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Sample records for knee extension isometric

  1. Effects of trunk stability on isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement while sitting

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Masahiro; Gomi, Masahiro; Katoh, Munenori

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of trunk stability on isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement while sitting by performing simultaneous measurements with a handheld dynamometer (HHD) and an isokinetic dynamometer (IKD) in the same seated condition. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 healthy volunteers. Isometric knee extension muscle strength was simultaneously measured with a HHD and an IKD by using an IKD-specific chair. The measurement was performed twice. Measurement instrument variables and the number of measurements were examined by using the analysis of variance and correlation tests. [Results] The measurement instrument variables and the number of measurements were not significantly different. The correlation coefficients between the HHD and IKD measurements were ≥0.96. [Conclusion] Isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement using the HHD in the sitting position resulted in a lower value than that using the IKD, presumably because of the effect of trunk stability on the measurement. In the same seated posture with trunk stability, no significant difference in measurement values was observed between the HHD and IKD. The present findings suggest that trunk stability while seated during isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement influenced the HHD measurement. PMID:27799673

  2. Mechanical correction of dynamometer moment for the effects of segment motion during isometric knee-extension tests.

    PubMed

    Tsaopoulos, Dimitrios E; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Richards, Paula J; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of dynamometer and joint axis misalignment on measured isometric knee-extension moments using inverse dynamics based on the actual joint kinematic information derived from the real-time X-ray video and to compare the errors when the moments were calculated using measurements from external anatomical surface markers or obtained from the isokinetic dynamometer. Six healthy males participated in this study. They performed isometric contractions at 90° and 20° of knee flexion, gradually increasing to maximum effort. For the calculation of the actual knee-joint moment and the joint moment relative to the knee-joint center, determined using the external marker, two free body diagrams were used of the Cybex arm and the lower leg segment system. In the first free body diagram, the mean center of the circular profiles of the femoral epicondyles was used as the knee-joint center, whereas in the second diagram, the joint center was assumed to coincide with the external marker. Then, the calculated knee-joint moments were compared with those measured by the dynamometer. The results indicate that 1) the actual knee-joint moment was different from the dynamometer recorded moment (difference ranged between 1.9% and 4.3%) and the moment calculated using the skin marker (difference ranged between 2.5% and 3%), and 2) during isometric knee extension, the internal knee angle changed significantly from rest to the maximum contraction state by about 19°. Therefore, these differences cannot be neglected if the moment-knee-joint angle relationship or the muscle mechanical properties, such as length-tension relationship, need to be determined. PMID:21474701

  3. Knee extension isometric torque production differences based on verbal motivation given to introverted and extroverted female children.

    PubMed

    McWhorter, J Wesley; Landers, Merrill; Young, Daniel; Puentedura, E Louie; Hickman, Robbin A; Brooksby, Candi; Liveratti, Marc; Taylor, Lisa

    2011-08-01

    To date, little research has been conducted to test the efficacy of different forms of motivation based on a female child's personality type. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of female children to perform a maximal knee extension isometric torque test with varying forms of motivation, based on the child's personality type (introvert vs. extrovert). The subjects were asked to perform a maximal isometric knee extension test under three different conditions: 1) with no verbal motivation, 2) with verbal motivation from the evaluator only, and 3) with verbal motivation from a group of their peers and the evaluator combined. A 2×3 mixed ANOVA was significant for an interaction (F 2,62=17.530; p<0.0005). Post hoc testing for the introverted group showed that scores without verbal motivation were significantly higher than with verbal motivation from the evaluator or the evaluator plus the peers. The extroverted group revealed that scores with verbal motivation from the evaluator or the evaluator plus the peers were significantly higher than without verbal motivation. Results suggest that verbal motivation has a varying effect on isometric knee extension torque production in female children with different personality types. Extroverted girls perform better with motivation, whereas introverted girls perform better without motivation from others. PMID:20812856

  4. Knee extension isometric torque production differences based on verbal motivation given to introverted and extroverted female children.

    PubMed

    McWhorter, J Wesley; Landers, Merrill; Young, Daniel; Puentedura, E Louie; Hickman, Robbin A; Brooksby, Candi; Liveratti, Marc; Taylor, Lisa

    2011-08-01

    To date, little research has been conducted to test the efficacy of different forms of motivation based on a female child's personality type. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of female children to perform a maximal knee extension isometric torque test with varying forms of motivation, based on the child's personality type (introvert vs. extrovert). The subjects were asked to perform a maximal isometric knee extension test under three different conditions: 1) with no verbal motivation, 2) with verbal motivation from the evaluator only, and 3) with verbal motivation from a group of their peers and the evaluator combined. A 2×3 mixed ANOVA was significant for an interaction (F 2,62=17.530; p<0.0005). Post hoc testing for the introverted group showed that scores without verbal motivation were significantly higher than with verbal motivation from the evaluator or the evaluator plus the peers. The extroverted group revealed that scores with verbal motivation from the evaluator or the evaluator plus the peers were significantly higher than without verbal motivation. Results suggest that verbal motivation has a varying effect on isometric knee extension torque production in female children with different personality types. Extroverted girls perform better with motivation, whereas introverted girls perform better without motivation from others.

