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Sample records for knee extension isometric

  1. Quadriceps femoris electromyogram during concentric, isometric and eccentric phases of fatiguing dynamic knee extensions.

    PubMed

    Pincivero, Danny M; Gandhi, Varsha; Timmons, Mark K; Coelho, Alan J

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the superficial quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle electromyogram (EMG) during fatiguing knee extensions. Thirty young adults were evaluated for their one-repetition maximum (1RM) during a seated, right-leg, inertial knee extension. All subjects then completed a single set of repeated knee extensions at 50% 1RM, to failure. Subjects performed a knee extension (concentric phase), held the weight with the knee extended for 2s (isometric phase), and lowered the weight in a controlled manner (eccentric phase). Raw EMG of the vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles were full-wave rectified, integrated and normalized to the 1RM EMG, for each respective phase and repetition. The EMG median frequency (f(med)) was computed during the isometric phase. An increase in QF muscle EMG was observed during the concentric phase across the exercise duration. VL EMG was greater than the VM and RF muscles during the isometric phase, in which no significant changes occurred in any of the muscles across the exercise duration. A significant decrease in EMG across the exercise duration was observed during the eccentric phase, with the VL EMG greater than the VM and RF muscles. A greater decrease in VL and RF muscle f(med) during the isometric phase, than the VM muscle, was observed with no gender differences. The findings demonstrated differential recruitment of the superficial QF muscle, depending on the contraction mode during dynamic knee extension exercise, where VL muscle dominance appears to manifest across the concentric-isometric-eccentric transition.

  2. Effects of trunk stability on isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement while sitting.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Masahiro; Gomi, Masahiro; Katoh, Munenori

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of trunk stability on isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement while sitting by performing simultaneous measurements with a handheld dynamometer (HHD) and an isokinetic dynamometer (IKD) in the same seated condition. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 healthy volunteers. Isometric knee extension muscle strength was simultaneously measured with a HHD and an IKD by using an IKD-specific chair. The measurement was performed twice. Measurement instrument variables and the number of measurements were examined by using the analysis of variance and correlation tests. [Results] The measurement instrument variables and the number of measurements were not significantly different. The correlation coefficients between the HHD and IKD measurements were ≥0.96. [Conclusion] Isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement using the HHD in the sitting position resulted in a lower value than that using the IKD, presumably because of the effect of trunk stability on the measurement. In the same seated posture with trunk stability, no significant difference in measurement values was observed between the HHD and IKD. The present findings suggest that trunk stability while seated during isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement influenced the HHD measurement.

  3. Fast unilateral isometric knee extension torque development and bilateral jump height.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Cornelis J; Van Leeuwen, Daniel; Heijblom, Arjan; Bobbert, Maarten F; de Haan, Arnold

    2006-10-01

    We hypothesized that the initial rate (first 40 ms) of unilateral knee extensor torque development during a maximally fast isometric contraction would depend on the subjects' ability for fast neural activation and that it would predict bilateral jumping performance. Nine males (21.8 +/- 0.9 yr, means +/- SD) performed unilateral fast isometric knee extensions (120 degrees knee angle) without countermovement on a dynamometer and bilateral squat jumps (SJ) and countermovement jumps (CMJ) starting from 90 and 120 degrees knee angles (full extension = 180 degrees ). The dynamometer contractions started either from full relaxation or from an isometric pre-tension (15% maximal isometric torque, Tmax). Torque time integral for the first 40 ms after torque onset (TTI-40, normalized to Tmax) and averaged normalized rectified knee extensor EMG for 40 ms before fast torque onset (EMG-40) were used to quantify initial torque rise and voluntary muscle activation. TTI-40 without pre-tension (range: 0.02-0.19% Tmax per second) was significantly lower than TTI-40 with pre-tension, and both were significantly (r = 0.81 and 0.80) related to EMG-40. During jumping, similar significant positive relations were found between jump height and knee extensor EMG during the first 100 ms of the rise in ground reaction force. There also were significant positive linear relations between dynamometer TTI-40 and jump height (r = 0.75 (SJ 90), 0.84 (SJ 120), 0.76 (CMJ 90), and 0.86 (CMJ 120)) but not between dynamometer Tmax and jump height (-0.16 < r < 0.02). One-legged TTI-40 to a large extent explained the variation in jump height. The ability to produce a high efferent neural drive before muscle contraction seemed to dominate performance in both the simple single-joint isometric task and the complex multijoint dynamic task.

  4. Isometric knee extension force measured using a handheld dynamometer with and without belt-stabilization.

    PubMed

    Bohannon, Richard W; Kindig, Jeffrey; Sabo, Gregory; Duni, Allison E; Cram, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Although evidence suggests that tester strength limits the magnitude of isometric force that can be measured using a handheld dynamometer (HHD), previous studies have not investigated the actual limits of force magnitude that can be measured by trained testers when a belt is or is not used to stabilize the dynamometer. Therefore, the primary aims of this study were to determine: 1) the magnitude of knee extension forces that could be measured with a HHD with and without belt-stabilization and 2) the relationship between tester characteristics and knee extension strength measured with and without belt-stabilization. The characteristics of 20 trained testers (10 men, 10 women) were determined. Thereafter, they measured isometric knee extension strength using the MicroFET HHD with and without belt-stabilization. Paired t-tests were used to compare maximal knee extension forces under two conditions. Pearson product-moment correlations were calculated to determine the relationship between tester characteristics and knee extension forces measured under the two conditions. Knee extension forces (Newtons) measured using the HHD without belt-stabilization (470.6 ± 179.8) were significantly lower (t= -7.968, p<0.001) than those measured with belt-stabilization (866.9 ± 131.7). Pearson correlations between tester characteristics and knee extension forces measured with no belt-stabilization were all statistically significant (p ≤ 0.002); however, the correlations were not statistically significant under the belt-stabilization condition. The forces that can be measured with a HHD are higher than those suggested by previous researchers. By rectifying limitations imposed by tester strength, use of a belt allows very high knee extension forces to be measured.

  5. Neuromuscular differences between men and prepubescent boys during a peak isometric knee extension intermittent fatigue test.

    PubMed

    Armatas, Vasilios; Bassa, Eleni; Patikas, Dimitrios; Kitsas, Ilias; Zangelidis, Georgios; Kotzamanidis, Christos

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the fatigue and recovery in boys and men during a maximal intermittent isometric fatigue test of the knee extensor muscles, by evaluating the electromyogram of vastus lateralis, vastus medialis and biceps femoris. Thirteen boys (10.0 +/- 0.8yrs) and 13 men (26.1 +/- 4.2yrs) were fatigued until torque reached 50% of its initial value. Three and 6 min after, a maximal isometric knee extension test was assessed. Men had faster torque decline during fatigue and slower torque recovery compared with boys. Agonist activity declined in both groups during fatigue but men had greater extent of reduction. After 6 min boys recovered fully in respect to agonist EMG, whereas this was not the case for the men. The lower level of fatigue and faster recovery in boys could be attributed to the limited inhibition that was observed in the boys' agonist muscles, whereas the antagonist activity does not seem to play a role in the fatigue or recovery differences between the groups.

  6. Validity and reliability of an instrumented leg-extension machine for measuring isometric muscle strength of the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Caroline; Haupenthal, Alessandro; Jacomel, Gabriel Fernandes; Fontana, Heiliane de Brito; Santos, Daniela Pacheco dos; Scoz, Robson Dias; Roesler, Helio

    2015-05-20

    Isometric muscle strength of knee extensors has been assessed for estimating performance, evaluating progress during physical training, and investigating the relationship between isometric and dynamic/functional performance. To assess the validity and reliability of an adapted leg-extension machine for measuring isometric knee extensor force. Validity (concurrent approach) and reliability (test and test-retest approach) study. University laboratory. 70 healthy men and women aged between 20 and 30 y (39 in the validity study and 31 in the reliability study). Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values calculated for the maximum voluntary isometric torque of knee extensors at 30°, 60°, and 90°, measured with the prototype and with an isokinetic dynamometer (ICC2,1, validity study) and measured with the prototype in test and retest sessions, scheduled from 48 h to 72 h apart (ICC1,1, reliability study). In the validity analysis, the prototype showed good agreement for measurements at 30° (ICC2,1 = .75, SEM = 18.2 Nm) and excellent agreement for measurements at 60° (ICC2,1 = .93, SEM = 9.6 Nm) and at 90° (ICC2,1 = .94, SEM = 8.9 Nm). Regarding the reliability analysis, between-days' ICC1,1 were good to excellent, ranging from .88 to .93. Standard error of measurement and minimal detectable difference based on test-retest ranged from 11.7 Nm to 18.1 Nm and 32.5 Nm to 50.1 Nm, respectively, for the 3 analyzed knee angles. The analysis of validity and repeatability of the prototype for measuring isometric muscle strength has shown to be good or excellent, depending on the knee joint angle analyzed. The new instrument, which presents a relative low cost and easiness of transportation when compared with an isokinetic dynamometer, is valid and provides consistent data concerning isometric strength of knee extensors and, for this reason, can be used for practical, clinical, and research purposes.

  7. Mechanical correction of dynamometer moment for the effects of segment motion during isometric knee-extension tests.

    PubMed

    Tsaopoulos, Dimitrios E; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Richards, Paula J; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of dynamometer and joint axis misalignment on measured isometric knee-extension moments using inverse dynamics based on the actual joint kinematic information derived from the real-time X-ray video and to compare the errors when the moments were calculated using measurements from external anatomical surface markers or obtained from the isokinetic dynamometer. Six healthy males participated in this study. They performed isometric contractions at 90° and 20° of knee flexion, gradually increasing to maximum effort. For the calculation of the actual knee-joint moment and the joint moment relative to the knee-joint center, determined using the external marker, two free body diagrams were used of the Cybex arm and the lower leg segment system. In the first free body diagram, the mean center of the circular profiles of the femoral epicondyles was used as the knee-joint center, whereas in the second diagram, the joint center was assumed to coincide with the external marker. Then, the calculated knee-joint moments were compared with those measured by the dynamometer. The results indicate that 1) the actual knee-joint moment was different from the dynamometer recorded moment (difference ranged between 1.9% and 4.3%) and the moment calculated using the skin marker (difference ranged between 2.5% and 3%), and 2) during isometric knee extension, the internal knee angle changed significantly from rest to the maximum contraction state by about 19°. Therefore, these differences cannot be neglected if the moment-knee-joint angle relationship or the muscle mechanical properties, such as length-tension relationship, need to be determined.

  8. Mechanical correction of dynamometer moment for the effects of segment motion during isometric knee-extension tests

    PubMed Central

    Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Richards, Paula J.; Maganaris, Constantinos N.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of dynamometer and joint axis misalignment on measured isometric knee-extension moments using inverse dynamics based on the actual joint kinematic information derived from the real-time X-ray video and to compare the errors when the moments were calculated using measurements from external anatomical surface markers or obtained from the isokinetic dynamometer. Six healthy males participated in this study. They performed isometric contractions at 90° and 20° of knee flexion, gradually increasing to maximum effort. For the calculation of the actual knee-joint moment and the joint moment relative to the knee-joint center, determined using the external marker, two free body diagrams were used of the Cybex arm and the lower leg segment system. In the first free body diagram, the mean center of the circular profiles of the femoral epicondyles was used as the knee-joint center, whereas in the second diagram, the joint center was assumed to coincide with the external marker. Then, the calculated knee-joint moments were compared with those measured by the dynamometer. The results indicate that 1) the actual knee-joint moment was different from the dynamometer recorded moment (difference ranged between 1.9% and 4.3%) and the moment calculated using the skin marker (difference ranged between 2.5% and 3%), and 2) during isometric knee extension, the internal knee angle changed significantly from rest to the maximum contraction state by about 19°. Therefore, these differences cannot be neglected if the moment–knee-joint angle relationship or the muscle mechanical properties, such as length-tension relationship, need to be determined. PMID:21474701

  9. Increase in rate of force development with skin cooling during isometric knee extension.

    PubMed

    Shimose, Ryota; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Tadano, Chigaya; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Yona, Masae; Matsunaga, Atsuhiko; Muro, Masuo

    2014-12-01

    Rate of force development (RFD) plays an important role when performing rapid and forceful movements. Cold-induced afferent input with transient skin cooling (SC) can modulate neural drive. However, the relationship between RFD and SC is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether SC increases RFD during isometric knee extension. Fifteen young healthy men (25 ± 8 yrs old) contracted their quadriceps muscle as fast and forcefully as possible with or without SC. Skin cooling was administered to the front of the thigh. Torque and electromyographic activity were measured simultaneously. Peak torque was not affected by SC. Skin cooling induced a significant increase in RFD at the phase 0-30 and 0-50 ms. The root mean square of the electromyography of vastus medialis, rectus femoris and vastus lateralis at the phases 0-30-50-100 ms increased significantly or tended to increase with SC. These results suggest that SC may increase neural drive and improve RFD in the very early phases of contraction.

  10. Knee extension isometric torque production differences based on verbal motivation given to introverted and extroverted female children.

    PubMed

    McWhorter, J Wesley; Landers, Merrill; Young, Daniel; Puentedura, E Louie; Hickman, Robbin A; Brooksby, Candi; Liveratti, Marc; Taylor, Lisa

    2011-08-01

    To date, little research has been conducted to test the efficacy of different forms of motivation based on a female child's personality type. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of female children to perform a maximal knee extension isometric torque test with varying forms of motivation, based on the child's personality type (introvert vs. extrovert). The subjects were asked to perform a maximal isometric knee extension test under three different conditions: 1) with no verbal motivation, 2) with verbal motivation from the evaluator only, and 3) with verbal motivation from a group of their peers and the evaluator combined. A 2×3 mixed ANOVA was significant for an interaction (F 2,62=17.530; p<0.0005). Post hoc testing for the introverted group showed that scores without verbal motivation were significantly higher than with verbal motivation from the evaluator or the evaluator plus the peers. The extroverted group revealed that scores with verbal motivation from the evaluator or the evaluator plus the peers were significantly higher than without verbal motivation. Results suggest that verbal motivation has a varying effect on isometric knee extension torque production in female children with different personality types. Extroverted girls perform better with motivation, whereas introverted girls perform better without motivation from others.

  11. Estimations of One Repetition Maximum and Isometric Peak Torque in Knee Extension Based on the Relationship Between Force and Velocity.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Yoshito; Hatanaka, Yasuhiko; Arai, Tomoaki; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Kanada, Yoshikiyo

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to investigate whether a linear regression formula based on the relationship between joint torque and angular velocity measured using a high-speed video camera and image measurement software is effective for estimating 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and isometric peak torque in knee extension. Subjects comprised 20 healthy men (mean ± SD; age, 27.4 ± 4.9 years; height, 170.3 ± 4.4 cm; and body weight, 66.1 ± 10.9 kg). The exercise load ranged from 40% to 150% 1RM. Peak angular velocity (PAV) and peak torque were used to estimate 1RM and isometric peak torque. To elucidate the relationship between force and velocity in knee extension, the relationship between the relative proportion of 1RM (% 1RM) and PAV was examined using simple regression analysis. The concordance rate between the estimated value and actual measurement of 1RM and isometric peak torque was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Reliability of the regression line of PAV and % 1RM was 0.95. The concordance rate between the actual measurement and estimated value of 1RM resulted in an ICC(2,1) of 0.93 and that of isometric peak torque had an ICC(2,1) of 0.87 and 0.86 for 6 and 3 levels of load, respectively. Our method for estimating 1RM was effective for decreasing the measurement time and reducing patients' burden. Additionally, isometric peak torque can be estimated using 3 levels of load, as we obtained the same results as those reported previously. We plan to expand the range of subjects and examine the generalizability of our results.

  12. The role of agonist and antagonist muscles in explaining isometric knee extension torque variation with hip joint angle.

    PubMed

    Bampouras, Theodoros M; Reeves, Neil D; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2017-08-12

    The biarticular rectus femoris (RF), operating on the ascending limb of the force-length curve, produces more force at longer lengths. However, experimental studies consistently report higher knee extension torque when supine (longer RF length) compared to seated (shorter RF length). Incomplete activation in the supine position has been proposed as the reason for this discrepancy, but differences in antagonistic co-activation could also be responsible due to altered hamstrings length. We examined the role of agonist and antagonist muscles in explaining the isometric knee extension torque variation with changes in hip joint angle. Maximum voluntary isometric knee extension torque (joint MVC) was recorded in seated and supine positions from nine healthy males (30.2 ± 7.7 years). Antagonistic torque was estimated using EMG and added to the respective joint MVC (corrected MVC). Submaximal tetanic stimulation quadriceps torque was also recorded. Joint MVC was not different between supine (245 ± 71.8 Nm) and seated (241 ± 69.8 Nm) positions and neither was corrected MVC (257 ± 77.7 and 267 ± 87.0 Nm, respectively). Antagonistic torque was higher when seated (26 ± 20.4 Nm) than when supine (12 ± 7.4 Nm). Tetanic torque was higher when supine (111 ± 31.9 Nm) than when seated (99 ± 27.5 Nm). Antagonistic co-activation differences between hip positions do not account for the reduced MVC in the supine position. Rather, reduced voluntary knee extensor muscle activation in that position is the major reason for the lower MVC torque when RF is lengthened (hip extended). These findings can assist standardising muscle function assessment and improving musculoskeletal modelling applications.

  13. Acute effects of kinesio taping on knee extensor peak torque and electromyographic activity after exhaustive isometric knee extension in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Simon S; Yeung, Ella W; Sakunkaruna, Yosawin; Mingsoongnern, Sutida; Hung, Wing Y; Fan, Yun L; Iao, Heng C

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of Kinesio Tex tape and its method of application, Kinesio Taping (KT) on knee extensor performance before and after an exhaustive isometric knee extension exercise. Single-blinded, randomized control trial. Centre for Sports Training and Rehabilitation at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Twenty-six healthy volunteers with no history of knee injuries. Subjects were randomized to either the KT or sham taping group. The effects of KT on the neuromuscular performance of the knee extensors were measured before and after KT application, and immediately and 5 and 10 minutes after an exhaustive isometric knee extension exercise. Within-group analyses revealed a significant effect of time on the peak torque in isometric knee extension (F2.73,65.44 = 24.5, P < 0.001), but no significant group (F2.73,65.44 = 2.13, P = 0.11) or interaction (F1,24 = 0.59, P = 0.45) effect. A significant time effect (F2.52,60.14 = 3.75, P = 0.02) and a significant time × group interaction (F1,24 = 4.59, P = 0.04) was found for the rate of peak torque development. Post hoc comparisons revealed significantly higher rates in the intervention group (F1,24 = 4.594, P = 0.04) over all 5 tests. No significant effects of time (F4,96 = 0.88, P = 0.48; F2.56,61.35 = 2.75, P = 0.06), group (F4,96 = 0.56, P = 0.69; F2.56,61.35 = 1.16, P = 0.33), or time × group interaction (F1,24 = 2.77, P = 0.11; F1,24 = 0.20, P = 0.66) were found for either the electromechanical delay or electromyographic results, respectively. The present study suggests that KT shortens the time required to generate peak torque during isometric knee extension, which has important implications for sports performances that require the rapid generation of peak muscular force. Kinesio taping is commonly seen in the sports arena. The popularity is presumably due to the general belief in its injury prevention and enhancement of muscle performance. The results of the present findings suggested that KT shortens the

  14. Skinfold thickness affects the isometric knee extension torque evoked by Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Flávia V A; Vieira, Amilton; Carregaro, Rodrigo L; Bottaro, Martim; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Durigan, João L Q

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue may influence the transmission of electrical stimuli through to the skin, thus affecting both evoked torque and comfort perception associated with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). This could seriously affect the effectiveness of NMES for either rehabilitation or sports purposes. To investigate the effects of skinfold thickness (SFT) on maximal NMES current intensity, NMES-evoked torque, and NMES-induced discomfort. First, we compared NMES current intensity, NMES-induced discomfort, and NMES-evoked torque between two subgroups of subjects with thicker (n=10; 20.7 mm) vs. thinner (n=10; 29.4 mm) SFT. Second, we correlated SFT to NMES current intensity, NMES-induced discomfort, and NMES-evoked knee extension torque in 20 healthy women. The NMES-evoked torque was normalized to the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. The discomfort induced by NMES was assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS). NMES-evoked torque was 27.5% lower in subjects with thicker SFT (p=0.01) while maximal current intensity was 24.2% lower in subjects with thinner SFT (p=0.01). A positive correlation was found between current intensity and SFT (r=0.540, p=0.017). A negative correlation was found between NMES-evoked torque and SFT (r=-0.563, p=0.012). No significant correlation was observed between discomfort scores and SFT (rs=0.15, p=0.53). These results suggest that the amount of subcutaneous adipose tissue (as reflected by skinfold thickness) affected NMES current intensity and NMES-evoked torque, but had no effect on discomfort perception. Our findings may help physical therapists to better understand the impact of SFT on NMES and to design more rational stimulation strategies.

  15. Skinfold thickness affects the isometric knee extension torque evoked by Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Flávia V A; Vieira, Amilton; Carregaro, Rodrigo L; Bottaro, Martim; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Durigan, João L Q

    2015-09-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue may influence the transmission of electrical stimuli through to the skin, thus affecting both evoked torque and comfort perception associated with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). This could seriously affect the effectiveness of NMES for either rehabilitation or sports purposes. To investigate the effects of skinfold thickness (SFT) on maximal NMES current intensity, NMES-evoked torque, and NMES-induced discomfort. First, we compared NMES current intensity, NMES-induced discomfort, and NMES-evoked torque between two subgroups of subjects with thicker (n=10; 20.7 mm) vs. thinner (n=10; 29.4 mm) SFT. Second, we correlated SFT to NMES current intensity, NMES-induced discomfort, and NMES-evoked knee extension torque in 20 healthy women. The NMES-evoked torque was normalized to the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. The discomfort induced by NMES was assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS). NMES-evoked torque was 27.5% lower in subjects with thicker SFT (p=0.01) while maximal current intensity was 24.2% lower in subjects with thinner SFT (p=0.01). A positive correlation was found between current intensity and SFT (r=0.540, p=0.017). A negative correlation was found between NMES-evoked torque and SFT (r=-0.563, p=0.012). No significant correlation was observed between discomfort scores and SFT (rs=0.15, p=0.53). These results suggest that the amount of subcutaneous adipose tissue (as reflected by skinfold thickness) affected NMES current intensity and NMES-evoked torque, but had no effect on discomfort perception. Our findings may help physical therapists to better understand the impact of SFT on NMES and to design more rational stimulation strategies.

  16. Skinfold thickness affects the isometric knee extension torque evoked by Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Flávia V. A.; Vieira, Amilton; Carregaro, Rodrigo L.; Bottaro, Martim; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Durigan, João L. Q.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subcutaneous adipose tissue may influence the transmission of electrical stimuli through to the skin, thus affecting both evoked torque and comfort perception associated with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). This could seriously affect the effectiveness of NMES for either rehabilitation or sports purposes. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of skinfold thickness (SFT) on maximal NMES current intensity, NMES-evoked torque, and NMES-induced discomfort. METHOD: First, we compared NMES current intensity, NMES-induced discomfort, and NMES-evoked torque between two subgroups of subjects with thicker (n=10; 20.7 mm) vs. thinner (n=10; 29.4 mm) SFT. Second, we correlated SFT to NMES current intensity, NMES-induced discomfort, and NMES-evoked knee extension torque in 20 healthy women. The NMES-evoked torque was normalized to the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. The discomfort induced by NMES was assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS). RESULTS: NMES-evoked torque was 27.5% lower in subjects with thicker SFT (p=0.01) while maximal current intensity was 24.2% lower in subjects with thinner SFT (p=0.01). A positive correlation was found between current intensity and SFT (r=0.540, p=0.017). A negative correlation was found between NMES-evoked torque and SFT (r=-0.563, p=0.012). No significant correlation was observed between discomfort scores and SFT (rs=0.15, p=0.53). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the amount of subcutaneous adipose tissue (as reflected by skinfold thickness) affected NMES current intensity and NMES-evoked torque, but had no effect on discomfort perception. Our findings may help physical therapists to better understand the impact of SFT on NMES and to design more rational stimulation strategies. PMID:26647748

  17. Reliability of Concentric, Eccentric and Isometric Knee Extension and Flexion when using the REV9000 Isokinetic Dynamometer.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Froufe Andrade, Alberto César Pereira; Caserotti, Paolo; de Carvalho, Carlos Manuel Pereira; de Azevedo Abade, Eduardo André; da Eira Sampaio, António Jaime

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of isokinetic and ISO knee extensor and flexor muscle strength when using the REV9000 (Technogym) isokinetic dynamometer. Moreover, the reliability of several strength imbalance indices and bilateral ratios were also examined. Twenty-four physically active healthy subjects (age 23±3 years) underwent three testing sessions, two on the same day and a third, 7 days later. All sessions proceeded in the same order: five concentric contractions at 60ºs-1 followed by an isometric contraction (5 seconds) and five eccentric contractions (60ºs-1). The results of this study showed a high reproducibility in eccentric (0.95-0.97), concentric (0.95-0.96) and isometric (0.93-0.96), isokinetic strength for knee extensor and flexor muscles, thus indicating that the REV9000 isokinetic dynamometer can be used in future sports performance studies. A low-to-moderate reliability was found in the isokinetic strength bilateral ratios while the Hamstring:Quadricep concentric ratio showed moderate reliability. The highest reliability (>0.90) was observed in the dynamic control ratio (Hamstring eccentric:Quadricep concentric) which consequently confirms that it is a more valid indicator for imbalanced reciprocal parameters and can be used in rehabilitation and sports medicine.

  18. Sex differences in variances of multi-channel surface electromyography distribution of the vastus lateralis muscle during isometric knee extension in young adults.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Yuichi; Watanabe, Kohei; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Hosomi, Naohisa; Orita, Naoya; Mikami, Yukio; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare spatial electromyographic potential distribution during force production between healthy young female and male using multi-channel surface electromyography (multi-SEMG). Thirty healthy subjects (15 females) performed sustained isometric knee extension at 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) task for 120 s. Multi-SEMG signals from the vastus lateralis muscle were detected and the modified entropy, coefficient of variation (CV), and correlation coefficient determined. The modified entropy and CV showed significant interaction and difference between females and males at all time points during the 10% MVC task. The correlation coefficient in females was significantly lower at 90 and 120 s than that of males. The multi-SEMG potential distribution pattern in females showed more varied motor unit recruitment during sustained low-intensity isometric contraction than that of males. Variations in motor unit recruitment may result from recruitment and/or de-recruitment of motor units.

  19. Comparison between the effects of 4 different electrical stimulation current waveforms on isometric knee extension torque and perceived discomfort in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Lucas Ogura; Vieira, Amilton; Siqueira, Aristides Leite; Salvini, Tania Fatima; Durigan, João Luiz Quagliotti

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effects of different neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) currents, 2 kHz-frequency alternating currents (KACs, Russian and Aussie) and 2 pulsed currents (PCs), on isometric knee extension torque and discomfort level, both in isolation and combined, with maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Twenty-one women (age 21.6 ± 2.5 years) were studied. We evaluated torque evoked by NMES or NMES combined with maximum voluntary contraction of the quadriceps muscle of healthy women. Discomfort level was measured using a visual analog pain scale. Despite comparable levels of discomfort, evoked torque was lower for Russian current compared with the other modalities (Russian 50.8%, Aussie 71.7%, PC500 76.9%, and PC200 70.1%; P < 0.001). There was no advantage in combining NMES with MVC compared with isolated NMES. The Aussie and PC approaches proved superior to Russian current for inducing isometric knee extension torque. This information is important in guiding decision making with regard to NMES protocols for muscle strengthening. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Efficacy of isometric exercise full knee extension horizontally (FKEH)--a new and simple maneuver to predict early onset of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pandit, R; Chowdhury, P Roy; Pramanik, T; Singh, S

    2013-03-01

    Hypertension is recognized as one of the risk factors for cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Early identification of persons at increased risk for developing hypertension is a priority, which help them, to live a healthy life by altering lifestyle. Persons having predisposing factors of hypertension (e.g., family history of hypertension) show blood pressure hyper-responsiveness to stress. Elevated blood pressure due to sympathetic stimulation prevailed longer time in susceptible persons. In previous studies some instruments (e.g., hand immersion in cold (4 degrees C) water or isometric exercise by handgrip dynamometer) were required to elicit sympathetic stimulation. In the present study a simple maneuver Full Knee Extension Horizontally (FKEH) has been introduced--a stressor that caused full isometric contraction of quadriceps femoris muscles of both sides. The test was conducted in normotensive, non-smoker males (n = 150) of age group 18-25 years. Among them some (n = 100) were from families having no history of familial hypertension and others (n = 50) were from the families with history of hypertension. The causal blood pressure and heart rate of the participants were recorded. Then the volunteers were requested to perform FKEH maneuver for one minute. Both blood pressure and heart rate were recorded immediately after and 3 minutes following FKEH. The data analyzed using t-test showed that, diastolic blood pressure didn't return and stabilized to pre-exercise level even after 3 minutes following FKEH in volunteers who were mostly from hypertensive family (P< 0.05) i.e., having predisposing factors of hypertension. This indicated those people are prone to early onset of hypertension as their Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) is not competent enough to stabilize their blood pressure to pre-exercise level. Hence, stress in the form of FKEH for one minute may be used as a bedside test to assess the competence of ANS and the proneness of developing early

  1. Characteristics of fast voluntary and electrically evoked isometric knee extensions during 56 days of bed rest with and without exercise countermeasure

    PubMed Central

    Gerrits, K. H. L.; Rittweger, J.; Felsenberg, D.; Stegeman, D. F.; de Haan, A.

    2008-01-01

    The contractile characteristics of fast voluntary and electrically evoked unilateral isometric knee extensions were followed in 16 healthy men during 56 days of horizontal bed rest and assessed at bed rest days 4, 7, 10, 17, 24, 38 and 56. Subjects were randomized to either an inactive control group (Ctrl, n = 8) or a resistive vibration exercise countermeasure group (RVE, n = 8). No changes were observed in neural activation, indicated by the amplitude of the surface electromyogram, or the initial rate of voluntary torque development in either group during bed rest. In contrast, for Ctrl, the force oscillation amplitude at 10 Hz stimulation increased by 48% (P < 0.01), the time to reach peak torque at 300 Hz stimulation decreased by 7% (P < 0.01), and the half relaxation time at 150 Hz stimulation tended to be slightly reduced by 3% (P = 0.056) after 56 days of bed rest. No changes were observed for RVE. Torque production at 10 Hz stimulation relative to maximal (150 Hz) stimulation was increased after bed rest for both Ctrl (15%; P < 0.05) and RVE (41%; P < 0.05). In conclusion, bed rest without exercise countermeasure resulted in intrinsic speed properties of a faster knee extensor group, which may have partly contributed to the preserved ability to perform fast voluntary contractions. The changes in intrinsic contractile properties were prevented by resistive vibration exercise, and voluntary motor performance remained unaltered for RVE subjects as well. PMID:18386049

  2. Reliability of isometric knee extension muscle strength measurements made by a hand-held dynamometer and a belt: a comparison of two types of device.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Munenori

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to compare the reliability of 2 hand-held dynamometers (HHD-1, 2) with different designs, by performing isometric knee muscle extension measurements two times each. [Subjects] The subjects were 40 young healthy adults. [Methods] The reliability of the measurements was examined using Bland-Altman analysis. [Results] Bland-Altman analysis found a fixed bias in measurements made by HHD-1 with an average limits of agreement (LOA) value of -2.1 kgf. For HHD-2, only random errors were detected, and the minimal detectable change (MDC) was 11.4 kgf. Fixed biases were observed between the two devices with an average LOA value of 2.2 kgf. When the bodyweight ratio was used, fixed biases were observed in measurements made by both devices, and the average value of LOA was -0.03 kgf/kg. The comparison of the two devices revealed only random errors, and MDC was 0.22 kgf/kg. [Conclusion] For HHD measurements using these two devices, the appropriate number of measurements is two times, and comparison of measurement values between the two devices should be avoided.

  3. Reliability of Isometric Knee Extension Muscle Strength Measurements of Healthy Elderly Subjects Made with a Hand-held Dynamometer and a Belt.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Munenori; Isozaki, Koji

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability of three isometric knee extension strength measurements (IKE) made with a hand-held dynamometer (HHD) and a belt of healthy elderly living in the community as subjects. [Subjects] The subject cohort consisted of 186 healthy elderly people, aged 65 to 79 years, living in local communities. [Methods] IKE of the leg subjects used to kick a ball was measured. IKE of each subject was measured three times using an HHD-belt at intervals of 30 seconds. The reliability of the larger of the first two measurements (LV2) as well as the third measurement (3V) was investigated. [Results] The intraclass correlation coefficients [ICC (1, 1)] for LV2 and 3V were 0.955. Bland-Altman analysis showed a fixed bias, and the limits of agreement ranged from -5.6 to 4.6. [Conclusion] The ICC results show that the test-retest reproducibility of IKE measurements of healthy elderly subjects using an HHD-belt is high. However, Bland-Altman analysis showed a fixed bias, suggesting the need for three measurements.

  4. Resistance Exercise with concurrent whole body vibration preserves isometric knee extension strength during 8 weeks of horizontal bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, E. R.; Stegeman, D. F.; Gerrits, K.; Rittweger, J.; Felsenberg, D.; de Haan, A.

    2005-08-01

    Changes in the quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle with respect to anatomical cross sectional area (CSA), neural activation level and isometric maximal voluntary torque (MVT) were determined in 18 healthy men subjected to 8 weeks of horizontal bed rest (BR) with (n = 9) and without (Ctrl; n = 9) 6 days/week resistance exercise concurrent with whole body vibration (RVE). For Ctrl, mean QF CSA decreased linearly over time to a reduction of 14.3 ± 4.9% at the end of BR. For RVE, exercise during BR significantly mitigated this reduction (3.9 ± 4.4%). Prior to and seven times during BR, MVT values were obtained together with neural activation levels, the latter by means of a superimposed stimulation technique. MVT was maintained for RVE during BR, whereas for Ctrl, MVT was significantly reduced by 14.2 ± 8.1% after 8 weeks. In contrast to previous reports, the maximal voluntary activation remained unaltered for both groups throughout the study. For Ctrl, the absence of a change in neural activation might be related to the repeated testing during the bed rest, which had presumably resulted in a habituation to the task. When both groups were pooled, a significant positive correlation (R= 0.62; P < 0.01) was observed between changes in CSA and changes in MVT.

  5. Reliability and measurement precision of concentric-to-isometric and eccentric-to-isometric knee active joint position sense tests in uninjured physically active adults.

    PubMed

    Clark, Nicholas C; Akins, Jonathan S; Heebner, Nicholas R; Sell, Timothy C; Abt, John P; Lovalekar, Mita; Lephart, Scott M

    2016-03-01

    Proprioception is important because it is used by the central nervous system to mediate muscle control of joint stability, posture, and movement. Knee active joint position sense (AJPS) is one representation of knee proprioception. The purpose of this study was to establish the intra-tester, inter-session, test-retest reliability of concentric-to-isometric (seated knee extension; prone knee flexion) and eccentric-to-isometric (seated knee flexion; prone knee extension) knee AJPS tests in uninjured adults. Descriptive. University laboratory. Six males, six females (age 26.2 ± 5.7 years; height 171.1 ± 9.6 cm; mass 71.1 ± 16.6 kg). Mean absolute error (AE; °); intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (2,1); standard error of measurement (SEM; °). Mean AE ranged from 3.18° to 5.97° across tests. The ICCs and SEMs were: seated knee extension 0.13, 1.3°; prone knee flexion 0.51, 1.2°; seated knee flexion 0.31, 1.7°; prone knee extension 0.87, 1.4°. The prone knee flexion and prone knee extension tests demonstrated moderate to good reliability. Prone knee flexion and prone knee extension AJPS tests may be useful in cross-sectional studies estimating how proprioception contributes to knee functional joint stability or prospective studies estimating the role of proprioception in the onset of knee injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Isometric knee-extensor torque development and jump height in volleyball players.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, C J; Vermeulen, Gido; Toussaint, Huub M; de Haan, Arnold

    2007-08-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the contribution of the intrinsic muscle properties and muscle activation of the knee extensors to the maximal rate of unilateral isometric torque development and to relate both factors to maximal bilateral jumping performance in experienced jumpers. On the basis of previous studies, we hypothesized that maximal rate of torque development during maximal effort isometric contractions and jump height would depend on the subjects' ability for maximal muscle activation rather than on the muscle's contractile properties. Eleven male elite volleyball players (20 +/- 2 yr, means +/- SD) performed squat jumps starting from a 120 degrees knee angle (SJ120; full extension = 180 degrees ) and countermovement jumps. In addition, maximal voluntary and electrically evoked unilateral isometric knee-extension torque development (120 degrees angle) was obtained. Torque time integral for the first 40 ms after torque onset (TTI40) and (time to) maximal rate of torque development (MRTD) were calculated. Muscle activation was quantified using surface EMG. Voluntary TTI40 was significantly related to the preceding EMG (r2 = 0.83) and negatively related to the time to MRTD (r2 = 0.64). Voluntary MRTD and TTI40 were not related to their respective values obtained during electrical stimulation (r2 < 0.04). Only electrically evoked MRTD was significantly related to jump height (e.g., r2 = 0.70 for SJ120). As expected initial maximal voluntary isometric torque development correlated with muscle activation and not with muscle contractile speed. However, unexpectedly, only the latter could predict jump performance in skilled jumpers.

  7. Knee extension torque variability after exercise in ACL reconstructed knees.

    PubMed

    Goetschius, John; Kuenze, Christopher M; Hart, Joseph M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare knee extension torque variability in patients with ACL reconstructed knees before and after exercise. Thirty two patients with an ACL reconstructed knee (ACL-R group) and 32 healthy controls (control group) completed measures of maximal isometric knee extension torque (90° flexion) at baseline and following a 30-min exercise protocol (post-exercise). Exercise included 30-min of repeated cycles of inclined treadmill walking and hopping tasks. Dependent variables were the coefficient of variation (CV) and raw-change in CV (ΔCV): CV = (torque standard deviation/torque mean x 100), ΔCV = (post-exercise - baseline). There was a group-by-time interaction (p = 0.03) on CV. The ACL-R group demonstrated greater CV than the control group at baseline (ACL-R = 1.07 ± 0.55, control = 0.79 ± 0.42, p = 0.03) and post-exercise (ACL-R = 1.60 ± 0.91, control = 0.94 ± 0.41, p = 0.001). ΔCV was greater (p = 0.03) in the ACL-R group (0.52 ± 0.82) than control group (0.15 ± 0.46). CV significantly increased from baseline to post-exercise (p = 0.001) in the ACL-R group, while the control group did not (p = 0.06). The ACL-R group demonstrated greater knee extension torque variability than the control group. Exercise increased torque variability more in the ACL-R group than control group.

  8. β-alanine supplementation improves isometric endurance of the knee extensor muscles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We examined the effect of four weeks of β-alanine supplementation on isometric endurance of the knee extensors at 45% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Methods Thirteen males (age 23 ± 6 y; height 1.80 ± 0.05 m; body mass 81.0 ± 10.5 kg), matched for pre-supplementation isometric endurance, were allocated to either a placebo (n = 6) or β-alanine (n = 7; 6.4 g·d-1 over 4 weeks) supplementation group. Participants completed an isometric knee extension test (IKET) to fatigue, at an intensity of 45% MVIC, before and after supplementation. In addition, two habituation tests were completed in the week prior to the pre-supplementation test and a further practice test was completed in the week prior to the post-supplementation test. MVIC force, IKET hold-time, and impulse generated were recorded. Results IKET hold-time increased by 9.7 ± 9.4 s (13.2%) and impulse by 3.7 ± 1.3 kN·s-1 (13.9%) following β-alanine supplementation. These changes were significantly greater than those in the placebo group (IKET: t(11) = 2.9, p ≤0.05; impulse: t(11) = 3.1, p ≤ 0.05). There were no significant changes in MVIC force in either group. Conclusion Four weeks of β-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g·d-1 improved endurance capacity of the knee extensors at 45% MVIC, which most likely results from improved pH regulation within the muscle cell as a result of elevated muscle carnosine levels. PMID:22697405

  9. Kinesio Taping effects on knee extension force among soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Maysa V. G. B.; Vieira, Edgar R.; Brunt, Denis; Goethel, Márcio F.; Gonçalves, Mauro; Quemelo, Paulo R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Kinesio Taping (KT) is widely used, however the effects of KT on muscle activation and force are contradictory. Objective: To evaluate the effects of KT on knee extension force in soccer players. Method: This is a clinical trial study design. Thirty-four subjects performed two maximal isometric voluntary contractions of the lower limbs pre, immediately post, and 24 hours after tape application on the lower limbs. Both lower limbs were taped, using K-Tape and 3M Micropore tape randomly on the right and left thighs of the participants. Isometric knee extension force was measured for dominant side using a strain gauge. The following variables were assessed: peak force, time to peak force, rate of force development until peak force, time to peak rate of force development, and 200 ms pulse. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the variables assessed between KT and Micropore conditions (F=0.645, p=0.666) or among testing sessions (pre, post, and 24h after) (F=0.528, p=0.868), and there was no statistical significance (F=0.271, p=0.986) for interaction between tape conditions and testing session. Conclusion: KT did not affect the force-related measures assessed immediately and 24 hours after the KT application compared with Micropore application, during maximal isometric voluntary knee extension. PMID:25789557

  10. Knee-extension-assist for knee-ankle-foot orthoses.

    PubMed

    Spring, Alexander; Kofman, Jonathan; Lemaire, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with quadriceps muscle weakness often have difficulty generating the knee-extension moments required for common mobility tasks. A new device that provides a knee-extension moment was designed to help individuals perform sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit. The knee-extension-assist (KEA) was designed as a modular component to be incorporated into existing knee-ankle-foot-orthoses (KAFO). The KEA loads a set of springs as the knee flexes under bodyweight and returns the stored energy as an extension moment during knee extension. The springs can be locked in place at the end of flexion to prevent unwanted knee extension while seated. When the affected leg is unloaded, the device disengages, allowing free joint motion. A prototype KEA underwent mechanical testing and biomechanical evaluation on an able-bodied individual during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit.

  11. Twitch potentiation induced by stimulated and voluntary isometric contractions at various torque levels in human knee extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Naokazu; Yanai, Toshimasa; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the extent of twitch potentiation (TP) after stimulated or voluntary contractions at identical intensities for the human knee extensor muscles. Isometric knee extensions of 10 s were performed at 20%, 40%, and 60% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque level, through percutaneous electrical stimulation of the quadriceps at 80 Hz or voluntary contraction. Twitch responses were evoked by stimulating the femoral nerve percutaneously with supramaximal intensity. The extent of TP after the stimulated contraction was greater than that after the voluntary contraction at the 20% MVC torque level, whereas a stimulated contraction induced a smaller extent of TP than did a voluntary contraction at contraction intensities higher than 40% MVC. We suggest that this contraction intensity dependence of differences in TP after stimulated and voluntary isometric conditioning contractions is responsible for differences in the recruitment pattern of motor units during the conditioning contractions.

  12. Effect of antagonist muscle fatigue on knee extension torque.

    PubMed

    Beltman, J G M; Sargeant, A J; Ball, D; Maganaris, C N; de Haan, A

    2003-09-01

    The effect of hamstring fatigue on knee extension torque was examined at different knee angles for seven male subjects. Before and after a dynamic flexion fatigue protocol (180 degrees s(-1), until dynamic torque had declined by 50%), maximal voluntary contraction extension torque was measured at four knee flexion angles (90 degrees, 70 degrees, 50 degrees and 30 degrees ). Maximal torque generating capacity and voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle were determined using electrical stimulation. Average rectified EMG of the biceps femoris was determined. Mean dynamic flexion torque declined by 48+/-11%. Extensor maximal voluntary contraction torque, maximal torque generating capacity, voluntary activation and average rectified EMG at the four knee angles were unaffected by the hamstring fatigue protocol. Only at 50 degrees knee angle was voluntary activation significantly lower (15.7%) after fatigue ( P<0.05). In addition, average rectified EMG before fatigue was not significantly influenced by knee angle. It was concluded that a fatigued hamstring muscle did not increase the maximal voluntary contraction extension torque and knee angle did not change coactivation. Three possible mechanisms may explain the results: a potential difference in recruited fibre populations in antagonist activity compared with the fibres which were fatigued in the protocol, a smaller loss in isometric torque generating capacity of the hamstring muscle than was expected from the dynamic measurements and/or a reduction in voluntary activation.

  13. VARIABILITY IN ANTAGONIST MUSCLE ACTIVITY AND PEAK TORQUE DURING ISOMETRIC KNEE STRENGTH TESTING

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Williams, Glenn N.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Strength testing is common in the treatment of people with knee pathology and in research related to knee health. Variability in the magnitude of antagonist muscle activity and peak torque measurements during isometric knee strength testing is not well defined and has potential implications of strength test validity and reliability. The aim of this study was to determine the magnitude and variability (side-to-side, session-to-session) of antagonist muscle activity and peak torque during isometric knee strength testing and to compare and contrast the results of males and females. METHODS: Electromyograms and torque data were collected from 30 active young people (15 males, 15 females) during isometric strength testing of the knee extensors and flexors at two sessions that took place approximately one week apart. The magnitude of antagonist muscle activity and peak torque during isometric knee strength testing was calculated and the variability in these parameters assessed. RESULTS: Significant side-to-side differences were observed in the magnitude of antagonist muscle activity when the leg with higher antagonist activity was contrasted with the leg with lower antagonist activity (P < 0.001). Significant side-to-side differences were also observed when peak torque measurements were contrasted in a similar manner (P < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in peak torque and antagonist activity measurements between sessions. Significantly higher vastus medialis antagonist activity was observed in females (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that significant variability in antagonist muscle activity and peak torque is present during maximal isometric knee strength testing. This variability may reduce the accuracy of knee strength tests, especially when side-to-side comparisons are made as is typical in clinical settings. The results of this study may be helpful when interpreting strength test results and setting criteria for

  14. Isometric and isokinetic torque curves at the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Yoon, T S; Park, D S; Kang, S W; Chun, S I; Shin, J S

    1991-03-01

    Isometric and isokinetic torques of bilateral quadriceps and hamstrings were measured with Isokinetic Rehabilitation and Testing System (Model No. Cybex 340) on 40 normal untrained subjects, 20 males and 20 females, ranging between the ages of 23 and 35 years. The mean peak isometric and isokinetic torque values of both muscle groups showed no significant differences between dominant (right) and nondominant (left) limbs in both sexes; however there were significant differences between the male and the female. As the angular velocity increased, the peak torque significantly decreased, and the point of peak torque output occurred significantly later in the range of motion for quadriceps and hamstrings (p less than 0.01). There were no significant changes in the hamstrings to quadriceps (H/Q) ratios as the angular velocity increased. However, there were significant differences of mean H/Q ratio between male and female (p less than 0.01). Height had significant positive correlation with peak isometric and isokinetic torques for both quadriceps and hamstrings (p less than 0.01). Weight was found to correlate significantly with peak isometric and isokinetic torques (p less than 0.01). The mean isometric torques were significantly higher than the mean isokinetic torques for any joint angles in both sexes (p less than .01).

  15. [Comparison of the effectiveness of isokinetic vs isometric therapeutic exercise in patients with osteoarthritis of knee].

    PubMed

    Rosa, Uganet Hernández; Velásquez Tlapanco, Jorge; Lara Maya, Catalina; Villarreal Ríos, Enrique; Martínez González, Lidia; Vargas Daza, Emma Rosa; Galicia Rodríguez, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic joint disease; isometric exercise leads to the development of mechanical work and isokinetic exercise leads to better joint mobility. To compare the effectiveness of isometric versus isokinetic therapeutic exercises in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Quasiexperimental study in a population of 45 to 75 year old patients with a diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis. Group 1 (experimental) was put under isokinetic exercises and group 2 (control) under isometric exercises. The sample size was of 33 patients per group; the allocation to the experimentation or control group was nonrandom, but stratified by degrees of knee osteoarthritis. The effectiveness of the exercise was measured in three dimensions: muscle strength, joint range and pain. The intervention lasted eight weeks and the physical activity was carried out every third day. The statistical analysis included averages, standard deviation, percentage, Chi square test, z test for two populations, t test for two independent populations and twin t test. The analysis of muscle strength comparing the categories independently demonstrates differences at 8 weeks; 33.3% of the isokinetic exercise is in the normal category and 15.2% in the isometric exercise (p= 0.04). There was not difference of joint range between groups, despite finding a stage I range in 100.0% of the isokinetic group and 97.0% in the isometric (p> 0.05) group. Pain was milder in the isokinetic exercise group at 8 weeks (p= 0.01) Isokinetic exercises have a greater effectiveness than isometric exercises for muscle strength and pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, other studies with randomized designs are needed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Knee extension strength in obese and nonobese male adolescents.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoula, Achref; Martin, Vincent; Bouchant, Antoine; Walrand, Stéphane; Lavet, Cédric; Taillardat, Michel; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Boisseau, Nathalie; Duché, Pascale; Ratel, Sébastien

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare "absolute" and "relative" knee extension strength between obese and nonobese adolescents. Ten nonobese and 12 severely obese adolescent boys of similar chronological age, maturity status, and height were compared. Total body and regional soft tissue composition were determined using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Knee extensors maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) torque was measured using an isometric dynamometer at a knee angle of 60° (0° is full extension). Absolute MVC torque was significantly higher in obese adolescents than in controls. However, although MVC torque expressed per unit of body mass was found to be significantly lower in obese adolescent boys, no significant difference in MVC torque was found between groups when normalized to fat-free mass. Conversely, when correcting for thigh lean mass and estimated thigh muscle mass, MVC torque was significantly higher in the obese group (17.9% and 22.2%, respectively; P <0.05). To conclude, our sample of obese adolescent boys had higher absolute and relative knee extension strength than our nonobese controls. However, further studies are required to ascertain whether or not relative strength, measured with more accurate in vivo methods such as magnetic resonance imaging, is higher in obese adolescents than in nonobese controls.

  17. Assessment of isometricity before and after total knee arthroplasty: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Markus S; Jeffcote, Benjamin O; Schirm, Andreas C; Jacob, Hilaire; Nicholls, Rochelle L

    2009-10-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) relies on soft tissue to regulate joint stability after surgery. In practice, the exact balance of the gaps can be difficult to measure, and various methods including intra-operative spreaders or distraction devices have been proposed. While individual ligament strain patterns have been measured, no data exist on the isometricity of the soft tissue envelope as a whole. In this study, a novel device was developed and validated to compare isometricity in the entire soft tissue envelope for both the intact and TKA knee. A spring-loaded rod was inserted in six cadaver knee joints between the tibial shaft and the tibial plateau or tibial tray after removing a 7 mm slice of bone. The displacement of the rod during passive flexion represented variation in tissue tension around the joint. The rod position in the intact knee remained within 1 mm of its initial position between 15 degrees and 135 degrees of flexion, and within 2 mm (+/-1.2 mm) throughout the entire range of motion (0-150 degrees). After insertion of a mobile-bearing TKA, the rod was displaced a mean of 6 mm at 150 degrees (p<0.001). The results were validated using a force transducer implanted in the tibial baseplate of the TKA, which showed increased tibiofemoral force in the parts of the flexion range where the rod was most displaced. The force measurements were highly correlated with the displacement pattern of the spring-loaded rod (r=-0.338; p=0.006). A simple device has been validated to measure isometricity in the soft tissue envelope around the knee joint. Isometricity measurements may be used in the future to improve implantation techniques during TKA surgery.

  18. Experimental knee pain impairs submaximal force steadiness in isometric, eccentric, and concentric muscle actions.

    PubMed

    Rice, David A; McNair, Peter J; Lewis, Gwyn N; Mannion, Jamie

    2015-09-12

    Populations with knee joint damage, including arthritis, have noted impairments in the regulation of submaximal muscle force. It is difficult to determine the exact cause of such impairments given the joint pathology and associated neuromuscular adaptations. Experimental pain models that have been used to isolate the effects of pain on muscle force regulation have shown impaired force steadiness during acute pain. However, few studies have examined force regulation during dynamic contractions, and these findings have been inconsistent. The goal of the current study was to examine the effect of experimental knee joint pain on submaximal quadriceps force regulation during isometric and dynamic contractions. The study involved fifteen healthy participants. Participants were seated in an isokinetic dynamometer. Knee extensor force matching tasks were completed in isometric, eccentric, and concentric muscle contraction conditions. The target force was set to 10 % of maximum for each contraction type. Hypertonic saline was then injected into the infrapatella fat pad to generate acute joint pain. The force matching tasks were repeated during pain and once more 5 min after pain had subsided. Hypertonic saline resulted in knee pain with an average peak pain rating of 5.5 ± 2.1 (0-10 scale) that lasted for 18 ± 4 mins. Force steadiness significantly reduced during pain across all three muscle contraction conditions. There was a trend to increased force matching error during pain but this was not significant. Experimental knee pain leads to impaired quadriceps force steadiness during isometric, eccentric, and concentric contractions, providing further evidence that joint pain directly affects motor performance. Given the established relationship between submaximal muscle force steadiness and function, such an effect may be detrimental to the performance of tasks in daily life. In order to restore motor performance in people with painful arthritic conditions of the

  19. Muscle Damage following Maximal Eccentric Knee Extensions in Males and Females.

    PubMed

    Hicks, K M; Onambélé, G L; Winwood, K; Morse, C I

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether there is a sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. Vastus Lateralis and patella tendon properties were measured in males and females using ultrasonography. During maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions (12 reps x 6 sets), Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions torque were recorded every 10° of knee joint angle (20-90°). Isometric torque, Creatine Kinase and muscle soreness were measured pre, post, 48, 96 and 168 hours post damage as markers of exercise induced muscle damage. Patella tendon stiffness and Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening were significantly higher in males compared to females (p<0.05). There was no sex difference in isometric torque loss and muscle soreness post exercise induced muscle damage (p>0.05). Creatine Kinase levels post exercise induced muscle damage were higher in males compared to females (p<0.05), and remained higher when maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, relative to estimated quadriceps anatomical cross sectional area, was taken as a covariate (p<0.05). Based on isometric torque loss, there is no sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. The higher Creatine Kinase in males could not be explained by differences in maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and patella tendon stiffness. Further research is required to understand the significant sex differences in Creatine Kinase levels following exercise induced muscle damage.

  20. Muscle Damage following Maximal Eccentric Knee Extensions in Males and Females

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether there is a sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. Materials and Method Vastus Lateralis and patella tendon properties were measured in males and females using ultrasonography. During maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions (12 reps x 6 sets), Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions torque were recorded every 10° of knee joint angle (20–90°). Isometric torque, Creatine Kinase and muscle soreness were measured pre, post, 48, 96 and 168 hours post damage as markers of exercise induced muscle damage. Results Patella tendon stiffness and Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening were significantly higher in males compared to females (p<0.05). There was no sex difference in isometric torque loss and muscle soreness post exercise induced muscle damage (p>0.05). Creatine Kinase levels post exercise induced muscle damage were higher in males compared to females (p<0.05), and remained higher when maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, relative to estimated quadriceps anatomical cross sectional area, was taken as a covariate (p<0.05). Conclusion Based on isometric torque loss, there is no sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. The higher Creatine Kinase in males could not be explained by differences in maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and patella tendon stiffness. Further research is required to understand the significant sex differences in Creatine Kinase levels following exercise induced muscle damage. PMID:26986066

  1. Muscle oxygenation of superficial and deep regions in knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles during repeated isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Kubo, K

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in muscle oxygenation of knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles during repeated muscle contractions under the same condition. In addition, we compared changes in muscle oxygenation between superficial and deep regions of both muscles. Eleven healthy males participated in this study. During repeated knee extensions and plantar flexions (50 repetitions at 50% of the isometric maximum voluntary contraction for 3 s with 3 s relaxations), blood volume and oxygen saturation (StO₂) of the vastus lateralis and medial gastrocnemius muscles (superficial and deep region of each muscle) were measured using near infrared spectroscopy. The decrement of StO₂at the end of exercises was greater in plantar flexor muscle than in knee extensor muscle (P<0.001). For both muscles, the decrement of StO₂at the end of exercises was greater in the deep region than in the superficial one (both P<0.001). These results suggested that the oxygen utilization of plantar flexor muscle and deep regions of each muscle were higher than that of knee extensor muscle and superficial regions of each muscle.

  2. The effects of imagery training on fast isometric knee extensor torque development.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Cornelis J; Hutter, Vana; Icke, Chris; Groen, Bart; Gemmink, Anne; Smilde, Hiltsje; de Haan, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that imagery training would improve the fast onset of neuromuscular activation and thereby fast knee extensor isometric torque development. Forty young healthy participants, not involved in strength training, were assigned to one of four groups: physical training, imagery training, placebo training or control. The three training groups had three 15 min sessions per week for 4 weeks, with a 90 ° knee angle but were tested also at 120 °. At 90 ° knee angle, maximal torque increased (-8%) similarly in all three training groups. The torque-time integral (contractile impulse) over the first 40 ms after torque onset (TTI40) increased (P < 0.05) after physical training (by -100%), but only at 90 °. This increase was significantly different from the delta values (change pre to post) in the control and placebo groups, whereas delta values in the imagery group were similar to those in the placebo group. The increases in TTI40 following physical training were related (r (2) = 0.81, P < 0.05) to significant increases of knee extensor rectified surface EMG at torque onset (EMG40). In conclusion, only physical training led to a knee angle specific increase of contractile impulse that was significantly different from placebo and controls and that was related to improved onset of neuromuscular activation.

  3. Isometric hip and knee torque measurements as an outcome measure in robot assisted gait training.

    PubMed

    Galen, Sujay S; Clarke, Celia J; McLean, Alan N; Allan, David B; Conway, Bernard A

    2014-01-01

    Strength changes in lower limb muscles following robot assisted gait training (RAGT) in subjects with incomplete spinal cord injury (ISCI) has not been quantified using objective outcome measures. To record changes in the force generating capacity of lower limb muscles (recorded as peak voluntary isometric torque at the knee and hip), before, during and after RAGT in both acute and subacute/chronic ISCI subjects using a repeated measures study design. Eighteen subjects with ISCI participated in this study (Age range: 26-63 years mean age = 49.3 ± 11 years). Each subject participated in the study for a total period of eight weeks, including 6 weeks of RAGT using the Lokomat system (Hocoma AG, Switzerland). Peak torques were recorded in hip flexors, extensors, knee flexors and extensors using torque sensors that are incorporated within the Lokomat. All the tested lower limb muscle groups showed statistically significant (p < 0.001) increases in peak torques in the acute subjects. Comparison between the change in peak torque generated by a muscle and its motor score over time showed a non-linear relationship. The peak torque recorded during isometric contractions provided an objective outcome measure to record changes in muscle strength following RAGT.

  4. The Effect of Tibial Rotation on the Contribution of Medial and Lateral Hamstrings During Isometric Knee Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Jónasson, Gunnlaugur; Helgason, Andri; Ingvarsson, Þorsteinn; Kristjánsson, Arnar Már; Briem, Kristín

    2015-01-01

    Background: Selective atrophy of hamstring components may result from muscle strain or graft harvesting for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Assessment and rehabilitation that specifically targets medial (MH) or lateral (LH) hamstring components may improve patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effects of volitional tibial rotation medially (MR) versus laterally (LR) on activation levels of MH versus LH and strength measures during isometric testing of knee flexors. Hypothesis: Muscle activation of MH and LH during knee flexor strength testing will be augmented when coupled with MR and LR of the tibia, respectively, without affecting knee flexor strength measures. Study Design: Cross-sectional laboratory study. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: Surface electrodes were used to record neuromuscular activity from MH and LH of the right lower limb in 40 healthy young men and women during isometric knee flexor strength testing at 40° of knee flexion, where participants maintained concurrent volitional MR or LR of the tibia. Statistical analyses of variance included general linear models for repeated measures. Results: A significant interaction was found for tibial rotation and hamstring component variables (P < 0.01). When isometric knee flexion was coupled with LR, normalized activation levels were similar for MH and LH. When performed with MR, a significant drop in LH activation led to dissimilar activation levels of the 2 components. Significantly greater strength measures were found when isometric knee flexion was performed with concurrent LR of the tibia (P < 0.01). Both sexes demonstrated the same rotation-dependent differences. Conclusion: Coupling tibial rotation with knee flexor activities primarily affects the LH component. Clinical Relevance: Strategies involving volitional tibial rotation may be considered for specific assessment/rehabilitation of the MH or LH component. PMID:26721286

  5. The Effect of Tibial Rotation on the Contribution of Medial and Lateral Hamstrings During Isometric Knee Flexion.

    PubMed

    Jónasson, Gunnlaugur; Helgason, Andri; Ingvarsson, Þorsteinn; Kristjánsson, Arnar Már; Briem, Kristín

    2016-01-01

    Selective atrophy of hamstring components may result from muscle strain or graft harvesting for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Assessment and rehabilitation that specifically targets medial (MH) or lateral (LH) hamstring components may improve patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effects of volitional tibial rotation medially (MR) versus laterally (LR) on activation levels of MH versus LH and strength measures during isometric testing of knee flexors. Muscle activation of MH and LH during knee flexor strength testing will be augmented when coupled with MR and LR of the tibia, respectively, without affecting knee flexor strength measures. Cross-sectional laboratory study. Level 3. Surface electrodes were used to record neuromuscular activity from MH and LH of the right lower limb in 40 healthy young men and women during isometric knee flexor strength testing at 40° of knee flexion, where participants maintained concurrent volitional MR or LR of the tibia. Statistical analyses of variance included general linear models for repeated measures. A significant interaction was found for tibial rotation and hamstring component variables (P < 0.01). When isometric knee flexion was coupled with LR, normalized activation levels were similar for MH and LH. When performed with MR, a significant drop in LH activation led to dissimilar activation levels of the 2 components. Significantly greater strength measures were found when isometric knee flexion was performed with concurrent LR of the tibia (P < 0.01). Both sexes demonstrated the same rotation-dependent differences. Coupling tibial rotation with knee flexor activities primarily affects the LH component. Strategies involving volitional tibial rotation may be considered for specific assessment/rehabilitation of the MH or LH component.

  6. Effects of series elasticity on the human knee extension torque-angle relationship in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Ohgo, Kazuya; Takeishi, Ryuichi; Yoshinaga, Kazunari; Tsunoda, Naoya; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of series elasticity on the torque-angle relationship of the knee extensors in vivo. Forty-two men volunteered to take part in the present study. The participants performed maximal voluntary isometric contractions at eight knee-joint angles (40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110 degrees). The elongation of the tendon and aponeurosis of the vastus lateralis muscle was directly measured by ultrasonography, while the participants performed ramp isometric knee extensions to the voluntary maximum at 800 of knee angle. There was no significant difference in the torque value between 50 degrees and 100 degrees, although there was variation in the shape of the "torque-angle" relationship. The variability in the torque-angle curve was not affected by the activation level of agonist and antagonist muscles and the moment arm length. The ratio of torque at 1000 compared to that at 50 degrees was significantly (r(2) = 18-23 %) correlated to the maximal elongation and strain (to initial length) of the tendon structures. These results suggest that increased compliance of tendon structures of the knee extensors may contribute to variations in the torque-angle curves of the knee extensors.

  7. No Critical Peripheral Fatigue Threshold during Intermittent Isometric Time to Task Failure Test with the Knee Extensors

    PubMed Central

    Froyd, Christian; Beltrami, Fernando G.; Millet, Guillaume Y.; Noakes, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that group III and IV muscle afferents provide inhibitory feedback from locomotor muscles to the central nervous system, setting an absolute threshold for the development of peripheral fatigue during exercise. The aim of this study was to test the validity of this theory. Thus, we asked whether the level of developed peripheral fatigue would differ when two consecutive exercise trials were completed to task failure. Ten trained sport students performed two exercise trials to task failure on an isometric dynamometer, allowing peripheral fatigue to be assessed 2 s after maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) post task failure. The trials, separated by 8 min, consisted of repeated sets of 10 × 5-s isometric knee extension followed by 5-s rest between contractions. In each set, the first nine contractions were performed at a target force at 60% of the pre-exercise MVC, while the 10th contraction was a MVC. MVC and evoked force responses to supramaximal electrical femoral nerve stimulation on relaxed muscles were assessed during the trials and at task failure. Stimulations at task failure consisted of single stimulus (SS), paired stimuli at 10 Hz (PS10), paired stimuli at 100 Hz (PS100), and 50 stimuli at 100 Hz (tetanus). Time to task failure for the first trial (12.84 ± 5.60 min) was longer (P < 0.001) than for the second (5.74 ± 1.77 min). MVC force was significantly lower at task failure for both trials compared with the pre-exercise values (both P < 0.001), but there were no differences in MVC at task failure in the first and second trials (P = 1.00). However, evoked peak force for SS, PS100, and tetanus were all reduced more at task failure in the second compared to the first trial (P = 0.014 for SS, P < 0.001 for PS100 and tetanus). These results demonstrate that subjects do not terminate exercise at task failure because they have reached a critical threshold in peripheral fatigue. The present data therefore question the existence of a

  8. The effects of isometric resistance training on stretch reflex induced tremor in the knee extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Durbaba, Rade; Cassidy, Angela; Budini, Francesco; Macaluso, Andrea

    2013-06-15

    This study examines the effect of 4 wk of high-intensity isometric resistance training on induced tremor in knee extensor muscles. Fourteen healthy volunteers were assigned to either the training group (n = 7) or the nontraining control group (n = 7). Induced tremor was assessed by measuring force fluctuations during anisometric contractions against spring loading, whose compliance was varied to allow for preferential activation of the short or long latency stretch reflex components. Effects of high-intensity isometric resistance training on induced tremor was assessed under two contraction conditions: relative force matching, where the relative level of activity was equal for both pre- and post-training sessions, set at 30% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and absolute force matching, where the level of activity was set to 30% pretrained MVC. The training group experienced a 26.5% increase in MVC in contrast to the 0.8% for the control group. For relative force-matching contractions, induced tremor amplitude and frequency did not change in either the training or control group. During absolute force-matching contractions, induced tremor amplitude was decreased by 37.5% and 31.6% for the short and long components, respectively, with no accompanying change in frequency, for the training group. No change in either measure was observed in the control group for absolute force-matching contractions. The results are consistent with high-intensity isometric resistance training induced neural changes leading to increased strength, coupled with realignment of stretch reflex automatic gain compensation to the new maximal force output. Also, previous reported reductions in anisometric tremor following strength training may partly be due to changed stretch reflex behavior.

