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Sample records for knee chondral lesions

  1. Autologous Collagen-Induced Chondrogenesis Technique for Knee Chondral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Paz, Matias; Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Yacuzzi, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate a series of patients with osteochondral lesions who underwent a microfractures treatment and autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis technique (ACIC). Methods: Microfracture treatment and ACIC was performed in eight patients with grade IV cartilage lesion of more than 3 cm2 long. Two patients were discarded due to short follow-up. Four women and two men were evaluated with 50 year-old mean age. The average follow-up was 12.5 months. An associated valgus osteotomy was performed in two patients. Patients were evaluated using the Lysholm score and IKDC. Radiographs were evaluated and a Magnetic Resonance (MRI) was performed in 3 patients. Results: Six patients were evaluated with a 1 B, 2 C and 3 D arthrosis grade according to IKDC classification. Atelocollagen was placed in the medial femoral condyle in four patients (2 associated to tibial valgus osteotomy), in the trochlea in one patient and in both in one patient. Pre and post operative average score IKDC was 38/58 and Lysholm 34/89. One case of postoperative artrofibrosis was registered which was mobilized under anesthesia with satisfactory results. The MRI showed signal with coverage of the chondral defect in more than 70%. There were no cases of infection or reactive synovitis. Conclusion: Atelocollagen combined with microfractures improved the clinical conditions in patients with articular cartilage lesions of the knee. It is necessary more patients and longer follow-up to verify this data.

  2. Photoactivated platelet-rich plasma therapy for a traumatic knee chondral lesion.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Julien; Barnard, Adele; Rotstein, Andrew

    2012-12-17

    To evaluate the effect of combining photoactivation therapy with platelet-rich plasma injections in the treatment of a traumatic chondral lesion of the knee. A 38-year-old man presented with left-knee pain and swelling following a basketball injury. MRI demonstrated a full-thickness lateral tibial plateau chondral flap with subchondral cyst formation and marrow oedema. The patient underwent a course of photoactivated platelet-rich plasma (PAPRP) injections. Patient outcome measures included the numerical pain rating scale and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index 3.0 (WOMAC). Following treatment, the patient reported improvement in both pain and function as measured by the numerical pain-rating scale and WOMAC. MRI showed resolution of subchondral bone marrow bruising/oedema. No complications were noted. In this case report, PAPRP injections demonstrated improvement in all recorded outcome measures. Recognising the limitations of a single case report, the results highlight the need for more formal controlled trials to determine the potential use of PAPRP in the treatment of chondral lesions.

  3. UPDATING ON DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF CHONDRAL LESION OF THE KNEE.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Cavalcanti, Filho Marcantonio Machado; Doca, Daniel; Cohen, Moisés; Ferretti, Mário

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of chondral knee injuries remains a challenge for the orthopedic surgeon, mainly owing to the characteristics of the cartilage tissue, which promote low potential for regeneration. Chondral lesions can be caused by metabolic stimulation, or by genetic, vascular and traumatic events, and are classified according to the size and thickness of the affected cartilage. Clinical diagnosis can be difficult, especially due to insidious symptoms. Additional tests, as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), may be needed. The treatment of these lesions usually starts with non-operative management. Surgery should be reserved for patients with detached chondral fragments, blocked range of motion, or the failure of non-operative treatment. The surgical techniques used for the treatment of partial thickness defects are Debridement and Ablation. These techniques aim to improve symptoms, since they do not restore normal structure and function of the cartilage. For full-thickness defects (osteochondral lesion), available treatments are Abrasion, Drilling, Microfracture, Osteochondral Autologous and Allogeneic Transplantation, and biological techniques such as the use of Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation, Minced Cartilage and stem cells.

  4. UPDATING ON DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF CHONDRAL LESION OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha Cavalcanti, Filho Marcantonio Machado; Doca, Daniel; Cohen, Moisés; Ferretti, Mário

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTS The treatment of chondral knee injuries remains a challenge for the orthopedic surgeon, mainly owing to the characteristics of the cartilage tissue, which promote low potential for regeneration. Chondral lesions can be caused by metabolic stimulation, or by genetic, vascular and traumatic events, and are classified according to the size and thickness of the affected cartilage. Clinical diagnosis can be difficult, especially due to insidious symptoms. Additional tests, as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), may be needed. The treatment of these lesions usually starts with non-operative management. Surgery should be reserved for patients with detached chondral fragments, blocked range of motion, or the failure of non-operative treatment. The surgical techniques used for the treatment of partial thickness defects are Debridement and Ablation. These techniques aim to improve symptoms, since they do not restore normal structure and function of the cartilage. For full-thickness defects (osteochondral lesion), available treatments are Abrasion, Drilling, Microfracture, Osteochondral Autologous and Allogeneic Transplantation, and biological techniques such as the use of Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation, Minced Cartilage and stem cells. PMID:27027078

  5. Rehabilitation following microfracture for chondral injury in the knee.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Jason M; Steadman, J Richard; O'Brien, Luke; Rodkey, William G; Briggs, Karen K

    2010-04-01

    Full-thickness chondral defects in the knee are common, and these articular cartilage lesions may present in various clinical settings and at different ages. Articular cartilage defects that extend full thickness to subchondral bone rarely - by providing a suitable environment for new tissue formation and takes advantage of the body's own healing potential. Proper surgical technique and rehabilitation improve the success rate of the microfracture procedure. The goals are to alleviate the pain and disability that can result from chondral lesions and restore joint conformity, thereby preventing late degenerative changes in the joint.

  6. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the treatment of isolated knee chondral lesions: design of a randomised controlled pilot study comparing arthroscopic microfracture versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative mesenchymal stem cell injections

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Julien; Ford, Jon; Bates, Dan; Boyd, Richard; Hahne, Andrew; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cicuttini, Flavia; Huguenin, Leesa; Norsworthy, Cameron; Shah, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The management of intra-articular chondral defects in the knee remains a challenge. Inadequate healing in areas of weight bearing leads to impairment in load transmission and these defects predispose to later development of osteoarthritis. Surgical management of full thickness chondral defects include arthroscopic microfracture and when appropriate autologous chondrocyte implantation. This latter method however is technically challenging, and may not offer significant improvement over microfracture. Preclinical and limited clinical trials have indicated the capacity of mesenchymal stem cells to influence chondral repair. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a pilot randomised controlled trial comparing arthroscopic microfracture alone for isolated knee chondral defects versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative autologous adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell injections. Methods and analysis A pilot single-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. 40 participants aged 18–50 years, with isolated femoral condyle chondral defects and awaiting planned arthroscopic microfracture will be randomly allocated to a control group (receiving no additional treatment) or treatment group (receiving postoperative adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment). Primary outcome measures will include MRI assessment of cartilage volume and defects and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Secondary outcomes will include further MRI assessment of bone marrow lesions, bone area and T2 cartilage mapping, a 0–10 Numerical Pain Rating Scale, a Global Impression of Change score and a treatment satisfaction scale. Adverse events and cointerventions will be recorded. Initial outcome follow-up for publication of results will be at 12 months. Further annual follow-up to assess long-term differences between the two group will occur. Ethics and dissemination This trial has received prospective ethics approval through

  7. OSTEOCHONDRAL AUTOLOGOUS TRANSPLANTATION FOR TREATING CHONDRAL LESIONS IN THE PATELLA

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Moises; Amaro, Joicemar Tarouco; Fernandes, Ricardo de Souza Campos; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Astur, Diego da Costa; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Skaf, Abdalla

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The primary aim of this study was to assess the clinical and functional evolution of patients with total-thickness symptomatic cartilaginous injury of the patellar joint surface, treated by means of osteochondral autologous transplantation. Methods: This prospective study was conducted from June 2008 to March 2011 and involved 17 patients. The specific questionnaires of Lysholm, Kujala and Fulkerson were completed preoperatively and one year postoperatively in order to assess the affected knee, and SF-36 was used to assess these patients’ general quality of life. The nonparametric paired Wilcoxon test was used for statistical analysis on the pre and postoperative questionnaires. The data were analyzed using the SPSS for Windows software, version 16.0, and a significance level of 5% was used. Results: The Lysholm preoperative and postoperative average scores were 54.59 and 75.76 points (p < 0.05). The Fulkerson pre and postoperative average scores were 52.53 and 78.41 points (p < 0.05). Conclusions: We believe that autologous osteochondral transplantation is a good treatment method for total-thickness symptomatic chondral lesions of the joint surface of the patella. PMID:27042645

  8. Association Between Previous Meniscal Surgery and the Incidence of Chondral Lesions at Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Robert H.; Wright, Rick W.; David, Tal S.; McCormack, Robert G.; Sekiya, Jon K.; Svoboda, Steven J.; Huston, Laura J.; Haas, Amanda K.; Steger-May, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Background Knees undergoing revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction typically have more intra-articular injuries than do knees undergoing primary reconstruction. Hypothesis Previous partial meniscectomy (PM) is associated with a higher rate of chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction, whereas previous meniscal repair (MR) is not associated with a higher rate of chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction, compared with knees undergoing revision ACL with no previous meniscal surgery. Study design Cohort study (Prevalence); Level of evidence, 2. Methods Data from a multicenter cohort was reviewed to determine the history of prior meniscal surgery (PM/MR) and the presence of grade II/III/IV chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction. The association between previous meniscal surgery and the incidence of chondral lesions was examined. Patient age was included as a covariate to determine if surgery type contributes predictive information independent of patient age. Results The cohort included 725 ACL revision surgeries. Chondrosis was associated with patient age (P < .0001) and previous meniscal surgery (P < .0001). After adjusting for patient age, knees with previous PM were more likely to have chondrosis than knees with previous MR (P = .003) or no previous meniscal surgery (P < .0001). There was no difference between knees without previous meniscal surgery and knees with previous MR (P = .7). Previous partial meniscectomy was associated with a higher rate of chondrosis in the same compartment compared with knees without previous meniscal surgery (P < .0001) and knees with previous MR (P ≤ .03). Conclusion The status of articular cartilage at the time of revision ACL reconstruction relates to previous meniscal surgery independent of the effect of patient age. Previous partial meniscectomy is associated with a higher incidence of articular cartilage lesions, whereas previous meniscal repair is not. Although this association may

  9. Effect of chondral defect size, shape, and location on MRI diagnostic performance in the porcine knee.

    PubMed

    Flanigan, David C; Harris, Joshua D; Jia, Guang; Choi, Seongjin; Siston, Robert A; Randazzo, John L; Knopp, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and positive predictive value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the identification of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in the porcine knee. Seventy-two full-thickness chondral defects (small or large; circular, oval, or triangular) were created in 12 porcine knees. The authors used 3.0-T MRI with 3-dimensional gradient echo water-selective/fluid (WATSf) sequences acquired in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes. Sensitivity and positive predictive value parameters were calculated for 2 readers. Magnetic resonance imaging was highly sensitive for detection of full-thickness defects in the knee (85%). The highest sensitivity was observed at the medial femoral condyle (93%), while the lowest was observed at the medial patella (71%). The sensitivities for detecting different shapes were unique to each shape, with oval lesions identified with greatest sensitivity (93%). Small lesions (86%) were detected at a similar sensitivity as large lesions (83%). The positive predictive values for accurate true-positive reads were low for all lesion shapes (18%-57%) and moderate for small (69%) and large (59%) sizes, with significant differences observed between the 2 readers. Magnetic resonance imaging has a high sensitivity in the detection of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in the porcine knee. Variability in defect shape and intra-articular location affects MRI sensitivity, while size does not. Magnetic resonance imaging was not effective in describing lesion shape or size. Further, there was subjectivity in reading defect shape and size between 2 radiologists.

  10. Association Between Meniscal and Chondral Lesions and Timing of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    de Campos, Gustavo Constantino; Nery, Wilton; Teixeira, Paulo Eduardo Portes; Araujo, Paulo Henrique; Alves, Wilson de Mello

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common sports injury and is known to be associated with an increased risk of knee osteoarthritis. Several studies have indicated that the risk of additional injuries to the menisci and articular cartilage increases with delays in the treatment of ACL tears. However, no consensus has been reached regarding the ideal timing for ACL reconstruction in terms of preventing secondary lesions. Purpose: To determine how the time elapsed between an ACL lesion and its reconstruction affects the incidence of meniscal and chondral lesions. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Medical records of 764 patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction were reviewed. Data from arthroscopic findings that included information about meniscal lesions and full-thickness articular cartilage lesions at the time of surgery were collected. The association between time elapsed between ACL lesion and reconstruction surgery and incidence of articular cartilage and meniscal lesions was analyzed by chi-square or Fisher exact test. The risk of secondary lesion was calculated by odds ratios (ORs) obtained from simple logistic regression analysis. Results: A positive correlation was observed between time after injury and the presence of any articular lesions (P = .003), cartilage lesions (P = .01), and medial meniscus lesions (P < .001). When analyzing the risk of secondary lesion relative to the reference period (<2 months), it was observed that the odds of finding any articular injury at the time of ACL reconstruction increased when the time from ACL injury to surgery was between 12 and 24 months (OR = 2.62) and >24 months (OR = 5.88). Furthermore, the odds of lesions on the medial meniscus increased when the timing between injury and surgery was 6 to 12 months (OR = 2.71) and continued to increase when the timing was 12 to 24 months (OR = 3.78) and >24 months (OR = 9.07). Conclusion: Associated articular lesions

  11. [Chondral and osteochondral fractures].

    PubMed

    Kayaoğlu, E Esin; Binnet, Mehmet S

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic chondral and osteochondral fractures and their role in the development of joint degeneration are not fully elucidated. While assessing traumatic knee injuries, one important criterion for the diagnosis of chondral fractures is to remember the possibility of a chondral or osteochondral fracture. Symptoms in osteochondral fractures are more obvious and cause severe pain and difficulty in movement of knee with hemarthrosis. The presence of hemarthrosis facilitates the diagnosis of an osteochondral fracture. Chondral and osteochondral fractures may be associated with other intra-articular pathologies. There are two main mechanisms of these fractures, including a direct effect causing avulsion or impaction and, a more common mechanism, flexion-rotation force to the knee, which is also the mechanism for an acute patellar dislocation. It is known that arthroscopic treatment is the best method for the diagnosis and treatment of chondral and osteochondral fractures. In osteochondral lesions, the aim of treatment is to restore the congruity of articular surfaces. In agreement with literature data, our clinical experience favors internal fixation as the most effective method for the treatment of osteochondral fractures.

  12. Up-to-date Review and Cases Report on Chondral Defects of Knee Treated by ACI Technique: Clinical-instrumental and Histological Results.

    PubMed

    Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Ghilardi, Marco; Bottai, Vanna; Bugelli, Giulia; Guido, Giulio; Giannotti, Stefano

    2015-05-01

    The limited regenerative potential of a full thickness defect of the knee joint cartilage has certainly conditioned the development of therapeutic strategies that take into account all the aspects of the healing process. The most common treatments to repair chondral and osteochondral lesions are bone marrow stimulation, osteochondral autograft transplantation, autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis, and autologous chondrocyte implantation. We like to emphasize the difference between a chondral and an osteochondral lesion because the difference is sometimes lost in the literature. In the context of treatment of injuries of the knee joint cartilage, the second-generation autologous chondrocyte transplant is a consolidated surgical method alternative to other techniques. Our experience with the transplantation of chondrocytes has had exceptional clinical results. We report 2 complete cases of a group of 22 in knee and ankle. These 2 cases had histological and instrumental evaluation. We cannot express conclusions, but can only make considerations, stating that, with the clinical functional result being equal, we obtained an excellent macroscopic result in both cases of second look. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a multiple surgical procedure with expensive chondrocyte culture, but even with this limitation, we think that it must be the choice in treating chondral lesions, especially in young patients.

  13. MOSAICPLASTY WITH PERIOSTEAL GRAFT FOR RESURFACING LOCAL FULL-THICKNESS CHONDRAL DEFECTS OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: Clinical and functional assessment comparing cases of full-thickness chondral defects (OC) treated with mosaicplasty or mosaicplasty covered with periosteum (mosaicambium). Methods: 20 knees with chondral defect, (10 mosaicplasty/10 mosaicambium) were operated between 1999 and 2005. All patients were clinically assessed preoperatively using the ICRS scale, VAS scale, X-ray and MRI. During 2008, we reviewed patients using the same protocol. For statistical purposes, the patients were divided into two groups, according to the surgical technique. Statistical analysis was performed with EPI2000 program, using chi-squared test and Student's t test, with a significance level of 0.05. Results: Preoperatively, all patients were in group C/D (ICRS scale). In 2008, 18 cases were in groups A and B according to the ICRS scale (12 in A). Between groups, there were no statistical differences. The X-ray study revealed no changes in 55% of cases. Discussion: With no differences, why mosaicambium option? Morbidity on graft donor zones is not negligible. Mosaicambium uses less chondral grafts, reducing the potential for morbidity at graft donor zones. Conclusion: The mosaicambium technique is an excellent alternative for chondral defects greater than 2 cm2. “… articular cartilage defects are a troublesome thing … they don't heal …”. William Hunter (1718-1783). PMID:26998467

  14. [Arthroscopic treatment of chondral lesions of the ankle joint. Evidence-based therapy].

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Jordan, M; Hamborg-Petersen, E

    2016-02-01

    Ankle sprains are the most relevant injuries of the lower extremities and can lead to damage to ligaments and osteochondral lesions. Up to 50 % of patients with a sprained ankle later develop a lesion of the cartilage in the ankle joint or an osteochondral lesion of the talus. This can lead to osteoarthritis of the injured ankle joint. Spontaneous healing is possible in all age groups in cases of a bone bruise in the subchondral bone but in isolated chondral injuries is only useful in pediatric patients. In many cases chondral and osteochondral injuries lead to increasing demarcation of the affected area and can result in progressive degeneration of the joint if not recognized in time. There also exist a certain number of osteochondral changes of the articular surface of the talus without any history of relevant trauma, which are collectively grouped under the term osteochondrosis dissecans. Perfusion disorders are discussed as one of many possible causes of these alterations. Nowadays, chondral and osteochondral defects can be treated earlier due to detection using very sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) techniques. The use of conservative treatment only has a chance of healing in pediatric patients. Conservative measures for adults should only be considered as adjuvant treatment to surgery.Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, this article gives an overview and critical analysis of the current concepts for treatment of chondral and osteochondral injuries and lesions of the talus. With arthroscopic therapy curettage and microfracture of talar lesions are the predominant approaches or retrograde drilling of the defect is another option when the chondral coating is retained. Implantation of autologous chondral cells or homologous juvenile cartilage tissue is also possible with arthroscopic techniques. Osteochondral fractures (flake fracture) are usually performed as a mini-open procedure supported by

  15. Chondral Injury in Patellofemoral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lustig, Sébastien; Servien, Elvire; Neyret, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Patellofemoral instability is common and affects a predominantly young age group. Chondral injury occurs in up to 95%, and includes osteochondral fractures and loose bodies acutely and secondary degenerative changes in recurrent cases. Biomechanical abnormalities, such as trochlear dysplasia, patella alta, and increased tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance, predispose to both recurrent dislocations and patellofemoral arthrosis. Design: In this article, we review the mechanisms of chondral injury in patellofemoral instability, diagnostic modalities, the distribution of lesions seen in acute and episodic dislocation, and treatments for articular cartilage lesions of the patellofemoral joint. Results: Little specific evidence exists for cartilage treatments in patellofemoral instability. In general, the results of reparative and restorative procedures in the patellofemoral joint are inferior to those observed in other compartments of the knee. Conclusion: Given the increased severity of chondral lesions and progression to osteoarthritis seen with recurrent dislocations, careful consideration should be given to early stabilisation in patients with predisposing factors. PMID:26069693

  16. Long-term outcome of grade III and IV chondral injuries of the knee treated with Steadman microfracture technique

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Marco; Trinchese, Ermanno; Bisaccia, Michele; Rinonapoli, Giuseppe; Meccariello, Luigi; Falzarano, Gabriele; Medici, Antonio; Piscitelli, Luigi; Ferrara, Pellegrino; Caraffa, Auro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction The aim of our study is to demonstrate the effectiveness of Steadman microfracture technique in the management of high-grade chondral defects at the level of the knee by clinical follow-ups at eleven years. Materials and methods This is a study conducted on fifteen patients suffering from Outerbridge grade III and IV chondral lesions of the knee, who underwent Steadman microfracture surgery between 2003 and 2004. Selective exclusion criteria to prevent that other treatments or comorbidities could invalidate the results were used. Patients were clinically evaluated with Lysholm and IKDC scale scores before surgery and at follow-ups at eleven years. Results There has been an improvement in the Lysholm scores (59.33 ± 18.2 at time zero vs 82.13 ± 14.16 at time t; p value: 0.0342) and in the IKDC scores (45.13 ± 17.07 at time zero vs 68.66 ± 21.47 at time t; p value: 0.04) that appears statistically significant. Discussion Currently microfracture surgery is not indicated in patients with high-grade chondral defects, but at the same time, it is a technique of easy execution, low cost and good results. The clinical improvement observed appears statistically significant, but we have also noticed a slight clinical worsening in two patients, possibly caused by: improper treatment, new trauma, incorrect rehabilitation and age at time of surgery. Conclusions The study has shown significant clinical improvements in patients, despite the fact that indications to the use of microfracture are still very limited and selective. It’s essential to underline the importance of the single patient assessment process, taking into account a variety of aspects including the site, the number and extent of the lesion, the degree of functionality, activity level, age and previous trauma. This shows the importance of a comprehensive assessment of the patient in order to choose the most suitable surgical option, which not necessarily has to strictly adhere to standard

  17. [The future of treatment for chondral and osteochondral lesions].

    PubMed

    Cirpar, Meriç; Korkusuz, Feza

    2007-01-01

    The population of patients with symptomatic focal or generalized cartilage lesions is growing due to prolongation of life expectancy and to increasing frequency of sports injuries. Cartilage tissue lesions which were defined as untreatable in the past have now become treatable thanks to advances in basic scientific research. With the development of technologies regarding biomaterial, cell and local regulators, and with the introduction of new surgical techniques, it is estimated that, in the near future, clinical applications of cartilage tissue engineering will also receive particular attention in our country. Currently, all alternatives used in the treatment of cartilage lesions have merits and demerits, including arthroscopic debridement and lavage, mesenchymal stem cell stimulation, osteochondral replacement techniques, and autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Preliminary results of experimental cartilage tissue engineering are encouraging for the replacement of disrupted tissue with that having mechanical properties of hyaline cartilage. Clinical applications of cartilage tissue engineering include bioabsorbable scaffolds as extracellular collagen, hyaluronic acid matrices, and genetically engineered bioactive materials.

  18. Arthroscopic retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation to chondral lesion in femoral head.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Sarper; Toker, Berkin; Taser, Omer

    2014-06-01

    This report describes the treatment of 2 cases of full-thickness cartilage defect of the femoral head. The authors performed osteochondral autologous transplantation with a different technique that has not been reported to date. One patient was 37 years old, and the other was 42 years old. Both presented with hip pain. In both patients, radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a focal chondral defect on the weight-bearing area of the femoral head and acetabular impingement. A retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation technique combined with hip arthroscopy and arthroscopic impingement treatment was performed. After a 2-month recovery period, the symptoms were resolved. In the first year of follow-up, Harris Hip scores improved significantly (case 1, 56.6 to 87.6; case 2, 58.6 to 90). The technique described yielded good short- and midterm clinical and radiologic outcomes. To the authors' knowledge, this report is the first to describe a retrograde osteochondral transplantation technique performed with hip arthroscopy in the femoral head.

  19. Arthroscopic Treatment of Hip Chondral Defects With Bone Marrow Stimulation and BST-CarGel

    PubMed Central

    Tey, Marc; Mas, Jesús; Pelfort, Xavier; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2015-01-01

    Microfracture, the current standard of care for the treatment of non-degenerative chondral lesions in the hip joint, is limited by the poor quality of the filling fibrocartilaginous tissue. BST-CarGel (Piramal Life Sciences, Laval, Quebec, Canada) is a chitosan-based biopolymer that, when mixed with fresh, autologous whole blood and placed over the previously microfractured area, stabilizes the blood clot and enhances marrow-triggered wound-healing repair processes. BST-CarGel has been previously applied in the knee, with statistically significant greater lesion filling and superior repair tissue quality compared with microfracture treatment alone. In this report we describe the application of BST-CarGel for the arthroscopic treatment of hip chondral lesions. Our preliminary data suggest that our BST-CarGel procedure provides high-quality repair tissue and therefore may be considered a safe, cost-efficient therapeutic choice for the treatment of hip chondral defects. PMID:25973370

  20. Unusual lesions that distend the knee joint: pictorial essay*

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Luana T. Barros; de Albuquerque Filho, Eolo Santana; Batista, Laecio Leitão; de Moraes, Talita Peixoto; Pereira, Bruno Perez Guedes

    2016-01-01

    The high number of knee imaging exams at radiology clinics, together with the wide variety of knee disorders, calls for expanding the knowledge about the less common lesions seen in routine diagnostic practice. The purpose of this pictorial essay was to illustrate unusual lesions that distend the knee joint, selected by relevance and evaluated with multiple imaging modalities, including X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature. PMID:27818547

  1. Autologous chondrocyte implantation for the treatment of cartilage lesions of the knee: a systematic review of randomized studies.

    PubMed

    Vasiliadis, Haris S; Wasiak, Jason; Salanti, Georgia

    2010-12-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) techniques are becoming more popular for the treatment of full thickness cartilage lesions of the knee joint. However, there is no systematic information for the efficacy of the new generation ACI techniques compared to other treatment options. A systematic review of the existing evidence from randomized clinical trials of ACI treatment would contribute to understanding the advantages and limitations of this method and would inform the planning of future studies. Using pre-defined criteria, we searched a number of electronic databases to identify all the existing randomized control trials of any type of ACI treatment. Risk of bias was assessed and an analysis of the reported outcomes was performed. Information on the clinical efficacy and safety of ACI compared to other interventions was collected and presented. Nine trials were identified with 626 patients. Patients ranged from 15 to 52 years, and the size of treated lesions was between 1 and 22 cm(2). ACI was associated with improvement in clinical outcomes compared to baseline. However, the body of evidence did not suggest any superiority of ACI over other treatments. Complication rates were comparable between interventions except from an increased rate of graft hypertrophies after ACI with periosteum. ACI is an effective treatment for full thickness chondral defects of the knee, providing an improvement of clinical outcomes. However, there is insufficient data to say whether ACI is superior to other treatment strategies. More high quality studies and harmonization in the reported outcomes are needed before specific suggestions for practice can be made.

  2. [Traumatic vascular lesions of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Markgraf, E; Clausner, G; Lungershausen, W

    1989-09-01

    The popliteal artery is a "critical" or key-artery, whose sudden occlusion leads to the ischemia-syndrome. The rate of amputation after missing or too late recovery is very high. The real time for the recovery runs to 3-6 hours. The reason for the injury of the vessel is the dorsal luxation of the knee-joint, the fracture of the lower thigh or the fracture of the tibial head with extreme dislocation of the fragments. The management of the diagnosis, the contents and the order of the surgical treatment are reported.

  3. S53P4 bioactive glass and fibrin glue for the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the knee - a preliminary in vivo study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zazgyva, AncuŢa Marilena; Gurzu, Simona; Jung, Ioan; Nagy, Örs; Mühlfay, Gheorghe; Pop, Tudor Sorin

    2015-01-01

    The role of the subchondral bone and the importance of treating both bone and cartilage in cases of chondral and osteochondral lesions of the knee have been highly emphasized. There are no current studies on the experimental use of bioactive glass S53P4 (BonAlive®) as granules in the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the knee. Our preliminary study was designed to establish an experimental model and assesses the effect of glass granules fixed with fibrin compared to fibrin alone as fillers of the osteochondral defects created in the weight-bearing and partial weight-bearing regions of the distal femur in six adult rabbits. We found that the size of the distal femur in adult domestic rabbits allows the creation of 4 mm diameter and 5 mm deep osteochondral defects on both the medial femoral condyle and the trochlea, bilaterally, without significantly affecting the activity level of the animals. Retention of the glass granules in the defects was achieved successfully using a commercially available fibrin sealant. At five weeks post-implantation, we found macroscopic and microscopic differences between the four types of defects. The use of bioactive glass S53P4 for filling condylar osteochondral defects in rabbit femora led to the initiation of an early bone repair process, observed at five weeks after implantation, while the filling of trochlear defects with fibrin glue resulted in the appearance of cartilaginous tissue characteristic of endochondral ossification.

  4. Bone marrow lesions and subchondral bone pathology of the knee.

    PubMed

    Kon, Elizaveta; Ronga, Mario; Filardo, Giuseppe; Farr, Jack; Madry, Henning; Milano, Giuseppe; Andriolo, Luca; Shabshin, Nogah

    2016-06-01

    Bone marrow lesions (BMLs) around the knee are a common magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) finding. However, despite the growing interest on BMLs in multiple pathological conditions, they remain controversial not only for the still unknown role in the etiopathological processes, but also in terms of clinical impact and treatment. The differential diagnosis includes a wide range of conditions: traumatic contusion and fractures, cyst formation and erosions, hematopoietic and infiltrated marrow, developmental chondroses, disuse and overuse, transient bone marrow oedema syndrome and, lastly, subchondral insufficiency fractures and true osteonecrosis. Regardless the heterogeneous spectrum of these pathologies, a key factor for patient management is the distinction between reversible and irreversible conditions. To this regard, MRI plays a major role, leading to the correct diagnosis based on recognizable typical patterns that have to be considered together with coexistent abnormalities, age, and clinical history. Several treatment options have been proposed, from conservative to surgical approaches. In this manuscript the main lesion patterns and their management have been analysed to provide the most updated evidence for the differential diagnosis and the most effective treatment.

  5. The Use of Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation for Primary Treatment of Cartilage Lesions in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Dustin T.; Sadr, Kamran N.; Pulido, Pamela A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the outcome of osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation as the primary treatment for cartilage injury in patients with no previous surgical treatment. Study Design: Case series. Patients were identified in our outcomes database. Patients undergoing primary OCA transplantation with no prior surgical treatment and a minimum of 2 years follow-up were selected. Pain and function were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively. Patient satisfaction was assessed. Reoperations following OCA transplantation were captured. Failure was defined as revision OCA or conversion to arthroplasty. Results: Fifty-five patients (61 knees) were included in the analysis. The study consisted of 30 males and 25 females (mean age = 32.9 years; range = 15.7-67.8 years). The most common diagnoses for the OCA transplantation were osteochondritis dissecans (44.3%) and avascular necrosis (31.1%). Pain and function improved preoperatively to postoperatively on all outcome scales (P < 0.01). The majority of patients (86%) were “extremely satisfied” or “satisfied.” OCA survivorship was 89.5% at 5 years and 74.7% at 10 years. At latest follow-up (mean = 7.6 years; range = 1.9-22.6 years), OCA remained in situ in 50 knees (82%). Eighteen knees (29.5%) had further surgery; 11 OCA failures and 7 other surgical procedure(s). Of the failed knees (mean time to failure = 3.5 years; range = 0.5-13.7 years), 8 were converted to arthroplasty, 2 had OCA revisions, and 1 had a patellectomy. Conclusions: OCA transplantation is an acceptable primary treatment method for some chondral and osteochondral defects of the knee. Failure of previous treatment(s) is not a prerequisite for OCA transplantation. PMID:26425257

  6. Role of Arthroscopy in the Treatment of Osteoarthritis of Knee

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Saurabh; Singh, Ch Arun Kumar; Datta, Snehasish; Paul, Vinil; Masatvar, Pranav; Hmarj, Christopher L.; Marbaniang, Graham Bell

    2015-01-01

    Background A variety of procedures have been described for treatment of the osteoarthritic knee. Comprehensive Arthroscopic treatment regime has definite role in treating patients with knee Osteoarthritis. Aim To evaluate the role of arthroscopy in functional and subjective outcomes of patient with moderate to severe osteoarthritis of knee. Materials and Methods Between October 2011 to September 2013, 30 patients were treated with an arthroscopic regimen. Patients with primary osteoarthritis who fulfilled clinical and radiographic classification criteria of American College of Rheumatology for osteoarthritis were included. All patients were followed for 18 months. All patients were subjected to comprehensive arthroscopic treatment. Results Overall, mean age was 59 years, with 17 females and 13 males. According to Kellgren Lawrence scale, 17 patients had grade 2 osteoarthritis, 10 had grade 3 osteoarthritis and 3 patients had grade 4. The average preoperative Lysholm score was 38.8. According to Outerbridge grading of chondral surface lesions, 14 patients were in grade-1, 5 in grade-2, 8 in grade-3 and 3 patients were in grade-4. The average 18 months postoperative Lysholm score was 83.3 (range 60- 96). 73.33% patients showed good/ excellent outcome. 80% of patients with chondral and meniscal lesions showed excellent/good outcome. Conclusion This arthroscopic treatment regimen can improve function and activity levels in patients with moderate to severe osteoarthritis. Patients with meniscal and chondral pathology will be benefited more by arthroscopic treatment. PMID:26436009

  7. Chronic knee extensor mechanism lesions in total knee arthroplasty: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    COTTINO, UMBERTO; DELEDDA, DAVIDE; ROSSO, FEDERICA; BLONNA, DAVIDE; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2016-01-01

    Knee extensor mechanism rupture is a serious complication of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Its prevalence ranges from 1 to 10% and it is commonly observed as a chronic multifactorial pathology with the patellar tendon as the most common site of rupture. Knee extensor mechanism reconstruction can be performed using allogenic or synthetic grafts. In the literature it is still not clear whether one of these techniques is superior to the other and the choice is usually tailored to the patient case by case. Allografts allow better restoration of the anatomical landmarks, whereas the mesh technique is more reproducible and the graft does not elongate over time. Allografts carry an increased risk of infection compared with synthetic reconstructions, while the mesh technique is cheaper and more readily available. In this paper, we review the etiology, diagnosis and treatment of this pathology, drawing on the most recent literature. PMID:27900308

  8. Bone Marrow Edema: Chronic Bone Marrow Lesions of the Knee and the Association with Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jason A; Beutel, Bryan G; Strauss, Eric; Youm, Thomas; Jazrawi, Laith

    2016-03-01

    Bone marrow edema of the knee occurs secondary to a myriad of causes. The hallmark of a bone marrow lesion (BML) is an area of decreased signal intensity on T1 weighted MRI with a corresponding area of increased signal intensity on a T2 weighted MRI. Recently, chronic bone marrow lesions have been correlated with knee pain and progression of osteoarthritis. These lesions have also been associated with other degenerative conditions such as meniscal tears, cartilage deterioration, subchondral cyst formation, mechanical malalignment, and ultimately progression to arthroplasty. Medical treatments, such as prostacyclin and bisphosphonate therapy, have shown promise. Alignment procedures, as well as core decompression and subchondroplasty, have been used as surgical treatments for chronic BMLs.

  9. Clinical examination of the knee: know your tools for diagnosis of knee injuries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The clinical evaluation of the knee is a fundamental tool to correctly address diagnosis and treatment, and should never be replaced by the findings retrieved by the imaging studies carried on the patient. Every surgeon has his own series of exams with whom he is more confident and on whom he relies on for diagnosis. Usually, three sets of series are used: one for patello-femoral/extensor mechanism pathologies; one for meniscal and chondral (articular) lesions; and one for instability evaluation. This review analyses the most commonly used tests and signs for knee examination, outlining the correct way to perform the test, the correct interpretation of a positive test and the best management for evaluating an injured knee both in the acute and delayed timing. PMID:22035381

  10. [Knee dislocation--a simple diagnosis? Compartment syndrome with occlusion of the popliteal artery and lesion of the peroneal nerve after inadequate trauma].

    PubMed

    Back, D A; Rauhut, F; Rieger, H

    2011-01-01

    Knee dislocations are rare and often associated with damage to the surrounding structures. We present a case where a soldier sustained a complex knee dislocation during routine training. This trauma was associated with a compartment syndrome, occlusion of the popliteal artery, lesion of the peroneal nerve and multiple lesions of ligaments and tendons of the knee.

  11. Autologous Membrane Induced Chondrogenesis (AMIC) for the treatment of acetabular chondral defect

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Acetabular chondral defect are very frequently associated to FAI. Treatment options are still questionable. Methods Between 2008 and 2014, 201 patients over 583 have been arthroscopically treated with the AMIC procedure for grade III and/or IV acetabular chondral lesions. Patients age was between 18 and 50 years; acetabular chondral lesion size was between 2 and 4 cm2; radiological Tönnis degree of osteoarthritis was ≤ 2. Results The mean follow up of the entire group of 201 patients was 5 years (from 8 to 2). Significant improvement, as measured by the mHHS, was observed at 6 months in comparison to preoperative levels (80.3 ± 8.3) (p<0.001). Continuous improvement with respect to each previous evaluation time point was seen, reaching the highest improvement level at the three year follow-up (85.5 ± 7.2). The mean mHHS improvement recorded at the five year follow-up compared with preoperative scores was 39.1 ± 5.9. Conclusions AMIC is a valid procedure to repair medium-sized chondral defects on the acetabular side of the hip found during treatment of FAI and lead to long-term favourable outcomes. Level of evidence IV. PMID:28066742

  12. Synovial inflammation in patients with different stages of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ene, Răzvan; Sinescu, Ruxandra Diana; Ene, Patricia; Cîrstoiu, Monica Mihaela; Cîrstoiu, Florin Cătălin

    2015-01-01

    The synovium is an intra-articular mesenchymal tissue and essential for the normal joint function. It is involved in many pathological characteristic processes and sometimes specific for this distinctive tissue. In this study, we refer to synovial proliferative disorders according to the stage of osteoarthritis (OA) disease. Forty-three patients with knee OA were treated in the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Emergency University Hospital of Bucharest, Romania, in the last two years. In all cases, we used at least five criteria for the knee OA: knee pain, knee joint tenderness, no palpable warmth over the knee, stiffness, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels. In all the cases the synovial tissue was selected by the orthopedic surgeon. X-ray examination was taken in every case of the affected joint. Patients who were considered to have early OA underwent arthroscopic synovial biopsy of the symptomatic joint. Synovial tissue samples from patients with late OA were obtained at the time of knee joint arthroplasty. Microscopic examination in early osteoarthritis revealed for more than half of patients with synovial biopsy through arthroscopic technique having synovitis lesions with mononuclear infiltrates, diffuse fibrosis, thickening of the lining layer, macrophages appearance and neoformation vessels also. The synovitis seen in advanced OA knees tends to be diffuse and is not mandatory localized to areas of chondral defects, although an association has been reported between chondral defects and associated synovitis in the knee medial tibio-femoral compartment. The overexpression of mediators of inflammation and the increased mononuclear cell infiltration were seen in early OA, compared with late OA.

  13. Salmonella osteomyelitis: A rare differential diagnosis in osteolytic lesions around the knee.

    PubMed

    Salem, Khaled Hamed

    2014-02-01

    Salmonella osteomyelitis in immunocompetent adults is uncommon. It usually has a diaphyseal location or present as spondylitis. Metaphyseal affection is extremely rare. A 51-year-old male presented with refractory knee pain. Plain X-rays showed a rounded osteolytic lesion in the proximal tibia without marginal sclerosis. A minimal C-reactive protein elevation and a normal leucocytic count were present. Further imaging raised suspicion of malignancy so that a biopsy was done. After fenestering the lesion, 15-ml turbid fluid was evacuated. Microbiological examination showed Salmonella enteritidis. Repeated debridements were done and antibiotic therapy with ciprofloxacin was initiated. The cavity was then filled with synthetic bone graft leading to progressive healing. Although rare, Salmonella bone infection usually lacks the typical periosteal reaction and the laboratory evidence of infection of pyogenic osteomyelitis. It should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of osteolytic neoplastic lesions.

  14. Treatment of articular cartilage lesions of the knee joint using a modified AMIC technique.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Antonio; Ciatti, Riccardo; Pascarella, Fabio; Latte, Carmine; Di Salvatore, Mariano Giuseppe; Liguori, Luciano; Iannella, Germano

    2010-04-01

    This study describes a modified AMIC technique consisting of perforations according to Pridie, rather than microfractures, and the covering of the focus of the lesion with a biological collagen patch enriched with bone marrow blood drawn through the knee itself. This technique allows advantages of both the Pridie technique and the in situ proliferation of mesenchymal cells beneath a biological collagen membrane, 'augmented', with bone marrow blood. The collagen membrane forms the roof of a 'biological chamber', and serves to protect and contains the stem cells as they differentiate into chondrocytes, which will form a healthy regenerative cartilage.

  15. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and hyaluronic acid are sensitive serum biomarkers for early cartilage lesions in the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qiang; Wei, Lei; Chen, Chongwei; Li, Pengcui; Wang, Xiaohu; Li, Yongping; Guo, Li; Zhang, Congming; Wei, Xiaochun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between five previously established serum osteoarthritis biomarkers and the severity of cartilage lesions in the knee. Cartilage damage (classified according to the Outerbridge scoring system) and serum concentrations of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), collagen type II C-telopeptide (CTX-II), matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), collagen type III N-propeptide, (PIIINP), and hyaluronic acid (HA) were determined in 79 patients who underwent knee arthroscopy or total knee replacement. HA and COMP concentrations were significantly higher in the Outerbridge score 1 and 2 groups, respectively. These results suggest that serum COMP and HA concentrations can be used to predict early cartilage lesions in the knee.

  16. Morel-Lavallée Lesion of the Knee in a Recreational Frisbee Player

    PubMed Central

    Shmerling, Alison; Bravman, Jonathan T.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic swelling/effusion in the knee region is a relatively common presenting complaint among athletes and nonathletes. Due to its broad differential diagnosis, a comprehensive evaluation beginning with history and physical examination are recommended. Knee joint effusion can be differentiated from other types of swelling by careful physical examination. Imaging, including plain radiography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is preferred modality. Aspiration of a local fluctuating mass may help with the diagnosis and management of some of these conditions. We present a case of a 26-year-old gentleman with superomedial Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) of the knee with history of a fall during a Frisbee game. His MLL was successfully treated with therapeutic aspiration and compression wrap without further sequelae. MLL is a rare condition consisting of a closed degloving injury caused by pressure and shear stress between the subcutaneous tissue and the superficial fascia or bone. Most commonly, MLL is found over the greater trochanter and sacrum but in rare cases can occur in other regions of the body. In most cases, concurrent severe injury mechanisms and concomitant fractures are present. MLL due to sports injuries are very rare. Therapeutic strategies may vary from compression wraps and aspiration to surgical evacuation. PMID:27493817

  17. Anterior knee pain.

    PubMed

    LLopis, Eva; Padrón, Mario

    2007-04-01

    Anterior knee pain is a common complain in all ages athletes. It may be caused by a large variety of injuries. There is a continuum of diagnoses and most of the disorders are closely related. Repeated minor trauma and overuse play an important role for the development of lesions in Hoffa's pad, extensor mechanism, lateral and medial restrain structures or cartilage surface, however usually an increase or change of activity is referred. Although the direct relation of cartilage lesions, especially chondral, and pain is a subject of debate these lesions may be responsible of early osteoarthrosis and can determine athlete's prognosis. The anatomy and biomechanics of patellofemoral joint is complex and symptoms are often unspecific. Transient patellar dislocation has MR distinct features that provide evidence of prior dislocation and rules our complication. However, anterior knee pain more often is related to overuse and repeated minor trauma. Patella and quadriceps tendon have been also implicated in anterior knee pain, as well as lateral or medial restraint structures and Hoffa's pad. US and MR are excellent tools for the diagnosis of superficial tendons, the advantage of MR is that permits to rule out other sources of intraarticular derangements. Due to the complex anatomy and biomechanic of patellofemoral joint maltracking is not fully understood; plain films and CT allow the study of malalignment, new CT and MR kinematic studies have promising results but further studies are needed. Our purpose here is to describe how imaging techniques can be helpful in precisely defining the origin of the patient's complaint and thus improve understanding and management of these injuries.

  18. Knee Articular Cartilage Repair and Restoration Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Dustin L.; Schenck, Robert C.; Wascher, Daniel C.; Treme, Gehron

    2015-01-01

    Context: Isolated chondral and osteochondral defects of the knee are a difficult clinical challenge, particularly in younger patients for whom alternatives such as partial or total knee arthroplasty are rarely advised. Numerous surgical techniques have been developed to address focal cartilage defects. Cartilage treatment strategies are characterized as palliation (eg, chondroplasty and debridement), repair (eg, drilling and microfracture [MF]), or restoration (eg, autologous chondrocyte implantation [ACI], osteochondral autograft [OAT], and osteochondral allograft [OCA]). Evidence Acquisition: PubMed was searched for treatment articles using the keywords knee, articular cartilage, and osteochondral defect, with a focus on articles published in the past 5 years. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: In general, smaller lesions (<2 cm2) are best treated with MF or OAT. Furthermore, OAT shows trends toward greater longevity and durability as well as improved outcomes in high-demand patients. Intermediate-size lesions (2-4 cm2) have shown fairly equivalent treatment results using either OAT or ACI options. For larger lesions (>4 cm2), ACI or OCA have shown the best results, with OCA being an option for large osteochondritis dissecans lesions and posttraumatic defects. Conclusion: These techniques may improve patient outcomes, though no single technique can reproduce normal hyaline cartilage. PMID:26502188

  19. Arthroscopically Assisted Two-stage Cementation Technique for a Periarticular Knee Lesion.

    PubMed

    Christoforou, Dimitrios; Golant, Alexander; Ort, Paul J

    2010-03-01

    Managing skeletal metastatic disease can be a challenging task for the orthopedic surgeon. In patients who have poor survival prognoses or are poor candidates for extensive reconstructive procedures, management with intralesional curettage and stabilization with bone cement with or without internal fixation to prevent development or propagation of a pathologic fracture may be the best option. The use of bone cement is preferable over the use of bone graft, as it allows for immediate postoperative weight bearing on the affected extremity.This article describes a case where the combined use of arthroscopy and a 2-stage cementation technique may allow preservation of the articular surface and optimization of short-term functional outcome after curettage of a periarticular metastatic lesion in a patient with an end-stage malignancy. We used knee arthroscopy to identify any articular penetration or intra-articular loose bodies after curettage and initial cementation of the periarticular lesion of the distal femur. Arthroscopic evaluation was carried out again after the lesion was packed with cement to identify and remove any loose intra-articular debris. The applicability of this technique is broad, and it can be used in any procedure involving cement packing in a periarticular location. Performed with caution, this technique can be a useful adjunct to surgical management of both malignant and locally aggressive benign bone lesions in periarticular locations.

  20. Advancements in Orthopedic Intervention: Retrograde Drilling and Bone Grafting of Osteochondral Lesions of the Knee Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Seebauer, Christian J.; Bail, Hermann J.; Rump, Jens C. Walter, Thula Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M.

    2010-12-15

    Computer-assisted surgery is currently a novel challenge for surgeons and interventional radiologists. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided procedures are still evolving. In this experimental study, we describe and assess an innovative passive-navigation method for MRI-guided treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the knee. A navigation principle using a passive-navigation device was evaluated in six cadaveric knee joint specimens for potential applicability in retrograde drilling and bone grafting of osteochondral lesions using MRI guidance. Feasibility and accuracy were evaluated in an open MRI scanner (1.0 T Philips Panorama HFO MRI System). Interactive MRI navigation allowed precise drilling and bone grafting of osteochondral lesions of the knee. All lesions were hit with an accuracy of 1.86 mm in the coronal plane and 1.4 mm the sagittal plane. Targeting of all lesions was possible with a single drilling. MRI allowed excellent assessment of correct positioning of the cancellous bone cylinder during bone grafting. The navigation device and anatomic structures could be clearly identified and distinguished throughout the entire drilling procedure. MRI-assisted navigation method using a passive navigation device is feasible for the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the knee under MRI guidance and allows precise and safe drilling without exposure to ionizing radiation. This method may be a viable alternative to other navigation principles, especially for pediatric and adolescent patients. This MRI-navigated method is also potentially applicable in many other MRI-guided interventions.

  1. Management of focal cartilage defects in the knee - Is ACI the answer?

    PubMed

    Strauss, Eric J; Fonseca, Lauren E; Shah, Mehul R; Yorum, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Injuries to the articular cartilage of the knee are common. They alter the normal distribution of weightbearing forces and predispose patients to the development of degenerative joint disease. The management of focal chondral lesions continues to be problematic for the treating orthopaedic surgeon. Although many treatment options are currently available, none fulfill the criteria for an ideal repair solution: a hyaline repair tissue that completely fills the defect and integrates well with the surrounding normal cartilage. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a relatively new cell-based treatment method for full-thickness cartilage injuries that in recent years has increased in popularity, with early studies showing promising results. The current article reviews the nature of cartilage lesions in the knee and the treatment modalities utilized in their management, focusing on the role ACI plays in the surgical treatment of these complex injuries.

  2. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J; Matsuda, Nicole A; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16-41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5-6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface.

  3. Low Grade Juvenile Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Blanchod, C. Collazo; Palanconi, M.; Zordan, J.; Salinas, E. Alvarez; Autorino, C.

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee is a nosological entity acquired, idiopathic and potentially reversible. Dissects the subchondral bone tissue plane from the underlying bone, making a partial or complete osteochondral detachment, with a loose body. Consensus to treat none surgically poor symptomatic and stable lesions. If the lesion becomes instable or more symptomatic, surgical treatment will be best the option. Recently histological evidence holds is possible find sources of instability in deep layers sub chondral bone, even in patients with ¨stables lesions¨. This condition might be the reason of unfavorable evolution certain cases previously considered as ¨stable or incipient¨, treated with the classic non operative protocols. Objectives: The purpose of the present study consist in present a series of cases of young patients with symptomatic low grade juvenile OCD (grade I-II), treated surgically with subchondral debridement and fixation ¨in situ¨ describing the clinical and imaging findings. Methods: We evaluated 15 cases of symptomatic juvenile OCD of the knee, stables lesion (grade I/ II) according to Di Paola´s classification, who have not responded to conservative therapy for at least 6 months. Results: All patients were treated surgical consecutively with arthroscopically assisted ¨in situ¨ fixation with pins Smart Nail NR, ConMed-Linvatex and for the same group of surgeons. We evaluated the clinical and imagenologic outcomes with MRI for a minimum follow up of six month to one year. No looseness of fastening material or loose bodies in the submitted sample were recorded. The study by MRI imaging techniques using high definition chondral identification evidence allowed the consolidation of the fragment to the 6th month. Conclusion: All patients evolved asymptomatic and returned to the previous activity, with high level of satisfaction.

  4. MRI of knee ligament injury and reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Farshad-Amacker, Nadja A; Potter, Hollis G

    2013-10-01

    Knee ligament instability may lead to meniscal and chondral damage, resulting in early osteoarthritis. Due to its superior soft tissue contrast and avoidance of harmful ionizing radiation, MRI has become the most important imaging modality for early recognition of structural defects of the knee joint. This review aims to the understanding of MRI appearances of knee ligament structures associated with knee instability, and to review the common patterns of altered knee mechanics that lead to ligament failure. Normal anatomy of the knee ligaments, pathologic conditions, and postsurgical appearances of the anterior cruciate ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, and posterolateral corner are described.

  5. MRI EVALUATION OF KNEE CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Camanho, Gilberto Luís

    2015-01-01

    Through the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to characterize soft tissue noninvasively, it has become an excellent method for evaluating cartilage. The development of new and faster methods allowed increased resolution and contrast in evaluating chondral structure, with greater diagnostic accuracy. In addition, physiological techniques for cartilage assessment that can detect early changes before the appearance of cracks and erosion have been developed. In this updating article, the various techniques for chondral assessment using knee MRI will be discussed and demonstrated. PMID:27022562

  6. Articular cartilage defects in the knee--basics, therapies and results.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jürgen; Janssen, Pia; Gaissmaier, Christoph; Schewe, Bernhard; Weise, Kuno

    2008-04-01

    Full-thickness defects of the articular cartilage in the knee joint have lower regenerative properties than chondral lesions of the ankle. In order to avoid early osteoarthritis, symptomatic articular cartilage defects in younger patients should undergo biological reconstruction as soon as possible. Various surgical procedures are available to biologically resurface the articular joint line. Numerous animal experiments and clinical studies have shown that early biological reconstruction of circumscribed cartilage defects in the knee is superior to conservative or delayed surgical treatment. This superiority refers not only to defect healing but also to the elimination of changes following secondary osteoarthritis. The various surgical procedures can be differentiated by the range of indications and the final outcome. Additional malalignment, meniscus tears and/or ligament instabilities should be treated simultaneously with the cartilage resurfacing. The mid- and long-term results of the various current techniques are promising, but further modifications and improvements are needed.

  7. PHYSICAL THERAPY INTERVENTION FOR A FORMER POWER LIFTER AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC MICROFRACTURE PROCEDURE FOR GRADE IV GLENOHUMERAL CHONDRAL DEFECTS

    PubMed Central

    Sum, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Power lifting places the shoulder complex at risk for injury. Microfracture is a relatively new procedure for chondral defects of the glenohumeral joint and is not well described in the literature. Objectives: The purpose of this case report is to describe the post-operative rehabilitation used with a power lifter who underwent a microfracture procedure to address glenoid and humeral chondral defects, debridement of type I superior labral anterior-posterior lesion, and a subacromial decompression. Case Description: The patient was a 46 year-old male who was evaluated nine weeks status-post arthroscopic microfracture procedure for glenoid and humeral chondral defects, debridement of superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesion, and subacromial decompression. Rehabilitation consisted of postural education, manual therapy, rotator cuff and scapular strengthening, dynamic stabilization, weightbearing exercises, and weight training over nine weeks (24 sessions). Lifting modifications were addressed. Outcomes: Results of the QuickDASH indicate that activities of daily living (ADLs), work, and sports modules all improved significantly, and the patient was able to return to recreational power lifting with limited discomfort or restrictions. Discussion: A structured post-operative physical therapy treatment program allowed this patient to return to recreational power lifting while restoring independent function for work-related activities and ADLs. PMID:21655454

  8. Increased interleukin 6 and tumour necrosis factor α expression in the infrapatellar fat pad of the knee joint with the anterior knee pain syndrome: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Witoński, Dariusz; Wągrowska-Danilewicz, Małgorzata; Kęska, Rafał; Raczyńska-Witońska, Grażyna; Stasikowska-Kanicka, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The pathway of pain in the anterior knee pain syndrome remains unclear. It has been hypothesized that some biochemical mediators of inflammation, such as cytokines contribute to the process. The objective of this work was to evaluate the synovial membrane and the infrapatellar fat pad expression of the inflammatory mediators and potentially chondrodestructive cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in the anterior knee pain syndrome, and to determine whether the cytokine expression counterpart with/corresponds to the amount of chondral damage in this syndrome. Ten consecutive patients with the anterior knee pain syndrome (group I) participated in the study. Patients with a history of trauma were excluded from this group. For comparison we used 10 patients with anterior cruciate ligament rupture or meniscal lesion with no history of pain in the anterior compartment (group II). Immunohistochemical techniques using a polyclonal rabbit anti-human antibody to IL-6 and a monoclonal mouse anti-human antibody to TNF-α were employed. The results show a statistically significant higher expression of IL-6 in infrapatellar fat pad (p < 0.05) as well as TNF-α in the infrapatellar fad pad and the synovium (p < 0.03, and p < 0.02, respectively) in group I as compared to control subjects. There is no any difference in the amount of chondral damage present in group I as compared to group II. The results of this study provide the immunohistochemical evidence suggesting that the anterior knee pain syndrome could be characterized by infrapatellar fat pad and synovial inflammation variations without the articular cartilage loss.