  5. Estimations of One Repetition Maximum and Isometric Peak Torque in Knee Extension Based on the Relationship Between Force and Velocity.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Yoshito; Hatanaka, Yasuhiko; Arai, Tomoaki; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Kanada, Yoshikiyo

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to investigate whether a linear regression formula based on the relationship between joint torque and angular velocity measured using a high-speed video camera and image measurement software is effective for estimating 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and isometric peak torque in knee extension. Subjects comprised 20 healthy men (mean ± SD; age, 27.4 ± 4.9 years; height, 170.3 ± 4.4 cm; and body weight, 66.1 ± 10.9 kg). The exercise load ranged from 40% to 150% 1RM. Peak angular velocity (PAV) and peak torque were used to estimate 1RM and isometric peak torque. To elucidate the relationship between force and velocity in knee extension, the relationship between the relative proportion of 1RM (% 1RM) and PAV was examined using simple regression analysis. The concordance rate between the estimated value and actual measurement of 1RM and isometric peak torque was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Reliability of the regression line of PAV and % 1RM was 0.95. The concordance rate between the actual measurement and estimated value of 1RM resulted in an ICC(2,1) of 0.93 and that of isometric peak torque had an ICC(2,1) of 0.87 and 0.86 for 6 and 3 levels of load, respectively. Our method for estimating 1RM was effective for decreasing the measurement time and reducing patients' burden. Additionally, isometric peak torque can be estimated using 3 levels of load, as we obtained the same results as those reported previously. We plan to expand the range of subjects and examine the generalizability of our results.

  6. Estimations of One Repetition Maximum and Isometric Peak Torque in Knee Extension Based on the Relationship Between Force and Velocity.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Yoshito; Hatanaka, Yasuhiko; Arai, Tomoaki; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Kanada, Yoshikiyo

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to investigate whether a linear regression formula based on the relationship between joint torque and angular velocity measured using a high-speed video camera and image measurement software is effective for estimating 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and isometric peak torque in knee extension. Subjects comprised 20 healthy men (mean ± SD; age, 27.4 ± 4.9 years; height, 170.3 ± 4.4 cm; and body weight, 66.1 ± 10.9 kg). The exercise load ranged from 40% to 150% 1RM. Peak angular velocity (PAV) and peak torque were used to estimate 1RM and isometric peak torque. To elucidate the relationship between force and velocity in knee extension, the relationship between the relative proportion of 1RM (% 1RM) and PAV was examined using simple regression analysis. The concordance rate between the estimated value and actual measurement of 1RM and isometric peak torque was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Reliability of the regression line of PAV and % 1RM was 0.95. The concordance rate between the actual measurement and estimated value of 1RM resulted in an ICC(2,1) of 0.93 and that of isometric peak torque had an ICC(2,1) of 0.87 and 0.86 for 6 and 3 levels of load, respectively. Our method for estimating 1RM was effective for decreasing the measurement time and reducing patients' burden. Additionally, isometric peak torque can be estimated using 3 levels of load, as we obtained the same results as those reported previously. We plan to expand the range of subjects and examine the generalizability of our results. PMID:26382131

  7. Quantifying thigh muscle co-activation during isometric knee extension contractions: within- and between-session reliability.

    PubMed

    Katsavelis, Dimitrios; Threlkeld, A Joseph

    2014-08-01

    Muscle co-activation around the knee is important during ambulation and balance. The wide range of methodological approaches for the quantification of co-activation index (CI) makes comparisons across studies and populations difficult. The present study determined within- and between-session reliability of different methodological approaches for the quantification of the CI of the knee extensor and flexor muscles during maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVICs). Eight healthy volunteers participated in two repeated testing sessions. A series of knee extension MVICs of the dominant leg with concomitant torque and electromyographic (EMG) recordings were captured. CI was calculated utilizing different analytical approaches. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) showed that within-session measures displayed higher reliability (ICC>0.861) and lower variability (Coefficient of variation; CV<21.8%) than between-session measures (ICC<0.645; CV>24.2%). A selection of a 500ms or larger window of RMS EMG activity around the PT delivered more reliable and less variable results than other approaches. Our findings suggest that the CI can provide a reliable measure for comparisons among conditions and is best utilized for within-session experimental designs.

