgery. PMID:25302310

  20. Does Ligamentous Laxity Protect Against Chondral Injury in Patients with Patellofemoral Instability?

    PubMed Central

    Redler, Lauren H.; Mayer, Gabrielle M.; Kalbian, Irene L.; Nguyen, Joseph; Stein, Beth E. Shubin; Strickland, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Hypermobility may be a risk factor for musculoskeletal injuries during sports participation. However, we have seen a low incidence of chondral injuries requiring treatment in patients undergoing medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction for patellofemoral instability. It is unknown if patients with ligamentous laxity, who are at an increased risk for patellofemoral instability, are somewhat protected from chondral injury. We hypothesize in patients undergoing MPFL reconstruction for patellofemoral instability, patients with ligamentous laxity will be less likely to have chondral defects requiring surgical intervention. Methods: 171 patients (32 male, 139 female) average age 22 years (range 11-57) with patellofemoral instability were rated with the Beighton-Horan (BH) scale for constitutional ligamentous laxity (0-9). Preoperative MRIs were evaluated (chondral injury present/absent, size of chondral injury, Outerbridge grade) and intra-operative arthroscopic findings noted (chondral injury present/absent, size of chondral injury, Outerbridge grade, surgical intervention yes/no, type of surgical intervention) of 79 non-lax (BH<6) and 92 ligamentously lax patients (BH≥6) (LAX) undergoing MPFL reconstruction. Anatomic measurements were documented for each patient including: tibial tubercle-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance, Caton-Deschamps (C/D) ratio for patellar height, and the Dejour classification of trochlear dysplasia. Surgical interventions included chondroplasty, microfracture, particulated juvenile cartilage implantation (DeNovo, Zimmer, Warsaw, IN), osteochondral fracture fixation or osteochondral allograft transplantation (OATS). Results: 58/171 (33.9%) required a surgical intervention for a chondral defect: chondroplasty 29/58 (50%), microfracture 16/58 (27.6%), particulated juvenile cartilage implantation 18/58 (31%), osteochondral fracture fixation 2/58 (3.5%), and OATS 2/58 (3.5%). There was no difference in the proportion of

  1. [Evaluation of meniscal morphology and relation between the diagnostic findings of magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy in lesions of the knee].

    PubMed

    Esparragoza-Montero, Ricardo; Rodriguez-Diaz, José; Lanier-Dominguez, Julio; Molero-Campos, María; Puccia-Scimonello, Marianela

    2009-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful in the diagnosis of meniscal lesions of the knee. The purpose of this study was to relate the findings of MRI and arthroscopy and to evaluate the morphology of the menisci with tears. 39 patients of both genders were included, whose age range was 13 to 74 years old (mean: 42.6 years), with and without a history of trauma, who underwent MRI and arthroscopy of the knee, due to symptoms of articular lesion. The images of magnetic resonances were analyzed independently by two specialists prior to the arthroscopy. The measurements of the medial and lateral menisci were made in each meniscal horn with sagital images in protonic density and fat-suppression. MRI detected 8 cases of tear of the lateral meniscus of the 11 catalogued by arthroscopy, and 11 cases of tears of the medial meniscus of the 13 catalogued by arthroscopy. The sensibility and specificity of MRI for the lateral meniscal tears were 72% and 100%, and for the medial tears were 85% and 89%. The meniscal tears were localized mainly in the posterior horn. The dimensions of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus were larger in disrupted menisci (height, 7.1 +/- 1.3 mm vs. 6.1 +/- 0.7 mm, p < .05; wide, 10.2 +/- 1.6 mm vs. 8.8 +/- 1.3 mm, p < 0.05). A meniscal tear produces morphological changes, particularly in the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus. Magnetic resonance constitutes the imaging technique of choice for the diagnosis of the meniscal tears.

  2. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  3. All-Arthroscopic Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis for the Treatment of Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; de Girolamo, Laura; Grassi, Miriam; D'Ambrosi, Riccardo; Montrasio, Umberto Alfieri; Boga, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Several surgical techniques have been described for the treatment of talar chondral lesions. Among them, microfracture is well established. Autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC), using microfracture and biomaterials, has shown promising results for the treatment of knee osteochondral lesions and has been proposed for the ankle as an open technique. We describe an all-arthroscopic AMIC technique. The benefits of an all-arthroscopic procedure include smaller incisions with less soft-tissue dissection, better visualization of the joint, and a quicker recovery compared with open surgery. The use of matrix to support cartilage regeneration promotes good-quality cartilage tissue with satisfactory long-term outcomes. Our all-arthroscopic AMIC technique uses a type I–type III porcine collagen matrix (Chondro-Gide; Geistlich Pharma, Wolhusen, Switzerland) and is characterized by 2 different arthroscopic surgical phases. First, adequate exposure is achieved through use of a Hintermann spreader (Integra LifeSciences, Plainsboro, NJ) with sufficient joint distraction and wet lesion preparation. The second surgical step is performed dry, involving matrix placement and fixation. The all-arthroscopic AMIC technique for the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus allows a very precise reconstruction in the case of cartilage defects and avoids the need for a more invasive operation associated with higher morbidity and a longer surgical time. PMID:26258040

  4. All-Arthroscopic Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis for the Treatment of Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus.

    PubMed

    Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; de Girolamo, Laura; Grassi, Miriam; D'Ambrosi, Riccardo; Montrasio, Umberto Alfieri; Boga, Michele

    2015-06-01

    Several surgical techniques have been described for the treatment of talar chondral lesions. Among them, microfracture is well established. Autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC), using microfracture and biomaterials, has shown promising results for the treatment of knee osteochondral lesions and has been proposed for the ankle as an open technique. We describe an all-arthroscopic AMIC technique. The benefits of an all-arthroscopic procedure include smaller incisions with less soft-tissue dissection, better visualization of the joint, and a quicker recovery compared with open surgery. The use of matrix to support cartilage regeneration promotes good-quality cartilage tissue with satisfactory long-term outcomes. Our all-arthroscopic AMIC technique uses a type I-type III porcine collagen matrix (Chondro-Gide; Geistlich Pharma, Wolhusen, Switzerland) and is characterized by 2 different arthroscopic surgical phases. First, adequate exposure is achieved through use of a Hintermann spreader (Integra LifeSciences, Plainsboro, NJ) with sufficient joint distraction and wet lesion preparation. The second surgical step is performed dry, involving matrix placement and fixation. The all-arthroscopic AMIC technique for the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus allows a very precise reconstruction in the case of cartilage defects and avoids the need for a more invasive operation associated with higher morbidity and a longer surgical time.

  5. Joint-preserving surgical options for management of chondral injuries of the hip.

    PubMed

    El Bitar, Youssef F; Lindner, Dror; Jackson, Timothy J; Domb, Benjamin G

    2014-01-01

    Management of injuries to the articular cartilage is complex and challenging; it becomes especially problematic in weight-bearing joints such as the hip. Several causes of articular cartilage damage have been described, including trauma, labral tears, and femoroacetabular impingement, among others. Because articular cartilage has little capacity for healing, nonsurgical management options are limited. Surgical options include total hip arthroplasty, microfracture, articular cartilage repair, autologous chondrocyte implantation, mosaicplasty, and osteochondral allograft transplantation. Advances in hip arthroscopy have broadened the spectrum of tools available for diagnosis and management of chondral damage. However, the literature is still not sufficiently robust to draw firm conclusions regarding best practices for chondral defects. Additional research is needed to expand our knowledge of and develop guidelines for management of chondral injuries of the hip.

  6. The Meniscus-Deficient Knee

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Allison J.; Erickson, Brandon J.; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Yanke, Adam B.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cole, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common knee injury, and partial meniscectomies are the most common orthopaedic surgical procedure. The injured meniscus has an impaired ability to distribute load and resist tibial translation. Partial or complete loss of the meniscus promotes early development of chondromalacia and osteoarthritis. The primary goal of treatment for meniscus-deficient knees is to provide symptomatic relief, ideally to delay advanced joint space narrowing, and ultimately, joint replacement. Surgical treatments, including meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT), high tibial osteotomy (HTO), and distal femoral osteotomy (DFO), are options that attempt to decrease the loads on the articular cartilage of the meniscus-deficient compartment by replacing meniscal tissue or altering joint alignment. Clinical and biomechanical studies have reported promising outcomes for MAT, HTO, and DFO in the postmeniscectomized knee. These procedures can be performed alone or in conjunction with ligament reconstruction or chondral procedures (reparative, restorative, or reconstructive) to optimize stability and longevity of the knee. Complications can include fracture, nonunion, patella baja, compartment syndrome, infection, and deep venous thrombosis. MAT, HTO, and DFO are effective options for young patients suffering from pain and functional limitations secondary to meniscal deficiency. PMID:26779547

  7. Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  8. Evaluation of the chondral modeling theory using fe-simulation and numeric shape optimization

    PubMed Central

    Plochocki, Jeffrey H; Ward, Carol V; Smith, Douglas E

    2009-01-01

    The chondral modeling theory proposes that hydrostatic pressure within articular cartilage regulates joint size, shape, and congruence through regional variations in rates of tissue proliferation.The purpose of this study is to develop a computational model using a nonlinear two-dimensional finite element analysis in conjunction with numeric shape optimization to evaluate the chondral modeling theory. The model employed in this analysis is generated from an MR image of the medial portion of the tibiofemoral joint in a subadult male. Stress-regulated morphological changes are simulated until skeletal maturity and evaluated against the chondral modeling theory. The computed results are found to support the chondral modeling theory. The shape-optimized model exhibits increased joint congruence, broader stress distributions in articular cartilage, and a relative decrease in joint diameter. The results for the computational model correspond well with experimental data and provide valuable insights into the mechanical determinants of joint growth. The model also provides a crucial first step toward developing a comprehensive model that can be employed to test the influence of mechanical variables on joint conformation. PMID:19438771

  9. Resection and Resolution of Bone Marrow Lesions Associated with an Improvement of Pain after Total Knee Replacement: A Novel Case Study Using a 3-Tesla Metal Artefact Reduction MRI Sequence.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Thomas; Kerslake, Robert; Haywood, Brett; Pearson, Richard G; Scammell, Brigitte E

    2016-01-01

    We present our case report using a novel metal artefact reduction magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence to observe resolution of subchondral bone marrow lesions (BMLs), which are strongly associated with pain, in a patient after total knee replacement surgery. Large BMLs were seen preoperatively on the 3-Tesla MRI scans in a patient with severe end stage OA awaiting total knee replacement surgery. Twelve months after surgery, using a novel metal artefact reduction MRI sequence, we were able to visualize the bone-prosthesis interface and found complete resection and resolution of these BMLs. This is the first reported study in the UK to use this metal artefact reduction MRI sequence at 3-Tesla showing that resection and resolution of BMLs in this patient were associated with an improvement of pain and function after total knee replacement surgery. In this case it was associated with a clinically significant improvement of pain and function after surgery. Failure to eradicate these lesions may be a cause of persistent postoperative pain that is seen in up to 20% of patients following TKR surgery.

  10. Resection and Resolution of Bone Marrow Lesions Associated with an Improvement of Pain after Total Knee Replacement: A Novel Case Study Using a 3-Tesla Metal Artefact Reduction MRI Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, Brett; Pearson, Richard G.; Scammell, Brigitte E.

    2016-01-01

    We present our case report using a novel metal artefact reduction magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence to observe resolution of subchondral bone marrow lesions (BMLs), which are strongly associated with pain, in a patient after total knee replacement surgery. Large BMLs were seen preoperatively on the 3-Tesla MRI scans in a patient with severe end stage OA awaiting total knee replacement surgery. Twelve months after surgery, using a novel metal artefact reduction MRI sequence, we were able to visualize the bone-prosthesis interface and found complete resection and resolution of these BMLs. This is the first reported study in the UK to use this metal artefact reduction MRI sequence at 3-Tesla showing that resection and resolution of BMLs in this patient were associated with an improvement of pain and function after total knee replacement surgery. In this case it was associated with a clinically significant improvement of pain and function after surgery. Failure to eradicate these lesions may be a cause of persistent postoperative pain that is seen in up to 20% of patients following TKR surgery.

  11. Resection and Resolution of Bone Marrow Lesions Associated with an Improvement of Pain after Total Knee Replacement: A Novel Case Study Using a 3-Tesla Metal Artefact Reduction MRI Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, Brett; Pearson, Richard G.; Scammell, Brigitte E.

    2016-01-01

    We present our case report using a novel metal artefact reduction magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence to observe resolution of subchondral bone marrow lesions (BMLs), which are strongly associated with pain, in a patient after total knee replacement surgery. Large BMLs were seen preoperatively on the 3-Tesla MRI scans in a patient with severe end stage OA awaiting total knee replacement surgery. Twelve months after surgery, using a novel metal artefact reduction MRI sequence, we were able to visualize the bone-prosthesis interface and found complete resection and resolution of these BMLs. This is the first reported study in the UK to use this metal artefact reduction MRI sequence at 3-Tesla showing that resection and resolution of BMLs in this patient were associated with an improvement of pain and function after total knee replacement surgery. In this case it was associated with a clinically significant improvement of pain and function after surgery. Failure to eradicate these lesions may be a cause of persistent postoperative pain that is seen in up to 20% of patients following TKR surgery. PMID:27648327

  12. Resection and Resolution of Bone Marrow Lesions Associated with an Improvement of Pain after Total Knee Replacement: A Novel Case Study Using a 3-Tesla Metal Artefact Reduction MRI Sequence.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Thomas; Kerslake, Robert; Haywood, Brett; Pearson, Richard G; Scammell, Brigitte E

    2016-01-01

    We present our case report using a novel metal artefact reduction magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence to observe resolution of subchondral bone marrow lesions (BMLs), which are strongly associated with pain, in a patient after total knee replacement surgery. Large BMLs were seen preoperatively on the 3-Tesla MRI scans in a patient with severe end stage OA awaiting total knee replacement surgery. Twelve months after surgery, using a novel metal artefact reduction MRI sequence, we were able to visualize the bone-prosthesis interface and found complete resection and resolution of these BMLs. This is the first reported study in the UK to use this metal artefact reduction MRI sequence at 3-Tesla showing that resection and resolution of BMLs in this patient were associated with an improvement of pain and function after total knee replacement surgery. In this case it was associated with a clinically significant improvement of pain and function after surgery. Failure to eradicate these lesions may be a cause of persistent postoperative pain that is seen in up to 20% of patients following TKR surgery. PMID:27648327

  13. Use of collagen scaffold and autologous bone marrow concentrate as a one-step cartilage repair in the knee: histological results of second-look biopsies at 1 year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Gigante, A; Calcagno, S; Cecconi, S; Ramazzotti, D; Manzotti, S; Enea, D

    2011-01-01

    Chondral articular defects are a key concern in orthopaedic surgery. To overcome the disadvantages of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and to improve the outcomes of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC), the latter technique is currently augmented with bone marrow concentrate injected under or seeded onto the scaffold. However, to date, only a little is known about histological outcomes of either the AMIC technique or AMIC associated with bone marrow concentrate. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of the repair tissue obtained from biopsies harvested during second-look arthroscopy after arthroscopic AMIC augmented with bone marrow concentrate. We analysed five second-look core biopsies harvested at 12 months follow-up. At the time of biopsy the surgeon reported the quality of the repair tissue using the standard ICRS Cartilage Repair Assessment (CRA). Every biopsy together with patient data was sent to our centre to undergo blind histological evaluation (ICRS II Visual Histological Assessment Scale) and data analysis. Five asymptomatic patients (mean age 43.4 years) had isolated lesions (mean size was 3.7 cm2) at the medial femoral condyle. All the implants appeared nearly normal (ICRS CRA) at arthroscopic evaluation and had a mean overall histological (ICRS II) of 59.8±14,5. Hyaline-like matrix was found in only one case, a mixture of hyaline/fibrocartilage was found in one case and fibrocartilage was found three cases. Our clinical and histological data suggest that this procedure achieved a nearly normal arthroscopic appearance and a satisfactory repair tissue, which was possibly still maturing at 12 months follow-up. Further studies are needed to understand the true potential of one-step procedures in the repair of focal chondral lesions in the knee.

  14. Femoral condyle curvature is correlated with knee walking kinematics in ungulates.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Adam D

    2015-12-01

    The knee has been the focus of many studies linking mammalian postcranial form with locomotor behaviors and animal ecology. A more difficult task has been linking joint morphology with joint kinematics during locomotor tasks. Joint curvature represents one opportunity to link postcranial morphology with walking kinematics because joint curvature develops in response to mechanical loading. As an initial examination of mammalian knee joint curvature, the curvature of the medial femoral condyle was measured on femora representing 11 ungulate species. The position of a region of low curvature was measured using a metric termed the "angle to low curvature". This low-curvature region is important because it provides the greatest contact area between femoral and tibial condyles. Kinematic knee angles during walking were derived from the literature and kinematic knee angles across the gait cycle were correlated with angle to low curvature values. The highest correlation between kinematic knee angle and the angle to low curvature metric occurred at 20% of the walking gait cycle. This early portion of the walking gait cycle is associated with a peak in the vertical ground reaction force for some mammals. The chondral modeling theory predicts that frequent and heavy loading of particular regions of a joint surface during ontogeny will result in these regions being flatter than the surrounding joint surface. The locations of flatter regions of the femoral condyles of ungulates, and their association with knee angles used during the early stance phase of walking provides support for the chondral modeling theory.

  15. Femoral condyle curvature is correlated with knee walking kinematics in ungulates.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Adam D

    2015-12-01

    The knee has been the focus of many studies linking mammalian postcranial form with locomotor behaviors and animal ecology. A more difficult task has been linking joint morphology with joint kinematics during locomotor tasks. Joint curvature represents one opportunity to link postcranial morphology with walking kinematics because joint curvature develops in response to mechanical loading. As an initial examination of mammalian knee joint curvature, the curvature of the medial femoral condyle was measured on femora representing 11 ungulate species. The position of a region of low curvature was measured using a metric termed the "angle to low curvature". This low-curvature region is important because it provides the greatest contact area between femoral and tibial condyles. Kinematic knee angles during walking were derived from the literature and kinematic knee angles across the gait cycle were correlated with angle to low curvature values. The highest correlation between kinematic knee angle and the angle to low curvature metric occurred at 20% of the walking gait cycle. This early portion of the walking gait cycle is associated with a peak in the vertical ground reaction force for some mammals. The chondral modeling theory predicts that frequent and heavy loading of particular regions of a joint surface during ontogeny will result in these regions being flatter than the surrounding joint surface. The locations of flatter regions of the femoral condyles of ungulates, and their association with knee angles used during the early stance phase of walking provides support for the chondral modeling theory. PMID:26414648

  16. Knee Bracing: What Works?

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Knee Bracing: What Works? Knee Bracing: What Works? What are knee braces? Knee braces are supports ... have arthritis in their knees. Do knee braces work? Maybe. Companies that make knee braces claim that ...

  17. Outcomes of Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in the Knee following Failed Microfracture

    PubMed Central

    Riff, Andrew Joseph; Yanke, Adam Blair; Tilton, Annemarie K.; Cole, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Marrow stimulation techniques such as drilling or microfracture are first-line treatment options for symptomatic cartilage defects of the knee. For young patients who have failed microfracture, cartilage restoration techniques such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), OATS, and osteochondral allograft and are frequently employed. Nevertheless, there a few reports in the literature evaluating the results of ACI following failed microfracture and those available suggest inferior outcomes compared to primary ACI. This study was performed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) following failed microfracture in the knee and compare these outcomes to those of primary ACI. Methods: Patients were identified who underwent autologous chondrocyte implantation for symptomatic chondral lesions of the knee refractory to previous microfracture. Postoperative data were collected using several subjective scoring systems (Noyes, Tegner, Lysholm, IKDC, KOOS, SF12). An age-matched cohort of 103 patients who underwent primary ACI of the knee was used as a control group. Statistics were performed in a paired manner using a Student’s t-test for ordinal data and chi-square test for categorical data. Results: Ninety-two patients met the inclusion criteria. The average patient age was 30.1 years (range, 14-49 years) at the time of ACI. The average duration from microfracture to ACI was 21.2 months (range, 1-88 months). ACI was performed in the tibiofemoral compartment in 42 patients, the patellofemoral compartments in 38 patients, and in both in 12 patients. The primary lesion treated with ACI involved the MFC in 38 patients, the trochlea in 25 patients, the patella in 19 patients, and the LFC in 10 patients. The lesions averaged 467mm3 in the trochlea, 445mm3 in the LFC, 265mm3 in the patella, and 295mm3 in the patella. Nineteen patients underwent concurrent ACI to multiple lesions. Thirty-one patients underwent concomitant

  18. Description of an evaluation system for knee kinematics in ligament lesions, by means of optical tracking and 3D tomography☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tiago Lazzaretti; Ribeiro, Douglas Badillo; da Rocha, Diogo Cristo; Albuquerque, Cyro; Pereira, César Augusto Martins; Pedrinelli, André; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe and demonstrate the viability of a method for evaluating knee kinematics, by means of a continuous passive motion (CPM) machine, before and after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Methods This study was conducted on a knee from a cadaver, in a mechanical pivot-shift simulator, with evaluations using optical tracking, and also using computed tomography. Results This study demonstrated the viability of a protocol for measuring the rotation and translation of the knee, using reproducible and objective tools (error < 0.2 mm). The mechanized provocation system of the pivot-shift test was independent of the examiner and always allowed the same angular velocity and traction of 20 N throughout the movement. Conclusion The clinical relevance of this method lies in making inferences about the in vivo behavior of a knee with an ACL injury and providing greater methodological quality in future studies for measuring surgical techniques with grafts in relatively close positions. PMID:26229854

  19. The Basic Science of Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate in Chondral Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Holton, James; Imam, Mohamed; Ward, Jonathan; Snow, Martyn

    2016-01-01

    There has been great interest in bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) as a cost effective method in delivering mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to aid in the repair and regeneration of cartilage defects. Alongside MSCs, BMAC contains a range of growth factors and cytokines to support cell growth following injury. However, there is paucity of information relating to the basic science underlying BMAC and its exact biological role in supporting the growth and regeneration of chondrocytes. The focus of this review is the basic science underlying BMAC in relation to chondral damage and regeneration. PMID:27761221

  20. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sprains A sprain means you've stretched or torn a ligament. Common knee sprains usually involve damage ... A strain means you've partly or completely torn a muscle or tendon. With knee strains, you ...

  1. Reconstruction of complex osteochondral lesions of the talus with cylindrical sponge allograft and particulate juvenile cartilage graft: provisional results with a short-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bleazey, Scott; Brigido, Stephen A

    2012-10-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus can be a challenging injury to treat for even the most experienced foot and ankle surgeon. Although the advances in imaging have made the diagnosis of chondral lesions more accurate, surgeons are still struggling to find ways to reliably treat advanced lesions with subchondral bone damage. This article looks at the use of allograft bone and particulate juvenile cartilage in patients with advanced subchondral bone damage and osteochondral lesions of the talus.

  2. A novel scaffold geometry for chondral applications: theoretical model and in vivo validation.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, Silvia; Ceseracciu, Luca; Aiello, Maurizio; Coluccino, Luca; Ferrazzo, Federica; Giannoni, Paolo; Quarto, Rodolfo

    2014-10-01

    A theoretical model of the 3D scaffold internal architecture has been implemented with the aim to predict the effects of some geometrical parameters on total porosity, Young modulus, buckling resistance and permeability of the graft. This model has been adopted to produce porous poly-caprolacton based grafts for chondral tissue engineering applications, best tuning mechanical and functional features of the scaffolds. Material prototypes were produced with an internal geometry with parallel oriented cylindrical pores of 200 μm of radius (r) and an interpore distance/pores radius (d/r) ratio of 1. The scaffolds have been then extensively characterized; progenitor cells were then used to test their capability to support cartilaginous matrix deposition in an ectopic model. Scaffold prototypes fulfill both the chemical-physical requirements, in terms of Young's modulus and permeability, and the functional needs, such as surface area per volume and total porosity, for an enhanced cellular colonization and matrix deposition. Moreover, the grafts showed interesting chondrogenic potential in vivo, besides offering adequate mechanical performances in vitro, thus becoming a promising candidate for chondral tissues repair. Finally, a very good agreement was found between the prediction of the theoretical model and the experimental data. Many assumption of this theoretical model, hereby applied to cartilage, may be transposed to other tissue engineering applications, such as bone substitutes.

  3. Eccrine Spiradenoma in Knee

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, A; Sengupta, P; Das, Anjan Kumar; Nigam, Manish Kumar; Chattopadhya, S

    2014-01-01

    Eccrine spiradenoma is an uncommon benign adnexal tumor of the eccrine sweat glands. Although it can occur at any age, it is most common in young adults without any sex predilection. Malignant transformation is rare, presenting as rapid increase in size of a long-standing lesion. Here, we report a case of eccrine spiradenoma in a 35-year-old man who presented with swelling over the right knee, with cytological atypia but no recurrence until date. PMID:25284865

  4. [Osteochondritis dissecans of the knee].

    PubMed

    Benedict, Shaike; Oron, Amir; Beer, Yiftah; Agar, Gavriel

    2008-07-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans of the knee is diagnosed at an increasing rate among adolescents and young adults. One of the reasons is due to the increasing number of sports participants among these populations. Although many theories exist, the cause of osteochondritis dissecans is unknown. Early diagnosis is very important. While adult type osteochondritis dissecans is unstable, in most young patients it is stable, and patients with an intact articular surface have a good chance to heal with non-operative treatment and cessation of physical activity. The value of complementary treatment (bed rest, partial weight bearing, bracing aimed at reducing weight bearing of the involved knee) is unknown. Patients with open physes and stable lesions, who failed non-operative treatment, may be treated with local bone drilling, encouraging lesion healing. As the disease progresses, more aggressive measures should to be taken, whilst decreasing success ratios are expected. The healing potential of the lesion may be evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging. Most adult type osteochondritis dissecans patients, as most young patients, with unstable lesions and loose bodies within their knees, are treated with fixation of the lesions and even bone grafting. Many unstable lesions will heal after fixation, but the long-term prognosis is elusive. Chronic loose bodies are very difficult to fix, with less favorable outcomes. Excision of large lesions originating from weight bearing cartilage is not favorable and different rehabilitation measures of local cartilage damage are not encouraging. PMID:18814522

  5. Debridement of cartilage lesions before autologous chondrocyte implantation by open or transarthroscopic techniques: a comparative study using post-mortem materials.

    PubMed

    Drobnic, M; Radosavljevic, D; Cör, A; Brittberg, M; Strazar, K

    2010-04-01

    We compared the quality of debridement of chondral lesions performed by four arthroscopic (SH, shaver; CU, curette; SHCU, shaver and curette; BP, bipolar electrodes) and one open technique (OPEN, scalpel and curette) which are used prior to autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). The ex vivo simulation of all five techniques was carried out on six juvenile equine stifle joints. The OPEN, SH and SHCU techniques were tested on knees harvested from six adult human cadavers. The most vertical walls with the least adjacent damage to cartilage were obtained with the OPEN technique. The CU and SHCU methods gave inferior, but still acceptable results whereas the SH technique alone resulted in a crater-like defect and the BP method undermined the cartilage wall. The subchondral bone was severely violated in all the equine samples which might have been peculiar to this model. The predominant depth of the debridement in the adult human samples was at the level of the calcified cartilage. Some minor penetrations of the subchondral end-plate were induced regardless of the instrumentation used. Our study suggests that not all routine arthroscopic instruments are suitable for the preparation of a defect for ACI. We have shown that the preferred debridement technique is either open or arthroscopically-assisted manual curettage. The use of juvenile equine stifles was not appropriate for the study of the cartilage-subchondral bone interface. PMID:20357342

  6. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors.

  7. Arthroscopic Treatment of Chondral and Osteochondral Defects in the Ankle Using the Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis Technique

    PubMed Central

    Piontek, Tomasz; Bąkowski, Paweł; Ciemniewska-Gorzela, Kinga; Naczk, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges nowadays facing orthopaedic surgeons around the world is the problem of articular cartilage defects and their treatment. The autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis technique is based on 2 elements—drilling into bones and matrix application. The purpose of this article is to present the surgical technique of arthroscopic treatment of chondral or osteochondral defects in the ankle using the autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis technique. PMID:26697305

  8. Runner's Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... Over the summer he bought a pair of running shoes and took up jogging. He started with ... bending the knee — when walking, kneeling, squatting, or running, for example. Walking or running downhill or even ...

  9. Knee Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Robert C.; Richter, Dustin L.; Wascher, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic knee dislocation is becoming more prevalent because of improved recognition and increased exposure to high-energy trauma, but long-term results are lacking. Purpose: To present 2 cases with minimum 20-year follow-up and a review of the literature to illustrate some of the fundamental principles in the management of the dislocated knee. Study Design: Review and case reports. Methods: Two patients with knee dislocations who underwent multiligamentous knee reconstruction were reviewed, with a minimum 20-year follow-up. These patients were brought back for a clinical evaluation using both subjective and objective measures. Subjective measures include the following scales: Lysholm, Tegner activity, visual analog scale (VAS), Short Form–36 (SF-36), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and a psychosocial questionnaire. Objective measures included ligamentous examination, radiographic evaluation (including Telos stress radiographs), and physical therapy assessment of function and stability. Results: The mean follow-up was 22 years. One patient had a vascular injury requiring repair prior to ligament reconstruction. The average assessment scores were as follows: SF-36 physical health, 52; SF-36 mental health, 59; Lysholm, 92; IKDC, 86.5; VAS involved, 10.5 mm; and VAS uninvolved, 2.5 mm. Both patients had excellent stability and were functioning at high levels of activity for their age (eg, hiking, skydiving). Both patients had radiographic signs of arthritis, which lowered 1 subject’s IKDC score to “C.” Conclusion: Knee dislocations have rare long-term excellent results, and most intermediate-term studies show fair to good functional results. By following fundamental principles in the management of a dislocated knee, patients can be given the opportunity to function at high levels. Hopefully, continued advances in the evaluation and treatment of knee dislocations will improve the long-term outcomes for these patients in the

  10. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt or diseased, you have knee problems. Knee problems can cause pain and difficulty ...

  11. Total knee arthroplasty in a rheumatoid arthritic knee with large geode: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shih, H N; Hsu, K Y; Tan, C F; Hsueh, S; Hsu, R W

    1997-09-01

    Geodes (subchondral cysts) are a well-known manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis. Solitary cysts or cysts larger than 2 cm are not generally found in the knee joint of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We report a case of RA involving both knees with a giant geode over the right proximal tibia. Surgical treatment was performed including synovectomy, cyst enucleation and packing of autogenous bone chips followed by primary total knee arthroplasty. The postsurgical result was excellent with the knee restored to good function and complete healing of the cystic lesion.

  12. Irreducible dislocation of the knee.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, R A; Bellafiore, V A; Corzatt, R D

    1999-11-01

    Irreducible knee dislocation is a rare injury. This case report describes a knee dislocation in a 39-year-old male U.S. Army noncommissioned officer who was injured while playing in a softball game. Arthroscopy showed the medial collateral ligament and capsule to be locked in the intercondylar notch, covering the medial femoral condyle. Arthrotomy and open reduction were required. Staged posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patellar tendon autograft was later performed. Review of the magnetic resonance imaging scan showed the irreducible lesion. The diagnostic clinical and radiographic features of this unusual injury are described.

  13. Early osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Kon, Elizaveta; Condello, Vincenzo; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Steinwachs, Matthias; Seil, Romain; Berruto, Massimo; Engebretsen, Lars; Filardo, Giuseppe; Angele, Peter

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing awareness on the importance in identifying early phases of the degenerative processes in knee osteoarthritis (OA), the crucial period of the disease when there might still be the possibility to initiate treatments preventing its progression. Early OA may show a diffuse and ill-defined involvement, but also originate in the cartilage surrounding a focal lesion, thus necessitating a separate assessment of these two entities. Early OA can be considered to include a maximal involvement of 50 % of the cartilage thickness based on the macroscopic ICRS classification, reflecting an OARSI grade 4. The purpose of this paper was to provide an updated review of the current status of the diagnosis and definition of early knee OA, including the clinical, radiographical, histological, MRI, and arthroscopic definitions and biomarkers. Based on current evidence, practical classification criteria are presented. As new insights and technologies become available, they will further evolve to better define and treat early knee OA.

  14. [Jumper's knee].

    PubMed

    Hagner, W; Sosnowski, S; Kaziński, W; Frankowski, S

    1993-01-01

    A series of 30 athletes aged about 16 years on an average, exposed to activities putting a strain on the patellar tendon during training has been examined. They were involved in competitive sports for 3 years on an average. In 27 per cent of them jumpers knee symptoms have been found.

  15. Jumper's knee.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, A; Ippolito, E; Mariani, P; Puddu, G

    1983-01-01

    Jumper's knee (patellar or quadriceps tendon tendonitis) is found in a high number of athletes, especially in volleyball and basketball players. Conservative treatment (rest, stretching, physical therapy and antiinflammatory drugs) is usually successful. The athletes often recover completely and resume their sports activity. The purpose of this study is to present the histologic findings and our surgical repair of 18 knees of patients who underwent surgery after failure of conservative treatment. Histologic findings confirm that the so-called "jumper's knee" is a pathology localized at the bone-tendon junction. In all cases the following abnormalities were found: pseudocystic cavities at the borderline between mineralized fibrocartilage and bone, disappearance of the "blue line," increased thickness of the insertional fibrocartilage with myxomatous and hyaline metaplasia, mineralization, and ossification of the fibrocartilage far from the "blue line." Abnormalities of the patellar tendon were observed only in one patient who received local injection of corticosteroids. Eleven of the 18 surgically treated knees obtained a satisfactory result with complete resumption of sports activity.

  16. Current Concepts of Articular Cartilage Restoration Techniques in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Stuart, Michael J.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Articular cartilage injuries are common in patients presenting to surgeons with primary complaints of knee pain or mechanical symptoms. Treatment options include comprehensive nonoperative management, palliative surgery, joint preservation operations, and arthroplasty. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search on articular cartilage restoration techniques of the knee was conducted to identify outcome studies published from 1993 to 2013. Special emphasis was given to Level 1 and 2 published studies. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: Current surgical options with documented outcomes in treating chondral injuries in the knee include the following: microfracture, osteochondral autograft transfer, osteochondral allograft transplant, and autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Generally, results are favorable regarding patient satisfaction and return to sport when proper treatment algorithms and surgical techniques are followed, with 52% to 96% of patients demonstrating good to excellent clinical outcomes and 66% to 91% returning to sport at preinjury levels. Conclusion: Clinical, functional, and radiographic outcomes may be improved in the majority of patients with articular cartilage restoration surgery; however, some patients may not fully return to their preinjury activity levels postoperatively. In active and athletic patient populations, biological techniques that restore the articular surface may be options that provide symptom relief and return patients to their prior levels of function. PMID:24790697

  17. Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Suzer, Ferzan; Thermann, Hajo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) is a 1-step cartilage restoration technique that combines microfracture with the use of an exogenous scaffold. This matrix covers and mechanically stabilizes the clot. There have been an increasing number of studies performed related to the AMIC technique and an update of its use and results is warranted. Design and methods: Using the PubMed database, a literature search was performed using the terms “AMIC” or “Autologous Matrix Induced Chondrogenesis.” A total of 19 basic science and clinical articles were identified. Results: Ten studies that were published on the use of AMIC for knee chondral defects were identified and the results of 219 patients were analyzed. The improvements in Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective, Lysholm and Tegner scores at 2 years were comparable to the published results from autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and matrix ACI techniques for cartilage repair. Conclusions: Our systematic review of the current state of the AMIC technique suggests that it is a promising 1-stage cartilage repair technique. The short-term clinical outcomes and magnetic resonance imaging results are comparable to other cell-based methods. Further studies with AMIC in randomized studies versus other repair techniques such as ACI are needed in the future. PMID:26069694

  18. Major vascular injuries complicating knee arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancu, Serban; Muresan, Mircea; Sala, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Starting with a case report, we made a detailed review of the literature, with the purpose of identifying and analyzing the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion following knee arthroscopy and the method of vascular repair. A PubMed literature search was undertaken to locate all reported cases of major vascular iatrogenic injuries during arthroscopic knee procedures. We identified 39 papers which report a total of 62 cases of major iatrogenic popliteal lesions after knee arthroscopy, between 1985 and 2014. The type of arthroscopic intervention performed, the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion encountered, the time passed until its discovery and treatment, the method of vascular reconstruction, and the postoperative course are presented. Postarthroscopy vascular complications are infrequent but potentially disastrous for the condition of the affected inferior limb. An early diagnosis and reintervention are mandatory for a good postoperative outcome. PMID:26240627

  19. Cartilage transplantation techniques for talar cartilage lesions.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Matthew E; Giza, Eric; Sullivan, Martin R

    2009-07-01

    Talar articular cartilage is known to differ significantly from knee cartilage. Even so, recommendations for the treatment of talar cartilage lesions have been based on strategies for the knee. Arthroscopic management of osteochondral lesions of the talus is well documented. Results have been favorable with reparative techniques such as débridement with curettage and débridement with drilling, whether undertaken via early open techniques or more recent arthroscopic procedures. Salvage of failed reparative techniques is controversial. Early efforts to salvage failed débridement focused on osteochondral allografts and autografts that used the knee as a donor site. Results of these restorative techniques have been favorable, but concerns have been raised regarding knee donor site morbidity, the use of malleolar osteotomy, and incomplete restoration of the talar articular surface. More recent restorative techniques developed for the knee have been adapted for the ankle, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation and matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation.

  20. Risk Factors at Time of Primary ACL Reconstruction that Contribute to Significant Chondral Surface Change at Time of Revision ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kaeding, Christopher C.; Group, Mars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Articular cartilage health is an important issue following primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). It is not clear what risk factors at the time of primary reconstruction affect future articular cartilage health. The purpose of this study was to examine risk factors affecting chondral surface change in a cohort from the time of primary ACLR to revision ACLR. Methods: Subjects who had both primary and revision data contained in the MOON and MARS registries were included. Data included chondral surface status (grade and size) at time of primary and revision, meniscal status (no treatment/repair, ≤33% excision, >33% excision) at time of primary, time from primary to revision ACLR, and age, sex, BMI, Marx, KOOS, and IKDC at time of revision. Significant chondral surface change was defined as >25% deterioration between time of primary and revision in the femoral condyle, tibial plateau, patella, or trochlea. Logistic regression was used to test each variable’s contribution to significant chondral surface change in the medial compartment, lateral compartment, and patellofemoral compartment. Results: 134 subjects met our inclusion criteria. 34/134 (25.4%) had significant lateral compartment chondral surface change, 32/134 (23.9%) had significant medial compartment chondral surface change, and 31/134 (23.1%) had significant patellofemoral chondral surface change. Median age at time of revision was 19.5 years [IQ range 17-25] and median time from primary to revision was 462.5 days [IQ range 292-1049]. KOOS and IKDC at revision were not associated with significant chondral surface change in any compartment. Patients with >33% of their lateral meniscus excised had 13.5 times the odds of having significant lateral compartment surface change compared to subjects who either did not have lateral meniscal damage, had it repaired, or had an excision of ≤33% controlling for age (p<0.001). Patients with ≤33% excision of their medial meniscus had

  1. Assessment of tissue repair in full thickness chondral defects in the rabbit using magnetic resonance imaging transverse relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Sharan; Gurkan, Ilksen; Sharma, Blanka; Cascio, Brett; Fishbein, Kenneth W; Spencer, Richard G

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the noninvasive and nondestructive technique of magnetic resonance imaging could be used to quantify the amount of repair tissue that fills surgically-induced chondral defects in the rabbit. Sixteen 4-mm diameter full-thickness chondral defects were created. A photopolymerizable hydrogel was used to seal the defects as a treatment modality. At 5 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and the distal femur was subjected to MRI analyses at high field (9.4 T). The transverse relaxation time (T(2)) in each defect was measured. Histology and histomorphometric analysis were used to quantify the amount of repair tissue that filled each defect. The relationship between T(2) and percent tissue fill was found to fit well to a negatively sloped, linear model. The linear (Pearson's product-moment) correlation coefficient was found to be r = -0.82 and the associated coefficient of determination was r(2) = 0.67. This correlation suggests that the MRI parameter T(2) can be used to track changes in the amount of repair tissue that fills cartilage defects. This would be especially useful in in vivo cartilage tissue engineering studies that attempt to determine optimal biomaterials for scaffold design.

  2. [CHARACTERISTICS OF OSTEOCYTE CELL LINES FROM BONES FORMED AS A RESULT OF MEMBRANOUS (SKULL BONES) AND CHONDRAL (LONG BONES) OSSIFICATION].

    PubMed

    Avrunin, A S; Doktorov, A A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the literature data and the results of authors' own research, to answer the question--if the osteocytes of bone tissues resulting from membranous and chondral ossification, belong to one or to different cell lines. The differences between the cells of osteocyte lines derived from bones resulting from membranous and chondral ossification were established in: 1) the magnitude of the mechanical signal, initiating the development of the process of mechanotransduction; 2) the nature of the relationship between the magnitude of the mechanical signal that initiates the reorganization of the architecture of bone structures and the resource of their strength; in membranous bones significantly lower mechanical signal caused a substantially greater increment of bone strength resource; 3) the biological activity of bone structures, bone fragments formed from membranous tissue were more optimal for transplantation; 4) the characteristics of expression of functional markers of bone cells at different stages of their differentiation; 5) the nature of the reaction of bone cells to mechanical stress; 6) the sensitivity of bone cells to one of the factors controlling the process of mechanotransduction (PGI2); 7) the functioning of osteocytes during lactation. These differences reflect the functional requirements to the bones of the skeleton--the supporting function in the bones of the limbs and the shaping and protection in the bones of the cranial vault. These data suggest that the results of research conducted on the bones of the skull, should not be transferred to the entire skeleton as a whole.

  3. The extent and distribution of cell death and matrix damage in impacted chondral explants varies with the presence of underlying bone.

    PubMed

    Krueger, J A; Thisse, P; Ewers, B J; Dvoracek-Driksna, D; Orth, M W; Haut, R C

    2003-02-01

    Excessive mechanical loading can lead to matrix damage and chondrocyte death in articular cartilage. Previous studies on chondral and osteochondral explants have not clearly distinguished to what extent the degree and the distribution of cell death are dependent on the presence of an underlying layer of bone. The current study hypothesized that the presence of underlying bone would decrease the amount of matrix damage and cell death. Chondral and osteochondral explants were loaded to 30 MPa at a high rate of loading (approximately 600 MPa/s) or at a low rate of loading (30 MPa/s). After 24 hours in culture, matrix damage was assessed by the total length and average depth of surface fissures. The explants were also sectioned and stained for cell viability in the various layers of the cartilage. More matrix damage was documented in chondral than osteochondral explants for each rate of loading experiment. The total amount of cell death was also less in osteochondral explants than chondral explants. The presence of underlying bone significantly reduced the extent of cell death in all zones in low rate of loading tests. The percentage of cell death was also reduced in the intermediate zone and deep zones of the explant by the presence of the underlying bone for a high rate of loading. This study indicated that the presence of underlying bone significantly limited the degree of matrix damage and cell death, and also affected the distribution of dead cells through the explant thickness. These data may have relevance to the applicability of experimental data from chondral explants to the in situ condition.

  4. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology*

    PubMed Central

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors. PMID:27403019

  5. [Physical examination of the knee after trauma].

    PubMed

    Rommers, G M; de Jongh, Tjeerd O H; van der Sluis, Corry K; Dekker, Rienk

    2011-01-01

    The practice guideline 'Traumatic knee complaints' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners is aimed at differentiating between intra-articular and extra-articular lesions. The diagnosis is based mainly on a combination of patient history and a limited physical examination of the knee. Specific tests for hydrarthrosis, injuries to the collateral or cruciate ligaments, and meniscal pathology have only a low diagnostic accuracy. Few reliable studies have been conducted into the diagnostic value of specific tests; most studies employed poor methodology, had considerable inter-observer variation and produced widely heterogenous results. Inspection of the knee can provide information regarding the presence of fluids in the knee (hydrarthrosis or haemarthrosis). A restricted active range of movement in flexion and extension may indicate osteoarthritis or arthritis.

  6. [CHARACTERISTICS OF OSTEOCYTE CELL LINES FROM BONES FORMED AS A RESULT OF MEMBRANOUS (SKULL BONES) AND CHONDRAL (LONG BONES) OSSIFICATION].

    PubMed

    Avrunin, A S; Doktorov, A A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the literature data and the results of authors' own research, to answer the question--if the osteocytes of bone tissues resulting from membranous and chondral ossification, belong to one or to different cell lines. The differences between the cells of osteocyte lines derived from bones resulting from membranous and chondral ossification were established in: 1) the magnitude of the mechanical signal, initiating the development of the process of mechanotransduction; 2) the nature of the relationship between the magnitude of the mechanical signal that initiates the reorganization of the architecture of bone structures and the resource of their strength; in membranous bones significantly lower mechanical signal caused a substantially greater increment of bone strength resource; 3) the biological activity of bone structures, bone fragments formed from membranous tissue were more optimal for transplantation; 4) the characteristics of expression of functional markers of bone cells at different stages of their differentiation; 5) the nature of the reaction of bone cells to mechanical stress; 6) the sensitivity of bone cells to one of the factors controlling the process of mechanotransduction (PGI2); 7) the functioning of osteocytes during lactation. These differences reflect the functional requirements to the bones of the skeleton--the supporting function in the bones of the limbs and the shaping and protection in the bones of the cranial vault. These data suggest that the results of research conducted on the bones of the skull, should not be transferred to the entire skeleton as a whole. PMID:27487656

  7. [Clinical relevance of unloading in cartilage therapy of the knee--shoe insoles, knee braces or additional operative procedure?].

    PubMed

    Kraus, T M; Imhoff, A B; Ateschrang, A; Stöckle, U; Schröter, S

    2015-02-01

    Restoration of a neutral biomechanical environment and reduction of overload is an important factor contributing to the success of any cartilage repair procedure. Reduction of overload can by achieved by so called unloading procedures in order to reduce intraarticular pressure from the repair zone. Unloading can be achieved via loss of weight, wedged shoe insoles, knee braces or via operations such as osteotomies around the knee joint. The cartilage therapy and the concomitant unloading procedure should be adapted to the individual pathology and realistic aims of the patient. Wedged insoles and braces are the least invasive treatment methods. In comparison, however, beneficial effects of braces outline those of laterally wedged heels. Nevertheless long-term compliance with insoles and braces is poor. Concerning braces either because the positive effects of the braces are too small or because the adverse effects are too large. Unloading in the long run may only be achieved through operative procedures. When an osteotomy seems to be too invasive the arthroscopic release of the posterior oblique ligament might be an option. Patients with an intact contralateral chondral status, medium to slight malalignment who want to remain at high activity levels, remain good candidates for unloading osteotomies.

  8. [Management of the meniscal lesion].

    PubMed

    Baillon, B; Cermak, K; Vancabeke, M

    2011-01-01

    About 1,5 million arthroscopies are each year performed in the world, 50 % for meniscal affections. The menisci participate in the femoro-tibial load transmission and in the joint shock absorption; they contribute to the knee stability and play a role in the joint lubrication. The menisci are therefore important structures, and, in the case of a lesion, surgical abstention or repair should be favoured. When a meniscectomy has to be performed, it should be economical, preserving the meniscal wall. Meniscectomy is contra-indicated in the child and in the case of knee osteoarthrosis. Meniscal healing is compromised if the knee is unstable. If after total meniscectomy a patient presents symptomatic early osteoarthrosis, without marked loss of alignment, meniscal allografting is a therapeutic option, especially at the lateral compartment.

  9. Microprocessor prosthetic knees.

    PubMed

    Berry, Dale

    2006-02-01

    This article traces the development of microprocessor prosthetic knees from early research in the 1970s to the present. Read about how microprocessor knees work, functional options, patient selection, and the future of this prosthetic.

  10. Knee arthroscopy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... retinacular release - discharge; Synovectomy - discharge; Patellar debridement - discharge; Meniscus repair - discharge; Lateral release - discharge; Collateral ligament repair - discharge; Knee surgery - ...