  9. Minimally invasive selective osteotomy of the knee: A new surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Leon, H O; Blanco, C E; Guthrie, T B

    2001-05-01

    We present a simple surgical technique created by the authors to address degenerative chondral lesions of the knee and its application in a limited prospective case series. The technique assumes the concept of beneficial epiphyseal changes caused by disruption of the subchondral bone in improving symptoms, as with drilling, microfracture, periarticular osteotomy, and other invasive procedures. Minimally invasive selective osteotomy (MISO) is an expansion of the arthroscopic treatment of the knee, specifically targeting symptomatic lesions with minimal additional trauma and cost, while avoiding disruption of the articular surface of the subchondral bone. The technique involves a mimimal access approach with selective saw cuts placed with a 1-cm oscillating blade parallel to the joint surface 1 to 1.5 cm deep to identified lesions. The technique does not address malalignment but can address lesions not addressed by classic osteotomies and, as such, may be combined with other corrective alignment procedures as necessary. We present the results of MISO of the knee in a case series of 62 outpatients carried out at the Orthopaedic Division of the Clinical and Surgical Hermanos Ameijeiras Hospital in Havana, Cuba. At 2-year follow-up, there was improvement of symptoms without significant complications.

  10. Preliminary validation of the Knee Inflammation MRI Scoring System (KIMRISS) for grading bone marrow lesions in osteoarthritis of the knee: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Dean; Buller, M; Wichuk, Stephanie; McDougall, Dave; Lambert, Robert GW; Maksymowych, Walter P

    2017-01-01

    Objective Bone marrow lesions (BML) are an MRI feature of osteoarthritis (OA) offering a potential target for therapy. We developed the Knee Inflammation MRI Scoring System (KIMRISS) to semiquantitatively score BML with high sensitivity to small changes, and compared feasibility, reliability and responsiveness versus the established MRI Osteoarthritis Knee Score (MOAKS). Methods KIMRISS incorporates a web-based graphic overlay to facilitate detailed regional BML scoring. Observers scored BML by MOAKS and KIMRISS on sagittal fluid-sensitive sequences. Exercise 1 focused on interobserver reliability in Osteoarthritis Initiative observational data, with 4 readers (two experienced/two new to KIMRISS) scoring BML in 80 patients (baseline/1 year). Exercise 2 focused on responsiveness in an open-label trial of adalimumab, with 2 experienced readers scoring BML in 16 patients (baseline/12 weeks). Results Scoring time was similar for KIMRISS and MOAKS. Interobserver reliability of KIMRISS was equivalent to MOAKS for BML status (ICC=0.84 vs 0.79), but consistently better than MOAKS for change in BML: Exercise 1 (ICC 0.82 vs 0.53), Exercise 2 (ICC 0.90 vs 0.32), and in new readers (0.87–0.92 vs 0.32–0.51). KIMRISS BML was more responsive than MOAKS BML: post-treatment BML improvement in Exercise 2 reached statistical significance for KIMRISS (SRM −0.69, p=0.015), but not MOAKS (SRM −0.12, p=0.625). KIMRISS BML also more strongly correlated to WOMAC scores than MOAKS BML (r=0.80 vs 0.58, p<0.05). Conclusions KIMRISS BML scoring was highly feasible, and was more reliable for assessment of change and more responsive to change than MOAKS BML for expert and new readers. PMID:28123780

  11. Bone Marrow Lesions and Joint Effusion are Strongly and Independently Associated with Weight-Bearing Pain in Knee Osteoarthritis: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Lo, GH; McAlindon, TE; Niu, J; Zhang, Y; Beals, C; Dabrowski, C; Hellio Le Graverand, MP; Hunter, DJ

    2009-01-01

    Objective It is widely believed that there are multiple sources of pain at a tissue level in osteoarthritis (OA). MRIs provide a wealth of anatomic information and may allow identification of specific features associated with pain. We hypothesized that in knees with OA, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), synovitis, and effusion would be associated with weight-bearing and (less so with) non-weight-bearing pain independently. Methods In a cross-sectional study of persons with symptomatic knee OA using univariate and multivariate logistic regressions with maximal BML, effusion, and synovitis defined by Boston Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score as predictors, and knee pain using weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing Western Ontario and McMaster University OA Index pain questions as the outcome, we tested the association between MRI findings and knee symptoms Results 160 participants, mean age 61 (±9.9), mean BMI 30.3 (±4.7) and 50% female, stronger associations were seen with weight-bearing compared with non-weight-bearing knee pain with adjusted risk ratios (RRs) of weight-bearing knee pain, for increasing maximal BML scores of 1.0 (referent) (maximal BML = 0), 1.2, 1.9, and 2.0 (p for trend = 0.006). For effusion scores, adjusted ORs of knee pain were 1.0, 1.7, 2.0, and 2.6 (p for trend = 0.0004); and for synovitis scores, adjusted ORs were 1.0, 1.4, 1.5, and 1.9 (p for trend = 0.22). Conclusion Cross-sectionally, maximal BML and effusion scores are independently associated with weight-bearing and less so with non-weight-bearing knee pain, supporting the idea that pain in OA is multifactorial. These MRI features should be considered as possible new treatment targets in knee OA. PMID:19583959

  12. Two-year outcome after Xpert stent implantation for treating below the knee lesions in critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Bosiers, Marc; Lioupis, Christos; Deloose, Koen; Verbist, Jürgen; Peeters, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of Xpert (Abbott Vascular, Abbott Park, IL) nitinol stents for the treatment of infrapopliteal lesions in patients with Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI). Between May 2005 and November 2007, 94 CLI patients (70 male, mean age 73.5 years) received 134 Xpert stents in 102 limbs. Seventy-nine patients (71.2%) were scored as Rutherford Category 4, 31 patients (27.9%) as Category 5 and 1 patient (0.9%) as Category 6. Primary endpoint of this study was defined as 2-year duplex derived primary patency. Secondary endpoints were 2-year limb salvage rate and the absence of reintervention after the index procedure. Kaplan Meier analysis reported 2-year primary patency and limb salvage rates of 54.4% and 90.8%, respectively. Stratification by lesion location did not reveal any significant differences in 2-year primary patency rates in proximal and distal below the knee lesions. Our results suggest that treatment with nitinol Xpert stents can be considered effective for treating CLI patients, with satisfying patency outcome.

  13. Biological Knee Reconstruction With Concomitant Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation and Meniscal Allograft Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Takahiro; Bryant, Tim; Minas, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treating articular cartilage defects and meniscal deficiency is challenging. Although some short- to mid-term follow-up studies report good clinical outcomes after concurrent autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT), longer follow-up is needed. Purpose: To evaluate mid- to long-term outcomes after combined ACI with MAT. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of prospectively gathered data from patients who had undergone ACI with MAT between 1999 and 2013. A single surgeon treated 18 patients for symptomatic full-thickness chondral defects with meniscal deficiency. One patient was lost to follow-up. Thus, 17 patients (18 knees; mean age, 31.7 years) were evaluated over a mean 7.9-year follow-up (range, 2-16 years). A mean 1.8 lesions per knee were treated over a total surface area of 7.6 cm2 (range, 2.3-21 cm2) per knee. Seventeen lateral and 1 medial MATs were performed. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. The modified Cincinnati Knee Rating Scale, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, visual analog scale, and Short Form–36 were used to evaluate clinical outcomes. Patients also self-reported knee function and satisfaction. Standard radiographs were scored for Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade. Results: Both 5- and 10-year survival rates were 75%. Outcomes for 6 knees were considered failures. Of the 6 failures, 4 knees were converted to arthroplasty and the other 2 knees underwent biological revision surgery. Of the 12 successfully operated knees, all clinical measures significantly improved postoperatively. Ten patients representing 11 of the 12 knees rated outcomes for their knees as good or excellent, and 1 rated their outcome as fair. Eight patients representing 9 of the 12 knees were satisfied with the procedure. There was no significant osteoarthritis progression based on K-L grading from preoperatively to a

  14. Current concepts in the treatment of cartilage lesions with special regard to the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Widuchowski, Wojciech; Tomaszewski, Wiesław; Widuchowski, Jerzy; Czamara, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    The last twenty years have been marked by a rapid development of articular cartilage treatment and regeneration techniques. We present current concepts in the treatment of cartilage lesions and injuries, including gene therapy and tissue engineering.

  15. The use of radiofrequency energy for arthroscopic chondroplasty in the knee.

    PubMed

    Kosy, Jonathan D; Schranz, Peter J; Toms, Andrew D; Eyres, Keith S; Mandalia, Vipul I

    2011-05-01

    We present a review of the current literature surrounding the use of radiofrequency energy for arthroscopic chondroplasty in the knee. This review article summarizes basic science, clinical efficacy, and recent advances in the understanding of radiofrequency energy use for the treatment of chondral lesions. Laboratory evidence of increased mechanical stability and decreased release of inflammatory mediators associated with the use of radiofrequency energy chondroplasty is described with clinical evidence of decreased pain and increased functional scores when compared with mechanical chondroplasty. We re-examine concerns about the immediate side effects of radiofrequency energy use, including damage to local structures, in light of new potentially contradictory results, as well as the progression of techniques and probe design. However, although reported complications are few, because the quality of clinical evidence about safety and efficacy remains low, we suggest cautious and judicious use of this technology until future research has clearly defined the long-term clinical outcomes and risks.

  16. Novel nano-composite multi-layered biomaterial for the treatment of multifocal degenerative cartilage lesions.

    PubMed

    Kon, Elizaveta; Delcogliano, M; Filardo, G; Altadonna, G; Marcacci, M

    2009-11-01

    We report on a 46-year-old athletic patient, previously treated with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, with large degenerative chondral lesions of the medial femoral condyle, trochlea and patella, which was successfully treated with a closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy and the implant of a newly developed biomimetic nanostructured osteochondral bioactive scaffold. After 1 year of follow-up the patient was pain-free, had full knee range of motion, and had returned to his pre-operation level of athletic activity. MRI evaluation at 6 months showed that the implant gave a hyaline-like signal as well as a good restoration of the articular surface, with minimal subchondral bone oedema. Subchondral oedema was almost non-visible at 12 months.

  17. In Vivo Kinetics of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplanted into the Knee Joint in a Rat Model Using a Novel Magnetic Method of Localization.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Yasunari; Kamei, Naosuke; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a magnetic system for targeting cells in minimally invasive cell transplantation. Magnetically labeled MSCs (m-MSCs) with nanoscale iron particles can be guided into the desired region by magnetic force from an extracorporeal device. We reported that magnetic targeting of m-MSCs enhances cartilage repair in a mini-pig model. However, the detailed kinetics of these magnetically targeted m-MSCs remain unknown. For clinical use, this aspect should be clarified from a safety standpoint. We therefore investigated the spatial and temporal distribution of the fluorescently-labeled m-MSCs transplanted into the knee joint using in vivo fluorescence combined with three-dimensional computed tomographic imaging in a rat model. Although the intraarticularly injected m-MSCs were spread throughout the joint cavity in the absence of magnetic force, the magnetic force caused the injected m-MSCs to accumulate around the chondral lesion. Further examinations including ex vivo imaging, histological assessments and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that transplanted MSCs were not present in any major organs after intraarticular administration, regardless of magnetic targeting. Our data suggest that m-MSCs can be accumulated efficiently into a chondral lesion using our magnetic targeting system, while none of the intraarticularly transplanted MSCs migrate to other major organs.

  18. [Ultrasonography in the study of lesions of the menisci and the collateral ligaments of the knee. Findings in 48 surgically treated patients].

    PubMed

    Tomasella, G; Turra, S; Olmeda, A; Soliman, A; Brunino, L G

    1991-06-01

    The authors report the results of the study of 48/112 patients who underwent US examination of the knee for gonalgia. Meniscopathy or capsular-ligamentous lesions were clinically suspected. US results were compared with arthroscopic or athrotomic findings; the latter two methods were considered as the reference gold standard. US exhibited 81.2% overall diagnostic accuracy, thus confirming its limitations, more evident than those of arthroscopy and arthrography, CT and MR imaging. Major limitations of US were its failed recognition of meniscal tears smaller than 5-6 mm, and its failed distinction of degenerative meniscopathies from common meniscal fractures (with the exception of 2 cases). Moreover, US did not allow cruciate ligament lesions to be demonstrated; however, in all these cases, US did demonstrate increased capsular thickness (greater than 3 mm at the lower margin of femoral condyle). This indirect sign, together with roudness of parameniscus and capsular-ligamentous limitans (at the hemirhyme), and the direct sign of inhomogeneous hyperechogenicity of the meniscal triangle (normally hypoechoic) contributed to raising overall diagnostic accuracy of US to 89.9%. In the 5 patients with a suspected lesion of the medial collateral ligament examined within 48 hours from trauma, US gave 2 false-positive results in 2 cases where forced abduction test was also positive. Massive edema and swelling of adjacent structures prevented the correct evaluation of ligament limitans. In these 2 cases, a lesion in the anterior cruciate ligament was found at surgery; one of them was associated with a meniscal lesion already diagnosed at US. Both parameniscal and popliteal cysts were correctly diagnosed with US. Due to the well-known limitations of clinics in the diagnosis of knee pain, US could be suggested as the examination of choice to evaluate suspected meniscopathy or ligamentous lesions, thanks to its low cost and short execution time. The use of US could also spare the

  19. The present state of treatments for articular cartilage defects in the knee

    PubMed Central

    Perera, JR; Gikas, PD; Bentley, G

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Chondral and osteochondral lesions of the knee are notoriously difficult to treat due to the poor healing capacity of articular cartilage and the hostile environment of moving joints, ultimately causing disabling pain and early osteoarthritis. There are many different reconstructive techniques used currently but few are proven to be of value. However, some have been shown to produce a better repair with hyaline-like cartilage rather than fibrocartilage. METHODS A systematic search of all available online databases including PubMed, MEDLINE® and Embase™ was undertaken using several keywords. All the multiple treatment options and methods available were considered. These were summarised and the evidence for and against them was scrutinised. RESULTS A total of 460 articles were identified after cross-referencing the database searches using the keywords. These revealed that autologous and matrix assisted chondrocyte implantation demonstrated both ‘good to excellent’ histological results and significant improvement in clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Autologous and matrix assisted chondrocyte implantation have been shown to treat symptomatic lesions successfully with significant histological and clinical improvement. There is, however, still a need for further randomised clinical trials, perfecting the type of scaffold and the use of adjuncts such as growth factors. A list of recommendations for treatment and the potential future trends of managing these lesions are given. PMID:22943326

  20. Intraoperative application Platelet rich fibrin, postoperative injections OF PRP or microfracture only for osteochondral lesions of the knee: a five-year retrospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Papalia, R; Diaz Balzani, L; Torre, G; Tirindelli, M C; Nobile, C; Maffulli, N; Denaro, V

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage lesions are the most common cause of chronic knee pain. Micro-fracturing is reliable, effective, easy to perform and inexpensive. We propose a novel approach to cartilage lesions where microfractures are performed contextually to intra-operative or post-operative administration of platelet concentrates. We retrospectively evaluate 48 patients divided in 3 groups. Group 1: 15 patients underwent microfractures and intraoperative administration of PRF (PRF group); group 2: 16 microfractures and postoperative injections of PRP (PRP group); group 3: 17 patients with isolated microfractures (Microfractures group). Clinical scores (IKDC, VAS pain) were administered at 2 and 5 years postoperative and MRI was performed to evaluate the lesions of patients according to the MOCART criteria (2006). Patients treated with platelet concentrates achieved better clinical results compared to patients treated with microfracture only. The PRF group showed better results than the PRP group at 2 years, with loss of significance at 5 years. At MOCART score, PRF group obtained better results earlier than the other two groups.

  1. MRI of anterior knee pain.

    PubMed

    Samim, Mohammad; Smitaman, Edward; Lawrence, David; Moukaddam, Hicham

    2014-07-01

    Anterior knee pain is the most common knee complaint. It may be due to a variety of soft tissue or osseous abnormalities. Knowledge of the radiologic appearance of the abnormalities allows more accurate diagnosis of the cause of the pain including chondral abnormalities, patellar instability and dislocation, femoral trochlear dysplasia, abnormal patellar location, bipartite patella, various tendinopathies, bursal inflammation, traction apophysitis in pediatric and adolescent patients, and miscellaneous diseases including mediopatellar plica syndrome and Hoffa's disease. Radiographs are often obtained to exclude acute osseous abnormalities, such as fractures. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers superior soft tissue contrast resolution and allows for more accurate evaluation of the underlying etiology and therefore may improve treatment and possible surgical planning.

  2. Runner's Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Runner's Knee KidsHealth > For Teens > Runner's Knee A A A ... told he had runner's knee. What Is Runner's Knee? Runner's knee is the term doctors use for ...

  3. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  4. Cartilage Delamination Flap Mimicking a Torn Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Amit Kanta, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a chondral delamination lesion due to medial parapatellar plica friction syndrome involving the medial femoral condyle. This mimicked a torn medial meniscus in clinical and radiological presentation. Arthroscopy revealed a chondral delamination flap, which was debrided. Diagnosis of chondral lesions in the knee can be challenging. Clinical examination and MRI have good accuracy for diagnosis and should be used in tandem. Early diagnosis and treatment of chondral lesions are important to prevent progression to early osteoarthritis. PMID:28070434

  5. Treatment for cartilage injuries of the knee with a new treatment algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Özmeriç, Ahmet; Alemdaroğlu, Kadir Bahadır; Aydoğan, Nevres Hürriyet

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of articular cartilage injuries to the knee remains a considerable challenge today. Current procedures succeed in providing relief of symptoms, however damaged articular tissue is not replaced with new tissue of the same biomechanical properties and long-term durability as normal hyaline cartilage. Despite many arthroscopic procedures that often manage to achieve these goals, results are far from perfect and there is no agreement on which of these procedures are appropriate, particularly when full-thickness chondral defects are considered.Therefore, the search for biological solution in long-term functional healing and increasing the quality of wounded cartilage has been continuing. For achieving this goal and apply in wide defects, scaffolds are developed.The rationale of using a scaffold is to create an environment with biodegradable polymers for the in vitro growth of living cells and their subsequent implantation into the lesion area. Previously a few numbers of surgical treatment algorithm was described in reports, however none of them contained one-step or two –steps scaffolds. The ultimate aim of this article was to review various arthroscopic treatment options for different stage lesions and develop a new treatment algorithm which included the scaffolds. PMID:25405097

  6. The Meniscus-Deficient Knee

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Allison J.; Erickson, Brandon J.; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Yanke, Adam B.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cole, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common knee injury, and partial meniscectomies are the most common orthopaedic surgical procedure. The injured meniscus has an impaired ability to distribute load and resist tibial translation. Partial or complete loss of the meniscus promotes early development of chondromalacia and osteoarthritis. The primary goal of treatment for meniscus-deficient knees is to provide symptomatic relief, ideally to delay advanced joint space narrowing, and ultimately, joint replacement. Surgical treatments, including meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT), high tibial osteotomy (HTO), and distal femoral osteotomy (DFO), are options that attempt to decrease the loads on the articular cartilage of the meniscus-deficient compartment by replacing meniscal tissue or altering joint alignment. Clinical and biomechanical studies have reported promising outcomes for MAT, HTO, and DFO in the postmeniscectomized knee. These procedures can be performed alone or in conjunction with ligament reconstruction or chondral procedures (reparative, restorative, or reconstructive) to optimize stability and longevity of the knee. Complications can include fracture, nonunion, patella baja, compartment syndrome, infection, and deep venous thrombosis. MAT, HTO, and DFO are effective options for young patients suffering from pain and functional limitations secondary to meniscal deficiency. PMID:26779547

  7. Type II collagen fragment HELIX-II is a marker for early cartilage lesions but does not predict the progression of cartilage destruction in human knee joint synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaochun; Yin, Kun; Li, Pengcui; Wang, Huan; Ding, Juan; Duan, Wangping; Wei, Lei

    2013-07-01

    To determine whether there is a direct correlation between the concentration of type II collagen fragment HELIX-II in synovial fluid and the severity of cartilage damage at the knee joint, 83 patients who had undergone knee arthroscopy or total knee replacement were enrolled in this study (49% women, mean ± SD age 49.5 ± 19). The content of HELIX-II in the synovial fluid samples was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cartilage damage at the knee joint was classified during arthroscopy or direct surgical observation, using the Outerbridge cartilage damage scoring system. The maximum damage score was defined as the highest score among the six areas of the knee joint, and the cumulative score was defined as the sum of the scores of the six areas of the knee joint. The intra-assay and inter-assay variations of the HELIX-II ELISA were lower than 13 and 15%, respectively. The level of HELIX-II in the severely damaged cartilage groups (cumulative scores = 11-24 or maximum score = 2-4) was much higher than in the slightly damaged cartilage groups (cumulative scores = 0-10 or maximum score = 0-1). The level of HELIX-II in cartilage from severely damaged cartilage groups was significantly higher than in the slightly damaged groups, but no significant difference was detected in the level of HELIX-II among the severely damaged cartilage sub-groups. There was a significant correlation between the HELIX-II concentration in the synovial fluid and the cumulative (r = 0.807) and maximum scores (r = 0.794). Thus, elevated HELIX-II level is correlated with early cartilage lesions, but does not have the sensitivity to predict the progression of severity of cartilage damage in the knee joint.

  8. Virtual reality simulation of arthroscopy of the knee.

    PubMed

    Mabrey, Jay D; Gillogly, Scott D; Kasser, James R; Sweeney, Howard J; Zarins, Bertram; Mevis, Howard; Garrett, William E; Poss, Robert; Cannon, W Dilworth

    2002-01-01

    The virtual reality arthroscopic knee simulator (VR-AKS) consists of a computer platform, a video display, and two force-feedback (haptic) interfaces known as "PHANToMs" that also monitor the position of the instruments in the user's hands. The forces that the user would normally apply to the lower limb during arthroscopy are directed through an instrumented surrogate leg. Proprietary software provides the mathematical representation of the physical world and replicates the visual, mechanical, and behavioral aspects of the knee. This includes moderating the haptic interface and simultaneously executing a collision-detection algorithm that prevents the instruments from moving through "solid" surfaces. Modeling software interacts with this algorithm to send the appropriate images to the video display, including knee pathology such as meniscal tears and chondral defects as well as normal anatomy. Task-oriented programs monitor specific performance such as executing a proper examination of the knee or shaving a torn meniscus.

  9. Addition of Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Autologous Platelet-Enhanced Fibrin Scaffolds in Chondral Defects

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, Laurie R.; Chen, Albert C.; Werpy, Natasha M.; Williams, Ashley A.; Kisiday, John D.; Su, Alvin W.; Cory, Esther; Morley, Paul S.; McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Sah, Robert L.; Chu, Constance R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The chondrogenic potential of culture-expanded bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMDMSCs) is well described. Numerous studies have also shown enhanced repair when BMDMSCs, scaffolds, and growth factors are placed into chondral defects. Platelets provide a rich milieu of growth factors and, along with fibrin, are readily available for clinical use. The objective of this study was to determine if the addition of BMDMSCs to an autologous platelet-enriched fibrin (APEF) scaffold enhances chondral repair compared with APEF alone. Methods: A 15-mm-diameter full-thickness chondral defect was created on the lateral trochlear ridge of both stifle joints of twelve adult horses. In each animal, one defect was randomly assigned to receive APEF+BMDMSCs and the contralateral defect received APEF alone. Repair tissues were evaluated one year later with arthroscopy, histological examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), and biomechanical testing. Results: The arthroscopic findings, MRI T2 map, histological scores, structural stiffness, and material stiffness were similar (p > 0.05) between the APEF and APEF+BMDMSC-treated repairs at one year. Ectopic bone was observed within the repair tissue in four of twelve APEF+BMDMSC-treated defects. Defects repaired with APEF alone had less trabecular bone edema (as seen on MRI) compared with defects repaired with APEF+BMDMSCs. Micro-CT analysis showed thinner repair tissue in defects repaired with APEF+BMDMSCs than in those treated with APEF alone (p < 0.05). Conclusions: APEF alone resulted in thicker repair tissue than was seen with APEF+BMDMSCs. The addition of BMDMSCs to APEF did not enhance cartilage repair and stimulated bone formation in some cartilage defects. Clinical Relevance: APEF supported repair of critical-size full-thickness chondral defects in horses, which was not improved by the addition of BMDMSCs. This work supports further investigation to determine

  10. Resection and Resolution of Bone Marrow Lesions Associated with an Improvement of Pain after Total Knee Replacement: A Novel Case Study Using a 3-Tesla Metal Artefact Reduction MRI Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, Brett; Pearson, Richard G.; Scammell, Brigitte E.

    2016-01-01

    We present our case report using a novel metal artefact reduction magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence to observe resolution of subchondral bone marrow lesions (BMLs), which are strongly associated with pain, in a patient after total knee replacement surgery. Large BMLs were seen preoperatively on the 3-Tesla MRI scans in a patient with severe end stage OA awaiting total knee replacement surgery. Twelve months after surgery, using a novel metal artefact reduction MRI sequence, we were able to visualize the bone-prosthesis interface and found complete resection and resolution of these BMLs. This is the first reported study in the UK to use this metal artefact reduction MRI sequence at 3-Tesla showing that resection and resolution of BMLs in this patient were associated with an improvement of pain and function after total knee replacement surgery. In this case it was associated with a clinically significant improvement of pain and function after surgery. Failure to eradicate these lesions may be a cause of persistent postoperative pain that is seen in up to 20% of patients following TKR surgery. PMID:27648327

  11. The effects of laparoscopic mesh fixation device on bone, costo-chondral junction and tendon site.

    PubMed

    Ekçi, Baki; Altinli, Ediz; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Demir, Mustafa; Tasci, Ihsan

    2011-01-01

    Osteitis pubis is one of the important complications of inguinal hernia repair surgery occurring with the placement of sutures through the periosteum. The aim of this study is to evaluate scintigraphic and histopathological alterations associated with the use of mesh fixation device on pelvic bone, cartilage and tendons in an experimental animal model. Twenty New-Zealand young male rabbits were used. A mesh fixation device was inserted at each animal's costa-chondral junction, superior anterior iliac crest, and achiles tendon. One week prior to the surgery and 16 weeks after the operation, scintigraphic evaluation was performed. Histopathological evaluation was performed at the end of study. No nuclear activity or pathological change was found at bone site (p > 0.05). Foreign body reaction was evident at the tendon and costa-chondral site (p = 0.001). In conclusion; the mesh fixation device leads to foreign body reaction in costa-chondral junction and tendon. It does not cause any nuclear activity increase.

  12. Bone marrow edema-like lesions (BMELs) are associated with higher T1ρ and T2 values of cartilage in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-reconstructed knees: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jingshan; Pedoia, Valentina; Facchetti, Luca; Link, Thomas M.; Ma, C. Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the longitudinal changes of bone marrow edema-like lesions (BMELs) in patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to investigate the effect of BMELs on cartilage matrix composition changes measured using MR T1ρ and T2 mapping. Methods Patients with acute ACL tear were enrolled in a prospective study. MR imaging was performed at baseline (before surgeries) and at 6-month, 1-year and 2-year after ACL reconstruction. MR imaging included sagittal high-resolution, 3D fast spin-echo (CUBE) sequences for BMEL evaluation, and 3D T1ρ mapping and T2 mapping for cartilage assessment. BMELs were assessed using whole-organ magnetic resonance imaging score (WORMS), and the volume of BMELs was measured by a semi-automatic method. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) was used to explore association between BMELs at baseline and cartilage changes during follow-up. Results Fifty four patients were included in the present study and 39 patients had completed 2-year follow-up. BMELs were noted in 42 injured knees (77.8%) with 105 lesions and in 7 contralateral knees (13.0%) with 9 lesions (χ2=45.763, P<0.001) at the baseline. The WORMS and volume of BMELs of the injured knees were 2.36±0.65 and 386.98±382.54 mm3 (r=0.681, P<0.001), respectively. 87 BMELs were found at baseline in 34 patients (87.2%) of the 39 patients who had completed 2 years follow-up. During the follow-up, 18 (20.7%), 12 (13.8%), and 5 (5.7%) baseline lesions were still seen at 6-month, 1-year and 2-year, respectively. The changes of BMELs prevalence regarding bone compartments over time points were statistically significant (χ2=163.660, P<0.001). Except T2 value at 6 months, T1ρ and T2 values of cartilage overlying baseline BMELs in the injured knees were higher than that of anatomically matched cartilage in the contralateral knees at baseline and each follow-up time-point. In the injured knees, GEE analysis showed that baseline BMELs were significantly

  13. Knee Bursitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... make a diagnosis of knee bursitis during a physical exam. Your doctor will inspect your knee by: Comparing the condition of both knees, particularly if only one is painful Gently pressing on different areas of your knee to detect warmth, swelling and the source of pain Carefully moving ...

  14. Description of an evaluation system for knee kinematics in ligament lesions, by means of optical tracking and 3D tomography☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tiago Lazzaretti; Ribeiro, Douglas Badillo; da Rocha, Diogo Cristo; Albuquerque, Cyro; Pereira, César Augusto Martins; Pedrinelli, André; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe and demonstrate the viability of a method for evaluating knee kinematics, by means of a continuous passive motion (CPM) machine, before and after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Methods This study was conducted on a knee from a cadaver, in a mechanical pivot-shift simulator, with evaluations using optical tracking, and also using computed tomography. Results This study demonstrated the viability of a protocol for measuring the rotation and translation of the knee, using reproducible and objective tools (error < 0.2 mm). The mechanized provocation system of the pivot-shift test was independent of the examiner and always allowed the same angular velocity and traction of 20 N throughout the movement. Conclusion The clinical relevance of this method lies in making inferences about the in vivo behavior of a knee with an ACL injury and providing greater methodological quality in future studies for measuring surgical techniques with grafts in relatively close positions. PMID:26229854

  15. One-Year Clinical and Radiological Results of a Prospective, Investigator-Initiated Trial Examining a Novel, Purely Autologous 3-Dimensional Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation Product in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Gerwien, Philip; Helmert, Benjamin; Schattenberg, Torsten; Weckbach, Sabine; Kaszkin-Bettag, Marietta; Lehmann, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Background: The 3-dimensional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT3D) comprises isolation of chondrocytes from cartilage biopsies, cultivation to spheroids, and transplantation into the cartilage defect. Objectives: To evaluate the patients’ general health and functionality and to assess the defect repair after ACT3D with spheroids by MRI and MOCART scoring. Methods: Thirty-seven patients with isolated chondral lesions of the knee underwent ACT3D with spheroids through medial arthrotomy. Patient-administered scores were assessed at baseline (day before transplantation), at 6 weeks, and at 3, 6, and 12 months. MRI and MOCART scoring were performed at 3 and 12 months after ACT3D. Results: Patients were diagnosed with full-thickness patellofemoral (n = 16), femoral condylar (n = 18), or both defect types (n = 3), International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grade 3 or 4, with defect sizes between 1.0 and 12.0 cm2. On average, 59.5 spheroids/cm2 in defect size were transplanted. An overall statistically significant improvement from baseline to 12 months was observed for all assessment scores (Lysholm, International Knee Documentation Committee [IKDC], SF-36, Tegner) combined with a significant reduction in the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and an advanced defect filling. Subgroup analyses revealed a positive clinical outcome independent on defect size, defect locations, spheroid dosage, age, duration of symptoms, and severity of complaints at baseline. Seven patients experienced in total 8 adverse events, of which knee joint effusion and blocking were assessed as possibly or probably related to ACT3D. Conclusions: The patient-administered assessment scores along with the fast defect filling with ACT3D using spheroids demonstrated an increase in activity level and quality of life after a 1-year follow-up. PMID:26069617

  16. Knee pain, knee injury, knee osteoarthritis & work.

    PubMed

    Dulay, Gurdeep S; Cooper, C; Dennison, E M

    2015-06-01

    Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) can be viewed as the end result of a molecular cascade which ensues after certain triggers occur and ultimately results in irreversible damage to the articular cartilage. The clinical phenotype that knee OA can produce is variable and often difficult to accurately predict. This is further complicated by the often poor relationship between radiographic OA and knee pain. As a consequence, it can be difficult to compare studies that use different definitions of OA. However, the literature suggests that while there are multiple causes of knee OA, two have attracted particular attention over recent years; occupation related knee OA and OA subsequent to previous knee injury. The evidence of a relationship, and the strength of this association, is discussed in this chapter.

  17. Implantation of scaffold-free engineered cartilage constructs in a rabbit model for chondral resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Jillian M; Ventura, Nicole M; Tse, M Yat; Winterborn, Andrew; Bardana, Davide D; Pang, Stephen C; Hurtig, Mark B; Waldman, Stephen D

    2014-02-01

    Joint resurfacing techniques offer an attractive treatment for damaged or diseased cartilage, as this tissue characteristically displays a limited capacity for self-repair. While tissue-engineered cartilage constructs have shown efficacy in repairing focal cartilage defects in animal models, a substantial number of cells are required to generate sufficient quantities of tissue for the repair of larger defects. In a previous study, we developed a novel approach to generate large, scaffold-free cartilaginous constructs from a small number of donor cells (20 000 cells to generate a 3-cm(2) tissue construct). As comparable thicknesses to native cartilage could be achieved, the purpose of the present study was to assess the ability of these constructs to survive implantation as well as their potential for the repair of critical-sized chondral defects in a rabbit model. Evaluated up to 6 months post-implantation, allogenic constructs survived weight bearing without a loss of implant fixation. Implanted constructs appeared to integrate near-seamlessly with the surrounding native cartilage and also to extensively remodel with increasing time in vivo. By 6 months post-implantation, constructs appeared to adopt both a stratified (zonal) appearance and a biochemical composition similar to native articular cartilage. In addition, constructs that expressed superficial zone markers displayed higher histological scores, suggesting that transcriptional prescreening of constructs prior to implantation may serve as an approach to achieve superior and/or more consistent reparative outcomes. As the results of this initial animal study were encouraging, future studies will be directed toward the repair of chondral defects in more mechanically demanding anatomical locations.

  18. Detection of Traumatic Bone Marrow Lesions after Knee Trauma: Comparison of ADC Maps Derived from Diffusion-weighted Imaging with Standard Fat-saturated Proton Density-weighted Turbo Spin-Echo Sequences.

    PubMed

    Klengel, Alexis; Stumpp, Patrick; Klengel, Steffen; Böttger, Ina; Rönisch, Nadja; Kahn, Thomas

    2016-10-24

    Purpose To compare single-shot echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps with fat-saturated (FS) proton density (PD)-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) imaging in the detection of bone marrow lesions (BMLs) after knee trauma. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained from Leipzig University. Written informed consent was waived. Three radiologists retrospectively re-examined 97 consecutive patients with reported knee trauma who underwent 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging within 90 days of knee trauma. The following sequences were used: (a) sagittal T1-weighted TSE and FS PD-weighted TSE and (b) sagittal T1-weighted TSE and single-shot echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging-derived ADC mapping. BMLs on the lateral and medial femoral condyle, lateral and medial aspect of the tibial plateau, and patella were documented. Volumetry was performed on BMLs with a thickness of at least 15 mm (major BMLs). ADC values were measured in intact bone marrow and major BMLs. A McNemar test and t tests were used as appropriate to test for significant differences between BML number and volume at an α level of .05. Results Significantly more patients showed at least one BML on ADC maps (98%, 95 of 97 patients) than on FS PD-weighted TSE images (86%, 84 of 97 patients) (P < .001). Of the affected regions detected on FS PD-weighted TSE images, 97% (170 of 175 regions) were identified consistently on ADC maps. Only 58% of the affected regions detected on ADC maps (170 of 293 regions) were identified on FS PD-weighted TSE images (P < .001). Median volume of concordant major BML was approximately two times larger on ADC maps (81 cm(3)) than on FS PD-weighted TSE images (39 cm(3)) (P < .001). The ADC values of intact bone marrow and BMLs did not overlap. Conclusion ADC maps are more sensitive than corresponding FS PD-weighted TSE images for detection of BML after knee trauma and allow detection of significantly more

  19. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Jumper's Knee KidsHealth > For Teens > Jumper's Knee A A A ... continued damage to the knee. How Does the Knee Work? To understand how jumper's knee happens, it ...

  20. Knee arthroscopy - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee problems such as: a torn knee disc (meniscus) a damaged knee bone (patella) a damaged ligament ... surgeon can see the ligaments, the knee disc (meniscus), the knee bone (patella), the lining of the ...

  1. High levels of glucosamine-chondroitin sulfate can alter the cyclic preload and acute overload responses of chondral explants.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feng; Haut, Roger C

    2009-03-01

    A recent study by our laboratory showed that 14 days of low intensity, intermittent cyclic preloading of chondral explants elevated the concentration of proteoglycans (PGs) to cause a mechanical stiffening of the explants prior to an acute overload and limit the extent of tissue damage. Longer term loading to 21 days resulted in tissue degradation prior to the acute traumatic event and excessive damage from an acute overload. Previous studies by others showed that bathing chondral explants in a supplement of glucosamine-chondroitin sulfate (glcN-CS) upregulated the synthesis of tissue PGs, particularly in stressed tissue, and the supplement served as an anti-inflammatory agent. Our current hypothesis was that the supplementation of culture media with a high concentration of glcN-CS would upregulate the production of tissue PG and limit or mitigate long-term degradation of chondral explants under cyclic preloading and limit tissue damage in an acute overload. We showed that, in the presence of supplement, cyclic preloading significantly increased tissue PG content and matrix modulus by about 65 and 300%, respectively, at 21 days, resulting in a reduction of matrix damage and cell death following an acute overload. These data show a biological action of high concentrations of this supplement and its effect on the mechanical properties in this in vitro model.

  2. Runner's Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... name just two. It's the most common overuse injury among runners, but it can also strike other athletes who do activities that require a lot of knee bending, such as biking, jumping, or skiing. Runner's knee happens when the kneecap (patella) tracks incorrectly over a ...

  3. Surgery for osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Richmond, John C

    2013-02-01

    Although total knee replacement is an excellent treatment of end-stage osteoarthritis of the knee in the older (>65 years) population, many patients with less severe disease are significantly impacted by their symptoms and have failed to respond to less invasive treatment alternatives. For this group, there are several less invasive surgical alternatives, including arthroscopic meniscectomy, grafting of symptomatic areas of bone marrow lesions, unloading osteotomy, and unicompartmental knee replacement. Current total knee arthroplasty designs can be expected to survive 20 years or more in the older, less active population. New materials may extend that survivorship.

  4. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... keeping it from bending outward. anterior cruciate ligament (ACL): The ACL connects your femur to your tibia at the ... Common knee sprains usually involve damage to the ACL and/or MCL. The most serious sprains involve ...

  5. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the knee uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  6. Knee Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Robert C.; Richter, Dustin L.; Wascher, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic knee dislocation is becoming more prevalent because of improved recognition and increased exposure to high-energy trauma, but long-term results are lacking. Purpose: To present 2 cases with minimum 20-year follow-up and a review of the literature to illustrate some of the fundamental principles in the management of the dislocated knee. Study Design: Review and case reports. Methods: Two patients with knee dislocations who underwent multiligamentous knee reconstruction were reviewed, with a minimum 20-year follow-up. These patients were brought back for a clinical evaluation using both subjective and objective measures. Subjective measures include the following scales: Lysholm, Tegner activity, visual analog scale (VAS), Short Form–36 (SF-36), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and a psychosocial questionnaire. Objective measures included ligamentous examination, radiographic evaluation (including Telos stress radiographs), and physical therapy assessment of function and stability. Results: The mean follow-up was 22 years. One patient had a vascular injury requiring repair prior to ligament reconstruction. The average assessment scores were as follows: SF-36 physical health, 52; SF-36 mental health, 59; Lysholm, 92; IKDC, 86.5; VAS involved, 10.5 mm; and VAS uninvolved, 2.5 mm. Both patients had excellent stability and were functioning at high levels of activity for their age (eg, hiking, skydiving). Both patients had radiographic signs of arthritis, which lowered 1 subject’s IKDC score to “C.” Conclusion: Knee dislocations have rare long-term excellent results, and most intermediate-term studies show fair to good functional results. By following fundamental principles in the management of a dislocated knee, patients can be given the opportunity to function at high levels. Hopefully, continued advances in the evaluation and treatment of knee dislocations will improve the long-term outcomes for these patients in the

  7. [CHARACTERISTICS OF OSTEOCYTE CELL LINES FROM BONES FORMED AS A RESULT OF MEMBRANOUS (SKULL BONES) AND CHONDRAL (LONG BONES) OSSIFICATION].

    PubMed

    Avrunin, A S; Doktorov, A A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the literature data and the results of authors' own research, to answer the question--if the osteocytes of bone tissues resulting from membranous and chondral ossification, belong to one or to different cell lines. The differences between the cells of osteocyte lines derived from bones resulting from membranous and chondral ossification were established in: 1) the magnitude of the mechanical signal, initiating the development of the process of mechanotransduction; 2) the nature of the relationship between the magnitude of the mechanical signal that initiates the reorganization of the architecture of bone structures and the resource of their strength; in membranous bones significantly lower mechanical signal caused a substantially greater increment of bone strength resource; 3) the biological activity of bone structures, bone fragments formed from membranous tissue were more optimal for transplantation; 4) the characteristics of expression of functional markers of bone cells at different stages of their differentiation; 5) the nature of the reaction of bone cells to mechanical stress; 6) the sensitivity of bone cells to one of the factors controlling the process of mechanotransduction (PGI2); 7) the functioning of osteocytes during lactation. These differences reflect the functional requirements to the bones of the skeleton--the supporting function in the bones of the limbs and the shaping and protection in the bones of the cranial vault. These data suggest that the results of research conducted on the bones of the skull, should not be transferred to the entire skeleton as a whole.

  8. An olecranon chondral flap and osteochondral coronoid fracture in a spontaneously reduced elbow dislocation in a child.

    PubMed

    Quick, Tom J; Gibbons, Paul; Smith, Nick

    2013-09-01

    Elbow injuries in children are very common and radiographs are often difficult to interpret because of the radiolucency of the cartilaginous anlage and the progressive appearance of multiple secondary ossification centres. Elbow dislocations are rare injuries in children. Coronoid fractures can occur during dislocation or relocation of the elbow and can be the only hallmark of a severe injury. The understanding of the mechanics of these injuries has undergone considerable evolution over the past decade. Intra-articular chondral flap fractures are a traumatic elevation of the hyaline cartilage from the subchondral bone. They are also rare injuries in children but should be included in the differential when examining an injured joint. The infrequency of these injuries provides little opportunity to become accustomed to the radiographic signs. We present a case report of a 4-year-old boy with both an olecranon chondral flap and coronoid cartilaginous fracture after a joint dislocation. We present his plain radiography and MRI with illustrated photographic records of the operative findings. This injury has been little described in the literature and never with such imaging to aid understanding of both the pathology and the injury mechanism.

  9. Early osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Kon, Elizaveta; Condello, Vincenzo; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Steinwachs, Matthias; Seil, Romain; Berruto, Massimo; Engebretsen, Lars; Filardo, Giuseppe; Angele, Peter

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing awareness on the importance in identifying early phases of the degenerative processes in knee osteoarthritis (OA), the crucial period of the disease when there might still be the possibility to initiate treatments preventing its progression. Early OA may show a diffuse and ill-defined involvement, but also originate in the cartilage surrounding a focal lesion, thus necessitating a separate assessment of these two entities. Early OA can be considered to include a maximal involvement of 50 % of the cartilage thickness based on the macroscopic ICRS classification, reflecting an OARSI grade 4. The purpose of this paper was to provide an updated review of the current status of the diagnosis and definition of early knee OA, including the clinical, radiographical, histological, MRI, and arthroscopic definitions and biomarkers. Based on current evidence, practical classification criteria are presented. As new insights and technologies become available, they will further evolve to better define and treat early knee OA.

  10. Knee Menisci.

    PubMed

    Bryceland, James Kevin; Powell, Andrew John; Nunn, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The menisci of the knees are semicircular fibrocartilaginous structures consisting of a hydrophilic extracellular matrix containing a network of collagen fibers, glycoproteins, and proteoglycans maintained by a cellular component. The menisci are responsible for more than 50% of load transmission across the knee and increase joint congruity thereby also aiding in fluid film lubrication of the joint. In the United Kingdom, meniscal tears are the most common form of intra-articular knee injury and one of the commonest indications for orthopedic intervention. The management of these injuries is dependent on the location within the meniscus (relative to peripheral blood supply) and the pattern of tear. Removal of meniscus is known to place the knee at increased risk of osteoarthritis; therefore repair of meniscal tears is preferable. However, a significant proportion of tears are irreparable and can only be treated by partial or even complete meniscectomy. More recent studies have shown encouraging results with meniscal replacement in this situation, though further work is required in this area.

  11. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection.

  12. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection. PMID:27004193

  13. Sonography of the knee joint☆

    PubMed Central

    Razek, A.A.K.A.; Fouda, N.S.; Elmetwaley, N.; Elbogdady, E.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the sonographic appearances of common disorders involving the knee joint. Ultrasound is a sensitive method for diagnosis of tendon injuries. Injured ligaments appear swollen with mixed echogenicity. Meniscal injuries and muscle tears can be easily diagnosed. Ultrasound shows synovial thickening and effusion in inflammatory arthropathy and erosions of the articular surface in degenerative arthritis. It can be used effectively in the detection of rheumatoid arthritic activity and for grading degenerative arthritis lesions. Cystic lesions, as well as benign and malignant soft-tissue masses, are clearly delineated. Ultrasound is a safe noninvasive imaging modality that can be used for diagnosis of different disorders involving the knee joint. PMID:23397073

  14. Bursae around the knee joints

    PubMed Central

    Chatra, Priyank S

    2012-01-01

    A bursa is a fluid-filled structure that is present between the skin and tendon or tendon and bone. The main function of a bursa is to reduce friction between adjacent moving structures. Bursae around the knee can be classified as those around the patella and those that occur elsewhere. In this pictorial essay we describe the most commonly encountered lesions and their MRI appearance. PMID:22623812

  15. Knee CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - knee; Computed axial tomography scan - knee; Computed tomography scan - knee ... scanners can perform the exam without stopping.) A computer makes several images of the body area. These ...

  16. Knee pain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or softening of the patella cartilage as ... knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in the ligaments, osteoarthritis of the ...

  17. Total Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... stability. The long thigh muscles give the knee strength. All remaining surfaces of the knee are covered ... physical examination. This will assess knee motion, stability, strength, and overall leg alignment. • X-rays. These images ...

  18. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002974.htm Knee joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Knee joint replacement is a surgery to replace a knee ...

  19. Water on the Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... your knee joint. Some people call this condition "water on the knee." A swollen knee may be ... Choose low-impact exercise. Certain activities, such as water aerobics and swimming, don't place continuous weight- ...

  20. Subchondral bone overgrowth in the presence of full-thickness cartilage defects in the knee.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Ian J P; La Valette, David P

    2005-12-01

    Between October 2000 and December 2003, 252 autologous chondrocyte implants were performed in 183 patients. Eighty lesions showed overgrowth of the subchondral bone plate under the chondral lesion, this was termed a "bone boss." Thirty-seven were on the medial femoral condyle (MFC), 18 on the lateral femoral condyle (LFC), 21 in the trochlea and 4 on the patella. There was a statistically significant association between the LFC and "bone boss." The lesions showing this finding were of a larger area (3.4 cm2 and 2.8 cm2 respectively, p=0.006), and had more diffuse chondral changes than lesions without. The patients with a "bone boss" had a tendency to longer duration of symptoms (85.3 months and 64.3 months respectively, p=0.089). The "bone bosses" were resected back to the level of the surrounding subchondral bone prior to implantation. Radiological and clinical follow-up showed no statistical difference between the two groups. A discussion of the possible aetiology of the "bone boss" is made.

  1. Viscosupplementation with hylan g-f 20 in patients with osteoarthrosis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Bert, Jack M; Waddell, David D

    2010-06-01

    Viscosupplementation (VIS) is one of several treatment modalities for osteoarthritis of the knee. It is useful in the treatment of osteoarthritis when other methods of conservative care have failed and it may be a safer method of treatment than oral chemical therapy which can have significant side effects with even short-term usage. The biochemical effects of hyaluronic acid are incompletely understood, however there are several accepted modes of action which result in a positive clinical effect on the function of the knee joint. There is some evidence that hyaluronic acid preparations with a higher molecular weight may be more beneficial to the patient. It is commonly used after arthroscopic meniscectomy and or debridement of the knee in a patient with chondral disease. The clinical effects have been well documented in multiple studies in patients with mild to moderate osteoarthritis in study groups before or after arthroscopic surgery of the knee. Adverse events do occur and are easily treated with only rare case reports of systemic effects. Furthermore, there is some evidence that VIS can prolong the need for total knee arthroplasty in the older patient as well.

  2. Viscosupplementation with Hylan G-F 20 in Patients with Osteoarthrosis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Bert, Jack M.; Waddell, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Viscosupplementation (VIS) is one of several treatment modalities for osteoarthritis of the knee. It is useful in the treatment of osteoarthritis when other methods of conservative care have failed and it may be a safer method of treatment than oral chemical therapy which can have significant side effects with even short-term usage. The biochemical effects of hyaluronic acid are incompletely understood, however there are several accepted modes of action which result in a positive clinical effect on the function of the knee joint. There is some evidence that hyaluronic acid preparations with a higher molecular weight may be more beneficial to the patient. It is commonly used after arthroscopic meniscectomy and or debridement of the knee in a patient with chondral disease. The clinical effects have been well documented in multiple studies in patients with mild to moderate osteoarthritis in study groups before or after arthroscopic surgery of the knee. Adverse events do occur and are easily treated with only rare case reports of systemic effects. Furthermore, there is some evidence that VIS can prolong the need for total knee arthroplasty in the older patient as well. PMID:22870442

  3. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt ... your life. The most common disease affecting the knee is osteoarthritis. The cartilage in the knee gradually wears away, ...

  4. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology*

    PubMed Central

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors. PMID:27403019

  5. Drug-eluting balloons in below the knee treatment.

    PubMed

    VAN DEN Berg, Jos C

    2016-12-01

    The endovascular treatment of atherosclerotic disease of the infra-inguinal arteries has changed significantly since the introduction of drug-eluting balloon technology. The role of angioplasty using drug-eluting balloons for lesions of the superficial femoral and popliteal artery is now well established. The positive results of the use of drug-eluting balloons in the above knee segment could not be achieved in the below-the-knee segment. This paper will give an overview of the current status of drug-eluting balloon angioplasty for below-the-knee lesions, and will present a review of 2 single center registry, 5 randomized trials and a meta-analysis.

  6. [Chronic knee joint discomfort].

    PubMed

    Wittke, R

    2005-06-23

    Chronic pain in the knee joint is frequently a sign of arthrosis in adults. This must be clearly differentiated from other knee problems. Patellofemoral stress syndrome (occurs mostly in young people) and arthritis with effusion in the knee joint after long and mostly unusual stress also allow only a reduced function of the knee joint. However, even when the knee joint is still fully functional, chronic problems could already exist: For example, for joggers, iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee) or after high unphysiological stress, patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee). These must be differentiated from pes anserinus syndrome and a plica mediopatellaris.

  7. The Relationship between Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury and Osteoarthritis of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Simon, David; Mascarenhas, Randy; Saltzman, Bryan M; Rollins, Meaghan; Bach, Bernard R; MacDonald, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are a common injury, particularly in the athletic and youth populations. The known association between ACL injury and subsequent osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee merits a more in-depth understanding of the relationship between the ACL-injured knee and osteoarthritis. ACL injury, especially with concomitant meniscal or other ligamentous pathology, predisposes the knee to an increased risk of osteoarthritis. ACL insufficiency results in deterioration of the normal physiologic knee bending culminating in increased anterior tibial translation and increased internal tibial rotation. This leads to increased mean contact stresses in the posterior medial and lateral compartments under anterior and rotational loading. However, surgical reconstruction of the ACL has not been shown to reduce the risk of future OA development back to baseline and has variability based on operative factors of graft choice, timing of surgery, presence of meniscal and chondral abnormalities, and surgical technique. Known strategies to prevent OA development are applicable to patients with ACL deficiency or after ACL reconstruction and include weight management, avoidance of excessive musculoskeletal loading, and strength training. Reconstruction of the ACL does not necessarily prevent osteoarthritis in many of these patients and may depend on several external variables.

  8. Ultrasonographic scan in knee pain in athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, N; Regine, R; Carrillo, F; Minelli, S; Beaconsfield, T

    1992-01-01

    Fifty-two knees were examined using real-time high-definition ultrasonography with a 7.5 MHz probe. The extra-articular structures were easily visualized and diagnosis of patellar tendon lesions and Baker's cysts formulated. While the meniscal cartilages were shown as a homogeneous triangular structure between the femoral condyle and the tibial plateau, no lesions were detected. Deeper intra-articular structures, such as the cruciate ligaments, were not shown by the scan, thus their evaluation was not possible. Given its low cost, wide availability, non-invasiveness and patients' acceptability of the technique, ultrasonography may play an important role in the diagnosis of soft tissue lesions in and around the knee joint. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:1623366

  9. Subchondral nacre implant in the articular zone of the sheep's knee: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Marthe; Delattre, Olivier; Gillet, Pierre; Lopez, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to analyze the intra-articular behaviour of nacre, when implanted in the subchondral bone area in the sheep knee. We implanted nacre blocks in sheep's trochlea by replacing the half of the femoral trochlea (nacre group). For comparison we used complete cartilage resection (resection group) down to the subchondral bone. In the "nacre group", implants were well tolerated without any synovial inflammation. In addition, we observed centripetal regrowth of new cartilage after 3 months. In the "resection group", no chondral regrowth was observed, but, in contrast, a thin layer of fibrous tissue was formed. After 6 months, a new tissue covered the nacre implant formed by an osteochondral regrowth. Nacre, as a subchondral implant, exerts benefic potential for osteochondral repair.

  10. Knee Bracing: What Works?

    MedlinePlus

    ... that make knee braces claim that their products work well. Scientific studies have not completely agreed. It's not clear what the knee braces actually do. Braces often work better in the laboratory than they do in ...

  11. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  12. Preventing Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a result of a twisting or pivoting motion. This injury may cause susceptibility to repeat injuries and knee instability, and therefore often requires surgery. Occasionally, a twisting or hyperextension force to the knee may result in a tibial ...

  13. Knee arthroscopy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... remove it. Torn or damaged anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) Inflamed or damaged ... surgery Knee pain Meniscal allograft transplantation Patient Instructions ACL reconstruction - discharge Getting your home ready - knee or ...

  14. Microprocessor prosthetic knees.

    PubMed

    Berry, Dale

    2006-02-01

    This article traces the development of microprocessor prosthetic knees from early research in the 1970s to the present. Read about how microprocessor knees work, functional options, patient selection, and the future of this prosthetic.

  15. Knee braces - unloading

    MedlinePlus

    ... in their knees, they are referring to a type of arthritis called osteoarthritis . Osteoarthritis is caused by wear and tear inside your knee joints. Cartilage, the firm, rubbery tissue that cushions all of ...

  16. External Knee Adduction and Flexion Moments during Gait and Medial Tibiofemoral Disease Progression in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alison H.; Moisio, Kirsten C.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Eckstein, Felix; Guermazi, Ali; Prasad, Pottumarthi V.; Zhang, Yunhui; Almagor, Orit; Belisle, Laura; Hayes, Karen; Sharma, Leena

    2015-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that greater baseline peak external knee adduction moment (KAM), KAM impulse, and peak external knee flexion moment (KFM) during the stance phase of gait are associated with baseline-to-2-year medial tibiofemoral cartilage damage and bone marrow lesion progression, and cartilage thickness loss. Methods Participants all had knee OA in at least one knee. Baseline peak KAM, KAM impulse, and peak KFM (normalized to body weight and height) were captured and computed using a motion analysis system and 6 force plates. Participants underwent MRI of both knees at baseline and two years later. To assess the association between baseline moments and baseline-to-2-year semiquantitative cartilage damage and bone marrow lesion progression and quantitative cartilage thickness loss, we used logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE), adjusting for gait speed, age, gender, disease severity, knee pain severity, and medication use. Results The sample consisted of 391 knees (204 persons): mean age 64.2 years (SD 10.0); BMI 28.4 kg/m2 (5.7); 156 (76.5%) women. Greater baseline peak KAM and KAM impulse were each associated with worsening of medial bone marrow lesions, but not cartilage damage. Higher baseline KAM impulse was associated with 2-year medial cartilage thickness loss assessed both as % loss and as a threshold of loss, whereas peak KAM was related only to % loss. There was no relationship between baseline peak KFM and any medial disease progression outcome measures. Conclusion Findings support targeting KAM parameters in an effort to delay medial OA disease progression. PMID:25677110

  17. Examining the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Monk, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Appropriate history taking and examination can ensure accurate diagnosis of common knee problems, and rapid and effective interventions or referral to orthopaedic specialists. This article describes the anatomy of the knee joint and discusses relevant history taking, the examination process, special tests and radiology, as well as common knee injuries and their management.