  8. Skinfold thickness affects the isometric knee extension torque evoked by Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Flávia V. A.; Vieira, Amilton; Carregaro, Rodrigo L.; Bottaro, Martim; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Durigan, João L. Q.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subcutaneous adipose tissue may influence the transmission of electrical stimuli through to the skin, thus affecting both evoked torque and comfort perception associated with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). This could seriously affect the effectiveness of NMES for either rehabilitation or sports purposes. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of skinfold thickness (SFT) on maximal NMES current intensity, NMES-evoked torque, and NMES-induced discomfort. METHOD: First, we compared NMES current intensity, NMES-induced discomfort, and NMES-evoked torque between two subgroups of subjects with thicker (n=10; 20.7 mm) vs. thinner (n=10; 29.4 mm) SFT. Second, we correlated SFT to NMES current intensity, NMES-induced discomfort, and NMES-evoked knee extension torque in 20 healthy women. The NMES-evoked torque was normalized to the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. The discomfort induced by NMES was assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS). RESULTS: NMES-evoked torque was 27.5% lower in subjects with thicker SFT (p=0.01) while maximal current intensity was 24.2% lower in subjects with thinner SFT (p=0.01). A positive correlation was found between current intensity and SFT (r=0.540, p=0.017). A negative correlation was found between NMES-evoked torque and SFT (r=-0.563, p=0.012). No significant correlation was observed between discomfort scores and SFT (rs=0.15, p=0.53). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the amount of subcutaneous adipose tissue (as reflected by skinfold thickness) affected NMES current intensity and NMES-evoked torque, but had no effect on discomfort perception. Our findings may help physical therapists to better understand the impact of SFT on NMES and to design more rational stimulation strategies. PMID:26647748

  9. Influence of exercise intensity and joint angle on endurance time prediction of sustained submaximal isometric knee extensions.

    PubMed

    Boyas, Sébastien; Guével, Arnaud

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of endurance time (T (lim)) prediction is to determine the exertion time of a muscle contraction before it occurs. T (lim) prediction would then allow the evaluation of muscle capacities limiting fatigue and deleterious effects associated with exhaustive exercises. The present study aimed to analyze the influence of exercise intensity and joint angle on T (lim) prediction using changes in surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals recorded during the first moments of the exercise. Fifteen male performed four knee extensions sustained until exhaustion that were different in exercise intensity (20% or 50% of maximal voluntary torque-MVT) and in joint angle (40 or 70º, 0° = full extension). T (lim) prediction was explored using some parameters of the sEMG signals from rectus femoris, vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles. Changes in sEMG parameters (root mean square, mean power frequency and frequency banding 6-30 Hz) were expressed using the slope of the linear regression and the area ratio index. Results indicated that relationships between changes in sEMG signal and T (lim) (0.51 < r < 0.83) were greater for experimental conditions associated with higher exercise intensity (50% MVT) and so to lower time duration. Knee joint angle had little influence on T (lim) prediction results. Results also showed higher T (lim) prediction considering spectral parameters and area ratio. This could be in relation to differences in relative contribution of central and peripheral fatigue that seems to change according to the exercise intensity, but also to the influence of psychological factors that increases with the duration of the task.

  10. Knee angle-dependent oxygen consumption during isometric contractions of the knee extensors determined with near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, C J; de Boer, M D; Spanjaard, M; de Haan, A

    2005-08-01

    Fatigue resistance of knee extensor muscles is higher during voluntary isometric contractions at short compared with longer muscle lengths. In the present study we hypothesized that this would be due to lower energy consumption at short muscle lengths. Ten healthy male subjects performed isometric contractions with the knee extensor muscles at a 30, 60, and 90 degrees knee angle (full extension = 0 degrees ). At each angle, muscle oxygen consumption (m.VO2) of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, and vastus medialis muscle was obtained with near-infrared spectroscopy. m.VO2 was measured during maximal isometric contractions and during contractions at 10, 30, and 50% of maximal torque capacity. During all contractions, blood flow to the muscle was occluded with a pressure cuff (450 mmHg). m.VO2 significantly (P < 0.05) increased with torque and at all torque levels, and for each of the three muscles. m.VO2 was significantly lower at 30 degrees compared with 60 degrees and 90 degrees and m.VO2 was similar (P > 0.05) at 60 degrees and 90 degrees . Across all torque levels, average (+/- SD) m.VO2 at the 30 degrees angle for vastus medialis, rectus femoris, and vastus lateralis, respectively, was 70.0 +/- 10.4, 72.2 +/- 12.7, and 75.9 +/- 8.0% of the average m.VO2 obtained for each torque at 60 and 90 degrees . In conclusion, oxygen consumption of the knee extensors was significantly lower during isometric contractions at the 30 degrees than at the 60 degrees and 90 degrees knee angle, which probably contributes to the previously reported longer duration of sustained isometric contractions at relatively short muscle lengths.