  11. Effects of surgically induced instability on rat knee articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J M; Felten, D L; Peterson, R G; O'Connor, B L

    1982-01-01

    Degenerative lesions in the articular cartilage were present following transection of the anterior cruciate ligament in the rat. These lesions included surface disruptions, a reduction in matrix proteoglycans, and cellular changes and therefore were similar to lesions seen in dogs following transection of the anterior cruciate ligament as well as lesions seen in other mechanical derangement models. Lesions were more frequently encountered in animals that had been exercised on a treadmill. This suggests that the rat knee joint may be a useful small animal model in studying the effect of mechanical derangement on articular tissues. Images Figs. 1-2 Figs. 3-4 Figs. 5-6 PMID:7076535

  12. [Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of knee joint sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Shubkin, V N; Gunicheva, N V; Akhadov, T A; Puzhitskiĭ, L B; Keshishian, R A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to study the potentialities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of knee joint sarcomas. The paper presents the results of examining 13 patients of different age, shows the potentialities of the technique in the identification of knee joint sarcomas, and describes the MRI semiotics of sarcomas in both the routine study and that using contrast enhancement in lesions of bone and soft tissue elements in the presence of regional metastases.

  13. Early knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Favero, Marta; Ramonda, Roberta; Goldring, Mary B; Goldring, Steven R; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Concepts regarding osteoarthritis, the most common joint disease, have dramatically changed in the past decade thanks to the development of new imaging techniques and the widespread use of arthroscopy that permits direct visualisation of intra-articular tissues and structure. MRI and ultrasound allow the early detection of pre-radiographic structural changes not only in the peri-articular bone but also in the cartilage, menisci, synovial membrane, ligaments and fat pad. The significance of MRI findings such as cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions, synovial inflammation/effusions and meniscal tears in patients without radiographic signs of osteoarthritis is not fully understood. Nevertheless, early joint tissue changes are associated with symptoms and, in some cases, with progression of disease. In this short review, we discuss the emerging concept of early osteoarthritis localised to the knee based on recently updated knowledge. We highlight the need for a new definition of early osteoarthritis that will permit the identification of patients at high risk of osteoarthritis progression and to initiate early treatment interventions. PMID:26557380

  14. Large animal models in experimental knee sports surgery: focus on clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Ochi, Mitsuo; Cucchiarini, Magali; Pape, Dietrich; Seil, Romain

    2015-12-01

    Large animal models play a crucial role in sports surgery of the knee, as they are critical for the exploration of new experimental strategies and the clinical translation of novel techniques. The purpose of this contribution is to provide critical aspects of relevant animal models in this field, with a focus on paediatric anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, high tibial osteotomy, and articular cartilage repair. Although there is no single large animal model strictly replicating the human knee joint, the sheep stifle joint shares strong similarities. Studies in large animal models of paediatric ACL reconstruction identified specific risk factors associated with the different surgical techniques. The sheep model of high tibial osteotomy is a powerful new tool to advance the understanding of the effect of axial alignment on the lower extremity on specific issues of the knee joint. Large animal models of both focal chondral and osteochondral defects and of osteoarthritis have brought new findings about the mechanisms of cartilage repair and treatment options. The clinical application of a magnetic device for targeted cell delivery serves as a suitable example of how data from such animal models are directly translated into in clinical cartilage repair. As novel insights from studies in these translational models will advance the basic science, close cooperation in this important field of clinical translation will improve current reconstructive surgical options and open novel avenues for regenerative therapies of musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:26914877

  15. Posterolateral Corner of the Knee: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Moatshe, Gilbert; Dean, Chase S.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the posterolateral corner (PLC) comprise a significant portion of knee ligament injuries. A high index of suspicion is necessary when evaluating the injured knee to detect these sometimes occult injuries. Moreover, a thorough physical examination and a comprehensive review of radiographic studies are necessary to identify these injuries. In this sense, stress radiographs can help to objectively determine the extent of these lesions. Non-operative and operative treatment options have been reported depending on the extent of the injury. Complete PLC lesions rarely heal with non-operative treatment, and are therefore most often treated surgically. The purpose of this article was to review the anatomy and clinically relevant biomechanics, diagnosis algorithms, treatment and rehabilitation protocols for PLC injuries. PMID:27200384

  16. Older Adults without Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis: Knee Alignment and Knee Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Fahlman, Lissa; Sangeorzan, Emmeline; Chheda, Nimisha; Lambright, Daphne

    2014-01-01

    This study describes knee alignment and active knee range of motion (ROM) in a community-based group of 78-year old adults (n = 143) who did not have radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis in either knee (KL < 2). Although knee malalignment is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, most women and men had either valgus or varus alignments. Notably, no men were valgus in both knees. Women with both knees valgus had significantly greater body mass index (P > 0.001) than women with varus or straight knees. Men and women with valgus or varus knee alignments had generally lower ROM than individuals with both knees straight. In summary, this study highlights the complex relationships among knee alignment, ROM, body mass index, and gender in elderly adults without radiographic knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24453501

  17. Older Adults without Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis: Knee Alignment and Knee Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Lissa; Sangeorzan, Emmeline; Chheda, Nimisha; Lambright, Daphne

    2014-01-12

    This study describes knee alignment and active knee range of motion (ROM) in a community-based group of 78-year old adults (n = 143) who did not have radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis in either knee (KL < 2). Although knee malalignment is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, most women and men had either valgus or varus alignments. Notably, no men were valgus in both knees. Women with both knees valgus had significantly greater body mass index (P > 0.001) than women with varus or straight knees. Men and women with valgus or varus knee alignments had generally lower ROM than individuals with both knees straight. In summary, this study highlights the complex relationships among knee alignment, ROM, body mass index, and gender in elderly adults without radiographic knee osteoarthritis.

  18. Use of chondral fragments for one stage cartilage repair: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Marmotti, Antongiulio; Rosso, Federica; Collo, Gianluca; Rossi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the state of the art regarding Cartilage Autograft Implantation System (CAIS) or Particulated Juvenile Allograft Cartilage (PJAC). METHODS: The authors searched the English literature regarding CAIS and PJAC. The search strategy was: (particulated cartilage) OR autologous cartilage fragments. All basic science articles were included. Clinical articles with less than 10 patients treated and less than 6 mo of follow-up were excluded. With these criteria, a total of 17 articles were available for the present review. RESULTS: PJAC and CAIS are relatively novel techniques for cartilage repair. Good basic science evidence was described to support the concept. Although the preliminary clinical reports show encouraging results, clinical data are still limited, especially for CAIS. The indications for both techniques need to be precisely defined (age of the patients, size of the lesion, and involvement of the subchondral bone), together with other debated issues. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the authors can state that encouraging preliminary results are available for both techniques. However, further studies are necessary to precisely determine the indications, surgical techniques, and long term outcomes for PJAC and CAIS. PMID:26716098

  19. Modern prosthetic knee mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Michael, J W

    1999-04-01

    The plethora of presently available prosthetic knee components can be divided into two groups based on how they are controlled: recent innovations that incorporate an onboard computer and the more familiar purely mechanical devices. These categories then can be subdivided into generic functional classes based on the degree of stance phase stability and swing phase responsiveness offered by each type of knee mechanism. This article summarizes the key advantages and limitations of available prosthetic knee systems and suggests a simple method to match the biomechanical capabilities of specific prosthetic knee components to the individual functional capabilities and goals of the person with an amputated limb.

  20. Patterns of knee osteoarthritis in Arabian and American knees.

    PubMed

    Hodge, W Andrew; Harman, Melinda K; Banks, Scott A

    2009-04-01

    This study illustrates differences in the cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritic knees in patients with more frequent hyperflexion activities of daily living compared with Western patients. Proximal tibial articular cartilage wear and cruciate ligament condition were assessed in Saudi Arabian and North American patients with varus osteoarthritis undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) intact knees, there were significant differences in wear location, with a clearly more anterior pattern in Saudi Arabian knees. Complete ACL deficiency occurred in 25% of North American knees but only 14% of Saudi Arabian knees. These ACL-deficient knees showed the most severe cartilage wear in both groups and posterior medial wear patterns. Biomechanical descriptions of knee flexion and axial rotation during kneeling or squatting are consistent with the more pronounced anteromedial and posterolateral cartilage wear patterns observed on the Saudi Arabian knees. These observations provide insight into altered knee mechanics in 2 culturally different populations with different demands on knee flexion.

  1. Enhanced microfracture techniques in cartilage knee surgery: Fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Bark, Stefan; Piontek, Tomasz; Behrens, Peter; Mkalaluh, Sabreen; Varoga, Deike; Gille, Justus

    2014-09-18

    The limited intrinsic healing potential of human articular cartilage is a well-known problem in orthopedic surgery. Thus a variety of surgical techniques have been developed to reduce joint pain, improve joint function and delay the onset of osteoarthritis. Microfractures as a bone marrow stimulation technique present the most common applied articular cartilage repair procedure today. Unfortunately the deficiencies of fibrocartilaginous repair tissue inevitably lead to breakdown under normal joint loading and clinical results deteriorate with time. To overcome the shortcomings of microfracture, an enhanced microfracture technique was developed with an additional collagen I/III membrane (Autologous, Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis, AMIC(®)). This article reviews the pre-clinical rationale of microfractures and AMIC(®), presents clinical studies and shows the advantages and disadvantages of these widely used techniques. PubMed and the Cochrane database were searched to identify relevant studies. We used a comprehensive search strategy with no date or language restrictions to locate studies that examined the AMIC(®) technique and microfracture. Search keywords included cartilage, microfracture, AMIC(®), knee, Chondro-Gide(®). Besides this, we included our own experiences and study authors were contacted if more and non published data were needed. Both cartilage repair techniques represent an effective and safe method of treating full-thickness chondral defects of the knee in selected cases. While results after microfracture deteriorate with time, mid-term results after AMIC(®) seem to be enduring. Randomized studies with long-term follow-up are needed whether the grafted area will maintain functional improvement and structural integrity over time.

  2. Interventional articular and para-articular knee procedures.

    PubMed

    Lalam, Radhesh K; Winn, Naomi; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common area of the body to undergo interventional procedures. This article discusses image-guided interventional issues specific to the knee area. The soft tissues in and around the knee are frequently affected by sport-related injuries and often need image-guided intervention. This article details the specific technical issues related to intervention in these soft tissues, including the iliotibial tract, fat pads, patellar tendon and other tendons, bursae and the meniscus. Most often, simple procedures such as injection and aspiration are performed without image guidance. Rarely image-guided diagnostic arthrography and therapeutic joint injections are necessary. The technique, indications and diagnostic considerations for arthrography are discussed in this article. Primary bone and soft-tissue tumours may involve the knee and adjacent soft tissues. Image-guided biopsies are frequently necessary for these lesions; this article details the technical issues related to image-guided biopsy around the knee. A number of newer ablation treatments are now available, including cryoablation, high-frequency ultrasound and microwave ablation. Radiofrequency ablation, however, still remains the most commonly employed ablation technique. The indications, technical and therapeutic considerations related to the application of this technique around the knee are discussed here. Finally, we briefly discuss some newer, but as of yet, unproven image-guided interventions for osteochondral lesions and Brodie's abscess. PMID:26682669

  3. Interventional articular and para-articular knee procedures.

    PubMed

    Lalam, Radhesh K; Winn, Naomi; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common area of the body to undergo interventional procedures. This article discusses image-guided interventional issues specific to the knee area. The soft tissues in and around the knee are frequently affected by sport-related injuries and often need image-guided intervention. This article details the specific technical issues related to intervention in these soft tissues, including the iliotibial tract, fat pads, patellar tendon and other tendons, bursae and the meniscus. Most often, simple procedures such as injection and aspiration are performed without image guidance. Rarely image-guided diagnostic arthrography and therapeutic joint injections are necessary. The technique, indications and diagnostic considerations for arthrography are discussed in this article. Primary bone and soft-tissue tumours may involve the knee and adjacent soft tissues. Image-guided biopsies are frequently necessary for these lesions; this article details the technical issues related to image-guided biopsy around the knee. A number of newer ablation treatments are now available, including cryoablation, high-frequency ultrasound and microwave ablation. Radiofrequency ablation, however, still remains the most commonly employed ablation technique. The indications, technical and therapeutic considerations related to the application of this technique around the knee are discussed here. Finally, we briefly discuss some newer, but as of yet, unproven image-guided interventions for osteochondral lesions and Brodie's abscess.

  4. Partial knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... You will need to understand what surgery and recovery will be like. Partial knee arthroplasty may be a good choice if you have arthritis in only one side or part of the knee and: You are older, thin, and not very active. You do not ...

  5. Knee arthroscopy - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ligaments are among the ligaments of the knee joint. ... the joint (synovium), and the rest of the joint. Damaged tissues can be removed. Arthroscopy can also be used to help view the inside of the knee while ligaments or tendons are repaired from the outside.

  6. Preventing Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to tearing. Growth Plate Injuries, Fractures, and Dislocations Knee fractures rarely occur in childhood sports, but with any ... is the bump on the front of the knee where the patellar tendon attaches. Fractures to the growth plate in this area often ...

  7. An Update on Methods for Revascularization and Expansion of the TASC Lesion Classification to Include Below-the-Knee Arteries: A Supplement to the Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC II)

    PubMed Central

    Jaff, *Michael R.; White, Christopher J.; Hiatt, William R.; Fowkes, Gerry R.; Dormandy, John; Razavi, Mahmood; Reekers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC) guidelines were last updated in 2007 (TASC II) and represented the collaboration of international vascular specialties involved in the management of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Since the publication of TASC II, there have been innovations in endovascular revascularization strategies for patients with PAD. The intent of this publication is to provide a complete anatomic lower limb TASC lesion classification, including the infrapopliteal segment, and an updated literature review of new endovascular techniques and practice patterns employed by vascular specialists today. PMID:26730266

  8. Abnormal findings on knee magnetic resonance imaging in asymptomatic NBA players.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Brian E; McCulloch, Patrick C; Kang, Richard W; Zelazny, Anthony; Tedeschi, Fred; Cole, Brian J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knees of asymptomatic National Basketball Association (NBA) players via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confirm or dispute findings reported in the previous literature. It is thought that a variety of significant abnormalities affecting the knee exist in asymptomatic patients and that these findings can be accurately identified on MRI. Two months prior to the 2005 season, bilateral knee MRI examinations of 14 asymptomatic NBA players (28 knees) were evaluated for abnormalities of the articular cartilage, menisci, and patellar and quadriceps tendons. The presence of joint effusion, subchondral edema, and cystic lesions and the integrity of the collateral and cruciate ligaments were also assessed.

  9. Anterior knee pain following total knee replacement correlates with the OARSI score of the cartilage of the patella

    PubMed Central

    Vorobjov, Sigrid; Lepik, Katrin; Märtson, Aare

    2014-01-01

    Background Attempts to relate patellar cartilage involvement to anterior knee pain (AKP) have yielded conflicting results. We determined whether the condition of the cartilage of the patella at the time of knee replacement, as assessed by the OARSI score, correlates with postsurgical AKP. Patients and methods We prospectively studied 100 patients undergoing knee arthroplasty. At surgery, we photographed and biopsied the articular surface of the patella, leaving the patella unresurfaced. Following determination of the microscopic grade of the patellar cartilage lesion and the stage by analyzing the intraoperative photographs, we calculated the OARSI score. We interviewed the patients 1 year after knee arthroplasty using the HSS patella score for diagnosis of AKP. Results 57 of 95 patients examined had AKP. The average OARSI score of painless patients was 13 (6–20) and that of patients with AKP was 15 (6–20) (p = 0.04). Patients with OARSI scores of 13–24 had 50% higher risk of AKP (prevalence ratio = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0–2.3) than patients with OARSI scores of 0–12. Interpretation The depth and extent of the cartilage lesion of the knee-cap should be considered when deciding between the various options for treatment of the patella during knee replacement. PMID:24954482

  10. Human growth hormone and the development of osteochondritis dissecans lesions.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Waqas M; Hussain, Haroon M; Hussain, Mohammed S; Ho, Sherwin S W

    2011-12-01

    No single etiology regarding the cause of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions is unanimously accepted. This report documents a novel case of multiple OCD lesions affecting the left knee and a solitary defect of the right elbow in a patient with acquired human growth hormone (hGH) deficiency and supplementation. hGH deficiency and hormone replacement may be related to the development of OCD lesions.

  11. Treating Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... osteotomy may need knee replacement surgery in the future. Arthroplasty is also called joint or knee replacement therapy. A surgeon removes the part of the knee damaged by osteoarthritis and replaces it with an artificial joint made from metals and plastic. All or part of the knee joint may ...

  12. Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Ghnaimat, Malek; Alodat, Mohannad; Aljazazi, Mohammad; Al-Zaben, Raad; Alshwabkah, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    The giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a benign lesion which arises from the synovium of a joint, bursa or tendon sheath, with 85% of the tumors occurring in the fingers and 12% of the tumors located in large joints such as the knee and ankle. The GCTTS is usually monoarticular, slowly proliferative and rarely locally aggressive. This paper reports three cases of this rare lesion in the knee. Patients presented with painful swelling in the anterior knee, MRI showed localized soft tissue masses which were able to be excised. A follow up of the cases showed no recurrences. This case report emphasizes the importance of considering GCTTS in the differential diagnosis of soft tissue swelling and pain in large joints.

  13. Arthroscopy of the knee without pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Schlepckow, P; Weber, M; Hempel, K

    1994-01-01

    From 1983 to 1990, 82 knee arthroscopies (8.2%) carried out in our patients found nothing pathological. Sixty-four percent of these patients were active in sports, but trauma was noted in 32% of the cases only. Football and other ball games, skiing, and track and field athletics were the main causes. Twenty-six percent of the patients had undergone previous surgery in the affected knee. At a mean of 4.6 years postoperatively, clinical and radiological re-assessment was conducted so as to compare our pre- and intraoperative findings with the further course of events. We found that 48.2% of the patients were symptom-free after the diagnostic arthroscopy, 37.5% had persistent discomfort and 14.3% had a recurrence of discomfort after 6 months to 2 years. The objective measurement score (Zarins Rowe score), at 47.5 out of 50 points, was better than the subjective score, at 40 out of 50 points. Our diagnoses had to be changed retrospectively: meniscal lesions were diagnosed too frequently, while chondropathia patellae and instability were often missed. Additionally, complaints could be related to abnormal axis, limited range of motion of the hip or knee, leg length inequality and hypermobility. Being unable to verify a presumed intra-articular lesion arthroscopically is frustrating for both doctor and patient. Our data suggest that meniscal signs should be looked at more critically and emphasise the need for a complete evaluation of the whole locomotor system.

  14. Chronic Knee Dislocation After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ross, John P; Brown, Nicholas M; Levine, Brett R

    2015-12-01

    Knee dislocation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), although rare, is a dangerous injury that can lead to neurovascular compromise and permanent disability. Chronic dislocation after TKA is even less common and is defined as dislocation that is present for 4 weeks or more. There are few reports of its management. Chronic dislocation may be complicated further by concomitant extensor mechanism disruption, ligamentous instability, and/or capsular contracture. This article describes 3 cases of chronically dislocated TKAs and the challenges encountered in treating this difficult problem. A higher level of constraint was required to maintain knee stability, and an extensor mechanism allograft was needed in 2 of the 3 reported patients. The preferred technique at the authors' institution is a complete allograft composite, tensioned in full extension. In the setting of a chronically dislocated TKA, the authors now recommend revision surgery with an enhanced measure of constraint (constrained condylar device or hinged knee prosthesis), reconstruction of the extensor mechanism when necessary, and restoration of the joint while compensating for concomitant bony defects. Even when surgeons follow these principles, it is important to inform the patient that long-term outcomes will likely be inferior to those of revision surgery for other causes.

  15. Advanced concepts in knee arthrodesis

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jennifer H; Conway, Janet D

    2015-01-01

    The aim is to describe advanced strategies that can be used to diagnose and treat complications after knee arthrodesis and to describe temporary knee arthrodesis to treat infected knee arthroplasty. Potential difficult complications include nonunited knee arthrodesis, limb length discrepancy after knee arthrodesis, and united but infected knee arthrodesis. If a nonunited knee arthrodesis shows evidence of implant loosening or failure, then bone grafting the nonunion site as well as exchange intramedullary nailing and/or supplemental plate fixation are recommended. If symptomatic limb length discrepancy cannot be satisfactorily treated with a shoe lift, then the patient should undergo tibial lengthening over nail with a monolateral fixator or exchange nailing with a femoral internal lengthening device. If a united knee arthrodesis is infected, the nail must be removed. Then the surgeon has the option of replacing it with a long, antibiotic cement-coated nail. The authors also describe temporary knee arthrodesis for infected knee arthroplasty in patients who have the potential to undergo insertion of a new implant. The procedure has two goals: eradication of infection and stabilization of the knee. A temporary knee fusion can be accomplished by inserting both an antibiotic cement-coated knee fusion nail and a static antibiotic cement-coated spacer. These advanced techniques can be helpful when treating difficult complications after knee arthrodesis and treating cases of infected knee arthroplasty. PMID:25793160

  16. Pre-radiographic MRI findings are associated with onset of knee symptoms: the most study

    PubMed Central

    Javaid, M. K.; Lynch, J. A.; Tolstykh, I.; Guermazi, A.; Roemer, F.; Aliabadi, P.; McCulloch, C.; Curtis, J.; Felson, D.; Lane, N. E.; Torner, J.; Nevitt, M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greater sensitivity to detect osteoarthritis (OA) damage than radiographs but it is uncertain which MRI findings in early OA are clinically important. We examined MRI abnormalities detected in knees without radiographic OA and their association with incident knee symptoms. Method Participants from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) without frequent knee symptoms (FKS) at baseline were eligible if they also lacked radiographic features of OA at baseline. At 15 months, knees that developed FKS were defined as cases while control knees were drawn from those that remained without FKS. Baseline MRIs were scored at each subregion for cartilage lesions (CARTs); osteophytes (OST); bone marrow lesions (BML) and cysts. We compared cases and controls using marginal logistic regression models, adjusting for age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI), previous injury and clinic site. Results 36 case knees and 128 control knees were analyzed. MRI damage was common in both cases and controls. The presence of a severe CART (P = 0.03), BML (P = 0.02) or OST (P = 0.02) in the whole knee joint was more common in cases while subchondral cysts did not differ significantly between cases and controls (P > 0.1). Case status at 15 months was predicted by baseline damage at only two locations; a BML in the lateral patella (P = 0.047) and at the tibial subspinous subregions (P = 0.01). Conclusion In knees without significant symptoms or radiographic features of OA, MRI lesions of OA in only a few specific locations preceded onset of clinical symptoms and suggest that changes in bone play a role in the early development of knee pain. Confirmation of these findings in other prospective studies of knee OA is warranted. PMID:19919856

  17. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  18. Comparison of 3.0-T MR vs 3.0-T MR arthrography of the hip for detection of acetabular labral tears and chondral defects in the same patient population

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We report our experience in diagnostic sensitivity of 3.0-T conventional MR vs 3.0-T MR arthrography of the hip for detection of acetabular labral tears and chondral defects in the same patient population. Methods: 43 consecutive patients had both conventional hip MR and MR arthrography examinations performed. These examinations were reviewed retrospectively by independent reading of two musculoskeletal radiologists who read the MR and MR arthrogram examinations in a randomized fashion (i.e. MR and MR arthrogram examinations were read at separate sittings and in a randomized fashion so as not to bias reviewers). Scans were assessed for acetabular labral tears and chondral defects. All patients went on to arthroscopy. Results: Of these 43 patients, 40 had acetabular labral tears read by Reader 1 and 39 had acetabular labral tears read by Reader 2 on MR arthrogram, 39 had acetabular labral tears read by Reader 1 and 38 had acetabular labral tears read by Reader 2 on conventional MR examination. There were 42 labral tears in 43 patients at arthroscopy. There were four false-negative labral tears compared with arthroscopy on MR and three false negatives on MR arthrography for Reader 1 and five false negatives on MR and four false negatives on MR arthrography for Reader 2. Each reader had one false-positive labral tear compared with arthroscopy on both MR and MR arthrography. There were 32 acetabular chondral defects at arthroscopy. Reader 1 saw 21 acetabular chondral defects on conventional MR and 27 chondral defects at MR arthrography. Reader 2 saw 19 acetabular chondral defects at conventional MR and 25 acetabular chondral defects on MR arthrography. There were no false-positive readings of chondral defects compared with arthroscopy on MR and one false positive for Reader 1 and two false positives for Reader 2 on MR arthrography as compared with arthroscopy. On conventional MR examination, sensitivities and specificities as compared with arthroscopy were

  19. Anterior knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... as running, jumping or twisting, skiing, or playing soccer). You have flat feet. Anterior knee pain is ... to the kneecap Runners, jumpers, skiers, bicyclists, and soccer players who exercise often Teenagers and healthy young ...

  20. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to attach this part. Repair your muscles and tendons around the new joint and close the surgical cut. The surgery takes about 2 hours. Most artificial knees have both metal and plastic parts. Some ...

  1. Total Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... as anti- inflammatory medications, cortisone injections, lubricating injections, physical therapy, or other surgeries A knee that has become ... your function. Other treatment options — including medications, injections, physical therapy, or other types of surgery — will also be ...

  2. Single-step scaffold-based cartilage repair in the knee: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Stefan; Kisser, Agnes

    2016-12-01

    Chondral lesions are difficult-to-treat entities that often affect young and active people. Moreover, cartilage has limited intrinsic healing potential. The purpose of this systematic literature review was to analyse whether the single-step scaffold-based cartilage repair in combination with microfracturing (MFx) is more effective and safe in comparison to MFx alone. From the three identified studies, it seems that the single-step scaffold-assisted cartilage repair in combination with MFx leads to similar short- to medium-term (up to five years follow-up) results, compared to MFx alone. All of the studies have shown improvements regarding joint functionality, pain and partly quality of life. PMID:27408497

  3. Single-step scaffold-based cartilage repair in the knee: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Stefan; Kisser, Agnes

    2016-12-01

    Chondral lesions are difficult-to-treat entities that often affect young and active people. Moreover, cartilage has limited intrinsic healing potential. The purpose of this systematic literature review was to analyse whether the single-step scaffold-based cartilage repair in combination with microfracturing (MFx) is more effective and safe in comparison to MFx alone. From the three identified studies, it seems that the single-step scaffold-assisted cartilage repair in combination with MFx leads to similar short- to medium-term (up to five years follow-up) results, compared to MFx alone. All of the studies have shown improvements regarding joint functionality, pain and partly quality of life.

  4. Reading Knee-Deep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Freire told his audience at a seminar at the University of Massachusetts, "You need to read knee-deep in texts, for deeper than surface meanings, and you need to know the words to be able to do it" (quoted in Cleary, 2003). In a children's literature class, fifteen teachers and I traveled along a path that moved us toward reading knee-deep as we…

  5. Dashboard (in the) knee.

    PubMed

    Patel, M S; Qureshi, A A; Green, T P

    2015-03-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old individual presenting to an orthopaedic outpatient clinic several months following a dashboard knee injury during a road traffic accident with intermittent mechanical symptoms. Despite unremarkable examination findings and normal magnetic resonance imaging, the patient was identified subsequently as having an intra-articular plastic foreign body consistent with a piece of dashboard on arthroscopic knee assessment, the retrieval of which resulted in a complete resolution of symptoms.

  6. Taking care of your new knee joint

    MedlinePlus

    Knee arthroplasty - precautions; Knee replacement - precautions ... After you have knee replacement surgery , you will need to be careful about how you move your knee, especially for the first few ...

  7. Dislocation after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wazir, N N; Shan, Y; Mukundala, V V; Gunalan, R

    2007-05-01

    Two cases of dislocation of total knee arthroplasty presented to us within the same week. The first patient is a 71-year-old woman who underwent bilateral primary total knee arthroplasty. The left knee dislocated three weeks after the surgery. Due to failure of conservative measures, she underwent revision total knee arthroplasty. The other patient is a 72-year-old woman presenting ten years after primary total knee arthroplasty, with a traumatic dislocation of the knee joint. She was treated as an outpatient with closed manipulative reduction.

  8. Knee pain in competitive swimming.

    PubMed

    Rodeo, S A

    1999-04-01

    The high volume of training in competitive swimming results in cumulative overload injuries. Knee pain ranks second to shoulder pain as a common complaint in competitive swimmers. Most knee pain occurs on the medial side of the knee and, most commonly, in breaststroke swimmers; however, knee pain may accompany all strokes. This article reviews the incidence of knee pain, the biomechanic and anatomic factors predisposing to injury, specific injury patterns, injury diagnosis, and the treatment and prevention of injury to the knee in swimmers. PMID:10230572

  9. Association between meniscal tears and the peak external knee adduction moment and foot rotation during level walking in postmenopausal women without knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Davies-Tuck, Miranda L; Wluka, Anita E; Teichtahl, Andrew J; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Jones, Graeme; Ding, Changhai; Davis, Susan R; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Meniscal injury is a risk factor for the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis, yet little is known about risk factors for meniscal pathology. Joint loading mediated via gait parameters may be associated with meniscal tears, and determining whether such an association exists was the aim of this study. Methods Three-dimensional Vicon gait analyses were performed on the dominant knee of 20 non-osteoarthritic women, and the peak external knee adduction moment during early and late stance was determined. The degree of foot rotation was also examined when the knee adductor moment peaked during early and late stance. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to determine the presence and severity of meniscal lesions in the dominant knee. Results The presence (P = 0.04) and severity (P = 0.01) of medial meniscal tears were positively associated with the peak external knee adduction moment during early stance while a trend for late stance was observed (P = 0.07). They were also associated with increasing degrees of internal foot rotation during late stance, independent of the magnitude of the peak external knee adduction moment occurring at that time (P = 0.03). During level walking among healthy women, the presence and severity of medial meniscal tears were positively associated with the peak external knee adduction moment. Moreover, the magnitude of internal foot rotation was associated with the presence and severity of medial meniscal lesions, independent of the peak knee adductor moment during late stance. Conclusion These data may suggest that gait parameters may be associated with meniscal damage, although longitudinal studies will be required to clarify whether gait abnormalities predate meniscal lesions, or vice versa, and therefore whether modification of gait patterns may be helpful. PMID:18492234

  10. Unique Anatomic Feature of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament in Knees Associated With Osteochondritis Dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masakazu; Adachi, Nobuo; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Nakamae, Atsuo; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Ikuta, Yasunari; Hayashi, Seiju; Deie, Masataka; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee is a disorder in juveniles and young adults; however, its etiology still remains unclear. For OCD at the medial femoral condyle (MFC), it is sometimes observed that the lesion has a connection with fibers of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Although this could be important information related to the etiology of MFC OCD, there is no report examining an association between the MFC OCD and the PCL anatomy. Purpose: To investigate the anatomic features of knees associated with MFC OCD, focusing especially on the femoral attachment of the PCL, and to compare them with knees associated with lateral femoral condyle (LFC) OCD and non-OCD lesions. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients (46 knees) with OCD lesions who had undergone surgical treatment. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, the PCL attachment at the lateral wall of the MFC was measured on the coronal sections, and the knee flexion angle was also measured on the sagittal sections. As with non-OCD knees, we reviewed and analyzed 25 knees with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and 16 knees with meniscal injuries. Results: MRIs revealed that the femoral PCL footprint was located in a significantly more distal position in the patients with MFC OCD compared with patients with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. There was no significant difference in knee flexion angle among the 4 groups. Conclusion: The PCL in patients with MFC OCD attached more distally at the lateral aspect of the MFC compared with knees with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. PMID:27294170

  11. Rehabilitation following Microfracture of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Kevin E; Macrina, Leonard C; Reinold, Michael M

    2010-04-01

    Postoperative rehabilitation programs following articular cartilage repair procedures will vary greatly among patients and need to be individualized based on the nature of the lesion, the unique characteristics of the patient, and the type and detail of each surgical procedure. These programs are based on knowledge of the basic science, anatomy, and biomechanics of articular cartilage as well as the biological course of healing following surgery. The goal is to restore full function in each patient as quickly as possible by facilitating a healing response without overloading the healing articular cartilage. The purpose of this article is to overview the principles of rehabilitation following microfracture procedures of the knee.

  12. Obesity, knee osteoarthritis and knee arthroplasty: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of obesity is rising worldwide. Obesity is a risk factor for developing osteoarthritis in the knee. Obesity and knee osteoarthritis are independently disabling conditions and in combination pose difficult therapeutic challenges. This review will discuss obesity, osteoarthritis, and the problems associated with knee osteoarthritis in an obese population. Treatment options including surgery and its success will be discussed. PMID:24304704

  13. Epidemiology of jumper's knee.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, A

    1986-01-01

    Jumper's knee is a typical functional overload injury because it affects those athletes who submit their knee extensor mechanisms to intense and repeated stress, e.g. volleyball and basketball players, high and long jumpers. According to the classification of Perugia and colleagues, it is an insertional tendinopathy affecting, in order of frequency, the insertion of the patellar tendon into the patella (65% of cases), attachment of the quadriceps tendon to the patella (25%) and the attachment of the patellar tendon to the tibial tuberosity (10%). The frequent occurrence of this injury in athletes led to the study of factors that may contribute to its onset and aggravation. These factors are divided into extrinsic (i.e. kind of sport practised and training methods used) and intrinsic (i.e. connected with the somatic and morphological characteristics of the athletes). On the basis of our experience and after a review of the literature it appears, contrary to what has been repeatedly claimed in the past, the extrinsic factors are more important than the intrinsic in the aetiology of jumper's knee. The effect of traumatic incidents and use of elastic kneecap guards should also be considered negligible. The intrinsic causes of jumper's knee, can be sought in the mechanical properties of tendons (resistance, elasticity and extensibility) rather than in morphological or biomechanical abnormalities of the knee extensor mechanism.

  14. Alterations in walking knee joint stiffness in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee instability.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Jonathan A; Gorman, Shannon; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Increased walking knee joint stiffness has been reported in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a compensatory strategy to improve knee joint stability. However, presence of episodic self-reported knee instability in a large subgroup of patients with knee OA may be a sign of inadequate walking knee joint stiffness. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in walking knee joint stiffness in patients with knee OA with and without self-reported instability and examine the relationship between walking knee joint stiffness with quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity, and varus knee malalignment. Overground biomechanical data at a self-selected gait velocity was collected for 35 individuals with knee OA without self-reported instability (stable group) and 17 individuals with knee OA and episodic self-reported instability (unstable group). Knee joint stiffness was calculated during the weight-acceptance phase of gait as the change in the external knee joint moment divided by the change in the knee flexion angle. The unstable group walked with lower knee joint stiffness (p=0.01), mainly due to smaller heel-contact knee flexion angles (p<0.01) and greater knee flexion excursions (p<0.01) compared to their knee stable counterparts. No significant relationships were observed between walking knee joint stiffness and quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity or varus knee malalignment. Reduced walking knee joint stiffness appears to be associated with episodic knee instability and independent of quadriceps muscle weakness, knee joint laxity or varus malalignment. Further investigations of the temporal relationship between self-reported knee joint instability and walking knee joint stiffness are warranted.

  15. Cementless total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Salvatore; Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Agati, Gabriele; Massè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Interest for uncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has greatly increased in recent years. This technique, less used than cemented knee replacement in the last decades, sees a revival thanks an advance in prosthetic design, instrumentation and operative technique. The related literature in some cases shows conflicting data on survival and on the revision’s rate, but in most cases a success rate comparable to cemented TKA is reported. The optimal fixation in TKA is a subject of debate with the majority of surgeons favouring cemented fixation. PMID:27162779

  16. Arthrography and arthrotomy of the knee in sports injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Kulthanan, T; Noiklang, P

    1993-01-01

    A total of 266 patients with injuries to the knee sustained during sports activities were managed by arthroscopy and/or arthrotomy. All of them received systemic examination and a standard battery of knee stability tests. Fifty-three were examined by arthrography and all underwent arthrotomy for surgical correction of the lesion diagnosed by both clinical examination and arthrography. Our study showed that clinical examination could give an accurate clinical diagnosis in 88.35% of cases and arthrography in 76.89%. No complication from arthrography was found. Injury occurred most commonly between 21 and 30 years of age and was more common to the right knee than the left. The sport in which most injuries occurred was football. PMID:8358590

  17. Calcific tendinitis of biceps femoris: an unusual site and cause for lateral knee pain.

    PubMed

    Chan, Warwick; Chase, Helen Emily; Cahir, John G; Walton, Neil Patrick

    2016-01-01

    A 37-year-old man presented to the acute knee and sports medicine clinic with atraumatic lateral knee pain. He had point tenderness over the lateral aspect of his knee which had not settled with anti-inflammatory medications. Imaging revealed a large opaque lesion lateral to the knee and although there was no clear mechanism, injury to the posterolateral corner was considered. An MRI subsequently revealed a rare case of calcific tendinitis to the biceps femoris tendon insertion. This condition was self-limiting and did not require interventions such as steroid injections. This is the first reported case of calcific tendinitis of biceps femoris as a cause of acute knee pain. PMID:27473032

  18. Heat generated by knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, James W

    2006-01-01

    Temperature sensors were placed in 50 knees in 25 patients who had one or both joints replaced. Temperature recordings were made before walking, after walking, and after cycling. The heat generated in healthy, arthritic, and replaced knees was measured. The knee replacements were done using eight different prostheses. A rotating hinge knee prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 7 degrees C in 20 minutes and 9 degrees C in 40 minutes. An unconstrained ceramic femoral prosthesis articulating with a polyethylene tibial prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 4 degrees C compared with a healthy resting knee. The other designs using a cobalt-chrome alloy and high-density polyethylene had temperature increases of 5 degrees-7 degrees C with exercise. Frictional heat generated in a prosthetic knee is not immediately dissipated and may result in wear, creep, and other degenerative processes in the high-density polyethylene. Extended periods of elevated temperature in joints may inhibit cell growth and perhaps contribute to adverse performance via bone resorption or component loosening. Prosthetic knees generate more heat with activity than healthy or arthritic knees. More-constrained knee prostheses generate more heat than less-constrained prostheses. A knee with a ceramic femoral component generates less heat than a knee with the same design using a cobalt-chromium alloy. PMID:16394760

  19. Bilateral knee replacements for treatment of acute septic arthritis in both knees.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Muhammad Omer; Asumu, Theophilus

    2013-11-01

    A case report of bilateral acute septic arthritis of knees is presented, which was managed with staged total knee replacements for both knees. A literature review on septic arthritis treated with knee arthroplasty is also presented.

  20. Physicians’ accuracy and interrator reliability for the diagnosis of unstable meniscal tears in patients having osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Dervin, Geoffrey F.; Stiell, Ian G.; Wells, George A.; Rody, Kelly; Grabowski, Jenny

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine clinicians’ accuracy and reliability for the clinical diagnosis of unstable meniscus tears in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee. Design A prospective cohort study. Setting A single tertiary care centre. Patients One hundred and fifty-two patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee refractory to conservative medical treatment were selected for prospective evaluation of arthroscopic débridement. Intervention Arthroscopic débridement of the knee, including meniscal tear and chondral flap resection, without abrasion arthroplasty. Outcome measures A standardized assessment protocol was administered to each patient by 2 independent observers. Arthroscopic determination of unstable meniscal tears was recorded by 1 observer who reviewed a video recording and was blinded to preoperative data. Those variables that had the highest interobserver agreement and the strongest association with meniscal tear by univariate methods were entered into logistic regression to model the best prediction of resectable tears. Results There were 92 meniscal tears (77 medial, 15 lateral). Interobserver agreement between clinical fellows and treating surgeons was poor to fair (κ < 0.4) for all clinical variables except radiographic measures, which were good. Fellows and surgeons predicted unstable meniscal tear preoperatively with equivalent accuracy of 60%. Logistic regression modelling revealed that a history of swelling and a ballottable effusion were negative predictors. A positive McMurray test was the only positive predictor of unstable meniscal tear. “Mechanical” symptoms were not reliable predictors in this prospective study. The model was 69% accurate for all patients and 76% for those with advanced medial compartment osteoarthritis defined by a joint space height of 2 mm or less. Conclusions This study underscored the difficulty in using clinical variables to predict unstable medial meniscal tears in patients with pre

  1. Hypermobility and Knee Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Mark E.

    1987-01-01

    A review of research on the effect of hypermobility on knee injury indicates that greater than normal joint flexibility may be necessary for some athletic endeavors and that it may be possible to change one's underlying flexibility through training. However, for most athletes, inherited flexibility probably plays only a small role, if any, in…

  2. Custom Knee Device for Knee Contractures After Internal Femoral Lengthening.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Ong, Peck-Hoon; Standard, Shawn C; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2015-07-01

    The development of knee flexion contractures is among the most common problems and complications associated with lengthening the femur with an internal device or external fixator. Conservative treatment strategies include physical therapy, serial casting, and low-load prolonged stretching with commercially available splinting systems. The authors developed an individually molded, low-cost custom knee device with polyester synthetic conformable casting material to treat knee flexion contractures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the results of treatment with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy in patients who had knee flexion contracture during femoral lengthening with an intramedullary lengthening femoral nail. This retrospective study included 23 patients (27 limbs) who underwent femoral lengthening with an internal device for the treatment of limb length discrepancy. All patients had a knee flexion contracture raging from 10° to 90° during the lengthening process and were treated with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy. The average flexion contracture before treatment was 36°. The mean amount of lengthening was 5.4 cm. After an average of 3.8 weeks of use of the custom knee device, only 2 of 27 limbs (7.5%) had not achieved complete resolution of the flexion contracture. The average final extension was 1.4°. Only 7 of 27 limbs (26%) required additional soft tissue release. The custom knee device is an inexpensive and effective method for treating knee flexion contracture after lengthening with an internal device.

  3. A 5-Year Follow-Up After Cartilage Repair in the Knee Using a Platelet-Rich Plasma-Immersed Polymer-Based Implant

    PubMed Central

    Siclari, Alberto; Mascaro, Gennaro; Kaps, Christian; Boux, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to analyze the clinical outcome after repair of cartilage defects of the knee with subchondral drilling and resorbable polymer-based implants immersed with autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Fifty-two patients with focal chondral defects were treated with subchondral drilling, followed by covering with a polyglycolic acid - hyaluronan (PGA-HA) implant (chondrotissue®) immersed with autologous PRP. At 5-year follow-up, patients’ situation was assessed using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and compared to the pre-operative situation. The KOOS showed clinically meaningful and significant (p < 0.05) improvement in all subcategories compared to baseline. Subgroup analysis showed that there were no differences in the clinical outcome regarding defect size and localization as well as degenerative condition of the knee. Cartilage repair was complete in 20 out of 21 patients at 4-year follow-up as shown by magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring. Covering of focal cartilage defects with the PGA-HA implant and PRP after bone marrow stimulation leads to a lasting improvement of the patients’ situation. PMID:25352927

  4. Dynamic impact force and association with structural damage to the knee joint: an ex-vivo study.

    PubMed

    Brill, Richard; Wohlgemuth, Walther A; Hempfling, Harald; Bohndorf, Klaus; Becker, Ursula; Welsch, Ulrich; Kamp, Alexander; Roemer, Frank W

    2014-12-01

    No systematic, histologically confirmed data are available concerning the association between magnitude of direct dynamic impact caused by vertical impact trauma and the resulting injury to cartilage and subchondral bone. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between dynamic impact and the resulting patterns of osteochondral injury in an ex-vivo model. A mechanical apparatus was employed to perform ex-vivo controlled dynamic vertical impact experiments in 110 pig knees with the femur positioned in a holding fixture. A falling body with a thrust plate and photo sensor was applied. The direct impact to the trochlear articular surface was registered and the resulting osteochondral injuries macroscopically and histologically correlated and categorized. The relationship between magnitude of direct impact and injury severity could be classified as stage I injuries (impact <7.3MPa): elastic deformation, no histological injury; stage II injuries (impact 7.3-9.6MPa): viscoelastic imprint of the cartilaginous surface, subchondral microfractures; stage III injuries (impact 9.6-12.7MPa): disrupted cartilage surface, chondral fissures and subchondral microfractures; stage IV injuries (impact >12.7MPa): osteochondral impression, histologically imprint and osteochondral macrofractures. The impact ranges and histologic injury stages determined from this vertical dynamic impact experiment allowed for a biomechanical classification of direct, acute osteochondral injury. In contrast to static load commonly applied in ex-vivo experiments, dynamic impact more realistically represents actual trauma to the knee joint.

  5. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  15. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  16. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  17. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  18. Spontaneous Knee Ankylosis through Heterotopic Ossification after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boulezaz, Samuel; Gibon, Emmanuel; Loriaut, Philippe; Casabianca, Laurent; Rousseau, Romain; Dallaudiere, Benjamin; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a case of total ankylosis of the knee after a cruciate-sacrificing cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA). An 82-year-old female patient previously underwent primary TKA for osteoarthritis twenty years ago in our institution. She had recovered uneventfully and returned to her regular activities. There was no history of postsurgical trauma; however, she progressively lost knee range of motion. Radiographs revealed severe bridging heterotopic ossification. PMID:27119034

  19. Pain in the knee associated with osteoporosis of the patella.

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, M; Colston, J R; Tucker, A K

    1977-01-01

    Four patients, all of whom complained of pain in the knee, were found to have radiological evidence of osteoporosis particularly marked in the patella. In 3 a neurological lesion at the appropriate spinal segment was present, and the fourth patient, who was frankly hysterical, had an autonomic disturbance. If radiological porosis is isolated to the patella a distant cause such as nerve irritation should be sought. Images PMID:856068

  20. Interesting clinical presentation of anterior knee pain causing diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Samer S; Balasubramanian, S; Teanby, D

    2009-09-01

    A diverse variety of lesions may occasionally occur in the patella. In this case report, we are presenting an interesting case of anterior knee pain in middle aged gentleman. Initial investigations including Magnetic Resonance Imaging not showed any abnormality. Due to prolonged continued pain he had bone scan and MRI, which confirmed the diagnosis of Brodie's abscess. We are presenting this case of Brodie's abscess of the patella causing diagnostic dilemma because of its rarity.

  1. Irreducible posterolateral dislocation of the knee: a case report.

    PubMed

    Solarino, Giuseppe; Notarnicola, Angela; Maccagnano, Giuseppe; Piazzolla, Andrea; Moretti, Biagio

    2015-01-01

    Irreducible posterolateral dislocations of the knee are rare lesions, generally caused by high-energy trauma inducing rotational stress and a posterior and lateral displacement of the tibia. In these conditions, the interposition of abundant soft tissue inside the enlarged medial joint space prevents spontaneous reduction or non-surgical treatment by manipulation of the dislocation. Surgical treatment is therefore compulsory. We report the clinical case of a woman who suffered a subluxation of the knee while jogging. The case we describe is of interest because it shows that even less severe knee dislocations, like this subluxation caused by a low-velocity sports trauma, may present in an irreducible form requiring open surgery. Clinical-instrumental monitoring did not reveal any signs of vascular or nerve injury. Owing to the irreducibility of the lesion we were obliged to perform open surgery in order to free the joint from the interposed muscle tissue and repair medial capsule-ligament lesions. Repair of the damaged cruciate ligaments was deferred to a second stage, but ultimately rendered necessary by the persistence of joint instability and the need to address the patient's functional needs. In the literature, different one- and two-step surgical options, performed by arthroscopy or arthrotomy, are reported for such related problems. The Authors discuss these various options and examine and discuss their own decision taken during the surgical work-up of this case. PMID:26605258

  2. Irreducible posterolateral dislocation of the knee: a case report

    PubMed Central

    SOLARINO, GIUSEPPE; NOTARNICOLA, ANGELA; MACCAGNANO, GIUSEPPE; PIAZZOLLA, ANDREA; MORETTI, BIAGIO

    2015-01-01

    Irreducible posterolateral dislocations of the knee are rare lesions, generally caused by high-energy trauma inducing rotational stress and a posterior and lateral displacement of the tibia. In these conditions, the interposition of abundant soft tissue inside the enlarged medial joint space prevents spontaneous reduction or non-surgical treatment by manipulation of the dislocation. Surgical treatment is therefore compulsory. We report the clinical case of a woman who suffered a subluxation of the knee while jogging. The case we describe is of interest because it shows that even less severe knee dislocations, like this subluxation caused by a low-velocity sports trauma, may present in an irreducible form requiring open surgery. Clinical-instrumental monitoring did not reveal any signs of vascular or nerve injury. Owing to the irreducibility of the lesion we were obliged to perform open surgery in order to free the joint from the interposed muscle tissue and repair medial capsule-ligament lesions. Repair of the damaged cruciate ligaments was deferred to a second stage, but ultimately rendered necessary by the persistence of joint instability and the need to address the patient’s functional needs. In the literature, different one- and two-step surgical options, performed by arthroscopy or arthrotomy, are reported for such related problems. The Authors discuss these various options and examine and discuss their own decision taken during the surgical work-up of this case. PMID:26605258

  3. A biomechanical approach to interpreting magnetic resonance imaging of knee injuries.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Scott E; Khurana, Bharti; Gaviola, Glenn; Davis, Kirkland W

    2014-11-01

    This article discusses common injury mechanisms and the subsequent constellation of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in the knee following trauma in the context of instability, as distinguished by the degree of knee flexion and tibial rotation at the time of initial injury, in addition to the direction and magnitude of the responsible force vectors. Using 3-dimensional imaging, common injury mechanisms are illustrated and correlated with MR imaging findings of the resulting osteochondral, ligamentous, meniscal, and musculotendinous lesions. The most common classification and grading systems for these individual lesions and their subsequent treatment implications are discussed. PMID:25442026

  4. Knee arthroplasty rating.

    PubMed

    Binazzi, R; Soudry, M; Mestriner, L A; Insall, J N

    1992-06-01

    A number of rating systems used to evaluate the results of total knee arthroplasty exist. Many of these systems are based on different concepts, and might be expected to give divergent results. To see if this was so, the authors examined a consecutive series of 235 posterior stabilized knee arthroplasties recording the results according to five rating systems: HSS (The Hospital for Special Surgery), Brigham, Freeman, BOA (British Orthopaedic Association), and the VENN diagram. In spite of their apparent differences, all point systems and the BOA gave almost identical results, while the VENN diagram proved to be the most stringent. The authors suggest that any of the current point systems may be used to "score" arthroplasties, but the results should also be rated with the VENN diagram in order to see the quality of the arthroplasty and a comparison between the different series.