  9. Knee-Extension Torque Variability and Subjective Knee Function in Patients With a History of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Goetschius, John; Hart, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    Context  When returning to physical activity, patients with a history of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) often experience limitations in knee-joint function that may be due to chronic impairments in quadriceps motor control. Assessment of knee-extension torque variability may demonstrate underlying impairments in quadriceps motor control in patients with a history of ACL-R. Objective  To identify differences in maximal isometric knee-extension torque variability between knees that have undergone ACL-R and healthy knees and to determine the relationship between knee-extension torque variability and self-reported knee function in patients with a history of ACL-R. Design  Descriptive laboratory study. Setting  Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants  A total of 53 individuals with primary, unilateral ACL-R (age = 23.4 ± 4.9 years, height = 1.7 ± 0.1 m, mass = 74.6 ± 14.8 kg) and 50 individuals with no history of substantial lower extremity injury or surgery who served as controls (age = 23.3 ± 4.4 years, height = 1.7 ± 0.1 m, mass = 67.4 ± 13.2 kg). Main Outcome Measure(s)  Torque variability, strength, and central activation ratio (CAR) were calculated from 3-second maximal knee-extension contraction trials (90° of flexion) with a superimposed electrical stimulus. All participants completed the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Evaluation Form, and we determined the number of months after surgery. Group differences were assessed using independent-samples t tests. Correlation coefficients were calculated among torque variability, strength, CAR, months after surgery, and IKDC scores. Torque variability, strength, CAR, and months after surgery were regressed on IKDC scores using stepwise, multiple linear regression. Results  Torque variability was greater and strength, CAR, and IKDC scores were lower in the ACL-R group than in the control group (P < .05). Torque variability and strength were

  10. Knee-Extension Torque Variability and Subjective Knee Function in Patients with a History of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Goetschius, John; Hart, Joseph M

    2016-01-01

    When returning to physical activity, patients with a history of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) often experience limitations in knee-joint function that may be due to chronic impairments in quadriceps motor control. Assessment of knee-extension torque variability may demonstrate underlying impairments in quadriceps motor control in patients with a history of ACL-R. To identify differences in maximal isometric knee-extension torque variability between knees that have undergone ACL-R and healthy knees and to determine the relationship between knee-extension torque variability and self-reported knee function in patients with a history of ACL-R. Descriptive laboratory study. Laboratory. A total of 53 individuals with primary, unilateral ACL-R (age = 23.4 ± 4.9 years, height = 1.7 ± 0.1 m, mass = 74.6 ± 14.8 kg) and 50 individuals with no history of substantial lower extremity injury or surgery who served as controls (age = 23.3 ± 4.4 years, height = 1.7 ± 0.1 m, mass = 67.4 ± 13.2 kg). Torque variability, strength, and central activation ratio (CAR) were calculated from 3-second maximal knee-extension contraction trials (90° of flexion) with a superimposed electrical stimulus. All participants completed the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Evaluation Form, and we determined the number of months after surgery. Group differences were assessed using independent-samples t tests. Correlation coefficients were calculated among torque variability, strength, CAR, months after surgery, and IKDC scores. Torque variability, strength, CAR, and months after surgery were regressed on IKDC scores using stepwise, multiple linear regression. Torque variability was greater and strength, CAR, and IKDC scores were lower in the ACL-R group than in the control group (P < .05). Torque variability and strength were correlated with IKDC scores (P < .05). Torque variability, strength, and CAR were correlated with each other (P < .05

  11. Muscle Activation Differs between Three Different Knee Joint-Angle Positions during a Maximal Isometric Back Squat Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Jarbas da Silva, Josinaldo; Jon Schoenfeld, Brad; Nardi, Priscyla Silva Monteiro; Pecoraro, Silvio Luis; D'Andréa Greve, Julia Maria; Hartigan, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activation of the lower limb muscles when performing a maximal isometric back squat exercise over three different positions. Fifteen young, healthy, resistance-trained men performed an isometric back squat at three knee joint angles (20°, 90°, and 140°) in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion. Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activation of the vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST), and gluteus maximus (GM). In general, muscle activity was the highest at 90° for the three quadriceps muscles, yet differences in muscle activation between knee angles were muscle specific. Activity of the GM was significantly greater at 20° and 90° compared to 140°. The BF and ST displayed similar activation at all joint angles. In conclusion, knee position alters muscles activation of the quadriceps and gluteus maximus muscles. An isometric back squat at 90° generates the highest overall muscle activation, yet an isometric back squat at 140° generates the lowest overall muscle activation of the VL and GM only. PMID:27504484

  12. Neuromuscular function during knee extension exercise after cold water immersion.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Wijayanto, Titis; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2017-06-23

    Human adaptability to cold environment has been focused on in the physiological anthropology and related research area. Concerning the human acclimatization process in the natural climate, it is necessary to conduct a research assessing comprehensive effect of cold environment and physical activities in cold. This study investigated the effect of cold water immersion on the exercise performance and neuromuscular function during maximal and submaximal isometric knee extension. Nine healthy males participated in this study. They performed maximal and submaximal (20, 40, and 60% maximal load) isometric knee extension pre- and post-immersion in 23, 26, and 34 °C water. The muscle activity of the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) was measured using surface electromyography (EMG). The percentages of the maximum voluntary contraction (%MVC) and mean power frequency (MPF) of EMG data were analyzed. The post-immersion maximal force was significantly lower in 23 °C than in 26 and 34 °C conditions (P < 0.05). The post-immersion %MVC of RF was significantly higher than pre-immersion during 60% maximal exercise in 23 and 26 °C conditions (P < 0.05). In the VL, the post-immersion %MVC was significantly higher than pre-immersion in 23 and 26 °C conditions during 20% maximal exercise and in 26 °C at 40 and 60% maximal intensities (P < 0.05). The post-immersion %MVC of VL was significantly higher in 26 °C than in 34 °C at 20 and 60% maximal load (P < 0.05). The post-immersion MPF of RF during 20% maximal intensity was significantly lower in 23 °C than in 26 and 34 °C conditions (P < 0.05), and significantly different between three water temperature conditions at 40 and 60% maximal intensities (P < 0.05). The post-immersion MPF of VL during three submaximal trials were significantly lower in 23 and 26 °C than in 34 °C conditions (P < 0.05). The lower shift of EMG frequency would be connected with the decrease in the

  13. Investigation of Cervical Fleksor and Extensor Muscle Activation During Isometric Neck Extension Applied by Therraband

    PubMed Central

    Önal, Sercan; Can, Filiz; Yakut, Yavuz; Baltacı, Gül

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Therrabands are commonly used for resistive exercises, streching and stabilization exercises and also isometric exercises. However, principles of practice of therrabands are mostly focused on exercise variety. Likewise it is only given point to exercise variety during therrabands’ usage at cervical region. Nevertheless, for effective usage of therrabands and for proper assessment of effectiveness response, it is necessary to know the amount of resistance being given or muscle activation response against the resistance given. The aim of this study was to compare activations of cervical flexor and extensor muscles during isometric extension exercise against the resistance of therraband in healthy individuals. Methods: 14 healthy subjects (8 female,6 male)aged between 19-32 have been included in the study. Subjects with neck problems, systemic diseases, history of trauma or operation were excluded. Neck isometric exercises with therraband was 2 sets with 2 minutes’ intervals and EMG records have been taken during exercises. After preparation of the skin, surface electrodes placed on the motor points of sternocleidomastoideus(SCM) and erector spinae(ES) muscles. After taking the average of 3 measures, the first 10 seconds of muscular activations were recorded. The average of integrated EMG(iEMG) values of each records was used for statistical data. Independent T test and Mann Whitney U test were used for the analysis of findings. Results: There was no significant difference between the right ES and left ES’s mean iEMG during isometric neck extension against therraband (p=0.06). Although there was no difference between right SCM and right ES muscles action potentials(t=-0.895; p=0.379), there was a significant difference between left SCM and left ES muscles’ action potentials (z= -2.435; p=0.01). When all the right and left SCM and ES muscle activations were compared, a significant difference was detected in favour of ES muscles ( t= -2.133; p= 0

  14. Less indication of muscle damage in the second than initial electrical muscle stimulation bout consisting of isometric contractions of the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Aldayel, Abdulaziz; Jubeau, Marc; McGuigan, Michael R; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2010-03-01

    This study compared the first and second exercise bouts consisting of electrically evoked isometric contractions for muscle damage profile. Nine healthy men (31 +/- 4 years) had two electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) bouts separated by 2 weeks. The knee extensors of one leg were stimulated by biphasic rectangular pulses (75 Hz, 400 mus, on-off ratio 5-15 s) at the knee joint angle of 100 degrees (0 degrees , full extension) to induce 40 isometric contractions, while the current amplitude was increased to maintain maximal force generation. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) torque of the knee extensors at 100 degrees , muscle soreness, pressure pain threshold and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were used as indirect markers of muscle damage, and measured before and 1, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after EMS bout, and the changes over time were compared between bouts. The torque produced during exercise was approximately 30% of MVC, and no significant difference between bouts was evident for the changes in peak and average torque over 40 contractions. MVC decreased significantly (P < 0.05) by 26% immediately and 1 h after both bouts, but the recovery was significantly (P < 0.05) faster after the second bout (100% at 96 h) compared with the first bout (81% at 96 h). Development of muscle soreness and tenderness, and increases in plasma CK activity were significantly (P < 0.05) smaller after the second than the first bout. These results show that changes in muscle damage markers were attenuated in the second EMS bout compared with the initial EMS bout.

  15. IS PAIN IN ONE KNEE ASSOCIATED WITH ISOMETRIC MUSCLE STRENGTH IN THE CONTRALATERAL LIMB? - DATA FROM THE OSTEOARTHRITIS INITIATIVE (OAI)

    PubMed Central

    Steidle, E.; Wirth, W.; Glass, N.; Ruhdorfer, A.; Cotofana, S.; Eckstein, F.; Segal, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Knee pain and muscle weakness confer risk for knee osteoarthritis incidence and progression. The purpose of this study was to determine whether unilateral knee pain influences contralateral thigh muscle strength. Design Of 4796 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants, 224 (mean±SD age 63.9±8.9 years) cases could be matched to a control. Cases were defined as having unilateral knee pain (numerical rating scale (NRS)≥4/10; ≥infrequent pain) and one pain-free knee (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Controls were defined as having bilaterally pain-free knees (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Maximal isometric muscle strength [N] was compared between limbs in participants with unilateral pain (cases), and between pain-free limbs of cases and controls. Results Knee extensor/flexor strength in pain-free limbs of cases was lower than in bilaterally pain-free controls (−5.5%/–8.4%; p=0.043/p=0.022). Within cases, maximum extensor/flexor strength was significantly lower in the painful than in the pain-free limb (−6.4%/4.1%; p<0.0001/p=0.015). Conclusions These results suggest that strength in limbs without knee pain is associated with the pain status of the contralateral knee. The strength difference between unilateral pain-free cases and matched bilateral pain-free controls was similar to that between limbs in persons with unilateral knee pain. Lower strength due to contralateral knee pain might be centrally mediated. PMID:25768069

  16. Muscle activity during knee-extension strengthening exercise performed with elastic tubing and isotonic resistance.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil; Andersen, Christoffer H; Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Lars L

    2012-12-01

    While elastic resistance training, targeting the upper body is effective for strength training, the effect of elastic resistance training on lower body muscle activity remains questionable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the EMG-angle relationship of the quadriceps muscle during 10-RM knee-extensions performed with elastic tubing and an isotonic strength training machine. 7 women and 9 men aged 28-67 years (mean age 44 and 41 years, respectively) participated. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded in 10 muscles during the concentric and eccentric contraction phase of a knee extension exercise performed with elastic tubing and in training machine and normalized to maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) EMG (nEMG). Knee joint angle was measured during the exercises using electronic inclinometers (range of motion 0-90°). When comparing the machine and elastic resistance exercises there were no significant differences in peak EMG of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM) during the concentric contraction phase. However, during the eccentric phase, peak EMG was significantly higher (p<0.01) in RF and VM when performing knee extensions using the training machine. In VL and VM the EMG-angle pattern was different between the two training modalities (significant angle by exercise interaction). When using elastic resistance, the EMG-angle pattern peaked towards full knee extension (0°), whereas angle at peak EMG occurred closer to knee flexion position (90°) during the machine exercise. Perceived loading (Borg CR10) was similar during knee extensions performed with elastic tubing (5.7±0.6) compared with knee extensions performed in training machine (5.9±0.5). Knee extensions performed with elastic tubing induces similar high (>70% nEMG) quadriceps muscle activity during the concentric contraction phase, but slightly lower during the eccentric contraction phase, as knee extensions performed using an isotonic

  17. Effects of knee position on the reliability and production of maximal and rapid strength characteristics during an isometric squat test.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Ty B; Pineda, Jose G; Durham, Rachel M

    2017-10-10

    This study aimed to examine the effects of knee position on the reliability and production of peak force (PF) and rate of force (RFD) development characteristics during an isometric squat. Fourteen resistance-trained females performed isometric squats at 90, 120, and 150° knee angles (corresponding to parallel, half, and quarter squat positions, respectively) on two different occasions, from which PF, peak RFD, and early (RFD30,RFD50,RFD100) and late (RFD200) phase RFD variables were extracted. PF and RFD200 were highly consistent across trials for all three squat positions, with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) ranging between 0.812-0.904 and coefficients of variation (CVs) between 6.6-19.4%. For peak and early RFD characteristics, higher ICCs and lower CV values were observed for the quarter squat (ICCs=0.818-0.852, CVs=17.3-19.4%) compared to the parallel (ICCs=0.591-0.649, CVs=30.1-55.9%) and half squats (ICCs=0.547-0.598, CVs=31.1-34.2%). In addition, isometric PF and RFD200 increased (P≤0.001-0.035) with squat position (parallelisometric squats at higher (150°) rather than lower knee joint angles (90-120°) may provide for an improved capacity to produce greater PF and RFD200 as well as a more reliable testing position for measuring peak and early RFD characteristics.

  18. Effects of a 16-week Pilates exercises training program for isometric trunk extension and flexion strength.

    PubMed

    Kliziene, Irina; Sipaviciene, Saule; Vilkiene, Jovita; Astrauskiene, Audrone; Cibulskas, Gintautas; Klizas, Sarunas; Cizauskas, Ginas

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of Pilates exercises designed to improve isometric trunk extension and flexion strength of muscles in women with chronic low back pain (cLBP). Female volunteers with cLBP were divided into an experimental group (EG; n = 27) and a control group (CG; n = 27). Pilates exercises were performed twice per week by the EG; the duration of each session was 60 min. The program lasted for 16 weeks; thus patients underwent a total of 32 exercise sessions. The maximum isometric waist bending strength of the EG had improved significantly (p = 0.001) after 16 weeks of the Pilates program. The results of trunk flexion muscle endurance tests significantly depended on the trunk extension muscle endurance before the intervention, and at 1 month (r = 0.723, p < 0.001) and 2 months (r = 0.779, p < 0.001) after the Pilates exercise program. At the end of the 16-week exercise program, cLBP intensity decreased by 2.01 ± 0.8 (p < 0.05) in the EG, and this reduction persisted for 1 month after completion of the program. At 1 and 2 months after cessation of the Pilates exercise program the pain intensified and the functional state deteriorated much faster than the maximum trunk muscle strength. Therefore, it can be concluded that, to decrease pain and improve functional condition, regular exercise (and not only improved strength and endurance) is required. We established that, although the 16-week lumbar stabilization exercise program increased isometric trunk extension and flexion strength and this increase in strength persisted for 2 months, decreased LBP and improved functional condition endured for only 1 month. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional imaging of muscle oxygenation and oxygen consumption in the knee extensor muscles during isometric contractions by spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kek, Khai Jun; Miyakawa, Takahiro; Kudo, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Katsuyuki

    2007-02-01

    In this study, we showed that exercise type- and intensity-dependent regional differences in muscle oxygenation and oxygen consumption rate (Vo II) of the knee extensor muscles could be imaged in real time with a multi-channel spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (SR-NIRS) imaging device. Healthy subjects performed isometric knee extension exercise for 30 s (without- or with-leg-press action) at different exercise intensities [10%, 40% and 70% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)]. "Separation-type" probes were attached to the skin over the major knee extensor muscles: vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF) and vastus medialis (VM). Placement of the probes enabled simultaneously measurement of 12 sites over a skin area of about 30 cm2 (temporal resolution = 0.25 s). Local Vo II of each muscle, resting Vo II (Vo II, rest) and recovery Vo II (Vo II, rec ), were determined with arterial occlusion before the start and after the end of contraction, respectively. There was no significant difference between the values of Vo II rest, in the muscles. However, during knee extension exercise without-leg-press action, Vo II rec, value of the RF was significantly greater than the values of the VL and VM at all exercise intensities. In contrast, during exercise with-leg-press action, Vo II rec, values of the RF and VM were greater than those of the VL, especially during exercise at 40% and 70% MVC. In summary, the regional differences in muscle oxygenation and Vo II of the knee extensor muscles, probably due to the differences in relative contributions of muscles to exercise and in muscle architecture, were imaged using SR-NIRS.

  20. Acute Improvement of Vertical Jump Performance After Isometric Squats Depends on Knee Angle and Vertical Jumping Ability.

    PubMed

    Tsoukos, Athanasios; Bogdanis, Gregory C; Terzis, Gerasimos; Veligekas, Panagiotis

    2016-08-01

    Tsoukos, A, Bogdanis, GC, Terzis, G, and Veligekas, P. Acute improvement of vertical jump performance after isometric squats depends on knee angle and vertical jumping ability. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2250-2257, 2016-This study examined the acute effects of maximum isometric squats at 2 different knee angles (90 or 140°) on countermovement jump (CMJ) performance in power athletes. Fourteen national-level male track and field power athletes completed 3 main trials (2 experimental and 1 control) in a randomized and counterbalanced order 1 week apart. Countermovement jump performance was evaluated using a force-plate before and 15 seconds, 3, 6, 9, and 12 minutes after 3 sets of 3 seconds maximum isometric contractions with 1-minute rest in between, from a squat position with knee angle set at 90 or 140°. Countermovement jump performance was improved compared with baseline only in the 140° condition by 3.8 ± 1.2% on the 12th minute of recovery (p = 0.027), whereas there was no change in CMJ height in the 90° condition. In the control condition, there was a decrease in CMJ performance over time, reaching -3.6 ± 1.2% (p = 0.049) after 12 minutes of recovery. To determine the possible effects of baseline jump performance on subsequent CMJ performance, subjects were divided into 2 groups ("high jumpers" and "low jumpers"). The baseline CMJ values of "high jumpers" and "low jumpers" differed significantly (CMJ: 45.1 ± 2.2 vs. 37.1 ± 3.9 cm, respectively, p = 0.001). Countermovement jump was increased only in the "high jumpers" group by 5.4 ± 1.4% (p = 0.001) and 7.4 ± 1.2% (p = 0.001) at the knee angles of 90 and 140°, respectively. This improvement was larger at the 140° angle (p = 0.049). Knee angle during isometric squats and vertical jumping ability are important determinants of the acute CMJ performance increase observed after a conditioning activity.

  1. Co-contraction Recruitment and Spinal Load During Isometric Trunk Flexion and Extension

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Kevin P.; Lee, Patrick E.; Franklin, Timothy C.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Pushing and pulling tasks account for 20% of occupational low-back injury claims. Primary torso muscle groups recruited during pushing tasks include rectus abdominis and the external obliques. However, analyses suggest that antagonistic co-contraction of the para spinal muscles is necessary to stabilize the spine during flexion exertions. The study quantified co-contraction and spinal load differences during isometric flexion and extension exertions. The goal was to provide insight into the mechanisms requiring greater co-contraction during trunk flexion exertions compared to extension exertions. Methods. Electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from the trunk muscles of healthy volunteers during isometric trunk flexion and extension exertions. A biomechanical model was implemented to estimate total muscle force from the measured EMG and trunk moment data. A similar model estimated the muscle forces necessary to achieve equilibrium while minimizing the sum of squared muscle forces. The difference in these forces represented co-contraction. Spinal load attributed to co-contraction was computed. Results. Average co-contraction during flexion exertions was approximately twice the value of co-contraction during extension, i.e. 28% and 13% of total muscle forces respectively. Co-contraction accounted for up to 47% of the total spinal load during flexion exertions. Consequently, spinal compression during the flexion tasks was nearly 50% greater than during extension exertions despite similar levels of trunk moment. Interpretation. Co-contraction must be considered when evaluating spinal load during pushing exertions. Results underscore the need to consider neuromuscular control of spinal stability when evaluating the biomechanical risks. PMID:16154249

  2. Inter-machine reliability of the Biodex and Cybex isokinetic dynamometers for knee flexor/extensor isometric, concentric and eccentric tests.

    PubMed

    de Araujo Ribeiro Alvares, João Breno; Rodrigues, Rodrigo; de Azevedo Franke, Rodrigo; da Silva, Bruna Gonçalves Cordeiro; Pinto, Ronei Silveira; Vaz, Marco Aurélio; Baroni, Bruno Manfredini

    2015-02-01

    To assess the inter-machine reliability of the Biodex System 3 Pro and Cybex Humac Norm Model 770 dynamometers for knee extensor and knee flexor peak torque measurements in isometric, concentric and eccentric tests. Randomized/crossover. Exercise Research Laboratory, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil). 25 healthy male subjects. Isometric, concentric and eccentric knee extensor and knee flexor peak torques recorded in the same test procedure performed on both isokinetic dynamometers. One-way ANOVA, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM) and coefficient of variation (CV) were used to verify significant differences, relative and absolute reliability between devices. No significant differences were found between tests performed on Biodex and Cybex (p > 0.05). ICC values indicated a high to very high reproducibility for isometric, concentric and eccentric peak torques (0.88-0.92), and moderate to high reliability for agonist-antagonist strength ratios (0.62-0.73). Peak torque did not show great difference between dynamometers for SEM (3.72-11.27 Nm) and CV (5.27-7.77%). Strength ratios presented CV values of 8.57-10.72%. Maximal knee extensor and knee flexor tests performed in isometric (60° of knee flexion), concentric and eccentric modes at 60°/s in Biodex and Cybex dynamometers present similar values. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of hand and knee positions on muscular activity during trunk extension exercise with the Roman chair.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-yeon; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-12-01

    This experimental study was performed to investigate the effects of hand and knee positions on muscular activity during back extension exercises with the Roman chair. Eighteen asymptomatic male amateur athletes performed four prone back extension exercises with two hand positions (crossed-arms and behind-the-head), and two knee positions (extended knee and 90° flexed knee). Surface electromyography (sEMG) was performed to collect data from the lower trapezius (LT), latissimus dorsi (LD), erector spinae in the T12 paraspinal region (ES-T12), erector spinae at the L3 level (ES-L3), gluteus maximus (GM), and biceps femoris (BF). Two-way repeated analysis of variance with two within-subject factors (two hand positions and two knee positions) was used to determine the significance of differences between the exercise conditions, and which hand and knee positions resulted in greater activation with exercise variation. The root mean square sEMG values were normalized using the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) and represented as the % of the maximum EMG (%mEMG). There was no significant interaction between knee and hand positions in the %mEMG data. The results showed that the hand position affected the normalized activation of LT; the behind-the-head position resulted in significantly greater muscle activation than the crossed-arms hand position (P<0.05). The activations of the LD, ES-T10, ES-L4, and GM were greater in the 90° flexed-knee position compared to the extended-knee position (P<0.05). Although back extension exercise using the Roman chair has been shown to effectively activate the extensor musculature, our results indicated that changing the knee and hand positions could activate specific muscles differently. To achieve greater activation of trunk extensor muscle during extension exercise with the Roman chair, the flexed-knee position is a useful means of increasing resistance.

  4. Correlation of isokinetic and novel hand-held dynamometry measures of knee flexion and extension strength testing.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Rod; Jacobsen, Phillip; Prior, Simon; Skazalski, Christopher; Otten, Roald; Johnson, Amanda

    2012-09-01

    Describe inter-rater reliability of, and correlations between a novel method of isometric knee extension and flexion and eccentric knee flexion strength using hand-held dynamometry and isokinetic testing for flexion/extension in the knees of athletic participants. Document strength data normalized to the individual's limb muscle mass. Observational and reliability study. Inter-rater reliability for each of the hand-held dynamometry measures was established in both legs of 10 volunteers (6 male). During routine annual screening, 216 male professional football (soccer) players were examined using these same measures in addition to performing an isokinetic evaluation of knee flexion and extension strength. Intra-class correlation coefficients for inter-rater reliability, Pearson r correlations between hand-held dynamometry and isokinetic dynamometry were calculated. Peak torque, peak torque normalized to: body weight; lean body mass; and lean limb mass were documented. Excellent inter-rater reliability was demonstrated with intra-class correlation₂,₁ values of 0.90, 0.91, and 0.96, for the eccentric hamstrings, isometric hamstrings, and isometric quadriceps measures respectively. Medium to high correlations (r=0.322-0.617) which were all significant (p<0.001) were found for the comparisons between the hand-held dynamometry and isokinetic measures. We present 3 novel and reliable methods of examining knee flexion and extension strength using hand-held dynamometry which require less skill and strength on the part of the examiner than previous measures. Correlations between these measures and isokinetic dynamometry are documented. The hand-held dynamometry examinations took less than 4 min per player to conduct and may be useful in clinical practice where isokinetic examination can be difficult to implement. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A new modification of KAFO for assistance in knee extension.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Selda; Basaran, Aynur; Ortancil, Ozgur; Balbaloglu, Ozlem

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a dynamic knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO) extension assisted with elastic support, has been described which contributes to stance phase stability and swing phase freedom. The temporal distance factors including velocity, cadence, stride length, and clinical gait assessment score (CGAS) with bare foot and orthosis have been documented. The orthosis enables walking without fully immobilizing the knee.

  6. Immediate effects of whole body vibration on patellar tendon properties and knee extension torque.

    PubMed

    Rieder, F; Wiesinger, H-P; Kösters, A; Müller, E; Seynnes, O R

    2016-03-01

    Reports about the immediate effects of whole body vibration (WBV) exposure upon torque production capacity are inconsistent. However, the changes in the torque-angle relationship observed by some authors after WBV may hinder the measurement of torque changes at a given angle. Acute changes in tendon mechanical properties do occur after certain types of exercise but this hypothesis has never been tested after a bout of WBV. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether tendon compliance is altered immediately after WBV, effectively shifting the optimal angle of peak torque towards longer muscle length. Twenty-eight subjects were randomly assigned to either a WBV (n = 14) or a squatting control group (n = 14). Patellar tendon CSA, stiffness and Young's modulus and knee extension torque-angle relationship were measured using ultrasonography and dynamometry 1 day before and directly after the intervention. Tendon CSA was additionally measured 24 h after the intervention to check for possible delayed onset of swelling. The vibration intervention had no effects on patellar tendon CSA, stiffness and Young's modulus or the torque-angle relationship. Peak torque was produced at ~70° knee angle in both groups at pre- and post-test. Additionally, the knee extension torque globally remained unaffected with the exception of a small (-6%) reduction in isometric torque at a joint angle of 60°. The present results indicate that a single bout of vibration exposure does not substantially alter patellar tendon properties or the torque-angle relationship of knee extensors.

  7. Intensity-dependent alterations in the excitability of cortical and spinal projections to the knee extensors during isometric and locomotor exercise

    PubMed Central

    Weavil, J. C.; Sidhu, S. K.; Mangum, T. S.; Richardson, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of exercise intensity and associated central motor drive in determining corticomotoneuronal excitability. Ten participants performed a series of nonfatiguing (3 s) isometric single-leg knee extensions (ISO; 10–100% of maximal voluntary contractions, MVC) and cycling bouts (30–160% peak aerobic capacity, Wpeak). At various exercise intensities, electrical potentials were evoked in the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) via transcranial magnetic stimulation (motor-evoked potentials, MEP), and electrical stimulation of both the cervicomedullary junction (cervicomedullary evoked potentials, CMEP) and the femoral nerve (maximal M-waves, Mmax). Whereas Mmax remained unchanged in both muscles (P > 0.40), voluntary electromyographic activity (EMG) increased in an exercise intensity-dependent manner for ISO and cycling exercise in VL and RF (both P < 0.001). During ISO exercise, MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased in VL and RF until a plateau was reached at ∼75% MVC; further increases in contraction intensity did not cause additional changes (P > 0.35). During cycling exercise, VL-MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ∼65% until a plateau was reached at Wpeak. In contrast, RF MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ∼110% throughout the tested cycling intensities without the occurrence of a plateau. Furthermore, alterations in EMG below the plateau influenced corticomotoneuronal excitability similarly between exercise modalities. In both exercise modalities, the MEP-to-CMEP ratio did not change with exercise intensity (P > 0.22). In conclusion, increases in exercise intensity and EMG facilitates the corticomotoneuronal pathway similarly in isometric knee extension and locomotor exercise until a plateau occurs at a submaximal exercise intensity. This facilitation appears to be primarily mediated by increases in excitability of the motoneuron pool. PMID:25876651

  8. Intensity-dependent alterations in the excitability of cortical and spinal projections to the knee extensors during isometric and locomotor exercise.

    PubMed

    Weavil, J C; Sidhu, S K; Mangum, T S; Richardson, R S; Amann, M

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the role of exercise intensity and associated central motor drive in determining corticomotoneuronal excitability. Ten participants performed a series of nonfatiguing (3 s) isometric single-leg knee extensions (ISO; 10-100% of maximal voluntary contractions, MVC) and cycling bouts (30-160% peak aerobic capacity, W peak). At various exercise intensities, electrical potentials were evoked in the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) via transcranial magnetic stimulation (motor-evoked potentials, MEP), and electrical stimulation of both the cervicomedullary junction (cervicomedullary evoked potentials, CMEP) and the femoral nerve (maximal M-waves, M max). Whereas M max remained unchanged in both muscles (P > 0.40), voluntary electromyographic activity (EMG) increased in an exercise intensity-dependent manner for ISO and cycling exercise in VL and RF (both P < 0.001). During ISO exercise, MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased in VL and RF until a plateau was reached at ∼ 75% MVC; further increases in contraction intensity did not cause additional changes (P > 0.35). During cycling exercise, VL-MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ∼ 65% until a plateau was reached at W peak. In contrast, RF MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ∼ 110% throughout the tested cycling intensities without the occurrence of a plateau. Furthermore, alterations in EMG below the plateau influenced corticomotoneuronal excitability similarly between exercise modalities. In both exercise modalities, the MEP-to-CMEP ratio did not change with exercise intensity (P > 0.22). In conclusion, increases in exercise intensity and EMG facilitates the corticomotoneuronal pathway similarly in isometric knee extension and locomotor exercise until a plateau occurs at a submaximal exercise intensity. This facilitation appears to be primarily mediated by increases in excitability of the motoneuron pool.

  9. Impact of Pain Reported During Isometric Quadriceps Muscle Strength Testing in People With Knee Pain: Data From the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Stratford, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Muscle force testing is one of the more common categories of diagnostic tests used in clinical practice. Clinicians have little evidence to guide interpretations of muscle force tests when pain is elicited during testing. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the construct validity of isometric quadriceps muscle strength tests by determining whether the relationship between maximal isometric quadriceps muscle strength and functional status was influenced by pain during isometric testing. Design A cross-sectional design was used. Methods Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative were used to identify 1,344 people with unilateral knee pain and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale scores of 1 or higher on the involved side. Measurements of maximal isometric quadriceps strength and ratings of pain during isometric testing were collected. Outcome variables were WOMAC physical function subscale, 20-m walk test, 400-m walk test, and a repeated chair stand test. Multiple regression models were used to determine whether pain during testing modified or confounded the relationship between strength and functional status. Results Pearson r correlations among the isometric quadriceps strength measures and the 4 outcome measures ranged from −.36 (95% confidence interval=−.41, −.31) for repeated chair stands to .36 (95% confidence interval=.31, .41) for the 20-m walk test. In the final analyses, neither effect modification nor confounding was found for the repeated chair stand test, the 20-m walk test, the 400-m walk test, or the WOMAC physical function subscale. Moderate or severe pain during testing was weakly associated with reduced strength, but mild pain was not. Limitations The disease spectrum was skewed toward mild or moderate symptoms, and the pain measurement scale used during muscle force testing was not ideal. Conclusions Given that the spectrum of the sample was skewed toward mild or moderate

  10. Effects of prolonged vibration to vastus intermedius muscle on force steadiness of knee extensor muscles during isometric force-matching task.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira; Ando, Ryosuke; Akima, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Afferent inputs from Ia fibers in muscle spindles are essential for the control of force and prolonged vibration has been applied to muscle-tendon units to manipulate the synaptic input from Ia afferents onto α-motor neurons. The vastus intermedius (VI) reportedly provides the highest contribution to the low-level knee extension torque among the individual synergists of quadriceps femoris (QF). The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of prolonged vibration to the VI on force steadiness of the QF. Nine healthy men (25.1±4.3years) performed submaximal force-matching task of isometric knee extension for 15s before and after mechanical vibration to the superficial region of VI for 30min. Target forces were 2.5%, 10%, and 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and force steadiness was determined by the coefficient of variation (CV) of force. After the prolonged VI vibration, the CV of force at 2.5%MVC was significantly increased, but CVs at 10% and 30%MVCs were not significantly changed. The present study concluded that application of prolonged vibration to the VI increased force fluctuations of the QF during a very low-level force-matching task.

  11. Activity in three parts of the quadriceps recorded isometrically at two different knee angles and during a functional exercise.

    PubMed

    Morrish, G M; Woledge, R C; Haddad, F S

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate individual differences in three parts of the quadriceps activated isometrically at 60 degrees and 90 degrees of knee flexion, and during a functional activity involving both concentric and eccentric muscle work. Surface EMG amplitudes were therefore recorded from oblique parts of vastus medialis (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VLO) and from rectus femoris (RF). VMO and VLO showed less activation at 60 degrees than at 90 degrees, but in RF there was no difference between the two angles. In the second experiment, where 11 subjects stepped on and off a stool; these amplitudes were compared with those from a maximal isometric voluntary contraction at 90 degrees of knee flexion. For VMO & VLO the normalised peak amplitude in stepping up was 1.41 +/- 0.12, & 1.46 +/- 0.15 respectively, showing that higher activity is necessary during concentric contractions. These two results suggest that the motor control of VMO/VLO may be different from the bulk of quadriceps. Our findings have implications for patellofemoral function.

  12. Isometric fatigue patterns in time and time-frequency domains of triceps surae muscle in different knee positions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Glauber Ribeiro; de Oliveira, Liliam Fernandes; Nadal, Jurandir

    2011-08-01

    The occurrence of fatigue in triceps surae (TS) muscles during sustained plantar flexion contraction is investigated by means of the RMS electromyogram (EMG) and the instantaneous median frequency (IMF) of the short time Fourier transform (STFT). Six male subjects realized a 40% maximal plantar flexion isometric voluntary contraction until fatigue in two knee positions. Electrodes were positioned on gastrocnemius medialis, gastrocnemius lateralis and soleus muscles. The torque (TO) and EMG signals were synchronized. The RMS and the median of the IMF values were obtained, respectively, for each 250 ms and 1s windows of signal. Each signal was segmented into 10 epochs, from which the mean values of IMF, RMS and TO were obtained and submitted to linear regressions to determine parameter trends. Friedman test with the Dunn's post hoc were used to test for differences among muscles activation for each knee position and among slopes of regression curves, as well as to observe changes in TS RMS values over time. The results indicate different activation strategies with the knee extended (KE) in contrast to knee flexed (KF). With the KE, the gastrocnemii showed typical fatigue behavior with significant (p<0.05) IMF reductions and RMS increases over time, while soleus showed concomitant RMS and IMF increases (p<0.05) suggesting an increased soleus contribution to the torque production. With KF, the gastrocnemii were under activated, increasing the role of soleus. Thus, time-frequency analysis represented an important tool for TS muscular fatigue evaluation, allowing differentiates the role of soleus muscle.

  13. Can a finite set of knee extension in supine position be used for a knee functional examination?

    PubMed

    Marin, F; Sangeux, M; Charleux, F; Ho Ba Tho, M-C; Dürselen, L

    2006-01-01

    The kinematic magnetic resonance imaging technique has been developed to provide a functional examination of the knee. Technical limitations require this examination to be performed in supine position, and the knee motion is represented by an assembly of static positions at different knee angles. However, the main knee function is to support the body weight and perform continuous motion, e.g. parallel squat. Our study quantified the knee kinematics of 20 healthy subjects in different motion conditions (finite and continuous) and in different mechanical conditions (continuous unloaded and continuous loaded). We evaluated the angular and localisation difference of a finite helical axis of the knee motion for parallel squat, continuous knee extension in supine position and the finite set of knee extension in supine position. We found large inter-individual dispersion. The majority of subjects had equivalent knee kinematics between continuous knee extension and the finite set of knee extension in supine position, but not between continuous knee extension in supine position and the parallel squat. Therefore, results from a functional examination of a finite set of knee extensions in supine position do not represent the knee motion in a parallel squat. Our results suggest that functional examination of the knee from magnetic resonance imaging do not necessarily reflect the physiological kinematics of the knee. Further investigation should focus on a new magnetic resonance imaging acquisition protocol that allows image acquisition during weight bearing or includes a special device which reproduces the loaded condition.

  14. Lower limb proprioception deficits persist following knee replacement surgery despite improvements in knee extension strength.

    PubMed

    Levinger, Pazit; Menz, Hylton B; Morrow, Adam D; Wee, Elin; Feller, Julian A; Bartlett, John R; Bergman, Neil

    2012-06-01

    Knee pain and disability can persist following knee replacement surgery which may place patients at increased risk of falls. This study investigated the falls risk and the occurrence of falls of people with knee osteoarthritis (OA) before and at 12 months following knee replacement surgery. Thirty-five patients with knee OA were tested prior to undergoing knee replacement surgery and at 12 months following surgery using the short form Physiological Profile Assessment, which incorporates tests of vision, lower limb proprioception, knee extension strength, reaction time and postural sway. Physical activity, number of falls, fear of falling, pain, disability and health-related quality of life were also assessed. No significant differences were found between the number of falls pre- and post-surgery (n.s.), with 48.5 and 40% reporting at least one fall in the 12 months before and following the surgery, respectively. Improvements in knee strength, reaction time and fear of falling were evident following surgery, with no improvement in lower limb proprioception. Self-reported pain, function and stiffness were significantly improved, but health-related quality of life deteriorated following the surgery. The number of falls experienced following knee replacement surgery remained relatively high, which may be attributed to the persistence of impaired lower limb proprioception. Although knee replacement surgery improves function and alleviates pain, people who undergo this procedure may need to engage in rehabilitation following the surgery to reduce the risk of falling. Therapeutic study investigating the result of treatment on patient outcomes, Level IV.

  15. Effects of Series Elasticity on the Human Knee Extension Torque-Angle Relationship in Vivo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubo, Keitaro; Ohgo, Kazuya; Takeishi, Ryuichi; Yoshinaga, Kazunari; Tsunoda, Naoya; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of series elasticity on the torque-angle relationship of the knee extensors in vivo. Forty-two men volunteered to take part in the present study. The participants performed maximal voluntary isometric contractions at eight knee-joint angles (40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110[degree]). The…

  16. Effects of Series Elasticity on the Human Knee Extension Torque-Angle Relationship in Vivo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubo, Keitaro; Ohgo, Kazuya; Takeishi, Ryuichi; Yoshinaga, Kazunari; Tsunoda, Naoya; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of series elasticity on the torque-angle relationship of the knee extensors in vivo. Forty-two men volunteered to take part in the present study. The participants performed maximal voluntary isometric contractions at eight knee-joint angles (40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110[degree]). The…

  17. The effects of electrical stimulation combined with continuous passive motion versus isometric exercise on symptoms, functional capacity, quality of life and balance in knee osteoarthritis: randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Tok, Fatih; Aydemir, Koray; Peker, Fatma; Safaz, Ismail; Taşkaynatan, Mehmet Ali; Ozgül, Ahmet

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of electrical stimulation combined with continuous passive motion (CPM-ES) versus isometric exercise on symptoms, functional capacity, quality of life, muscle strength, knee and thigh circle measurements, and balance in knee osteoarthritis (OA). This is a randomized clinical trial. The study was done in Gulhane Military Medical Academy (GMMA) Rehabilitation Center. Forty patients with knee OA were included in this study. Participants were randomly assigned to two groups: 20 patients placed in Group 1 were treated with conventional physical therapy and CPM-ES combination; 20 patients in Group 2 were treated with conventional physical therapy and isometric exercise. Therapies were applied 3 weeks, 5 days per week. The following main outcome measures were done: values of pain (VAS was used), WOMAC, SF-36, knee and thigh circle measurements, isokinetic tests, dynamic and static balance tests were determined at baseline and after the treatment. There were no statistically significant differences in the tested variables between the groups for post-treatment values. Dynamic and static balance test improved statistically strongly significantly in both groups. The findings of this study demonstrate that knee OA patients could improve their balance function in both static and dynamic conditions after CPM-ES combination or isometric exercise therapy. The improvement might prevent knee OA patients from falling down and increase their sense of security during physical activities.

  18. Agonist muscle activity and antagonist muscle co-activity levels during standardized isotonic and isokinetic knee extensions.

    PubMed

    Remaud, Anthony; Cornu, Christophe; Guével, Arnaud

    2009-06-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effects of the contraction mode (isotonic vs. isokinetic concentric conditions), the joint angle and the investigated muscle on agonist muscle activity and antagonist muscle co-activity during standardized knee extensions. Twelve healthy adult subjects performed three sets of isotonic knee extensions at 40% of their maximal voluntary isometric torque followed by three sets of maximal isokinetic knee extensions on an isokinetic dynamometer. For each set, the mean angular velocity and the total external amount of work performed were standardized during the two contraction modes. Surface electromyographic activity of vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), rectus femoris (RF), semitendinosus (ST) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles was recorded. Root mean square values were then calculated for each 10 degrees between 85 degrees and 45 degrees of knee extension (0 degrees =horizontal position). Results show that agonist muscle activity and antagonist muscle co-activity levels are significantly greater in isotonic mode compared to isokinetic mode. Quadriceps activity and hamstrings co-activity are significantly lower at knee extended position in both contraction modes. Considering agonist muscles, VL reveals a specific pattern of activity compared to VM and RF; whereas considering hamstring muscles, BF shows a significantly higher co-activity than ST in both contraction modes. Results of this study confirmed our hypothesis that higher quadriceps activity is required during isotonic movements compared to isokinetic movements leading to a higher hamstrings co-activity.

  19. Effect of stretching on agonist-antagonist muscle activity and muscle force output during single and multiple joint isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    McBride, J M; Deane, R; Nimphius, S

    2007-02-01

    Eight moderately active male subjects where tested for peak force in an isometric knee extension test and peak force and rate of force development in an isometric squat test. Both tests where performed at a 100 degrees knee angle and average integrated electromyography (IEMG) was measured from the vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles. Subjects performed the two conditions, stretching (S) or control (C) in a randomized order. Subjects where tested for baseline strength measures in both the isometric knee extension and isometric squat and then either stretched or sat quietly for 10 min. Following S or C subjects where then tested at six time points. Following S peak force in the isometric knee extension was significantly (P < or = 0.05) less than C at 1, 2, 8 and 16 min post. No significant difference in peak force was found between S and C in the isometric squat. However, following S the rate of force development in the isometric squat was significantly less than C at immediately post. No significant differences where observed in IEMG of the VM or VL between S and C in either the isometric knee extension or isometric squat. However, IEMG significantly decreased in the BF at 1 min post after S in comparison with C in both the isometric knee extension and isometric squat. Stretching appears to decrease muscle force output in a single joint isometric contraction and rate of force development in a multiple joint isometric contraction. Possible changes in agonist-antagonist muscle activity patterns need to be further examined.

  20. An Investigation into Reliability of Knee Extension Muscle Strength Measurements, and into the Relationship between Muscle Strength and Means of Independent Mobility in the Ward: Examinations of Patients Who Underwent Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Munenori; Kaneko, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to investigate the reliability of isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement of patients who underwent femoral neck fracture surgery, as well as the relationship between independent mobility in the ward and knee muscle strength. [Subjects] The subjects were 75 patients who underwent femoral neck fracture surgery. [Methods] We used a hand-held dynamometer and a belt to measure isometric knee extension muscle strength three times, and used intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) to investigate the reliability of the measurements. We used a receiver operating characteristic curve to investigate the cutoff values for independent walking with walking sticks and non-independent mobility. [Results] ICCs (1, 1) were 0.9 or higher. The cutoff value for independent walking with walking sticks was 0.289 kgf/kg on the non-fractured side, 0.193 kgf/kg on the fractured side, and the average of both limbs was 0.238 kgf/kg. [Conclusion] We consider that the test-retest reliability of isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement of patients who have undergone femoral neck fracture surgery is high. We also consider that isometric knee extension muscle strength is useful for investigating means of independent mobility in the ward. PMID:24567667

  1. Protective effect by maximal isometric contractions against maximal eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage of the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kuo-Wei; Tseng, Wei-Chin; Lin, Ming-Ju; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Nosaka, Kazunori; Chen, Trevor C

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) performed before maximal eccentric contractions (MaxEC) would attenuate muscle damage of the knee extensors. Untrained men were placed to an experimental group that performed 6 sets of 10 MVIC at 90° knee flexion 2 weeks before 6 sets of 10 MaxEC or a control group that performed MaxEC only (n = 13/group). Changes in muscle damage markers were assessed before to 5 days after each exercise. Small but significant changes in maximal voluntary concentric contraction torque, range of motion (ROM) and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were evident at immediately to 2 days post-MVIC (p < 0.05), but other variables (e.g. thigh girth, myoglobin concentration, B-mode echo intensity) did not change significantly. Changes in all variables after MaxEC were smaller (p < 0.05) by 45% (soreness)-67% (CK) for the experimental than the control group. These results suggest that MVIC conferred potent protective effect against MaxEC-induced muscle damage.

  2. Drop-Landing Performance and Knee-Extension Strength After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kuenze, Christopher M; Foot, Nathaniel; Saliba, Susan A; Hart, Joseph M

    2015-06-01

    Individuals with a history of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) are at greater risk of reinjury and developing early-onset osteoarthritis due to persistent abnormal joint loading. Real-time clinical assessment tools may help identify patients experiencing abnormal movement patterns after ACLR. To compare performance on the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) between participants with ACLR and uninjured control participants and to determine the relationship between LESS score and knee-extension strength in these participants. Controlled laboratory study. Research laboratory. Forty-six recreationally active participants, consisting of 22 with ACLR (12 men, 10 women; age = 22.5 ± 5.0 years, height = 172.8 ± 7.2 cm, mass = 74.2 ± 15.6 kg, body mass index = 24.6 ± 4.0) and 24 healthy control participants (12 men, 12 women; age = 21.7 ± 3.6 years, height = 168.0 ± 8.8 cm, mass = 69.2 ± 13.6 kg, body mass index = 24.3 ± 3.2) were enrolled. Bilateral normalized knee-extension maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) torque (Nm/kg) and LESS scores were measured during a single testing session. We compared LESS scores between groups using a Mann-Whitney U test and the relationships between LESS scores and normalized knee-extension MVIC torque using Spearman ρ bivariate correlations. The ACLR participants had a greater number of LESS errors (6.0 ± 3.6) than healthy control participants (2.8 ± 2.2; t44 = -3.73, P = .002). In ACLR participants, lower normalized knee-extension MVIC torque in the injured limb (ρ = -0.455, P = .03) was associated with a greater number of landing errors. Participants with ACLR displayed more errors while landing. The occurrence of landing errors was negatively correlated with knee-extension strength, suggesting that weaker participants had more landing errors. Persistent quadriceps weakness commonly associated with ACLR may be related to a reduced quality of lower extremity movement during dynamic tasks.

  3. Drop-Landing Performance and Knee-Extension Strength After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kuenze, Christopher M.; Foot, Nathaniel; Saliba, Susan A.; Hart, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Context Individuals with a history of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) are at greater risk of reinjury and developing early-onset osteoarthritis due to persistent abnormal joint loading. Real-time clinical assessment tools may help identify patients experiencing abnormal movement patterns after ACLR. Objective To compare performance on the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) between participants with ACLR and uninjured control participants and to determine the relationship between LESS score and knee-extension strength in these participants. Design Controlled laboratory study. Setting Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Forty-six recreationally active participants, consisting of 22 with ACLR (12 men, 10 women; age = 22.5 ± 5.0 years, height = 172.8 ± 7.2 cm, mass = 74.2 ± 15.6 kg, body mass index = 24.6 ± 4.0) and 24 healthy control participants (12 men, 12 women; age = 21.7 ± 3.6 years, height = 168.0 ± 8.8 cm, mass = 69.2 ± 13.6 kg, body mass index = 24.3 ± 3.2) were enrolled. Main Outcome Measure(s) Bilateral normalized knee-extension maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) torque (Nm/kg) and LESS scores were measured during a single testing session. We compared LESS scores between groups using a Mann-Whitney U test and the relationships between LESS scores and normalized knee-extension MVIC torque using Spearman ρ bivariate correlations. Results The ACLR participants had a greater number of LESS errors (6.0 ± 3.6) than healthy control participants (2.8 ± 2.2; t44 = −3.73, P = .002). In ACLR participants, lower normalized knee-extension MVIC torque in the injured limb (ρ = −0.455, P = .03) was associated with a greater number of landing errors. Conclusions Participants with ACLR displayed more errors while landing. The occurrence of landing errors was negatively correlated with knee-extension strength, suggesting that weaker participants had more landing errors. Persistent quadriceps weakness commonly

  4. Left ventricular twist mechanics during incremental cycling and knee extension exercise in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Alexander; Hough, John; Sculthorpe, Nicholas; Richards, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate left ventricular (LV) twist mechanics in response to incremental cycling and isometric knee extension exercises. Twenty-six healthy male participants (age = 30.42 ± 6.17 years) were used to study peak twist mechanics at rest and during incremental semi-supine cycling at 30 and 60% work rate maximum (W max) and during short duration (15 s contractions) isometric knee extension at 40 and 75% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), using two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography. Data presented as mean ± standard deviation or median (interquartile range). LV twist increased from rest to 30% W max (13.21° ± 4.63° to 20.04° ± 4.76°, p < 0.001) then remained unchanged. LV systolic and diastolic twisting velocities progressively increased with exercise intensity during cycling from rest to 60% W max (twisting, 88.21° ± 20.51° to 209.05° ± 34.56° s(-1), p < 0.0001; untwisting, -93.90 (29.62)° to -267.31 (104.30)° s(-1), p < 0.0001). During the knee extension exercise, LV twist remained unchanged with progressive intensity (rest 13.40° ± 4.80° to 75% MVC 16.77° ± 5.54°, p > 0.05), whilst twisting velocity increased (rest 89.15° ± 21.77° s(-1) to 75% MVC 124.32° ± 34.89° s(-1), p < 0.01). Untwisting velocity remained unchanged from rest [-90.60 (27.19)° s(-1)] to 40% MVC (p > 0.05) then increased from 40 to 75% MVC [-98.44 (43.54)° s(-1) to -138.42 (73.29)° s(-1), p < 0.01]. Apical rotations and rotational velocities were greater than basal during all conditions and intensities (all p < 0.01). Cycling increased LV twist to 30% W max which then remained unchanged thereafter, whereas twisting velocities showed further increases to greater intensities. A novel finding is that LV twist was unaffected by incremental knee extension, yet systolic and diastolic twisting velocities augmented with isometric exercise.

  5. Comparison of different passive knee extension torque-angle assessments.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Sandro R; Vaz, João R; Bruno, Paula M; Valamatos, Maria J; Mil-Homens, Pedro

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have used isokinetic dynamometry to assess joint torques and angles during passive extension of the knee, often without reporting upon methodological errors and reliability outcomes. In addition, the reliability of the techniques used to measure passive knee extension torque-angle and the extent to which reliability may be affected by the position of the subjects is also unclear. Therefore, we conducted an analysis of the intra- and inter-session reliability of two methods of assessing passive knee extension: (A) a 2D kinematic analysis coupled to a custom-made device that enabled the direct measurement of resistance to stretch and (B) an isokinetic dynamometer used in two testing positions (with the non-tested thigh either flexed at 45° or in the neutral position). The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) of torque, the slope of the torque-angle curve, and the parameters of the mathematical model that were fit to the torque-angle data for the above conditions were measured in sixteen healthy male subjects (age: 21.4 ± 2.1 yr; BMI: 22.6 ± 3.3 kg m(-2); tibial length: 37.4 ± 3.4 cm). The results found were: (1) methods A and B led to distinctly different torque-angle responses; (2) passive torque-angle relationship and stretch tolerance were influenced by the position of the non-tested thigh; and (3) ICCs obtained for torque were higher than for the slope and for the mathematical parameters that were fit to the torque-angle curve. In conclusion, the measurement method that is used and the positioning of subjects can influence the passive knee extension torque-angle outcome.

  6. The relationship of force output characteristics during a sit-to-stand movement with lower limb muscle mass and knee joint extension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takayoshi; Demura, Shinichi

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the reliability of ground reaction force (GRF) parameters during sit-to-stand (STS) movements and the relationships between the GRF parameters and lower limb muscle mass and knee extension muscle strength. Fifty elderly females performed an STS movement twice from a chair adjusted to their knee height and the GRF, lower limb muscle mass and isometric knee extension muscle strength were measured. Reliabilities of GRF parameters were high (intra-class correlation coefficient=ICC=0.70-0.95). Parameters on force output during trunk flexion phase (ground reaction force at hip-lift off, sum of force output between beginning of STS movement and hip-lift off) differed significantly between trials, but their effect sizes were small (0.15-0.23). GRF parameters during hip-lift off and knee-hip joint extension phases significantly correlated with knee extension strength (|r|=0.29-0.64) but not lower limb muscle mass. In conclusion, the reliability of GRF during STS movement is good in hip-lift off and knee-hip joint extension phases and these phases relate significantly with lower limb muscle function. These two phases are useful for evaluation of leg muscle function of the elderly.

  7. Isometric knee extensor fatigue following a Wingate test: peripheral and central mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-del-Olmo, M; Rodriguez, F A; Marquez, G; Iglesias, X; Marina, M; Benitez, A; Vallejo, L; Acero, R M

    2013-02-01

    Central and peripheral fatigue have been explored during and after running or cycling exercises. However, the fatigue mechanisms associated with a short maximal cycling exercise (30 s Wingate test) have not been investigated. In this study, 10 volunteer subjects performed several isometric voluntary contractions using the leg muscle extensors before and after two bouts of cycling at 25% of maximal power output and two bouts of Wingate tests. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electrical motor nerve stimulation (NM) were applied at rest and during the voluntary contractions. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), twitch amplitude evoked by electrical nerve stimulation, M wave and motor potential evoked by TMS (MEP) were recorded. MVC, VA and twitch amplitude evoked at rest by NM decreased significantly after the first and second Wingate tests, indicating central and peripheral fatigue. MVC and VA, but not the twitch amplitude evoked by NM, recovered before the second Wingate test. These results suggest that the Wingate test results in a decrease in MVC associated with peripheral and central fatigue. While the peripheral fatigue is associated with an intramuscular impairment, the central fatigue seems to be the main reason for the Wingate test-induced impairment of MVC. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Isokinetic strength during knee flexion and extension in elite fencers.

    PubMed

    Poulis, I; Chatzis, S; Christopoulou, K; Tsolakis, Ch

    2009-06-01

    The relation of leg preference and muscular strength in elite fencers was examined. The dominant and nondominant extensor and flexor muscles of 30 elite fencers (M age = 18.2 yr., SD = 2.0 yr.; M height = 173 cm, SD=7.4 cm; M weight = 62.7 kg, SD=8.9 kg), who were members of the Greek national team, and 14 healthy, young, sedentary adults (8 men, 6 women; M age 23.4 yr., SD = 1.9; M height = 169 cm, SD = 10.5 cm; M weight = 66.3 kg, SD = 9.9) were tested for concentric isokinetic contraction at slow (30 to 60 degrees/sec.) and fast (240 degrees/sec.) angular velocities. Significant multivariate differences were found between groups for knee extension, angle of knee extension, knee flexion, and flexor/extensor peak torque ratio. In contrast, no significant difference was found between the dominant and nondominant legs. There was no significant difference in the flexor/extensor peak torque ratio among any of the concentric angular velocities tested. These findings suggest that long-term training in fencing influences the strength characteristics of the lower limbs.

  9. Influence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in the fluctuation of the submaximal isometric torque of knee extensors in patients with early-grade osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Andressa; Mello, Marco T.; Serrão, Paula R.; Luz, Roberta P.; Bittencourt, Lia R.; Mattiello, Stela M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) alters the fluctuation of submaximal isometric torque of the knee extensors in patients with early-grade osteoarthritis (OA). METHOD: The study included 60 male volunteers, aged 40 to 70 years, divided into four groups: Group 1 (G1) - Control (n=15): without OA and without OSA; Group 2 (G2) (n=15): with OA and without OSA; Group 3 (G3) (n=15): without OA and with OSA; and Group 4 (G4) (n=15) with OA and with OSA. Five patients underwent maximal isometric contractions of 10 seconds duration each, with the knee at 60° of flexion to determine peak torque at 60°. To evaluate the fluctuation of torque, 5 submaximal isometric contractions (50% of maximum peak torque) of 10 seconds each, which were calculated from the standard deviation of torque and coefficient of variation, were performed. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed between groups for maximum peak torque, while G4 showed a lower value compared with G1 (p=0.005). Additionally, for the average torque exerted, G4 showed a lower value compared to the G1 (p=0.036). However, no differences were found between the groups for the standard deviation (p=0.844) and the coefficient of variation (p=0.143). CONCLUSION: The authors concluded that OSA did not change the parameters of the fluctuation of isometric submaximal torque of knee extensors in patients with early-grade OA. PMID:26443974

  10. Fatigue reduces the complexity of knee extensor torque fluctuations during maximal and submaximal intermittent isometric contractions in man

    PubMed Central

    Pethick, Jamie; Winter, Samantha L; Burnley, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular fatigue increases the amplitude of fluctuations in torque output during isometric contractions, but the effect of fatigue on the temporal structure, or complexity, of these fluctuations is not known. We hypothesised that fatigue would result in a loss of temporal complexity and a change in fractal scaling of the torque signal during isometric knee extensor exercise. Eleven healthy participants performed a maximal test (5 min of intermittent maximal voluntary contractions, MVCs), and a submaximal test (contractions at a target of 40% MVC performed until task failure), each with a 60% duty factor (6 s contraction, 4 s rest). Torque and surface EMG signals were sampled continuously. Complexity and fractal scaling of torque were quantified by calculating approximate entropy (ApEn), sample entropy (SampEn) and the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) scaling exponent α. Fresh submaximal contractions were more complex than maximal contractions (mean ± SEM, submaximal vs. maximal: ApEn 0.65 ± 0.09 vs. 0.15 ± 0.02; SampEn 0.62 ± 0.09 vs. 0.14 ± 0.02; DFA α 1.35 ± 0.04 vs. 1.55 ± 0.03; all P < 0.005). Fatigue reduced the complexity of submaximal contractions (ApEn to 0.24 ± 0.05; SampEn to 0.22 ± 0.04; DFA α to 1.55 ± 0.03; all P < 0.005) and maximal contractions (ApEn to 0.10 ± 0.02; SampEn to 0.10 ± 0.02; DFA α to 1.63 ± 0.02; all P < 0.01). This loss of complexity and shift towards Brownian-like noise suggests that as well as reducing the capacity to produce torque, fatigue reduces the neuromuscular system's adaptability to external perturbations. PMID:25664928

  11. The ability of male and female clinicians to effectively test knee extension strength using manual muscle testing.

    PubMed

    Mulroy, S J; Lassen, K D; Chambers, S H; Perry, J

    1997-10-01

    It has been suggested that the accuracy of manual muscle testing is dependent on examiner strength. Our purpose was to relate male and female clinicians' upper extremity strength to their ability to challenge the quadriceps and detect weakness in patients using manual muscle testing. Quadriceps muscles of seven men and 12 women with postpoliomyelitis were tested manually by a male and female clinician while forces were recorded with a hand-held dynamometer. Patients' maximal isometric knee extension force was recorded with a Lido dynamometer and clinicians' maximal vertical push force was recorded with the hand-held dynamometer. Manual muscle testing forces, patient maximum quadriceps forces, and examiner push forces were compared with repeated measures analysis of variance. Female examiners' maximal vertical push force (235.7 +/- 54.3 N) was not significantly different from either female or male patients' maximal quadriceps force (166.8 +/- 66.7 N and 341.6 +/- 123.7 N) but was only 60% and 40% of the isometric knee extension forces generated by a group of normal women and men. Male examiners were significantly stronger (357.0 +/- 93.4 N) than the female but not the male patients and produced 90% and 60% of the normal isometric quadriceps forces for women and men. Examiners gave appropriate grades in 30 of 38 tests. Examiner strength limits detection of moderate quadriceps weakness with manual resistance. Most of the muscle test grades, however, were appropriate, given the examiner's upper extremity strength. Clinicians using manual muscle testing should determine their maximal vertical push force and the extent of weakness they can detect.

  12. Reliability of knee extension and flexion measurements using the Con-Trex isokinetic dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Bizzini, Mario; Desbrosses, Kevin; Babault, Nicolas; Munzinger, Urs

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of isokinetic and isometric assessments of the knee extensor and the flexor muscle function using the Con-Trex isokinetic dynamometer. Thirty healthy subjects (15 males, 15 females) were tested and retested 7 days later for maximal strength (isokinetic peak torque, work, power and angle of peak torque as well as isometric maximal voluntary contraction torque and rate of torque development) and fatigue (per cent loss and linear slope of torque and work across a series of 20 contractions). For both the knee extensor and the flexor muscle groups, all strength data - except angle of peak torque - demonstrated moderate-to-high reliability, with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) higher than 0.86. The highest reliability was observed for concentric peak torque of the knee extensor muscles (ICC = 0.99). Test-retest reliability of fatigue variables was moderate for the knee extensor (ICC range 0.84-0.89) and insufficient-to-moderate for the knee flexor muscles (ICC range 0.78-0.81). The more reliable index of muscle fatigue was the linear slope of the decline in work output. These findings establish the reliability of isokinetic and isometric measurements using the Con-Trex machine.

  13. The effectiveness of posterior knee capsulotomies and knee extension osteotomies in crouched gait in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Daveda; Connor, Justin; Church, Chris; Lennon, Nancy; Henley, John; Niiler, Tim; Miller, Freeman

    2016-11-01

    Crouched gait is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and there are various treatment options. This study evaluated the effectiveness of single-event multilevel surgery including posterior knee capsulotomy or distal femoral extension osteotomy to correct knee flexion contracture in children with CP. Gait analyses were carried out to evaluate gait preoperatively and postoperatively. Significant improvements were found in physical examination and kinematic measures, which showed that children with CP and crouched gait who develop knee flexion contractures can be treated effectively using single-event multilevel surgery including a posterior knee capsulotomy or distal femoral extension osteotomy.

  14. Neuromuscular function of the quadriceps muscle during isometric maximal, submaximal and submaximal fatiguing voluntary contractions in knee osteoarthrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Jacksteit, Robert; Jackszis, Mario; Feldhege, Frank; Weippert, Matthias; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer; Skripitz, Ralf; Behrens, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Knee osteoarthrosis (KOA) is commonly associated with a dysfunction of the quadriceps muscle which contributes to alterations in motor performance. The underlying neuromuscular mechanisms of muscle dysfunction are not fully understood. The main objective of this study was to analyze how KOA affects neuromuscular function of the quadriceps muscle during different contraction intensities. Materials and methods The following parameters were assessed in 20 patients and 20 healthy controls: (i) joint position sense, i.e. position control (mean absolute error, MAE) at 30° and 50° of knee flexion, (ii) simple reaction time task performance, (iii) isometric maximal voluntary torque (IMVT) and root mean square of the EMG signal (RMS-EMG), (iv) torque control, i.e. accuracy (MAE), absolute fluctuation (standard deviation, SD), relative fluctuation (coefficient of variation, CV) and periodicity (mean frequency, MNF) of the torque signal at 20%, 40% and 60% IMVT, (v) EMG-torque relationship at 20%, 40% and 60% IMVT and (vi) performance fatigability, i.e. time to task failure (TTF) at 40% IMVT. Results Compared to the control group, the KOA group displayed: (i) significantly higher MAE of the angle signal at 30° (99.3%; P = 0.027) and 50° (147.9%; P < 0.001), (ii) no significant differences in reaction time, (iii) significantly lower IMVT (-41.6%; P = 0.001) and tendentially lower RMS-EMG of the rectus femoris (-33.7%; P = 0.054), (iv) tendentially higher MAE of the torque signal at 20% IMVT (65.9%; P = 0.068), significantly lower SD of the torque signal at all three torque levels and greater MNF at 60% IMVT (44.8%; P = 0.018), (v) significantly increased RMS-EMG of the vastus lateralis at 20% (70.8%; P = 0.003) and 40% IMVT (33.3%; P = 0.034), significantly lower RMS-EMG of the biceps femoris at 20% (-63.6%; P = 0.044) and 40% IMVT (-41.3%; P = 0.028) and tendentially lower at 60% IMVT (-24.3%; P = 0.075) and (vi) significantly shorter TTF (-51.1%; P = 0

  15. Effects of a knee extension constraint brace on lower extremity movements after ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Christopher J; Creighton, R Alexander; Gross, Michael T; Garrett, William E; Yu, Bing

    2011-06-01

    Patients have high reinjury rates after ACL reconstruction. Small knee flexion angles and large peak posterior ground reaction forces in landing tasks increase ACL loading. We determined the effects of a knee extension constraint brace on knee flexion angle, peak posterior ground reaction force, and movement speed in functional activities of patients after ACL reconstruction. Six male and six female patients 3.5 to 6.5 months after ACL reconstruction participated in the study. Three-dimensional videographic and force plate data were collected while patients performed level walking, jogging, and stair descent wearing a knee extension constraint brace, wearing a nonconstraint brace, and not wearing a knee brace. Knee flexion angle at initial foot contact with the ground, peak posterior ground reaction force, and movement speed were compared across brace conditions and between genders. Wearing the knee extension constraint brace increased the knee flexion angle at initial foot contact for each activity when compared with the other two brace conditions. Wearing the knee extension constraint brace also decreased peak posterior ground reaction force during walking but not during jogging and stair descent. Although the knee extension constraint brace did not consistently reduce the peak posterior ground reaction force in all functional activities, it consistently increased knee flexion angle and should reduce ACL loading as suggested by previous studies. These results suggest the knee extension constraint brace has potential as a rehabilitation tool to alter lower extremity movement patterns of patients after ACL reconstruction to address high reinjury rates.

  16. The hip and knee replacement operation: an extensive life event.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Birgitta Åkesdotter; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa; Ponzer, Sari; Heikkilä, Kristiina

    2010-12-01

    A total hip replacement and a total knee replacement have shown to effectively reduce pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and knee joint despite associated risks. Even though the intervention primarily concerns older people with additional health problems, the patients stand on their feet the day after the operation and are discharged a few days later. Previous research indicates that reflections about life are related to the operation. The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of reflections related to hip and knee replacement surgery. A phenomenological hermeneutical approach with a longitudinal design was chosen in order to study the participants' experiences of the hip and knee replacement intervention across the entire perioperative period. Four themes emerged from the structural analysis; choosing the challenge, past memories connect to the current situation, moving from happiness to ordinary everyday life and moving from despair towards reluctant acceptance of unexpected bad conditions for everyday life. There was inner negotiations about having surgery or not, and existential anxiety that reminded people that life cannot be taken for granted. Our findings indicate the operation was seen as an extensive life event including reflections about life and death and about hope and fear. Previous bad experiences of care seemed to influence the way patients dealt with fear and hope. Fear had to be overcome by inner negotiations about undergoing surgery or not. Relief was expressed about surviving the actual operation, but soon after fears arose about how to manage on the actual road to recovery. Hope for a good life grew either stronger or weaker, depending on the progress following the operation. The outcome eventually generated a transition from happiness to ordinary everyday life, or a transition from despair towards reluctant acceptance of unfulfilled expectations. © 2010 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences

  17. Knee extension and flexion: MR delineation of normal and torn anterior cruciate ligaments

    SciTech Connect

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the effect of joint position of semiflexed and extended knees in MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semiflexed position (average 45{degrees} of flexion) within the magnet bore. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained for both extended and flexed knee positions. Thirty-two knees with intact ACLs and 43 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL tears were evaluated. Two observers compared paired MR images of both extended and flexed positions and rated them by a relative three point scale. Anatomic correlation in MR images was obtained by a cadaveric knee with incremental flexion. The MR images of flexed knees were more useful than of extended knees in 53% of the case reviews of femoral attachments and 36% of reviews of midportions of normal ACLs. Compared with knee extensions, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 48% of reviews of disrupted sites and 52% of residual bundles of torn ACLs. Normal ACL appeared taut in the knee extension and lax in semiflexion. Compared with MR images of knees in extension, MR images of knees in flexion more clearly delineate the femoral side of the ligament with wider space under the intercondylar roof and with decreased volume-averaging artifacts, providing superior visualization of normal and torn ACLs. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Progressive versus rapid rate of contraction during 7 wk of isometric resistance training.

    PubMed

    Maffiuletti, N A; Martin, A

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of isometric training performed with progressive versus rapid rate of contraction on the knee extensor neuromuscular properties over a 7-wk period. Sixteen healthy male subjects trained quadriceps femoris muscle in a leg extension machine three times a week during 7 wk. The training sessions consisted of six sets of six maximal isometric contractions. A first group trained by performing progressive contractions lasting 4 s, whereas a second group performed contractions with a rapid rate of contraction (i.e., ballistic contractions) lasting about 1 s. Both groups significantly increased the isometric and isokinetic voluntary torque, and the respective absolute or relative gains were comparable. Isometric training performed with progressive rate of contraction affected the evoked action potential (M wave) of the vastus lateralis muscle and not the related twitch properties. On the other hand, the isometric training completed with ballistic contractions significantly modified the twitch contractile properties of the knee extensors and not the associated M waves of both vastus medialis and vastus lateralis. Knee extensors adapted specifically their neuromuscular properties to the type of rate of contraction performed during 7-wk isometric resistance training. Progressive isometric contractions produced modifications of the nervous system at peripheral level (i.e., muscle membrane electrical activity), whereas ballistic isometric contractions affected the knee extensor contractile muscle properties (i.e., excitation-contraction coupling).

  19. Perioperative rehabilitation using a knee extension device and arthroscopic debridement in the treatment of arthrofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Biggs-Kinzer, Angie; Murphy, Brian; Shelbourne, K Donald; Urch, Scott

    2010-09-01

    Arthrofibrosis is a postoperative complication of intra-articular knee surgery that can be difficult to treat. Evidence suggests that maximizing knee range of motion may improve outcomes in patients with arthrofibrosis who undergo arthroscopic debridement. Patients who achieve greater knee range of motion will have better subjective scores. Retrospective case series analysis. A review of records was performed for 33 patients with arthrofibrosis who underwent knee arthroscopy and scar resection coupled with perioperative rehabilitation to maximize knee range of motion. Patient demographics and preoperative and postoperative range of motion measurements were extracted from the records. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Form was administered to assess pain, activity, and knee function. Patients performed a preoperative and postoperative rehabilitation program utilizing a knee extension device to maximize knee extension. According to the IKDC range of motion criteria, 27 of 33 patients achieved normal knee extension, and 14 of 33 achieved normal knee flexion at a mean of 8.6 months after surgery. Patients with normal knee motion had a mean IKDC Subjective Knee Form score of 72.6 ± 13.6, which was significantly higher than patients who did not achieve normal motion (P = .04). Overall, mean IKDC Subjective Knee Form scores improved from 45.3 ± 16.7 preoperatively to 67.1 ± 18.0 postoperatively (P < .01) at a mean of 14.7 months after surgery. Perioperative rehabilitation that emphasizes restoration of normal knee range of motion appears to improve outcomes in patients with arthrofibrosis who undergo arthroscopic scar resection. In support of our hypothesis, patients who achieved greater knee range of motion had better subjective knee scores.

  20. Perioperative Rehabilitation Using a Knee Extension Device and Arthroscopic Debridement in the Treatment of Arthrofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs-Kinzer, Angie; Murphy, Brian; Shelbourne, K. Donald; Urch, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Background: Arthrofibrosis is a postoperative complication of intra-articular knee surgery that can be difficult to treat. Evidence suggests that maximizing knee range of motion may improve outcomes in patients with arthrofibrosis who undergo arthroscopic debridement. Hypothesis: Patients who achieve greater knee range of motion will have better subjective scores. Study Design: Retrospective case series analysis. Methods: A review of records was performed for 33 patients with arthrofibrosis who underwent knee arthroscopy and scar resection coupled with perioperative rehabilitation to maximize knee range of motion. Patient demographics and preoperative and postoperative range of motion measurements were extracted from the records. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Form was administered to assess pain, activity, and knee function. Patients performed a preoperative and postoperative rehabilitation program utilizing a knee extension device to maximize knee extension. Results: According to the IKDC range of motion criteria, 27 of 33 patients achieved normal knee extension, and 14 of 33 achieved normal knee flexion at a mean of 8.6 months after surgery. Patients with normal knee motion had a mean IKDC Subjective Knee Form score of 72.6 ± 13.6, which was significantly higher than patients who did not achieve normal motion (P = .04). Overall, mean IKDC Subjective Knee Form scores improved from 45.3 ± 16.7 preoperatively to 67.1 ± 18.0 postoperatively (P < .01) at a mean of 14.7 months after surgery. Conclusions: Perioperative rehabilitation that emphasizes restoration of normal knee range of motion appears to improve outcomes in patients with arthrofibrosis who undergo arthroscopic scar resection. In support of our hypothesis, patients who achieved greater knee range of motion had better subjective knee scores. PMID:23015970

  1. Local architecture of the vastus intermedius is a better predictor of knee extension force than that of the other quadriceps femoris muscle heads.