  18. Knee disarticulation after total-knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Lambregts, S A M; Hitters, W M G C

    2002-12-01

    An 89-year-old woman who had a total-knee replacement in the past, underwent a knee disarticulation of the same leg because of an ischaemic foot. Eight (8) months postoperatively the stump is fully weight-bearing and the patient is able to walk safely, using a prosthesis and a walking frame.

  19. Knee Lymphocutaneous Fistula Secondary to Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-de la Fuente, T.; Sandoval, E.; Alonso-Burgos, A.; García-Pardo, L.; Cárcamo, C.; Caballero, O.

    2014-01-01

    Lower limb lymphorrhea secondary to a surgical procedure is a rare but difficult-to-solve complication. In lower limb, this entity is frequently associated with vascular procedures around the inguinal area. We report on a case of a knee lymphocutaneous fistula secondary to a knee revision arthroplasty. To our knowledge, no previous reports regarding this complication have been published. PMID:25580333

  20. Update management below knee intervention.

    PubMed

    Bosiers, M; Deloose, K; Verbist, J; Peeters, P

    2009-02-01

    The application of percutaneous techniques for the treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) has gained widespread interest over the last decade. Together with the development of new endovascular tools and with an increasing operator experience, the minimal invasive percutaneous therapy became first line therapy at many institutions. Patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) due to infrapopliteal lesions are often no good candidates infra-geniculate bypass surgery (IBS), as they often present with prohibitive comorbidities, inadequate conduit, and lack of suitable distal targets for revascularization. Therefore, CLI patients due to blockage of below-the-knee (BTK) arteries are in benefit of the endovascular approach: it offers the advantages of local anesthesia, potentially reduced costs (even anticipating the need for reintervention in many patients), shorter hospital stays The current article provides an overview of the diagnosis and endovascular treatment strategies for infrapopliteal lesions in patients with CLI and gives recommendations for future infrapopliteal device technology advancements.

  1. Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear

    PubMed Central

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L Stefan; Jørgensen, Uffe; Nissen, Nis; Schjerning, Jeppe; Thorlund, Jonas B

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA and patients’ characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods — 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18–77) years, 57% men) with full datasets available were included in the present study. Prior to surgery, patients completed questionnaires regarding onset of symptoms, duration of symptoms, and mechanical symptoms along with the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS). At arthroscopy, the operating surgeon recorded information about meniscal pathology and cartilage damage. Early or more established knee OA was defined as the combination of self-reported frequent knee pain, cartilage damage, and the presence of degenerative meniscal tissue. Results — 43% of patients (269 of 620) had early or more established knee OA. Of these, a large proportion had severe cartilage lesions with almost half having a severe cartilage lesion in at least 1 knee compartment. Interpretation — Based on a definition including frequent knee pain, cartilage damage, and degenerative meniscal tissue, early or more established knee OA was present in 43% of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy for meniscal tear. PMID:27798972

  2. Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear.

    PubMed

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L Stefan; Jørgensen, Uffe; Nissen, Nis; Schjerning, Jeppe; Thorlund, Jonas B

    2017-02-01

    Background and purpose - Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA and patients' characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods - 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18-77) years, 57% men) with full datasets available were included in the present study. Prior to surgery, patients completed questionnaires regarding onset of symptoms, duration of symptoms, and mechanical symptoms along with the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS). At arthroscopy, the operating surgeon recorded information about meniscal pathology and cartilage damage. Early or more established knee OA was defined as the combination of self-reported frequent knee pain, cartilage damage, and the presence of degenerative meniscal tissue. Results - 43% of patients (269 of 620) had early or more established knee OA. Of these, a large proportion had severe cartilage lesions with almost half having a severe cartilage lesion in at least 1 knee compartment. Interpretation - Based on a definition including frequent knee pain, cartilage damage, and degenerative meniscal tissue, early or more established knee OA was present in 43% of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy for meniscal tear.

  3. Lower limb fractures associated with multiligament knee injury

    PubMed Central

    Stagnaro, Joaquin; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Barla, Jorge; Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Costa-Paz, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Knee ligament injuries related to lower limb fractures are common and frequently unnoticed. Management of acute polytrauma is usually focused in the bone lesion and a complete physical examination might be really difficult. The purpose of this study was to analyze a series of patients who suffered multiligament knee injuries associated to a lower limb fracture. Hypothesis: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during the initial management can lead to an early diagnosis of ligament injuries. Methods: A retrospective search was conducted from our hospital´s electronic database. We evaluated the initial diagnosis and acute surgical treatment, and management and functional outcomes after the ligament lesion was diagnosed. Results: Seven patients who presented a knee multiligament injury associated with a lower limb fracture were evaluated. The average age was 29 years. Primary diagnoses were: four tibial plateau fractures; one open fracture-dislocation of the knee; one open leg fracture and ipsilateral hip dislocation; and one bifocal femur fracture. Only three patients had an MRI during the initial management of trauma. Six out of seven patients had to be operated on for the multiligament knee injury. The period between the resolution of the fracture and the ligamentous repair was from 3 to 24 months. Conclusion: Poor functional outcomes are reported in patients with multiligament knee injuries associated with high-energy lower limb fractures. We consider an MRI during the initial management can lead to better outcomes. A trauma surgeon working alongside an arthroscopic surgeon might optimize the results for these lesions.

  4. Posterolateral Corner of the Knee: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Moatshe, Gilbert; Dean, Chase S.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the posterolateral corner (PLC) comprise a significant portion of knee ligament injuries. A high index of suspicion is necessary when evaluating the injured knee to detect these sometimes occult injuries. Moreover, a thorough physical examination and a comprehensive review of radiographic studies are necessary to identify these injuries. In this sense, stress radiographs can help to objectively determine the extent of these lesions. Non-operative and operative treatment options have been reported depending on the extent of the injury. Complete PLC lesions rarely heal with non-operative treatment, and are therefore most often treated surgically. The purpose of this article was to review the anatomy and clinically relevant biomechanics, diagnosis algorithms, treatment and rehabilitation protocols for PLC injuries. PMID:27200384

  5. Post-traumatic chylous knee effusion.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Masamichi; Katsumi, Akira; Akazawa, Tsutomu; Otsuka, Yoshinori; Kitahara, Sota

    2011-03-01

    Chylous joint effusion is a rare condition in which synovial fluids containing large amounts of lipids take on a milky appearance as a result. We report on a 19-year-old male patient with posttraumatic chylous knee effusion. Several days after striking his knee against the ground because of a traffic accident, his left knee showed obvious swelling. Aspiration of his knee was performed, yielding 70ml of purulent-appearing fluid. To distinguish this condition from purulent or tuberculosis arthritis, arthroscopic biopsy and debridement were performed. Arthroscopic examination visualized distinctive yellow-white soft lesions covering much of the joint capsule, resembling a cobweb. Tissue cultures for bacteria were negative. Pathologically, we identified clusters of xanthoma cells with fibrin exudation due to disruption of the synovium and intra-articular fat pad necrosis. Centrifuging the aspiration fluid yielded a thick creamy lipid layer as the supernatant. A fresh drop preparation showed that the specimen contained innumerable fat globules, which stained red with oil red O stain. The patient was able to walk without difficulty or further swelling of his knee at the end of the second postoperative week. Posttraumatic chylous effusion is self-limited. Purulent arthritis or tuberculosis arthritis, however, should still be the presumptive diagnosis in such cases. Arthroscopic irrigation and debridement should be considered for these traumatic cases to confirm diagnosis and to speed up recovery.

  6. Total knee arthroplasty for posttraumatic osteoarthritis in military personnel under age 50.

    PubMed

    Murtha, Andrew S; Johnson, Anthony E; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Rivera, Jessica C

    2016-05-13

    United States military personnel frequently suffer knee injuries. The resulting progressive post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) causes significant disability in these young high-demand patients for which total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the only effective treatment of their pain and impairment. Yet the use of this option for treatment of PTOA has not been studied. This retrospective review identified 74 knees in 64 U.S. military personnel who underwent TKA at ≤ 50 years-of-age during an eight year period at a tertiary-care, academic, military medical center. Fifty-five knees (74.3%) experienced one or more prior ligamentous, meniscal, or chondral injuries prior to arthroplasty. Only one subject had a history of osteochondral intra-articular fracture. The average at injury was 29.2 years (95% CI of ± 2.50) with an average age at arthroplasty of 44.3 years (± 1.11). The most common injury was anterior cruciate ligament rupture (n = 19) with a mean time to TKA of 23.1 years (± 10.54) and 18.8 years (± 7.01) when concomitant meniscal pathology was noted. Nineteen patients were noted to have radiographic and symptomatic end-stage osteoarthritis without a specified etiology at 41.4 years (± 1.47) and underwent subsequent TKA. This is the first study to evaluate treatment of end-stage PT OA in young people treated with TKA, finding that the incidence of PTOA as an indication for arthroplasty is significantly higher than among civilians. In this otherwise healthy, high-demand patient population, the rate of OA progression following knee injury is accelerated and the long term implications can be career and life-altering. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. [Total replacement of a middle phalanx by free non-vascularized chondral graft, after failure of sclerotherapy for treatment of an aneurysmal bone cyst].

    PubMed

    Salon, A; Rémi, J; Brunelle, F; Drapé, J L; Glorion, Ch

    2005-01-01

    We treated an eleven year-old boy for an aneurysmal bone cyst of the middle phalanx of the long finger. Diagnosis was established after total curettage. The tumor involved the whole phalanx and grew steadily after two attempts at sclerotherapy (with absolute alcohol and Ethibloc). After two years, en-bloc resection had to be performed, and raised the problem of reconstructing a complete finger phalanx with its proximal and distal epiphyses. A free cartilaginous graft from the non-ossified iliac crest was shaped to the exact dimensions of the phalanx and set in its place, with minimal damage to the surrounding tissues during dissection and fixation. By six months an almost normal range of motion was achieved in the PIP (10 to 90 degrees ) and DIP (5 to 30 degrees) joints and radiographs showed complete metaplasia of the chondral graft into an ossified phalanx at 20 months follow-up. The joint spaces also remodelled, and this was confirmed with MRI scanning. Reports on partial replacement of diaphysis or epiphyses in the digits are discussed, but the only valid comparison of total phalanx replacement is free toe phalanx grafting. We did not choose this solution in a normal hand because of the length discrepancy between finger and toe phalanges. This case shows that, in this particular paediatric situation, the free non-vascularised transfer of a chondral graft restored excellent function, with remodelling of the phalanx and joint spaces of the finger.

  8. Assessment of glenoid chondral healing: comparison of microfracture to autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis in a novel rabbit shoulder model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Vincent M.; Karas, Vasili; Lee, Andrew S.; Yin, Ziying; Van Thiel, Geoffrey S.; Hussey, Kristen; Sumner, D. Rick; Chubinskaya, Susan; Magin, Richard L.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Cole, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Management of glenohumeral arthrosis in young patients is a considerable challenge, with a growing need for non-arthroplasty alternatives. The objectives of this study were to develop an animal model to study glenoid cartilage repair and to compare surgical repair strategies to promote glenoid chondral healing. Methods Forty-five rabbits underwent unilateral removal of the entire glenoid articular surface and were divided into 3 groups—duntreated defect (UD), microfracture (MFx), and MFx plus type I/III collagen scaffold (autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis [AMIC])—for the evaluation of healing at 8 weeks (12 rabbits) and 32 weeks (33 rabbits) after injury. Contralateral shoulders served as unoperated controls. Tissue assessments included 11.7-T magnetic resonance imaging (long-term healing group only), Equilibrium Partitioning of an Ionic Contrast agent via microcomputed tomography (EPIC-μCT), and histologic investigation (grades on International Cartilage Repair Society II scoring system). Results At 8 weeks, x-ray attenuation, thickness, and volume did not differ by treatment group. At 32 weeks, the T2 index (ratio of T2 values of healing to intact glenoids) was significantly lower for the MFx group relative to the AMIC group (P = .01) whereas the T1ρ index was significantly lower for AMIC relative to MFx (P = .01). The micro–computed tomography–derived repair tissue volume was significantly higher for MFx than for UD. Histologic investigation generally suggested inferior healing in the AMIC and UD groups relative to the MFx group, which exhibited improvements in both integration of repair tissue with subchondral bone and tidemark formation over time. Discussion Improvements conferred by AMIC were limited to magnetic resonance imaging outcomes, whereas MFx appeared to promote increased fibrous tissue deposition via micro–computed tomography and more hyaline-like repair histologically. The findings from this novel model suggest that

  9. Brain Lesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scans, brain lesions appear as dark or light spots that don't look like normal brain tissue. Usually, a brain lesion is an incidental finding unrelated to the condition or symptom that led to the imaging test in the first place. ...

  10. Treatment of knee cartilage defect in 2010.

    PubMed

    Versier, G; Dubrana, F

    2011-12-01

    Treatment of knee cartilage defect, a true challenge, should not only reconstruct hyaline cartilage on a long-term basis, but also be able to prevent osteoarthritis. Osteochondral knee lesions occur in either traumatic lesions or in osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). These lesions can involve all the articular surfaces of the knee in its three compartments. In principle, this review article covers symptomatic ICRS grade C or D lesions, depth III and IV, excluding management of superficial lesions, asymptomatic lesions that are often discovered unexpectedly, and kissing lesions, which arise prior to or during osteoarthritis. For clarity sake, the international classifications used are reviewed, for both functional assessment (ICRS and functional IKDC for osteochondral fractures, Hughston for osteochondritis) and morphological lesion evaluations (the ICRS macroscopic evaluation for fractures, the Bedouelle or SOFCOT for osteochondritis, and MOCART for MRI). The therapeutic armamentarium to treat these lesions is vast, but accessibility varies greatly depending on the country and the legislation in effect. Many comparative studies have been conducted, but they are rarely of high scientific quality; the center effect is nearly constant because patients are often referred to certain centers for an expert opinion. The indications defined herein use algorithms that take into account the size of the cartilage defect and the patient's functional needs for cases of fracture and the vitality, stability, and size of the fragment for cases of osteochondritis dissecans. Fractures measuring less than 2 cm(2) are treated with either microfracturing or mosaic osteochondral grafting, between 2 and 4 cm(2) with microfractures covered with a membrane or a culture of second- or third-generation chondrocytes, and beyond this size, giant lesions are subject to an exceptional allografting procedure, harvesting from the posterior condyle, or chondrocyte culture on a 3D matrix to restore

  11. The natural course of spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK)

    PubMed Central

    Juréus, Jan; Lindstrand, Anders; Geijer, Mats; Robertsson, Otto; Tägil, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK) is a painful lesion in the elderly, frequently leading to osteoarthritis and subsequent knee surgery. We evaluated the natural course and long-term consequences of SPONK in terms of need for major knee surgery. Methods Between 1982 and 1988, 40 consecutive patients were diagnosed with SPONK. The short-term outcome has been reported previously (1991). After 1–7 years, 10 patients had a good radiographic outcome and 30 were considered failures, developing osteoarthritis. In 2012, all 40 of the patients were matched with the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR) and their medical records were reviewed to evaluate the long-term need for major knee surgery. Results At the 2012 review, 33 of the 40 patients had died. The mean follow-up time from diagnosis to surgery, death, or end of study was 9 (1–27) years. 17 of 40 patients had had major knee surgery with either arthroplasty (15) or osteotomy (2). All operated patients but 1 were in the radiographic failure group and had developed osteoarthritis in the study from 1991. 6 of 7 patients with large lesions (> 40% of the AP radiographic view of the condyle) at the time of the diagnosis were operated. None of the 10 patients with a lesion of less than 20% were ever operated. Interpretation It appears that the size of the osteonecrotic lesion can be used to predict the outcome. Patients showing early signs of osteoarthritis or with a large osteonecrosis have a high risk of later major knee surgery. PMID:23799344

  12. Patterns of knee osteoarthritis in Arabian and American knees.

    PubMed

    Hodge, W Andrew; Harman, Melinda K; Banks, Scott A

    2009-04-01

    This study illustrates differences in the cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritic knees in patients with more frequent hyperflexion activities of daily living compared with Western patients. Proximal tibial articular cartilage wear and cruciate ligament condition were assessed in Saudi Arabian and North American patients with varus osteoarthritis undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) intact knees, there were significant differences in wear location, with a clearly more anterior pattern in Saudi Arabian knees. Complete ACL deficiency occurred in 25% of North American knees but only 14% of Saudi Arabian knees. These ACL-deficient knees showed the most severe cartilage wear in both groups and posterior medial wear patterns. Biomechanical descriptions of knee flexion and axial rotation during kneeling or squatting are consistent with the more pronounced anteromedial and posterolateral cartilage wear patterns observed on the Saudi Arabian knees. These observations provide insight into altered knee mechanics in 2 culturally different populations with different demands on knee flexion.

  13. Acetabular cartilage defects cause altered hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait

    PubMed Central

    Samaan, Michael A.; Teng, Hsiang-Ling; Kumar, Deepak; Lee, Sonia; Link, Thomas; Majumdar, Sharmila; Souza, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with acetabular cartilage defects reported increased pain and disability compared to those without acetabular cartilage defects. The specific effects of acetabular cartilage defects on lower extremity coordination patterns are unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage defects. Methods A combined approach, consisting of a semi-quantitative MRI-based quantification method and vector coding, was used to assess hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage lesions. Findings The coordination variability of the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation, hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation and hip rotation/knee rotation joint couplings were reduced in the acetabular lesion group compared to the control group during loading response of the gait cycle. The lesion group demonstrated increased variability in the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation and hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation joint couplings, compared to the control group, during the terminal stance/pre-swing phase of gait. Interpretation Reduced variability during loading response in the lesion group may suggest reduced movement strategies and a possible compensation mechanism for lower extremity instability during this phase of the gait cycle. During terminal stance/pre-swing, a larger variability in the lesion group may suggest increased movement strategies and represent a compensation or pain avoidance mechanism caused by the load applied to the hip joint. PMID:26298706

  14. An Update on Methods for Revascularization and Expansion of the TASC Lesion Classification to Include Below-the-Knee Arteries: A Supplement to the Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC II)

    PubMed Central

    Jaff, *Michael R.; White, Christopher J.; Hiatt, William R.; Fowkes, Gerry R.; Dormandy, John; Razavi, Mahmood; Reekers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC) guidelines were last updated in 2007 (TASC II) and represented the collaboration of international vascular specialties involved in the management of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Since the publication of TASC II, there have been innovations in endovascular revascularization strategies for patients with PAD. The intent of this publication is to provide a complete anatomic lower limb TASC lesion classification, including the infrapopliteal segment, and an updated literature review of new endovascular techniques and practice patterns employed by vascular specialists today. PMID:26730266

  15. Interventional articular and para-articular knee procedures

    PubMed Central

    Lalam, Radhesh K; Winn, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common area of the body to undergo interventional procedures. This article discusses image-guided interventional issues specific to the knee area. The soft tissues in and around the knee are frequently affected by sport-related injuries and often need image-guided intervention. This article details the specific technical issues related to intervention in these soft tissues, including the iliotibial tract, fat pads, patellar tendon and other tendons, bursae and the meniscus. Most often, simple procedures such as injection and aspiration are performed without image guidance. Rarely image-guided diagnostic arthrography and therapeutic joint injections are necessary. The technique, indications and diagnostic considerations for arthrography are discussed in this article. Primary bone and soft-tissue tumours may involve the knee and adjacent soft tissues. Image-guided biopsies are frequently necessary for these lesions; this article details the technical issues related to image-guided biopsy around the knee. A number of newer ablation treatments are now available, including cryoablation, high-frequency ultrasound and microwave ablation. Radiofrequency ablation, however, still remains the most commonly employed ablation technique. The indications, technical and therapeutic considerations related to the application of this technique around the knee are discussed here. Finally, we briefly discuss some newer, but as of yet, unproven image-guided interventions for osteochondral lesions and Brodie's abscess. PMID:26682669

  16. Interventional articular and para-articular knee procedures.

    PubMed

    Lalam, Radhesh K; Winn, Naomi; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common area of the body to undergo interventional procedures. This article discusses image-guided interventional issues specific to the knee area. The soft tissues in and around the knee are frequently affected by sport-related injuries and often need image-guided intervention. This article details the specific technical issues related to intervention in these soft tissues, including the iliotibial tract, fat pads, patellar tendon and other tendons, bursae and the meniscus. Most often, simple procedures such as injection and aspiration are performed without image guidance. Rarely image-guided diagnostic arthrography and therapeutic joint injections are necessary. The technique, indications and diagnostic considerations for arthrography are discussed in this article. Primary bone and soft-tissue tumours may involve the knee and adjacent soft tissues. Image-guided biopsies are frequently necessary for these lesions; this article details the technical issues related to image-guided biopsy around the knee. A number of newer ablation treatments are now available, including cryoablation, high-frequency ultrasound and microwave ablation. Radiofrequency ablation, however, still remains the most commonly employed ablation technique. The indications, technical and therapeutic considerations related to the application of this technique around the knee are discussed here. Finally, we briefly discuss some newer, but as of yet, unproven image-guided interventions for osteochondral lesions and Brodie's abscess.

  17. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... regularly play sports that involve a lot of repetitive jumping — like track and field (particularly high-jumping), basketball, volleyball, gymnastics, running, and soccer — can put a lot of strain on their knees. Jumper's knee can seem like a minor injury that isn't really that serious. Because of ...

  18. Tuberculosis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Lidder, Surjit; Lang, Kathryn; Haroon, Mallick; Shahidi, Mitra; El-Guindi, Magdi

    2009-01-01

    Extrapulmonary manifestations of tuberculosis are reported in less than one in five cases with the knee affected in 8% after the spine and hip. We report a case of isolated highly erosive tuberculosis of the knee presenting in a previously fit Vietnamese woman. The difficulties of diagnosis, modalities of chemotherapeutic management, and surgical treatment are discussed. PMID:21808686

  19. Partial knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS). Treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee: Evidence-based guideline 2nd edition (summary). Rosemont, IL. ... al. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee (nonarthroplasty). J Am Acad Orthop Surg . 2009;17: ...

  20. Pneumatic osteoarthritis knee brace.

    PubMed

    Stamenović, Dimitrije; Kojić, Milos; Stojanović, Boban; Hunter, David

    2009-04-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic disease that necessitates long term therapeutic intervention. Biomechanical studies have demonstrated an improvement in the external adduction moment with application of a valgus knee brace. Despite being both efficacious and safe, due to their rigid frame and bulkiness, current designs of knee braces create discomfort and difficulties to patients during prolonged periods of application. Here we propose a novel design of a light osteoarthritis knee brace, which is made of soft conforming materials. Our design relies on a pneumatic leverage system, which, when pressurized, reduces the excessive loads predominantly affecting the medial compartment of the knee and eventually reverses the malalignment. Using a finite-element analysis, we show that with a moderate level of applied pressure, this pneumatic brace can, in theory, counterbalance a greater fraction of external adduction moment than the currently existing braces.

  1. Abnormal findings on knee magnetic resonance imaging in asymptomatic NBA players.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Brian E; McCulloch, Patrick C; Kang, Richard W; Zelazny, Anthony; Tedeschi, Fred; Cole, Brian J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knees of asymptomatic National Basketball Association (NBA) players via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confirm or dispute findings reported in the previous literature. It is thought that a variety of significant abnormalities affecting the knee exist in asymptomatic patients and that these findings can be accurately identified on MRI. Two months prior to the 2005 season, bilateral knee MRI examinations of 14 asymptomatic NBA players (28 knees) were evaluated for abnormalities of the articular cartilage, menisci, and patellar and quadriceps tendons. The presence of joint effusion, subchondral edema, and cystic lesions and the integrity of the collateral and cruciate ligaments were also assessed.

  2. Validity of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Knee Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Grubor, Predrag; Asotic, Amina; Grubor, Milan; Asotic, Mithat

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Knee injuries are common in athletes, recreationists, and other people in their everyday activities. Objective: The study is aimed at establishing the validity of clinical findings, MRI and diagnostic arthroscopy of the knee in ACL, PCL, medial or lateral ligament lesions. Methods: The prospective research involved 63 inpatients at the Traumatology Clinic in Banja Luka- Niš between 1 January 2011 and 1 June 2012. Results: When clinically examining the ACL and based on the calculated post-test probability amounting to (LR+) = 0.8017, we conclude that there is a considerable probability (80.17%) that a patient with an arthroscopically diagnosed ACL lesion will have the same lesion diagnosed by MRI. The post-test probability following the clinical examination of the medial meniscus and amounting to (LR+) = 0.6943 suggests that there is a considerable probability (69.43%) that an arthroscopically diagnosed lesion of the medial meniscus will also be diagnosed by MRI. On the basis of the clinical examination of the lateral meniscus in the examined sample and calculated post-test probability amounting to (LR+) = 0.6346, we conclude that there is a considerable difference (63.46%) between the diagnostic arthroscopy and MRI of lateral meniscus lesions. Conclusion: Arthroscopic examination of the knee is a more valuable method than diagnosis by MRI and clinical examination for detecting lesions of the ACL, PCL, medial and lateral meniscus. PMID:24167392

  3. Sequential outcome following autologous chondrocyte implantation of the knee: A six-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    David, Lee A.; Briggs, Tim W. R.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective six-year longitudinal study reviews the clinical outcome of patients undergoing autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and a porcine type I/III collagen membrane cover for deep chondral defects of the knee. We present 57 patients (31 male, 26 female) with a mean age of 31.6 years (range 15–51 years) that have undergone ACI since July 1998. The mean size of the defect was 3.14 cm2 (range 1.0–7.0 cm2). All patients were assessed annually using seven independent validated clinical rating scores with the data analysed using ANOVA. ACI using a porcine type I/III collagen membrane cover produced statistically significant improvements (p < 0.001), maintained for up to six years, in knee symptoms compared to pre-operative levels. This study provides evidence of the medium-term benefit achieved by transplanting autologous chondrocytes to osteochondral defects. PMID:19669763

  4. Advanced concepts in knee arthrodesis

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jennifer H; Conway, Janet D

    2015-01-01

    The aim is to describe advanced strategies that can be used to diagnose and treat complications after knee arthrodesis and to describe temporary knee arthrodesis to treat infected knee arthroplasty. Potential difficult complications include nonunited knee arthrodesis, limb length discrepancy after knee arthrodesis, and united but infected knee arthrodesis. If a nonunited knee arthrodesis shows evidence of implant loosening or failure, then bone grafting the nonunion site as well as exchange intramedullary nailing and/or supplemental plate fixation are recommended. If symptomatic limb length discrepancy cannot be satisfactorily treated with a shoe lift, then the patient should undergo tibial lengthening over nail with a monolateral fixator or exchange nailing with a femoral internal lengthening device. If a united knee arthrodesis is infected, the nail must be removed. Then the surgeon has the option of replacing it with a long, antibiotic cement-coated nail. The authors also describe temporary knee arthrodesis for infected knee arthroplasty in patients who have the potential to undergo insertion of a new implant. The procedure has two goals: eradication of infection and stabilization of the knee. A temporary knee fusion can be accomplished by inserting both an antibiotic cement-coated knee fusion nail and a static antibiotic cement-coated spacer. These advanced techniques can be helpful when treating difficult complications after knee arthrodesis and treating cases of infected knee arthroplasty. PMID:25793160

  5. Pre-radiographic MRI findings are associated with onset of knee symptoms: the most study

    PubMed Central

    Javaid, M. K.; Lynch, J. A.; Tolstykh, I.; Guermazi, A.; Roemer, F.; Aliabadi, P.; McCulloch, C.; Curtis, J.; Felson, D.; Lane, N. E.; Torner, J.; Nevitt, M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greater sensitivity to detect osteoarthritis (OA) damage than radiographs but it is uncertain which MRI findings in early OA are clinically important. We examined MRI abnormalities detected in knees without radiographic OA and their association with incident knee symptoms. Method Participants from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) without frequent knee symptoms (FKS) at baseline were eligible if they also lacked radiographic features of OA at baseline. At 15 months, knees that developed FKS were defined as cases while control knees were drawn from those that remained without FKS. Baseline MRIs were scored at each subregion for cartilage lesions (CARTs); osteophytes (OST); bone marrow lesions (BML) and cysts. We compared cases and controls using marginal logistic regression models, adjusting for age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI), previous injury and clinic site. Results 36 case knees and 128 control knees were analyzed. MRI damage was common in both cases and controls. The presence of a severe CART (P = 0.03), BML (P = 0.02) or OST (P = 0.02) in the whole knee joint was more common in cases while subchondral cysts did not differ significantly between cases and controls (P > 0.1). Case status at 15 months was predicted by baseline damage at only two locations; a BML in the lateral patella (P = 0.047) and at the tibial subspinous subregions (P = 0.01). Conclusion In knees without significant symptoms or radiographic features of OA, MRI lesions of OA in only a few specific locations preceded onset of clinical symptoms and suggest that changes in bone play a role in the early development of knee pain. Confirmation of these findings in other prospective studies of knee OA is warranted. PMID:19919856

  6. Pink lesions.

    PubMed

    Giacomel, Jason; Zalaudek, Iris

    2013-10-01

    Dermoscopy (dermatoscopy or surface microscopy) is an ancillary dermatologic tool that in experienced hands can improve the accuracy of diagnosis of a variety of benign and malignant pigmented skin tumors. The early and more accurate diagnosis of nonpigmented, or pink, tumors can also be assisted by dermoscopy. This review focuses on the dermoscopic diagnosis of pink lesions, with emphasis on blood vessel morphology and pattern. A 3-step algorithm is presented, which facilitates the timely and more accurate diagnosis of pink tumors and subsequently guides the management for such lesions.

  7. Evolution of knee kinematics three months after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Alice, Bonnefoy-Mazure; Stéphane, Armand; Yoshisama, Sagawa Junior; Pierre, Hoffmeyer; Domizio, Suvà; Hermes, Miozzari; Katia, Turcot

    2015-02-01

    In patients with debilitating knee osteoarthritis, total knee replacement is the most common surgical procedure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that knee kinematics one year after total knee replacement are still altered compared to the healthy joint. However, little is known regarding impairments and functional limitations of patients several months after total knee replacement. The aim of this study was to describe the evolution of the knee gait kinematic in patients with knee osteoarthritis before and three months after a total knee replacement. Ninety patients who were to undergo total knee replacement were included in this study. Twenty-three subjects were recruited as the control group. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed before and three months after surgery. The spatio-temporal parameters and three-dimensional knee kinematics for the operated limb were evaluated during a comfortable gait and compared between groups (the before and after surgery groups and the control group). Three months after surgery, patients always walk with a slower gait velocity and lower knee flexion-extension movements compared to the control group. However, a degree of progress was observed in term of the stride and step length, gait velocity and knee alignment in the coronal plane. Our results suggest that the disability is still significant for most patients three months after total knee replacement. A better understand of the impairments and functional limitations following surgery would help clinicians design rehabilitation programs. Moreover, patients should be informed that rehabilitation after total knee replacement is a long process.

  8. Bilateral pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Samir H.; Porrino, Jack A.; Green, John R.; Chew, Felix S.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a disorder resulting in a villous, nodular, or villonodular proliferation of the synovium, with pigmentation related to the presence of hemosiderin. These lesions are almost exclusively benign with rare reports of malignancy. Pigmented villonodular synovitis can occur in a variety of joints and at any age but most often occurs within the knee in the young adult. Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare disease entity, and bilateral synchronous or metachronous involvement of a joint is even more uncommon, with few reports previously described in the literature. We present a case of pigmented villonodular synovitis involving both the right and left knee in the same patient, with radiographic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, photograph and video intraoperative imaging, and pathologic correlation. PMID:26649121

  9. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY ON TENDON RUPTURES OF THE KNEE EXTENSOR MECHANISM AT A LEVEL 1 HOSPITAL

    PubMed Central

    Pires e Albuquerque, Rodrigo; Prado, Juliano; Hara, Rafael; Ferreira, Evaldo; Schiavo, Leonardo; Giordano, Vincenzo; Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro do; Barretto, João Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to review the epidemiological aspects of tendon ruptures of the knee extensor apparatus at a level 1 hospital. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 76 lesions of the knee extensor apparatus that were treated surgically at the Miguel Couto Municipal Hospital between March 2004 and March 2011. We took into consideration age, sex, trauma mechanism, anatomical classification of the lesion, affected side, comorbidities and associated lesions. Results: Among the patients studied, 68 were male and the mean age was 36 years. Regarding the trauma mechanism, 62 lesions occurred due to direct trauma; the right side was affected in 21 cases; eight presented comorbidities and four presented associated lesions. Conclusion: The majority of the patients were male, at an economically active age (young people), and were victims of direct trauma. Ruptures of the patellar ligament were the most frequent lesions. Associated lesions were rare and comorbidities were infrequent in our sample. PMID:27047890

  10. Knee Conditioning Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscles help your knee joint absorb shock. Flexibility: Stretching the muscles that you strengthen is important for restoring range of motion and preventing injury. Gently stretching after strengthening exercises can help reduce muscle soreness ...

  11. Anterior knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... places extra stress on the kneecap (such as running, jumping or twisting, skiing, or playing soccer). You ... noticeable with: Deep knee bends Going down stairs Running downhill Standing up after sitting for awhile

  12. Prosthetic Knee Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... must give support when people stand, allow smooth motion when people walk, and permit movement when people ... of knees and their options for stability and motion control would work best for them. There are ...

  13. Knee microfracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... WM, Griesser MJ, Parker RD. Patellofemoral pain. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 105. Miller RH, Azar FM. Knee injuries. In: Canale ST, ...

  14. Runners knee (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... forces on the knee, such as a misaligned patella. Chondromalacia is treated with rest or immobilization and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain. Physical therapy, especially ... alignment of the patella that cannot be corrected with therapy.

  15. Dashboard (in the) Knee

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, AA; Green, TP

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old individual presenting to an orthopaedic outpatient clinic several months following a dashboard knee injury during a road traffic accident with intermittent mechanical symptoms. Despite unremarkable examination findings and normal magnetic resonance imaging, the patient was identified subsequently as having an intra-articular plastic foreign body consistent with a piece of dashboard on arthroscopic knee assessment, the retrieval of which resulted in a complete resolution of symptoms. PMID:25723676

  16. Unique Anatomic Feature of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament in Knees Associated With Osteochondritis Dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masakazu; Adachi, Nobuo; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Nakamae, Atsuo; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Ikuta, Yasunari; Hayashi, Seiju; Deie, Masataka; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee is a disorder in juveniles and young adults; however, its etiology still remains unclear. For OCD at the medial femoral condyle (MFC), it is sometimes observed that the lesion has a connection with fibers of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Although this could be important information related to the etiology of MFC OCD, there is no report examining an association between the MFC OCD and the PCL anatomy. Purpose: To investigate the anatomic features of knees associated with MFC OCD, focusing especially on the femoral attachment of the PCL, and to compare them with knees associated with lateral femoral condyle (LFC) OCD and non-OCD lesions. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients (46 knees) with OCD lesions who had undergone surgical treatment. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, the PCL attachment at the lateral wall of the MFC was measured on the coronal sections, and the knee flexion angle was also measured on the sagittal sections. As with non-OCD knees, we reviewed and analyzed 25 knees with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and 16 knees with meniscal injuries. Results: MRIs revealed that the femoral PCL footprint was located in a significantly more distal position in the patients with MFC OCD compared with patients with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. There was no significant difference in knee flexion angle among the 4 groups. Conclusion: The PCL in patients with MFC OCD attached more distally at the lateral aspect of the MFC compared with knees with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. PMID:27294170

  17. Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid following arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of the knee.

    PubMed

    Thein, Rafael; Haviv, Barak; Kidron, Amos; Bronak, Shlomo

    2010-10-11

    The short-term recovery period post-arthroscopic meniscectomy is characterized by pain and impaired function most likely related to the irrigation of synovial fluid from the knee intraoperatively. Consequently, along with removal of harmful debris, the irrigation fluid dilutes the hyaluronic acid layer covering the joint tissues. Hyaluronic acid contributes to the homeostasis of the joint environment and is an important component of synovial fluid and cartilage matrix. Hence, the instillation of hyaluronic acid after the procedure may relieve symptoms. This prospective, single-blind, randomized, controlled study evaluated clinical outcome after hyaluronic acid injection to patients who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy of the knee. Patients with ligamentous injuries or severe chondral damage were excluded. Fifty-six patients with a mean age of 34 years (range, 17-44 years) were injected with Viscoseal (TRB Chemedica International S.A., Geneva, Switzerland) or normal saline immediately post-arthroscopy and divided into the Viscoseal group or control group, respectively. Patients were evaluated for pain, swelling, and function at 1, 4, and 12 weeks postoperatively. Patients in the control group reported more pain at week 1, with a mean visual analog score (VAS) of 43, than did patients in the Viscoseal group, with a mean VAS of 28 (P=.006). At 4 weeks postoperatively, none of the Viscoseal patients had consumed analgesics, where 9 (of 28) in the control group reported acetaminophen intake (P=.039). No significant difference in knee function was found between groups. Intra-articular injection of Viscoseal after arthroscopic meniscectomy reduced pain in the short-term recovery period.

  18. Alterations in walking knee joint stiffness in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee instability.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Jonathan A; Gorman, Shannon; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Increased walking knee joint stiffness has been reported in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a compensatory strategy to improve knee joint stability. However, presence of episodic self-reported knee instability in a large subgroup of patients with knee OA may be a sign of inadequate walking knee joint stiffness. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in walking knee joint stiffness in patients with knee OA with and without self-reported instability and examine the relationship between walking knee joint stiffness with quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity, and varus knee malalignment. Overground biomechanical data at a self-selected gait velocity was collected for 35 individuals with knee OA without self-reported instability (stable group) and 17 individuals with knee OA and episodic self-reported instability (unstable group). Knee joint stiffness was calculated during the weight-acceptance phase of gait as the change in the external knee joint moment divided by the change in the knee flexion angle. The unstable group walked with lower knee joint stiffness (p=0.01), mainly due to smaller heel-contact knee flexion angles (p<0.01) and greater knee flexion excursions (p<0.01) compared to their knee stable counterparts. No significant relationships were observed between walking knee joint stiffness and quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity or varus knee malalignment. Reduced walking knee joint stiffness appears to be associated with episodic knee instability and independent of quadriceps muscle weakness, knee joint laxity or varus malalignment. Further investigations of the temporal relationship between self-reported knee joint instability and walking knee joint stiffness are warranted.

  19. Runner's knee injuries.

    PubMed

    Lutter, L D

    1984-01-01

    In our series of running injuries 40% of all injuries have been related to the knee area. Over 20 million people in the United States run on a regular basis. Figures from large running sources show that 60% to 70% of individuals running regularly are injured severely enough to temporarily stop running. The figures are significant, not in the seriousness of the knee injury, but in the fact that seeking treatment for their knee problems. Orthopaedic surgeons, because of their ability to evaluate the entire lower extremity, become the central component for treatment of this large group of injured runners. As has been noted, the underlying biomechanical abnormality must be sought and dealt with or the symptoms return. By identification of the injured structure(s) integrated with biomechanical understanding, treatment can be developed on a rational basis, dealing with acute problems and prevention of future ones.

  20. Drug-eluting stents below the knee.

    PubMed

    Bosiers, M; Deloose, K; Callaert, J; Keirse, K; Verbist, J; Peeters, P

    2011-04-01

    The fear that early thrombosis and late luminal loss due to intimal hyperplasia formation potentially leads to insufficient long-term patency rates can explain the reluctance on implanting stents in small diameter below-the-knee (BTK) arteries. Drug-eluting stent (DES) technology was developed to prevent early thrombosis and late luminal loss to potentially improve long-term patency rates. Currently, the first level 1 evidence from prospective, randomized, controlled DESTINY and ACHILLES studies indicate that the implantation of DES in short lesion lenghts in the infrapopliteal vasculature leads to favorable outcomes with high primary patency rates. This makes that primary DES placement can be recommended as treatment strategy in short BTK-lesions.

  1. Cementless total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Salvatore; Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Agati, Gabriele; Massè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Interest for uncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has greatly increased in recent years. This technique, less used than cemented knee replacement in the last decades, sees a revival thanks an advance in prosthetic design, instrumentation and operative technique. The related literature in some cases shows conflicting data on survival and on the revision’s rate, but in most cases a success rate comparable to cemented TKA is reported. The optimal fixation in TKA is a subject of debate with the majority of surgeons favouring cemented fixation. PMID:27162779

  2. Performance characteristics of ultrasound of the knee in a general radiological setting.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Warwick; Lee, Tack Shin; Sundarajan, Vijaya; Walker, Peter; Magnussen, John; Van der Wall, Hans

    2004-08-01

    Ultrasound of the musculoskeletal system is an attractive imaging modality due to the lack of ionising radiation, cost and ease of availability. A role has been established in the shoulder and pediatric hip but not in the knee. Ultrasound studies of the knee performed at six general radiological practices without established musculoskeletal expertise were compared with clinical examination in 56 patients. Final diagnoses were established by arthroscopy and/or MRI. The sensitivity and specificity for detection of superficial lesions in the knee were 88 and 41% for clinical examination and 32 and 59% for ultrasound. For deep lesions sensitivity and specificity were 61 and 64% for clinical examination and 13 and 100% for ultrasound. Ultrasound studies of the knee in a general radiological practice do not offer significant information above clinical examination.

  3. Physicians’ accuracy and interrator reliability for the diagnosis of unstable meniscal tears in patients having osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Dervin, Geoffrey F.; Stiell, Ian G.; Wells, George A.; Rody, Kelly; Grabowski, Jenny

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine clinicians’ accuracy and reliability for the clinical diagnosis of unstable meniscus tears in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee. Design A prospective cohort study. Setting A single tertiary care centre. Patients One hundred and fifty-two patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee refractory to conservative medical treatment were selected for prospective evaluation of arthroscopic débridement. Intervention Arthroscopic débridement of the knee, including meniscal tear and chondral flap resection, without abrasion arthroplasty. Outcome measures A standardized assessment protocol was administered to each patient by 2 independent observers. Arthroscopic determination of unstable meniscal tears was recorded by 1 observer who reviewed a video recording and was blinded to preoperative data. Those variables that had the highest interobserver agreement and the strongest association with meniscal tear by univariate methods were entered into logistic regression to model the best prediction of resectable tears. Results There were 92 meniscal tears (77 medial, 15 lateral). Interobserver agreement between clinical fellows and treating surgeons was poor to fair (κ < 0.4) for all clinical variables except radiographic measures, which were good. Fellows and surgeons predicted unstable meniscal tear preoperatively with equivalent accuracy of 60%. Logistic regression modelling revealed that a history of swelling and a ballottable effusion were negative predictors. A positive McMurray test was the only positive predictor of unstable meniscal tear. “Mechanical” symptoms were not reliable predictors in this prospective study. The model was 69% accurate for all patients and 76% for those with advanced medial compartment osteoarthritis defined by a joint space height of 2 mm or less. Conclusions This study underscored the difficulty in using clinical variables to predict unstable medial meniscal tears in patients with pre

  4. Arthrography and arthrotomy of the knee in sports injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Kulthanan, T; Noiklang, P

    1993-01-01

    A total of 266 patients with injuries to the knee sustained during sports activities were managed by arthroscopy and/or arthrotomy. All of them received systemic examination and a standard battery of knee stability tests. Fifty-three were examined by arthrography and all underwent arthrotomy for surgical correction of the lesion diagnosed by both clinical examination and arthrography. Our study showed that clinical examination could give an accurate clinical diagnosis in 88.35% of cases and arthrography in 76.89%. No complication from arthrography was found. Injury occurred most commonly between 21 and 30 years of age and was more common to the right knee than the left. The sport in which most injuries occurred was football. PMID:8358590

  5. Calcific tendinitis of biceps femoris: an unusual site and cause for lateral knee pain.

    PubMed

    Chan, Warwick; Chase, Helen Emily; Cahir, John G; Walton, Neil Patrick

    2016-07-29

    A 37-year-old man presented to the acute knee and sports medicine clinic with atraumatic lateral knee pain. He had point tenderness over the lateral aspect of his knee which had not settled with anti-inflammatory medications. Imaging revealed a large opaque lesion lateral to the knee and although there was no clear mechanism, injury to the posterolateral corner was considered. An MRI subsequently revealed a rare case of calcific tendinitis to the biceps femoris tendon insertion. This condition was self-limiting and did not require interventions such as steroid injections. This is the first reported case of calcific tendinitis of biceps femoris as a cause of acute knee pain.

  6. Evaluation of patients presenting with knee pain: Part II. Differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Calmbach, Walter L; Hutchens, Mark

    2003-09-01

    Knee pain is a common presenting complaint with many possible causes. An awareness of certain patterns can help the family physician identify the underlying cause more efficiently. Teenage girls and young women are more likely to have patellar tracking problems such as patellar subluxation and patellofemoral pain syndrome, whereas teenage boys and young men are more likely to have knee extensor mechanism problems such as tibial apophysitis (Osgood-Schlatter lesion) and patellar tendonitis. Referred pain resulting from hip joint pathology, such as slipped capital femoral epiphysis, also may cause knee pain. Active patients are more likely to have acute ligamentous sprains and overuse injuries such as pes anserine bursitis and medial plica syndrome. Trauma may result in acute ligamentous rupture or fracture, leading to acute knee joint swelling and hemarthrosis. Septic arthritis may develop in patients of any age, but crystal-induced inflammatory arthropathy is more likely in adults. Osteoarthritis of the knee joint is common in older adults.

  7. Autologous chondrocyte implantation in the knee: systematic review and economic evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Hema; Connock, Martin; Pink, Joshua; Shyangdan, Deepson; Clar, Christine; Royle, Pamela; Court, Rachel; Biant, Leela C; Metcalfe, Andrew; Waugh, Norman

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND The surfaces of the bones in the knee are covered with articular cartilage, a rubber-like substance that is very smooth, allowing frictionless movement in the joint and acting as a shock absorber. The cells that form the cartilage are called chondrocytes. Natural cartilage is called hyaline cartilage. Articular cartilage has very little capacity for self-repair, so damage may be permanent. Various methods have been used to try to repair cartilage. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) involves laboratory culture of cartilage-producing cells from the knee and then implanting them into the chondral defect. OBJECTIVE To assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ACI in chondral defects in the knee, compared with microfracture (MF). DATA SOURCES A broad search was done in MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, NHS Economic Evaluation Database and Web of Science, for studies published since the last Health Technology Assessment review. REVIEW METHODS Systematic review of recent reviews, trials, long-term observational studies and economic evaluations of the use of ACI and MF for repairing symptomatic articular cartilage defects of the knee. A new economic model was constructed. Submissions from two manufacturers and the ACTIVE (Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation/Implantation Versus Existing Treatment) trial group were reviewed. Survival analysis was based on long-term observational studies. RESULTS Four randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published since the last appraisal provided evidence on the efficacy of ACI. The SUMMIT (Superiority of Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implant versus Microfracture for Treatment of symptomatic articular cartilage defects) trial compared matrix-applied chondrocyte implantation (MACI(®)) against MF. The TIG/ACT/01/2000 (TIG/ACT) trial compared ACI with characterised chondrocytes against MF. The ACTIVE trial compared several forms of ACI against standard treatments, mainly MF. In the SUMMIT

  8. Does increasing applied load lead to contact changes indicative of knee osteoarthritis? A subject-specific FEA study.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Jennifer L; Zavatsky, Amy B; Gill, Harinderjit S

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated whether increased loading (representing obesity) in the extended knee and flexed knee led to increased stresses in areas of typical medial and lateral osteoarthritis cartilage lesions, respectively. We created two paired sets of subject-specific finite element models; both sets included models of extended knees and of flexed knees. The first set represented normal loading; the second set represented increased loading. All other variables were held constant. The von Mises stresses and contact areas calculated on the tibial cartilage surfaces of the paired models were then compared. In the extended knee models, applying a larger load led to increased stress in the anterior and central regions of the medial tibial cartilage. These are the typical locations of medial osteoarthritis cartilage lesions. Therefore, the results support that increased loading in the extended knee may result in medial osteoarthritis. In the flexed knee models, applying a larger load increased stress in the anterior and central regions of the lateral tibial cartilage. Lateral osteoarthritis cartilage lesions typically occur centrally and posteriorly. Therefore, these results do not support our hypothesis. Shear stress was increased in areas of typical lateral lesions, however, and should be investigated in future studies.

  9. Reading Knee-Deep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Freire told his audience at a seminar at the University of Massachusetts, "You need to read knee-deep in texts, for deeper than surface meanings, and you need to know the words to be able to do it" (quoted in Cleary, 2003). In a children's literature class, fifteen teachers and I traveled along a path that moved us toward reading…

  10. Hypermobility and Knee Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Mark E.

    1987-01-01

    A review of research on the effect of hypermobility on knee injury indicates that greater than normal joint flexibility may be necessary for some athletic endeavors and that it may be possible to change one's underlying flexibility through training. However, for most athletes, inherited flexibility probably plays only a small role, if any, in…

  11. Custom Knee Device for Knee Contractures After Internal Femoral Lengthening.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Ong, Peck-Hoon; Standard, Shawn C; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2015-07-01

    The development of knee flexion contractures is among the most common problems and complications associated with lengthening the femur with an internal device or external fixator. Conservative treatment strategies include physical therapy, serial casting, and low-load prolonged stretching with commercially available splinting systems. The authors developed an individually molded, low-cost custom knee device with polyester synthetic conformable casting material to treat knee flexion contractures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the results of treatment with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy in patients who had knee flexion contracture during femoral lengthening with an intramedullary lengthening femoral nail. This retrospective study included 23 patients (27 limbs) who underwent femoral lengthening with an internal device for the treatment of limb length discrepancy. All patients had a knee flexion contracture raging from 10° to 90° during the lengthening process and were treated with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy. The average flexion contracture before treatment was 36°. The mean amount of lengthening was 5.4 cm. After an average of 3.8 weeks of use of the custom knee device, only 2 of 27 limbs (7.5%) had not achieved complete resolution of the flexion contracture. The average final extension was 1.4°. Only 7 of 27 limbs (26%) required additional soft tissue release. The custom knee device is an inexpensive and effective method for treating knee flexion contracture after lengthening with an internal device.

  12. Giant Angioleiomyoma of Knee Presenting as Painless Ulcer: The First Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Souradip; Chattopadhyay, Debarati; Dhiman, Pratibha; Gupta, Sandipan

    2015-01-01

    Angioleiomyomas are benign tumors originating in the vascular smooth muscle. The tumor typically presents as painful, solitary, small (<2 cm), slow growing, subcutaneous nodule. Angioleiomyoma of the knee is rare, and only few cases have been reported so far. We have described herein a giant angioleiomyoma of the knee presenting as a painless ulcer in a 22-year-old man. There was no intra-articular extension of the tumor, and total excision was curative. This is the first case report of giant angioleiomyoma of the knee as well as the first case report of angioleiomyoma presenting as a painless ulcerative lesion.

  13. Anterior subluxation of the lateral tibial plateau. A new clinical test and the morbidity of this type of knee instability.

    PubMed

    Martens, M A; Mulier, J C

    1981-01-01

    A new clinical test is presented for the diagnosis of anterolateral knee instability. The advantages of the test are obviation of apprehension- and muscle spasm avoiding false negative results and also the recognition by the patient of his sensation of "collapsing at the knee". This allows for differentiation between "giving away" due to a torn meniscus alone and concomitant anterolateral knee instability. It implies important consequences for prognosis and treatment of the knee problem of the athlete. Underlying pathology consists of a torn anterior cruciate ligament and primary or secondary stretching of the soft tissues at the lateral and posterolateral capsule. These lesions and a positive test for anterolateral knee instability does not inevitably result in a disability for sports activity. The dynamic muscular control protects the knee in many instances from collapsing at cross over cutting.

  14. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  2. Knee Power Is an Important Parameter in Understanding Medial Knee Joint Load in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Calder, Kristina M; Acker, Stacey M; Arora, Neha; Beattie, Karen A; Callaghan, Jack P; Adachi, Jonathan D; Maly, Monica R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent to which knee extensor strength and power explain variance in knee adduction moment (KAM) peak and impulse in clinical knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Fifty-three adults (mean ± SD age 61.6 ± 6.3 years, 11 men) with clinical knee OA participated. The KAM waveform was calculated from motion and force data and ensemble averaged from 5 walking trials. The KAM peak was normalized to body mass (Nm/kg). The mean KAM impulse reflected the mean total medial knee load during stride (Nm × seconds). For strength, the maximum knee extensor moment attained from maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) was normalized to body mass (Nm/kg). For power, the maximum knee extensor power during isotonic contractions, with the resistance set at 25% of MVIC, was normalized to body mass (W/kg). Covariates included age, sex, knee pain on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, gait speed, and body mass index (BMI). Relationships of the KAM peak and impulse with strength and power were examined using sequential stepwise forward linear regressions. Results Covariates did not explain variance in the KAM peak. While extensor strength did not, peak knee extensor power explained 8% of the variance in the KAM peak (P = 0.02). Sex and BMI explained 24% of the variance in the KAM impulse (P < 0.05). Sex, BMI, and knee extensor power explained 31% of the variance in the KAM impulse (P = 0.02), with power contributing 7% (P < 0.05). Conclusion Knee extensor power was more important than isometric knee strength in understanding medial knee loads during gait. PMID:24920175

  3. Management of the Swollen Knee

    PubMed Central

    Stanish, William D.; Rice, William; Ratson, Gary; Loebenberg, Mark; Langley, Linda

    1988-01-01

    The primary-care physician plays a critical role in the diagnosis, initial treatment, and subsequent rehabilitation of many orthopedic conditions. The knee is the most frequently injured joint in sport medicine. The family physician must therefore be familiar with the etiology, cause, and natural history of problems related to the knee joint. The swollen knee is one of the most common ailments the family physician is asked to assess in his or her busy day-to-day practice of medicine. He or she must therefore remain abreast of the dynamic field of diagnostic procedures, treatments, and rehabilitative measures relating to many knee injuries. This paper deals with the more common causes of the acutely swollen knee, paying particular attention to the infected knee and the acute hemarthrosis. It should provide answers to most questions about diagnosis, initial treatment, and subsequent management of this problem. PMID:21264033

  4. A biomechanical approach to interpreting magnetic resonance imaging of knee injuries.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Scott E; Khurana, Bharti; Gaviola, Glenn; Davis, Kirkland W

    2014-11-01

    This article discusses common injury mechanisms and the subsequent constellation of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in the knee following trauma in the context of instability, as distinguished by the degree of knee flexion and tibial rotation at the time of initial injury, in addition to the direction and magnitude of the responsible force vectors. Using 3-dimensional imaging, common injury mechanisms are illustrated and correlated with MR imaging findings of the resulting osteochondral, ligamentous, meniscal, and musculotendinous lesions. The most common classification and grading systems for these individual lesions and their subsequent treatment implications are discussed.