  5. Selectively Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael D. (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Baker, Kevin J. (Inventor); Rice, Darron C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A knee brace for aiding in rehabilitation of damaged leg muscles includes upper and lower housings normally pivotable one relative to the other about the knee joint axis of a patient. The upper housing is attachable to the thigh of the patient above the knee joint while the lower housing is secured to a stirrup which extends downwardly along the patient's leg and is attached to the patient's shoe. An actuation rod is carried within the lower housing and is coupled to a cable. The upper and lower housings carry cooperative clutch/brake elements which normally are disengaged to permit relative movement between the upper and lower housings. When the cable is extended the clutch/brake elements engage and lock the housings together. A heel strike mechanism fastened to the stirrup and the heel of the shoe is connected to the cable to selectively extend the cable and lock the brace in substantially any position when the patient places weight on the heel.

  6. Selectively lockable knee brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Neill (Inventor); Shadoan, Mike (Inventor); Forbes, John (Inventor); Baker, Kevin (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A knee brace for aiding in rehabilitation of damaged leg muscles includes upper and lower housings, normally pivotable, one relative to the other about the knee joint axis of a patient. The upper housing is attachable to the thigh of the patient above the knee joint, while the lower housing is secured to a stirrup which extends downwardly along the patient's leg and is attached to the patient's shoe. An actuation rod is carried within the lower housing and is coupled to a cable. The upper and lower housings carry cooperative clutch/brake elements which normally are disengaged to permit relative movement between the upper and lower housings. When the cable is extended, the clutch/brake elements engage and lock the housings together. A heel strike mechanism fastened to the stirrup and the heel of the shoe is connected to the cable to selectively extend the cable and lock the brace in substantially any position when the patient places weight on the heel.

  7. Synovial plicae of the knee

    SciTech Connect

    Apple, J.S.; Martinez, S.; Daffner, R.H.; Gehweiler, J.A.; Hardaker, W.T.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the anatomy, patho-physiology, clinical, and radiographic findings, and treatment of the synovial plicae of the knee joint. The suprapatellar plica is a synovial fold present in the suprapatellar pouch of the knee joint in approximately 20% of the population. This fold may become symptomatic after injury and cause symptoms similar to other common internal derangements of the knee. Double contrast arthrography of the knee can be used to identify the presence of plicae. Although arthrography can identify the presence of a plica, its clinical significance requires close correlation with symptoms and an accurate clinical examination.

  8. Active knee joint flexibility and sports activity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, T; Foldspang, A; Vestergaard, E; Ingemann-Hansen, T

    1999-04-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate active knee flexion and active knee extension in athletes and to investigate the potential association of each to different types of sports activity. Active knee extension and active knee flexion was measured in 339 athletes. Active knee extension was significantly higher in women than in men and significantly positively associated with weekly hours of swimming and weekly hours of competitive gymnastics. Active knee flexion was significantly positively associated with participation in basketball, and significantly negatively associated with age and weekly hours of soccer, European team handball and swimming. The results point to sport-specific adaptation of active knee flexion and active knee extension.

  9. Knee closure in total knee replacement: a randomized prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Masri, B A; Laskin, R S; Windsor, R E; Haas, S B

    1996-10-01

    A randomized prospective study of 75 total knee replacements in 64 patients who were randomized to capsular closure with the knee in full extension or in flexion was done. Thirty-one knees received a posterior cruciate ligament retaining prosthesis and 44 knees received a posterior stabilized prosthesis. Preoperatively, there was no significant difference between the groups, and patients were stratified by surgeon and type of prosthesis. Postoperatively, all patients were evaluated by a physical therapist who did not know the type of prosthesis the patient received. In addition to the range of motion obtained at discharge; the number of days required to achieve unassisted transfer; the number of days required to achieve assisted and unassisted use of a walker, cane, and stairs; and the number of days to discharge from the hospital were recorded. All patients were also evaluated at 2 to 3 months postoperatively, and the Knee Society clinical rating system scores were compared. There was no statistically significant difference in any of the early rehabilitation parameters or in the 2- to 3-month followup data. Moreover, there was no statistically significant difference in the rate of complications. With stratification according to the type of prosthesis used or the surgeon performing the operation, there was still no statistically significant difference in any of the studied parameters. It was therefore concluded that the degree of knee flexion at the time of capsular closure in total knee replacement has no effect on early rehabilitation after total knee replacement.

  10. Lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Minami, Shinji; Miyake, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint is extremely rare. We describe an 11-year-old boy who complained of a gradual swelling mass of the lateral knee joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a high signal intensity tumor on T1- and T2-weighted images with a thickened septa and nodular lesion that showed low signal intensity. The radiologist suggested the possible differential diagnosis of well-differentiated liposarcoma. At operation, the tumor was found under the iliotibial tract and was not in contact with the knee joint. Histopathologically, this lesion was diagnosed as lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint. On MRI, the appearance of lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint differed from that of conventional intra-articular lipoma arborescens. In this report, we describe a case of extra-articular lipoma arborescens of the knee joint bursa and discuss the diagnosis and etiology. PMID:27382924

  11. Lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Shinji; Miyake, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint is extremely rare. We describe an 11-year-old boy who complained of a gradual swelling mass of the lateral knee joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a high signal intensity tumor on T1- and T2-weighted images with a thickened septa and nodular lesion that showed low signal intensity. The radiologist suggested the possible differential diagnosis of well-differentiated liposarcoma. At operation, the tumor was found under the iliotibial tract and was not in contact with the knee joint. Histopathologically, this lesion was diagnosed as lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint. On MRI, the appearance of lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint differed from that of conventional intra-articular lipoma arborescens. In this report, we describe a case of extra-articular lipoma arborescens of the knee joint bursa and discuss the diagnosis and etiology. PMID:27382924

  12. Exercise and the Knee Joint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    This report by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports examines the effects of various forms of physical exercise on the knee joint which, because of its vulnerability, is especially subject to injury. Discussion centers around the physical characteristics of the joint, commonly used measurements for determining knee stability,…

  13. New Generation Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A knee brace that uses Space Shuttle propulsion technology has moved a step closer to being available to help knee injury and stroke patients and may possibly benefit patients with birth defects, spinal cord injuries, and post-polio conditions. After years of hard work, inventors at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have turned over the final design and prototype to industry partners at Horton's Orthotic Lab in Little Rock, Arkansas for further clinical testing. The device, called the Selectively Lockable Knee Brace, may mean faster, less painful rehabilitation for patients by allowing the knee to move when weight is not on the heel. Devices currently on the market lock the knee in a rigid, straight-leg position, or allow continuous free motion. Pictured here is a knee brace prototype being tested and fitted at Horton's Orthotic Lab. The knee brace is just one example of how space technology is being used to improve the lives of people on Earth. NASA's MSFC inventors Michael Shadoan and Neill Myers are space propulsion engineers who use the same mechanisms and materials to build systems for rockets that they used to design and develop the knee brace.

  14. Automatic locking orthotic knee device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An articulated tang in clevis joint for incorporation in newly manufactured conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices or for replacing such joints in conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices is discussed. The instant tang in clevis joint allows the user the freedom to extend and bend the knee normally when no load (weight) is applied to the knee and to automatically lock the knee when the user transfers weight to the knee, thus preventing a damaged knee from bending uncontrollably when weight is applied to the knee. The tang in clevis joint of the present invention includes first and second clevis plates, a tang assembly and a spacer plate secured between the clevis plates. Each clevis plate includes a bevelled serrated upper section. A bevelled shoe is secured to the tank in close proximity to the bevelled serrated upper section of the clevis plates. A coiled spring mounted within an oblong bore of the tang normally urges the shoes secured to the tang out of engagement with the serrated upper section of each clevic plate to allow rotation of the tang relative to the clevis plate. When weight is applied to the joint, the load compresses the coiled spring, the serrations on each clevis plate dig into the bevelled shoes secured to the tang to prevent relative movement between the tang and clevis plates. A shoulder is provided on the tang and the spacer plate to prevent overextension of the joint.

  15. [Elevated gastric lesions].

    PubMed

    de Careaga, B; Villagómez, G; Pabón, J; Calderón, O; Elío, D; Pérez, J; Martínez, M; Patiño, F; Ponce, R; Lora, J

    1986-01-01

    Elevated gastric lesions, represent an important group among gastric pathology. To establish its incidence in our experience, we studied the endoscopic reports of two important hospitals in La Paz city: Instituto de Gastroenterología Boliviano Japonés and Hospital Obrero No. 1. In order to make a good endoscopic diagnosis among different elevated lesions we use some parameters like: location, shape, size, diameter, surface of the lesion and surrounding mucosa and characteristics of the falls. 10.472 endoscopic reports were reviewed, 497 elevated gastric lesions were found, 475 corresponded to mucosal lesions (352 benign lesions and 123 malignant lesions), 11 to submucosal and 11 extragastric lesions.

  16. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  1. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  2. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) § 572.176 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) The knee assembly for the purpose of this test is the part of the leg assembly shown in drawing...

  3. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  4. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  5. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  6. Prosthetic knee design by simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K; Hollister, A

    1999-07-30

    Although 150,000 total knee replacement surgeries are performed annually in North America, current designs of knee prostheses have mechanical problems that include a limited range of motion, abnormal gait patterns, patellofemoral joint dysfunction, implant loosening or subsidence, and excessive wear. These problems fall into three categories: failure to reproduce normal joint kinematics, which results in altered limb function; bone-implant interface failure; and material failure. Modern computer technology can be used to design, prototype, and test new total knee implants. The design team uses the full range of CAD-CAM to design and produce implant prototypes for mechanical and clinical testing. Closer approximation of natural knee kinematics and kinetics is essential for improved patient function and diminished implant loads. Current knee replacement designs are based on 19th Century theories that the knee moves about a variable axis of rotation. Recent research has shown, however, that knee motion occurs about two fixed, offset axes of rotation. These aces are not perpendicular to the long axes of the bones or to each other, and the axes do not intersect. Bearing surfaces of mechanisms that move about axes of rotation are surfaces of revolution of those axes which advanced CAD technology can produce. Solids with surfaces of revolution for the two axes of rotation for the knee have been made using an HP9000 workstation and Structural Ideas Master Series CAD software at ArthroMotion. The implant's CAD model should closely replicate movements of the normal knee. The knee model will have a range of flexion-extension (FE) from -5 to 120 degrees. Movements include varus, valgus, internal and external rotation, as well as flexion and extension. The patellofemoral joint is aligned perpendicular to the FE axis and replicates the natural joint more closely than those of existing prostheses. The bearing surfaces will be more congruent than current designs and should

  7. A Cohort Study on Meniscal Lesions among Airport Baggage Handlers.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Brauer, Charlotte; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker; Alkjær, Tine; Koblauch, Henrik; Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Helweg-Larsen, Karin; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal lesions are common and may contribute to the development of knee arthrosis. A few case-control and cross-sectional studies have identified knee-straining work as risk factors for meniscal lesions, but exposure-response relations and the role of specific exposures are uncertain, and previous results may be sensitive to reporting and selection bias. We examined the relation between meniscal lesions and cumulative exposure to heavy lifting in a prospective register-based study with complete follow-up and independent information on exposure and outcome. We established a cohort of unskilled men employed at Copenhagen Airport or in other companies in the metropolitan Copenhagen area from 1990 to 2012 (the Copenhagen Airport Cohort). The cohort at risk included 3,307 airport baggage handlers with heavy lifting and kneeling or squatting work tasks and 63,934 referents with a similar socioeconomic background and less knee-straining work. Baggage handlers lifted suitcases with an average weight of approximately 15 kg, in total approximately five tonnes during a 9-hour workday. The cohort was followed in the National Patient Register and Civil Registration System. The outcome was a first time hospital diagnosis or surgery of a meniscal lesion. Baggage handlers had a higher incidence of meniscal lesions than the referents. Within baggage handlers spline regression showed that the incidence rate ratio was 1.91 (95% confidence interval: 1.29-2.84) after five years as a baggage handler and then decreased slowly to reach unity after approximately 30 years, adjusted for effects of potential confounders. This relation between baggage handling and meniscal lesions was present for work on the apron which involves lifting in a kneeling or squatting position, but not in the baggage hall, which only involves lifting in standing positions. The results support that long-term heavy lifting in a kneeling or squatting position is a risk factor for the development of symptomatic

  8. A Cohort Study on Meniscal Lesions among Airport Baggage Handlers

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Brauer, Charlotte; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker; Alkjær, Tine; Koblauch, Henrik; Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Helweg-Larsen, Karin; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal lesions are common and may contribute to the development of knee arthrosis. A few case-control and cross-sectional studies have identified knee-straining work as risk factors for meniscal lesions, but exposure-response relations and the role of specific exposures are uncertain, and previous results may be sensitive to reporting and selection bias. We examined the relation between meniscal lesions and cumulative exposure to heavy lifting in a prospective register-based study with complete follow-up and independent information on exposure and outcome. We established a cohort of unskilled men employed at Copenhagen Airport or in other companies in the metropolitan Copenhagen area from 1990 to 2012 (the Copenhagen Airport Cohort). The cohort at risk included 3,307 airport baggage handlers with heavy lifting and kneeling or squatting work tasks and 63,934 referents with a similar socioeconomic background and less knee-straining work. Baggage handlers lifted suitcases with an average weight of approximately 15 kg, in total approximately five tonnes during a 9-hour workday. The cohort was followed in the National Patient Register and Civil Registration System. The outcome was a first time hospital diagnosis or surgery of a meniscal lesion. Baggage handlers had a higher incidence of meniscal lesions than the referents. Within baggage handlers spline regression showed that the incidence rate ratio was 1.91 (95% confidence interval: 1.29–2.84) after five years as a baggage handler and then decreased slowly to reach unity after approximately 30 years, adjusted for effects of potential confounders. This relation between baggage handling and meniscal lesions was present for work on the apron which involves lifting in a kneeling or squatting position, but not in the baggage hall, which only involves lifting in standing positions. The results support that long-term heavy lifting in a kneeling or squatting position is a risk factor for the development of symptomatic

  9. A Cohort Study on Meniscal Lesions among Airport Baggage Handlers.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Brauer, Charlotte; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker; Alkjær, Tine; Koblauch, Henrik; Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Helweg-Larsen, Karin; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal lesions are common and may contribute to the development of knee arthrosis. A few case-control and cross-sectional studies have identified knee-straining work as risk factors for meniscal lesions, but exposure-response relations and the role of specific exposures are uncertain, and previous results may be sensitive to reporting and selection bias. We examined the relation between meniscal lesions and cumulative exposure to heavy lifting in a prospective register-based study with complete follow-up and independent information on exposure and outcome. We established a cohort of unskilled men employed at Copenhagen Airport or in other companies in the metropolitan Copenhagen area from 1990 to 2012 (the Copenhagen Airport Cohort). The cohort at risk included 3,307 airport baggage handlers with heavy lifting and kneeling or squatting work tasks and 63,934 referents with a similar socioeconomic background and less knee-straining work. Baggage handlers lifted suitcases with an average weight of approximately 15 kg, in total approximately five tonnes during a 9-hour workday. The cohort was followed in the National Patient Register and Civil Registration System. The outcome was a first time hospital diagnosis or surgery of a meniscal lesion. Baggage handlers had a higher incidence of meniscal lesions than the referents. Within baggage handlers spline regression showed that the incidence rate ratio was 1.91 (95% confidence interval: 1.29-2.84) after five years as a baggage handler and then decreased slowly to reach unity after approximately 30 years, adjusted for effects of potential confounders. This relation between baggage handling and meniscal lesions was present for work on the apron which involves lifting in a kneeling or squatting position, but not in the baggage hall, which only involves lifting in standing positions. The results support that long-term heavy lifting in a kneeling or squatting position is a risk factor for the development of symptomatic

  10. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D. W.; Liddle, A. D.; Dodd, C. A. F.; Pandit, H.

    2015-01-01

    There is a large amount of evidence available about the relative merits of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty (UKA and TKA). Based on the same evidence, different people draw different conclusions and as a result, there is great variability in the usage of UKA. The revision rate of UKA is much higher than TKA and so some surgeons conclude that UKA should not be performed. Other surgeons believe that the main reason for the high revision rate is that UKA is easy to revise and, therefore, the threshold for revision is low. They also believe that UKA has many advantages over TKA such as a faster recovery, lower morbidity and mortality and better function. They therefore conclude that UKA should be undertaken whenever appropriate. The solution to this argument is to minimise the revision rate of UKA, thereby addressing the main disadvantage of UKA. The evidence suggests that this will be achieved if surgeons use UKA for at least 20% of their knee arthroplasties and use implants that are appropriate for these broad indications. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B(10 Suppl A):3–8. PMID:26430080

  11. Exercise for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Baker, K; McAlindon, T

    2000-09-01

    Adverse outcomes in knee osteoarthritis include pain, loss of function, and disability. These outcomes can have devastating effects on the quality of life of those suffering from the disease. Treatments have generally targeted pain, assuming that disability would improve as a direct result of improvements in pain. However, there is evidence to suggest that determinants of pain and disability differ. In general, treatments have been more successful at decreasing pain rather than disability. Many of the factors that lead to disability can be improved with exercise. Exercise, both aerobic and strength training, have been examined as treatments for knee osteoarthritis, with considerable variability in the results. The variability between studies may be due to differences in study design, exercise protocols, and participants in the studies. Although there is variability among studies, it is notable that a majority of the studies had a positive effect on pain and or disability. The mechanism of exercise remains unclear and merits future studies to better define a concise, clear exercise protocol that may have the potential for a public health intervention.

  12. Anatomy and physical examination of the knee menisci: a narrative review of the orthopedic literature

    PubMed Central

    Chivers, Michael D.; Howitt, Scott D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to review the physical examination tests available to a practitioner in order to arrive at a clinical diagnosis or suspicion of a meniscal lesion. Background: The menisci transmit weight bearing forces and increase stability of the knee. The menisci also facilitate nutrition, provide lubrication and shock absorption for the articular cartilage and promote knee proprioception. The combinations of torsional and axial loading appear to be the cause of most meniscal injuries. Diagnosis of acute knee injuries has long been a topic for discussion throughout the orthopedic literature. Many clinical tests and diagnostic studies have been developed to increase the clinician’s ability to accurately diagnose these types of disorders of the knee. Conclusion: The accuracy of all diagnostic tests is thought to be dependant upon the skill of the examiner, and the severity and location of the injury. The multitude of tests described to assess meniscal lesions suggests that none are consistently reliable. However, recent research has focused on a composite score to accurately predict meniscus lesions. The combination of a comprehensive history, multiple physical tests and diagnostic imaging for confirmation is typical for a clinical meniscal lesion diagnosis while the gold standard remains the arthroscopic procedure itself. PMID:20037697

  13. New Generation Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A knee brace that uses Space Shuttle propulsion technology has moved a step closer to being available to help knee injury and stroke patients and may possibly benefit patients with birth defects, spinal cord injuries, and post-polio conditions. After years of hard work, inventors at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have turned over the final design and prototype to industry partners at Horton's Orthotic Lab in Little Rock, Arkansas for further clinical testing. The device, called the Selectively Lockable Knee Brace, may mean faster, less painful rehabilitation for patients by allowing the knee to move when weight is not on the heel. Devices currently on the market lock the knee in a rigid, straight-leg position, or allow continuous free motion. The knee brace is just one example of how space technology is being used to improve the lives of people on Earth. NASA's MSFC inventors Michael Shadoan and Neill Myers are space propulsion engineers who use the same mechanisms and materials to build systems for rockets that they used to design and develop the knee brace.

  14. Physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Page, Carolyn J; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-05-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic joint disease causing pain and disability. Physiotherapy, which encompasses a number of modalities, is a non-invasive treatment option in the management of OA. This review summarizes the evidence for commonly used physiotherapy interventions. There is strong evidence to show short-term beneficial effects of exercise on pain and function, although the type of exercise does not seem to influence treatment outcome. Delivery modes, including individual, group or home exercise are all effective, although therapist contact may improve benefits. Attention to improving adherence to exercise is needed to maximize outcomes in the longer-term. Knee taping applied with the aim of realigning the patella and unloading soft tissues can reduce pain. There is also evidence to support the use of knee braces in people with knee OA. Biomechanical studies show that lateral wedge shoe insoles reduce knee load but clinical trials do not support symptomatic benefits. Recent studies suggest individual shoe characteristics also affect knee load and there is current interest in the effect of modified shoe designs. Manual therapy, while not to be used as a stand-alone treatment, may be beneficial. In summary, although the research is not equivocal, there is sufficient evidence to indicate that physiotherapy interventions can reduce pain and improve function in those with knee OA.

  15. Acute and old ruptures of the extensor apparatus of the knee in adults (excluding knee replacement).

    PubMed

    Saragaglia, D; Pison, A; Rubens-Duval, B

    2013-02-01

    Rupture of the extensor apparatus of the knee in adults is infrequent and dominated by patellar fracture, which in our experience is six times as frequent as quadriceps or patellar tendon tear. Patellar fracture poses few diagnostic problems and treatment is now well codified. Tension-band osteosynthesis is generally used, involving two longitudinal K-wires and wire in a figure-of-eight pattern looped over the anterior patella; sometimes, for more complex fractures, cerclage wiring is added to the tension band. Non-union is rare and generally well tolerated. Quadriceps tendon tear mainly affects patients over 40 years of age, in a context of systemic disease. Diagnosis is easily suggested by inability to actively extend the knee, but is unfortunately still often overlooked in emergency. In most cases, early surgical management is needed to reinsert the tendon at the proximal pole of the patella by bone suture. For chronic lesions, it is often necessary to lengthen the quadriceps tendon by V-Y plasty or the Codivilla technique. Patellar tendon tear, on the other hand, typically occurs in patients under 40 years of age, often involved in sports. Diagnosis is again clinically straightforward, but again may be missed in emergency, especially in case of incomplete tear. Surgery is mandatory in all cases. The procedure depends on the type of lesion: either end-to-end suture or transosseous reinsertion. In most cases repair is protected by tendon augmentation. Old lesions often require tendon graft or a tendon-bone-tendon-bone graft taken from the opposite side.

  16. Determinants of pain in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Behzad; Hajian-Tilaki, Karimollah; Babaei, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several factors are associated with the development or exacerbation of pain in knee osteoarthritis (KOA). In this study, we reviewed this context based on relevant studies. Methods: Recent published studies which have addressed the relationship between pain and KOA were summarized. Results: Correlates of the clinical, demographic features, laboratory tests and abnormalities on radiographic as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the knee pain have been discussed. The results indicated that many factors such as synovitis, synovial effusion, obesity, as well as structural lesions determined by MRI or radiographic examination, serum cytokines, inflammatory markers are determinants of pain in KOA. Conclusion: This context requires further investigations for identification of additional factors which initiate pain in asymptomatic KOA PMID:27757198

  17. Study of Imaging Pattern in Bone Marrow Oedema in MRI in Recent Knee Injuries and its Correlation with Type of Knee Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Kulamani; Saha, Pramod; Dodia, Jainesh Valjibhai; Raj, Vinay Rajappa; Bhairagond, Shweta Jagadish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The knee is a major weight bearing joint that provides mobility and stability during physical activity as well as balance while standing. If the knee is exposed to forces beyond its physiologic range, risk of injury to bone or soft tissue structures increases. A thorough understanding of knee injury patterns and their mechanisms may help in achieving more accurate assessment of injuries. Aim To identify imaging pattern in bone marrow oedema and to correlate the pattern of bone marrow oedema retrospectively with type of knee injury from clinical history. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was done on all patients referred to Krishna Hospital, Karad for MRI knee with history of recent (< 6 weeks) knee injury. Study was conducted between May 2014 to September 2015 with a sample size of 200 patients. Plain radiograph of knee was done in all patients and they were scanned using 1.5 Tesla Seimens Avanto (Tim + Dot) with Tx/Rx 15 channel knee coil # Tim. Results Among the 200 cases, bone marrow contusion was noted in 138 cases (69%) and absent contusion in 62 cases (31%). Bone marrow contusion showed five patterns (according to Sanders classification) i.e., Clip injury in 39 cases (28.3%), Pivot shift injury in 78 cases (56.5%), Dashboard injury in eight cases (5.8%), Hyperextension injury in four cases (2.9%), Lateral patellar dislocation in three cases (2.2%). In six cases (4.3%) no pattern of bone marrow contusion could be explained and was categorized as unclassified pattern. Conclusion Pivot shift pattern is most common contusion pattern and the most common type/mode of sports related injury. By analysing bone marrow contusion pattern, type/mode can be determined in most of the cases. By applying a biomechanical approach in MR interpretation, it is possible to detect lesions like ligament rupture and osseous contusion, to predict subtle but it might overlook important abnormalities. PMID:27190914

  18. Arthroscopic treatment of patients with moderate arthrofibrosis after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Jerosch, Joerg; Aldawoudy, Akram M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the effect of arthroscopic management in patients with knee stiffness after total knee replacement. We present a case series study, in which 32 patients have been treated for moderate arthrofibrosis of the knee after total knee replacement, with the same regimen. We have excluded all cases of stiffness, because of infection, mechanical mal-alignment, loosening of the implants and other obvious reasons of stiffness of the knee, rather than pure arthrofibrosis. All patients first underwent a trial of conservative treatment before going for arthroscopic management. A pain catheter for femoral nerve block was inserted just before anesthesia for post-operative pain management. Arthroscopic arthrolysis of the intra-articular pathology was performed in a standardized technique with release of all fibrous bands in the suprapatellar pouch, reestablishing the medial and lateral gutter, release of the patella, resection of the remaining meniscal tissue or an anterior cyclops, if needed. Intensive physiotherapy and continuous passive motion were to start immediately post-operatively. All the patients were available for the follow up and they were evaluated using the knee society rating system. A total of 25 of the 32 procedures resulted in an improvement of the patients knee score. All the knees operated upon had intra-articular fibrous bands, hypertrophic synovitis and peri-patellar adhesions. A total of eight patients suffered from an anterior cyclops lesion and six patients showed pseudomenicus. In 19 cases a medial and lateral relapse of the patella was performed; only 5 patients got an isolated lateral release. The mean knee flexion was 119 degrees (100-130) at the end of arthroscopy and was 97 degrees (75-115) at the last follow up. The eight patients with extension lags decreased from 27 degrees (10 degrees-35 degrees) pre-operatively to 4 degrees (0-10) at time of follow up. The average knee society ratings increased from 70

  19. Giant intraosseous cyst-like lesions in rheumatoid arthritis report of a case.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Anne; Carbillet, Jean-Pierre; Onimus, Michel; Stevenel, Françoise; Toussirot, Eric; Wendling, Daniel

    2003-02-01

    The term "intraosseous synovial cyst" is used to designate both the epiphyseal cyst-like lesions seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and mucoid cysts, which occur in a different setting. We report the case of a patient in whom a 4-cm cyst-like lesion developed in the left tibia 18 years after onset of RA and 6 years after osmic acid synovectomy of the left knee. Positive contrast arthrography and magnetic resonance imaging visualized a communication between the lesion and the joint space. Preexisting bone and joint lesions and increased intraarticular pressure play a major role in the genesis of cyst-like lesions in RA. In our patient, the osmic acid synovectomy may have contributed to the development of the lesion. "Synovial cyst" is a misnomer for these giant lesions, which are geodes rather than cysts. Despite their low incidence, these lesions deserve attention because they raise diagnostic and therapeutic problems.

  20. Posterolateral knee reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Djian, P

    2015-02-01

    Injury to the cruciate ligaments of the knee commonly occurs in association with posterolateral instability, which can cause severe functional disability including varus, posterior translation, and external rotational instability. Failure to diagnose and treat an injury of the posterolateral corner in a patient who has a tear of the cruciate ligament can also result in the failure of the reconstructed cruciate ligament. There seems to be a consensus of opinion that injury to the posterolateral corner, whether isolated or combined, is best treated by reconstructing the posterolateral corner along with the coexisting cruciate ligament injury, if combined. Commonly proposed methods of reconstructing the posterolateral corner have focused on the reconstruction of the popliteus, the popliteofibular ligament, and the lateral collateral ligament. The aim of this conference is to describe the posterolateral corner reconstruction technique and to provide an algorithm of treatment. PMID:25596981

  1. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  2. Knee injuries in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, M R; Ireland, M L

    1995-04-01

    Female athletes are at increased risk for certain sports-related injuries, particularly those involving the knee. Factors that contribute to this increased risk are the differences in sports undertaken and in gender anatomy and structure. Gender differences include baseline level of conditioning, lower extremity alignment, physiological laxity, pelvis width, tibial rotation and foot alignment. Sports like gymnastics and cheerleading create a noncontact environment, but can result in significant knee injuries. In quick stopping and cutting sports, females have an increased incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury by noncontact mechanisms. Patellofemoral (PF) disorders are also very common in female athletes. Awareness of these facts helps the sports medicine professional make an accurate diagnosis and institute earlier treatment-focused rehabilitation with or without surgery. Further prospective and retrospective research is needed in areas of epidemiology, mechanisms, severity and types of knee injuries. The goal is to lessen the severity of certain knee injuries and to prevent others. PMID:7604201

  3. Knee Brace Would Lock And Unlock Automatically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Neill; Forbes, John; Shadoan, Mike; Baker, Kevin

    1995-01-01

    Proposed knee brace designed to aid rehabilitation of person who suffered some muscle damage in leg. Not limited to locking in straight-leg position and, instead, locks at any bend angle. Does not prevent knee from bearing weight. Instead, knee brace allows knee to bear weight and locks only when foot and lower leg bear weight. Thus, brace prevents flexion that wearer desired to prevent but could not prevent because of weakened muscles. Knee bends freely to exercise knee-related muscles. Knee brace strapped at upper end to leg above knee, and anchored at lower end by stirrup under foot. Joint mechanism (identical mechanisms used in left and right assemblies) allows knee joint to flex freely except when weight applied to heel.

  4. Analysis of Joint Sounds in the Diagnosis of Knee Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-22

    Healthy Patients; No Knee Complaints; No Knee Injuries; No Knee Surgeries; No Neurological Problems; Patients Undergoing Knee Arthroscopy, Who Has a Pre-op MRI; Age Groups of 20,40 and 60 Years of Age.

  5. Do Knee Moments Normalized to Measures of Knee Cartilage Area Better Classify the Severity of Knee Osteoarthritis?

    PubMed

    Brisson, Nicholas M; Stratford, Paul W; Totterman, Saara; Tamez-Peña, José G; Beattie, Karen A; Adachi, Jonathan D; Maly, Monica R

    2015-12-01

    Investigations of joint loading in knee osteoarthritis (OA) typically normalize the knee adduction moment to global measures of body size (eg, body mass, height) to allow comparison between individuals. However, such measurements may not reflect knee size. This study used a morphometric measurement of the cartilage surface area on the medial tibial plateau, which better represents medial knee size. This study aimed to determine whether normalizing the peak knee adduction moment and knee adduction moment impulse during gait to the medial tibial bone-cartilage interface could classify radiographic knee OA severity more accurately than traditional normalization techniques. Individuals with mild (N = 22) and severe (N = 17) radiographic knee OA participated. The medial tibial bone-cartilage interface was quantified from magnetic resonance imaging scans. Gait analysis was performed, and the peak knee adduction moment and knee adduction moment impulse were calculated in nonnormalized units and normalized to body mass, body weight × height, and the medial tibial bone-cartilage interface. Receiver operating characteristic curves compared the ability of each knee adduction moment normalization technique to classify participants according to radiographic disease severity. No normalization technique was superior at distinguishing between OA severities. Knee adduction moments normalized to medial knee size were not more sensitive to OA severity.

  6. The natural history of the anterior knee instability by stress radiography

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende, Márcia Uchôa; Hernandez, Arnaldo José; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the anteroposterior displacement of the knee by means of stress radiography in individuals with unilateral anterior knee instability and relate to time of instability. METHODS: Sixty individuals with intact knees (control group) and 125 patients with unilateral anterior instability (AI group) agreed to participate in the study. Gender, age, weight, height, age at injury, time between injury and testing, and surgical findings are studied. Both groups are submitted to anterior and posterior stress radiographies of both knees. Anterior (ADD) and posterior displacement difference (PDD) were calculated between sides. RESULTS: In the control group ADD and PDD are in average, zero, whereas in the AI group ADD averaged 9.8mm and PDD, 1.92mm. Gender, age, weight, height, age at trauma and presence of menisci's lesions do not intervene in the values of ADD and PDD. Meniscal injuries increase with time. ADD and PDD do not relate with the presence or absence of associated menisci's lesions. The ADD and the PDD are related to each other and increase with time. CONCLUSION: There is a permanent anterior subluxation of the injured knee that is related to the amount of anterior displacement that increases with time. Level of Evidence III, Study Types Case-control study. PMID:25246846

  7. Benign breast lesions: Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Masciadri, N.; Ferranti, C.

    2011-01-01

    Benign breast diseases constitute a heterogeneous group of lesions arising in the mammary epithelium or in other mammary tissues, and they may also be linked to vascular, inflammatory or traumatic pathologies. Most lesions found in women consulting a physician are benign. Ultrasound (US) diagnostic criteria indicating a benign lesion are described as well as US findings in the most frequent benign breast lesions. PMID:23396888

  8. [Ski shoe versus knee joint--3: Risk for falling backward].

    PubMed

    Schaff, P; Hauser, W

    1990-12-01

    In contrast to the drop in the incidence of fractures of the lower leg that has been observed in recent years, the incidence of knee injuries has not decreased in skiing. There has even been a relative increase of severe knee lesions and isolated ACL ruptures, prompting us to conduct a comprehensive study of the causes of this phenomena. The goal of the study was to develop a new measuring device for alpine skiing research by combining motion analysis, pressure and force measurement, comprehensive examine the forward/backward movement in skiboots in the lab and by means of telemetry on the slope (Skiboot versus knee joint part 1/Sportverlerletzung. Sportschaden 3, 1989, pp. 149-161) and to come up with a proposal for a new safety concept to reduce the high number of knee injuries in alpine skiing in the future. The first study was devoted to the forward movement in skiboots (Skiboot versus knee joint part 2/Sportverletzung. Sportschaden 4, 1990, pp. 1-13). The results showed that a skiing style in backward lean position was adopted by skiers wearing boots with a stiff forward flexion and was supported by the fixed backward spoiler. In order to quantify the influence of the backward spoiler a special skiboot was constructed allowing the rear spoiler to give way at a variable, defined stiffness and register the angular displacement and horizontal force Fh. The results showed most clearly that even a medium rear spoiler resistance will sign, reduce the peak force values by a factor of 5.5. The acceleration at the knee joint level is significantly higher (factor 1.6, p less than 0.05) in case of a rigid spoiler. The lab tests could be confirmed on the slope (sign. reduction of max. force by factor 8). It also proved that normal skiing can be performed in such a boot without limitations. In consideration of our facts it is concluded that the principle of safety bindings must definitely apply in future in equal measure also to the ski boot. As a proposal for future

  9. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  10. Example Based Lesion Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2016-01-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer’s disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  11. Association of physical activity measured by accelerometer, knee joint abnormalities and cartilage T2-measurements obtained from 3T MRI: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, M.; Lin, W.; Nardo, L.; Joseph, G. B.; Dunlop, D. D.; Heilmeier, U.; Nevitt, M. C.; Alizai, H.; McCulloch, C. E.; Lynch, J. A.; Link, T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the cross-sectional association between physical activity measured with an accelerometer, structural knee abnormalities and cartilage T2-values assessed with 3T MRI. Methods We included 274 subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative cohort without definite radiographic osteoarthritis (KL 0 and 1) and at most mild pain, stiffness and functional limitation in the study knee (WOMAC 0–1), which had not limited their activity due to knee pain. Physical activity was measured over seven days with an ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer. Subjects were categorized by quartile of physical activity based on the average daily minutes of moderate/vigorous activity (mv-PA). MR images of the right knee (at 48-months visit) were assessed for structural abnormalities using a modified WORMS score and for T2-relaxation times derived from segmented cartilage of 4 femorotibial regions and the patella. WORMS-grades and T2-measurements were compared between activity quartiles using a linear regression model. Covariates included age, sex, BMI, knee injury, family history of knee replacement, knee symptoms, hip and ankle pain and daily wear time of the accelerometer. Results Higher mv-PA was associated with increased severity (p=0.0087) and number of lesions of the medial meniscus (p=0.0089) and severity of bone marrow edema lesions (p=0.0053). No association between cartilage lesions and mv-PA was found. T2-values of cartilage (loss, damage, abnormalities) tended to be greater in the higher quartiles of mv-PA, but the differences were non-significant. Conclusion In knees without radiographic osteoarthritis in subjects with no or mild knee pain, higher physical activity levels were associated with increases in meniscal and BMEP lesions. PMID:25777255

  12. Atypical location of an osteoid osteoma with atypical anterior knee pain

    PubMed Central

    Harun, Mutlu; Hayrettin, Yaldız; Serhat, Mutlu; Engin, Cetinkaya; Kamil, Cepni; Armagan, Arslan; Sancar, Parmaksızoglu Atilla

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION An osteoid osteoma is a painful tumor that most commonly affects the extra-articular parts of the long bones. An intra-articular location of an osteoid osteoma is rare. Various differential diagnoses may arise in connection with such an unusual location because it causes atypical clinical signs. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 24-year-old male developed pain in the central region of the right knee. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no clear pathology in the knee joint. A technetium bone scan and computed tomography (CT) were then ordered and confirmed the presence of an osteoid osteoma in the knee joint. The patient was treated through an anteromedial approach to the knee, and the lesion was removed by excisional biopsy under fluoroscopy. DISCUSSION The diagnosis of intra-articular osteoid osteoma is challenging because the clinical presentation can be misleading. MRI is often requested as the first imaging method when dealing with knee symptoms, and radiologists are often unaware of the clinical presentation. Edema seen on MRI can be misleading with respect to the location of the nidus. CT is considered to be the best imaging method because it usually allows for clear visualization of the nidus. Different treatments have been proposed, ranging from open excision to arthroscopic resection. CONCLUSION Osteoid osteoma should be considered in young adult patients with chronic knee pain and no history of trauma. PMID:25462055

  13. Knee arthroscopy after yttrium or osmic acid injection

    SciTech Connect

    Guaydier-Souquieres, C.; Beguin, J.; Ollivier, D.; Loyau, G.

    1989-01-01

    This study presents the macroscopic and histologic results of 35 knee arthroscopies performed on patients with rheumatoid arthritis, some months after an yttrium or osmic acid intraarticular injection. The procedure was most often performed after a failure of the injection or a relapse of synovitis. Arthroscopy provides an understanding of the cause of synoviorthesis failure--insufficient action of the product on the synovitis or its poor diffusion, fibri-nonecrotic deposits, or cartilaginous lesions--and may be used both diagnostically and therapeutically.

  14. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.166... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  15. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test...

  16. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Six-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a)...

  17. Comparison of knee gait kinematics of workers exposed to knee straining posture to those of non-knee straining workers.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathaly; Hagemeister, Nicola; Poitras, Stéphane; de Guise, Jacques A

    2013-06-01

    Workers exposed to knee straining postures, such as kneeling and squatting, may present modifications in knee gait kinematics that can make them vulnerable to osteoarthritis. In this study, knee kinematics of workers exposed to occupational knee straining postures (KS workers) were compared to those of non-knee straining (non-KS) workers. Eighteen KS workers and 20 non-KS workers participated in the study. Three-dimensional gait kinematic data were recorded at the knee using an electromagnetic motion tracking system. The following parameters were extracted from flexion/extension, adduction/abduction and internal/external rotation angle data and used for group comparisons: knee angle at initial foot contact, peak angles, minimal angles and angle range during the entire gait cycle. Group comparisons were performed with Student t-tests. In the sagittal plane, KS workers had a greater knee flexion angle at initial foot contact, a lower peak knee flexion angle during the swing phase and a lower angle range than non-KS workers (p<0.05). In the frontal plane, all parameters indicated that KS workers had their knees more adducted than non-KS workers. External/internal rotation range was greater for KS workers. This study provides new knowledge on work related to KS postures and knee kinematics. The results support the concept that KS workers might exhibit knee kinematics that are different from those of non-KS workers.

  18. Predicting Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Woodhouse, Francis G; Besier, Thor F; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Lloyd, David G; Zhang, Lihai; Smith, David W

    2016-01-01

    Treatment options for osteoarthritis (OA) beyond pain relief or total knee replacement are very limited. Because of this, attention has shifted to identifying which factors increase the risk of OA in vulnerable populations in order to be able to give recommendations to delay disease onset or to slow disease progression. The gold standard is then to use principles of risk management, first to provide subject-specific estimates of risk and then to find ways of reducing that risk. Population studies of OA risk based on statistical associations do not provide such individually tailored information. Here we argue that mechanistic models of cartilage tissue maintenance and damage coupled to statistical models incorporating model uncertainty, united within the framework of structural reliability analysis, provide an avenue for bridging the disciplines of epidemiology, cell biology, genetics and biomechanics. Such models promise subject-specific OA risk assessment and personalized strategies for mitigating or even avoiding OA. We illustrate the proposed approach with a simple model of cartilage extracellular matrix synthesis and loss regulated by daily physical activity. PMID:26206679

  19. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance

    PubMed Central

    D’Lima, Darryl D.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  20. Congenital dislocation of the knee.

    PubMed

    Ko, J Y; Shih, C H; Wenger, D R

    1999-01-01

    Between February 1988 and June 1995, 24 congenital dislocations of the knee joints (17 patients) were reduced with closed methods including immediate reduction, serial casting, or traction in patients from 10 min to 26 days old. At an average follow-up of 4 years and 10 months, an excellent or good result was achieved if there were no associated anomalies. Fair or poor results were the result of delayed treatment or associated musculoskeletal anomalies including arthrogryposis multiplex congenita or Larsen's syndrome. Routine check of the hip dislocation is suggested. Diagnosis with manual testing was difficult, and other methods such as radiography or sonography were suggested in combination to detect hip dysplasia. The dislocated knee should be reduced before treating the hip dislocation. Concomitant treatment of the congenital dislocation of the knee and the hip with Pavlik harness provided satisfactory results. When late, progressive, genu valgus deformity occurred because of global instability of the knee and asymmetric physeal growth, reconstruction of the medial structures of the knee and prolonged bracing provided good results. PMID:10088699

  1. TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT IN PATIENTS WITH BELOW-KNEE AMPUTATION

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Matthew D; Willey, Michael; Shurr, Donald G

    2010-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is reserved for patients with severe and disabling arthritis that is non-responsive to conservative measures. Based on existing data, total knee replacement is a safe and cost-effective treatment for alleviating pain and improving physical function in patients who do not respond to conservative therapy. Despite the large variation in health status of patients and types of prosthesis implanted, total knee replacement has proven to be a relatively low risk and successful operation. Each year in the United States surgeons perform approximately 300,000 TKR.1 Likewise, lower extremity amputation is commonly performed in the United States with an annual incidence of 110,000 per year.2 Nearly 70% of all lower extremity amputations are performed as the result of chronic vascular disease, followed by trauma (22%), congenital etiology and tumor (4% each).3 Approximately 50% of all lower extremity amputations are performed secondary to complications from Diabetes Mellitus. Norvell et al. demonstrated that patients who have previously undergone transtibial amputation and ambulate with a prosthesis are more likely to develop degenerative joint disease in the con-tralateral extremity than the ipsilateral extremity.4 Further, radiographic changes consistent with osteoporosis have been demonstrated in up to 88% of limbs that have undergone transtibial amputation.8 To our knowledge, there have been only three reported cases of total knee replacement in patients with ipsilateral transtibial amputation.5,7 The purpose of the present study is to review the existing data on total knee replacement in patients who have undergone transtibial amputation. Further we present a patient with a transtibial amputation who underwent contralateral total knee replacement. PMID:21045987

  2. Snapping knee caused by symptomatic fabella in a native knee.

    PubMed

    Hire, Justin M; Oliver, David L; Hubbard, Ryan C; Fontaine, Michelle L; Bojescul, John A

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of a 31-year-old man with a 5-year history of snapping knee syndrome secondary to a single, large symptomatic fabella of the knee. On physical examination, the patient was able to reproduce an audible and palpable snapping with active range of motion. His condition was refractory to physical therapy. He had undergone a prior iliotibial band release at an outside facility. After excision of the fabella, measuring 15 × 8 × 9 mm, the patient's snapping and pain with activity were resolved.

  3. Self-reported previous knee injury and low knee function increase knee injury risk in adolescent female football.

    PubMed

    Clausen, M B; Tang, L; Zebis, M K; Krustrup, P; Hölmich, P; Wedderkopp, N; Andersen, L L; Christensen, K B; Møller, M; Thorborg, K

    2016-08-01

    Knee injuries are common in adolescent female football. Self-reported previous knee injury and low Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) are proposed to predict future knee injuries, but evidence regarding this in adolescent female football is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale score as risk factors for future knee injuries in adolescent female football. A sample of 326 adolescent female football players, aged 15-18, without knee injury at baseline, were included. Data on self-reported previous knee injury and KOOS questionnaires were collected at baseline. Time-loss knee injuries and football exposures were reported weekly by answers to standardized text-message questions, followed by injury telephone interviews. A priori, self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale scores (< 80 points) were chosen as independent variables in the risk factor analyses. The study showed that self-reported previous knee injury significantly increased the risk of time-loss knee injury [relative risk (RR): 3.65, 95% confidence (CI) 1.73-7.68; P < 0.001]. Risk of time-loss knee injury was also significantly increased in players with low KOOS subscale scores (< 80 points) in Activities of Daily Living (RR: 5.0), Sport/Recreational (RR: 2.2) and Quality of Life (RR: 3.0) (P < 0.05). In conclusion, self-reported previous knee injury and low scores in three KOOS subscales significantly increase the risk of future time-loss knee injury in adolescent female football. PMID:26179111

  4. Knee Replacement - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Knee Replacement (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Total Knee Replacement Potpuna zamjena koljena - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Total Knee Replacement 全膝关节置换 - 简体中文 ( ...

  5. Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint locks and unlocks automatically, at any position within range of bend angles, without manual intervention by wearer. Includes tang and clevis, locks whenever wearer transfers weight to knee and unlocks when weight removed. Locking occurs at any angle between 45 degrees knee bend and full extension.

  6. Prosthetic knee Candida parapsilosis infection.

    PubMed

    Wada, M; Baba, H; Imura, S

    1998-06-01

    We report a 77-year-old man who developed Candida parapsilosis infection following total knee arthroplasty. Knee joint effusion was noted 2 weeks after surgery, and repeated cultures of aspirated fluid established the diagnosis of Candida parapsilosis infection 4 weeks after surgery. Treatment consisted of debridement and lavage of the involved joint together with continuous irrigation with fluconazole for 4 weeks, followed by oral fluconazole for another 6 months. At 3 years follow-up, the patient was doing well and radiological examination of the affected knee showed a firm attachment of the prosthesis. We suggest that early identification of the causative organism followed by continuous irrigation and use of appropriate antifungal medication may prevent joint instability and spares the removal of the prosthesis.