  11. Effect of hamstring flexibility on isometric knee flexion angle-torque relationship.

    PubMed

    Alonso, J; McHugh, M P; Mullaney, M J; Tyler, T F

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between hamstring flexibility and knee flexion angle-torque relationship. Hamstring flexibility was assessed in 20 subjects (10 men, 10 women) using the straight leg raise (SLR) and active knee extension (AKE) tests. Isometric knee flexion strength was measured at five knee flexion angles while subjects were seated with the test thigh flexed 40 degrees and the trunk flexed 80 degrees . Lower extremities were classified as tight or normal based on the SLR and AKE tests. Peak knee flexion torque, angle of peak torque, and angle-torque relationship were compared between flexibility groups. Peak knee flexion torque was not different between tight and normal groups (SLR P=0.82; AKE P=0.68) but occurred in greater knee flexion (shorter muscle length) in the tight group compared with the normal group (SLR P<0.01; AKE P<0.05). The tight group had higher torque than the normal group at the shortest muscle length tested but lower torque at longer muscle lengths (SLR P<0.001; AKE P<0.001). In conclusion, the angle-torque relationship was shifted to the left in less flexible hamstrings such that knee flexion torque was increased at short muscle lengths and decreased at long muscle lengths when compared with more flexible hamstrings.

  12. Knee extension torque variability after exercise in ACL reconstructed knees.

    PubMed

    Goetschius, John; Kuenze, Christopher M; Hart, Joseph M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare knee extension torque variability in patients with ACL reconstructed knees before and after exercise. Thirty two patients with an ACL reconstructed knee (ACL-R group) and 32 healthy controls (control group) completed measures of maximal isometric knee extension torque (90° flexion) at baseline and following a 30-min exercise protocol (post-exercise). Exercise included 30-min of repeated cycles of inclined treadmill walking and hopping tasks. Dependent variables were the coefficient of variation (CV) and raw-change in CV (ΔCV): CV = (torque standard deviation/torque mean x 100), ΔCV = (post-exercise - baseline). There was a group-by-time interaction (p = 0.03) on CV. The ACL-R group demonstrated greater CV than the control group at baseline (ACL-R = 1.07 ± 0.55, control = 0.79 ± 0.42, p = 0.03) and post-exercise (ACL-R = 1.60 ± 0.91, control = 0.94 ± 0.41, p = 0.001). ΔCV was greater (p = 0.03) in the ACL-R group (0.52 ± 0.82) than control group (0.15 ± 0.46). CV significantly increased from baseline to post-exercise (p = 0.001) in the ACL-R group, while the control group did not (p = 0.06). The ACL-R group demonstrated greater knee extension torque variability than the control group. Exercise increased torque variability more in the ACL-R group than control group.

  13. Kinesio Taping effects on knee extension force among soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Maysa V. G. B.; Vieira, Edgar R.; Brunt, Denis; Goethel, Márcio F.; Gonçalves, Mauro; Quemelo, Paulo R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Kinesio Taping (KT) is widely used, however the effects of KT on muscle activation and force are contradictory. Objective: To evaluate the effects of KT on knee extension force in soccer players. Method: This is a clinical trial study design. Thirty-four subjects performed two maximal isometric voluntary contractions of the lower limbs pre, immediately post, and 24 hours after tape application on the lower limbs. Both lower limbs were taped, using K-Tape and 3M Micropore tape randomly on the right and left thighs of the participants. Isometric knee extension force was measured for dominant side using a strain gauge. The following variables were assessed: peak force, time to peak force, rate of force development until peak force, time to peak rate of force development, and 200 ms pulse. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the variables assessed between KT and Micropore conditions (F=0.645, p=0.666) or among testing sessions (pre, post, and 24h after) (F=0.528, p=0.868), and there was no statistical significance (F=0.271, p=0.986) for interaction between tape conditions and testing session. Conclusion: KT did not affect the force-related measures assessed immediately and 24 hours after the KT application compared with Micropore application, during maximal isometric voluntary knee extension. PMID:25789557