  5. Differential expression of TGF-β superfamily members and role of Smad1/5/9-signalling in chondral versus endochondral chondrocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Dexheimer, Verena; Gabler, Jessica; Bomans, Katharina; Sims, Tanja; Omlor, Georg; Richter, Wiltrud

    2016-01-01

    Proteins of the transforming-growth-factor-β (TGF-β)-superfamily have a remarkable ability to induce cartilage and bone and the crosstalk of TGF-β - and BMP-signalling pathways appears crucial during chondrocyte development. Aim was to assess the regulation of TGF-β-superfamily members and of Smad2/3- and Smad1/5/9-signalling during endochondral in vitro chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) relative to chondral redifferentiation of articular chondrocytes (AC) to adjust chondrocyte development of MSC towards a less hypertrophic phenotype. While MSC increased BMP4 and BMP7 and reduced TGFBR2 and TGFBR3-expression during chondrogenesis, an opposite regulation was observed during AC-redifferentiation. Antagonists CHRD and CHL2 rose significantly only in AC-cultures. AC showed higher initial BMP4, pSmad1/5/9 and SOX9 protein levels, a faster (re-)differentiation but a similar decline of pSmad2/3- and pSmad1/5/9-signalling versus MSC-cultures. BMP-4/7-stimulation of MSC-pellets enhanced SOX9 and accelerated ALP-induction but did not shift differentiation towards osteogenesis. Inhibition of BMP-signalling by dorsomorphin significantly reduced SOX9, raised RUNX2, maintained collagen-type-II and collagen-type-X lower and kept ALP-activity at levels reached at initiation of treatment. Conclusively, ALK1,2,3,6-signalling was essential for MSC-chondrogenesis and its prochondrogenic rather than prohypertrophic role may explain why inhibition of canonical BMP-signalling could not uncouple cartilage matrix production from hypertrophy as this was achieved with pulsed PTHrP-application. PMID:27848974

  6. Selectively lockable knee brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Neill (Inventor); Shadoan, Mike (Inventor); Forbes, John (Inventor); Baker, Kevin (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A knee brace for aiding in rehabilitation of damaged leg muscles includes upper and lower housings, normally pivotable, one relative to the other about the knee joint axis of a patient. The upper housing is attachable to the thigh of the patient above the knee joint, while the lower housing is secured to a stirrup which extends downwardly along the patient's leg and is attached to the patient's shoe. An actuation rod is carried within the lower housing and is coupled to a cable. The upper and lower housings carry cooperative clutch/brake elements which normally are disengaged to permit relative movement between the upper and lower housings. When the cable is extended, the clutch/brake elements engage and lock the housings together. A heel strike mechanism fastened to the stirrup and the heel of the shoe is connected to the cable to selectively extend the cable and lock the brace in substantially any position when the patient places weight on the heel.

  7. Selectively Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael D. (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Baker, Kevin J. (Inventor); Rice, Darron C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A knee brace for aiding in rehabilitation of damaged leg muscles includes upper and lower housings normally pivotable one relative to the other about the knee joint axis of a patient. The upper housing is attachable to the thigh of the patient above the knee joint while the lower housing is secured to a stirrup which extends downwardly along the patient's leg and is attached to the patient's shoe. An actuation rod is carried within the lower housing and is coupled to a cable. The upper and lower housings carry cooperative clutch/brake elements which normally are disengaged to permit relative movement between the upper and lower housings. When the cable is extended the clutch/brake elements engage and lock the housings together. A heel strike mechanism fastened to the stirrup and the heel of the shoe is connected to the cable to selectively extend the cable and lock the brace in substantially any position when the patient places weight on the heel.

  8. [Physical activity for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Masashi; Ishijima, Muneaki; Kaneko, Haruka; Takazawa, Yuji; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Kazuo

    Elder populations have been increasing in Japan and estimated 24 million people have knee osteoarthritis(OA). Recently, people have diverse sociological background and demand for participating sports has been growing. People may participate sports to prevent some diseases such as locomotive syndrome. According to the recent studies, excessive high impact sports increase the risk of OA, while daily life exercise decrease the risk. Epidemiological approach demonstrated that reduced knee extension muscle strength increases the risk of OA. We reviewed and discussed the recent topics including efficacy of physical therapy for knee OA and how much sports activities could be beneficial after knee surgery.

  9. Knee stabilization in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lewek, Michael D.; Ramsey, Dan K.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Rudolph, Katherine S.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis (MKOA) experience knee laxity and instability. Muscle stabilization strategies may influence the long term integrity of the joint. In this study we determined how individuals with medial knee OA respond to a rapid valgus knee movement to investigate the relationship between muscle stabilization strategies and knee instability. METHODS Twenty one subjects with MKOA and genu varum, and 19 control subjects were tested. Subjects stood with the test limb on a moveable platform that translated laterally to rapidly stress the knee’s medial periarticular structures and create a potentially destabilizing feeling at the knee joint. Knee motion and muscle responses were recorded. Subjects rated their knee instability with a self-report questionnaire about knee instability during daily activities. RESULTS Prior to plate movement the OA subjects demonstrated more medial muscle co-contraction (p=0.014). Following plate movement the OA subjects shifted less weight off the test limb (p = 0.013) and had more medial co-contraction (p=0.037). Those without instability had higher VMMH co-contraction than those who reported more instability (p=0.038). Knee stability correlated positively with VMMH co-contraction prior to plate movement (r = 0.459; p = 0.042). CONCLUSION This study demonstrates that individuals with MKOA attempt to stabilize the knee with greater medial muscle co-contraction in response to laxity that appears on only the medial side of the joint. This strategy presumably contributes to higher joint compression and could exacerbate joint destruction and needs to be altered to slow or stop the progression of the OA disease process. PMID:16142714

  10. Development of a knee joint motion simulator to evaluate deep knee flexion of artificial knee joints.

    PubMed

    Takano, Y; Ueno, M; Kiguchi, K; Ito, J; Mawatari, M; Hotokebuchi, T

    2008-01-01

    A purpose of this study is to examine the effect that quadriceps femoris force gives to rotation angle and joint reaction force of total knee prosthesis during deep knee flexion such as a unique sitting style called 'seiza' in Japanese. For the evaluation, we developed the knee motion simulator which could bend to 180 degrees continually simulating the passive flexion performed by clinicians. A total knee prosthesis, which is a specially-devised posterior stabilized type and capable of flexion up to 180 degrees, was inserted into bone model. And this prosthesis pulled by three kinds of quadriceps femoris forces to perform parameter study. The results obtained in this study were showed the same tendency with those in the past cadaveric experiment. It is suggested that the rotation angle and joint reaction force of total knee prosthesis are affected by shape of prosthesis, a vector of quadriceps femoris force, and bony aliments during deep knee flexion.

  11. Medial pivot knee in primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Atzori, Francesco; Salama, Wael; Sabatini, Luigi; Mousa, Shazly; Khalefa, Abdelrahman

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with a medial pivot design was developed in order to mimic normal knee kinematics; the highly congruent medial compartment implant should improve clinical results and decrease contact stresses. Clinical and radiographic mid-term outcomes are satisfactory, but we need other studies to evaluate long-term results and indications for unusual cases.

  12. Correlating anatomy and congruence of the patellofemoral joint with cartilage lesions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Tan, Hongbo; Yang, Lui; Dai, Gang; Guo, Botao

    2009-01-01

    Cartilage lesion of the patellofemoral joint is a common and challenging disease of the knee and an important cause of anterior knee pain. There are many naturally occurring variations in the anatomy and congruence of the patella and femoral trochlea. The purpose of this study was to identify the variations in patellofemoral anatomy and congruency that predispose to cartilage lesions. Among patients who underwent knee arthroscopy in our center from January 2005 to December 2006, 111 patients with chronic patellofemoral cartilage lesions and anterior knee pain were selected as the lesion group, while 124 patients with isolated meniscus rupture without anterior knee pain were selected as the control group. Twenty-one parameters measured on magnetic resonance images were used to assess the patellofemoral anatomy and congruence. A binary logistic regression model was used to look for possible associations between each of these parameters and the occurrence of patellofemoral cartilage lesions. The Bonferroni correction with a type I error rate of 0.0024 (0.05/21) was adopted to indicate statistical significance. Based on examination of the patellofemoral anatomy, 4 parameters were significantly associated with patellofemoral cartilage lesions. These were the patella lateral facet width, patella lateral facet ratio, sulcus depth and sulcus relative depth (P for linear trend <.0024). For patellofemoral congruence, 3 parameters were significantly associated with patellofemoral cartilage lesions. These were the lateral patella displacement, patella epicondylar axis angle and congruence angle (P for linear trend <.0024). Among the many kinds of patellofemoral variations, several were found to correlate with the development of patellofemoral cartilage lesions. These problems could be important risk factors for patellofemoral cartilage lesions.

  13. New Generation Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A knee brace that uses Space Shuttle propulsion technology has moved a step closer to being available to help knee injury and stroke patients and may possibly benefit patients with birth defects, spinal cord injuries, and post-polio conditions. After years of hard work, inventors at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have turned over the final design and prototype to industry partners at Horton's Orthotic Lab in Little Rock, Arkansas for further clinical testing. The device, called the Selectively Lockable Knee Brace, may mean faster, less painful rehabilitation for patients by allowing the knee to move when weight is not on the heel. Devices currently on the market lock the knee in a rigid, straight-leg position, or allow continuous free motion. Pictured here is a knee brace prototype being tested and fitted at Horton's Orthotic Lab. The knee brace is just one example of how space technology is being used to improve the lives of people on Earth. NASA's MSFC inventors Michael Shadoan and Neill Myers are space propulsion engineers who use the same mechanisms and materials to build systems for rockets that they used to design and develop the knee brace.

  14. Automatic locking orthotic knee device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An articulated tang in clevis joint for incorporation in newly manufactured conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices or for replacing such joints in conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices is discussed. The instant tang in clevis joint allows the user the freedom to extend and bend the knee normally when no load (weight) is applied to the knee and to automatically lock the knee when the user transfers weight to the knee, thus preventing a damaged knee from bending uncontrollably when weight is applied to the knee. The tang in clevis joint of the present invention includes first and second clevis plates, a tang assembly and a spacer plate secured between the clevis plates. Each clevis plate includes a bevelled serrated upper section. A bevelled shoe is secured to the tank in close proximity to the bevelled serrated upper section of the clevis plates. A coiled spring mounted within an oblong bore of the tang normally urges the shoes secured to the tang out of engagement with the serrated upper section of each clevic plate to allow rotation of the tang relative to the clevis plate. When weight is applied to the joint, the load compresses the coiled spring, the serrations on each clevis plate dig into the bevelled shoes secured to the tang to prevent relative movement between the tang and clevis plates. A shoulder is provided on the tang and the spacer plate to prevent overextension of the joint.

  15. Exercise and the Knee Joint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    This report by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports examines the effects of various forms of physical exercise on the knee joint which, because of its vulnerability, is especially subject to injury. Discussion centers around the physical characteristics of the joint, commonly used measurements for determining knee stability,…

  16. [Ultrasound criteria of a meniscus lesion].

    PubMed

    Sohn, C; Casser, H R; Swobodnik, W

    1990-04-01

    The tear in the meniscus interrupts the outline at which the sound-wave energy is reflected. This means that the sonogram shows an echo-rich, light reflection pattern. Degeneration also shows up as an echo-rich area, reflecting greater density of the tissue in the meniscus. This has been confirmed by experimental examination of knees of corpses, and also by clinical experience based on more than 2000 sonograms of the meniscus. A quota of more than 90% correct diagnoses can be obtained if the proper criteria are observed in case of a lesion of the meniscus, and if the technical equipment is adequate and the examiner has acquired sufficient skill.

  17. Relation of Hand Enthesophytes with Knee Enthesopathy: Is Osteoarthritis Related to a Systemic Enthesopathy?

    PubMed Central

    GIBSON, NADIA; GUERMAZI, ALI; CLANCY, MARGARET; NIU, JINGBO; GRAYSON, PETER; ALIABADI, PIRAN; ROEMER, FRANK; FELSON, DAVID T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Enthesopathy has been reported as a feature of osteoarthritis (OA) in the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints. We previously reported that central bone marrow lesions (BML) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are associated with OA. In this study, we evaluated whether hand and knee enthesopathy were related. Methods We studied knee and hand radiographs of subjects from the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study. Subjects seen in 2002–2005 had bilateral posteroanterior hand radiographs, weight-bearing knee radiographs, and knee MRI scans. Hand radiographs were read for enthesophytes at the juxtaarticular non-synovial areas of metacarpophalangeal (MCP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP), and DIP joints, and midshafts of the phalanges. We selected 100 cases of knees with central BML and 100 matched controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to assess associations. Results Subjects with enthesophytes of at least 1 score ≥ 2 at DIP, PIP, and/or MCP were not more likely to have central knee BML (OR 0.49, 95% CI 0.17–1.40) than those without enthesophytes. Similarly, having at least 1 score ≥ 2 on the shafts was not significantly associated with having a central knee BML (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.23–1.51). Adjustment for the presence of diabetes mellitus did not affect these results, but there was an increased prevalence of diabetes in those with hand enthesophytes (OR 3.09, 95% 1.29–7.40, enthesophyte score ≥ 2). Conclusion We found no increase in the prevalence of hand enthesophytes among persons with central knee BML on their knee MRI scans. This provides evidence against a systemic enthesopathic disorder in association with knee OA. PMID:22174209

  18. [Arthroscopic treatment for osteoarthritic knee].

    PubMed

    Bloom, Shlomo; Lebel, David; Cohen, Eugen; Atar, Dan; Rath, Ehud

    2008-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of knee morbidity. Age and overweight are the main risk factors for development of knee OA. The majority of patients respond to conservative treatment. For those who don't, surgical treatment is the only alternative. Arthroscopic surgery for the osteoarthritic knee is a well known procedure. Recently, numerous publications addressed the advantages of arthroscopic treatment for this indication. Some of the publications concluded that arthroscopic treatment for knee OA equals placebo. Others found temporary relief of symptoms. Among special subgroup of patients, in which acute pain exacerbation, mechanical block or early OA, utilizing arthroscopic techniques revealed satisfactory results. In this review, we discuss the indications and contraindications for arthroscopic treatment of the osteoarthritic knee according to the latest literature.

  19. [Pathogenesis of knee osteoarthrist].

    PubMed

    Bennemann, M; Hönle, W; Simank, H G; Schuh, A

    2007-06-21

    More than 20% of the population of over 60-year olds suffers from degenerative joint diseases of the lower extremities. The cause of primary osteoarthritis of the knee is still unknown. A multifactorial genesis is presumed that includes genetic, nutritional, hormonal and age-related factors. On the other hand, secondary osteoarthritis is a sequela of predisposing factors. The most frequent are axial deformities, pre-existing conditions or injuries. Pre-osteoarthritis appears as dysplasias and dystopias (abnormal presentation) of the patella and axial misalignments, incongruities and joint damage after fractures. The result is the mechanical destruction of the cartilage that, in turn, initiates a vicious circle of further cartilage loss.

  20. Prosthetic knee design by simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K; Hollister, A

    1999-07-30

    Although 150,000 total knee replacement surgeries are performed annually in North America, current designs of knee prostheses have mechanical problems that include a limited range of motion, abnormal gait patterns, patellofemoral joint dysfunction, implant loosening or subsidence, and excessive wear. These problems fall into three categories: failure to reproduce normal joint kinematics, which results in altered limb function; bone-implant interface failure; and material failure. Modern computer technology can be used to design, prototype, and test new total knee implants. The design team uses the full range of CAD-CAM to design and produce implant prototypes for mechanical and clinical testing. Closer approximation of natural knee kinematics and kinetics is essential for improved patient function and diminished implant loads. Current knee replacement designs are based on 19th Century theories that the knee moves about a variable axis of rotation. Recent research has shown, however, that knee motion occurs about two fixed, offset axes of rotation. These aces are not perpendicular to the long axes of the bones or to each other, and the axes do not intersect. Bearing surfaces of mechanisms that move about axes of rotation are surfaces of revolution of those axes which advanced CAD technology can produce. Solids with surfaces of revolution for the two axes of rotation for the knee have been made using an HP9000 workstation and Structural Ideas Master Series CAD software at ArthroMotion. The implant's CAD model should closely replicate movements of the normal knee. The knee model will have a range of flexion-extension (FE) from -5 to 120 degrees. Movements include varus, valgus, internal and external rotation, as well as flexion and extension. The patellofemoral joint is aligned perpendicular to the FE axis and replicates the natural joint more closely than those of existing prostheses. The bearing surfaces will be more congruent than current designs and should

  1. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.166... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N)....

  2. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.166... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N)....

  3. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  7. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.166... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N)....

  8. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.166... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N)....

  9. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  10. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.166... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N)....

  11. Diagnostic Value of CT Arthrography for Evaluation of Osteochondral Lesions at the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Kirschke, Jan S.; Braun, Sepp; Baum, Thomas; Holwein, Christian; Schaeffeler, Christoph; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background. To retrospectively determine the diagnostic value of computed tomography arthrography (CTA) of the ankle in the evaluation of (osteo)chondral lesions in comparison to conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intraoperative findings. Methods. A total of N = 79 patients had CTAs and MRI of the ankle; in 17/79 cases surgical reports with statements on cartilage integrity were available. Cartilage lesions and bony defects at talus and tibia were scored according to defect depth and size by two radiologists. Statistical analysis included sensitivity analyses and Cohen's kappa calculations. Results. On CTA, 41/79 and 31/79 patients had full thickness cartilage defects at the talus and at the tibia, respectively. MRI was able to detect 54% of these defects. For the detection of full thickness cartilage lesions, interobserver agreement was substantial (0.72 ± 0.05) for CTA and moderate (0.55 ± 0.07) for MRI. In surgical reports, 88–92% and 46–62% of full thickness defects detected by CTA and MRI were described. CTA findings changed the further clinical management in 15.4% of cases. Conclusions. As compared to conventional MRI, CTA improves detection and visualization of cartilage defects at the ankle and is a relevant tool for treatment decisions in unclear cases. PMID:27891511

  12. A Cohort Study on Meniscal Lesions among Airport Baggage Handlers

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Brauer, Charlotte; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker; Alkjær, Tine; Koblauch, Henrik; Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Helweg-Larsen, Karin; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal lesions are common and may contribute to the development of knee arthrosis. A few case-control and cross-sectional studies have identified knee-straining work as risk factors for meniscal lesions, but exposure-response relations and the role of specific exposures are uncertain, and previous results may be sensitive to reporting and selection bias. We examined the relation between meniscal lesions and cumulative exposure to heavy lifting in a prospective register-based study with complete follow-up and independent information on exposure and outcome. We established a cohort of unskilled men employed at Copenhagen Airport or in other companies in the metropolitan Copenhagen area from 1990 to 2012 (the Copenhagen Airport Cohort). The cohort at risk included 3,307 airport baggage handlers with heavy lifting and kneeling or squatting work tasks and 63,934 referents with a similar socioeconomic background and less knee-straining work. Baggage handlers lifted suitcases with an average weight of approximately 15 kg, in total approximately five tonnes during a 9-hour workday. The cohort was followed in the National Patient Register and Civil Registration System. The outcome was a first time hospital diagnosis or surgery of a meniscal lesion. Baggage handlers had a higher incidence of meniscal lesions than the referents. Within baggage handlers spline regression showed that the incidence rate ratio was 1.91 (95% confidence interval: 1.29–2.84) after five years as a baggage handler and then decreased slowly to reach unity after approximately 30 years, adjusted for effects of potential confounders. This relation between baggage handling and meniscal lesions was present for work on the apron which involves lifting in a kneeling or squatting position, but not in the baggage hall, which only involves lifting in standing positions. The results support that long-term heavy lifting in a kneeling or squatting position is a risk factor for the development of symptomatic

  13. MRI of the knee: its cost-effective use in a district general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Chissell, H. R.; Allum, R. L.; Keightley, A.

    1994-01-01

    In the first year of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning of the knee in the East Berkshire Health District, 175 patients were scanned and 79 of these subsequently had an arthroscopy performed. We found that MRI accurately demonstrated the pathology present in the knee, particularly for meniscal lesions, although it was less accurate for anterior cruciate and cartilage lesions. The relative costs of MRI scanning, arthroscopy and conservative treatment are compared. On the basis of this analysis we have worked out a protocol for the cost-effective use of MRI in imaging the knee. This protocol has reduced the number of arthroscopies performed, allowing us to expend resources on patients who would definitely benefit from arthroscopic surgery. PMID:8117014

  14. Multiple osteochondroses of bilateral knee joints: a case report.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Francesco; Barnaba, Simona Angela; Rojas, Mario; Gualdi, Giancarlo; Rizzello, Giacomo; Papalia, Rocco; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2007-04-01

    Knee injuries in young athletes include not only the typical adult bone injuries, ligament and cartilage, but also the growth plate lesions. Osteochondroses are idiopathic, self-limited disturbance of enchondral ossification in which a rapid growth spurt is present. The patella could be affected by two different kinds of osteochondroses: Kohler syndrome and Sinding-Larsen-Johansson. Here we are reporting the first case of simultaneous location of osteochondroses of the two ossification centers of both patella. A 9-year-old boy, competitive skater, presented a history of anterior knee pain involving both knees. Standard X-rays, axial patellar view, MRI and arthro-MR were performed. In order to follow the natural history of the pathology and the evolution of the healing, examinations at 2 years were repeated. We proposed the young skater a medical and a physiotherapeutic treatment based on unloading, isometric exercises, NSAID. As the symptoms improve a gradual return to competitive sports activity was allowed. The case mentioned above can be considered an atypical case because the patient suffered for a bilateral knee osteochondroses, involving simultaneously the primary ossification centre (Kohler syndrome) and the secondary ossification centre (Larsen syndrome) of the patella.

  15. Exercise for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Baker, K; McAlindon, T

    2000-09-01

    Adverse outcomes in knee osteoarthritis include pain, loss of function, and disability. These outcomes can have devastating effects on the quality of life of those suffering from the disease. Treatments have generally targeted pain, assuming that disability would improve as a direct result of improvements in pain. However, there is evidence to suggest that determinants of pain and disability differ. In general, treatments have been more successful at decreasing pain rather than disability. Many of the factors that lead to disability can be improved with exercise. Exercise, both aerobic and strength training, have been examined as treatments for knee osteoarthritis, with considerable variability in the results. The variability between studies may be due to differences in study design, exercise protocols, and participants in the studies. Although there is variability among studies, it is notable that a majority of the studies had a positive effect on pain and or disability. The mechanism of exercise remains unclear and merits future studies to better define a concise, clear exercise protocol that may have the potential for a public health intervention.

  16. New Generation Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A knee brace that uses Space Shuttle propulsion technology has moved a step closer to being available to help knee injury and stroke patients and may possibly benefit patients with birth defects, spinal cord injuries, and post-polio conditions. After years of hard work, inventors at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have turned over the final design and prototype to industry partners at Horton's Orthotic Lab in Little Rock, Arkansas for further clinical testing. The device, called the Selectively Lockable Knee Brace, may mean faster, less painful rehabilitation for patients by allowing the knee to move when weight is not on the heel. Devices currently on the market lock the knee in a rigid, straight-leg position, or allow continuous free motion. The knee brace is just one example of how space technology is being used to improve the lives of people on Earth. NASA's MSFC inventors Michael Shadoan and Neill Myers are space propulsion engineers who use the same mechanisms and materials to build systems for rockets that they used to design and develop the knee brace.

  17. Physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Page, Carolyn J; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-05-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic joint disease causing pain and disability. Physiotherapy, which encompasses a number of modalities, is a non-invasive treatment option in the management of OA. This review summarizes the evidence for commonly used physiotherapy interventions. There is strong evidence to show short-term beneficial effects of exercise on pain and function, although the type of exercise does not seem to influence treatment outcome. Delivery modes, including individual, group or home exercise are all effective, although therapist contact may improve benefits. Attention to improving adherence to exercise is needed to maximize outcomes in the longer-term. Knee taping applied with the aim of realigning the patella and unloading soft tissues can reduce pain. There is also evidence to support the use of knee braces in people with knee OA. Biomechanical studies show that lateral wedge shoe insoles reduce knee load but clinical trials do not support symptomatic benefits. Recent studies suggest individual shoe characteristics also affect knee load and there is current interest in the effect of modified shoe designs. Manual therapy, while not to be used as a stand-alone treatment, may be beneficial. In summary, although the research is not equivocal, there is sufficient evidence to indicate that physiotherapy interventions can reduce pain and improve function in those with knee OA.

  18. [Comparison of the postoperative intraarticular use of RV023 and hyaluronate G-F20 in knee arthroscopy. Experience at Hospital Español de México].

    PubMed

    Valles-Figueroa, J F J; Ambrosio-Salgado, J; Suárez-Ahedo, C E; Rueda-Villarón, O

    2011-01-01

    For the past two decades arthroscopic surgery has revolutionized the treatment of acute traumatic knee injuries with patients returning sooner to activities of daily living. However, there are factors that delay this goal, such as postoperative intraarticular bleeding, and the swelling and pain that restrain immediate articular mobility. This paper analyzes such factors and their pathophysiologic processes. This led us to formulating a preparation for intraarticular use called RV023. The report of an original, prospective, longitudinal trial is presented herein, assessing the functional results of preparation RV023 in a 60-patient sample selected based on the following inclusion criteria: knee pain lasting 2 years and unresponsive to NSAID treatment, an MRI showing an Outerbridge grade I chondral injury without evidence of ligament or meniscal injury or fracture, and having undergone arthroscopic knee surgery. A significant difference was found in the articular function of subjects treated with the preparation as compared with those in whom it was not used. The articular function recovery curves of individuals treated with the preparation were virtually symmetrical to the curves for healthy controls. On the other hand, no allergic reactions, unwanted or side effects were reported. We therefore conclude that the safety and the benefits seen with preparation RV023 in experimental models are enough to support its use in humans.

  19. Juvenile Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee. About A Case

    PubMed Central

    Astore, Ignacio; Agotegaray, Juan Ignacio; Comba, Ignacio; Bisiach, Luciana

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Juvenile osteochondritis dissecans is a pathology that affects the superficial articular cartilage and subchondral bone in patients with open physes. Treatment of this disease is based on patient’s age and the stage of the disease. Methods: 16-year-old patient, athlete, with a history of knee pain on the right side of acute onset, without traumatic history. A physical examination shows pain in the external compartment of the knee. MRI shows a stable lesion that involves the external femoral condyle, over a posterior area of 16 mm by 20mm. Crutches are indicate for walking without body burden. Symptoms continue for six months and there are no changes in MRI. It is decided to do a stabilization with a Herbert type screw. After the surgery, pain persists and in x-ray controls, osteointegration is not observed. Osteosynthesis material is extracted and mosaicplasty is performed. We used Guhl’s intraoperative classification. Results: In this case, for a young patient with Guhl’s lesion type III, the reduction with a Herbert type screw was indicated, as the lesion was stable, of a significant size and congruent. Lesion progressed to type IV in 6 months. Thus, mosaicplasty was performed, obtaining a good functional result according to the physical exam, with a complete range of flexion and extension. A second-look arthroscopic assessment was carried out 2 months after surgery, showing osteointegration and stability of the allogenic graft. Conclusion: The variable of stability of the fragment is very important when determining the treatment. Most of the stable lesions can be successfully treated with a conservative treatment. Also, it has been demonstrated that young patients have a higher rate of healing. Instead, unstable lesions require surgical treatment.

  20. Determinants of pain in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Behzad; Hajian-Tilaki, Karimollah; Babaei, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several factors are associated with the development or exacerbation of pain in knee osteoarthritis (KOA). In this study, we reviewed this context based on relevant studies. Methods: Recent published studies which have addressed the relationship between pain and KOA were summarized. Results: Correlates of the clinical, demographic features, laboratory tests and abnormalities on radiographic as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the knee pain have been discussed. The results indicated that many factors such as synovitis, synovial effusion, obesity, as well as structural lesions determined by MRI or radiographic examination, serum cytokines, inflammatory markers are determinants of pain in KOA. Conclusion: This context requires further investigations for identification of additional factors which initiate pain in asymptomatic KOA PMID:27757198

  1. Clinical knee findings in floor layers with focus on meniscal status

    PubMed Central

    Rytter, Søren; Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of self-reported and clinical knee morbidity among floor layers compared to a group of graphic designers, with special attention to meniscal status. Methods We obtained information about knee complaints by questionnaire and conducted a bilateral clinical and radiographic knee examination in 134 male floor layers and 120 male graphic designers. After the exclusion of subjects with reports of earlier knee injuries the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) of knee complaints and clinical findings were computed among floor layers compared to graphic designers, using logistic regression. Estimates were adjusted for effects of body mass index, age and knee straining sports. Using radiographic evaluations, we conducted side-specific sensitivity analyses regarding clinical signs of meniscal lesions after the exclusion of participants with tibiofemoral (TF) osteoarthritis (OA). Results Reports of knee pain (OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.5–4.6), pain during stair walking (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.3–3.9) and symptoms of catching of the knee joint (OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.4–5.7) were more prevalent among floor layers compared to graphic designers. Additionally, significant more floor layers than graphic designers had clinical signs suggesting possible meniscal lesions: a positive McMurray test (OR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.1–5.0) and TF joint line tenderness (OR = 5.4, 95% CI = 2.4–12.0). Excluding floor layers (n = 22) and graphic designers (n = 15) with radiographic TF OA did not alter this trend between the two study groups: a positive McMurray test (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.0–4.9), TF joint line tenderness (OR = 5.0, 95% CI = 2.0–12.5). Conclusion Results indicate that floor layers have a high prevalence of both self-reported and clinical knee morbidity. Clinical knee findings suggesting possible meniscal lesions were significant more prevalent among floor layers compared to a group of low-level exposed graphic

  2. Arthroscopic treatment of patients with moderate arthrofibrosis after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Jerosch, Joerg; Aldawoudy, Akram M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the effect of arthroscopic management in patients with knee stiffness after total knee replacement. We present a case series study, in which 32 patients have been treated for moderate arthrofibrosis of the knee after total knee replacement, with the same regimen. We have excluded all cases of stiffness, because of infection, mechanical mal-alignment, loosening of the implants and other obvious reasons of stiffness of the knee, rather than pure arthrofibrosis. All patients first underwent a trial of conservative treatment before going for arthroscopic management. A pain catheter for femoral nerve block was inserted just before anesthesia for post-operative pain management. Arthroscopic arthrolysis of the intra-articular pathology was performed in a standardized technique with release of all fibrous bands in the suprapatellar pouch, reestablishing the medial and lateral gutter, release of the patella, resection of the remaining meniscal tissue or an anterior cyclops, if needed. Intensive physiotherapy and continuous passive motion were to start immediately post-operatively. All the patients were available for the follow up and they were evaluated using the knee society rating system. A total of 25 of the 32 procedures resulted in an improvement of the patients knee score. All the knees operated upon had intra-articular fibrous bands, hypertrophic synovitis and peri-patellar adhesions. A total of eight patients suffered from an anterior cyclops lesion and six patients showed pseudomenicus. In 19 cases a medial and lateral relapse of the patella was performed; only 5 patients got an isolated lateral release. The mean knee flexion was 119 degrees (100-130) at the end of arthroscopy and was 97 degrees (75-115) at the last follow up. The eight patients with extension lags decreased from 27 degrees (10 degrees-35 degrees) pre-operatively to 4 degrees (0-10) at time of follow up. The average knee society ratings increased from 70

  3. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  4. Arthroplasty of a Charcot knee

    PubMed Central

    Babazadeh, Sina; Stoney, James D.; Lim, Keith; Choong, Peter F.M.

    2010-01-01

    The Charcot knee - or neuropathic arthropathy - presents a considerable challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. Caused by a combination of sensory, motor and autonomic neuropathy, it was originally described as an arthritic sequelae of neurosyphilis. In today's western orthopaedics it is more often caused by diabetes. A Charcot knee is often symptomatically painful and unstable. Traditional management has usually been conservative or arthrodesis, with limited success. Arthroplasty of a Charcot joint has commonly been avoided at all costs. However, in the right patient, using the right technique, arthroplasty can significantly improve the symptoms of a Charcot joint. This article explores the evidence surrounding the role of arthroplasty in the management of a Charcot knee. Arthroplasty is compared to other forms of treatment and specific patient demographics and surgical techniques are explored in an attempt to define the role of arthroplasty in the management of a Charcot knee. PMID:21808708

  5. Bowlegs and Knock-Knees

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted ... and Knock-Knees Page Content Article Body Toddlers’ legs often have a bowed appearance. In fact, many children have bowing of the ...

  6. Knee Brace Would Lock And Unlock Automatically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Neill; Forbes, John; Shadoan, Mike; Baker, Kevin

    1995-01-01

    Proposed knee brace designed to aid rehabilitation of person who suffered some muscle damage in leg. Not limited to locking in straight-leg position and, instead, locks at any bend angle. Does not prevent knee from bearing weight. Instead, knee brace allows knee to bear weight and locks only when foot and lower leg bear weight. Thus, brace prevents flexion that wearer desired to prevent but could not prevent because of weakened muscles. Knee bends freely to exercise knee-related muscles. Knee brace strapped at upper end to leg above knee, and anchored at lower end by stirrup under foot. Joint mechanism (identical mechanisms used in left and right assemblies) allows knee joint to flex freely except when weight applied to heel.

  7. [Congenital knee dislocation: case report].

    PubMed

    Arvinius, C; Luque, R; Díaz-Ceacero, C; Marco, F

    2016-01-01

    Congenital knee dislocation is an infrequent condition with unknown etiology. In some cases it occurs as an isolated condition, while in others it coexists with associated conditions or syndromes. The treatment of congenital knee dislocation is driven by the severity and flexibility of the deformity. The literature includes from serial casting or the Pavlik harness to quadriceps tendon plasty or femoral osteotomies. We report herein the case of a congenital dislocation treated with serial casting with a good outcome.

  8. Tibia valga morphology in osteoarthritic knees: importance of preoperative full limb radiographs in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Ahmed; Rahmé, Michel; Lavigne, Martin; Massé, Vincent; Vendittoli, Pascal-André

    2014-08-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is associated with deformities of the lower limb. Tibia valga is a contributing factor to lower limb alignment in valgus knees. We evaluated 97 valgus knees and 100 varus knees. Long-leg films were taken in weight bearing with both knees in full extension. For valgus knees, 52 knees (53%) had a tibia valga deformity. Average tibia valgus deformation was 5.0°. For varus knees, there was only 1 case of tibia valga (1%), with a deformation of 2.5°. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of primary tibia valga in valgus and varus knees and understand how it affects our approach to total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We recommend having full-leg length films when planning for TKA in valgus knees.

  9. Changes in knee kinematics following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Akbari Shandiz, Mohsen; Boulos, Paul; Saevarsson, Stefan Karl; Yoo, Sam; Miller, Stephen; Anglin, Carolyn

    2016-04-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) changes the knee joint in both intentional and unintentional, known and unknown, ways. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics play an important role in postoperative pain, function, satisfaction and revision, yet are largely unknown. Preoperative kinematics, postoperative kinematics or changes in kinematics may help identify causes of poor clinical outcome. Patellofemoral kinematics are challenging to record since the patella is obscured by the metal femoral component in X-ray and moves under the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the kinematic degrees of freedom having significant changes and to evaluate the variability in individual changes to allow future study of patients with poor clinical outcomes. We prospectively studied the 6 degrees of freedom patellofemoral and tibiofemoral weightbearing kinematics, tibiofemoral contact points and helical axes of rotation of nine subjects before and at least 1 year after total knee arthroplasty using clinically available computed tomography and radiographic imaging systems. Normal kinematics for healthy individuals were identified from the literature. Significant differences existed between pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics, with the post-TKA kinematics being closer to normal. While on average the pre-total knee arthroplasty knees in this group displayed no pivoting (only translation), individually only five knees displayed this behaviour (of these, two showed lateral pivoting, one showed medial pivoting and one showed central pivoting). There was considerable variability postoperatively as well (five central, two lateral and two medial pivoting). Both preop and postop, flexion behaviour was more hinge-like medially and more rolling laterally. Helical axes were more consistent postop for this group. An inclusive understanding of the pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics and changes in kinematics due to total knee arthroplasty could improve implant design, patient diagnosis and

  10. Medial unicondylar knee arthroplasty: technical pearls

    PubMed Central

    BONIFORTI, FILIPPO

    2015-01-01

    Unicondylar knee arthroplasty implantation is extremely demanding as the prosthesis needs to be integrated in the natural anatomy of the knee. It ensures the integrity of the natural knee kinematic. Some studies and registries data have shown lower success rate in comparison with total knee arthroplasty, and patient-related factors may have an impact on outcome. While, better results have been published by high volume centres. The indications for surgery should be reconsidered critically, even if medial osteoarthritis of the knee remains the most common. This article sets out the diagnostic, and surgical steps in order to fine tuning the unicompartmental replacement of the knee. PMID:26605256

  11. The natural history of the anterior knee instability by stress radiography

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende, Márcia Uchôa; Hernandez, Arnaldo José; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the anteroposterior displacement of the knee by means of stress radiography in individuals with unilateral anterior knee instability and relate to time of instability. METHODS: Sixty individuals with intact knees (control group) and 125 patients with unilateral anterior instability (AI group) agreed to participate in the study. Gender, age, weight, height, age at injury, time between injury and testing, and surgical findings are studied. Both groups are submitted to anterior and posterior stress radiographies of both knees. Anterior (ADD) and posterior displacement difference (PDD) were calculated between sides. RESULTS: In the control group ADD and PDD are in average, zero, whereas in the AI group ADD averaged 9.8mm and PDD, 1.92mm. Gender, age, weight, height, age at trauma and presence of menisci's lesions do not intervene in the values of ADD and PDD. Meniscal injuries increase with time. ADD and PDD do not relate with the presence or absence of associated menisci's lesions. The ADD and the PDD are related to each other and increase with time. CONCLUSION: There is a permanent anterior subluxation of the injured knee that is related to the amount of anterior displacement that increases with time. Level of Evidence III, Study Types Case-control study. PMID:25246846

  12. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  13. Knee and hip radiographic osteoarthritis features: differences on pain, function and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Duarte; Severo, Milton; Santos, Rui A; Barros, Henrique; Branco, Jaime; Lucas, Raquel; Costa, Lúcia; Ramos, Elisabete

    2016-06-01

    The association between radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) and symptoms is inconsistent and variable according to each joint. The purpose of this study is to understand the relation between radiographic OA features, pain, function and quality of life, in knee and hip joints. A cross-sectional study was performed using information from EPIPorto cohort. Data was obtained by interview using a structured questionnaire on social, demographic, behavioural and clinical data. Pain was assessed using a pain frequency score (regarding ever having knee pain, pain in the last year, in the last 6 months and in the last month). Quality of life was evaluated with Short Form 36 (SF-36) and function disability with the Lequesne knee and hip indexes. Radiographic knees and hips were classified using the Kellgren-Lawrence score (KL 0-4). Linear regression and proportional odds ratios estimated the association between radiographic features, pain, function and quality of life. In our study, symptomatic OA (KL ≥ 2 plus joint pain) was 26.0 % in knee and 7.0 % hip joints. In knee, the increase on radiographic score increased the odds to have a higher pain frequency score [1.58 (95 % CI = 1.27, 1.97)] and was associated [adjusted β (95 % CI)] with worst general health [-3.05 (-5.00, -1.09)], physical function [-4.92 (-7.03, -2.80)], role-physical [-4.10 (-8.08, -0.11)], bodily pain [-2.96 (-5.45, -0.48)] and limitations in activities of daily living [0.48 (0.08, 0.89)]. Regarding hip, no significant associations were found between the severity of radiographic lesions and these measures. Radiographic lesions in knee were associated with higher complaints, as far as pain and functional limitations are concerned, compared with hip.

  14. Intraoperative passive knee kinematics during total knee arthroplasty surgery.

    PubMed

    Young, Kathryn L; Dunbar, Michael J; Richardson, Glen; Astephen Wilson, Janie L

    2015-11-01

    Surgical navigation systems for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery are capable of capturing passive three-dimensional (3D) angular joint movement patterns intraoperatively. Improved understanding of patient-specific knee kinematic changes between pre and post-implant states and their relationship with post-operative function may be important in optimizing TKA outcomes. However, a comprehensive characterization of the variability among patients has yet to be investigated. The objective of this study was to characterize the variability within frontal plane joint movement patterns intraoperatively during a passive knee flexion exercise. Three hundred and forty patients with severe knee osteoarthritis (OA) received a primary TKA using a navigation system. Passive kinematics were captured prior to (pre-implant), and after prosthesis insertion (post-implant). Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to capture characteristic patterns of knee angle kinematics among patients, to identify potential patient subgroups based on these patterns, and to examine the subgroup-specific changes in these patterns between pre- and post-implant states. The first four extracted patterns explained 99.9% of the diversity within the frontal plane angle patterns among the patients. Post-implant, the magnitude of the frontal plane angle shifted toward a neutral mechanical axis in all phenotypes, yet subtle pattern (shape of curvature) features of the pre-implant state persisted.

  15. Anterior knee pain after total knee arthroplasty: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Wolf; Rembitzki, Ingo Volker; Brüggemann, Gerd-Peter; Ellermann, Andree; Best, Raymond; Koppenburg, Andreas Gösele-; Liebau, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Anterior knee pain is one of the most common causes of persistent problems after implantation of a total knee replacement. It can occur in patients with or without patellar resurfacing. As a result of the surgical procedure itself many changes can occur which may affect the delicate interplay of the joint partners in the patello-femoral joint. Functional causes of anterior knee pain can be distinguished from mechanical causes. The functional causes concern disorders of inter- and intramuscular coordination, which can be attributed to preoperative osteoarthritis. Research about anterior knee pain has shown that not only the thigh muscles but also the hip and trunk stabilising muscles may be responsible for the development of a dynamic valgus malalignment. Dynamic valgus may be a causative factor for patellar maltracking. The mechanical causes of patello-femoral problems after knee replacement can be distinguished according to whether they increase instability in the joint, increase joint pressure or whether they affect the muscular lever arms. These causes include offset errors, oversizing, rotational errors of femoral or tibial component, instability, maltracking and chondrolysis, patella baja and aseptic loosening. In these cases, reoperation or revision is often necessary.

  16. Report of experience in 190 patients with the use of closed suction drainage in arthroscopic knee procedures.

    PubMed

    Tatari, Hasan; Dervişbey, Mahmut; Muratli, Kivanç; Ergör, Alp

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this study is to report our experience with the use of suction drainage for various arthroscopic knee procedures. One hundred and ninety patients who underwent arthroscopic knee procedures participated in the study, and were divided into two groups (Group 1: Suction drainage, Group 2: No suction drainage). For every patient, the following parameters were recorded: age, gender, operative time, tourniquet or pump use, the amount of fluid collected in the hemovac drain, presence of meniscal tear, type of the operative procedure, date of the operation, and presence of effusion at the follow-up. Statistical analysis was performed to detect any significant statistical difference between the amount of fluid collected in the hemovac drain and the other mentioned parameters in Group 1; and these patients were divided into four subgroups to facilitate the statistical evaluation between the procedures and the amount of fluid collected in the hemovac drain. The partial meniscectomy subgroup had significantly lower amounts of collected fluid when compared to the subtotal meniscectomy subgroup. Drilling of the osteochondral faces led to significantly higher amounts of fluid when compared to non-drilling cases. Use of an infusion pump during surgery and shorter operation time led to lower amounts of fluid to be collected. No case in either main group suffered from effusion at the follow-up. Our investigation demonstrated that in different arthroscopic interventions, variable amounts of fluid can be collected in the hemovac drains. Subtotal meniscal resection, drilling of the osteochondral faces and longer duration of the operation increase the amount of fluid. In cases of partial meniscal resection and/or chondral debridement, limited synovial and plica resection, suction drainage is unnecessary.

  17. Knee arthroscopy after yttrium or osmic acid injection

    SciTech Connect

    Guaydier-Souquieres, C.; Beguin, J.; Ollivier, D.; Loyau, G.

    1989-01-01

    This study presents the macroscopic and histologic results of 35 knee arthroscopies performed on patients with rheumatoid arthritis, some months after an yttrium or osmic acid intraarticular injection. The procedure was most often performed after a failure of the injection or a relapse of synovitis. Arthroscopy provides an understanding of the cause of synoviorthesis failure--insufficient action of the product on the synovitis or its poor diffusion, fibri-nonecrotic deposits, or cartilaginous lesions--and may be used both diagnostically and therapeutically.

  18. [Plain radiography of the knee: the articular surfaces].

    PubMed

    Malghem, J; Maldague, B; Lecouvet, F; Koutaïssoff, S; Vande Berg, B

    2008-05-01

    Lateral knee radiographs allow recognition of both medial and lateral femoral and tibial surfaces, groove and anterior borders of the trochlea and lateral facet and ridge of the patella. Analysis of these lines allows detection of focal contour abnormalities, femoral trochlear dysplasia and patellar tilt. Qualitative radiological analysis of the osseous surfaces detects the particular aspect of abraded subchondral bone ("drawn with chalk"), preventing the trap of false joint spaces on non weight-bearing views. Occasionally, very subtle bone abnormalities can be recognized in cases of cartilaginous, subchondral or even meniscal lesions. However, these focal abnormalities are not constant, and their visualization is somewhat anecdotal.

  19. Subcutaneous thigh fat necrosis as a result of tourniquet control during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tamvakopoulos, George S; Toms, Andoni P; Glasgow, Malcolm

    2005-09-01

    The use of a pneumatic tourniquet in total knee arthroplasty has been linked to complications caused by local tissue hypoxia. Fat necrosis is a rare condition that presents as an ill-defined subcutaneous lesion. The clinical features resemble that of a lipoma but histological appearance is characteristic. Ultrasound imaging is helpful in establishing the diagnosis both by sonographic appearance as well as in directing a biopsy if necessary. We present a case of encapsulated fat necrosis caused by the use of a pneumatic tourniquet during total knee arthroplasty.

  20. Treatment of medial and posteromedial knee instability: indications, techniques, and review of the results.

    PubMed

    Bonasia, D E; Bruzzone, M; Dettoni, F; Marmotti, A; Blonna, D; Castoldi, F; Gasparetto, F; D'Elicio, D; Collo, G; Rossi, R

    2012-01-01

    Injuries of the posteromedial corner of the knee are relatively common. These can be isolated or combined with other ligament lesions. In some cases the treatment of postero-medial corner injuries is controversial. After a brief description of the anatomy and biomechanics of the medial side of the knee, this paper reviews the indications for isolated and multiligamentous medial/posteromedial corner injuries both in the acute and in the chronic setting. In addition, the most common surgical techniques for repair and reconstruction are described in addition to outcomes based upon a review of the literature.

  1. Comparison of knee gait kinematics of workers exposed to knee straining posture to those of non-knee straining workers.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathaly; Hagemeister, Nicola; Poitras, Stéphane; de Guise, Jacques A

    2013-06-01

    Workers exposed to knee straining postures, such as kneeling and squatting, may present modifications in knee gait kinematics that can make them vulnerable to osteoarthritis. In this study, knee kinematics of workers exposed to occupational knee straining postures (KS workers) were compared to those of non-knee straining (non-KS) workers. Eighteen KS workers and 20 non-KS workers participated in the study. Three-dimensional gait kinematic data were recorded at the knee using an electromagnetic motion tracking system. The following parameters were extracted from flexion/extension, adduction/abduction and internal/external rotation angle data and used for group comparisons: knee angle at initial foot contact, peak angles, minimal angles and angle range during the entire gait cycle. Group comparisons were performed with Student t-tests. In the sagittal plane, KS workers had a greater knee flexion angle at initial foot contact, a lower peak knee flexion angle during the swing phase and a lower angle range than non-KS workers (p<0.05). In the frontal plane, all parameters indicated that KS workers had their knees more adducted than non-KS workers. External/internal rotation range was greater for KS workers. This study provides new knowledge on work related to KS postures and knee kinematics. The results support the concept that KS workers might exhibit knee kinematics that are different from those of non-KS workers.

  2. Predicting Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Woodhouse, Francis G; Besier, Thor F; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Lloyd, David G; Zhang, Lihai; Smith, David W

    2016-01-01

    Treatment options for osteoarthritis (OA) beyond pain relief or total knee replacement are very limited. Because of this, attention has shifted to identifying which factors increase the risk of OA in vulnerable populations in order to be able to give recommendations to delay disease onset or to slow disease progression. The gold standard is then to use principles of risk management, first to provide subject-specific estimates of risk and then to find ways of reducing that risk. Population studies of OA risk based on statistical associations do not provide such individually tailored information. Here we argue that mechanistic models of cartilage tissue maintenance and damage coupled to statistical models incorporating model uncertainty, united within the framework of structural reliability analysis, provide an avenue for bridging the disciplines of epidemiology, cell biology, genetics and biomechanics. Such models promise subject-specific OA risk assessment and personalized strategies for mitigating or even avoiding OA. We illustrate the proposed approach with a simple model of cartilage extracellular matrix synthesis and loss regulated by daily physical activity.

  3. Knee Replacement: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases) Also in Spanish Knee Replacement (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and ... American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons) - PDF Also in Spanish Total Knee Replacement (Arthroplasty) (Beyond the Basics) (UpToDate) ...

  4. [What's new about total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Dao Trong, Mai Lang; Helmy, Näder

    2013-10-30

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is one of the most common problems in the orthopedic practice and its surgical technique is still challenging. This Mini-Review presents patient specific cutting blocks for the implantation of a total knee arthroplasty.

  5. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance

    PubMed Central

    D’Lima, Darryl D.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  6. Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint locks and unlocks automatically, at any position within range of bend angles, without manual intervention by wearer. Includes tang and clevis, locks whenever wearer transfers weight to knee and unlocks when weight removed. Locking occurs at any angle between 45 degrees knee bend and full extension.

  7. Knee Replacement - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Knee Replacement (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Total Knee Replacement Potpuna zamjena koljena - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Total Knee Replacement 全膝关节置换 - 简体中文 ( ...

  8. Effect of exercise and gait retraining on knee adduction moment in people with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Khalaj, Nafiseh; Abu Osman, Noor A; Mokhtar, Abdul H; Mehdikhani, Mahboobeh; Wan Abas, Wan A B

    2014-02-01

    The knee adduction moment represents the medial knee joint load, and greater value is associated with higher load. In people with knee osteoarthritis, it is important to apply proper treatment with the least side effects to reduce knee adduction moment and, consequently, reduce medial knee joint load. This reduction may slow the progression of knee osteoarthritis. The research team performed a literature search of electronic databases. The search keywords were as follows: knee osteoarthritis, knee adduction moment, exercise program, exercise therapy, gait retraining, gait modification and knee joint loading. In total, 12 studies were selected, according to the selection criteria. Findings from previous studies illustrated that exercise and gait retraining programs could alter knee adduction moment in people with knee osteoarthritis. These treatments are noninvasive and nonpharmacological which so far have no or few side effects, as well as being low cost. The results of this review revealed that gait retraining programs were helpful in reducing the knee adduction moment. In contrast, not all the exercise programs were beneficial in reducing knee adduction moment. Future studies are needed to indicate best clinical exercise and gait retraining programs, which are most effective in reducing knee adduction moment in people with knee osteoarthritis.

  9. Intraoperative passive kinematics of osteoarthritic knees before and after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Siston, Robert A; Giori, Nicholas J; Goodman, Stuart B; Delp, Scott L

    2006-08-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is a successful procedure to treat pain and functional disability due to osteoarthritis. However, precisely how a total knee arthroplasty changes the kinematics of an osteoarthritic knee is unknown. We used a surgical navigation system to measure normal passive kinematics from 7 embalmed cadaver lower extremities and in vivo intraoperative passive kinematics on 17 patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty to address two questions: How do the kinematics of knees with advanced osteoarthritis differ from normal knees?; and, Does posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty restore kinematics towards normal? Osteoarthritic knees displayed a decreased screw-home motion and abnormal varus/valgus rotations between 10 degrees and 90 degrees of knee flexion when compared to normal knees. The anterior-posterior motion of the femur in osteoarthritic knees was not different than in normal knees. Following total knee arthroplasty, we found abnormal varus/valgus rotations in early flexion, a reduced screw-home motion when compared to the osteoarthritic knees, and an abnormal anterior translation of the femur during the first 60 degrees of flexion. Posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty does not appear to restore normal passive varus/valgus rotations or the screw motion and introduces an abnormal anterior translation of the femur during intraoperative evaluation.

  10. The association of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected structural pathology of the knee with crepitus in a population-based cohort with knee pain: the MoDEKO study.

    PubMed

    Crema, M D; Guermazi, A; Sayre, E C; Roemer, F W; Wong, H; Thorne, A; Singer, J; Esdaile, J M; Marra, M D; Kopec, J A; Nicolaou, S; Cibere, J

    2011-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common arthropathy of the knee joint(1). Symptoms reported by patients and signs noted during physical examination guide clinicians in identifying subjects with knee OA(2-4). Pain is one of the most important symptoms reported by subjects with knee OA(2,3). Although very common, pain is a non-specific symptom, related to pathology in several structures within the knee joint, and includes synovitis(5), subchondral bone marrow lesions(6), and joint effusion(7). Further, pain is a subjective symptom that cannot be directly measured or assessed during physical examination. Crepitus or crepitation in association with arthritis is defined as a crackling or grinding sound on joint movement with a sensation in the joint. Crepitus may occur with or without pain and is a common finding during physical examination in subjects with knee OA(2-4,8,9). It is not known whether crepitus is related to pathology in various structures within the knee. The aim of our study was to determine the cross-sectional associations of structural pathologies within the knee with crepitus in a population-based cohort with knee pain, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Subjects with knee pain were recruited as a random population sample, with crepitus assessed in each compartment of the knee using a validated and standardized approach during physical examination(10). MRI of the knee was performed to assess cartilage morphology, meniscal morphology, osteophytes, cruciate ligaments, and collateral ligaments. For both compartment-specific and whole-knee analyses, a multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the associations of MRI-detected structural pathology with crepitus, adjusting for potential confounders. Variables were selected by backwards elimination within each compartment and in the overall knee models, and only statistically significant variables remained in the "selected" models; remaining variables in these models are adjusted for

  11. Aetiology of abfraction lesions.

    PubMed

    Lyons, K

    2001-09-01

    The aetiology of abfraction lesions is complex. Most evidence indicates that physical loading forces are a major contributing factor, although they are unlikely to be entirely responsible. Intraoral chemical influences and toothbrush abrasion, combined with the dynamics of inter-occlusal activity such as chewing, swallowing, and parafunction, lead to stress corrosion and may contribute to abfraction lesions. The multifactorial aetiology that operates in the initiation and progression of these lesions has made investigation difficult. Various theories have been proposed and numerous surveys and studies conducted, but the primary causal factor has yet to be definitively determined. This review concludes that occlusal loading is the initiating factor in the development of abfraction lesions.

  12. A conceptual framework for a sports knee injury performance profile (SKIPP) and return to activity criteria (RTAC)

    PubMed Central

    Logerstedt, David; Arundale, Amelia; Lynch, Andrew; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to the knee, including intra-articular fractures, ligamentous ruptures, and meniscal and articular cartilage lesions, are commonplace within sports. Despite advancements in surgical techniques and enhanced rehabilitation, athletes returning to cutting, pivoting, and jumping sports after a knee injury are at greater risk of sustaining a second injury. The clinical utility of objective criteria presents a decision-making challenge to ensure athletes are fully rehabilitated and safe to return to sport. A system centered on specific indicators that can be used to develop a comprehensive profile to monitor rehabilitation progression and to establish return to activity criteria is recommended to clear athletes to begin a progressive and systematic approach to activities and sports. Integration of a sports knee injury performance profile with return to activity criteria can guide clinicians in facilitating an athlete's safe return to sport, prevention of subsequent injury, and life-long knee joint health. PMID:26537805

  13. [Rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty of hip and knee].