    PubMed

    Ando, Ryosuke; Saito, Akira; Umemura, Yoshihisa; Akima, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the muscle architecture of each head of the quadriceps femoris (QF) at multiple regions can be used to predict knee extension force. Muscle thickness and pennation angle were measured using sonographic images from multiple regions on each muscle of the QF with the knee flexed to 90°. The fascicle lengths of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus intermedius (VI) muscles were estimated based on sonographic images taken along the length of the thigh. The muscle architecture of the vastus intermedius was determined in two separate locations using sonographic images of the anterior (ant-VI) and lateral portions (lat-VI). The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was measured during isometric knee extension at a knee joint angle of 90°. The relationship between MVC force and muscle architecture was examined using a stepwise linear regression analysis with MVC force as the dependent variable. The muscle thickness of the ant-VI was selected as an independent variable in the first step of the linear regression analysis (R(2) = 0.66, P<0.01). In the second step, pennation angle of the lat-VI was added to the model (R(2) = 0.91, P<0.01). These results suggest that among the four muscles that make up the QF, the muscle architecture of the VI is the best predictor of knee extension force. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Greater glucose uptake heterogeneity in knee muscles of old compared to young men during isometric contractions detected by [(18)F]-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Rudroff, Thorsten; Kindred, John H; Benson, John-Michael; Tracy, Brian L; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2014-01-01

    We used positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and [(18)F]-FDG to test the hypothesis that glucose uptake (GU) heterogeneity in skeletal muscles as a measure of heterogeneity in muscle activity is greater in old than young men when they perform isometric contractions. Six young (26 ± 6 years) and six old (77 ± 6 years) men performed two types of submaximal isometric contractions that required either force or position control. [(18)F]-FDG was injected during the task and PET/CT scans were performed immediately after the task. Within-muscle heterogeneity of knee muscles was determined by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV) of GU in PET image voxels within the muscles of interest. The average GU heterogeneity (mean ± SD) for knee extensors and flexors was greater for the old (35.3 ± 3.3%) than the young (28.6 ± 2.4%) (P = 0.006). Muscle volume of the knee extensors were greater for the young compared to the old men (1016 ± 163 vs. 598 ± 70 cm(3), P = 0.004). In a multiple regression model, knee extensor muscle volume was a predictor (partial r = -0.87; P = 0.001) of GU heterogeneity for old men (R (2) = 0.78; P < 0.001), and MVC force predicted GU heterogeneity for young men (partial r = -0.95, P < 0.001). The findings demonstrate that GU is more spatially variable for old than young men and especially so for old men who exhibit greater muscle atrophy.

  3. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT FOAM ROLLING VOLUMES ON KNEE EXTENSION FATIGUE

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Victor Gonçalves Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    Background Foam rolling (FR) is a common intervention utilized for the purpose of acutely increasing range-of-motion without subsequent decreases in performance. FR is characterized as an active technique which subject performs upon themselves. Thus, it is believed that the accumulated fatigue can influence whether the task can be continued. Purpose To analyze the effect of different foam rolling volumes on fatigue of the knee extensors. Methods Twenty-five recreationally active females (age 27.7 ± 3.56 y, height 168.4 ± 7.1 cm, weight 69.1 ± 10.2 kg) were recruited for the study. The experiment involved three sets of knee extensions with a pre-determined 10 repetition maximum load to concentric failure. Then, subjects performed the control (CONT) and foam rolling (FR) conditions. FR conditions consisted of different anterior thigh rolling volumes (60-, 90-, and 120-seconds) which were performed during the inter-set rest period. After that, the fatigue index was calculated and compared between each experimental condition. Fatigue index indicates how much (%) resistance the subjects experienced, calculated by the equation: (thidset/firstset) x 100. Results Fatigue index was statistically significantly greater (greater fatigue resistance) for CONT compared to FR90 (p = 0.001) and FR120 (p = 0.001). Similarly, higher fatigue resistance was observed for FR60 when compared to FR120 (p = 0.048). There were no significant differences between the other conditions (p > 0.005). Conclusion The finding of foam rolling fatigue index decline (less fatigue resistance) as compared to control conditions may have implications for foam rolling prescription and implementation, in both rehabilitation and athletic populations. For the purposes of maximum repetition performance, foam rolling should not be applied to the agonist muscle group between sets of knee extensions. Moreover, it seems that volumes greater than 90-seconds are detrimental to the

  4. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT FOAM ROLLING VOLUMES ON KNEE EXTENSION FATIGUE.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Estêvão Rios; Neto, Victor Gonçalves Corrêa

    2016-12-01

    Foam rolling (FR) is a common intervention utilized for the purpose of acutely increasing range-of-motion without subsequent decreases in performance. FR is characterized as an active technique which subject performs upon themselves. Thus, it is believed that the accumulated fatigue can influence whether the task can be continued. To analyze the effect of different foam rolling volumes on fatigue of the knee extensors. Twenty-five recreationally active females (age 27.7 ± 3.56 y, height 168.4 ± 7.1 cm, weight 69.1 ± 10.2 kg) were recruited for the study. The experiment involved three sets of knee extensions with a pre-determined 10 repetition maximum load to concentric failure. Then, subjects performed the control (CONT) and foam rolling (FR) conditions. FR conditions consisted of different anterior thigh rolling volumes (60-, 90-, and 120-seconds) which were performed during the inter-set rest period. After that, the fatigue index was calculated and compared between each experimental condition. Fatigue index indicates how much (%) resistance the subjects experienced, calculated by the equation: (thidset/firstset) x 100. Fatigue index was statistically significantly greater (greater fatigue resistance) for CONT compared to FR90 (p = 0.001) and FR120 (p = 0.001). Similarly, higher fatigue resistance was observed for FR60 when compared to FR120 (p = 0.048). There were no significant differences between the other conditions (p > 0.005). The finding of foam rolling fatigue index decline (less fatigue resistance) as compared to control conditions may have implications for foam rolling prescription and implementation, in both rehabilitation and athletic populations. For the purposes of maximum repetition performance, foam rolling should not be applied to the agonist muscle group between sets of knee extensions. Moreover, it seems that volumes greater than 90-seconds are detrimental to the ability to continually produce force. 2b.

  5. Lifestyle-Related Factors Contributing to Decline in Knee Extension Strength among Elderly Women: A Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Narumi; Kim, Miji; Saito, Kyoko; Yoshida, Hideyo; Yoshida, Yuko; Hirano, Hirohiko; Obuchi, Shuichi; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Takao; Kim, Hunkyung

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional and 4-year longitudinal cohort study aimed to clarify how various lifestyle-related variables affect knee extension strength in elderly Japanese women. The participants were community-dwelling women (n = 575) living in the Itabashi Ward of Tokyo, Japan aged 75–85 years at baseline (in 2008) who returned for a follow-up examination 4 years later (in 2012). Maximum isometric knee extension strength in the dominant leg was measured during comprehensive medical check-ups at baseline and follow-up. Interviews with participants included questions on their history of 11 diseases and lifestyle-related factors such as physical activity as well as dietary, smoking, and drinking habits. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses yielded inconsistent results regarding the associations between lifestyle-related factors and knee extension strength. While going out more frequently and regular physical exercise positively affected baseline knee extension strength, they did not affect knee extension strength in the longitudinal analysis. The longitudinal analysis revealed that more frequent intake of soy products or green and yellow vegetables at baseline decreased age-related knee extension strength decline. The inconsistent results from the cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses indicate that conducting both types of analyses is crucial for researching this type of subject. The present study demonstrates that the age-related decline in muscle strength is lower in those who frequently eat soy products or green and yellow vegetables. Thus, recommending higher intake of soy products, and green and yellow vegetables for the elderly might help maintain their muscle health. PMID:26177292

  6. Lifestyle-Related Factors Contributing to Decline in Knee Extension Strength among Elderly Women: A Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Narumi; Kim, Miji; Saito, Kyoko; Yoshida, Hideyo; Yoshida, Yuko; Hirano, Hirohiko; Obuchi, Shuichi; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Takao; Kim, Hunkyung

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional and 4-year longitudinal cohort study aimed to clarify how various lifestyle-related variables affect knee extension strength in elderly Japanese women. The participants were community-dwelling women (n = 575) living in the Itabashi Ward of Tokyo, Japan aged 75-85 years at baseline (in 2008) who returned for a follow-up examination 4 years later (in 2012). Maximum isometric knee extension strength in the dominant leg was measured during comprehensive medical check-ups at baseline and follow-up. Interviews with participants included questions on their history of 11 diseases and lifestyle-related factors such as physical activity as well as dietary, smoking, and drinking habits. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses yielded inconsistent results regarding the associations between lifestyle-related factors and knee extension strength. While going out more frequently and regular physical exercise positively affected baseline knee extension strength, they did not affect knee extension strength in the longitudinal analysis. The longitudinal analysis revealed that more frequent intake of soy products or green and yellow vegetables at baseline decreased age-related knee extension strength decline. The inconsistent results from the cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses indicate that conducting both types of analyses is crucial for researching this type of subject. The present study demonstrates that the age-related decline in muscle strength is lower in those who frequently eat soy products or green and yellow vegetables. Thus, recommending higher intake of soy products, and green and yellow vegetables for the elderly might help maintain their muscle health.

  7. Knee-Extension Training with a Single-Joint Hybrid Assistive Limb during the Early Postoperative Period after Total Knee Arthroplasty in a Patient with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Hisashi; Kubota, Shigeki; Onishi, Mio; Kanamori, Akihiro; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The knee range of motion is an important outcome of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). According to previous studies, the knee range of motion temporarily decreases for approximately 1 month after TKA due to postoperative pain and quadriceps dysfunction following surgical invasion into the knee extensor mechanism. We describe our experience with a knee-extension training program based on a single-joint hybrid assistive limb (HAL-SJ, Cyberdyne Inc., Tsukuba, Japan) during the acute recovery phase after TKA. HAL-SJ is a wearable robot suit that facilitates the voluntary control of knee joint motion. A 76-year-old man underwent HAL-SJ-based knee-extension training, which enabled him to perform knee function training during the acute phase after TKA without causing increased pain. Thus, he regained the ability to fully extend his knee postoperatively. HAL-SJ-based knee-extension training can be used as a novel post-TKA rehabilitation modality. PMID:27774330

  8. Percutaneous quadriceps tendon pie-crusting release of extension contracture of the knee.

    PubMed

    Liu, H X; Wen, H; Hu, Y Z; Yu, H C; Pan, X Y

    2014-05-01

    To release extension contracture of the knee, the authors used a minimally invasive technique: percutaneous quadriceps tendon pie-crusting release. Percutaneous pie-crusting release was performed using an 18-gauge needle to puncture the stiff fibrous band of the distal and lateral quadriceps tendon under maximum knee flexion. Quadriceps contracture was gradually released by multiple needle punctures. A knee brace was prescribed for one week and knee flexion exercises were performed on the first postoperative day. This technique was performed in seven post-traumatic stiff knees and five stiff total knee arthroplasties. Mean maximum flexion increased from 37° preoperatively to 50° after arthrolysis and 107(o) after pie-crusting. At a mean follow-up of eight months, mean maximum flexion was 103°. There were no major complications. The technique of quadriceps tendon pie-crusting release is a simple, minimally invasive and effective treatment for knee extension contracture.

  9. Effect of sensory feedback from the proximal upper limb on voluntary isometric finger flexion and extension in hemiparetic stroke subjects

    PubMed Central

    Schmit, Brian D.; Kahn, Jennifer H.; Kamper, Derek G.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the potential influence of proximal sensory feedback on voluntary distal motor activity in the paretic upper limb of hemiparetic stroke survivors and the potential effect of voluntary distal motor activity on proximal muscle activity. Ten stroke subjects and 10 neurologically intact control subjects performed maximum voluntary isometric flexion and extension, respectively, at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of the fingers in two static arm postures and under three conditions of electrical stimulation of the arm. The tasks were quantified in terms of maximum MCP torque [MCP flexion (MCPflex) or MCP extension (MCPext)] and activity of targeted (flexor digitorum superficialis or extensor digitorum communis) and nontargeted upper limb muscles. From a previous study on the MCP stretch reflex poststroke, we expected stroke subjects to exhibit a modulation of voluntary MCP torque production by arm posture and electrical stimulation and increased nontargeted muscle activity. Posture 1 (flexed elbow, neutral shoulder) led to greater MCPflex in stroke subjects than posture 2 (extended elbow, flexed shoulder). Electrical stimulation did not influence MCPflex or MCPext in either subject group. In stroke subjects, posture 1 led to greater nontargeted upper limb flexor activity during MCPflex and to greater elbow flexor and extensor activity during MCPext. Stroke subjects exhibited greater elbow flexor activity during MCPflex and greater elbow flexor and extensor activity during MCPext than control subjects. The results suggest that static arm posture can modulate voluntary distal motor activity and accompanying muscle activity in the paretic upper limb poststroke. PMID:21832028

  10. Immediate effects of a knee brace with a constraint to knee extension on knee kinematics and ground reaction forces in a stop-jump task.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Herman, Daniel; Preston, Jennifer; Lu, William; Kirkendall, Donald T; Garrett, William E

    2004-01-01

    A small knee flexion angle in landing tasks was identified as a possible risk factor for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries that are common in sports. A specially designed knee brace with a constraint to knee extension would significantly increase the knee flexion angle at the landing of athletic tasks preceded with horizontal movement components, such as stop-jump tasks. Repeated measure design for brace effects. Three-dimensional videographic and force plate data were collected for 10 male and 10 female recreational athletes performing a stop-jump task with and without the specially designed brace. Knee flexion angle at landing, maximum knee flexion angle, and peak ground reaction forces during the stance phase of the stop-jump task were determined for each subject with and without the knee brace. The knee brace decreased the knee flexion angle at the landing by 5 degrees for both genders but did not significantly affect the peak ground reaction forces during the landing. The specially designed knee brace may be a useful device in the prevention and rehabilitation of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in sports. Copyright 2004 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

  11. The Effects of Hamstring Stretching on Leg Rotation during Knee Extension.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Atsushi

    2013-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of hamstring stretching on leg rotation during active knee extension. [Subjects] Subjects were 100 bilateral legs of 50 healthy women without articular disease. [Methods] Hamstring hardness, leg rotation and muscle activities of the knee extensors during active knee extension were measured before and after hamstring stretching. [Results] Hamstring hardness was significantly decreased after hamstring stretching. The leg rotation angle, variation in leg rotation angle, variation in leg external rotation angle, and muscle activities of the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris were significantly increased after hamstring stretching. A moderate positive correlation was found between variation in leg rotation and variation in muscle hardness in hamstring. [Conclusion] Leg rotation during active knee extension was increased by hamstring stretching. Hamstring stretching would be effective as a pretreatment for restoring proper leg rotation when knee extension is conducted as a therapeutic exercise.

  12. [Sincerity of effort: isokinetic evaluation of knee extension].

    PubMed

    Colombo, R; Demaiti, G; Sartorio, F; Orlandini, D; Vercelli, S; Ferriero, G

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find a reliable method to evaluate the sincerity of the muscular maximal effort performed in a dynamometric isokinetic test of knee flexion-extension. The coefficient of variation of the peak torque (CV) and 3 new indices were analysed: (1) the average coefficient of variation calculated on the complete peak torque curve (CVM); (2) the slope of the regression line in an endurance test (PRR); (3) the correlation coefficient of the peak torques in the same endurance test (CCR). Twenty healthy subjects underwent assessment in two different trials, maximal (MX) and 50% submaximal (SMX), with 20 minutes of rest between trials. Each trial consisted of 4 tests, each of 3 repetitions, at angular speed of 30, 180, 30, and 180 degrees/s, respectively, and 1 test of 15 repetitions at 240 degrees/s. Our findings confirmed the ability of CV to detect a high percentage of sincere efforts: at 30 degrees/s Sensibility (Sns)=100% and Specificity (Spc)=70%; at 180 degrees/s Sns=75%, Spc=95%. The 3 new indices here proposed showed high characteristics of Sns and Spc, generally better than those of CV. CVM showed at 180 degrees/s Sns=90% and Spc=100%, while at 30 degrees/s Sns=90%, Spc=75%. PRR was the best index identifying all the efforts, except one (Sns=100%, Spc=95%). The CCR coefficient showed Sns and Spc values both of 90%.

  13. Effects of knee extension constraint training on knee flexion angle and peak impact ground-reaction force.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Wu, Will; Yao, Wanxiang; Spang, Jeffrey T; Creighton, R Alexander; Garrett, William E; Yu, Bing

    2014-04-01

    Low compliance with training programs is likely to be one of the major reasons for inconsistency of the data regarding the effectiveness of current anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs. Training methods that reduce training time and cost could favorably influence the effectiveness of ACL injury prevention programs. A newly designed knee extension constraint training device may serve this purpose. (1) Knee extension constraint training for 4 weeks would significantly increase the knee flexion angle at the time of peak impact posterior ground-reaction force and decrease peak impact ground-reaction forces during landing of a stop-jump task and a side-cutting task, and (2) the training effects would be retained 4 weeks after completion of the training program. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-four recreational athletes were randomly assigned to group A or B. Participants in group A played sports without wearing a knee extension constraint device for 4 weeks and then played sports while wearing the device for 4 weeks, while participants in group B underwent a reversed protocol. Both groups were tested at the beginning of week 1 and at the ends of weeks 4 and 8 without wearing the device. Knee joint angles were obtained from 3-dimensional videographic data, while ground-reaction forces were measured simultaneously using force plates. Analyses of variance were performed to determine the training effects and the retention of training effects. Participants in group A significantly increased knee flexion angles and decreased ground-reaction forces at the end of week 8 (P ≤ .012). Participants in group B significantly increased knee flexion angles and decreased ground-reaction forces at the ends of weeks 4 and 8 (P ≤ .007). However, participants in group B decreased knee flexion angles and increased ground-reaction forces at the end of week 8 in comparison with the end of week 4 (P ≤ .009). Knee extension constraint training for 4 weeks

  14. Skeletal muscle oxygen uptake in obese patients: functional evaluation by knee-extension exercise.

    PubMed

    Lazzer, Stefano; Salvadego, Desy; Porcelli, Simone; Rejc, Enrico; Agosti, Fiorenza; Sartorio, Alessandro; Grassi, Bruno

    2013-08-01

    We hypothesized, in a group of obese women (OB), a more significant impairment of aerobic metabolism during knee extension (KE) exercise vs. that described during cycle ergometer exercise, lending support to the role of skeletal muscles in limiting exercise tolerance in OB. Eleven OB (age 29.5 ± 5.5 years, body mass index 43.2 ± 5.4 kg m(-2)) and 10 non-obese controls (CTRL) women were tested. Fat-free mass of a lower-limb (FFMLL) was assessed by a densitometer. Heart rate (HR) and pulmonary O2 uptake (VO2) were determined during incremental exercise tests to voluntary exhaustion carried out on a custom-built KE ergometer and on a cycle ergometer (CE). FFMLL and maximal isometric force of KE muscles were higher in OB vs. CTRL (+42.4 and +46.2 %, respectively). Peak work rate was significantly lower in OB (-18.4 %) vs. CTRL in CE, but not in KE. Expressed in mL min(-1), peak VO2 was not different in OB vs. CTRL in CE and in KE. After it was divided per unit of FFM involved in the exercises, peak VO2 was significantly lower in OB vs. CTRL, both for CE (-19 %) and KE (-33 %). Expressed per unit of exercising muscle mass, peak oxidative function is impaired in OB. The impairment is more pronounced after limitations related to cardiovascular O2 delivery are reduced. In OB muscle hypertrophy and the increased muscle force allow to preserve exercise tolerance during aerobic exercises carried out by relatively small muscle masses.

  15. Quasi-stiffness of the knee joint in flexion and extension during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical understanding of the knee joint during a golf swing is essential to improve performance and prevent injury. In this study, we quantified the flexion/extension angle and moment as the primary knee movement, and evaluated quasi-stiffness represented by moment-angle coupling in the knee joint. Eighteen skilled and 23 unskilled golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras and two force platforms were used to record a swing motion. The anatomical angle and moment were calculated from kinematic and kinetic models, and quasi-stiffness of the knee joint was determined as an instantaneous slope of moment-angle curves. The lead knee of the skilled group had decreased resistance duration compared with the unskilled group (P < 0.05), and the resistance duration of the lead knee was lower than that of the trail knee in the skilled group (P < 0.01). The lead knee of the skilled golfers had greater flexible excursion duration than the trail knee of the skilled golfers, and of both the lead and trail knees of the unskilled golfers. These results provide critical information for preventing knee injuries during a golf swing and developing rehabilitation strategies following surgery.

  16. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ISOMETRIC THIGH MUSCLE STRENGTH AND MINIMAL CLINICALLY IMPORTANT DIFFERENCES (MCIDS) IN KNEE FUNCTION IN OSTEOARTHRITIS – DATA FROM THE OSTEOARTHRITIS INITIATIVE

    PubMed Central

    Ruhdorfer, Anja; Wirth, Wolfgang; Eckstein, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between thigh muscle strength and clinically relevant differences in self-assessed lower limb function. Methods Isometric knee extensor and flexor strength of 4553 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants (2651 women/1902 men) was related to Western Ontario McMasters Universities (WOMAC) physical function scores by linear regression. Further, groups of Male and female participant strata with minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs) in WOMAC function scores (6/68) were compared across the full range of observed values, and to participants without functional deficits (WOMAC=0). The effect of WOMAC knee pain and body mass index on the above relationships was explored using stepwise regression. Results Per regression equations, a 3.7% reduction in extensor and a 4.0% reduction in flexor strength were associated with an MCID in WOMAC function in women, and a 3.6%/4.8% reduction in men. For strength divided by body weight, reductions were 5.2%/6.7% in women and 5.8%/6.7% in men. Comparing MCID strata across the full observed range of WOMAC function confirmed the above estimates and did not suggest non-linear relationships across the spectrum of observed values. WOMAC pain correlated strongly with WOMAC function, but extensor (and flexor) muscle strength contributed significant independent information. Conclusion Reductions of approximately 4% in isometric muscle strength and of 6% in strength/weight were related to a clinically relevant difference in WOMAC functional disability. Longitudinal studies will need to confirm these relationships within persons. Muscle extensor (and flexor) strength (per body weight) provided significant independent information in addition to pain in explaining variability in lower limb function. PMID:25303012

  17. Combined isometric and vibration training does not enhance strength beyond that of isometric training alone.

    PubMed

    Fisher, J; Van-Dongen, M; Sutherland, R

    2015-09-01

    Research considering combined vibration and strength training is extensive yet results are equivocal. However, to date there appears no research which has considered the combination of both direct vibration and whole-body vibration when used in an isometric deadlift position. The aim of this study was to compare groups performing isometric training with and without direct and whole-body vibration. Twenty four participants (19-24 years) were randomly divided into: isometric training with vibration (ST+VT: N.=8), isometric training without vibration (ST: N.=8), and control (CON: N.=8). Within the training groups participants trained twice per week, for 6 weeks, performing 6-sets of maximal isometric deadlift contractions, increasing in duration from 30 seconds to 40 seconds (weeks 1-6). Hip and knee angle was maintained at 60° and 110°, respectively for both testing and training. Training sessions for ST+VT were identical to ST with the addition of a direct vibratory stimulus through hand-held straps and whole-body vibration via standing on vibration a platform. The amplitude remained constant (2 mm) throughout the intervention whilst the frequency increased from 35Hz to 50Hz. Pre- and post-test isometric strength was measured using an isometric deadlift dynamometer. Results revealed significant increases in isometric strength for both ST+VT (P<0.001, 23.8%) and ST (P<0.001, 32.5%) compared to CON, with no significant differences between ST+VT and ST training groups. The present study provides evidence to suggest that there are no greater gains to be incurred by the addition of a vibratory stimulus to traditional strength training.

  18. In vivo knee laxity in flexion and extension: a radiographic study in 30 older healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Heesterbeek, P J C; Verdonschot, N; Wymenga, A B

    2008-01-01

    In order to determine how "tight" a total knee prosthesis should be implanted, it is important to know the amount of laxity in a healthy knee. The objective of this study was to determine knee laxity in extension and flexion in healthy, non-arthritic knees of subjects similar in age to patients undergoing a total knee arthroplasty and to provide guidelines for the orthopaedic surgeon in his attempt to restore the stability of an osteoarthritic knee to normal. Thirty healthy subjects (15 male, 15 female), mean age 62 (SD 6.4) years, were included in the study. For each subject one, randomly selected, knee was stressed in extension and in 70 degrees flexion (15 Nm). Varus and valgus laxity were measured on radiographs. The passive range of motion and active flexion was assessed. Mean valgus laxity in extension was 2.3 degrees (SD 0.9, range 0.2 degrees -4.1 degrees ). In extension mean varus laxity was 2.8 degrees (SD 1.3, range 0.6 degrees -5.4 degrees ). In flexion, mean valgus laxity was 2.5 degrees (SD 1.5, range 0.0 degrees -6.0 degrees ) and mean varus laxity was 3.1 degrees (SD 2.0, range 0.1 degrees -7.0 degrees ). Varus and valgus knee laxity in extension and in flexion were comparable. This study shows that the normal knee in this age group has an inherent degree of varus-valgus laxity. Whether the results of the present study can be used to optimise the total knee arthroplasty implantation technique requires further investigation.

  19. Localised application of vibration improves passive knee extension in women with apparent reduced hamstring extensibility: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiary, Amir Hoshang; Fatemi, Elham; Khalili, Mohammad Amozade; Ghorbani, Raheb

    2011-01-01

    Does the localised application of vibration over the hamstrings improve hamstring extensibility? Randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis, and assessor blinding. 30 non-athletic females (aged 18-22 yrs) with limited hamstring extensibility bilaterally. The experimental group received 3 sessions of localised application of vibration per week for 8 weeks. At each session, 3 sets of vibration were applied over the left and right hamstring muscles. The control group continued their usual daily activities. Both groups were asked to perform no specific exercises during the 8-week intervention period. Hamstring muscle extensibility was measured bilaterally at baseline and at the end of the 8-week intervention period by measuring passive knee extension in supine with 90 deg of hip flexion. At baseline, the mean lack of knee extension was 27 deg (SD 9) in the experimental group and 24 deg (SD 8) in the control group. At 8 weeks, this had changed to 13 deg (SD 5) in the experimental group and 23 deg (SD 9) in the control group. This was a significant treatment effect: mean between-group difference of 13 deg (95% CI 11 to 16). An 8-week regimen of localised application of vibration over the hamstring muscles significantly reduces knee extension lack in women with reduced range on the passive knee extension test. Copyright © 2011 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by .. All rights reserved.

  20. An in vivo study of the effect of distal femoral resection on passive knee extension.

    PubMed

    Smith, Conrad K; Chen, Justin A; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2010-10-01

    A previous study showed that 1 mm of distal femoral resection restored knee extension 4.5°. We determined the relationship with a more accurate measurement technique. Twenty-six subjects treated with total knee arthroplasty were studied. Digital photographs of the extended knee with and without 1.5 and 3.0 mm thick augments placed between the femoral component and distal femur were analyzed, and knee extension was measured. One millimeter of distal femoral resection restored 1.8° of extension that is less correction than the previous study reported. Because an attempt to correct a 10° extension deficit by resecting the distal femur could require 5 mm or more of bone removal that moves the joint line too proximal, we recommend exploring other techniques before resecting the femur.

  1. Preliminary analysis of knee stress in Full Extension Landing

    PubMed Central

    Makinejad, Majid Davoodi; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Bayat, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study provides an experimental and finite element analysis of knee-joint structure during extended-knee landing based on the extracted impact force, and it numerically identifies the contact pressure, stress distribution and possibility of bone-to-bone contact when a subject lands from a safe height. METHODS: The impact time and loads were measured via inverse dynamic analysis of free landing without knee flexion from three different heights (25, 50 and 75 cm), using five subjects with an average body mass index of 18.8. Three-dimensional data were developed from computed tomography scans and were reprocessed with modeling software before being imported and analyzed by finite element analysis software. The whole leg was considered to be a fixed middle-hinged structure, while impact loads were applied to the femur in an upward direction. RESULTS: Straight landing exerted an enormous amount of pressure on the knee joint as a result of the body's inability to utilize the lower extremity muscles, thereby maximizing the threat of injury when the load exceeds the height-safety threshold. CONCLUSIONS: The researchers conclude that extended-knee landing results in serious deformation of the meniscus and cartilage and increases the risk of bone-to-bone contact and serious knee injury when the load exceeds the threshold safety height. This risk is considerably greater than the risk of injury associated with walking downhill or flexion landing activities. PMID:24141832

  2. Development, validity and reliability of a new pressure air biofeedback device (PAB) for measuring isometric extension strength of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Pienaar, Andries W; Barnard, Justhinus G

    2017-04-01

    This study describes the development of a new portable muscle testing device, using air pressure as a biofeedback and strength testing tool. For this purpose, a pressure air biofeedback device (PAB(®)) was developed to measure and record the isometric extension strength of the lumbar multifidus muscle in asymptomatic and low back pain (LBP) persons. A total of 42 subjects (age 47.58 years, ±18.58) participated in this study. The validity of PAB(®) was assessed by comparing a selected measure, air pressure force in millibar (mb), to a standard criterion; calibrated weights in kilograms (kg) during day-to-day tests. Furthermore, clinical trial-to-trial and day-to-day tests of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of L5 lumbar multifidus were done to compare air pressure force (mb) to electromyography (EMG) in microvolt (μV) and to measure the reliability of PAB(®). A highly significant relationship were found between air pressure output (mb) and calibrated weights (kg). In addition, Pearson correlation calculations showed a significant relationship between PAB(®) force (mb) and EMG activity (μV) for all subjects (n = 42) examined, as well as for the asymptomatic group (n = 24). No relationship was detected for the LBP group (n = 18). In terms of lumbar extension strength, we found that asymptomatic subjects were significantly stronger than LBP subjects. The results of the PAB(®) test differentiated between LBP and asymptomatic subject's lumbar isometric extension strength without any risk to the subjects and also indicate that the lumbar isometric extension test with the new PAB(®) device is reliable and valid.

  3. Hand-held dynamometry in patients with haematological malignancies: Measurement error in the clinical assessment of knee extension strength

    PubMed Central

    Knols, Ruud H; Aufdemkampe, Geert; de Bruin, Eling D; Uebelhart, Daniel; Aaronson, Neil K

    2009-01-01

    Background Hand-held dynamometry is a portable and inexpensive method to quantify muscle strength. To determine if muscle strength has changed, an examiner must know what part of the difference between a patient's pre-treatment and post-treatment measurements is attributable to real change, and what part is due to measurement error. This study aimed to determine the relative and absolute reliability of intra and inter-observer strength measurements with a hand-held dynamometer (HHD). Methods Two observers performed maximum voluntary peak torque measurements (MVPT) for isometric knee extension in 24 patients with haematological malignancies. For each patient, the measurements were carried out on the same day. The main outcome measures were the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC ± 95%CI), the standard error of measurement (SEM), the smallest detectable difference (SDD), the relative values as % of the grand mean of the SEM and SDD, and the limits of agreement for the intra- and inter-observer '3 repetition average' and the 'highest value of 3 MVPT' knee extension strength measures. Results The intra-observer ICCs were 0.94 for the average of 3 MVPT (95%CI: 0.86–0.97) and 0.86 for the highest value of 3 MVPT (95%CI: 0.71–0.94). The ICCs for the inter-observer measurements were 0.89 for the average of 3 MVPT (95%CI: 0.75–0.95) and 0.77 for the highest value of 3 MVPT (95%CI: 0.54–0.90). The SEMs for the intra-observer measurements were 6.22 Nm (3.98% of the grand mean (GM) and 9.83 Nm (5.88% of GM). For the inter-observer measurements, the SEMs were 9.65 Nm (6.65% of GM) and 11.41 Nm (6.73% of GM). The SDDs for the generated parameters varied from 17.23 Nm (11.04% of GM) to 27.26 Nm (17.09% of GM) for intra-observer measurements, and 26.76 Nm (16.77% of GM) to 31.62 Nm (18.66% of GM) for inter-observer measurements, with similar results for the limits of agreement. Conclusion The results indicate that there is acceptable relative reliability for

  4. Hamstring extensibility and transverse plane knee control relationship in athletic women.

    PubMed

    Nyland, J; Caborn, D N; Shapiro, R; Johnson, D L; Fang, H

    1999-01-01

    Athletic women are at particular risk for sustaining a non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The hamstrings are vital to providing dynamic knee motion control in the sagittal and transverse planes during running stance, and some have suggested this function is enhanced when they are less extensible. This study attempted to determine the correlational relationships between hamstring extensibility and transverse plane knee kinematics and from these data to describe the dynamic transverse plane knee motion control capabilities of the hamstrings. Twenty normal athletic women (mean +/- SD; aged 21 +/- 1.6 years; height 163.3 +/- 5.7 cm; weight 60.1 +/- 3.6 kg) were evaluated for active hamstring extensibility and transverse plane knee kinematic relationships during crossover-cut stance phase. Following crossover-cut training (3 weeks) using the left (preferred) lower extremity as the stance limb, hamstring extensibility was measured. Following this, subjects were fitted with 9 retroreflective markers denoting the local segmental coordinate systems (3 markers each) of the left foot, leg and thigh. Kinematic (3-dimensional, four phase-locked cameras, 200 Hz) knee and ankle data were sampled and analyzed. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlations between hamstring extensibility and knee and ankle kinematic variables were calculated. Statistical significance was set at P < or = 0.05 with Bonferroni adjustments. Hamstring extensibility (12 degrees +/- 8 degrees terminal extension) revealed low but significant positive correlations with tibial external rotation (6 degrees +/- 10.7 degrees) at heelstrike (19.3 degrees +/- 8.5 degrees knee flexion) (r = 0.62, P = 0.004) and tibial internal rotation (-13 degrees +/- 8.4 degrees) at peak knee flexion (57.8 degrees +/- 9.3 degrees) following heelstrike (r = 0.47, P = 0.01). Increased hamstring extensibility resulted in increased tibial external rotation at heelstrike and decreased tibial internal rotation at

  5. Effects of a 2-hour cheerleading practice on dynamic postural stability, knee laxity, and hamstring extensibility.

    PubMed

    Rowe, A; Wright, S; Nyland, J; Caborn, D N; Kling, R

    1999-08-01

    One group; pretest, posttest design. To assess the effect of a 2-hour cheerleading practice on the anterior knee laxity, hamstring extensibility, and dynamic postural stability (preferred stance leg during vision-denied unilateral stance) of 17 nonimpaired members of a college cheerleading team (8 females, 9 males; 18-25 years old). Anterior knee laxity and hamstring extensibility increase following exercise. The relationship between exercise induced anterior knee laxity, hamstring extensibility, and dynamic postural stability, however, has not been examined. Pre- and postpractice measurements were compared using paired t tests and Bonferroni's correction for multiple comparisons. A 3 x 2 analysis of variance (force level applied to the arthrometer by condition) and Tukey honest significant difference post hoc test were used to evaluate specific arthrometer force level by condition effects (P < .05). Mean laxity at 133 N and hamstring extensibility increased (mean +/- SD) 1.5 +/- 1 mm and 3 +/- 4 degrees, respectively, following practice. Mean medial-lateral stabiliometer platform angulation (frontal plane position) moved medially following practice (2.9 +/- 3 degrees) and produced a weak correlation with increased knee laxity (r = 0.58). Hamstring extensibility did not significantly relate to stabiliometry or knee laxity variables. The relationship between the medially directed platform angulation and the increase in anterior knee laxity following cheerleading practice suggests a relationship between subtalar joint position and anterior cruciate ligament strain.

  6. The Effect of Stabilization on Isokinetic Knee Extension and Flexion Torque Production

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, S. Peter; Geismar, Richard A.; Gleim, Gilbert W.; Nicholas, James A.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of four methods of stabilization on maximal reciprocal isokinetic knee extension and flexion. Left knee extension/flexion was tested at 60°/s in 20 subjects. Warm-up consisted of five submaximal and one maximal effort followed by three maximal efforts in each of four randomized stabilization conditions: 1) Hands and back stabilization; the trunk was strapped to the back rest and the hands grasped the seat. 2) Back stabilization; the trunk was strapped to the back rest and the hands were folded across the chest. 3) Hand stabilization; the hands grasped the seat and the back rest was removed. 4) No stabilization; the hands were folded across the chest and the back rest was removed. One-way repeated measures ANOVA showed a significant effect of stabilization for knee extension (F(3,57)=17.44, p=.0001) and knee flexion (F(3,57)= 5.37, p=.002). Paired, two-tailed student's t-tests with Bonferroni correction showed that, in knee extension, no stabilization was significantly less than all others, p<.001. In addition, back stabilization was less than hands and back stabilization, p<.005. In knee flexion, no stabilization was significantly less than all others, p<.01. In conclusion, the method of trunk stabilization significantly affected maximal reciprocal isokinetic knee extension/flexion strength measurements. Maximal knee extension/flexion torque production was achieved when the trunk was strapped to the back support and when the hands grasped the seat. ImagesFig 1a.Fig 1b.Fig 1c.Fig 1d. PMID:16558235

  7. Bilateral Medial Tibiofemoral Joint Stiffness in Full Extension and 20° of Knee Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Patricia A; Rijke, Arie M; Ingersoll, Christopher D

    2008-01-01

    Context: The valgus stress test is used clinically to assess injury to the medial knee structures in 2 positions: full extension and some degree of flexion. The amount of flexion used to “isolate” the medial collateral ligament is not consistent in the literature, but most studies have shown that stiffness of the ligaments was consistent between the limbs. Objective: To determine (1) if the stiffness of the medial knee structures was the same bilaterally, and (2) if the stiffness was different in full extension compared with 20° of knee flexion. Design: Criterion standard, before-after design. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Both knees of 45 healthy and active volunteers (26 females, 19 males; age  =  23.2 ± 3.96 years, height  =  170.6 ± 7.75 cm, mass  =  74.2 ± 15.14 kg) were studied. Intervention(s): A valgus force of 60 N was applied to the lateral aspect of both knees in full extension and in 20° of flexion. Main Outcome Measure(s): The slope of the force-strain line of the medial knee during a valgus force was calculated using the LigMaster arthrometer. Results: Slope means in full extension were 16.1 ± 3.3 (right knee) and 15.8 ± 3.1(left knee). Means for 20° of flexion were 12.2 ± 3.1 (right) and 11.7 ± 2.8 (left). Stiffness was greater when the knee was in full extension versus 20° of flexion (t44  =  12.04, P < .001). No difference was noted between the slopes of the 2 knees in extension (t44  =  0.74, P  =  .46) or in flexion (t44  =  1.2, P  =  .27). Conclusions: These findings support the use of the contralateral knee as a control. Further, the valgus stress test should be performed in full extension and in some degree of flexion to assess the different restraining structures of the medial tibiofemoral joint. PMID:18345340

  8. Effects of hamstring stretching on passive muscle stiffness vary between hip flexion and knee extension maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, N; Hirata, K; Kanehisa, H

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the effects of hamstring stretching on the passive stiffness of each of the long head of the biceps femoris (BFl), semitendinosus (ST), and semimembranosus (SM) vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In 12 male subjects, before and after five sets of 90 s static stretching, passive lengthening measurements where knee or hip joint was passively rotated to the maximal range of motion (ROM) were performed. During the passive lengthening, shear modulus of each muscle was measured by ultrasound shear wave elastography. Both stretching maneuvers significantly increased maximal ROM and decreased passive torque at a given joint angle. Passive knee extension stretching maneuver significantly reduced shear modulus at a given knee joint angle in all of BFl, ST, and SM. In contrast, the stretching effect by passive hip flexion maneuver was significant only in ST and SM. The present findings indicate that the effects of hamstring stretching on individual passive muscles' stiffness vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In terms of reducing the muscle stiffness of BFl, stretching of the hamstring should be performed by passive knee extension rather than hip flexion.

  9. Treatment for flexion contracture of the knee during Ilizarov reconstruction of tibia with passive knee extension splint.

    PubMed

    Kwan, M K; Penafort, R; Saw, A

    2004-12-01

    Joint stiffness is one of the complications of limb procedure. It developes as a result of failure of knee flexors to lengthen in tandem with the bone, especially when there is inadequate physical therapy to provide active and passive mobilization of the affected joint. We are reporting four patients who developed fixed flexion contracture of their knees during bone lengthening procedure for the tibia with Ilizarov external fixator. Three of them were treated for congenital pseudoarthrosis and one was for fibular hemimelia. None of them were able to visit the physiotherapist even on a weekly basis. A splint was constructed from components of Ilizarov external fixator and applied on to the existing frame to passively extend the affected knee. Patients and their family members were taught to perform this exercise regularly and eventually near complete correction were achieved. With this result, we would like to recommend the use of this "Passive Knee Extension Splint" to avoid knee flexion Contracture during limb lengthening procedures with Ilizarov external fixators.

  10. Construct validity of change scores of the Chair Stand Test versus Timed Up and Go Test, KOOS questionnaire and the isometric muscle strength test in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis undergoing total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Huber, Erika O; Meichtry, Andre; de Bie, Rob A; Bastiaenen, Caroline H

    2016-02-01

    The Chair Stand Test (CST) is a frequently used performance-based test in clinical studies involving individuals with knee osteoarthritis and demonstrates good reliability. To assess the construct validity of change scores of the CST compared to three other measures in patients before and after total knee replacement surgery. The construct validity of change scores of the CST compared to the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score questionnaire (KOOS, subscale ADL) and the isometric muscle strength test of the knee extensors (IMS sum) was measured 1-2 week before and 3 months after surgery. Change (%) CST = -4.45, TUG = -2.08, KOOS ADL = 43.90, IMS sum = -13.24. Correlations CST-TUG = 0.56 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.29, 0.74), CST-KOOS = -0.31 (95% CI -0.57, 0.01), CST-IMS sum = -0.11 (95% CI -0.42, 0.22). Comparison of pairwise correlations: CST-KOOS versus CST-TUG (p < 0.0004), CST-TUG versus CST-IMS sum (p < 0.0068), CST-KOOS versus CST-IMS sum (p < 0.3100). For patients undergoing TKR, the CST might not be an ideal measure to assess change between pre-surgery and 3 months post-surgery. Construct validity of change scores was close to zero but the result might have been influenced by the relatively small homogeneous sample size and the chosen timespan of measurement. We ordered pairwise correlations based on the strength of correlation between the different instruments, which to our knowledge has never been done before. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Activation of quadriceps femoris including vastus intermedius during fatiguing dynamic knee extensions.

    PubMed

    Akima, Hiroshi; Saito, Akira

    2013-11-01

    Fatigue-related muscle activity in the superficial quadriceps femoris (QF) muscles has been widely examined; however, there is no information on the activity of the deep vastus intermedius (VI) muscle during fatiguing dynamic knee extensions. The purpose of this study was to investigate neuromuscular activation patterns of the QF synergists, including the VI, during fatiguing dynamic knee extensions at two submaximal loads. Nine healthy men performed dynamic knee extensions with loads of 50 and 70 % of one-repetition maximum (1RM) until failure. Muscle activation of the VI, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis (VM) and rectus femoris was recorded using surface electrodes. Root mean square (RMS) amplitude was calculated during the concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) phases of each repetition, and normalized to the RMS amplitude during the CON and ECC phases of the 1RM. Each CON and ECC phase was further divided into three subphases according to knee joint angle. The normalized RMS amplitude of the four individual QF muscles during the CON phase linearly increased with fatigue with contractions at both 50 and 70 % 1RM. The highest RMS amplitude was found in VI at flexed knee joint angles until fatigue. This activation pattern was more prominent at 70 % 1RM than 50 % 1RM. The RMS amplitude of VM at extended knee joint angles was selectively higher at 70 % 1RM than 50 % 1RM. These results suggest that the contribution of the four individual QF muscles to fatiguing dynamic knee extensions differs according to knee joint angle and intensity of load.

  12. Isometric strength and steadiness adaptations of the knee extensor muscles to level and downhill treadmill walking in older adults.

    PubMed

    Gault, Mandy Lucinda; Willems, Mark Elizabeth Theodorus

    2013-04-01

    An ageing related decline in muscle strength and steadiness decreases quality of life and increases the risk for falls. Downhill treadmill walking (DTW) may enhance muscle strength and steadiness in older adults. Eighteen healthy older adults (age: 67 ± 4, body mass: 75 ± 14 kg) completed 12-weeks of level treadmill walking (LTW, 0 %, n = 8) or DTW (-10 %, n = 10) (30 min, 3 days per week) at a self-selected walking speed (re-adjusted in week 4 and 8). Maximal voluntary isometric force (MVIF) and electromyography (EMG) of the m. quadriceps femoris (QF) were measured at baseline, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Steadiness of submaximal (5, 10 and 20 % MVIF) isometric contractions (i.e. coefficient of variation of the force signal) and EMG of QF were measured at baseline and 12 weeks. Baseline MVIF of LTW (340 ± 112 N) and DTW (368 ± 128 N) increased equally by 14 ± 6 and 5 ± 6 % (p < 0.05). Steadiness at 5 %MVIF improved following 12 weeks of LTW (baseline: 0.04 ± 0.01; 12 weeks: 0.03 ± 0.01) and DTW (baseline: 0.04 ± 0.02; 12 weeks: 0.03 ± 0.01 (p < 0.05). EMG root mean square of m. vastus lateralis during MVIF increased by 38 % following 12 weeks of LTW only (p < 0.05). The potential implications for an exercise modality, such as DTW, with a lower oxygen demand, to improve muscle strength could serve as a rehabilitative countermeasure for older adults.

  13. RAPID KNEE-EXTENSIONS TO INCREASE QUADRICEPS MUSCLE ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: A RANDOMIZED CROSS-OVER STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Wilquin, Lousia; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Bandholm, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background Inhibition of the quadriceps muscle and reduced knee-extension strength is common shortly following total knee arthroplasty (weeks to months), due to reduced voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle. In healthy subjects, strength training with heavy loads is known to increase agonist muscle activity, especially if the exercise is conducted using rapid muscle contractions. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine if patients with total knee arthroplasty could perform rapid knee-extensions using a 10 RM load four to eight weeks after surgery, and the degree to which rapid knee-extensions were associated with greater voluntary quadriceps muscle activity during an experimental strength training session, compared to that elicited using slow knee-extensions. Study Design A randomized cross-over study. Methods Twenty-four patients (age 66.5) 4-8 weeks post total knee arthroplasty randomly performed one set of five rapid, and one set of five slow knee-extensions with the operated leg, using a load of their 10 repetition maximum, while surface electromyography recordings were obtained from the vastus medialis and lateralis of the quadriceps muscle. Results Data from 23 of the 24 included patients were analyzed. Muscle activity was significantly higher during rapid knee-extensions (120.2% [10th-90th percentile: 98.3-149.1]) compared to slow knee-extensions (106.0% [88.8-140.8]) for the vastus lateralis (p<0.01), but not for the vastus medialis (120.8% [90.4-134.0]) and (121.8% [93.0-133.0]) (p = 0.17), respectively. Slow and rapid knee-extensions were performed at a median angular velocity of 19.7 degrees/sec (13.7-24.4) and 51.4 degrees/sec (28.9-63.1), respectively Conclusion Four to eight weeks after their total knee arthroplasty, the patients in the present study were able to conduct rapid knee-extensions according to the experimental protocol with an approximately doubled angular velocity compared to slow knee-extensions. This was associated with

  14. Measurement of knee flexion/extension angle using wearable UWB radios.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon; Maskooki, Arash

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a wearable system using UWB transceivers to measure the knee flexion/extension angle parameter, who is known to be of clinical importance. First, a pair of very small and light antennas is placed on the adjacent segments of knee joint. Then, the range data between these two antennas is acquired using Time of Arrival (TOA) estimator. We further use the measured distance to compute the flexion/extension angle using the law of cosines. The performance of the method was compared with a flexible goniometer by simultaneously measuring knee flexion-extension angle. The experimental results show that the system has reasonable performance and has sufficient accuracy for clinical applications.

  15. Maneuverability and usability analysis of three knee-extension propelled wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Bloswick, D S; Erickson, J; Brown, D R; Howell, G; Mecham, W

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the maneuverability and usability of three knee-extension propelled wheelchairs. The maneuverability of the knee-extension propelled wheelchairs was determined in a controlled test representing five standard wheelchair activities. The usability of the wheelchairs was evaluated in a field test with elderly residents of an extended care facility in Salt Lake City. The results indicate that the wheelchair designs using a swinging (four-bar linkage) or sliding belt mechanism are preferred to a sliding plate design. The use of knee-extension propelled wheelchairs is a feasible alternative to hand propelled wheelchairs. Further development and research is needed to address power requirements, maneuverability, and entrance/egress from the chairs.

  16. A descriptive profile of age‐specific knee extension flexion strength in elite junior tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbecker, Todd S; Roetert, E Paul; Sueyoshi, Tetsuro; Riewald, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Background Tennis requires repetitive multidirectional movement patterns that can lead to lower extremity injury. Knowledge of population and age‐specific strength parameters can be used during performance enhancement training and rehabilitation of tennis players. Objectives The purpose of this study was to generate population and age‐specific descriptive profiles of concentric isokinetic knee extension and flexion strength in elite junior tennis players, and determine whether bilateral differences exist between extremities and across age ranges. Methods A total of 103 elite male tennis players (mean (SD) 15.92 (2.14), range 11–21) and 53 female tennis players (mean (SD) 15.0 (2.30, range 11–21) were isokinetically tested on a Cybex 6000 isokinetic dynamometer at 180 and 300°/s to assess bilateral concentric knee extension and flexion strength using a standard bilateral testing protocol. Results No significant bilateral difference between the dominant (racquet side) lower extremity and the contralateral non‐dominant side were measured in lower extremity knee extension or flexion strength normalised to body weight, or in the hamstring quadriceps strength ratios in male and female subjects. Male subjects did show significant (p<0.001) increases in knee extension and flexion strength across the age ranges from 11–15 years of age to 16–21 years. Female subjects did not show any significant change in the normalised knee extension or flexion strength across age ranges. Hamstring/quadriceps strength ratios were bilaterally symmetric and remained clinically and statistically constant across age ranges for the male and female elite tennis players. Conclusions Population and age‐specific isokinetic descriptive data from elite tennis players can provide guidance in the development and monitoring of performance enhancement and rehabilitation programs for elite tennis players. The changes identified in normalised knee extension and flexion strength in elite

  17. Effect of ageing on isometric strength through joint range at knee and hip joints in three age groups of older adults.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Dinesh; Rowe, Philip J

    2009-01-01

    Strength of lower extremity muscles is an important determinant of mobility-based functional activities. Loss of strength with age produces functional limitation in activities of daily living such as rising from a chair or stair negotiation. However, there is limited information on the effect of age-related changes on the torque-producing ability of muscles through their ranges of joint motion. To investigate the effect of ageing on the torque-producing ability of lower extremity muscles in a large sample of older adults in three age groups. Eighty-two volunteers participated in this study and were divided into six groups according to their chronological age (60s, 70s and 80s and above) and gender (male, female). Isometric muscle strength was measured at the knee and hip joints at three positions through the joint range using a custom-built strain gauge torque dynamometer and a purpose built plinth. The peak torque of major muscle groups of the knee and hip joints decreased with increasing age at all the three joint positions at which strength was tested. The 80-year-olds had 20% lower strength compared to the 60-year-olds. Age-related decrease in muscle strength was significant when comparing 80-year-olds with the 60-year-olds (p < 0.05). Strength loss was noted to be higher at the inner (muscle is shortened from mid-position) and outer (muscle is lengthened from mid-position) ranges of muscle action when compared with the mid-range position (mid-position). Gender-based differences were significant for all the strength tests (p < 0.05). Strength decreased with increasing age at all the positions within joint range of motion for knee and hip joints. However, the percentage loss of muscle strength was different at different positions in the joint range. Our findings suggest that muscle strength was more preserved in the middle range of muscle function compared to the inner and outer range of muscle action. In older people, lower extremity muscles might be required

  18. IMPROVEMENTS IN KNEE EXTENSION STRENGTH ARE ASSOCIATED WITH IMPROVEMENTS IN SELF-REPORTED HIP FUNCTION FOLLOWING ARTHROSCOPY FOR FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Thomas J.; Amesur, Ajit K.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Di Stasi, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Background Recovery of strength is critical for return to sport, and is a known predictor of functional outcomes in post-surgical orthopedic populations. Muscle weakness is a known impairment in patients with femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS) but whether improvements in muscle strength after arthroscopy are associated with improved hip function is unknown. Hypothesis/Purpose To examine the relationships between changes in hip and thigh muscle strength and self-reported function in athletes undergoing arthroscopy for FAIS. Study Design Single cohort descriptive and correlational study Methods Twenty-eight athletes underwent strength testing and completed the Hip Outcome Score Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) and Sports (HOS-S) subscales prior to and six months after surgery. Isokinetic knee extension and flexion strength were measured using a Biodex dynamometer at 60 °/s and 300 °/s. Isometric hip abduction strength was measured using a custom dynamometer. Changes in strength, limb symmetry, and HOS scores were assessed using paired t-tests. Spearman's rank correlations were used to examine relationships between change in involved limb strength and change in HOS scores. Results Subjects were tested an average of 32 days before and 178 days after surgery. HOS-ADL and HOS-S subscales improved by a mean of 19.0 ± 21.1 and 23.8 ± 31.9, respectively, over time (p < 0.001). Hip abduction strength did not increase over time in either limb (p ≥ 0.27). Involved limb knee flexion and extension strength did not increase significantly over time (p-values: 0.10-0.48) with the exception of knee extension at 300 °/s (p = 0.04). Uninvolved limb knee extension strength at both velocities and knee flexion strength at 60 °/s improved significantly over time (p < 0.012). Increases in knee extension strength (60 °/s) of the involved limb were significantly correlated with improvements on the HOS-ADL (r = 0.431; 0 = 0

  19. Voluntary Movement Frequencies in Submaximal One- and Two-Legged Knee Extension Exercise and Pedaling

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Julie; Wiig, Håvard; Hermansen, Marte; Hansen, Ernst Albin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of behavior and control of human voluntary rhythmic stereotyped leg movements is useful in work to improve performance, function, and rehabilitation of exercising, healthy, and injured humans. The present study aimed at adding to the existing understanding within this field. To pursue the aim, correlations between freely chosen movement frequencies in relatively simple, single-joint, one- and two-legged knee extension exercise were investigated. The same was done for more complex, multiple-joint, one- and two-legged pedaling. These particular activities were chosen because they could be considered related to some extent, as they shared a key aspect of knee extension, and because they at the same time were different. The activities were performed at submaximal intensities, by healthy individuals (n = 16, thereof eight women; 23.4 ± 2.7 years; 1.70 ± 0.11 m; 68.6 ± 11.2 kg). High and fair correlations (R-values of 0.99 and 0.75) occurred between frequencies generated with the dominant leg and the nondominant leg during knee extension exercise and pedaling, respectively. Fair to high correlations (R-values between 0.71 and 0.95) occurred between frequencies performed with each of the two legs in an activity, and the two-legged frequency performed in the same type of activity. In general, the correlations were higher for knee extension exercise than for pedaling. Correlations between knee extension and pedaling frequencies were of modest occurrence. The correlations between movement frequencies generated separately by each of the legs might be interpreted to support the following working hypothesis, which was based on existing literature. It is likely that involved central pattern generators (CPGs) of the two legs share a common frequency generator or that separate frequency generators of each leg are attuned via interneuronal connections. Further, activity type appeared to be relevant. Thus, the apparent common rhythmogenesis for the two legs appeared

  20. Greater Hip Extension but Not Hip Abduction Explosive Strength Is Associated With Lesser Hip Adduction and Knee Valgus Motion During a Single-Leg Jump-Cut

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Baker; Johnson, Samuel T.; Chang, Eunwook; Pollard, Christine D.; Norcross, Marc F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationships between hip abductor and extensor strength and frontal plane hip and knee motions that are associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury risk are equivocal. However, previous research on these relationships has evaluated relatively low-level movement tasks and peak torque rather than a time-critical strength measure such as the rate of torque development (RTD). Hypothesis: Females with greater hip abduction and extension RTD would exhibit lesser frontal plane hip and knee motion during a single-leg jump-cutting task. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Forty recreationally active females performed maximal isometric contractions and single-leg jump-cuts. From recorded torque data, hip extension and abduction RTD was calculated from torque onset to 200 ms after onset. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to quantify frontal plane hip and knee kinematics during the movement task. For each RTD measure, jump-cut biomechanics were compared between participants in the highest (high) and lowest (low) RTD tertiles. Results: No differences in frontal plane hip and knee kinematics were identified between high and low hip abduction RTD groups. However, those in the high hip extension RTD group exhibited lower hip adduction (high, 3.8° ± 3.0°; low, 6.5° ± 3.0°; P = .019) and knee valgus (high, –2.5° ± 2.3°; low, –4.4° ± 3.2°; P = .046) displacements during the jump-cut. Conclusion: In movements such as cutting that are performed with the hip in a relatively abducted and flexed position, the ability of the gluteus medius to control hip adduction may be compromised. However, the gluteus maximus, functioning as a hip abductor, may take on a pivotal role in controlling hip adduction and knee valgus motion during these types of tasks. Clinical Relevance: Training with a specific emphasis on increasing explosive strength of the hip extensors may be a means through which to improve frontal plane hip and knee

  1. Minimization of the knee shear joint load in leg-extension equipment.

    PubMed

    Biscarini, A

    2008-10-01

    We developed an analytical biomechanical model for leg-extension equipment and the associated knee-extension/flexion exercises. The shear component, phi(t), of the tibiofemoral joint load was calculated taking into account all the fundamental elements of the equipment mechanics (resistance pad placement, cam/pulley system geometry, selected weight stack, etc.) and the instantaneous values of the relevant kinematical parameters (knee-flexion angle (theta(f)), angular velocity, and angular acceleration). The optimal distance (a(R))(OPT) between the knee-flexion/extension axis and the resistance pad placement point was derived by minimizing phi(t). (a(R))(OPT) is nearly independent of joint angular velocity and, for appreciably high resistance torques, becomes nearly independent of resistance level and cam/pulley geometry: for theta(f)>40 degrees , phi(t) is minimized by placing the resistance pad distally along the lower leg; for theta(f)knee-extension phase and distally during knee-flexion phase (0.17 mknee angular accelerations and hamstrings co-contractions, not predictable in advance, the value of (a(R))(OPT) obtained neglecting these effects still represents a good compromise for joint protection. This work establishes the rational basis for the design and clinical use of a leg-extension equipment that minimizes phi(t).

  2. Absolute reliability of isokinetic knee flexion and extension measurements adopting a prone position.

    PubMed

    Ayala, F; De Ste Croix, M; Sainz de Baranda, P; Santonja, F

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the absolute and relative reliability of isokinetic peak torque (PT), angle of peak torque (APT), average power (PW) and total work (TW) for knee flexion and extension during concentric and eccentric actions measured in a prone position at 60, 180 and 240° s(-1). A total of 50 recreational athletes completed the study. PT, APT, PW and TW for concentric and eccentric knee extension and flexion were recorded at three different angular velocities (60, 180 and 240° s(-1)) on three different occasions with a 72- to 96-h rest interval between consecutive testing sessions. Absolute reliability was examined through typical percentage error (CV(TE)), percentage change in the mean (ChM) and relative reliability with intraclass correlations (ICC(3,1)). For both the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups, all strength data (except APT during knee flexion movements) demonstrated moderate absolute reliability (ChM < 3%; ICCs > 0·70; and CV(TE) < 20%) independent of the knee movement (flexion and extension), type of muscle action (concentric and eccentric) and angular velocity (60, 180 and 240° s(-1)). Therefore, the current study suggests that the CV(TE) values reported for PT (8-20%), APT (8-18%) (only during knee extension movements), PW (14-20%) and TW (12-28%) may be acceptable to detect the large changes usually observed after rehabilitation programmes, but not acceptable to examine the effect of preventative training programmes in healthy individuals.

  3. Characteristics associated with improved knee extension after strength training for individuals with cerebral palsy and crouch gait.

    PubMed

    Steele, K M; Damiano, D L; Eek, M N; Unger, M; Delp, S L

    2012-01-01

    Muscle weakness may contribute to crouch gait in individuals with cerebral palsy, and some individuals participate in strength training programs to improve crouch gait. Unfortunately, improvements in muscle strength and gait are inconsistent after completing strength training programs. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in knee extensor strength and knee extension angle during walking after strength training in individuals with cerebral palsy who walk in crouch gait and to determine subject characteristics associated with these changes. A literature review was performed of studies published since January 2000 that included strength training, three-dimensional motion analysis, and knee extensor strength measurements for individuals with cerebral palsy. Three studies met these criteria and individual subject data was obtained from the authors for thirty crouch gait subjects. Univariate regression analyses were performed to determine which of ten physical examination and motor performance variables were associated with changes in strength and knee extension during gait. Change in knee extensor strength ranged from a 25% decrease to a 215% increase, and change in minimum knee flexion angle during gait ranged from an improvement of 9° more knee extension to 15° more knee flexion. Individuals without hamstring spasticity had greater improvement in knee extension after strength training. Hamstring spasticity was associated with an undesired increase in knee flexion during walking. Subject-specific factors such as hamstring spasticity may be useful for predicting which subjects will benefit from strength training to improve crouch gait.

  4. Trapezoid supracondylar femoral extension osteotomy for knee flexion contractures in patients with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, S M J; Heidari, P; Esfandiari, H; Motamedi, M

    2008-01-01

    Flexion deformity of the haemophilic knee is a considerable cause of disability and may need to be managed surgically in severe cases. We have used a trapezoid supracondylar femoral extension osteotomy to correct severe knee flexion deformity. Nine severe haemophilic patients with contractures >30 degrees that were unresponsive to conservative measures underwent 11 trapezoid osteotomies. The angle of deformity was measured using anteroposterior and lateral knee X-ray films at maximum extension. Factor levels of 80-100% were achieved before the operation. A trapezoid osteotomy of the distal femur bone was performed using a lateral approach. The frontal plane angular deformity (if any) was corrected at the same time. The osteotomy site was fixed using an Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteo synthesefragen (AO) condylar blade plate. Following surgery, the knee was supported by a plaster splint at 20 degrees of flexion. Physiotherapy was started on third postoperative day and continued three times a week. There was no serious complication. The deformities were corrected in all of the patients and the mean range of motion increased form 68.6 degrees to 98.1 degrees . Bleeding episodes decreased in all four knees which had a bleeding score of 3 before surgery. Using the Orthopaedic Advisory Committee of the World Federation of Haemophilia scores, nine good and two fair results were obtained. All patients regained the ability to walk for both short and long distance without any aid, climb the stairs, bath, and use public transportation. Trapezoid supracondylar femoral extension osteotomy should be considered in the surgical management of severe haemophilic flexion deformity of the knee joint.

  5. The Mediolateral Excursion of the Meniscal Bearing during Flexion and Extension of the Knee after Medial Mobile-Bearing Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Bae, Ji-Hoon; Suh, Dong-Won; Kim, Han-Ju; Lim, Hong-Chul

    2017-02-01

    This mediolateral excursion of the bearing during knee motion is supposed to be caused by external rotation of the tibia during knee extension. However, to our knowledge, there is no published clinical evidence supporting these hypotheses. The current study aimed to evaluate the mediolateral excursion of the bearing during flexion-extension motion of the knee after medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). In 52 knees, varus/valgus (F-VarVal) or rotational position (F-Rot) of the femoral component and relative location of the bearing were measured with the standing anteroposterior and modified axial view, respectively. We adopted the modified axial radiographs that are simple to assess the bearing position in the flexed knee. The modified axial view showed excellent inter- and intraobserver agreements. F-Rot in the modified axial view and CT showed a high agreement in terms of validity (r = 0.98; p < 0.0001). On average, the bearing showed more medial position in extension than flexion of the knee. No correlation was found between the femoral component positions (F-VarVal and F-Rot) and mediolateral bearing excursion (p = 0.68 and 0.80, respectively). In conclusion, coronal location of bearing according to flexion-extension of the knee is not influenced by the coronal and axial alignment of the femoral component. With simple radiographic method, more medial position of the bearing according to flexion-extension of the knee. Our method could be used to assess axial rotation of the femoral component and spin-out phenomenon of the bearing following the medial UKA.

  6. On the Role of the Patella, ACL and Joint Contact Forces in the Extension of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Cleather, Daniel J.; Southgate, Dominic F. L.; Bull, Anthony M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional descriptions of the knee suggest that the function of the patella is to facilitate knee extension by increasing the moment arm of the quadriceps muscles. Through modelling and evidence from the literature it is shown in this paper that the presence of the patella makes the ability of the quadriceps to rotate the thigh greater than their ability to rotate the tibia. Furthermore, this difference increases as the knee is flexed, thus demonstrating a pattern that is consistent with many human movements. This paper also shows that the anterior cruciate ligament plays a previously unheralded role in extending the shank and that translation at the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints is important in improving the capacity for thigh rotation when the knee is flexed. This study provides new insights as to how the structure of the knee is adapted to its purpose and illustrates how the functional anatomy of the knee contributes to its extension function. PMID:25536067

  7. Adaptive control of functional neuromuscular stimulation-induced knee extension exercise.

    PubMed

    Ezenwa, B N; Glaser, R M; Couch, W; Figoni, S F; Rodgers, M M

    1991-01-01

    An automated system for exercising the paralyzed quadriceps muscles of spinal cord injured patients using functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) has been developed. It induces smooth concentric and eccentric contractions in both limbs to enable bilateral 70 degree knee extensions in an asynchronous pattern. External load resistance is applied at the ankle level to "overload" the muscles and bring about training effects. The system uses adaptive control methods to adjust FNS current output (threshold level and the ramp slope) to the quadriceps muscles to maintain performance as the muscles fatigue. Feedback control signals for limb movement and knee extension angle are used to continuously adjust the FNS current parameters so that the external load is moved through the preset zero to 70 degree angle range. Typically, the threshold current level and the FNS current increase as the muscles fatigue to maintain performance with repetitive contractions. Fatigue is defined as the inability to extend the knee to 50 percent of the 70 degree target angle. When this occurs, FNS is automatically terminated for the fatigued leg, while the functioning leg continues to exercise. The automated nature of this system appears to be advantageous as compared to a manually operated system for subject safety, convenience, and uniformity of exercise bouts. Simulated safety problems, such as hyperextension of the knee joint, open circuitry, muscle spasms, and low battery power, were successfully detected by the logic circuitry, and the system followed appropriate safety procedures to minimize risk.

  8. Does the Q - H index show a stronger relationship than the H:Q ratio in regard to knee pain during daily activities in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    PubMed

    Fujita, Remi; Matsui, Yasumoto; Harada, Atsushi; Takemura, Marie; Kondo, Izumi; Nemoto, Tetsuya; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Ota, Susumu

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship between knee muscle strength and knee pain in activities of daily living, based on consideration of the difference between extension and flexion strength (Q - H) and the hamstring:quadriceps (H:Q) ratio in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 78 females with knee osteoarthritis, and a total of 133 knees that had not been treated surgically were the targets of this research. The legs were divided according to dominance. Isometric knee extension and flexion muscle strength and knee pain during activities of daily living were measured. The H:Q ratio (flexion/extension muscle strength) and the difference between extension and flexion strength, (extension muscle strength/weight) minus (flexion muscle strength/weight), that is, Q - H, were calculated. The correlation between these indices and the knee pain score during activities of daily living was investigated. [Results] Greater knee pain during activities of daily living was related to lower knee extension muscle strength and Q - H in both the dominant and nondominant legs. Knee flexion muscle strength and the H:Q ratio were not significantly correlated with knee pain during any activities of daily living. [Conclusion] Knee extension muscle strength and Q - H were found to be significantly correlated with knee pain during activities of daily living, whereas the H:Q ratio was not.

  9. Defining the knee joint flexion-extension axis for purposes of quantitative gait analysis: an evaluation of methods.

    PubMed

    Schache, Anthony G; Baker, Richard; Lamoreux, Larry W

    2006-08-01

    Minimising measurement variability associated with hip axial rotation and avoiding knee joint angle cross-talk are two fundamental objectives of any method used to define the knee joint flexion-extension axis for purposes of quantitative gait analysis. The aim of this experiment was to compare three different methods of defining this axis: the knee alignment device (KAD) method, a method based on the transepicondylar axis (TEA) and an alternative numerical method (Dynamic). The former two methods are common approaches that have been applied clinically in many quantitative gait analysis laboratories; the latter is an optimisation procedure. A cohort of 20 subjects performed three different functional tasks (normal gait; squat; non-weight bearing knee flexion) on repeated occasions. Three-dimensional hip and knee angles were computed using the three alternative methods of defining the knee joint flexion-extension axis. The repeatability of hip axial rotation measurements during normal gait was found to be significantly better for the Dynamic method (p<0.01). Furthermore, both the variance in the knee varus-valgus kinematic profile and the degree of knee joint angle cross-talk were smallest for the Dynamic method across all functional tasks. The Dynamic method therefore provided superior results in comparison to the KAD and TEA-based methods and thus represents an attractive solution for orientating the knee joint flexion-extension axis for purposes of quantitative gait analysis.

  10. Knee extension fatigue attenuates repeated force production of the elbow flexors.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Israel; Aboodarda, Saied J; Behm, David G

    2014-01-01

    Non-local muscle fatigue has been demonstrated with unilateral activities, where fatiguing one limb alters opposite limb forces. Fewer studies have examined if non-local fatigue occurs with unrelated muscles. The purpose of this study was to investigate if knee extensors fatigue alters elbow flexors force and electromyography (EMG) activity. Eighteen males completed a control and fatiguing session (randomised). Blood lactate was initially sampled followed by three maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) with the elbow flexors and two with the knee extensors. Thereafter, subjects either sat (control) or performed five sets of bilateral dynamic knee extensions to exhaustion using a load equal to the dominant limb MVC (1-min rest between sets). Immediately afterwards, subjects were assessed for blood lactate and unilateral knee extensors MVC, and after 1 min performed a single unilateral elbow flexor MVC. Two minutes later, subjects performed 12 unilateral elbow flexor MVCs (5 s contraction/10 s rest) followed by a third blood lactate test. Compared to control, knee extensor force dropped by 35% (p < 0.001; ES = 1.6) and blood lactate increased by 18% (p < 0.001; ES = 2.8). Elbow flexor forces were lower after the fatiguing protocol only during the last five MVCs (p < 0.05; ES = ∼ 0.58; ∼ 5%). No changes occurred between conditions in EMG. Elbow flexor forces significantly decreased after knee extensors fatigue. The effect was revealed during the later stages of the repeated MVCs protocol, demonstrating that non-local fatigue may have a stronger effect on repeated rather than on single attempts of maximal force production.