  7. Robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Pierce, Todd P; Mont, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Robotics in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has undergone vast improvements. Although some of the systems have fallen out of favor due to safety concerns, there has been recent increased interest for semi-active haptic robotic systems that provide intraoperative tactile feedback to the surgeon. The potential advantages include improvements in radiographic outcomes, reducing the incidence of mechanical axis malalignment of the lower extremity and better tissue balance. Proponents of robotic technology believe that these improvements may lead to superior functional outcomes and implant survivorship. We aim to discuss robotic technology development, outcomes of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty and the future outlook. Short-term follow-up studies on robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty suggest that, although some alignment objectives may have been achieved, more studies regarding functional outcomes are needed. Furthermore, studies evaluating the projected cost-benefit analyses of this new technology are needed before widespread adoption. Nevertheless, the short-term results warrant further evaluation. PMID:26365088

  8. Virus infection and knee injury.

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, P; Venner, R; Clements, G B

    1987-01-01

    Serological evidence of virus infection was sought in 31 consecutive patients presenting with knee swelling and compared with age/sex-matched controls. In a normal age/sex-matched control group, 42% of patients had evidence of recent or past infection with Coxsackie B virus, emphasising the care required in the evaluation of the significance of Coxsackie B neutralization titres in individual patients. Of 12 patients presenting with knee swelling and a history of a twisting injury, eight had serological evidence of recent or past infection with Coxsackie B virus, and one had evidence of a current adenovirus infection. PMID:2825728

  9. Native Chondrocyte Viability during Cartilage Lesion Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Kumkum; McRury, Ian D.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Morgan, Roy E.; Augé, Wayne K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Early surgical intervention for articular cartilage disease is desirable before full-thickness lesions develop. As early intervention treatments are designed, native chondrocyte viability at the treatment site before intervention becomes an important parameter to consider. The purpose of this study is to evaluate native chondrocyte viability in a series of specimens demonstrating the progression of articular cartilage lesions to determine if the chondrocyte viability profile changes during the evolution of articular cartilage disease to the level of surface fibrillation. Design: Osteochondral specimens demonstrating various degrees of articular cartilage damage were obtained from patients undergoing knee total joint replacement. Three groups were created within a patient harvest based on visual and tactile cues commonly encountered during surgical intervention: group 1, visually and tactilely intact surfaces; group 2, visually intact, tactilely soft surfaces; and group 3, surface fibrillation. Confocal laser microscopy was performed following live/dead cell viability staining. Results: Groups 1 to 3 demonstrated viable chondrocytes in all specimens, even within the fibrillated portions of articular cartilage, with little to no evidence of dead chondrocytes. Chondrocyte viability profile in articular cartilage does not appear to change as disease lesion progresses from normal to surface fibrillation. Conclusions: Fibrillated partial-thickness articular cartilage lesions are a good therapeutic target for early intervention. These lesions retain a high profile of viable chondrocytes and are readily diagnosed by visual and tactile cues during surgery. Early intervention should be based on matrix failure rather than on more aggressive procedures that further corrupt the matrix and contribute to chondrocyte necrosis of contiguous untargeted cartilage. PMID:26069561

  10. A conceptual framework for a sports knee injury performance profile (SKIPP) and return to activity criteria (RTAC).

    PubMed

    Logerstedt, David; Arundale, Amelia; Lynch, Andrew; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to the knee, including intra-articular fractures, ligamentous ruptures, and meniscal and articular cartilage lesions, are commonplace within sports. Despite advancements in surgical techniques and enhanced rehabilitation, athletes returning to cutting, pivoting, and jumping sports after a knee injury are at greater risk of sustaining a second injury. The clinical utility of objective criteria presents a decision-making challenge to ensure athletes are fully rehabilitated and safe to return to sport. A system centered on specific indicators that can be used to develop a comprehensive profile to monitor rehabilitation progression and to establish return to activity criteria is recommended to clear athletes to begin a progressive and systematic approach to activities and sports. Integration of a sports knee injury performance profile with return to activity criteria can guide clinicians in facilitating an athlete's safe return to sport, prevention of subsequent injury, and life-long knee joint health.

  11. A conceptual framework for a sports knee injury performance profile (SKIPP) and return to activity criteria (RTAC)

    PubMed Central

    Logerstedt, David; Arundale, Amelia; Lynch, Andrew; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to the knee, including intra-articular fractures, ligamentous ruptures, and meniscal and articular cartilage lesions, are commonplace within sports. Despite advancements in surgical techniques and enhanced rehabilitation, athletes returning to cutting, pivoting, and jumping sports after a knee injury are at greater risk of sustaining a second injury. The clinical utility of objective criteria presents a decision-making challenge to ensure athletes are fully rehabilitated and safe to return to sport. A system centered on specific indicators that can be used to develop a comprehensive profile to monitor rehabilitation progression and to establish return to activity criteria is recommended to clear athletes to begin a progressive and systematic approach to activities and sports. Integration of a sports knee injury performance profile with return to activity criteria can guide clinicians in facilitating an athlete's safe return to sport, prevention of subsequent injury, and life-long knee joint health. PMID:26537805

  12. Matching osteochondritis dissecans lesions in identical twin brothers.

    PubMed

    Richie, Lucas B; Sytsma, Mark J

    2013-09-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans is a disorder of unknown etiology that can result in fragmentation of osteochondral surfaces, most commonly of the knee, shoulder, elbow, and ankle. This may lead to sequelae of pain and an inability to participate in desired activities. Multiple theories exist as to the true cause of the disorder, but none have been fully proven. One such proposed etiology is genetic causation. Familial cases of osteochondritis dissecans are rare, yet these cases offer support to growing evidence that may support a genetic link. This article describes osteochondritis dissecans lesions of the femoral trochlea in monozygotic (identical) twins. Both twins presented with similar symptoms 1 year apart. Neither twin had any clear inciting trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed osteochondral lesions in similar positions of the lateral trochlear of the same knee in both brothers. Osteochondral autograft transfer and tibial tubercle anteromedialization were performed on both patients. An identical postoperative protocol was followed, and recovery with full return to sport was comparable for the brothers. To the authors' knowledge, only 1 other case report exists of osteochondritis dissecans lesions in monozygotic twins. Although debate continues regarding the true etiology of this disorder, cases of identical twins presenting with a similar disease process are highly suggestive of a genetic component and may lead to early identification and treatment of these lesions. Continued research in the area of osteochondritis dissecans and its genetic basis is needed to completely understand this disorder. PMID:24025016

  13. [Rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty of hip and knee].

    PubMed

    Jansen, E; Brienza, S; Gierasimowicz-Fontana, A; Matos, C; Reynders-Frederix-Dobre, C; HateM, S M

    2015-09-01

    Numbers of total hip and knee arthroplasties are increasing on a regular basis. Clinical pathways tend to shorten the duration of hospitalization in acute care after surgery. Therefore, the preoperative preparation of the patient and his abilities for postoperative rehabilitation should be carefully addressed. Before the surgical intervention, it is recommended that the patient receives an educational program and a physical preparation. After the surgical intervention, the patient can benefit from a home-based rehabilitation program supervised by a physiotherapist, if there were no preoperative reasons for prolonging the hospital stay and if the surgery took place without complications. Some patients may benefit from postsurgical rehabilitation in a specialized locomotor rehabilitation long-stay care unit. The indications for inpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation are : two simultaneous arthroplasties, revision of a previous hip or knee arthroplasty, postsurgical complications, advanced age, comorbidities influencing the rehabilitation process, social difficulties, necessity for adaptation of the environment, insufficient or unadapted out-patient (para)medical care. The goals of the rehabilitation treatment depend on the patient's characteristics and environment, on the properties of the prosthesis and on the postsurgical complications. The functional prognosis of a total joint arthroplasty of the knee or hip is excellent, provided that there are no post-surgical complications and that the patient benefits from adequate rehabilitation therapy. The present paper describes the different phases of rehabilitation treatment and the general and specific complications of total hip and knee arthroplasties that may influence the rehabilitation outcome.

  14. [Rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty of hip and knee].

    PubMed

    Jansen, E; Brienza, S; Gierasimowicz-Fontana, A; Matos, C; Reynders-Frederix-Dobre, C; HateM, S M

    2015-09-01

    Numbers of total hip and knee arthroplasties are increasing on a regular basis. Clinical pathways tend to shorten the duration of hospitalization in acute care after surgery. Therefore, the preoperative preparation of the patient and his abilities for postoperative rehabilitation should be carefully addressed. Before the surgical intervention, it is recommended that the patient receives an educational program and a physical preparation. After the surgical intervention, the patient can benefit from a home-based rehabilitation program supervised by a physiotherapist, if there were no preoperative reasons for prolonging the hospital stay and if the surgery took place without complications. Some patients may benefit from postsurgical rehabilitation in a specialized locomotor rehabilitation long-stay care unit. The indications for inpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation are : two simultaneous arthroplasties, revision of a previous hip or knee arthroplasty, postsurgical complications, advanced age, comorbidities influencing the rehabilitation process, social difficulties, necessity for adaptation of the environment, insufficient or unadapted out-patient (para)medical care. The goals of the rehabilitation treatment depend on the patient's characteristics and environment, on the properties of the prosthesis and on the postsurgical complications. The functional prognosis of a total joint arthroplasty of the knee or hip is excellent, provided that there are no post-surgical complications and that the patient benefits from adequate rehabilitation therapy. The present paper describes the different phases of rehabilitation treatment and the general and specific complications of total hip and knee arthroplasties that may influence the rehabilitation outcome. PMID:26591319

  15. Ghost cell lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, E.; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K. M. K.; Balachander, N.

    2015-01-01

    Ghost cells have been a controversy for a long time. Ghost cell is a swollen/enlarged epithelial cell with eosnophilic cytoplasm, but without a nucleus. In routine H and E staining these cells give a shadowy appearance. Hence these cells are also called as shadow cells or translucent cells. The appearance of these cells varies from lesion to lesion involving odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. This article review about the origin, nature and significance of ghost cells in different neoplasms. PMID:26015694

  16. Open Knee: Open Source Modeling and Simulation in Knee Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Erdemir, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Virtual representations of the knee joint can provide clinicians, scientists, and engineers the tools to explore mechanical functions of the knee and its tissue structures in health and disease. Modeling and simulation approaches such as finite element analysis also provide the possibility to understand the influence of surgical procedures and implants on joint stresses and tissue deformations. A large number of knee joint models are described in the biomechanics literature. However, freely accessible, customizable, and easy-to-use models are scarce. Availability of such models can accelerate clinical translation of simulations, where labor-intensive reproduction of model development steps can be avoided. Interested parties can immediately utilize readily available models for scientific discovery and clinical care. Motivated by this gap, this study aims to describe an open source and freely available finite element representation of the tibiofemoral joint, namely Open Knee, which includes the detailed anatomical representation of the joint's major tissue structures and their nonlinear mechanical properties and interactions. Three use cases illustrate customization potential of the model, its predictive capacity, and its scientific and clinical utility: prediction of joint movements during passive flexion, examining the role of meniscectomy on contact mechanics and joint movements, and understanding anterior cruciate ligament mechanics. A summary of scientific and clinically directed studies conducted by other investigators are also provided. The utilization of this open source model by groups other than its developers emphasizes the premise of model sharing as an accelerator of simulation-based medicine. Finally, the imminent need to develop next-generation knee models is noted. These are anticipated to incorporate individualized anatomy and tissue properties supported by specimen-specific joint mechanics data for evaluation, all acquired in vitro from varying age

  17. Knee extension torque variability after exercise in ACL reconstructed knees.

    PubMed

    Goetschius, John; Kuenze, Christopher M; Hart, Joseph M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare knee extension torque variability in patients with ACL reconstructed knees before and after exercise. Thirty two patients with an ACL reconstructed knee (ACL-R group) and 32 healthy controls (control group) completed measures of maximal isometric knee extension torque (90° flexion) at baseline and following a 30-min exercise protocol (post-exercise). Exercise included 30-min of repeated cycles of inclined treadmill walking and hopping tasks. Dependent variables were the coefficient of variation (CV) and raw-change in CV (ΔCV): CV = (torque standard deviation/torque mean x 100), ΔCV = (post-exercise - baseline). There was a group-by-time interaction (p = 0.03) on CV. The ACL-R group demonstrated greater CV than the control group at baseline (ACL-R = 1.07 ± 0.55, control = 0.79 ± 0.42, p = 0.03) and post-exercise (ACL-R = 1.60 ± 0.91, control = 0.94 ± 0.41, p = 0.001). ΔCV was greater (p = 0.03) in the ACL-R group (0.52 ± 0.82) than control group (0.15 ± 0.46). CV significantly increased from baseline to post-exercise (p = 0.001) in the ACL-R group, while the control group did not (p = 0.06). The ACL-R group demonstrated greater knee extension torque variability than the control group. Exercise increased torque variability more in the ACL-R group than control group.

  18. Complex function of the knee joint: the current understanding of the knee.

    PubMed

    Hirschmann, Michael T; Müller, Werner

    2015-10-01

    Since the early years of orthopaedics, it is a well-known fact that anatomy follows function. During the evolution of mankind, the knee has been optimally adapted to the forces and loads acting at and through the knee joint. However, anatomy of the knee joint is variable and the only constant is its complex function. In contrast to the time of open surgery, nowadays the majority of reconstructive knee surgery is done arthroscopically. Keyhole surgery is less invasive, but on the backside, the knee surgeon lacks daily visualisation of the complex open anatomy. As open anatomical knowledge is less present in our daily practice, it is even more important to highlight this complex anatomy and function of the knee. It is the purpose of this review to perform a systematic review of knee anatomy, highlight the complex function of the knee joint and present an overview about recent and current knowledge about knee function. Level of evidence Systematic review, Level IV.

  19. Biomechanics of knee joint — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeti, Bhaskar Kumar; Chalamalasetti, Srinivasa Rao; Bolla Pragada, S. K. Sundara siva rao

    2015-06-01

    The present paper is to know how the work is carried out in the field of biomechanics of knee. Various model formulations are discussed and further classified into mathematical model, two-dimensional model and three-dimensional model. Knee geometry is a crucial part of human body movement, in which how various views of knee is shown in different planes and how the forces act on tibia and femur are studied. It leads to know the forces acting on the knee joint. Experimental studies of knee geometry and forces acting on knee shown by various researchers have been discussed, and comparisons of results are made. In addition, static and dynamic analysis of knee has been also discussed respectively to some extent.

  20. Immediate effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on knee joint moments in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Masashi; Takagi, Yui; Goto, Yusuke; Otsuka, Naoki; Koyama, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Masashi; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Footwear modification can beneficially alter knee loading in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This study evaluated the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on reductions in external knee moments in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to examine the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology versus control shoes on the knee adduction and flexion moments in 17 women (mean age, 63.6 years) with radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis. The lateral and anterior trunk lean values, knee flexion and adduction angles, and ground reaction force were also evaluated. The influence of the original walking pattern on the changes in knee moments with Masai Barefoot Technology shoes was evaluated. The knee flexion moment in early stance was significantly reduced while walking with the Masai Barefoot Technology shoes (0.25±0.14Nm/kgm) as compared with walking with control shoes (0.30±0.19 Nm/kgm); whereas the knee adduction moment showed no changes. Masai Barefoot Technology shoes did not increase compensatory lateral and anterior trunk lean. The degree of knee flexion moment in the original walking pattern with control shoes was correlated directly with its reduction when wearing Masai Barefoot Technology shoes by multiple linear regression analysis (adjusted R2=0.44, P<0.01). Masai Barefoot Technology shoes reduced the knee flexion moment during walking without increasing the compensatory trunk lean and may therefore reduce external knee loading in women with knee osteoarthritis.

  1. Imaging of traumatic injury and impingement of anterior knee fat.

    PubMed

    Lapègue, F; Sans, N; Brun, C; Bakouche, S; Brucher, N; Cambon, Z; Chiavassa, H; Larbi, A; Faruch, M

    2016-01-01

    Fat is not just used by the body as bulk tissue. In addition to its role in storing energy and regulating hormone action, fat is used in some parts of the body for its mechanical properties. The anatomy of anterior knee fat is more complex than it appears at first sight and is capable of withstanding considerable compressive and shear stress. Specific lesions occur when such mechanical stress exceeds the physiological limits and are yet little known. Superficial fat can be the site of either acute injury by closed degloving called the Morel-Lavallée lesion or chronic injury, when subject to repeat excessive shear forces, due to more complex and less well-defined disruptions that result in pseudo-bursitis. There are three main anterior, intracapsular and extrasynovial fat pads in the knee joint, which are the infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) or Hoffa's fat pad, the quadriceps fat pad and the prefemoral fat pad. The IFP plays an important role as a mechanical shock absorber and guides the patella tendon and even the patella itself during flexion-extension movements. In response to repeated excessive stress, an inflammatory reaction and swelling of the IFP is first observed, followed by a fibrotic reaction with metaplastic transformation into fibrous, cartilaginous or bone tissue. More rarely, the two other deep fat pads (quadriceps and prefemoral) can, if subject to repeated stress, undergo similar restructuring inflammatory reactions with metaplasia resulting in tissue hardening, anterior pain and partial loss of function. PMID:27118690

  2. Petriellidium boydii infection of knee

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, H.B.S.; Bedford, A.F.; Fincham, W.J.

    1982-12-01

    A case of Petriellidium boydii (synonym: Allescheria boydii) infection of the knee joint is described. It followed a penetrating soft tissue injury with a pitchfork. Such infections are rare in this country and bone involvement has not been recorded previously except in maduramycosis contracted in tropical areas.

  3. Polyethylene Wear in Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Rajit; Elmallah, Randa D K; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Kurtz, Steven M; Mont, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene (PE) wear and osteolysis are common causes for late revisions of knee arthroplasties. Several implant and surgical factors have been implicated in contributing to the development of wear, such as type of bearing surface used, inaccurate articular geometry, and poor knee kinematics. In addition, patient-related factors, such as younger age and higher activity levels, may also contribute to wear. Our purpose was to evaluate and compare the effect of these variables on wear rates following knee arthroplasty. Recently, technological advancements have been aimed at reducing the incidence of wear by improving the PE manufacturing process, creating implants that minimize contact stresses, and refining our surgical techniques. Furthermore, the development of newer highly cross-linked PEs (HXLPEs) and the introduction of additives, such as vitamin E, to the PEs may improve overall implant survivorship. As a result, with the advent of newer implant and PE designs, wear is no longer the most common cause of early failure, though it remains an important factor in limiting long-term implant survivorship. However, there are a few clinical studies evaluating the long-term outcomes of newer HXLPEs and implant designs, with further evaluations necessary to determine the best implant-PE combination for improved knee arthroplasty survivorship. PMID:26030263

  4. Phaeohyphomycosis infection in the knee.

    PubMed

    Sadigursky, David; Nogueira E Ferreira, Luisa; Moreno de Oliveira Corrêa, Liz

    2016-01-01

    Phaeohyphomycosis is caused by cutaneous fungi and rarely affects large joints. This is a case report on phaeohyphomycosis in the left knee of an elderly individual without immunosuppression. It was accompanied by pain and swelling the anterior knee. The case was first suspected to be suprapatellar bursitis, and was treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, without remission of symptoms. Surgical treatment was performed, with resection of the suprapatellar bursa and anterior region of the quadriceps tendon. The material was sent for anatomopathological examination and culturing. The pathological examination showed phaeohyphomycosis. The treatment instituted consisted of itraconazole, 200 mg/day for six weeks, and complete remission of symptoms was achieved. The physical examination remained normal after one year of follow-up. This is the first published case of phaeohyphomycosis infection in the suprapatellar region of the knee. Although almost all the cases reported have been associated with immunosuppressed patients, this was an exception. It is important to suspect phaeohyphomycosis in cases of knee infection, in the area of the suprapatellar bursa, when the symptoms do not resolve after clinical treatment.

  5. Dynamic splinting for knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Finger, Eric; Willis, F Buck

    2008-01-01

    Total Knee Arthroplasty operations are increasing in frequency, and knee flexion contracture is a common pathology, both pre-existing and post-operative. A 61-year-old male presented with knee flexion contracture following a total knee arthroplasty. Physical therapy alone did not fully reduce the contracture and dynamic splinting was then prescribed for daily low-load, prolonged-duration stretch. After 28 physical therapy sessions, the active range of motion improved from -20 degrees to -12 degrees (stiff knee still lacking full extension), and after eight additional weeks with nightly wear of dynamic splint, the patient regained full knee extension, (active extension improved from -12 degrees to 0 degrees ).

  6. Preinvasive lesions

    Cancer.gov

    This definition is for allocation of lesions with preinvasive/borderline properties. It is currently aimed at newly identified neoplasms, which may be similar to those described in humans. In mouse pathology, many adenomas may be preinvasive/borderline lesions. However, their inclusion in the preinvasive category can be justified only upon development of better diagnostic criteria.

  7. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  8. Extragastric Dieulafoy's lesion

    PubMed Central

    Gauci, James; Galea, Samuel; Galea, Joseph; Schembri, Mark

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old man on warfarin for aortic valve replacement presented with recurrent episodes of melaena. An initial oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) was normal, as were red cell scanning and colonoscopy. It was a third OGD that revealed the cause of the melaena—a vascular lesion in the duodenum, at the junction between D1 and D2. An extragastric Dieulafoy's lesion was diagnosed, and the lesion was injected with epinephrine and tattooed. Over the following months, episodes of bleeding recurred despite further attempts at injection. Percutaneous radiologically assisted embolisation of the gastroduodenal artery, and eventually duodenotomy and oversuturing of the lesion were performed to no avail. The patient has undergone over 10 endoscopies, and has received over 70 units of packed red cells to date, since his initial presentation 6 years ago. Attempts to stop the bleeding permanently have been difficult, highlighting the complexity of managing such a lesion. PMID:25216921

  9. Arthroscopical and histological study of cartilaginous lesions treated by mosaicplasty

    PubMed Central

    Cirstoiu, CF; Bădilă, AE

    2010-01-01

    Aim. The aim of our study was to assess macro– and microscopically the knee cartilaginous lesions outcome treated by mosaicplasty. Material and method Our study included 32 patients which underwent mosaicplasty for nondegenerative cartilaginous lesions of the knee and a second look arthroscopy. In 21 patients, minibiopsies from the repaired lesion were performed under arthroscopic control (from the cartilaginous region of the transplanted osteocartilaginous grafts and from the spaces between grafts). All repaired lesions were carefully examined during arthroscopy and all harvested minifragments were studied by optical microscopy (staining method – hematoxylin eosin). Results Macroscopically, the articular surface of the repaired cartilaginous lesions was smooth and congruent to the adjacent surfaces. The aspect and resistance to compression of grafted area was similar to those of the normal surrounding cartilage. The transferred cartilage maintained its height, being at the level of the neighboring cartilage. One year postoperatively, the limits of the cartilaginous autografts were still visible. Two years postoperatively, these limits were no longer visible. Microscopically, the region of the former lesion was constituted mainly by viable hyaline cartilage. Fibrous cartilaginous tissue was visualized in the spaces between the grafts. Conclusions The second look arthroscopy showed that after mosaicplasty the repaired articular surface was smooth, leveled, homogenous and congruent to adjacent cartilage. The spaces between grafts are progressively covered by fibrous cartilaginous tissue with a more textured and uneven surface. Mosaicplasty is a biological surgical technique which restores the normal osteocartilaginous architecture of the most part of the grafted area. The transplanted osteocartilaginous cylindrical grafts maintain its viability and mechanical properties. PMID:21254739

  10. Retrospective Cohort Study of 207 Cases of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Green, Daniel W.; Arbucci, John; Silberman, Jason; Luderowski, Eva; Uppstrom, Tyler J.; Nguyen, Joseph; Tuca, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Describe the clinical characteristics, image findings, and outcomes of patients with juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (JOCD) of the knee. To our knowledge, this is the largest single-surgeon cohort of JOCD patients. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of knee JOCD patients assessed by a single pediatric orthopaedic surgeon at a tertiary care center between 2005-2015. All diagnoses were confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients with patellar dislocations or osteochondral fractures were excluded. Demographic data, sports played, comorbidities, surgical procedures, and clinical data were extracted from charts. Images were analyzed to identify the location and size of lesions. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests were used to compare discrete variables, and Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis tests to compare continuous variables between groups. P-values of <0.05 were considered significant. Results: Sample consisted of 180 patients (207 knees), 124 boys and 56 girls. Average age at diagnosis was 12.8 years (7.5-17.5). Majority were active in sports (80.8%), primary soccer (36.7%) and basketball (29.4%). JOCD was present bilaterally in 27 patients (15%), 14 knees had bifocal OCD (6.8%), and only 1 patient had bifocal lesions in both knees. Most common location was medial femoral condyle (56.3%) followed by lateral femoral condyle (23.1%), trochlea (11.4%), patella (9%), and tibia (0.5%). In the sagittal view, most common location was the middle third of the condyles (48.7%). Surgery was performed in 72 knees (34.8%), with an average age at surgery of 14.1 years (9.3-18.1). Bilateral JOCD was present in 13 surgical patients (18.8%), but only 3 patients had bilateral surgery. Two operative patients had bifocal JOCD (2.7%) and surgery on both lesions. Location distribution did not differ between surgical and non-surgical lesions. The average normalized area of non-surgical JOCD lesions was 6.8 (0.1-18), whereas surgical lesions averaged a

  11. Giant Cell Tumor of the Patella Tendon Sheath Presenting as a Painful Locked Knee

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Andreas; Tsoumpos, Pantelis; Tatani, Irini; Iliopoulos, Ilias; Papachristou, Dionysios

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 26 Final Diagnosis: Giant cell tumor of the patella tendon seath Symptoms: Efusion • locking knee • pain Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Arthroscopy and open resection of the tumor Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCT-TS) is a benign proliferative synovial tumor manifesting as an intra-articular solitary nodule. When it involves the infrapatellar fat pad it can present acutely as a painful locked knee. Case Report: A 26-year-old white male presented with a 2-week history of painful locking in his right knee. Clinical examination revealed lack of extension by approximately 20°. To help establish the diagnosis, an MRI scan of the right knee was performed, showing a large (5×4×2 cm), oval, well-circumscribed mass with a low-intensity homogenous signal. The size of the mass prohibited the removal by arthroscopy and we therefore proceeded with an open arthrotomy. Histological examination showed a tendosynovial giant cell tumor of the patella tendon sheath. At the latest follow-up, 2 years postoperatively, there was no local tumor recurrence. Conclusions: These rare tumorous lesions should be included in the differential diagnosis of painful locking knee, especially in the absence of definite traumatic history. PMID:26302970

  12. Intraosseous infiltration of platelet-rich plasma for severe knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Mikel; Fiz, Nicolás; Guadilla, Jorge; Padilla, Sabino; Anitua, Eduardo; Sánchez, Pello; Delgado, Diego

    2014-12-01

    We describe a new technique of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) infiltration for the treatment of severe knee osteoarthritis. PRP intra-articular infiltration is a promising treatment for knee osteoarthritis, but it still has some limitations in high-degree osteoarthritis. Diagnosis of osteoarthritis is based on clinical and radiographic findings, and patients with grade III or IV knee tibiofemoral osteoarthritis based on the Ahlbäck scale are considered candidates for this technique. The technique consists of performing intraosseous infiltration of PRP into the subchondral bone, which acts on this tissue and consequently on cartilage-bone communication. Although the intraosseous injection hinders the conventional knee intra-articular infiltration, it allows an extension of the range of action of the PRP, which acts directly on the subchondral bone, which is involved in the progression of osteoarthritis. Thus this technique involves a new administration of PRP that can delay knee arthroplasty; moreover, it can be applied for not only severe osteoarthritis but also other pathologies in which the subchondral bone is critical in the etiology, such as necrosis and osteochondral lesions. PMID:25685680

  13. Role of flexors in knee stability.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Y; Jiang, C C; Jan, M H; Lai, J S

    1995-05-01

    The muscle strength of knee extensors is commonly used as an indicator of a patient's functional recovery following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The knee flexors are dynamic stabilizers that prevent tibial anterior displacement and may reinforce the function of the ACL. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of knee flexor performance assessed by isokinetic dynamometer and clinical evaluations including KT-1000 stability tests, shuttle run tests, thigh and calf circumference and range of motion of the knee joint. Ten patients who received ACL reconstruction over a 3- to 5-year period were included in this study, as were 15 normal controls who were tested for comparison. There was no significant difference in the time taken for the shuttle run test between normal controls and patients who underwent ACL, but there was a positive correlation between the shuttle run test and laxity of the knee joint. The knee laxity of ACL patients was significantly greater than that of the normal controls under passive anterior force. However, no significant difference was seen in the stability test under active contraction of the knee extensors. In addition, a positive correlation was seen between the KT-1000 knee ligament arthrometry test results and both torque acceleration energy and the average power of the flexors. These results suggest that physical therapy for patients following ACL reconstruction should emphasize the explosiveness of knee flexors to help strengthen the dynamic stability of the knee joint and motor performance.

  14. SIMULTANEOUS BILATERAL TEAR OF THE KNEE EXTENSOR MECHANISM IN A PRE-ADOLESCENT: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires; Giordano, Vincenzo; Albuquerque, Maria Isabel Pires; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; do Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro; Barretto, João Maurício

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral tearing of a patellar tendon and a contralateral sleeve fracture in a pre-adolescent are rare lesions. We report a case in which a pre-adolescent sustained a fall while jumping during a soccer match. No predisposing risk factors were identified. The injuries were treated with surgical repairs and transosseous suturing. The aim of this study was to present a case of spontaneous concurrent tearing of the extensor mechanism of the knee in a pre-adolescent. PMID:27047882

  15. The effect of total knee arthroplasty on knee joint kinematics and kinetics during gait.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Gillian L; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L; Astephen Wilson, Janie L; Dunbar, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    This study determined how total knee arthroplasty (TKA) altered knee motion and loading during gait. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic gait patterns of 42 patients with severe knee osteoarthritis were collected 1 week prior and 1-year post-TKA. Principal component analysis extracted major patterns of variability in the gait waveforms. Overall and midstance knee adduction moment magnitude decreased. Overall knee flexion angle magnitude increased due to an increase during swing. Increases in the early stance knee flexion moment and late stance knee extension moment were found, indicating improved impact attenuation and function. A decrease in the early stance knee external rotation moment indicated alteration in the typical rotation mechanism. Most changes moved toward an asymptomatic pattern and would be considered improvements in motion, function, and loading.

  16. Editorial Commentary: Platelet-Rich Plasma Improves Knee Pain and Function in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-11-01

    Systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that platelet-rich plasma improves knee pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Ultimately, biologics hold promise for chondroprotection in addition to symptomatic relief. PMID:26542203

  17. Anterior knee pain following primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shervin, David; Pratt, Katelyn; Healey, Travis; Nguyen, Samantha; Mihalko, William M; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-11-18

    Despite improvements in technique and technology for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), anterior knee pain impacts patient outcomes and satisfaction. Addressing the prosthetic and surgical technique related causes of pain after TKA, specifically as it relates to anterior knee pain, can aid surgeons in addressing these issues with their patients. Design features of the femoral and patellar components which have been reported as pain generators include: Improper femoral as well as patellar component sizing or designs that result in patellofemoral stuffing; a shortened trochlear groove distance from the flange to the intercondylar box; and then surgical technique related issues resulting in: Lateral patellar facet syndrome; overstuffed patella/flange combination; asymmetric patellar resurfacing, improper transverse plane component rotation resulting in patellar subluxation/tilt. Any design consideration that allows impingement of extensor mechanism anatomical elements has the possibility of impacting outcome by becoming a pain generator. As the number of TKA procedures continues to increase, it is increasingly critical to develop improved, evidence based prostheses that maximize function and patient satisfaction while minimizing pain and other complications. PMID:26601061

  18. Anterior knee pain following primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shervin, David; Pratt, Katelyn; Healey, Travis; Nguyen, Samantha; Mihalko, William M; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvements in technique and technology for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), anterior knee pain impacts patient outcomes and satisfaction. Addressing the prosthetic and surgical technique related causes of pain after TKA, specifically as it relates to anterior knee pain, can aid surgeons in addressing these issues with their patients. Design features of the femoral and patellar components which have been reported as pain generators include: Improper femoral as well as patellar component sizing or designs that result in patellofemoral stuffing; a shortened trochlear groove distance from the flange to the intercondylar box; and then surgical technique related issues resulting in: Lateral patellar facet syndrome; overstuffed patella/flange combination; asymmetric patellar resurfacing, improper transverse plane component rotation resulting in patellar subluxation/tilt. Any design consideration that allows impingement of extensor mechanism anatomical elements has the possibility of impacting outcome by becoming a pain generator. As the number of TKA procedures continues to increase, it is increasingly critical to develop improved, evidence based prostheses that maximize function and patient satisfaction while minimizing pain and other complications. PMID:26601061

  19. Multifocal vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Levin, Laura E; Lauren, Christine T

    2016-03-01

    Multifocal vascular lesions are important to recognize and appropriately diagnose. Generally first noticed on the skin, multifocal vascular lesions may have systemic involvement. Distinguishing among the different types of multifocal vascular lesions is often based on clinical features; however, radiological imaging and/or biopsy are frequently needed to identify distinct features and guide treatment. Knowledge of the systemic associations that can occur with different vascular anomalies may reduce life-threatening complications, such as coagulopathy, bleeding, cardiac compromise, and neurologic sequelae. This review provides a synopsis of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, workup, and treatment of several well-recognized multifocal vascular tumors and malformations. PMID:27607324

  20. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  1. Retinal lesions in septicemia.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, M; Barnea, Y; Geyer, O; Siegman-Igra, Y

    1993-12-15

    We explored the association between septicemia and specific retinal lesions in a prospective controlled study. Hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, or Roth's spots were found in 24 of 101 septicemic patients (24%), compared to four of 99 age- and gender-matched control patients (4%) (P = .0002). There was no significant association between types of organisms or focus of infection and the presence of specific lesions. Histologic examination of affected eyes disclosed cytoid bodies in the nerve fiber layer without inflammation. A definite association between septicemia and retinal lesions was found and indicates the need for routine ophthalmoscopy in septicemic patients. PMID:8250076

  2. Tibiofemoral contact mechanics following a horizontal cleavage lesion in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Arno, Sally; Bell, Christopher P; Uquillas, Carlos; Borukhov, Ilya; Walker, Peter S

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a horizontal cleavage lesion (HCL) of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus would result in changes to tibiofemoral contact mechanics, as measured by peak contact pressure and contact area, which can lead to cartilage degeneration. To study this, 10 cadaveric knees were tested in a rig where forces were applied (500 N Compression, 100 N shear, 2.5 Nm Torque) and the knee dynamically flexed from -5° to 135°, as peak contact pressure and contact area were recorded. After testing of the intact knee, a horizontal cleavage lesion was created arthroscopically and testing repeated. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine if there were differences in peak contact pressure and contact area between the intact knee and that with the HCL. A statistically significant increase in peak contact pressure of 13%, on average, and a decrease in contact area of 6%, on average, was noted following the HCL. This suggests that a horizontal cleavage lesion will result in small but statistically significant changes in tibiofemoral contact mechanics which may lead to cartilage degeneration.

  3. Parametric modelling of a knee joint prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Khoo, L P; Goh, J C; Chow, S L

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the establishment of a parametric model of knee joint prosthesis. Four different sizes of a commercial prosthesis are used as an example in the study. A reverse engineering technique was employed to reconstruct the prosthesis on CATIA, a CAD (computer aided design) system. Parametric models were established as a result of the analysis. Using the parametric model established and the knee data obtained from a clinical study on 21 pairs of cadaveric Asian knees, the development of a prototype prosthesis that suits a patient with a very small knee joint is presented. However, it was found that modification to certain parameters may be inevitable due to the uniqueness of the Asian knee. An avenue for rapid modelling and eventually economical production of a customized knee joint prosthesis for patients is proposed and discussed.

  4. A prosthetic knee using magnetorhelogical fluid damper for above-knee amputees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhyuk; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    A prosthetic knee for above-knee (AK) amputees is categorized into two types; namely a passive and an active type. The passive prosthetic knee is generally made by elastic materials such as carbon fiber reinforced composite material, titanium and etc. The passive prosthetic knee easy to walk. But, it has disadvantages such that a knee joint motion is not similar to ordinary people. On the other hand, the active prosthetic knee can control the knee joint angle effectively because of mechanical actuator and microprocessor. The actuator should generate large damping force to support the weight of human body. But, generating the large torque using small actuator is difficult. To solve this problem, a semi-active type prosthetic knee has been researched. This paper proposes a semi-active prosthetic knee using a flow mode magneto-rheological (MR) damper for AK amputees. The proposed semi-active type prosthetic knee consists of the flow mode MR damper, hinge and prosthetic knee body. In order to support weight of human body, the required energy of MR damper is smaller than actuator of active prosthetic leg. And it can control the knee joint angle by inducing the magnetic field during the stance phase.

  5. Skin lesion of blastomycosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... in: Africa Canada Central and southeastern United States India Israel Saudi Arabia A person gets infected by ... is diagnosed by identifying the fungus in a culture taken from a skin lesion. This usually requires ...

  6. Rothia prosthetic knee joint infection.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Manish N; Malhotra, Prashant

    2015-08-01

    Rothia species - Gram-positive pleomorphic bacteria that are part of the normal oral and respiratory flora - are commonly associated with dental cavities and periodontal disease although systemic infections have been described. We describe a 53-year-old female with rheumatoid arthritis complicated by prosthetic knee joint infection due to Rothia species, which was successfully treated by surgical removal of prosthesis and prolonged antimicrobial therapy. The issue of antibiotic prophylaxis before dental procedures among patients with prosthetic joint replacements is discussed.

  7. Acute nontraumatic liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Caremani, Marcello; Tacconi, Danilo; Lapini, Laura

    2013-11-26

    The principal conditions requiring emergency/urgent intervention in patients with nontraumatic liver lesions are hemorrhage (with or without tumor rupture), rupture of hydatid cysts (with or without infection), complications arising from liver abscesses or congenital liver cysts, rupture related to peliosis hepatis, and in rare cases spontaneous hemorrhage. This article examines each of these conditions, its appearance on ultrasound (the first-line imaging method of choice for assessing any urgent nontraumatic liver lesion) and indications for additional imaging studies.

  8. [Osteoarticular lesions from parachuting].

    PubMed

    Orso, C A; Valbonesi, L; Calabrese, B F; D'Onofrio, S

    1990-01-01

    Based on personal experience gained in a parachuting centre (Pescara Aero-club) from 1975 up to 1988, the authors report their evaluation on chronic and acute osteoarticular lesions. The review of the cases was not based on the incidence of the lesions nor on their characteristics, normally found in common traumatology, but it was related to the dynamics of the trauma during the landing and to painful syndromes following a prolonged parachuting activity.

  9. Stiffness after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Jorge; Gomez, Miguel M; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-04-01

    Stiffness after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) adversely affects outcome and impacts patient function. Various risk factors for stiffness after TKA have been identified, including reduced preoperative knee range of motion, history of prior knee surgery, etiology of arthritis, incorrect positioning or oversizing of components, and incorrect gap balancing. Mechanical and associated causes, such as infection, arthrofibrosis, complex regional pain syndrome, and heterotopic ossification, secondary gain issues have also been identified. Management of stiffness following TKA can be challenging. The condition needs to be assessed and treated in a staged manner. A nonsurgical approach is the first step. Manipulation under anesthesia may be considered within the first 3 months after the index TKA, if physical therapy fails to improve the range of motion. Beyond this point, consideration should be given to surgical intervention such as lysis of adhesions, either arthroscopically or by open arthrotomy. If the cause of stiffness is deemed to be surgical error, such as component malpositioning, revision arthroplasty is indicated. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the various aspects of management of stiffness after TKA.

  10. Resistance Exercise for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Kevin R.; Vincent, Heather K.

    2013-01-01

    The initiation, progression, and severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA) has been associated with decreased muscular strength and alterations in joint biomechanics. Chronic OA pain may lead to anxiety, depression, fear of movement, and poor psychological outlook. The fear of movement may prevent participation in exercise and social events which could lead to further physical and social isolation. Resistance exercise (RX) has been shown to be an effective intervention both for decreasing pain and for improving physical function and self-efficacy. RX may restore muscle strength and joint mechanics while improving physical function. RX may also normalize muscle firing patterns and joint biomechanics leading to reductions in joint pain and cartilage degradation. These physical adaptations could lead to improved self-efficacy and decreased anxiety and depression. RX can be prescribed and performed by patients across the OA severity spectrum. When designing and implementing an RX program for a patient with knee OA, it is important to consider both the degree of OA severity as well as the level of pain. RX, either in the home or at a fitness facility, is an important component of a comprehensive regimen designed to offset the physical and psychological limitations associated with knee OA. Unique considerations for this population include: 1) monitoring pain during and after exercise, 2) providing days of rest when disease flares occur, and 3) infusing variety into the exercise regimen to encourage adherence. PMID:22632702

  11. Nonsurgical Management of Knee Pain in Adults.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brandon Q; Covey, Carlton J; Sineath, Marvin H

    2015-11-15

    The role of the family physician in managing knee pain is expanding as recent literature supports nonsurgical management for many patients. Effective treatment depends on the etiology of knee pain. Oral analgesics-most commonly nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen-are used initially in combination with physical therapy to manage the most typical causes of chronic knee pain. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommends against glucosamine/chondroitin supplementation for osteoarthritis. In patients who are not candidates for surgery, opioid analgesics should be used only if conservative pharmacotherapy is ineffective. Exercise-based therapy is the foundation for treating knee osteoarthritis and patellofemoral pain syndrome. Weight loss should be encouraged for all patients with osteoarthritis and a body mass index greater than 25 kg per m2. Aside from stabilizing traumatic knee ligament and tendon tears, the effectiveness of knee braces for chronic knee pain is uncertain, and the use of braces should not replace physical therapy. Foot orthoses can be helpful for anterior knee pain. Corticosteroid injections are effective for short-term pain relief in patients with osteoarthritis. The benefit of hyaluronic acid injections is controversial, and recommendations vary; recent systematic reviews do not support a clinically significant benefit. Small studies suggest that regenerative injections can improve pain and function in patients with chronic knee tendinopathies and osteoarthritis. PMID:26554281

  12. [Knee endoprosthesis: sports orthopedics possibilities and limitations].

    PubMed

    Kuster, M S; Grob, K; Gächter, A

    2000-08-01

    Many patients would like to resume some sport activities after total knee replacement; however, most recommendations are based on subjective opinion rather than scientific evidence. The following paper presents a literature review of sports after total knee replacement and includes recommendations which are based on biomechanical laws. Most total knee designs show increased conformity near full extension. Beyond a certain knee flexion angle, the conformity ratio decreases due to a reduced femoral radius. Therefore, these designs accept higher loads near full extension than in flexion. In order to recommend suitable physical activities after total knee replacement, both the load and the knee flexion angle of the peak load must be considered. It has been shown that power walking and cycling produce the lowest polyethylene inlay stress of a total knee replacement and seem to be the least demanding endurance activities. Jogging and downhill walking show high inlay stress levels and should be avoided. Hence, for mountain hiking, patients are advised to avoid descents or at least use skipoles and walk slowly downhill to reduce the load on the knee joint. It must also be mentioned that any activity represents additional wear, which may affect the long-term results of total knee replacements. Further clinical studies are necessary to validate the biomechanical investigations. PMID:11013918

  13. Cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R; Ribeiro, F; Oliveira, J

    2010-03-01

    The effects of cryotherapy on joint position sense are not clearly established; however it is paramount to understand its impact on peripheral feedback to ascertain the safety of using ice therapy before resuming exercise on sports or rehabilitation settings. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cryotherapy, when applied over the quadriceps and over the knee joint, on knee position sense. This within-subjects repeated-measures study encompassed fifteen subjects. Knee position sense was measured by open kinetic chain technique and active positioning at baseline and after cryotherapy application. Knee angles were determined by computer analysis of the videotape images. Twenty-minute ice bag application was applied randomly, in two sessions 48 h apart, over the quadriceps and the knee joint. The main effect for cryotherapy application was significant (F (1.14)=7.7, p=0.015) indicating an increase in both absolute and relative angular errors after the application. There was no significant main effect for the location of cryotherapy application, indicating no differences between the application over the quadriceps and the knee joint. In conclusion, cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense in normal knees. This deleterious effect is similar when cryotherapy is applied over the quadriceps or the knee joint.

  14. Cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R; Ribeiro, F; Oliveira, J

    2010-03-01

    The effects of cryotherapy on joint position sense are not clearly established; however it is paramount to understand its impact on peripheral feedback to ascertain the safety of using ice therapy before resuming exercise on sports or rehabilitation settings. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cryotherapy, when applied over the quadriceps and over the knee joint, on knee position sense. This within-subjects repeated-measures study encompassed fifteen subjects. Knee position sense was measured by open kinetic chain technique and active positioning at baseline and after cryotherapy application. Knee angles were determined by computer analysis of the videotape images. Twenty-minute ice bag application was applied randomly, in two sessions 48 h apart, over the quadriceps and the knee joint. The main effect for cryotherapy application was significant (F (1.14)=7.7, p=0.015) indicating an increase in both absolute and relative angular errors after the application. There was no significant main effect for the location of cryotherapy application, indicating no differences between the application over the quadriceps and the knee joint. In conclusion, cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense in normal knees. This deleterious effect is similar when cryotherapy is applied over the quadriceps or the knee joint. PMID:20221997

  15. Immediate Effects of an Elastic Knee Sleeve on Frontal Plane Gait Biomechanics in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Schween, Raphael; Gehring, Dominic; Gollhofer, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis of the knee affects millions of people. Elastic knee sleeves aim at relieving symptoms. While symptomatic improvements have been demonstrated as a consequence of elastic knee sleeves, evidence for biomechanical alterations only exists for the sagittal plane. We therefore asked what effect an elastic knee sleeve would have on frontal plane gait biomechanics. Methods 18 subjects (8 women, 10 men) with osteoarthritis of the medial tibiofemoral joint walked over ground with and without an elastic knee sleeve. Kinematics and forces were recorded and joint moments were calculated using an inverse dynamics approach. Conditions with sleeve and without sleeve were compared with paired t-Tests. Results With the sleeve, knee adduction angle at ground contact was reduced by 1.9±2.1° (P = 0.006). Peak knee adduction was reduced by 1.5±1.6° (P = 0.004). The first peak knee adduction moment and positive knee adduction impulse were decreased by 10.1% (0.74±0.9 Nm•kg-1; P = 0.002) and 12.9% (0.28±0.3 Nm•s•kg-1; P < 0.004), respectively. Conclusion Our study provides evidence that wearing an elastic knee sleeve during walking can reduce knee adduction angles, moments and impulse in subjects with knee osteoarthritis. As a higher knee adduction moment has previously been identified as a risk factor for disease progression in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis, we speculate that wearing a knee sleeve may be beneficial for this specific subgroup. PMID:25621488

  16. An update on methods for revascularization and expansion of the TASC lesion classification to include below-the-knee arteries: A supplement to the inter-society consensus for the management of peripheral arterial disease (TASC II): The TASC steering committee.

    PubMed

    Jaff, Michael R; White, Christopher J; Hiatt, William R; Fowkes, Gerry R; Dormandy, John; Razavi, Mahmood; Reekers, Jim; Norgren, Lars

    2015-10-01

    The Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC) guidelines were last updated in 2007 (TASC II) and represented the collaboration of international vascular specialties involved in the management of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Since the publication of TASC II, there have been innovations in endovascular revascularization strategies for patients with PAD. The intent of this publication is to provide a complete anatomic lower limb TASC lesion classification, including the infrapopliteal segment, and an updated literature review of new endovascular techniques and practice patterns employed by vascular specialists today.

  17. Function after through-knee compared with below-knee and above-knee amputation.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, E; Berlin, O K; Renström, P

    1992-12-01

    Fifty-nine amputees, 24 below-knee (BK), 17 through-knee (TK) and 18 above-knee (AK) who had prosthetic replacements, were evaluated using a questionnaire which provided a quantitative and qualitative assessment scale for the prosthetic function. The ability to apply or don the prosthesis was noted in 100% of the BK, 70% of the TK and 56% of the AK amputations (p < 0.001). Daily use of the prosthesis was recorded in 96% of the BK, 76% of the TK and 50% of the AK amputations (p < 0.001). A higher level of amputation resulted in a significantly lower degree of rehabilitation (p < 0.05). The qualitative evaluation shows that the higher the level of amputation, the lower the usefulness of the prosthesis. Four percent of the BK, 12% of the TK and 39% of the AK amputees had no use whatsoever of their prosthesis (p < 0.01). From a functional standpoint, TK amputation should always be considered as the primary alternative to AK amputation when a BK amputation is not feasible.