    PubMed

    Jansen, E; Brienza, S; Gierasimowicz-Fontana, A; Matos, C; Reynders-Frederix-Dobre, C; HateM, S M

    2015-09-01

    Numbers of total hip and knee arthroplasties are increasing on a regular basis. Clinical pathways tend to shorten the duration of hospitalization in acute care after surgery. Therefore, the preoperative preparation of the patient and his abilities for postoperative rehabilitation should be carefully addressed. Before the surgical intervention, it is recommended that the patient receives an educational program and a physical preparation. After the surgical intervention, the patient can benefit from a home-based rehabilitation program supervised by a physiotherapist, if there were no preoperative reasons for prolonging the hospital stay and if the surgery took place without complications. Some patients may benefit from postsurgical rehabilitation in a specialized locomotor rehabilitation long-stay care unit. The indications for inpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation are : two simultaneous arthroplasties, revision of a previous hip or knee arthroplasty, postsurgical complications, advanced age, comorbidities influencing the rehabilitation process, social difficulties, necessity for adaptation of the environment, insufficient or unadapted out-patient (para)medical care. The goals of the rehabilitation treatment depend on the patient's characteristics and environment, on the properties of the prosthesis and on the postsurgical complications. The functional prognosis of a total joint arthroplasty of the knee or hip is excellent, provided that there are no post-surgical complications and that the patient benefits from adequate rehabilitation therapy. The present paper describes the different phases of rehabilitation treatment and the general and specific complications of total hip and knee arthroplasties that may influence the rehabilitation outcome.

  14. Degos-Like Lesions Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min Soo; Park, Jong Bin; Yang, Myeong Hyeon; Jang, Ji Yun; Kim, Joon Hee; Lee, Kang Hoon; Kim, Geun Tae; Hwangbo, Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Degos disease, also referred to as malignant atrophic papulosis, was first described in 1941 by Köhlmeier and was independently described by Degos in 1942. Degos disease is characterized by diffuse, papular skin eruptions with porcelain-white centers and slightly raised erythematous telangiectatic rims associated with bowel infarction. Although the etiology of Degos disease is unknown, autoimmune diseases, coagulation disorders, and vasculitis have all been considered as underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Approximately 15% of Degos disease have a benign course limited to the skin and no history of gastrointestinal or central nervous system (CNS) involvement. A 29-year-old female with history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presented with a 2-year history of asymptomatic lesions on the dorsum of all fingers and both knees. The patient had only skin lesions and no gastrointestinal or CNS vasculitis symptoms. Her skin lesions were umbilicated, atrophic porcelain-white lesions with a rim of erythema. On the basis of clinical, histologic, and laboratory findings, a diagnosis of Degos-like lesions associated with SLE was made. The patient had been treated for SLE for 7 years. Her treatment regimen was maintained over a 2 month follow-up period, and the skin lesions improved slightly with no development of new lesions. PMID:28392651

  15. Basic knee arthroscopy part 3: diagnostic arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ward, Benjamin D; Lubowitz, James H

    2013-11-01

    Knee arthroscopy is an important diagnostic and therapeutic tool in the management of disorders of the knee. In a series of 4 articles, the basics of knee arthroscopy are reviewed. In this article (part 3), step-by-step diagnostic arthroscopy is reviewed. Diagnostic arthroscopy is a crucial skill for diagnosing intra-articular disorders of the knee including meniscal, synovial, ligamentous, and articular cartilage pathology. Mastery of the basic diagnostic arthroscopy is a critical tool for orthopaedic surgeons treating disorders of the knee.

  16. Basic Knee Arthroscopy Part 1: Patient Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Benjamin D.; Lubowitz, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Knee arthroscopy is an important diagnostic and therapeutic tool in the management of disorders of the knee. In a series of 4 articles, the basics of knee arthroscopy are reviewed. In this article (part 1), patient positioning, tourniquet placement, and draping are reviewed. Meticulous attention to these details allows surgical access to the compartments of the knee. A circumferential leg holder or a lateral post allows the application of varus and valgus forces to open the medial and lateral compartments of the knee. PMID:24892015

  17. Surgical implants and technologies for cartilage repair and preservation of the knee.

    PubMed

    Stroh, D Alex; Johnson, Aaron J; Mont, Michael A

    2011-05-01

    Focal lesions of the articular cartilage of the knee can be managed with a variety of products and technologies in an attempt to restore function to the afflicted joint and forestall the need for possible total knee arthroplasty. Among these approaches are non-implant-based procedures (arthroscopic chondroplasty and microfracture), grafting procedures (autografts/mosaicplasty and allografts), cell-based procedures (autologous chondrocyte implantation) and nonbiologic implants (metallic plugs and cell-free polymers). For each clinically established procedure there are also a number of investigational variations that aim to improve the in vivo quality of the regenerated/restored cartilage surface. This article analyzes existing and developing non-implant- and graft-based technologies for the repair or restoration of the articular cartilage of the knee based on a review of the published literature.

  18. Knee extension torque variability after exercise in ACL reconstructed knees.

    PubMed

    Goetschius, John; Kuenze, Christopher M; Hart, Joseph M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare knee extension torque variability in patients with ACL reconstructed knees before and after exercise. Thirty two patients with an ACL reconstructed knee (ACL-R group) and 32 healthy controls (control group) completed measures of maximal isometric knee extension torque (90° flexion) at baseline and following a 30-min exercise protocol (post-exercise). Exercise included 30-min of repeated cycles of inclined treadmill walking and hopping tasks. Dependent variables were the coefficient of variation (CV) and raw-change in CV (ΔCV): CV = (torque standard deviation/torque mean x 100), ΔCV = (post-exercise - baseline). There was a group-by-time interaction (p = 0.03) on CV. The ACL-R group demonstrated greater CV than the control group at baseline (ACL-R = 1.07 ± 0.55, control = 0.79 ± 0.42, p = 0.03) and post-exercise (ACL-R = 1.60 ± 0.91, control = 0.94 ± 0.41, p = 0.001). ΔCV was greater (p = 0.03) in the ACL-R group (0.52 ± 0.82) than control group (0.15 ± 0.46). CV significantly increased from baseline to post-exercise (p = 0.001) in the ACL-R group, while the control group did not (p = 0.06). The ACL-R group demonstrated greater knee extension torque variability than the control group. Exercise increased torque variability more in the ACL-R group than control group.

  19. Identification of factors associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis in a young to middle-aged cohort of patients with knee complaints.

    PubMed

    Huétink, Kasper; Stoel, Berend C; Watt, Iain; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Bloem, Johan L; Malm, Steve H; Van't Klooster, Ronald; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA) development in a young to middle-aged population with sub-acute knee complaints. This, in order to define high risk patients who may benefit from early preventive or future disease modifying therapies. Knee OA development visible on radiographs and MR in 319 patients (mean age 41.5 years) 10 years after sub-acute knee complaints and subjective knee function (KOOS score) was studied. Associations between OA development and age, gender, activity level, BMI, meniscal or anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lesions, OA in first-degree relatives and radiographic hand OA were determined using multivariable logistic regression analysis. OA on radiographs and MR in the TFC is associated with increased age (OR: 1.10, 95 % 1.04-1.16 and OR: 1.07, 95 % 1.02-1.13). TFC OA on radiographs only is associated with ACL and/or meniscal lesions (OR: 5.01, 95 % 2.14-11.73), presence of hand OA (OR: 4.69, 95 % 1.35-16.32) and higher Tegner activity scores at baseline before the complaints (OR: 1.20, 95 % 1.01-1.43). The presence of OA in the TFC diagnosed only on MRI is associated with a family history of OA (OR: 2.44, 95 % 1.18-5.06) and a higher BMI (OR: 1.13, 95 % 1.04-1.23). OA in the PFC diagnosed on both radiographs and MR is associated with an increased age (OR: 1.06, 95 % 1.02-1.12 and OR: 1.05, 95 % 1.00-1.09). PFC OA diagnosed on radiographs only is associated with a higher BMI (OR: 1.12, 95 % 1.02-1.22). The presence of OA in the PFC diagnosed on MR only is associated with the presence of hand OA (OR: 3.39, 95 % 1.10-10.50). Compared to normal reference values, the study population had significantly lower KOOS scores in the different subscales. These results show that knee OA development in young to middle aged patients with a history of sub-acute knee complaints is associated with the presence of known risk factors for knee OA. OA is already visible on radiographs and MRI after 10

  20. Complex function of the knee joint: the current understanding of the knee.

    PubMed

    Hirschmann, Michael T; Müller, Werner

    2015-10-01

    Since the early years of orthopaedics, it is a well-known fact that anatomy follows function. During the evolution of mankind, the knee has been optimally adapted to the forces and loads acting at and through the knee joint. However, anatomy of the knee joint is variable and the only constant is its complex function. In contrast to the time of open surgery, nowadays the majority of reconstructive knee surgery is done arthroscopically. Keyhole surgery is less invasive, but on the backside, the knee surgeon lacks daily visualisation of the complex open anatomy. As open anatomical knowledge is less present in our daily practice, it is even more important to highlight this complex anatomy and function of the knee. It is the purpose of this review to perform a systematic review of knee anatomy, highlight the complex function of the knee joint and present an overview about recent and current knowledge about knee function. Level of evidence Systematic review, Level IV.

  1. Can generic knee joint models improve the measurement of osteoarthritic knee kinematics during squatting activity?

    PubMed

    Clément, Julien; Dumas, Raphaël; Hagemeister, Nicola; de Guise, Jaques A

    2017-01-01

    Knee joint kinematics derived from multi-body optimisation (MBO) still requires evaluation. The objective of this study was to corroborate model-derived kinematics of osteoarthritic knees obtained using four generic knee joint models used in musculoskeletal modelling - spherical, hinge, degree-of-freedom coupling curves and parallel mechanism - against reference knee kinematics measured by stereo-radiography. Root mean square errors ranged from 0.7° to 23.4° for knee rotations and from 0.6 to 9.0 mm for knee displacements. Model-derived knee kinematics computed from generic knee joint models was inaccurate. Future developments and experiments should improve the reliability of osteoarthritic knee models in MBO and musculoskeletal modelling.

  2. Biomechanics of knee joint — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeti, Bhaskar Kumar; Chalamalasetti, Srinivasa Rao; Bolla Pragada, S. K. Sundara siva rao

    2015-06-01

    The present paper is to know how the work is carried out in the field of biomechanics of knee. Various model formulations are discussed and further classified into mathematical model, two-dimensional model and three-dimensional model. Knee geometry is a crucial part of human body movement, in which how various views of knee is shown in different planes and how the forces act on tibia and femur are studied. It leads to know the forces acting on the knee joint. Experimental studies of knee geometry and forces acting on knee shown by various researchers have been discussed, and comparisons of results are made. In addition, static and dynamic analysis of knee has been also discussed respectively to some extent.

  3. Immediate effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on knee joint moments in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Masashi; Takagi, Yui; Goto, Yusuke; Otsuka, Naoki; Koyama, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Masashi; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Footwear modification can beneficially alter knee loading in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This study evaluated the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on reductions in external knee moments in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to examine the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology versus control shoes on the knee adduction and flexion moments in 17 women (mean age, 63.6 years) with radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis. The lateral and anterior trunk lean values, knee flexion and adduction angles, and ground reaction force were also evaluated. The influence of the original walking pattern on the changes in knee moments with Masai Barefoot Technology shoes was evaluated. The knee flexion moment in early stance was significantly reduced while walking with the Masai Barefoot Technology shoes (0.25±0.14Nm/kgm) as compared with walking with control shoes (0.30±0.19 Nm/kgm); whereas the knee adduction moment showed no changes. Masai Barefoot Technology shoes did not increase compensatory lateral and anterior trunk lean. The degree of knee flexion moment in the original walking pattern with control shoes was correlated directly with its reduction when wearing Masai Barefoot Technology shoes by multiple linear regression analysis (adjusted R2=0.44, P<0.01). Masai Barefoot Technology shoes reduced the knee flexion moment during walking without increasing the compensatory trunk lean and may therefore reduce external knee loading in women with knee osteoarthritis.

  4. Imaging of traumatic injury and impingement of anterior knee fat.

    PubMed

    Lapègue, F; Sans, N; Brun, C; Bakouche, S; Brucher, N; Cambon, Z; Chiavassa, H; Larbi, A; Faruch, M

    2016-01-01

    Fat is not just used by the body as bulk tissue. In addition to its role in storing energy and regulating hormone action, fat is used in some parts of the body for its mechanical properties. The anatomy of anterior knee fat is more complex than it appears at first sight and is capable of withstanding considerable compressive and shear stress. Specific lesions occur when such mechanical stress exceeds the physiological limits and are yet little known. Superficial fat can be the site of either acute injury by closed degloving called the Morel-Lavallée lesion or chronic injury, when subject to repeat excessive shear forces, due to more complex and less well-defined disruptions that result in pseudo-bursitis. There are three main anterior, intracapsular and extrasynovial fat pads in the knee joint, which are the infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) or Hoffa's fat pad, the quadriceps fat pad and the prefemoral fat pad. The IFP plays an important role as a mechanical shock absorber and guides the patella tendon and even the patella itself during flexion-extension movements. In response to repeated excessive stress, an inflammatory reaction and swelling of the IFP is first observed, followed by a fibrotic reaction with metaplastic transformation into fibrous, cartilaginous or bone tissue. More rarely, the two other deep fat pads (quadriceps and prefemoral) can, if subject to repeated stress, undergo similar restructuring inflammatory reactions with metaplasia resulting in tissue hardening, anterior pain and partial loss of function.

  5. Advances in below-the-knee drug-eluting balloons.

    PubMed

    Ferraresi, R; Centola, M; Biondi-Zoccai, G

    2012-04-01

    The management of critical limb ischemia due to below-the-knee disease remains challenging due to the frequent patient comorbidities, diffuse vascular involvement, and high rates of restenosis and disease progression. The BASIL study has established the substantial equivalence between bypass surgery and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty in this setting, at least at mid-term follow-up, but percutaneous techniques and devices have seen major developments since the publication of this pivotal trial in 2005. A major breakthrough has indeed been the introduction of drug-eluting balloons, which have several theoretical advantages in comparison to standard balloons and metallic stents for infra-popliteal lesions. Two clinical trials have already been reported with favorable results for the In.Pact Amphirion paclitaxel-eluting balloon, when employed for below-the-knee lesions. We hereby discuss the rationale for the use of drug-eluting balloons in this complex setting and the main findings of the study by Schmidt et al. and the DEBATE-BTK trial.

  6. Phaeohyphomycosis infection in the knee.

    PubMed

    Sadigursky, David; Nogueira E Ferreira, Luisa; Moreno de Oliveira Corrêa, Liz

    2016-01-01

    Phaeohyphomycosis is caused by cutaneous fungi and rarely affects large joints. This is a case report on phaeohyphomycosis in the left knee of an elderly individual without immunosuppression. It was accompanied by pain and swelling the anterior knee. The case was first suspected to be suprapatellar bursitis, and was treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, without remission of symptoms. Surgical treatment was performed, with resection of the suprapatellar bursa and anterior region of the quadriceps tendon. The material was sent for anatomopathological examination and culturing. The pathological examination showed phaeohyphomycosis. The treatment instituted consisted of itraconazole, 200 mg/day for six weeks, and complete remission of symptoms was achieved. The physical examination remained normal after one year of follow-up. This is the first published case of phaeohyphomycosis infection in the suprapatellar region of the knee. Although almost all the cases reported have been associated with immunosuppressed patients, this was an exception. It is important to suspect phaeohyphomycosis in cases of knee infection, in the area of the suprapatellar bursa, when the symptoms do not resolve after clinical treatment.

  7. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  8. Dynamic splinting for knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Finger, Eric; Willis, F Buck

    2008-12-29

    Total Knee Arthroplasty operations are increasing in frequency, and knee flexion contracture is a common pathology, both pre-existing and post-operative. A 61-year-old male presented with knee flexion contracture following a total knee arthroplasty. Physical therapy alone did not fully reduce the contracture and dynamic splinting was then prescribed for daily low-load, prolonged-duration stretch. After 28 physical therapy sessions, the active range of motion improved from -20 degrees to -12 degrees (stiff knee still lacking full extension), and after eight additional weeks with nightly wear of dynamic splint, the patient regained full knee extension, (active extension improved from -12 degrees to 0 degrees ).

  9. Posterior femoral condylar offset after total knee replacement in the risk of knee flexion contracture.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Tomohiro; Majima, Tokifumi; Nishiike, Osamu; Kasahara, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Daisuke

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the risk of knee flexion contracture associated with a posterior femoral condylar offset after total knee replacement (TKR). Radiographs from 100 healthy Japanese volunteers were included in the study. We evaluated femoral component posterior offset in various implants and compared them with the normal Japanese knee. Posterior offset of the femoral condyle is up to a maximum of 4.7 times greater than that of the healthy Japanese knee in all knee implants. Excess posterior offset of the femoral condyle in TKR prostheses may cause knee joint flexion contracture due to the relative shortening of the posterior soft tissue.

  10. Osteochondral Defects of the Knee treated with Mosaicplasty. Results at Eight Years of Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Romoli, Agustin Molina; Revah, Mariano Agustin; Dere, Juan Jose; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Costa-Paz, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: There are several surgical options described for osteochondral defects of the knee depending on the size, location and condition of subchondral bone. The main indication for a mosaicplasty procedure is a less than 4 cm2 femoral condyle lesion. The purpose of this study was to analyze a series of patients treated with mosaicplasty with average eight years of follow-up. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated sixty-two patients with osteochondral defects of the knee who underwent a mosaicplasty between 2001 and 2014 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Patients were evaluated using the Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee Score (IKDC) and Kellgren-Lawrence radiographic scale. Results: The mean Lysholm score was 80.1 and IKDC was 66.7. Forty-two patients had isolated mosaicplasty and 20 patients presented an associated surgical procedure (osteotomy, ACL reconstruction, meniscectomy). There were no significant differences between the Lysholm and IKDC scores in these two groups. Conclusion: We consider that mosaicplasty is a satisfactory procedure with good functional results in patients with focal articular cartilage lesions of the knee.

  11. Osteochondral grafting for cartilage defects in the patellar grooves of bilateral knee joints.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Matsusue, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Takashi; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2004-07-01

    Autogenous osteochondral grafts have become popular recently for use in small, isolated, contained articular cartilage defects. We treated a 35-year-old man who had cartilage defects, which were the same shape and probably the result of overuse, in the patellar grooves of both knee joints. The left side was 30 x 25 mm, and the right side was 17 x 17 mm in his right patellar groove, and 15 x 7 mm in his right medial femoral condyle. Therefore, we performed multiple osteochondral grafting of the bilateral lesions. Thirty-two months after his right knee operation (37 months after his left one), he had no pain or symptoms in his left knee and occasional mild pain and catching in his right knee. At second-look arthroscopy, the joint surface of the articular cartilage in the bilateral patellar groove was almost completely smooth. However, the whole of the weight-bearing area around the grafted plugs in the medial femoral condyle showed cartilage degeneration. Approximately 3 years after implantation of osteochondral grafts into similarly shaped cartilage lesions in the bilateral patellar grooves, the operative results were good. However, careful follow up is needed.

  12. Retrospective Cohort Study of 207 Cases of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Green, Daniel W.; Arbucci, John; Silberman, Jason; Luderowski, Eva; Uppstrom, Tyler J.; Nguyen, Joseph; Tuca, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Describe the clinical characteristics, image findings, and outcomes of patients with juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (JOCD) of the knee. To our knowledge, this is the largest single-surgeon cohort of JOCD patients. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of knee JOCD patients assessed by a single pediatric orthopaedic surgeon at a tertiary care center between 2005-2015. All diagnoses were confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients with patellar dislocations or osteochondral fractures were excluded. Demographic data, sports played, comorbidities, surgical procedures, and clinical data were extracted from charts. Images were analyzed to identify the location and size of lesions. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests were used to compare discrete variables, and Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis tests to compare continuous variables between groups. P-values of <0.05 were considered significant. Results: Sample consisted of 180 patients (207 knees), 124 boys and 56 girls. Average age at diagnosis was 12.8 years (7.5-17.5). Majority were active in sports (80.8%), primary soccer (36.7%) and basketball (29.4%). JOCD was present bilaterally in 27 patients (15%), 14 knees had bifocal OCD (6.8%), and only 1 patient had bifocal lesions in both knees. Most common location was medial femoral condyle (56.3%) followed by lateral femoral condyle (23.1%), trochlea (11.4%), patella (9%), and tibia (0.5%). In the sagittal view, most common location was the middle third of the condyles (48.7%). Surgery was performed in 72 knees (34.8%), with an average age at surgery of 14.1 years (9.3-18.1). Bilateral JOCD was present in 13 surgical patients (18.8%), but only 3 patients had bilateral surgery. Two operative patients had bifocal JOCD (2.7%) and surgery on both lesions. Location distribution did not differ between surgical and non-surgical lesions. The average normalized area of non-surgical JOCD lesions was 6.8 (0.1-18), whereas surgical lesions averaged a

  13. Poor outcome of bilateral lower extremity morel-lavallee lesions: a case report.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Sharon S; Molmenti, Ernesto P; Siskind, Eric; Kasabian, Armen K; Huang, Su-I D

    2014-03-01

    The Morel-Lavallee lesion is a closed, internal degloving injury that results when a strong, shearing force is applied parallel to the plane of injury, as is common in vehicular trauma. It is an underdiagnosed entity that is often missed during the initial trauma workup as symptoms can be subtle. There are few reports of lesions occurring below the knee. Most cases affect the proximal thigh and trochanter, as these tend to be dependent areas in high velocity trauma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first literature report of bilateral lower extremity Morel-Lavallee lesions.

  14. Multifocal vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Levin, Laura E; Lauren, Christine T

    2016-09-01

    Multifocal vascular lesions are important to recognize and appropriately diagnose. Generally first noticed on the skin, multifocal vascular lesions may have systemic involvement. Distinguishing among the different types of multifocal vascular lesions is often based on clinical features; however, radiological imaging and/or biopsy are frequently needed to identify distinct features and guide treatment. Knowledge of the systemic associations that can occur with different vascular anomalies may reduce life-threatening complications, such as coagulopathy, bleeding, cardiac compromise, and neurologic sequelae. This review provides a synopsis of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, workup, and treatment of several well-recognized multifocal vascular tumors and malformations.

  15. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  16. Incidental vertebral lesions.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Walcott, Brian P

    2011-12-01

    Incidental vertebral lesions on imaging of the spine are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Contributing factors include the aging population, the increasing prevalence of back pain, and increased usage of MR imaging. Additionally, refinements in CT and MR imaging have increased the number of demonstrable lesions. The management of incidental findings varies among practitioners and commonly depends more on practice style than on data or guidelines. In this article we review incidental findings within the vertebral column and review management of these lesions, based on available Class III data.

  17. SIMULTANEOUS BILATERAL TEAR OF THE KNEE EXTENSOR MECHANISM IN A PRE-ADOLESCENT: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires; Giordano, Vincenzo; Albuquerque, Maria Isabel Pires; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; do Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro; Barretto, João Maurício

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral tearing of a patellar tendon and a contralateral sleeve fracture in a pre-adolescent are rare lesions. We report a case in which a pre-adolescent sustained a fall while jumping during a soccer match. No predisposing risk factors were identified. The injuries were treated with surgical repairs and transosseous suturing. The aim of this study was to present a case of spontaneous concurrent tearing of the extensor mechanism of the knee in a pre-adolescent. PMID:27047882

  18. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  19. Skin lesion removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... removal; Basal cell cancer - removal; Actinic keratosis - removal; Wart - removal; Squamous cell - removal; Mole - removal; Nevus - removal; ... can remove: Benign or pre-malignant skin lesions Warts Moles Sunspots Hair Small blood vessels in the ...

  20. Bilateral lacrimal caruncle lesions

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Yuta; Takai, Yoshiko; Yasuda, Shunsuke; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 65-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the treatment of a lesion on the medial lacrimal canthus of both eyes. He had a history of perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, i.e., pANCA-positive interstitial pneumonia. Orbital magnetic resonance imaging excluded space occupying lesions, and laboratory testing excluded thyroid-related diseases. The masses were excised, and histopathological examinations showed sebaceous gland hyperplasia and inflammatory changes around the gland. In addition, the specimen from the left eye showed a retention cyst possibly caused by an infection. It was also possible that the use of steroid was involved in the development of the lesions. A relationship between the ANCA and the lesions was not completely eliminated. PMID:28303065

  1. Parametric modelling of a knee joint prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Khoo, L P; Goh, J C; Chow, S L

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the establishment of a parametric model of knee joint prosthesis. Four different sizes of a commercial prosthesis are used as an example in the study. A reverse engineering technique was employed to reconstruct the prosthesis on CATIA, a CAD (computer aided design) system. Parametric models were established as a result of the analysis. Using the parametric model established and the knee data obtained from a clinical study on 21 pairs of cadaveric Asian knees, the development of a prototype prosthesis that suits a patient with a very small knee joint is presented. However, it was found that modification to certain parameters may be inevitable due to the uniqueness of the Asian knee. An avenue for rapid modelling and eventually economical production of a customized knee joint prosthesis for patients is proposed and discussed.

  2. Adjustable hinge permits movement of knee in plaster cast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maley, W. E.

    1967-01-01

    Metal knee hinge with an adjustable sleeve worn on the outside of a leg cast facilitates movement of the knee joint. This helps eliminate stiffness of the knee and eliminates bulkiness and adjustment difficulty.

  3. Normal anatomy and biomechanics of the knee.

    PubMed

    Flandry, Fred; Hommel, Gabriel

    2011-06-01

    Functionally, the knee comprises 2 articulations-the patellofemoral and tibiofemoral. Stability of the joint is governed by a combination of static ligaments, dynamic muscular forces, meniscocapsular aponeurosis, bony topography, and joint load. The surgeon is ill equipped to undertake surgical treatment of a dislocated knee without a sound footing in the anatomic complexities of this joint. We review the normal anatomy of the knee, emphasizing connective tissue structures and common injury patterns.

  4. A prosthetic knee using magnetorhelogical fluid damper for above-knee amputees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhyuk; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    A prosthetic knee for above-knee (AK) amputees is categorized into two types; namely a passive and an active type. The passive prosthetic knee is generally made by elastic materials such as carbon fiber reinforced composite material, titanium and etc. The passive prosthetic knee easy to walk. But, it has disadvantages such that a knee joint motion is not similar to ordinary people. On the other hand, the active prosthetic knee can control the knee joint angle effectively because of mechanical actuator and microprocessor. The actuator should generate large damping force to support the weight of human body. But, generating the large torque using small actuator is difficult. To solve this problem, a semi-active type prosthetic knee has been researched. This paper proposes a semi-active prosthetic knee using a flow mode magneto-rheological (MR) damper for AK amputees. The proposed semi-active type prosthetic knee consists of the flow mode MR damper, hinge and prosthetic knee body. In order to support weight of human body, the required energy of MR damper is smaller than actuator of active prosthetic leg. And it can control the knee joint angle by inducing the magnetic field during the stance phase.

  5. Instability following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Background Knee prosthesis instability (KPI) is a frequent cause of failure of total knee arthroplasty. Moreover, the degree of constraint required to achieve immediate and long-term stability in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is frequently debated. Questions This review aims to define the problem, analyze risk factors, and review strategies for prevention and treatment of KPI. Methods A PubMed (MEDLINE) search of the years 2000 to 2010 was performed using two key words: TKA and instability. One hundred and sixty-five initial articles were identified. The most important (17) articles as judged by the author were selected for this review. The main criteria for selection were that the articles addressed and provided solutions to the diagnosis and treatment of KPI. Results Patient-related risk factors predisposing to post-operative instability include deformity requiring a large surgical correction and aggressive ligament release, general or regional neuromuscular pathology, and hip or foot deformities. KPI can be prevented in most cases with appropriate selection of implants and good surgical technique. When ligament instability is anticipated post-operatively, the need for implants with a greater degree of constraint should be anticipated. In patients without significant varus or valgus malalignment and without significant flexion contracture, the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) can be retained. However, the PCL should be sacrificed when deformity exists particularly in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy, previous high tibial osteotomy or distal femoral osteotomy, and posttraumatic osteoarthritis with disruption of the PCL. In most cases, KPI requires revision surgery. Successful outcomes can only be obtained if the cause of KPI is identified and addressed. Conclusions Instability following TKA is a common cause of the need for revision. Typically, knees with deformity, rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy or high tibial osteotomy, and

  6. The Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register

    PubMed Central

    Robertsson, O.; Ranstam, J.; Sundberg, M.; W-Dahl, A.; Lidgren, L.

    2014-01-01

    We are entering a new era with governmental bodies taking an increasingly guiding role, gaining control of registries, demanding direct access with release of open public information for quality comparisons between hospitals. This review is written by physicians and scientists who have worked with the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR) periodically since it began. It reviews the history of the register and describes the methods used and lessons learned. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:217–22. PMID:24986492

  7. Hinge total knee replacement revisited

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Hugh U.; Hu, Cungen; Vyamont, Didier

    1997-01-01

    Objective To determine if aseptic loosening is a major problem in hinge total knee replacement. Design A cohort study. Setting A university-affiliated institute, specializing in elective orthopedic surgery. Patients Fifty-eight patients, mainly those requiring revision, in whom the conditions were such that it was felt only a totally constrained implant was appropriate. In 7 patients the implant was press-fitted; in the remainder it was cemented. Five patients required fusion or revision, and 8 died less than 2 years after implantation, leaving 45 for review. Follow-up was 2 to 13 years. Intervention Total knee replacement with a Guepar II prosthesis. Main outcome measures Radiolucency determined by the Cameron system and clinical scoring using the Hospital for Special Surgery system. Results Of the cemented components, 91% of femoral stems were type IA (no lucency), 9% were type IB (partial lucency), with no type II or III lucency. Tibial lucency was 87% type IA and 13% type IB, with no type II or III lucency. Of the noncemented components, 58% of femoral components were type IA and 42% type IB. Tibial lucency was 71% type IA and 29% type IB. Lucency was mainly present in zones 1 and 2 adjacent to the knee. Clinical rating was 18% excellent, 20% good, 20% fair and 42% poor. Postoperative complications included infection (13%), aseptic loosening (7%), quadriceps lag (16%) and extensor mechanism problems (16%). Conclusions Aseptic loosening is an uncommon problem in hinge total knee replacement. The complication rate in cases of sufficient severity as to require a hinge replacement remains high. Current indications for a hinge prosthesis are anteroposterior instability with a very large flexion gap, complete absence of the collateral ligaments and complete absence of a functioning extensor mechanism. PMID:9267296

  8. Painful knee prosthesis: surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    Villano, Marco; Carulli, Christian; Puccini, Serena; Soderi, Stefano; Innocenti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Summary There are many conditions that may be responsible of a painful knee prosthesis. The possible causes are not always easily diagnosed. Common causes of prosthetic failure, such as aseptic loosening, infection, instability, progressive patellar arthropathy and recurrent synovitis are associated with clearly defined radiographic and/or clinical evidence. Prosthetic infection should always be considered first until any other cause has been demonstrated. In the presence of an infected prosthesis we carry out a two-step revision. Aseptic loosening needs implant revision more often with increasing prosthesis stability. Varus-valgus, anteroposterior, global and patello-femoral instability are failures often due to technical errors; superstabilized or constrained implants are needed depending on the instability entity. In presence of patello-femoral pain it is necessary to evaluate the stability of the patellar component and any alterations in its motion. Patellar progressive arthropathy can often cause late-onset knee pain; in this case patella resurfacing is needed. Altered patellar tracking, may need a lateral release but in some cases is related to misalignment of the components and the revision procedure is mandatory. Nevertheless, the diagnosis and treatment of a painful knee prosthesis can be extremely difficult if there is no clear evidence of any of the most common causes of failure. Referred pain, ligament and tendon dysfunction, cutaneous neuromas, synovitis, a patellar clunk have to be diagnosed and treated. A possible aetiological understimated factor is painful knee prosthesis due to metals sensibilization, in particular to nickel. In this event the quantity of nickel in the revision prosthesis must be minimal. PMID:22461812

  9. Imaging following acute knee trauma.

    PubMed

    Kijowski, R; Roemer, F; Englund, M; Tiderius, C J; Swärd, P; Frobell, R B

    2014-10-01

    Joint injury has been recognized as a potent risk factor for the onset of osteoarthritis. The vast majority of studies using imaging technology for longitudinal assessment of patients following joint injury have focused on the injured knee joint, specifically in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury and meniscus tears where a high risk for rapid onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis is well known. Although there are many imaging modalities under constant development, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the most important instrument for longitudinal monitoring after joint injury. MR imaging is sensitive for detecting early cartilage degeneration and can evaluate other joint structures including the menisci, bone marrow, tendons, and ligaments which can be sources of pain following acute injury. In this review, focusing on imaging following acute knee trauma, several studies were identified with promising short-term results of osseous and soft tissue changes after joint injury. However, studies connecting these promising short-term results to the development of osteoarthritis were limited which is likely due to the long follow-up periods needed to document the radiographic and clinical onset of the disease. Thus, it is recommended that additional high quality longitudinal studies with extended follow-up periods be performed to further investigate the long-term consequences of the early osseous and soft tissue changes identified on MR imaging after acute knee trauma.

  10. Cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R; Ribeiro, F; Oliveira, J

    2010-03-01

    The effects of cryotherapy on joint position sense are not clearly established; however it is paramount to understand its impact on peripheral feedback to ascertain the safety of using ice therapy before resuming exercise on sports or rehabilitation settings. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cryotherapy, when applied over the quadriceps and over the knee joint, on knee position sense. This within-subjects repeated-measures study encompassed fifteen subjects. Knee position sense was measured by open kinetic chain technique and active positioning at baseline and after cryotherapy application. Knee angles were determined by computer analysis of the videotape images. Twenty-minute ice bag application was applied randomly, in two sessions 48 h apart, over the quadriceps and the knee joint. The main effect for cryotherapy application was significant (F (1.14)=7.7, p=0.015) indicating an increase in both absolute and relative angular errors after the application. There was no significant main effect for the location of cryotherapy application, indicating no differences between the application over the quadriceps and the knee joint. In conclusion, cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense in normal knees. This deleterious effect is similar when cryotherapy is applied over the quadriceps or the knee joint.

  11. Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the knee joint: a report of 85 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Krudwig, W K; Schulte, K-K; Heinemann, C

    2004-03-01

    Intra-articular ganglia and cysts of the knee joint are rare and mostly incidental findings in MRI and arthroscopy. During a period of 15 years, nearly 8000 knees were arthroscopically examined. In total, 85 intra-articular soft tissue masses were found within the knee cavity. Of these, 76 were incidental and asymptomatic findings in arthroscopy performed for treatment of osteoarthritic symptoms. Several repeated minor knee traumata were reported in this group but no histories of serious traumatic events. Nine ganglion cysts were obviously solely responsible for the intermittent or chronic non-specific knee discomfort, and classified as symptomatic. There were no histories of previous injury to the knees, no clinical signs of instabilities or meniscal and femoropatellar pathologies, and no associated further intra-articular lesions in arthroscopy. Forty-nine cystic masses originated from the ACL, 16 from the PCL, 12 from the anterior (eight medial, four lateral) and three from the posterior horn of the menisci (two medial, one lateral). Three were located in the infrapatellar fat pad, one arose from a medial plica and one from a subchondral bone cyst. All ganglion cysts were successfully resected or excised using arthroscopic technique. A review of the literature is given and compared with the findings and data of this study.

  12. Immediate Effects of an Elastic Knee Sleeve on Frontal Plane Gait Biomechanics in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Schween, Raphael; Gehring, Dominic; Gollhofer, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis of the knee affects millions of people. Elastic knee sleeves aim at relieving symptoms. While symptomatic improvements have been demonstrated as a consequence of elastic knee sleeves, evidence for biomechanical alterations only exists for the sagittal plane. We therefore asked what effect an elastic knee sleeve would have on frontal plane gait biomechanics. Methods 18 subjects (8 women, 10 men) with osteoarthritis of the medial tibiofemoral joint walked over ground with and without an elastic knee sleeve. Kinematics and forces were recorded and joint moments were calculated using an inverse dynamics approach. Conditions with sleeve and without sleeve were compared with paired t-Tests. Results With the sleeve, knee adduction angle at ground contact was reduced by 1.9±2.1° (P = 0.006). Peak knee adduction was reduced by 1.5±1.6° (P = 0.004). The first peak knee adduction moment and positive knee adduction impulse were decreased by 10.1% (0.74±0.9 Nm•kg-1; P = 0.002) and 12.9% (0.28±0.3 Nm•s•kg-1; P < 0.004), respectively. Conclusion Our study provides evidence that wearing an elastic knee sleeve during walking can reduce knee adduction angles, moments and impulse in subjects with knee osteoarthritis. As a higher knee adduction moment has previously been identified as a risk factor for disease progression in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis, we speculate that wearing a knee sleeve may be beneficial for this specific subgroup. PMID:25621488

  13. Multiligament Injury of the Knee. First Intrarticular or Posterior

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Nils

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Show our experience about the multiligament injury of the knee. In the surgical technique it is most popular and recommended stabilized first all posterior and lateral (Ligament cruciate Posterior (LCP) and postero-lateral corner) if is a case. We show our experience stabilized first all intra-articular ACL and LCP. Methods: Prospective study and Case Series. The study includes, 45 cases in 15 years of experience. The patients have two or more ligaments with rupture, and associated lesions, like meniscus, cartilages, fractures, etc. 45 cases with a ACL rupture, 40 PCL, 7 posteromedial corner, 25 postero-lateral corner, 30 meniscus medial, 28 meniscus lateral, 1 vascular lesion, and 3 fibular nerve. In the surgical technique always use autograft. Prefer hamstrings, quadricipital tendon, contralateral hamstrings, BTB and sometimes peroneus brevis. We hope 1 or 2 weeks for the surgery. I never use pump, and use tourniquet for two hours. We start for the meniscus lesions and cartilage lesion and first reconstruction ligaments intra-articular. Finalized we open the tourniquet and stabilized the postero-lateral o posteromedial corner if is necessary. In the first cases we did a surgery in two times, but now we stabilized in one surgical time. Results: 3 to 6 days in the hospital 2 weeks immobilized and star rehabilitation with brace for more two weeks. Use crutches for 4-6 weeks. Worked in rehabilitation for a one year and star competition in one year. Complications: 1 case of amputation for vascular lesion, 9 arthrofibrosis, 2 medial instability, 1 lateral instability and1 LCP instability. One case needs a revision two years after the first surgery, for a new trauma in the work. All other cases had a new surgery for revision the residual instability. Conclusion: The multiligament injury of the knee it is not frequently, but every year I receive more cases, and more difficult. In the surgical technique have two options. The more recommended stabilized first

  14. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  15. Unicondylar knee arthroplasty: a cementless perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Michael E.; Englund, Roy E.; Leighton, Ross K.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To compare the results of cementless unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) with those already reported in a similar study on cemented UKA. Design A case-series cross-sectional study. Setting The Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax. Patients Fifty-one patients who underwent a total of 57 UKAs between May 1989 and May 1997. Inclusion criteria were osteoarthritis involving the predominantly the medial compartment of the knee, relative sparing of the other compartments, less than 15° of varus, minimal knee instability, and attendance at the postoperative clinical visit. Intervention Cementless UKA. Main outcome measures Clinical parameters that included pain, range of motion and the Knee Society Clinical Knee Score. Roentgenographic parameters that included α, β, γ and σ angles and the presence of periprosthetic radiolucency or loose beads. Results Age, weight, gender and follow-up interval did not significantly affect the clinical results in terms of pain, range of motion or knee score. Knees with more than 1 mm of radiolucency had significantly lower knee scores than those with no radiolucency. Knees that radiologically had loose beads also had significantly lower knee scores. The clinical outcomes of cementless UKA were comparable to those already reported on cemented UKA. Cementless femurs had less radiolucency than the cemented femurs, whereas cementless tibias had more radiolucency than their cemented counterparts. Conclusions Cementless UKA seems to be as efficacious as cemented UKA. However, there is some concern about the amount of radiolucency in the cementless tibial components. A randomized clinical trial comparing both cementless and cemented tibial components with a cementless femur (hybrid knee) is needed to further assess this controversial issue in UKA. PMID:11129829

  16. Astym® Therapy for the Management of Recalcitrant Knee Joint Stiffness after Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Anil; Corcoran, James; Cherian, Jeffery J; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Knee stiffness is a common complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Despite studies published on the surgical management of reduced range of motion (ROM) after TKA, there is limited evidence on the nonoperative management of joint and soft tissue imbalances possibly contributing to reduced knee ROM. This report assesses changes in ROM, pain, function, and patellar tendon length after Astym® joint mobilization use. A 38-year-old male professional skier had a right TKA 3 months before presentation with 2 subsequent manipulations under anesthesia secondary to persistent knee stiffness. He had patellar baja on radiograph, a reduced arc of ROM, reduced patellar mobility and muscular extensibility, and pain to palpation along the patellar tendon. He had 12 visits of physical therapy with the use of Astym®, patellar mobilization, and tibio-femoral mobilizations with movement. The patient also used a customized knee device at home for prolonged knee extension stretching. The patient was treated for 12 visits, along with home use of customized bracing for knee extension. Significant improvements were seen in pain, function, and ROM. He returned to work full-time, ambulated prolonged distances, and negotiated stairs pain-free. He also demonstrated resolution of patellar baja radiographically. Conservative management of recalcitrant knee joint stiffness after primary TKA can be effective in restoring knee mobility and reducing pain and activity limitation. A multimodal approach using Astym® treatment, customized knee bracing, and targeted joint mobilization can be effective in resolving knee joint stiffness.

  17. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Severe Unstable Knee: Case-Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Amjad, Gholamreza Ghorbani; Kaseb, Mohammad Hassan; Bashti, Kaveh

    2017-01-01

    Multiplanar or global laxity in arthritic knee is rare, most of this patients have neuromuscular disorder (post poliomyelitis, spinal dystrophy) or history of knee trauma. Ligament insufficiency and severe bone loss is significant in this patient. The estimated prevalence for the concurrence of charcot marie-tooth (CMT) with myasthenia gravis (MG) suggests an extremely rare event. We have presented a 54-year-old female patient with CMT and MG complaining of progressive pain, swelling, and crepitation of the knee joints who had been undergone total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with rotating hinge prosthesis. She had an acute myasthenia crisis soon after operation with prolonged intubation and intensive care unit admission. Radiographies and physical examination revealed bilateral severe unstable arthritic knee joints and left knee posterior dislocation. Short-term postoperative follow-up revealed improved knee function and resolution of all symptoms in the operated side. PMID:28271089

  18. Total Knee Arthroplasty for Severe Flexion Contracture in Rheumatoid Arthritis Knees

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Youn Soo; Moon, Kyu Pill; Kim, Kyung Taek; Kim, Jin Wan; Park, Won Seok

    2016-01-01

    Flexion contracture deformities, as well as severe varus and valgus deformities of the knee joint, accompany osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In particular, severe flexion contracture deformity of the knee joint is often found in patients with RA, which renders them nonambulatory. This report describes a 26-year-old female patient diagnosed with RA 10 years ago. She had chronic joint pain, severe flexion contracture, valgus deformity in both knees, and limited range of motion in both knees and became nonambulatory. She underwent a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and serial casting and physical therapy to restore stable joint movement and correct knee joint deformity. Her pain was successfully relieved, and she was able to walk after surgery. Here, we report the excellent results of TKA in this RA patient with severe flexion contracture of both knees. PMID:27894181

  19. Effect of patellar thickness on knee flexion in total knee arthroplasty: a biomechanical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemian, Mansour; Samiezadeh, Saeid; Sternheim, Amir; Bougherara, Habiba; Barnes, C Lowry; Backstein, David J

    2014-01-01

    A biomechanical computer-based model was developed to simulate the influence of patellar thickness on passive knee flexion after arthroplasty. Using the computer model of a single-radius, PCL-sacrificing knee prosthesis, a range of patella-implant composite thicknesses was simulated. The biomechanical model was then replicated using two cadaveric knees. A patellar-thickness range of 15 mm was applied to each of the knees. Knee flexion was found to decrease exponentially with increased patellar thickness in both the biomechanical and experimental studies. Importantly, this flexion loss followed an exponential pattern with higher patellar thicknesses in both studies. In order to avoid adverse biomechanical and functional consequences, it is recommended to restore patellar thickness to that of the native knee during total knee arthroplasty.

  20. In vivo knee kinematics in patients with bilateral total knee arthroplasty of 2 designs.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Nobukazu; Breslauer, Leigh; Hedley, Anthony K; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Banks, Scott A

    2011-09-01

    Many younger and highly active patients desire to achieve high flexion after total knee arthroplasty. This study's purpose was to determine if a contemporary total knee arthroplasty design improved functional knee flexion compared with a traditional total knee arthroplasty in patients living a Western lifestyle. Ten patients with bilateral total knee arthroplasty of 2 types were studied during weight-bearing lunge, kneeling, and stair activities using fluoroscopic imaging. There were no differences in maximum knee flexion during lunging or kneeling. Statistically significant differences in tibial rotation and condylar translation were observed during the 3 activities. Although several joint kinematic differences were observed, no important functional differences were observed in clinically excellent, high performing subjects with bilateral total knee arthroplasty of 2 types.

  1. The effect of orthotic devices on knee adduction moment, pain and function in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Baghaei Roodsari, Roshanak; Esteki, Ali; Aminian, Gholamreza; Ebrahimi, Ismaeil; Mousavi, Mohammad Ebramim; Majdoleslami, Basir; Bahramian, Fatemeh

    2016-03-15

    Background Knee braces and foot orthoses are commonly used to improve knee adduction moment, pain and function in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, no literature review has been performed to compare the effects of foot orthoses and knee braces in this group of patients. Purpose The aim of this review was to evaluate the effects of foot orthoses and knee braces on knee adduction moment, pain and function in individuals with knee OA. Study design Literature review. Method The search strategy was based on the Population Intervention Comparison Outcome method. A search was performed in PubMed, Science Direct, Google Scholar and ISI web of knowledge databases using the PRISMA method and based on selected keywords. Thirty-one related articles were selected for final evaluation. Results The results of the analysis of these studies demonstrated that orthotic devices reduce knee adduction moment and also improve pain and function in individuals with knee OA. Conclusion Foot orthoses may be more effective in improving pain and function in subjects with knee OA. Both knee braces and foot orthoses reduce the knee adduction moment in knee OA and consequently patients typically do not need to use knee braces for a long period of time. Also, foot orthoses and knee braces may be more effective for medial compartment knee OA patients due to the fact that this treatment helps improve pain and function. Implications for Rehabilitation Knee braces and foot orthoses are commonly used for improving knee adduction moment, pain and function in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Orthotic devices can reduce knee adduction moment, pain and improve function in knee OA. The combined use of a knee braces and foot orthoses can provide more improvement in knee adduction moment, reduced pain and increased function.

  2. Arthroscopic knee debridement can delay total knee replacement in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Gomez-Cardero, Primitivo

    2016-09-01

    The role of arthroscopic debridement of the knee in haemophilia is controversial in the literature. The purpose of this study is to describe the results of arthroscopic knee debridement (AKD), with the aim of determining whether it is possible to delay total knee replacement (TKR) for painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients. In a 14-year period (1998-2011), AKD was performed for moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in 27 patients with haemophilia A. Their average age at operation was 28.6 years (range 26-39 years). Indications for surgery were as follows: more than 90° of knee flexion, flexion deformity less than 30°, good axial alignment of the knee, good patellar alignment, and pain above >60 points in a visual analogue scale [0 (no pain) to 100 points]. Secondary haematological prophylaxis and rehabilitation (physiotherapy) was given for at least 3 months after surgery. Follow-up was for an average of 7.5 years (range 2-14 years). We assessed the clinical outcome before surgery and at the time of latest follow-up using the Knee Society pain and function scores, the range of motion, and the radiological score of the World Federation of Haemophilia. Knee Society pain scores improved from 39 preoperatively to 66 postoperatively, and function scores improved from 36 to 52. Range of motion improved on an average from -15° of extension and 90° of flexion before surgery, to -5° of extension and 110° of flexion at the last follow-up. A radiological deterioration of 2.8 points on average was found. There were two (7.4%) postoperative complications (haemarthroses resolved by joint aspiration). One patient (3.7%) required a TKR 12.5 years later. AKD should be considered in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients to delay TKR.

  3. Treating Early Knee Osteoarthritis with the Atlas® Unicompartmental Knee System in a 26-Year-Old Ex-Professional Basketball Player: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability among adults. Within the affected population, there exists a group of patients who have exhausted conservative treatment options and yet are not ideal candidates for current surgical treatments due to young age, early disease severity, or neutral mechanical knee alignment. For these patients, a new potential treatment option may be considered. We present an interesting case report of a young, ex-professional athlete treated with a minimally invasive load-altering implant (Atlas System) whose young age (26 years), disease status (tibiofemoral kissing lesions), and neutral mechanical limb alignment eliminated all traditional surgical treatment options such as high tibial osteotomy or arthroplasty. At 6 months after surgery, our patient demonstrated positive outcomes improvement in pain, function, and quality of life and had returned to high-impact athletic activity without symptoms. These initial results are promising, and longer follow-up data on the treatment will be necessary. PMID:28246566

  4. KNEE-JOINT LOADING IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: INFLUENCE OF ABDOMINAL AND THIGH FAT

    PubMed Central

    Messier, Stephen P.; Beavers, Daniel P.; Loeser, Richard F.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Hunter, David J.; DeVita, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee-joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography and total lean and fat mass determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age = 66.3 yr., BMI = 33.5 kg·m−2) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Results Higher total body mass was significantly associated (p ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (p < 0.0001), patellofemoral forces (p< 0.006), and knee extensor moments (p = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (p = 0.0001), shear (p < 0.001), and patellofemoral forces (p = 0.01) and knee extension moment (p = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (p = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (p ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with the knee abduction (p = 0.03) and knee extension moment (p = 0.02). Conclusions Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA. PMID:25133996

  5. Intraventricular mass lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.; Sobel, D.F.; Kelley, W.M.; Norman, D.

    1984-11-01

    Determining the precise etiology of an intraventricular mass can be a difficult diagnostic problem. CT and angiographic findings were reviewed in a series of 73 patients who had intraventricular masses. The histologic diagnosis can be suggested preoperatively by an analysis of the frequency of lesions occurring at a given ventricular location, lesion density before and after administration of contrast material, age, and sex of the patient, morphologic appearance of the mass, and presence or absence of hydrocephalus. Angiography is useful when meningioma, choroid plexus papilloma and carcinoma, or arteriovenous malformation are considered.

  6. Prophylactic Knee Braces: Where Do They Stand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Paul

    1988-01-01

    The effectiveness of knee braces in preventing knee injuries in football is inconclusive. This article reviews research from epidemiologic, cadaver, and surrogate studies; discusses reasons for conflicting study results, including research design problems; and describes alternative approaches that have been suggested. (IAH)

  7. [Ossifying bursitis praepatellaris of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Erler, M

    2009-01-01

    A 53-year-old patient was admitted to our hospital with a tumour at the site of the left knee joint praepatellar. The diagnostic imaging, operative findings and histology showed a chronic ossifying bursitis praepatellaris of the knee joint. Aetiology and pathogenesis of the ossifying bursitis are discussed.

  8. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... regularly play sports that involve a lot of repetitive jumping — like track and field (particularly high-jumping), basketball, volleyball, gymnastics, running, and soccer — can put a lot of strain on their knees. Jumper's knee can seem like a minor injury that isn't really that serious. Because of ...

  9. Knee Braces to Prevent Injuries in Football.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Five physicians discuss the use of knee braces to prevent injuries in football players. Questions are raised regarding the strength and design of the braces, whether they prestress the knee in some cases, and whether they actually reduce injuries. More clinical and biomechanical research is called for. (MT)

  10. The acute swollen knee: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Chinmay; St Mart, Jean-Pierre

    2013-07-01

    The acutely swollen knee is a common presentation of knee pathology in both primary care and the emergency department. The key to diagnosis and management is a thorough history and examination to determine the primary pathology, which includes inflammation, infection or a structural abnormality in the knee. The location of pain and tenderness can aid to localization of structural pathology even before radiological tests are requested, and indeed inform the investigations that should be carried out. Aspiration of an acutely swollen knee can aid diagnosis and help relieve pain. The management of the swollen knee depends on underlying pathology and can range from anti-inflammatory medication for inflammation to operative intervention for a structural abnormality.

  11. Effect of implant design on knee flexion.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Douglas A; Heekin, R David; Clark, Charles R; Murphy, Jeffrey A; O'Dell, Tammy L; Dwyer, Kimberly A

    2013-03-01

    From March 2006 to August 2008, 93 subjects (186 knees) underwent simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty performed by eight surgeons at North American centers. This randomized study was conducted to determine whether non-weight-bearing passive flexion was superior for knees receiving a posterior stabilized high flexion device compared to a posterior stabilized standard device in the contra-lateral knee. Weight-bearing single leg active flexion was one secondary endpoint. Follow-up compliance was 92.5%. Results show small, but significant superiority in the motion metrics for the high flexion device compared to the standard device 12 months after surgery, especially for a subgroup of patients with pre-operative flexion less than 120° in both knees. Thus, the ideal candidate for the high flexion device may be one with lesser pre-operative flexion.

  12. The acute swollen knee: diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Chinmay; St Mart, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The acutely swollen knee is a common presentation of knee pathology in both primary care and the emergency department. The key to diagnosis and management is a thorough history and examination to determine the primary pathology, which includes inflammation, infection or a structural abnormality in the knee. The location of pain and tenderness can aid to localization of structural pathology even before radiological tests are requested, and indeed inform the investigations that should be carried out. Aspiration of an acutely swollen knee can aid diagnosis and help relieve pain. The management of the swollen knee depends on underlying pathology and can range from anti-inflammatory medication for inflammation to operative intervention for a structural abnormality. PMID:23821708

  13. Lesion of the hip abductor mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Caviglia, Horacio; Cambiaggi, Guillermo; Vattani, Nosrat; Landro, María Eulalia; Galatro, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The disruption of the abductor muscles of the hip after hip revision surgery often causes limping, pain, and instability of the implant. The purpose of our paper is to describe a mesh technique to repair hip abductor mechanism injuries after hip revision. Patients and methods: Forty-six patients with hip abductor damage after prosthetic revision were treated. Inclusion criteria were: patients presenting with prosthetic loosening, complaint of pain, and with a positive Trendelenburg sign due to deficient abductor muscle mechanisms. Thirty-one were women (67.39%) with an average age of 64 years (34–82 years). The number of previous revision surgeries was three (two to seven). The Merle d’Aubigné score and variants before and after treatment were also reported. Results: In the postoperative follow-up after hip revision with the mesh technique, the Merle d’Aubigné score improved and the Trendelenburg sign was negative in 78.3% of the patients (p < 0.001). Also, the Trendelenburg test with the knee flexed was negative in 60.9% (p < 0.001) and the stair-climbing test was negative in 60.9% of cases (p < 0.001). The gluteus medius test in the lateral position was negative in 52.2% of patients, and in the lateral position with the knee flexed it was negative in 47.8% of patients (p < 0.001). Discussion: Repair of the abductor mechanism with the mesh technique has proven effective for both partial and total lesions. PMID:27382925

  14. Tuberculosis of the patella imitating chronic knee synovitis.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jatin; Vijay, Vipul

    2014-04-15

    Tuberculosis of patella is a rare occurrence with incidence of less than 0.15% in the literature. Owing to its rarity the diagnosis is usually missed. Here we present a case of tuberculosis of the patella, being treated as chronic synovitis elsewhere. An 11-year-old boy presented to us with chronic knee swelling and a draining sinus of 5 months duration. He was being treated with broad spectrum antibiotics and incision and drainage. Standard X-rays revealed a lytic area with surrounding coke such as sequestrum in patella. MRI was suggestive of osteomyelitis of the patella with soft tissue oedema. Diagnosis was confirmed on biopsy. The patient was managed by curettage and excision of the sinus tract along with antitubercular treatment. The patient responded well to antitubercular therapy and gained excellent functional range of movement. In today's era of potent antituberculous drugs and decreasing tuberculosis incidence the rare and unusual locations of tuberculosis such as patella should be borne in mind while dealing with chronic lesions of the knee especially in tubercular endemic areas. A timely diagnosis helps in regaining good range of motion and a satisfactory outcome.