  11. The relationships between exercise intensity, heart rate, and blood pressure during an incremental isometric exercise test.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Jonathan D; Allum, Simon R; Coleman, Damian A; Swaine, Ian L

    2008-01-15

    Currently, it is not possible to prescribe isometric exercise at an intensity that corresponds to given heart rates or systolic blood pressures. This might be useful in optimizing the effects of isometric exercise training. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the relationships between isometric exercise intensity and both heart rate and systolic blood pressure during repeated incremental isometric exercise tests. Fifteen participants performed seated isometric double-leg knee extension, during which maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) was assessed, using an isokinetic dynamometer. From this, a corresponding peak electromyographic activity (EMG(peak)) was determined. Subsequently, participants performed two incremental isometric exercise tests (at least 48 h apart) at 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30% EMG(peak), during which steady-state heart rate and systolic blood pressure were recorded. In all participants, there were linear relationships between %EMG(peak) and heart rate (r at least 0.91; P < 0.05) and between %EMG(peak) and systolic blood pressure (r at least 0.92; P < 0.05). Also, when repeated tests were compared, there were no differences in the slopes (P > 0.50) or elevations (P > 0.10) for either of the relationships. Therefore, these linear relationships could be used to identify isometric exercise training intensities that correspond to precise heart rates or systolic blood pressures. Training performed in this way might provide greater insight into the underlying mechanisms for the cardiovascular adaptations that are known to occur as a result.

  12. Use of Knee Extension Device During Rehabilitation of a Patient with Type 3 Arthrofibrosis after ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shelbourne, K. Donald

    2006-01-01

    Background Arthrofibrosis is a frequent complication following rehabilitation of a patient with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Although prevention is the best treatment, little information exists within the literature regarding the management and rehabilitation intervention for arthrofibrosis. In this case report a rehabilitation program in the treatment of a patient with arthrofibrosis is described. Objectives To identify the importance of discrete measures of knee range of motion in the knee of a patient following ACL reconstruction in order to help prevent postoperative complications. Case Description The patient was an 18-year-old female who sustained an ACL and medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury in a basketball game and underwent an ACL reconstruction with an ipsilateral patellar tendon graft. The patient developed arthrofibrosis and, despite traditional physical therapy of therapeutic exercise and manual therapy, the patient continued to complain of pain, stiffness, limited activities of daily living, and the inability to participate in competitive sports. This patient used a knee extension device as part of her rehabilitation program. Outcomes The patient was able to obtain knee extension and flexion equal to her opposite normal knee. Upon completion of the rehabilitation program, the patient returned to full activities of daily living and competitive sports. Discussion Increasing and maintaining knee extension that is equal to the opposite normal knee is an important component in the successful outcome for the patient after ACL reconstruction. The use of a knee extension device may provide an effective rehabilitation intervention in the treatment of arthrofibrosis. PMID:21522224

  13. Use of Knee Extension Device During Rehabilitation of a Patient with Type 3 Arthrofibrosis after ACL Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Angie; Shelbourne, K Donald

    2006-08-01

    Arthrofibrosis is a frequent complication following rehabilitation of a patient with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Although prevention is the best treatment, little information exists within the literature regarding the management and rehabilitation intervention for arthrofibrosis. In this case report a rehabilitation program in the treatment of a patient with arthrofibrosis is described. To identify the importance of discrete measures of knee range of motion in the knee of a patient following ACL reconstruction in order to help prevent postoperative complications. The patient was an 18-year-old female who sustained an ACL and medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury in a basketball game and underwent an ACL reconstruction with an ipsilateral patellar tendon graft. The patient developed arthrofibrosis and, despite traditional physical therapy of therapeutic exercise and manual therapy, the patient continued to complain of pain, stiffness, limited activities of daily living, and the inability to participate in competitive sports. This patient used a knee extension device as part of her rehabilitation program. The patient was able to obtain knee extension and flexion equal to her opposite normal knee. Upon completion of the rehabilitation program, the patient returned to full activities of daily living and competitive sports. Increasing and maintaining knee extension that is equal to the opposite normal knee is an important component in the successful outcome for the patient after ACL reconstruction. The use of a knee extension device may provide an effective rehabilitation intervention in the treatment of arthrofibrosis.

  14. Asymmetry of lower extremity force and muscle activation during knee extension and functional tasks.

    PubMed

    Bond, Colin W; Cook, Summer B; Swartz, Erik E; Laroche, Dain P

    2017-09-01

    Strength and power asymmetries of >10% may negatively impact physical function. Twenty-four healthy participants, 30-60 years of age, were assessed for muscle power asymmetry during isokinetic knee extension and ground reaction force asymmetry during chair-rise and vertical jump tasks. Neuromuscular activation asymmetry and coactivation of vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris (BF) were assessed in each condition. Symmetric (SG) and asymmetric (AG) groups were identified using a 10% knee extension power asymmetry criterion. The AG had greater chair-rise rate of force development asymmetry (P = 0.003, d = 1.29), but a similar chair-rise and vertical jump peak force asymmetry as the SG. Large group effects were found for VL activation asymmetry during knee extension (P = 0.047, d = 0.87), BF activation asymmetry during vertical jump (P = 0.015, d = 1.12), and strong leg coactivation during vertical jump (P = 0.028, d = 0.96). Compensation for muscle power asymmetry may occur during functional tasks, potentially through differential activation of strong and weak leg muscles. Muscle Nerve 56: 495-504, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Influence of angular velocity on vastus lateralis and rectus femoris oxygenation dynamics during knee extension exercises.

    PubMed

    Denis, Romain; Wilkinson, Jennifer; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether changes in angular velocity would alter vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) oxygenation status during maximal isokinetic knee extension exercises. Eleven recreationally active male participants randomly performed ten maximal knee extensions at 30, 60, 120 and 240° s(-1). Tissue oxygenation index (TOI) and total haemoglobin concentration ([tHb]) were acquired from the VL and RF muscles by means of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Breath-by-breath pulmonary oxygen consumption (VO(2p)) was recorded throughout the tests. Peak torque and VO(2p) significantly decreased as a function of velocity (P<0·05). Interestingly, RF and VL TOI significantly increased as a function of velocity (P<0·05), whereas [tHb] significantly decreased as a function of velocity (P<0·05). A greater number of muscle fibre recruited at slow velocity, where the torque and VO(2p) were the highest, might explain the lower VL and RF TOI observed herein. Furthermore, the increase in local blood flow (suggested by [tHb] changes) during isokinetic knee extension exercises performed at slow angular velocity might have been induced by a higher intramuscular pressure during the contraction phases as well as a greater microcirculatory vasodilatation during relaxation phases. Implementing slow-velocity isokinetic exercises in rehabilitation or other training programmes could delay the short-term anoxia generated by such exercises and result in muscle metabolism enhancement.

  16. Effects of static stretching of knee musculature on patellar alignment and knee functional disability in male patients diagnosed with knee extension syndrome: A single-group, pretest-posttest trial.

    PubMed

    Pourahmadi, Mohammad Reza; Ebrahimi Takamjani, Ismail; Hesampour, Kazem; Shah-Hosseini, Gholam Reza; Jamshidi, Ali Ashraf; Shamsi, Mohammad Bagher

    2016-04-01

    Knee extension (Kext) syndrome is based on movement system impairments and is described as knee pain associated with quadriceps stiffness. To investigate the effects of 3 times per week for 4 weeks static stretching of knee musculature on patellar alignment and knee functional disability in male Kext syndrome patients. A single-group, pretest-posttest clinical trial. Hazrat-e-Rasoul Akram Hospital. Forty-six male Kext syndrome patients aged 18-35 years. Knee functional disability was assessed by the Kujala questionnaire. Patellar tilt was assessed using the skyline view X-ray. In addition, patella alta was assessed by X-ray using the Insall-Salvati ratio. After intervention, changes in knee flexion-extension range of motion (ROM) and hip adduction were assessed by goniometer and inclinometer. Changes in patellar tilt and patella alta were evaluated. Correlations between muscles length, patellar tilt and knee functional disability were also evaluated. The mean of patellar tilt in male Kext syndrome patients was 15.19°. Only the correlation between rectus femoris shortness and patellar tilt (P = 0.002) and the correlation between rectus femoris shortness and knee functional disability (P = 0.037) were significant. Patella alta was not severe in male Kext syndrome patients (1.28 ± 0.10). Knee flexion-extension ROM and femoral adduction increased significantly after a 12-session stretching programme (P < 0.0001). The results demonstrated that rectus femoris shortness had higher correlation with patellar tilt and knee functional disability than iliotibial band and hamstring shortness. Stretching was effective in reducing patellar tilt, patella alta, knee functional disability, increasing knee ROM and hip adduction in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Within- and between-session reliability of the maximal voluntary knee extension torque and activation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihong; Hopkins, J Ty

    2013-01-01

    A ratio between the torque generated by maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) and exogenous electrical stimulus, central activation ratio (CAR), has been widely used to assess quadriceps function. To date, no data exist regarding between-session reliability of this measurement. Thirteen neurologically sound volunteers underwent three testing sessions (three trials per session) with 48 hours between-session. Subjects performed MVICs of the quadriceps with the knee locked at 90° flexion and the hip at 85°. Once the MVIC reached a plateau, an electrical stimulation from superimposed burst technique (SIB: 125 V with peak output current 450 mA) was manually delivered and transmitted directly to the quadriceps via stimulating electrodes. CAR was calculated by using the following equation: CAR = MVIC torque/MVIC + SIB torque. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated within- (ICC((2,1))) and between-session (ICC((2,k))) for MVIC torques and CAR values. Our data show that quadriceps MVIC and CAR are very reliable both within- (ICC((2,1)) = 0.99 for MVIC; 0.94 for CAR) and between-measurement sessions (ICC((2,k)) = 0.92 for MVIC; 0.86 for CAR) in healthy young adults. For clinical research, more data of the patients with pathological conditions are required to ensure reproducibility of calculation of CAR.

  18. Muscle Fiber Type Composition and Knee Extension Isometric Strength Fatigue Patterns in Power- and Endurance-Trained Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroll, Walter; And Others

    1980-01-01

    There is a degree of uniqueness in fatigue patterns, particularly between different levels of absolute maximum strength. Caution should be used when analyzing fatigue curves among subjects with unspecified strength levels. (CJ)

  19. Normal isometric and isokinetic peak torques of hamstring and quadriceps muscles in young adult Saudi males.

    PubMed

    Alangari, Abdulrahman S; Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M

    2004-07-01

    To provide reference data for peak isometric and isokinetic muscle strength of hamstring and quadriceps muscles in young adult Saudi males. The strength of left and right quadriceps and hamstrings leg muscles was assessed in 132 college-male students in the campus of King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in the year 2002 using a Cybex machine and a standardized protocol at the following velocities: 0, 60, 180, and 300 degrees/sec. Isometric strength (0 degrees/sec) was assessed at 65 degrees angle of knee flexion. Isometric flexion strength was 9.3% higher in the right leg compared to the left (p < 0.01), while there was no significant difference between the 2 legs in extension. In isokinetic strength, there was a decrease in both extension and flexion strength with increasing velocity. However, only in flexion strength a significant right-left difference was observed. Flexion/extension peak concentric torque ratio relative to angular velocity varied from 59.9-63.3% in the right leg and from 55.8-59.9% in the left leg, with significant difference (p < 0.02) between the 2 legs. In addition, the angle of peak torque decreased with increasing velocity at knee extension but increased at knee flexion. Young Saudi males appeared to have similar isometric peak strength in the knee extensors but not in the flexors when compared to previously published research. Isokinetic extension strength at 60 degrees/sec in the Saudi males is lower than values reported for untrained males elsewhere. Furthermore, the hamstrings/quadriceps ratio in Saudi males seems to be within the recommended range of appropriate muscle function.

  20. Right-Left Differences in Knee Extension Stiffness for the Normal Rat Knee: In Vitro Measurements Using a New Testing Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Markolf, Keith L; Evseenko, Denis; Petrigliano, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Knee stiffness following joint injury or immobilization is a common clinical problem, and the rat has been used as a model for studies related to joint stiffness and limitation of motion. Knee stiffness measurements have been reported for the anesthetized rat, but it is difficult to separate the contributions of muscular and ligamentous restraints to the recorded values. in vitro testing of isolated rat knees devoid of musculature allows measurement of joint structural properties alone. In order to measure the effects of therapeutic or surgical interventions designed to alter joint stiffness, the opposite extremity is often used as a control. However, right-left stiffness differences for the normal rat knee have not been reported in the literature. If stiffness changes observed for a treatment group are within the normal right-left variation, validity of the results could be questioned. The objectives of this study were to utilize a new testing apparatus to measure right-left stiffness differences during knee extension in a population of normal rat knees and to document repeatability of the stiffness measurements on successive testing days. Moment versus rotation curves were recorded for 15 right-left pairs of normal rat knees on three consecutive days, with overnight specimen storage in a refrigerator. Each knee was subjected to ten loading-unloading cycles, with the last loading curve used for analysis. Angular rotation (AR), defined here as the change in flexion-extension angle from a specified applied joint moment, is commonly used as a measure of overall joint stiffness. For these tests, ARs were measured from the recorded test curves with a maximum applied extension moment of 100 g cm. Mean rotations for testing days 2 and 3 were 0.81-1.25 deg lower (p < 0.001) than for day 1, but were not significantly different from each other. For each testing day, mean rotations for right knees were 1.12-1.30 deg greater (p < 0.001) than left knees. These right

  1. Development of estimation system of knee extension strength using image features in ultrasound images of rectus femoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsuneo; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Terabayashi, Nobuo; Hara, Takeshi; Muramatsu, Chisako; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    The word "Locomotive syndrome" has been proposed to describe the state of requiring care by musculoskeletal disorders and its high-risk condition. Reduction of the knee extension strength is cited as one of the risk factors, and the accurate measurement of the strength is needed for the evaluation. The measurement of knee extension strength using a dynamometer is one of the most direct and quantitative methods. This study aims to develop a system for measuring the knee extension strength using the ultrasound images of the rectus femoris muscles obtained with non-invasive ultrasonic diagnostic equipment. First, we extract the muscle area from the ultrasound images and determine the image features, such as the thickness of the muscle. We combine these features and physical features, such as the patient's height, and build a regression model of the knee extension strength from training data. We have developed a system for estimating the knee extension strength by applying the regression model to the features obtained from test data. Using the test data of 168 cases, correlation coefficient value between the measured values and estimated values was 0.82. This result suggests that this system can estimate knee extension strength with high accuracy.

  2. Identifying the Functional Flexion-extension Axis of the Knee: An In-Vivo Kinematics Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Chen, Kaining; Guo, Lin; Cheng, Liangjun; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to calculate the flexion-extension axis (FEA) of the knee through in-vivo knee kinematics data, and then compare it with two major anatomical axes of the femoral condyles: the transepicondylar axis (TEA) defined by connecting the medial sulcus and lateral prominence, and the cylinder axis (CA) defined by connecting the centers of posterior condyles. Methods The knee kinematics data of 20 healthy subjects were acquired under weight-bearing condition using bi-planar x-ray imaging and 3D-2D registration techniques. By tracking the vertical coordinate change of all points on the surface of femur during knee flexion, the FEA was determined as the line connecting the points with the least vertical shift in the medial and lateral condyles respectively. Angular deviation and distance among the TEA, CA and FEA were measured. Results The TEA-FEA angular deviation was significantly larger than that of the CA-FEA in 3D and transverse plane (3.45° vs. 1.98°, p < 0.001; 2.72° vs. 1.19°, p = 0.002), but not in the coronal plane (1.61° vs. 0.83°, p = 0.076). The TEA-FEA distance was significantly greater than that of the CA-FEA in the medial side (6.7 mm vs. 1.9 mm, p < 0.001), but not in the lateral side (3.2 mm vs. 2.0 mm, p = 0.16). Conclusion The CA is closer to the FEA compared with the TEA; it can better serve as an anatomical surrogate for the functional knee axis. PMID:26039711

  3. Strength does not influence knee function in the ACL-deficient knee but is a correlate of knee function in the and ACL-reconstructed knee.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Erik; Bryant, Adam; Tetsworth, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    Knee function, whether anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient or ACL-reconstructed, is related to many conditions, and no single biomechanical variable can be used to definitively assess knee performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between extension and flexion muscle strength and knee function in patients prior and following ACL reconstruction. 44 ACL-deficient patients with a mean age of 26.6 years were tested between 3 and 6 months following an acute injury and 2 years following ACL reconstruction. All reconstructed patients underwent surgical reconstruction within 6 months of ACL injury using bone-patellar tendon and interference screws. The Cincinnati knee rating system was used to assess knee function. Muscle strength was assessed with the Biodex™ Dynamometer. Isokinetic concentric and eccentric flexion and extension peak torque (Nm/kg) was tested at three different speeds: 60°/s, 120°/s and 180°/s. Isometric strength was tested in 30° and 60° of knee flexion. Both the involved and non-involved legs were tested to calculate symmetry indices. The mean Cincinnati score in the ACL-deficient patient was 62.0 ± 14.5 (range 36-84) and increased to 89.3 ± 9.5 (range 61-100) in the ACL-reconstructed patient. Significant relationships between knee function and muscle strength in the ACL-deficient group were observed for knee symmetry indices (r = 0.38-0.50, p = 0.0001-0.05). In the ACL-reconstructed group significant relationships between knee functionality were observed for isometric and isokinetic peak torque of the involved limb (r = 0.46-0.71, p = 0.0001-0.007). The findings of this study suggest that neither extension nor flexion peak torque were correlates of knee function in the ACL-deficient knee. However, leg symmetry indices were correlated to knee function. In the ACL-reconstructed knee, knee symmetry indices were not related to knee function but extension and flexion isokinetic concentric and

  4. Isometric embeddings of polyhedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minemyer, Barry

    An indefinite metric polyhedron is a triple (X, T, g) where X is a topological space, T is a simplicial triangulation of X with edge set E, and g is a function from E to the reals. g assigns to each k-dimensional simplex S a unique quadratic form on Rk, denoted by G(S). An indefinite metric polyhedron is called a Euclidean polyhedron if the form G(S) is positive definite for every simplex S. Rpq denotes R p + q endowed with the inner product of signature (p, q). Our first result is that every compact n-dimensional indefinite metric polyhedron with vertex set V admits a simplicial isometric embedding into Rqq where q = max{d, 2n + 1} and d = max{deg(v) | v is in V}. We can use the compact case to extend to the non-compact case, but only if we assume that d = max{deg(v) | v is in V} is less than infinity. Specifically, every (non-compact) indefinite metric polyhedron admits a simplicial isometric embedding into Rpp where p = 2q(d3 - d2 + d + 1) and q and d are defined as above. Finally we use results of Akopyan and Greene to prove that every n-dimensional indefinite metric polyhedron admits a piecewise linear isometric embedding into Rn2n. In Chapter 2 we prove that every short (1-Lipschitz) map from an n-dimensional Euclidean polyhedron into EN is epsilon close to a pl isometric embedding (for anyepsilon > 0) provided N ≥ 3n. We can relax the dimensionality of the Euclidean space to 2n + 1 if we allow our map to be continuous instead of pl. These results are extensions of a result due to Akopyan. We provide a detailed proof of Akopyan's Theorem, as the only currently available proof is in Russian. The remaining results in this work are applications of our continuous isometric embedding theorem above. This result is used to prove that every Pro-Euclidean space of rank at most n admits an isometric embedding into E2n + 1. The result, as well as a theorem due to Bridson, also allows for an approximate isometric embedding theorem for geodesic metric spaces with

  5. Is knee extension strength a better predictor of functional performance than handgrip strength among older adults in three different settings?

    PubMed

    Martien, Sofie; Delecluse, Christophe; Boen, Filip; Seghers, Jan; Pelssers, Johan; Van Hoecke, Ann-Sophie; Van Roie, Evelien

    2015-01-01

    The first purpose was to examine whether knee extension strength is a better predictor of functional performance than handgrip strength among older adults (≥60 years). The second purpose was to identify functionally relevant cut-off values for muscle strength. 770 community-dwelling older adults, 104 older adults living in assisted living facilities and 73 nursing home residents were included. Static strength, expressed in kg/kg body weight (BW), was measured using two field tests: handgrip (GRIP/BW) and knee extension (KNEE/BW) test. Functional performance was assessed with 6-Minute Walk Distance (6MWD, N=947) and modified Physical Performance Test (mPPT, N=152). Both GRIP/BW and KNEE/BW were positively correlated with functional performance in all settings (p<0.05). In the community and nursing homes, both strength variables equally contributed to functional performance. In assisted living facilities, KNEE/BW (R(2)6MWD=0.39 and R2mPPT=0.35) was clearly a better predictor of functional performance than GRIP/BW (R(2)6MWD=0.15 and R2mPPT=0.12). GRIP/BW had no added value to KNEE/BW in order to explain the variance in functional performance. Functionally relevant cut-off values for static strength, for men and women respectively, were set at 0.40 and 0.31 for KNEE/BW and at 0.43 and 0.31 for GRIP/BW. Handgrip and knee extension strength are both important predictors of functional performance in older adults. In assisted living facilities only, knee extension strength was clearly more predictive than handgrip strength. Both cut-off values appear to be highly sensitive to screen for functionally relevant muscle weakness in older adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Influence of Body Position on Load Range During Isokinetic Knee Extension/Flexion

    PubMed Central

    W. Findley, Brian; E. Brown, Lee; Whitehurst, Michael; Keating, Tedd; P. Murray, Daniel; M. Gardner, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Isokinetic range of motion (ROM) has three distinct phases: rate of velocity development (RVD), load range (LR), and deceleration (DCC). The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in isokinetic knee extension/flexion LR exist between body positions. Ten subjects (4 males and 6 females, age 29.3 ± 5.4 yrs, ht 1.71 ± 0.10 m, wt 71.9 ± 12.9 kg) volunteered to participate in the seated vs. prone investigation and nine different subjects (4 males and 5 females, age 29.5 ± 6.9 yrs, ht 1.72 ± 0.09 m, wt 69.0 ± 13.8 kg) volunteered to participate in the seated vs. supine study. Each subject completed 3 maximal reciprocal concentric/concentric repetitions of dominant knee extension/flexion on a Biodex System 2 isokinetic dynamometer at 60, 120, 180, 240 and 360 deg·sec-1 in the supine or prone and seated positions. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed that only seated flexion at 360 deg·sec-1 (57.6 ± 1.7 degrees) elicited significantly (p < 0.05) greater LR than prone (49.2 ± 2.8 degrees). No significant differences in LR extension or flexion existed at any velocity between the supine vs. seated positions. ANOVA also demonstrated differences between seated vs. prone torque, work and power at most velocities while there was no difference between seated vs. supine. LR is the only phase of an isokinetic repetition where quantifiable resistance is maintained and this data appears to support that it may not be position-dependent but position may alter traditional performance variables. Key Points Load range is the constant velocity phase where torque is collected. Load range has an inverse relationship with velocity. Load range may not be position dependent for the knee extensors or flexors. PMID:24353457

  7. Increased patellar tendon microcirculation and reduction of tendon stiffness following knee extension eccentric exercises.

    PubMed

    Yin, Nai-Hao; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Wu, Ying-Tai; Shih, Tiffany Tingfang; Rolf, Christer; Wang, Hsing-Kuo

    2014-04-01

    Controlled laboratory study. To measure and compare patellar tendon stiffness and microcirculation in college tennis players and nonathletic students when performing eccentric knee extension exercises that do and do not reduce tendon stiffness. Previous studies suggest that tendon microcirculation response during exercises may vary based on the tendon's plastic properties. Methods The study included 3 groups of college-age male students: tennis players who performed 4 sets of either 40 (n = 12) or 80 (n = 13) repetitions of eccentric knee extension exercise and nonathletic students (n = 14) who performed 4 sets of 40 repetitions. Tendon stiffness was measured before and after exercise completion. Changes in total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation (OSat) were analyzed while performing the 4 sets. Comparisons were made within and between the groups. The level of association between tendon microcirculation and stiffness reduction was assessed. The 2 groups (player/4 × 80 and student/4 × 40) exhibiting patellar tendon stiffness reductions (P<.008) showed higher total hemoglobin and OSat levels, above the pre-exercise levels, in the fourth set compared to the first set of exercises (P<.004). The tennis players who performed 4 sets of 40 repetitions exhibited higher OSat levels in the fourth set than in the first set (P = .004) but had no reduction in tendon stiffness. Changes in OSat levels in the fourth set were correlated with patellar tendon stiffness reductions (r = -0.381, P = .02). We conclude that there was increased patellar tendon microcirculation after performing knee extension eccentric exercises that resulted in a reduction in tendon stiffness.

  8. Effects of vascular occlusion on muscular endurance in dynamic knee extension exercise at different submaximal loads.

    PubMed

    Wernbom, Mathias; Augustsson, Jesper; Thomeé, Roland

    2006-05-01

    Strength training with low load under conditions of vascular occlusion has been proposed as an alternative to heavy-resistance exercise in the rehabilitation setting, when large forces acting upon the musculoskeletal system are unwanted. Little is known, however, about the relative intensity at which occlusion of blood flow significantly reduces dynamic muscular endurance and, hence, when it may increase the training effect. The purpose of this study was to investigate endurance during dynamic knee extension at different loads with and without cuff occlusion. Sixteen subjects (20-45 years of age) with strength-training experience were recruited. At 4 test sessions, the subjects performed unilateral knee extensions to failure with and without a pressure cuff around the thigh at 20, 30, 40, and 50% of their 1 repetition maximum (1RM). The pressure cuff was inflated to 200 mm Hg during exercise with occlusion. Significant differences in the number of repetitions performed were found between occluded and nonoccluded conditions for loads of 20, 30, and 40% of 1RM (p < 0.01) but not for the 50% load (p = 0.465). Thus, the application of a pressure cuff around the thigh appears to reduce dynamic knee extension endurance more at a low load than at a moderate load. These results may have implications regarding when it could be useful to apply a tourniquet in order to increase the rate of fatigue and perhaps also the resulting training effect. However, the short- and long-term safety of training under ischemic conditions needs to be addressed in both healthy and less healthy populations. Furthermore, the high acute pain ratings and the delayed-onset muscle soreness associated with this type of training may limit its potential use to highly motivated individuals.

  9. Does the Q − H index show a stronger relationship than the H:Q ratio in regard to knee pain during daily activities in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Remi; Matsui, Yasumoto; Harada, Atsushi; Takemura, Marie; Kondo, Izumi; Nemoto, Tetsuya; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Ota, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship between knee muscle strength and knee pain in activities of daily living, based on consideration of the difference between extension and flexion strength (Q − H) and the hamstring:quadriceps (H:Q) ratio in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 78 females with knee osteoarthritis, and a total of 133 knees that had not been treated surgically were the targets of this research. The legs were divided according to dominance. Isometric knee extension and flexion muscle strength and knee pain during activities of daily living were measured. The H:Q ratio (flexion/extension muscle strength) and the difference between extension and flexion strength, (extension muscle strength/weight) minus (flexion muscle strength/weight), that is, Q − H, were calculated. The correlation between these indices and the knee pain score during activities of daily living was investigated. [Results] Greater knee pain during activities of daily living was related to lower knee extension muscle strength and Q − H in both the dominant and nondominant legs. Knee flexion muscle strength and the H:Q ratio were not significantly correlated with knee pain during any activities of daily living. [Conclusion] Knee extension muscle strength and Q − H were found to be significantly correlated with knee pain during activities of daily living, whereas the H:Q ratio was not. PMID:28174444

  10. Discrepancy between femoral and capillary blood flow kinetics during knee extension exercise.

    PubMed

    Schlup, S J; Ade, C J; Broxterman, R M; Barstow, T J

    2015-12-01

    Capillary blood flow (QCAP) kinetics have previously been shown to be significantly slower than femoral artery (QFA) kinetics following the onset of dynamic knee extension exercise. If the increase in QCAP does not follow a similar time course to QFA, then a substantial proportion of the available blood flow is not distributed to the working muscle. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is that blood flow also increases to the nonworking lower leg muscles. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine if a reduction in lower limb blood flow, via arterial occlusion below the knee, alters the kinetics of QFA and QCAP during knee extension exercise, and thus provide insight into the potential mechanisms controlling the rapid increase in QFA. Subjects performed a ramp max test to determine the work rate at which gas exchange threshold (GET) occurred. At least four constant work rate trials with and without below-knee occlusion were conducted at work rates eliciting ∼ 80% GET. Pulmonary gas exchange, near-infrared spectroscopy and QFA measurements were taken continuously during each exercise bout. Muscle oxygen uptake (VO2m) and deoxy[hemoglobin+myoglobin] were used to estimate QCAP. There was no significant difference between the uncuffed and cuffed conditions in any response (P>0.05). The mean response times (MRT) of QFA were 18.7 ± 14.2s (uncuffed) and 24.6 ± 14.9s (cuffed). QCAP MRTs were 51.8 ± 23.4s (uncuffed) and 56.7 ± 23.2s (cuffed), which were not significantly different from the time constants (τ) of VO2m (39.7 ± 23.2s (uncuffed) and 46.3 ± 24.1s (cuffed). However, the MRT of QFA was significantly faster (P<0.05) than the MRT of QCAP and τVO2m. τVO2m and MRT QCAP were significantly correlated and estimated QCAP kinetics tracked VO2m following exercise onset. Cuffing below the knee did not significantly change the kinetics of QFA, QCAP or VO2m, although an effect size of 1.02 suggested that a significant effect on QFA may have been hidden

  11. Voluntary breathing increases corticospinal excitability of lower limb muscle during isometric contraction.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Kazuki; Yunoki, Takahiro; Afroundeh, Roghayyeh; Lian, Chang-Shun; Matsuura, Ryouta; Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yano, Tokuo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of voluntary breathing on corticospinal excitability of a leg muscle during isometric contraction. Seven subjects performed 5-s isometric knee extension at the intensity of 10% of maximal voluntary contraction (10% MVC). During the 10% MVC, the subjects were instructed to breath normally (NORM) or to inhale (IN) or exhale (OUT) once as fast as possible. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) induced by transcranialmagnetic stimulation in the right vastus lateralis (VL) during the 10% MVC were recorded and compared during the three breathing tasks. MEPs in IN and OUT were significantly higher than that in NORM. Effort sense of breathing was significantly higher in IN and OUT than in NORM. There was a significant positive correlation between MEP and effort sense of breathing. These results suggest that activation of the breathing-associated cortical areas with voluntary breathing is involved in the increase in corticospinal excitability of the VL during isometric contraction.

  12. A lower-extremity exoskeleton improves knee extension in children with crouch gait from cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Zachary F; Damiano, Diane L; Bulea, Thomas C

    2017-08-23

    The ability to walk contributes considerably to physical health and overall well-being, particularly in children with motor disability, and is therefore prioritized as a rehabilitation goal. However, half of ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP), the most prevalent childhood movement disorder, cease to walk in adulthood. Robotic gait trainers have shown positive outcomes in initial studies, but these clinic-based systems are limited to short-term programs of insufficient length to maintain improved function in a lifelong disability such as CP. Sophisticated wearable exoskeletons are now available, but their utility in treating childhood movement disorders remains unknown. We evaluated an exoskeleton for the treatment of crouch (or flexed-knee) gait, one of the most debilitating pathologies in CP. We show that the exoskeleton reduced crouch in a cohort of ambulatory children with CP during overground walking. The exoskeleton was safe and well tolerated, and all children were able to walk independently with the device. Rather than guiding the lower limbs, the exoskeleton dynamically changed the posture by introducing bursts of knee extension assistance during discrete portions of the walking cycle, a perturbation that resulted in maintained or increased knee extensor muscle activity during exoskeleton use. Six of seven participants exhibited postural improvements equivalent to outcomes reported from invasive orthopedic surgery. We also demonstrate that improvements in crouch increased over the course of our multiweek exploratory trial. Together, these results provide evidence supporting the use of wearable exoskeletons as a treatment strategy to improve walking in children with CP. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  13. Efficacy of passive extension mobilization in addition to exercise in the osteoarthritic knee: an observational parallel-group study.

    PubMed

    Kappetijn, Olaf; van Trijffel, Emiel; Lucas, Cees

    2014-06-01

    Pretest post-test observational parallel-group design. To evaluate the efficacy of passive knee extension mobilization in addition to exercise therapy on extension range of motion (ROM) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Secondary objectives were to determine changes in pain and functional abilities. Patients with knee OA complain of pain, limited range of motion, and impaired activities. Efficacy of mobilization as a treatment option next to exercises has not been studied rigorously. Thirty-four participants with persistent knee pain, a positive radiography for knee OA, and a passive extension deficit were included. Seventeen participants (mean age±SD, 59.8±6.1years) were treated with an exercise protocol and were additionally given manual mobilizations to improve passive extension ROM. The other group (mean age±SD, 61.5±7.3years) with equal characteristics was treated with an identical exercise therapy protocol only. Prior to participation, detailed ROM measurements were recorded next to muscle function tests, pain (VAS), six-minute walking tests (6MWTs), a condition-specific questionnaire, and the patient-specific function scale (PSFS). Participants in both groups completed 16 treatment sessions each. Passive mobilization significantly improved extension ROM in the intervention group (5.2 versus 8.6°, p=.017). The manually mobilized group also had better physical capacities as assessed by 6MWT, less pain, and a lower PSFS score. A combined protocol including exercise therapy and passive mobilization was beneficial for patients with OA of the knee complaining of pain, decreased extension ROM and decreased limited abilities. Therapy, 2b. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel clinical evaluation method using maximum angular velocity during knee extension to assess lower extremity muscle function of older adults.

    PubMed

    Arai, Takeshi; Obuchi, Shuichi; Shiba, Yoshitaka

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the utilities of maximum angular velocity (AV) assessment during knee extension (KE) using a gyroscope for clinical evaluation of exercise program for older adults. Two hundred and 4 community-dwelling older adults underwent a 3-month exercise intervention program. Outcome measures included AV during KE and other physical functions (isometric strength (IS), walking abilities, and balance functions). A correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the relationships between AV and other physical functions at baseline. The differences of physical functions before and after intervention were evaluated and the effect size of each measurement was calculated after the program. The AV measurement was significantly correlated with IS during KE (r=0.303, P<0.01) and other physical functions. Most correlation coefficients of angular velocity were greater than that of IS. All of physical assessments were significantly improved. Also, effect size of AV was greater than that of IS (d=0.45 vs. 0.42). AV of the lower extremities is useful to evaluate the effects of exercise intervention in the elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sense of extension force and angle of the knee joint are correlated between two generations of men.

    PubMed

    Bezulska, Anna; Naczk, M; Adach, Z; Arlet, J; Celichowski, J

    2017-05-04

    Numerous motor abilities depend on the activity of proprioceptors, which has been suggested to be genetically determined. To test this hypothesis, the control of torque generated by knee extensors and knee position was studied in 30 father-son pairs both before and immediately after running. After stabilisation of the participant in a sitting position, the knee joint of his dominant leg was flexed to 90°, and the maximal voluntary torque (MVT) of the dominant knee extensors under static conditions was measured. The participant then tried five times to produce 50% of the MVT. Next, the participant extended the knee to 45° five times without visual control. Significant correlations between the reproducibility of successive trials for groups of fathers and their sons were found. The correlation coefficients for the repeatability of the knee extension torque were 0.69 (confidence interval [CI] = 0.45-0.84; P < 0.01) and 0.75 (CI = 0.54-0.87; P < 0.01) before and after the fatiguing exercise, respectively, whereas the coefficient for the reproducibility of positioning the knee was 0.49 (CI = 0.16-0.72; P < 0.01) after the fatiguing exercise. Our results indicate a significant influence of hereditary factors on the control of limb torque and position.

  16. A rare case of extensive diffuse nonpigmented villonodular synovitis as a cause of total knee arthroplasty failure

    PubMed Central

    Tosun, Hacı Bayram; Uludağ, Abuzer; Serbest, Sancar; Gümüştaş, Seyitali; Erdoğdu, İbrahim Halil

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Nonpigmented villonodular synovitis (non-PVNS) is a benign proliferative disease involving the synovium. It is a rare condition that is little recognized. Non-PVNS has been reported as a cause of total knee replacement failure. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case of extensive diffuse non-PVNS in a patient with tibial component loosening after total knee replacement and review the related literature. DISCUSSION It is reported that pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) occurs less frequently than non-PVNS after knee replacement. However, there are many more case reports of PVNS than non-PVNS after knee arthroplasty in the English-language literature. CONCLUSION Previously, there were no reported cases of extensive diffuse non-PVNS after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This case study highlights an unusual case of non-PVNS as a cause of TKA failure. We propose that non-PVNS should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients after TKA who present with recurrent pain and effusion/hemarthrosis of the knee, and that it is one of the causes of implant loosening after TKA. PMID:24892248

  17. A rare case of extensive diffuse nonpigmented villonodular synovitis as a cause of total knee arthroplasty failure.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Hacı Bayram; Uludağ, Abuzer; Serbest, Sancar; Gümüştaş, Seyitali; Erdoğdu, Ibrahim Halil

    2014-01-01

    Nonpigmented villonodular synovitis (non-PVNS) is a benign proliferative disease involving the synovium. It is a rare condition that is little recognized. Non-PVNS has been reported as a cause of total knee replacement failure. We report a case of extensive diffuse non-PVNS in a patient with tibial component loosening after total knee replacement and review the related literature. It is reported that pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) occurs less frequently than non-PVNS after knee replacement. However, there are many more case reports of PVNS than non-PVNS after knee arthroplasty in the English-language literature. Previously, there were no reported cases of extensive diffuse non-PVNS after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This case study highlights an unusual case of non-PVNS as a cause of TKA failure. We propose that non-PVNS should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients after TKA who present with recurrent pain and effusion/hemarthrosis of the knee, and that it is one of the causes of implant loosening after TKA. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. An estimation of the influence of force decrease on the mean power spectral frequency shift of the EMG during repetitive maximum dynamic knee extensions.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, J S; Ostlund, N; Larsson, B; Gerdle, B

    2003-10-01

    Frequency analysis of myoelectric (ME) signals, using the mean power spectral frequency (MNF), has been widely used to characterize peripheral muscle fatigue during isometric contractions assuming constant force. However, during repetitive isokinetic contractions performed with maximum effort, output (force or torque) will decrease markedly during the initial 40-60 contractions, followed by a phase with little or no change. MNF shows a similar pattern. In situations where there exist a significant relationship between MNF and output, part of the decrease in MNF may per se be related to the decrease in force during dynamic contractions. This study estimated force effects on the MNF shifts during repetitive dynamic knee extensions. Twenty healthy volunteers participated in the study and both surface ME signals (from the right vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, and rectus femoris muscles) and the biomechanical signals (force, position, and velocity) of an isokinetic dynamometer were measured. Two tests were performed: (i) 100 repetitive maximum isokinetic contractions of the right knee extensors, and (ii) five gradually increasing static knee extensions before and after (i). The corresponding ME signal time-frequency representations were calculated using the continuous wavelet transform. Compensation of the MNF variables of the repetitive contractions was performed with respect to the individual MNF-force relation based on an average of five gradually increasing contractions. Whether or not compensation was necessary was based on the shape of the MNF-force relationship. A significant compensation of the MNF was found for the repetitive isokinetic contractions. In conclusion, when investigating maximum dynamic contractions, decreases in MNF can be due to mechanisms similar to those found during sustained static contractions (force-independent component of fatigue) and in some subjects due to a direct effect of the change in force (force-dependent component of fatigue

  19. The Isokinetic and Electromyographic Assessment of Knee Muscles Strength in the Short- and Long-Term Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Askary-Ashtiani, Ahmadreza; Ghanjal, Ali; Motaqi, Monireh; Meftahi, Gholam Hossein; Hatef, Boshra; Niknam, Hoda

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients are subject to muscle weakness. Objectives The aim of the study was an assessment of electromyographic (EMG) activity of knee muscles during isometric maximal voluntary contraction in the different disease durations of T2DM. Methods Eighteen patients with less than 10 years and twelve patients with more than 10 years of T2DM were compared with nineteen matched healthy control subjects. EMG of flexor and extensor muscles of knee concurrently with isometric maximal peak torque of knee flexion and extension at 75 degrees of knee flexion were recorded in three groups. Results Isometric maximal peak torque of extension and root mean squared (RMS) of vastus lateralis and medial hamstring in the healthy control was significantly higher than both patient groups. Whenever the maximal isometric peak flexion torque was not significantly different between groups, the mean power frequency (MPF) of flexor muscles especially medial hamstrings were higher in the short-term T2DM than healthy control groups. The two factors, gender and age, had significant effect on maximal peak torque and RMS of knee muscles. Conclusions EMG could show the effect of T2DM, gender and age on knee muscles activity. It seems that the medial hamstring was the most sensitive muscle of knee compartment to show the effect of T2DM and difference of short and long-term T2DM in EMG study. PMID:28144413

  20. In vitro investigation of the influence of tibial slope on quadriceps extension force after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ostermeier, Sven; Hurschler, Christof; Windhagen, Henning; Stukenborg-Colsman, Christina

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of tibial base plate angulation on knee kinematics and kinetics during knee arthroplasty. The amount of quadriceps force required to extend the knee and the anteroposterior displacement of a mobile bearing insert as well as tibiofemoral position were measured during an in vitro simulation of an isokinetic knee extension cycle. Human knee specimens (n = 7, mean age 62, range 52-75 years, all male) were tested in a kinematic knee simulating machine after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with a mobile bearing insert prosthesis (Interax), Stryker/Howmedica). During simulation, a hydraulic cylinder applied sufficient force to the quadriceps tendon to produce an extension moment of 31 N m about the knee. The quadriceps load was measured using a load cell attached to the quadriceps tendon, the anteroposterior displacement of the mobile bearing insert as well as the relative tibiofemoral position was measured using an ultrasound base motion analysis system (CMS 100, Zebris). Quadriceps load, insert and tibial displacement were first investigated with the tibial base plate implanted with a neutral tibial base plate orientation, and subsequently after 10 degrees posterior angulation. The quadriceps forces needed to produce a 31 N m knee extension moment after TKA with neutral slope reached levels as high as 1,391 N (SD 82 N). After applying a posterior slope of 10 degrees , maximum quadriceps force was measured to be up to 1,303 N (SD 34 N, P = 0.04). The mobile bearing insert was observed to move up to 0.1 mm (SD 4.2 mm) anteriorly relative to the tibial base plate with neutral tibial slope, and up to 1.0 mm (SD 4.5 mm, P = 0.47) with tibial slope. Femoral position relative to the tibia moved from a posterior position of 13.1 mm (SD 4.0 mm) anteriorly up to 0.5 mm (SD 6.3 mm), and from 16.0 mm (SD 6.4 mm, P = 0.67) to 9.5 mm (SD 9.9 mm, P = 0.33) with a 10 degrees tibial slope. Posterior slope of the tibial base plate

  1. Test-retest reliability of wavelet - and Fourier based EMG (instantaneous) median frequencies in the evaluation of back and hip muscle fatigue during isometric back extensions.

    PubMed

    Coorevits, Pascal; Danneels, Lieven; Cambier, Dirk; Ramon, Herman; Druyts, Hans; Karlsson, J Stefan; De Moor, Georges; Vanderstraeten, Guy

    2008-10-01

    The present study aimed at assessing the test-retest reliability of wavelet - and Fourier derived (instantaneous) median frequencies of surface electromyographic (EMG) measurements of back and hip muscles during isometric back extensions. Twenty healthy subjects (10 males and 10 females) performed a modified Biering-Sørensen test on two separate days, with a 1-week interval between the two tests. Surface EMG measurements were bilaterally performed from the latissimus dorsi, the thoracic and lumbar parts of the longissimus thoracis, the thoracic and lumbar parts of the iliocostalis lumborum, the multifidus, the gluteus maximus and the biceps femoris. In addition, three-dimensional kinematic data were recorded of the subjects' lumbar vertebrae. The (instantaneous) median frequencies were calculated from the EMG signals using continuous wavelet (IMDF) - and short-time Fourier transforms (MDF). Linear regressions performed on the IMDF and MDF data as a function of time yielded slopes (IMDF(slope) and MDF(slope)) and intercepts (IMDF(init) and MDF(init)) of the regression lines. Test-retest reliability was assessed on the normalized slopes and intercept parameters by means of intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and standard errors of measurements expressed as percentages of the mean values (% SEM). The results of IMDF(slope) and MDF(slope) parameters indicated ICCs for back and hip muscles between .443 and .727 for IMDF(slope), values between .273 and .734 for MDF(slope), % SEM between 7.6% and 58.9% for IMDF(slope) and % SEM between 8.2% and 25.3% for MDF(slope), respectively. The ICCs for IMDF(init) and MDF(init) parameters varied between .376 and .907 for IMDF(init) and between .383 and .883 for MDF(init), and % SEM ranged from 2.7% to 6.3% for IMDF(init) and from 2.6% to 4.7% for MDF(init), respectively. These results indicate that both wavelet - and Fourier based (instantaneous) median frequency parameters generally are reliable in the analysis of back and

  2. Ischemic Preconditioning Enhances Muscle Endurance during Sustained Isometric Exercise.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, D; Suga, T; Tanaka, T; Kido, K; Honjo, T; Fujita, S; Hamaoka, T; Isaka, T

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) enhances whole-body exercise endurance. However, it is poorly understood whether the beneficial effects originate from systemic (e. g., cardiovascular system) or peripheral (e. g., skeletal muscle) adaptations. The present study examined the effects of IPC on local muscle endurance during fatiguing isometric exercise. 12 male subjects performed sustained isometric unilateral knee-extension exercise at 20% of maximal voluntary contraction until failure. Prior to the exercise, subjects completed IPC or control (CON) treatments. During exercise trial, electromyography activity and near-infrared spectroscopy-derived deoxygenation in skeletal muscle were continuously recorded. Endurance time to task failure was significantly longer in IPC than in CON (mean±SE; 233±9 vs. 198±9 s, P<0.001). Quadriceps electromyography activity was not significantly different between IPC and CON. In contrast, deoxygenation dynamics in the quadriceps vastus lateralis muscle was significantly faster in IPC than in CON (27.1±3.4 vs. 35.0±3.6 s, P<0.01). The present study found that IPC can enhance muscular endurance during fatiguing isometric exercise. Moreover, IPC accelerated muscle deoxygenation dynamics during the exercise. Therefore, we suggest that the origin of beneficial effects of IPC on exercise performance may be the enhanced mitochondrial metabolism in skeletal muscle.

  3. A Maximum Muscle Strength Prediction Formula Using Theoretical Grade 3 Muscle Strength Value in Daniels et al.'s Manual Muscle Test, in Consideration of Age: An Investigation of Hip and Knee Joint Flexion and Extension

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Masashi; Ichikawa, Kazuna; Takei, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    This study attempted to develop a formula for predicting maximum muscle strength value for young, middle-aged, and elderly adults using theoretical Grade 3 muscle strength value (moment fair: Mf)—the static muscular moment to support a limb segment against gravity—from the manual muscle test by Daniels et al. A total of 130 healthy Japanese individuals divided by age group performed isometric muscle contractions at maximum effort for various movements of hip joint flexion and extension and knee joint flexion and extension, and the accompanying resisting force was measured and maximum muscle strength value (moment max, Mm) was calculated. Body weight and limb segment length (thigh and lower leg length) were measured, and Mf was calculated using anthropometric measures and theoretical calculation. There was a linear correlation between Mf and Mm in each of the four movement types in all groups, excepting knee flexion in elderly. However, the formula for predicting maximum muscle strength was not sufficiently compatible in middle-aged and elderly adults, suggesting that the formula obtained in this study is applicable in young adults only. PMID:28133549

  4. A Maximum Muscle Strength Prediction Formula Using Theoretical Grade 3 Muscle Strength Value in Daniels et al.'s Manual Muscle Test, in Consideration of Age: An Investigation of Hip and Knee Joint Flexion and Extension.

    PubMed

    Usa, Hideyuki; Matsumura, Masashi; Ichikawa, Kazuna; Takei, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    This study attempted to develop a formula for predicting maximum muscle strength value for young, middle-aged, and elderly adults using theoretical Grade 3 muscle strength value (moment fair: Mf )-the static muscular moment to support a limb segment against gravity-from the manual muscle test by Daniels et al. A total of 130 healthy Japanese individuals divided by age group performed isometric muscle contractions at maximum effort for various movements of hip joint flexion and extension and knee joint flexion and extension, and the accompanying resisting force was measured and maximum muscle strength value (moment max, Mm ) was calculated. Body weight and limb segment length (thigh and lower leg length) were measured, and Mf was calculated using anthropometric measures and theoretical calculation. There was a linear correlation between Mf and Mm in each of the four movement types in all groups, excepting knee flexion in elderly. However, the formula for predicting maximum muscle strength was not sufficiently compatible in middle-aged and elderly adults, suggesting that the formula obtained in this study is applicable in young adults only.

  5. Robotic device-assisted knee extension training during the early postoperative period after opening wedge high tibial osteotomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Kubota, Shigeki; Sugaya, Hisashi; Hyodo, Kojiro; Ogawa, Kaishi; Taniguchi, Yu; Kanamori, Akihiro; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2017-08-05

    Maintenance or restoration of a good range of motion of the knee is one of the most important outcomes following knee surgery. According to previous studies, opening wedge high tibial osteotomy enables better recovery of range of motion in knee flexion than that achievable after total knee arthroplasty or unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. However, few reports provide a detailed description of the postoperative recovery of knee extension range of motion after opening wedge high tibial osteotomy. We describe our experience with a knee extension training program using a single-joint hybrid assistive limb device (HAL-SJ; Cyberdyne Inc., Tsukuba, Japan) during the acute recovery phase after opening wedge high tibial osteotomy. The HAL-SJ is a wearable robotic device that facilitates voluntary control of knee joint motion. A 67-year-old Japanese woman who underwent opening wedge high tibial osteotomy for spontaneous osteonecrosis of the left medial femoral condyle received HAL-SJ-based knee extension training postoperatively. Our experience with this patient revealed that knee extension training with the HAL-SJ during the acute phase following opening wedge high tibial osteotomy is feasible. Furthermore, the patient's knee extension range of motion improved to values similar to those seen during the preoperative stage, and her flexion range of motion was improved at 3 months after the surgery. HAL-SJ-based knee extension training could be used as a novel post-opening wedge high tibial osteotomy rehabilitation modality. Further exploration of individualized optimal settings of the HAL-SJ is required to improve its safety and efficacy.

  6. Acute effects of blood flow restriction on muscle activity and endurance during fatiguing dynamic knee extensions at low load.

    PubMed

    Wernbom, Mathias; Järrebring, Rickard; Andreasson, Mikael A; Augustsson, Jesper

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activity and endurance during fatiguing low-intensity dynamic knee extension exercise with and without blood flow restriction. Eleven healthy subjects with strength training experience performed 3 sets of unilateral knee extensions with no relaxation between repetitions to concentric torque failure at 30% of the 1 repetition maximum. One leg was randomized to exercise with cuff occlusion and the other leg to exercise without occlusion. The muscle activity in the quadriceps was recorded with electromyography (EMG). Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and acute pain were collected immediately, and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) was rated before and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. The results demonstrated high EMG levels in both experimental conditions, but there were no significant differences regarding maximal muscle activity, except for a higher EMG in the eccentric phase in set 3 for the nonoccluded condition (p = 0.005). Significantly more repetitions were performed with the nonoccluded leg in every set (p < 0.05). The RPE and acute pain ratings were similar, but DOMS was higher in the nonoccluded leg (p < 0.05). We conclude that blood flow restriction during low-intensity dynamic knee extension decreases the endurance but does not increase the maximum muscle activity compared with training without restriction when both regimes are performed to failure. The high levels of muscle activity suggest that performing low-load dynamic knee extensions in a no-relaxation manner may be a useful method in knee rehabilitation settings when large forces are contraindicated. However, similarly to fatiguing blood flow restricted exercise, this method is associated with ischemic muscle pain, and thus its applications may be limited to highly motivated individuals.

  7. Tissue temperature transients in resting contra-lateral leg muscle tissue during isolated knee extension.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Glen P; Reardon, Frank D; Ducharme, Michel B; Reardon, Mark L; Zaleski, Wytek

    2002-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the role of non-active tissue in the retention and dissipation of heat during and following intense isolated muscle activity. Six subjects performed an incremental isotonic test (constant angular velocity, increases in force output) on a KIN-COM isokinetic apparatus to determine their maximal oxygen consumption during single knee extensions (VO2sp). In a subsequent session, a thin wire multi-sensor temperature probe was inserted into the left vastus medialis under ultrasound guidance at a specific internal marker. The deepest temperature sensor (tip, Tmu10) was located approximately 10 mm from the femur and deep femoral artery with 2 additional sensors located at 15 (Tmu25) and 30 (Tmu40) mm from the tip. Implant site was midway between and medial to a line joining the anterior superior iliac spine and base of patella. Esophageal temperature (Tes) temperature was measured as an index of core temperature. Subjects rested in a supine position for 60 min followed by 30 min of seated rest in an ambient condition of 22 degree C. Subjects then performed 15 min of isolated single right knee extensions against a dynamic resistance on a KIN COM corresponding to 60% of VO2sp at 60 degree x sec(-1). Exercise was followed by 60 min of seated rest. Resting Tes was 37 degree C while Tmu10, Tmu25, and Tmu40 were 36.58, 36.55 and 36.45 degree C, respectively. Exercise resulted in a Tes increase of 0.31 C above pre-exercise resting. Tmu of the non-exercising leg increased 0.23, 0.19 and 0.09 degree C for Tmu10, Tmu25, and Tmu40, respectively. While Tes decreased to baseline values within approximately 15 min of end-exercise, Tmu10 reached resting values following approximately 40 min of recovery. These results suggest that during isolated muscle activity, convective heat transfer by the blood to non-active muscle tissue may have a significant role in maintaining resting core temperature.

  8. Huge Subchondral Cyst Communicating with Medulary Canal of Femur in OA Knee-Treated by Extension Stem and Bone Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Rajani, Amyn M; Kumar, Ritesh; Shyam, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We report an osteoarthritic patient with huge sub-chondral cyst-like lesions in the Anterior part of distal femur. Deep and large bone defects and severe lateral laxity due to Advanced osteoarthritis was successfully treated with semi-constrained type total knee arthroplasty with long stem. Case Report: A 70yrs old Female was admitted in our institution diagnosed with severe bilateral Osteoarthritis. The x-rays showed bone on bone Tricompartment OA Knee with Varus Malalignment. She was posted for Single Stage Bilateral Total Knee Replacement and as planned the Left Knee Was Operated first. After exposure, Proximal Tibial, Distal Femoral Cuts and measurement of extension gaps the synovium from the anterior Femur was removed and sizing was done. The AP cut was then proceeded with. We spotted a small Osteochondral Cyst in the Anterior Femur which was curretted to remove the cystic material, which is when we realised that the cyst was large and communicating with the medulary canal. The remaining Femoral preparations was done keeping in mind the risk of iatrogenic fracture and extension Stem was used in the femur. The defect was then packed cancellous bone graft. Conclusion: If suspected a Preoperative MRI should be done to exclude any sub-chondral cysts osteochondral defects and any surprise during surgery. Usually one should keep extension stems ready for difficult cases. Operating surgeon should know his implants very well, as in many standard implants extension stems can only be used when distal femur cuts are taken accordingly as 5° Valgus. Mini incision should be avoided because it may fail to reveal such surprises and may land into periprosthetic fractures. PMID:27298967

  9. The Influence of Velocity Overshoot Movement Artifact on Isokinetic Knee Extension Tests

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Fabiano Peruzzo; Bottaro, Martim; Celes, Rodrigo Souza; Brown, Lee E.; Nascimento, Francisco Assis de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Exercise on an isokinetic device involves three distinct movement phases: acceleration, constant velocity, and deceleration. Inherent in these phases are unique occurrences that may confound test data and, thereby, test interpretation. Standard methods of data reduction like windowing and other techniques consist of removing the acceleration and deceleration phases in order to assure analysis under constant velocity conditions. However, none of these techniques adequately quantify the velocity overshoot (VO) movement artifact which is a result of the devices resistance imposed to the limb. This study tested the influence of VO on isokinetic data interpretation. A computational algorithm was developed to accurately identify each movement phase and to delineate the VO segment. Therefore, the VO was then treated as a fourth and independent phase. A total of sixteen healthy men (26.8 ± 4.7 yrs, 1.76 ± 0.05 m, and 79.2 ± 9.4 kg) performed two sets of ten maximal concentric extension repetitions of their dominant knee (at 60°·s-1 and 180°·s-1), on separate days and in a counterbalanced order, on a Biodex System 3 Pro dynamometer. All the phases of the isokinetic exercise were measured in terms of their biomechanical descriptors and according to the developed algorithm, the windowing method, and a data reduction technique that eliminates the first and last 10° of the total range of motion. Results showed significant differences (p < 0.05) between the constant velocity phases found by each method: the largest segment was obtained with the windowing method; the second one, with the algorithm; and the smallest, with data reduction technique. The point of peak torque was not affected by none of the techniques, but significant differences (p < 0.05) were found between the data including and not including the VO phase, concerning total work, time interval, and average length of load range: VO represents more than 10% of the amount calculated in constant velocity phase

  10. Biceps femoris and semitendinosus tendon/aponeurosis strain during passive and active (isometric) conditions.

    PubMed

    Kellis, Eleftherios

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify strain and elongation of the long head of the biceps femoris (BFlh) and the semitendinosus (ST) tendon/aponeurosis. Forty participants performed passive knee extension trials from 90° of knee flexion to full extension (0°) followed by ramp isometric contractions of the knee flexors at 0°, 45° and 90° of knee flexion. Two ultrasound probes were used to visualize the displacement of BFlh and ST tendon/aponeurosis. Three-way analysis of variance designs indicated that: (a) Tendon/aponeurosis (passive) elongation and strain were higher for the BFlh than the ST as the knee was passively extended (p<0.05), (b) contraction at each angular position was accompanied by a smaller BFlh tendon/aponeurosis (active) strain and elongation than the ST at higher levels of effort (p<0.05) and (c) combined (passive and active) strain was significantly higher for the BFlh than ST during ramp contraction at 0° but the opposite was observed for the 45° and 90° flexion angle tests (p<0.05). Passive elongation of tendon/aponeurosis has an important effect on the tendon/aponeurosis behavior of the hamstrings and may contribute to a different loading of muscle fibers and tendinous tissue between BFlh and ST.

  11. Residual force enhancement during multi-joint leg extensions at joint- angle configurations close to natural human motion.

    PubMed

    Paternoster, Florian Kurt; Seiberl, Wolfgang; Hahn, Daniel; Schwirtz, Ansgar

    2016-03-21

    The isometric steady-state forces following lengthening are greater than those produced at the same muscle length and activation level but without prior lengthening. Although residual force enhancement (RFE) has been investigated across a range of conditions, its relevance for daily human movement is still poorly understood. We aimed to study RFE in a setup imitating daily activity, i.e., submaximal activation of the lower extremity's muscles with slightly flexed knee joints comparable to human walking. A motor-driven leg press dynamometer was used for randomly arranged purely isometric and isometric-eccentric-isometric contractions. Thirteen subjects performed multi-joint leg extensions, which were feedback-controlled at 30% of maximum voluntary vastus lateralis activation. Isometric-eccentric-isometric contractions incorporated a stretch from 30° to 50° knee flexion, while isometric contractions were performed at 50° knee flexion. Isometric contractions following stretch and purely isometric reference contractions were performed at 50° knee flexion. Kinematics, forces, and muscular activity were measured using 3D optical motion tracking, force plates, and surface EMG of 9 lower limb muscles of the right leg and joint torques were calculated by inverse dynamics. Variables of standardization (EMG, joint angles) showed no differences between contraction conditions. Eight of 13 subjects showed RFE of up to 24.8±32.5% for external forces and joint torques. Because the remaining 5 non-responders failed to produce enhanced forces during the stretch, we believe that RFE is functionally relevant for muscle function comparable to everyday human motion but only if there is enhanced force during stretch that sufficiently triggers mechanisms underlying RFE.

  12. Slower but not faster unilateral fatiguing knee extensions alter contralateral limb performance without impairment of maximal torque output.

    PubMed

    Prieske, Olaf; Aboodarda, Saied J; Benitez Sierra, José A; Behm, David G; Granacher, Urs

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of unilateral fatigue of the knee extensors at different movement velocities on neuromuscular performance in the fatigued and non-fatigued leg. Unilateral fatigue of the knee extensors was induced in 11 healthy young men (23.7 ± 3.8 years) at slower (60°/s; FAT60) and faster movement velocities (240°/s; FAT240) using an isokinetic dynamometer. A resting control (CON) condition was included. The fatigue protocols consisted of five sets of 15 maximal concentric knee extensions using the dominant leg. Before and after fatigue, peak isokinetic torque (PIT) and time to PIT (TTP) of the knee extensors as well as electromyographic (EMG) activity of vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and biceps femoris muscles were assessed at 60 and 240°/s movement velocities in the fatigued and non-fatigued leg. In the fatigued leg, significantly greater PIT decrements were observed following FAT60 and FAT240 (11-19%) compared to CON (3-4%, p = .002, d = 2.3). Further, EMG activity increased in vastus lateralis and biceps femoris muscle following FAT240 only (8-28%, 0.018 ≤ p ≤ .024, d = 1.8). In the non-fatigued leg, shorter TTP values were found after the FAT60 protocol (11-15%, p = .023, d = 2.4). No significant changes were found for EMG data in the non-fatigued leg. The present study revealed that both slower and faster velocity fatiguing contractions failed to show any evidence of cross-over fatigue on PIT. However, unilateral knee extensor fatigue protocols conducted at slower movement velocities (i.e., 60°/s) appear to modulate torque production on the non-fatigued side (evident in shorter TTP values).

  13. Slope of the lateral density function of extensive air showers around the knee region as an indicator of shower age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Rajat K.; Dam, Sandip

    2016-11-01

    Analyzing simulated extensive air shower (EAS) events generated with the Monte Carlo code CORSIKA, this paper critically studies the characteristics of lateral distribution of electrons in EAS around the knee energy region of the energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays. The study takes into account the issue of the lateral shower age parameter as an indicator of the stage of development of showers in the atmosphere. The correlation of the lateral shower age parameter with other EAS observables is examined, using simulated data in the context of its possible use in a multi-parameter study of EAS, with a view to obtaining information about the nature of the shower initiating primaries at sea level EAS experiments. It is shown that the observed slope of the lateral density function in the 3-dimensional plot, at least for the KASCADE data, supports the idea of a transition from light to heavy mass composition around the knee.

  14. Validity and reliability of a low-cost digital dynamometer for measuring isometric strength of lower limb.

    PubMed

    Romero-Franco, Natalia; Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro; Montaño-Munuera, Juan A

    2016-11-24

    Lower limb isometric strength is a key parameter to monitor the training process or recognise muscle weakness and injury risk. However, valid and reliable methods to evaluate it often require high-cost tools. The aim of this study was to analyse the concurrent validity and reliability of a low-cost digital dynamometer for measuring isometric strength in lower limb. Eleven physically active and healthy participants performed maximal isometric strength for: flexion and extension of ankle, flexion and extension of knee, flexion, extension, adduction, abduction, internal and external rotation of hip. Data obtained by the digital dynamometer were compared with the isokinetic dynamometer to examine its concurrent validity. Data obtained by the digital dynamometer from 2 different evaluators and 2 different sessions were compared to examine its inter-rater and intra-rater reliability. Intra-class correlation (ICC) for validity was excellent in every movement (ICC > 0.9). Intra and inter-tester reliability was excellent for all the movements assessed (ICC > 0.75). The low-cost digital dynamometer demonstrated strong concurrent validity and excellent intra and inter-tester reliability for assessing isometric strength in the main lower limb movements.

  15. Functional impairment of skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism during knee extension exercise after bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Salvadego, Desy; Lazzer, Stefano; Marzorati, Mauro; Porcelli, Simone; Rejc, Enrico; Šimunič, Bostjan; Pišot, Rado; di Prampero, Pietro Enrico

    2011-01-01

    A functional evaluation of skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism during dynamic knee extension (KE) incremental exercises was carried out following a 35-day bed rest (BR) (Valdoltra 2008 BR campaign). Nine young male volunteers (age: 23.5 ± 2.2 yr; mean ± SD) were evaluated. Pulmonary gas exchange, heart rate and cardiac output (by impedance cardiography), skeletal muscle (vastus lateralis) fractional O2 extraction, and brain (frontal cortex) oxygenation (by near-infrared spectroscopy) were determined during incremental KE. Values at exhaustion were considered “peak”. Peak heart rate (147 ± 18 beats/min before vs. 146 ± 17 beats/min after BR) and peak cardiac output (17.8 ± 3.3 l/min before vs. 16.1 ± 1.8 l/min after BR) were unaffected by BR. As expected, brain oxygenation did not decrease during KE. Peak O2 uptake was lower after vs. before BR, both when expressed as liters per minute (0.99 ± 0.17 vs. 1.26 ± 0.27) and when normalized per unit of quadriceps muscle mass (46.5 ± 6.4 vs. 56.9 ± 11.0 ml·min−1·100 g−1). Skeletal muscle peak fractional O2 extraction, expressed as a percentage of the maximal values obtained during a transient limb ischemia, was lower after (46.3 ± 12.1%) vs. before BR (66.5 ± 11.2%). After elimination, by the adopted exercise protocol, of constraints related to cardiovascular O2 delivery, a decrease in peak O2 uptake and muscle peak capacity of fractional O2 extraction was found after 35 days of BR. These findings suggest a substantial impairment of oxidative function at the muscle level, “downstream” with respect to bulk blood flow to the exercising muscles, that is possibly at the level of blood flow distribution/O2 utilization inside the muscle, peripheral O2 diffusion, and intracellular oxidative metabolism. PMID:21921243

  16. High-intensity preoperative training improves physical and functional recovery in the early post-operative periods after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Casaña, Jose; Ezzatvar, Yasmin; Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Andersen, Lars L

    2016-01-14

    The benefits of preoperative training programmes compared with alternative treatment are unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a high-intensity preoperative resistance training programme in patients waiting for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Forty-four subjects (7 men, 37 women) scheduled for unilateral TKA for osteoarthritis (OA) during 2014 participated in this randomized controlled trial. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the Physical Functioning Scale of the Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36), a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS), isometric knee flexion, isometric knee extension, isometric hip abduction, active knee range of motion and functional tasks (Timed Up and Go test and Stair ascent-descent test) were assessed at 8 weeks before surgery (T1), after 8 weeks of training (T2), 1 month after TKA (T3) and finally 3 months after TKA (T4). The intervention group completed an 8-week training programme 3 days per week prior to surgery. Isometric knee flexion, isometric hip abduction, VAS, WOMAC, ROM extension and flexion and all the functional assessments were greater for the intervention group at T2, T3 and T4, whereas isometric knee extension was greater for this group at T2 and T4 compared with control. The present study supports the use of preoperative training in end-stage OA patients to improve early postoperative outcomes. High-intensity strength training during the preoperative period reduces pain and improves lower limb muscle strength, ROM and functional task performance before surgery, resulting in a reduced length of stay at the hospital and a faster physical and functional recovery after TKA. The present training programme can be used by specialists to speed up recovery after TKA. I.

  17. The effect of velocity and gender on load range during knee extension and flexion exercise on an isokinetic device.

    PubMed

    Brown, L E; Whitehurst, M; Gilbert, R; Buchalter, D N

    1995-02-01

    Limb acceleration and deceleration during exercise on an isokinetic device encounter no machine-offered resistance. The purpose of this study was to quantify the relationship between velocity and range of motion that is sustained at a predetermined isokinetic velocity, termed load range, during concentric knee extension and flexion exercise. Nine male and nine female subjects performed three maximal concentric reciprocal knee extension and flexion repetitions at 60, 120, 180, 240, 360, and 450 degrees/sec. Extension and flexion results revealed a significant (p < 0.05) increase in acceleration and deceleration range of motion while load range significantly decreased with increasing velocity. Males exhibited greater load range and less acceleration range of motion than females at 240, 360, and 450 degrees/sec, while deceleration range of motion was not different between genders at any speed. These results demonstrate an inverse relationship between isokinetic velocity and load range and suggest a need to carefully consider velocity selection when performing exercise on an isokinetic device.

  18. The functional anatomy of the iliotibial band during flexion and extension of the knee: implications for understanding iliotibial band syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, John; Hayashi, Koji; Toumi, Hechmi; Lyons, Kathleen; Bydder, Graeme; Phillips, Nicola; Best, Thomas M; Benjamin, Mike

    2006-03-01

    Iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome is a common overuse injury in runners and cyclists. It is regarded as a friction syndrome where the ITB rubs against (and 'rolls over') the lateral femoral epicondyle. Here, we re-evaluate the clinical anatomy of the region to challenge the view that the ITB moves antero-posteriorly over the epicondyle. Gross anatomical and microscopical studies were conducted on the distal portion of the ITB in 15 cadavers. This was complemented by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of six asymptomatic volunteers and studies of two athletes with acute ITB syndrome. In all cadavers, the ITB was anchored to the distal femur by fibrous strands, associated with a layer of richly innervated and vascularized fat. In no cadaver, volunteer or patient was a bursa seen. The MR scans showed that the ITB was compressed against the epicondyle at 30 degrees of knee flexion as a consequence of tibial internal rotation, but moved laterally in extension. MR signal changes in the patients with ITB syndrome were present in the region occupied by fat, deep to the ITB. The ITB is prevented from rolling over the epicondyle by its femoral anchorage and because it is a part of the fascia lata. We suggest that it creates the illusion of movement, because of changing tension in its anterior and posterior fibres during knee flexion. Thus, on anatomical grounds, ITB overuse injuries may be more likely to be associated with fat compression beneath the tract, rather than with repetitive friction as the knee flexes and extends.