  18. Unicondylar knee arthroplasty: a cementless perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Michael E.; Englund, Roy E.; Leighton, Ross K.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To compare the results of cementless unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) with those already reported in a similar study on cemented UKA. Design A case-series cross-sectional study. Setting The Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax. Patients Fifty-one patients who underwent a total of 57 UKAs between May 1989 and May 1997. Inclusion criteria were osteoarthritis involving the predominantly the medial compartment of the knee, relative sparing of the other compartments, less than 15° of varus, minimal knee instability, and attendance at the postoperative clinical visit. Intervention Cementless UKA. Main outcome measures Clinical parameters that included pain, range of motion and the Knee Society Clinical Knee Score. Roentgenographic parameters that included α, β, γ and σ angles and the presence of periprosthetic radiolucency or loose beads. Results Age, weight, gender and follow-up interval did not significantly affect the clinical results in terms of pain, range of motion or knee score. Knees with more than 1 mm of radiolucency had significantly lower knee scores than those with no radiolucency. Knees that radiologically had loose beads also had significantly lower knee scores. The clinical outcomes of cementless UKA were comparable to those already reported on cemented UKA. Cementless femurs had less radiolucency than the cemented femurs, whereas cementless tibias had more radiolucency than their cemented counterparts. Conclusions Cementless UKA seems to be as efficacious as cemented UKA. However, there is some concern about the amount of radiolucency in the cementless tibial components. A randomized clinical trial comparing both cementless and cemented tibial components with a cementless femur (hybrid knee) is needed to further assess this controversial issue in UKA. PMID:11129829

  19. The knee-spine syndrome. Association between lumbar lordosis and extension of the knee.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yasuaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamagata, Masatsune; Hanaoka, Eiji; Moriya, Hideshige

    2003-01-01

    Degenerative changes of the knee often cause loss of extension. This may affect aspects of posture such as lumbar lordosis. A total of 366 patients underwent radiological examination of the lumbar spine in a standing position. The knee and body angles were measured by physical examination using a goniometer. Limitation of extension of the knee was significantly greater in patients whose lumbar lordosis was 30 degrees or less. Lumbar lordosis was significantly reduced in patients whose limitation of extension of the knee was more than 5 degrees. It decreased over the age of 70 years, and the limitation of extension of the knee increased over the age of 60 years. Our study indicates that symptoms from the lumbar spine may be caused by degenerative changes in the knee. This may be called the 'knee-spine syndrome'. PMID:12585585

  20. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  1. Monitoring pigmented skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Vincent P.; Bamber, Jeffery C.; Ott, Robert J.; Crawford, Diane C.; Mortimer, Peter S.

    2002-06-01

    The rising incidence of skin cancer has led to an increase in the number of patients with skin lesions that require diagnosis, mostly using subjective visual examination. Successful treatment depends on early diagnosis. Unfortunately diagnostic accuracy, even by experts, can be as low as 56%; therefore, an accurate, objective diagnostic aid is greatly needed. Reflectance characteristics of pigmented skin lesions were documented to evaluate their diagnostic potential. Reflectance spectra in the wavelength range 320-1100nm were obtained from 260 lesions. Differences between spectra from benign and malignant lesions were utilized by extracting features with the best discriminating power. Discrimination was evaluated using two techniques: multivariate statistical analysis and artificial neural networks, using histology as the standard. Each technique was tested in a blind study and assessed in terms of its ability to diagnose new cases and compared to the clinical diagnosis. The artificial neural network achieved the best diagnostic performance for discriminating between malignant melanoma and benign nevi, having a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 65%. Utilization of visible and infrared techniques for monitoring skin lesions has lead to improvements in diagnostic accuracy. We conclude that these techniques are worthy of further development and evaluation in clinical practice as a screening tool.

  2. Prophylactic Knee Braces: Where Do They Stand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Paul

    1988-01-01

    The effectiveness of knee braces in preventing knee injuries in football is inconclusive. This article reviews research from epidemiologic, cadaver, and surrogate studies; discusses reasons for conflicting study results, including research design problems; and describes alternative approaches that have been suggested. (IAH)

  3. Will 'Unloading' Shoes Help Your Arthritic Knees?

    MedlinePlus

    ... anti-inflammatory medications may also help, as might physical therapy designed to improve flexibility and motion range. In severe cases, patients undergo invasive knee surgery ranging from joint-lining removal to partial or total knee replacement. Clinicians also often recommend using a ...

  4. Conservative biomechanical strategies for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Neil D; Bowling, Frank L

    2011-02-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent forms of this disease, with the medial compartment most commonly affected. The direction of external forces and limb orientation during walking results in an adduction moment that acts around the knee, and this parameter is regarded as a surrogate measure of medial knee compression. The knee adduction moment is intimately linked with the development and progression of knee OA and is, therefore, a target for conservative biomechanical intervention strategies, which are the focus of this Review. We examine the evidence for walking barefoot and the use of lateral wedge insoles and thin-soled, flexible shoes to reduce the knee adduction moment in patients with OA. We review strategies that directly affect the gait, such as walking with the foot externally rotated ('toe-out gait'), using a cane, lateral trunk sway and gait retraining. Valgus knee braces and muscle strengthening are also discussed for their effect upon reducing the knee adduction moment. PMID:21289615

  5. Basic biomechanic principles of knee instability.

    PubMed

    Zlotnicki, Jason P; Naendrup, Jan-Hendrik; Ferrer, Gerald A; Debski, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    Motion at the knee joint is a complex mechanical phenomenon. Stability is provided by a combination of static and dynamic structures that work in concert to prevent excessive movement or instability that is inherent in various knee injuries. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a main stabilizer of the knee, providing both translational and rotatory constraint. Despite the high volume of research directed at native ACL function, pathogenesis and surgical reconstruction of this structure, a gold standard for objective quantification of injury and subsequent repair, has not been demonstrated. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that novel anatomic structures may play a significant role in knee stability. The use of biomechanical principles and testing techniques provides essential objective/quantitative information on the function of bone, ligaments, joint capsule, and other contributing soft tissues in response to various loading conditions. This review discusses the principles of biomechanics in relation to knee stability, with a focus on the objective quantification of knee stability, the individual contributions of specific knee structures to stability, and the most recent technological advances in the biomechanical evaluation of the knee joint. PMID:27007474

  6. A rare variant of knee dislocation

    PubMed Central

    HUSSIN, P.; MAWARDI, M.; AB HALIM, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Knee dislocation is a rare injury. It represents less than 0.2% of orthopaedic injuries. This case reports a rare form of knee dislocation caused by the impact of a high-energy trauma. In these cases the appropriate assessment and management is needed to ensure that patient receives the proper treatment. PMID:27381692

  7. Obesity. A risk factor for knee dislocation.

    PubMed

    Marin, E L; Bifulco, S S; Fast, A

    1990-06-01

    Complete dislocation of the knee joint is a severe injury that is commonly the result of high-velocity injuries and often associated with disruption of the popliteal artery. We report two cases in which obesity appeared to be the principal cause of knee dislocation with vascular compromise. Preventive measures in extremely obese patients are recommended.

  8. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... regularly play sports that involve a lot of repetitive jumping — like track and field (particularly high-jumping), basketball, volleyball, gymnastics, running, and soccer — can put a lot of strain on their knees. Jumper's knee can seem like a minor injury that isn't really that serious. Because of ...

  9. Current Surgical Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rönn, Karolin; Reischl, Nikolaus; Gautier, Emanuel; Jacobi, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Osteoathritis (OA) of the knee is common, and the chances of suffering from OA increase with age. Its treatment should be initially nonoperative—and requires both pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment modalities. If conservative therapy fails, surgery should be considered. Surgical treatments for knee OA include arthroscopy, cartilage repair, osteotomy, and knee arthroplasty. Determining which of these procedures is most appropriate depends on several factors, including the location, stage of OA, comorbidities on the one side and patients suffering on the other side. Arthroscopic lavage and débridement is often carried out, but does not alter disease progression. If OA is limited to one compartment, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty or unloading osteotomy can be considered. They are recommended in young and active patients in regard to the risks and limited durability of total knee replacement. Total arthroplasty of the knee is a common and safe method in the elderly patients with advanced knee OA. This paper summarizes current surgical treatment strategies for knee OA, with a focus on the latest developments, indications and level of evidence. PMID:22046517

  10. Overuse injuries of the knee in basketball.

    PubMed

    Molnar, T J; Fox, J M

    1993-04-01

    Overuse injuries of the knee are abundant in basketball players. This article discusses the pathophysiology of overuse and the principles of treatment. The diagnosis and clinical management of jumper's knee, patellofemoral pain, and stress fractures are outlined with specific attention to rehabilitation techniques and training.

  11. Occupational activities and osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is rising and the search for interventions to mitigate risk is intensifying. This review considers the contribution of occupational activities to disease occurrence and the lessons for prevention. Sources Systematic search in Embase and Medline covering the period 1996 to November 2011. Areas of agreement Reasonably good evidence exists that physical work activities (especially kneeling, squatting, lifting, and climbing) can cause and/or aggravate knee OA. These exposures should be reduced where possible. Obese workers with such exposures are at additional risk of knee OA and should therefore particularly be encouraged to lose weight. Areas of uncertainty/research need Workplace interventions and policies to prevent knee OA have seldom been evaluated. Moreover, their implementation can be problematic. However, the need for research to optimise the design of work in relation to knee OA is pressing, given population trends towards extended working life. PMID:22544778

  12. Gait Analysis of Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty and Bicruciate Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Triaxial Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Tomite, Takenori; Saito, Hidetomo; Aizawa, Toshiaki; Kijima, Hiroaki; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    One component of conventional total knee arthroplasty is removal of the anterior cruciate ligament, and the knee after total knee arthroplasty has been said to be a knee with anterior cruciate ligament dysfunction. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty is believed to reproduce anterior cruciate ligament function in the implant and provide anterior stability. Conventional total knee arthroplasty was performed on the right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty was performed on the left knee in the same patient, and a triaxial accelerometer was fitted to both knees after surgery. Gait analysis was then performed and is reported here. The subject was a 78-year-old woman who underwent conventional total knee arthroplasty on her right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty on her left knee. On the femoral side with bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional total knee arthroplasty, there was little acceleration in the x-axis direction (anteroposterior direction) in the early swing phase. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty may be able to replace anterior cruciate ligament function due to the structure of the implant and proper anteroposterior positioning. PMID:27648328

  13. Gait Analysis of Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty and Bicruciate Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Triaxial Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hidetomo; Aizawa, Toshiaki; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    One component of conventional total knee arthroplasty is removal of the anterior cruciate ligament, and the knee after total knee arthroplasty has been said to be a knee with anterior cruciate ligament dysfunction. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty is believed to reproduce anterior cruciate ligament function in the implant and provide anterior stability. Conventional total knee arthroplasty was performed on the right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty was performed on the left knee in the same patient, and a triaxial accelerometer was fitted to both knees after surgery. Gait analysis was then performed and is reported here. The subject was a 78-year-old woman who underwent conventional total knee arthroplasty on her right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty on her left knee. On the femoral side with bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional total knee arthroplasty, there was little acceleration in the x-axis direction (anteroposterior direction) in the early swing phase. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty may be able to replace anterior cruciate ligament function due to the structure of the implant and proper anteroposterior positioning. PMID:27648328

  14. Gait Analysis of Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty and Bicruciate Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Triaxial Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hidetomo; Aizawa, Toshiaki; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    One component of conventional total knee arthroplasty is removal of the anterior cruciate ligament, and the knee after total knee arthroplasty has been said to be a knee with anterior cruciate ligament dysfunction. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty is believed to reproduce anterior cruciate ligament function in the implant and provide anterior stability. Conventional total knee arthroplasty was performed on the right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty was performed on the left knee in the same patient, and a triaxial accelerometer was fitted to both knees after surgery. Gait analysis was then performed and is reported here. The subject was a 78-year-old woman who underwent conventional total knee arthroplasty on her right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty on her left knee. On the femoral side with bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional total knee arthroplasty, there was little acceleration in the x-axis direction (anteroposterior direction) in the early swing phase. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty may be able to replace anterior cruciate ligament function due to the structure of the implant and proper anteroposterior positioning.

  15. Intraventricular mass lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.; Sobel, D.F.; Kelley, W.M.; Norman, D.

    1984-11-01

    Determining the precise etiology of an intraventricular mass can be a difficult diagnostic problem. CT and angiographic findings were reviewed in a series of 73 patients who had intraventricular masses. The histologic diagnosis can be suggested preoperatively by an analysis of the frequency of lesions occurring at a given ventricular location, lesion density before and after administration of contrast material, age, and sex of the patient, morphologic appearance of the mass, and presence or absence of hydrocephalus. Angiography is useful when meningioma, choroid plexus papilloma and carcinoma, or arteriovenous malformation are considered.

  16. [Jumper's knee--a review].

    PubMed

    Tibesku, C O; Pässler, H H

    2005-06-01

    Jumper's knee has been defined as painful chronic overuse injury of the extensor mechanism of the knee joint. The disease has a high incidence in jumping sports and depends on training frequency and level of performance. Its natural course is protracted, repetitive, and often bilaterally occurring. Its etiology is a chronic overload of the knee extensor mechanism which is triggered by jumping sports (volleyball, basketball etc.) as well as different intrinsic (ligamentous laxity, Q-angle, patella height, tenderness, pattern of force development) and extrinsic dispositions (frequency of training, level of performance, hardness of underground). The place of pathology most often is the osteo-tendinous transition zone of the proximal patellar tendon. Histologic evaluation of the tendon showed that the disease is rather degenerative than inflammatory. The diagnosis is primarily based on the typical sports history, physical examination, and ultrasound. MRI is helpful in operation planning. Plain radiography, CT, and bone scans are used to rule out differential diagnoses. Therapy should be chosen according to the stage of the disease and usually starts with a non-surgical approach. This includes rest from sports activities, immobilisation, non-steroid antiphlogistics, para-tendinous cortisone injections, massage, electric therapy, ultrasound and extracorporal shock waves. Afterwards an increase of activities is begun (moderate training, adequate warm-up, ice cooling after activity, muscle stretching, eccentric strengthening of the quadriceps). Patella straps and soft insoles are used as prevention. Up to 42 % of patients need surgical therapy after failure of long-lasting non-surgical measures, carried out either open or arthroscopically. Surgical principles include excision of the para-tendon, excision of the degenerative tissue, resection of the lower patella pole, and longitudinal incisions into the tendon. Most patients are pain-free after surgery but return to sports

  17. Quadriceps atrophy after knee traumatisms and immobilization: electrophysiological assessment.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martínez, A; Ramírez, A; Arpa, J

    2000-01-01

    Automatic analysis of EMG (T/A analysis) and invasive muscle fiber conduction velocity in situ (MFCV) were performed in 15 patients after traumatic lesions of the knee and immobilization with quadriceps atrophy. T/A analysis showed transient reduced number of turns, consistent with inhibition of quadriceps motoneurons, that recovered within the first 2 weeks after the plaster cast had been removed. MFCV was significantly slowed and showed a gradual improvement, reaching normal values after 6 weeks. These results suggest that decrement in activated motor units may be the cause of the disproportionate weakness of the quadriceps muscle on the first days after immobilization by the plaster cast. The recovery of MFCV was related with functional improvement of strength after the first weeks.

  18. Ho:YAG laser arthroscopy of the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisto, Domenick J.; Blazina, Martin E.; Hirsh, Linda C.

    1994-09-01

    The HO:YAG laser is a near-contact laser with a capacity to ablate or cut tissues. The ablation function allows the surgeon to remove meniscal tissue, lyse and resect adhesions, melt loose bodies, and dissolve inflamed synovium. The cutting function of the laser is utilized to perform a lateral release or resect torn menisci. The laser can also be utilized to drill holes in Grade IV chondromalacic lesions to initiate a healing response. The laser has been embraced by orthopaedic surgeons because of its shape and versatility. The tip is only 2 mm wide and can be delivered into the tight posterior compartments of the knee with no damaging contact with the articular surfaces. The laser coagulates as it works and bleeding is minimized. The laser can function both as a cutting and ablating tool. The laser can also drill holes into subchondral bone to, hopefully, initiate a healing response.

  19. Radionuclide therapy for arthritic knees

    SciTech Connect

    Doepel, L.K.

    1985-02-08

    A new radionuclide therapeutic approach for rheumatoid arthritis of the knee is described. This therapy combines a short-lived radionuclide with a carrier whose physical and chemical characteristics aid retention of the radioactive particles within the joint. Joining a radionuclide to a particulate carrier had not been explored previously as a potential method for inhibiting radiation leakage. The treatment couples the rare earth element dysprosium 165 to ferric hydroxide in macroaggregate form (size range: 3 to 10 ..mu..m). After the relatively inert iron complex penetrates the synovium, it causes cell death. Macrophages and phagocytes clear away the cellular debris, essentially eliminating the synovium.

  20. Automatic locking knee brace joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention is an apparatus for controlling the pivotal movement of a knee brace comprising a tang-and-clevis joint that has been uniquely modified. Both the tang and the clevis have a set of teeth that, when engaged, can lock the tang and the clevis together. In addition, the tang is biased away from the clevis. Consequently, when there is no axial force (i.e., body weight) on the tang, the tang is free to pivot within the clevis. However, when an axial force is exerted on the tang, the tang is pushed into the clevis, both sets of teeth engage, and the tang and the clevis lock together.

  1. Lesion of the hip abductor mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Caviglia, Horacio; Cambiaggi, Guillermo; Vattani, Nosrat; Landro, María Eulalia; Galatro, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The disruption of the abductor muscles of the hip after hip revision surgery often causes limping, pain, and instability of the implant. The purpose of our paper is to describe a mesh technique to repair hip abductor mechanism injuries after hip revision. Patients and methods: Forty-six patients with hip abductor damage after prosthetic revision were treated. Inclusion criteria were: patients presenting with prosthetic loosening, complaint of pain, and with a positive Trendelenburg sign due to deficient abductor muscle mechanisms. Thirty-one were women (67.39%) with an average age of 64 years (34–82 years). The number of previous revision surgeries was three (two to seven). The Merle d’Aubigné score and variants before and after treatment were also reported. Results: In the postoperative follow-up after hip revision with the mesh technique, the Merle d’Aubigné score improved and the Trendelenburg sign was negative in 78.3% of the patients (p < 0.001). Also, the Trendelenburg test with the knee flexed was negative in 60.9% (p < 0.001) and the stair-climbing test was negative in 60.9% of cases (p < 0.001). The gluteus medius test in the lateral position was negative in 52.2% of patients, and in the lateral position with the knee flexed it was negative in 47.8% of patients (p < 0.001). Discussion: Repair of the abductor mechanism with the mesh technique has proven effective for both partial and total lesions. PMID:27382925

  2. Intra-articular knee mass in a 51-year-old woman.

    PubMed

    Bergin, Patrick F; Milchteim, Charles; Beaulieu, Gregory P; Brindle, Kathleen A; Schwartz, Arnold M; Faulks, Craig R

    2011-03-01

    A 51-year-old woman presented with moderate knee pain refractory to conservative measures. Radiographs revealed a well-defined, but irregularly-shaped ovoid soft tissue density at the posterior superior aspect of the infrapatellar fat pad of Hoffa. On magnetic resonance imaging, the mass was mildly heterogeneous and had intermediate signal in the proton density series and mixed signal intensity on the T2-weighted images. A low-signal rim could be seen around a portion of the lesion. Arthroscopic resection was performed and a vascular stalk was encountered. The differential diagnosis included: ganglion cyst, meniscal cyst, intra-articular lipoma, villous proliferation of the synovial membrane, Hoffa disease, and intracapsular chondroma. Histologic examination revealed a fibrous capsule partially surrounding a benign lipomatous neoplasm containing an abundance of thin- and thick-walled blood vessels with periadventitial myxoid stroma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an intra-articular angiomyxolipoma in the literature. At 8-month follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with no sign of recurrence. We postulate a low recurrence rate based on the insidious growth rate and benign histological appearance of such lesions. To our knowledge, no other intra-articular lipomatous lesion of the knee has been removed solely with arthroscopic techniques. Further follow-up information is needed to better understand the natural course of these lesions.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of liver lesions: exceptions and atypical lesions.

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Indra C; Hussain, Shahid M; de Man, Robert A; Zondervan, Pieter E; Ijzermans, Jan N M; Preda, A; Krestin, Gabriel P

    2008-01-01

    On state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging, most lesions can be detected and characterized with confidence according to well-known criteria. However, atypical characteristics in some common lesions and the incidental encounter with rare lesions may pose diagnostic difficulties. In this article, six challenging hepatic lesions will be discussed and evaluated on the most important magnetic resonance imaging sequences, with histological correlation when available. In addition, the background information concerning these lesions will be described based on the most recent available literature. By reading this article, the reader will be able to (1) categorize the lesion in solid and fluid-containing lesions, based on the T2 signal intensity; and (2) define the benign or malignant nature of the lesion, in relation to the signal intensity and dynamic enhancement pattern, despite the presence of atypical characteristics of some lesions. PMID:18436109

  4. Platelet-Rich Plasma Treatment in Symptomatic Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gobbi, Alberto; Karnatzikos, Georgios; Mahajan, Vivek; Malchira, Somanna

    2012-01-01

    Background: With increasing frequency, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparations have been used to treat cartilage lesions to regenerate tissue homeostasis and retard the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of intra-articular PRP injections in active patients with knee OA and to evaluate clinical outcomes in patients with and without previous surgical treatment for cartilage lesions. Study Design: Case series. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with knee OA were followed for a minimum of 12 months. All were treated with 2 intra-articular injections of autologous PRP. Twenty-five patients had undergone a previous operative intervention for cartilage lesions, whereas 25 had not. Operated patients had undergone either cartilage shaving or microfracture. Multiple evaluative scores were collected at pretreatment and at 6 and 12 months posttreatment. The required sample of patients was determined beforehand by using statistical power analysis; International Knee Documentation Committee (subjective) score was defined as the primary parameter. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. General linear model–repeated measure test evaluated within-time improvement for each variable for all patients. Post hoc test with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons was performed to investigate the significance in improvement within time evaluations for each variable for the total sample. The differences in improvement between operated and nonoperated patients were also investigated, as were those between sexes. Results: All patients showed significant improvement in all scores at 6 and 12 months (P < 0.01) and returned to previous activities. No significant difference in improvement was found between the evaluated subgroups (P < 0.01). Conclusions: The PRP treatment showed positive effects in patients with knee OA. Operated and nonoperated patients showed significant improvement by means of diminishing

  5. Are External Knee Load and EMG Measures Accurate Indicators of Internal Knee Contact Forces during Gait?

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Andrew J.; D'Lima, Darryl D.; Besier, Thor F.; Lloyd, David G.; Colwell, Clifford W.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical loading is believed to be a critical factor in the development and treatment of knee osteoarthritis. However, the contact forces to which the knee articular surfaces are subjected during daily activities cannot be measured clinically. Thus, the ability to predict internal knee contact forces accurately using external measures (i.e., external knee loads and muscle EMG signals) would be clinically valuable. This study quantifies how well external knee load and EMG measures predict internal knee contact forces during gait. A single subject with a force-measuring tibial prosthesis and post-operative valgus alignment performed four gait patterns (normal, medial thrust, walking pole, and trunk sway) to induce a wide range of external and internal knee joint loads. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess how much of the variability in internal contact forces was accounted for by variability in the external measures. Though the different gait patterns successfully induced significant changes in the external and internal quantities, changes in external measures were generally weak indicators of changes in total, medial, and lateral contact force. Our results suggest that when total contact force may be changing, caution should be exercised when inferring changes in knee contact forces based on observed changes in external knee load and EMG measures. Advances in musculoskeletal modeling methods may be needed for accurate estimation of in vivo knee contact forces. PMID:23280647

  6. Real-Time Tracking of Knee Adduction Moment in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Lee, Song Joo; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Background The external knee adduction moment (EKAM) is closely associated with the presence, progression, and severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is a lack of convenient and practical method to estimate and track in real-time the EKAM of patients with knee OA for clinical evaluation and gait training, especially outside of gait laboratories. New Method A real-time EKAM estimation method was developed and applied to track and investigate the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping on an elliptical trainer in both healthy subjects and a patient with knee OA. Results Substantial changes were observed in the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping in the patient with knee OA. Comparison with Existing Method(s) This is the first study to develop and test feasibility of real-time tracking method of the EKAM on patients with knee OA using 3-D inverse dynamics. Conclusions The study provides us an accurate and practical method to evaluate in real-time the critical EKAM associated with knee OA, which is expected to help us to diagnose and evaluate patients with knee OA and provide the patients with real-time EKAM feedback rehabilitation training. PMID:24361759

  7. Prevalence of and risk factors for hock and knee injuries on dairy cows in tiestall housing in Canada.

    PubMed

    Nash, C G R; Kelton, D F; DeVries, T J; Vasseur, E; Coe, J; Heyerhoff, J C Zaffino; Bouffard, V; Pellerin, D; Rushen, J; de Passillé, A M; Haley, D B

    2016-08-01

    Leg injuries on dairy cows are a common and highly visible welfare concern on commercial dairy farms. With greater attention being placed on food animal welfare and limited research being conducted on tiestall farms, this study aimed to identify prevalence and risk factors for hock and knee injuries on dairy cows housed in tiestall barns in Ontario (n=40) and Quebec (n=60). A sample of 40 cows was purposively selected per farm and several animal- and farm-based measures were taken. Both hocks and both knees on each cow were scored as injured (presence of lesions or swelling) or not injured (no alterations or hair loss), and the highest score of each of the 2 knees and the 2 hocks was considered the cow's hock or knee score. Possible animal- and farm-based risk factors were incorporated into 2 separate multivariable logistic models for hock injuries and knee injuries respectively at the cow level. Mean (±SD) percentage of cow with hock injuries per farm was found to be 56±18% and mean percentage of knee injuries per farm was found to be 43±23%. Animal-based factors found to be associated with a greater odds of hock injuries at the cow level were increased days in milk (DIM), lower body condition score (BCS), lameness, higher parity, higher cow width, median lying bout duration, and median number of lying bouts. Environmental factors found to be associated with hock injuries at the cow level were province, stall width, tie rail position, stall base, chain length, and age of stall base. Animal-based factors found to be associated with knee injuries at the cow level were DIM, BCS, and median lying time. Environmental factors found to be associated with knee injuries at the cow level were stall width, chain length, province, stall base, and bed length. Quadratic and interaction terms were also identified between these variables in both the hock and knee models. This study demonstrates that hock and knee injuries are still a common problem on tiestall dairy farms in

  8. Three-dimensional dynamic analysis of knee joint during gait in medial knee osteoarthritis using loading axis of knee.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Katsutoshi; Omori, Go; Koga, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Koichi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Tanabe, Yuji; Tanaka, Masaei; Arakawa, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    We recently developed a new method for three-dimensional evaluation of mechanical factors affecting knee joint in order to help identify factors that contribute to the progression of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). This study aimed to verify the clinical validity of our method by evaluating knee joint dynamics during gait. Subjects were 41 individuals (14 normal knees; 8 mild KOAs; 19 severe KOAs). The positions of skin markers attached to the body were captured during gait, and bi-planar X-ray images of the lower extremities were obtained in standing position. The positional relationship between the markers and femorotibial bones was determined from the X-ray images. Combining this relationship with gait capture allowed for the estimation of relative movement between femorotibial bones. We also calculated the point of intersection of loading axis of knee on the tibial proximal surface (LAK point) to analyze knee joint dynamics. Knee flexion range in subjects with severe KOA during gait was significantly smaller than that in those with normal knees (p=0.011), and knee adduction in those with severe KOA was significantly larger than in those with mild KOA (p<0.000). LAK point was locally loaded on the medial compartment of the tibial surface as KOA progressed, with LAK point of subjects with severe KOA rapidly shifting medially during loading response. Local loading and medial shear force were applied to the tibial surface during stance phase as medial KOA progressed. Our findings suggest that our method is useful for the quantitative evaluation of mechanical factors that affect KOA progression.

  9. Three-dimensional dynamic analysis of knee joint during gait in medial knee osteoarthritis using loading axis of knee.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Katsutoshi; Omori, Go; Koga, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Koichi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Tanabe, Yuji; Tanaka, Masaei; Arakawa, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    We recently developed a new method for three-dimensional evaluation of mechanical factors affecting knee joint in order to help identify factors that contribute to the progression of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). This study aimed to verify the clinical validity of our method by evaluating knee joint dynamics during gait. Subjects were 41 individuals (14 normal knees; 8 mild KOAs; 19 severe KOAs). The positions of skin markers attached to the body were captured during gait, and bi-planar X-ray images of the lower extremities were obtained in standing position. The positional relationship between the markers and femorotibial bones was determined from the X-ray images. Combining this relationship with gait capture allowed for the estimation of relative movement between femorotibial bones. We also calculated the point of intersection of loading axis of knee on the tibial proximal surface (LAK point) to analyze knee joint dynamics. Knee flexion range in subjects with severe KOA during gait was significantly smaller than that in those with normal knees (p=0.011), and knee adduction in those with severe KOA was significantly larger than in those with mild KOA (p<0.000). LAK point was locally loaded on the medial compartment of the tibial surface as KOA progressed, with LAK point of subjects with severe KOA rapidly shifting medially during loading response. Local loading and medial shear force were applied to the tibial surface during stance phase as medial KOA progressed. Our findings suggest that our method is useful for the quantitative evaluation of mechanical factors that affect KOA progression. PMID:26002602

  10. Objective measurements of static anterior and rotational knee laxity.

    PubMed

    Mouton, Caroline; Theisen, Daniel; Seil, Romain

    2016-06-01

    Several devices allow to measure anterior and rotational static knee laxity. To date, the use of rotational laxity measurements in the daily clinical practice however remains to be improved. These measurements may be systematically integrated to the follow-up of knee injuries. Physiologic laxity measurements may particularly be of interest for the identification of risk factors in athletes. Furthermore, knee laxity measurements help to improve the diagnosis of knee soft tissue injuries and to follow up reconstructions. Further prospective follow-ups of knee laxity in the injured/reconstructed knees are however required to conclude on the best treatment strategy for knee soft tissue injuries. PMID:26970758

  11. Simultaneous surgical management of chronic grade-2 valgus instability of the knee and anterior cruciate ligament deficiency in athletes.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Merlo, Franco; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-03-01

    We report on 22 patients with chronic grade-2 valgus laxity of the knee combined with chronic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency, in whom the two lesions were addressed at the same surgical setting. At a minimum follow-up of 24 months, clinical and functional variables had improved significantly (P < 0.001), and 20 of the 22 patients (91%) had returned to sport at pre-injury level. There were no operative complications in this series. In selected athletes with chronic symptomatic valgus laxity of the knee combined with ACL insufficiency, surgical repair of the MCL in association with ACL reconstruction is a suitable and reliable option to restore knee stability and allow return to pre-injury activity level.

  12. Ganglion cysts in the lateral portal region of the knee after arthroscopy: report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Sever, Cem; Malkoc, Melih; Acar, Turker; Turkmen, Faik; Oto, Onur

    2015-01-01

    A ganglion cyst (GC) is a mucinous or gelatinous-filled benign tumor overlying a joint or tendon sheath, which commonly arises in the dorsal and volar wrist side but may occur anywhere in the body. Although cystic lesions around the knee are common, the occurrence of GCs are rare. Ganglia may arise from intra or extra-articular, soft tissue, intraosseous, or periosteal location. Symptoms may vary according to the size and location. After the more frequent performance of magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of a knee joint, the number of incidental, asymptomatic lesions have been increasingly diagnosed. The etiology of GC remains unclear; however, trauma and a flaw in the joint tissues may explain its appearance. The authors report two cases of women aged 47 years and 37 years who presented pain and swelling in their left knees following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy. The former was surgically treated and had a favorable outcome, while the latter had conservative treatment and a gloomy outcome. PMID:26894048

  13. Early knee changes in dancers identified by ultra-high-field 7 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Chang, G; Diamond, M; Nevsky, G; Regatte, R R; Weiss, D S

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to determine whether a unique, ultra-high-field 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner could detect occult cartilage and meniscal injuries in asymptomatic female dancers. This study had Institutional Review Board approval. We recruited eight pre-professional female dancers and nine non-athletic, female controls. We scanned the dominant knee on a 7 T MRI scanner using a three-dimensional fast low-angle shot sequence and a proton density, fast spin-echo sequence to evaluate cartilage and menisci, respectively. Two radiologists scored cartilage (International Cartilage Repair Society classification) and meniscal (Stoller classification) lesions. We applied two-tailed z- and t-tests to determine statistical significance. There were no cartilage lesions in dancers or controls. For the medial meniscus, the dancers demonstrated higher mean MRI score (2.38 ± 0.61 vs 1.0 ± 0.97, P < 0.0001) and higher frequency of mean grade 2 lesions (88% vs 11%, P < 0.01) compared with the controls. For the lateral meniscus, there was no difference in score (0.5 ± 0.81 vs 0.5 ± 0.78, P = 0.78) in dancers compared with the control groups. Asymptomatic dancers demonstrate occult medial meniscal lesions. Because this has been described in early osteoarthritis, close surveillance of dancers' knee symptoms and function with appropriate activity modification may help maintain their long-term knee health.

  14. The Cruciate Ligaments in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parcells, Bertrand W; Tria, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    The early knee replacements were hinge designs that ignored the ligaments of the knee and resurfaced the joint, allowing freedom of motion in a single plane. Advances in implant fixation paved the way for modern designs, including the posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that sacrifices both cruciate ligaments while substituting for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and the cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA designs that sacrifice the anterior cruciate ligament but retain the PCL. The early bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA designs suffered from loosening and early failures. Townley and Cartier designed BCR knees that had better clinical results but the surgical techniques were challenging.Kinematic studies suggest that normal motion relies on preservation of both cruciate ligaments. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty retains all knee ligaments and closely matches normal motion, while PS and CR TKA deviate further from normal. The 15% to 20% dissatisfaction rate with current TKA has renewed interest in the BCR design. Replication of normal knee kinematics and proprioception may address some of the dissatisfaction.

  15. Surgical approaches for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul; Demesugh, Daniel Mue; Agarwal, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    There are various surgical approaches to the knee joint and its surrounding structures and such approaches are generally designed to allow the best access to an area of pathology whilst safeguarding important surrounding structures. Controversy currently surrounds the optimal surgical approach for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The medial parapatellar arthrotomy, or anteromedial approach, has been the most used and has been regarded as the standard approach for exposure of the knee joint. It provides extensive exposure and is useful for open anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, total knee replacement, and fixation of intra-articular fractures. Because this approach has been implicated in compromise of the patellar circulation, some authors have advocated the subvastus, midvastus, and trivector approaches for exposure of the knee joint. While these approaches expose the knee from the medial side, the anterolateral approach exposes the knee joint from the lateral side. With careful planning and arthrotomy selection, the anterior aspect of the joint can be adequately exposed for TKA in different clinical scenarios. PMID:27182142

  16. Knee arthrodesis – ultima ratio for the treatment of the infected knee

    PubMed Central

    Tiemann, Andreas H. H.

    2013-01-01

    The irretrievable destruction of the knee due to trauma, tumor or infection is the indication for knee arthrodesis. The main reason for knee arthrodesis in terms of infection ist the infected total knee arthroplasty. Central problem is the definition of the term “irretrievable”. It is based on the subjective opinion of the attending physician and depends on his expert knowledge of this specific entity. The preservation of a functioning extremity is the main goal. This article shows the typical indications and contraindications for knee arthrodesis following septic knee diseases. In addition it gives insight into the biomechanical and technical considerations to be kept in mind. Finally the postoperative care and outcome of different techniques are analysed. PMID:26504699

  17. Translational and rotational knee joint stability in anterior and posterior cruciate-retaining knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lo, JiaHsuan; Müller, Otto; Dilger, Torsten; Wülker, Nikolaus; Wünschel, Markus

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated passive translational and rotational stability properties of the intact knee joint, after bicruciate-retaining bi-compartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) and after posterior cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fourteen human cadaveric knee specimens were used in this study, and a robotic manipulator with six-axis force/torque sensor was used to test the joint laxity in anterior-posterior translation, valgus-varus, and internal-external rotation. The results show the knee joint stability after bicruciate-retaining BKA is similar to that of the native knee. On the other hand, the PCL-retaining TKA results in inferior joint stability in valgus, varus, external rotation, anterior and, surprisingly, posterior directions. Our findings suggest that, provided functional ligamentous structures, bicruciate-retaining BKA is a biomechanically attractive treatment for joint degenerative disease.

  18. Dynamic splinting for knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Eric; Willis, F Buck

    2008-01-01

    Total Knee Arthroplasty operations are increasing in frequency, and knee flexion contracture is a common pathology, both pre-existing and post-operative. A 61-year-old male presented with knee flexion contracture following a total knee arthroplasty. Physical therapy alone did not fully reduce the contracture and dynamic splinting was then prescribed for daily low-load, prolonged-duration stretch. After 28 physical therapy sessions, the active range of motion improved from -20° to -12° (stiff knee still lacking full extension), and after eight additional weeks with nightly wear of dynamic splint, the patient regained full knee extension, (active extension improved from -12° to 0°). PMID:19113998

  19. Failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Leta, Tesfaye H; Lygre, Stein Håkon L; Skredderstuen, Arne; Hallan, Geir; Furnes, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose In Norway, the proportion of revision knee arthroplasties increased from 6.9% in 1994 to 8.5% in 2011. However, there is limited information on the epidemiology and causes of subsequent failure of revision knee arthroplasty. We therefore studied survival rate and determined the modes of failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties. Method This study was based on 1,016 aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register between 1994 and 2011. Revisions done for infections were not included. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the survival rate and the relative risk of re-revision with all causes of re-revision as endpoint. Results 145 knees failed after revision total knee arthroplasty. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of re-revision (28%), followed by instability (26%), loose tibial component (17%), and pain (10%). The cumulative survival rate for revision total knee arthroplasties was 85% at 5 years, 78% at 10 years, and 71% at 15 years. Revision total knee arthroplasties with exchange of the femoral or tibial component exclusively had a higher risk of re-revision (RR = 1.7) than those with exchange of the whole prosthesis. The risk of re-revision was higher for men (RR = 2.0) and for patients aged less than 60 years (RR = 1.6). Interpretation In terms of implant survival, revision of the whole implant was better than revision of 1 component only. Young age and male sex were risk factors for re-revision. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of failure of revision of aseptic total knee arthroplasties. PMID:25267502

  20. [Managing focal incidental renal lesions].

    PubMed

    Nicolau, C; Paño, B; Sebastià, C

    2016-01-01

    Incidental renal lesions are relatively common in daily radiological practice. It is important to know the different diagnostic possibilities for incidentally detected lesions, depending on whether they are cystic or solid. The management of cystic lesions is guided by the Bosniak classification. In solid lesions, the goal is to differentiate between renal cancer and benign tumors such as fat-poor angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma. Radiologists need to know the recommendations for the management of these lesions and the usefulness of the different imaging techniques and interventional procedures in function of the characteristics of the incidental lesion and the patient's life expectancy.

  1. Knee joint arthroplasty after tibial osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Fosco, Matteo; Cenni, Elisabetta; Tigani, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    A total of 29 consecutive knee joint arthroplasties in 24 patients who underwent previous high tibial osteotomy (HTO) for medial unicompartment osteoarthritis of the knee and followed up for a mean of 97 months were compared with a control group of 28 patients with 29 primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) without previous HTO. Results for the osteotomy group were satisfactory in 96.5% of cases. In one patient loosening of the implant occurred after 37 months, which required prosthesis revision. Three patients underwent a further operation of secondary patella resurfacing for patella pain. The group without osteotomy reported a similar percentage of satisfactory results. PMID:19882155

  2. Physiotherapy following through-knee amputation.

    PubMed

    Mensch, G

    1983-08-01

    Physiotherapeutic treatment considerations specific to the through-knee amputee are presented. Treatment is determined by the assessment findings. The physiotherapy programme includes post-operative exercises, early weight-bearing, bed to chair transfers, bandaging techniques, the counteracting of contractures and gait training. Physiotherapy is a vital part of the rehabilitation of through-knee amputees. Principles of treatment are based on normal human locomotion, the individual patient's health status, biomechanical changes and expected stump functions. The through-knee stump is generally problem free, functional and end-bearing, allowing for a high rehabilitation rate in independent ambulation. It is therefore well suited for the geriatric amputee.

  3. Chondroblastoma of the Knee Treated with Resection and Osteochondral Allograft Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Judd; Broehm, Cory; Treme, Gehron

    2014-01-01

    Case. This case report describes the operative management of 16-year-old male with a symptomatic chondroblastoma of the distal femur with breach of the chondral surface. Following appropriate imaging and core needle biopsy, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically. The patient then underwent intralesional curettage and osteochondral allograft reconstruction of the defect. At one-year follow-up the patient was pain-free and has obtained excellent range of motion. There is radiographic evidence of allograft incorporation and no evidence of local recurrence. Conclusion. Osteochondral allograft reconstruction is an effective option following marginal resection and curettage of chondroblastoma involving the chondral surface of the distal femur. PMID:25548701

  4. Chondroblastoma of the knee treated with resection and osteochondral allograft reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Judd; Broehm, Cory; Chafey, David; Treme, Gehron

    2014-01-01

    Case. This case report describes the operative management of 16-year-old male with a symptomatic chondroblastoma of the distal femur with breach of the chondral surface. Following appropriate imaging and core needle biopsy, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically. The patient then underwent intralesional curettage and osteochondral allograft reconstruction of the defect. At one-year follow-up the patient was pain-free and has obtained excellent range of motion. There is radiographic evidence of allograft incorporation and no evidence of local recurrence. Conclusion. Osteochondral allograft reconstruction is an effective option following marginal resection and curettage of chondroblastoma involving the chondral surface of the distal femur.

  5. Chondroblastoma of the knee treated with resection and osteochondral allograft reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Judd; Broehm, Cory; Chafey, David; Treme, Gehron

    2014-01-01

    Case. This case report describes the operative management of 16-year-old male with a symptomatic chondroblastoma of the distal femur with breach of the chondral surface. Following appropriate imaging and core needle biopsy, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically. The patient then underwent intralesional curettage and osteochondral allograft reconstruction of the defect. At one-year follow-up the patient was pain-free and has obtained excellent range of motion. There is radiographic evidence of allograft incorporation and no evidence of local recurrence. Conclusion. Osteochondral allograft reconstruction is an effective option following marginal resection and curettage of chondroblastoma involving the chondral surface of the distal femur. PMID:25548701

  6. Determination of representative dimension parameter values of Korean knee joints for knee joint implant design.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Dai Soon; Tao, Quang Bang; Todo, Mitsugu; Jeon, Insu

    2012-05-01

    Knee joint implants developed by western companies have been imported to Korea and used for Korean patients. However, many clinical problems occur in knee joints of Korean patients after total knee joint replacement owing to the geometric mismatch between the western implants and Korean knee joint structures. To solve these problems, a method to determine the representative dimension parameter values of Korean knee joints is introduced to aid in the design of knee joint implants appropriate for Korean patients. Measurements of the dimension parameters of 88 male Korean knee joint subjects were carried out. The distribution of the subjects versus each measured parameter value was investigated. The measured dimension parameter values of each parameter were grouped by suitable intervals called the "size group," and average values of the size groups were calculated. The knee joint subjects were grouped as the "patient group" based on "size group numbers" of each parameter. From the iterative calculations to decrease the errors between the average dimension parameter values of each "patient group" and the dimension parameter values of the subjects, the average dimension parameter values that give less than the error criterion were determined to be the representative dimension parameter values for designing knee joint implants for Korean patients.

  7. Complex function of the knee joint: the current understanding of the knee.

    PubMed

    Hirschmann, Michael T; Müller, Werner

    2015-10-01

    Since the early years of orthopaedics, it is a well-known fact that anatomy follows function. During the evolution of mankind, the knee has been optimally adapted to the forces and loads acting at and through the knee joint. However, anatomy of the knee joint is variable and the only constant is its complex function. In contrast to the time of open surgery, nowadays the majority of reconstructive knee surgery is done arthroscopically. Keyhole surgery is less invasive, but on the backside, the knee surgeon lacks daily visualisation of the complex open anatomy. As open anatomical knowledge is less present in our daily practice, it is even more important to highlight this complex anatomy and function of the knee. It is the purpose of this review to perform a systematic review of knee anatomy, highlight the complex function of the knee joint and present an overview about recent and current knowledge about knee function. Level of evidence Systematic review, Level IV. PMID:25962963

  8. Examination of knee joint moments on the function of knee-ankle-foot orthoses during walking.

    PubMed

    Andrysek, Jan; Klejman, Susan; Kooy, John

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate clinically relevant biomechanical conditions relating to the setup and alignment of knee-ankle-foot orthoses and the influence of these conditions on knee extension moments and orthotic stance control during gait. Knee moments were collected using an instrumented gait laboratory and concurrently a load transducer embedded at the knee-ankle-foot orthosis knee joint of four individuals with poliomyelitis. We found that knee extension moments were not typically produced in late stance-phase of gait. Adding a dorsiflexion stop at the orthotic ankle significantly decreased the knee flexion moments in late stance-phase, while slightly flexing the knee in stance-phase had a variable effect. The findings suggest that where users of orthoses have problems initiating swing-phase flexion with stance control orthoses, an ankle dorsiflexion stop may be used to enhance function. Furthermore, the use of stance control knee joints that lock while under flexion may contribute to more inconsistent unlocking of the stance control orthosis during gait.

  9. Improvements in knee biomechanics during walking are associated with increased physical activity after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Arnold, John B; Mackintosh, Shylie; Olds, Timothy S; Jones, Sara; Thewlis, Dominic

    2015-12-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in people with knee osteoarthritis increases knee-specific and general physical function, but it has not been established if there is a relationship between changes in these elements of functional ability. This study investigated changes and relationships between knee biomechanics during walking, physical activity, and use of time after TKA. Fifteen people awaiting TKA underwent 3D gait analysis before and six months after surgery. Physical activity and use of time were determined in free-living conditions from a high resolution 24-h activity recall. After surgery, participants displayed significant improvements in sagittal plane knee biomechanics and improved their physical activity profiles, standing for 105 more minutes (p=0.001) and performing 64 min more inside chores on average per day (p=0.008). Changes in sagittal plane knee range of motion (ROM) and peak knee flexion positively correlated with changes in total daily energy expenditure, time spent undertaking moderate to vigorous physical activity, inside chores and passive transport (r=0.52-0.66, p=0.005-0.047). Restoration of knee function occurs in parallel and is associated with improvements in physical activity and use of time after TKA. Increased functional knee ROM is required to support improvements in total and context specific physical activity.

  10. Is Lifelong Knee Joint Force from Work, Home, and Sport Related to Knee Osteoarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Ratzlaff, Charles R.; Koehoorn, Mieke; Cibere, Jolanda; Kopec, Jacek A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the association of cumulative lifetime knee joint force on the risk of self-reported medically-diagnosed knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Exposure data on lifetime physical activity type (occupational, household, sport/recreation) and dose (frequency, intensity, duration) were collected from 4,269 Canadian men and women as part of the Physical Activity and Joint Heath cohort study. Subjects were ranked in terms of the “cumulative peak force index”, a measure of lifetime mechanical knee force. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to obtain adjusted effects for mean lifetime knee force on the risk of knee OA. Results. High levels of total lifetime, occupational and household-related force were associated with an increased in risk of OA, with odds ratio's ranging from approximately 1.3 to 2. Joint injury, high BMI and older age were related to risk of knee OA, consistent with previous studies. Conclusions. A newly developed measure of lifetime mechanical knee force from physical activity was employed to estimate the risk of self-reported, medically-diagnosed knee OA. While there are limitations, this paper suggests that high levels of total lifetime force (all domains combined), and occupational force in men and household force in women were risk factors for knee OA. PMID:22848225

  11. Knee anterior laxity: a risk factor for traumatic knee injury among sportswomen?

    PubMed

    Vauhnik, Renata; Morrissey, Matthew C; Rutherford, Olga M; Turk, Zmago; Pilih, Iztok A; Pohar, Maja

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if knee anterior laxity, measured with an arthrometer, is a risk factor for traumatic knee injury in sportswomen. To allow a more complete analysis, other, easily measured variables such as anthropometry, lower leg characteristics, sport exposure and menstrual cycle characteristics were also evaluated as possible risk factors. Subjects were Slovenian sportswomen aged between 11 and 41 years participating in basketball, team handball and volleyball (N = 540). Sportswomen were tested in the pre-season and followed for one season. The data collection included: written informed consent, background questionnaire, anthropometric tests, leg dominance assessment, navicular drop test (measurement of foot pronation), passive knee extension assessment and measurement of knee anterior laxity with a KT arthrometer. Several sets of data analysis were performed including logistic regression analysis in order to build a model for predicting traumatic knee injury among sportswomen. Height and average hours of training per week were found to differ significantly (P < 0.05) between injured and uninjured sportswomen. More sportswomen injured their non-dominant leg. Traumatic knee injuries among Slovenian sportswomen participating in basketball, team handball and volleyball are associated with higher amounts of training, greater body height and greater knee anterior laxity. Only 1% of the variability in traumatic knee injuries among sportswomen were explained with those variables suggesting that there are many other variables associated with traumatic knee injuries among sportswomen than were tested in this study.