  15. Gait Analysis of Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty and Bicruciate Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Triaxial Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hidetomo; Aizawa, Toshiaki; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    One component of conventional total knee arthroplasty is removal of the anterior cruciate ligament, and the knee after total knee arthroplasty has been said to be a knee with anterior cruciate ligament dysfunction. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty is believed to reproduce anterior cruciate ligament function in the implant and provide anterior stability. Conventional total knee arthroplasty was performed on the right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty was performed on the left knee in the same patient, and a triaxial accelerometer was fitted to both knees after surgery. Gait analysis was then performed and is reported here. The subject was a 78-year-old woman who underwent conventional total knee arthroplasty on her right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty on her left knee. On the femoral side with bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional total knee arthroplasty, there was little acceleration in the x-axis direction (anteroposterior direction) in the early swing phase. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty may be able to replace anterior cruciate ligament function due to the structure of the implant and proper anteroposterior positioning. PMID:27648328

  16. [Jumper's knee--a review].

    PubMed

    Tibesku, C O; Pässler, H H

    2005-06-01

    Jumper's knee has been defined as painful chronic overuse injury of the extensor mechanism of the knee joint. The disease has a high incidence in jumping sports and depends on training frequency and level of performance. Its natural course is protracted, repetitive, and often bilaterally occurring. Its etiology is a chronic overload of the knee extensor mechanism which is triggered by jumping sports (volleyball, basketball etc.) as well as different intrinsic (ligamentous laxity, Q-angle, patella height, tenderness, pattern of force development) and extrinsic dispositions (frequency of training, level of performance, hardness of underground). The place of pathology most often is the osteo-tendinous transition zone of the proximal patellar tendon. Histologic evaluation of the tendon showed that the disease is rather degenerative than inflammatory. The diagnosis is primarily based on the typical sports history, physical examination, and ultrasound. MRI is helpful in operation planning. Plain radiography, CT, and bone scans are used to rule out differential diagnoses. Therapy should be chosen according to the stage of the disease and usually starts with a non-surgical approach. This includes rest from sports activities, immobilisation, non-steroid antiphlogistics, para-tendinous cortisone injections, massage, electric therapy, ultrasound and extracorporal shock waves. Afterwards an increase of activities is begun (moderate training, adequate warm-up, ice cooling after activity, muscle stretching, eccentric strengthening of the quadriceps). Patella straps and soft insoles are used as prevention. Up to 42 % of patients need surgical therapy after failure of long-lasting non-surgical measures, carried out either open or arthroscopically. Surgical principles include excision of the para-tendon, excision of the degenerative tissue, resection of the lower patella pole, and longitudinal incisions into the tendon. Most patients are pain-free after surgery but return to sports

  17. Radionuclide therapy for arthritic knees

    SciTech Connect

    Doepel, L.K.

    1985-02-08

    A new radionuclide therapeutic approach for rheumatoid arthritis of the knee is described. This therapy combines a short-lived radionuclide with a carrier whose physical and chemical characteristics aid retention of the radioactive particles within the joint. Joining a radionuclide to a particulate carrier had not been explored previously as a potential method for inhibiting radiation leakage. The treatment couples the rare earth element dysprosium 165 to ferric hydroxide in macroaggregate form (size range: 3 to 10 ..mu..m). After the relatively inert iron complex penetrates the synovium, it causes cell death. Macrophages and phagocytes clear away the cellular debris, essentially eliminating the synovium.

  18. Automatic locking knee brace joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention is an apparatus for controlling the pivotal movement of a knee brace comprising a tang-and-clevis joint that has been uniquely modified. Both the tang and the clevis have a set of teeth that, when engaged, can lock the tang and the clevis together. In addition, the tang is biased away from the clevis. Consequently, when there is no axial force (i.e., body weight) on the tang, the tang is free to pivot within the clevis. However, when an axial force is exerted on the tang, the tang is pushed into the clevis, both sets of teeth engage, and the tang and the clevis lock together.

  19. Molecular Biomarkers of Knee Pathology.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Vanessa; Strauss, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers has become increasingly important in our fundamental understanding of the molecular basis for disease and subsequently in the advancement of modern medicine. Biomarkers have been identified in a plethora of normal and pathologic conditions and are most often found in blood, tissue, or synovial fluid. Orthopaedic research has more recently focused on biomarkers of cartilage and joint diseases, with an emphasis on understanding the molecular underpinnings of their pathophysiology. This article focuses on the biomarkers identified to date in several select knee pathologies and how further research can contribute to new diagnostic tools and targeted therapeutics.

  20. [Meniscal injuries of the knee: arthrographic and echographic study].

    PubMed

    Corbetti, F; Tomasella, G

    1989-03-01

    In order to evaluate the diagnostic capabilities of sonography (US) in meniscal lesions of the knee, 65 unquestionable cases of meniscopathy at arthrography were studied with high-resolution US. In 92% of the cases, inhomogeneous echo structure was demonstrated in correspondence with pathological meniscus, with irregular hyperechoic areas and, in some cases, with hyperechoic lines corresponding to the tear. 40% of patients presented with tumefaction and external bulging of the parameniscal region, while in 87% of the cases the articular capsule was thickened. These results confirm that, as reported by some authors, US is a promising method for the study of meniscopathies. We therefore believe that US could nowadays be at least employed as a complement to clinical examination, while its diagnostic capabilities are further assessed through other studies.

  1. Intra-articular knee mass in a 51-year-old woman.

    PubMed

    Bergin, Patrick F; Milchteim, Charles; Beaulieu, Gregory P; Brindle, Kathleen A; Schwartz, Arnold M; Faulks, Craig R

    2011-03-11

    A 51-year-old woman presented with moderate knee pain refractory to conservative measures. Radiographs revealed a well-defined, but irregularly-shaped ovoid soft tissue density at the posterior superior aspect of the infrapatellar fat pad of Hoffa. On magnetic resonance imaging, the mass was mildly heterogeneous and had intermediate signal in the proton density series and mixed signal intensity on the T2-weighted images. A low-signal rim could be seen around a portion of the lesion. Arthroscopic resection was performed and a vascular stalk was encountered. The differential diagnosis included: ganglion cyst, meniscal cyst, intra-articular lipoma, villous proliferation of the synovial membrane, Hoffa disease, and intracapsular chondroma. Histologic examination revealed a fibrous capsule partially surrounding a benign lipomatous neoplasm containing an abundance of thin- and thick-walled blood vessels with periadventitial myxoid stroma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an intra-articular angiomyxolipoma in the literature. At 8-month follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with no sign of recurrence. We postulate a low recurrence rate based on the insidious growth rate and benign histological appearance of such lesions. To our knowledge, no other intra-articular lipomatous lesion of the knee has been removed solely with arthroscopic techniques. Further follow-up information is needed to better understand the natural course of these lesions.

  2. Effect of following recommendations for tiestall configuration on neck and leg lesions, lameness, cleanliness, and lying time in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bouffard, V; de Passillé, A M; Rushen, J; Vasseur, E; Nash, C G R; Haley, D B; Pellerin, D

    2017-02-16

    Cow comfort in tiestalls is directly affected by stall dimensions, for which some recommendations exist. To evaluate how well Canadian dairy farms with tiestalls complied with recommendations for stall dimensions, as well as the effect of compliance on cow comfort and cleanliness, we assessed lactating Holstein cows (n = 3,485) on 100 tiestall dairy farms for neck and leg lesions, lameness, and cleanliness and measured time spent lying down. Data on stall dimensions (width and length of the stall, position and height of the tie rail, length of the chain, and height of the manger curb) were recorded for each cow. The majority of cows were housed in stalls smaller than recommended. The prevalence of lesions and lameness was high (neck, 33%; knee, 44%; hock; 58%, lameness, 25%) and the prevalence of dirtiness was low (udder, 4%; flank, 11%; legs, 4%). Chains shorter than recommended increased the risk of neck, knee, and hock lesions. A tie rail further back in the stall than recommended increased the risk of neck, knee, and hock lesions and reduced the frequency of lying bouts and the risk of a dirty udder. A tie rail set lower than recommended decreased the risk of neck lesions and lameness and increased lying time and lying bout frequency. Stalls narrower in width than recommended increased the risk of neck injuries and lameness and reduced the daily duration of lying time and the risk of a dirty flank and legs. Stalls shorter in length than recommended increased the risk of knee lesions and reduced lying bout frequency and the risk of a dirty udder. The majority of farms do not follow recommendations for stall dimensions (with the exception of tie rail height), and the lack of compliance is associated with increased risk of lesions and lameness and can affect lying time. Recommended stall dimensions tend to reduce cleanliness, but the prevalence of dirty cows remains very low.

  3. Ultrasonographic evaluation of knee joint cartilage in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Batalov, A Z; Kuzmanova, S I; Penev, D P

    2000-01-01

    The non-invasive methods used to study joint cartilage are restricted in their scope. No direct visualization of the joint cartilage is possible in conventional radiology and tomography and the decrease in joint space is only indirect evidence for joint destruction. CT is a radiologic method for direct visualization of joint cartilage but its diagnostic precision in the evaluation of early cartilage lesions is limited because it can not produce an image in a plane other than the transversal plane perpendicular to the direction of the main axis of the body and because it has limited spatial resolution. Other methods for direct visualization of joint cartilage are arthrography and arthroscopy which are little used in clinical practice because of their invasiveness and limited indications. MRI is a promising technique but its usage is limited by the high price and limited accessibility. Our object in the present study was to evaluate the significance of arthro-sonography in the diagnosis of early arthritic lesions of knee cartilage, based on the ultrasonographic assessment of the joint surface and cartilage thickness. Femoral cartilage was our choice for the study as there is statistically well documented high incidence of early arthritic changes in this area; moreover, the area is easily accessible for ultrasound evaluation using a scan perpendicular to the articular surface, incl. the cases with complete flexion of the knee joint, where the pressure areas of the condyles are apositioned to the tibial plateau. Using a 7.5 MHz transducer we managed to measure and document early arthritic changes in joint thickness and the contour of the joint surfaces before they can be detected using routine radiologic methods.

  4. Knee injuries account for the sports-related increased risk of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Thelin, N; Holmberg, S; Thelin, A

    2006-10-01

    Increased risk of osteoarthritis has been found among athletes active in different kinds of sports. Knee injury is an established risk factor for knee osteoarthritis. In this population-based case-control study we investigated the risk of knee osteoarthritis with respect to sports activity and previous knee injuries. A total of 825 cases with x-ray-verified femorotibial osteoarthritis were identified at six hospitals in southern Sweden. The cases were matched (age, sex and residential area) with 825 controls from the general population. Mailed questionnaire data on sports activity for more than 1 year after the age of 16, knee injuries and confounding variables (weight, height, heredity, smoking and occupation) were collected and analyzed using logistic regression models. The response frequency was 89%. Among men knee osteoarthritis was related to soccer (odds ratio (OR) 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.2), ice hockey (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-3.0) and tennis (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.8) but not to track and field sports, cross-country skiing, and orienteering. After adjustment for confounding variables soccer and ice hockey remained significantly related to knee osteoarthritis, but after adjustment for knee injuries no significant relation remained. The sports-related increased risk for knee osteoarthritis was explained by knee injuries.

  5. Real-Time Tracking of Knee Adduction Moment in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Lee, Song Joo; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Background The external knee adduction moment (EKAM) is closely associated with the presence, progression, and severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is a lack of convenient and practical method to estimate and track in real-time the EKAM of patients with knee OA for clinical evaluation and gait training, especially outside of gait laboratories. New Method A real-time EKAM estimation method was developed and applied to track and investigate the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping on an elliptical trainer in both healthy subjects and a patient with knee OA. Results Substantial changes were observed in the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping in the patient with knee OA. Comparison with Existing Method(s) This is the first study to develop and test feasibility of real-time tracking method of the EKAM on patients with knee OA using 3-D inverse dynamics. Conclusions The study provides us an accurate and practical method to evaluate in real-time the critical EKAM associated with knee OA, which is expected to help us to diagnose and evaluate patients with knee OA and provide the patients with real-time EKAM feedback rehabilitation training. PMID:24361759

  6. Anterior knee pain and cold knees: a possible association in women.

    PubMed

    Selfe, James; Sutton, Chris; Hardaker, Natalie J; Greenhalgh, Sue; Karki, Anne; Dey, Paola

    2010-10-01

    Abnormal reactions to environmental cold have been observed in some patients with Anterior Knee Pain (AKP). The aims of this study were to investigate whether palpation of the knee could classify patients into those with and those without cold knees; whether this classification could be objectively validated using thermal imaging; whether the cold and not cold knee groups varied in response to a cold stress test and in patient-reported measures. Fifty eight patients were recruited; palpation classified them into cold and not cold groups. Twenty-one (36%) patients were classified as having a cold knee by palpation: fourteen (36%) females and seven males (37%). Preliminary analysis suggested gender might be an effect modifier and the number of men was small, therefore the analysis focussed on females. Women with cold knees had a significantly smaller patellar skin fold, lower levels of activity and worse scores on the MFIQ, there also appeared to be an association with a traumatic onset. Women with cold knees were more likely to report cold weather affected their knees and they preferred a hot water bottle compared to an ice-pack on their knee; there was also a trend towards having to wear extra tights/long johns in the winter. This study has helped to define a clinical profile for a group of females with AKP and cold knees. This group appears to demonstrate a mild form of Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy.

  7. Six degree-of-freedom knee joint kinematics in obese individuals with knee pain during gait

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Sheng; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Felson, David T.; Li, Guoan; Lewis, Cara L.

    2017-01-01

    Knee joint pain is a common symptom in obese individuals and walking is often prescribed as part of management programs. Past studies in obese individuals have focused on standing alignment and kinematics in the sagittal and coronal planes. Investigation of 6 degree-of-freedom (6DOF) knee joint kinematics during standing and gait is important to thoroughly understand knee function in obese individuals with knee pain. This study aimed to investigate the 6DOF knee joint kinematics in standing and during gait in obese patients using a validated fluoroscopic imaging system. Ten individuals with obesity and knee pain were recruited. While standing, the knee was in 7.4±6.3°of hyperextension, 2.8±3.3° of abduction and 5.6±7.3° of external rotation. The femoral center was located 0.7±3.1mm anterior and 5.1±1.5mm medial to the tibial center. During treadmill gait, the sagittal plane motion, i.e., flexion/extension and anterior-posterior translation, showed a clear pattern. Specifically, obese individuals with knee pain maintained the knee in more flexion and more anterior tibial translation during most of the stance phase of the gait cycle and had a reduced total range of knee flexion when compared to a healthy non-obese group. In conclusion, obese individuals with knee pain used hyperextension knee posture while standing, but maintained the knee in more flexion during gait with reduced overall range of motion in the 6DOF analysis. PMID:28339477

  8. [When should MRI for knee or hip osteoarthritis should be performed?].

    PubMed

    Loeuille, Damien

    2012-05-01

    Radiograph is the gold standard to establish the diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA) and to classify patients in function structural severity according to Kellgren and Lawrence's classification. Radiograph should be performed on standing position for weight-bearing joints. In clinical practice, MRI is usually used to eliminate other diagnosis when X-rays are considered as normal and to precise abarticular structures and bone lesions affected in OA. This imaging technic allows to directly visualize articular cartilage damage with an excellent correlation compared to arthroscopy But MRI is also able to depict articular damages associated with OA such as bone marrow lesion (BML), osteophytes, cysts, joint effusion, synovitis, menisci lesions, tendinitis and bursitis. Some of them were associated with pain (BML, synovitis, effusion) while some articular lesions were more implicated in chondrolysis (focal cartilage lesion, BML, menisci lesion, synovitis effusion). In cases of X-ray abnormalities (osteophytes, joint space narrowing, bone condensation, cysts), menisci lesions should not be considered as responsible for pain in knee OA. Thus, MRI is the only imaging technic able to precise which articular structure is affected during the disease (bone, synovial tissue or abarticular tissues) and helps clinician to have a more targeted therapeutic approach.

  9. Three-dimensional dynamic analysis of knee joint during gait in medial knee osteoarthritis using loading axis of knee.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Katsutoshi; Omori, Go; Koga, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Koichi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Tanabe, Yuji; Tanaka, Masaei; Arakawa, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    We recently developed a new method for three-dimensional evaluation of mechanical factors affecting knee joint in order to help identify factors that contribute to the progression of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). This study aimed to verify the clinical validity of our method by evaluating knee joint dynamics during gait. Subjects were 41 individuals (14 normal knees; 8 mild KOAs; 19 severe KOAs). The positions of skin markers attached to the body were captured during gait, and bi-planar X-ray images of the lower extremities were obtained in standing position. The positional relationship between the markers and femorotibial bones was determined from the X-ray images. Combining this relationship with gait capture allowed for the estimation of relative movement between femorotibial bones. We also calculated the point of intersection of loading axis of knee on the tibial proximal surface (LAK point) to analyze knee joint dynamics. Knee flexion range in subjects with severe KOA during gait was significantly smaller than that in those with normal knees (p=0.011), and knee adduction in those with severe KOA was significantly larger than in those with mild KOA (p<0.000). LAK point was locally loaded on the medial compartment of the tibial surface as KOA progressed, with LAK point of subjects with severe KOA rapidly shifting medially during loading response. Local loading and medial shear force were applied to the tibial surface during stance phase as medial KOA progressed. Our findings suggest that our method is useful for the quantitative evaluation of mechanical factors that affect KOA progression.

  10. Can a finite set of knee extension in supine position be used for a knee functional examination?

    PubMed

    Marin, F; Sangeux, M; Charleux, F; Ho Ba Tho, M-C; Dürselen, L

    2006-01-01

    The kinematic magnetic resonance imaging technique has been developed to provide a functional examination of the knee. Technical limitations require this examination to be performed in supine position, and the knee motion is represented by an assembly of static positions at different knee angles. However, the main knee function is to support the body weight and perform continuous motion, e.g. parallel squat. Our study quantified the knee kinematics of 20 healthy subjects in different motion conditions (finite and continuous) and in different mechanical conditions (continuous unloaded and continuous loaded). We evaluated the angular and localisation difference of a finite helical axis of the knee motion for parallel squat, continuous knee extension in supine position and the finite set of knee extension in supine position. We found large inter-individual dispersion. The majority of subjects had equivalent knee kinematics between continuous knee extension and the finite set of knee extension in supine position, but not between continuous knee extension in supine position and the parallel squat. Therefore, results from a functional examination of a finite set of knee extensions in supine position do not represent the knee motion in a parallel squat. Our results suggest that functional examination of the knee from magnetic resonance imaging do not necessarily reflect the physiological kinematics of the knee. Further investigation should focus on a new magnetic resonance imaging acquisition protocol that allows image acquisition during weight bearing or includes a special device which reproduces the loaded condition.

  11. [Chronic anterior and internal instabilities of the knee. Theoretical study. Clinical and radiological diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Lemaire, M; Miremad, C

    1983-01-01

    Antero-medial instability of the knee comprises 96 p. 100 of all knee instabilities. In most instances, the instability is moderate and cannot be analyzed without an adequate understanding of the anatomy and mechanics of the joint. They usually occur after forced movement in medial rotation which ruptures the anterior cruciate ligament and may rupture the postero-medial ligament. Less frequently, they appear after a strain in abduction, flexion and lateral rotation. Some degree of hyper-extension may be added to the primary causal strain. Diagnosis is mainly based on the physical examination which determines the type of surgical procedure that should be made. An anterior draw sign and a click in medial rotation are present when the anterior cruciate ligament is torn. When these signs are very marked, it implies an associated tear of the postero-medial ligament. Standard X-rays and arthrography are most important. Arthroscopy is not of great value and only makes it possible to visualize the meniscus lesions which are important for prognosis. The author describes an original concept of the mechanics of rotation of the knee and the pathogenesis of lesions of the medial capsulo-ligamentous layer.

  12. Ganglion cysts in the lateral portal region of the knee after arthroscopy: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Sever, Cem; Malkoc, Melih; Acar, Turker; Turkmen, Faik; Korkmaz, Ozgur; Oto, Onur

    2015-01-01

    A ganglion cyst (GC) is a mucinous or gelatinous-filled benign tumor overlying a joint or tendon sheath, which commonly arises in the dorsal and volar wrist side but may occur anywhere in the body. Although cystic lesions around the knee are common, the occurrence of GCs are rare. Ganglia may arise from intra or extra-articular, soft tissue, intraosseous, or periosteal location. Symptoms may vary according to the size and location. After the more frequent performance of magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of a knee joint, the number of incidental, asymptomatic lesions have been increasingly diagnosed. The etiology of GC remains unclear; however, trauma and a flaw in the joint tissues may explain its appearance. The authors report two cases of women aged 47 years and 37 years who presented pain and swelling in their left knees following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy. The former was surgically treated and had a favorable outcome, while the latter had conservative treatment and a gloomy outcome.

  13. Chronic cutaneous lesions of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Marchell, Richard M; Judson, Marc A

    2007-01-01

    Sarcoidosis involvement of the skin is common. The skin lesions of sarcoidosis may be nonspecific, showing a nondiagnostic inflammatory reaction pattern on histologic evaluation. Nonspecific skin lesions are often associated with an acute presentation of sarcoidosis and, in general, portend a good prognosis. Specific sarcoidosis skin lesions reveal typical sarcoid granulomas on histologic examination. These lesions tend to be chronic and require therapy for resolution. This article will review the epidemiology, diagnostic evaluation, and description of the various chronic skin lesions of sarcoidosis. Various images of these skin lesions will be demonstrated.

  14. [Managing focal incidental renal lesions].

    PubMed

    Nicolau, C; Paño, B; Sebastià, C

    2016-01-01

    Incidental renal lesions are relatively common in daily radiological practice. It is important to know the different diagnostic possibilities for incidentally detected lesions, depending on whether they are cystic or solid. The management of cystic lesions is guided by the Bosniak classification. In solid lesions, the goal is to differentiate between renal cancer and benign tumors such as fat-poor angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma. Radiologists need to know the recommendations for the management of these lesions and the usefulness of the different imaging techniques and interventional procedures in function of the characteristics of the incidental lesion and the patient's life expectancy.

  15. Penetrating Blast Injury to the Knee of a United States Soldier Treated with Allograft Mosaicplasty

    PubMed Central

    Eichinger, Maj. Josef K.; Bluman, Eric M.; Arrington, Col. Edward D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This is the first report of successful allograft mosaicplasty treatment of a large osteochondral lesion of the knee caused by a blast fragment sustained during combat operations. The patient was able to return to active duty following rehabilitation. Methods: An active-duty infantryman sustained an osteochondral lesion of the medial femoral condyle caused by a metallic fragment of an explosively formed projectile. Initial treatment consisted of removal of the foreign body and primary closure. The patient continued to experience pain, mechanical symptoms, and repeated effusions after initial nonoperative treatment. Allograft mosaicplasty of the lesion utilizing two 18-mm-diameter fresh allograft osteochondral plugs was performed at 6 months post-injury. Results: At 2-year follow-up, the patient remains on active duty with marked improvement in symptoms. Two years postoperatively, his outcome scores are 72 of 100 on the Western Ontario and McMaster University osteoarthritis scoring index (WOMAC) and 60 of 100 on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). His follow-up x-rays and MRI demonstrate intact articular cartilage and subchondral bone incorporation. Conclusion: Penetrating injuries to joints are commonplace in the battlefield environment. Combat injuries to the knee are frequently associated with articular cartilage injury. While numerous cartilage restoration techniques have been used with success for the treatment of osteochondral injuries to the femoral condyles, no published reports describe the use of allograft mosaicplasty in this location for open, penetrating injuries with focal cartilage loss. This is the first documented use of allograft mosaicplasty for a traumatic osteochondral defect of the medial femoral condyle caused by a metallic projectile. The patient was able to return to active duty following rehabilitation. We demonstrate a high level of functioning is possible following allograft mosaicplasty of a large

  16. Intraoperative knee anthropometrics: correlation with cartilage wear.

    PubMed

    Rooney, N; Fitzpatrick, D P; Beverland, D E

    2006-08-01

    Accurate knee morphology is of value in determining the correct sizing of prosthetic implants. Intraoperative measurement of key linear dimensional variables was carried out on 196 Caucasian knees (osteoarthritic patients: 68 male and 128 female). Of the 196 knees measured, 70 had extensive cartilage degeneration. Statistical analysis was carried out on this large sample size of data. Summary statistics and correlation coefficients between variables were determined and compared between subgroups. Male knees were on average larger than female knees. Higher correlation was found between variables for males than between variables for females. Overall, the patellar dimensions were seen to correlate least well with other anatomical variables. High correlation between femoral variables supports current femoral sizing procedure, although routine patellar resection practices are called into question. Average values for the 70 knees with extensive cartilage degeneration were significantly smaller (P < 0.01) than their counterparts for the other 126 knees. For a measurement not containing cartilage, such as femoral epicondylar width, this difference cannot be accounted for by the loss of cartilage owing to wear. This suggests that, for similar height and weight, a naturally narrower femoral epicondylar width may be associated with severe osteoarthritis.

  17. Translational and rotational knee joint stability in anterior and posterior cruciate-retaining knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lo, JiaHsuan; Müller, Otto; Dilger, Torsten; Wülker, Nikolaus; Wünschel, Markus

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated passive translational and rotational stability properties of the intact knee joint, after bicruciate-retaining bi-compartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) and after posterior cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fourteen human cadaveric knee specimens were used in this study, and a robotic manipulator with six-axis force/torque sensor was used to test the joint laxity in anterior-posterior translation, valgus-varus, and internal-external rotation. The results show the knee joint stability after bicruciate-retaining BKA is similar to that of the native knee. On the other hand, the PCL-retaining TKA results in inferior joint stability in valgus, varus, external rotation, anterior and, surprisingly, posterior directions. Our findings suggest that, provided functional ligamentous structures, bicruciate-retaining BKA is a biomechanically attractive treatment for joint degenerative disease.

  18. Human knee joint anatomy revisited: morphometry in the light of sex-specific total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dargel, Jens; Michael, Joern W P; Feiser, Janna; Ivo, Roland; Koebke, Juergen

    2011-04-01

    This study investigates differences in the anatomy of male and female knee joints to contribute to the current debate on sex-specific total knee implants. Morphometric data were obtained from 60 human cadaver knees, and sex differences were calculated. All data were corrected for height, and male and female specimens presenting with an identical length of the femur were analyzed as matched pairs. Male linear knee joint dimensions were significantly larger when compared with females. When corrected for differences in height, medial-lateral dimensions of male knees were significantly larger than female; however, matched paired analysis did not prove these differences to be consistent. Although implant design should focus interindividual variations in knee joint anatomy, our data do not support the concept of a female-specific implant design.

  19. Knee range of motion after total knee arthroplasty: how important is this as an outcome measure?

    PubMed

    Miner, Andrew L; Lingard, Elizabeth A; Wright, Elizabeth A; Sledge, Clement B; Katz, Jeffrey N

    2003-04-01

    We investigated the relationship of knee range of motion (ROM) and function in a prospective, observational study of primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Preoperative and 12-month data were collected on 684 patients, including knee ROM, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain and function questionnaire scores, patient satisfaction, and perceived improvement in quality of life (QOL). Only modest correlations were found between knee ROM and WOMAC function (r<0.34). At 12 months we found significantly worse WOMAC function scores for patients with <95 degrees flexion compared with patients with > or =95 degrees (mean, 61.9 vs 75.0; P<.0001). In linear regression models, WOMAC pain and function scores at 12 months were both correlates of patient satisfaction and perceived improvement in QOL (standardized beta>3.5; P<.0001), but knee flexion was not. For assessment of these outcomes, WOMAC function appears to be more important than knee flexion.

  20. In vivo knee kinematics during stair and deep flexion activities in patients with bicruciate substituting total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Yuji; Mu, Shang; Hamai, Satoshi; Robb, William J; Banks, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons and their patients continue to seek better functional outcomes after total knee arthroplasty. The bicruciate substituting (BCS) total knee arthroplasty design has been introduced to achieve more natural knee mechanics. The purpose of this study was to characterize kinematics in knees with BCS arthroplasty during deep flexion and stair activities using fluoroscopy and model-image registration. In 20 patients with 25 BCS knees, we observed average implant flexion of 128° during kneeling and consistent posterior condylar translations with knee flexion. Tibial rotations were qualitatively similar to those observed in the arthritic natural knee. Knee kinematics with BCS arthroplasty were qualitatively more similar to arthritic natural knees than knees with either posterior cruciate-retaining or posterior-stabilized arthroplasty.

  1. Osteotomies about the knee: AAOS exhibit selection.

    PubMed

    Uquillas, Carlos; Rossy, William; Nathasingh, Christopher K; Strauss, Eric; Jazrawi, Laith; Gonzalez-Lomas, Guillem

    2014-12-17

    Varus or valgus malalignment of the lower extremity can alter the load distribution across the knee and hasten the development of focal osteoarthritis. Although knee arthroplasty remains an effective option for end-stage arthritis, it is not typically recommended in the young, active patient. In the setting of painful unicompartmental cartilage injury in a mechanically malaligned limb, alignment correction by osteotomy has been shown to slow the progression of osteoarthritis and lessen pain. In this review, we will discuss the different options, indications, and techniques for osteotomies about the knee.

  2. Which osteotomy for a valgus knee?

    PubMed Central

    Cipolla, Massimo; Cerullo, Guglielmo; Franco, Vittorio; Giannì, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    A valgus knee is a disabling condition that can affect patients of all ages. Antivalgus osteotomy of the knee is the treatment of choice to correct the valgus, to eliminate pain in the young or middle age patient, and to avoid or delay a total knee replacement. A distal femoral lateral opening wedge procedure appears to be one of the choices for medium or large corrections and is particularly easy and precise if compared to the medial femoral closing wedge osteotomy. However, if the deformity is minimal, a tibial medial closing wedge osteotomy can be done with a faster healing and a short recovery time. PMID:19547972

  3. Gap balancing in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bottros, John; Gad, Bishoy; Krebs, Viktor; Barsoum, Wael K

    2006-06-01

    It is well known that the success of total knee arthroplasty is collectively dependent on the proper recreation of the joint line, appropriate soft tissue balancing, and respectful management of the extensor mechanism. One of the most decisive factors within the surgeon's control is the reestablishment of proper knee kinematics through both medial-lateral and flexion-extension ligamentous balancing. This can be accomplished only by a comprehensive intraoperative evaluation in full flexion, mid flexion, and full extension to minimize potential gap mismatches. Most of the discussion will focus on this aspect of soft tissue balancing, but this does not undermine the importance of the other aforementioned principles of successful knee arthroplasty.

  4. Proprioception and Knee Arthroplasty: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Wodowski, Andrew J; Swigler, Colin W; Liu, Hongchao; Nord, Keith M; Toy, Patrick C; Mihalko, William M

    2016-04-01

    Proprioceptive mechanoreceptors provide neural feedback for position in space and are critical for three-dimensional interaction. Proprioception is decreased with osteoarthritis of the knees, which leads to increased risk of falling. As the prevalence of osteoarthritis increases so does the need for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and knowing the effect of TKA on proprioception is essential. This article reviews the literature regarding proprioception and its relationship to balance, aging, osteoarthritis, and the effect of TKA on proprioception. Knee arthroplasty involving retention of the cruciate ligaments is also reviewed, as well the evidence of proprioception in the posterior cruciate ligament after TKA.

  5. Unicompartmental Knee Osteoarthritis (UKOA): Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty (UKA) or High Tibial Osteotomy (HTO)?

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E. Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review article is to analyze the results of high tibial osteotomy compared to unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in patients with unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis. The search engine used was PubMed. The keywords were: “high tibial osteotomy versus unicompartmental knee arthroplasty”. Twenty-one articles were found on 28 February 2015, but only eighteen were selected and reviewed because they strictly focused on the topic. In a meta-analysis the ratio for an excellent outcome was higher in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty than high tibial osteotomy and the risks of revision and complications were lower in the former. A prospective comparative study showed that unicompartmental knee arthroplasty offers better long-term success (77% for unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and 60% for high tibial osteotomy at 7-10 years). However, a review of the literature showed no evidence of superior results of one treatment over the other. A multicenter study stated that unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis without constitutional deformity should be treated with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty while in cases with constitutional deformity high tibial osteotomy should be indicated. A case control study stated that unicompartmental knee arthroplasty offers a viable alternative to high tibial osteotomy if proper patient selection is done. The literature is still controversial regarding the best surgical treatment for unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis (high tibial osteotomy or unicompartmental knee arthroplasty). However, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty utilization is increasing, while high tibial osteotomy utilization is decreasing, and a meta-analysis has shown better outcomes and less risk of revision and complications in the former. A systematic review has found that with correct patient selection, both procedures show effective and reliable results. However, prospective randomized studies are needed in order to answer the question of this article

  6. Biceps tendinitis as a cause of acute painful knee after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pandher, Dilbans Singh; Boparai, Randhir Singh; Kapila, Rajesh

    2009-12-01

    The case report highlights an unusual case of posterolateral knee pain after total knee arthroplasty. Tendinitis of the patellar tendon or pes anserinus is a common complication after total knee arthroplasty; however, there is no report in the literature regarding the biceps femoris tendinitis causing acute pain in the early postoperative period. In this case, the biceps tendinitis was diagnosed and treated by ultrasound-guided injection into the tendon sheath.

  7. Is Lifelong Knee Joint Force from Work, Home, and Sport Related to Knee Osteoarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Ratzlaff, Charles R.; Koehoorn, Mieke; Cibere, Jolanda; Kopec, Jacek A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the association of cumulative lifetime knee joint force on the risk of self-reported medically-diagnosed knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Exposure data on lifetime physical activity type (occupational, household, sport/recreation) and dose (frequency, intensity, duration) were collected from 4,269 Canadian men and women as part of the Physical Activity and Joint Heath cohort study. Subjects were ranked in terms of the “cumulative peak force index”, a measure of lifetime mechanical knee force. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to obtain adjusted effects for mean lifetime knee force on the risk of knee OA. Results. High levels of total lifetime, occupational and household-related force were associated with an increased in risk of OA, with odds ratio's ranging from approximately 1.3 to 2. Joint injury, high BMI and older age were related to risk of knee OA, consistent with previous studies. Conclusions. A newly developed measure of lifetime mechanical knee force from physical activity was employed to estimate the risk of self-reported, medically-diagnosed knee OA. While there are limitations, this paper suggests that high levels of total lifetime force (all domains combined), and occupational force in men and household force in women were risk factors for knee OA. PMID:22848225

  8. A comparative evaluation of the Adaptive knee and Catech knee joints: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Jepson, F; Datta, D; Harris, I; Heller, B; Howitt, J; McLean, J

    2008-03-01

    The Adaptive knee joint is a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee that incorporates both pneumatic and hydraulic control in one electronic unit. Pneumatic control is said to provide control during swing phase and the hydraulic control during the stance phase of the gait. This hybrid controller is triggered by a computer contained within the knee that responds to input from force, time and angle sensors. The microprocessor then selects an appropriate speed and stability setting. The Catech knee joint is a conventional hydraulic knee joint. The aim of this study was to compare the Adaptive and Catech knee joints in established trans-femoral amputees. The patients meeting the inclusion criteria were all established trans-femoral amputees using the Catech knee joint. The study was carried out by performing gait analysis, assessing energy requirements using the Physiological Cost Index (PCI) and using questionnaires. There was no significant benefit gained from the use of the Adaptive knee over the Catech knee joint in our small study group.

  9. EFFECTS OF THE GENIUM MICROPROCESSOR KNEE SYSTEM ON KNEE MOMENT SYMMETRY DURING HILL WALKING

    PubMed Central

    Highsmith, M. Jason; Klenow, Tyler D.; Kahle, Jason T.; Wernke, Matthew M.; Carey, Stephanie L.; Miro, Rebecca M.; Lura, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    Use of the Genium microprocessor knee (MPK) system reportedly improves knee kinematics during walking and other functional tasks compared to other MPK systems. This improved kinematic pattern was observed when walking on different hill conditions and at different speeds. Given the improved kinematics associated with hill walking while using the Genium, a similar improvement in the symmetry of knee kinetics is also feasible. The purpose of this study was to determine if Genium MPK use would reduce the degree of asymmetry (DoA) of peak stance knee flexion moment compared to the C-Leg MPK in transfemoral amputation (TFA) patients. This study used a randomized experimental crossover of TFA patients using Genium and C-Leg MPKs (n = 20). Biomechanical gait analysis by 3D motion tracking with floor mounted force plates of TFA patients ambulating at different speeds on 5° ramps was completed. Knee moment DoA was significantly different between MPK conditions in the slow and fast uphill as well as the slow and self-selected downhill conditions. In a sample of high-functioning TFA patients, Genium knee system accommodation and use improved knee moment symmetry in slow speed walking up and down a five degree ramp compared with C-Leg. Additionally, the Genium improved knee moment symmetry when walking downhill at comfortable speed. These results likely have application in other patients who could benefit from more consistent knee function, such as older patients and others who have slower walking speeds. PMID:28066523

  10. Improvements in knee biomechanics during walking are associated with increased physical activity after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Arnold, John B; Mackintosh, Shylie; Olds, Timothy S; Jones, Sara; Thewlis, Dominic

    2015-12-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in people with knee osteoarthritis increases knee-specific and general physical function, but it has not been established if there is a relationship between changes in these elements of functional ability. This study investigated changes and relationships between knee biomechanics during walking, physical activity, and use of time after TKA. Fifteen people awaiting TKA underwent 3D gait analysis before and six months after surgery. Physical activity and use of time were determined in free-living conditions from a high resolution 24-h activity recall. After surgery, participants displayed significant improvements in sagittal plane knee biomechanics and improved their physical activity profiles, standing for 105 more minutes (p=0.001) and performing 64 min more inside chores on average per day (p=0.008). Changes in sagittal plane knee range of motion (ROM) and peak knee flexion positively correlated with changes in total daily energy expenditure, time spent undertaking moderate to vigorous physical activity, inside chores and passive transport (r=0.52-0.66, p=0.005-0.047). Restoration of knee function occurs in parallel and is associated with improvements in physical activity and use of time after TKA. Increased functional knee ROM is required to support improvements in total and context specific physical activity.

  11. EFFECTS OF THE GENIUM MICROPROCESSOR KNEE SYSTEM ON KNEE MOMENT SYMMETRY DURING HILL WALKING.

    PubMed

    Highsmith, M Jason; Klenow, Tyler D; Kahle, Jason T; Wernke, Matthew M; Carey, Stephanie L; Miro, Rebecca M; Lura, Derek J

    2016-09-01

    Use of the Genium microprocessor knee (MPK) system reportedly improves knee kinematics during walking and other functional tasks compared to other MPK systems. This improved kinematic pattern was observed when walking on different hill conditions and at different speeds. Given the improved kinematics associated with hill walking while using the Genium, a similar improvement in the symmetry of knee kinetics is also feasible. The purpose of this study was to determine if Genium MPK use would reduce the degree of asymmetry (DoA) of peak stance knee flexion moment compared to the C-Leg MPK in transfemoral amputation (TFA) patients. This study used a randomized experimental crossover of TFA patients using Genium and C-Leg MPKs (n = 20). Biomechanical gait analysis by 3D motion tracking with floor mounted force plates of TFA patients ambulating at different speeds on 5° ramps was completed. Knee moment DoA was significantly different between MPK conditions in the slow and fast uphill as well as the slow and self-selected downhill conditions. In a sample of high-functioning TFA patients, Genium knee system accommodation and use improved knee moment symmetry in slow speed walking up and down a five degree ramp compared with C-Leg. Additionally, the Genium improved knee moment symmetry when walking downhill at comfortable speed. These results likely have application in other patients who could benefit from more consistent knee function, such as older patients and others who have slower walking speeds.

  12. Determination of representative dimension parameter values of Korean knee joints for knee joint implant design.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Dai Soon; Tao, Quang Bang; Todo, Mitsugu; Jeon, Insu

    2012-05-01

    Knee joint implants developed by western companies have been imported to Korea and used for Korean patients. However, many clinical problems occur in knee joints of Korean patients after total knee joint replacement owing to the geometric mismatch between the western implants and Korean knee joint structures. To solve these problems, a method to determine the representative dimension parameter values of Korean knee joints is introduced to aid in the design of knee joint implants appropriate for Korean patients. Measurements of the dimension parameters of 88 male Korean knee joint subjects were carried out. The distribution of the subjects versus each measured parameter value was investigated. The measured dimension parameter values of each parameter were grouped by suitable intervals called the "size group," and average values of the size groups were calculated. The knee joint subjects were grouped as the "patient group" based on "size group numbers" of each parameter. From the iterative calculations to decrease the errors between the average dimension parameter values of each "patient group" and the dimension parameter values of the subjects, the average dimension parameter values that give less than the error criterion were determined to be the representative dimension parameter values for designing knee joint implants for Korean patients.

  13. Effect of knee sleeve on static and dynamic balance in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Shih-Hung; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Chen, Tien-Wen; Weng, Ming-Chang; Liu, Chin-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2007-08-01

    Patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) find that use of elastic knee sleeves gives them partial pain relief and a greater sense of joint stability. However, the scientific effects of knee OA patients wearing braces are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of knee sleeves on static and dynamic balance in knee OA patients. Fifty patients with knee OA were enrolled in the study and all subjects were randomly divided into two groups. Initially, subjects in group A did not wear a neoprene sleeve while receiving balance tests but then wore them to be re-tested. Subjects in group B did just the reverse procedure. In this investigation, an instrument (KAT 2000; Breg Inc., Vista, CA, USA), which quantified motor control performance of the lower extremities was used and balance scores from the KAT 2000 software were obtained. The results revealed that the scores of patients wearing braces were significantly lower than those of patients without braces (p < 0.05).The finding of this study demonstrated that knee OA patients wearing knee sleeves could experience increased balance ability in both static and dynamic conditions. The improvement might prevent knee OA patients from falling down and increase their sense of security during physical activities.

  14. Gram stain of skin lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Skin lesion gram stain Images Viral lesion culture References Hall GS, Woods GL. Medical bacteriology. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  15. Lipoma Arborescens of the Knee: Report of Three Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kapoutsis, Dimitrios; Tzavellas, Anastasios-Nektarios; Kalaitzoglou, Ioannis; Tsikes, Apostolos; Gkouvas, George

    2017-01-01

    Lipoma arborescens is a chronic, slow-growing, intra-articular lesion of benign nature, which is characterized by villous proliferation of the synovium, with replacement of the subsynovial connective tissue by mature fat cells. It usually involves the suprapatellar pouch of the knee joint. It is not a neoplasm but is rather considered a nonspecific reactive response to chronic synovial irritation, due to either mechanical or inflammatory insults. We report three cases of lipoma arborescens affecting the knee, the first in a young male without previous history of arthritis or trauma, the second in a 58-year-old male associated with osteoarthritis, and the final in a 44-year-old male diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis, which cover the entire pathologic spectrum of this unusual entity. We highlight the clinical findings and imaging features, by emphasizing especially the role of MRI, in the differential diagnosis of other, more complex intra-articular masses. PMID:28243256

  16. McMurray Test: A Prediction of Arthroscopic Meniscectomy Outcomes in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng; Lin, Xiangjin; Zhu, Liulong; Li, Min

    2015-05-01

    The McMurray test is used to evaluate patients with meniscal tears of the knee. Analysis of the sensitivity and specificity of McMurray test and the correlation between McMurray sign and postoperative outcomes are helpful to screen the candidates for arthroscopic meniscectomy. The present study compares the results of McMurray test with arthroscopic examination in patients with knee osteoarthritis. We studied 149 patients diagnosed as meniscal lesion with osteoarthritis by radiology and had arthroscopic surgery. Our data show that positive McMurray sign implies good postoperative outcomes for the patients with meniscal tear associated with osteoarthritis. For patients with osteoarthritis, those whose positive McMurray signs are in line with their radiological findings indicate they are eligible candidates for arthroscopic meniscectomy. Our study suggests that McMurray sign can be used as an indication for both symptomatic meniscal tear and postoperative outcomes.

  17. Radiological assessment of irreducible posterolateral knee subluxation after dislocation due to interposition of the vastus medialis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Paulin, Emilie; Boudabbous, Sana; Nicodème, Jean-Damien; Arditi, Daniel; Becker, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    Knee dislocation is a serious and relatively uncommon traumatism that every emergency room is supposed to diagnose and treat rapidly. Most of the time these dislocations reduce spontaneously or with closed reduction. If a subluxation persists, an incarceration of soft tissue in the joint must be suspected. Irreducible knee subluxations after dislocation are rare entities better described in the orthopaedic than in the radiological literature. However, the initial radiological assessment is an important tool to obtain the correct diagnosis, to detect neurovascular complications, and to plan the most suitable treatment. In cases of delayed diagnosis, the functional prognosis of the joint and even the limb may be seriously compromised primarily because of vascular lesions. Thereby, vascular imaging is essential in cases of dislocation of the knee, and we will discuss the role of angiography and the more recent use of computed tomography angiography or magnetic resonance angiography. Our patient presented with an irreducible knee subluxation due to interposition of the vastus medialis, and we will review the classical clinical presentation and 'do not miss' imaging findings on conventional radiography, computed tomography angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Finally, we will also report the classical imaging pathway indicated in knee dislocation, with a special emphasis on the irreducible form.

  18. Lockable Knee Brace Speeds Rehabilitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center develops key transportation and propulsion technologies for the Space Agency. The Center manages propulsion hardware and technologies of the space shuttle, develops the next generation of space transportation and propulsion systems, oversees science and hardware development for the International Space Station, manages projects and studies that will help pave the way back to the Moon, and handles a variety of associated scientific endeavors to benefit space exploration and improve life here on Earth. It is a large and diversified center, and home to a great wealth of design skill. Some of the same mechanical design skill that made its way into the plans for rocket engines and advanced propulsion at this Alabama-based NASA center also worked its way into the design of an orthotic knee joint that is changing the lives of people with weakened quadriceps.

  19. Arthroscopic lysis in knee arthrofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, J; Vidal, C; Medina, E; Baena, J

    1993-01-01

    Arthrofibrosis continues to be a difficult complication in articular surgery on the knee. We present our experience in 21 cases of arthroscopic lysis as an alternative to mobilization under anesthesia. The technique begins with the liberation of the adhesions of the suprapatellar pouch, continues down both gutters, and ends with a cleaning of the notch where necessary. When a restriction of patellar mobility persists, we make a retinacular release. The results obtained are very satisfactory, with an average increase in the arc of mobility of 68 degrees. The average gain in mobility at 6 months is significantly greater than that achieved in the immediate postoperative period. Longer follow-up showed no improvement in range of motion after 6 months.

  20. NAVIGATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire

    2015-01-01

    Navigation was the most significant advance in instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty over the last decade. It provides surgeons with a precision tool for carrying out surgery, with the possibility of intraoperative simulation and objective control over various anatomical and surgical parameters and references. Since the first systems, which were basically used to control the alignment of bone cutting referenced to the mechanical axis of the lower limb, many other surgical steps have been incorporated, such as component rotation, ligament balancing and arranging the symmetry of flexion and extension spaces, among others. Its efficacy as a precision tool with an effective capacity for promoting better alignment of the lower-limb axis has been widely proven in the literature, but the real value of optimized alignment and the impact of navigation on clinical results and the longevity of arthroplasty have yet to be established. PMID:27026979

  1. MRI based knee cartilage assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, Dirk-Jan; Kowalski, Przemyslaw; Tekieli, Wojciech; Reeuwijk, Els; Saris, Daniel; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2012-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of pain and disability worldwide and a major health problem in developed countries due to the gradually aging population. Though the symptoms are easily recognized and described by a patient, it is difficult to assess the level of damage or loss of articular cartilage quantitatively. We present a novel method for fully automated knee cartilage thickness measurement and subsequent assessment of the knee joint. First, the point correspondence between a pre-segmented training bone model is obtained with use of Shape Context based non-rigid surface registration. Then, a single Active Shape Model (ASM) is used to segment both Femur and Tibia bone. The surfaces obtained are processed to extract the Bone-Cartilage Interface (BCI) points, where the proper segmentation of cartilage begins. For this purpose, the cartilage ASM is trained with cartilage edge positions expressed in 1D coordinates at the normals in the BCI points. The whole cartilage model is then constructed from the segmentations obtained in the previous step. An absolute thickness of the segmented cartilage is measured and compared to the mean of all training datasets, giving as a result the relative thickness value. The resulting cartilage structure is visualized and related to the segmented bone. In this way the condition of the cartilage is assessed over the surface. The quality of bone and cartilage segmentation is validated and the Dice's coefficients 0.92 and 0.86 for Femur and Tibia bones and 0.45 and 0.34 for respective cartilages are obtained. The clinical diagnostic relevance of the obtained thickness mapping is being evaluated retrospectively. We hope to validate it prospectively for prediction of clinical outcome the methods require improvements in accuracy and robustness.

  2. Quantifying Quadriceps Muscle Strength in Patients With ACL Injury, Focal Cartilage Lesions, and Degenerative Meniscus Tears

    PubMed Central

    Eitzen, Ingrid; Grindem, Hege; Nilstad, Agnethe; Moksnes, Håvard; Risberg, May Arna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reduced quadriceps strength influences knee function and increases the risk of knee osteoarthritis. Thus, it is of significant clinical relevance to precisely quantify strength deficits in patients with knee injuries. Purpose: To evaluate isokinetic concentric quadriceps muscle strength torque values, assessed both from peak torque and at specific knee flexion joint angles, in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, focal cartilage lesions, and degenerative meniscus tears. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data were synthesized from patients included in 3 previously conducted research projects: 2 prospective cohort studies and 1 randomized controlled trial. At the time of inclusion, all patients were candidates for surgery. Isokinetic concentric quadriceps muscle strength measurements (60 deg/s) were performed at baseline (preoperative status) and after a period of progressive supervised exercise therapy (length of rehabilitation period: 5 weeks for ACL injury, 12 weeks for cartilage lesions and degenerative meniscus). Outcome measures were peak torque and torque at specific knee flexion joint angles from 20° to 70°. All patients had unilateral injuries, and side-to-side deficits were calculated. For comparisons between and within groups, we utilized 1-way analysis of variance and paired t tests, respectively. Results: In total, 250 patients were included. At baseline, cartilage patients had the most severe deficit (39.7% ± 24.3%; P < .001). Corresponding numbers for ACL and degenerative meniscus subjects were 21.7% (±13.2%) and 20.7% (±16.3%), respectively. At retest, there was significant improvement in all groups (P < .001), with remaining deficits of 24.7% (±18.5%) for cartilage, 16.8% (±13.9%) for ACL, and 3.3% (±17.8%) for degenerative meniscus. Peak torque was consistently measured at 60° of knee flexion, whereas the largest mean deficits were measured at 30° at baseline and 70° at retest for the

  3. Hyperextended Knee: Cause of Serious Injury?

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 24, 2015. Brooks GP, et al. Treatment of knee injuries in the ... of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. "Mayo," "Mayo Clinic," "MayoClinic.org," "Mayo ...

  4. Is Running Bad for Your Knees?

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162903.html Is Running Bad for Your Knees? Study suggests it may ... THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Everybody believes running can leave you sore and swollen, right? Well, ...

  5. Deciding to have knee or hip replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hip In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ... the knee. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  6. Risks of hip and knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hip In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ... the knee. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  7. Periprosthetic Knee Infection: Ten Strategies That Work

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, Priscilla Ku; Diaz-Ledezma, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most serious complications following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The demand for TKA is rapidly increasing, resulting in a subsequent increase in infections involving knee prosthesis. Despite the existence of common management practices, the best approach for several aspects in the management of periprosthetic knee infection remains controversial. This review examines the current understanding in the management of the following aspects of PJI: preoperative risk stratification, preoperative antibiotics, preoperative skin preparation, outpatient diagnosis, assessing for infection in revision cases, improving culture utility, irrigation and debridement, one and two-stage revision, and patient prognostic information. Moreover, ten strategies for the management of periprosthetic knee infection based on available literature, and experience of the authors were reviewed. PMID:24368992

  8. American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Programs Performance & Quality Practice Management FARE – AAHKS Foundation Partner With AAHKS AAHKS Committee Orientation AJRR 2016 Annual Report Hip and Knee Online Exam Page AAHKS Business Reports AAHKS Committee Orientation AAHKS News 2014 AAHKS ...

  9. Knee System Utilizing Personalized Solutions Instrumentation

    MedlinePlus

    ATTUNE® Knee System utilizing the TRUMATCH® Personalized Solutions Instrumentation Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Computational Poromechanics of Human Knee Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Mojtaba; Li, LePing

    2012-02-01

    Extensive computer modeling has been performed in the recent decade to investigate the mechanical response of the healthy and repaired knee joints. Articular cartilages and menisci have been commonly modeled as single-phase elastic materials in the previous 3D simulations. A comprehensive study considering the interplay of the collagen fibers and fluid pressurization in the tissues in situ remains challenging. We have developed a 3D model of the human knee accounting for the mechanical function of collagen fibers and fluid flow in the cartilages and menisci. An anatomically accurate structure of the human knee was used for this purpose including bones, articular cartilages, menisci and ligaments. The fluid pressurization in the femoral cartilage and menisci under combined creep loading was investigated. Numerical results showed that fluid flow and pressure in the tissues played an important role in the mechanical response of the knee joint. The load transfer in the joint was clearly seen when the fluid pressure was considered.

  11. Obesity May Not Compromise Knee Surgery Success

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164282.html Obesity May Not Compromise Knee Surgery Success Results similar ... over 35, so it's unclear if more severe obesity might increase the risk of meniscal repair failure, ...

  12. MicroRNA-9 regulates the development of knee osteoarthritis through the NF-kappaB1 pathway in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ronghe; Liu, Ning; Luo, Simin; Huang, Weiguo; Zha, Zhengang; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It has been suggested that microRNA-9 (miR-9) is associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). This study was aimed to investigate the association between the mechanism of miR-9 targeting nuclear factor kappa-B1 (NF-κB1) and the proliferation and apoptosis of knee OA chondrocytes. Cartilage samples were collected from 25 patients with knee OA and 10 traumatic amputees, and another 15 OA rat models, together with 15 rats without knee OA lesions were also established. MiR-9 expressions in both knee OA cartilage and normal cartilage samples were detected using quantitative real-time PCR. The expressions of related genes (NF-κB1, IL-6, and MMP-13) in the two groups were also detected. Dual luciferase reporter gene assay was employed to examine the effect of miR-9 on the luciferase activity of NF-κB1 3′UTR. Knee OA chondrocytes were transfected with miR-9 mimics, miR-9 inhibitor, and NF-κB1 siRNA, respectively, and changes in cellular proliferation and apoptosis were detected via MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Western blotting assay was used to detect the expressions of NF-κB1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13). According to results from human OA samples and rat OA models, miR-9 was significantly downregulated in knee OA cartilage tissues compared with normal cartilage tissues (P < 0.01). The expressions of NF-κB1, IL-6, and MMP-13 in knee OA cartilage tissues were significantly higher than those in normal cartilage tissues (P < 0.01). Dual luciferase reporter gene assay showed that miR-9 could bind to the 3′UTR of NF-κB1 and significantly inhibit the luciferase activity by 37% (P < 0.01). Upregulation of miR-9 or downregulation of NF-κB1 could promote cell proliferation and suppress cell apoptosis. Conclusively, downregulated miR-9 can facilitate proliferation and antiapoptosis of knee OA chondrocytes by directly binding to NF-kB1, implying that stimulating miR-9

  13. Self-reported knee instability and activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis: results of the Amsterdam osteoarthritis cohort.