  19. Knee flexion with quadriceps cocontraction: A new therapeutic exercise for the early stage of ACL rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Biscarini, Andrea; Contemori, Samuele; Busti, Daniele; Botti, Fabio M; Pettorossi, Vito E

    2016-12-08

    Quadriceps strengthening exercises designed for the early phase of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rehabilitation should limit the anterior tibial translation developed by quadriceps contraction near full knee extension, in order to avoid excessive strain on the healing tissue. We hypothesize that knee-flexion exercises with simultaneous voluntary contraction of quadriceps (voluntary quadriceps cocontraction) can yield considerable levels of quadriceps activation while preventing the tibia from translating forward relative to the femur. Electromyographic activity in quadriceps and hamstring muscles was measured in 20 healthy males during isometric knee-flexion exercises executed near full knee extension with maximal voluntary effort of quadriceps cocontraction and external resistance (R) ranging from 0% to 60% of the 1-repetition maximum (1RM). Biomechanical modeling was applied to derive the shear (anterior/posterior) tibiofemoral force developed in each exercise condition. Isometric knee-flexion exercises with small external resistance (R=10% 1RM) and maximal voluntary effort of quadriceps cocontraction yielded a net posterior (ACL-unloading) tibial pull (P=0.005) and levels of activation of 32%, 50%, and 45% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction, for the rectus femoris, vastus medialis, and vastus lateralis, respectively. This exercise might potentially rank as one of the most appropriate quadriceps strengthening interventions in the early phase of ACL rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The contribution of leg press and knee extension strength and power to physical function in people with knee osteoarthritis: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Tevald, Michael A; Murray, Amanda M; Luc, Brittney; Lai, Kafai; Sohn, David; Pietrosimone, Brian

    2016-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to 1) determine the additional contributions of leg press and knee extensor power, over and above that of strength, to the performance of physical function tasks in people with knee osteoarthritis, and 2) compare the ability of bilateral leg press to unilateral knee extensor strength and power to predict functional task performance.

  1. 'MYNI's orthosis': a self-adjustable, dynamic knee extension orthosis for quadriceps weakness in haemophilia rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Manigandan, C; Bedford, E; Kumar, S; Nathan, V; Peter, B K; Premkumar, J Charles

    2004-11-01

    In developing countries like India, where walking is the primary, preferred and feasible mode of transport, the implications following quadriceps weakness poses a serious threat to ones functional independence. This has been a challenge for professionals while ambulating individuals with haemophilia, where quadriceps weakness is very common. Although external splinting has been understood for many years, as a means of support in haemophilia, there is still a dearth of knowledge in making an appropriate splint to assist or to take over the weak quadriceps during ambulation. This newly designed 'MYNI's orthosis' helps in versatile ways in addition to assisting the weak quadriceps. It provides prolonged stretch to contracted tissue, allows for being used as a serial cast in improving the knee range and is cosmetically acceptable. Above all, it is user-friendly, thus enhancing compliance and superior outcome in haemophilic knee rehabilitation.

  2. Comparison of Proximally Versus Distally Placed Spatially Distributed Sequential Stimulation Electrodes in a Dynamic Knee Extension Task.

    PubMed

    Laubacher, Marco; Aksöz, Efe A; Binder-Macleod, Stuart; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2016-06-13

    Spatially distributed sequential stimulation (SDSS) has demonstrated substantial power output and fatigue benefits compared to single electrode stimulation (SES) in the application of functional electrical stimulation (FES). This asymmetric electrode setup brings new possibilities but also new questions since precise placement of the electrodes is one critical factor for good muscle activation. The aim of this study was to compare the power output, fatigue and activation properties of proximally versus distally placed SDSS electrodes in an isokinetic knee extension task simulating knee movement during recumbent cycling. M. vastus lateralis and medialis of seven able-bodied subjects were stimulated with rectangular bi-phasic pulses of constant amplitude of 40 mA and at an SDSS frequency of 35 Hz for 6 min on both legs with both setups (i.e. n=14). Torque was measured during knee-extension movement by a dynamometer at an angular velocity of 110 deg/s. Mean power, peak power and activation time were calculated and compared for the initial and final stimulation phases, together with an overall fatigue index. Power output values (Pmean, Ppeak) were scaled to a standardised reference input pulse width of 100 μs (Pmean,s, Ppeak,s). The initial evaluation phase showed no significant differences between the two setups for all outcome measures. Ppeak and Ppeak,s were both significantly higher in the final phase for the distal setup (25.4 ± 8.1 W vs. 28.2 ± 6.2 W, p=0.0062 and 34.8 ± 9.5 W vs. 38.9 ± 6.7 W, p=0.021, respectively). With distal SDSS, there was modest evidence of higher Pmean and Pmean,s (p=0.071, p=0.14, respectively) but of longer activation time (p=0.096). The rate of fatigue was similar for both setups. For practical FES applications, distal placement of the SDSS electrodes is preferable.

  3. Isometric exercise (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Isometric exercise works muscles and strengthens bone. Increased muscle mass elevates metabolism, which in turn burns fat. Strength training is also called anaerobic exercise, as opposed to aerobic, because ...

  4. Leg extension test, sEMG and vibratory stimuli to assess functional recovery following knee joint surgery

    PubMed Central

    Foti, Calogero; Laurini, Alessandro; Tiberti, Simone; Carli, Giancarlo; Tsarpela, Olga; Adamidis, Kostas; Bonifazi, Marco; Giombini, Arrigo; Tihanyi, Joszef; von Duvillard, Serge; De Vita, Marilena; Bosco†, Carmelo

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective: the purpose of this study was to introduce new procedure to determine the magnitude of functional recovery after knee surgery. Design: we compared the performance in the leg extension test and the response in the sEMG activity to vibration in the operated to the non-operated leg. Thirty-eight patients with knee operation and 14 healthy subjects participated in these experiments. Results: during leg extension test, the mechanical power of the operated leg showed a lower value (P<0.001) than the contralateral one, while no differences were noted in the sEMG activity. The sEMG activity during vibration treatment was higher in the operated compared to non-operated leg (P<0.001). It has been suggested that the reduced motility trigger functional adaptations that are exhibited via the vibration test. Conclusions: results of our study suggest that combination of vibration and sEMG recordings may detect the impairment as well as monitoring progress of the rehabilitation programs. PMID:23738286

  5. Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching and Kinesiology Taping on Pelvic Compensation During Double-Knee Extension

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Woong; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Shortened hamstrings are likely to restrict the anterior pelvic tilt and induce a slumped posture due to the posterior pelvic tilt. This study was conducted to compare the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching and modified anterior pelvic tilt taping (APTT) on hamstring shortness-associated pelvic compensation while executing seated double-knee extension. Male college students (28 healthy young adults; mean age: 21.4 ± 2.1 years) with hamstring shortness were recruited as study subjects and randomly assigned to either the PNF stretching group (control group) or the APTT group (experimental group). In all the subjects, changes in the movement distance of the centre of gluteal pressure (COGP) as well as rectus abdominis (RA) and semitendinosus (SEM) muscle activities were measured during seated double-knee extension while the respective intervention method was applied. Both groups showed significant decreases in COGP distance and RA muscle activity compared with their respective baseline values (p < 0.05), however, no significant changes were observed in SEM muscle activity. We can infer that not only a direct intervention on the hamstring, such as PNF stretching, but also a modified APTT-mediated pelvic intervention may be used as a method for reducing pelvic compensation induced by hamstring shortness. PMID:26839606

  6. Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching and Kinesiology Taping on Pelvic Compensation During Double-Knee Extension.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Woong; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-12-22

    Shortened hamstrings are likely to restrict the anterior pelvic tilt and induce a slumped posture due to the posterior pelvic tilt. This study was conducted to compare the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching and modified anterior pelvic tilt taping (APTT) on hamstring shortness-associated pelvic compensation while executing seated double-knee extension. Male college students (28 healthy young adults; mean age: 21.4 ± 2.1 years) with hamstring shortness were recruited as study subjects and randomly assigned to either the PNF stretching group (control group) or the APTT group (experimental group). In all the subjects, changes in the movement distance of the centre of gluteal pressure (COGP) as well as rectus abdominis (RA) and semitendinosus (SEM) muscle activities were measured during seated double-knee extension while the respective intervention method was applied. Both groups showed significant decreases in COGP distance and RA muscle activity compared with their respective baseline values (p < 0.05), however, no significant changes were observed in SEM muscle activity. We can infer that not only a direct intervention on the hamstring, such as PNF stretching, but also a modified APTT-mediated pelvic intervention may be used as a method for reducing pelvic compensation induced by hamstring shortness.

  7. Strain and elongation of the vastus lateralis aponeurosis and tendon in vivo during maximal isometric contraction.

    PubMed

    Stafilidis, Savvas; Karamanidis, Kiros; Morey-Klapsing, Gaspar; Demonte, Gianpiero; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2005-06-01

    The strain and elongation of the vastus lateralis (VL) tendon, tendon plus aponeurosis, and aponeurosis were examined during maximal voluntary contractions on a Biodex-dynamometer (knee angle 115 degrees , hip angle 140 degrees ) in 12 sprinters. Following a warm-up phase, the subjects were instructed to perform a gradual maximal knee extension and hold it for about 3 s. The kinematics of the leg were recorded using a Vicon 512 system with eight cameras operating at 120 Hz. Ultrasonography images were taken simultaneously from the VL myotendinous junction and the mid lateral part of the VL muscle belly. During the maximal isometric knee extensions, the knee joint rotated (13.6+/-5.9 degrees ), leading to an overestimation of the elongation of the tendinous tissues. After correcting for this, the maximal elongation of the VL tendon examined at the myotendinous junction was lower (P<0.05) than the maximal elongation of the VL tendon plus aponeurosis examined at the muscle belly (15 vs. 27 mm, respectively). The maximal estimated strains of the tendon, tendon plus aponeurosis, and aponeurosis showed no statistical differences (8+/-2%, 8+/-1%, and 7+/-2%, respectively, P>0.05). It is concluded that the strains of the human VL tendon, VL tendon plus aponeurosis, and VL aponeurosis, as estimated in vivo by two dimensional ultrasound during maximal isometric contractions, do not differ from each other. The displacement measured at a cross point in the VL muscle belly is significantly greater than that measured at the VL myotendinous junction.

  8. Muscle activation and knee biomechanics during squatting and lunging after lower extremity fatigue in healthy young women.

    PubMed

    Longpré, Heather S; Acker, Stacey M; Maly, Monica R

    2015-02-01

    Muscle activations and knee joint loads were compared during squatting and lunging before and after lower extremity neuromuscular fatigue. Electromyographic activations of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis and biceps femoris, and the external knee adduction and flexion moments were collected on 25 healthy women (mean age 23.5 years, BMI of 23.7 kg/m(2)) during squatting and lunging. Participants were fatigued through sets of 50 isotonic knee extensions and flexions, with resistance set at 50% of the peak torque achieved during a maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Fatigue was defined as a decrease in peak isometric knee extension or flexion torque ≥25% from baseline. Co-activation indices were calculated between rectus femoris and biceps femoris; and between vastus lateralis and biceps femoris. Fatigue decreased peak isometric extension and flexion torques (p<0.05), mean vastus lateralis activation during squatting and lunging (p<0.05), and knee adduction and flexion moments during lunging (p<0.05). Quadriceps activations were greater during lunging than squatting (p<0.05). Thus, fatigue altered the recruitment strategy of the quadriceps during squatting and lunging. Lunging challenges quadriceps activation more than squatting in healthy, young women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cortical activity differs between position- and force-control knee extension tasks.

    PubMed

    Poortvliet, Peter C; Tucker, Kylie J; Finnigan, Simon; Scott, Dion; Sowman, Paul; Hodges, Paul W

    2015-12-01

    Neural control differs between position- and force-control tasks as evident from divergent effects of fatigue and pain. Unlike force-control tasks, position-control tasks focus on a postural goal to maintain a joint angle. Cortical involvement is suggested to be less during postural control, but whether this differs between position- and force-control paradigms remains unclear. Coherence estimates the functional communication between spatially distinct active regions within the cortex (cortico-cortical coherence; CCC) and between the cortex and muscles (corticomuscular coherence; CMC). We investigated whether cortical involvement differed between force-control and more posturally focused, position-control tasks. Seventeen adults performed position- and force-control knee extensor efforts at a submaximal load (10 % maximum voluntary contraction). Surface electromyography was recorded from the right knee extensor and flexor muscles and brain activity using electroencephalography (EEG). CCC and CMC in the beta (13-30 Hz) and gamma (30-45 Hz) frequency bands were calculated between combinations of intra- and inter-hemispheric pairs of electrodes, and between four EEG electrodes that approximated the left motor cortical area, and right knee extensor EMG, respectively. Differences in EEG power and muscle activity were also calculated. CCC was greater across distributed regions in the force-control task. Beta EEG power in the left hemisphere was higher for the position-control task. Although averaged CMC data differed between tasks, there was no task difference for individual CMC data. Muscle activity and force did not differ between tasks. The results demonstrate differential cortical contributions to control force- versus position-control tasks. This might contribute to differences in performance outcomes of these tasks that have been shown previously.

  10. The functional anatomy of the iliotibial band during flexion and extension of the knee: implications for understanding iliotibial band syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fairclough, John; Hayashi, Koji; Toumi, Hechmi; Lyons, Kathleen; Bydder, Graeme; Phillips, Nicola; Best, Thomas M; Benjamin, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome is a common overuse injury in runners and cyclists. It is regarded as a friction syndrome where the ITB rubs against (and ‘rolls over’) the lateral femoral epicondyle. Here, we re-evaluate the clinical anatomy of the region to challenge the view that the ITB moves antero-posteriorly over the epicondyle. Gross anatomical and microscopical studies were conducted on the distal portion of the ITB in 15 cadavers. This was complemented by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of six asymptomatic volunteers and studies of two athletes with acute ITB syndrome. In all cadavers, the ITB was anchored to the distal femur by fibrous strands, associated with a layer of richly innervated and vascularized fat. In no cadaver, volunteer or patient was a bursa seen. The MR scans showed that the ITB was compressed against the epicondyle at 30° of knee flexion as a consequence of tibial internal rotation, but moved laterally in extension. MR signal changes in the patients with ITB syndrome were present in the region occupied by fat, deep to the ITB. The ITB is prevented from rolling over the epicondyle by its femoral anchorage and because it is a part of the fascia lata. We suggest that it creates the illusion of movement, because of changing tension in its anterior and posterior fibres during knee flexion. Thus, on anatomical grounds, ITB overuse injuries may be more likely to be associated with fat compression beneath the tract, rather than with repetitive friction as the knee flexes and extends. PMID:16533314

  11. Muscle activation and blood flow do not explain the muscle length-dependent variation in quadriceps isometric endurance.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, R D; de Ruiter, C J; de Haan, A

    2005-03-01

    We investigated the role of central activation in muscle length-dependent endurance. Central activation ratio (CAR) and rectified surface electromyogram (EMG) were studied during fatigue of isometric contractions of the knee extensors at 30 and 90 degrees knee angles (full extension = 0 degree). Subjects (n = 8) were tested on a custom-built ergometer. Maximal voluntary isometric knee extension with supramaximal superimposed burst stimulation (three 100-mus pulses; 300 Hz) was performed to assess CAR and maximal torque capacity (MTC). Surface EMG signals were obtained from vastus lateralis and rectus femoris muscles. At each angle, intermittent (15 s on 6 s off) isometric exercise at 50% MTC with superimposed stimulation was performed to exhaustion. During the fatigue task, a sphygmomanometer cuff around the upper thigh ensured full occlusion (400 mmHg) of the blood supply to the knee extensors. At least 2 days separated fatigue tests. MTC was not different between knee angles (30 degrees : 229.6 +/- 39.3 N.m vs. 90 degrees: 215.7 +/- 13.2 N.m). Endurance times, however, were significantly longer (P < 0.05) at 30 vs. 90 degrees (87.8 +/- 18.7 vs. 54.9 +/- 12.1 s, respectively) despite the CAR not differing between angles at torque failure (30 degrees: 0.95 +/- 0.05 vs. 90 degrees: 0.96 +/- 0.03) and full occlusion of blood supply to the knee extensors. Furthermore, rectified surface EMG values of the vastus lateralis (normalized to prefatigue maximum) were also similar at torque failure (30 degrees : 56.5 +/- 12.5% vs. 90 degrees : 58.3 +/- 15.2%), whereas rectus femoris EMG activity was lower at 30 degrees (44.3 +/- 12.4%) vs. 90 degrees (69.5 +/- 25.3%). We conclude that differences in endurance at different knee angles do not find their origin in differences in central activation and blood flow but may be a consequence of muscle length-related differences in metabolic cost.

  12. The effective mechanical advantage of a.L. 129-1a for knee extension.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Adam D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Kramer, Patricia Ann

    2011-09-01

    The functional significance of shape differences between modern human and australopithecine distal femora remains unclear. Here, we examine the morphological component of the effective mechanical advantage (EMA) of the quadriceps muscle group in a sample of hominins that includes the fossil A.L. 129-1a (Australopithecus afarensis) and modern humans. Quadriceps muscle moment arms were calculated from three-dimensional computer models of specimens through a range of knee flexion. All hominins were compared using the same limb positions to allow us to examine, in isolation, the morphological component of the lengths of the pertinent moment arms. After taking into account the differences in bicondylar angle, the morphological component of the EMA was calculated as the ratio of the quadriceps muscle and ground reaction force moment arms. Our analyses reveal that A.L. 129-1a would have possessed a morphological component of the quadriceps muscle EMA expected for a hominin of its body mass.

  13. Reduced activation in isometric muscle action after lengthening contractions is not accompanied by reduced performance fatigability

    PubMed Central

    Seiberl, W.; Hahn, D.; Paternoster, F. K.

    2016-01-01

    After active lengthening contractions, a given amount of force can be maintained with less muscle activation compared to pure isometric contractions at the same muscle length and intensity. This increase in neuromuscular efficiency is associated with mechanisms of stretch-induced residual force enhancement. We hypothesized that stretch-related increase in neuromuscular efficiency reduces fatigability of a muscle during submaximal contractions. 13 subjects performed 60 s isometric knee extensions at 60% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with and without prior stretch (60°/s, 20°). Each 60 s trial was preceded and followed by neuromuscular tests consisting of MVCs, voluntary activation (VA) and resting twitches (RT), and there was 4 h rest between sets. We found a significant (p = 0.036) 10% reduction of quadriceps net-EMG after lengthening compared to pure isometric trials. However, increase in neuromuscular efficiency did not influence the development of fatigue. Albeit we found severe reduction of MVC (30%), RT (30%) and VA (5%) after fatiguing trials, there were no differences between conditions with and without lengthening. As the number of subjects showing no activation reduction increased with increasing contraction time, intensity may have been too strenuous in both types of contractions, such that a distinction between different states of fatigue was not possible anymore. PMID:27966620

  14. Simultaneous Knee Extensor Muscle Action Induces an Increase in Voluntary Force Generation of Plantar Flexor Muscles.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahito; Shioda, Kohei; Kinugasa, Ryuta; Fukashiro, Senshi

    2017-02-01

    Suzuki, T, Shioda, K, Kinugasa, R, and Fukashiro, S. Simultaneous knee extensor muscle action induces an increase in voluntary force generation of plantar flexor muscles. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 365-371, 2017-Maximum activation of the plantar flexor muscles is required for various sporting activities that involve simultaneous plantar flexion and knee extension. During a multi-joint movement, activation of the plantar flexor muscles is affected by the activity of the knee extensor muscles. We hypothesized that coactivation of the plantar flexor muscles and knee extensor muscles would result in a higher plantar flexion torque. To test this hypothesis, 8 male volunteers performed maximum voluntary isometric action of the plantar flexor muscles with and without isometric action of the knee extensor muscles. Surface electromyographic data were collected from 8 muscles of the right lower limb. Voluntary activation of the triceps surae muscles, evaluated using the interpolated twitch technique, significantly increased by 6.4 percentage points with intentional knee extensor action (p = 0.0491). This finding is in line with a significant increase in the average rectified value of the electromyographic activity of the vastus lateralis, fibularis longus, and soleus muscles (p = 0.013, 0.010, and 0.045, respectively). The resultant plantar flexion torque also significantly increased by 11.5% of the predetermined maximum (p = 0.031). These results suggest that higher plantar flexor activation coupled with knee extensor activation facilitates force generation during a multi-joint task.

  15. Comparison of Proximally Versus Distally Placed Spatially Distributed Sequential Stimulation Electrodes in a Dynamic Knee Extension Task

    PubMed Central

    Laubacher, Marco; Aksöz, Efe A.; Binder-Macleod, Stuart; Hunt, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Spatially distributed sequential stimulation (SDSS) has demonstrated substantial power output and fatigue benefits compared to single electrode stimulation (SES) in the application of functional electrical stimulation (FES). This asymmetric electrode setup brings new possibilities but also new questions since precise placement of the electrodes is one critical factor for good muscle activation. The aim of this study was to compare the power output, fatigue and activation properties of proximally versus distally placed SDSS electrodes in an isokinetic knee extension task simulating knee movement during recumbent cycling. M. vastus lateralis and medialis of seven able-bodied subjects were stimulated with rectangular bi-phasic pulses of constant amplitude of 40 mA and at an SDSS frequency of 35 Hz for 6 min on both legs with both setups (i.e. n=14). Torque was measured during knee-extension movement by a dynamometer at an angular velocity of 110 deg/s. Mean power, peak power and activation time were calculated and compared for the initial and final stimulation phases, together with an overall fatigue index. Power output values (Pmean, Ppeak) were scaled to a standardised reference input pulse width of 100 μs (Pmean,s, Ppeak,s). The initial evaluation phase showed no significant differences between the two setups for all outcome measures. Ppeak and Ppeak,s were both significantly higher in the final phase for the distal setup (25.4 ± 8.1 W vs. 28.2 ± 6.2 W, p=0.0062 and 34.8 ± 9.5 W vs. 38.9 ± 6.7 W, p=0.021, respectively). With distal SDSS, there was modest evidence of higher Pmean and Pmean,s (p=0.071, p=0.14, respectively) but of longer activation time (p=0.096). The rate of fatigue was similar for both setups. For practical FES applications, distal placement of the SDSS electrodes is preferable. PMID:27478563

  16. Pelvic movement strategies and leg extension power in patients with end-stage medial compartment knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, Signe; Jørgensen, Peter Bo; Dalgas, Ulrik; Søballe, Kjeld; Mechlenburg, Inger

    2015-09-01

    During movement tasks, patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis use compensatory strategies to minimise the joint load of the affected leg. Movement strategies of the knees and trunk have been investigated, but less is known about movement strategies of the pelvis during advancing functional tasks, and how these strategies are associated with leg extension power. The aim of the study was to investigate pelvic movement strategies and leg extension power in patients with end-stage medial compartment knee osteoarthritis compared with controls. 57 patients (mean age 65.6 years) scheduled for medial uni-compartmental knee arthroplasty, and 29 age and gender matched controls were included in this cross-sectional study. Leg extension power was tested with the Nottingham Leg Extension Power-Rig. Pelvic range of motion was derived from an inertia-based measurement unit placed over the sacrum bone during walking, stair climbing and stepping. Patients had lower leg extension power than controls (20-39 %, P < 0.01) and used greater pelvic range of motion during stair and step ascending and descending (P ≤ 0.03, except for pelvic range of motion in the frontal plane during ascending, P > 0.06). Furthermore, an inverse association (coefficient: -0.03 to -0.04; R (2) = 13-22 %) between leg extension power and pelvic range of motion during stair and step descending was found in the patients. Compared to controls, patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis use greater pelvic movements during advanced functional performance tests, particularly when these involve descending tasks. Further studies should investigate if it is possible to alter these movement strategies by an intervention aimed at increasing strength and power for the patients.

  17. Is the Modified Tardieu Scale in Semi-Standing Position Better Associated with Knee Extension and Hamstring Activity in Terminal Swing than the Supine Tardieu?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Irene R.; Nienhuis, Bart; Rijs, Nique P. A. M.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Duysens, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the modified Tardieu scale (MTS) in a semi-standing position, used for the assessment of hamstrings spasticity, was better associated with knee extension and hamstrings activity in terminal swing than the MTS in a supine position in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Seven children diagnosed with…

  18. Is the Modified Tardieu Scale in Semi-Standing Position Better Associated with Knee Extension and Hamstring Activity in Terminal Swing than the Supine Tardieu?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Irene R.; Nienhuis, Bart; Rijs, Nique P. A. M.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Duysens, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the modified Tardieu scale (MTS) in a semi-standing position, used for the assessment of hamstrings spasticity, was better associated with knee extension and hamstrings activity in terminal swing than the MTS in a supine position in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Seven children diagnosed with…

  19. The validity of an assessment of maximum angular velocity of knee extension (KE) using a gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Arai, Takeshi; Obuchi, Shuichi; Shiba, Yoshitaka; Omuro, Kazuya; Inaba, Yasuko; Kojima, Motonaga

    2012-01-01

    Although it is more important to assess the muscular power of the lower extremities than the strength, no simplified method for doing so has been found. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of the assessment of the angular velocity of KE using a gyroscope. Participants included 105 community-dwelling older people (55 women, 50 men, age ± standard deviation (SD) 75±5.3). Pearson correlation coefficients and Spearman rank-correlation coefficients were used to examine the relationships between the angular velocity of KE and functional performance measurements, a self-efficacy scale and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The data from the gyroscope were significantly correlated with some physical functions such as muscle strength (r=0.304, p<0.01), and walking velocity (r=0.543, p<0.001). In addition, the joint angular velocity was significantly correlated with self-efficacy (r=0.219-0.329, p<0.01-0.05) and HRQOL (r=0.207-0.359, p<0.01-0.05). The absolute value of the correlation coefficient of angular velocity tended to be greater than that of the muscle strength for mobility functions such as walking velocity and the timed-up-and-go (TUG) test. In conclusion, it was found that the assessment of the angular velocity of the knee joint using a gyroscope could be a feasible and meaningful measurement in the geriatrics field.

  20. Acute hemodynamic responses of spinal cord injured individuals to functional neuromuscular stimulation-induced knee extension exercise.

    PubMed

    Figoni, S F; Glaser, R M; Rodgers, M M; Hooker, S P; Ezenwa, B N; Collins, S R; Mathews, T; Suryaprasad, A G; Gupta, S C

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare acute hemodynamic responses of spinal cord injured (SCI) quadriplegics (quads), and paraplegics (paras) during a graded-intensity knee extension (KE) exercise test utilizing functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) of paralyzed quadriceps muscles. Seven quads and seven paras (N = 14) performed a series of 4-minute stages of bilateral alternating FNS-KE exercise (approximately zero to 70 degree range of motion at the knee and 6 KE/min/leg) at ankle loads of 0, 5, 10, and 15 kg/leg. Physiologic responses were determined with open-circuit spirometry, impedance cardiography, and auscultation. Comparing rest with peak FNS-KE for both groups combined, FNS-KE exercise elicited significant (p less than 0.05) increases in oxygen uptake (130 percent), pulmonary ventilation (120 percent), respiratory exchange ratio (37 percent), arteriovenous oxygen difference (57 percent), cardiac output (32 percent), stroke volume (41 percent), mean arterial pressure (18 percent), and rate-pressure product (23 percent). Heart rate increased significantly by 11 percent from the 5- to the 15-kg/leg stages. Physiologic responses of quads and paras were very similar, except for lower (p less than 0.05) arterial pressures, rate-pressure product, and peripheral vascular resistance in quads. This graded FNS-KE exercise up to the 15-kg/leg load induced relatively small but appropriate increases in aerobic metabolism and cardiopulmonary responses that appear to be safe and easily tolerated by quads and paras. Arterial pressure needs to be monitored carefully in quads to prevent excessive hypertension or hypotension. Although FNS-KE exercise has been shown to elicit peripheral adaptations to improve muscle strength and endurance, it is probably not an effective central cardiovascular training tool for all but the least fit SCI individuals. This information is important for understanding the effects of FNS use during more complex activities such

  1. Computational biomechanics of knee joint in open kinetic chain extension exercises.

    PubMed

    Mesfar, W; Shirazi-Adl, A

    2008-02-01

    Open kinetic chain (OKC) extension exercises are commonly performed to strengthen quadriceps muscles and restore joint function in performance enhancement programs, in exercise therapies and following joint reconstruction. Using a validated 3D nonlinear finite element model, the detailed biomechanics of the entire joint in OKC extension exercises are investigated at 0, 30, 60 and 90 degrees joint angles. Two loading cases are simulated; one with only the weight of the leg and the foot while the second considers also a moderate resistant force of 30 N acting at the ankle perpendicular to the tibia. The presence of the 30 N markedly influences the results both in terms of the magnitude and the trend. The resistant load substantially increases the required quadriceps, patellar tendon, cruciate ligaments and joint contact forces, especially at near 90 degrees angles with the exception of ACL force that is increased at 0 degrees angle. At post-ACL reconstruction period or in the joint with ACL injury, the exercise should preferably be avoided at near full extension positions under large resistant forces.

  2. Plyometric training improves voluntary activation and strength during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Martin; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Mueller, Karoline; Heise, Sandra; Gube, Martin; Beuster, Nico; Herlyn, Philipp K E; Fischer, Dagmar-C; Bruhn, Sven

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated effects of plyometric training (6 weeks, 3 sessions/week) on maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) strength and neural activation of the knee extensors during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Twenty-seven participants were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Maximum voluntary torques (MVT) during the different types of contraction were measured at 110° knee flexion (180°=full extension). The interpolated twitch technique was applied at the same knee joint angle during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions to measure voluntary activation. In addition, normalized root mean square of the EMG signal at MVT was calculated. The twitch torque signal induced by electrical nerve stimulation at rest was used to evaluate training-related changes at the muscle level. In addition, jump height in countermovement jump was measured. After training, MVT increased by 20Nm (95% CI: 5-36Nm, P=0.012), 24Nm (95% CI: 9-40Nm, P=0.004) and 27Nm (95% CI: 7-48Nm, P=0.013) for isometric, concentric and eccentric MVCs compared to controls, respectively. The strength enhancements were associated with increases in voluntary activation during isometric, concentric and eccentric MVCs by 7.8% (95% CI: 1.8-13.9%, P=0.013), 7.0% (95% CI: 0.4-13.5%, P=0.039) and 8.6% (95% CI: 3.0-14.2%, P=0.005), respectively. Changes in the twitch torque signal of the resting muscle, induced by supramaximal electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve, were not observed, indicating no alterations at the muscle level, whereas jump height was increased. Given the fact that the training exercises consisted of eccentric muscle actions followed by concentric contractions, it is in particular relevant that the plyometric training increased MVC strength and neural activation of the quadriceps muscle regardless of the contraction mode. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of skin sympathetic nerve responses to isometric arm and leg exercise.

    PubMed

    Ray, Chester A; Wilson, Thad E

    2004-07-01

    Measurement of skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) during isometric exercise has been previously limited to handgrip. We hypothesized that isometric leg exercise due to the greater muscle mass of the leg would elicit greater SSNA responses than arm exercise because of presumably greater central command and muscle mechanoreceptor activation. To compare the effect of isometric arm and leg exercise on SSNA and cutaneous end-organ responses, 10 subjects performed 2 min of isometric knee extension (IKE) and handgrip (IHG) at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction followed by 2 min of postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) in a normothermic environment. SSNA was recorded from the peroneal nerve. Cutaneous vascular conductance (laser-Doppler flux/mean arterial pressure) and electrodermal activity were measured within the field of cutaneous afferent discharge. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure significantly increased by 16 +/- 3 and 23 +/- 3 beats/min and by 22 +/- 2 and 27 +/- 3 mmHg from baseline during IHG and IKE, respectively. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure responses were significantly greater during IKE compared with IHG. SSNA increased significantly and comparably during IHG and IKE (52 +/- 20 and 50 +/- 13%, respectively). During PEMI, SSNA and heart rate returned to baseline, whereas mean arterial pressure remained significantly elevated (Delta12 +/- 2 and Delta13 +/- 2 mmHg from baseline for IHG and IKE, respectively). Neither cutaneous vascular conductance nor electrodermal activity was significantly altered by either exercise or PEMI. These results indicate that, despite cardiovascular differences in response to IHG and IKE, SSNA responses are similar at the same exercise intensity. Therefore, the findings suggest that relative effort and not muscle mass is the main determinant of exercise-induced SSNA responses in humans.

  4. Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis in Relation to Hamstring and Quadriceps Strength

    PubMed Central

    Hafez, Ashraf Ramadan; Al-Johani, Ahmed H.; Zakaria, Abdul Rahim; Al-Ahaideb, Abdulaziz; Buragadda, Syamala; Melam, Ganeswara Rao; Kachanathu, Shaji J.

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] To assess the effect of hamstring and quadriceps strengthening exercises on pain intensity, gait velocity, maximum isometric strength, and activities of daily living of patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). [Subjects and Methods] A total of 20 patients with knee OA, 50 to 65 years of age (57.65 ± 4.78 years), received hot packs, strengthening exercises for the quadriceps and the hamstring muscles and stretching exercises for hamstring muscles. Outcome measures included: the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA index questionnaire (WOMAC) scores for assessing health status and health outcomes of knee OA; self-reported pain intensity scores, measured using a visual analogue scale; the 50 ft walk test (a measure of gait velocity and function); and handheld dynamometry (a tool used to measure maximum isometric strength of knee extension and flexion). [Results] There was a significant difference between pre- and post-intervention measures of pain intensity, 50 ft walk times, hamstring strength, and quadriceps strength. Significant differences in WOMAC measures were also observed in the subscales of pain, stiffness and physical function, as well as WOMAC total scores. [Conclusion] Strengthening the hamstring muscles in addition to strengthening the quadriceps muscles proved to be beneficial for perceived knee pain, range of motion, and decreasing the limitation of functional performance of patients with knee OA. PMID:24396198

  5. Predicting the Functional Roles of Knee Joint Muscles from Internal Joint Moments.

    PubMed

    Flaxman, Teresa E; Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Benoit, Daniel L

    2017-03-01

    Knee muscles are commonly labeled as flexors or extensors and aptly stabilize the knee against sagittal plane loads. However, how these muscles stabilize the knee against adduction-abduction and rotational loads remains unclear. Our study sought 1) to classify muscle roles as they relate to joint stability by quantifying the relationship between individual muscle activation patterns and internal net joint moments in all three loading planes and 2) to determine whether these roles change with increasing force levels. A standing isometric force matching protocol required subjects to modulate ground reaction forces to elicit various combinations and magnitudes of sagittal, frontal, and transverse internal joint moments. Surface EMG measured activities of 10 lower limb muscles. Partial least squares regressions determined which internal moment(s) were significantly related to the activation of individual muscles. Rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae were classified as moment actuators for knee extension and hip flexion. Hamstrings were classified as moment actuators for hip extension and knee flexion. Gastrocnemius and hamstring muscles were classified as specific joint stabilizers for knee rotation. Vastii were classified as general joint stabilizers because activation was independent of moment generation. Muscle roles did not change with increasing effort levels. Our findings indicate muscle activation is not dependent on anatomical orientation but perhaps on its role in maintaining knee joint stability in the frontal and transverse loading planes. This is useful for delineating the roles of biarticular knee joint muscles and could have implications in robotics, musculoskeletal modeling, sports sciences, and rehabilitation.

  6. Measurement of knee joint gaps without bone resection: "physiologic" extension and flexion gaps in total knee arthroplasty are asymmetric and unequal and anterior and posterior cruciate ligament resections produce different gap changes.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, Andrej Maria; Majewski, Martin; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Valderrabano, Victor

    2012-04-01

    General agreement is that flexion and extension gaps should be equal and symmetrical in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedures. However, comparisons using a standard TKA approach to normal knee joints that have not undergone bone resection are currently unavailable. Since bony preparation can influence capsule and ligament tension, our purpose was to perform measurements without this influence. Ten normal cadaveric knees were assessed using a standard medial parapatellar TKA approach with patellar subluxation. Gap measurements were carried out twice each alternating 100 and 200 N per compartment using a prototypical force-determining ligament balancer without the need for bony resection. Initial measurements were performed in extension, followed by 908 of flexion. The ACL was then resected, and finally the PCL was resected, and measurements were carried out in an analogous fashion. In general, the lateral compartment could be stretched further than the medial compartment, and the corresponding flexion gap values were significantly larger. ACL resection predominantly increased extension gaps, while PCL resection increased flexion gaps. Distraction force of 100 N per compartment appeared adequate; increasing to 200 N did not improve the results.

  7. A comparison of volume-equated knee extensions to failure, or not to failure, upon rating of perceived exertion and strength adaptations.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James Peter; Blossom, Dominic; Steele, James

    2016-02-01

    The present study aimed to compare the effects of repetition duration-, volume-, and load-matched resistance training to muscular failure (MMF) or not to muscular failure (NMF) on maximal voluntary isometric knee extensor strength. This design also allowed testing of the efficacy of "5×5" training. Nine recreationally active males (age, 21.4 ± 1.2 years; height, 1.79 ± 0.07 m; weight, 78.4 ± 7.1 kg) performed unilateral resistance training at 80% of maximal torque at 2×/week for 6 weeks. Using their nondominant leg, participants performed 5 sets of 5 repetitions (NMF). Using their dominant leg, participants performed 25 repetitions in as few sets as possible (MMF). All repetitions were performed at a pace of 2 s concentric, 1 s isometric pause, and 2 s eccentric with a 2-min rest interval between sets. Analyses identified significant pre- to post-intervention strength increases for both MMF and NMF, with effect sizes (ESs) of 2.01 and 1.65, respectively, with no significant differences between conditions (p > 0.05). Peak and mean ratings of perceived exertion (RPEs) were significantly higher for MMF compared with NMF conditions (p < 0.0001), and a tendency for significantly higher RPE values reported for later sets for the NMF condition. Total training time per session was significantly longer for NMF compared with MMF (p < 0.001). The present study suggests that in untrained participants, resistance training NMF produces equivocally the same strength increases as training to MMF when volume-matched. However, resistance training to MMF appears to be a more time-efficient protocol and may produce greater strength gains as indicated by a larger ES.

  8. The Influence of Oral L-Glutamine Supplementation on Muscle Strength Recovery and Soreness Following Unilateral Knee Extension Eccentric Exercise.

    PubMed

    Legault, Zachary; Bagnall, Nicholas; Kimmerly, Derek S

    2015-10-01

    The study aimed to examine the effects that L-glutamine supplementation has on quadriceps muscle strength and soreness ratings following eccentric exercise. It was hypothesized that glutamine ingestion would quicken the recovery rate of peak force production and decrease muscle soreness ratings over a 72-hr recovery period. Sixteen healthy participants (8♀/8♂; 22 ± 4 years) volunteered in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study. Supplement conditions consisted of isoenergetic placebo (maltodextrin, 0.6 g·kg-1·day-1) and L-glutamine (0.3 g·kg-1·day-1 + 0.3 g·kg-1·day-1 maltodextrin) ingestion once per day over 72 hr. Knee extensor peak torque at 0°, 30°, and 180° per second and muscle soreness were measured before, immediately following, 24, 48, and 72 hr posteccentric exercise. Eccentric exercise consisted of 8 sets (10 repetitions/set) of unilateral knee extension at 125% maximum concentric force with 2-min rest intervals. L-glutamine resulted in greater relative peak torque at 180°/sec both immediately after (71 ± 8% vs. 66 ± 9%), and 72 hr (91 ± 8% vs. 86 ± 7%) postexercise (all, p < .01). In men, L-glutamine produced greater (p < .01) peak torques at 30°/ sec postexercise. Men also produced greater normalized peak torques at 30°/sec (Nm/kg) in the L-glutamine condition than women (all, p < .05). In the entire sample, L-glutamine resulted in lower soreness ratings at 24 (2.8 ± 1.2 vs. 3.4 ± 1.2), 48 (2.6 ± 1.4 vs. 3.9 ± 1.2), and 72 (1.7 ± 1.2 vs. 2.9 ± 1.3) hr postexercise (p < .01). The L-glutamine supplementation resulted in faster recovery of peak torque and diminished muscle soreness following eccentric exercise. The effect of L-glutamine on muscle force recovery may be greater in men than women.

  9. Extension gap needs more than 1-mm laxity after implantation to avoid post-operative flexion contracture in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Shigetoshi; Okazaki, Ken; Mitsuyasu, Hiroaki; Matsuda, Shuichi; Mizu-Uchi, Hideki; Hamai, Satoshi; Tashiro, Yasutaka; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-12-01

    In total knee arthroplasty (TKA), a high soft-tissue tension in extension at the time of operation would cause a post-operative flexion contracture. However, how tight the extension gap should be during surgery to avoid a post-operative flexion contracture remains unclear. The hypothesis is that some laxity in the intraoperative extension gap is necessary to avoid the post-operative flexion contracture. A posterior-stabilized TKA was performed for 75 osteoarthritic knees with a varus deformity. The intraoperative extension gap was measured using a tensor device that provides the gap length and the angle between the femoral component and the tibial cut surface. The medial component gap was defined as the gap calculated by subtracting the selected thickness of the tibial component, including the polyethylene liner, from the extension gap at the medial side. Then, the patients were divided into three groups according to the medial component gap, and post-operative extension angle measured 1 year after the surgery was compared between each groups. One year post-operatively, a flexion contracture of more than 5° was found in 0/34 patients when the medial component gap was more than 1 mm, in 2/26 (8%) patients when the gap was between 0 and 1 mm, and in 3/15 (20%) patients when the gap was <0 mm. Three factors were associated significantly with the post-operative extension angle: age, preoperative extension angle, and medial component gap. The intraoperative extension gap is related to the post-operative extension angle. Surgeons should leave more than 1-mm laxity after the implantation to avoid the post-operative flexion contracture. As a clinical relevance, this study clarified the optimal extension gap to avoid the post-operative flexion contracture. Prospective comparative study, Level II.

  10. Effect of acute hypoxia on central fatigue during repeated isometric leg contractions.

    PubMed

    Millet, G Y; Aubert, D; Favier, F B; Busso, T; Benoît, H

    2009-10-01

    To determine whether hypoxia has a direct influence on the central command independently of the working muscles, 16 subjects performed intermittent isometric unilateral knee extensions until exhaustion either in normobaric hypoxia (inspired O(2) fraction=0.11, arterial oxygen saturation approximately 84%) or in normoxia while the knee extensor muscles were exposed to circulatory occlusion with a 250 mmHg cuff. Among the subjects, 11 also performed the tests in hypoxia and normoxia without occlusion. Single electrical stimulations were regularly delivered to the femoral nerve to measure the changes in the knee extensor peak twitch force. With the cuff, the average slope of decrease in peak twitch did not depend on the inspired oxygen fraction. Performance was slightly but significantly lower during hypoxia than in normoxia (8.2+/-2.6 vs 9.4+/-3.1 repetitions, P<0.05) with the cuff on. The number of repetitions was much higher during hypoxia with maintaining leg blood flow (15.6+/-4.5 repetitions) than with circulatory occlusion in normoxia. In conclusion, this study showed that a direct effect of hypoxia in reducing the motor drive to the working muscles exists but this effect is moderate.

  11. Impaired voluntary quadriceps force control following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: relationship with knee function.

    PubMed

    Perraton, Luke; Clark, Ross; Crossley, Kay; Pua, Yong-Hao; Whitehead, Tim; Morris, Hayden; Telianidis, Stacey; Bryant, Adam

    2017-05-01

    Impairments in quadriceps force control and altered quadriceps and hamstring muscle activation strategies have been observed following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction; however, the functional implications of these impairments are unclear. This study examined the cross-sectional associations between quadriceps force control, quadriceps activation, hamstring coactivation and clinically assessed knee function following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a hamstring graft. Sixty-six patients (18 ± 3 months following surgery) and 41 uninjured individuals participated. Quadriceps force control was assessed using an isometric knee extension task. Participants cyclically increased and decreased quadriceps force at slow speeds between 5 and 30 % maximum voluntary isometric contraction matching a moving target displayed on a screen. Quadriceps activation and hamstring coactivation were assessed concurrently using surface electromyography. Knee function was assessed with the Cincinnati Knee Rating Scale and three single-leg hop tests. The reconstructed group completed the task with 48 % greater root-mean-square error (RMSE), indicating significantly worse quadriceps force control (p < 0.001). In a multivariable model adjusted for sex, greater RMSE and greater lateral hamstring coactivation were significantly associated with worse knee function that is greater odds of scoring <85 % on one or more knee functional assessment. Less-accurate quadriceps force output and greater hamstring coactivation are associated with worse knee joint function following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and may contribute to irregular knee joint loading and the onset or progression of knee osteoarthritis. Impairments in quadriceps force control and altered muscle activation strategies may be modifiable through neuromuscular training, and this is an area for future research. Case-control study, Level III.

  12. Differential Glucose Uptake in Quadriceps and Other Leg Muscles During One-Legged Dynamic Submaximal Knee-Extension Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kalliokoski, Kari K.; Boushel, Robert; Langberg, Henning; Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Ryberg, Ann Kathrine; Døssing, Simon; Kjær, Andreas; Kjær, Michael

    2011-01-01

    One-legged dynamic knee-extension exercise (DKE) is a widely used model to study the local cardiovascular and metabolic responses to exercise of the quadriceps muscles. In this study, we explored the extent to which different muscles of the quadriceps are activated during exercise using positron emission tomography (PET) determined uptake of [18F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (GU) during DKE. Five healthy male subjects performed DKE at 25 W for 35 min and both the contracting and contralateral resting leg were scanned with PET from mid-thigh and distally. On average, exercise GU was the highest in the vastus intermedius (VI) and lowest in the vastus lateralis (VL; VI vs VL, p < 0.05), whereas the coefficient of variation was highest in VL (VL vs VI, p < 0.05). Coefficient of variation between the mean values of the four quadriceps femoris (QF) muscles in the exercising leg was 35 ± 9%. Compared to mean GU in QF (=100%), GU was on average 73% in VL, 84% in rectus femoris, 115% in vastus medialis, and 142% in VI. Variable activation of hamstring muscles and muscles of the lower leg was also observed. These results show that GU of different muscles of quadriceps muscle group as well as between individuals vary greatly during DKE, and suggests that muscle activity is not equal between quadriceps muscles in this exercise model. Furthermore, posterior thigh muscles and lower leg muscles are more active than hitherto thought even during this moderate exercise intensity. PMID:22046164

  13. Differential glucose uptake in quadriceps and other leg muscles during one-legged dynamic submaximal knee-extension exercise.

    PubMed

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Boushel, Robert; Langberg, Henning; Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Ryberg, Ann Kathrine; Døssing, Simon; Kjær, Andreas; Kjær, Michael

    2011-01-01

    One-legged dynamic knee-extension exercise (DKE) is a widely used model to study the local cardiovascular and metabolic responses to exercise of the quadriceps muscles. In this study, we explored the extent to which different muscles of the quadriceps are activated during exercise using positron emission tomography (PET) determined uptake of [(18)F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (GU) during DKE. Five healthy male subjects performed DKE at 25 W for 35 min and both the contracting and contralateral resting leg were scanned with PET from mid-thigh and distally. On average, exercise GU was the highest in the vastus intermedius (VI) and lowest in the vastus lateralis (VL; VI vs VL, p < 0.05), whereas the coefficient of variation was highest in VL (VL vs VI, p < 0.05). Coefficient of variation between the mean values of the four quadriceps femoris (QF) muscles in the exercising leg was 35 ± 9%. Compared to mean GU in QF (=100%), GU was on average 73% in VL, 84% in rectus femoris, 115% in vastus medialis, and 142% in VI. Variable activation of hamstring muscles and muscles of the lower leg was also observed. These results show that GU of different muscles of quadriceps muscle group as well as between individuals vary greatly during DKE, and suggests that muscle activity is not equal between quadriceps muscles in this exercise model. Furthermore, posterior thigh muscles and lower leg muscles are more active than hitherto thought even during this moderate exercise intensity.

  14. Knee extension and flexion strength asymmetry in Human Immunodeficiency Virus positive subjects: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Vitor H F; Wiechmann, Susana L; Narciso, Argéria M S; Deminice, Rafael

    2017-07-03

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus positive subjects present impairment in muscle function, neural activation, balance, and gait. In other populations, all of these factors have been associated with muscle strength asymmetry. To investigate the existence of muscle strength asymmetry between dominant and non-dominant lower limbs and to determine the hamstrings-to-quadriceps strength ratio in Human Immunodeficiency Virus positive subjects. In this cross-sectional study, 48 subjects were included (22 men and 26 women; mean age 44.6 years), all of them under highly active antiretroviral therapy. They performed isokinetic strength efforts at speeds of 60°/s and 180°/s for knee extension and flexion in concentric-concentric mode. Peak torque was higher (p<0.01) at 60°/s for quadriceps (193, SD=57 vs. 173, SD=55% body mass) and hamstrings (97, SD=36 vs. 90, SD=37% body mass) in dominant compared to non-dominant. Similarly, peak torque was higher at 180°/s (quadriceps 128, SD=44 vs. 112, SD=42; hamstrings 64, SD=24 vs. 57, SD=26% body mass) in dominant. Average power was also higher for all muscle groups and speeds, comparing dominant with non-dominant. The hamstrings-to-quadriceps ratio at 60°/s was 0.50 for dominant and 0.52 for non-dominant, and at 180°/s, it was 0.51 for both limbs, with no significant difference between them. The percentage of subjects with strength asymmetry ranged from 46 to 58%, depending upon muscle group and speed analyzed. Human Immunodeficiency Virus positive subjects present muscle strength asymmetry between lower limbs, assessed through isokinetic dynamometry. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Isometric force development of some muscle groups in athletes.

    PubMed

    Doder, Dragan V; Babiak, Jan J; Janjić, Nataša J; Doder, Radoslava Z

    2012-01-01

    In a large sample of both male and female athletes, subdivided by age and sex, a development curve of isometric muscule force (F) was analyzed for hand flexors, upper-body flexors and extensors, and knee extensors (PDS). A sample of 1,857 male and 1,009 female athletes, aged 8-30 years, subdivided by their age and sex, was used to measure the mean values of isometric muscle force of certain muscle groups by way of 5 topologically defined tests. Based on the results, isometric muscle force (F) development curves are shown and analyzed for the right-hand and left-hand (PLS) flexors, upper-body flexors (PTR), upper-body extensors (OTR), and knee extensors (ONO). The application of certain statistical programs gave rise to equations of the relationship between isometric force and age. The maximum mean value of PLS was chosen as the reference value or "the gold standard," with which PTR, OTR, and ONO were subsequently compared. The relationships were 1:1:1:2.8:5.9 (for male athletes), and 1:1:1.3:3.2:5.2 (for female athletes). The newly derived relationship was recognized as "the canon." The results may have practical application in athletes' fitness and conditioning. Every topologically defined muscle force has its own patterns and rules that should be closely followed in the training process, because any generalization may lead to false conclusions.

  16. Skeletal muscle ATP turnover by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during moderate and heavy bilateral knee extension

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Daniel T; Bimson, William E; Hampson, Sophie A; Bowen, T Scott; Murgatroyd, Scott R; Marwood, Simon; Kemp, Graham J; Rossiter, Harry B

    2014-01-01

    During constant-power high-intensity exercise, the expected increase in oxygen uptake () is supplemented by a  slow component (), reflecting reduced work efficiency, predominantly within the locomotor muscles. The intracellular source of inefficiency is postulated to be an increase in the ATP cost of power production (an increase in P/W). To test this hypothesis, we measured intramuscular ATP turnover with 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and whole-body during moderate (MOD) and heavy (HVY) bilateral knee-extension exercise in healthy participants (n = 14). Unlocalized 31P spectra were collected from the quadriceps throughout using a dual-tuned (1H and 31P) surface coil with a simple pulse-and-acquire sequence. Total ATP turnover rate (ATPtot) was estimated at exercise cessation from direct measurements of the dynamics of phosphocreatine (PCr) and proton handling. Between 3 and 8 min during MOD, there was no discernable (mean ± SD, 0.06 ± 0.12 l min−1) or change in [PCr] (30 ± 8 vs. 32 ± 7 mm) or ATPtot (24 ± 14 vs. 17 ± 14 mm min−1; each P = n.s.). During HVY, the was 0.37 ± 0.16 l min−1 (22 ± 8%), [PCr] decreased (19 ± 7 vs. 18 ± 7 mm, or 12 ± 15%; P < 0.05) and ATPtot increased (38 ± 16 vs. 44 ± 14 mm min−1, or 26 ± 30%; P < 0.05) between 3 and 8 min. However, the increase in ATPtot (ΔATPtot) was not correlated with the during HVY (r2 = 0.06; P = n.s.). This lack of relationship between ΔATPtot and , together with a steepening of the [PCr]– relationship in HVY, suggests that reduced work efficiency during heavy exercise arises from both contractile (P/W) and mitochondrial sources (the O2 cost of ATP resynthesis; P/O). PMID:25281731

  17. Evaluation of electromyographic activity and heart rate responses to isometric exercise. The role played by muscular mass and type.

    PubMed

    Silva, E; Oliveira, L; Catai, A M; Ferreira Filho, P; Bérzin, F; Gallo Júnior, L

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between the electromyographic (EMG) activity and heart rate (HR) responses induced by isometric exercise performed by knee extension (KE) and flexion (KF) in men. Fifteen healthy male subjects, 21 +/- 1.3 years (mean +/- SD), were submitted to KE and KF isometric exercise tests at 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). The exercises were performed with one leg (right or left) and with two legs simultaneously, for 10 s in the sitting position with the hip and knee flexed at 90 degrees. EMG activity (root mean square values) and HR (beats/min) were recorded simultaneously both at rest and throughout the sustained contraction. The HR responses to isometric exercise in KE and KF were similar when performed with one and two legs. However, the HR increase was always significantly higher in KE than KF (P < 0.05), whereas the EMG activity was higher in KE than in KF (P < 0.05), regardless of the muscle mass (one or two legs) involved in the effort. The correlation coefficients between HR response and the EMG activity during KE (r = 0.33, P > 0.05) and KF (r = 0.15, P > 0.05) contractions were not significant. These results suggest that the predominant mechanism responsible for the larger increase in HR response to KE as compared to KF in our study could be dependent on qualitative and quantitative differences in the fiber type composition found in each muscle group. This mechanism seems to demand a higher activation of motor units with a corresponding increase in central command to the cardiovascular centers that modulate HR control.

  18. Knee angle-dependent oxygen consumption of human quadriceps muscles during maximal voluntary and electrically evoked contractions.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, R D; de Ruiter, C J; de Haan, A

    2008-01-01

    Fatigability and muscle oxygen consumption (mVO(2)) during sustained voluntary isometric knee extensions are less at extended (30 degrees knee angle; 0 degrees , full extension) versus flexed knee angles (90 degrees). This lower energy consumption may partially result from lower neural activation at extended knee angles. We hypothesized a smaller difference in mVO(2) between extended and flexed knee angles during electrical stimulation, which guaranteed maximal activation, than during maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). In eight healthy young males, MVC extension torque was obtained at 30 degrees, 60 degrees and 90 degrees knee angles. mVO(2) of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL) and medialis muscle was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy during tetanic (10 s) and maximal voluntary (15 s) contractions (MVC(15)). For electrically induced contractions, steady state mVO(2) was reached at similar (P > 0.05) times after torque onset (4.6 +/- 0.7 s) at all knee angles. In contrast, during MVC(15) at 30 degrees mVO(2) was reached at 7.1 +/- 1.1 s, significantly later compared to 60 degrees and 90 degrees knee angles. The knee angle dependent differences in mVO(2) were not lower in electrically induced contractions (as hypothesised) but were similar as in voluntary contractions. Normalized mVO(2) at 30 degrees (percentage 90 degrees knee angle) was 79.0 +/- 9.4% (across muscles) for electrically induced and 79.5 +/- 7.6% (across muscles) for voluntary contractions (P < 0.05). We conclude that the slower onset of mVO(2) during voluntary effort at 30 degrees may have been due to a lower maximal activation. However, because steady state mVO(2) both during electrically induced and voluntary contractions was approximately 20% less at extended versus flexed knee angles, the causes for the lower mVO(2) must reside within the muscle itself.

  19. Knee Power Is an Important Parameter in Understanding Medial Knee Joint Load in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Calder, Kristina M; Acker, Stacey M; Arora, Neha; Beattie, Karen A; Callaghan, Jack P; Adachi, Jonathan D; Maly, Monica R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent to which knee extensor strength and power explain variance in knee adduction moment (KAM) peak and impulse in clinical knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Fifty-three adults (mean ± SD age 61.6 ± 6.3 years, 11 men) with clinical knee OA participated. The KAM waveform was calculated from motion and force data and ensemble averaged from 5 walking trials. The KAM peak was normalized to body mass (Nm/kg). The mean KAM impulse reflected the mean total medial knee load during stride (Nm × seconds). For strength, the maximum knee extensor moment attained from maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) was normalized to body mass (Nm/kg). For power, the maximum knee extensor power during isotonic contractions, with the resistance set at 25% of MVIC, was normalized to body mass (W/kg). Covariates included age, sex, knee pain on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, gait speed, and body mass index (BMI). Relationships of the KAM peak and impulse with strength and power were examined using sequential stepwise forward linear regressions. Results Covariates did not explain variance in the KAM peak. While extensor strength did not, peak knee extensor power explained 8% of the variance in the KAM peak (P = 0.02). Sex and BMI explained 24% of the variance in the KAM impulse (P < 0.05). Sex, BMI, and knee extensor power explained 31% of the variance in the KAM impulse (P = 0.02), with power contributing 7% (P < 0.05). Conclusion Knee extensor power was more important than isometric knee strength in understanding medial knee loads during gait. PMID:24920175

  20. Effect of increased maxillo-mandibular relationship on isometric strength in TMD patients with loss of vertical dimension of occlusion.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, T; Mehta, N R; Forgione, A G; Clark, R E; Kronman, J H; Munsat, T L; George, P

    1997-01-01

    The effect on isometric strength of the shoulders and limbs while biting in habitual occlusion, on a bite-elevating appliance and on a placebo appliance was analyzed. Twenty female volunteer patients, presenting with temporomandibular pain dysfunction syndrome and obvious loss of vertical dimension, served as subjects. All were weaker to the manual application of the isometric Deltoid Press (IDP) when biting, as opposed to maintaining the mandible in an unsupported rest position. Two intraoral appliances were fabricated for each subject: a bite-elevating appliance (BEA) set by a functional criterion of peak strength to the IDP and a placebo appliance which did not interfere with occlusion but was "set" with a mock IDP procedure. Testing was carried out by the Neuromuscular Research Testing Laboratory of the Neurology Department of Tufts New England Medical Center. Testing was independent of the dentist who fabricated and set the appliances. A standard neuromuscular test with the Maximal Voluntary Isometric Contraction apparatus was used to assess strength of right and left shoulder, elbow and knee flexion and extension as is routinely performed with all neuromuscular disease patients. Twelve strength tests were carried out for each of three conditions: 1. Baseline-biting in habitual occlusion; 2. Elevated-biting on the BEA; and 3. Placebo-biting with the placebo appliance inserted. The order of conditions 2 and 3 was counterbalanced without knowledge of the subjects. Twelve repeated measures ANOVAs (each subject as their own control) were conducted for each of the 12 strength measures. All F-tests indicated a significant main effect for treatment differences (p < 0.0001). Mean strength biting on the BEA was consistantly greater (p < 0.001) than Baseline or Placebo strength. Baseline and Placebo condition were equivalent. These findings confirmed previous observations at this TMD Center: individuals with loss of vertical dimension of occlusion respond to a bite

  1. Prolonged infrapatellar tendon vibration does not influence quadriceps maximal or explosive isometric force production in man.

    PubMed

    Fry, Adam; Folland, Jonathan P

    2014-08-01

    The influence of muscle/tendon vibration on maximal muscle performance is unclear. This study examined the effect of a prolonged tendon vibration stimulus on maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and explosive voluntary contraction (EVC) performance. Eighteen young healthy males (nine strength trained and nine untrained) completed a series of isometric unilateral knee extensions (EVCs, electrically evoked octet responses, MVCs, ramp contractions) pre and post two separate 30-min intervention trials; infrapatellar tendon vibration (80 Hz), and quiet sitting (control). H max and M max were measured at the start and end of each series of contractions, both pre- and post-intervention (i.e., at four time points). Knee extensor force and both quadriceps and hamstrings EMG were measured throughout each series of contractions. Vibration had no effect on either maximum force (ANOVA, trial × time interaction P = 0.92), explosive force (P ≥ 0.36), or the associated agonist EMG amplitude during these tasks (P ≥ 0.23). Octet responses were also unaffected by vibration (P ≥ 0.39). Conversely, post-intervention H max/M max was 60 % lower in the vibration trial vs. control, and remained 38 % lower at the end of the post-intervention measurements (t test, both P < 0.01). Individual H max/M max depression did not correlate to changes in either maximum or explosive force (Spearman's Rank, P ≥ 0.54), and training status had no influence on the effect of vibration. Prolonged infrapatellar tendon vibration depressed H-reflex amplitude, but did not affect either maximal or explosive isometric force production of the quadriceps.

  2. Comparative Study on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Determination of Isometric Points with and Without Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Fabio J.; Albuquerque, Roberto F. M.; Sasaki, Sandra U.; Camanho, Gilberto L.; Hernandez, Arnaldo J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the accuracy of tunnel placement and graft isometry for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction performed using a computer-assisted navigation system (Orthopilot) and using traditional instruments. METHODS: The anterior cruciate ligament was removed intact from 36 pairs of human cadaver knees. From each pair, one knee was randomized to Group 1 (conventional) and the other to Group 2 (Orthopilot). An inelastic suture was then passed through the central points of the tibial and femoral tunnels. Neither of the tunnels was drilled. All knees were then dissected, and six parameters were obtained: distances from the tibial tunnel center to the 1) posterior cruciate ligament, 2) anterior horn of the lateral meniscus and 3) medial tibial spine; 4) distance from the femoral tunnel center to the posterior femoral cortex; 5) femoral tunnel coronal angle; and 6) variation of the distance from the femoral to the tibial tunnel with the knee extended and at 90 degrees of flexion. RESULTS: The variation of the distance from the femoral to the tibial tunnel during flexion and extension was smaller in the Orthopilot group (better isometry) compared to the conventional group. There were no statistical differences in any other parameters between the groups, and all tunnels were considered to be in satisfactory positions. DISCUSSION: The results obtained for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction depend on precise isometric point positioning, and a navigation system is a precision tool that can assist surgeons in tunnel positioning. CONCLUSION: No differences in tunnel position were observed between the groups. Nonetheless, better isometry was achieved in the Orthopilot group than with conventional instruments. PMID:20668625

  3. Older men are more fatigable than young when matched for maximal power and knee extension angular velocity is unconstrained.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Brian H; Power, Geoffrey A; Paturel, Justin R; Rice, Charles L

    2015-06-01

    The underlying factors related to the divergent findings of age-related fatigue for dynamic tasks are not well understood. The purpose here was to investigate age-related fatigability and recovery between a repeated constrained (isokinetic) and an unconstrained velocity (isotonic) task, in which participants performed fatiguing contractions at the velocity (isokinetic) or resistance (isotonic) corresponding with maximal power. To compare between tasks, isotonic torque-power relationships were constructed prior to and following both fatiguing tasks and during short-term recovery. Contractile properties were recorded from 9 old (~75 years) and 11 young (~25 years) men during three testing sessions. In the first session, maximal power was assessed, and sessions 2 and 3 involved an isokinetic or an isotonic concentric fatigue task performed until maximal power was reduced by 40 %. Compared with young, the older men performed the same number of contractions to task failure for the isokinetic task (~45 contractions), but 20 % fewer for the isotonic task (p < 0.05). Regardless of age and task, maximal voluntary isometric contraction strength, angular velocity, and power were reduced by ~30, ~13, and ~25 %, respectively, immediately following task failure, and only isometric torque was not recovered fully by 10 min. In conclusion, older men are more fatigable than the young when performing a repetitive maximal dynamic task at a relative resistance (isotonic) but not an absolute velocity (isokinetic), corresponding to maximal power.

  4. A new isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise using EMG-biofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Kesemenli, Cumhur C; Sarman, Hakan; Baran, Tuncay; Memisoglu, Kaya; Binbir, Ismail; Savas, Yilmaz; Isik, Cengiz; Boyraz, Ismail; Koc, Bunyamin

    2014-01-01

    A new isometric contraction quadriceps-strengthening exercise was developed to restore the quadriceps strength lost after knee surgery more rapidly. This study evaluated the results of this new method. Patients were taught to perform the isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise in the unaffected knee in the supine position, and then they performed it in the affected knee. First, patients were taught the classical isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise, and then they were taught our new alternative method: “pull the patella superiorly tightly and hold the leg in the same position for 10 seconds”. Afterward, the quadriceps contraction was evaluated using a non-invasive Myomed 932 EMG-biofeedback device (Enraf-Nonius, The Netherlands) with gel-containing 48 mm electrodes (Türklab, The Turkey) placed on both knees. The isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise performed using our new method had stronger contraction than the classical method (P < 0.01). The new method involving pulling the patella superiorly appears to be a better choice, which can be applied easily, leading to better patient compliance and greater quadriceps force after arthroscopic and other knee surgeries. PMID:25356122

  5. Rehabilitation and functional outcomes after extensive surgical debridement of a knee infected by fusobacterium necrophorum: a case report.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Andrew R; Briggs, Matthew S; Kegelmeyer, Deborah K; Kloos, Anne D

    2013-06-01

    Joint infection is a rare but serious complication after knee injury that should be part of a physical therapist's differential diagnosis. This case report presents the care of a 17 year-old female athlete with septic arthritis from a Fusobacterium infection after sustaining a right lateral meniscus tear. Joint pathology combined with the aggressive infectious agent led to arthrofibrosis of her knee joint and resultant activity limitations and participation restrictions. The purpose of this case report is to highlight a rare and unique pathology, the serious effects that a joint infection can have on musculoskeletal function, and the challenges encountered during the rehabilitation process. The subject was a 17 year-old volleyball player who injured her right knee while playing volleyball. Within 7 days, the subject developed a severe joint infection that spread into surrounding gluteal, quadriceps, and gastrocnemius musculature. The infection was surgically debrided eight times during a 10-week inpatient hospital stay. A manipulation under anesthesia was performed to restore range of motion in her knee joint. Outpatient physical therapy was initiated 4 days later in order to restore musculoskeletal function. Over eight months of physical therapy services were utilized to address the impairments and activity limitations caused by her joint dysfunction. She met her physical therapy goals and made significant improvements on the Knee Outcome Survey and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Success in physical therapy and completion of additional strength training exercise allowed this subject to return to competitive softball at the club level during her freshman year of college. Though rare after musculoskeletal injury, joint infection can lead to soft tissue damage, partial or complete degradation of articular cartilage, and arthrofibrosis causing significant disability. Physical therapists must incorporate evidence-based treatment principles including eccentric

  6. Hip Abductor and Knee Extensor Muscle Strength of Children with and without Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mercer, V S; Lewis, C L

    2001-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to 1) determine test-retest reliability of hand-held dynamometer measurements of right hip abductor and knee extensor muscle strength in children with Down syndrome (DS), 2) identify differences in isometric muscle strength between children with DS and peers who are developing typically, and 3) determine the relationship between various anthropometric and demographic variables and isometric muscle strength. Seventeen children with DS between the ages of seven and 15 years and a comparison group of 17 age- and gender-matched peers who were developing typically participated in the study. A hand-held dynamometer was used to measure peak force during maximal isometric right hip abduction and knee extension at two test sessions approximately one week apart. Peak torque values were calculated by multiplying peak force measurements by the appropriate segment lengths. Anthropometric measurements were obtained, and a questionnaire was used to measure habitual physical activity levels. Test-retest reliability was high, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.89 to 0.95. Children with DS had significantly lower mean peak torque values for hip abduction and knee extension than children in the comparison group. Regression analyses indicated that weight, body mass index, height, activity level, and gender were significant predictors of peak torque production for the sample as a whole. Hand-held dynamometry can be used to obtain reliable measurements of isometric muscle strength in children with DS. Anthropometric characteristics and activity levels may play a role in peak torque production in children with and without DS.

  7. Seasonal changes of jumping performance and knee muscle strength in under-19 women volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Rousanoglou, Elissavet N; Barzouka, Karolina G; Boudolos, Konstantinos D

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the seasonal changes (preparation period [PP] and competition period [CP]) of vertical jumping performance and knee muscle strength in a team of under-19 women volleyball players (N = 12, 16.2 ± 1.5 years). The countermovement jump was used to evaluate jumping performance. The isometric knee extension moment at 150 ms from the onset of contraction (T150) and at a maximum of contraction (TMAX) were determined at 9 knee angles (from 10° to 90°, full knee extension = 0°). The peak isokinetic knee extension (TISOK-EXT) and flexion (TISOK-FLEX) moment were determined at 60, 180, and 240°·s. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was applied to the differences between PP and CP (p ≤ 0.05). Significant increases in jumping performance were found for jump height, peak impulse, total impulse, peak power, and takeoff velocity (p ≤ 0.05). At the knee flexion angles from 40° to 90°, T150 was significantly increased (p ≤ 0.05), whereas the increase was not significant at the rather extended knee angles of 10°, 20°, and 30° (p > 0.05). Only at 90° of knee flexion (p ≤ 0.05), TMAX was significantly increased. With the exception of TISOK-FLEX at 60°·s (p ≤ 0.05), the increases of TISOK-EXT and TISOK-FLEX were not significant (p > 0.05). The TISOK-EXT/TISOK-FLEX ratios were not significantly changed (p > 0.05). The main application of the study is that it provides performance standards and potential criteria for variable selection for jumping performance and knee muscle strength seasonal evaluation.