  12. Novel lesion detection aids.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, K W; Longbottom, C; Ellwood, R; Lussi, A

    2009-01-01

    Several non-invasive and novel aids for the detection of (and in some cases monitoring of) caries lesions have been introduced in the field of 'caries diagnostics' over the last 15 years. This chapter focusses on those available to dentists at the time of writing; continuing research is bound to lead to further developments in the coming years. Laser fluorescence is based on measurements of back-scattered fluorescence of a 655-nm light source. It enhances occlusal and (potentially) approximal lesion detection and enables semi-quantitative caries monitoring. Systematic reviews have identified false-positive results as a limitation. Quantitative light-induced fluorescence is another sensitive method to quantitatively detect and measure mineral loss both in enamel and some dentine lesions; again, the trade-offs with lower specificity when compared with clinical visual detection must be considered. Subtraction radiography is based on the principle of digitally superimposing two radiographs with exactly the same projection geometry. This method is applicable for approximal surfaces and occlusal caries involving dentine but is not yet widely available. Electrical caries measurements gather either site-specific or surface-specific information of teeth and tooth structure. Fixed-frequency devices perform best for occlusal dentine caries but the method has also shown promise for lesions in enamel and other tooth surfaces with multi-frequency approaches. All methods require further research and further validation in well-designed clinical trials. In the future, they could have useful applications in clinical practice as part of a personalized, comprehensive caries management system. PMID:19494675

  13. Deconditioned Knee: The Effectiveness of a Rehabilitation Program that Restores Normal Knee Motion to Improve Symptoms and Function

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Angela; Gray, Tinker

    2007-01-01

    Background Knee pain can cause a deconditioned knee. Deconditioned is defined as causing one to lose physical fitness. Therefore, a deconditioned knee is defined as a painful syndrome caused by anatomical or functional abnormalities that result in a knee flexion contracture (functional loss of knee extension), decreased strength, and decreased function. To date, no published studies exist examining treatment for a deconditioned knee. Objective To determine the effectiveness of a rehabilitation program focused on increasing range of motion for patients with a deconditioned knee. Methods Fifty patients (mean age 53.2 years) enrolled in the study. Objective evaluation included radiographs, knee range of motion, and isokinetic strength testing. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective questionnaire was used to measure symptoms and function. Patients were given a rehabilitation program to increase knee extension (including hyperextension) and flexion equal to the normal knee, after which patients were instructed in leg strengthening exercises. Results Knee extension significantly improved from a mean deficit of 10° to 3° and knee flexion significantly improved from a mean deficit of 19° to 9°. The IKDC survey scores significantly improved from a mean of 34.5 points to 70.5 points 1 year after beginning treatment. The IKDC subjective pain frequency and severity scores were significantly improved. Conclusions A rehabilitation program that improves knee range of motion can relieve pain and improve function for patients with a deconditioned knee. PMID:21522205

  14. The knee: Surface-coil MR imaging at 1. 5 T

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, J.; Noto, A.M.; Mosure, J.C.; Weiss, K.L.; Zuelzer, W.; Christoforidis, A.J.

    1986-06-01

    Seven normal knees (in five volunteers) and seven injured knees (in seven patients) were examined by high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 1.5 T with a surface coil. Seven medial meniscal tears, three anterior cruciate ligament tears, one posterior cruciate ligament avulsion, an old osteochondral fracture, femoral condylar chondro-malacia, and one case of semimembranous tendon reinsertion were identified. MR images correlated well with recent double-contrast arthrograms or results of surgery. All tears were identified in both the sagittal and coronal planes. Because of its ability to demonstrate small meniscal lesions and ligamentous injuries readily, MR imaging with a surface coil may eventually replace the more invasive arthrography.

  15. Surgical Treatment of Neglected Traumatic Quadriceps Tendon Rupture with Knee Ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Song, Eun-Kyoo; Seon, Jong-Keun; Woo, Seong-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury. This disabling condition is the result of direct or indirect trauma. It requires surgical repair to avoid poor outcomes in cases of neglected or chronic rupture. In most acute cases, simple tendon suture or reinsertion is suitable for an extensor mechanism reconstruction of the knee joint. However, chronic lesions often require a tendon graft or flap reconstruction. We report a case of a 15-year-old male who was diagnosed with a chronic quadriceps rupture with a patellar superior pole fracture. We performed quadriceps reconstruction using tibialis anterior allograft tendon and additional screw fixation to reconstruct the extensor mechanism and recover knee joint range of motion to prevent a high-level functional restriction. The treatment was difficult and limited due to neglect for 9-months that led to ankylosis accompanied with nonunion of tibial fracture. Our surgical treatment using allograft tendon resulted in a very good outcome after 30 months of follow-up.

  16. Extensor-mechanism-reconstruction of the knee joint after traumatic loss of the entire extensor apparatus.

    PubMed

    Raschke, D; Schüttrumpf, J P; Tezval, M; Stürmer, K M; Balcarek, P

    2014-06-01

    Injuries to the extensor apparatus of the knee joint have an incidence of 0.5% to 6%. Although previous studies have described the advantages and disadvantages of operative treatment in cases of patellar tendon rupture, patella fracture or quadriceps tendon lesions, a report on the reconstruction of the extensor apparatus after traumatic loss of the patella, the patellar tendon, the tibial tuberosity and parts of the lateral quadriceps muscle is absent from the literature. We present the case of a young motorcyclist who underwent a reconstruction of the extensor apparatus using autologous tendon grafts. At a 24-month follow-up, the patient has a nearly physiological range of motion of the knee joint and is able to cope well with everyday life.

  17. NAVIGATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire

    2015-01-01

    Navigation was the most significant advance in instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty over the last decade. It provides surgeons with a precision tool for carrying out surgery, with the possibility of intraoperative simulation and objective control over various anatomical and surgical parameters and references. Since the first systems, which were basically used to control the alignment of bone cutting referenced to the mechanical axis of the lower limb, many other surgical steps have been incorporated, such as component rotation, ligament balancing and arranging the symmetry of flexion and extension spaces, among others. Its efficacy as a precision tool with an effective capacity for promoting better alignment of the lower-limb axis has been widely proven in the literature, but the real value of optimized alignment and the impact of navigation on clinical results and the longevity of arthroplasty have yet to be established. PMID:27026979

  18. Lockable Knee Brace Speeds Rehabilitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center develops key transportation and propulsion technologies for the Space Agency. The Center manages propulsion hardware and technologies of the space shuttle, develops the next generation of space transportation and propulsion systems, oversees science and hardware development for the International Space Station, manages projects and studies that will help pave the way back to the Moon, and handles a variety of associated scientific endeavors to benefit space exploration and improve life here on Earth. It is a large and diversified center, and home to a great wealth of design skill. Some of the same mechanical design skill that made its way into the plans for rocket engines and advanced propulsion at this Alabama-based NASA center also worked its way into the design of an orthotic knee joint that is changing the lives of people with weakened quadriceps.

  19. MRI based knee cartilage assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, Dirk-Jan; Kowalski, Przemyslaw; Tekieli, Wojciech; Reeuwijk, Els; Saris, Daniel; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2012-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of pain and disability worldwide and a major health problem in developed countries due to the gradually aging population. Though the symptoms are easily recognized and described by a patient, it is difficult to assess the level of damage or loss of articular cartilage quantitatively. We present a novel method for fully automated knee cartilage thickness measurement and subsequent assessment of the knee joint. First, the point correspondence between a pre-segmented training bone model is obtained with use of Shape Context based non-rigid surface registration. Then, a single Active Shape Model (ASM) is used to segment both Femur and Tibia bone. The surfaces obtained are processed to extract the Bone-Cartilage Interface (BCI) points, where the proper segmentation of cartilage begins. For this purpose, the cartilage ASM is trained with cartilage edge positions expressed in 1D coordinates at the normals in the BCI points. The whole cartilage model is then constructed from the segmentations obtained in the previous step. An absolute thickness of the segmented cartilage is measured and compared to the mean of all training datasets, giving as a result the relative thickness value. The resulting cartilage structure is visualized and related to the segmented bone. In this way the condition of the cartilage is assessed over the surface. The quality of bone and cartilage segmentation is validated and the Dice's coefficients 0.92 and 0.86 for Femur and Tibia bones and 0.45 and 0.34 for respective cartilages are obtained. The clinical diagnostic relevance of the obtained thickness mapping is being evaluated retrospectively. We hope to validate it prospectively for prediction of clinical outcome the methods require improvements in accuracy and robustness.

  20. Posterior cruciate ligament of the knee (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is a powerful ligament extending from the top-rear surface of the tibia to the bottom-front surface of the femur. The ligament prevents the knee joint from posterior instability.

  1. Risks of hip and knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... JW, Crockarell JR. Arthroplasty of the hip In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ... 24820247 . Mihalko WM. Arthroplasty of the knee. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ...

  2. Deciding to have knee or hip replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... JW, Crockarell JR. Arthroplasty of the hip In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ... 3. Mihalk WM. Arthroplasty of the knee. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ...

  3. Computational Poromechanics of Human Knee Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Mojtaba; Li, LePing

    2012-02-01

    Extensive computer modeling has been performed in the recent decade to investigate the mechanical response of the healthy and repaired knee joints. Articular cartilages and menisci have been commonly modeled as single-phase elastic materials in the previous 3D simulations. A comprehensive study considering the interplay of the collagen fibers and fluid pressurization in the tissues in situ remains challenging. We have developed a 3D model of the human knee accounting for the mechanical function of collagen fibers and fluid flow in the cartilages and menisci. An anatomically accurate structure of the human knee was used for this purpose including bones, articular cartilages, menisci and ligaments. The fluid pressurization in the femoral cartilage and menisci under combined creep loading was investigated. Numerical results showed that fluid flow and pressure in the tissues played an important role in the mechanical response of the knee joint. The load transfer in the joint was clearly seen when the fluid pressure was considered.

  4. American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Replacement Surgery Will my artificial joint set off airport security metal detectors? Preventing Infection in Your Joint at ... Knee Replacement Will my artificial joint set off airport security metal detectors? Contact Us Draft Hip Arthroplasty Performance ...

  5. Progenitor model of cosmic ray knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijay, Biplab; Bhadra, Arunava

    2016-01-01

    The primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays exhibits a knee at about 3 PeV where a change in the spectral index occurs. Despite many efforts, the origin of such a feature in the spectrum is not satisfactorily solved yet. Here it is proposed that the steepening of the spectrum beyond the knee may be a consequence of the mass distribution of the progenitor of the cosmic ray source. The proposed speculative model can account for all the major observed features of cosmic rays without invoking any fine tuning to match flux or spectra at any energy point. The prediction of the proposed model regarding the primary composition scenario beyond the knee is quite different from most of the prevailing models of the knee, and thereby can be discriminated from precise experimental measurement of the primary composition.

  6. MicroRNA-9 regulates the development of knee osteoarthritis through the NF-kappaB1 pathway in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ronghe; Liu, Ning; Luo, Simin; Huang, Weiguo; Zha, Zhengang; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It has been suggested that microRNA-9 (miR-9) is associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). This study was aimed to investigate the association between the mechanism of miR-9 targeting nuclear factor kappa-B1 (NF-κB1) and the proliferation and apoptosis of knee OA chondrocytes. Cartilage samples were collected from 25 patients with knee OA and 10 traumatic amputees, and another 15 OA rat models, together with 15 rats without knee OA lesions were also established. MiR-9 expressions in both knee OA cartilage and normal cartilage samples were detected using quantitative real-time PCR. The expressions of related genes (NF-κB1, IL-6, and MMP-13) in the two groups were also detected. Dual luciferase reporter gene assay was employed to examine the effect of miR-9 on the luciferase activity of NF-κB1 3′UTR. Knee OA chondrocytes were transfected with miR-9 mimics, miR-9 inhibitor, and NF-κB1 siRNA, respectively, and changes in cellular proliferation and apoptosis were detected via MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Western blotting assay was used to detect the expressions of NF-κB1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13). According to results from human OA samples and rat OA models, miR-9 was significantly downregulated in knee OA cartilage tissues compared with normal cartilage tissues (P < 0.01). The expressions of NF-κB1, IL-6, and MMP-13 in knee OA cartilage tissues were significantly higher than those in normal cartilage tissues (P < 0.01). Dual luciferase reporter gene assay showed that miR-9 could bind to the 3′UTR of NF-κB1 and significantly inhibit the luciferase activity by 37% (P < 0.01). Upregulation of miR-9 or downregulation of NF-κB1 could promote cell proliferation and suppress cell apoptosis. Conclusively, downregulated miR-9 can facilitate proliferation and antiapoptosis of knee OA chondrocytes by directly binding to NF-kB1, implying that stimulating miR-9

  7. MicroRNA-9 regulates the development of knee osteoarthritis through the NF-kappaB1 pathway in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ronghe; Liu, Ning; Luo, Simin; Huang, Weiguo; Zha, Zhengang; Yang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    It has been suggested that microRNA-9 (miR-9) is associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). This study was aimed to investigate the association between the mechanism of miR-9 targeting nuclear factor kappa-B1 (NF-κB1) and the proliferation and apoptosis of knee OA chondrocytes.Cartilage samples were collected from 25 patients with knee OA and 10 traumatic amputees, and another 15 OA rat models, together with 15 rats without knee OA lesions were also established. MiR-9 expressions in both knee OA cartilage and normal cartilage samples were detected using quantitative real-time PCR. The expressions of related genes (NF-κB1, IL-6, and MMP-13) in the two groups were also detected. Dual luciferase reporter gene assay was employed to examine the effect of miR-9 on the luciferase activity of NF-κB1 3'UTR. Knee OA chondrocytes were transfected with miR-9 mimics, miR-9 inhibitor, and NF-κB1 siRNA, respectively, and changes in cellular proliferation and apoptosis were detected via MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Western blotting assay was used to detect the expressions of NF-κB1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13).According to results from human OA samples and rat OA models, miR-9 was significantly downregulated in knee OA cartilage tissues compared with normal cartilage tissues (P < 0.01). The expressions of NF-κB1, IL-6, and MMP-13 in knee OA cartilage tissues were significantly higher than those in normal cartilage tissues (P < 0.01). Dual luciferase reporter gene assay showed that miR-9 could bind to the 3'UTR of NF-κB1 and significantly inhibit the luciferase activity by 37% (P < 0.01). Upregulation of miR-9 or downregulation of NF-κB1 could promote cell proliferation and suppress cell apoptosis.Conclusively, downregulated miR-9 can facilitate proliferation and antiapoptosis of knee OA chondrocytes by directly binding to NF-kB1, implying that stimulating miR-9 expressions might

  8. Quantifying Quadriceps Muscle Strength in Patients With ACL Injury, Focal Cartilage Lesions, and Degenerative Meniscus Tears

    PubMed Central

    Eitzen, Ingrid; Grindem, Hege; Nilstad, Agnethe; Moksnes, Håvard; Risberg, May Arna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reduced quadriceps strength influences knee function and increases the risk of knee osteoarthritis. Thus, it is of significant clinical relevance to precisely quantify strength deficits in patients with knee injuries. Purpose: To evaluate isokinetic concentric quadriceps muscle strength torque values, assessed both from peak torque and at specific knee flexion joint angles, in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, focal cartilage lesions, and degenerative meniscus tears. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data were synthesized from patients included in 3 previously conducted research projects: 2 prospective cohort studies and 1 randomized controlled trial. At the time of inclusion, all patients were candidates for surgery. Isokinetic concentric quadriceps muscle strength measurements (60 deg/s) were performed at baseline (preoperative status) and after a period of progressive supervised exercise therapy (length of rehabilitation period: 5 weeks for ACL injury, 12 weeks for cartilage lesions and degenerative meniscus). Outcome measures were peak torque and torque at specific knee flexion joint angles from 20° to 70°. All patients had unilateral injuries, and side-to-side deficits were calculated. For comparisons between and within groups, we utilized 1-way analysis of variance and paired t tests, respectively. Results: In total, 250 patients were included. At baseline, cartilage patients had the most severe deficit (39.7% ± 24.3%; P < .001). Corresponding numbers for ACL and degenerative meniscus subjects were 21.7% (±13.2%) and 20.7% (±16.3%), respectively. At retest, there was significant improvement in all groups (P < .001), with remaining deficits of 24.7% (±18.5%) for cartilage, 16.8% (±13.9%) for ACL, and 3.3% (±17.8%) for degenerative meniscus. Peak torque was consistently measured at 60° of knee flexion, whereas the largest mean deficits were measured at 30° at baseline and 70° at retest for the

  9. BASK survey of The Knee readership 2015.

    PubMed

    Aframian, Arash; Johnson, David Sands; Hing, Caroline Blanca

    2015-10-01

    A convenience sample of the attendees of the 2015 annual meeting of the British Association of Knee showed that the majority of the attendees who responded read The Knee, would like a section on surgical tips, more themed supplements and guest editorials. There is still not enough support for purely electronic publication. For those that have submitted papers, the experience with the publication process was positive.

  10. Proximal tibial fracture following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Krause, Heike; Dunleavy, Kim

    2011-09-01

    The patient was a 74-year-old man, with a history of total knee arthoplasty 14 years earlier, after having sustained a pathological fracture of the proximal diaphysis of the left tibia following a fall. Given the unstable nature of the fracture and the severe osteolysis noted below the total knee arthroplasty, surgical management 1 day after the fall entailed packing cancellous bone graft into the defect and realigning the fracture. PMID:21885911

  11. Multibody dynamic simulation of knee contact mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Yanhong; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2006-01-01

    Multibody dynamic musculoskeletal models capable of predicting muscle forces and joint contact pressures simultaneously would be valuable for studying clinical issues related to knee joint degeneration and restoration. Current three-dimensional multi-body knee models are either quasi-static with deformable contact or dynamic with rigid contact. This study proposes a computationally efficient methodology for combining multibody dynamic simulation methods with a deformable contact knee model. The methodology requires preparation of the articular surface geometry, development of efficient methods to calculate distances between contact surfaces, implementation of an efficient contact solver that accounts for the unique characteristics of human joints, and specification of an application programming interface for integration with any multibody dynamic simulation environment. The current implementation accommodates natural or artificial tibiofemoral joint models, small or large strain contact models, and linear or nonlinear material models. Applications are presented for static analysis (via dynamic simulation) of a natural knee model created from MRI and CT data and dynamic simulation of an artificial knee model produced from manufacturer’s CAD data. Small and large strain natural knee static analyses required 1 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact conditions except for peak pressure, which was higher for the large strain model. Linear and nonlinear artificial knee dynamic simulations required 10 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact force and torque but different contact pressures, which were lower for the nonlinear model due to increased contact area. This methodology provides an important step toward the realization of dynamic musculoskeletal models that can predict in vivo knee joint motion and loading simultaneously. PMID:15564115

  12. Observer variation in examination of knee joints.

    PubMed

    Marks, J S; Palmer, M K; Burke, M J; Smith, P

    1978-08-01

    The knees of 20 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were each examined on two occasions on the same morning by three observers. Assessments were made of joint warmth, synovial thickening, effusion, instability, quadriceps power, bony enlargement, range of movement, and knee circumference, and were graded on a scale of 0-4. Analysis of the results shows close intraobserver agreement for all measurements but considerable interobserver variation for all subjective measurements.

  13. OSTEOCHONDRITIS DISSECANS OF THE KNEE: DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Mestriner, Luiz Aurélio

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a pathological process affecting the subchondral bone of the knee in children and adolescents with open growth plates (juvenile OCD) and young adults with closed growth plates (adult OCD). It may lead to secondary effects on joint cartilage, such as pain, edema, possible formation of free bodies and mechanical symptoms, including joint locking. OCD may lead to degenerative changes may develop if left untreated. This article presents a review and update on this problem, with special emphasis on diagnosis and treatment. The latter may include either conservative methods, which show more predictable results for juvenile OCD, or various surgical methods, which include reparative techniques like isolated removal of the fragment, bone drilling and fixation of the osteochondral fragments, and restorative techniques like microfractures, autologous osteochondral transplantation (mosaicplasty), autologous chondrocyte implantation and fresh osteochondral allograft, depending on lesion stability, lesion viability, skeletal maturity and OCD process location. Recent assessments on the results from several types of treatment have shown that there is a lack of studies with reliable levels of evidence and have suggested that further multicenter prospective randomized and controlled studies on management of this disease should be conducted. PMID:27047865

  14. Current perspectives in stem cell research for knee cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Orth, Patrick; Rey-Rico, Ana; Venkatesan, Jagadeesh K; Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2014-01-01

    Protocols based on the delivery of stem cells are currently applied in patients, showing encouraging results for the treatment of articular cartilage lesions (focal defects, osteoarthritis). Yet, restoration of a fully functional cartilage surface (native structural organization and mechanical functions) especially in the knee joint has not been reported to date, showing the need for improved designs of clinical trials. Various sources of progenitor cells are now available, originating from adult tissues but also from embryonic or reprogrammed tissues, most of which have already been evaluated for their chondrogenic potential in culture and for their reparative properties in vivo upon implantation in relevant animal models of cartilage lesions. Nevertheless, particular attention will be needed regarding their safe clinical use and their potential to form a cartilaginous repair tissue of proper quality and functionality in the patient. Possible improvements may reside in the use of biological supplements in accordance with regulations, while some challenges remain in establishing standardized, effective procedures in the clinics. PMID:24520197

  15. How crouch gait can dynamically induce stiff-knee gait.

    PubMed

    van der Krogt, Marjolein M; Bregman, Daan J J; Wisse, Martijn; Doorenbosch, Caroline A M; Harlaar, Jaap; Collins, Steven H

    2010-04-01

    Children with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). Stiff-knee gait is often accompanied by an overly flexed knee during stance (crouch gait). Studies on stiff-knee gait have mostly focused on excessive knee muscle activity during (pre)swing, but the passive dynamics of the limbs may also have an important effect. To examine the effects of a crouched posture on swing knee flexion, we developed a forward-dynamic model of human walking with a passive swing knee, capable of stable cyclic walking for a range of stance knee crouch angles. As crouch angle during stance was increased, the knee naturally flexed much less during swing, resulting in a 'stiff-knee' gait pattern and reduced foot clearance. Reduced swing knee flexion was primarily due to altered gravitational moments around the joints during initial swing. We also considered the effects of increased push-off strength and swing hip flexion torque, which both increased swing knee flexion, but the effect of crouch angle was dominant. These findings demonstrate that decreased knee flexion during swing can occur purely as the dynamical result of crouch, rather than from altered muscle function or pathoneurological control alone.

  16. Knee Instability and Basic and Advanced Function Decline in Persons with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Leena; Chmiel, Joan S.; Almagor, Orit; Moisio, Kirsten; Chang, Alison H.; Belisle, Laura; Zhang, Yunhui; Hayes, Karen W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Manifestations of instability in knee OA include low overall knee confidence, low confidence that the knees will not buckle, buckling, and excessive motion during gait. Confidence and buckling may particularly influence activity choices, contributing to events leading to disability. Buckling is more likely to affect advanced than basic functional tasks. In this prospective, longitudinal study, we tested the hypotheses: overall knee confidence, buckling confidence, buckling, and frontal plane motion during gait are associated with advanced 2-year function outcome in persons with knee OA. Methods Persons with knee OA were queried about overall knee confidence (higher worse), buckling confidence, and knee buckling, and underwent quantitative gait analysis to quantify varus-valgus excursion and angular velocity. Physical function was assessed using the LLFDI Basic and Advanced Lower Extremity Domain scores. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between baseline instability measures and baseline-to-2-year function outcome, adjusting for potential confounders. Results 212 persons (mean age 64.6 years, 76.9% women) comprised the sample. Buckling was significantly associated with poor advanced (adjusted OR 2.08, 95% CI: 1.03–4.20) but not basic function outcome. Overall knee confidence was significantly associated with advanced outcome (adjusted OR 1.65, 95% CI: 1.01–2.70), while associations between buckling confidence and both outcomes approached significance. Neither varus-valgus excursion nor angular velocity during gait was associated with either outcome. Conclusion Knee buckling and confidence were each associated with poor 2-year advanced function outcome. Current treatment does not address these modifiable factors; interventions to address them may improve outcome in knee OA. PMID:25732594

  17. Total knee arthroplasty using subvastus approach in stiff knee: A retrospective analysis of 110 cases

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilen A; Patil, Hitendra Gulabrao; Vaishnav, Vinod O; Savale, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subvastus approach used in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is known to produce an earlier recovery but is not commonly utilized for TKA when the preoperative range of motion (ROM) of the knee is limited. Subvastus approach is known for its ability to give earlier recovery due to less postoperative pain and early mobilization (due to rapid quadriceps recovery). Subvastus approach is considered as a relative contraindication for TKA in knees with limited ROM due to difficulty in exposure which can increase risk of complications such as patellar tendon avulsion or medial collateral injury. Short stature and obesity are also relative contraindications. Tarabichi successfully used subvastus approach in knees with limited preoperative ROM. However, there are no large series in literature with the experience of the subvatus approach in knees with limited preoperative ROM. We are presenting our experience of the subvastus approach for TKA in knees with limited ROM. Materials and Methods: We conducted retrospective analysis of patients with limited preoperative ROM (flexion ≤90°) of the knee who underwent TKA using subvastus approach and presenting the 2 years results. There were a total 84 patients (110 knees) with mean age 64 (range 49–79 years) years. The mean preoperative flexion was 72° (range 40°–90°) with a total ROM of 64° (range 36°–90°). Results: Postoperatively knee flexion improved by mean 38° (P < 0.05) which was significant as assed by Student's t- test. The mean knee society score improved from 36 (range 20–60) to 80 (range 70–90) postoperatively (P < 0.05). There was one case of partial avulsion of patellar tendon from the tibial tubercle. Conclusions: We concluded that satisfactory results of TKA can be obtained in knees with limited preoperative ROM using subvastus approach maintaining the advantages of early mobilization. PMID:27053806

  18. Insights into Osteoarthritis Progression Revealed by Analyses of Both Knee Tibiofemoral Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ching-Heng; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Song, I-Wen; Lu, Liang-Suei; Shen, Hsain-Chung; Lee, Chian-Her; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Kraus, Virginia Byers; Wu, Chia-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify disease relevant genes and pathways associated with knee Osteoarthritis (OA) progression in human subjects using medial and lateral compartment dominant OA knee tissue. Design Gene expression of knee cartilage was comprehensively assessed for three regions of interest from human medial dominant OA (n=10) and non-OA (n=6) specimens. Histology and gene expression were compared for the regions with minimal degeneration, moderate degeneration and significant degeneration. Agilent whole-genome microarray was performed and data were analyzed using Agilent GeneSpring GX11.5. Significant differentially regulated genes were further investigated by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify functional categories. To confirm their association with disease severity as opposed to site within the knee, 30 differentially expressed genes, identified by microarray, were analyzed by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction on additional medial (n=16) and lateral (n=10) compartment dominant knee OA samples. Results A total of 767 genes were differentially expressed ≥two-fold (P ≤0.05) in lesion compared to relatively intact regions. Analysis of these data by IPA predicted biological functions related to an imbalance of anabolism and catabolism of cartilage matrix components. Up-regulated expression of IL11, POSTN, TNFAIP6, and down-regulated expression of CHRDL2, MATN4, SPOCK3, VIT, PDE3B were significantly associated with OA progression and validated in both medial and lateral compartment dominant OA samples. Conclusions Our study provides a strategy for identifying targets whose modification may have the potential to ameliorate pathological alternations and progression of disease in cartilage and to serve as biomarkers for identifying individuals susceptible to progression. PMID:25575966

  19. Dislocation of the knee: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Damon; Lomasney, Laurie; Pierce, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Dislocations of the knee are relatively uncommon injuries. However, the incidence of this injury appears to be increasing. Knee dislocations are most often high velocity blunt injuries, with motor vehicle accidents being a frequent etiology. Other causes include falls from height, athletic injuries, farming and industrial accidents, and even low velocity mechanisms such as a misstep into a hole. Likewise, minor trauma in the morbidly obese is increasingly recognized as a mechanism of knee dislocation. Multiple forms of dislocation exist, with the common factor being disruption of the tibiofemoral articulation. Dislocation can occur in a variety of directions depending on the mechanism of injury. The most common dislocation is anterior, which may be seen in hyperextension injuries such as martial arts kicking. The "dashboard injury" of motor vehicle accidents can result in a posterior dislocation of the knee. Lateral and rotary dislocations are less common. Knee dislocation is more commonly diagnosed in men, with a mean age of 23 to 31 years old. This is the very patient population encountered by Special Operations Forces (SOF) healthcare providers. Given the mechanisms of injury noted above, it is reasonable to conclude that knee dislocations may be seen in a young, active SOF patient population, particularly those engaged in parachuting, fast-roping/rappelling, driving at high speeds during military operations, and mixed martial arts. PMID:20306414

  20. MR Imaging of Knee Arthroplasty Implants

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Jan; Lurie, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Primary total knee arthroplasty is a highly effective treatment that relieves pain and improves joint function in a large percentage of patients. Despite an initially satisfactory surgical outcome, pain, dysfunction, and implant failure can occur over time. Identifying the etiology of complications is vital for appropriate management and proper timing of revision. Due to the increasing number of knee arthroplasties performed and decreasing patient age at implantation, there is a demand for accurate diagnosis to determine appropriate treatment of symptomatic joints following knee arthroplasty, and for monitoring of patients at risk. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging allows for comprehensive imaging evaluation of the tissues surrounding knee arthroplasty implants with metallic components, including the polyethylene components. Optimized conventional and advanced pulse sequences can result in substantial metallic artifact reduction and afford improved visualization of bone, implant-tissue interfaces, and periprosthetic soft tissue for the diagnosis of arthroplasty-related complications. In this review article, we discuss strategies for MR imaging around knee arthroplasty implants and illustrate the imaging appearances of common modes of failure, including aseptic loosening, polyethylene wear–induced synovitis and osteolysis, periprosthetic joint infections, fracture, patellar clunk syndrome, recurrent hemarthrosis, arthrofibrosis, component malalignment, extensor mechanism injury, and instability. A systematic approach is provided for evaluation of MR imaging of knee implants. MR imaging with optimized conventional pulse sequences and advanced metal artifact reduction techniques can contribute important information for diagnosis, prognosis, risk stratification, and surgical planning. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26295591

  1. [Brodie abscess. Primarily misinterpreted as traumatic lesion].

    PubMed

    Nicolajsen, K; Jørgensen, P S; Tørholm, C

    1996-01-01

    Two case histories are presented. In the first, a 49 year-old man fell on his right hip. He was able to walk, but because of pain he came to our emergency room. Radiographics gave an impression of an undislocated intertrochanteric fracture, scintigraphy confirmed the suspicion. There were no signs of infection. On starting osteosynthesis with the drilling of a hole in the lateral cortex, discharge of pus was observed and curettage of the abscess cavity was performed. In the second, a 21 year-old man hit his right knee against a table. Because of pain he was admitted to hospital. Primary signs of a lesion of the lateral meniscus were found and arthroscopy was scheduled. When readmitted we found signs of an infection and X-ray revealed a Brodie's abscess in the proximal tibia. The abscess cavity was opened and curettage was performed. Radiographics, scintigraphics, blood parameters and pathological and microbiological investigations revealed primary chronic osteomyelitis in both patients. Antibiotic therapy was instituted and six weeks after primary operation bone transplantation was performed. The further course was uncomplicated.

  2. Cystic Lesions of the Mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Daniel; Suby-Long, Thomas; Restrepo, Carlos S

    2016-06-01

    Cystic lesions are commonly seen in the mediastinum, and they may arise from virtually any organ. The vast majority of these lesions are benign and result in no symptoms. When large, cysts may produce symptoms related to compression of adjacent structures. The most common mediastinal cysts are pericardial and foregut duplication cysts. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance are routinely used to evaluate these lesions. Although computed tomography offers superior spatial resolution, magnetic resonance is useful in differentiating cysts that contain proteinaceous material from solid lesions. Occasionally, cysts arise from solid lesions, such as thymoma or teratoma. Although cysts are alike in appearance, location helps narrowing the differential diagnoses.

  3. Greater Step Widths Reduce Internal Knee Abduction Moments in Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis Patients During Stair Ascent.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Max R; Klipple, Gary; Zhang, Songning

    2015-08-01

    Increased step widths have been shown to reduce peak internal knee abduction moments in healthy individuals but not in knee osteoarthritis patients during stair descent. This study aimed to assess effects of increased step widths on peak knee abduction moments and associated variables in adults with medial knee osteoarthritis and healthy older adults during stair ascent. Thirteen healthy older adults and 13 medial knee osteoarthritis patients performed stair ascent using preferred, wide, and wider step widths. Three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction forces (GRFs) using an instrumented staircase were collected. Increased step width reduced first and second peak knee abduction moments, and knee abduction moment impulse. In addition, frontal plane GRF at time of first and second peak knee abduction moment and lateral trunk lean at time of first peak knee abduction moment were reduced with increased step width during stair ascent in both groups. Knee abduction moment variables were not different between knee osteoarthritis patients and healthy controls. Our findings suggest that increasing step width may be an effective simple gait alteration to reduce knee abduction moment variables in both knee osteoarthritis and healthy adults during stair ascent. However, long term effects of increasing step width during stair ascent in knee osteoarthritis and healthy adults remain unknown.

  4. Correlation between magnetic resonance imaging and physical exam in assessment of injuries to posterolateral corner of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gury, Lucas Archanjo; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Pécora, José Ricardo; Angelini, Fábio Janson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the correlation between magnetic resonance imaging, clinical examination and intraoperative identification of posterolateral corner injuries of the knee. METHODS: We compared the findings of physical examination under anesthesia and intraoperative findings as the gold standard for the posterolateral corner injury with the reports of the MRIs of patients who underwent reconstruction of the posterolateral corner. Thus, we evaluated the use of MRI for the diagnosis of lesions. RESULTS: We found a sensitivity of 100% in lesions of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), 86.96% in lesions of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), 57.58% in lesions of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) and 24.24 % in tendon injuries of the popliteal muscle (PMT). CONCLUSION: Posterolateral corner injury is difficult to visualize and interpret; therefore, MRI imaging should not be used alone for diagnosis. Level of Evidence II. Diagnostic Studies. PMID:25061416

  5. Lesion mimic mutants

    PubMed Central

    Moeder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade a substantial number of lesion mimic mutants (LMM) have been isolated and a growing number of the genes have been cloned. It is now becoming clear that these mutants are valuable tools to dissect various aspects of programmed cell death (PCD) and pathogen resistance pathways in plants. Together with other forward genetics approaches LMMs shed light on the PCD machinery in plant cells and revealed important roles for sphingolipids, Ca2+ and chloroplast-derived porphyrin-metabolites during cell death development. PMID:19513227

  6. The effect of modern total knee arthroplasty on muscle balance at the knee.

    PubMed

    Buford, William L; Ivey, F; Loveland, Dustin M; Flowers, Christopher W

    2009-01-01

    Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) may affect the muscles operating at the flexion/extension (FE) or internal /external rotation (IE) axes. This study tested the hypothesis that a modern posterior stabilizing TKA will change the mechanical balance of the knee joint by altering the moment arms of muscles acting about two separate axes of rotation. Moment arms were determined for the normal knee, the knee after resection of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (the ACL - knee) and the knee after a PCL-sacrificing TKA. Five fresh cadaver hemi pelvis specimens were used with 5 posterior stabilizing prostheses (a single model available from one manufacturer). Moment arms for the individual muscle tendons were multiplied by the muscle's tension fraction (fractional physiological cross-sectional area [PCSA]) to estimate its potential for moment production relative to the other muscles at the knee, and this value was labeled as the muscle's moment potential. Unlike earlier studies that looked at TKA across many manufacturers' types, this study concluded that there were no significant differences in muscle balance when comparing the intact knee and the posterior stabilized TKA.

  7. Effect of center of pressure modulation on knee adduction moment in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Haim, Amir; Wolf, Alon; Rubin, Guy; Genis, Yulya; Khoury, Mona; Rozen, Nimrod

    2011-11-01

    The knee adduction moment (KAM) provides a major contribution to the elevated load in the medial compartment of the knee. An abnormally high KAM has been linked with the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Footwear-generated biomechanical manipulations reduce the magnitude of this moment by conveying a more laterally shifted trajectory of the foot's center of pressure (COP), reducing the distance between the ground reaction force and the center of the knee joint, thus lowering the magnitude of the torque. We sought to examine the outcome of a COP shift in a cohort of female patients suffering from medial knee OA. Twenty-two female patients suffering from medial compartment knee OA underwent successive gait analysis testing and direct pedobarographic examination of the COP trajectory with a foot-worn biomechanical device allowing controlled manipulation of the COP. Modulation of the COP coronal trajectory from medial to lateral offset resulted in a significant reduction of the KAM. This trend was demonstrated in subjects with mild-to-moderate OA and in patients suffering from severe stages of the disease. Our results indicate that controlled manipulation of knee coronal kinetics in individuals suffering from medial knee OA can be facilitated by customized COP modification.

  8. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... test is the part of the leg assembly shown in drawing 880105-560. (b)(1) When the knee assembly, consisting of sliding knee assembly (drawing 880105-528R or -528L), lower leg structural replacement (drawing 880105-603), lower leg flesh (drawing 880105-601), ankle assembly (drawing 880105-660), foot...

  9. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... test is the part of the leg assembly shown in drawing 880105-560. (b)(1) When the knee assembly, consisting of sliding knee assembly (drawing 880105-528R or -528L), lower leg structural replacement (drawing 880105-603), lower leg flesh (drawing 880105-601), ankle assembly (drawing 880105-660), foot...

  10. Can knees kneel? Kneeling ability after total, unicompartmental and patellofemoral knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hassaballa, M A; Porteous, A J; Newman, J H; Rogers, C A

    2003-06-01

    This study investigates patients' perception of kneeling ability before and at 1 and 2 years after total, unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) and patellofemoral knee replacement (PFR), for osteoarthritis. Kneeling is an important function of the knee joint required for many daily activities and inability to kneel after knee surgery is a frequent cause of dissatisfaction. Data were prospectively collected on 253 knees. A kneeling score was obtained by analysis of the relevant section of the Oxford knee score. Scores were obtained pre-operatively and at 1 and 2 years post-operatively. Absolute values and change following surgery were recorded. Correlations with pain and other knee functions were also made. Kneeling ability prior to surgery was poor in all 3 groups (80% found it extremely difficult or impossible to kneel) and improved in all groups after surgery (20% had little or no difficulty to kneel at 2 years). Kneeling ability was best in UKR and worst in PFR. These results suggest that kneeling ability in osteoarthritic patients is poor but improves with knee arthroplasty surgery, however the majority of patients will still have difficulty in kneeling.

  11. The influence of joint line position on knee stability after condylar knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Martin, J W; Whiteside, L A

    1990-10-01

    Using a special knee-testing device, ten knees obtained at autopsy were subjected to varus-valgus, anterior-posterior, and flexion-rotation analysis in the intact state and after total knee arthroplasty. The ten knees showed no significant change in stability after knee replacement when the joint line was maintained in its natural position. When the femoral component was repositioned 5 mm proximally and 5 mm anteriorly, a significant increase in laxity occurred during midflexion. When the joint line was shifted 5 mm distal and 5 mm posterior to its anatomic location, significant tightening occurred in midrange of motion. Coupled rotation of the tibia with knee flexion was decreased after surgery in all knees with no specific relationship to joint line position. Coupled rotation with varus-valgus testing, however, remained within the normal range through the first 30 degrees of flexion only when the joint line was restored to its normal anatomic position. Stability in condylar knee arthroplasty is in part dependent on position of the joint line. Surgical techniques that rely on restoring the flexion and extension gap without regard to joint line position may result in alteration of varus-valgus or anterior-posterior displacement in midrange flexion. PMID:2208849

  12. An improved OpenSim gait model with multiple degrees of freedom knee joint and knee ligaments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hang; Bloswick, Donald; Merryweather, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Musculoskeletal models are widely used to investigate joint kinematics and predict muscle force during gait. However, the knee is usually simplified as a one degree of freedom joint and knee ligaments are neglected. The aim of this study was to develop an OpenSim gait model with enhanced knee structures. The knee joint in this study included three rotations and three translations. The three knee rotations and mediolateral translation were independent, with proximodistal and anteroposterior translations occurring as a function of knee flexion/extension. Ten elastic elements described the geometrical and mechanical properties of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL), and the medial and lateral collateral ligaments (MCL and LCL). The three independent knee rotations were evaluated using OpenSim to observe ligament function. The results showed that the anterior and posterior bundles of ACL and PCL (aACL, pACL and aPCL, pPCL) intersected during knee flexion. The aACL and pACL mainly provided force during knee flexion and adduction, respectively. The aPCL was slack throughout the range of three knee rotations; however, the pPCL was utilised for knee abduction and internal rotation. The LCL was employed for knee adduction and rotation, but was slack beyond 20° of knee flexion. The MCL bundles were mainly used during knee adduction and external rotation. All these results suggest that the functions of knee ligaments in this model approximated the behaviour of the physical knee and the enhanced knee structures can improve the ability to investigate knee joint biomechanics during various gait activities.

  13. Evaluation of a knee-kicker bumper design for reducing knee morbidity among carpet layers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wan-Fu; Wu, Chih-Fu

    2012-09-01

    Carpet layers have a high prevalence of occupational knee morbidity. One of the main causes is that they need to frequently 'kick' the bumper on the rear end of the knee kicker with one knee when laying a carpet. Considering the bumper's marked effects on kicking force transmission and safety, this study aims to improve the design of the knee-kicker bumper by reducing the risk factors. An improved pendulum-type impact-testing platform was designed as an evaluative apparatus, with the impulse and the coefficient of restitution serving as evaluative criteria. The newly developed bumper has improved firmness from drilled blind holes and an increase in effective forward force of 15%-138%, which implies lower operational demands and a lighter knee burden (i.e., less kicking energy results in the same work efficiency), and a softer contact surface that enhances operating comfort. The newly designed kicker was positively reviewed by subjects.

  14. Annual Incidence of Knee Symptoms and Four Knee Osteoarthritis Outcomes in the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Louise B; Moss, Susan; Do, Barbara T; Helmick, Charles G; Schwartz, Todd A.; Barbour, Kamil E; Renner, Jordan; Kalsbeek, William; Jordan, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate annual incidence rates (IR) of knee symptoms and four knee OA outcomes (radiographic, symptomatic, severe radiographic and severe symptomatic) overall and stratified by socio-demographic characteristics and knee OA risk factors. Methods We analyzed baseline [1991–1997] and first follow-up [1999–2003] data (n=1,518) from Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project. Participants are black and white adults ≥ 45 years living in Johnston County, North Carolina, US. Knee symptoms were pain, aching, or stiffness on most days in a knee. Radiographic OA was K-L grade ≥ 2 (severe radiographic ≥3) in at least one knee. Symptomatic OA was symptoms in a radiographically affected knee; severe symptomatic OA was severe symptoms and severe radiographic OA. Results The median follow-up time was 5.5 years. Average annual IRs were: symptoms=6%, radiographic OA=3%, symptomatic OA=2%, severe radiographic OA=2%, and severe symptomatic OA=0.8%. Across outcomes, IRs were highest among those with the following baseline characteristics: age ≥ 75 years; obese; a history of knee injury; or an annual household income ≤ $15,000. Conclusion The annual onset of knee symptoms and four OA outcomes in Johnston County was high. This may preview the future of knee OA in the US and underscores the urgency of clinical and public health collaborations that reduce risk factors for, and manage the impact of, these outcomes. Inexpensive, convenient and proven strategies (e.g., physical activity, self-management education courses) complement clinical care, and can reduce pain and improve quality of life for people with arthritis. PMID:26097226

  15. Isokinetic torque levels in hemophiliac knee musculature.

    PubMed

    Strickler, E M; Greene, W B

    1984-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to 1) measure peak torques generated by knee extensors and flexors in hemophilia patients; 2) describe flexor to extensor; 3) record the point in the arc of motion where peak torque was achieved; 4) correlate results with age, degree of hemophilic arthropathy, and presence of flexion contracture; and 5) compare results with reports on healthy subjects. Forty-seven patients (94 knees) with severe hemophilia were tested with a Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer at a speed of 30 degrees per second. Height, weight, thigh girths, and passive knee range of motion were recorded. Standing roentgenograms of the knee were evaluated to assess degree of arthropathy. Subjects were divided into groups by age and degree of arthropathy. Descriptive statistics were generated for all groups. Average peak extensor and flexor torque was similar for adolescents and adults. Increasing degree of arthropathy was associated with significant decreases in both extensor and flexor torque, an increase in flexor to extensor ratios and increasing knee flexion contractures. Across all groups, flexor to extensor ratios were abnormally high, particularly in patients with type IV arthropathy. The point in arc of motion where peak torques occurred did not differ significantly across groups and compared favorably with measures reported in the literature. For all ages, mean peak extensor and flexor torques were less than values reported in the literature for healthy subjects. Results of this study demonstrate the profound decrease in torque produced by knee musculature in hemophilia patients, particularly those with more severe arthropathy and knee flexion deformity.

  16. Localized form of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee: the meniscal mime.

    PubMed

    Bouguennec, N; Meyer, A; Graveleau, N

    2014-04-01

    The localized form of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee is a rare condition with non-specific symptoms. This makes diagnosis especially difficult when the meniscus is affected. A full assessment with several imaging modalities can help support the preoperative diagnosis. But in the case reported here, the full clinical and paraclinical assessment (X-rays, CT arthrography and MRI) was wrong--the localized form of pigmented villonodular synovitis had mimicked a lateral meniscus injury and was only detected during arthroscopy. The lesion was excised surgically and the diagnosis was confirmed through postoperative histopathology.

  17. A Case of Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the Knee with Early and Simultaneous Involvement of the Medial Femoral Condyle and Medial Tibial Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Shinya; Arai, Yuji; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK) usually involves a single condyle, most often the medial femoral condyle (MFC). Involvement of the medial tibial plateau (MTP) is less common, occurring in about 2% of knees with SPONK. Early onset SPONK on the ipsilateral side of the medial compartment is very rare, with, to our knowledge, only four cases reported to date. We describe a very rare case of SPONK with early simultaneous development in the MFC and MTP. Serial plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging showed that SPONK in both condyles followed a similar progressive course. The pathological findings in these lesions were similar to those observed in subchondral insufficiency fractures. PMID:27242941

  18. ANATOMICAL STUDY ON THE LATERAL SUPRAPATELLAR ACCESS ROUTE FOR LOCKED INTRAMEDULLARY NAILS IN TIBIAL FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Italo Scanavini; Petersen, Pedro Araujo; Júnior, Rames Mattar; Silva, Jorge dos Santos; Reis, Paulo; Gaiarsa, Guilherme Pelosini; Morandi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Intramedullary nails are the gold standard for treating tibial shaft fractures. Knee pain is a frequent complication after the procedure. Alternative routes such as the suprapatellar approach for nail insertion are seen as an option for avoiding late postoperative knee pain. The question is whether this approach might give rise to any injury to intra-articular structures of the knee. Methods: This study analyzed the suprapatellar approach and the risk to adjacent structures by reproducing it in 10 knees of five cadavers. Results: This approach was seen to make it easy to locate the entry point, with lesions only occurring in the Hoffa fat. In three of our cases, there were lesions of the chondral surface, which is an obstacle that is difficult to overcome. Conclusion: There is a need to develop specific material to minimize injury to intra-articular structures when using this route. PMID:27042617

  19. Joint Line Reconstruction in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-16

    Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Because of; Loosening; Instability; Impingement; or Other Reasons Accepted as Indications for TKA Exchange.; The Focus is to Determine the Precision of Joint Line Restoration in Navigated vs. Conventional Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

  20. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Volker; Han, Jeong S; Adwanikar, Hita; Fu, Yu; Ji, Guangchen

    2007-03-28

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review.