  14. Effect of Isometric Quadriceps Exercise on Muscle Strength, Pain, and Function in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to investigate the effects of isometric quadriceps exercise on muscle strength, pain, and function in knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Outpatients (N=42, 21 per group; age range 40–65 years; 13 men and 29 women) with osteoarthritis of the knee participated in the study. The experimental group performed isometric exercises including isometric quadriceps, straight leg raising, and isometric hip adduction exercise 5 days a week for 5 weeks, whereas the control group did not performed any exercise program. The outcome measures or dependent variables selected for this study were pain intensity, isometric quadriceps strength, and knee function. These variables were measured using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), strength gauge device, and reduced WOMAC index, respectively. All the measurements were taken at baseline (week 0) and at the end of the trial at week 5. [Results] In between-group comparisons, the maximum isometric quadriceps strength, reduction in pain intensity, and improvement in function in the isometric exercise group at the end of the 5th week were significantly greater than those of the control group (p<0.05). [Conclusion] The 5-week isometric quadriceps exercise program showed beneficial effects on quadriceps muscle strength, pain, and functional disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. PMID:24926143

  15. Maximum isometric knee flexor and extensor muscle contractions: normal patterns of torque versus time.

    PubMed

    Murray, M P; Baldwin, J M; Gardner, G M; Sepic, S B; Downs, W J

    1977-06-01

    Isometric torque of the knee flexor and extensor muscles were recorded for 5 seconds at three knee joint positions. The subjects included healthy men in age groups from 20 to 35 and 45 to 65 years of age. The amplitudes and duration of peak torque and the time to peak torque were measured for each contraction. Peak torque was usually maintaned less than 0.1 second and never longer than 0.9 second. At each of the three angles, the mean extensor muscle torque was higher than the mean flexor muscle torque in both age groups, and the mean torque for both muscle group was higher among the younger than among the older man. The highest average torque was recorded at the knee angle of 60 degrees for the extensor muscles and 45 degrees for the flexor muscles, but this was not always a stereotyped response either for a given individual or among individuals.

  16. Knee extension strength in obese and nonobese male adolescents.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoula, Achref; Martin, Vincent; Bouchant, Antoine; Walrand, Stéphane; Lavet, Cédric; Taillardat, Michel; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Boisseau, Nathalie; Duché, Pascale; Ratel, Sébastien

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare "absolute" and "relative" knee extension strength between obese and nonobese adolescents. Ten nonobese and 12 severely obese adolescent boys of similar chronological age, maturity status, and height were compared. Total body and regional soft tissue composition were determined using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Knee extensors maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) torque was measured using an isometric dynamometer at a knee angle of 60° (0° is full extension). Absolute MVC torque was significantly higher in obese adolescents than in controls. However, although MVC torque expressed per unit of body mass was found to be significantly lower in obese adolescent boys, no significant difference in MVC torque was found between groups when normalized to fat-free mass. Conversely, when correcting for thigh lean mass and estimated thigh muscle mass, MVC torque was significantly higher in the obese group (17.9% and 22.2%, respectively; P <0.05). To conclude, our sample of obese adolescent boys had higher absolute and relative knee extension strength than our nonobese controls. However, further studies are required to ascertain whether or not relative strength, measured with more accurate in vivo methods such as magnetic resonance imaging, is higher in obese adolescents than in nonobese controls. PMID:22448629

  17. The effects of imagery training on fast isometric knee extensor torque development.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Cornelis J; Hutter, Vana; Icke, Chris; Groen, Bart; Gemmink, Anne; Smilde, Hiltsje; de Haan, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that imagery training would improve the fast onset of neuromuscular activation and thereby fast knee extensor isometric torque development. Forty young healthy participants, not involved in strength training, were assigned to one of four groups: physical training, imagery training, placebo training or control. The three training groups had three 15 min sessions per week for 4 weeks, with a 90 ° knee angle but were tested also at 120 °. At 90 ° knee angle, maximal torque increased (-8%) similarly in all three training groups. The torque-time integral (contractile impulse) over the first 40 ms after torque onset (TTI40) increased (P < 0.05) after physical training (by -100%), but only at 90 °. This increase was significantly different from the delta values (change pre to post) in the control and placebo groups, whereas delta values in the imagery group were similar to those in the placebo group. The increases in TTI40 following physical training were related (r (2) = 0.81, P < 0.05) to significant increases of knee extensor rectified surface EMG at torque onset (EMG40). In conclusion, only physical training led to a knee angle specific increase of contractile impulse that was significantly different from placebo and controls and that was related to improved onset of neuromuscular activation.