  8. Relationships between Isometric Muscle Strength, Gait Parameters, and Gross Motor Function Measure in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyung-Ik; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Chung, Chin Youb; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Seung Yeol; Lee, In Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the correlation between isometric muscle strength, gross motor function, and gait parameters in patients with spastic cerebral palsy and to find which muscle groups play an important role for gait pattern in a flexed knee gait. Materials and Methods Twenty-four ambulatory patients (mean age, 10.0 years) with spastic cerebral palsy who were scheduled for single event multilevel surgery, including distal hamstring lengthening, were included. Preoperatively, peak isometric muscle strength was measured for the hip flexor, hip extensor, knee flexor, and knee extensor muscle groups using a handheld dynamometer, and three-dimensional (3D) gait analysis and gross motor function measure (GMFM) scoring were also performed. Correlations between peak isometric strength and GMFM, gait kinematics, and gait kinetics were analyzed. Results Peak isometric muscle strength of all muscle groups was not related to the GMFM score and the gross motor function classification system level. Peak isometric strength of the hip extensor and knee extensor was significantly correlated with the mean pelvic tilt (r=-0.588, p=0.003 and r=-0.436, p=0.033) and maximum pelvic obliquity (r=-0.450, p=0.031 and r=-0.419, p=0.041). There were significant correlations between peak isometric strength of the knee extensor and peak knee extensor moment in early stance (r=0.467, p=0.021) and in terminal stance (r=0.416, p=0.043). Conclusion There is no correlation between muscle strength and gross motor function. However, this study showed that muscle strength, especially of the extensor muscle group of the hip and knee joints, might play a critical role in gait by stabilizing pelvic motion and decreasing energy consumption in a flexed knee gait. PMID:26632404

  9. A randomised clinical trial of the efficacy of drop squats or leg extension/leg curl exercises to treat clinically diagnosed jumper's knee in athletes: pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Cannell, L; Taunton, J; Clement, D; Smith, C; Khan, K

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To compare the therapeutic effect of two different exercise protocols in athletes with jumper's knee. Methods—Randomised clinical trial comparing a 12 week programme of either drop squat exercises or leg extension/leg curl exercises. Measurement was performed at baseline and after six and 12 weeks. Primary outcome measures were pain (visual analogue scale 1–10) and return to sport. Secondary outcome measures included quadriceps and hamstring moment of force using a Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer at 30°/second. Differences in pain response between the drop squat and leg extension/curl treatment groups were assessed by 2 (group) x 3 (time) analysis of variance. Two by two contingency tables were used to test differences in rates of return to sport. Analysis of variance (2 (injured versus non-injured leg) x 2 (group) x 3 (time)) was also used to determine differences for secondary outcome measures. Results—Over the 12 week intervention, pain diminished by 2.3 points (36%) in the leg extension/curl group and 3.2 points (57%) in the squat group. There was a significant main effect of both exercise protocols on pain (p<0.01) with no interaction effect. Nine of 10 subjects in the drop squat group returned to sporting activity by 12 weeks, but five of those subjects still had low level pain. Six of nine of the leg extension/curl group returned to sporting activity by 12 weeks and four patients had low level pain. There was no significant difference between groups in numbers returning to sporting activity. There were no differences in the change in quadriceps or hamstring muscle moment of force between groups. Conclusions—Progressive drop squats and leg extension/curl exercises can reduce the pain of jumper's knee in a 12 week period and permit a high proportion of patients to return to sport. Not all patients, however, return to sport by that time. Key Words: knee; patellar tendon; tendinopathy; tendinosis; eccentric strengthening; strength training

  10. Changes in voluntary quadriceps activation predict changes in muscle strength and gait biomechanics following knee joint effusion.

    PubMed

    Pietrosimone, Brian; Lepley, Adam S; Murray, Amanda M; Thomas, Abbey C; Bahhur, Nael O; Schwartz, Todd A

    2014-09-01

    It has been hypothesized that arthrogenic muscle inhibition is responsible for altering physical function following knee injury. The association between the onset of arthrogenic muscle inhibition, measured using voluntary quadriceps activation, and changes in muscle strength and gait biomechanics are unknown. Outcomes were collected before and following a 60 ml experimental knee effusion in eighteen healthy participants. Voluntary quadriceps activation was the predictor variable, while the criterion variable included, maximal voluntary isometric strength, peak knee flexion angle, peak internal knee extension moment, and peak vertical ground reaction forces during the first half of stance phase upon stair descent. Percent change scores (Δ) were imputed into linear regression equations to determine associations between predictor and criterion variables. The variance in Δ voluntary quadriceps activation significantly predicted 87% the variance in the Δ strength (R(2)=0.87, P<0.001; Δ strength=-2.15+1.77Δ voluntary quadriceps activation) and 25% of the Δ vertical ground reaction force following effusion (R(2)=0.25, P=0.04; Δ vertical ground reaction force=-6.1+0.57 Δ voluntary quadriceps activation). After accounting for Δ knee flexion angle, Δ voluntary quadriceps activation predicted an additional 29% (Δ R(2)=0.29, P=0.007) of the variance in the Δ knee extension moment (R(2)=0.54, P=0.003, Δ knee extension moment=-10.79+0.74Δ knee flexion angle+1.64Δ voluntary quadriceps activation) following knee effusion. Immediate quadriceps activation deficits following joint effusion result in immediate alterations in muscle strength, knee extensor moment and vertical ground reaction force during gait. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. REHABILITATION AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER EXTENSIVE SURGICAL DEBRIDEMENT OF A KNEE INFECTED BY FUSOBACTERIUM NECROPHORUM: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Matthew S.; Kegelmeyer, Deborah K.; Kloos, Anne D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Joint infection is a rare but serious complication after knee injury that should be part of a physical therapist's differential diagnosis. This case report presents the care of a 17 year‐old female athlete with septic arthritis from a Fusobacterium infection after sustaining a right lateral meniscus tear. Joint pathology combined with the aggressive infectious agent led to arthrofibrosis of her knee joint and resultant activity limitations and participation restrictions. The purpose of this case report is to highlight a rare and unique pathology, the serious effects that a joint infection can have on musculoskeletal function, and the challenges encountered during the rehabilitation process. Case Description: The subject was a 17 year‐old volleyball player who injured her right knee while playing volleyball. Within 7 days, the subject developed a severe joint infection that spread into surrounding gluteal, quadriceps, and gastrocnemius musculature. The infection was surgically debrided eight times during a 10‐week inpatient hospital stay. A manipulation under anesthesia was performed to restore range of motion in her knee joint. Outpatient physical therapy was initiated 4 days later in order to restore musculoskeletal function. Outcome: Over eight months of physical therapy services were utilized to address the impairments and activity limitations caused by her joint dysfunction. She met her physical therapy goals and made significant improvements on the Knee Outcome Survey and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Success in physical therapy and completion of additional strength training exercise allowed this subject to return to competitive softball at the club level during her freshman year of college. Discussion: Though rare after musculoskeletal injury, joint infection can lead to soft tissue damage, partial or complete degradation of articular cartilage, and arthrofibrosis causing significant disability. Physical therapists must

  12. The isometric athlete.

    PubMed

    Longhurst, J C; Stebbins, C L

    1992-05-01

    A number of normal daily and athletic activities require isometric or static exercise. Such sports as weight lifting and other high-resistance activities are used by athletes to gain strength and skeletal muscle bulk. However, static exercise also causes significant increases in blood pressure, heart rate, myocardial contractility, and cardiac output. These changes occur in response to central neural irradiation, called central command, as well as a reflex originating from statically contracting muscle. Studies have demonstrated that blood pressure appears to be the regulated variable, presumably because the increased pressure provides blood flow into muscles that have compressed their arterial inflow as a result of increases in intramuscular pressure created by contraction. Thus, static exercise is characterized by a pressure load to the heart and can be differentiated from dynamic (isotonic) exercise, which involves a volume load to the heart. Physical training with static exercise leads to concentric cardiac, particularly left ventricular, hypertrophy, whereas training with dynamic exercise leads to eccentric hypertrophy. Furthermore, the magnitude of cardiac hypertrophy is much less in athletes training with static than dynamic exercise. Neither systolic nor diastolic function is altered by the hypertrophic process associated with static exercise training. Many of the energy requirements for static exercise, particularly during more severe levels of exercise, are met by anaerobic glycolysis because the contracting muscle becomes deprived of blood flow. Training with repetitive static exercise therefore causes little increase in oxygen transport capacity, so that maximal oxygen consumption is either not or only minimally increased. Peripheral cardiovascular adaptations also can occur in response to static exercise training. Although controversial, these adaptations include modest decreases in resting blood pressure, smaller increases in blood pressure during a

  13. The effects of fatigue on the resultant joint moment, agonist and antagonist electromyographic activity at different angles during dynamic knee extension efforts.

    PubMed

    Kellis, E

    1999-06-01

    Examination of the effects of fatigue on antagonist function can provide information on the role of antagonists in limiting the resultant joint moment and stabilizing the knee. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the moment, agonist and antagonist electromyographic (EMG) activity levels at different angular positions during an isokinetic muscular endurance knee extension test. Fifteen healthy males (age 22.6+/-1.9 yr) performed 34 maximal isokinetic concentric efforts of the knee extensors at 120 degrees s(-1). The EMG activity of vastus medialis and biceps femoris was recorded using surface electrodes. The motion ranged from 90 degrees to 0 degrees of knee flexion. The average moment and average EMG (AEMG) at 10-35 degrees, 36-55 degrees and 56-80 degrees angular position intervals were calculated for each repetition. Twenty eight efforts were further analysed. The moment of force demonstrated a decline of 70% at the end of the test. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance tests indicated that this decline was significant (p < 0.05). No significant effects of angular position on fatigue moment characteristics were found. The agonist (vastus medialis) AEMG during the first repetition demonstrated a significant increase of 40-60% towards the middle part of the test (p < 0.05). In the second part of the test, the VM AEMG at longer muscle lengths was significantly higher compared to the initial efforts whereas the AEMG at short muscle lengths returned to initial values. The antagonist AEMG at all angular positions did not change significantly during the test. The decline in the resultant joint moment could be attributed to the effects of fatigue on the agonist muscle function. The agonist AEMG fatigue-patterns are dependent on the length of the muscle and may be due to alterations in the motor unit recruitment and/or activation failure in the quadriceps muscle. The biceps femoris maintains constant submaximal (21-33% of the maximum) AEMG

  14. Isometric push and pull strengths of young Taiwanese males.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Lang; Lee, Yu-Chi; Hsu, Tin-Chi

    2011-01-01

    This study recruited 30 young Taiwanese males to determine the horizontally maximum isometric pushing and pulling strengths under 16 exertion heights and four handle-foot horizontal distances. This study shows that isometric push and pull strengths as measured on a simulated frictional floor condition in Taiwanese hypermarkets were markedly lower than previous tests using high-traction flooring or anchoring participant's feet. Pushing strengths were always higher than pulling in all 64 task combinations, whereas no significant differences were present at heights of 30-60 cm. When considering maximum push and pull force demands, the optimal heights for such activities would be 50-90 cm (approximately ranged from the knee to hip position). The push and pull strength profiles identified in this study must be used appropriately, considering the real task situations.

  15. Genome-wide linkage scan for maximum and length-dependent knee muscle strength in young men: significant evidence for linkage at chromosome 14q24.3.

    PubMed

    De Mars, G; Windelinckx, A; Huygens, W; Peeters, M W; Beunen, G P; Aerssens, J; Vlietinck, R; Thomis, M A I

    2008-05-01

    Maintenance of high muscular fitness is positively related to bone health, functionality in daily life and increasing insulin sensitivity, and negatively related to falls and fractures, morbidity and mortality. Heritability of muscle strength phenotypes ranges between 31% and 95%, but little is known about the identity of the genes underlying this complex trait. As a first attempt, this genome-wide linkage study aimed to identify chromosomal regions linked to muscle and bone cross-sectional area, isometric knee flexion and extension torque, and torque-length relationship for knee flexors and extensors. In total, 283 informative male siblings (17-36 years old), belonging to 105 families, were used to conduct a genome-wide SNP-based multipoint linkage analysis. The strongest evidence for linkage was found for the torque-length relationship of the knee flexors at 14q24.3 (LOD = 4.09; p<10(-5)). Suggestive evidence for linkage was found at 14q32.2 (LOD = 3.00; P = 0.005) for muscle and bone cross-sectional area, at 2p24.2 (LOD = 2.57; p = 0.01) for isometric knee torque at 30 degrees flexion, at 1q21.3, 2p23.3 and 18q11.2 (LOD = 2.33, 2.69 and 2.21; p<10(-4) for all) for the torque-length relationship of the knee extensors and at 18p11.31 (LOD = 2.39; p = 0.0004) for muscle-mass adjusted isometric knee extension torque. We conclude that many small contributing genes rather than a few important genes are involved in causing variation in different underlying phenotypes of muscle strength. Furthermore, some overlap in promising genomic regions were identified among different strength phenotypes.

  16. Hip- and knee-strength assessments using a hand-held dynamometer with external belt-fixation are inter-tester reliable.

    PubMed

    Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas; Hölmich, Per

    2013-03-01

    In football, ice-hockey, and track and field, injuries have been predicted, and hip- and knee-strength deficits quantified using hand-held dynamometry (HHD). However, systematic bias exists when testers of different sex and strength perform the measurements. Belt-fixation of the dynamometer may resolve this. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine the inter-tester reliability concerning strength assessments of isometric hip abduction, adduction, flexion, extension and knee-flexion strength, using HHD with external belt-fixation. Twenty-one healthy athletes (6 women), 30 (8.6) (mean (SD)) years of age, were included. Two physiotherapy students (1 female and 1 male) performed all the measurements after careful instruction and procedure training. Isometric hip abduction, adduction, flexion, extension, and knee-flexion strength were tested. The tester-order and hip-action order were randomised. No systematic between-tester differences (bias) were observed for any of the hip or knee actions. The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC 2.1) ranged from 0.76 to 0.95. Furthermore, standard errors of measurement in per cent (SEM %) ranged from 5 to 11 %, and minimal detectable change in per cent (MDC %) from 14 to 29 % for the different hip and knee actions. The present study shows that isometric hip- and knee-strength measurements have acceptable inter-tester reliability at the group level, when testing strong individuals, using HHD with belt-fixation. This procedure is therefore perfectly suited for the evaluation and monitoring of strong athletes with hip, groin and hamstring injuries, some of the most common and troublesome injuries in sports. Diagnostic, Level III.

  17. Runner's Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Runner's Knee KidsHealth > For Teens > Runner's Knee A A A ... told he had runner's knee. What Is Runner's Knee? Runner's knee is the term doctors use for ...

  18. Preliminary Assessment of the Efficacy of Supplementing Knee Extension Capability in a Lower Limb Exoskeleton with FES

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Hugo A.; Farris, Ryan J.; Ha, Kevin; Goldfarb, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe a cooperative controller that combines the knee joint actuation of an externally powered lower limb exoskeleton with the torque and power contribution from the electrically stimulated quadriceps muscle group. The efficacy of combining these efforts is experimentally validated with a series of weighted leg lift maneuvers. Measurements from these experiments indicate that the control approach effectively combines the respective efforts of the motor and muscle, such that good control performance is achieved, with substantial torque and energy contributions from both the biological and non-biological actuators. PMID:23366646

  19. Trunk biomechanics and its association with hip and knee kinematics in patients with and without patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Theresa Helissa; Maciel, Carlos Dias; Serrão, Fábio Viadanna

    2015-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is a common lower extremity condition observed in sports clinics. Recently, it has been suggested that trunk motion could affect hip and knee biomechanics in the frontal plane. Thus, the purpose of the study was compare trunk kinematics, strength and muscle activation between people with PFP and healthy participants. In addition, the associations among trunk biomechanics, hip and knee kinematics were analysed. Thirty people with PFP and thirty pain-free individuals participated. The peak ipsilateral trunk lean, hip adduction, and knee abduction were evaluated with an electromagnetic tracking system, and the surface electromyographic signals of the iliocostalis and external oblique muscle were recorded during single-leg squats. Trunk extension and trunk flexion with rotation isometric strength and side bridge tests were quantified using a handheld dynamometer. Compared with the control group, the PFP group demonstrated increased ipsilateral trunk lean, hip adduction and knee abduction (p = 0.02-0.04) during single-leg squat accompanied with decreased trunk isometric strength (p = < 0.001-0.009). There was no between-group difference in trunk muscle activation. Only in the control group, ipsilateral trunk lean was significantly correlated with hip adduction (r = -0.66) and knee abduction (r = 0.49); also, the side bridge test correlated with knee abduction (r = -0.51). Differences in trunk, hip and knee biomechanics were found in people with PFP. No relationship among trunk, hip and knee biomechanics was found in the PFP group, suggesting that people with PFP show different movement patterns compared to the control group.

  20. Angle- and gender-specific quadriceps femoris muscle recruitment and knee extensor torque.

    PubMed

    Pincivero, Danny M; Salfetnikov, Yuliya; Campy, Robert M; Coelho, Alan J

    2004-11-01

    The objectives were to examine knee angle-, and gender-specific knee extensor torque output and quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle recruitment during maximal effort, voluntary contractions. Fourteen young adult men and 15 young adult women performed three isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC), in a random order, with the knee at 0 degrees (terminal extension), 10 degrees, 30 degrees, 50 degrees, 70 degrees, and 90 degrees flexion. Knee extensor peak torque (PT), and average torque (AT) were expressed in absolute (N m), relative (N m kg(-1)) and allometric-modeled (N m kg(-n)) units. Vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), and rectus femoris (RF) muscle EMG signals were full-wave rectified and integrated over the middle 3 s of each contraction, averaged over the three trials at each knee angle, and normalized to the activity recorded at 0 degrees. Muscle recruitment efficiency was calculated as the ratio of the normalized EMG of each muscle to the allometric-modeled average torque (normalized to the values at 0 degrees flexion), and expressed as a percent. Men generated significantly greater knee extensor PT and AT than women in absolute, relative and allometric-modeled units. Absolute and relative PT and AT were significantly highest at 70 degrees, while allometric-modeled values were observed to increase significantly across knee joint angles 10-90 degrees. VM EMG was significantly greater than the VL and RF muscles across all angles, and followed a similar pattern to absolute knee extensor torque. Recruitment efficiency improved across knee joint angles 10-90 degrees and was highest for the VL muscle. VM recruitment efficiency improved more than the VL and RF muscles across 70-90 degrees flexion. The findings demonstrate angle-, and gender-specific responses of knee extensor torque to maximal-effort contractions, while superficial QF muscle recruitment was most efficient at 90 degrees, and less dependent on gender.

  1. Quadriceps Rate of Force Development affects Gait and Function in People with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Joshua D.; Rudolph, Katherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Quadriceps weakness exists in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA) but other muscle factors like rate of force development (RFD) may also be affected by knee OA. The purpose of this study was to determine if people with knee OA have deficits in quadriceps RFD, determine if quadriceps RFD would improve predicting knee joint power absorption and generation during free and fast walking, and determine if RFD would improve predicting functional outcomes. Methods 26 subjects with knee OA and 23 healthy control subjects performed maximal voluntary isometric strength (MVIC) and RFD measures of the quadriceps. Subjects also underwent a 3-D motion analysis of both self-selected free and self-selected fast walking speeds. Joint kinetics were calculated from inverse dynamics. Results RFD was not different by group (p=0.763), however the OA subjects generated the highest peak RFD at a lower %MVIC (p=0.008). Controls walked significantly faster at both free and fast walking speeds (p=0.001, p=0.029). Knee angles at heel strike and peak knee extension were lower (p=0.004, p=0.027) in the OA group. During fast walking knee power generation was higher in Controls (p=0.028). MVIC and force of highest peak RFD predicted KOOS ADL score in the OA subjects, but only MVIC predicted stair climbing time. Conclusions The submaximal force at which peak RFD occurs plays a significant role in knee joint power as well as functional measures in the OA subjects, providing further evidence that factors other than maximal strength are also important in people with knee OA. PMID:24240535

  2. Effects of Lumbosacral Manipulation on Isokinetic Strength of the Knee Extensors and Flexors in Healthy Subjects: A Randomized, Controlled, Single-Blind Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Grant D.; Nitz, Arthur J.; Abel, Mark G.; Symons, T. Brock; Shapiro, Robert; Black, W. Scott; Yates, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of manual manipulations targeting the lumbar spine and/or sacroiliac joint on concentric knee extension and flexion forces. Torque production was measured during isometric and isokinetic contractions. Methods This was a randomized, controlled, single-blind crossover design with 21 asymptomatic, college-aged subjects who had never received spinal manipulation. During 2 separate sessions, subjects’ peak torques were recorded while performing maximal voluntary contractions on an isokinetic dynamometer. Isometric knee extension and flexion were recorded at 60° of knee flexion, in addition to isokinetic measurements obtained at 60°/s and 180°/s. Baseline measurements were acquired before either treatment form of lumbosacral manipulation or sham manipulation, followed by identical peak torque measurements within 5 and 20 minutes posttreatment. Data were analyzed with a repeated measures analysis of variance. Results A statistically significant difference did not occur between the effects of lumbosacral manipulation or the sham manipulation in the percentage changes of knee extension and flexion peak torques at 5 and 20 minutes posttreatment. Similar, nonsignificant results were observed in the overall percentage changes of isometric contractions (spinal manipulation 4.0 ± 9.5 vs sham 1.2 ± 6.3, P = .067), isokinetic contractions at 60°/s (spinal manipulation − 4.0 ± 14.2 vs sham − 0.3 ± 8.2, P = .34), and isokinetic contractions at 180°/s (spinal manipulation − 1.4 ± 13.9 vs sham − 5.5 ± 20.0, P = .18). Conclusion The results of the current study suggest that spinal manipulation does not yield an immediate strength-enhancing effect about the knee in healthy, college-aged subjects when measured with isokinetic dynamometry. PMID:26793035

  3. Effects of Lumbosacral Manipulation on Isokinetic Strength of the Knee Extensors and Flexors in Healthy Subjects: A Randomized, Controlled, Single-Blind Crossover Trial.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Grant D; Nitz, Arthur J; Abel, Mark G; Symons, T Brock; Shapiro, Robert; Black, W Scott; Yates, James W

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of manual manipulations targeting the lumbar spine and/or sacroiliac joint on concentric knee extension and flexion forces. Torque production was measured during isometric and isokinetic contractions. This was a randomized, controlled, single-blind crossover design with 21 asymptomatic, college-aged subjects who had never received spinal manipulation. During 2 separate sessions, subjects' peak torques were recorded while performing maximal voluntary contractions on an isokinetic dynamometer. Isometric knee extension and flexion were recorded at 60° of knee flexion, in addition to isokinetic measurements obtained at 60°/s and 180°/s. Baseline measurements were acquired before either treatment form of lumbosacral manipulation or sham manipulation, followed by identical peak torque measurements within 5 and 20 minutes posttreatment. Data were analyzed with a repeated measures analysis of variance. A statistically significant difference did not occur between the effects of lumbosacral manipulation or the sham manipulation in the percentage changes of knee extension and flexion peak torques at 5 and 20 minutes posttreatment. Similar, nonsignificant results were observed in the overall percentage changes of isometric contractions (spinal manipulation 4.0 ± 9.5 vs sham 1.2 ± 6.3, P = .067), isokinetic contractions at 60°/s (spinal manipulation - 4.0 ± 14.2 vs sham - 0.3 ± 8.2, P = .34), and isokinetic contractions at 180°/s (spinal manipulation - 1.4 ± 13.9 vs sham - 5.5 ± 20.0, P = .18). The results of the current study suggest that spinal manipulation does not yield an immediate strength-enhancing effect about the knee in healthy, college-aged subjects when measured with isokinetic dynamometry.

  4. Monitoring muscle metabolic indexes by time-domain near-infrared spectroscopy during knee flex-extension induced by functional electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, Simona; Contini, Davide; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Torricelli, Alessandro; Molteni, Franco; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2009-07-01

    A noninvasive methodology, combining functional electrical stimulation and time-domain near-infrared spectroscopy (TD-NIRS), is developed to verify whether stroke-altered muscular metabolism on postacute patients. Seven healthy subjects and nine postacute stroke patients undergo a protocol of knee flex-extension induced by quadricep electrical stimulation. During the protocol, TD-NIRS measurements are performed on both rectus femoris to investigate whether significant differences arise between able-bodied and stroke subjects and between patients' paretic and healthy legs. During baseline, metabolic parameters do not show any significant differences among subjects. During stimulation, paretic limbs produce a knee angle significantly lower than healthy legs. During recovery, patients' healthy limbs show a metabolic behavior correlated to able-bodied subjects. Instead, the correlation between the metabolic behavior of the paretic and able-bodied legs allows the definition of two patients' subgroups: one highly correlated (R>0.87) and the other uncorrelated (R<0.08). This grouping reflects the patient functional condition. The results obtained on the most impaired patients suggest that stroke does not produce any systemic consequences at the muscle, but the metabolic dysfunction seems to be local and unilateral. It is crucial to enlarge the sample size of the two subgroups before making these preliminary results a general finding.

  5. Measurement of the local muscular metabolism by time-domain near infrared spectroscopy during knee flex-extension induced by functional electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, D.; Spinelli, L.; Torricelli, A.; Ferrante, S.; Pedrocchi, A.; Molteni, F.; Ferrigno, G.; Cubeddu, R.

    2009-02-01

    We present a preliminary study that combines functional electrical stimulation and time-domain near infrared spectroscopy for a quantitative measurement of the local muscular metabolism during rehabilitation of post-acute stroke patients. Seven healthy subjects and nine post-acute stroke patients underwent a protocol of knee flex-extension of the quadriceps induced by functional electrical stimulation. During the protocol time-domain near infrared spectroscopy measurement were performed on both left and right muscle. Hemodynamic parameters (concentration of oxy- and deoxy-genated hemoglobin) during baseline did not show any significant differences between healthy subject and patients, while functional performances (knee angle amplitude) were distinctly different. Nevertheless, even if their clinical histories were noticeably different, there was no differentiation among functional performances of patients. On the basis of the hemodynamic parameters measured during the recovery phase, instead, it was possible to identify two classes of patients showing a metabolic trend similar or very different to the one obtained by healthy subjects. The presented results suggest that the combination of functional and metabolic information can give an additional tool to the clinicians in the evaluation of the rehabilitation in post-acute stroke patients.

  6. Training-related changes in the EMG-moment relationship during isometric contractions: Further evidence of improved control of muscle activation in strength-trained men?

    PubMed

    Amarantini, David; Bru, Bertrand

    2015-08-01

    The possibility of using electromyography (EMG) to track muscle activity has raised the question of its relationship with the effort exerted by the muscles around the joints. However, the EMG-moment relationship is yet to be fully defined, and increasing knowledge of this topic could contribute to research in motor control and to the development of EMG-based algorithms and devices. With regards the training-related adaptations at the peripheral and central level, the present study investigated the effect of strength training on EMG-moment relationship. Our aim was to clarify its nature and gain further understanding of how morphological and neural factors may affect its form. The EMG-moment relationship was determined during knee flexion and extension isometric contractions performed by strength-trained male athletes and untrained male participants. The results showed that strength training induced linearity of the EMG-moment relationship concomitantly with enhanced maximum force production capacity and decreased co-activation of knee agonist-antagonist muscle pair. These results clarified discordant results regarding the linear or curved nature of the EMG-moment in isometric conditions and suggested that the remarkable linearity of the EMG-moment found in trained participants could indicate improved control of muscle activation.

  7. Effects of Low-Impact Dance on Blood Biochemistry, Bone Mineral Density, the Joint Range of Motion of Lower Extremities, Knee Extension Torque, and Fall in Females.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui Ying; Tu, Jui Hung; Hsu, Chin Hsing; Tsao, Te Hung

    2016-01-01

    The effect of low-impact dance on blood metabolites, the joint range of motion (ROM) of the lower extremities, knee extension torque, bone mass density (BMD), the number of falls, and the confidence to perform daily activities (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale [MFES]) was examined in older sedentary women (age: 59 ± 4 years) before and after a 16-week intervention. Results showed that the average score for the MFES, some parameters of blood chemistry, and joint ROM were significantly improved after low-impact intervention. In addition to improvements in blood lipids and body fat percentages, the increases shown in the parameters regarding the lower extremities may contribute to confidence in performing common daily activities in older women, although the number of falls did not significantly differ between the two groups during the 16-week period.

  8. Whole-body vibration does not influence knee joint neuromuscular function or proprioception.

    PubMed

    Hannah, R; Minshull, C; Folland, J P

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the acute effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on knee joint position sense and indices of neuromuscular function, specifically strength, electromechanical delay and the rate of force development. Electromyography and electrically evoked contractions were used to investigate neural and contractile responses to WBV. Fourteen healthy males completed two treatment conditions on separate occasions: (1) 5 × 1 min of unilateral isometric squat exercise on a synchronous vibrating platform [30 Hz, 4 mm peak-to-peak amplitude] (WBV) and (2) a control condition (CON) of the same exercise without WBV. Knee joint position sense (joint angle replication task) and quadriceps neuromuscular function were assessed pre-, immediately-post and 1 h post-exercise. During maximum voluntary knee extensions, the peak force (PF(V)), electromechanical delay (EMD(V)), rate of force development (RFD(V)) and EMG of the quadriceps were measured. Twitch contractions of the knee extensors were electrically evoked to assess EMD(E) and RFD(E). The results showed no influence of WBV on knee joint position, EMD(V), PF(V) and RFD(V) during the initial 50, 100 or 150 ms of contraction. Similarly, electrically evoked neuromuscular function and neural activation remained unchanged following the vibration exercise. A single session of unilateral WBV did not influence any indices of thigh muscle neuromuscular performance or knee joint proprioception.

  9. Knee joint angle affects EMG-force relationship in the vastus intermedius muscle.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira; Akima, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    It is not understood how the knee joint angle affects the relationship between electromyography (EMG) and force of four individual quadriceps femoris (QF) muscles. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the knee joint angle on the EMG-force relationship of the four individual QF muscles, particularly the vastus intermedius (VI), during isometric knee extensions. Eleven healthy men performed 20-100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) at knee joint angles of 90°, 120° and 150°. Surface EMG of the four QF synergists was recorded and normalized by the root mean square during MVC. The normalized EMG of the four QF synergists at a knee joint angle of 150° was significantly lower than that at 90° and 120° (P < 0.05). Comparing the normalized EMG among the four QF synergists, a significantly lower normalized EMG was observed in the VI at 150° as compared with the other three QF muscles (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the EMG-force relationship of the four QF synergists shifted downward at an extended knee joint angle of 150°. Furthermore, the neuromuscular activation of the VI was the most sensitive to change in muscle length among the four QF synergistic muscles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanics of the knee. A study of joint and muscle load with clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Nisell, R

    1985-01-01

    The load moment of force about the knee joint during machine milking and when lifting a 12.8 kg box was quantified using a computerized static sagittal plane body model. Surface electromyography of quadriceps and hamstrings muscles was normalized and expressed as a percentage of an isometric maximum voluntary test contraction. Working with straight knees and the trunk flexed forwards induced extending knee load moments of maximum 55 Nm. Lifting the box with flexed knees gave flexing moments of 50 Nm at the beginning of the lift, irrespective of whether the burden was between or in front of the feet. During machine milking, a level difference between operator and cow of 0.70 m - 1.0 m significantly lowered the knee extending moments. To quantify the force magnitudes acting in the tibio-femoral and patello-femoral joints, a local biomechanical model of the knee was developed using a combination of cadaver knee dissections and lateral knee radiographs of healthy subjects. The moment arm of the knee extensor was significantly shorter for women than for men, which resulted in higher knee joint forces in women if the same moment was produced. A diagram for quantifying patellar forces was worked out. The force magnitudes given by the knee joint biomechanical model correlated well with experimentally forces measured by others. During the parallel squat in powerlifting, the maximum flexing knee load moment was estimated to 335-550 Nm when carrying a 382.5 kg burden and the in vivo force of a complete quadriceps tendon-muscle rupture to between 10,900 and 18,300 N. During isokinetic knee extension, the tibio-femoral compressive force reached peak magnitudes of 9 times body weight and the anteroposterior shear force was close to 1 body weight at knee angles straighter than 60 degrees, indicating that high forces stress the anterior cruciate ligament. A proximal resistance pad position decreased the shear force considerably, and this position is recommended in early

  11. The influence of familiarization sessions on the stability of ramp and ballistic isometric torque in older adults.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Lilian F; Barroso, Renato; Tricoli, Valmor; Mello, Marco T; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos

    2010-10-01

    Ramp isometric contractions determine peak torque (PT) and neuromuscular activation (NA), and ballistic contractions can be used to evaluate rate of torque development (RTD) and electrical mechanical delay (EMD). The purposes of this study were to assess the number of sessions required to stabilize ramp and ballistic PT and to compare PT and NA between contractions in older adults. Thirty-five older men and women (age 63.7 ± 3.7 yr, body mass 64.3 ± 10.7 kg, height 159.2 ± 6.6 cm) performed 4 sessions of unilateral ramp and ballistic isometric knee extension, 48 hr apart. PT significantly increased (main time effect p < .05) from the first to the third session, with no further improvements thereafter. There was a trend toward higher PT in ballistic than in ramp contractions. No difference between contraction types on EMG values was observed. Therefore, the authors suggest that 3 familiarization sessions be performed to correctly assess PT. In addition, PT, NA, RTD, and EMD can be assessed with ballistic contraction in older adults.

  12. [Studies of the neuromuscular system of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Börnert, K; Dippold, A

    1990-02-01

    The paper analysis the therapeutic effects of isometric training and electromechanic therapy (EMT) of the quadriceps muscles on subjects. The effects of the training practised with the knee joint bent was to be compared with previous results of training with the knee joint stretched. 36 subjects were trained and the increase in strength was measured with the help of a strain gauge dynamometer. Again a marked superiority of the EMT over sole isometric training could be demonstrated. More over, the results showed that the increase of the isometric maximal strength following an EMT is not influenced by the position of the angle of the joint.

  13. Influence of aging on isometric muscle strength, fat-free mass and electromyographic signal power of the upper and lower limbs in women

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Josária F.; Alvim, Felipe C.; Castro, Eliane A.; Doimo, Leonice A.; Silva, Marcus V.; Novo, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Aging is a multifactorial process that leads to changes in the quantity and quality of skeletal muscle and contributes to decreased levels of muscle strength. Objective This study sought to investigate whether the isometric muscle strength, fat-free mass (FFM) and power of the electromyographic (EMG) signal of the upper and lower limbs of women are similarly affected by aging. Method The sample consisted of 63 women, who were subdivided into three groups (young (YO) n=33, 24.7±3.5 years; middle age (MA) n=15, 58.6±4.2 years; and older adults (OA). n=15, 72.0±4.2 years). Isometric strength was recorded simultaneously with the capture of the electrical activity of the flexor muscles of the fingers and the vastus lateralis during handgrip and knee extension tests, respectively. FFM was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results The handgrip strength measurements were similar among groups (p=0.523), whereas the FFM of the upper limbs was lower in group OA compared to group YO (p=0.108). The RMSn values of the hand flexors were similar among groups (p=0.754). However, the strength of the knee extensors, the FFM of the lower limbs and the RMSn values of the vastus lateralis were lower in groups MA (p=0.014, p=0.006 and p=0.013, respectively) and OA (p=0.000, p=0.000 and p<0.000, respectively) compared to group YO. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that changes in isometric muscle strength in MLG and electromyographic activity of the lower limbs are more pronounced with the aging process of the upper limb. PMID:24676705

  14. [Long-term results of proximal osteocartilaginous autografts in extensive cartilagenous destruction of the knee. Apropos of 5 cases].

    PubMed

    Maynou, C; Mestdagh, H; Beltrand, E; Petroff, E; Dubois, H

    1998-06-01

    Five patients with a large defect in the articular cartilage at the knee joint were treated by transplantation of an autogenic osteochondral fragment. The graft was harvested from the posterior portion of the ipsilateral femoral condyle in 4 cases of osteochondritis dissecans, and from the lateral third of the patella pedicled on the patellar ligament in one case of posttraumatic necrotic collapse of the lateral tibial plateau. One patient underwent concomitant high tibial osteotomy. Two months postoperatively bony union was achieved in all cases but in one case, the grafted articular cartilage did not survive after weight bearing because of an overlooked varus deformity. At the follow-up examination (8 to 20 years) all 5 patients were asymptomatic ; the range of flexion was somewhat restricted (120 degrees) ; roentgenogram revealed slight narrowing of the articular space or at least flattening of the grafted zone and subchondral osteosclerosis. At arthroscopic exploration, the grafted zones were recognizable from the surrounding cartilage, and histologic examination of their border revealed fibrocartilage and proliferating vessels; late gonarthrosis might ensue over time. Therefore the procedure should be performed only in large osteochondral defects where neither reattachment of a loose body, nor hemiarthroplasty, nor isolated osteotomy are suitable and before degenerative changes have developed. Morever any associated varus deformity requires concomitant correction by high tibial osteotomy to relieve stress from the graft.

  15. Comparison of elasticity of human tendon and aponeurosis in knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2005-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the elasticity of tendon and aponeurosis in human knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors in vivo and to examine whether the maximal strain of tendon was correlated to that of aponeurosis. The elongation of tendon and aponeurosis during isometric knee extension (n = 23) and ankle plantar flexion (n = 22), respectively, were determined using a real-time ultrasonic apparatus, while the participants performed ramp isometric contractions up to voluntary maximum. To calculate the strain values from the measured elongation, we measured the respective length of tendon and aponeurosis. For the knee extensors, the maximal strain of aponeurosis (12.1 +/- 2.8 %) was significantly greater than that of the patella tendon (8.3 +/- 2.4 %), p < 0.001. On the contrary, the maximal strain of Achilles tendon (5.9 +/- 1.4 %) was significantly greater than that of aponeurosis in ankle plantar flexors (2.7 +/- 1.4 %), p < 0.001. Furthermore, for both knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors there was no significant correlation between maximal strain of tendon and aponeurosis. These results would be important for understanding the different roles of tendon and aponeurosis during human movements and for more accurate muscle modeling.

  16. Pain complaint: comparison of electrical stimulation with conventional isometric exercise.

    PubMed

    Currier, D; Mann, R

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess the pain experiences of 17 healthy subjects who trained with isometric exercise, electrical stimulation, and the combination of isometric exercise and electrical stimulation. The McGill Pain Questionnaire was administered during posttest sessions upon termination of 5 weeks of training. Results indicated that subjects who received the electrical stimulation mode of training experienced similar torque gains but less muscle soreness than those who used conventional isometric exercise. Most subjects of the exercise and electrical stimulation groups experienced pain at the medial aspect of their knee, The pain was predominantly expressed as a sensory rather than an effective or an evaluative quality. Of all the trained subjects, those who received electrical stimulation described the greatest amount of transient discomfort. Electrical stimulation does not appear to increase the risk of discomfort more than volitional resistive exercise for achieving similar force-developing capacity of muscle in healthy subjects.J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1984;5(6):318-323.

  17. Isokinetic and isometric strength-endurance after 6 hours of immersion and 6 degrees head-down tilt in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer-Bailey, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Hutchinson, T. M.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine weight (water) loss levels for onset of muscular strength and endurance changes during deconditioning. METHODS: Seven men (27-40 yr) performed maximal shoulder-, knee-, and ankle-joint isometric (0 degree.s(-1) load) and isokinetic (60 degrees, 120 degrees, 180 degrees.s(-1) velocity) exercise tests during ambulatory control (AC), after 6 h of 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT; dry-bulb temp. = 23.2 +/- SD 0.6 degrees C, relative humidity = 31.1+/- 11.1%) and after 6 h of 80 degrees foot-down head-out water immersion (WI; water temp. = 35.0 +/- SD 0.1 degree C) treatments. RESULTS: Weight (water) loss after HDT (1.10 +/- SE 0.14 kg, 1.4 +/- 0.2% body wt) and WI (1.54+/- 0.19 kg, 2.0 +/- 0.2% body wt) were not different, but urinary excretion with WI (1,354 +/- 142 ml.6 h(-1)) was 28% greater (p < 0.05) than that of 975 +/- 139 ml.6 h(-1) with HDT. Muscular endurance (total work; maximal flexion-extension of the non-dominant knee at 180 degrees.s(-1) for 30 s) was not different between AC and the WI or HDT treatments. Shoulder-, knee-, and ankle-joint strength was unchanged except for three knee-joint peak torques: AC torque (120 degrees.s(-1), 285 +/- 20 Nm) decreased to 268 +/- 21 Nm (delta = -6%, p < 0.05) with WI; and AC torques (180 degrees.s(-1), 260 +/- 19 Nm) decreased to 236 +/- 15 Nm (delta = -9%, p < 0.01) with HDT, and to 235 +/- 19 Nm (delta = -10%, p < 0.01) with WI. CONCLUSION: Thus, the total body hypohydration threshold level for shoulder- and ankle-joint strength and endurance decrements is more than 2% body weight (water) loss, while significant reduction in knee-joint muscular strength-endurance occurred only at moderate (120 degrees.s(-1) and lighter (180 degrees.s(-1)) loads with body weight loss of 1.4-2.0% following WI or HDT, respectively. These weight (water) losses and knee-joint strength decrements are somewhat less than the mean weight loss of 2.6% and knee-joint strength decrements of 6-20% of American astronauts after

  18. Isokinetic and isometric strength-endurance after 6 hours of immersion and 6 degrees head-down tilt in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer-Bailey, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Hutchinson, T. M.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine weight (water) loss levels for onset of muscular strength and endurance changes during deconditioning. METHODS: Seven men (27-40 yr) performed maximal shoulder-, knee-, and ankle-joint isometric (0 degree.s(-1) load) and isokinetic (60 degrees, 120 degrees, 180 degrees.s(-1) velocity) exercise tests during ambulatory control (AC), after 6 h of 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT; dry-bulb temp. = 23.2 +/- SD 0.6 degrees C, relative humidity = 31.1+/- 11.1%) and after 6 h of 80 degrees foot-down head-out water immersion (WI; water temp. = 35.0 +/- SD 0.1 degree C) treatments. RESULTS: Weight (water) loss after HDT (1.10 +/- SE 0.14 kg, 1.4 +/- 0.2% body wt) and WI (1.54+/- 0.19 kg, 2.0 +/- 0.2% body wt) were not different, but urinary excretion with WI (1,354 +/- 142 ml.6 h(-1)) was 28% greater (p < 0.05) than that of 975 +/- 139 ml.6 h(-1) with HDT. Muscular endurance (total work; maximal flexion-extension of the non-dominant knee at 180 degrees.s(-1) for 30 s) was not different between AC and the WI or HDT treatments. Shoulder-, knee-, and ankle-joint strength was unchanged except for three knee-joint peak torques: AC torque (120 degrees.s(-1), 285 +/- 20 Nm) decreased to 268 +/- 21 Nm (delta = -6%, p < 0.05) with WI; and AC torques (180 degrees.s(-1), 260 +/- 19 Nm) decreased to 236 +/- 15 Nm (delta = -9%, p < 0.01) with HDT, and to 235 +/- 19 Nm (delta = -10%, p < 0.01) with WI. CONCLUSION: Thus, the total body hypohydration threshold level for shoulder- and ankle-joint strength and endurance decrements is more than 2% body weight (water) loss, while significant reduction in knee-joint muscular strength-endurance occurred only at moderate (120 degrees.s(-1) and lighter (180 degrees.s(-1)) loads with body weight loss of 1.4-2.0% following WI or HDT, respectively. These weight (water) losses and knee-joint strength decrements are somewhat less than the mean weight loss of 2.6% and knee-joint strength decrements of 6-20% of American astronauts after

  19. Lack of effect of superficial heat to the knee on quadriceps function in individuals with quadriceps inhibition.

    PubMed

    Warner, Brandon; Kim, Kyung-Min; Hart, Joseph M; Saliba, Susan

    2013-05-01

    Quadriceps function improves after application of focal joint cooling or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation to the knee in patients with arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI), yet it is not known whether superficial heat is able to produce a similar effect. To determine quadriceps function after superficial heat to the knee joint in individuals with AMI. Single blinded randomized crossover. Laboratory. 12 subjects (4 female, 8 males; 25.6 ± 7.7 y, 177.2 ± 12.7 cm, 78.4 ± 18.2 kg) with a history of knee-joint pathology and AMI, determined with a quadriceps central activation ratio (CAR) of <90%. 3 treatment conditions for 15 min on separate days: superficial heat using a cervical moist-heat pack (77 °C), sham using a cervical moist pack (room temperature at about 24 °C), and control (no treatment). All subjects received all treatment conditions in a randomized order. Central activation ratio and knee-extension torque during maximal voluntary isometric contraction with the knee flexed to 60° were collected at pre, immediately post, 30 min post, and 45 min posttreatment. Skin temperature of the quadriceps and knee and room temperature were also recorded at the same time points. Three (treatment conditions) by 4 (time) repeated ANOVAs found that there were no significant interactions or main effects in either CAR or knee-extension torque (all P > .05). Skin-temperature 1-way ANOVAs revealed that the skin temperature in the knee during superficial heat was significantly higher than other treatment conditions at all time points (P < .05). Superficial heat to the knee joint using a cervical moist-heat pack did not influence quadriceps function in individuals with AMI in the quadriceps.

  20. Effects of prior exercise on oxygen uptake and phosphocreatine kinetics during high-intensity knee-extension exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rossiter, H B; Ward, S A; Kowalchuk, J M; Howe, F A; Griffiths, J R; Whipp, B J

    2001-01-01

    A prior bout of high-intensity square-wave exercise can increase the temporal adaptation of pulmonary oxygen uptake () to a subsequent bout of high-intensity exercise. The mechanisms controlling this adaptation, however, are poorly understood. We therefore determined the dynamics of intramuscular [phosphocreatine] ([PCr]) simultaneously with those of in seven males who performed two consecutive bouts of high-intensity square-wave, knee-extensor exercise in the prone position for 6 min with a 6 min rest interval. A magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) transmit-receive surface coil under the quadriceps muscle allowed estimation of [PCr]; was measured breath-by-breath using a custom-designed turbine and a mass spectrometer system. The kinetics of the second exercise bout were altered compared with the first such that (a) not only was the instantaneous rate of change (at a given level of ) greater but the phase II τ was also reduced – averaging 46.6 ± 6.0 s (bout 1) and 40.7 ± 8.4 s (bout 2) (mean ± s.d.) and (b) the magnitude of the later slow component was reduced. This was associated with a reduction of, on average, 16.1 % in the total exercise-induced [PCr] decrement over the 6 min of the exercise, of which 4.0 % was due to a reduction in the slow component of [PCr]. There was no discernable alteration in the initial rate of [PCr] change. The prior exercise, therefore, changed the multi-compartment behaviour towards that of functionally first-order dynamics. These observations demonstrate that the responses relative to the work rate input for high-intensity exercise are non-linear, as are, it appears, the putative phosphate-linked controllers for which [PCr] serves as a surrogate. PMID:11711581

  1. Effects of weight lifting training combined with plyometric exercises on physical fitness, body composition, and knee extension velocity during kicking in football.

    PubMed

    Perez-Gomez, Jorge; Olmedillas, Hugo; Delgado-Guerra, Safira; Ara, Ignacio; Vicente-Rodriguez, German; Ortiz, Rafael Arteaga; Chavarren, Javier; Calbet, Jose A L

    2008-06-01

    The effects of a training program consisting of weight lifting combined with plyometric exercises on kicking performance, myosin heavy-chain composition (vastus lateralis), physical fitness, and body composition (using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)) was examined in 37 male physical education students divided randomly into a training group (TG: 16 subjects) and a control group (CG: 21 subjects). The TG followed 6 weeks of combined weight lifting and plyometric exercises. In all subjects, tests were performed to measure their maximal angular speed of the knee during in-step kicks on a stationary ball. Additional tests for muscle power (vertical jump), running speed (30 m running test), anaerobic capacity (Wingate and 300 m running tests), and aerobic power (20 m shuttle run tests) were also performed. Training resulted in muscle hypertrophy (+4.3%), increased peak angular velocity of the knee during kicking (+13.6%), increased percentage of myosin heavy-chain (MHC) type IIa (+8.4%), increased 1 repetition maximum (1 RM) of inclined leg press (ILP) (+61.4%), leg extension (LE) (+20.2%), leg curl (+15.9%), and half squat (HQ) (+45.1%), and enhanced performance in vertical jump (all p < or = 0.05). In contrast, MHC type I was reduced (-5.2%, p < or = 0.05) after training. In the control group, these variables remained unchanged. In conclusion, 6 weeks of strength training combining weight lifting and plyometric exercises results in significant improvement of kicking performance, as well as other physical capacities related to success in football (soccer).

  2. Ligament length relationships in the moving knee.

    PubMed

    Sidles, J A; Larson, R V; Garbini, J L; Downey, D J; Matsen, F A

    1988-01-01

    This article presents an investigation of potential ligament attachment sites for surgical reconstruction of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments as well as for the lateral extraarticular iliotibial band tenodesis. Our methodology was based on quantitative measurements of knee anatomy and motion in fresh cadavers, not on biomechanical modeling. Using computer search techniques, we located all the ligament insertion sites that were nearly isometric for motion of the intact knee.

  3. Effects on Hamstring Muscle Extensibility, Muscle Activity, and Balance of Different Stretching Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kyoung-Il; Nam, Hyung-Chun; Jung, Kyoung-Sim

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two different stretching techniques on range of motion (ROM), muscle activation, and balance. [Subjects] For the present study, 48 adults with hamstring muscle tightness were recruited and randomly divided into three groups: a static stretching group (n=16), a PNF stretching group (n=16), a control group (n=16). [Methods] Both of the stretching techniques were applied to the hamstring once. Active knee extension angle, muscle activation during maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC), and static balance were measured before and after the application of each stretching technique. [Results] Both the static stretching and the PNF stretching groups showed significant increases in knee extension angle compared to the control group. However, there were no significant differences in muscle activation or balance between the groups. [Conclusion] Static stretching and PNF stretching techniques improved ROM without decrease in muscle activation, but neither of them exerted statistically significant effects on balance. PMID:24648633

  4. Measurement of the end-to-end distances between the femoral and tibial insertion sites of the anterior cruciate ligament during knee flexion and with rotational torque.

    PubMed

    Wang, Joon Ho; Kato, Yuki; Ingham, Sheila J M; Maeyama, Akira; Linde-Rosen, Monica; Smolinski, Patrick; Fu, Freddie H

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the end-to-end distance changes in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) fibers during flexion/extension and internal/external rotation of the knee. The positional relation between the femur and tibia of 10 knees was digitized on a robotic system during flexion/extension and with an internal/external rotational torque (5 Nm). The ACL insertion site data, acquired by 3-dimensional scanning, were superimposed on the positional data. The end-to-end distances of 5 representative points on the femoral and tibial insertion sites of the ACL were calculated. The end-to-end distances of all representative points except the most anterior points were longest at full extension and shortest at 90°. The distances of the anteromedial (AM) and posterolateral (PL) bundles were 37.2 ± 2.1 mm and 27.5 ± 2.8 mm, respectively, at full extension and 34.7 ± 2.4 mm and 20.7 ± 2.3 mm, respectively, at 90°. Only 4 knees had an isometric point, which was 1 of the 3 anterior points. Under an internal torque, both bundles became longer with statistical meaning at all flexion angles (P = .005). The end-to-end distances of all points became longest with internal torque at full extension and shortest with an external torque at 90°. Only 4 of 10 specimens had an isometric point at a variable anterior point. The end-to-end distances of the AM and PL bundles were longer in extension and shorter in flexion. The nonisometric tendency of the ACL and the end-to-end distance change during knee flexion/extension and internal/external rotation should be considered during ACL reconstruction to avoid overconstraint of the graft. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessing the accuracy of subject-specific, muscle-model parameters determined by optimizing to match isometric strength.

    PubMed

    DeSmitt, Holly J; Domire, Zachary J

    2016-12-01

    Biomechanical models are sensitive to the choice of model parameters. Therefore, determination of accurate subject specific model parameters is important. One approach to generate these parameters is to optimize the values such that the model output will match experimentally measured strength curves. This approach is attractive as it is inexpensive and should provide an excellent match to experimentally measured strength. However, given the problem of muscle redundancy, it is not clear that this approach generates accurate individual muscle forces. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate this approach using simulated data to enable a direct comparison. It is hypothesized that the optimization approach will be able to recreate accurate muscle model parameters when information from measurable parameters is given. A model of isometric knee extension was developed to simulate a strength curve across a range of knee angles. In order to realistically recreate experimentally measured strength, random noise was added to the modeled strength. Parameters were solved for using a genetic search algorithm. When noise was added to the measurements the strength curve was reasonably recreated. However, the individual muscle model parameters and force curves were far less accurate. Based upon this examination, it is clear that very different sets of model parameters can recreate similar strength curves. Therefore, experimental variation in strength measurements has a significant influence on the results. Given the difficulty in accurately recreating individual muscle parameters, it may be more appropriate to perform simulations with lumped actuators representing similar muscles.

  6. Frontal and transverse plane hip kinematics and gluteus maximus recruitment correlate with frontal plane knee kinematics during single-leg squat tests in women.

    PubMed

    Hollman, John H; Galardi, Christy M; Lin, I-Hsuan; Voth, Brandon C; Whitmarsh, Crystal L

    2014-04-01

    Hip muscle dysfunction may be associated with knee valgus that contributes to problems like patellofemoral pain syndrome. The purpose of this study was to (1) compare knee and hip kinematics and hip muscle strength and recruitment between "good" and "poor" performers on a single-leg squat test developed to assess hip muscle dysfunction and (2) examine relationships between hip muscle strength, recruitment and frontal plane knee kinematics to see which variables correlated with knee valgus during the test. Forty-one active women classified via visual rating as "good" or "poor" performers on the test participated. Participants completed 5-repetition single-leg squat tests. Isometric hip extension and abduction strength, gluteus maximus and gluteus medius recruitment, and 3-dimensional hip and knee kinematics during the test were compared between groups and examined for their association with frontal plane knee motion. "Poor" performers completed the test with more hip adduction (mean difference=7.6°) and flexion (mean difference=6.3°) than "good" performers. No differences in knee kinematics, hip strength or hip muscle recruitment occurred. However, the secondary findings indicated that increased medial hip rotation (partial r=0.94) and adduction (partial r=0.42) and decreased gluteus maximus recruitment (partial r=0.35) correlated with increased knee valgus. Whereas hip muscle function and knee kinematics did not differ between groups as we'd hypothesized, frontal plane knee motion correlated with transverse and frontal plane hip motions and with gluteus maximus recruitment. Gluteus maximus recruitment may modulate frontal plane knee kinematics during single-leg squats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Strength deficit of knee flexors is dependent on hip position in adults with chronic hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Michaelsen, Stella M; Ovando, Angélica C; Bortolotti, Adriano; Bandini, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which muscle length affects force production in paretic lower limb muscles after stroke in comparison to controls has not been established. To investigate knee flexor strength deficits dependent on hip joint position in adults with hemiparesis and compare with healthy controls. a cross-sectional study with ten subjects with chronic (63±40 months) hemiparesis with mild to moderate lower limb paresis (Fugl-Meyer score 26±3) and 10 neurologically healthy controls. Isometric knee flexion strength with the hip positioned at 90° and 0° of flexion was assessed randomly on the paretic and non-paretic side of hemiparetic subjects and healthy controls. Subjects were asked to perform a maximal isometric contraction sustained for four seconds and measured by a dynamometer. The ratio of knee flexor strength between these two hip positions was calculated: Hip 0°/Hip 90°. Also, locomotor capacity was evaluated by the timed up and go test and by walking velocity over 10 meters. In subjects with hemiparesis, absolute knee flexion torque decreased (p<0.001) with the hip in extension (at 0°). The ratio of knee flexor torque Hip 0°/Hip 90° on the paretic side in hemiparetics was lower than in controls (p=0.02). Weakness dependent on joint position is more significant in the paretic lower limb of adults with hemiparesis when compared to controls. More attention should be given to lower limb muscle strengthening exercises in individuals with stroke, with emphasis on the strengthening exercises in positions in which the muscle is shortened.

  8. Dynamic Frequency Analyses of Lower Extremity Muscles during Sit-To-Stand Motion for the Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Yagi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Objective Muscle activities during the sit-to-stand motion (STS) are characterized by coordinated movements between hip extensors and knee extensors. However, previous reports regarding the STS and lower extremity muscle activities have focused on some quantitative assessment, but little qualitative research. This study aimed to examine the muscle activities of the lower extremity both quantitatively and qualitatively. Methods Study participants included 13 patients with knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) and 11 age-matched asymptomatic controls. The task was STS from a chair with a height-adjustable seat. EMG activities were acquired using surface electromyogram. The root mean square signals normalized as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction values (RMS%MVC) and the mean power frequency (MPF) were calculated. Results During STS, knee OA patients had increased RMS%MVC of the vastus medialis and raised MPF of the rectus femoris before buttocks-off. Conclusion These findings suggest that STS of knee OA patients not only increased relative muscle activity of the vastus medialis, but also enlisted the rectus femoris in knee extension to improve muscle contraction force by activating more type II fibers to accomplish buttocks-off. PMID:26807578

  9. Evolution of knee kinematics three months after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Alice, Bonnefoy-Mazure; Stéphane, Armand; Yoshisama, Sagawa Junior; Pierre, Hoffmeyer; Domizio, Suvà; Hermes, Miozzari; Katia, Turcot

    2015-02-01

    In patients with debilitating knee osteoarthritis, total knee replacement is the most common surgical procedure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that knee kinematics one year after total knee replacement are still altered compared to the healthy joint. However, little is known regarding impairments and functional limitations of patients several months after total knee replacement. The aim of this study was to describe the evolution of the knee gait kinematic in patients with knee osteoarthritis before and three months after a total knee replacement. Ninety patients who were to undergo total knee replacement were included in this study. Twenty-three subjects were recruited as the control group. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed before and three months after surgery. The spatio-temporal parameters and three-dimensional knee kinematics for the operated limb were evaluated during a comfortable gait and compared between groups (the before and after surgery groups and the control group). Three months after surgery, patients always walk with a slower gait velocity and lower knee flexion-extension movements compared to the control group. However, a degree of progress was observed in term of the stride and step length, gait velocity and knee alignment in the coronal plane. Our results suggest that the disability is still significant for most patients three months after total knee replacement. A better understand of the impairments and functional limitations following surgery would help clinicians design rehabilitation programs. Moreover, patients should be informed that rehabilitation after total knee replacement is a long process.

  10. Ocular hemodynamics during isometric exercise.

    PubMed

    Kiss, B; Dallinger, S; Polak, K; Findl, O; Eichler, H G; Schmetterer, L

    2001-01-01

    The autoregulatory capacity of the human retina is well documented, but the pressure-flow relationship of the human choroid is still a matter of controversy. Recent data, using laser Doppler flowmetry to measure choroidal blood flow, indicate that the choroid has some autoregulatory potential, whereas most data using other techniques for the assessment of choroidal hemodynamics indicate that the choroidal pressure-flow curve is linear. We used a new laser interferometric technique to characterize choroidal blood flow during isometric exercise. Twenty healthy subjects performed squatting for 6 min during normocapnia and during inhalation of 5% CO2 and 95% air. Ocular fundus pulsation amplitude, flow velocities in the ophthalmic artery, intraocular pressure, and systemic hemodynamics were measured in 2-min intervals. To gain information on choroidal blood flow fundus pulsation amplitude was corrected for changes in flow pulsatility using data from the ophthalmic artery and for changes in pulse rate. Ocular perfusion pressure was calculated from mean arterial pressure and intraocular pressure. The ocular pressure-flow relationship was calculated by sorting data according to ascending ocular perfusion pressure values. In a pilot study in 6 healthy subjects comparable ocular pressure flow relationships were obtained when choroidal blood flow was assessed with the method described above and with laser Doppler flowmetry. In the main study isometric exercise caused a significant increase in mean arterial pressure (56%, P < 0.001), pulse rate (84%, P < 0.001), and intraocular pressure (37%, P 0.004), but decreased fundus pulsation amplitude (-36%, P < 0.001). Significant deviations from baseline choroidal blood flow were observed only at ocular perfusion pressures >69% during normocapnia and 70% during hypercapnia. Our data indicate that during isometric exercise the choroid has a high capacity to keep blood flow constant despite changes in perfusion pressure and that this

  11. MUSCLE ACTIVITY DURING KNEE‐EXTENSION STRENGTHENING EXERCISE PERFORMED WITH ELASTIC TUBING AND ISOTONIC RESISTANCE

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrup, Emil; Andersen, Christoffer H.; Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Zebis, Mette K.; Andersen, Lars L.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Purpose: While elastic resistance training, targeting the upper body is effective for strength training, the effect of elastic resistance training on lower body muscle activity remains questionable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the EMG‐angle relationship of the quadriceps muscle during 10‐RM knee‐extensions performed with elastic tubing and an isotonic strength training machine. Methods: 7 women and 9 men aged 28‐67 years (mean age 44 and 41 years, respectively) participated. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded in 10 muscles during the concentric and eccentric contraction phase of a knee extension exercise performed with elastic tubing and in training machine and normalized to maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) EMG (nEMG). Knee joint angle was measured during the exercises using electronic inclinometers (range of motion 0‐90°). Results: When comparing the machine and elastic resistance exercises there were no significant differences in peak EMG of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM) during the concentric contraction phase. However, during the eccentric phase, peak EMG was significantly higher (p<0.01) in RF and VM when performing knee extensions using the training machine. In VL and VM the EMG‐angle pattern was different between the two training modalities (significant angle by exercise interaction). When using elastic resistance, the EMG‐angle pattern peaked towards full knee extension (0°), whereas angle at peak EMG occurred closer to knee flexion position (90°) during the machine exercise. Perceived loading (Borg CR10) was similar during knee extensions performed with elastic tubing (5.7±0.6) compared with knee extensions performed in training machine (5.9±0.5). Conclusion: Knee extensions performed with elastic tubing induces similar high (>70% nEMG) quadriceps muscle activity during the concentric contraction phase, but slightly lower during the eccentric

  12. Metabolically assessed muscle fibre recruitment in brief isometric contractions at different intensities.

    PubMed

    Beltman, J G M; de Haan, A; Haan, H; Gerrits, H L; van Mechelen, W; Sargeant, A J

    2004-08-01

    This study investigated the recruitment of type I, IIA and IIAX fibres after seven isometric contractions at 40, 70 and 100% maximal voluntary knee extension torque (MVC, 1 s on/1 s off). Biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscle were collected from seven subjects at rest and immediately post-exercise. Fibre fragments were dissected from the freeze-dried samples and characterized as type I, IIA and IIAX using mATPase staining. Phosphocreatine (PCr) and creatine (Cr) content were measured in the remaining part of characterized fibres. A decline in the ratio of PCr to Cr (PCr/Cr) was used as an indication of activation. The mean peak torques were, respectively, 39 (2), 72 (2) and 87 (6)% MVC. Cumulative distributions of type I and IIA fibres were significantly shifted to lower PCr/Cr ratios at all intensities (Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, P<0.05). The cumulative distribution of type IIAX fibres showed a significant leftward shift only at 87% MVC ( P<0.05). A hierarchical order of fibre activation with increasing intensity of exercise was found, with some indication of rate coding for type I and IIA fibres. Evidence for activation of type IIAX fibres was only found at 87% MVC.

  13. Neuromuscular adaptations associated with knee joint angle-specific force change.

    PubMed

    Noorkõiv, Marika; Nosaka, Kazunori; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2014-08-01

    Neuromuscular adaptations to joint angle-specific force increases after isometric training have not yet been fully elucidated. This study examined angle-specific neuromuscular adaptations in response to isometric knee extension training at short (SL, joint angle 38.1° ± 3.7°) versus long (LL, 87.5° ± 6.0°) muscle lengths. Sixteen men trained three times a week for 6 wk either at SL (n = 8) or LL (n = 8). Voluntary maximal isometric knee extensor (MVC) force, doublet twitch force, EMG amplitudes (EMG/Mmax), and voluntary activation during MVC force (VA%) were measured at eight knee joint angles (30°-100°) at weeks 0, 3, and 6. Muscle volume and cross-sectional area (CSA) were measured from magnetic resonance imaging scans, and fascicle length (Lf) was assessed using ultrasonography before and after training. Clear joint angle specificity of force increase was seen in SL but not in LL. The 13.4% ± 9.7% (P = 0.01) force increase around the training angle in SL was related to changes in vastus lateralis and vastus medialis EMG/Mmax around the training angle (r = 0.84-0.88, P < 0.05), without changes in the doublet twitch force-angle relation or muscle size. In LL, muscle volume and CSA increased and the changes in CSA at specific muscle regions were correlated with changes in MVC force. A 5.4% ± 4.9% (P = 0.001) increase in Lf found in both groups was not associated with angle-specific force changes. There were no angle-specific changes in VA%. The EMG/Mmax, although not VA%, results suggest that neural adaptations underpinned training-related changes at short quadriceps lengths, but hypertrophic changes predominated after training at long lengths. The findings of this study should contribute to the development of more effective and evidence-based rehabilitation and strength training protocols.

  14. Comparison of isometric ankle strength between females with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Moura Campos Carvalho E Silva, Ana Paula; Magalhães, Eduardo; Bryk, Flavio Fernandes; Fukuda, Thiago Yukio

    2014-10-01

    Proximal and distal influences on the knee may be related as etiological factors of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). The distal factors include subtalar excessive pronation as well as medial tibia rotation, but no study has investigated whether ankle weakness could lead to alterations that influence the patellofemoral joint. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare the ankle dorsiflexor and invertor muscles strength, as well as rearfoot eversion and the Navicular Drop Test (NDT) in females with PFPS to a control group of females of similar demographics without PFPS. Forty females, between 20 and 40 years of age (control group: n=20; PFPS group: n=20) participated. Rearfoot eversion range of motion and the NDT were assessed for both groups. The Numeric Pain Rating Scale and the Anterior Knee Pain Scale were used to evaluate the level of pain and the functional capacity of the knee during activities, respectively. Isometric ankle dorsiflexor and invertor strength was measured using a handheld dynamometer as the dependent variable. The isometric strength of the dorsiflexor and invertor muscle groups in females with PFPS was not statistically different (P>0.05) than that of the control group. There was no statistically significant difference between groups for rearfoot eversion and NDT (p>0.05). These results suggest that there is no difference between isometric ankle dorsiflexion and inversion strength, the NDT, and rearfoot eversion range of motion in females with and without PFPS. 3-b.

  15. The use of the isometric squat as a measure of strength and explosiveness.

    PubMed

    Bazyler, Caleb D; Beckham, George K; Sato, Kimitake

    2015-05-01

    The isometric squat has been used to detect changes in kinetic variables as a result of training; however, controversy exists in its application to dynamic multijoint tasks. Thus, the purpose of this study was to further examine the relationship between isometric squat kinetic variables and isoinertial strength measures. Subjects (17 men, 1-repetition maximum [1RM]: 148.2 ± 23.4 kg) performed squats 2 d · wk(-1) for 12 weeks and were tested on 1RM squat, 1RM partial squat, and isometric squat at 90° and 120° of knee flexion. Test-retest reliability was very good for all isometric measures (intraclass correlation coefficients > 0.90); however, rate of force development 250 milliseconds at 90° and 120° seemed to have a higher systematic error (relative technical error of measurement = 8.12%, 9.44%). Pearson product-moment correlations indicated strong relationships between isometric peak force at 90° (IPF 90°) and 1RM squat (r = 0.86), and IPF 120° and 1RM partial squat (r = 0.79). Impulse 250 milliseconds (IMP) at 90° and 120° exhibited moderate to strong correlations with 1RM squat (r = 0.70, 0.58) and partial squat (r = 0.73, 0.62), respectively. Rate of force development at 90° and 120° exhibited weak to moderate correlations with 1RM squat (r = 0.55, 0.43) and partial squat (r = 0.32, 0.42), respectively. These findings demonstrate a degree of joint angle specificity to dynamic tasks for rapid and peak isometric force production. In conclusion, an isometric squat performed at 90° and 120° is a reliable testing measure that can provide a strong indication of changes in strength and explosiveness during training.

  16. Short term effectiveness of neural sliders and neural tensioners as an adjunct to static stretching of hamstrings on knee extension angle in healthy individuals: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Saurab; Balthillaya, Ganesh; Rao, Roopa; Mani, Ramakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the added benefit of nerve-biased interventions over static stretching in hamstring flexibility and to compare the effectiveness of two types of nerve-biased interventions over a week. Three-arm assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial. University Laboratory. Sixty healthy individuals (mean age = 22 ± 2.4 years) with reduced hamstring flexibility were randomized to three groups who received static stretching and neurodynamic sliders (NS-SS); static stretching with neurodynamic tensioner (NT-SS) and static stretching (SS) alone. Knee extension angle (KEA) in degrees. Baseline characteristics including demographic, anthropomorphic and KEA between groups were comparable. A significant interaction was observed between group (intervention) and time, [F (2,114) = 3.595; p = 0.031]. Post-hoc pairwise comparisons analyses revealed significant differences at post-intervention measurement time point between NS-SS and SS (mean difference: -6.8; 95%CI = -12, -1.5; p = 0.011) and NT-SS and SS (mean difference: -11.6; 95%CI = -16.7, -6.3; p < 0.001). However there was no significant difference between NS-SS and NT-SS groups (mean difference: 4.8; 95%CI = 0.4, 9.9; p = 0.074). Neural sliders and tensioners are both effective in increasing hamstring flexibility as an adjunct to static hamstring stretching when compared to static stretching alone. No neural mobilization technique proved to be superior over another. This clinical trial is registered in Clinical Trials Registry- India (CTRI) with registration number CTRI/2012/05/002619. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neuromuscular fatigue following isometric contractions with similar torque time integral.

    PubMed

    Rozand, V; Cattagni, T; Theurel, J; Martin, A; Lepers, R

    2015-01-01

    Torque time integral (TTI) is the combination of intensity and duration of a contraction. The aim of this study was to compare neuromuscular alterations following different isometric sub-maximal contractions of the knee extensor muscles but with similar TTI. Sixteen participants performed 3 sustained contractions at different intensities (25%, 50%, and 75% of Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC) torque) with different durations (68.5±33.4 s, 35.1±16.8 s and 24.8±12.9 s, respectively) but similar TTI value. MVC torque, maximal voluntary activation level (VAL), M-wave characteristics and potentiated doublet amplitude were assessed before and immediately after the sustained contractions. EMG activity of the vastus lateralis (VL) and -rectus femoris (RF) muscles was recorded during the sustained contractions. MVC torque reduction was similar in the 3 conditions after the exercise (-23.4±2.7%). VAL decreased significantly in a similar extent (-3.1±1.3%) after the 3 sustained contractions. Potentiated doublet amplitude was similarly reduced in the 3 conditions (-19.7±1.5%), but VL and RF M-wave amplitudes remained unchanged. EMG activity of VL and RF muscles increased in the same extent during the 3 contractions (VL: 54.5±40.4%; RF: 53.1±48.7%). These results suggest that central and peripheral alterations accounting for muscle fatigue are similar following isometric contractions with similar TTI. TTI should be considered in the exploration of muscle fatigue during sustained isometric contractions.