    PubMed

    van der Esch, Martin; Knoop, Jesper; van der Leeden, Marike; Voorneman, Ramon; Gerritsen, Martijn; Reiding, Dick; Romviel, Suzanne; Knol, Dirk L; Lems, Willem F; Dekker, Joost; Roorda, Leo D

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether self-reported knee instability is associated with activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), in addition to knee pain and muscle strength. A cohort of 248 patients diagnosed with knee OA was examined. Self-reported knee instability was defined as the perception of any episode of buckling, shifting, or giving way of the knee in the past 3 months. Knee pain was assessed using a numeric rating scale, and knee extensor and flexor strength were measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Activity limitations were measured by using the Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index physical function questionnaire, the timed Get Up and Go, and the timed stair climbing and three questionnaires evaluating walking, climbing stairs, and rising from a chair. Other potential determinants of activity limitations were also collected, including joint proprioception, joint laxity, age, sex, body mass index (BMI), disease duration, and radiographic disease severity. Regression analyses evaluated the effect of adding self-reported knee instability to knee pain and muscle strength, when examining associations with the activity limitations measures. Self-reported knee instability was common (65 %) in this cohort of patients with knee OA. Analyses revealed that self-reported knee instability is significantly associated with activity limitations, even after controlling for knee pain and muscle strength. Joint proprioception, joint laxity, age, sex, BMI, duration of complaints, and radiographic severity did not confound the associations. In conclusion, self-reported knee instability is associated with activity limitations in patients with knee OA, in addition to knee pain and muscle strength. Clinically, self-reported knee instability should be assessed in addition to knee pain and muscle strength.

  14. Tantalum Cones in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eric G; Patel, Nirav K; Chughtai, Morad; Elmallah, Randa D K; Delanois, Ronald E; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-11-01

    The best strategy to address large bony defects in revision total knee arthroplasty has yet to be determined. The relatively recent development of porous tantalum cones and their use to address massive bone loss in knee arthroplasty has shown promising short- and intermediate-term results. The purpose of this review is to present the current literature on: (1) basic science of porous tantalum, (2) classification and treatment for bone loss, (3) clinical results, and (4) evolution of newer generation cones.

  15. Multibody dynamic simulation of knee contact mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Yanhong; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2006-01-01

    Multibody dynamic musculoskeletal models capable of predicting muscle forces and joint contact pressures simultaneously would be valuable for studying clinical issues related to knee joint degeneration and restoration. Current three-dimensional multi-body knee models are either quasi-static with deformable contact or dynamic with rigid contact. This study proposes a computationally efficient methodology for combining multibody dynamic simulation methods with a deformable contact knee model. The methodology requires preparation of the articular surface geometry, development of efficient methods to calculate distances between contact surfaces, implementation of an efficient contact solver that accounts for the unique characteristics of human joints, and specification of an application programming interface for integration with any multibody dynamic simulation environment. The current implementation accommodates natural or artificial tibiofemoral joint models, small or large strain contact models, and linear or nonlinear material models. Applications are presented for static analysis (via dynamic simulation) of a natural knee model created from MRI and CT data and dynamic simulation of an artificial knee model produced from manufacturer’s CAD data. Small and large strain natural knee static analyses required 1 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact conditions except for peak pressure, which was higher for the large strain model. Linear and nonlinear artificial knee dynamic simulations required 10 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact force and torque but different contact pressures, which were lower for the nonlinear model due to increased contact area. This methodology provides an important step toward the realization of dynamic musculoskeletal models that can predict in vivo knee joint motion and loading simultaneously. PMID:15564115

  16. OSTEOCHONDRITIS DISSECANS OF THE KNEE: DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Mestriner, Luiz Aurélio

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a pathological process affecting the subchondral bone of the knee in children and adolescents with open growth plates (juvenile OCD) and young adults with closed growth plates (adult OCD). It may lead to secondary effects on joint cartilage, such as pain, edema, possible formation of free bodies and mechanical symptoms, including joint locking. OCD may lead to degenerative changes may develop if left untreated. This article presents a review and update on this problem, with special emphasis on diagnosis and treatment. The latter may include either conservative methods, which show more predictable results for juvenile OCD, or various surgical methods, which include reparative techniques like isolated removal of the fragment, bone drilling and fixation of the osteochondral fragments, and restorative techniques like microfractures, autologous osteochondral transplantation (mosaicplasty), autologous chondrocyte implantation and fresh osteochondral allograft, depending on lesion stability, lesion viability, skeletal maturity and OCD process location. Recent assessments on the results from several types of treatment have shown that there is a lack of studies with reliable levels of evidence and have suggested that further multicenter prospective randomized and controlled studies on management of this disease should be conducted. PMID:27047865

  17. Knee Instability and Basic and Advanced Function Decline in Persons with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Leena; Chmiel, Joan S.; Almagor, Orit; Moisio, Kirsten; Chang, Alison H.; Belisle, Laura; Zhang, Yunhui; Hayes, Karen W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Manifestations of instability in knee OA include low overall knee confidence, low confidence that the knees will not buckle, buckling, and excessive motion during gait. Confidence and buckling may particularly influence activity choices, contributing to events leading to disability. Buckling is more likely to affect advanced than basic functional tasks. In this prospective, longitudinal study, we tested the hypotheses: overall knee confidence, buckling confidence, buckling, and frontal plane motion during gait are associated with advanced 2-year function outcome in persons with knee OA. Methods Persons with knee OA were queried about overall knee confidence (higher worse), buckling confidence, and knee buckling, and underwent quantitative gait analysis to quantify varus-valgus excursion and angular velocity. Physical function was assessed using the LLFDI Basic and Advanced Lower Extremity Domain scores. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between baseline instability measures and baseline-to-2-year function outcome, adjusting for potential confounders. Results 212 persons (mean age 64.6 years, 76.9% women) comprised the sample. Buckling was significantly associated with poor advanced (adjusted OR 2.08, 95% CI: 1.03–4.20) but not basic function outcome. Overall knee confidence was significantly associated with advanced outcome (adjusted OR 1.65, 95% CI: 1.01–2.70), while associations between buckling confidence and both outcomes approached significance. Neither varus-valgus excursion nor angular velocity during gait was associated with either outcome. Conclusion Knee buckling and confidence were each associated with poor 2-year advanced function outcome. Current treatment does not address these modifiable factors; interventions to address them may improve outcome in knee OA. PMID:25732594

  18. Injury risk curves for the skeletal knee-thigh-hip complex for knee-impact loading.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Jonathan D; Flannagan, Carol A C; Kuppa, Shashi M

    2010-01-01

    Injury risk curves for the skeletal knee-thigh-hip (KTH) relate peak force applied to the anterior aspect of the flexed knee, the primary source of KTH injury in frontal motor-vehicle crashes, to the probability of skeletal KTH injury. Previous KTH injury risk curves have been developed from analyses of peak knee-impact force data from studies where knees of whole cadavers were impacted. However, these risk curves either neglect the effects of occupant gender, stature, and mass on KTH fracture force, or account for them using scaling factors derived from dimensional analysis without empirical support. A large amount of experimental data on the knee-impact forces associated with KTH fracture are now available, making it possible to estimate the effects of subject characteristics on skeletal KTH injury risk by statistically analyzing empirical data. Eleven studies were identified in the biomechanical literature in which the flexed knees of whole cadavers were impacted. From these, peak knee-impact force data and the associated subject characteristics were reanalyzed using survival analysis with a lognormal distribution. Results of this analysis indicate that the relationship between peak knee-impact force and the probability of KTH fracture is a function of age, total body mass, and whether the surface that loads the knee is rigid. Comparisons between injury risk curves for the midsize adult male and small adult female crash test dummies defined in previous studies and new risk curves for these sizes of occupants developed in this study suggest that previous injury risk curves generally overestimate the likelihood of KTH fracture at a given peak knee-impact force. Future work should focus on defining the relationships between impact force at the human knee and peak axial compressive forces measured by load cells in the crash test dummy KTH complex so that these new risk curves can be used with ATDs.

  19. Design and cadaveric validation of a novel device to quantify knee stability during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Siston, Robert A; Maack, Thomas L; Hutter, Erin E; Beal, Matthew D; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2012-11-01

    The success of total knee arthroplasty depends, in part, on the ability of the surgeon to properly manage the soft tissues surrounding the joint, but an objective definition as to what constitutes acceptable postoperative joint stability does not exist. Such a definition may not exist due to lack of suitable instrumentation, as joint stability is currently assessed by visual inspection while the surgeon manipulates the joint. Having the ability to accurately and precisely measure knee stability at the time of surgery represents a key requirement in the process of objectively defining acceptable joint stability. Therefore, we created a novel sterilizable device to allow surgeons to measure varus-valgus, internal-external, or anterior-posterior stability of the knee during a total knee arthroplasty. The device can be quickly adjusted between 0 deg and 90 deg of knee flexion. The device interfaces with a custom surgical navigation system, which records the resultant rotations or translations of the knee while the surgeon applies known loads to a patient's limb with a handle instrumented with a load cell. We validated the performance of the device by having volunteers use it to apply loads to a mechanical linkage that simulated a knee joint; we then compared the joint moments calculated by our stability device against those recorded by a load cell in the simulated knee joint. Validation of the device showed low mean errors (less than 0.21 ± 1.38 Nm and 0.98 ± 3.93 N) and low RMS errors (less than 1.5 Nm and 5 N). Preliminary studies from total knee arthroplasties performed on ten cadaveric specimens also demonstrate the utility of our new device. Eventually, the use of this device may help determine how intra-operative knee stability relates to postoperative function and could lead to an objective definition of knee stability and more efficacious surgical techniques.

  20. Klatskin-Like Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Senthil Kumar, M. P.; Marudanayagam, R.

    2012-01-01

    Hilar cholangiocarcinoma, also known as Klatskin tumour, is the commonest type of cholangiocarcinoma. It poses unique problems in the diagnosis and management because of its anatomical location. Curative surgery in the form of major hepatic resection entails significant morbidity. About 5–15% of specimens resected for presumed Klatskin tumour prove not to be cholangiocarcinomas. There are a number of inflammatory, infective, vascular, and other pathologies, which have overlapping clinical and radiological features with a Klatskin tumour, leading to misinterpretation. This paper aims to summarise the features of such Klatskin-like lesions that have been reported in surgical literature. PMID:22811587

  1. Cystic Lesions of the Mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Daniel; Suby-Long, Thomas; Restrepo, Carlos S

    2016-06-01

    Cystic lesions are commonly seen in the mediastinum, and they may arise from virtually any organ. The vast majority of these lesions are benign and result in no symptoms. When large, cysts may produce symptoms related to compression of adjacent structures. The most common mediastinal cysts are pericardial and foregut duplication cysts. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance are routinely used to evaluate these lesions. Although computed tomography offers superior spatial resolution, magnetic resonance is useful in differentiating cysts that contain proteinaceous material from solid lesions. Occasionally, cysts arise from solid lesions, such as thymoma or teratoma. Although cysts are alike in appearance, location helps narrowing the differential diagnoses.

  2. Quantifying knee mechanics during balance training exercises.

    PubMed

    Benson, Lauren C; Almonroeder, Thomas G; O'Connor, Kristian M

    2017-01-01

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is common among runners and those recovering from anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Training programs designed to prevent or treat injuries often include balance training, although balance interventions have been reported to coincide with more knee injuries. Knowledge of the effect of balance exercises on knee mechanics may be useful when designing training programs. High knee abduction moment has been implicated in the development of PFP, and imbalance between vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis oblique (VMO) may contribute to patellofemoral stress. The purpose was to quantify knee abduction moment and vasti muscle activity during balance exercises. Muscle activity of VMO and VL, three-dimensional lower-extremity kinematics, and ground reaction forces of healthy recreational athletes (12M, 13F) were recorded during five exercises. Peak knee abduction moment, ratio of VMO:VL activity, and delay in onset of VMO relative to VL were quantified for each exercise. The influence of sex and exercise on each variable was determined using a mixed-model ANOVA. All analyses indicated a significant main effect of exercise, p<0.05. Follow-up comparisons showed low peak knee abduction moment and high VMO:VL ratio for the task with anterior-posterior motion. Delay of VMO relative to VL was similar among balance board tasks.

  3. Arthroscopic treatment of the septic knee.

    PubMed

    Smith, M J

    1986-01-01

    Pyarthrosis of the knee was treated in 30 patients by arthroscopic decompression and lavage, coupled with parenteral and oral antibiotics. There were 21 men and nine women patients whose ages ranged from 6 months to 65 years of age. Twenty-two patients were considered to have a hematogenous origin as a cause of their pyarthrosis, and eight were caused by penetrating trauma. Twenty-eight of these patients had the onset of symptoms within 72 h prior to arthroscopy. Two adults had the onset of their symptoms 1 week prior to treatment. Follow-up has ranged from 6 months to 5 years. Staphylococcus aureus was cultured in 20 knees, Streptococcus pneumonia in three knees, Haemophilus influenzae in four knees, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in one knee. The average hospital stay among 22 children aged 12 years or younger was 3.50 days. The other eight patients had an average hospital stay of 9.50 days. Three adults with diabetes and other medical problems, such as renal failure, had an average hospital stay of 17.33 days. Excellent results were obtained in 28 (93.3%) of 30 patients and good results were obtained in two (6.7%) of 30 patients. There were no poor results or recurrences, and no cases of osteomyelitis occurred. This method of treatment markedly reduces the morbidity and hospital stay of patients with a septic knee.

  4. Associations of knee muscle force, bone malalignment, and knee-joint laxity with osteoarthritis in elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Kazumasa; Maeda, Misako

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] From the viewpoint of prevention of knee osteoarthritis, the aim of this study was to verify how muscle strength and joint laxity are related to knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects consisted of 90 community-dwelling elderly people aged more than 60 years (22 males, 68 females). Femorotibial angle alignment, knee joint laxity, knee extensors and flexor muscle strengths were measured in all subjects. In addition, the subjects were divided into four groups based on the presence of laxity and knee joint deformation, and the muscle strength values were compared. [Results] There was no significant difference in knee extensor muscle strength among the four groups. However, there was significant weakness of the knee flexor muscle in the group with deformation and laxity was compared with the group without deformation and laxity. [Conclusion] Decreased knee flexor muscle strengths may be involved in knee joint deformation. The importance of muscle strength balance was also considered. PMID:28356631

  5. Associations of knee muscle force, bone malalignment, and knee-joint laxity with osteoarthritis in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kazumasa; Maeda, Misako

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] From the viewpoint of prevention of knee osteoarthritis, the aim of this study was to verify how muscle strength and joint laxity are related to knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects consisted of 90 community-dwelling elderly people aged more than 60 years (22 males, 68 females). Femorotibial angle alignment, knee joint laxity, knee extensors and flexor muscle strengths were measured in all subjects. In addition, the subjects were divided into four groups based on the presence of laxity and knee joint deformation, and the muscle strength values were compared. [Results] There was no significant difference in knee extensor muscle strength among the four groups. However, there was significant weakness of the knee flexor muscle in the group with deformation and laxity was compared with the group without deformation and laxity. [Conclusion] Decreased knee flexor muscle strengths may be involved in knee joint deformation. The importance of muscle strength balance was also considered.

  6. Nonuniform Weakness in the Paretic Knee and Compensatory Strength Gains in the Nonparetic Knee Occurs after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lomaglio, Melanie J.; Eng, Janice J.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was designed to quantify torque production at different joint angles in the paretic and non-paretic knee joints of individuals with stroke. Methods Extension and flexion torques were measured at 6 angles of the knee joint and normalized to peak torque in 19 subjects with stroke and 19 controls. Results Paretic knee extension torque was lower than controls when the knee was positioned near extension. In contrast, nonparetic knee extension and flexion torques were higher than controls when the knee was positioned near full flexion. Conclusions The paretic knee extensors demonstrated exaggerated weakness at short muscle lengths and the nonparetic knee extensors and flexors demonstrated selective strength gains. Clinicians should therefore consider paretic knee extensor strengthening near full extension and promote symmetrical use of the legs to prevent compensatory overuse of the non-paretic leg. PMID:18946213

  7. Knee Osteochondritis Dissecans Treated by the AO Hook Fixation System: A Four Year Follow-Up of an Alternative Technique

    PubMed Central

    Pengas, Ioannis P; Assiotis, Angelos; Kokkinakis, Michail; Khan, Wasim S; Meyers, Paul; Arbuthnot, James; Mcnicholas, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Surgical fixation is recommended for stable osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions that have failed nonoperative management and for all unstable lesions. In this study we set out to describe and evaluate an alternative method of surgical fixation for such lesions. Five knees with unstable OCD lesions in four male adolescent patients with open physes were treated with the AO Hook Fixation System. The outcome was evaluated both clinically and with three separate outcome systems (IKDC 2000, KOOS, Lysholm) at one and a mean four year follow-up. We demonstrated excellent clinical results in all patients. At four years, all scoring systems demonstrated statistically significant improvement when compared to the preoperative status. Our study suggests that the AO Hook Fixation System is an alternative method of surgical intervention with comparable medium term results with other existing modes of fixation and the added biomechanical advantage of the absence of distracting forces during hardware removal. PMID:25067976

  8. Effect of center of pressure modulation on knee adduction moment in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Haim, Amir; Wolf, Alon; Rubin, Guy; Genis, Yulya; Khoury, Mona; Rozen, Nimrod

    2011-11-01

    The knee adduction moment (KAM) provides a major contribution to the elevated load in the medial compartment of the knee. An abnormally high KAM has been linked with the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Footwear-generated biomechanical manipulations reduce the magnitude of this moment by conveying a more laterally shifted trajectory of the foot's center of pressure (COP), reducing the distance between the ground reaction force and the center of the knee joint, thus lowering the magnitude of the torque. We sought to examine the outcome of a COP shift in a cohort of female patients suffering from medial knee OA. Twenty-two female patients suffering from medial compartment knee OA underwent successive gait analysis testing and direct pedobarographic examination of the COP trajectory with a foot-worn biomechanical device allowing controlled manipulation of the COP. Modulation of the COP coronal trajectory from medial to lateral offset resulted in a significant reduction of the KAM. This trend was demonstrated in subjects with mild-to-moderate OA and in patients suffering from severe stages of the disease. Our results indicate that controlled manipulation of knee coronal kinetics in individuals suffering from medial knee OA can be facilitated by customized COP modification.

  9. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... percent for at least four hours prior to a test. (2) Mount the test material and secure it to a rigid test... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES...

  10. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 70 percent for at least four hours prior to a test. (2) Mount the test material and secure it to a... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST...

  11. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the test material and secure it to a rigid test fixture as shown in Figure O5. No part of the foot or... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST...

  12. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 70 percent for at least four hours prior to a test. (2) Mount the test material and secure it to a... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST...

  13. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the test material and secure it to a rigid test fixture as shown in Figure O5. No part of the foot or... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST...

  14. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the test material and secure it to a rigid test fixture as shown in Figure O5. No part of the foot or... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST...

  15. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... percent for at least four hours prior to a test. (2) Mount the test material and secure it to a rigid test... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES...

  16. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... percent for at least four hours prior to a test. (2) Mount the test material and secure it to a rigid test... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES...

  17. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... percent for at least four hours prior to a test. (2) Mount the test material and secure it to a rigid test... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES...

  18. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the test material and secure it to a rigid test fixture as shown in Figure O5. No part of the foot or... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST...

  19. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 70 percent for at least four hours prior to a test. (2) Mount the test material and secure it to a... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST...

  20. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the test material and secure it to a rigid test fixture as shown in Figure O5. No part of the foot or... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST...

  1. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... percent for at least four hours prior to a test. (2) Mount the test material and secure it to a rigid test... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES...

  2. [Knee joint distraction: a solution for young patients with osteoarthritis of the knee?

    PubMed

    Piscaer, T M; van der Jagt, O P; Gosens, T

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment for patients with end-stage generalised osteoarthritis of the knee is total knee replacement. In a recent paper in Plos One the authors examined an alternative approach, namely knee joint distraction. On the basis of a model, they claim that this treatment can postpone total knee replacement for about 20 years. This would reduce the costs for the healthcare services and improve quality of life for these patients. Although these claims seem promising, the model is only based on extrapolations of short-term results of small cohort studies. Furthermore, concerns about potential complications, e.g. osteomyelitis following pin-tract infections, are not mentioned. Further high quality studies in knee joint distraction are needed to prove its long-term efficacy and safety before this procedure can be implemented in standard clinical care.

  3. Co-delivery of adipose-derived stem cells and growth factor-loaded microspheres in RGD-grafted N-methacrylate glycol chitosan gels for focal chondral repair.

    PubMed

    Sukarto, Abby; Yu, Claire; Flynn, Lauren E; Amsden, Brian G

    2012-08-13

    The coencapsulation of growth factor-loaded microspheres with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) within a hydrogel matrix was studied as a potential means to enhance ASC chondrogenesis in the development of a cell-based therapeutic strategy for the regeneration of partial thickness chondral defects. A photopolymerizable N-methacrylate glycol chitosan (MGC) was employed to form an in situ gel used to encapsulate microspheres loaded with bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP-6) and transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3) with human ASCs. ASC viability and retention were enhanced when the Young's modulus of the MGC ranged between 225 and 380 kPa. Grafting an RGD-containing peptide onto the MGC backbone (RGD-MGC) improved ASC viability within the gels, remaining at greater than 90% over 14 days in culture. The effects of BMP-6 and TGF-β3 released from the polymer microspheres on ASC chondrogenesis were assessed, and the level of differentiation was compared to ASCs in control gels containing nongrowth factor-loaded microspheres cultured with and without the growth factors supplied in the medium. There was enhanced expression of chondrogenic markers at earlier time points when the ASCs were induced with the sustained and local release of BMP-6 and TGF-β3 from the microspheres. More specifically, the normalized glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II protein expression levels were significantly higher than in the controls. In addition, the ratio of collagen type II to type I was significantly higher in the microsphere delivery group and increased over time. End-point RT-PCR analysis supported that there was a more rapid induction and enhancement of ASC chondrogenesis in the controlled release group. Interestingly, in all of the assays, there was evidence of chondrogenic differentiation when the ASCs were cultured in the gels in the absence of growth factor stimulation. Overall, the co-delivery of growth-factor-loaded microspheres and ASCs in RGD-modified MGC gels

  4. Human papillomavirus in oral lesions.

    PubMed

    González, Joaquín V; Gutiérrez, Rafael A; Keszler, Alicia; Colacino, Maria del Carmen; Alonio, Lidia V; Teyssie, Angelica R; Picconi, Maria Alejandra

    2007-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral cancer; however its involvement is still controversial. This study evaluates the frequency of HPV DNA in a variety of oral lesions in patients from Argentina. A total of 77 oral tissue samples from 66 patients were selected (cases); the clinical-histopathological diagnoses corresponded to: 11 HPV- associated benign lesions, 8 non-HPV associated benign lesions, 33 premalignant lesions and 25 cancers. Sixty exfoliated cell samples from normal oral mucosa were used as controls. HPV detection and typing were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers MY09, 11, combined with RFLP or alternatively PCR using primers GP5+, 6+ combined with dot blot hybridization. HPV was detected in 91.0% of HPV- associated benign lesions, 14.3% of non-HPV associated benign lesions, 51.5% of preneoplasias and 60.0% of cancers. No control sample tested HPV positive. In benign HPV- associated lesions, 30.0% of HPV positive samples harbored high-risk types, while in preneoplastic lesions the value rose to 59.9%. In cancer lesions, HPV detection in verrucous carcinoma was 88.9% and in squamous cell carcinoma 43.8%, with high-risk type rates of 75.5% and 85.6%, respectively. The high HPV frequency detected in preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions supports an HPV etiological role in at least a subset of oral cancers.

  5. Position controlled Knee Rehabilitation Orthotic Device for Patients after Total Knee Replacement Arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wannaphan, Patsiri; Chanthasopeephan, Teeranoot

    2016-11-01

    Knee rehabilitation after total knee replacement arthroplasty is essential for patients during their post-surgery recovery period. This study is about designing one degree of freedom knee rehabilitation equipment to assist patients for their post-surgery exercise. The equipment is designed to be used in sitting position with flexion/extension of knee in sagittal plane. The range of knee joint motion is starting from 0 to 90 degrees angle for knee rehabilitation motion. The feature includes adjustable link for different human proportions and the torque feedback control at knee joint during rehabilitation and the control of flexion/extension speed. The motion of the rehabilitation equipment was set to move at low speed (18 degrees/sec) for knee rehabilitation. The rehabilitation link without additional load took one second to move from vertical hanging up to 90° while the corresponding torque increased from 0 Nm to 2 Nm at 90°. When extra load is added, the link took 1.5 seconds to move to 90° The torque is then increased from 0 Nm to 4 Nm. After a period of time, the speed of the motion can be varied. User can adjust the motion to 40 degrees/sec during recovery activity of the knee and users can increase the level of exercise or motion up to 60 degrees/sec to strengthen the muscles during throughout their rehabilitation program depends on each patient. Torque control is included to prevent injury. Patients can use the equipment for home exercise to help reduce the number of hospital visit while the patients can receive an appropriate therapy for their knee recovery program.

  6. Exercise and knee osteoarthritis: benefit or hazard?

    PubMed Central

    Bosomworth, Neil J.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine whether physical exercise constitutes a benefit or a risk in the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE, EMBASE, DARE, ACP Journal Club, and Cochrane databases were searched from registry inception to January 2009 using MeSH headings or text words, including osteoarthritis, arthritis and knee and exercise, physical training, and run. Reference lists from retrieved articles, citation listings when available, and related articles suggested in PubMed were also evaluated. For individuals without osteoarthritis, strong level II evidence was found (limited by problems with blinding and randomization); for those with pre-existing knee osteoarthritis, robust level I evidence was available. MAIN MESSAGE Knee osteoarthritis is a major contributor to disability in seniors, and patients have expressed concern that continued exercise might lead to knee symptoms in later years. Studies done on subjects self-selected for exercise and followed for substantial periods of time show no evidence of accelerated development of osteoarthritis, provided injury is avoided. Further, there is good evidence for reduced pain and disability with exercise in this cohort compared with controls. Patients with established osteoarthritis are shown to derive uniform benefit to physical functioning, with reduction of pain and disability, using aerobic, muscle strengthening, aquatic, or physiotherapy-based exercise modalities. CONCLUSION Provided trauma is avoided, moderate exercise does not lead to acceleration of knee osteoarthritis, whether or not there is evidence of pre-existing disease. In either case there appears to be improved physical functioning and reduction of pain and disability in those who exercise. It is likely that exercise interventions are underused in the management of established knee osteoarthritis symptoms. PMID:19752252

  7. Primary cartilage lesions and outcome among subjects with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kettunen, Jyrki A; Visuri, Tuomo; Harilainen, Arsi; Sandelin, Jerker; Kujala, Urho M

    2005-03-01

    We investigated the association between cartilage lesion and future symptoms in two groups of subjects with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Group A consisted of 31 men (mean age 20.9 years, range 19-32) and group B of 28 consecutive patients (12 men and 16 women; mean age 27.8 years, range 15-50) operated on for PFPS. The mean follow-up time was 3.4 (range 1-7) years in group A and 4.9 (range 1-6) years in group B. At follow-up the subjects in group A with severe cartilage lesion (n = 10) reported more knee symptoms as measured by their Kujala score (mean 75.1, SE 3.6 vs. 88.5, SE 2.4) than those with minor cartilage lesion (n = 21) (age and follow-up time-adjusted P < 0.01). In group B the subjects with severe cartilage lesion tended to report more knee symptoms according to their Kujala score (mean 71.0, SE 7.0 vs. 86.1, SE 5.9; age, sex and follow-up time-adjusted P = 0.15) and VAS score (mean 51.8, SE 11.8 vs. 12.7, SE 10.4; adjusted P = 0.04) than the subjects without cartilage lesion. Our study shows that among the patients with PFPS, the subjects with severe cartilage lesion of the patella or femoral trochlea reported more subjective symptoms and functional limitations at follow-up than those without or with small cartilage lesion of the patella or femoral trochlea.

  8. A Case of Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the Knee with Early and Simultaneous Involvement of the Medial Femoral Condyle and Medial Tibial Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Shinya; Arai, Yuji; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK) usually involves a single condyle, most often the medial femoral condyle (MFC). Involvement of the medial tibial plateau (MTP) is less common, occurring in about 2% of knees with SPONK. Early onset SPONK on the ipsilateral side of the medial compartment is very rare, with, to our knowledge, only four cases reported to date. We describe a very rare case of SPONK with early simultaneous development in the MFC and MTP. Serial plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging showed that SPONK in both condyles followed a similar progressive course. The pathological findings in these lesions were similar to those observed in subchondral insufficiency fractures. PMID:27242941

  9. Automated Estimation Of Lesion Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttimann, Urs E.; Webber, Richard L.; Groenhuis, Roelf A. J.; Troullos, Emanuel; Rethman, Michael T.

    1985-06-01

    Two methods were studied of estimating automatically the relative volume of local lesions in digital subtractions radiographs. The first method approximates the projected, lesion area by an equivalent circular area, and the second by an equivalent polygonal area. Lesion volume is estimated in both methods as equivalent area times the average gray-level difference between the detected area and the surrounding background. Regression results of the estimated relative volume versus the calibrated size of lesions induced in dry human mandibles showed the polygonal approximation to be superior. This method also permitted successful monitoring of bone remodelling during the healing process of surgically induced lesions in dogs. The quantitative results, as well as the examples from in vivo lesions demonstrate feasibility and clinically relavance of the methodology.

  10. Functional state of knee arthritis patients and related factors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiyeon; Kim, Jung-Hee; Chung, EunJung; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study is to provide a direction for efficient management of arthritis through the analysis of multiple factors related to the functional state of patients. [Subjects and Methods] The Visual Analog Scale, Knee Society Knee Score & Function Score, Hospital for Special Surgery, Short Form-36 Health Survey and Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index for a total of 135 patients with knee arthritis were determined with a survey. [Results] There is a significant correlation between age, pain, Knee Society Knee Score, Hospital for Special Surgery, Knee Society Function Score, and Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score. [Conclusion] It is necessary to improve the factors that affect knee function and quality of life, and a study on knee joint muscle strength is suggested as a follow-up study. PMID:28265166

  11. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker; Han, Jeong S; Adwanikar, Hita; Fu, Yu; Ji, Guangchen

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review. PMID:17391515

  12. Joint Line Reconstruction in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-16

    Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Because of; Loosening; Instability; Impingement; or Other Reasons Accepted as Indications for TKA Exchange.; The Focus is to Determine the Precision of Joint Line Restoration in Navigated vs. Conventional Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

  13. Getting your home ready - knee or hip surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... if it is placed in a bathtub. Avoiding Falls Keep tripping hazards out of your home. Remove ... Knee arthroscopy - discharge Knee joint replacement - discharge Preventing falls - what to ask your doctor Taking care of ...

  14. Editorial Commentary: Knee Hyaluronic Acid Viscosupplementation Reduces Osteoarthritis Pain.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to the AAOS knee osteoarthritis guidelines, systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that viscosupplementation with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injection reduces knee osteoarthritis pain and improves function according to the highest level of evidence.

  15. Knee Replacement Doesn't Always Pay, Researchers Say

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_164320.html Knee Replacement Doesn't Always Pay, Researchers Say Less pain to begin ... 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Knee replacement surgery isn't always a game changer, according to a new ...

  16. Hip or knee replacement - before - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 7. Read More Hip joint replacement Hip pain Knee joint replacement Knee pain ... joint replacement - discharge Taking care of your new hip joint Review Date 3/5/2015 Updated by: C. ...

  17. Hip or knee replacement - after - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 7. Read More Hip joint replacement Hip pain Knee joint replacement Knee pain ... joint replacement - discharge Taking care of your new hip joint Review Date 3/5/2015 Updated by: C. ...

  18. Financial impact of radiological reports on medical-legal evaluation of compensation for meniscal lesions.

    PubMed

    Lelario, M; Ciuffreda, P; Lupo, P; Bristogiannis, C; Vinci, R; Stoppino, L P; De Filippo, M; Macarini, L

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate any discrepancy between radiological reports for clinical purposes and for medicolegal purposes and to quantify its economic impact on repayments made by private insurance companies for meniscal injuries of the knee. The medical records obtained pertaining to 108 knee injury patients (mean age 43.3 years) assessed over a period of 12 months were analysed. Clinical medical reports, aimed at assessing the lesion, and medicolegal reports, drawn up with a view to quantifying compensation, were compared. Unlike reports for clinical purposes in reports for medicolegal purposes, in the evaluation of meniscal lesions, in addition to morphological features of lesions, chronological, topographical, severity and exclusion criteria were applied. To estimate the economic impact resulting from the biological damage, we consulted an actuarial table based on the 9-point minor incapacity classification system. Meniscal lesions not compatible with a traumatic event and therefore not eligible for an insurance payout were found in 56 patients. Of these, 37 failed exclusion criteria, while 19 failed to meet chronological criteria. This difference resulted in a reduction in compensation made by private insurance companies with savings estimated with a saving between euro 203,715.41 and euro 622,315.39. The use of a clinical report for medicolegal purposes can be a source of valuation error, as chronological and/or dynamic information regarding the trauma mechanism may be lacking. Therefore, the use of a full radiological appraisal allows a better damage's assessment and an adequate compensation for injuries.

  19. Gait analysis in children affected by myelomeningocele: comparison of the various levels of lesion.

    PubMed

    Galli, Manuela; Albertini, Giorgio; Romei, Marianna; Santambrogio, Giorgio C; Tenore, Nunzio; Crivellini, Marcello

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to utilise the gait analysis (GA) methodology to characterise the walking act in children with different levels of myelomeningocele. To this end, we analysed 30 children (mean age 11 +/- 3 years, still able to walk without ortheses) grouped according to the site of their neurological lesion (localised from L4 down to S5); ten healthy children (mean age 9 +/- 2 years) were also analysed for comparison. Of the many kinematic and kinetic parameters provided by GA, we focused on those providing a good correlation with the level of lesion. In particular, the following parameters are presented and discussed: angle of flexion at the knee joint at the moment of contact of the foot with the ground, knee joint flexion-extension range of motion, flexion of the hip at the beginning of the stride, anterior pelvic tilt, range of rotation of the pelvis in the horizontal plane and ankle joint power. The higher the level of the neurological lesion, the more these parameters of gait were found to deviate from those measured in the control group. This study emphasises the relationship that exists between the site (level) of the neurological lesion and the individual aspects of the functional limitation associated with it.

  20. Post-traumatic knee stiffness: surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Pujol, N; Boisrenoult, P; Beaufils, P

    2015-02-01

    Post-traumatic knee stiffness and loss of range of motion is a common complication of injuries to the knee area. The causes of post-traumatic knee stiffness can be divided into flexion contractures, extension contractures, and combined contractures. Post-traumatic stiffness can be due to the presence of dense intra-articular adhesions and/or fibrotic transformation of peri-articular structures. Various open and arthroscopic surgical treatments are possible. A precise diagnosis and understanding of the pathology is mandatory prior to any surgical treatment. Failure is imminent if all pathologies are not addressed correctly. From a general point of view, a flexion contracture is due to posterior adhesions and/or anterior impingement. On the other hand, extension contractures are due to anterior adhesions and/or posterior impingement. This overview will describe the different modern surgical techniques for treating post-traumatic knee stiffness. Any bony impingements must be treated before soft tissue release is performed. Intra-articular stiff knees with a loss of flexion can be treated by an anterior arthroscopic arthrolysis. Extra-articular pathology causing a flexion contracture can be treated by open or endoscopic quadriceps release. Extension contractures can be treated by arthroscopic or open posterior arthrolysis. Postoperative care (analgesia, rehabilitation) is essential to maintaining the range of motion obtained intra-operatively.

  1. Knee injuries in women collegiate rugby players.

    PubMed

    Levy, A S; Wetzler, M J; Lewars, M; Laughlin, W

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the prevalence and patterns of knee injuries in 810 women collegiate rugby players. Injuries that resulted in players missing at least one game were recorded and a questionnaire was used to delineate players' rugby and knee injury history. There were 76 total knee injuries in 58,296 exposures. This resulted in a 1.3 knee injury rate per 1000 exposures. Twenty-one anterior cruciate ligament tears were reported for a 0.36 incidence per 1000 exposures. Other injuries included meniscal tears (25), medical collateral ligament sprains (23), patellar dislocations (5), and posterior cruciate ligament tears (2). Sixty-one percent of the medial collateral ligament sprains occurred in rugby forwards and 67% of anterior cruciate ligament tears occurred in rugby backs. All other injuries occurred with equal frequency in backs and forwards. This study demonstrates that knee injury rates in women's collegiate rugby are similar to those reported for other women's collegiate sports. The overall rate of anterior cruciate ligament injury in women's rugby, however, is slightly higher than that reported for women soccer and basketball players.

  2. Model-Based Estimation of Knee Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Serge; Vallery, Heike; Hardegger, Michael; Riener, Robert; Perreault, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    During natural locomotion, the stiffness of the human knee is modulated continuously and subconsciously according to the demands of activity and terrain. Given modern actuator technology, powered transfemoral prostheses could theoretically provide a similar degree of sophistication and function. However, experimentally quantifying knee stiffness modulation during natural gait is challenging. Alternatively, joint stiffness could be estimated in a less disruptive manner using electromyography (EMG) combined with kinetic and kinematic measurements to estimate muscle force, together with models that relate muscle force to stiffness. Here we present the first step in that process, where we develop such an approach and evaluate it in isometric conditions, where experimental measurements are more feasible. Our EMG-guided modeling approach allows us to consider conditions with antagonistic muscle activation, a phenomenon commonly observed in physiological gait. Our validation shows that model-based estimates of knee joint stiffness coincide well with experimental data obtained using conventional perturbation techniques. We conclude that knee stiffness can be accurately estimated in isometric conditions without applying perturbations, which presents an important step towards our ultimate goal of quantifying knee stiffness during gait. PMID:22801482

  3. Knee alignment in professional tennis players.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2002-01-01

    This study determined lower-limb alignment and knee geometry in professional tennis players and compared the data with those from nonathletic individuals. Twenty-four radiographs from 12 asymptomatic players (mean age: 23.4+/-3.8 years) were prospectively studied. The three angles most useful for describing limb alignment and knee geometry in the coronal plane were measured: hip-knee-ankle, condylar-hip, and plateau-ankle. The condylar-plateau angle, frontal foot rotation angle, and the relationship between the mechanical axis and tibial plateau also were calculated. Varus limb alignment was predominant and the mechanical axis passed medially through the knee center; there was increased valgus inclination of the distal femur, varus angulation of the tibial plateau, near parallel alignment of the joint, and exaggerated external foot rotation. Hip-knee-ankle, condylar-hip, plateau-ankle, and frontal foot rotation angles were significantly different (P<.05, two-tailed t test) from previously reported angles of nonathletic individuals. Variations, probably due to repetitive dynamic demands imposed on lower limbs from an early age, seem to involve both femoral condyles and proximal tibial metaphyses, maintaining normal parallel joint alignment.

  4. [The acute knee injury - practical considerations].

    PubMed

    Bouaicha, Samy

    2014-04-09

    The acute knee injury represents one of the most common reasons to visit a general practitioner or an emergency department in a hospital. The initial assessment of an acute knee injury usually is affected by severe swelling, pain and a significant lack of motion. Conventional radiographs in three planes may provide additional information to limit the differential diagnosis. A clinical re-evaluation after five to ten days usually allows proper functional testing and therefore correct diagnosis in the majority of cases can be made. With suspicious clinical findings, MRI may be helpful to evaluate ligamentous, meniscal and cartilaginous structures. Femoro-tibial knee dislocation represents the most harmful acute knee injury and needs to be further evaluated and treated in an adequate medical institution in every suspicious case. Rapid vascular diagnostic with (CT)-angiography is crucial. Behind a multi-ligament injury of the knee a spontaneously reduced dislocation may hide and proper neuro-vascular exam therefore is mandatory in every patient. When fracture, blocking and major instability can be excluded at initial assessment, there is usually no need for any acute surgical intervention and initial conservative treatment may be conducted on an out-patient basis for most of the patients. Priority of surgical treatment depends on the injury pattern and delayed intervention with a pre-habilitative phase may be beneficial for certain pathologies.

  5. Effects of Hata Yoga on Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Gholam A; Golkar, Ainaz; Marandi, Sayyd M

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this research was to study the effects of 8 weeks of Hata yoga exercises on women with knee osteoarthritis. Studies about effects of Yoga on different chronic diseases show that these exercises have positive effects on chronic diseases. As knee osteoarthritis is very common among middle age women we decided to measure effectiveness of these exercises on knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Sample included 30 women with knee osteoarthritis who voluntarily participated in this semi-experimental study and were divided into a control group (15) and a yoga group (15). The yoga group received 60 minutes sessions of Hata yoga, 3 times a week and for 8 weeks. Pain, symptoms, daily activities, sports and spare-time activities, and quality of life were respectively measured by Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scale (KOOS) questionnaire. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) method for repetitive data was used to analyze the results (P = 0.05). Results: Findings showed that pain and symptoms were significantly decreased and scores of daily activities, sports, spare-time activities, and quality of life were significantly increased in the yoga group. Conclusions: It seems that yoga can be used as a conservative treatment besides usual treatments and medications to improve the condition of people with osteoarthritis. PMID:23717763

  6. Cooling Does Not Affect Knee Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Ozmun, John C.; Thieme, Heather A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cooling on proprioception of the knee has not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the movement reproduction (timing and accuracy) aspect of proprioception. Subjects were tested under two conditions: a 20-minute application of ice and control. Proprioceptive accuracy and timing were measured by passively moving the knee, then comparing the subject's active reproduction of the passive movement. Subjects were blindfolded, then tested in three sectors of the knee's range of motion: 90° to 60°, 60° to 30°, and 30° to full extension. Ice application had no apparent effect on the subject's ability to perform accurate movement reproductions in the sectors tested. However, accuracy of the subject's final angle reproduction varied between the sectors as did the total time of the movement. One possible explanation for the difference between sectors is that different receptors are active at different points in the knee's range of motion. We conclude that cooling the knee joint for 20 minutes does not have an adverse effect on proprioception. PMID:16558379

  7. Cooling does not affect knee proprioception.

    PubMed

    Ozmun, J C; Thieme, H A; Ingersoll, C D; Knight, K L

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cooling on proprioception of the knee has not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the movement reproduction (timing and accuracy) aspect of proprioception. Subjects were tested under two conditions: a 20-minute application of ice and control. Proprioceptive accuracy and timing were measured by passively moving the knee, then comparing the subject's active reproduction of the passive movement. Subjects were blindfolded, then tested in three sectors of the knee's range of motion: 90 degrees to 60 degrees , 60 degrees to 30 degrees , and 30 degrees to full extension. Ice application had no apparent effect on the subject's ability to perform accurate movement reproductions in the sectors tested. However, accuracy of the subject's final angle reproduction varied between the sectors as did the total time of the movement. One possible explanation for the difference between sectors is that different receptors are active at different points in the knee's range of motion. We conclude that cooling the knee joint for 20 minutes does not have an adverse effect on proprioception.

  8. Fuzzy description of skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskaris, Nikolaos; Ballerini, Lucia; Fisher, Robert B.; Aldridge, Ben; Rees, Jonathan

    2010-02-01

    We propose a system for describing skin lesions images based on a human perception model. Pigmented skin lesions including melanoma and other types of skin cancer as well as non-malignant lesions are used. Works on classification of skin lesions already exist but they mainly concentrate on melanoma. The novelty of our work is that our system gives to skin lesion images a semantic label in a manner similar to humans. This work consists of two parts: first we capture they way users perceive each lesion, second we train a machine learning system that simulates how people describe images. For the first part, we choose 5 attributes: colour (light to dark), colour uniformity (uniform to non-uniform), symmetry (symmetric to non-symmetric), border (regular to irregular), texture (smooth to rough). Using a web based form we asked people to pick a value of each attribute for each lesion. In the second part, we extract 93 features from each lesions and we trained a machine learning algorithm using such features as input and the values of the human attributes as output. Results are quite promising, especially for the colour related attributes, where our system classifies over 80% of the lesions into the same semantic classes as humans.

  9. Improved Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint improved version of one described in "Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint" (MFS-28633). Locks automatically upon initial application of radial force (wearer's weight) and unlocks automatically, but only when all loads (radial force and bending) relieved. Joints lock whenever wearer applies weight to knee at any joint angle between full extension and 45 degree bend. Both devices offer increased safety and convenience relative to conventional orthotic knee joints.

  10. Patellar Skin Surface Temperature by Thermography Reflects Knee Osteoarthritis Severity

    PubMed Central

    Denoble, Anna E.; Hall, Norine; Pieper, Carl F.; Kraus, Virginia B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Digital infrared thermal imaging is a means of measuring the heat radiated from the skin surface. Our goal was to develop and assess the reproducibility of serial infrared measurements of the knee and to assess the association of knee temperature by region of interest with radiographic severity of knee Osteoarthritis (rOA). Methods: A total of 30 women (15 Cases with symptomatic knee OA and 15 age-matched Controls without knee pain or knee OA) participated in this study. Infrared imaging was performed with a Meditherm Med2000™ Pro infrared camera. The reproducibility of infrared imaging of the knee was evaluated through determination of intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for temperature measurements from two images performed 6 months apart in Controls whose knee status was not expected to change. The average cutaneous temperature for each of five knee regions of interest was extracted using WinTes software. Knee x-rays were scored for severity of rOA based on the global Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale. Results: The knee infrared thermal imaging procedure used here demonstrated long-term reproducibility with high ICCs (0.50–0.72 for the various regions of interest) in Controls. Cutaneous temperature of the patella (knee cap) yielded a significant correlation with severity of knee rOA (R = 0.594, P = 0.02). Conclusion: The skin temperature of the patellar region correlated with x-ray severity of knee OA. This method of infrared knee imaging is reliable and as an objective measure of a sign of inflammation, temperature, indicates an interrelationship of inflammation and structural knee rOA damage. PMID:21151853

  11. Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty for Simple Distal Femoral Fractures in Elderly Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nam-Yong; Sohn, Jong-Min; Cho, Sung-Gil; Kim, Seung-Chan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can be an alternative method for treating distal femoral fractures in elderly patients with knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic results in patients with knee osteoarthritis who underwent TKA with the Medial Pivot prosthesis for distal femoral fractures. Materials and Methods Eight displaced distal femoral fractures in 8 patients were treated with TKA using the Medial Pivot prosthesis and internal fixation. The radiographic and clinical evaluations were performed using simple radiographs and Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) knee scores during a mean follow-up period of 49 months. Results All fractures united and the mean time to radiographic union was 15 weeks. The mean range of motion of the knee joint was 114.3° and the mean HSS knee score was 85.1 at the final follow-up. Conclusions Based on the radiographic and clinical results, TKA with internal fixation can be considered as an option for the treatment of simple distal femoral fractures in elderly patients who have advanced osteoarthritis of the knee with appropriate bone stock. PMID:24032103

  12. One-stage long-stem total knee arthroplasty for arthritic knees with stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Amber; Bhosale, Pradeep B; Suryawanshi, Ashish V; Purohit, Shaligram

    2013-08-01

    PURPOSE. To evaluate the outcome of one-stage long-stem total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for patients with arthritic knees and tibiofemoral stress fractures. METHODS. Records of 11 men and 18 women aged 47 to 78 (mean, 66) years who underwent fixed-bearing posterior-stabilised TKA for osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis of the knee with tibial (n=31) and femoral (n=3) stress fractures were reviewed. All the tibial fractures involved the proximal half. There were 7 associated fibular stress fractures. Of the 31 knees with tibial stress fractures, 26 and 5 manifested varus and valgus deformity, respectively. RESULTS. The mean follow-up period was 51 (range, 24-96) months. The mean tibiofemoral angle improved from 23.2 to 1.9 degrees varus. The mean Knee Society knee score improved from 38.5 (range, 15- 63) to 89.6 (range, 80-95) [p<0.05]. The mean Knee Society functional score improved from 25.5 (range, 0-40) to 86.5 (range, 60-100) [p<0.05]. All fractures were united at the last follow-up. No complications were encountered. CONCLUSION. One-stage long-stem TKA restores limb alignment and facilitates fracture healing, with excellent outcome.

  13. Relationship between knee alignment and the electromyographic activity of quadriceps muscles in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seong Hoon; Hong, Bo Young; Oh, Jee Hae; Lee, Jong In

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We evaluated the relationship between knee alignment and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus medialis (VM) to the vastus lateralis (VL) muscles in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a cross-sectional study. [Subjects and Methods] Forty subjects with knee OA were assessed by anatomic radiographic knee alignment and the VM/VL ratio was calculated. Surface EMG from both the VM and VL muscles were evaluated during maximal isometric contraction at 60° knee flexion. Simultaneously, peak quadriceps torque was assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer. Subjects were categorized into low, moderate, and high varus groups according to knee malalignment. The peak quadriceps torque and VM/VL ratio across groups, and their relationships with varus malalignment were analyzed. [Results] All subjects had medial compartment OA and the VM/VL ratio of all subjects was 1.31 ± 0.28 (mean ± SD). There were no significant differences in the peak quadriceps torque or VM/VL ratios across the groups nor were there any significant relationships with varus malalignment. [Conclusion] The VM/VL ratio and peak quadriceps torque were not associated with the severity of knee varus malalignment. PMID:25995602

  14. Variable stiffness actuated prosthetic knee to restore knee buckling during stance: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Wentink, E C; Koopman, H F J M; Stramigioli, S; Rietman, J S; Veltink, P H

    2013-06-01

    Most modern intelligent knee prosthesis use dampers to modulate dynamic behavior and prevent excessive knee flexion, but they dissipate energy and do not assist in knee extension. Energy efficient variable stiffness control (VSA) can reduce the energy consumption yet effectively modulate the dynamic behavior and use stored energy during flexion to assist in subsequent extension. A principle design of energy efficient VSA in a prosthetic knee is proposed and analyzed for the specific case of rejection of a disturbed stance phase. The concept is based on the principle that the output stiffness of a spring can be changed without changing the energy stored in the elastic elements of the spring. The usability of this concept to control a prosthetic knee is evaluated using a model. Part of the stance phase of the human leg was modeled by a double pendulum. Specifically the rejection of a common disturbance of transfemoral prosthetic gait, an unlocked knee at heel strike, was evaluated. The ranges of spring stiffnesses were determined such that the angular characteristics of a normal stance phase were preserved, but disturbances could also be rejected. The simulations predicted that energy efficient VSA can be useful for the control of prosthetic knees.

  15. Lateral Knee Braces in Football: Do They Prevent Injury?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulos, Lonnie E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The results of three recently presented clinical studies and a biomechanical study of the use of lateral knee braces to prevent knee injuries are reviewed. The results raise serious doubts about the efficacy of the preventive knee braces which are currently available. (Author/MT)

  16. Evaluation of total knee mechanics using a crouching simulator with a synthetic knee substitute.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Michael; Rosenbaum, Heather; Walker, Peter S

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical evaluation of total knees is frequently required for aspects such as wear, strength, kinematics, contact areas, and force transmission. In order to carry out such tests, we developed a crouching simulator, based on the Oxford-type machine, with novel features including a synthetic knee including ligaments. The instrumentation and data processing methods enabled the determination of contact area locations and interface forces and moments, for a full flexion-extension cycle. To demonstrate the use of the simulator, we carried out a comparison of two different total knee designs, cruciate retaining and substituting. The first part of the study describes the simulator design and the methodology for testing the knees without requiring cadaveric knee specimens. The degrees of freedom of the anatomic hip and ankle joints were reproduced. Flexion-extension was obtained by changing quadriceps length, while variable hamstring forces were applied using springs. The knee joint was represented by three-dimensional printed blocks on to which the total knee components were fixed. Pretensioned elastomeric bands of realistic stiffnesses passed through holes in the block at anatomical locations to represent ligaments. Motion capture of the knees during flexion, together with laser scanning and computer modeling, was used to reconstruct contact areas on the bearing surfaces. A method was also developed for measuring tibial component interface forces and moments as a comparative assessment of fixation. The method involved interposing Tekscan pads at locations on the interface. Overall, the crouching machine and the methodology could be used for many different mechanical measurements of total knee designs, adapted especially for comparative or parametric studies.

  17. The Knee Pain Map: Reliability of a Method to Identify Knee Pain Location and Pattern

    PubMed Central

    THOMPSON, LAURA R.; BOUDREAU, ROBERT; HANNON, MICHAEL J.; NEWMAN, ANNE B.; CHU, CONSTANCE R.; JANSEN, MARY; NEVITT, MICHAEL C.; KWOH, C. KENT

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe the location and pattern of knee pain in patients with chronic, frequent knee pain using the Knee Pain Map, and to evaluate the inter- and intrarater reliability of the map. Methods A cohort of 799 participants from the University of Pittsburgh Osteoarthritis Initiative Clinical Center who had knee pain in the last 12 months were studied. Trained interviewers assessed and recorded participant-reported knee pain patterns into 8 local areas, 4 regional areas, or as diffuse. Inter- and intrarater reliability were assessed using Fleiss’ kappa. Results Participants most often reported localized (69%) followed by regional (14%) or diffuse (10%) knee pain. In those with localized pain, the most commonly reported locations were the medial (56%) and lateral (43%) joint lines. In those with regional pain, the most commonly reported regions were the patella (44%) and medial region (38%). There was excellent interrater reliability for the identification of localized and regional pain patterns (κ = 0.7–0.9 and 0.7–0.8, respectively). The interrater reliability for specific locations was also excellent (κ = 0.7–1.0) when the number of participants with pain in a location was >4. For regional pain, the kappa for specific regions varied from 0.7–1.0. Conclusion The majority of participants could identify the location of their knee pain, and trained interviewers could reliably record those locations. The variation in locations suggests that there are multiple sources of pain in knee OA. Additional studies are needed to determine whether specific knee pain patterns correlate with discrete pathologic findings on radiographs or magnetic resonance images. PMID:19479703

  18. Levels of biomarkers correlate with magnetic resonance imaging progression of knee cartilage degeneration: a study on canine.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chang; Changlin, Huang

    2007-07-01

    To examine the association between levers of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), matrix metalloproteinases-1 (MMP-1), matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) in serum and synovial fluid, and MR imaging of cartilage degeneration in knee joint, and to understand the effects of movement training with different intensity on cartilage of knee joint. 20 adult canines were randomly divided into three groups (8 in the light training group; 8 in the intensive training group; 4 in the control group), and canines of the two training groups were trained daily at different intensity. The training lasted for 10 weeks in all. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations were performed regularly (2, 4, 6, 8, 10 week) to investigate the changes of articular cartilage in the canine knee, while concentrations of COMP, MMP-1, MMP-3, TIMP-1 in serum and synovial fluid were measured by ELISA assays. We could find imaging changes of cartilage degeneration in both the training groups by MRI examination during training period, compared with the control group. However, there was no significant difference between these two training groups. Elevations of levels of COMP, MMP-1, MMP-3, TIMP-1, MMP-3/TIMP-1 were seen in serum and synovial fluid after training, and their levels had obvious association with knee MRI grades of cartilage lesion. Furthermore, there were statistically significant associations between biomarkers levels in serum and in synovial fluid. Long-time and high-intensity movement training induces cartilage degeneration in knee joint. Within the intensity extent applied in this study, knee cartilage degeneration caused by light training or intensive training has no difference in MR imaging, but has a comparatively obvious difference in biomarkers level. To detect articular cartilage degeneration in early stage and monitor pathological process, the associated application of several biomarkers has a very good practical

  19. Single Portal Knee Arthroscopy: 2015 Technique Update

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    A technique of single portal knee arthroscopy was reported in 2013. Using a parallel working cannula assembled to the arthroscope cannula, the instruments are passed into the joint in line with the arthroscope. The original technique video in Arthroscopy Techniques shows the use of a 25 mm tube assembly with a parallel portal through which biters and proximally bent cutter instruments are used to perform procedures in the knee. This 2015 technical update shows the current preferred and most versatile method of single portal knee arthroscopy using a parallel locking and rotating hub for passage of biters and double-bend cutters. The video shows adequate completion of a partial meniscectomy using only 1 portal. PMID:27073772

  20. [Knee joint pain with signs of arthrosis].