  1. Model-based estimation of knee stiffness.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Serge; Vallery, Heike; Hardegger, Michael; Riener, Robert; Perreault, Eric J

    2012-09-01

    During natural locomotion, the stiffness of the human knee is modulated continuously and subconsciously according to the demands of activity and terrain. Given modern actuator technology, powered transfemoral prostheses could theoretically provide a similar degree of sophistication and function. However, experimentally quantifying knee stiffness modulation during natural gait is challenging. Alternatively, joint stiffness could be estimated in a less disruptive manner using electromyography (EMG) combined with kinetic and kinematic measurements to estimate muscle force, together with models that relate muscle force to stiffness. Here we present the first step in that process, where we develop such an approach and evaluate it in isometric conditions, where experimental measurements are more feasible. Our EMG-guided modeling approach allows us to consider conditions with antagonistic muscle activation, a phenomenon commonly observed in physiological gait. Our validation shows that model-based estimates of knee joint stiffness coincide well with experimental data obtained using conventional perturbation techniques. We conclude that knee stiffness can be accurately estimated in isometric conditions without applying perturbations, which presents an important step toward our ultimate goal of quantifying knee stiffness during gait.

  2. Post-traumatic knee stiffness: surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Pujol, N; Boisrenoult, P; Beaufils, P

    2015-02-01

    Post-traumatic knee stiffness and loss of range of motion is a common complication of injuries to the knee area. The causes of post-traumatic knee stiffness can be divided into flexion contractures, extension contractures, and combined contractures. Post-traumatic stiffness can be due to the presence of dense intra-articular adhesions and/or fibrotic transformation of peri-articular structures. Various open and arthroscopic surgical treatments are possible. A precise diagnosis and understanding of the pathology is mandatory prior to any surgical treatment. Failure is imminent if all pathologies are not addressed correctly. From a general point of view, a flexion contracture is due to posterior adhesions and/or anterior impingement. On the other hand, extension contractures are due to anterior adhesions and/or posterior impingement. This overview will describe the different modern surgical techniques for treating post-traumatic knee stiffness. Any bony impingements must be treated before soft tissue release is performed. Intra-articular stiff knees with a loss of flexion can be treated by an anterior arthroscopic arthrolysis. Extra-articular pathology causing a flexion contracture can be treated by open or endoscopic quadriceps release. Extension contractures can be treated by arthroscopic or open posterior arthrolysis. Postoperative care (analgesia, rehabilitation) is essential to maintaining the range of motion obtained intra-operatively.

  3. Knee injuries in women collegiate rugby players.

    PubMed

    Levy, A S; Wetzler, M J; Lewars, M; Laughlin, W

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the prevalence and patterns of knee injuries in 810 women collegiate rugby players. Injuries that resulted in players missing at least one game were recorded and a questionnaire was used to delineate players' rugby and knee injury history. There were 76 total knee injuries in 58,296 exposures. This resulted in a 1.3 knee injury rate per 1000 exposures. Twenty-one anterior cruciate ligament tears were reported for a 0.36 incidence per 1000 exposures. Other injuries included meniscal tears (25), medical collateral ligament sprains (23), patellar dislocations (5), and posterior cruciate ligament tears (2). Sixty-one percent of the medial collateral ligament sprains occurred in rugby forwards and 67% of anterior cruciate ligament tears occurred in rugby backs. All other injuries occurred with equal frequency in backs and forwards. This study demonstrates that knee injury rates in women's collegiate rugby are similar to those reported for other women's collegiate sports. The overall rate of anterior cruciate ligament injury in women's rugby, however, is slightly higher than that reported for women soccer and basketball players.

  4. Model-Based Estimation of Knee Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Serge; Vallery, Heike; Hardegger, Michael; Riener, Robert; Perreault, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    During natural locomotion, the stiffness of the human knee is modulated continuously and subconsciously according to the demands of activity and terrain. Given modern actuator technology, powered transfemoral prostheses could theoretically provide a similar degree of sophistication and function. However, experimentally quantifying knee stiffness modulation during natural gait is challenging. Alternatively, joint stiffness could be estimated in a less disruptive manner using electromyography (EMG) combined with kinetic and kinematic measurements to estimate muscle force, together with models that relate muscle force to stiffness. Here we present the first step in that process, where we develop such an approach and evaluate it in isometric conditions, where experimental measurements are more feasible. Our EMG-guided modeling approach allows us to consider conditions with antagonistic muscle activation, a phenomenon commonly observed in physiological gait. Our validation shows that model-based estimates of knee joint stiffness coincide well with experimental data obtained using conventional perturbation techniques. We conclude that knee stiffness can be accurately estimated in isometric conditions without applying perturbations, which presents an important step towards our ultimate goal of quantifying knee stiffness during gait. PMID:22801482

  5. MR features of osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Madrid, F; Karvonen, R L; Teitge, R A; Miller, P R; Negendank, W G

    1994-01-01

    A group of patients with idiopathic osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee was surveyed using weight-bearing radiographs and MR imaging to compare the relative value of these methods in disease evaluation. Fifty-two patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of OA of the knee of relatively short duration (87%: < or = 4 yr) were compared to a reference group of 40 age- and sex-comparable subjects with no knee symptoms. All patients had a complete history, physical examination, standard anterior-posterior and lateral weight-bearing radiographs, T1-weighted, and FLASH MR images in both knees. The prevalence of MRI abnormalities was significantly greater in patients with OA of the knee in all radiographic grades (Kellgren and Lawrence) compared to the reference subjects. Significant differences were encountered for synovial thickening (OA, 73%; reference, 0%), synovial fluid (60%; 7%), meniscal degeneration (52%; 7%), osteophytes (67%; 12%), and subchondral bone involvement (65%; 7%), even in the patients at the mild end of the osteoarthritic spectrum, indicating the exquisite sensitivity of MRI compared with weight-bearing radiographs. PMID:7934656

  6. Cooling Does Not Affect Knee Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Ozmun, John C.; Thieme, Heather A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cooling on proprioception of the knee has not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the movement reproduction (timing and accuracy) aspect of proprioception. Subjects were tested under two conditions: a 20-minute application of ice and control. Proprioceptive accuracy and timing were measured by passively moving the knee, then comparing the subject's active reproduction of the passive movement. Subjects were blindfolded, then tested in three sectors of the knee's range of motion: 90° to 60°, 60° to 30°, and 30° to full extension. Ice application had no apparent effect on the subject's ability to perform accurate movement reproductions in the sectors tested. However, accuracy of the subject's final angle reproduction varied between the sectors as did the total time of the movement. One possible explanation for the difference between sectors is that different receptors are active at different points in the knee's range of motion. We conclude that cooling the knee joint for 20 minutes does not have an adverse effect on proprioception. PMID:16558379

  7. The young osteoarthritic knee: dilemmas in management

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    As a result of increasing life expectancies, continuing physical careers, lifestyles into later life and rising obesity levels, the number of younger patients presenting with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is increasing. When conservative management options have been exhausted, the challenge for the orthopedic surgeon is to offer a procedure that will relieve symptoms and allow a return to a high level of function but not compromise future surgery that may be required as disease progresses or prostheses fail and require revision. We discuss the options available to this group of patients and the relative benefits and potential negative points of each. Total knee replacement (TKR) in the young patient is associated with high risk of early failure and the need for future revision surgery. After TKR, most surgeons advise limitation of sporting activities. If osteoarthritis is limited to only one compartment in the knee there may be surgical options other than TKR. Osteotomy above or below the knee may be considered and works by redirecting the load passing through the joint into the relatively unaffected compartment. A unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) or patella-femoral joint (PFJ) replacement only replaces the articular surfaces in the affected compartment, leaving the unaffected compartments untouched with better preservation of the soft tissues. Which of these options is best for a particular patient depends upon the patient's symptoms, precise pathology, lifestyle, and expectations. PMID:23331908

  8. The Oxford Knee Score; problems and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Sarah L; Blom, Ashley W; Taylor, Adrian H; Pattison, Giles T R; Bannister, Gordon C

    2005-08-01

    The Oxford Knee Score is a self-completed patient based outcome score. We audited the outcome of total knee arthroplasty at our unit using the Oxford Knee Score. The hypothesis of this study is that the OKS can be easily and accurately completed by unassisted patients. Of 856 patients who had undergone total knee arthroplasty and were given questionnaires, 769 (90%) responded. 624 (81%) of the respondents managed to complete the questionnaire. A number of the 12 items composing the questionnaire posed problems for the patients and a number of items were left blank. Item 4 (concerning walking time) was omitted in 82 (13%) of the 624 completed questionnaires. Calculation of Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency suggests that there are redundancies within the Score. Limitations in some of the items of the scale suggest the need for reconsideration and reformulation of questions and response categories. This study suggests that where detailed assessment of outcome is required, such as for outcome studies or controlled trials, the Oxford Knee Score, in its present form, is not ideal for use as a postal questionnaire.

  9. Thalamic Lesions: A Radiological Review

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Dimitri; Campello, Chantal; Bouly, Stephane; Le Floch, Anne; Thouvenot, Eric; Waconge, Anne; Taieb, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Background. Thalamic lesions are seen in a multitude of disorders including vascular diseases, metabolic disorders, inflammatory diseases, trauma, tumours, and infections. In some diseases, thalamic involvement is typical and sometimes isolated, while in other diseases thalamic lesions are observed only occasionally (often in the presence of other typical extrathalamic lesions). Summary. In this review, we will mainly discuss the MRI characteristics of thalamic lesions. Identification of the origin of the thalamic lesion depends on the exact localisation inside the thalamus, the presence of extrathalamic lesions, the signal changes on different MRI sequences, the evolution of the radiological abnormalities over time, the history and clinical state of the patient, and other radiological and nonradiological examinations. PMID:25100900

  10. Improved Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint improved version of one described in "Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint" (MFS-28633). Locks automatically upon initial application of radial force (wearer's weight) and unlocks automatically, but only when all loads (radial force and bending) relieved. Joints lock whenever wearer applies weight to knee at any joint angle between full extension and 45 degree bend. Both devices offer increased safety and convenience relative to conventional orthotic knee joints.

  11. Design and evaluation of an orthotic knee-extension assist.

    PubMed

    Spring, Alexander N; Kofman, Jonathan; Lemaire, Edward D

    2012-09-01

    Individuals with quadriceps muscle weakness often have difficulty generating the knee-extension moments required to complete common mobility tasks. A new device that provides knee-extension moments through a range of knee angles was designed to help individuals perform stand-to-sit and sit-to-stand tasks. The novel knee-extension assist (KEA) was designed as a modular component to be incorporated into existing knee-ankle-foot orthoses or used in a knee orthosis. During stand-to-sit, a set of springs is loaded as the knee flexes under bodyweight and the KEA thus provides a knee-extension moment that aids in achieving a smoothly controlled knee flexion. The springs can be locked in place at the end of knee flexion to prevent unwanted knee extension while the user is seated. The entire knee extension assist can be disengaged to allow free joint motion anytime the affected leg is unloaded. During sit-to-stand, the KEA assists knee extension by returning the energy stored in the springs as an extension moment. In mechanical testing of a prototype of the new KEA, a mean maximum extension moment of 42.9 ± 0.46 Nm was provided by the device during flexion and 28.4 ± 0.28 Nm during extension. A biomechanical evaluation with two able-bodied individuals demonstrated the effectiveness of the KEA in successfully assisting stand-to-sit and sit-to-stand tasks. During stand-to-sit, the KEA provided 82% and 75% of the total (muscle and KEA) knee-extension moment required by the braced leg for the task for the two subjects, respectively; and during sit-to-stand, the KEA provided 56% and 50% of the total knee-extension moment for the two subjects, respectively. This KEA performance exceeded 50% knee-extension moment assistance for a 70 kg person.

  12. Financial impact of radiological reports on medical-legal evaluation of compensation for meniscal lesions.

    PubMed

    Lelario, M; Ciuffreda, P; Lupo, P; Bristogiannis, C; Vinci, R; Stoppino, L P; De Filippo, M; Macarini, L

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate any discrepancy between radiological reports for clinical purposes and for medicolegal purposes and to quantify its economic impact on repayments made by private insurance companies for meniscal injuries of the knee. The medical records obtained pertaining to 108 knee injury patients (mean age 43.3 years) assessed over a period of 12 months were analysed. Clinical medical reports, aimed at assessing the lesion, and medicolegal reports, drawn up with a view to quantifying compensation, were compared. Unlike reports for clinical purposes in reports for medicolegal purposes, in the evaluation of meniscal lesions, in addition to morphological features of lesions, chronological, topographical, severity and exclusion criteria were applied. To estimate the economic impact resulting from the biological damage, we consulted an actuarial table based on the 9-point minor incapacity classification system. Meniscal lesions not compatible with a traumatic event and therefore not eligible for an insurance payout were found in 56 patients. Of these, 37 failed exclusion criteria, while 19 failed to meet chronological criteria. This difference resulted in a reduction in compensation made by private insurance companies with savings estimated with a saving between euro 203,715.41 and euro 622,315.39. The use of a clinical report for medicolegal purposes can be a source of valuation error, as chronological and/or dynamic information regarding the trauma mechanism may be lacking. Therefore, the use of a full radiological appraisal allows a better damage's assessment and an adequate compensation for injuries.

  13. Abnormal loading of the major joints in knee osteoarthritis and the response to knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Andrew; Stewart, Caroline; Postans, Neil; Barlow, David; Dodds, Alexander; Holt, Cathy; Whatling, Gemma; Roberts, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is common and patients frequently complain that they are 'overloading' the joints of the opposite leg when they walk. However, it is unknown whether moments or co-contractions are abnormal in the unaffected joints of patients with single joint knee osteoarthritis, or how they change following treatment of the affected knee. Twenty patients with single joint medial compartment knee osteoarthritis were compared to 20 asymptomatic control subjects. Gait analysis was performed for normal level gait and surface EMG recordings of the medial and lateral quadriceps and hamstrings were used to investigate co-contraction. Patients were followed up 12 months post-operatively and the analysis was repeated. Results are presented for the first 14 patients who have attended follow-up. Pre-operatively, adduction moment impulses were elevated at both knees and the contra-lateral hip compared to controls. Co-contraction of hamstrings and quadriceps was elevated bilaterally. Post-operatively, moment waveforms returned to near-normal levels at the affected knee and co-contraction fell in the majority of patients. However, abnormalities persisted in the contra-lateral limb with partial or no recovery of both moment waveforms and co-contraction in the majority. Patients with knee osteoarthritis do experience abnormal loads of their major weight bearing joints bilaterally, and abnormalities persist despite treatment of the affected limb. Further treatment may be required if we are to protect the other major joints following joint arthroplasty.

  14. Knee stability before and after total and unicondylar knee replacement: in vivo kinematic evaluation utilizing navigation.

    PubMed

    Casino, Daniela; Martelli, Sandra; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Lopomo, Nicola; Iacono, Francesco; Bignozzi, Simone; Visani, Andrea; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2009-02-01

    Surgical navigation systems are currently used to guide the surgeon in the correct alignment of the implant. The aim of this study was to expand the use of navigation systems by proposing a surgical protocol for intraoperative kinematics evaluations during knee arthroplasty. The protocol was evaluated on 20 patients, half undergoing unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) and half undergoing posterior-substituting, rotating-platform total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The protocol includes a simple acquisition procedure and an original elaboration methodology. Kinematic tests were performed before and after surgery and included varus/valgus stress at 0 and 30 degrees and passive range of motion. Both UKA and TKA improved varus/valgus stability in extension and preserved the total magnitude of screw-home motion during flexion. Moreover, compared to preoperative conditions, values assumed by tibial axial rotation during flexion in TKA knees were more similar to the rotating patterns of UKA knees. The analysis of the anteroposterior displacement of the knee compartments confirmed that the two prostheses did not produce medial pivoting, but achieved a postoperative normal behavior. These results demonstrated that proposed intraoperative kinematics evaluations by a navigation system provided new information on the functional outcome of the reconstruction useful to restore knee kinematics during surgery.

  15. Variable stiffness actuated prosthetic knee to restore knee buckling during stance: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Wentink, E C; Koopman, H F J M; Stramigioli, S; Rietman, J S; Veltink, P H

    2013-06-01

    Most modern intelligent knee prosthesis use dampers to modulate dynamic behavior and prevent excessive knee flexion, but they dissipate energy and do not assist in knee extension. Energy efficient variable stiffness control (VSA) can reduce the energy consumption yet effectively modulate the dynamic behavior and use stored energy during flexion to assist in subsequent extension. A principle design of energy efficient VSA in a prosthetic knee is proposed and analyzed for the specific case of rejection of a disturbed stance phase. The concept is based on the principle that the output stiffness of a spring can be changed without changing the energy stored in the elastic elements of the spring. The usability of this concept to control a prosthetic knee is evaluated using a model. Part of the stance phase of the human leg was modeled by a double pendulum. Specifically the rejection of a common disturbance of transfemoral prosthetic gait, an unlocked knee at heel strike, was evaluated. The ranges of spring stiffnesses were determined such that the angular characteristics of a normal stance phase were preserved, but disturbances could also be rejected. The simulations predicted that energy efficient VSA can be useful for the control of prosthetic knees. PMID:23000012

  16. Dynamic Knee Alignment and Collateral Knee Laxity and Its Variations in Normal Humans.

    PubMed

    Deep, Kamal; Picard, Frederic; Clarke, Jon V

    2015-01-01

    Alignment of normal, arthritic, and replaced human knees is a much debated subject as is the collateral ligamentous laxity. Traditional quantitative values have been challenged. Methods used to measure these are also not without flaws. Authors review the recent literature and a novel method of measurement of these values has been included. This method includes use of computer navigation technique in clinic setting for assessment of the normal or affected knee before the surgery. Computer navigation has been known for achievement of alignment accuracy during knee surgery. Now its use in clinic setting has added to the inventory of measurement methods. Authors dispel the common myth of straight mechanical axis in normal knees and also look at quantification of amount of collateral knee laxity. Based on the scientific studies, it has been shown that the mean alignment is in varus in normal knees. It changes from lying non-weight-bearing position to standing weight-bearing position in both coronal and the sagittal planes. It also varies with gender and race. The collateral laxity is also different for males and females. Further studies are needed to define the ideal alignment and collateral laxity which the surgeon should aim for individual knees. PMID:26636090

  17. Dynamic Knee Alignment and Collateral Knee Laxity and Its Variations in Normal Humans

    PubMed Central

    Deep, Kamal; Picard, Frederic; Clarke, Jon V.

    2015-01-01

    Alignment of normal, arthritic, and replaced human knees is a much debated subject as is the collateral ligamentous laxity. Traditional quantitative values have been challenged. Methods used to measure these are also not without flaws. Authors review the recent literature and a novel method of measurement of these values has been included. This method includes use of computer navigation technique in clinic setting for assessment of the normal or affected knee before the surgery. Computer navigation has been known for achievement of alignment accuracy during knee surgery. Now its use in clinic setting has added to the inventory of measurement methods. Authors dispel the common myth of straight mechanical axis in normal knees and also look at quantification of amount of collateral knee laxity. Based on the scientific studies, it has been shown that the mean alignment is in varus in normal knees. It changes from lying non-weight-bearing position to standing weight-bearing position in both coronal and the sagittal planes. It also varies with gender and race. The collateral laxity is also different for males and females. Further studies are needed to define the ideal alignment and collateral laxity which the surgeon should aim for individual knees. PMID:26636090

  18. Reduced knee hyperextension after wearing a robotic knee orthosis during gait training--a case study.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yurong; Lo, Wai Leung; Xu, Guangqing; Li, Leonard Sheungwai; Li, Le; Huang, Dongfeng

    2015-01-01

    This case study describes the effects of a wearable dynamic knee orthosis to supplement walking training in a patient suffering knee hyperextension. The subject was a 57-year old female who was 3.5 years post-brain tumor surgery. She was presented with impaired right lower extremity muscle performance, increased lower extremity muscle tension, and right knee hyperextension. She reported pain at the right knee joint and tibialis anterior after 10 minutes of over-ground walk. Fifteen one-hour sessions of gait training with robotic knee orthosis (RKO) were provided an over 3 weeks period. The subject demonstrated improvement with right lower limb kinematic and kinetic measures of gait. Peak flexion degree and moment increased (from -4.99° to 13.47°, and from 0.18 Nm/kg to 0.20 Nm/kg respectively).Extension peak moment decreased from 1.03 Nm/kg to 0.53 Nm/kg. Knee joint force decreased from 0.68 N to 0.45 N. Ground reaction force (GRF) reduced from 11.06N to 10.11N. Berg Balance Scale (BBS) improved from 45/56 to 51/56. No difference was observed in Fugl-Meyer Assessment of the Lower limb (FMA-LE) scores. Gait training that integrates an intention-based RKO for correcting knee hyperextension can be clinically effective. The persistence and generalizability of these results need to be further investigated.

  19. Questions to ask your doctor after knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    You had surgery to get a new knee joint. Below are questions you may want to ask your health care provider to help you take care ... Knee replacement - after - what to ask your doctor; Knee arthroplasty - after - what to ask your doctor

  20. Pigmented Lesion of Buccal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  1. Stress-induced cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1992-05-01

    The increasing occurrence of dental lesions at the cervical surfaces requires more knowledge of the causes of the process. Acidic and abrasive mechanisms have clearly been documented as causes but the stress theory by Lee and Eakle is still controversial. This report describes several incidences of possible stress-induced lesions according to the characteristics described by Lee and Eakle. The occurrences of subgingival lesions lend credence to the stress-induction theory by exclusion of other superimposing etiologic factors. With the current concepts, a perceptive approach to the treatment of cervical lesions can be executed. PMID:1527763

  2. Mechanics of knee and ankle bandages.

    PubMed

    Viljakka, T

    1986-02-01

    Different types of bandages were tested mechanically and clinically. Four elastic and three elastic adhesive bandages were mechanically tested. The former proved better. Seven different ankle bandages and three knee bandages were tested in a simulated clinical situation, measuring the pressure which developed while walking for 15, 50 and 100 min, and immediately after application of the bandage. The bandages slackened most markedly during the first period of walking. The compression pressure of the padded adhesive ankle bandage was lower than that produced by most other bandages. The padded adhesive and elastic bandages proved to be most suitable for clinical use. The padded knee bandage produced a lower compression load than the elastic bandage tested. On the basis of this trial we recommend the use of a padded knee bandage.

  3. Single Portal Knee Arthroscopy: 2015 Technique Update

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    A technique of single portal knee arthroscopy was reported in 2013. Using a parallel working cannula assembled to the arthroscope cannula, the instruments are passed into the joint in line with the arthroscope. The original technique video in Arthroscopy Techniques shows the use of a 25 mm tube assembly with a parallel portal through which biters and proximally bent cutter instruments are used to perform procedures in the knee. This 2015 technical update shows the current preferred and most versatile method of single portal knee arthroscopy using a parallel locking and rotating hub for passage of biters and double-bend cutters. The video shows adequate completion of a partial meniscectomy using only 1 portal. PMID:27073772

  4. [Initial results with the Munich knee simulator].

    PubMed

    Frey, M; Riener, R; Burgkart, R; Pröll, T

    2002-01-01

    In orthopaedics more than 50 different clinical knee joint evaluation tests exist that have to be trained in orthopaedic education. Often it is not possible to obtain sufficient practical training in a clinical environment. The training can be improved by Virtual Reality technology. In the frame of the Munich Knee Joint Simulation project an artificial leg with anatomical properties is attached by a force-torque sensor to an industrial robot. The recorded forces and torques are the input for a simple biomechanical model of the human knee joint. The robot is controlled in such way that the user gets the feeling he moves a real leg. The leg is embedded in a realistic environment with a couch and a patient on it.

  5. Knee osteoarthritis: a review of management options.

    PubMed

    Hussain, S M; Neilly, D W; Baliga, S; Patil, S; Meek, Rmd

    2016-02-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is a complex peripheral joint disorder with multiple risk factors. The molecular basis of osteoarthritis has been generally accepted; however, the exact pathogenesis is still not known. Management of patients with osteoarthritis involves a comprehensive history, thorough physical examination and appropriate radiological investigation. The relative slow progress in the disease allows a stepwise algorithmic approach in treatment. Non-surgical treatment involves patient education, lifestyle modification and the use of orthotic devises. These can be achieved in the community. Surgical options include joint sparing procedures such as arthroscopyando osteotomy or joint-replacing procedures. Joint-replacing procedures can be isolated to a single compartment such as patellofemoral arthroplasty or unicompartmental knee replacement or total knee arthroplasty. The key to a successful long-term outcome is optimal patient selection, preoperative counselling and good surgical technique. PMID:27330013

  6. Anteroposterior Knee Stability During Stair Descent.

    PubMed

    Borque, Kyle A; Gold, Jonathan E; Incavo, Stephen J; Patel, Rupal M; Ismaily, Sabir E; Noble, Philip C

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the influence of tibio-femoral conformity on anteroposterior (AP) knee stability during stair descent, particularly with a dished cruciate sacrificing (CS) design. A joint simulator simulated stair descent of cadaveric knees. Tibio-femoral displacement was measured. Knees were tested in intact, ACL-deficient, and TKA with cruciate-retaining (CR), CS and posterior-stabilizing (PS) inserts. Loading during stair descent simulation caused femur displacement anteriorly prior to quadriceps contraction. Quadriceps contraction reestablished the initial femoral AP position. During simulated stair descent, AP stability was restored using PS, CR or CS inserts with an intact PCL. The CS design without the PCL did not provide AP stability. Increasing quadriceps force to restore AP stability may explain the clinical findings of pain and fatigue experienced by some patients after TKA.

  7. Fixed flexion deformity and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Su, E P

    2012-11-01

    Fixed flexion deformities are common in osteoarthritic knees that are indicated for total knee arthroplasty. The lack of full extension at the knee results in a greater force of quadriceps contracture and energy expenditure. It also results in slower walking velocity and abnormal gait mechanics, overloading the contralateral limb. Residual flexion contractures after TKA have been associated with poorer functional scores and outcomes. Although some flexion contractures may resolve with time after surgery, a substantial percentage will become permanent. Therefore, it is essential to correct fixed flexion deformities at the time of TKA, and be vigilant in the post-operative course to maintain the correction. Surgical techniques to address pre-operative flexion contractures include: adequate bone resection, ligament releases, removal of posterior osteophytes, and posterior capsular releases. Post-operatively, extension can be maintained with focused physiotherapy, a specially modified continuous passive motion machine, a contralateral heel lift, and splinting.

  8. Knee instability scores for ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Naendrup, Jan-Hendrik; Soni, Ashish; Olsen, Adam; Zlotnicki, Jason; Musahl, Volker

    2016-06-01

    Despite abundant biological, biomechanical, and clinical research, return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury remains a significant challenge. Residual rotatory knee laxity has been identified as one of the factors responsible for poor functional outcome. To improve and standardize the assessment of knee instability, a variety of instability scoring systems is available. Recently, devices to objectively quantify static and dynamic clinical exams have been developed to complement traditional subjective grading systems. These devices enable an improved evaluation of knee instability and possible associated injuries. This additional information may promote the development of new treatment algorithms and allow for individualized treatment. In this review, the different subjective laxity scores as well as complementary objective measuring systems are discussed, along with an introduction of injury to an individualized treatment algorithm. PMID:26980119

  9. Single Portal Knee Arthroscopy: 2015 Technique Update.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Daniel E

    2016-02-01

    A technique of single portal knee arthroscopy was reported in 2013. Using a parallel working cannula assembled to the arthroscope cannula, the instruments are passed into the joint in line with the arthroscope. The original technique video in Arthroscopy Techniques shows the use of a 25 mm tube assembly with a parallel portal through which biters and proximally bent cutter instruments are used to perform procedures in the knee. This 2015 technical update shows the current preferred and most versatile method of single portal knee arthroscopy using a parallel locking and rotating hub for passage of biters and double-bend cutters. The video shows adequate completion of a partial meniscectomy using only 1 portal.

  10. Physical activity and osteoarthritis of the knee: can MRI scans shed more light on this issue?

    PubMed

    Jones, Graeme; Schultz, Martin G; Dore, Dawn

    2011-09-01

    Physical activity has many health benefits; however, there has been concern that exercise may increase the risk of the development or progression of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. There is little doubt that injury increases the risk of OA, but the role of physical activity independent to injury is uncertain. Recently, magnetic resonance imaging has allowed an in-depth assessment of joints and relevant structural changes-this review covers the recent imaging data relevant to this area. In children and young adults, physical activity appears beneficial for knee cartilage, possibly even in structurally abnormal knees. In addition, there is consistent evidence showing aerobic and strengthening exercise improves OA symptoms later in life. However, there is limited evidence associating exercise with structural changes in later life and this lacks consistency, suggesting little or no effect. In the meantime, it appears safe to prescribe exercise in later life without major concern for structural deterioration, although caution is appropriate in those with bone marrow lesions until more information becomes available.

  11. Moxibustion Treatment for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ang; Wei, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Yi; Li, Bo; Guo, Xing; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine whether the administration of moxibustion is an effective treatment for knee osteoarthritis (KOA). We conducted a search of relevant articles using Medline, EMBASE, the Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library published before October 2015. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities’ Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC scale) and the short form 36 questionnaire (SF-36 scale) were assessed. Evidence grading was evaluated according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Four studies containing 746 participants fulfilled the inclusion criteria in the final analysis. In terms of quality of life (QOL), the meta-analysis of 2 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) showed significantly effects of moxibustion only in bodily pain (BP) compared with those in the control group (n = 348; weighted mean difference [WMD], 4.36; 95% confidence intervals [CIs], 2.27–6.44; P < 0.0001; heterogeneity: χ2 = 1.53, P = 0.22, I2 = 34%) in all of the subcategories of the SF-36 scale, with moderate quality. The meta-analysis of the 2 included trials showed that there was not a statistically significant difference in the pain or function subscale for the WOMAC scale when the 2 groups were compared (n = 322; WMD, 17.63; 95% CI, −23.15–58.41; P = 0.40; heterogeneity: χ2 = 19.42, P < 0.0001, I2 = 95%), with low or moderate quality separately. The administration of moxibustion can to some extent alleviate the symptoms of KOA. More rigorous, randomized controlled trials are required in the future. PMID:27057863

  12. Progressive foot drop caused by below-knee compression stocking after spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Karan; Butler, Joseph S.; Benton, Adam; Molloy, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Foot drop is a debilitating condition, which may take many months to recover. The most common cause of foot drop is a neuropathy of the common peroneal nerve (CPN). However, similar symptoms can be caused by proximal lesions of the sciatic nerve, lumbar plexus or L5 nerve root. We present a rare and unusual case of a patient undergoing spinal surgery at the level of L5/S1 and presenting 4 weeks postoperatively with progressive foot drop. Although the initial concern was a postoperative lesion at L5, the cause for this delayed presentation was extrinsic compression of the CPN at the level of the fibular head by a tight-fitting below-knee thromboembolic deterrent stocking. Compression stockings are widely used in all branches of medicine and in the community. It is important to recognize this potential cause of progressive foot drop early as it is preventable by simple measures, which can significantly reduce morbidity.

  13. Progressive foot drop caused by below-knee compression stocking after spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Karan; Butler, Joseph S; Benton, Adam; Molloy, Sean

    2016-09-01

    Foot drop is a debilitating condition, which may take many months to recover. The most common cause of foot drop is a neuropathy of the common peroneal nerve (CPN). However, similar symptoms can be caused by proximal lesions of the sciatic nerve, lumbar plexus or L5 nerve root. We present a rare and unusual case of a patient undergoing spinal surgery at the level of L5/S1 and presenting 4 weeks postoperatively with progressive foot drop. Although the initial concern was a postoperative lesion at L5, the cause for this delayed presentation was extrinsic compression of the CPN at the level of the fibular head by a tight-fitting below-knee thromboembolic deterrent stocking. Compression stockings are widely used in all branches of medicine and in the community. It is important to recognize this potential cause of progressive foot drop early as it is preventable by simple measures, which can significantly reduce morbidity. PMID:27617106

  14. Progressive foot drop caused by below-knee compression stocking after spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Karan; Butler, Joseph S.; Benton, Adam; Molloy, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Foot drop is a debilitating condition, which may take many months to recover. The most common cause of foot drop is a neuropathy of the common peroneal nerve (CPN). However, similar symptoms can be caused by proximal lesions of the sciatic nerve, lumbar plexus or L5 nerve root. We present a rare and unusual case of a patient undergoing spinal surgery at the level of L5/S1 and presenting 4 weeks postoperatively with progressive foot drop. Although the initial concern was a postoperative lesion at L5, the cause for this delayed presentation was extrinsic compression of the CPN at the level of the fibular head by a tight-fitting below-knee thromboembolic deterrent stocking. Compression stockings are widely used in all branches of medicine and in the community. It is important to recognize this potential cause of progressive foot drop early as it is preventable by simple measures, which can significantly reduce morbidity. PMID:27617106

  15. High knee valgus in female subjects does not yield higher knee translations during drop landings: a biplane fluoroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Torry, Michael R; Shelburne, Kevin B; Myers, Casey; Giphart, J Erik; Pennington, W Wesley; Krong, Jacob P; Peterson, Daniel S; Steadman, J Richard; Woo, Savio L-Y

    2013-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of peak knee valgus angle and peak knee abductor moment on the anterior, medial, and lateral tibial translations (ATT, MTT, LTT) in the "at risk" female knee during drop landing. Fifteen female subjects performed drop landings from 40 cm. Three-dimension knee motion was simultaneously recorded using a high speed, biplane fluoroscopy system, and a video-based motion analysis system. Valgus knee angles and knee abduction moments were stratified into low, intermediate, and high groups and peak ATT, MTT, and LTT were compared between these groups with ANOVA (α = 0.05). Significant differences were observed between stratified groups in peak knee valgus angle (p < 0.0001) and peak knee abduction moment (p < 0.0001). However, no corresponding differences in peak ATT, LTT, and MTT between groups exhibiting low to high-peak knee valgus angles (ATT: p = 0.80; LTT: p = 0.25; MTT: p = 0.72); or, in peak ATT (p = 0.61), LTT (p = 0.26) and MTT (p = 0.96) translations when stratified according to low to high knee abduction moments, were found. We conclude that the healthy female knee is tightly regulated with regard to translations even when motion analysis derived knee valgus angles and abduction moments are high.

  16. Relationship of Knee Shear Force and Extensor Moment on Knee Translations in Females Performing Drop Landings: A Biplane Fluoroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Torry, Michael R.; Myers, Casey; Shelburne, Kevin B.; Peterson, Daniel; Giphart, J. Erik; Pennington, W. Wesley; Krong, Jacob P.; Woo, Savio L-Y.; Steadman, J. Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background Research has linked knee extensor moment and knee shear force to the non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury during the landing motion. However, how these biomechanical performance factors relate to knee translations in vivo it is not known as knee translations cannot be obtained with traditional motion capture techniques. The purpose of this study was to combine traditional motion capture with high-speed, biplane fluoroscopy imaging to determine relationships between knee extensor moment and knee shear force profiles with anterior and lateral tibial translations occurring during drop landing in females athletes. Methods 15 females performed drop landings from a height of 40 cm while being recorded using a high speed, biplane fluoroscopy system and simultaneously being recorded using surface marker motion capture techniques to estimate knee joint angle, reaction force and moment profiles. Findings No significant statistical relationships were observed between peak anterior or posterior knee shear force and peak anterior and lateral tibial translations; or, between peak knee extensor moment and peak anterior and lateral tibial translations. Although differences were noted in peak shear force (P = 0.02) and peak knee extensor moment (P < 0.001) after stratification into low and high shear force and moment cohorts, no differences were noted in anterior and lateral tibial translations (all P ≥ 0.18). Interpretation Females exhibiting high knee extensor moment and knee shear force during drop landings do not yield correspondingly high anterior and lateral tibial translations. PMID:21820780

  17. High Knee Valgus in Female Subjects Does Not Yield Higher Knee Translations During Drop Landings: A Biplane Fluoroscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Torry, Michael R.; Shelburne, Kevin B.; Myers, Casey; Giphart, J. Erik; Pennington, W. Wesley; Krong, Jacob P.; Peterson, Daniel S.; Steadman, J. Richard; Woo, Savio L-Y.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of peak knee valgus angle and peak knee abductor moment on the anterior, medial, and lateral tibial translations (ATT, MTT, LTT) in the ‘at risk’ female knee during drop landing. Fifteen female subjects performed drop landings from 40 cm. 3D knee motion was simultaneously recorded using a high speed, biplane fluoroscopy system and a video-based motion analysis system. Valgus knee angles and knee abduction moments were stratified into low, intermediate and high groups and peak ATT, MTT and LTT were compared between these groups with ANOVA (α = .05). Significant differences were observed between stratified groups in peak knee valgus angle (p < .0001) and peak knee abduction moment (p < .0001). However, no corresponding differences in peak ATT, LTT and MTT between groups exhibiting low to high peak knee valgus angles (ATT: p = .80; LTT: p = .25; MTT: p = .72); or, in peak ATT (p = .61), LTT (p = .26) and MTT (p = .96) translations when stratified according to low to high knee abduction moments, were found. We conclude that the healthy female knee is tightly regulated with regard to translations even when motion analysis derived knee valgus angles and abduction moments are high. PMID:22968826

  18. Total knee replacement with and without patellar resurfacing: a prospective, randomised trial using the profix total knee system.

    PubMed

    Smith, A J; Wood, D J; Li, M-G

    2008-01-01

    We have examined the differences in clinical outcome of total knee replacement (TKR) with and without patellar resurfacing in a prospective, randomised study of 181 osteoarthritic knees in 142 patients using the Profix total knee system which has a femoral component with features considered to be anatomical and a domed patellar implant. The procedures were carried out between February 1998 and November 2002. A total of 159 TKRs in 142 patients were available for review at a mean of four years (3 to 7). The patients and the clinical evaluator were blinded in this prospective study. Evaluation was undertaken annually by an independent observer using the knee pain scale and the Knee Society clinical rating system. Specific evaluation of anterior knee pain, stair-climbing and rising from a seated to a standing position was also undertaken. No benefit was shown of TKR with patellar resurfacing over that without resurfacing with respect to any of the measured outcomes. In 22 of 73 knees (30.1%) with and 18 of 86 knees (20.9%) without patellar resurfacing there was some degree of anterior knee pain (p = 0.183). No revisions related to the patellofemoral joint were performed in either group. Only one TKR in each group underwent a re-operation related to the patellofemoral joint. A significant association between knee flexion contracture and anterior knee pain was observed in those knees with patellar resurfacing (p = 0.006). PMID:18160498

  19. Managing the pain of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hrnack, Scott A; Barber, F Alan

    2014-09-01

    Pain from knee osteoarthritis creates a significant burden for symptomatic patients, who are often forced to change their lifestyle because of their symptoms. Activity modification, therapy, weight loss, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, shoe orthotics, bracing, and injections are the nonoperative options available. New technologies are also emerging in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Ultimately, these therapeutic modalities should reduce pain and increase the overall functioning of patients. These nonoperative modalities give the clinician several effective options before surgical management is considered. PMID:25295768

  20. Snapping Pes Syndrome after Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Taketomi, Shuji; Yamagami, Ryota; Tahara, Keitaro; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Snapping pes syndrome is defined as a snapping sensation in the medial knee caused by pes anserinus and rarely occurs. Snapping pes syndrome after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) has not been reported yet. We experienced two cases with this syndrome after UKA. Conservative treatment was effective in one case, while surgical excision of the gracilis tendon was necessary to relieve painful snapping in the other case. The main cause of the first case might be posteromedial overhang of the tibial tray that reached up to 5 mm. The probable cause of the second case was posteromedial overhang of the mobile bearing. PMID:27274476

  1. Safety of knee radiosynovectomy with yttrium - 90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempińska, M.; Lass, P.; Ćwikła, J. B.; Żbikowski, P.

    2011-09-01

    Radioisotope knee synovectomy is based on an Yttrium - 90 citrate injection (185 - 222 MBq) into the knee joint cavity. The performance of procedure needs participation of a nuclear medicine specialist as well as an orthopedist or a rheumatologist and a technologist, who prepares radiopharmaceuticals. The ionization doses for patients and personnel depend not only on the injected activity, but also on the method and process of injection and the radioactivity measurement procedure used. The aim of this study is the evaluation of the degree of radiation exposure of patients and medical personnel during the performance of therapy with 90Y.

  2. Piezoelectric load measurement model in knee implants.

    PubMed

    Romero, Edwar; Rincon, Amilcar

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the feasibility of a new sensing platform for knee implant diagnostics. The proposed unit measures force and transmits the reading information wirelessly to an external receiving unit. This device is to be located in the tibial tray of the knee implant. The system measures force through the use of piezoelectric elements housed in the insert. At the same time, the piezoelectric material can generate enough energy to transmit the measurements without requiring batteries. Only the modeling of the piezoelectric voltage output is discussed at present. The force measurement can provide useful information about ligament balance while helping in the post-operative physical therapy.

  3. Gait Using Pneumatic Brace for End-Stage Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Starr, Roland; Chughtai, Morad; Mont, Michael A; Harwin, Steven F; Bhave, Anil

    2016-04-01

    More than 20 million individuals in the United States are affected by knee osteoarthritis (OA), which can lead to altered biomechanics and excessive joint loading. The use of an unloader pneumatic brace with extension assist has been proposed as a nonoperative treatment modality that may improve gait mechanics and correct knee malalignment. We assessed the following parameters in patients who have knee OA treated with and without a brace: (1) changes in temporospatial parameters in gait; (2) knee range of motion, knee extension at heel strike, and foot placement; (3) knee joint moments and impulse; and (4) changes in dynamic stiffness and rate of change of knee flexion during midstance to terminal stance. This 2:1 prospective, randomized, single-blinded trial evaluated 36 patients (24 brace and 12 matching). OA knee patients were randomized to receive either a pneumatic unloader brace or a standard nonoperative treatment regimen as the matching cohort for a 3-month period. They underwent evaluation of gait parameters using a three-dimensional gait analysis system at their initial appointment and at 3 months follow-up. All the testing, pre- and postbracing were performed without wearing the brace to examine for retained effects. Treatment with the brace led to significant improvements versus standard treatment in various gait parameters. Patients in the brace group had improvements in walking speed, knee extension at heel strike, total range of motion, knee joint forces, and rate of knee flexion from midstance to terminal stance when compared with the matching cohort. Knee OA patients who used a pneumatic unloader brace for 3 months for at least 3 hours per day had significant improvements various gait parameters when compared with a standard nonoperative therapy cohort. Braced patients demonstrated gait-modifying affects when not wearing the brace. These results are encouraging and suggest that this device represents a promising treatment modality for knee OA that

  4. Co-delivery of adipose-derived stem cells and growth factor-loaded microspheres in RGD-grafted N-methacrylate glycol chitosan gels for focal chondral repair.

    PubMed

    Sukarto, Abby; Yu, Claire; Flynn, Lauren E; Amsden, Brian G

    2012-08-13

    The coencapsulation of growth factor-loaded microspheres with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) within a hydrogel matrix was studied as a potential means to enhance ASC chondrogenesis in the development of a cell-based therapeutic strategy for the regeneration of partial thickness chondral defects. A photopolymerizable N-methacrylate glycol chitosan (MGC) was employed to form an in situ gel used to encapsulate microspheres loaded with bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP-6) and transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3) with human ASCs. ASC viability and retention were enhanced when the Young's modulus of the MGC ranged between 225 and 380 kPa. Grafting an RGD-containing peptide onto the MGC backbone (RGD-MGC) improved ASC viability within the gels, remaining at greater than 90% over 14 days in culture. The effects of BMP-6 and TGF-β3 released from the polymer microspheres on ASC chondrogenesis were assessed, and the level of differentiation was compared to ASCs in control gels containing nongrowth factor-loaded microspheres cultured with and without the growth factors supplied in the medium. There was enhanced expression of chondrogenic markers at earlier time points when the ASCs were induced with the sustained and local release of BMP-6 and TGF-β3 from the microspheres. More specifically, the normalized glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II protein expression levels were significantly higher than in the controls. In addition, the ratio of collagen type II to type I was significantly higher in the microsphere delivery group and increased over time. End-point RT-PCR analysis supported that there was a more rapid induction and enhancement of ASC chondrogenesis in the controlled release group. Interestingly, in all of the assays, there was evidence of chondrogenic differentiation when the ASCs were cultured in the gels in the absence of growth factor stimulation. Overall, the co-delivery of growth-factor-loaded microspheres and ASCs in RGD-modified MGC gels

  5. [The focal renal lesions].

    PubMed

    Tuma, Jan

    2013-06-01

    The focal renal lesions are altogether common. Most frequently are found Columna Bertini hypertrophies (so called pseudotumors) and simple renal cysts. The role of sonography in the practice is to distinguish pseudotumors from real renal tumors, and simple renal cysts from complex cysts. The differentiation of complex renal cysts is possible with the help of the CEUS (= contrast enhanced ultrasound) and other imaging modalities such as CT or MRI. In these cases, the CEUS imaging agent has clear advantages over CT and MRI, because it is composed of gas bubbles, which are only slightly smaller than red blood cells and remains exclusively intravascularly while the CT and MRI contrast agents diffuse into the interstitial space without any real perfusion. The real tumors can be differentiated from certain focal non-tumorous changes based on the ultrasound and clinic. The further differentiation of individual kidney tumors and metastases using ultrasound, MRI, CT and CEUS is only partly possible. In all uncertain or unclear cases, therefore, an open or ultrasound-guided biopsy is useful.

  6. Unexpected wear of an unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium.

    PubMed

    Luyet, Anais; Fischer, Jean-François; Jolles, Brigitte M; Lunebourg, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is a successful procedure for the treatment of localized osteoarthritis to one compartment of the knee with good long-term results. However, several modes of failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty have been described, namely aseptic or septic loosening, progression of disease, wear, and instability. Metallosis after unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is rarely reported and is most often related with polyethylene wear or break. We report on a case of rapid failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium associated with metallosis secondary to the dislocation of the polyethylene.

  7. Histoid leprosy with giant lesions of fingers and toes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Gerzaín; Henríquez, Rafael; Gallo, Shirley; Panqueva, César

    2015-01-01

    This work was conducted at the Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de La Sabana, and at the Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Surcolombiana. Histoid leprosy, a clinical and histological variant of multibacillary leprosy, may offer a challenging diagnosis even for experts. An 83-year-old woman presented with papular, nodular and tumor-like lesions of 3 years of evolution, affecting fingers, toes, hands, thighs and knees, and wide superficial ulcers in her lower calves. Cutaneous lymphoma was suspected. A biopsy of a nodule of the knee showed a diffuse dermal infiltrate with microvacuolated histiocytes, moderate numbers of lymphocytes and plasma cells. Cutaneous lymphoma was suggested. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed prominent CD68-positive macrophages, as well as CD3, CD8 and CD20 positive cells. Additional sections suggested cutaneous leishmaniasis. New biopsies were sent with the clinical diagnoses of cutaneous lymphoma, Kaposi´s sarcoma or lepromatous leprosy, as the patient had madarosis. These biopsies showed atrophic epidermis, a thin Grenz zone and diffuse inflammation with fusiform cells and pale vacuolated macrophages. ZiehlNeelsen stain showed abundant solid phagocytized bacilli with no globii formation. Abundant bacilli were demonstrated in the first biopsy. Histoid leprosy was diagnosed. The patient received the WHO multidrug therapy with excellent results. We concluded that Ziehl Neelsen staining should be used in the presence of a diffuse dermal infiltrate with fusiform and vacuolated histiocytes, which suggests a tumor, and an IHC particularly rich in CD68-positive macrophages; this will reveal abundant bacilli if the lesion is leprosy. A good clinical pathological correlation is essential to establish a proper diagnosis and management of the patient.

  8. Total condylar knee arthroplasty for valgus and combined valgus-flexion deformity of the knee.

    PubMed

    Ranawat, C S; Rose, H A; Rich, D S

    1984-01-01

    Total condylar knee arthroplasty was performed on 64 knees with fixed valgus or valgus/flexion deformities. The technique for release of tight lateral and posterior structures is important to balance the ligament. Clinical results were rated good and excellent in 95% of the knees. Four patients with excessive flexion deformities required 6 weeks of cast bracing in the immediate postoperative period for instabilities caused by an imbalance in the spacing in flexion and extension. In no joint in the entire series did stability deteriorate with time. There were no patellar complications or nerve palsies noted. Radiographic evaluation revealed well-fixed components in 92% of the arthroplasties. None has required revision for mechanical loosening to date. With proper technique the total condylar prosthesis can be employed in knees with valgus or valgus/flexion deformities to give predictably good results. The total condylar III prosthesis may be required in severe combined deformities for added stability. PMID:6546120

  9. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... movement at the time of initial contact between the impactor and the knee. (5) The test probe velocity at... cables, or any other attachments to the probe, including the velocity vane, shall make contact with...