  18. Effect of whole body vibration exercise on muscle strength and proprioception in females with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Trans, T; Aaboe, J; Henriksen, M; Christensen, R; Bliddal, H; Lund, H

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) exercise on muscle strength and proprioception in female patients with osteoarthritis in the knee (knee-OA). A single blinded, randomised, controlled trial was performed in an outpatient clinic on 52 female patients diagnosed with knee-OA (mean age 60.4 years+/-9.6). They were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups: 1. WBV-exercise on a stable platform (VibM; n=17 (mean age, 61.5+/-9.2)), WBV-exercise on a balance board (VibF; n=18 (mean age, 58.7+/-11.0)), or control group (Con; n=18 (mean age, 61.1+/-8.5)). The WBV groups trained twice a week for 8 weeks, with a progressively increasing intensity. The WBV groups performed unloaded static WBV exercise. The following were measured: knee muscle strength (extension/flexion) and proprioception (threshold for detection of passive movement (TDPM)). Self-reported disease status was measured using WOMAC. It was found that muscle strength increased significantly (p<0.001) in VibM compared to Con. Isometric knee-extension significantly increased (p=0.021) in VibM compared to Con. TDPM was significantly improved (p=0.033) in VibF compared to Con, while there was a tendency (p=0.051) for VibM to perform better compared to Con. There were no effects in the self-reported disease status measures. This study showed that the WBV-exercise regime on a stable platform (VibM) yielded increased muscle strength, while the WBV-exercise on a balance board (VibF) showed improved TDPM. The WBV-exercise is a time-saving and safe method for rehabilitation of women with knee-OA.

  19. Dynamic splinting for knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Finger, Eric; Willis, F Buck

    2008-12-29

    Total Knee Arthroplasty operations are increasing in frequency, and knee flexion contracture is a common pathology, both pre-existing and post-operative. A 61-year-old male presented with knee flexion contracture following a total knee arthroplasty. Physical therapy alone did not fully reduce the contracture and dynamic splinting was then prescribed for daily low-load, prolonged-duration stretch. After 28 physical therapy sessions, the active range of motion improved from -20 degrees to -12 degrees (stiff knee still lacking full extension), and after eight additional weeks with nightly wear of dynamic splint, the patient regained full knee extension, (active extension improved from -12 degrees to 0 degrees ).

  20. [Plea for accelerated rehabilitation after ligament plasty of the knee by a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft].

    PubMed

    Boileau, P; Rémi, M; Lemaire, M; Rousseau, P; Desnuelle, C; Argenson, C

    1999-09-01

    Knee rehabilitation after ACL repair with bone-tendon-bone graft is still controversial. While there was a tendency to protect the graft and the donor site in the eighties, actual tendency is to propose more aggressive, so called accelerated rehabilitation protocol. An extensive analysis of the literature shows that this accelerated rehabilitation is justified because of histologic, biomechanic, surgical and clinical arguments. This accelerated rehabilitation is based on seven reasons, at least: 1) the necrosis of the graft, initially observed in animals, does not seem to be as important in humans as demonstrated by histological studies after in vivo biopsies; 2) the use of solid bone-tendon-bone graft, whose resistance is maximum in the early post-operative period and is superior to the resistance of the ACL; 3) the more precise positioning (more "isometric") because of optic magnification allowed by arthroscopy; 4) the absence of graft impingement, routinely controlled, because of a more posterior tibial placement of the graft and the eventual notch-plasty; 5) the solid and confident fixation of the graft because of interference screws; 6) anterior knee pain are less important when early constraints are applied on the knee; 7) finally, undisciplined and demanding patients who refuse all protection for the graft and the donor site, have good and stable results regarding stability of the knees. Early constraints on the knee after bone-tendon-bone graft and interference fixation give better tolerance on the extension mechanism without compromising integrity of the graft and knee stability. Appropriate level of constraints on the ACL graft and the donor site guides the collagenic reorganisation process. Early restoration of normal hyperextension, decreased knee pain and maintenance of muscular trophicity, allowing patients to go back to sport at 4 months, are the most evident benefits of this accelerated rehabilitation. These considerations cannot be applied to the

  1. Kinesiologic measurements of functional performance before and after geometric total knee replacemtn: one-year follow-up of twenty cases.

    PubMed

    Collopy, M C; Murray, M P; Gardner, G M; DiUlio, R A; Gore, D R

    1977-01-01

    Kinesiologic measurements were made in patients with severe arthritis before and after geometric total knee replacements to evaluate the nature, rate and extent of change in their functional ability. Preoperatively, patients with rheumatoid arthritis functioned at lower levels than patients with osteoarthritis. Most patients with rheumatoid arthritis improved steadily after surgery, while progress of those with osteoarthritis was often irregular. The group with rheumatoid arthritis improved more than those with osteoarthritis, but they did not generally reach the functional level attained by the patients with osteoarthritis, and neither group reached the lower limits of normal variability 1 year postoperatively. On the average, both groups gained knee extensions, lost knee flexion, and gained isometric knee flexor muscle strength postoperatively. Every patient with osteoarthritis lost extensor muscle strength 1 year after surgery, while most with rheumatoid arthritis gained. During quiet standing, most patients had straighter knees postoperatively and bore a greater percent of body weight on the operated limb. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis improved more than patients with osteoarthritis in the type and amount of force applied to canes and crutches. Most patients walked faster postoperatively, took longer and more rapid steps, improved the pattern of knee motion used, and had smoother forward, lateral and vertical head motion.

  2. Knee Bursitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... make a diagnosis of knee bursitis during a physical exam. Your doctor will inspect your knee by: Comparing the condition of both knees, particularly if only one is painful Gently pressing on different areas of your knee to detect warmth, swelling and the source of pain Carefully moving ...

  3. Balance training reduces fear of falling and improves dynamic balance and isometric strength in institutionalised older people: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Gusi, Narcis; Carmelo Adsuar, Jose; Corzo, Hector; Del Pozo-Cruz, Borja; Olivares, Pedro R; Parraca, Jose A

    2012-01-01

    What is the effect of a balance training protocol with the Biodex Balance System in institutionalised older people with fear of falling? Randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation and assessor blinding. Forty older people who lived in a nursing home and had fear of falling. The experimental group completed a 12-week balance training protocol based on balancing/rebalancing training with the Biodex Balance System, with two sessions per week. During the training period, participants in both groups received the same multidisciplinary care (such as physiotherapy, occupational therapy and nursing) that they usually received in the nursing home. The primary outcome was fear of falling (Falls Efficacy Scale International questionnaire). Secondary outcomes were dynamic balance (Fall Risk Test) and isometric strength (torque of knee flexor and extensor isometric strength measured with an isokinetic dynamometer). Outcome measures were taken before and after the training program protocol. Compared to the control group, the exercise group had significantly greater improvements at 12 weeks in fear of falling (by 8 points, 95% CI 4 to 12), in dynamic balance (by 2 degrees, 95% CI 1 to 3), and in isometric strength of the knee flexors (by 7Nm, 95% CI 3 to 11) and knee extensors (by 7Nm, 95% CI 1 to 13). The training program was feasible and effective in reducing fear of falling and improving dynamic balance and isometric strength in institutionalised older people with fear of falling. ISRCTN21695765. Copyright © 2012 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by .. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxygen cost of dynamic or isometric exercise relative to recruited muscle mass

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Christopher P; Mahoney, Edward T; Black, Christopher D; Slade, Jill M; Dudley, Gary A

    2006-01-01

    Background Oxygen cost of different muscle actions may be influenced by different recruitment and rate coding strategies. The purpose of this study was to account for these strategies by comparing the oxygen cost of dynamic and isometric muscle actions relative to the muscle mass recruited via surface electrical stimulation of the knee extensors. Methods Comparisons of whole body pulmonary Δ V˙ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacH8akY=wiFfYdH8Gipec8Eeeu0xXdbba9frFj0=OqFfea0dXdd9vqai=hGuQ8kuc9pgc9s8qqaq=dirpe0xb9q8qiLsFr0=vr0=vr0dc8meaabaqaciaacaGaaeqabaqabeGadaaakeaacuWGwbGvgaGaaaaa@2DEA@O2 were made in seven young healthy adults (1 female) during 3 minutes of dynamic or isometric knee extensions, both induced by surface electrical stimulation. Recruited mass was quantified in T2 weighted spin echo magnetic resonance images. Results The Δ V˙ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacH8akY=wiFfYdH8Gipec8Eeeu0xXdbba9frFj0=OqFfea0dXdd9vqai=hGuQ8kuc9pgc9s8qqaq=dirpe0xb9q8qiLsFr0=vr0=vr0dc8meaabaqaciaacaGaaeqabaqabeGadaaakeaacuWGwbGvgaGaaaaa@2DEA@O2 for dynamic muscle actions, 242 ± 128 ml • min-1 (mean ± SD) was greater (p = 0.003) than that for isometric actions, 143 ± 99 ml • min-1. Recruited muscle mass was also greater (p = 0.004) for dynamic exercise, 0.716 ± 282 versus 0.483 ± 0.139 kg. The rate of oxygen consumption per unit of recruited muscle (V˙O2RM MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacH8akY=wiFfYdH8Gipec8Eeeu0xXdbba9frFj0=OqFfea0dXdd9vqai=hGuQ8kuc9pgc9s8qqaq=dirpe0xb9q8qiLsFr0=vr0=vr0dc8meaabaqaciaacaGaaeqabaqabeGadaaakeaacuqGwbGvgaGaaiabb+eapnaaBaaaleaacqaIYaGmdaahaaadbeqaaiabbkfasjabb2eanbaaaSqabaaaaa@32B0@) was similar in dynamic and isometric exercise (346 ± 162 versus 307 ± 198 ml • kg-1 • min-1; p = 0.352), but the V˙O2RM MathType@MTEF@5

  5. Knee Extensor Electromyographic Activity-to-Work Ratio is Greater With Isotonic Than Isokinetic Contractions.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Randy J.; Westwood, Kevin C.

    2001-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether isotonic or isokinetic contractions produced greater electromyographic (EMG) activity per unit of work during isotonic and isokinetic knee-extension exercise. DESIGN AND SETTING: Subjects performed three 3-second maximal voluntary isometric contractions of the dominant knee extensors for EMG normalization. Exercise testing performed on the Biodex System 3 Dynamometer involved 10 isokinetic contractions at 180 degrees.s(-1) and 10 isotonic contractions with the resistance set at 50% of the previously recorded maximal voluntary isometric contraction. SUBJECTS: Recreationally active college students (10 men and 11 women). MEASUREMENTS: Surface EMG signals were collected from the vastus medialis and lateralis muscles and then integrated (IEMG) over the concentric phase of each repetition for both exercises. The IEMG was divided by the total work performed during the concentric phase for each exercise (IEMG/W). RESULTS: We analyzed the IEMG/W data using a 1-between (sex), 2-within (exercise and muscle) repeated-measures analysis of variance. There was a significant main effect for exercise, with the isotonic IEMG/W value being significantly greater than the isokinetic IEMG/W value. Additionally, the IEMG/W relationship did not appear to be affected by sex or individual muscle tested. CONCLUSIONS: Per unit of work performed, the isotonic contractions resulted in greater motor unit recruitment or an increased rate of firing, or both. This finding may have implications for the early phase of rehabilitation, when goals include complete motor unit recruitment of injured or atrophied muscles.

  6. Knee Extensor Electromyographic Activity-to-Work Ratio is Greater With Isotonic Than Isokinetic Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, Kevin C.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether isotonic or isokinetic contractions produced greater electromyographic (EMG) activity per unit of work during isotonic and isokinetic knee-extension exercise. Design and Setting: Subjects performed three 3-second maximal voluntary isometric contractions of the dominant knee extensors for EMG normalization. Exercise testing performed on the Biodex System 3 Dynamometer involved 10 isokinetic contractions at 180°·s−1 and 10 isotonic contractions with the resistance set at 50% of the previously recorded maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Subjects: Recreationally active college students (10 men and 11 women). Measurements: Surface EMG signals were collected from the vastus medialis and lateralis muscles and then integrated (IEMG) over the concentric phase of each repetition for both exercises. The IEMG was divided by the total work performed during the concentric phase for each exercise (IEMG/W). Results: We analyzed the IEMG/W data using a 1-between (sex), 2-within (exercise and muscle) repeated-measures analysis of variance. There was a significant main effect for exercise, with the isotonic IEMG/W value being significantly greater than the isokinetic IEMG/W value. Additionally, the IEMG/W relationship did not appear to be affected by sex or individual muscle tested. Conclusions: Per unit of work performed, the isotonic contractions resulted in greater motor unit recruitment or an increased rate of firing, or both. This finding may have implications for the early phase of rehabilitation, when goals include complete motor unit recruitment of injured or atrophied muscles. PMID:12937480

  7. Reliability of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength measurements in persons with late effects of polio.

    PubMed

    Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt; Lexell, Jan

    2010-06-01

    To assess the reliability of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength measurements in persons with late effects of polio. A test-retest reliability study. Thirty men and women (mean age 63 (standard deviation 6.4) years) with verified late effects of polio. Knee extensor and flexor muscle strength in both lower limbs were measured twice 7 days apart using a Biodex dynamometer (isokinetic concentric contractions at 60 degrees /sec and isometric contractions with knee flexion angle 90 degrees) and a Leg Extension/Curl Rehab exercise machine with pneumatic resistance (HUR) (isotonic contractions). Reliability was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC1,1), the mean difference between the test sessions (d) together with the 95% confidence intervals for d, the standard error of measurement (SEM and SEM%), the smallest real difference (SRD and SRD%) and Bland-Altman graphs. Test-retest agreements were high, (ICC1,1 0.93-0.99) and measurement errors generally small. The SEM% was 4-14% and the SRD% 11-39%, with the highest values for the isokinetic measurements. Knee muscle strength can be measured reliably and can be used to detect real changes after an intervention for a group of persons with late effects of polio, whereas the values may be too high for single individuals or to detect smaller short-term changes over time for a group of individuals.

  8. Serratus Anterior and Lower Trapezius Muscle Activities During Multi-Joint Isotonic Scapular Exercises and Isometric Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruike, Masaaki; Ellenbecker, Todd S.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Proper scapular function during humeral elevation, such as upward rotation, external rotation, and posterior tilting of the scapula, is necessary to prevent shoulder injury. However, the appropriate intensity of rehabilitation exercise for the periscapular muscles has yet to be clarified. Objective: To identify the serratus anterior, lower trapezius, infraspinatus, and posterior deltoid muscle activities during 2 free-motion exercises using 3 intensities and to compare these muscle activities with isometric contractions during quadruped shoulder flexion and external rotation and abduction of the glenohumeral joint. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Health Science Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 16 uninjured, healthy, active, male college students (age = 19.5 ± 1.2 years, height = 173.1 ± 6.5 cm, weight = 68.8 ± 6.6 kg). Main Outcome Measure(s): Mean electromyographic activity normalized by the maximal voluntary isometric contraction was analyzed across 3 intensities and 5 exercises. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated for electromyographic activity of the 4 muscles in each free-motion exercise. Results: Significant interactions in electromyographic activity were observed between intensities and exercises (P < .05). The quadruped shoulder-flexion exercise activated all 4 muscles compared with other exercises. Also, the modified robbery free-motion exercise activated the serratus anterior, lower trapezius, and infraspinatus compared with the lawn-mower free-motion exercise. However, neither exercise showed a difference in posterior deltoid electromyographic activity. Conclusions: Three intensities exposed the nature of the periscapular muscle activities across the different exercises. The free-motion exercise in periscapular muscle rehabilitation may not modify serratus anterior, lower trapezius, and infraspinatus muscle activities unless knee-joint extension is limited. PMID:25689561

  9. Serratus Anterior and Lower Trapezius Muscle Activities During Multi-Joint Isotonic Scapular Exercises and Isometric Contractions.

    PubMed

    Tsuruike, Masaaki; Ellenbecker, Todd

    2014-11-14

    Context :  Proper scapular function during humeral elevation, such as upward rotation, external rotation, and posterior tilting of the scapula, is necessary to prevent shoulder injury. However, the appropriate intensity of rehabilitation exercise for the periscapular muscles has yet to be clarified. Objective :  To identify the serratus anterior, lower trapezius, infraspinatus, and posterior deltoid muscle activities during 2 free-motion exercises using 3 intensities and to compare these muscle activities with isometric contractions during quadruped shoulder flexion and external rotation and abduction of the glenohumeral joint. Design :  Cross-sectional study. Setting :  Health Science Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants :  A total of 16 uninjured, healthy, active, male college students (age = 19.5 ± 1.2 years, height = 173.1 ± 6.5 cm, weight = 68.8 ± 6.6 kg). Main Outcome Measure(s) :  Mean electromyographic activity normalized by the maximal voluntary isometric contraction was analyzed across 3 intensities and 5 exercises. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated for electromyographic activity of the 4 muscles in each free-motion exercise. Results :  Significant interactions in electromyographic activity were observed between intensities and exercises (P < .05). The quadruped shoulder-flexion exercise activated all 4 muscles compared with other exercises. Also, the modified robbery free-motion exercise activated the serratus anterior, lower trapezius, and infraspinatus compared with the lawn-mower free-motion exercise. However, neither exercise showed a difference in posterior deltoid electromyographic activity. Conclusions :  Three intensities exposed the nature of the periscapular muscle activities across the different exercises. The free-motion exercise in periscapular muscle rehabilitation may not modify serratus anterior, lower trapezius, and infraspinatus muscle activities unless knee-joint extension is limited.

  10. Force Sense of the Knee Not Affected by Fatiguing the Knee Extensors and Flexors.

    PubMed

    Allison, Katelyn F; Sell, Timothy C; Benjaminse, Anne; Lephart, Scott M

    2016-05-01

    Knee injuries commonly occur in later stages of competition, indicating that fatigue may influence dynamic knee stability. Force sense (FS) is a submodality of proprioception influenced by muscle mechanoreceptors, which, if negatively affected by fatigue, may result in less-effective neuromuscular control. To determine the effects of peripheral fatigue on FS of the quadriceps and hamstrings. Quasi-experimental study design. 20 healthy and physically active women and men (age 23.4 ± 2.7 y, mass 69.5 ± 10.9 kg, height 169.7 ± 9.4 cm). Fatigue was induced during a protocol with 2 sets of 40 repetitions, and the last set was truncated at 90 repetitions or stopped if torque production dropped below 25% of peak torque. FS of the hamstrings and quadriceps was tested on separate days before and after 3 sets of isokinetic knee flexion and extension to fatigue by examining the ability to produce a target isometric torque (15% MVIC) with and without visual feedback (FS error). Electromyographic data of the tested musculature were collected to calculate and determine median frequency shift. T tests and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were conducted to examine prefatigue and postfatigue FS error for flexion and extension. Despite verification of fatigue via torque-production decrement and shift in median frequency, no significant differences were observed in FS error for either knee flexion (pre 0.54 ± 2.28 N·m, post 0.47 ± 1.62 N·m) or extension (pre -0.28 ± 2.69 N·m, post -0.21 ± 1.78 N·m) prefatigue compared with the postfatigue condition. Although previous research has demonstrated that peripheral fatigue negatively affects threshold to detect passive motion (TTDPM), it did not affect FS as measured in this study. The peripheral-fatigue protocol may have a greater effect on the mechanoreceptors responsible for TTDPM than those responsible for FS. Further investigation into the effects of fatigue across various modes of proprioception is warranted.

  11. Relationship between leg extensor muscle strength and knee joint loading during gait before and after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vahtrik, Doris; Gapeyeva, Helena; Ereline, Jaan; Pääsuke, Mati

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate an isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force of the leg extensor muscles and its relationship with knee joint loading during gait prior and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Custom-made dynamometer was used to assess an isometric MVC force of the leg extensor muscles and 3-D motion analysis system was used to evaluate the knee joint loading during gait in 13 female patients (aged 49-68 years) with knee osteoarthritis. Patients were evaluated one day before, and three and six months following TKA in the operated and non-operated leg. Six months after TKA, MVC force of the leg extensor muscles for the operated leg did not differ significantly as compared to the preoperative level, whereas it remained significantly lower for the non-operated leg and controls. The knee flexion moment and the knee joint power during mid stance of gait was improved six months after TKA, remaining significantly lowered compared with controls. Negative moderate correlation between leg extensor muscles strength and knee joint loading for the operated leg during mid stance was noted three months after TKA. The correlation analysis indicates that due to weak leg extensor muscles, an excessive load is applied to knee joint during mid stance of gait in patients, whereas in healthy subjects stronger knee-surrounding muscles provide stronger knee joint loading during gait. III (correlational study). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The mechanics of activated semitendinosus are not representative of the pathological knee joint condition of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Ateş, Filiz; Temelli, Yener; Yucesoy, Can A

    2016-06-01

    Characteristic cerebral palsy effects in the knee include a restricted joint range of motion and forcefully kept joint in a flexed position. To show whether the mechanics of activated spastic semitendinosus muscle are contributing to these effects, we tested the hypothesis that the muscle's joint range of force exertion is narrow and force production capacity in flexed positions is high. The isometric semitendinosus forces of children with cerebral palsy (n=7, mean (SD)=7years (8months), GMFCS levels III-IV, 12 limbs tested) were measured intra-operatively as a function of knee angle, from flexion (120°) to full extension (0°). Peak force measured in the most flexed position was considered as the benchmark. However, peak force (mean (SD)=112.4N (54.3N)) was measured either at intermediate or even full knee extension (three limbs) indicating no narrow joint range of force exertion. Lack of high force production capacity in flexed knee positions (e.g., at 120° negligible or below 22% of the peak force) was shown except for one limb. Therefore, our hypothesis was rejected for a vast majority of the limbs. These findings and those reported for spastic gracilis agree, indicating that the patients' pathological joint condition must rely on a more complex mechanism than the mechanics of individual spastic muscles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Tibia valga morphology in osteoarthritic knees: importance of preoperative full limb radiographs in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Ahmed; Rahmé, Michel; Lavigne, Martin; Massé, Vincent; Vendittoli, Pascal-André

    2014-08-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is associated with deformities of the lower limb. Tibia valga is a contributing factor to lower limb alignment in valgus knees. We evaluated 97 valgus knees and 100 varus knees. Long-leg films were taken in weight bearing with both knees in full extension. For valgus knees, 52 knees (53%) had a tibia valga deformity. Average tibia valgus deformation was 5.0°. For varus knees, there was only 1 case of tibia valga (1%), with a deformation of 2.5°. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of primary tibia valga in valgus and varus knees and understand how it affects our approach to total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We recommend having full-leg length films when planning for TKA in valgus knees.

  14. Dissociation between the time courses of femoral artery blood flow and pulmonary VO2 during repeated bouts of heavy knee extension exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Fukuba, Yoshiyuki; Ohe, Yukie; Miura, Akira; Kitano, Asami; Endo, Masako; Sato, Hironori; Miyachi, Motohiko; Koga, Shunsaku; Fukuda, Osamu

    2004-05-01

    It has frequently been demonstrated that prior heavy cycling exercise facilitates pulmonary O(2) kinetics at the onset of subsequent heavy exercise. This might be due to improved muscle perfusion via acidosis-induced vasodilating effects. However, it is difficult to measure the blood flow (BF) to the working muscles (via the femoral artery) during cycling exercise. We therefore selected supine knee extension (KE) exercise as an alternative, and investigated whether the faster O(2) kinetics in the 2nd bout was matched by proportionally faster BF kinetics to the exercising muscle. Nine healthy subjects (aged 21-44 years) volunteered to participate in this study. The protocol consisted of two consecutive 6-min KE exercise bouts in a supine position (work rate: 70-75% of peak power) separated by a 6-min baseline rest (EX1 to EX2). During the protocol, a pulsed Doppler ultrasound technique was utilized to continuously measure the BF in the right femoral artery. The protocol was repeated at least 6 times to characterize the precise kinetics. In agreement with previous studies using cycling exercise, the O(2) kinetics in the 2nd bout were facilitated compared with that in the 1st bout [mean +/-s.d. of the 'effective' time constant (tau): EX1, 68.6 +/- 15.9, versus EX2, 58.0 +/- 14.4 s. Phase II-tau: EX1, 48.7 +/- 9.0, versus EX2, 41.2 +/- 13.3 s. Empirical index of the slow component (Delta O(2(6-3))): EX1, 78 +/- 44, versus EX2, 57 +/- 36 ml min(-1) (P < 0.05)]. However, no substantial difference was observed for the facilitation of the femoral artery BF response to the 1st and 2nd exercise bouts [i.e. the 'effective'tau of the femoral artery BF: EX1, 40.8 +/- 16.9, versus EX2, 39.0 +/- 17.1 s (P > 0.05)]. It was concluded that the faster pulmonary O(2) kinetics during heavy KE exercise following prior heavy exercise was not associated with a similar modulation in the BF to the working muscles.

  15. Knee injuries and Alpine skiing. Treatment and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Paletta, G A; Warren, R F

    1994-06-01

    central third of the patella tendon using a bone-tendon-bone autograft. Postoperative rehabilitation employs a functional staged approach, requiring vigilant supervision by the surgeon. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury is rare in skiing, constituting less than 1% of all knee injuries in most series. Careful physical examination must be employed to rule out associated arcuate ligament complex injury and more complex patterns of instability. Most isolated PCL injuries are treated nonoperatively with a programme of initial immobilisation in extension, ice, protected weight-bearing, early range-of-motion exercises and progressive isometric strengthening.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  16. Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint locks and unlocks automatically, at any position within range of bend angles, without manual intervention by wearer. Includes tang and clevis, locks whenever wearer transfers weight to knee and unlocks when weight removed. Locking occurs at any angle between 45 degrees knee bend and full extension.

  17. Nonuniform Weakness in the Paretic Knee and Compensatory Strength Gains in the Nonparetic Knee Occurs after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lomaglio, Melanie J.; Eng, Janice J.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was designed to quantify torque production at different joint angles in the paretic and non-paretic knee joints of individuals with stroke. Methods Extension and flexion torques were measured at 6 angles of the knee joint and normalized to peak torque in 19 subjects with stroke and 19 controls. Results Paretic knee extension torque was lower than controls when the knee was positioned near extension. In contrast, nonparetic knee extension and flexion torques were higher than controls when the knee was positioned near full flexion. Conclusions The paretic knee extensors demonstrated exaggerated weakness at short muscle lengths and the nonparetic knee extensors and flexors demonstrated selective strength gains. Clinicians should therefore consider paretic knee extensor strengthening near full extension and promote symmetrical use of the legs to prevent compensatory overuse of the non-paretic leg. PMID:18946213

  18. Methodology to Customize Maximal Isometric Forces for Hill-Type Muscle Models.

    PubMed

    Dal Maso, Fabien; Begon, Mickaël; Raison, Maxime

    2017-02-01

    One approach to increasing the confidence of muscle force estimation via musculoskeletal models is to minimize the root mean square error (RMSE) between joint torques estimated from electromyographic-driven musculoskeletal models and those computed using inverse dynamics. We propose a method that reduces RMSE by selecting subsets of combinations of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) trials that minimize RMSE. Twelve participants performed 3 elbow MVIC in flexion and in extension. An upper-limb electromyographic-driven musculoskeletal model was created to optimize maximum muscle stress and estimate the maximal isometric force of the biceps brachii, brachialis, brachioradialis, and triceps brachii. Maximal isometric forces were computed from all possible combinations of flexion-extension trials. The combinations producing the smallest RMSE significantly reduced the normalized RMSE to 7.4% compared with the combination containing all trials (9.0%). Maximal isometric forces ranged between 114-806 N, 64-409 N, 236-1511 N, and 556-3434 N for the brachii, brachialis, brachioradialis, and triceps brachii, respectively. These large variations suggest that customization is required to reduce the difference between models and actual participants' maximal isometric force. While the smallest previously reported RMSE was 10.3%, the proposed method reduced the RMSE to 7.4%, which may increase the confidence of muscle force estimation.

  19. Trunk isometric force production parameters during erector spinae muscle vibration at different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vibration is known to alter proprioceptive afferents and create a tonic vibration reflex. The control of force and its variability are often considered determinants of motor performance and neuromuscular control. However, the effect of vibration on paraspinal muscle control and force production remains to be determined. Methods Twenty-one healthy adults were asked to perform isometric trunk flexion and extension torque at 60% of their maximal voluntary isometric contraction, under three different vibration conditions: no vibration, vibration frequencies of 30 Hz and 80 Hz. Eighteen isometric contractions were performed under each condition without any feedback. Mechanical vibrations were applied bilaterally over the lumbar erector spinae muscles while participants were in neutral standing position. Time to peak torque (TPT), variable error (VE) as well as constant error (CE) and absolute error (AE) in peak torque were calculated and compared between conditions. Results The main finding suggests that erector spinae muscle vibration significantly decreases the accuracy in a trunk extension isometric force reproduction task. There was no difference between both vibration frequencies with regard to force production parameters. Antagonist muscles do not seem to be directly affected by vibration stimulation when performing a trunk isometric task. Conclusions The results suggest that acute erector spinae muscle vibration interferes with torque generation sequence of the trunk by distorting proprioceptive information in healthy participants. PMID:23919578

  20. RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF A MODIFIED ISOMETRIC DYNAMOMETER IN THE ASSESSMENT OF MUSCULAR PERFORMANCE IN INDIVIDUALS WITH ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcelos, Rodrigo Antunes; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora; Shimano, Antonio Carlos; Paccola, Cleber Jansen; Salvini, Tânia Fátima; Prado, Christiane Lanatovits; Junior, Wilson A. Mello

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of a modified isometric dynamometer (MID) in performance deficits of the knee extensor and flexor muscles in normal individuals and in those with ACL reconstructions. Methods: Sixty male subjects were invited to participate of the study, being divided into three groups with 20 subjects each: control group (GC), group of individuals with ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon graft (GTP, and group of individuals with ACL reconstruction with hamstrings graft (GTF). All individuals performed isometric tests in the MID, muscular strength deficits collected were subsequently compared to the tests performed on the Biodex System 3 operating in the isometric and isokinetic mode at speeds of 60°/s and 180o/s. Intraclass ICC correlation calculations were done in order to assess MID reliability, specificity, sensitivity and Kappa's consistency coefficient calculations, respectively, for assessing the MID's validity in detecting muscular deficits and intra- and intergroup comparisons when performing the four strength tests using the ANOVA method. Results: The modified isometric dynamometer (MID) showed excellent reliability and good validity in the assessment of the performance of the knee extensor and flexor muscles groups. In the comparison between groups, the GTP showed significantly greater deficits as compared to the GTF and GC groups. Conclusion: Isometric dynamometers connected to mechanotherapy equipments could be an alternative option to collect data concerning performance deficits of the extensor and flexor muscles groups of the knee in subjects with ACL reconstruction. PMID:27004175

  1. Varus-valgus stability at 90° flexion correlates with the stability at midflexion range more widely than that at 0° extension in posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hino, Kazunori; Kutsuna, Tatsuhiko; Watamori, Kunihiko; Kiyomatsu, Hiroshi; Ishimaru, Yasumitsu; Takeba, Jun; Watanabe, Seiji; Shiraishi, Yoshitaka; Miura, Hiromasa

    2017-08-28

    Midflexion stability can potentially improve the outcome of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between varus-valgus stability at 0° of extension and 90° of flexion and that at the midflexion range in posterior-stabilized (PS)-TKA. Forty-three knees that underwent PS-TKA were evaluated. Manual mild passive varus-valgus stress was applied to the knees, and the postoperative maximum varus-valgus stability was measured every 10° throughout range of motion, using a navigation system. Correlations between the stability at 0°, 90° of flexion, and that at each midflexion angle were evaluated using Spearman's correlation coefficients. The stability of 0° modestly correlated with that of 10°-20°, but it did not significantly correlate with that of 30°-80°. However, the stability of 90° strongly correlated with that of 60°-80°, modestly correlated with that of 40°-50°, weakly correlated with that of 20°-30°, and did not correlate with that of 10°. The present study confirmed the importance of acquiring stability at 90° flexion to achieve midflexion stability in PS-TKA. However, initial flexion stability did not strongly correlate with the stability at either 0° or 90°. Our findings can provide useful information for understanding varus-valgus stability throughout the range of motion in PS-TKA. Attention to soft tissue balancing is necessary to stabilize a knee at the initial flexion range in PS-TKA.

  2. Knee pain, knee injury, knee osteoarthritis & work.

    PubMed

    Dulay, Gurdeep S; Cooper, C; Dennison, E M

    2015-06-01

    Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) can be viewed as the end result of a molecular cascade which ensues after certain triggers occur and ultimately results in irreversible damage to the articular cartilage. The clinical phenotype that knee OA can produce is variable and often difficult to accurately predict. This is further complicated by the often poor relationship between radiographic OA and knee pain. As a consequence, it can be difficult to compare studies that use different definitions of OA. However, the literature suggests that while there are multiple causes of knee OA, two have attracted particular attention over recent years; occupation related knee OA and OA subsequent to previous knee injury. The evidence of a relationship, and the strength of this association, is discussed in this chapter.

  3. Influence of length-restricted strength training on athlete's power-load curves of knee extensors and flexors.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Boris; Kleinöder, Heinz; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated whether different length-restricted strength training regimens affect voluntary explosive concentric power-load curves of the quadriceps femoris (QF) and hamstring (HAM) muscles. Thirty-two athletes were divided into 3 different training groups (G1-G3): G1 performed isometric training at knee joint angles corresponding to long muscle-tendon unit (MTU) length for QF and HAM; G2 conducted concentric-eccentric contraction cycles that were restricted to a knee joint range of motion corresponding to predominantly long MTU length for QF and HAM; and G3 combined the protocols of G1 and G2. Knee joint angle-dependent power-load curves during maximal voluntary explosive concentric knee extensions and flexions were measured for loads corresponding to 40, 60, and 80% of individual 1 repetition maximum at 5 different occasions: 2 times before, after 5 and 8 weeks of training, and 4 weeks post training. Power values of each subject were normalized to the largest value produced at any knee joint position (percent maximum). Obtained by curve fitting, the optimal knee joint angle for power production of QF and HAM remained unaltered throughout the course of the study for all testing loads and training groups. Therefore, different strength training regimens with a common restriction to long MTU lengths failed to induce length-dependent alterations in athlete's voluntary concentric power-load curves of knee extensors and flexors. The approach to develop strength training programs that induce systematic shifts in length-dependent power production of QF and HAM is of direct practical relevance for athletic activities such as cycling, ice skating, and skiing. However, restricting the muscle excursion range during loading seems to be an inappropriate trigger to cause length-dependent alterations in athlete's voluntary concentric power-load curves.

  4. [Physical activity for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Masashi; Ishijima, Muneaki; Kaneko, Haruka; Takazawa, Yuji; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Kazuo

    Elder populations have been increasing in Japan and estimated 24 million people have knee osteoarthritis(OA). Recently, people have diverse sociological background and demand for participating sports has been growing. People may participate sports to prevent some diseases such as locomotive syndrome. According to the recent studies, excessive high impact sports increase the risk of OA, while daily life exercise decrease the risk. Epidemiological approach demonstrated that reduced knee extension muscle strength increases the risk of OA. We reviewed and discussed the recent topics including efficacy of physical therapy for knee OA and how much sports activities could be beneficial after knee surgery.

  5. Custom Knee Device for Knee Contractures After Internal Femoral Lengthening.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Ong, Peck-Hoon; Standard, Shawn C; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2015-07-01

    The development of knee flexion contractures is among the most common problems and complications associated with lengthening the femur with an internal device or external fixator. Conservative treatment strategies include physical therapy, serial casting, and low-load prolonged stretching with commercially available splinting systems. The authors developed an individually molded, low-cost custom knee device with polyester synthetic conformable casting material to treat knee flexion contractures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the results of treatment with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy in patients who had knee flexion contracture during femoral lengthening with an intramedullary lengthening femoral nail. This retrospective study included 23 patients (27 limbs) who underwent femoral lengthening with an internal device for the treatment of limb length discrepancy. All patients had a knee flexion contracture raging from 10° to 90° during the lengthening process and were treated with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy. The average flexion contracture before treatment was 36°. The mean amount of lengthening was 5.4 cm. After an average of 3.8 weeks of use of the custom knee device, only 2 of 27 limbs (7.5%) had not achieved complete resolution of the flexion contracture. The average final extension was 1.4°. Only 7 of 27 limbs (26%) required additional soft tissue release. The custom knee device is an inexpensive and effective method for treating knee flexion contracture after lengthening with an internal device.

  6. Comparison of three formal methods used to estimate the functional axis of rotation: an extensive in-vivo analysis performed on the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Colle, Francesca; Lopomo, Nicola; Visani, Andrea; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the main axis of rotation (AoR) of a human joint represents an important issue in biomechanics. This study compared three formal methods used to estimate functional AoR, namely a cylindrical fitting method, a mean helical axis transformation, and a symmetrical axis approach. These methods were tested on 106 subjects undergoing navigated total knee arthroplasty. AoR orientation in 3D and in the frontal and coronal planes provided by each method was compared to the transepicondylar axis direction. Although all the methods resulted effective, significant differences were identified among them, relatively to the orientation in 3D and in the frontal plane projection. This was probably due to the presence of secondary rotations during the first degrees of knee flexion.

  7. The Relationship Between Maximum Isometric Strength and Ball Velocity in the Tennis Serve

    PubMed Central

    Corbi, Francisco; Fuentes, Juan Pedro; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aims of this study were to analyze the relationship between maximum isometric strength levels in different upper and lower limb joints and serve velocity in competitive tennis players as well as to develop a prediction model based on this information. Twelve male competitive tennis players (mean ± SD; age: 17.2 ± 1.0 years; body height: 180.1 ± 6.2 cm; body mass: 71.9 ± 5.6 kg) were tested using maximum isometric strength levels (i.e., wrist, elbow and shoulder flexion and extension; leg and back extension; shoulder external and internal rotation). Serve velocity was measured using a radar gun. Results showed a strong positive relationship between serve velocity and shoulder internal rotation (r = 0.67; p < 0.05). Low to moderate correlations were also found between serve velocity and wrist, elbow and shoulder flexion – extension, leg and back extension and shoulder external rotation (r = 0.36 – 0.53; p = 0.377 – 0.054). Bivariate and multivariate models for predicting serve velocity were developed, with shoulder flexion and internal rotation explaining 55% of the variance in serve velocity (r = 0.74; p < 0.001). The maximum isometric strength level in shoulder internal rotation was strongly related to serve velocity, and a large part of the variability in serve velocity was explained by the maximum isometric strength levels in shoulder internal rotation and shoulder flexion. PMID:28149411

  8. The Relationship Between Maximum Isometric Strength and Ball Velocity in the Tennis Serve.

    PubMed

    Baiget, Ernest; Corbi, Francisco; Fuentes, Juan Pedro; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the relationship between maximum isometric strength levels in different upper and lower limb joints and serve velocity in competitive tennis players as well as to develop a prediction model based on this information. Twelve male competitive tennis players (mean ± SD; age: 17.2 ± 1.0 years; body height: 180.1 ± 6.2 cm; body mass: 71.9 ± 5.6 kg) were tested using maximum isometric strength levels (i.e., wrist, elbow and shoulder flexion and extension; leg and back extension; shoulder external and internal rotation). Serve velocity was measured using a radar gun. Results showed a strong positive relationship between serve velocity and shoulder internal rotation (r = 0.67; p < 0.05). Low to moderate correlations were also found between serve velocity and wrist, elbow and shoulder flexion - extension, leg and back extension and shoulder external rotation (r = 0.36 - 0.53; p = 0.377 - 0.054). Bivariate and multivariate models for predicting serve velocity were developed, with shoulder flexion and internal rotation explaining 55% of the variance in serve velocity (r = 0.74; p < 0.001). The maximum isometric strength level in shoulder internal rotation was strongly related to serve velocity, and a large part of the variability in serve velocity was explained by the maximum isometric strength levels in shoulder internal rotation and shoulder flexion.

  9. Reliability of the Q Force; a mobile instrument for measuring isometric quadriceps muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Douma, K W; Regterschot, G R H; Krijnen, W P; Slager, G E C; van der Schans, C P; Zijlstra, W

    2016-01-01

    The ability to generate muscle strength is a pre-requisite for all human movement. Decreased quadriceps muscle strength is frequently observed in older adults and is associated with a decreased performance and activity limitations. To quantify the quadriceps muscle strength and to monitor changes over time, instruments and procedures with a sufficient reliability are needed. The Q Force is an innovative mobile muscle strength measurement instrument suitable to measure in various degrees of extension. Measurements between 110 and 130° extension present the highest values and the most significant increase after training. The objective of this study is to determine the test-retest reliability of muscle strength measurements by the Q Force in older adults in 110° extension. Forty-one healthy older adults, 13 males and 28 females were included in the study. Mean (SD) age was 81.9 (4.89) years. Isometric muscle strength of the Quadriceps muscle was assessed with the Q Force at 110° of knee extension. Participants were measured at two sessions with a three to eight day interval between sessions. To determine relative reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated. To determine absolute reliability, Bland and Altman Limits of Agreement (LOA) were calculated and t-tests were performed. Relative reliability of the Q Force is good to excellent as all ICC coefficients are higher than 0.75. Generally a large 95 % LOA, reflecting only moderate absolute reliability, is found as exemplified for the peak torque left leg of -18.6 N to 33.8 N and the right leg of -9.2 N to 26.4 N was between 15.7 and 23.6 Newton representing 25.2 % to 39.9 % of the size of the mean. Small systematic differences in mean were found between measurement session 1 and 2. The present study shows that the Q Force has excellent relative test-retest reliability, but limited absolute test-retest reliability. Since the Q Force is relatively cheap and mobile it is suitable for

  10. Prediction of three dimensional maximum isometric neck strength.

    PubMed

    Fice, Jason B; Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-09-01

    We measured maximum isometric neck strength under combinations of flexion/extension, lateral bending and axial rotation to determine whether neck strength in three dimensions (3D) can be predicted from principal axes strength. This would allow biomechanical modelers to validate their neck models across many directions using only principal axis strength data. Maximum isometric neck moments were measured in 9 male volunteers (29±9 years) for 17 directions. The 3D moments were normalized by the principal axis moments, and compared to unity for all directions tested. Finally, each subject's maximum principal axis moments were used to predict their resultant moment in the off-axis directions. Maximum moments were 30±6 N m in flexion, 32±9 N m in lateral bending, 51±11 N m in extension, and 13±5 N m in axial rotation. The normalized 3D moments were not significantly different from unity (95% confidence interval contained one), except for three directions that combined ipsilateral axial rotation and lateral bending; in these directions the normalized moments exceeded one. Predicted resultant moments compared well to the actual measured values (r2=0.88). Despite exceeding unity, the normalized moments were consistent across subjects to allow prediction of maximum 3D neck strength using principal axes neck strength.

  11. Radiological analysis on femoral tunnel positioning between isometric and anatomical reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Rodrigo Barreiros; de Pinho Tavares, Leonardo Augusto; Pace Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos; da Cunha, Fernando Amaral; de Melo Lisboa, Lucas Araujo

    2014-01-01

    Objective the aim of this study was to radiologically evaluate the femoral tunnel position in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions using the isometric and anatomical techniques. Methods a prospective analytical study was conducted on patients undergoing ACL reconstruction by means of the isometric and anatomical techniques, using grafts from the knee flexor tendons or patellar tendon. Twenty-eight patients were recruited during the immediate postoperative period, at the knee surgery outpatient clinic of FCMMG-HUSJ. Radiographs of the operated knee were produced in anteroposterior (AP) view with the patient standing on both feet and in lateral view with 30° of flexion. The lines were traced out and the distances and angles were measured on the lateral radiograph to evaluate the sagittal plane. The distance from the center of the screw to the posterior cortical bone of the lateral condyle was measured and divided by the Blumensaat line. In relation to the height of the screw, the distance from the center of the screw to the joint surface of the lateral condyle of the knee was measured. On the AP radiograph, evaluating the coronal plane, the angle between the anatomical axis of the femur and a line traced at the center of the screw was measured. Results with regard to the p measurement (posteriorization of the interference screw), the tests showed that the p-value (0.4213) was greater than the significance level used (0.05); the null hypothesis was not rejected and it could be stated that there was no statistically significant difference between the anatomical and isometric techniques. With regard to the H measurement (height of the screw in relation to the lower cortical bone of the knee), the p-value observed (0.0006) was less than the significance level used (0.05); the null hypothesis was rejected and it could be stated that there was a statistically significant difference between the anatomical and isometric techniques. It can be concluded that the

  12. Time course of neuromuscular adaptations to knee extensor eccentric training.

    PubMed

    Baroni, B M; Rodrigues, R; Franke, R A; Geremia, J M; Rassier, D E; Vaz, M A

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the chronology of neural and morphological adaptations to knee extensor eccentric training and their contribution to strength gains in isometric, concentric and eccentric muscle actions. 20 male healthy subjects performed a 12-week eccentric training program on an isokinetic dynamometer, and neuromuscular evaluations of knee extensors were performed every 4 weeks. After 12 training weeks, significant increases were observed for: isometric (24%), concentric (15%) and eccentric (29%) torques; isometric (29%) and eccentric (33%) electromyographic activity; muscle thickness (10%) and anatomical cross-sectional area (19%). Eccentric and isometric torques increased progressively until the end of the program. Concentric torque and muscle mass parameters increased until the eighth training week, but did not change from this point to the twelfth training week. Eccentric and isometric activation increased at 4 and 8 training weeks, respectively, while no change was found in concentric activation. These results suggest that: 1) the relative increment in concentric strength was minor and does not relate to neural effects; 2) eccentric and isometric strength gains up to 8 training weeks are explained by the increased neural activation and muscle mass, whereas the increments in the last 4 training weeks seem to be associated with other mechanisms.

  13. Correlates of knee anterior laxity in sportswomen.

    PubMed

    Vauhnik, Renata; Morrissey, Matthew C; Rutherford, Olga M; Turk, Zmago; Pilih, Iztok A; Perme, Maja Pohar

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether any of the following factors are related to knee anterior laxity in healthy sportswomen: anthropometric characteristics, lower limb alignment characteristics, hormone-related factors and sport history. Six hundred and sixteen sportswomen were tested in the pre-season. The data have been analysed using linear regression for possible association of knee anterior laxity with other variables. Univariate linear regression indicated a positive association of knee anterior laxity with knee extension and navicular drop and a negative association with body height. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed statistically significant associations between knee anterior laxity and the combination of passive knee extension and the chosen sport (R(2)=0.089; p<0.05). The combination of passive knee extension and sport type was found to be related to the amount of knee anterior laxity, although the association was weak with this combination of factors able to explain only about 9% of the variability in laxity. Knowing which factors influence the amount of knee anterior laxity will help us to better interpret the results of knee anterior laxity testing and help us to understand the possible role of knee anterior laxity as a risk factor for knee injury.

  14. Model-Based Estimation of Knee Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Serge; Vallery, Heike; Hardegger, Michael; Riener, Robert; Perreault, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    During natural locomotion, the stiffness of the human knee is modulated continuously and subconsciously according to the demands of activity and terrain. Given modern actuator technology, powered transfemoral prostheses could theoretically provide a similar degree of sophistication and function. However, experimentally quantifying knee stiffness modulation during natural gait is challenging. Alternatively, joint stiffness could be estimated in a less disruptive manner using electromyography (EMG) combined with kinetic and kinematic measurements to estimate muscle force, together with models that relate muscle force to stiffness. Here we present the first step in that process, where we develop such an approach and evaluate it in isometric conditions, where experimental measurements are more feasible. Our EMG-guided modeling approach allows us to consider conditions with antagonistic muscle activation, a phenomenon commonly observed in physiological gait. Our validation shows that model-based estimates of knee joint stiffness coincide well with experimental data obtained using conventional perturbation techniques. We conclude that knee stiffness can be accurately estimated in isometric conditions without applying perturbations, which presents an important step towards our ultimate goal of quantifying knee stiffness during gait. PMID:22801482

  15. Nonoperative treatment of acute knee ligament injuries. A review with special reference to indications and methods.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P; Järvinen, M

    1990-04-01

    Nonoperative treatment has received little attention in the numerous scientific reports on knee ligament injuries. Great controversy still exists concerning the proper treatment of a knee with a ruptured ligament, especially the anterior cruciate ligament. However, according to the studies of the authors and an extensive review of the literature the indications for conservative management can be established to be all grade I and II sprains (partial tears) of knee ligaments as well as an isolated grade III sprain (complete tear) of the posterior cruciate ligament. In addition, an isolated complete rupture of an anterior cruciate, or medial or lateral collateral ligament may be treated nonoperatively in an older sedentary person. Other injuries obviously call for an operative approach at the acute stage. Nonoperative therapy protocols must be based on the knowledge of the biological phenomenon occurring during connective tissue healing process. In the first phase of ligament healing the injured knee needs 2 to 3 weeks immobilisation for undisturbed fibroblast invasion and proliferation of collagen fibres. This is achieved by immobilising the knee in a rehabilitative knee brace locked in 40 to 45 degrees of flexion. Thereafter, a gradually increasing controlled mobilisation is allowed in the brace to avoid the deleterious effects of immobilisation to cartilage, bone, muscles, tendons and ligaments, and to enhance the orientation of collagen fibres to the stress lines of the healing ligament. After 4 to 8 weeks the goal for rehabilitation is rapid and full recovery to work and sports. A functional knee brace may be used at this phase to give extra protection before final strengthening of the injured ligament. During the mobilisation and muscle training of the therapy protocol various specific techniques can be used for strengthening of the hamstring and quadriceps muscles, including isometric, isotonic, isokinetic and eccentric exercises with or without resistive

  16. [Clinical application of biomechanic and functional anatomical findings of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Friederich, N F; Müller, W; O'Brien, W R

    1992-02-01

    In order to study the functional anatomy of the knee joint, careful anatomical dissections were conducted on over 130 fresh-frozen cadaveric knee specimens. We found no evidence to support the two-bundle and three-bundle theories of cruciate ligament fiber patterns. The longest fibers in the anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) measured 37 mm, and the longest in the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), 41 mm. Cruciate ligament insertions follow a transition line on tibia and femur. Usually not all the fibers of the cruciate ligaments are taut at the same time. They are progressively recruited according to the biomechanical demands placed on them. Fibre recruitment in the ACL is from knee flexion to extension and in the PCL from extension to flexion. The concept of fiber recruitment was recently evaluated mathematically. As a working hypothesis, the knee joint can be looked upon as a biological realization of the crossed four-bar linkage, even in three dimensions. In vitro measurements have shown that correct graft placement in cruciate reconstructions is critical for knee biomechanics. Incorrect placement of grafts may lead to decreased range of motion and/or increased laxity. Distance changes of 3 mm between femoral origin and tibial insertion of a graft may lead to a 400% increase of graft preload and will thus easily reach published pull-out forces for some of the graft fixation methods (button = 248 N). Precise drill guides and isometers may be helpful in any operative technique (open, arthroscopic). Using the IKDC evaluation form and the KT-1000 arthrometer, our studies on 25 patients demonstrated a direct correlation between intraoperative graft tracking and the clinical outcome 2 years after operation. Biomechanical studies to investigate in vivo strain patterns of the anterior cruciate ligament and in vitro strain patterns of isometrically placed cruciate graft reconstructions showed that they did not reach critical fixation failure or graft rupture loads. The

  17. Differences in proprioception, muscle force control and comfort between conventional and new-generation knee and ankle orthoses.

    PubMed

    Marchini, A; Lauermann, S P; Minetto, M A; Massazza, G; Maffiuletti, N A

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare muscle force control and proprioception between conventional and new-generation experimental orthoses. Sixteen healthy subjects participated in a single-blind controlled trial in which two different types of orthosis were applied to the dominant knee or ankle, while the following variables were evaluated: muscle force control (accuracy), joint position sense, kinesthesia, static balance as well as subjective outcomes. The use of experimental orthoses resulted in better force accuracy during isometric knee extensions compared to conventional orthoses (P=0.005). Moreover, the use of experimental orthoses resulted in better force accuracy during concentric (P=0.010) and eccentric (P=0.014) ankle plantar flexions and better knee joint kinesthesia in the flexed position (P=0.004) compared to conventional orthoses. Subjective comfort (P<0.001) and preference scores were higher with experimental orthoses compared to conventional ones. In conclusion, orthosis type affected static and dynamic muscle force control, kinesthesia, and perceived comfort in healthy subjects. New-generation experimental knee and ankle orthoses may thus be recommended for prophylactic joint bracing during physical activity and to improve the compliance for orthosis use, particularly in patients who require long-term bracing.

  18. Determinants of skin sympathetic nerve responses to isometric exercise.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thad E; Dyckman, Damian J; Ray, Chester A

    2006-03-01

    Exercise-induced increases in skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) are similar between isometric handgrip (IHG) and leg extension (IKE) performed at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). However, the precise effect of exercise intensity and level of fatigue on this relationship is unclear. This study tested the following hypotheses: 1) exercise intensity and fatigue level would not affect the magnitude of exercise-induced increase in SSNA between IHG and IKE, and 2) altering IHG muscle mass would also not affect the magnitude of exercise-induced increase in SSNA. In protocol 1, SSNA (peroneal microneurography) was measured during baseline and during the initial and last 30 s of isometric exercise to volitional fatigue in 12 subjects who randomly performed IHG and IKE bouts at 15, 30, and 45% MVC. In protocol 2, SSNA was measured in eight subjects who performed one-arm IHG at 30% MVC with the addition of IHG of the contralateral arm in 10-s intervals for 1 min. Exercise intensity significantly increased SSNA responses during the first 30 s of IHG (34+/-13, 70+/-11, and 92+/-13% change from baseline) and IKE (30+/-17, 69+/-12, and 76+/-13% change from baseline) for 15, 30, and 45% MVC. During the last 30 s of exercise to volitional fatigue, there were no significant differences in SSNA between exercise intensities or limb. SSNA did not significantly change between one-arm and two-arm IHG. Combined, these data indicate that exercise-induced increases in SSNA are intensity dependent in the initial portion of isometric exercise, but these differences are eliminated with the development of fatigue. Moreover, the magnitude of exercise-induced increase in SSNA responses is not dependent on either muscle mass involved or exercising limb.

  19. Quadriceps Inhibition After Repetitive Lumbar Extension Exercise in Persons With a History of Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Joseph M; Fritz, Julie M; Kerrigan, D. Casey; Saliba, Ethan N; Gansneder, Bruce M; Ingersoll, Christopher D

    2006-01-01

    Context: A neuromuscular relationship exists between the lumbar extensor and quadriceps muscles during fatiguing exercise. However, this relationship may be different for persons with low back pain (LBP). Objective: To compare quadriceps inhibition after isometric, fatiguing lumbar extension exercise between persons with a history of LBP and control subjects. Design: A 2 × 3 factorial, repeated-measures, time-series design with independent variables of group (persons with a history of LBP, controls) and time (baseline, postexercise set 1, postexercise set 2). Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-five subjects with a history of LBP were matched by sex, height, and mass to 25 healthy control subjects. Intervention(s): Electromyography median frequency indexed lumbar paraspinal muscular fatigue while subjects performed 2 sets of isometric lumbar extension exercise. Subjects exercised until a 15% downward shift in median frequency for the first set and a 25% shift for the second set were demonstrated. Main Outcome Measure(s): Knee extension force was measured while subjects performed an isometric maximal quadriceps contraction. During this maximal effort, a percutaneous electric stimulus was applied to the quadriceps, causing a transient, supramaximal increase in force output. We used the ratio between the 2 forces to estimate quadriceps inhibition. Quadriceps electromyographic activity was recorded during the maximal contractions to compare median frequencies over time. Results: Both groups exhibited significantly increased quadriceps inhibition after the first (12.6% ± 10.0%, P < .001) and second (15.2% ± 9.7%, P < .001) exercise sets compared with baseline (9.6% ± 9.3%). However, quadriceps inhibition was not different between groups. Conclusions: Persons with a history of LBP do not appear to be any more or less vulnerable to quadriceps inhibition after fatiguing lumbar extension exercise. PMID:17043693

  20. Cervical isometric strength and range of motion of elite rugby union players: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Head and neck injury is relatively common in Rugby Union. Despite this, strength and range-of-motion characteristics of the cervical spine are poorly characterised. The aim of this study was to provide data on the strength and range-of-motion of the cervical spine of professional rugby players to guide clinical rehabilitation. Methods A cohort study was performed evaluating 27 players from a single UK professional rugby club. Cervical isometric strength and range-of-motion were assessed in 3 planes of reference. Anthropometric data was collected and multivariate regression modelling performed with a view to predicting cervical isometric strength. Results Largest forces were generated in extension, with broadly equal isometric side flexion forces at around 90% of extension values. The forwards generated significantly more force than the backline in all parameters bar flexion. The forwards had substantially reduced cervical range-of-motion and larger body mass, with differences observed in height, weight, neck circumference and chest circumference (p < 0.002). Neck circumference was the sole predictor of isometric extension (adjusted R2 = 30.34). Conclusion Rehabilitative training programs aim to restore individuals to pre-injury status. This work provides reference ranges for the strength and range of motion of the cervical spine of current elite level rugby players. PMID:25120916

  1. Alpine Skiing With total knee ArthroPlasty (ASWAP): muscular adaptations.

    PubMed

    Rieder, F; Kösters, A; Wiesinger, H-P; Dorn, U; Hofstaedter, T; Fink, C; Seynnes, O R; Müller, E

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of recreational skiing as an intervention to improve quadriceps muscle architecture, strength, and antagonistic co-activation in patients with unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Hence, patients with TKA were assigned to either an intervention group (IG) or control group (CG). The IG completed a 12-week guided skiing program whereas the CG was instructed not to change their daily routines for the same period and was not allowed to ski. Before, after the intervention/after an 8-week retention period m. rectus femoris (RF) cross-sectional area (CSA), m. vastus lateralis muscle thickness, fascicle length, and pennation angle were measured with ultrasonography, while isometric (90° knee angle) knee extension, flexion torque and m. biceps femoris co-activation were assessed on an isokinetic dynamometer in 26 patients. There were significant and stable increases in RF CSA for the operated (10%; P < 0.05) and non-operated leg (12%; P < 0.01) after the training period in the IG whereas no changes were observed for the CG (all P > 0.05). There were no significant effects for other parameters (all P > 0.05). Overall, the skiing intervention was successful in increasing muscle mass in TKA older patients.

  2. Light: Isometric Casing with Lens, South Elevation, North Elevation, Top ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Light: Isometric Casing with Lens, South Elevation, North Elevation, Top Plan, Base Plan; Fresnel Lens: Isometric, Elevation, Plan - Fort Washington, Fort Washington Light, Northeast side of Potomac River at Fort Washington Park, Fort Washington, Prince George's County, MD

  3. Postactivation Potentiation Biases Maximal Isometric Strength Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Leonardo Coelho Rabello; Oliveira, Felipe Bruno Dias; Oliveira, Thiago Pires; Assumpção, Claudio de Oliveira; Greco, Camila Coelho; Cardozo, Adalgiso Croscato; Denadai, Benedito Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    Postactivation potentiation (PAP) is known to enhance force production. Maximal isometric strength assessment protocols usually consist of two or more maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVCs). The objective of this study was to determine if PAP would influence isometric strength assessment. Healthy male volunteers (n = 23) performed two five-second MVCs separated by a 180-seconds interval. Changes in isometric peak torque (IPT), time to achieve it (tPTI), contractile impulse (CI), root mean square of the electromyographic signal during PTI (RMS), and rate of torque development (RTD), in different intervals, were measured. Significant increases in IPT (240.6 ± 55.7 N·m versus 248.9 ± 55.1 N·m), RTD (746 ± 152 N·m·s−1versus 727 ± 158 N·m·s−1), and RMS (59.1 ± 12.2% RMSMAX  versus 54.8 ± 9.4% RMSMAX) were found on the second MVC. tPTI decreased significantly on the second MVC (2373 ± 1200 ms versus 2784 ± 1226 ms). We conclude that a first MVC leads to PAP that elicits significant enhancements in strength-related variables of a second MVC performed 180 seconds later. If disconsidered, this phenomenon might bias maximal isometric strength assessment, overestimating some of these variables. PMID:25133157

  4. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Jumper's Knee KidsHealth > For Teens > Jumper's Knee A A A ... continued damage to the knee. How Does the Knee Work? To understand how jumper's knee happens, it ...

  5. Knee extensor strength and body weight in adolescent men and the risk of knee osteoarthritis by middle age.

    PubMed

    Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Timpka, Simon; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Ageberg, Eva; Englund, Martin

    2017-10-01

    To assess the extent to which knee extensor strength and weight in adolescence are associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) by middle age. We studied a cohort of 40 121 men who at age 18 years in 1969/1970 underwent mandatory conscription in Sweden. We retrieved data on isometric knee extensor strength, weight, height, smoking, alcohol consumption, parental education and adult occupation from Swedish registries. We identified participants diagnosed with knee OA or knee injury from 1987 to 2010 through the National Patient Register. We estimated the HR of knee OA using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional regression model. To assess the influence of adult knee injury and occupation, we performed a formal mediation analysis. The mean (SD) knee extensor strength was 234 (47) Nm, the mean (SD) weight was 66 (9.3) kg. During 24 years (median) of follow-up starting at the age of 35 years, 2049 persons were diagnosed with knee OA. The adjusted HR (95% CI) of incident knee OA was 1.12 (1.06 to 1.18) for each SD of knee extensor strength and 1.18 (1.15 to 1.21) per 5 kg of body weight. Fifteen per cent of the increase in OA risk due to higher knee extensor strength could be attributed to knee injury and adult occupation. Higher knee extensor strength in adolescent men was associated with increased risk of knee OA by middle age, challenging the current tenet of low muscle strength being a risk factor for OA. We confirmed higher weight to be a strong risk factor for knee OA. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Physiological response to submaximal isometric contractions of the paravertebral muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, B. R.; Jorgensen, K.; Hargens, A. R.; Nielsen, P. K.; Nicolaisen, T.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Brief (30-second) isometric trunk extensions at 5%, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 80% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and 3 minutes of prolonged trunk extension (20% MVC) in erect position were studied in nine healthy male subjects. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the intercorrelation between intramuscular pressure and tissue oxygenation of the paravertebral muscles during submaximal isometric contractions and further, to evaluate paravertebral electromyogram and intramuscular pressure as indicators of force development. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Local physiologic responses to muscle contraction are incompletely understood. METHODS: Relative oxygenation was monitored with noninvasive near-infrared spectroscopy, intramuscular pressure was measured with a transducer-tipped catheter, and surface electromyogram was monitored at three recording sites. RESULTS: The root mean square amplitudes of the paravertebral electromyogram (L4, left and right; T12, right) and intramuscular pressure measured in the lumbar multifidus muscle at L4 increased with greater force development in a curvilinear manner. A significant decrease in the oxygenation of the lumbar paravertebral muscle in response to muscle contraction was found at an initial contraction level of 20% MVC. This corresponded to a paravertebral intramuscular pressure of 30-40 mm Hg. However, during prolonged trunk extension, no further decrease in tissue oxygenation was found compared with the tissue oxygenation level at the end of the brief contractions, indicating that homeostatic adjustments (mean blood pressure and heart rate) over time were sufficient to maintain paravertebral muscle oxygen levels. CONCLUSION: At a threshold intramuscular pressure of 30-40 mm Hg during muscle contraction, oxygenation in the paravertebral muscles is significantly reduced. The effect of further increase in intramuscular pressure on tissue oxygenation over time may be compensated for by an increase in blood pressure and heart

  7. Physiological response to submaximal isometric contractions of the paravertebral muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, B. R.; Jorgensen, K.; Hargens, A. R.; Nielsen, P. K.; Nicolaisen, T.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Brief (30-second) isometric trunk extensions at 5%, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 80% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and 3 minutes of prolonged trunk extension (20% MVC) in erect position were studied in nine healthy male subjects. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the intercorrelation between intramuscular pressure and tissue oxygenation of the paravertebral muscles during submaximal isometric contractions and further, to evaluate paravertebral electromyogram and intramuscular pressure as indicators of force development. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Local physiologic responses to muscle contraction are incompletely understood. METHODS: Relative oxygenation was monitored with noninvasive near-infrared spectroscopy, intramuscular pressure was measured with a transducer-tipped catheter, and surface electromyogram was monitored at three recording sites. RESULTS: The root mean square amplitudes of the paravertebral electromyogram (L4, left and right; T12, right) and intramuscular pressure measured in the lumbar multifidus muscle at L4 increased with greater force development in a curvilinear manner. A significant decrease in the oxygenation of the lumbar paravertebral muscle in response to muscle contraction was found at an initial contraction level of 20% MVC. This corresponded to a paravertebral intramuscular pressure of 30-40 mm Hg. However, during prolonged trunk extension, no further decrease in tissue oxygenation was found compared with the tissue oxygenation level at the end of the brief contractions, indicating that homeostatic adjustments (mean blood pressure and heart rate) over time were sufficient to maintain paravertebral muscle oxygen levels. CONCLUSION: At a threshold intramuscular pressure of 30-40 mm Hg during muscle contraction, oxygenation in the paravertebral muscles is significantly reduced. The effect of further increase in intramuscular pressure on tissue oxygenation over time may be compensated for by an increase in blood pressure and heart

  8. Downhill walking training with and without exercise-induced muscle damage similarly increase knee extensor strength.

    PubMed

    Maeo, Sumiaki; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2016-11-01

    This study examined whether avoiding or experiencing exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) influences strength gain after downhill walking training. Healthy young males performed treadmill downhill walking (gradient: -28%, velocity: 5 km · h(-1) and load: 10% of body mass) 1 session per week for four weeks using either a ramp-up protocol (n = 16), where exercise duration was gradually increased from 10 to 30, 50 and 70 min over four sessions, or a constant protocol (n = 14), where exercise duration was 40 min for all four sessions. Indirect markers of EIMD were measured throughout the training period. Maximal knee extension torque in eccentric (-1.05 rad·s(-1)), isometric and concentric (1.05 rad·s(-1)) conditions were measured at pre- and post-training. The ramp-up group showed no indications of EIMD throughout the training period (e.g., plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity: always <185 U · L(-1)) while EIMD was evident after the first session in the constant group (CK: peak 485 U · L(-1)). Both groups significantly increased maximal knee extension torque in all conditions with greater gains in eccentric (ramp-up: +19%, constant: +21%) than isometric (+16%, +15%) and concentric (+12%, +10%) strength without any significant group-difference. The current results suggest that EIMD can be avoided by the ramp-up protocol and is not a major determinant of training-induced strength gain.

  9. Feedforward consequences of isometric contractions: effort and ventilation.

    PubMed

    Luu, Billy L; Smith, Janette L; Martin, Peter G; McBain, Rachel A; Taylor, Janet L; Butler, Jane E

    2016-08-01

    The onset of voluntary muscle contractions causes rapid increases in ventilation and is accompanied by a sensation of effort. Both the ventilatory response and perception of effort are proportional to contraction intensity, but these behaviors have been generalized from contractions of a single muscle group. Our aim was to determine how these relationships are affected by simultaneous contractions of multiple muscle groups. We examined the ventilatory response and perceived effort of contraction during separate and simultaneous isometric contractions of the contralateral elbow flexors and of an ipsilateral elbow flexor and knee extensor. Subjects made 10-sec contractions at 25, 50, and 100% of maximum during normocapnia and hypercapnia. For simultaneous contractions, both muscle groups were activated at the same intensities. Ventilation was measured continuously and subjects rated the effort required to produce each contraction. As expected, ventilation and perceived effort increased proportionally with contraction intensity during individual contractions. However, during simultaneous contractions, neither ventilation nor effort reflected the combined muscle output. Rather, the ventilatory response was similar to when contractions were performed separately, and effort ratings showed a small but significant increase for simultaneous contractions. Hypercapnia at rest doubled baseline ventilation, but did not affect the difference in perceived effort between separate and simultaneous contractions. The ventilatory response and the sense of effort at the onset of muscle activity are not related to the total output of the motor pathways, or the working muscles, but arise from cortical regions upstream from the motor cortex.

  10. Correlation between architectural variables and torque in the erector spinae muscle during maximal isometric contraction.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio; González-Sánchez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This study analysed whether a significant relationship exists between the torque and muscle thickness and pennation angle of the erector spinae muscle during a maximal isometric lumbar extension with the lumbar spine in neutral position. This was a cross-sectional study in which 46 healthy adults performed three repetitions for 5 s of maximal isometric lumbar extension with rests of 90 s. During the lumbar extensions, bilateral ultrasound images of the erector spinae muscle (to measure pennation angle and muscle thickness) and torque were acquired. Reliability test analysis calculating the internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) of the measure, correlation between pennation angle, muscle thickness and torque extensions were examined. Through a linear regression the contribution of each independent variable (muscle thickness and pennation angle) to the variation of the dependent variable (torque) was calculated. The results of the reliability test were: 0.976-0.979 (pennation angle), 0.980-0.980 (muscle thickness) and 0.994 (torque). The results show that pennation angle and muscle thickness were significantly related to each other with a range between 0.295 and 0.762. In addition, multiple regression analysis showed that the two variables considered in this study explained 68% of the variance in the torque. Pennation angle and muscle thickness have a moderate impact on the variance exerted on the torque during a maximal isometric lumbar extension with the lumbar spine in neutral position.

  11. Low-intensity eccentric contractions attenuate muscle damage induced by subsequent maximal eccentric exercise of the knee extensors in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Chen, Trevor C; Tseng, Wei-Chin; Huang, Guan-Ling; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Tseng, Kou-Wei; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated whether low-intensity eccentric contractions of the knee extensors would attenuate the magnitude of muscle damage induced by maximal eccentric exercise of the same muscle performed 7 days later using elderly individuals. Healthy older men (66.4 ± 4.6 years) were assigned to control or experimental (Exp) group (n = 13 per group). The control group performed six sets of ten maximal eccentric contractions (MaxECC) of the knee extensors of non-dominant leg. The Exp group performed six sets of ten low-intensity eccentric contractions of the knee extensors on a leg extension machine by lowering a weight of 10 % maximal voluntary isometric knee extension strength (10 %ECC) 7 days prior to MaxECC. Changes in maximal voluntary isokinetic concentric torque (MVC-CON), angle at peak torque, range of motion (ROM), upper thigh circumference, muscle soreness, plasma creatine kinase activity and myoglobin (Mb) concentration and B-mode ultrasound echo-intensity before and for 5 days after MaxECC were compared between groups by a mixed factor ANOVA. No significant changes in any variables were observed following 10 %ECC. Following MaxECC, all variables changed significantly, and changes in all variables except for angle at peak torque were significantly different between groups. MVC-CON and ROM decreased smaller and recovered faster (P < 0.05) for Exp than control group, and changes in other variables were smaller (P < 0.05) for Exp group compared with control group. These results suggest that preconditioning knee extensor muscles with low-intensity eccentric contractions was effective for attenuating muscle damage induced by subsequent MaxECC of the knee extensors for elderly individuals.