  18. Muscle Damage following Maximal Eccentric Knee Extensions in Males and Females

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether there is a sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. Materials and Method Vastus Lateralis and patella tendon properties were measured in males and females using ultrasonography. During maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions (12 reps x 6 sets), Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions torque were recorded every 10° of knee joint angle (20–90°). Isometric torque, Creatine Kinase and muscle soreness were measured pre, post, 48, 96 and 168 hours post damage as markers of exercise induced muscle damage. Results Patella tendon stiffness and Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening were significantly higher in males compared to females (p<0.05). There was no sex difference in isometric torque loss and muscle soreness post exercise induced muscle damage (p>0.05). Creatine Kinase levels post exercise induced muscle damage were higher in males compared to females (p<0.05), and remained higher when maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, relative to estimated quadriceps anatomical cross sectional area, was taken as a covariate (p<0.05). Conclusion Based on isometric torque loss, there is no sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. The higher Creatine Kinase in males could not be explained by differences in maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and patella tendon stiffness. Further research is required to understand the significant sex differences in Creatine Kinase levels following exercise induced muscle damage. PMID:26986066

  19. Isokinetic and isometric muscle function of the knee extensors and flexors during simulated soccer activity: effect of exercise and dehydration.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ajmol; Williams, Clyde

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of dehydration during soccer-type intermittent exercise on isokinetic and isometric muscle function. Eight soccer players performed two 90-min high-intensity intermittent shuttle-running trials without (NF) or with (FL) fluid ingestion (5 ml · kg(-1) before and 2 ml · kg(-1) every 15 min). Isokinetic and isometric strength and muscular power of knee flexors and knee extensors were measured pre-exercise, at half-time and post-exercise using isokinetic dynamometry. Sprint performance was monitored throughout the simulated-soccer exercise. Isokinetic knee strength was reduced at faster (3.13 rad · s(-1); P = 0.009) but not slower (1.05 rad · s(-1); P = 0.063) contraction speeds with exercise; however, there was no difference between FL and NF. Peak isometric strength of the knee extensors (P = 0.002) but not the knee flexors (P = 0.065) was significantly reduced with exercise with no difference between FL and NF. Average muscular power was reduced over time at both 1.05 rad · s(-1) (P = 0.01) and 3.14 rad · s(-1) (P = 0.033) but was not different between FL and NF. Mean 15-m sprint time increased with duration of exercise (P = 0.005) but was not different between FL and NF. In summary, fluid ingestion during 90 min of soccer-type exercise was unable to offset the reduction in isokinetic and isometric strength and muscular power of the knee extensors and flexors.

  20. Muscle Activation Differs between Three Different Knee Joint-Angle Positions during a Maximal Isometric Back Squat Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Jarbas da Silva, Josinaldo; Jon Schoenfeld, Brad; Nardi, Priscyla Silva Monteiro; Pecoraro, Silvio Luis; D'Andréa Greve, Julia Maria; Hartigan, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activation of the lower limb muscles when performing a maximal isometric back squat exercise over three different positions. Fifteen young, healthy, resistance-trained men performed an isometric back squat at three knee joint angles (20°, 90°, and 140°) in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion. Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activation of the vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST), and gluteus maximus (GM). In general, muscle activity was the highest at 90° for the three quadriceps muscles, yet differences in muscle activation between knee angles were muscle specific. Activity of the GM was significantly greater at 20° and 90° compared to 140°. The BF and ST displayed similar activation at all joint angles. In conclusion, knee position alters muscles activation of the quadriceps and gluteus maximus muscles. An isometric back squat at 90° generates the highest overall muscle activation, yet an isometric back squat at 140° generates the lowest overall muscle activation of the VL and GM only. PMID:27504484

  1. Less indication of muscle damage in the second than initial electrical muscle stimulation bout consisting of isometric contractions of the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Aldayel, Abdulaziz; Jubeau, Marc; McGuigan, Michael R; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2010-03-01

    This study compared the first and second exercise bouts consisting of electrically evoked isometric contractions for muscle damage profile. Nine healthy men (31 +/- 4 years) had two electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) bouts separated by 2 weeks. The knee extensors of one leg were stimulated by biphasic rectangular pulses (75 Hz, 400 mus, on-off ratio 5-15 s) at the knee joint angle of 100 degrees (0 degrees , full extension) to induce 40 isometric contractions, while the current amplitude was increased to maintain maximal force generation. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) torque of the knee extensors at 100 degrees , muscle soreness, pressure pain threshold and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were used as indirect markers of muscle damage, and measured before and 1, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after EMS bout, and the changes over time were compared between bouts. The torque produced during exercise was approximately 30% of MVC, and no significant difference between bouts was evident for the changes in peak and average torque over 40 contractions. MVC decreased significantly (P < 0.05) by 26% immediately and 1 h after both bouts, but the recovery was significantly (P < 0.05) faster after the second bout (100% at 96 h) compared with the first bout (81% at 96 h). Development of muscle soreness and tenderness, and increases in plasma CK activity were significantly (P < 0.05) smaller after the second than the first bout. These results show that changes in muscle damage markers were attenuated in the second EMS bout compared with the initial EMS bout.