  10. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... contact between the impactor and the knee. (5) The test probe velocity at the time of contact shall be 2.1... to the probe, including the velocity vane, shall make contact with the dummy during the test....

  11. Management of primary knee osteoarthritis and indications for total knee arthroplasty for general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Van Manen, Mike D; Nace, James; Mont, Michael A

    2012-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, one of the most common causes of disability, continues to increase in prevalence as the older adult and obese populations grow. Often, the general practitioner is the first to evaluate a patient with a painful knee that has arthritis. Evidence-based evaluation and treatment guidelines recommend the use of nonoperative treatments before surgical treatment options such as total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are considered. Understanding available nonoperative treatment options is critical for physicians who first encounter patients with OA of the knee. The authors provide an overview of nonoperative treatment options for patients with OA, including weight loss, aerobic exercise, osteopathic manipulative treatment, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroid injections. The authors also discuss operative treatment options to be considered before TKA and review indications for TKA when other treatment options have been exhausted.

  12. Microfracture for the treatment of cartilage defects in the knee joint - A golden standard?

    PubMed

    Erggelet, Christoph; Vavken, P

    2016-01-01

    The evidence for the effectiveness of the microfracture procedure is largely derived from case series and few randomized trials. Clinical outcomes improve with microfracture for the most part, but in some studies these effects are not sustained. The quality of cartilage repair following microfracture is variable and inconsistent due to unknown reasons. Younger patients have better clinical outcomes and quality of cartilage repair than older patients. When lesion location was shown to affect microfracture outcome, patients with lesions of the femoral condyle have the best clinical improvements and quality of cartilage repair compared with patients who had lesions in other areas. Patients with smaller lesions have better clinical improvement than patients with larger lesions. The necessity of long postoperative CPM and restricted weight bearing is widely accepted but not completely supported by solid data. Maybe new developments like the scaffold augmented microfracture(6) will show even more consistent clinical and biological results as well as faster rehabilitation for the treatment of small to medium sized cartilage defects in younger individuals. All in all there is limited evidence that micro fracture should be accepted as gold standard for the treatment of cartilage lesions in the knee joint. There is no study available which compares empty controls or non-surgical treatment/physiotherapy with microfracture. According to the literature there is even evidence for self regeneration of cartilage lesions. The natural history of damaged cartilage seems to be written e.g. by inflammatory processes, genetic predisposition and other factors. Possibly that explains the large variety of the clinical outcome after micro fracture and possibly the standard tools for evaluation of new technologies (randomized controlled trials, case series, etc.) are not sufficient (anymore). Future technologies will be evaluated by big data from international registries for earlier

  13. Microfracture for the treatment of cartilage defects in the knee joint - A golden standard?

    PubMed

    Erggelet, Christoph; Vavken, P

    2016-01-01

    The evidence for the effectiveness of the microfracture procedure is largely derived from case series and few randomized trials. Clinical outcomes improve with microfracture for the most part, but in some studies these effects are not sustained. The quality of cartilage repair following microfracture is variable and inconsistent due to unknown reasons. Younger patients have better clinical outcomes and quality of cartilage repair than older patients. When lesion location was shown to affect microfracture outcome, patients with lesions of the femoral condyle have the best clinical improvements and quality of cartilage repair compared with patients who had lesions in other areas. Patients with smaller lesions have better clinical improvement than patients with larger lesions. The necessity of long postoperative CPM and restricted weight bearing is widely accepted but not completely supported by solid data. Maybe new developments like the scaffold augmented microfracture(6) will show even more consistent clinical and biological results as well as faster rehabilitation for the treatment of small to medium sized cartilage defects in younger individuals. All in all there is limited evidence that micro fracture should be accepted as gold standard for the treatment of cartilage lesions in the knee joint. There is no study available which compares empty controls or non-surgical treatment/physiotherapy with microfracture. According to the literature there is even evidence for self regeneration of cartilage lesions. The natural history of damaged cartilage seems to be written e.g. by inflammatory processes, genetic predisposition and other factors. Possibly that explains the large variety of the clinical outcome after micro fracture and possibly the standard tools for evaluation of new technologies (randomized controlled trials, case series, etc.) are not sufficient (anymore). Future technologies will be evaluated by big data from international registries for earlier

  14. Pattern of joint damage in persons with knee osteoarthritis and concomitant ACL tears.

    PubMed

    Stein, Verena; Li, Ling; Lo, Grace; Guermazi, Ali; Zhang, Yuqing; Kent Kwoh, C; Eaton, Charles B; Hunter, David J

    2012-05-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are known to be a risk factor for incident knee osteoarthritis (OA). At the present time, it is unknown whether an incidental ACL tear in those with established knee OA alters the pattern of synovial joint damage. Therefore, our aim was to assess whether ACL tears in persons with knee OA are associated with specific patterns of cartilage loss, meniscal degeneration, and bone marrow lesion (BML) location. We included 160 participants from the progression subcohort of the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) Study, an ongoing 4-year, multicenter study, focusing on knee OA. Regional cartilage morphometry measures including cartilage volume (mm(3)), denuded area, normalized cartilage volume, bone surface area, as well as location of meniscal pathology and BMLs in index knees on the same side were compared between those with and without ACL tears. Of the 160 subjects (51% women, age 62.1 (±9.9), BMI 30.3 (±4.7) kg/m(2)), 14.4% had an ACL tear. After adjusting for age, BMI and gender participants with ACL tears had significantly greater cartilage volume in the posterior lateral femur (P = 0.04) and the central medial tibia (0.001) compared to those without ACL tears. Normalized cartilage volume was not different between those with and without ACL tears. In addition, individuals with ACL tears had significantly larger bone surface areas in the medial tibia (P = 0,006), the central medial tibia (P = 0.008), the posterior lateral femur (P = 0.004), and the posterior medial femur (P = 0.04). Furthermore, participants with ACL tears showed significantly more meniscal derangement in the lateral posterior horn (P = 0.019) and significantly more BMLs in the lateral femur (P = 0.0025). We found clear evidence of predominant lateral tibiofemoral involvement, with OA-associated findings on MRI, including increased denuded area and bone surface area, BMLs, and meniscal derangement in knees of individuals with ACL tears compared to those without.

  15. Soft tissue artifact compensation in knee kinematics by multi-body optimization: Performance of subject-specific knee joint models.

    PubMed

    Clément, Julien; Dumas, Raphaël; Hagemeister, Nicola; de Guise, Jaques A

    2015-11-01

    Soft tissue artifact (STA) distort marker-based knee kinematics measures and make them difficult to use in clinical practice. None of the current methods designed to compensate for STA is suitable, but multi-body optimization (MBO) has demonstrated encouraging results and can be improved. The goal of this study was to develop and validate the performance of knee joint models, with anatomical and subject-specific kinematic constraints, used in MBO to reduce STA errors. Twenty subjects were recruited: 10 healthy and 10 osteoarthritis (OA) subjects. Subject-specific knee joint models were evaluated by comparing dynamic knee kinematics recorded by a motion capture system (KneeKG™) and optimized with MBO to quasi-static knee kinematics measured by a low-dose, upright, biplanar radiographic imaging system (EOS(®)). Errors due to STA ranged from 1.6° to 22.4° for knee rotations and from 0.8 mm to 14.9 mm for knee displacements in healthy and OA subjects. Subject-specific knee joint models were most effective in compensating for STA in terms of abduction-adduction, inter-external rotation and antero-posterior displacement. Root mean square errors with subject-specific knee joint models ranged from 2.2±1.2° to 6.0±3.9° for knee rotations and from 2.4±1.1 mm to 4.3±2.4 mm for knee displacements in healthy and OA subjects, respectively. Our study shows that MBO can be improved with subject-specific knee joint models, and that the quality of the motion capture calibration is critical. Future investigations should focus on more refined knee joint models to reproduce specific OA knee geometry and physiology.

  16. Patient function after a posterior stabilizing total knee arthroplasty: cam-post engagement and knee kinematics.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Jeremy F; Hanson, George R; Park, Sang Eun; Moynihan, Angela L; Li, Guoan

    2008-03-01

    Even though posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty has been widely used in surgery, how the cam-post mechanism (posterior substituting mechanism) affects knee joint kinematics and function in patients is not known. The objective of the present study was to investigate posterior femoral translation, internal tibial rotation, tibiofemoral contact, and cam-post engagement of total knee arthroplasty patients during in vivo weight-bearing flexion. Twenty-four knees with a PS TKA were investigated while performing a single leg weight-bearing lunge from full extension to maximum flexion as images were recorded using a dual fluoroscopic system. The in vivo knee position at each targeted flexion angle was reproduced using 3D TKA models and the fluoroscopic images. The kinematics of the knee was measured from the series of the total knee arthroplasty models. The cam-post engagement was determined when the surface model of the femoral cam overlapped with that of the tibial post. The mean maximum flexion angle for all the subjects was 112.5 +/- 13.1 degrees . The mean flexion angle where cam-post engagement was observed was 91.1 +/- 10.9 degrees . The femur moved anteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees and posteriorly through the rest of the flexion range. The internal tibial rotation increased approximately 6 degrees from full extension to 90 degrees of flexion and decreased slightly with further flexion. Both the medial and lateral contact point moved posteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees , remained relatively constant from 30 degrees to 90 degrees , and then moved further posterior from 90 degrees to maximum flexion. The in vivo cam-post engagement corresponded to increased posterior translation and reduced internal tibial rotation at high flexion of the posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty. The initial cam-post engagement was also mildly correlated with the maximum flexion angle of the knee (R = 0.51, p = 0.019). A later cam-post engagement might

  17. The SIGN nail for knee fusion: technique and clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Duane Ray; Anderson, Lucas Aaron; Haller, Justin M.; Feyissa, Abebe Chala

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy of using the SIGN nail for instrumented knee fusion. Methods: Six consecutive patients (seven knees, three males) with an average age of 30.5 years (range, 18–50 years) underwent a knee arthrodesis with SIGN nail (mean follow-up 10.7 months; range, 8–14 months). Diagnoses included tuberculosis (two knees), congenital knee dislocation in two knees (one patient), bacterial septic arthritis (one knee), malunited spontaneous fusion (one knee), and severe gout with 90° flexion contracture (one knee). The nail was inserted through an anteromedial entry point on the femur and full weightbearing was permitted immediately. Results: All knees had clinical and radiographic evidence of fusion at final follow-up and none required further surgery. Four of six patients ambulated without assistive device, and all patients reported improved overall physical function. There were no post-operative complications. Conclusion: The technique described utilizing the SIGN nail is both safe and effective for knee arthrodesis and useful for austere environments with limited fluoroscopy and implant options. PMID:27163095

  18. Early recovery after fast-track Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose After total knee arthroplasty with conventional surgical approach, more than half of the quadriceps extension strength is lost in the first postoperative month. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) operated with minimally invasive surgery (MIS) results in less operative trauma. We investigated changes in leg-extension power (LEP) in the first month after MIS Oxford UKA and its relation to pain, knee motion, functional performance, and knee function. Patients and methods In 35 consecutive Oxford UKA patients, LEP was measured 1 week before and 1 month after surgery together with knee motion, knee swelling, the 30-second chair-stand test, and Oxford knee score. Assessment of knee pain at rest and walking was done using a visual analog scale. Results 30 patients were discharged on the day after surgery, and 5 on the second day after surgery. LEP and functional performance reached the preoperative level after 1 month. Only slight postoperative knee swelling was observed with rapid restoration of knee flexion and function. A high level of pain during the first postoperative night and day fell considerably thereafter. None of the patients needed physiotherapy supervision in the first month after discharge. Interpretation Fast-track MIS Oxford UKA with discharge on the day after surgery is safe and leads to early recovery of knee motion and strength even when no physiotherapy is used. PMID:22313368

  19. A prospective study on knee proprioception after meniscal allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thijs, Y; Witvrouw, E; Evens, B; Coorevits, P; Almqvist, F; Verdonk, R

    2007-06-01

    The meniscus plays an important role in the proprioceptive ability of the knee joint. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the short-term influence of a meniscus replacement on the proprioception of the knee. Fourteen patients who had undergone a fresh meniscal allograft transplantation between May 2001 and June 2003 were tested pre-operatively and 6 months post-operatively. Disability regarding pain, stiffness and functionality of the affected knee during daily activities was measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis (WOMAC) scale. The knee joint position sense was assessed using the Biodex System 3 isokinetic dynamometer. The results of the WOMAC scale showed no significant differences concerning pain, stiffness or knee function between the pre- and post-operative condition of the knee. Assessment of the knee joint position sense at a reference point of 70 degrees of knee flexion revealed a significant improvement of the proprioception of the operated knee at 6 months after surgery compared with the pre-operative condition. The results of this study suggest that although no significant improvement of pain and functionality of the operated knee occurred at this short-term follow-up period, a meniscal allograft transplantation seems to have a significant positive effect on the joint position sense of the previously meniscectomised knee.

  20. Diagnostic Performance of 3D Standing CT Imaging For Detection of Knee Osteoarthritis Features

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Neil A; Nevitt, Michael C.; Lynch, John A; Niu, Jingbo; Torner, James C; Guermazi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the diagnostic performance of standing computerized tomography (SCT) of the knee for osteophytes and subchondral cysts compared to fixed-flexion radiography, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the reference standard. Methods Twenty participants were recruited from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST). Participants' knees were imaged with SCT while standing in a knee-positioning frame, and with PA fixed-flexion radiography and 1T MRI. Medial and lateral marginal osteophytes and subchondral cysts were scored on bilateral radiographs and coronal SCT images using the OARSI grading system and on coronal MRI using Whole Organ MRI Scoring (WORMS). Imaging modalities were read separately with images in random order. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the detection of lesions were calculated and differences between modalities were tested using McNemar's test. Results Participants' mean age was 66.8 years, BMI was 29.6kg/m2 and 50% were women. Of the 160 surfaces (medial and lateral femur and tibia for 40 knees), MRI revealed 84 osteophytes and 10 subchondral cysts. In comparison with osteophytes and subchondral cysts detected by MRI, SCT was significantly more sensitive (93% and 100%; p<0.004) and accurate (95% and 99%; p<0.001 for osteophytes) than plain radiographs (sensitivity: 60% and 10% and accuracy 79% and 94% respectively). For osteophytes, differences in sensitivity and accuracy were greatest at the medial femur (p=0.002). Conclusions In comparison with MRI, SCT imaging was more sensitive and accurate for detection of osteophytes and subchondral cysts than conventional fixed-flexion radiography. Additional study is warranted to assess diagnostic performance of SCT measures of joint space width, progression of OA features and the patellofemoral joint. PMID:26313455

  1. Nerve Injury in Patients Following Hip and Knee Arthroplasties and Knee Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yacub, Jennifer N.; Rice, J. Bradford; Dillingham, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the reporting of lower limb neuropathy within 90 days of surgery for patients undergoing hip arthroplasty, knee arthroplasty or knee arthroscopy. Design This was a retrospective study utilizing data from the 1998 MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounter Database (The MEDSTAT Group) to identify lower limb neuropathy following these surgeries. The sample was selected within the first nine months of 1998 using ICD-9 and CPT codes for hip and knee surgical procedures. Lower limb nerve injuries as determined by ICD-9 codes within 90 days post surgery were the main outcome measures. The influence of diabetes on the rates of nerve injuries following surgery was also examined. Results 14,979 patients underwent these surgical procedures, 10 of whom were reported to have sustained a nerve injury post surgery (0.07%). A majority (53.1%) of the sample was male and the largest age groups consisted of those aged 45–54 years (27.0%) and those aged 55–64 years (27.7%). Nerve injury occurred at a rate of 0.03% after hip arthroplasty, 0.01% following knee arthroplasty and 0.02% within three months of arthroscopic knee surgery. Overall, nerve injuries were two times more prevalent in the diabetic vs. non-diabetic population (0.11% vs. 0.06%); however, this difference did not meet conventional levels of statistical significance. Specific to knee arthroplasty, there were ten-fold differences in nerve injury rates between diabetics and non-diabetics, 0.11% vs. 0.01% respectively (p ≤ 0.01) – although the overall risks were small. Conclusion Nerve injuries following hip and knee arthroplasty, and knee arthroscopy were rare in a large population of patients younger than 65 years. Although the overall rates were low, there was an increased occurrence of nerve injuries in the diabetic population. This information is useful when counseling patients and benchmarking surgical complication rates. PMID:19620828

  2. Computer-assisted navigation in knee arthroplasty: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Muralidharan; Mahadevan, Devendra; Ashford, Robert U

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this review was to appraise the use of computer-assisted navigation in total knee arthroplasty and to assess whether this technology has improved clinical outcomes. Studies were identified through searches in MEDLINE, Embase, and PubMed. Numerous studies have shown improved leg and component alignment using navigation systems. However, the better alignment achieved in navigated knee arthroplasty has not been shown to lead to better clinical outcomes. Navigated knee arthroplasty had lower calculated blood loss and lower incidence of fat embolism compared with conventional knee arthroplasty using intramedullary jigs. It may be most valued when dealing with complex knee deformities, revision surgery, or minimally invasive surgery. Navigated knee arthroplasty, however, is only cost-effective in centers with a high volume of joint replacements. Overall, computer-assisted navigated knee arthroplasty provides some advantages over conventional surgery, but its clinical benefits to date are unclear and remain to be defined on a larger scale.

  3. Genu Recurvatum versus Fixed Flexion after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Amila; Chong, Hwei Chi; Chin, Pak Lin; Chia, Shi Lu; Lo, Ngai Ngung; Yeo, Seng Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background To date, there is no study comparing outcomes between post-total knee replacement genu recurvatum and fixed flexion. This study aims to provide data that will help in deciding which side to err on when neutral extension is not achieved. Methods A prospective cohort study of primary total knee arthroplasties was performed, which compared the 6-month and 2-year clinical outcomes between fixed flexion and genu recurvatum deformities at 6 months. Results At 6 months, knees in genu recurvatum did better than knees in fixed flexion deformity in terms of knee flexion. However, at 2 years, knees in fixed flexion deformity did better in terms of knee scores and showed better improvement in the degree of deformity. Conclusions We conclude that it is better to err on the side of fixed flexion deformity if neutral alignment cannot be achieved. PMID:27583106

  4. Knee osteoarthritis prevalence, risk factors, pathogenesis and features: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Behzad

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) a common disease of aged population and one of the leading causes of disability. Incidence of knee OA is rising by increasing average age of general population. Age, weight, trauma to joint due to repetiting movements in particular squatting and kneeling are common risk factors of knee OA. Several factors including cytokines, leptin, and mechanical forces are pathogenic factors of knee OA. In patients with knee pain attribution of pain to knee OA should be considered with caution. Since a proportion of knee OA are asymptomatic and in a number of patients identification of knee OA is not possible due to low sensitivity of radiographic examination. In this review data presented in regard to prevalence, pathogenesis, risk factors. PMID:24024017

  5. Two cases of synovial haemangioma of the knee joint: Gd-enhanced image features on MRI and arthroscopic excision.

    PubMed

    Sasho, Takahisa; Nakagawa, Koichi; Matsuki, Kei; Hoshi, Hiroko; Saito, Masahiko; Ikegawa, Naoshi; Akagi, Ryuichiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2011-12-01

    Synovial haemangioma of the knee joint is a relatively rare benign condition with around 200 reported cases. We have recently encountered two cases of synovial haemangioma of the knee joint which preoperative MRI had assessed as highly suspect and which arthroscopic resection and subsequent histological examinations confirmed as synovial hemangiomas. Published studies have identified the following as characteristic MRI features of synovial haemangioma: homogenous low intensity to iso-intensity on T1 sequence; and heterogeneous high intensity with low-intensity septa or spots within the lesion on T2 sequence. However, several other intra-knee disorders mimic these characteristics. In our two cases, we found that gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced images, which have been relatively rarely discussed in the literature, were useful for making the diagnosis and for determining the extent of this condition. These images also were very helpful during arthroscopic excision of the lesion. Nonetheless, even after Gd enhancement, differentiating between malignant conditions such as synovial sarcoma and haemangioma solely from MRI findings is still difficult.

  6. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in middle-aged patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis: a protocol for a double-blind, randomized sham-controlled multi-centre trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy has been shown to be of no benefit to patients with concomitant knee osteoarthritis, but the optimal treatment of a degenerative meniscus tear in patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis is unknown. This article describes the rationale and methodology of a randomized sham-controlled trial to assess the benefit of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of a medial meniscus tear in patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis. The objective of the study is to test whether the benefit from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with knee pain, medial meniscus lesion and mild/no knee osteoarthritis, is greater after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy than following sham surgery. Methods We will conduct a randomized controlled trial of treatment for degenerative meniscus tears in middle-aged patients (aged 35–55 years) with an MRI-verified medial meniscus lesion and mild or no knee radiographic osteoarthritis (grade 0–2 on the Kellgren & Lawrence scale). Patients will be randomized to receive either conventional arthroscopic partial meniscectomy or a sham surgery procedure. The primary outcome will be the KOOS5 derived from the ‘Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score’ at 2 years follow-up. Secondary outcomes at 2 years will include all five individual subscales of the KOOS, a global perceived effect score, the Short-Form-36 health status score, EQ-5D for economic appraisal and objective tests of muscle strength and physical function. Radiographic knee osteoarthritis will be evaluated at 5 years. Discussion Demonstration of no additional benefit from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy on pain and function should lead to a change in clinical care of patients with a degenerative meniscus tear. The results of this study will provide empirical evidence for the potential benefit/harm of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy compared to a masked sham-therapeutics intervention. Trial registration NCT01264991 PMID

  7. Swing-through gait with free-knees produced by surface functional electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Heller, B W; Granat, M H; Andrews, B J

    1996-01-01

    The swing-through gait is often the gait of choice for those crutch walkers who can perform it. However, a practical (sufficiently low energy and sufficiently fast) gait is usually not achievable by paraplegic individuals with thoracic lesions. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) was used to assist three spinal cord injured (SCI) subjects with complete thoracic lesions at T11, T11 and T6 to ambulate with a swing-through gait patten. Eight channels of surface stimulation were used to bilaterally stimulate knee extensors, knee flexors, hip extensors and hip flexors. The stimulation sequence was controlled by a computer that implemented a finite-state, rule-based control strategy according to sensor inputs. Over a long, level walkway, the T11 subjects averaged 0.40 m/s and 0.38 m/s for distances of 56 m and 51 m; the T6 subject averaged 0.30 m/s for 43 m. Using a motion analysis system, the gait patterns of two of the subjects were compared to those of a trained, non-impaired subject. The SCI subjects spent more time in both double support phases (when both crutches and both feet contact the floor) than did the non-impaired subjects, leading to a loss of momentum and hence a slower and less efficient gait. In conclusion, an FES assisted swing-through gait is shown to be a potentially useful mode of FES gait.

  8. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement.

    PubMed

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Cates, Harold E; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05). No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups. PMID:27258086

  9. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Cates, Harold E.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05). No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups. PMID:27258086

  10. Kinematics and Mechanical Properties of Knees following Patellar Replacing and Patellar Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rongying; Liu, Yanqiang; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Knee injury is a common medical issue. A full understanding of the kinematics and mechanical properties of knees following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) repair utilizing patellar replacement (only the base of the patella is replaced) versus patellar retaining surgical techniques is still lacking. In the current paper, we investigated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data from knees repaired by these two methods and evaluated total knee models created using imaging reconstruction technology that simulated gait conditions. Results revealed that patellar replacement had little influence on tibiofemoral kinematics, although the tibia-surface equivalent stress increased slightly. By contrast, patellar replacement had a significant influence on the patellofemoral joint; patellar internal rotation, external rotation, and medial-lateral translation were all increased. Moreover, the stress distribution on patellar prostheses was altered, resulting in an increased surface maximal equivalent stress on the corresponding area. Moreover, during the gait cycle, we found that the area with maximal equivalent stress shifted its position. Finally, the patellofemoral joint showed decreased motion stability. From the view of kinematics and mechanics, this paper suggests that patella should be retained during TKA if it is possible. The present study presented approaches and technologies for evaluating kinematics and mechanical properties of total knee joint after TKA under gait loads. PMID:27057134

  11. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement.

    PubMed

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Cates, Harold E; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05). No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups.

  12. A comedy of errors: the bad knee.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Hugh U

    2005-06-01

    A review of 241 consecutive total knee revisions has been carried out. Other than loosening, wear, and stiffness, at present, a commoner reason is an unsatisfactory result due to minor errors of tibial and femoral placement. Currently, about 16% of femoral components required derotation during revision.

  13. Minimally invasive knee arthroplasty: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Tria, Alfred J; Scuderi, Giles R

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for arthroplasty of the knee began with surgery for unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA). Partial knee replacements were designed in the 1970s and were amenable to a more limited exposure. In the 1990s Repicci popularized the MIS for UKA. Surgeons began to apply his concepts to total knee arthroplasty. Four MIS surgical techniques were developed: quadriceps sparing, mini-mid vastus, mini-subvastus, and mini-medial parapatellar. The quadriceps sparing technique is the most limited one and is also the most difficult. However, it is the least invasive and allows rapid recovery. The mini-midvastus is the most common technique because it affords slightly better exposure and can be extended. The mini-subvastus technique entirely avoids incising the quadriceps extensor mechanism but is time consuming and difficult in the obese and in the muscular male patient. The mini-parapatellar technique is most familiar to surgeons and represents a good starting point for surgeons who are learning the techniques. The surgeries are easier with smaller instruments but can be performed with standard ones. The techniques are accurate and do lead to a more rapid recovery, with less pain, less blood loss, and greater motion if they are appropriately performed. PMID:26601062

  14. Extensor tendon ruptures after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, M; Lustig, S; Huten, D

    2016-02-01

    Extensor tendon rupture is a rare but serious complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that impairs active knee extension, thereby severely affecting knee function. Surgery is usually required. Surgical options range from simple suturing to allograft reconstruction of the entire extensor mechanism and include intermediate methods such as reconstruction using neighbouring tendons or muscles, synthetic ligament implantation, and partial allograft repair. Simple suturing carries a high failure rate and should therefore be routinely combined with tissue augmentation using a neighbouring tendon or a synthetic ligament. After allograft reconstruction, outcomes are variable and long-term complications common. Salvage procedures for managing the most severe cases after allograft failure involve reconstruction using gastrocnemius or vastus flaps. Regardless of the technique used, suturing must be performed under tension, with the knee fully extended, and rehabilitation must be conducted with great caution. Weaknesses of available case-series studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity, and inadequate follow-up duration. All treatment options are associated with substantial failure rates. The patient should be informed of this fact and plans made for a salvage option. Here, the main techniques and their outcomes are discussed, and a therapeutic strategy is suggested.

  15. Preoperative Planning in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tanzer, Michael; Makhdom, Asim M

    2016-04-01

    Preoperative planning is of paramount importance in primary total knee arthroplasty. A thorough preoperative analysis helps the surgeon envision the operation, anticipate any potential issues, and minimize the risk of premature implant failure. Obtaining a thorough history is critical for appropriate patient selection. The physical examination should evaluate the integrity of the soft tissues, the neurovascular status, range of motion, limb deformity, and the status of the collateral ligaments to help determine the soft-tissue balancing and constraint strategy required. Standard radiographs, with a known magnification, should be obtained for preoperative total knee arthroplasty templating. Routine standing AP, lateral, and skyline radiographs of the knee can help the surgeon plan the bone cuts and tibial slope as well as the implant size and position at the time of surgery. In certain circumstances, such as severe coronal deformities, bone deficiencies, and/or extra-articular deformities, additional measures are frequently necessary to successfully reconstruct the knee. Constrained implants, metal augments, and bone graft must be part of the surgeon's armamentarium. PMID:26990712

  16. Effects of proprioceptive circuit exercise on knee joint pain and muscle function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck; Kim, Sang-Soo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study applied proprioceptive circuit exercise to patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis and examined its effects on knee joint muscle function and the level of pain. [Subjects] In this study, 14 patients with knee osteoarthritis in two groups, a proprioceptive circuit exercise group (n = 7) and control group (n = 7), were examined. [Methods] IsoMed 2000 (D&R Ferstl GmbH, Hemau, Germany) was used to assess knee joint muscle function, and a Visual Analog Scale was used to measure pain level. [Results] In the proprioceptive circuit exercise group, knee joint muscle function and pain levels improved significantly, whereas in the control group, no significant improvement was observed. [Conclusion] A proprioceptive circuit exercise may be an effective way to strengthen knee joint muscle function and reduce pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  17. Voxelwise Bayesian Lesion Deficit Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; Hillis, Argye E.; Pawlak, Mikolaj; Herskovits, Edward H

    2008-01-01

    Relating cognitive deficits to the presence of lesions has been an important means of delineating structure-function associations in the human brain. We propose a voxel-based Bayesian method for lesion-deficit analysis, which identifies complex linear or nonlinear associations among brain-lesion locations, and neurological status. We validated this method using a simulated data set, and we applied this algorithm to data obtained from an acute-stroke study to identify associations among voxels with infarct or hypoperfusion, and impaired word reading. We found that a distributed region involving Brodmann areas (BA) 22, 37, 39, and 40 was implicated in word reading. PMID:18328733

  18. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  19. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-01-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5. PMID:24324319

  20. Knee extensor muscle weakness is a risk factor for development of knee osteoarthritis. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Øiestad, B E; Juhl, C B; Eitzen, I; Thorlund, J B

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the association between knee extensor muscle weakness and the risk of developing knee osteoarthritis. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted with literature searches in Medline, SPORTDiscus, EMBASE, CINAHL, and AMED. Eligible studies had to include participants with no radiographic or symptomatic knee osteoarthritis at baseline; have a follow-up time of a minimum of 2 years, and include a measure of knee extensor muscle strength. Hierarchies for extracting data on knee osteoarthritis and knee extensor muscle strength were defined prior to data extraction. Meta-analysis was applied on the basis of the odds ratios (ORs) of developing symptomatic knee osteoarthritis or radiographic knee osteoarthritis in subjects with knee extensor muscle weakness. ORs for knee osteoarthritis and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated and combined using a random effects model. Twelve studies were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis after the initial searches. Five cohort studies with a follow-up time between 2.5 and 14 years, and a total number of 5707 participants (3553 males and 2154 females), were finally included. The meta-analysis showed an overall increased risk of developing symptomatic knee osteoarthritis in participants with knee extensor muscle weakness (OR 1.65 95% CI 1.23, 2.21; I(2) = 50.5%). This systematic review and meta-analysis showed that knee extensor muscle weakness was associated with an increased risk of developing knee osteoarthritis in both men and women.

  1. Influence of Bicompartmental Knee Replacement on Stand-to-Sit Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, He; Frame, Jeff; Rolston, Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis often occurs in medial and patellofemoral compartments. A bicompartmental knee replacement system replaces these two affected knee compartments and keeps the lateral compartment and cruciate ligaments intact. It is yet to be determined whether limbs with bicompartmental knee systems can demonstrate frontal-plane knee mechanics…

  2. Decreased Knee Joint Loading Associated With Early Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Gardinier, Emily S.; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J.; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury predisposes individuals to early-onset knee joint osteoarthritis (OA). Abnormal joint loading is apparent after ACL injury and reconstruction. The relationship between altered joint biomechanics and the development of knee OA is unknown. Hypothesis Altered knee joint kinetics and medial compartment contact forces initially after injury and reconstruction are associated with radiographic knee OA 5 years after reconstruction. Study Design Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods Individuals with acute, unilateral ACL injury completed gait analysis before (baseline) and after (posttraining) preoperative rehabilitation and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after reconstruction. Surface electromyographic and knee biomechanical data served as inputs to an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model to estimate knee joint contact forces. Patients completed radiographic testing 5 years after reconstruction. Differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces were compared between patients with and those without radiographic knee OA. Results Patients with OA walked with greater frontal plane interlimb differences than those without OA (nonOA) at baseline (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.00 ± 0.08 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.15 ± 0.09 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .014; peak knee adduction moment impulse difference: −0.001 ± 0.032 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.048 ± 0.031 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .042). The involved limb knee adduction moment impulse of the group with osteoarthritis was also lower than that of the group without osteoarthritis at baseline (0.087 ± 0.023 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs 0.049 ± 0.018 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .023). Significant group differences were absent at posttraining but reemerged 6 months after reconstruction (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.02 ± 0.04 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.06 ± 0.11 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .043). In addition, the OA group walked with lower peak

  3. A new hydrogel for the conservative treatment of meniscal lesions: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    ZORZI, CLAUDIO; RIGOTTI, STEFANO; SCREPIS, DANIELE; GIORDAN, NICOLA; PIOVAN, GIANLUCA

    2015-01-01

    Purpose this study aimed to investigate the efficacy of intra-articular (IA) administration of a hydrogel formulation obtained from a hyaluronic acid (HA) derivative (HYADD4®) in the management of meniscal tears and in meniscal tear repair. Methods fifty subjects with degenerative meniscal tears were enrolled into this single-site, observer-blind, parallel-group study. Clinical evaluations were performed at baseline and after 14, 30 and 60 days. Clinical outcomes included: pain reduction (Visual Analog Scale), improvement of knee functionality (WOMAC questionnaire), reduction in length and depth of the meniscal lesion (MRI-confirmed) and SF-36 questionnaire scores. Local tolerability and safety were also investigated. Results a significant reduction in VAS pain (p< 0.001) in favor of HYADD4® was recorded at day 14 and maintained at all the follow-up assessments. Data on knee functionality were in line with the VAS pain assessment results. A significant reduction in length and depth of the meniscal lesion, assessed using MRI, was found in the HYADD4® group compared to the control group (p<0.001). Conclusions the results of this study may indicate a new treatment option in the conservative management of patients complaining of pain due to meniscal tears. The MRI data suggest that the hydrogel formulation of HA used in this study may also play a role in the healing process of the lesion. Level of evidence Level I, prospective randomized clinical trial. PMID:26889470

  4. Electrocautery for Precancerous Anal Lesions

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating potentially precancerous anal lesions in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

  5. Gram stain of skin lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be done along with this test. Other studies are often done on a skin sample to determine if cancer is present. Viral skin lesions like herpes simplex are examined by other tests or a viral culture.

  6. Osteochondral Lesions of Major Joints

    PubMed Central

    Durur-Subasi, Irmak; Durur-Karakaya, Afak; Yildirim, Omer Selim

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides information about osteochondral lesions (OCL) and example cases of OCL occurring in major joints, some of which are rarely seen. This simple tutorial is presented in question and answer format. PMID:26180500

  7. Arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs.

    PubMed

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Seijas Vázquez, Roberto; García Balletbó, Montserrat; Álvarez Díaz, Pedro; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Cuscó Segarra, Xavier; Rius Vilarrubia, Marta; Cugat Bertomeu, Ramón

    2011-02-01

    Partial or total meniscectomy are common procedures performed at Orthopedic Surgery departments. Despite providing a great relief of pain, it has been related to early onset knee osteoarthritis. Meniscal allograft transplantation has been proposed as an alternative to meniscectomy. The purposes of this study were to describe an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs technique and to report the preliminary results. All meniscal allograft transplantations performed between 2001 and 2006 were approached for eligibility, and a total of 35 patients (involving 37 menisci) were finally engaged in the study. Patients were excluded if they had ipsilateral knee ligament reconstruction or cartilage repair surgery before meniscal transplantation or other knee surgeries after the meniscal transplantation. Scores on Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scale for pain were obtained at a mean follow-up of 38.6 months and compared to pre-operative data. Data on chondral lesions were obtained during the arthroscopic procedure and through imaging (radiographs and MRI) studies pre-operatively. Two graft failures out of 59 transplants (3.4%) were found. Daily life accidents were responsible for all graft failures. Significant improvements for Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and VAS for pain scores following the meniscal allograft transplantation were found (P < 0.0001). Controlling for chondral lesion, there was no significant interactions for Lysholm (n.s.), Subjective IKDC Form (n.s.), and VAS for pain scores (n.s.). This study demonstrated that an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs improved knee function and symptoms after a total meniscectomy. Improvements were observed independently of the degree of chondral lesion.

  8. Knee joint kinematics during walking influences the spatial cartilage thickness distribution in the knee.

    PubMed

    Koo, Seungbum; Rylander, Jonathan H; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2011-04-29

    The regional adaptation of knee cartilage morphology to the kinematics of walking has been suggested as an important factor in the evaluation of the consequences of alteration in normal gait leading to osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of spatial cartilage thickness distributions of the femur and tibia in the knee to the knee kinematics during walking. Gait data and knee MR images were obtained from 17 healthy volunteers (age 33.2 ± 9.8 years). Cartilage thickness maps were created for the femoral and tibial cartilage. Locations of thickest cartilage in the medial and lateral compartments in the femur and tibia were identified using a numerical method. The flexion-extension (FE) angle associated with the cartilage contact regions on the femur, and the anterior-posterior (AP) translation and internal-external (IE) rotation associated with the cartilage contact regions on the tibia at the heel strike of walking were tested for correlation with the locations of thickest cartilage. The locations of the thickest cartilage had relatively large variation (SD, 8.9°) and was significantly associated with the FE angle at heel strike only in the medial femoral condyle (R(2)=0.41, p<0.01). The natural knee kinematics and contact surface shapes seem to affect the functional adaptation of knee articular cartilage morphology. The sensitivity of cartilage morphology to kinematics at the knee during walking suggests that regional cartilage thickness variations are influenced by both loading and the number of loading cycles. Thus walking is an important consideration in the analysis of the morphological variations of articular cartilage, since it is the dominant cyclic activity of daily living. The sensitivity of cartilage morphology to gait kinematics is also important in understanding the etiology and pathomechanics of osteoarthritis.

  9. Patellofemoral malalignment and chondral damage: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    MAZZOLA, CLAUDIO; MANTOVANI, DAVIDE

    2013-01-01

    Patellofemoral disorders can be classified according to specific criteria, and the most well-known classification systems are Insall’s classification and Merchant’s classification. In this work, after completion of an in-depth literature review, we will analyze the most frequent patellofemoral pathologies with the aim of determining the correct clinical-diagnostic-therapeutic course. Pathologies of greater clinical frequency will be examined in detail to provide the most relevant didactic scope. We will therefore address the following pathologies: excessive lateral patellar compression syndrome; patellar dislocations and subluxations; patellar chondromalacia; and patellofemoral osteoarthritis. PMID:25606514

  10. Asterixis in focal brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Degos, J D; Verroust, J; Bouchareine, A; Serdaru, M; Barbizet, J

    1979-11-01

    Asterixis was observed in 20 cases of focal brain lesions. Metabolic or toxic factors were excluded. An electromyogram study of asterixis was carried out in nine cases to establish the diagnosis. The site of the focal lesion was either parietal or mesencephalic and was always contralateral to the asterixis. "Focal asterixis" could result from a dysfunction of the sensorimotor integration in the parietal lobe and the midbrain.

  11. Benign Pediatric Salivary Gland Lesions.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Eric R; Ord, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Salivary gland lesions are rare in pediatric patients. In addition, the types of salivary gland tumors are different in their distribution in specific sites in the major and minor salivary glands in children compared with adults. This article reviews benign neoplastic and nonneoplastic salivary gland disorders in pediatric patients to help clinicians to develop an orderly differential diagnosis that will lead to expedient treatment of pediatric patients with salivary gland lesions.

  12. Endoscopic Management of Dieulafoy's Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hye Kyung

    2015-01-01

    A Dieulafoy's lesion is a vascular abnormality consisting of a large caliber-persistent tortuous submucosal artery. A small mucosal defect with the eruption of this protruding vessel can cause bleeding. In fact, a Dieulafoy's lesion is a relatively rare but potentially life-threatening condition. It accounts for 1% to 2% of cases of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Although there is no consensus on the treatment of Dieulafoy's lesions; treatment options depend on the mode of presentation, site of the lesion, and available expertise. Endoscopic therapy is usually successful in achieving primary hemostasis, with hemostasis success rates reaching 75% to 100%. Although various therapeutic endoscopic methods are used to control bleeding in Dieulafoy's lesions, the best method for endoscopic intervention is not clear. Combination endoscopic therapy is known to be superior to monotherapy because of a lower rate of recurrent bleeding. In addition, mechanical therapies including hemostatic clipping and endoscopic band ligation are more effective and successful in controlling bleeding than other endoscopic methods. Advances in endoscopic techniques have reduced mortality in patients with Dieulafoy's lesion-from 80% to 8%-and consequently, the need for surgical intervention has been reduced. Currently, surgical intervention is used for cases that fail therapeutic endoscopic or angiographic interventions. PMID:25844338

  13. DNA lesions: A thermodynamic perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, G.E.; Breslauer, K.J.

    1994-12-31

    The studies described in this paper are part of an overall program project entitled {open_quotes}The Chemistry and Biology of Exocyclic DNA Adducts and Oxidative DNA Damage.{close_quotes}. Initially, all the project leaders discuss and agree on biologically interesting lesions to target for study. Then begins the process of developing the chemistry required to synthesize modified nucleosides that either correspond to or model the damage sites of interest. Such modified nucleotides then are incorporated into oligonucleotides that are hybridized to their complements, thereby forming lesion-containing duplex structures. In any given duplex, the identity of the lesion-opposing nucleoside on the complementary strand is systematically altered, thereby allowing us to evaluate the impact on duplex properties of the identity of the base opposite the lesion. For comparative purposes, the undamaged parent Watson-Crick duplex also is synthesized. Such families of DNA duplexes are then sent for independent physiochemical characterizations. Armed with an extensive body of biophysical data, one then searches for correlations between the physiochemical influences of the lesions on duplex properties and the biological consequences of each lesion. At this stage, our approach is highly empirical. Ultimately, we hope that our studies will reveal correlations between physiochemical properties and biological consequences such that we will develop predictive powers and gain insight into the mechanisms of recognition, repair, and mutagenesis.

  14. Simulation of spiculated breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Alrehily, Faisal; Pinto, R. Ferrari; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wells, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Virtual clinical trials are a promising new approach increasingly used for the evaluation and comparison of breast imaging modalities. A key component in such an assessment paradigm is the use of simulated pathology, in particular, simulation of lesions. Breast mass lesions can be generally classified into two categories based on their appearance; nonspiculated masses and spiculated masses. In our previous work, we have successfully simulated non-spiculated masses using a fractal growth process known as diffusion limited aggregation. In this new work, we have extended the DLA model to simulate spiculated lesions by using features extracted from patient DBT images containing spiculated lesions. The features extracted included spicule length, width, curvature and distribution. This information was used to simulate realistic looking spicules which were attached to the surface of a DLA mass to produce a spiculated mass. A batch of simulated spiculated masses was inserted into normal patient images and presented to an experienced radiologist for review. The study yielded promising results with the radiologist rating 60% of simulated lesions in 2D and 50% of simulated lesions in DBT as realistic.

  15. [Examination of the knee joint. The value of clinical findings in arthroscopic control].

    PubMed

    Steinbrück, K; Wiehmann, J C

    1988-01-01

    Purely clinical examination of the knee joint can, at best, only be regarded as a "screening procedure". Diagnosis with the aid of apparatus (sonography, arthrography, CT, NMR) produces better results. However, arthroscopy performed by an experienced examiner confirms the diagnosis in cases of suspected meniscus injury or isolated lesions of the cruciate ligaments and leads to early and therefore optimal therapy. In a retrospective study 300 arthroscopies performed in 1985 were selected and evaluated. In 1986/87, a further 300 patients were clinically examined prospectively, according to the same criteria, and findings were compared with the arthroscopy performed the following day. Clinically, in 287 patients with multiple diagnoses, internal meniscus lesions were diagnosed in 162 cases (54%), external meniscus lesions in 38 (13%), chondropathia patellae in 54 (18%), and old ruptures of the cruciate ligaments in 46 (15%). In 13 patients no diagnosis could be established. Arthroscopically, pathology of the internal meniscus was found in 98 (33%) of the 300 patients, of the external meniscus in 40 (13%), cartilage damage in 103 (34%), old cruciate ligament ruptures in 51 (17%), and recent anterior cruciate ligament ruptures in 156 (52%); in 40 cases findings were normal. At 78%, the highest positive predictive value (proportion of tentative clinical diagnoses confirmed by arthroscopy) was found in cases of old ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament, followed by external meniscus lesions (61%) and internal meniscus lesions (55%); i.e., only 55 out of 100 clinically suspected internal meniscus lesions are diagnosed by arthroscopy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W.; Arokoski, Jari P.; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T.; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level. PMID:26926836

  17. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study.

    PubMed

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W; Arokoski, Jari P; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level. PMID:26926836

  18. Revision of minimal resection resurfacing unicondylar knee arthroplasty to total knee arthroplasty: results compared with primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Turlough M P; Abouazza, Omar; Neil, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    We compared a cohort of patients undergoing revision of a minimal resection resurfacing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with a cohort of patients undergoing primary TKA. Both cohorts were matched in terms of age, sex, and body mass index. We collected data on preoperative and postoperative range of motion, International Knee Society scores, and radiologic data. We also collected data on the modes of failure of the primary UKA. There were 55 patients in each cohort. The average time the UKA was in place was 48.3 months. The average follow-up period from the time of revision was 39.2 months. The most common reason for revision was subsidence of the tibial base plate (58%). Forty percent of patients required particulate bone grafting for contained defects. Two patients required metal augments, and 1 required stems. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in terms of range of motion, functional outcome, or radiologic outcomes. Revision of these types of implants to TKA is associated with similar results to primary TKA and is superior to revision of other forms of UKA.

  19. Intermittent applied mechanical loading induces subchondral bone thickening that may be intensified locally by contiguous articular cartilage lesions

    PubMed Central

    Poulet, B.; de Souza, R.; Kent, A.V.; Saxon, L.; Barker, O.; Wilson, A.; Chang, Y.-M.; Cake, M.; Pitsillides, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives Changes in subchondral bone (SCB) and cross-talk with articular cartilage (AC) have been linked to osteoarthritis (OA). Using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) this study: (1) examines changes in SCB architecture in a non-invasive loading mouse model in which focal AC lesions are induced selectively in the lateral femur, and (2) determines any modifications in the contralateral knee, linked to changes in gait, which might complicate use of this limb as an internal control. Methods Right knee joints of CBA mice were loaded: once with 2weeks of habitual use (n = 7), for 2weeks (n = 8) or for 5weeks (n = 5). Both left (contralateral) and right (loaded) knees were micro-CT scanned and the SCB and trabecular bone analysed. Gait analysis was also performed. Results These analyses showed a significant increase in SCB thickness in the lateral compartments in joints loaded for 5weeks, which was most marked in the lateral femur; the contralateral non-loaded knee also showed transient SCB thickening (loaded once and repetitively). Epiphyseal trabecular bone BV/TV and trabecular thickness were also increased in the lateral compartments after 5 weeks of loading, and in all joint compartments in the contralateral knee. Gait analysis showed that applied loading only affected gait in the contralateral himd-limb in all groups of mice from the second week after the first loading episode. Conclusions These data indicate a spatial link between SCB thickening and AC lesions following mechanical trauma, and the clear limitations associated with the use of contralateral joints as controls in such OA models, and perhaps in OA diagnosis. PMID:25655679

  20. Exercise Alters Gait Pattern but Not Knee Load in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Jia; Chang, Chao-Chin; Chou, You-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Six female patients with bilateral medial knee OA and 6 healthy controls were recruited. Patients with knee OA received a 6-week physiotherapist-supervised and home-based exercise program. Outcome measures, including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and Short Form-36 Health Survey as well as objective biomechanical indices were obtained at baseline and follow-up. After treatment, no significant difference was observed in the knee abductor moment (KAM), lever arm, and ground reaction force. We, however, observed significantly improved pain and physical function as well as altered gait patterns, including a higher hip flexor moment and hip extension angle with a faster walking speed. Although KAM was unchanged, patients with bilateral knee OA showed an improved walking speed and altered the gait pattern after 6 weeks of supervised exercise. This finding suggests that the exercise intervention improves proximal joint mechanics during walking and can be considered for patients with bilateral knee OA. Non-weight-bearing strengthening without external resistance combined with stretching exercise may be an option to improve pain and function in individuals with OA who cannot perform high resistance exercises owing to pain or other reasons. PMID:27725941