  12. The effect of short-term isometric training on core/torso stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin; McGill, Stuart

    2016-09-26

    "Core" exercise is a basic part of many physical training regimens with goals ranging from rehabilitation of spine and knee injuries to improving athletic performance. Core stiffness has been proposed to perform several functions including reducing pain by minimising joint micro-movements, and enhancing strength and speed performance. This study probes the links between a training approach and immediate but temporary changes in stiffness. Passive and active stiffness was measured on 24 participants; 12 having little to no experience in core training (inexperienced), and the other 12 being athletes experienced to core training methods; before and after a 15 min bout of isometric core exercises. Passive stiffness was assessed on a "frictionless" bending apparatus and active stiffness assessed via a quick release mechanism. Short-term isometric core training increased passive and active stiffness in most directions for both inexperienced and experienced participants, passive left lateral bend among experienced participants being the exception (P < 0.05). There was no difference between the inexperienced and experienced groups. The results confirm that the specific isometric training exercise approach tested here can induce immediate changes in core stiffness, in this case following a single session. This may influence performance and injury resilience for a brief period.

  13. Prosthetic knee design by simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K; Hollister, A

    1999-07-30

    Although 150,000 total knee replacement surgeries are performed annually in North America, current designs of knee prostheses have mechanical problems that include a limited range of motion, abnormal gait patterns, patellofemoral joint dysfunction, implant loosening or subsidence, and excessive wear. These problems fall into three categories: failure to reproduce normal joint kinematics, which results in altered limb function; bone-implant interface failure; and material failure. Modern computer technology can be used to design, prototype, and test new total knee implants. The design team uses the full range of CAD-CAM to design and produce implant prototypes for mechanical and clinical testing. Closer approximation of natural knee kinematics and kinetics is essential for improved patient function and diminished implant loads. Current knee replacement designs are based on 19th Century theories that the knee moves about a variable axis of rotation. Recent research has shown, however, that knee motion occurs about two fixed, offset axes of rotation. These aces are not perpendicular to the long axes of the bones or to each other, and the axes do not intersect. Bearing surfaces of mechanisms that move about axes of rotation are surfaces of revolution of those axes which advanced CAD technology can produce. Solids with surfaces of revolution for the two axes of rotation for the knee have been made using an HP9000 workstation and Structural Ideas Master Series CAD software at ArthroMotion. The implant's CAD model should closely replicate movements of the normal knee. The knee model will have a range of flexion-extension (FE) from -5 to 120 degrees. Movements include varus, valgus, internal and external rotation, as well as flexion and extension. The patellofemoral joint is aligned perpendicular to the FE axis and replicates the natural joint more closely than those of existing prostheses. The bearing surfaces will be more congruent than current designs and should

  14. Comparison of knee gait kinematics of workers exposed to knee straining posture to those of non-knee straining workers.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathaly; Hagemeister, Nicola; Poitras, Stéphane; de Guise, Jacques A

    2013-06-01

    Workers exposed to knee straining postures, such as kneeling and squatting, may present modifications in knee gait kinematics that can make them vulnerable to osteoarthritis. In this study, knee kinematics of workers exposed to occupational knee straining postures (KS workers) were compared to those of non-knee straining (non-KS) workers. Eighteen KS workers and 20 non-KS workers participated in the study. Three-dimensional gait kinematic data were recorded at the knee using an electromagnetic motion tracking system. The following parameters were extracted from flexion/extension, adduction/abduction and internal/external rotation angle data and used for group comparisons: knee angle at initial foot contact, peak angles, minimal angles and angle range during the entire gait cycle. Group comparisons were performed with Student t-tests. In the sagittal plane, KS workers had a greater knee flexion angle at initial foot contact, a lower peak knee flexion angle during the swing phase and a lower angle range than non-KS workers (p<0.05). In the frontal plane, all parameters indicated that KS workers had their knees more adducted than non-KS workers. External/internal rotation range was greater for KS workers. This study provides new knowledge on work related to KS postures and knee kinematics. The results support the concept that KS workers might exhibit knee kinematics that are different from those of non-KS workers.

  15. Liquid crystal helical ribbons as isometric textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achard, M.-F.; Kleman, M.; Nastishin, Yu. A.; Nguyen, H.-T.

    2005-01-01

    Deformations that conserve the parallelism and the distances between layers, in smectic phases; between columns, in columnar phases are commonplace in liquid crystals. The resulting isometric deformed textures display specific geometric features. The corresponding order parameter singularities extend over rather large, macroscopic, distances, e.g., cofocal conics in smectics. This well-known picture is modified when, superimposed to the 1D or 2D periodicities, the structure is helical. However isometry can be preserved. This paper discusses the case of a medium whose structure is made of 1D modulated layers (a lamello-columnar phase), assuming that the modulations rotate helically from one layer to the next. The price to pay is that any isometric texture is necessarily frustrated; it consists of layers folded into a set of parallel helicoids, in the manner of a screw dislocation (of macroscopic Burgers vector), the modulations being along the helices, i.e. double-twisted. The singularity set is made of two helical disclination lines. We complete this geometric analysis by a crude calculation of the energy of a helical ribbon. It is suggested that the helical ribbons observed in the B7 phase of banana-like molecules are such isometric textures. As a side result, let us mention that the description of double-twist, traditionally made in terms of a partition of the director field into nested cylinders, could more than often be profitably tested against a partition into nested helicoids.

  16. Effect of an eccentrically biased hamstring strengthening home program on knee flexor strength and the length-tension relationship.

    PubMed

    Orishimo, Karl F; McHugh, Malachy P

    2015-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to document relative activation intensities of the hamstrings and gluteus maximus during 4 eccentric hamstring strengthening exercises and to assess the effects of a short-term strengthening program comprised of these exercises on knee flexor strength and the length-tension relationship. Twelve healthy subjects participated in this study. Electromyographic (EMG) activities from the biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and gluteus maximus were recorded as subjects performed (a) standing hip extension with elastic resistance, (b) trunk flexion in single limb stance (diver), (c) standing split (glider), and (d) supine sliding bridge (slider). Baseline isometric knee flexor strength was measured at 90, 70, 50, and 30° of flexion at the knee with the subject seated and the hip flexed to 50° from horizontal. After completing the 4-week training program, strength tests were repeated. Repeated-measures analysis of variance were used to compare EMG activity between muscles and to assess angle-specific strength improvements. Hamstring activity exceeded gluteus maximus activity for resisted hip extension, glider, and slider exercises (p < 0.001) but not for the diver (p = 0.087). Hamstring activation was greatest during the slider and resisted hip extension and lowest during the glider and the diver. Knee flexor strength improved by 9.0% (p = 0.005) but was not angle specific (training by angle p = 0.874). The short-term home training program effectively targeted the hamstrings and resulted in strength gains that were similar at short and long muscle lengths. These data demonstrate that hamstring strength can be improved using eccentrically biased unilateral exercises without the use of weights or other equipments.

  17. The associations between quadriceps muscle strength, power, and knee joint mechanics in knee osteoarthritis: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Murray, Amanda M; Thomas, Abbey C; Armstrong, Charles W; Pietrosimone, Brian G; Tevald, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Abnormal knee joint mechanics have been implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of knee osteoarthritis. Deficits in muscle function (i.e., strength and power) may contribute to abnormal knee joint loading. The associations between quadriceps strength, power and knee joint mechanics remain unclear in knee osteoarthritis. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to collect peak knee joint angles and moments during the first 50% of stance phase of gait in 33 participants with knee osteoarthritis. Quadriceps strength and power were assessed using a knee extension machine. Strength was quantified as the one repetition maximum. Power was quantified as the peak power produced at 40-90% of the one repetition maximum. Quadriceps strength accounted for 15% of the variance in peak knee flexion angle (P=0.016). Quadriceps power accounted for 20-29% of the variance in peak knee flexion angle (P<0.05). Quadriceps power at 90% of one repetition maximum accounted for 9% of the variance in peak knee adduction moment (P=0.05). These data suggest that quadriceps power explains more variance in knee flexion angle and knee adduction moment during gait in knee osteoarthritis than quadriceps strength. Additionally, quadriceps power at multiple loads is associated with knee joint mechanics and therefore should be assessed at a variety of loads. Taken together, these results indicate that quadriceps power may be a potential target for interventions aimed at changing knee joint mechanics in knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of long-term isometric training on core/torso stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin C Y; McGill, Stuart M

    2015-06-01

    Although core stiffness enhances athletic performance traits, controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of isometric vs. dynamic core training methods. This study aimed to determine whether long-term changes in stiffness can be trained, and if so, what is the most effective method. Twenty-four healthy male subjects (23 ± 3 years; 1.8 ± 0.06 m; 77.5 ± 10.8 kg) were recruited for passive and active stiffness measurements before and after a 6-week core training intervention. Twelve subjects (22 ± 2 years; 1.8 ± 0.08 m; 78.3 ± 12.3 kg) were considered naive to physical and core exercise. The other 12 subjects (24 ± 3 years; 1.8 ± 0.05 m; 76.8 ± 9.7 kg) were Muay Thai athletes (savvy). A repeated-measures design compared core training methods (isometric vs. dynamic, with a control group) and subject training experience (naive vs. savvy) before and after a 6-week training period. Passive stiffness was assessed on a "frictionless" bending apparatus and active stiffness assessed through a quick release mechanism. Passive stiffness increased after the isometric training protocol. Dynamic training produced a smaller effect, and as expected, there was no change in the control group. Active stiffness did not change in any group. Comparisons between subject and training groups did not reveal any interactions. Thus, an isometric training approach was superior in terms of enhancing core stiffness. This is important since increased core stiffness enhances load bearing ability, arrests painful vertebral micromovements, and enhances ballistic distal limb movement. This may explain the efficacy reported for back and knee injury reduction.

  19. Astym® Therapy for the Management of Recalcitrant Knee Joint Stiffness after Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Anil; Corcoran, James; Cherian, Jeffery J; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Knee stiffness is a common complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Despite studies published on the surgical management of reduced range of motion (ROM) after TKA, there is limited evidence on the nonoperative management of joint and soft tissue imbalances possibly contributing to reduced knee ROM. This report assesses changes in ROM, pain, function, and patellar tendon length after Astym® joint mobilization use. A 38-year-old male professional skier had a right TKA 3 months before presentation with 2 subsequent manipulations under anesthesia secondary to persistent knee stiffness. He had patellar baja on radiograph, a reduced arc of ROM, reduced patellar mobility and muscular extensibility, and pain to palpation along the patellar tendon. He had 12 visits of physical therapy with the use of Astym®, patellar mobilization, and tibio-femoral mobilizations with movement. The patient also used a customized knee device at home for prolonged knee extension stretching. The patient was treated for 12 visits, along with home use of customized bracing for knee extension. Significant improvements were seen in pain, function, and ROM. He returned to work full-time, ambulated prolonged distances, and negotiated stairs pain-free. He also demonstrated resolution of patellar baja radiographically. Conservative management of recalcitrant knee joint stiffness after primary TKA can be effective in restoring knee mobility and reducing pain and activity limitation. A multimodal approach using Astym® treatment, customized knee bracing, and targeted joint mobilization can be effective in resolving knee joint stiffness.

  20. Skin mounted accelerometer system for measuring knee range of motion.

    PubMed

    McGinnis, Ryan S; Patel, Shyamal; Silva, Ikaro; Mahadevan, Nikhil; DiCristofaro, Steve; Jortberg, Elise; Ceruolo, Melissa; Aranyosi, A J

    2016-08-01

    Sufficient range of motion of the knee joint is necessary for performing many activities of daily living. Ambulatory monitoring of knee function can provide valuable information about progression of diseases like knee osteoarthritis and recovery after surgical interventions like total knee arthroplasty. In this paper, we describe a skin-mounted, conformal, accelerometer-based system for measuring knee angle and range of motion that does not require a skilled operator to apply devices. We establish the accuracy of this technique with respect to clinical gold standard goniometric measurements on a dataset collected from normative subjects during the performance of repeated bouts of knee flexion and extension tests. Results show that knee angle and range of motion estimates are highly correlated with goniometer measurements, and track differences in knee angle and range of motion to within 1%. These results demonstrate the ability of this system to characterize knee angle and range of motion, enabling future longitudinal monitoring of knee motion in naturalistic environments.

  1. The effects of isometric wall squat exercise on heart rate and blood pressure in a normotensive population.

    PubMed

    Goldring, Natalie; Wiles, Jonathan D; Coleman, Damian

    2014-01-01

    The isometric wall squat could be utilised in home-based training aimed at reducing resting blood pressure, but first its suitability must be established. The aim of this study was to determine a method of adjusting wall squat intensity and explore the cardiovascular responses. Twenty-three participants performed one 2 minute wall squat on 15 separate occasions. During the first ten visits, ten different knee joint angles were randomly completed from 135° to 90° in 5° increments; five random angles were repeated in subsequent visits. Heart rate and blood pressure (systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure) were measured. The heart rate and blood pressure parameters produced significant inverse relationships with joint angle (r at least -0.80; P < 0.05), demonstrating that wall squat intensity can be adjusted by manipulating knee joint angle. Furthermore, the wall squat elicited similar cardiovascular responses to other isometric exercise modes that have reduced resting blood pressure (135° heart rate: 76 ± 10 beats ∙ min(-1); systolic: 134 ± 14 mmHg; diastolic: 76 ± 6 mmHg and 90° heart rate: 119 ± 20 beats ∙ min(-1); systolic: 196 ± 18 mmHg; diastolic: 112 ± 13 mmHg). The wall squat may have a useful role to play in isometric training aimed at reducing resting blood pressure.

  2. Relationship between knee alignment and the electromyographic activity of quadriceps muscles in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seong Hoon; Hong, Bo Young; Oh, Jee Hae; Lee, Jong In

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We evaluated the relationship between knee alignment and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus medialis (VM) to the vastus lateralis (VL) muscles in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a cross-sectional study. [Subjects and Methods] Forty subjects with knee OA were assessed by anatomic radiographic knee alignment and the VM/VL ratio was calculated. Surface EMG from both the VM and VL muscles were evaluated during maximal isometric contraction at 60° knee flexion. Simultaneously, peak quadriceps torque was assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer. Subjects were categorized into low, moderate, and high varus groups according to knee malalignment. The peak quadriceps torque and VM/VL ratio across groups, and their relationships with varus malalignment were analyzed. [Results] All subjects had medial compartment OA and the VM/VL ratio of all subjects was 1.31 ± 0.28 (mean ± SD). There were no significant differences in the peak quadriceps torque or VM/VL ratios across the groups nor were there any significant relationships with varus malalignment. [Conclusion] The VM/VL ratio and peak quadriceps torque were not associated with the severity of knee varus malalignment. PMID:25995602

  3. The role of knee joint moments and knee impairments on self-reported knee pain during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Megan; Farrokhi, Shawn; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2016-01-01

    The association between high mechanical knee joint loading during gait with onset and progression of knee osteoarthritis has been extensively studied. However, less attention has been given to risk factors related to increased pain during gait. The purpose of this study was to evaluate knee joint moments and clinical characteristics that may be associated with gait-related knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Sixty-seven participants with knee osteoarthritis were stratified into three groups of no pain (n=18), mild pain (n=27), or moderate/severe pain (n=22) based on their self-reported symptoms during gait. All participants underwent three-dimensional gait analysis. Quadriceps strength, knee extension range of motion, radiographic knee alignment and self-reported measures of global pain and function were also quantified. The moderate/severe pain group demonstrated worse global pain (P<0.01) and physical function scores (P<0.01) compared to the no pain and the mild pain groups. The moderate/severe pain group also walked with greater knee flexion moments during the midstance phase of gait compared to the no pain group (P=0.02). Additionally, the moderate/severe pain group demonstrated greater varus knee malalignment (P=0.009), which was associated with higher weight acceptance peak knee adduction moments (P=0.003) and worse global pain (P=0.003) and physical function scores (P=0.006). Greater knee flexion moment is present during the midstance phase of gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis and moderate/severe pain during gait. Additionally, greater varus malalignment may be a sign of increased global knee joint dysfunction that can influence many activities of daily living beyond gait. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Total knee replacement plus physical and medical therapy or treatment with physical and medical therapy alone: a randomised controlled trial in patients with knee osteoarthritis (the MEDIC-study).

    PubMed

    Skou, Soren T; Roos, Ewa M; Laursen, Mogens B; Rathleff, Michael S; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Simonsen, Ole H; Rasmussen, Sten

    2012-05-09

    There is a lack of high quality evidence concerning the efficacy of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). According to international evidence-based guidelines, treatment of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) should include patient education, exercise and weight loss. Insoles and pharmacological treatment can be included as supplementary treatments. If the combination of these non-surgical treatment modalities is ineffective, TKA may be indicated. The purpose of this randomised controlled trial is to examine whether TKA provides further improvement in pain, function and quality of life in addition to optimised non-surgical treatment in patients with KOA defined as definite radiographic OA and up to moderate pain. The study will be conducted in The North Denmark Region. 100 participants with radiographic KOA (K-L grade ≥2) and mean pain during the previous week of ≤ 60 mm (0-100, best to worst scale) who are considered eligible for TKA by an orthopaedic surgeon will be included. The treatment will consist of 12 weeks of optimised non-surgical treatment consisting of patient education, exercise, diet, insoles, analgesics and/or NSAIDs. Patients will be randomised to either receiving or not receiving a TKA in addition to the optimised non-surgical treatment. The primary outcome will be the change from baseline to 12 months on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)(4) defined as the average score for the subscale scores for pain, symptoms, activities of daily living, and quality of life. Secondary outcomes include the five individual KOOS subscale scores, EQ-5D, pain on a 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale, self-efficacy, pain pressure thresholds, and isometric knee flexion and knee extension strength. This is the first randomised controlled trial to investigate the efficacy of TKA as an adjunct treatment to optimised non-surgical treatment in patients with KOA. The results will significantly contribute to evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of patients with

  5. Effect of Preactivation on Torque Enhancement by the Stretch-Shortening Cycle in Knee Extensors

    PubMed Central

    Fukutani, Atsuki; Misaki, Jun; Isaka, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    The stretch-shortening cycle is one of the most interesting topics in the field of sport sciences, because the performance of human movement is enhanced by the stretch-shortening cycle (eccentric contraction). The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the influence of preactivation on the torque enhancement by stretch-shortening cycle in knee extensors. Twelve men participated in this study. The following three conditions were conducted for knee extensors: (1) concentric contraction without preactivation (CON), (2) concentric contraction with eccentric preactivation (ECC), and (3) concentric contraction with isometric preactivation (ISO). Muscle contractions were evoked by electrical stimulation to discard the influence of neural activity. The range of motion of the knee joint was set from 80 to 140 degrees (full extension = 180 degrees). Angular velocities of the concentric and eccentric contractions were set at 180 and 90 degrees/s, respectively. In the concentric contraction phase, joint torques were recorded at 85, 95, and 105 degrees, and they were compared among the three conditions. In the early phase (85 degrees) of concentric contraction, the joint torque was larger in the ECC and ISO conditions than in the CON condition. However, these clear differences disappeared in the later phase (105 degrees) of concentric contraction. The results showed that joint torque was clearly different among the three conditions in the early phase whereas this difference disappeared in the later phase. Thus, preactivation, which is prominent in the early phase of contractions, plays an important role in torque enhancement by the stretch-shortening cycle in knee extensors. PMID:27414804

  6. A Novel Two-Velocity Method for Elaborate Isokinetic Testing of Knee Extensors.

    PubMed

    Grbic, Vladimir; Djuric, Sasa; Knezevic, Olivera M; Mirkov, Dragan M; Nedeljkovic, Aleksandar; Jaric, Slobodan

    2017-09-01

    Single outcomes of standard isokinetic dynamometry tests do not discern between various muscle mechanical capacities. In this study, we aimed to (1) evaluate the shape and strength of the force-velocity relationship of knee extensors, as observed in isokinetic tests conducted at a wide range of angular velocities, and (2) explore the concurrent validity of a simple 2-velocity method. Thirteen physically active females were tested for both the peak and averaged knee extensor concentric force exerted at the angular velocities of 30°-240°/s recorded in the 90°-170° range of knee extension. The results revealed strong (0.960isometric force. The 2-velocity method could therefore be developed into a standard method for isokinetic testing of mechanical capacities of knee extensors and, if supported by further research, other muscles. This brief and fatigue-free testing procedure could discern between muscle force, velocity, and power-producing capacities. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your knee, like keeping it from bending outward. anterior cruciate ligament (ACL): The ACL connects your femur to your ... Injuries Sports and Exercise Safety Osgood-Schlatter Disease Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries Bones, Muscles, and Joints Meniscus Tears ...

  8. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the knee uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  9. Knee Bursitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Runners can develop pain and inflammation in the pes anserine bursa, situated on the inner side of your knee below the joint. Obesity and osteoarthritis. Pes anserine bursitis, affecting the inner side of your ...

  10. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... keeping it from bending outward. anterior cruciate ligament (ACL): The ACL connects your femur to your tibia at the ... Common knee sprains usually involve damage to the ACL and/or MCL. The most serious sprains involve ...

  11. Hiking physiology and the "quasi-isometric" concept.

    PubMed

    Spurway, Neil C

    2007-08-01

    The literature indicates that the heart rate of a planing-dinghy sailor, in winds of 4 - 5 m . s(-1), is in the range seen in aerobic athletes, yet oxygen consumption (VO(2)) is roughly half that of the same individual cycling at that heart rate. Thus, although upper-body dynamic activity is a contributing factor, the dominant physiological demand must be the "quasi-isometric" stress on the lower-body anterior muscles - especially the quadriceps, which appears to impose 40 - 50% of the total oxygen demand in a typical hiking posture. Therefore, a non-trivial part of the sailor's fitness training should involve sustained quadriceps stress. Estimates of this stress on water vary widely in the literature, but about 25 - 30% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) tallies with endurance times recorded both in the literature and in an outline of new work reported here. Muscle blood flow is restricted under such a load, but not occluded. Laser Doppler measurements of femoral blood flow on a leg-extension ergometer found similar values during 10 - 30% MVC, much less at 40%, and marked hyperaemia on relaxation from 20% MVC or more - implying metabolic debt. Adding low-amplitude alternating leg movements while holding the same overall load stationary, and therefore increasing only internal not external work, further elevates blood flow and VO(2) both during and after exercise. Femoral-vein lactate concentration is also higher after these movements. Speculations that unusually dynamic lower-body movements by elite sailors might assist hiking endurance are not supported by these findings. Nevertheless, afloat or ashore, capillary lactate concentrations hardly ever exceed 5 mmol . l(-1), even during the post-exercise surge - challenging assumptions that the quadriceps had been profoundly anaerobic while under load. On the contrary, it appears that aerobic metabolism contributes substantially, if not completely, to energy supply. A preliminary comparison of elite sailors with

  12. Knee Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Robert C.; Richter, Dustin L.; Wascher, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic knee dislocation is becoming more prevalent because of improved recognition and increased exposure to high-energy trauma, but long-term results are lacking. Purpose: To present 2 cases with minimum 20-year follow-up and a review of the literature to illustrate some of the fundamental principles in the management of the dislocated knee. Study Design: Review and case reports. Methods: Two patients with knee dislocations who underwent multiligamentous knee reconstruction were reviewed, with a minimum 20-year follow-up. These patients were brought back for a clinical evaluation using both subjective and objective measures. Subjective measures include the following scales: Lysholm, Tegner activity, visual analog scale (VAS), Short Form–36 (SF-36), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and a psychosocial questionnaire. Objective measures included ligamentous examination, radiographic evaluation (including Telos stress radiographs), and physical therapy assessment of function and stability. Results: The mean follow-up was 22 years. One patient had a vascular injury requiring repair prior to ligament reconstruction. The average assessment scores were as follows: SF-36 physical health, 52; SF-36 mental health, 59; Lysholm, 92; IKDC, 86.5; VAS involved, 10.5 mm; and VAS uninvolved, 2.5 mm. Both patients had excellent stability and were functioning at high levels of activity for their age (eg, hiking, skydiving). Both patients had radiographic signs of arthritis, which lowered 1 subject’s IKDC score to “C.” Conclusion: Knee dislocations have rare long-term excellent results, and most intermediate-term studies show fair to good functional results. By following fundamental principles in the management of a dislocated knee, patients can be given the opportunity to function at high levels. Hopefully, continued advances in the evaluation and treatment of knee dislocations will improve the long-term outcomes for these patients in the

  13. [Decreasing systolic blood pressure with isometric muscle training: a CAT].

    PubMed

    Espinoza Salinas, Alexis; Sánchez, Pablo Aguilera; Zafra Santos, Edson; Cofre Bolados, Cristian; Prado Núñez, Hugo; Pavez Von Martens, Gustavo

    2014-09-11

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases such as coronary heart disease or heart failure. One of the interventions for the management of this disorder is isometric muscle training on upper and lower limbs. To prove the validity and applicability of results regarding the effectiveness of isometric training in hypertensive subjects. We also attempt to answer the following question: what is the effectiveness of isometric muscle training on the decrease of systolic blood pressure in hypertensive patients? Critical appraisal of the systematic review and meta-analysis "Isometric exercise training for blood pressure management". Isometric training reduces systolic blood pressure in normotensive and medicated hypertensive subjects, with a standardized mean difference of 6.77 mm Hg (95% confidence interval: 7.93-5.62). It is reasonable to recommend isometric muscle training with the aim of lowering systolic blood pressure, considering the impact of the results of the articles analyzed and the applicability of this type of training.

  14. 3D intersegmental knee loading in below-knee amputees across steady-state walking speeds.

    PubMed

    Fey, Nicholas P; Neptune, Richard R

    2012-05-01

    Unilateral below-knee amputees often develop comorbidities that include knee joint disorders (e.g., intact leg knee osteoarthritis), with the mechanisms leading to these comorbidities being poorly understood. Mechanical knee loading of non-amputees has been associated with joint disorders and shown to be influenced by walking speed. However, the relationships between amputee knee loading and speed have not been identified. This study examined three-dimensional mechanical knee loading of amputees across a wide range of steady-state walking speeds. Fourteen amputees and 10 non-amputee control subjects were analyzed at four overground walking speeds. At each speed, intersegmental joint moment and force impulses (i.e., time-integrals over the stance phase) were compared between the control, intact and residual knees using repeated-measures ANOVAs. There were no differences in joint force impulses between the intact and control knees. The intact knee abduction moment impulse was lower than the non-amputees at 0.6 and 0.9 m/s. The intact knee flexion moment impulses at 0.6, 1.2 and 1.5m/s and knee external rotation moment impulses at all speeds were greater than the residual knee. The residual knee extension moment and posterior force impulses were insensitive to speed increases, while these quantities increased in intact and control knees. These results suggest the intact knees of asymptomatic and relatively new amputees are not overloaded during walking compared to non-amputees. Increased knee loads may develop in response to prolonged prosthesis usage or joint disorder onset. Further study is needed to determine if the identified bilateral loading asymmetries across speeds lead to diminished knee joint health. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Abnormal coactivation of knee and ankle extensors is related to changes in heteronymous spinal pathways after stroke

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Abnormal coactivation of leg extensors is often observed on the paretic side of stroke patients while they attempt to move. The mechanisms underlying this coactivation are not well understood. This study (1) compares the coactivation of leg extensors during static contractions in stroke and healthy individuals, and (2) assesses whether this coactivation is related to changes in intersegmental pathways between quadriceps and soleus (Sol) muscles after stroke. Methods Thirteen stroke patients and ten healthy individuals participated in the study. Levels of coactivation of knee extensors and ankle extensors were measured in sitting position, during two tasks: maximal isometric voluntary contractions in knee extension and in plantarflexion. The early facilitation and later inhibition of soleus voluntary EMG evoked by femoral nerve stimulation were assessed in the paretic leg of stroke participants and in one leg of healthy participants. Results Coactivation levels of ankle extensors (mean ± SEM: 56 ± 7% of Sol EMG max) and of knee extensors (52 ± 10% of vastus lateralis (VL) EMG max) during the knee extension and the ankle extension tasks respectively were significantly higher in the paretic leg of stroke participants than in healthy participants (26 ± 5% of Sol EMG max and 10 ± 3% of VL EMG max, respectively). Early heteronymous facilitation of Sol voluntary EMG in stroke participants (340 ± 62% of Sol unconditioned EMG) was significantly higher than in healthy participants (98 ± 34%). The later inhibition observed in all control participants was decreased in the paretic leg. Levels of coactivation of ankle extensors during the knee extension task were significantly correlated with both the increased facilitation (Pearson r = 0.59) and the reduced inhibition (r = 0.56) in the paretic leg. Measures of motor impairment were more consistently correlated with the levels of coactivation of biarticular muscles than those of monoarticular muscles

  16. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt or diseased, you have knee problems. Knee problems can cause pain and difficulty ...

  17. Partial knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... minor deformity in the knee. You have good range of motion in your knee. The ligaments in your knee ... You will also need physical therapy to improve range of motion and strengthen the muscles around the knee.

  18. Unusual Wrist Tremor: Unilateral Isometric Tremor?

    PubMed Central

    Zesiewicz, Theresa; Vu, Tuan; Carranza, Michael A.; Appelbaum, Rachel; Snyder, Madeline; Staffetti, Joseph S.; Allison, Kevin G.; Shimberg, William R.; Louis, Elan D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tremors may be difficult to classify. Case Report An 83-year-old male presented with an unusual left wrist tremor. The tremor could be reproducibly elicited by making a fist or carrying a weighted object (e.g., a shopping bag, bottle of water) of approximately 1 lb or more, and it intensified with heavier weights. The tremor was difficult to classify, although it shared features with isometric tremor. Discussion This specific presentation of tremor has not been reported previously. We hope that the detailed description we provide will aid other neurologists who encounter this or similar tremors in their clinics. PMID:24455450

  19. Cervical Resistance Training: Effects on Isometric and Dynamic Strength

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    skinfold thicknesses . San Diego, CA: Naval Health Research Center; 1984. Report No: 84–39. 3. Coakwell MR, Bloswick DS, Moser R Jr. High-risk head and...Strength, Dynamic Strength, and Neck Circumference Isometric strength values are displayed in Table I. For isometric strength-flexion, the 2 2 ANOVA...Also, a main effect was observed TABLE I. RESISTANCE TRAINING VS. CONTROL GROUPS: ISOMETRIC STRENGTH (LB). RT Group (n 5) C Group (n 5) FLX EXT

  20. Almost isometric mesh parameterization through abstract domains.

    PubMed

    Pietroni, Nico; Tarini, Marco; Cignoni, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust, automatic technique to build a global hi-quality parameterization of a two-manifold triangular mesh. An adaptively chosen 2D domain of the parameterization is built as part of the process. The produced parameterization exhibits very low isometric distortion, because it is globally optimized to preserve both areas and angles. The domain is a collection of equilateral triangular 2D regions enriched with explicit adjacency relationships (it is abstract in the sense that no 3D embedding is necessary). It is tailored to minimize isometric distortion, resulting in excellent parameterization qualities, even when meshes with complex shape and topology are mapped into domains composed of a small number of large continuous regions. Moreover, this domain is, in turn, remapped into a collection of 2D square regions, unlocking many advantages found in quad-based domains (e.g., ease of packing). The technique is tested on a variety of cases, including challenging ones, and compares very favorably with known approaches. An open-source implementation is made available.

  1. [Assessment of concomitant floating knees injuries severity].

    PubMed

    Eone, Daniel Handy; Lamah, Léopold; Bayiha, Jean Emile; Ondoa, Danielle Larissa Essomba; Nonga, Bernadette Ngo; Ibrahima, Farikou; Bahebeck, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Floating knee is caused by high-energy trauma, whose genesis is suggestive of extensive locoregional and general damages. Referring to multiple trauma. The aim of our study was to collect data on all concomitant floating knee injuries in our practice environment and to evaluate their severity. We conducted a descriptive and retrospective study over a period of 14 years and 9 months. Our sample consisted of 75 floating knees, the average age was 35 years. Sixty six patients had an ISS≥16 (classified as polytrauma). Head traumas, chest and abdominal injuries associated with floating knee injuries require adequate resuscitation.

  2. An EEG-based study of discrete isometric and isotonic human lower limb muscle contractions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Electroencephalography (EEG) combined with independent component analysis enables functional neuroimaging in dynamic environments including during human locomotion. This type of functional neuroimaging could be a powerful tool for neurological rehabilitation. It could enable clinicians to monitor changes in motor control related cortical dynamics associated with a therapeutic intervention, and it could facilitate noninvasive electrocortical control of devices for assisting limb movement to stimulate activity dependent plasticity. Understanding the relationship between electrocortical dynamics and muscle activity will be helpful for incorporating EEG-based functional neuroimaging into clinical practice. The goal of this study was to use independent component analysis of high-density EEG to test whether we could relate electrocortical dynamics to lower limb muscle activation in a constrained motor task. A secondary goal was to assess the trial-by-trial consistency of the electrocortical dynamics by decoding the type of muscle action. Methods We recorded 264-channel EEG while 8 neurologically intact subjects performed isometric and isotonic, knee and ankle exercises at two different effort levels. Adaptive mixture independent component analysis (AMICA) parsed EEG into models of underlying source signals. We generated spectrograms for all electrocortical source signals and used a naïve Bayesian classifier to decode exercise type from trial-by-trial time-frequency data. Results AMICA captured different electrocortical source distributions for ankle and knee tasks. The fit of single-trial EEG to these models distinguished knee from ankle tasks with 80% accuracy. Electrocortical spectral modulations in the supplementary motor area were significantly different for isometric and isotonic tasks (p < 0.05). Isometric contractions elicited an event related desynchronization (ERD) in the α-band (8–12 Hz) and β-band (12–30 Hz) at joint torque onset and

  3. Improved Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint improved version of one described in "Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint" (MFS-28633). Locks automatically upon initial application of radial force (wearer's weight) and unlocks automatically, but only when all loads (radial force and bending) relieved. Joints lock whenever wearer applies weight to knee at any joint angle between full extension and 45 degree bend. Both devices offer increased safety and convenience relative to conventional orthotic knee joints.

  4. Improved Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint improved version of one described in "Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint" (MFS-28633). Locks automatically upon initial application of radial force (wearer's weight) and unlocks automatically, but only when all loads (radial force and bending) relieved. Joints lock whenever wearer applies weight to knee at any joint angle between full extension and 45 degree bend. Both devices offer increased safety and convenience relative to conventional orthotic knee joints.

  5. Severe COPD Alters Muscle Fiber Conduction Velocity During Knee Extensors Fatiguing Contraction.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Gennaro; Coratella, Giuseppe; Dardanello, Davide; Rinaldo, Nicoletta; Lanza, Massimo; Schena, Federico; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes in muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV), as a sign of fatigue during knee extensor contraction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as compared with healthy controls. Eleven male patients (5 with severe and 6 with moderate COPD; age 67 ± 5 years) and 11 age-matched healthy male controls (age 65 ± 4 years) volunteered for the study. CV was obtained by multichannel surface electromyography (EMG) from the vastus lateralis (VL) and medialis (VM) of the quadriceps muscle during isometric, 30-second duration knee extension at 70% of maximal voluntary contraction. The decline in CV in both the VL and VM was steeper in the severe COPD patients than in healthy controls (for VL: severe COPD vs. controls -0.45 ± 0.07%/s; p < 0.001, and for VM: severe COPD vs. controls -0.54 ± 0.09%/s, p < 0.001). No difference in CV decline was found between the moderate COPD patients and the healthy controls. These findings suggest that severe COPD may impair muscle functions, leading to greater muscular fatigue, as expressed by CV changes. The results may be due to a greater involvement of anaerobic metabolism and a shift towards fatigable type II fibers in the muscle composition of the severe COPD patients.

  6. Isometric deformations of planar quadrilaterals with constant index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaputryaeva, E. S.

    2014-05-01

    We consider isometric deformations (motions) of polygons (so-called carpenter's rule problem) in the case of self-intersecting polygons with the additional condition that the index of the polygon is preserved by the motion. We provide general information about isometric deformations of planar polygons and give a complete solution of the carpenter's problem for quadrilaterals. Bibliography: 17 titles.

  7. The Adaptive Range of 1/f Isometric Force Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Valantine, Andrew D.; Newell, Karl M.

    2009-01-01

    The adaptive range of 1/f dynamics in isometric force output was investigated. Participants produced isometric force to targets with predictable demands (constant and sinusoidal) and 1/f noise waveforms (white, pink, brown, and black) that also varied in the frequency bandwidth represented in the force signal (0-4 Hz, 0-8 Hz, and 0-12 Hz). The…

  8. Isometric deformations of planar quadrilaterals with constant index

    SciTech Connect

    Zaputryaeva, E S

    2014-05-31

    We consider isometric deformations (motions) of polygons (so-called carpenter's rule problem) in the case of self-intersecting polygons with the additional condition that the index of the polygon is preserved by the motion. We provide general information about isometric deformations of planar polygons and give a complete solution of the carpenter's problem for quadrilaterals. Bibliography: 17 titles.

  9. The Adaptive Range of 1/f Isometric Force Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Valantine, Andrew D.; Newell, Karl M.

    2009-01-01

    The adaptive range of 1/f dynamics in isometric force output was investigated. Participants produced isometric force to targets with predictable demands (constant and sinusoidal) and 1/f noise waveforms (white, pink, brown, and black) that also varied in the frequency bandwidth represented in the force signal (0-4 Hz, 0-8 Hz, and 0-12 Hz). The…

  10. KNEE-JOINT LOADING IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: INFLUENCE OF ABDOMINAL AND THIGH FAT

    PubMed Central

    Messier, Stephen P.; Beavers, Daniel P.; Loeser, Richard F.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Hunter, David J.; DeVita, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee-joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography and total lean and fat mass determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age = 66.3 yr., BMI = 33.5 kg·m−2) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Results Higher total body mass was significantly associated (p ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (p < 0.0001), patellofemoral forces (p< 0.006), and knee extensor moments (p = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (p = 0.0001), shear (p < 0.001), and patellofemoral forces (p = 0.01) and knee extension moment (p = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (p = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (p ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with the knee abduction (p = 0.03) and knee extension moment (p = 0.02). Conclusions Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA. PMID:25133996

  11. Knee joint loading in knee osteoarthritis: influence of abdominal and thigh fat.

    PubMed

    Messier, Stephen P; Beavers, Daniel P; Loeser, Richard F; Carr, J Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J; Hunter, David J; Devita, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography, and total lean and fat mass were determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age, 66.3 yr; body mass index, 33.5 kg·m) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Higher total body mass was significantly associated (P ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (P < 0.0001), patellofemoral forces (P < 0.006), and knee extensor moments (P = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (P = 0.0001), shear (P < 0.001), and patellofemoral forces (P = 0.01) and knee extension moment (P = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (P = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found that both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (P ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with knee abduction (P = 0.03) and knee extension moment (P = 0.02). Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA.

  12. Isometric handgrip exercise improves acute neurocardiac regulation.

    PubMed

    Millar, Philip J; MacDonald, Maureen J; Bray, Steven R; McCartney, Neil

    2009-11-01

    Isometric handgrip (IHG) training (>6 weeks) has been shown to reduce resting arterial blood pressure (ABP) and improve cardiac autonomic modulation. However, the effects of a single bout of IHG on acute neurocardiac regulation remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of IHG exercise on nonlinear heart rate dynamics and cardiac vagal activity. Nonlinear dynamics were assessed by sample entropy, detrended fluctuation analysis (alpha(1)), and correlation dimension techniques. The 4-second exercise test was used to calculate the cardiac vagal index (CVI), an indirect measure of cardiac vagal activity. In a randomized crossover design, 18 older (70 +/- 5 years of age) subjects completed IHG exercise (four 2-min isometric contractions at 30% MVC) and a time-matched control condition. Following a single bout of bilateral IHG, there was a small reduction in systolic blood pressure (125 +/- 2 to 122 +/- 1 mmHg, P < 0.01), in addition to, a significant decrease in alpha(1) (1.42 +/- 0.12 to 1.22 +/- 0.10, P < 0.05), an increase in sample entropy (1.28 +/- 0.03 to 1.40 +/- 0.05, P < 0.001), and an increase in the CVI (1.24 +/- 0.03 to 1.29 +/- 0.03, P < 0.01). These results suggest improvements in acute cardiac autonomic modulation following a single bout of IHG. This may be mechanistically linked to the observed reductions in ABP seen in previous IHG training studies. Alternatively, these acute effects may have clinical applications and require further investigation.

  13. The effects of knee direction, physical activity and age on knee joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Relph, Nicola; Herrington, Lee

    2016-06-01

    Previous research has suggested a decline in knee proprioception with age. Furthermore, regular participation in physical activity may improve proprioceptive ability. However, there is no large scale data on uninjured populations to confirm these theories. The aim of this study was to provide normative knee joint position data (JPS) from healthy participants aged 18-82years to evaluate the effects of age, physical activity and knee direction. A sample of 116 participants across five age groups was used. The main outcome measures were knee JPS absolute error scores into flexion and extension, Tegner activity levels and General Practitioner Physical Activity Questionnaire results. Absolute error scores in to knee flexion were 3.6°, 3.9°, 3.5°, 3.7° and 3.1° and knee extension were 2.7°, 2.5°, 2.9°, 3.4° and 3.9° for ages 15-29, 30-44, 45-59, 60-74 and 75 years old respectively. Knee extension and flexion absolute error scores were significantly different when age group data were pooled. There was a significant effect of age and activity level on joint position sense into knee extension. Age and lower Tegner scores were also negatively correlated to joint position sense into knee extension. The results provide some evidence for a decline in knee joint position sense with age. Further, active populations may have heightened static proprioception compared to inactive groups. Normative knee joint position sense data is provided and may be used by practitioners to identify patients with reduced proprioceptive ability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Gap balancing in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bottros, John; Gad, Bishoy; Krebs, Viktor; Barsoum, Wael K

    2006-06-01

    It is well known that the success of total knee arthroplasty is collectively dependent on the proper recreation of the joint line, appropriate soft tissue balancing, and respectful management of the extensor mechanism. One of the most decisive factors within the surgeon's control is the reestablishment of proper knee kinematics through both medial-lateral and flexion-extension ligamentous balancing. This can be accomplished only by a comprehensive intraoperative evaluation in full flexion, mid flexion, and full extension to minimize potential gap mismatches. Most of the discussion will focus on this aspect of soft tissue balancing, but this does not undermine the importance of the other aforementioned principles of successful knee arthroplasty.

  15. Ankle strength impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Glaucia Helena; Sendín, Francisco Alburquerque; da Silva Serrão, Paula Regina Mendes; Selistre, Luiz Fernando Approbato; Petrella, Marina; Carvalho, Cristiano; Mattiello, Stela Márcia

    2017-07-01

    Knee Osteoarthritis seems to negatively impact ankle biomechanics. However, the effect of knee osteoarthritis on ankle muscle strength has not been clearly established. This study aimed to evaluate the ankle strength of the plantar flexors and dorsiflexors of patients with knee osteoarthritis in different degrees of severity. Thirty-seven patients with knee osteoarthritis and 15 controls, subjected to clinical and radiographic analysis, were divided into three groups: control, mild, and moderate knee osteoarthritis. Participants answered a self-reported questionnaire and accomplished a muscle torque assessment of the ankle using the Biodex dynamometer in isometric, concentric and eccentric modes. The mild osteoarthritis group (peak torque=26.85(SD 3.58)) was significantly weaker than the control (peak torque=41.75(SD 4.42)) in concentric plantar flexion (P<0.05). The control and mild osteoarthritis groups were not significantly different from the moderate osteoarthritis group (peak torque=36.12(SD 4.61)) in concentric plantar flexion. There were no significant differences for dorsiflexion among the groups; however the control and moderate osteoarthritis groups presented large and medium standardized mean differences. The mild osteoarthritis group was significantly lower than the control and moderate osteoarthritis groups in the concentric plantar flexion by concentric dorsiflexion torque ratio. Ankle function exhibited impairments in patients with knee osteoarthritis, especially in the plantar flexion torque, in which the mild osteoarthritis group was weaker than the control. Interestingly, patients with moderate knee osteoarthritis showed results similar to the control group in plantar flexion torque. The results raise the possibility of a compensatory mechanism of the plantar flexors developed by patients in more advanced degrees to balance other muscle failures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Knee Arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... an EKG (electrocardiogram). Surgery Arthroscopic picture of torn anterior cruciate ligament [yellow star]. Almost all arthroscopic knee surgery is ... of torn meniscal cartilage • Reconstruction of a torn anterior cruciate ligament • Trimming of torn pieces of articular cartilage • Removal ...

  17. Knee Menisci.

    PubMed

    Bryceland, James Kevin; Powell, Andrew John; Nunn, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The menisci of the knees are semicircular fibrocartilaginous structures consisting of a hydrophilic extracellular matrix containing a network of collagen fibers, glycoproteins, and proteoglycans maintained by a cellular component. The menisci are responsible for more than 50% of load transmission across the knee and increase joint congruity thereby also aiding in fluid film lubrication of the joint. In the United Kingdom, meniscal tears are the most common form of intra-articular knee injury and one of the commonest indications for orthopedic intervention. The management of these injuries is dependent on the location within the meniscus (relative to peripheral blood supply) and the pattern of tear. Removal of meniscus is known to place the knee at increased risk of osteoarthritis; therefore repair of meniscal tears is preferable. However, a significant proportion of tears are irreparable and can only be treated by partial or even complete meniscectomy. More recent studies have shown encouraging results with meniscal replacement in this situation, though further work is required in this area.

  18. Time course of central and peripheral alterations after isometric neuromuscular electrical stimulation-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Fouré, Alexandre; Nosaka, Kazunori; Wegrzyk, Jennifer; Duhamel, Guillaume; Le Troter, Arnaud; Boudinet, Hélène; Mattei, Jean-Pierre; Vilmen, Christophe; Jubeau, Marc; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Isometric contractions induced by neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES) have been shown to result in a prolonged force decrease but the time course of the potential central and peripheral factors have never been investigated. This study examined the specific time course of central and peripheral factors after isometric NMES-induced muscle damage. Twenty-five young healthy men were subjected to an NMES exercise consisting of 40 contractions for both legs. Changes in maximal voluntary contraction force of the knee extensors (MVC), peak evoked force during double stimulations at 10 Hz (Db(10)) and 100 Hz (Db(100)), its ratio (10:100), voluntary activation, muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase activity were assessed before, immediately after and throughout four days after NMES session. Changes in knee extensors volume and T2 relaxation time were also assessed at two (D2) and four (D4) days post-exercise. MVC decreased by 29% immediately after NMES session and was still 19% lower than the baseline value at D4. The decrease in Db(10) was higher than in Db(100) immediately and one day post-exercise resulting in a decrease (-12%) in the 10:100 ratio. On the contrary, voluntary activation significantly decreased at D2 (-5%) and was still depressed at D4 (-5%). Muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase activity increased after NMES and peaked at D2 and D4, respectively. T2 was also increased at D2 (6%) and D4 (9%). Additionally, changes in MVC and peripheral factors (e.g., Db(100)) were correlated on the full recovery period, while a significant correlation was found between changes in MVC and VA only from D2 to D4. The decrease in MVC recorded immediately after the NMES session was mainly due to peripheral changes while both central and peripheral contributions were involved in the prolonged force reduction. Interestingly, the chronological events differ from what has been reported so far for voluntary exercise-induced muscle damage.

  19. Efficacy of multimodal, systematic non-surgical treatment of knee osteoarthritis for patients not eligible for a total knee replacement: a study protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Skou, Soren Thorgaard; Roos, Ewa M; Laursen, Mogens Berg; Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Simonsen, Ole; Rasmussen, Sten

    2012-01-01

    Introduction It is recommended that non-operative treatment of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) should be individually tailored and include multiple treatment modalities. Despite these recommendations, no one has yet investigated the efficacy of combining several non-surgical treatment modalities in a randomised controlled study. The purpose of this randomised controlled study is to examine if an optimised, combined non-surgical treatment programme results in greater improvements in pain, function and quality of life in comparison with usual care in patients with KOA who are not eligible for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods and analysis This study will include 100 consecutive patients from the North Denmark Region not eligible for TKA with radiographic KOA (K-L grade ≥1) and mean pain during the previous week of ≤60 mm (0–100). The participants will be randomised to receive either a 12-week non-surgical treatment programme consisting of patient education, exercise, diet, insoles, paracetamol and/or NSAIDs or usual care (two information leaflets containing information on KOA and advice regarding the above non-surgical treatment). The primary outcome will be the change from baseline to 12 months on the self-report questionnaire Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)4 defined as the average score for the subscale scores for pain, symptoms, activities of daily living and quality of life. Secondary outcomes include the five individual KOOS subscale scores, pain on a 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale, EQ-5D, self-efficacy, pain pressure thresholds, postural control and isometric knee flexion and knee extension strength. Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the local Ethics Committee of The North Denmark Region (N-20110085) and the protocol conforms to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki. Data collection will be completed by April 2014. Publications will be ready for submission in the summer of 2014. Trial registration number

  20. Effects of early whole-body vibration treatment on knee neuromuscular function and postural control after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pistone, Eugenio Maria; Laudani, Luca; Camillieri, Gianluca; Di Cagno, Alessandra; Tomassi, Gabriele; Macaluso, Andrea; Giombini, Arrigo

    2016-11-11

    To assess the effects of adding a whole-body vibration protocol at optimal frequency (WBV-OF) to a traditional rehabilitation programme (TRP) early after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, on maximal strength and balance, in comparison with a traditional rehabilitation programme. A total of 34 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed patients with hamstring-tendon graft underwent either 4 weeks of WBV-OF training in addition to a traditional rehabilitation programme, or a traditional rehabilitation programme only, starting from the first month after surgery. Patients were assessed for maximal voluntary isometric strength during both knee extension and flexion and for balance on a force platform before, 1 month after treatment and at 3-month follow-up. Strength symmetry of the knee flexor muscles improved in WBV-OF+TRP patients more than in TRP patients 1 month after treatment (mean 66% (standard deviation (SD) 15) vs 58% SD 13), and also at the 3-month follow-up (mean 77% (SD 15) vs 64% (SD 15)), with no differences in balance improvements between the groups. Adding 4-weeks of WBV-OF to a traditional rehabilitation programme 1 month after surgery is effective in improving muscle strength of the knee flexor muscles. This early intervention may be incorporated into current rehabilitation to facilitate early strength recovery of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed patients.

  1. A self-aligning knee joint for walking assistance devices.

    PubMed

    Byungjune Choi; Younbaek Lee; Jeonghun Kim; Minhyung Lee; Jongwon Lee; Se-Gon Roh; Hyundo Choi; Yong-Jae Kim; Jung-Yun Choi

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel self-aligning knee mechanism for walking assistance devices for the elderly to provide physical gait assistance. Self-aligning knee joints can assist in flexion/extension motions of the knee joint and compensate the knee's transitional movements in the sagittal plane. In order to compensate the center of rotation, which moves with the flexion/extension motion of the human knee joint, a self-aligning knee joint is proposed that adds redundant degrees of freedom (i.e., 2-DoF) to the 1-DoF revolute joint. The key idea of the proposed mechanism is to decouple joint rotations and translations for use in lower-extremity wearable devices. This paper describes the mechanical design of this self-aligning knee mechanism and its implementation on a wearable robot and in preliminary experiments. The performance of the proposed mechanism is verified by simulations and experiments.

  2. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker; Han, Jeong S; Adwanikar, Hita; Fu, Yu; Ji, Guangchen

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review. PMID:17391515

  3. Effect of the knee position during wound closure after total knee arthroplasty on early knee function recovery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the effect of the knee position during wound closure on early knee function recovery after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods This study included 80 primary total knee arthroplasties due to osteoarthritis. The patients were randomized according to the type of wound closure: extension group for full extension and flexion group for 90° flexion. The incision of articular capsule was marked for precise wound alignment. In the flexion group, the knee was kept in high flexion for 1 to 2 min after wound closure. The two groups were treated with the same postoperative rehabilitation exercises. The range of motion (ROM), visual analogue scale (VAS) score of anterior knee pain, Knee Society Score (KSS) and postoperative complications were assessed at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months, postoperatively. Results At 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively, the ROM in flexion group was 98.95 ± 10.33° and 110.05 ± 4.93° respectively, with 87.62 ± 8.92° and 95.62 ± 6.51° in extension group, respectively; The VAS score of anterior knee pain in flexion group was 2.02 ± 1.38 and 2.21 ± 0.87, respectively, with 2.57 ± 1.07 and 2.87 ± 0.83 in extension group, respectively. The ROM and VAS pain score of the two groups were significantly different at these two time points, with no significant difference at 6 months postoperatively. The two groups were not significantly different in KSS, and no apparent complication was observed at three time points. Conclusion Marking the articular capsule incision, wound closure in flexion and high flexion after wound closure can effectively decrease anterior knee pain after TKA and promote the early recovery of ROM. PMID:25149657

  4. Knee pain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or softening of the patella cartilage as ... knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in the ligaments, osteoarthritis of the ...

  5. Water on the Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... your knee joint. Some people call this condition "water on the knee." A swollen knee may be ... Choose low-impact exercise. Certain activities, such as water aerobics and swimming, don't place continuous weight- ...

  6. Lumbosacral compression in maximal lifting efforts in sagittal plane with varying mechanical disadvantage in isometric and isokinetic modes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S

    1994-12-01

    Nine normal male subjects (mean age 28.2 years and mean weight 72.6 kg) performed 20 standardized maximal effort lifting tasks. They were asked to perform stoop and squat lifts at half, three-quarters and full individual horizontal reach distances in mid-sagittal plane in isometric and isokinetic modes (fixed velocity 60 cm/s). Both stoop and squat lifts were initiated at the floor level and terminated at the individual's knuckle height keeping the horizontal distance constant throughout the lift. The isometric stoop lifts were performed with hip at 60 degrees and 90 degrees of flexion with hands at preselected reach distances. The isometric squat lifts were performed with knees at 90 degrees and 135 degrees of flexion with hands at similarly preselected reach distances. The force was measured using a Static Dynamic Strength Tester with load cell (SM 1000). The postures were recorded using a two-dimensional Peak Performance System with an event synchronizing unit. The load cell was sampled at 60 Hz and the video filming was done at 60 frames per second. The force and postural data were fed to a biomechanical model (Cheng and Kumar 1991) to extract external moment and lumbosacral compression. The strengths generated in different conditions were significantly different (p < 0.01). The strength variation ranged by up to 73% whereas the lumbosacral compression varied by only up to 15%. A high level of lumbosacral compression was maintained in all conditions.

  7. An improved OpenSim gait model with multiple degrees of freedom knee joint and knee ligaments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hang; Bloswick, Donald; Merryweather, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Musculoskeletal models are widely used to investigate joint kinematics and predict muscle force during gait. However, the knee is usually simplified as a one degree of freedom joint and knee ligaments are neglected. The aim of this study was to develop an OpenSim gait model with enhanced knee structures. The knee joint in this study included three rotations and three translations. The three knee rotations and mediolateral translation were independent, with proximodistal and anteroposterior translations occurring as a function of knee flexion/extension. Ten elastic elements described the geometrical and mechanical properties of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL), and the medial and lateral collateral ligaments (MCL and LCL). The three independent knee rotations were evaluated using OpenSim to observe ligament function. The results showed that the anterior and posterior bundles of ACL and PCL (aACL, pACL and aPCL, pPCL) intersected during knee flexion. The aACL and pACL mainly provided force during knee flexion and adduction, respectively. The aPCL was slack throughout the range of three knee rotations; however, the pPCL was utilised for knee abduction and internal rotation. The LCL was employed for knee adduction and rotation, but was slack beyond 20° of knee flexion. The MCL bundles were mainly used during knee adduction and external rotation. All these results suggest that the functions of knee ligaments in this model approximated the behaviour of the physical knee and the enhanced knee structures can improve the ability to investigate knee joint biomechanics during various gait activities.

  8. The effect of a knee ankle foot orthosis incorporating an active knee mechanism on gait of a person with poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Arazpour, Mokhtar; Chitsazan, Ahmad; Bani, Monireh Ahmadi; Rouhi, Gholamreza; Ghomshe, Farhad Tabatabai; Hutchins, Stephen W

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this case study was to identify the effect of a powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis on the kinematics and temporospatial parameters of walking by a person with poliomyelitis when compared to a knee ankle foot orthosis. A knee ankle foot orthosis was initially manufactured by incorporating drop lock knee joints and custom molded ankle foot orthoses and fitted to a person with poliomyelitis. The orthosis was then adapted by adding electrically activated powered knee joints to provide knee extension torque during stance and also flexion torque in swing phase. Lower limb kinematic and kinetic data plus data for temporospatial parameters were acquired from three test walks using each orthosis. Walking speed, step length, and vertical and horizontal displacement of the pelvis decreased when walking with the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis compared to the knee ankle foot orthosis. When using the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis, the knee flexion achieved during swing and also the overall pattern of walking more closely matched that of normal human walking. The reduced walking speed may have caused the smaller compensatory motions detected when the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis was used. The new powered SCKAFO facilitated controlled knee flexion and extension during ambulation for a volunteer poliomyelitis person.

  9. Knee joint functional range of movement prior to and following total knee arthroplasty measured using flexible electrogoniometry.

    PubMed

    Myles, Christine M; Rowe, Philip J; Walker, Colin R C; Nutton, Richard W

    2002-08-01

    The functional ranges of movement of the knee were investigated in a group of patients with knee osteoarthritis (n = 42, mean age 70 years) before, 4 months and at 18-24 months after total knee arthroplasty and then compared with age matched normal subjects (n = 20, mean age 67 years). Flexible electrogoniometry was used to record the maximum flexion-extension angle, the minimum flexion-extension angle and flexion-extension excursions of both knees during eleven functional activities along with the active and passive knee joint range of motion measured using a manual goniometer. Over the eleven functional activities the patients pre-operatively exhibited 28% less knee joint excursion than normal age matched subjects. By 18-24 months following total knee arthroplasty only 2% of this deficit was recovered. Statistically this recovery was only significant in level walking, slope ascent and slope descent. A greater range of movement was measured in a non-weight bearing position than was used in weight bearing functional activity. It is concluded that total knee arthroplasty gives rise to little improvement in knee motion during functional activities and that functional range of movement of the knee remains limited when compared to normal knee function for a minimum of 18 months following operation.

  10. Knee joint angle and vasti muscle electromyograms during fatiguing contractions.

    PubMed

    Ando, Ryosuke; Tomita, Aya; Watanabe, Kohei; Akima, Hiroshi

    2016-05-19

    We compared vasti muscle electromyograms for two knee joint angles during fatiguing tetanic contractions. Tetanic contraction of the knee extensors was evoked for 70 s by electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve at knee joint angles of 60° (extended, with 0° indicating full extension) and 110° (flexed) in eight healthy men. Surface electromyography was recorded from the vastus intermedius (VI), vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis (VM) muscles. Knee extension force and M-wave amplitudes and durations were calculated every 7 s, which were normalized by the initial value. Normalized knee extension force was decreased at the flexed knee joint angle compared with that of the extended knee joint angle (P<0·05). Decreased normalized M-wave amplitude and increased normalized M-wave duration of the VI were greater at the flexed knee joint angle than the extended knee joint angle (P<0·05), whereas those for the VL and VM were similar (P>0·05). These results suggest that peripheral fatigue profiles of the VI might be greater at the flexed than the extended knee joint angles, but that of VL and VM might be similar in the tested range of knee joint angles (i.e. 60°-110°) during continuous tetanic contraction induced by electrical stimulation. Therefore, greater reduction of knee extension force at the flexed knee joint angle than the extended knee joint angle may reflect fatigue development of the VI more than other quadriceps femoris components. © 2016 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Isometric and isokinetic muscle strength in the upper extremity can be reliably measured in persons with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ekstrand, Elisabeth; Lexell, Jan; Brogårdh, Christina

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the test-retest reliability of isometric and isokinetic muscle strength measurements in the upper extremity after stroke. A test-retest design. Forty-five persons with mild to moderate paresis in the upper extremity > 6 months post-stroke. Isometric arm strength (shoulder abduction, elbow flexion), isokinetic arm strength (elbow extension/flexion) and isometric grip strength were measured with electronic dynamometers. Reliability was evaluated with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC), changes in the mean, standard error of measurements (SEM) and smallest real differences (SRD). Reliability was high (ICCs: 0.92-0.97). The absolute and relative (%) SEM ranged from 2.7 Nm (5.6%) to 3.0 Nm (9.4%) for isometric arm strength, 2.6 Nm (7.4%) to 2.9 Nm (12.6%) for isokinetic arm strength, and 22.3 N (7.6%) to 26.4 N (9.2%) for grip strength. The absolute and relative (%) SRD ranged from 7.5 Nm (15.5%) to 8.4 Nm (26.1%) for isometric arm strength, 7.1 Nm (20.6%) to 8.0 Nm (34.8%) for isokinetic arm strength, and 61.8 N (21.0%) to 73.3 N (25.6%) for grip strength. Muscle strength in the upper extremity can be reliably measured in persons with chronic stroke. Isometric measurements yield smaller measurement errors than isokinetic measurements and might be preferred, but the choice depends on the research question.

  12. Force-Time Entropy of Isometric Impulse.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tsung-Yu; Newell, Karl M

    2016-01-01

    The relation between force and temporal variability in discrete impulse production has been viewed as independent (R. A. Schmidt, H. Zelaznik, B. Hawkins, J. S. Frank, & J. T. Quinn, 1979 ) or dependent on the rate of force (L. G. Carlton & K. M. Newell, 1993 ). Two experiments in an isometric single finger force task investigated the joint force-time entropy with (a) fixed time to peak force and different percentages of force level and (b) fixed percentage of force level and different times to peak force. The results showed that the peak force variability increased either with the increment of force level or through a shorter time to peak force that also reduced timing error variability. The peak force entropy and entropy of time to peak force increased on the respective dimension as the parameter conditions approached either maximum force or a minimum rate of force production. The findings show that force error and timing error are dependent but complementary when considered in the same framework with the joint force-time entropy at a minimum in the middle parameter range of discrete impulse.

  13. Postural dynamics in maximal isometric ramp efforts.

    PubMed

    Bouisset, Simon; Le Bozec, Serge; Ribreau, Christian

    2002-09-01

    Aglobal biomechanical model of transient push efforts is proposed where transient efforts are taken into consideration, with the aim to examine in greater depth the postural adjustments associated with voluntary efforts. In this context, the push effort is considered as a perturbation of balance, and the other reaction forces as a counter-perturbation which is necessary for the task to be performed efficiently. The subjects were asked to exert maximal horizontal two-handed isometric pushes on a dynamometric bar, as rapidly as possible. They were seated on a custom-designed device which measured global and partitive dynamic quantities. The results showed that the horizontal reaction forces and the horizontal displacement of the centre of pressure increased quasi-proportionally with the perturbation. In addition, it was established that vertical reaction forces increased at seat level whereas they decreased at foot level, resulting in minor vertical acceleration and displacement of the centre of gravity. On the contrary, the anteroposterior reaction forces increased both at foot and at seat levels. Based on a detailed examination of the various terms of the model, it is concluded that transient muscular effort induces dynamics of the postural chain. These observations support the view that there is a postural counter-perturbation which is associated with motor activity. More generally, the model helped to specify the effect of postural dynamic phenomena. It makes it possible to stress the importance of adherence at the contact level between the subject and the seat in the course of transient efforts.

  14. Comparison of sympathetic nerve responses to neck and forearm isometric exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, S. L. Jr; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although the autonomic and cardiovascular responses to arm and leg exercise have been studied, the sympathetic adjustments to exercise of the neck have not. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric contractions of the neck extensors and 2) to compare sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise of the neck and forearm. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate were measured in nine healthy subjects while performing isometric neck extension (INE) and isometric handgrip (IHG) in the prone position. After a 3-min baseline period, subjects performed three intensities of INE for 2.5 min each: 1) unloaded (supporting head alone), 2) 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 3) 30% MVC, then subjects performed two intensities (10% and 30% MVC) of IHG for 2.5 min. RESULTS: Supporting the head by itself did not significantly change any of the variables. During [NE, MAP significantly increased by 10 +/- 2 and 31 +/- 4 mm Hg and MSNA increased by 67 +/- 46 and 168 +/- 36 units/30 s for 10% and 30% MVC, respectively. IHG and INE evoked similar responses at 10% MVC, but IHG elicited higher peak MAP and MSNA at 30% MVC (37 +/- 7 mm Hg (P < 0.05) and 300 +/- 48 units/30 s (P < 0.01) for IHG, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The data indicate that INE can elicit marked increases in MSNA and cardiovascular responses but that it evokes lower peak responses as compared to IHG. We speculate that possible differences in muscle fiber type composition, muscle mass, and/or muscle architecture of the neck and forearm are responsible for these differences in peak responses.

  15. Comparison of sympathetic nerve responses to neck and forearm isometric exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, S. L. Jr; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although the autonomic and cardiovascular responses to arm and leg exercise have been studied, the sympathetic adjustments to exercise of the neck have not. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric contractions of the neck extensors and 2) to compare sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise of the neck and forearm. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate were measured in nine healthy subjects while performing isometric neck extension (INE) and isometric handgrip (IHG) in the prone position. After a 3-min baseline period, subjects performed three intensities of INE for 2.5 min each: 1) unloaded (supporting head alone), 2) 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 3) 30% MVC, then subjects performed two intensities (10% and 30% MVC) of IHG for 2.5 min. RESULTS: Supporting the head by itself did not significantly change any of the variables. During [NE, MAP significantly increased by 10 +/- 2 and 31 +/- 4 mm Hg and MSNA increased by 67 +/- 46 and 168 +/- 36 units/30 s for 10% and 30% MVC, respectively. IHG and INE evoked similar responses at 10% MVC, but IHG elicited higher peak MAP and MSNA at 30% MVC (37 +/- 7 mm Hg (P < 0.05) and 300 +/- 48 units/30 s (P < 0.01) for IHG, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The data indicate that INE can elicit marked increases in MSNA and cardiovascular responses but that it evokes lower peak responses as compared to IHG. We speculate that possible differences in muscle fiber type composition, muscle mass, and/or muscle architecture of the neck and forearm are responsible for these differences in peak responses.

  16. An Investigation Into the Relationship Between Maximum Isometric Strength and Vertical Jump Performance.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Christopher; Jones, Paul A; Rothwell, James; Chiang, Chieh Y; Comfort, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Research has demonstrated a clear relationship between dynamic strength and vertical jump (VJ) performance; however, the relationship of isometric strength and VJ performance has been studied less extensively. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between isometric strength and performance during the squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ). Twenty-two male collegiate athletes (mean ± SD; age = 21.3 ± 2.9 years; height = 175.63 ± 8.23 cm; body mass = 78.06 ± 10.77 kg) performed isometric midthigh pulls (IMTPs) to assess isometric peak force (IPF), maximum rate of force development, and impulse (IMP) (I100, I200, and I300). Force-time data, collected during the VJs, were used to calculate peak velocity, peak force (PF), peak power (PP), and jump height. Absolute IMTP measures of IMP showed the strongest correlations with VJ PF (r = 0.43-0.64; p ≤ 0.05) and VJ PP (r = 0.38-0.60; p ≤ 0.05). No statistical difference was observed in CMJ height (0.33 ± 0.05 m vs. 0.36 ± 0.05 m; p = 0.19; ES = -0.29) and SJ height performance (0.29 ± 0.06 m vs. 0.33 ± 0.05 m; p = 0.14; ES = -0.34) when comparing stronger to weaker athletes. The results of this study illustrate that absolute IPF and IMP are related to VJ PF and PP but not VJ height. Because stronger athletes did not jump higher than weaker athletes, dynamic strength tests may be more practical methods of assessing the relationships between relative strength levels and dynamic performance in collegiate athletes.

  17. 41. OPERATING CORRIDOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, INCLUDING SOME ISOMETRIC DETAILS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. OPERATING CORRIDOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, INCLUDING SOME ISOMETRIC DETAILS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106455. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-P-60 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Elevations, Major Component Isometric, Propellant Flow Schematic, and External Tank ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations, Major Component Isometric, Propellant Flow Schematic, and External Tank Connection to Shuttle Main Engines - Space Transportation System, Space Shuttle Main Engine, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  19. Cutaway Isometric, Upper Chord (Compression Joint), Lower Chord (Tension Splice) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cutaway Isometric, Upper Chord (Compression Joint), Lower Chord (Tension Splice) - McConnell's Mill Bridge, Spanning Slippery Rock Creek at McConnell's Mill Road (Township Route 415), Ellwood City, Lawrence County, PA

  20. 45. Photographic reproduction of construction drawing: "Launch Control Facility, Isometric." ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Photographic reproduction of construction drawing: "Launch Control Facility, Isometric." - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  1. Reliability of Isometric and Eccentric Isokinetic Shoulder External Rotation.

    PubMed

    Papotto, Brianna M; Rice, Thomas; Malone, Terry; Butterfield, Timothy; Uhl, Tim L

    2016-06-06

    Shoulder external rotators are challenged eccentrically throughout the deceleration phase of throwing, which is thought to contribute to overuse injuries. To evaluate the effectiveness of intervention programs, as well as identifying deficits, reliable and responsive measures of isometric and eccentric shoulder external rotation are necessary. Previously, isometric measures have primarily tested a single position, and eccentric measures have not been found to have high reliability. To examine the between-days reliability of multiple-angle isometric and dynamic eccentric isokinetic testing of shoulder external rotation. Repeated measures. 10 healthy subjects (age 30 ± 12 y, height 166 ± 13 cm, mass 72 ± 10 kg). Average isometric peak torque of shoulder external rotation at 7 angles was measured. From these values, the angle of isometric peak torque was calculated. Dynamic eccentric average peak torque, average total work, and average angle of peak torque were measured. Between-days reliability was high for average peak torque during isometric contractions at all angles (ICC ≥ .85), as it was for dynamic eccentric average peak torque (ICC ≥ .97). The estimated angle of isometric peak torque (ICC ≤ .65) was not highly reliable between days. The average angle of peak torque from the eccentric testing produced inconsistent results. Average total work of dynamic eccentric shoulder external rotation was found to be highly reliable between days (ICC ≥ .97). Aspects of force such as peak torque and total work in isometric and eccentric testing of the shoulder external-rotator muscles can be measured reliably between days and used to objectively evaluate shoulder strength and identify changes