  2. A Multiple Degree of Freedom Lower Extremity Isometric Device to Simultaneously Quantify Hip, Knee, and Ankle Torques.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Natalia; Acosta, Ana Maria; Stienen, Arno H A; Dewald, Julius P A

    2015-09-01

    Characterization of the joint torque coupling strategies used in the lower extremity to generate maximal and submaximal levels of torque at either the hip, knee, or ankle is lacking. Currently, there are no available isometric devices that quantify all concurrent joint torques in the hip, knee, and ankle of a single leg during maximum voluntary torque generation. Thus, joint-torque coupling strategies in the hip, knee, and concurrent torques at ankle and/or coupling patterns at the hip and knee driven by the ankle have yet to be quantified. This manuscript describes the design, implementation, and validation of a multiple degree of freedom, lower extremity isometric device (the MultiLEIT) that accurately quantifies simultaneous torques at the hip, knee, and ankle. The system was mechanically validated and then implemented with two healthy control individuals and two post-stroke individuals to test usability and patient acceptance. Data indicated different joint torque coupling strategies used by both healthy individuals. In contrast, data showed the same torque coupling patterns in both post-stroke individuals, comparable to those described in the clinic. Successful implementation of the MultiLEIT can contribute to the understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for abnormal movement patterns and aid in the design of therapeutic interventions.

  3. A Multiple Degree of Freedom Lower Extremity Isometric Device to Simultaneously Quantify Hip, Knee and Ankle Torques

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Natalia; Acosta, Ana Maria; Stienen, Arno H.A.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the joint torque coupling strategies used in the lower extremity to generate maximal and submaximal levels of torque at either the hip, knee or ankle is lacking. Currently, there are no available isometric devices that quantify all concurrent joint torques in the hip, knee and ankle of a single leg during maximum voluntary torque generation. Thus, joint-torque coupling strategies in the hip, knee and concurrent torques at ankle and/or coupling patterns at the hip and knee driven by the ankle have yet to be quantified. This manuscript describes the design, implementation and validation of a multiple degree of freedom, lower extremity isometric device (the MultiLEIT) that accurately quantifies simultaneous torques at the hip, knee and ankle. The system was mechanically validated and then implemented with two healthy control individuals and two post-stroke individuals to test usability and patient acceptance. Data indicated different joint torque coupling strategies used by both healthy individuals. In contrast, data showed the same torque coupling patterns in both post-stroke individuals, comparable to those described in the clinic. Successful implementation of the MultiLEIT can contribute to the understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for abnormal movement patterns and aid in the design of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25163064

  4. IS PAIN IN ONE KNEE ASSOCIATED WITH ISOMETRIC MUSCLE STRENGTH IN THE CONTRALATERAL LIMB? - DATA FROM THE OSTEOARTHRITIS INITIATIVE (OAI)

    PubMed Central

    Steidle, E.; Wirth, W.; Glass, N.; Ruhdorfer, A.; Cotofana, S.; Eckstein, F.; Segal, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Knee pain and muscle weakness confer risk for knee osteoarthritis incidence and progression. The purpose of this study was to determine whether unilateral knee pain influences contralateral thigh muscle strength. Design Of 4796 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants, 224 (mean±SD age 63.9±8.9 years) cases could be matched to a control. Cases were defined as having unilateral knee pain (numerical rating scale (NRS)≥4/10; ≥infrequent pain) and one pain-free knee (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Controls were defined as having bilaterally pain-free knees (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Maximal isometric muscle strength [N] was compared between limbs in participants with unilateral pain (cases), and between pain-free limbs of cases and controls. Results Knee extensor/flexor strength in pain-free limbs of cases was lower than in bilaterally pain-free controls (−5.5%/–8.4%; p=0.043/p=0.022). Within cases, maximum extensor/flexor strength was significantly lower in the painful than in the pain-free limb (−6.4%/4.1%; p<0.0001/p=0.015). Conclusions These results suggest that strength in limbs without knee pain is associated with the pain status of the contralateral knee. The strength difference between unilateral pain-free cases and matched bilateral pain-free controls was similar to that between limbs in persons with unilateral knee pain. Lower strength due to contralateral knee pain might be centrally mediated. PMID:25768069