    PubMed

    Bender, T T A; Marinova, M; Radbruch, L; Conrad, R; Jobst, D; Mücke, M

    2017-03-14

    Chronic pain in the knee joint is most commonly caused by osteoarthritis, especially in elderly patients but can be due to other causes, such as rheumatoid arthritis. The diagnostics include an exact patient medical history and a clinical examination, which often already provide clear indications of the cause of the knee pain. Subsequently, further diagnostics can then be considered, such as radiological procedures and laboratory diagnostics. The treatment is determined by the cause and the individual patient and aims to reduce pain and to preserve the mobility of the joint. Generally, therapy consists of pain management and physiotherapy as well as alternative therapeutic procedures, mostly in combination. Proximal tibial opening wedge osteotomy can be useful; however, partial or total knee arthroplasty should only be considered when conservative treatment options have been exhausted.

  1. Robotic control in knee joint replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Davies, B L; Rodriguez y Baena, F M; Barrett, A R W; Gomes, M P S F; Harris, S J; Jakopec, M; Cobb, J P

    2007-01-01

    A brief history of robotic systems in knee arthroplasty is provided. The place of autonomous robots is then discussed and compared to more recent 'hands-on' robotic systems that can be more cost effective. The case is made for robotic systems to have a clear justification, with improved benefits compared to those from cheaper navigation systems. A number of more recent, smaller, robot systems for knee arthroplasty are also described. A specific example is given of an active constraint medical robot, the ACROBOT system, used in a prospective randomized controlled trial of unicondylar robotic knee arthroplasty in which the robot was compared to conventional surgery. The results of the trial are presented together with a discussion of the need for measures of accuracy to be introduced so that the efficacy of the robotic surgery can be immediately identified, rather than have to wait for a number of years before long-term clinical improvements can be demonstrated.

  2. Knee ligament injury during lateral impact.

    PubMed

    Hearon, B F; Brinkley, J W; Raddin, J H; Fleming, B W

    1985-01-01

    A volunteer woman subject incurred injury to her right knee consisting of a torn anterior cruciate ligament and stretched medial collateral ligament during a lateral (+Gy) impact test. Similar injury has not been reported in the English-language literature an accidental sideward automotive crashes or lateral impact experimentation involving humans. The primary mechanism which produced this injury was external tibial rotation on the femur with the knee flexed. The factors contributing to the injury included extraordinarily forceful leg bracing by the subject, her knee joint laxity or hypermobility, and the absence of side supports to limit lower extremity flailing during the impact response. In future lateral impact tests, women subjects should be used with caution and any subject with abnormal joint mobility should be excluded from participation.

  3. Acute arterial occlusion after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Patricia C; Rogic, Roselyn; Eddington, Carolyn

    2006-11-01

    There are a number of complications associated with total knee-joint arthroplasty. These include deep venous thromboses, peroneal palsy, infection, anemia, and Ogilvie's syndrome. An uncommon but potentially limb-threatening complication is acute arterial occlusion. Approximately 35 cases have been reported in the orthopedic literature. Prompt recognition and treatment intervention are the keys to successful outcome. We describe the case of one patient who had mild peroneal palsy and developed acute arterial occlusion 9 days postoperatively while on the inpatient rehabilitation service. Prompt aggressive management restored arterial circulation to the lower limb. Careful management of patients after total knee arthroplasty requires an understanding that arterial occlusion is a rare limb-threatening complication of surgery, but that it is treatable with prompt, deliberate management. Physiatrists should be aware that this condition exists in postoperative knee-joint arthroplasty patients. They should pay careful attention to any patient with a history of peripheral vascular disease or postoperative peroneal palsy.

  4. Moxibustion Treatment for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ang; Wei, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Yi; Li, Bo; Guo, Xing; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine whether the administration of moxibustion is an effective treatment for knee osteoarthritis (KOA). We conducted a search of relevant articles using Medline, EMBASE, the Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library published before October 2015. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities’ Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC scale) and the short form 36 questionnaire (SF-36 scale) were assessed. Evidence grading was evaluated according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Four studies containing 746 participants fulfilled the inclusion criteria in the final analysis. In terms of quality of life (QOL), the meta-analysis of 2 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) showed significantly effects of moxibustion only in bodily pain (BP) compared with those in the control group (n = 348; weighted mean difference [WMD], 4.36; 95% confidence intervals [CIs], 2.27–6.44; P < 0.0001; heterogeneity: χ2 = 1.53, P = 0.22, I2 = 34%) in all of the subcategories of the SF-36 scale, with moderate quality. The meta-analysis of the 2 included trials showed that there was not a statistically significant difference in the pain or function subscale for the WOMAC scale when the 2 groups were compared (n = 322; WMD, 17.63; 95% CI, −23.15–58.41; P = 0.40; heterogeneity: χ2 = 19.42, P < 0.0001, I2 = 95%), with low or moderate quality separately. The administration of moxibustion can to some extent alleviate the symptoms of KOA. More rigorous, randomized controlled trials are required in the future. PMID:27057863

  5. Fortuitously discovered liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Sharma, Malay; Gibson, Robert N; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Jenssen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The fortuitously discovered liver lesion is a common problem. Consensus might be expected in terms of its work-up, and yet there is none. This stems in part from the fact that there is no preventive campaign involving the early detection of liver tumors other than for patients with known liver cirrhosis and oncological patients. The work-up (detection and differential diagnosis) of liver tumors comprises theoretical considerations, history, physical examination, laboratory tests, standard ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound techniques, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as image-guided biopsy. CEUS techniques have proved to be the most pertinent method; these techniques became part of the clinical routine about 10 years ago in Europe and Asia and are used for a variety of indications in daily clinical practice. CEUS is in many cases the first and also decisive technical intervention for detecting and characterizing liver tumors. This development is reflected in many CEUS guidelines, e.g., in the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) guidelines 2004, 2008 and 2012 as well as the recently published World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology-EFSUMB guidelines 2012. This article sets out considerations for making a structured work-up of incidental liver tumors feasible. PMID:23745019

  6. A Novel Method of Evaluating Knee Joint Stability of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: Multiscale Entropy Analysis with A Knee-Aiming Task.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Diange; Zhang, Shijie; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Long; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2017-03-23

    Deteriorating knee stability is a local risk factor that reflects the occurrence and aggregative of osteoarthritis (OA). Despite the many biomechanics-based methods for assessing the structural stability of knee joints in clinics, these methods have many limitations. The stability of the knee joint relies on not only biomechanical factors, but also proprioception and the central nervous system. In this study, we attempt to depict the stability of knee joint from a holistic viewpoint, and a novel index of knee joint stability (IKJS) was thus extracted. We compared the differences of IKJS in 57 healthy volunteers and 55 patients with OA before and after total knee replacement (TKR). Analysis of Variance results demonstrated that there existed significant differences in IKJS among the three participating groups (<0.0001). Also, the IKJS of the operated leg in patients with knee OA increased remarkably after TKR (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, the results of the experiment suggested that the IKJS has sufficient reproducibility (ICC = 0.80). In conclusion, the proposed IKJS that employs the knee-aiming task is feasible for quantitatively determining knee stability. It can provide a potentially valuable and convenient tool to evaluate the effect of postoperative rehabilitation for patients with knee OA.

  7. Progressive foot drop caused by below-knee compression stocking after spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Karan; Butler, Joseph S.; Benton, Adam; Molloy, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Foot drop is a debilitating condition, which may take many months to recover. The most common cause of foot drop is a neuropathy of the common peroneal nerve (CPN). However, similar symptoms can be caused by proximal lesions of the sciatic nerve, lumbar plexus or L5 nerve root. We present a rare and unusual case of a patient undergoing spinal surgery at the level of L5/S1 and presenting 4 weeks postoperatively with progressive foot drop. Although the initial concern was a postoperative lesion at L5, the cause for this delayed presentation was extrinsic compression of the CPN at the level of the fibular head by a tight-fitting below-knee thromboembolic deterrent stocking. Compression stockings are widely used in all branches of medicine and in the community. It is important to recognize this potential cause of progressive foot drop early as it is preventable by simple measures, which can significantly reduce morbidity. PMID:27617106

  8. An unusual case of cat-scratch disease of the knee: case report and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Schiettecatte, A; Shahabpour, M; Vanhoenacker, F M; Goossens, A; Pouliart, N; Machiels, F; de Mey, J

    2007-01-01

    We present a case of a 16-year-old boy with a painful swelling in the popliteal fossa, slight fever, articular and muscle pain of 3 weeks duration. Plain radiography and MR examination were performed in order to characterize the lesion. Additionally to the poorly defined mass, 2 satellite nodules were shown. Subsequent biopsy revealed a granulomatous process and 2 satellite lymphadenopathies highly suggestive of cat-scratch disease. This case shows that the differential diagnosis of a soft tissue mass of the knee should not only include tumoral processes or pseudotumoral lesions, but also granulomas from infectious or non-infectious origin. Knowledge of the patients contact with cats and the detection of skin scratches is usually the clue to the correct diagnosis.

  9. High Knee Valgus in Female Subjects Does Not Yield Higher Knee Translations During Drop Landings: A Biplane Fluoroscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Torry, Michael R.; Shelburne, Kevin B.; Myers, Casey; Giphart, J. Erik; Pennington, W. Wesley; Krong, Jacob P.; Peterson, Daniel S.; Steadman, J. Richard; Woo, Savio L-Y.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of peak knee valgus angle and peak knee abductor moment on the anterior, medial, and lateral tibial translations (ATT, MTT, LTT) in the ‘at risk’ female knee during drop landing. Fifteen female subjects performed drop landings from 40 cm. 3D knee motion was simultaneously recorded using a high speed, biplane fluoroscopy system and a video-based motion analysis system. Valgus knee angles and knee abduction moments were stratified into low, intermediate and high groups and peak ATT, MTT and LTT were compared between these groups with ANOVA (α = .05). Significant differences were observed between stratified groups in peak knee valgus angle (p < .0001) and peak knee abduction moment (p < .0001). However, no corresponding differences in peak ATT, LTT and MTT between groups exhibiting low to high peak knee valgus angles (ATT: p = .80; LTT: p = .25; MTT: p = .72); or, in peak ATT (p = .61), LTT (p = .26) and MTT (p = .96) translations when stratified according to low to high knee abduction moments, were found. We conclude that the healthy female knee is tightly regulated with regard to translations even when motion analysis derived knee valgus angles and abduction moments are high. PMID:22968826

  10. High knee valgus in female subjects does not yield higher knee translations during drop landings: a biplane fluoroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Torry, Michael R; Shelburne, Kevin B; Myers, Casey; Giphart, J Erik; Pennington, W Wesley; Krong, Jacob P; Peterson, Daniel S; Steadman, J Richard; Woo, Savio L-Y

    2013-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of peak knee valgus angle and peak knee abductor moment on the anterior, medial, and lateral tibial translations (ATT, MTT, LTT) in the "at risk" female knee during drop landing. Fifteen female subjects performed drop landings from 40 cm. Three-dimension knee motion was simultaneously recorded using a high speed, biplane fluoroscopy system, and a video-based motion analysis system. Valgus knee angles and knee abduction moments were stratified into low, intermediate, and high groups and peak ATT, MTT, and LTT were compared between these groups with ANOVA (α = 0.05). Significant differences were observed between stratified groups in peak knee valgus angle (p < 0.0001) and peak knee abduction moment (p < 0.0001). However, no corresponding differences in peak ATT, LTT, and MTT between groups exhibiting low to high-peak knee valgus angles (ATT: p = 0.80; LTT: p = 0.25; MTT: p = 0.72); or, in peak ATT (p = 0.61), LTT (p = 0.26) and MTT (p = 0.96) translations when stratified according to low to high knee abduction moments, were found. We conclude that the healthy female knee is tightly regulated with regard to translations even when motion analysis derived knee valgus angles and abduction moments are high.

  11. Predictors of self-reported knee instability among patients with knee osteoarthritis: results of the Amsterdam osteoarthritis cohort.

    PubMed

    van der Esch, Martin; van der Leeden, Marike; Roorda, Leo D; Lems, Willem F; Dekker, Joost

    2016-12-01

    The aims of the study were to (i) determine the prevalence and course of self-reported knee instability at 2-year follow-up and (ii) identify factors predictive of retention of self-reported knee instability among patients with established knee osteoarthritis (OA). Among 201 patients from the Amsterdam Osteoarthritis (AMS-OA) cohort, demographic characteristics, self-reported knee instability, muscle strength, proprioception, pain, and physical function were assessed at baseline and at 2 years. Exercise over the past 2 years was assessed by evaluating the medical files. The course of self-reported knee instability was determined in patients reporting instability at baseline. Baseline predictors of self-reported knee instability were determined by uni- and multivariable logistic regression analyses. At baseline, 123 (61 %) patients reported knee instability, and of these, 85 (64 %) patients reported instability 2 years later, while 38 (29 %) reported no instability 2 years later. Poor proprioception and high pain assessed at baseline predicted retention of self-reported knee instability at 2 years among patients with self-reported instability at baseline. Knee instability is highly prevalent among patients with knee osteoarthritis. In patients with self-reported knee instability, the majority retained instability over 2 years. Poor proprioception and high pain predicted retention of self-reported knee instability over time.

  12. PERIPROSTHETIC FRACTURES IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Paulo Gilberto Cimbalista; De Bortoli, Giovani; Ventura Vieira, Inácio Facó; Uliana, Christiano Saliba

    2015-01-01

    The increasing number of total knee arthroplasties, in combination with the population's longer life expectancy, has led to a greater number of long-term complications. These add to the poor bone quality of elderly patients and often culminate in periprosthetic fractures. This complex orthopedic problem has a great diversity of clinical presentation. It may affect any of the bones in the knee and, because of the difficulty in finding solutions, may lead to disastrous outcomes. Its treatment requires that orthopedists should have broad knowledge both of arthroplasty techniques and of osteosynthesis, as well as an elaborate therapeutic arsenal including, for example, access to a bone bank. PMID:27022546

  13. Total knee arthroplasty in vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Bhende, Harish; Laud, Nanadkishore; Deore, Sandeep; Shashidhar, V

    2015-01-01

    In Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome, vascular malformations are not only in skin and superficial soft tissues but also in deep tissues like muscles bones and joints. It is well documemted that these recurrent intraarticular bleeds can cause early arthritis and joint pain. Performing arthroplasty in such patients is difficult and fraught with complications. We describe such a case where navigated total knee arthroplasty was performed with success to avoid the problems of intra medullary alignment used in the presence of intra medullary vascular malformations. We also suggest certain measures when knee arthroplasty is considered in such patients. PMID:26538765

  14. Anterolateral rotatory instability of the knee.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Daniel; Griffith, Chad; Lesniak, Bryson; Lopomo, Nicola; Grassi, Alberto; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Fu, Freddie H; Musahl, Volker

    2015-10-01

    Recent publications have generated renewed interest in the anatomy of the anterolateral capsule. Knowledge of the biomechanical function of the anterolateral components is lacking. Further research is required to evaluate the influence of the anterolateral capsule on rotatory laxity of the knee. The role of surgical procedures, such as an extra-articular tenodesis or lateral plasty, has to be defined based on quantification of the injury. This article seeks to summarize the current literature and discusses the role of the anterolateral capsule and reconstructive techniques in combined ligamentous knee trauma. Level of evidence V.

  15. Snapping Pes Syndrome after Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Taketomi, Shuji; Yamagami, Ryota; Tahara, Keitaro; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Snapping pes syndrome is defined as a snapping sensation in the medial knee caused by pes anserinus and rarely occurs. Snapping pes syndrome after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) has not been reported yet. We experienced two cases with this syndrome after UKA. Conservative treatment was effective in one case, while surgical excision of the gracilis tendon was necessary to relieve painful snapping in the other case. The main cause of the first case might be posteromedial overhang of the tibial tray that reached up to 5 mm. The probable cause of the second case was posteromedial overhang of the mobile bearing. PMID:27274476

  16. Spitalfields knees study--a photographic challenge.

    PubMed

    Finan, Nicola; Oliver, Matthew; Shepperd, John

    2007-06-01

    This paper reports a study into human lower limb anatomy based on the Spitalfields collection of human skeletons at the Natural History Museum, London. The objective was to document knee alignment in a range of rotations, and also to define the topography of the knee surfaces. The work was a collaborative between the Medical Illustration department and the orthopaedic surgical team. This project involved photographic challenges that required development of versatile techniques in order to generate credible scientific data. The results have produced a valuable and unique record not previously available. It demonstrates the key role medical photography offers in this type of investigation.

  17. The infected total knee: management options.

    PubMed

    Cuckler, John M

    2005-06-01

    The management of infection after total knee arthroplasty depends on the chronicity of the infection, host factors, and sensitivity of the infecting bacteria. Two-stage salvage consisting of removal of implants and cement, placement of an antibiotic spacer, and appropriate intravenous antibiotic therapy followed by reimplantation with an antibiotic-impregnated cement appears to be the predominant approach to managing this complication. The use of articulated spacers consisting of the sterilized femoral and polyethylene components with antibiotic cement allows maintenance of motion and bone stock. This report details the author's experience with 44 infected knee arthroplasties.

  18. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Xin; Wen, Liang; Qu, Tie-Bing; Hou, Li-Li; Xiang, Dong; Bin, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS) knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0–135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee's kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, “rollback” compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis. PMID:25591565

  19. Long-term clinical outcomes and survivorship after total knee arthroplasty using a rotating platform knee prosthesis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hopley, Colin D J; Crossett, Lawrence S; Chen, Antonia F

    2013-01-01

    A systematic search identified 29 papers reporting survivorship and clinical and function Knee Society Scores (KSS) of 6437 total knee replacements using the Low Contact Stress (LCS) Rotating Platform (RP) mobile bearing knee. Low Contact Stress RP survivorship and KSS outcomes were compared with non-LCS knees in the Swedish knee registry at comparable time periods and in 2 independent systematic reviews of knee arthroplasty outcomes. There is a substantial body of mainly observational evidence supporting the LCS RP knee. Knee Society Score outcomes were comparable for LCS RP and non-LCS RP knees at up to 15 years of follow-up, with mean clinical and function scores ranging from 72 to 96 and 58 to 90, respectively. Survivorship of LCS RP knees up to 14 years was higher than that for all knees in the Swedish Knee Registry.

  20. Preliminary histopathological study of intra-articular injection of a novel highly cross-linked hyaluronic acid in a rabbit model of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Iannitti, Tommaso; Elhensheri, Mohamed; Bingöl, Ali O; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2013-04-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease mostly occurring in the knee and commonly seen in middle-aged and elderly adults. Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid has been widely used for treatment of knee osteoarthritis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intra-articular injection of a novel highly cross-linked hyaluronic acid, alone or in combination with ropivacaine hydrochloride and triamcinolone acetonide, on knee articular cartilage in a rabbit model of collagenase-induced knee osteoarthritis. After induction of experimental osteoarthritis by intra-articular injection of collagenase, adult New Zealand white rabbits (n = 12) were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 (control group) received 0.3 ml phosphate buffered saline into the right knee joint. Group 2 received 0.3 ml cross-linked hyaluronic acid (33 mg/ml) into the right knee joint. Group 3 received a mixture of 0.15 ml cross-linked hyaluronic acid (33 mg/ml), 0.05 ml ropivacaine hydrochloride 1 % and 0.1 ml triamcinolone acetonide (10 mg/ml) into the right knee joint. Intra-articular injections were given 4 weeks after first collagenase injection and were administered once a week for 3 weeks. Gross pathology and histological evaluation of rabbits' knee joints were performed after 16 weeks following initial collagenase injection. Histological analysis of sections of right knee joints at lesion sites showed a significant decrease in Mankin's score in groups treated with hyaluronic acid alone or in combination with ropivacaine hydrochloride and triamcinolone acetonide versus control group (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01 respectively). This evidence was consistent with strong articular degenerative changes in control right knee joints (grade III osteoarthritis), while the treated groups revealed less severe articular degenerative changes (grade II osteoarthritis). The present results show that cross-linked hyaluronic acid, alone or in combination with ropivacaine hydrochloride and

  1. Complicated Congenital Dislocation of the Knee: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Madadi, Firooz; Tahririan, Mohammad A.; Karami, Mohsen; Madadi, Firoozeh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital dislocation of the knee (CDK) is a rare disorder. We report the case of a 7-year-old girl with bilateral knee stiffness, marked anterior bowing of both legs, and inability to walk without aid. Radiologic investigation revealed bilateral knee joint dislocation accompanied by severe anterior bowing of both tibia proximally and posterior bowing of both femur distally, demonstrating a complicated congenital knee dislocation. Two-staged open reduction with proximal tibial osteotomy was performed to align the reduced knee joints. The patient was completely independent in her daily activities after surgical correction. PMID:27847857

  2. Unexpected wear of an unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium.

    PubMed

    Luyet, Anais; Fischer, Jean-François; Jolles, Brigitte M; Lunebourg, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is a successful procedure for the treatment of localized osteoarthritis to one compartment of the knee with good long-term results. However, several modes of failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty have been described, namely aseptic or septic loosening, progression of disease, wear, and instability. Metallosis after unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is rarely reported and is most often related with polyethylene wear or break. We report on a case of rapid failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium associated with metallosis secondary to the dislocation of the polyethylene.

  3. Segmentation of multiple knee bones from CT for orthopedic knee surgery planning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dijia; Sofka, Michal; Birkbeck, Neil; Zhou, S Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Patient-specific orthopedic knee surgery planning requires precisely segmenting from 3D CT images multiple knee bones, namely femur, tibia, fibula, and patella, around the knee joint with severe pathologies. In this work, we propose a fully automated, highly precise, and computationally efficient segmentation approach for multiple bones. First, each bone is initially segmented using a model-based marginal space learning framework for pose estimation followed by non-rigid boundary deformation. To recover shape details, we then refine the bone segmentation using graph cut that incorporates the shape priors derived from the initial segmentation. Finally we remove overlap between neighboring bones using multi-layer graph partition. In experiments, we achieve simultaneous segmentation of femur, tibia, patella, and fibula with an overall accuracy of less than 1mm surface-to-surface error in less than 90s on hundreds of 3D CT scans with pathological knee joints.

  4. Blastomycosis infection of the knee treated with staged total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Ian S; Day, Shandra R; Moore, Christopher C; Browne, James A

    2015-12-01

    Blastomycosis is a rare fungal disease that can cause intraarticular infection and joint destruction requiring surgical reconstruction. We describe a patient who presented with destruction of the knee joint of unknown etiology. The patient was initially treated with debridement and spacer placement followed by antifungal therapy after cultures grew blastomycosis. Following adequate treatment of the infection, the patient was taken back to the operating room for reconstruction with a total knee arthroplasty. The patient had a successful outcome with no evidence of infection at two years following surgery. To our knowledge, this case report represents the first documented case in which a blastomycotic infection of a native knee was successfully treated with a two-stage total knee arthroplasty.

  5. Accuracy of knee range of motion assessment after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lavernia, Carlos; D'Apuzzo, Michele; Rossi, Mark D; Lee, David

    2008-09-01

    Measurement of knee joint range of motion (ROM) is important to assess after total knee arthroplasty. Our objective was to determine level of agreement and accuracy between observers with different knowledge on total ROM after total knee arthroplasty. Forty-one patients underwent x-ray of active and passive knee ROM (gold standard). Five different raters evaluated observed and measured ROM: orthopedic surgeon, clinical fellow, physician assistant, research fellow, and a physical therapist. A 1-way analysis of variance was used to determine differences in ROM between raters over both conditions. Limit of agreement for each rater for both active and passive total ROM under both conditions was calculated. Analysis of variance indicated a difference between raters for all conditions (range, P = .004 to P < or =.0001). The trend for all raters was to overestimate ROM at higher ranges. Assessment of ROM through direct observation without a goniometer provides inaccurate findings.

  6. [Injuries of the medial collateral ligament and anterior cruciate ligament of the knee joint and Lemaire surgical functional treatment. Long-term outcome].

    PubMed

    Schmid, F

    1996-06-01

    The present paper reports the results of 112 extraarticular ligamento-plasties performed on the knee with the procedure proposed by Lemaire. The series includes isolated tears of the anterior cruciate and medical collateral ligament as well as combined tears of both ligaments. The clinical and radiological results with a mean follow-up time of 11.5 years are compared with the results obtained in a first assessment 8 years ago. Good clinical results are in contrast with increasing osteoarthrosis in 1/3 of the knees radiologically assessed. The operation for a torn anterior cruciate ligament should be performed as soon as possible to avoid secondary meniscal lesions with subsequent severe osteoarthrosis. Presence or absence of arthrotic signs in the X-rays mainly determine the long-term result after ligamento-plasties of the knee. The Lemaire plasties are well tolerated even by elderly still active people and need little postoperative care.

  7. Soft tissue artifact compensation in knee kinematics by multi-body optimization: Performance of subject-specific knee joint models.

    PubMed

    Clément, Julien; Dumas, Raphaël; Hagemeister, Nicola; de Guise, Jaques A

    2015-11-05

    Soft tissue artifact (STA) distort marker-based knee kinematics measures and make them difficult to use in clinical practice. None of the current methods designed to compensate for STA is suitable, but multi-body optimization (MBO) has demonstrated encouraging results and can be improved. The goal of this study was to develop and validate the performance of knee joint models, with anatomical and subject-specific kinematic constraints, used in MBO to reduce STA errors. Twenty subjects were recruited: 10 healthy and 10 osteoarthritis (OA) subjects. Subject-specific knee joint models were evaluated by comparing dynamic knee kinematics recorded by a motion capture system (KneeKG™) and optimized with MBO to quasi-static knee kinematics measured by a low-dose, upright, biplanar radiographic imaging system (EOS(®)). Errors due to STA ranged from 1.6° to 22.4° for knee rotations and from 0.8 mm to 14.9 mm for knee displacements in healthy and OA subjects. Subject-specific knee joint models were most effective in compensating for STA in terms of abduction-adduction, inter-external rotation and antero-posterior displacement. Root mean square errors with subject-specific knee joint models ranged from 2.2±1.2° to 6.0±3.9° for knee rotations and from 2.4±1.1 mm to 4.3±2.4 mm for knee displacements in healthy and OA subjects, respectively. Our study shows that MBO can be improved with subject-specific knee joint models, and that the quality of the motion capture calibration is critical. Future investigations should focus on more refined knee joint models to reproduce specific OA knee geometry and physiology.

  8. Patient function after a posterior stabilizing total knee arthroplasty: cam-post engagement and knee kinematics.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Jeremy F; Hanson, George R; Park, Sang Eun; Moynihan, Angela L; Li, Guoan

    2008-03-01

    Even though posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty has been widely used in surgery, how the cam-post mechanism (posterior substituting mechanism) affects knee joint kinematics and function in patients is not known. The objective of the present study was to investigate posterior femoral translation, internal tibial rotation, tibiofemoral contact, and cam-post engagement of total knee arthroplasty patients during in vivo weight-bearing flexion. Twenty-four knees with a PS TKA were investigated while performing a single leg weight-bearing lunge from full extension to maximum flexion as images were recorded using a dual fluoroscopic system. The in vivo knee position at each targeted flexion angle was reproduced using 3D TKA models and the fluoroscopic images. The kinematics of the knee was measured from the series of the total knee arthroplasty models. The cam-post engagement was determined when the surface model of the femoral cam overlapped with that of the tibial post. The mean maximum flexion angle for all the subjects was 112.5 +/- 13.1 degrees . The mean flexion angle where cam-post engagement was observed was 91.1 +/- 10.9 degrees . The femur moved anteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees and posteriorly through the rest of the flexion range. The internal tibial rotation increased approximately 6 degrees from full extension to 90 degrees of flexion and decreased slightly with further flexion. Both the medial and lateral contact point moved posteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees , remained relatively constant from 30 degrees to 90 degrees , and then moved further posterior from 90 degrees to maximum flexion. The in vivo cam-post engagement corresponded to increased posterior translation and reduced internal tibial rotation at high flexion of the posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty. The initial cam-post engagement was also mildly correlated with the maximum flexion angle of the knee (R = 0.51, p = 0.019). A later cam-post engagement might

  9. The SIGN nail for knee fusion: technique and clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Duane Ray; Anderson, Lucas Aaron; Haller, Justin M.; Feyissa, Abebe Chala

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy of using the SIGN nail for instrumented knee fusion. Methods: Six consecutive patients (seven knees, three males) with an average age of 30.5 years (range, 18–50 years) underwent a knee arthrodesis with SIGN nail (mean follow-up 10.7 months; range, 8–14 months). Diagnoses included tuberculosis (two knees), congenital knee dislocation in two knees (one patient), bacterial septic arthritis (one knee), malunited spontaneous fusion (one knee), and severe gout with 90° flexion contracture (one knee). The nail was inserted through an anteromedial entry point on the femur and full weightbearing was permitted immediately. Results: All knees had clinical and radiographic evidence of fusion at final follow-up and none required further surgery. Four of six patients ambulated without assistive device, and all patients reported improved overall physical function. There were no post-operative complications. Conclusion: The technique described utilizing the SIGN nail is both safe and effective for knee arthrodesis and useful for austere environments with limited fluoroscopy and implant options. PMID:27163095

  10. Total knee arthroplasty in patients with prior ipsilateral hip fusion.

    PubMed

    Romness, D W; Morrey, B F

    1992-03-01

    Sixteen total knee arthroplasties performed between 1977 and 1985 in 13 patients with prior ipsilateral hip arthrodesis or ankylosis were studied to determine the preferred sequence and long-term follow-up of procedures in this clinical setting. Twelve of 16 underwent fusion takedown and total hip arthroplasty prior to knee replacement. The average age at total knee arthroplasty was 52.7 years and the average time from hip fusion to total knee arthroplasty was 36.3 years. Mean follow-up after total knee arthroplasty was 5.5 years (range, 2.3 to 10 years). The Hospital for Special Surgery knee score increased from a mean of 31.8 preoperatively to 72.2 after surgery. In patients who had conversion of the hip fusion prior to knee replacement, knee scores were 28 before and 72.5 after both procedures. Patients who retained their hip fusion had mean scores of 43.5 and 72.1, respectively. None of the knees has been removed and 14 of 16 had no pain at last follow-up. One had mild pain and one had moderate pain attributed to pes anserine bursitis. Although the numbers are small, this experience reveals that takedown of the fusion with total hip arthroplasty is an effective technique before performing the knee replacement. Though successful in some instances, the experience is too small to show that if hip fusion is in good position, knee replacement without fusion takedown is acceptable.

  11. Recent Advances and Developments in Knee Surgery: Principles of Periprosthetic Knee Fracture Management

    PubMed Central

    Chimutengwende-Gordon, Mukai; Khan, Wasim; Johnstone, David

    2012-01-01

    The management of distal femoral, tibial and patellar fractures after total knee arthroplasty can be complex. The incidence of these fractures is increasing as the number of total knee arthroplasties being performed and patient longevity is increasing. There is a wide range of treatment options including revision arthroplasty for loose implants. This review article discusses the epidemiology, risk factors, classification and treatment of these fractures. PMID:22888380

  12. Robotic Total Knee Arthroplasty: Surgical Assistant for a Customized Normal Kinematic Knee.

    PubMed

    Urish, Kenneth L; Conditt, Michael; Roche, Martin; Rubash, Harry E

    2016-09-01

    Although current total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is considered a highly successful surgical procedure, patients undergoing TKA can still experience substantial functional impairment and increased revision rates as compared with those undergoing total hip arthroplasty. Robotic-assisted surgery has been available clinically for almost 15 years and was developed, in part, to address these concerns. Robotic-assisted surgery aims to improve TKA by enhancing the surgeon's ability to optimize soft tissue balancing, reproduce alignment, and restore normal knee kinematics. Current systems include a robotic arm with a variety of different navigation systems with active, semi-active, or passive control. Semi-active systems have become the dominant strategy, providing a haptic window through which the surgeon consistently prepares a TKA based on preoperative planning. A review of previous designs and clinical studies demonstrates that these robotic systems decrease variability and increase precision, primarily with the mechanical axis and restoration of the joint line. Future design objectives include precise planning and consistent intraoperative execution. Preoperative planning, intraoperative sensors, augmenting surgical instrumentation, and biomimetic surfaces will be used to re-create the 4-bar linkage system in the knee. Implants will be placed so that the knee functions with a medial pivot, lateral rollback, screw home mechanism, and patellar femoral tracking. Soft tissue balancing will become more than equalizing the flexion and extension gaps and will match the kinematics to a normal knee. Together, coupled with advanced knee designs, they may be the key to a patient stating, "My knee feels like my natural knee." [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):e822-e827.].

  13. Reverse Engineering Nature to Design Biomimetic Total Knee Implants.

    PubMed

    Varadarajan, Kartik Mangudi; Zumbrunn, Thomas; Rubash, Harry E; Malchau, Henrik; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Li, Guoan

    2015-10-01

    While contemporary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) provides tremendous clinical benefits, the normal feel and function of the knee is not fully restored. To address this, a novel design process was developed to reverse engineer "biomimetic" articular surfaces that are compatible with normal soft-tissue envelope and kinematics of the knee. The biomimetic articular surface is created by moving the TKA femoral component along in vivo kinematics of normal knees and carving out the tibial articular surface from a rectangular tibial block. Here, we describe the biomimetic design process. In addition, we utilize geometric comparisons and kinematic simulations to show that; (1) tibial articular surfaces of conventional implants are fundamentally incompatible with normal knee motion, and (2) the anatomic geometry of the biomimetic surface contributes directly to restoration of normal knee kinematics. Such biomimetic implants may enable us to achieve the long sought after goal of a "normal" knee post-TKA surgery.

  14. Tourniquet-Related Iatrogenic Femoral Nerve Palsy after Knee Surgery: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mingo-Robinet, Juan; Castañeda-Cabrero, Carlos; Alvarez, Vicente; León Alonso-Cortés, José Miguel; Monge-Casares, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Tourniquet-induced nerve injuries have been reported in the literature, but even if electromyography abnormalities in knee surgery are frequent, only two cases of permanent femoral nerve palsies have been reported, both after prolonged tourniquet time. We report a case of tourniquet-related permanent femoral nerve palsy after knee surgery. Case Report. We report a case of a 58-year-old woman who underwent surgical treatment of a patella fracture. Tourniquet was inflated to 310 mmHg for 45 minutes. After surgery, patient complained about paralysis of the quadriceps femoris with inability to extend the knee. Electromyography and nerve conduction study showed a severe axonal neuropathy of the left femoral nerve, without clinical remission after several months. Discussion. Even if complications are not rare, safe duration and pressure for tourniquet use remain a controversy. Nevertheless, subtle clinical lesions of the femoral nerve or even subclinical lesions only detectable by nerve conduction and EMG activity are frequent, so persistent neurologic dysfunction, even if rare, may be an underreported complication of tourniquet application. Elderly persons with muscle atrophy and flaccid, loose skin might be in risk for iatrogenic nerve injury secondary to tourniquet. PMID:24371536

  15. Two cases of synovial haemangioma of the knee joint: Gd-enhanced image features on MRI and arthroscopic excision.

    PubMed

    Sasho, Takahisa; Nakagawa, Koichi; Matsuki, Kei; Hoshi, Hiroko; Saito, Masahiko; Ikegawa, Naoshi; Akagi, Ryuichiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2011-12-01

    Synovial haemangioma of the knee joint is a relatively rare benign condition with around 200 reported cases. We have recently encountered two cases of synovial haemangioma of the knee joint which preoperative MRI had assessed as highly suspect and which arthroscopic resection and subsequent histological examinations confirmed as synovial hemangiomas. Published studies have identified the following as characteristic MRI features of synovial haemangioma: homogenous low intensity to iso-intensity on T1 sequence; and heterogeneous high intensity with low-intensity septa or spots within the lesion on T2 sequence. However, several other intra-knee disorders mimic these characteristics. In our two cases, we found that gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced images, which have been relatively rarely discussed in the literature, were useful for making the diagnosis and for determining the extent of this condition. These images also were very helpful during arthroscopic excision of the lesion. Nonetheless, even after Gd enhancement, differentiating between malignant conditions such as synovial sarcoma and haemangioma solely from MRI findings is still difficult.

  16. Patellar Subluxation With Early-Phase Synovial Chondromatosis of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Bashaireh, Khaldoon M

    2016-01-01

    Primary synovial chondromatosis is a rare, benign, monoarticular disease process that affects the synovial membrane of the joint, the synovial sheath, or the bursa around the joint. The etiology is unknown, but it has been associated with trauma in some cases. Although it is a benign lesion, if left untreated, it may lead to early secondary osteoarthritis of the joint. The knee joint is affected in 50% to 65% of cases, followed by the elbow and the hip. This article reports a 30-year-old active woman who presented to the author's clinic with a large infrapatellar mass that caused lateral subluxation of the patella, swelling, and episodic pain with crepitations 14 months after direct trauma to the knee. Clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging, and arthroscopy revealed a large infrapatellar mass causing lateral subluxation of the patella with no loose bodies. Hoffa's disease, para-articular osteochondroma, and early-phase synovial chondromatosis were considered in the differential diagnosis. The histopathologic and clinical features were consistent with early synovial chondromatosis. The patient underwent local excision of the mass through a medial parapatellar arthrotomy. At 5 years of follow-up, she had no recurrence of the lesion or progression of the disease. Early diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis with local excision offers a reliable cure. However, long-term follow-up is advised because of the high recurrence rates as well as the risk of metaplastic transformation.

  17. [Autologous chondrocyte transplantation for treatment of cartilage defects of the knee joint. Clinical results].

    PubMed

    Erggelet, C; Browne, J E; Fu, F; Mandelbaum, B R; Micheli, L J; Mosely, J B

    2000-01-01

    Cartilage defects in the knee joint are common and have a bad tendency for healing due to the limited regeneration of hyaline cartilage. Surgeons have an ample choice of various operative treatment measures. Especially for the treatment of larger lesions first results of autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) were published in 1994 [3]. Autologous chondrocytes are isolated from an arthoscopically harvested cartilage biopsy, cultured in vitro and implanted in the defect under a periostal flap in a second procedure. In an international multicenter study 1,051 patients treated with ACT between 6/95 and 12/98 were documented with follow-up examinations after 12 months (588 patients), 24 months (220 patients) and 36 months (40 patients). The majority of the defects (61.2%) were localized on the medial femoral condyle, measuring 4.6 cm2 and mostly described as grade III/IV lesions. The clinical evaluation was performed using a modified Cincinnati knee rating system independently for clinician and patient. Evaluations showed an increase from 3.35 to 6.25 after 24 months and from 3.10 to 6.77 in a scale from 1 (bad) to 10 (excellent). ACT favours defects of the femur with an improvement rate of 85%. Adverse events possibly related to ACT were described in 4.8% of the patients. Diagnostic second-look arthroscopies are included in the reoperation rate of 5.1%. The presented data indicate autologous chondrocyte transplantation as an effective and safe option for the treatment of large full thickness cartilage defects in the knee joint.

  18. Kinematics and Mechanical Properties of Knees following Patellar Replacing and Patellar Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rongying; Liu, Yanqiang; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Knee injury is a common medical issue. A full understanding of the kinematics and mechanical properties of knees following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) repair utilizing patellar replacement (only the base of the patella is replaced) versus patellar retaining surgical techniques is still lacking. In the current paper, we investigated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data from knees repaired by these two methods and evaluated total knee models created using imaging reconstruction technology that simulated gait conditions. Results revealed that patellar replacement had little influence on tibiofemoral kinematics, although the tibia-surface equivalent stress increased slightly. By contrast, patellar replacement had a significant influence on the patellofemoral joint; patellar internal rotation, external rotation, and medial-lateral translation were all increased. Moreover, the stress distribution on patellar prostheses was altered, resulting in an increased surface maximal equivalent stress on the corresponding area. Moreover, during the gait cycle, we found that the area with maximal equivalent stress shifted its position. Finally, the patellofemoral joint showed decreased motion stability. From the view of kinematics and mechanics, this paper suggests that patella should be retained during TKA if it is possible. The present study presented approaches and technologies for evaluating kinematics and mechanical properties of total knee joint after TKA under gait loads. PMID:27057134

  19. Predicting dynamic knee joint load with clinical measures in people with medial knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Michael A; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-08-01

    Knee joint loading, as measured by the knee adduction moment (KAM), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Given that the KAM can only currently be accurately measured in the laboratory setting with sophisticated and expensive equipment, its utility in the clinical setting is limited. This study aimed to determine the ability of a combination of four clinical measures to predict KAM values. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to calculate the peak KAM at a self-selected walking speed in 47 consecutive individuals with medial compartment knee OA and varus malalignment. Clinical predictors included: body mass; tibial angle measured using an inclinometer; walking speed; and visually observed trunk lean toward the affected limb during the stance phase of walking. Multiple linear regression was performed to predict KAM magnitudes using the four clinical measures. A regression model including body mass (41% explained variance), tibial angle (17% explained variance), and walking speed (9% explained variance) explained a total of 67% of variance in the peak KAM. Our study demonstrates that a set of measures easily obtained in the clinical setting (body mass, tibial alignment, and walking speed) can help predict the KAM in people with medial knee OA. Identifying those patients who are more likely to experience high medial knee loads could assist clinicians in deciding whether load-modifying interventions may be appropriate for patients, whilst repeated assessment of joint load could provide a mechanism to monitor disease progression or success of treatment.

  20. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Cates, Harold E.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05). No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups. PMID:27258086

  1. Cysts about the knee: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Stein, Drew; Cantlon, Matthew; Mackay, Brendan; Hoelscher, Christian

    2013-08-01

    Popliteal (Baker) cysts, meniscal cysts, proximal tibiofibular joint cysts, and cruciate ligament ganglion cysts are cystic masses commonly found about the knee. Popliteal cysts form when a bursa swells with synovial fluid, with or without a clear inciting etiology. Presentation ranges from asymptomatic to painful, limited knee motion. Management varies based on symptomatology and etiology. Meniscal cysts form within or adjacent to the menisci. These collections of synovial fluid are thought to develop from translocation of synovial cells or extravasation of synovial fluid into the meniscus through a tear. Joint-line pain and swelling are common symptoms. Management entails partial meniscectomy with cyst decompression or excision. Proximal tibiofibular joint cysts are rare, and their etiology remains unclear. Pain and swelling secondary to local tissue invasion is common, and management consists of surgical excision. Cruciate ligament ganglion cysts have no clear etiology but are associated with mucoid degeneration of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments, knee trauma, and synovial translocation into these ligaments. Knee pain and limited range of motion, especially with exercise, are common presenting symptoms. In symptomatic cases, arthroscopic excision is commonly performed.

  2. [Chronic sports injuries of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Mannil, M; Andreisek, G; Weishaupt, D; Fischer, M A

    2016-05-01

    Chronic sports injuries of the knee joint are common and mainly caused by repetitive (micro) trauma and exertion. Chronic insertion tendinopathies and avulsion fractures and symptoms related to entrapment, friction and impingement can be pathophysiologically distinguished in athletes. In this review, we depict the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the most commonly occurring pathologies.

  3. Extensor tendon ruptures after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, M; Lustig, S; Huten, D

    2016-02-01

    Extensor tendon rupture is a rare but serious complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that impairs active knee extension, thereby severely affecting knee function. Surgery is usually required. Surgical options range from simple suturing to allograft reconstruction of the entire extensor mechanism and include intermediate methods such as reconstruction using neighbouring tendons or muscles, synthetic ligament implantation, and partial allograft repair. Simple suturing carries a high failure rate and should therefore be routinely combined with tissue augmentation using a neighbouring tendon or a synthetic ligament. After allograft reconstruction, outcomes are variable and long-term complications common. Salvage procedures for managing the most severe cases after allograft failure involve reconstruction using gastrocnemius or vastus flaps. Regardless of the technique used, suturing must be performed under tension, with the knee fully extended, and rehabilitation must be conducted with great caution. Weaknesses of available case-series studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity, and inadequate follow-up duration. All treatment options are associated with substantial failure rates. The patient should be informed of this fact and plans made for a salvage option. Here, the main techniques and their outcomes are discussed, and a therapeutic strategy is suggested.

  4. Tibial osteotomy for the varus osteoarthritic knee.

    PubMed

    Aglietti, P; Rinonapoli, E; Stringa, G; Taviani, A

    1983-06-01

    High tibial osteotomy is a reliable method for relieving pain in the varus osteoarthritic knee. In a review of 139 osteotomies, excellent and good results were noted in 64% of the knees after a follow-up period of at least ten years. The ideal candidate for this operation has Grade I or II osteoarthritis; less than 10 degrees of varus deformity, as measured by a single leg standing roentgenogram; no lateral subluxation; and no instability. The lateral closed wedge osteotomy without internal fixation is the preferred technique, and correction beyond the normal anatomic position, to 5 degrees of valgus, is advised. Protected weight-bearing after the second postoperative day is allowed. Complications have been infrequent and minor. Forty-seven knees were managed in this manner, and 88% had an excellent or good result at a four-year follow-up evaluation. In the majority of the well corrected knees, the alignment did not change with time, and the osteoarthritis did not progress. No failures in this series were attributable to the associated patellofemoral osteoarthritis; the reaction of the patellofemoral joint to osteotomy is obscure.

  5. [Unicondylar replacement of the knee joint.].

    PubMed

    Stedrý, V; Vanecek, L

    1999-01-01

    Twenty-nine unicondylar replacements of the knee joint (UKR) of St. Georg type were implanted in 27 patients at the Orthopaedic Clinic IPVZ in the period between 1985-1994. The average age in case of females was 73 years, in case of men 71 years. The most frequent indication was osteoarthritis of the knee joint of varus type. Two patients (7 %) had to be reoperated on for aseptic loosening of the tibial component, on average 5,5 years after the surgery. Revision surgery for breaking of femoral component was performed in five cases, on average 6 years after the primary implantation. The authores evaluated 16 patients with UKR still in situ. In 8 patients the prosthesis is entirely painless, in 10 joints operated on the radiograph showed a developed femoropatelar osteoarthritis, osteoarthritic changes of the opposite compartment in 2 of them and a radioluscent line up to 1 mm in 3 cases. Despite a high frequency of late complications the authors consider UKR for an alternative to high supratubercular osteotomy of tibia in older patients, for a suitable method of the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans and Ahlbäck disease of the knee joint. The success of this operation is conditioned by a perfect surgical technique and implant of suitable design. Key words: replacement of the knee joint, aseptic loosening, fatique failure of material.

  6. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  7. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-01-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5. PMID:24324319

  8. No carious cervical lesions: abfraction.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-10-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5.

  9. Dermoscopy of pigmented skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Soyer, H P; Argenziano, G; Chimenti, S; Ruocco, V

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the basic concepts of dermoscopy, the various dermoscopic equipments and the standard criteria for diagnosing pigmented skin lesions. In assessing dermoscopic images, both global and local features can be recognized. These features will be systematically described and illustrated in Part I of this article. First, we will focus on 8 morphologically rather distinctive global features that allow a quick, preliminary categorization of a given pigmented skin lesion. Second, we will describe various local features representing the letters of the dermoscopic alphabet. The local features permit a more detailed assessment of pigmented skin lesions.

  10. Knee joint functional range of movement prior to and following total knee arthroplasty measured using flexible electrogoniometry.

    PubMed

    Myles, Christine M; Rowe, Philip J; Walker, Colin R C; Nutton, Richard W

    2002-08-01

    The functional ranges of movement of the knee were investigated in a group of patients with knee osteoarthritis (n = 42, mean age 70 years) before, 4 months and at 18-24 months after total knee arthroplasty and then compared with age matched normal subjects (n = 20, mean age 67 years). Flexible electrogoniometry was used to record the maximum flexion-extension angle, the minimum flexion-extension angle and flexion-extension excursions of both knees during eleven functional activities along with the active and passive knee joint range of motion measured using a manual goniometer. Over the eleven functional activities the patients pre-operatively exhibited 28% less knee joint excursion than normal age matched subjects. By 18-24 months following total knee arthroplasty only 2% of this deficit was recovered. Statistically this recovery was only significant in level walking, slope ascent and slope descent. A greater range of movement was measured in a non-weight bearing position than was used in weight bearing functional activity. It is concluded that total knee arthroplasty gives rise to little improvement in knee motion during functional activities and that functional range of movement of the knee remains limited when compared to normal knee function for a minimum of 18 months following operation.

  11. Effects of proprioceptive circuit exercise on knee joint pain and muscle function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck; Kim, Sang-Soo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study applied proprioceptive circuit exercise to patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis and examined its effects on knee joint muscle function and the level of pain. [Subjects] In this study, 14 patients with knee osteoarthritis in two groups, a proprioceptive circuit exercise group (n = 7) and control group (n = 7), were examined. [Methods] IsoMed 2000 (D&R Ferstl GmbH, Hemau, Germany) was used to assess knee joint muscle function, and a Visual Analog Scale was used to measure pain level. [Results] In the proprioceptive circuit exercise group, knee joint muscle function and pain levels improved significantly, whereas in the control group, no significant improvement was observed. [Conclusion] A proprioceptive circuit exercise may be an effective way to strengthen knee joint muscle function and reduce pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  12. Data Collection and Analysis Using Wearable Sensors for Monitoring Knee Range of Motion after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chih-Yen; Chen, Kun-Hui; Liu, Kai-Chun; Hsu, Steen Jun-Ping; Chan, Chia-Tai

    2017-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most common treatment for degenerative osteoarthritis of that articulation. However, either in rehabilitation clinics or in hospital wards, the knee range of motion (ROM) can currently only be assessed using a goniometer. In order to provide continuous and objective measurements of knee ROM, we propose the use of wearable inertial sensors to record the knee ROM during the recovery progress. Digitalized and objective data can assist the surgeons to control the recovery status and flexibly adjust rehabilitation programs during the early acute inpatient stage. The more knee flexion ROM regained during the early inpatient period, the better the long-term knee recovery will be and the sooner early discharge can be achieved. The results of this work show that the proposed wearable sensor approach can provide an alternative for continuous monitoring and objective assessment of knee ROM recovery progress for TKA patients compared to the traditional goniometer measurements. PMID:28241434

  13. Does a standard outpatient physiotherapy regime improve the range of knee motion after primary total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Mockford, Brian James; Thompson, Neville W; Humphreys, Patricia; Beverland, David E

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a standard course of outpatient physiotherapy improves the range of knee motion after primary total knee arthroplasty. One hundred and fifty patients were randomly assigned into one of 2 groups. One group received outpatient physiotherapy for 6 weeks (group A). Another received no outpatient physiotherapy (group B). Range of knee motion was measured preoperatively and at 1-year review. Validated knee scores and an SF-12 health questionnaire were also recorded. Although patients in group A achieved a greater range of knee motion than those in group B, this was not statistically significant. No difference either was noted in any of the outcome measures used. In conclusion, outpatient physiotherapy does not improve the range of knee motion after primary total knee arthroplasty.

  14. Laser arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder and knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Chadwick F.; Johansen, Ed; Bonvalet, Todd; Sutter, Leroy V., Jr.; Marshall, G. June

    1990-06-01

    The laser is used less in orthopaedics than in any other medical specialty. Improving technology and the impressive effect of the CO2 laser on orthopaedic tissues has, however, accelerated the interest of orthopaedic surgeons over the past two years. The carbon dioxide laser is now commonly used in orthopaedics for difficult to access lesions of the knee - particularly those of a degenerative nature with high surface area and low volume. The results are presented in this paper and reveal no evidence of lasting complications. Although several types of lasers are being experimentally utilized in orthopaedics, the YAG and CO2 lasers are the only lasers commonly utilized. The YAG laser is utilized for shoulder arthroscopy and offers the advantage of passage of energy through fiber and the ability to utilize the tool in an aqueous environment. It is too early to determine as to whether or not the YAG laser or the CO2 laser will be the most efficient energy delivery system for use in the shoulder.

  15. Measured flexion following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mai, Kenny T; Verioti, Christopher A; Hardwick, Mary E; Ezzet, Kace A; Copp, Steven N; Colwell, Clifford W

    2012-10-01

    Postoperative flexion is an important factor in the outcome of total knee arthroplasty. Although normal activities of daily living require a minimum of 105° to 110° of flexion, patients from non-Western cultures often engage in activities such as kneeling and squatting that require higher flexion. The desire to achieve greater flexion serves as the driving force for prosthetic modifications, including high-flexion designs. Techniques used to measure knee flexion and knee position during measurement are not often described or are different depending on the examiner. The purpose of this study was to compare active (self) and passive (assisted) flexion after successful total knee arthroplasty for 5 prostheses (2 standard and 3 high-flexion) using clinical (goniometer) and radiographic (true lateral radiograph) measurement techniques by different independent examiners.At a mean follow-up of 2.7 years (range, 1-5.6 years), a total of 108 patients (144 total knee arthroplasties) had completed the study. Mean postoperative active flexion was 111° clinically and 109° radiographically for the standard designs and 114° clinically and 117° radiographically for the high-flexion designs. Adding passive flexion increased flexion to 115° clinically and 117° radiographically for the standard designs and 119° clinically and 124° radiographically for the high-flexion designs. Flexion differences between the 2 measurement techniques (active vs passive and clinically vs radiographically) were statistically significant (P<.05). These findings demonstrate the importance of describing how flexion is measured in studies and understanding how the method of measurement can affect the findings.

  16. Influence of Bicompartmental Knee Replacement on Stand-to-Sit Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, He; Frame, Jeff; Rolston, Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis often occurs in medial and patellofemoral compartments. A bicompartmental knee replacement system replaces these two affected knee compartments and keeps the lateral compartment and cruciate ligaments intact. It is yet to be determined whether limbs with bicompartmental knee systems can demonstrate frontal-plane knee mechanics…

  17. Lesions of the avian pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert E; Reavill, Drury R

    2014-01-01

    Although not well described, occasional reports of avian exocrine and endocrine pancreatic disease are available. This article describes the lesions associated with common diseases of the avian pancreas reported in the literature and/or seen by the authors.

  18. Herpes viral culture of lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus; Herpes simplex virus culture Images Viral lesion culture References Costello M, Sabatini LM, Yungbluth M. Viral infections. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  19. Electrocautery for Precancerous Anal Lesions

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating potentially precancerous anal lesions in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

  20. Decreased Knee Joint Loading Associated With Early Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Gardinier, Emily S.; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J.; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury predisposes individuals to early-onset knee joint osteoarthritis (OA). Abnormal joint loading is apparent after ACL injury and reconstruction. The relationship between altered joint biomechanics and the development of knee OA is unknown. Hypothesis Altered knee joint kinetics and medial compartment contact forces initially after injury and reconstruction are associated with radiographic knee OA 5 years after reconstruction. Study Design Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods Individuals with acute, unilateral ACL injury completed gait analysis before (baseline) and after (posttraining) preoperative rehabilitation and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after reconstruction. Surface electromyographic and knee biomechanical data served as inputs to an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model to estimate knee joint contact forces. Patients completed radiographic testing 5 years after reconstruction. Differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces were compared between patients with and those without radiographic knee OA. Results Patients with OA walked with greater frontal plane interlimb differences than those without OA (nonOA) at baseline (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.00 ± 0.08 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.15 ± 0.09 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .014; peak knee adduction moment impulse difference: −0.001 ± 0.032 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.048 ± 0.031 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .042). The involved limb knee adduction moment impulse of the group with osteoarthritis was also lower than that of the group without osteoarthritis at baseline (0.087 ± 0.023 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs 0.049 ± 0.018 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .023). Significant group differences were absent at posttraining but reemerged 6 months after reconstruction (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.02 ± 0.04 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.06 ± 0.11 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .043). In addition, the OA group walked with lower peak