  5. Design and evaluation of an orthotic knee-extension assist.

    PubMed

    Spring, Alexander N; Kofman, Jonathan; Lemaire, Edward D

    2012-09-01

    Individuals with quadriceps muscle weakness often have difficulty generating the knee-extension moments required to complete common mobility tasks. A new device that provides knee-extension moments through a range of knee angles was designed to help individuals perform stand-to-sit and sit-to-stand tasks. The novel knee-extension assist (KEA) was designed as a modular component to be incorporated into existing knee-ankle-foot orthoses or used in a knee orthosis. During stand-to-sit, a set of springs is loaded as the knee flexes under bodyweight and the KEA thus provides a knee-extension moment that aids in achieving a smoothly controlled knee flexion. The springs can be locked in place at the end of knee flexion to prevent unwanted knee extension while the user is seated. The entire knee extension assist can be disengaged to allow free joint motion anytime the affected leg is unloaded. During sit-to-stand, the KEA assists knee extension by returning the energy stored in the springs as an extension moment. In mechanical testing of a prototype of the new KEA, a mean maximum extension moment of 42.9 ± 0.46 Nm was provided by the device during flexion and 28.4 ± 0.28 Nm during extension. A biomechanical evaluation with two able-bodied individuals demonstrated the effectiveness of the KEA in successfully assisting stand-to-sit and sit-to-stand tasks. During stand-to-sit, the KEA provided 82% and 75% of the total (muscle and KEA) knee-extension moment required by the braced leg for the task for the two subjects, respectively; and during sit-to-stand, the KEA provided 56% and 50% of the total knee-extension moment for the two subjects, respectively. This KEA performance exceeded 50% knee-extension moment assistance for a 70 kg person.

  6. Effectiveness of acupressure versus isometric exercise on pain, stiffness, and physical function in knee osteoarthritis female patients

    PubMed Central

    Sorour, Amany S.; Ayoub, Amany S.; Abd El Aziz, Eman M.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and a leading cause of disability in older adults. Conservative non-pharmacological strategies, particularly exercise, are recommended by clinical guidelines for its management. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of acupressure versus isometric exercise on pain, stiffness, and physical function in knee OA female patients. This quasi experimental study was conducted at the inpatient and outpatient sections at Al-kasr Al-Aini hospital, Cairo University. It involved three groups of 30 patients each: isometric exercise, acupressure, and control. Data were collected by an interview form and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) scale. The study revealed high initial scores of pain, stiffness, and impaired physical functioning. After the intervention, pain decreased in the two intervention groups compared to the control group (p < 0.001), while the scores of stiffness and impaired physical function were significantly lower in the isometric group (p < 0.001) compared to the other two groups. The decrease in the total WOMAC score was sharper in the two study groups compared to the control group. In multiple linear regression, the duration of illness was a positive predictor of WOMAC score, whereas the intervention is associated with a reduction in the score. In conclusion, isometric exercise and acupressure provide an improvement of pain, stiffness, and physical function in patients with knee OA. Since isometric exercise leads to more improvement of stiffness and physical function, while acupressure acts better on pain, a combination of both is recommended. The findings need further confirmation through a randomized clinical trial. PMID:25685487

  7. On the theory of muscle contraction: filament extensibility and the development of isometric force and stiffness.

    PubMed Central

    Mijailovich, S M; Fredberg, J J; Butler, J P

    1996-01-01

    The newly discovered extensibility of actin and myosin filaments challenges the foundation of the theory of muscle mechanics. We have reformulated A. F. Huxley's sliding filament theory to explicitly take into account filament extensibility. During isometric force development, growing cross-bridge tractions transfer loads locally between filaments, causing them to extend and, therefore, to slide locally relative to one another. Even slight filament extensibility implies that 1) relative displacement between the two must be nonuniform along the region of filament overlap, 2) cross-bridge strain must vary systematically along the overlap region, and importantly, 3) the local shortening velocities, even at constant overall sarcomere length, reduce force below the level that would have developed if the filaments had been inextensible. The analysis shows that an extensible filament system with only two states (attached and detached) displays three important characteristics: 1) muscle stiffness leads force during force development; 2) cross-bridge stiffness is significantly higher than previously assessed by inextensible filament models; and 3) stiffness is prominently dissociated from the number of attached cross-bridges during force development. The analysis also implies that the local behavior of one myosin head must depend on the state of neighboring attachment sites. This coupling occurs exclusively through local sliding velocities, which can be significant, even during isometric force development. The resulting mechanical cooperativity is grounded in fiber mechanics and follows inevitably from filament extensibility. PMID:8874021

  8. Acute Improvement of Vertical Jump Performance After Isometric Squats Depends on Knee Angle and Vertical Jumping Ability.

    PubMed

    Tsoukos, Athanasios; Bogdanis, Gregory C; Terzis, Gerasimos; Veligekas, Panagiotis

    2016-08-01

    Tsoukos, A, Bogdanis, GC, Terzis, G, and Veligekas, P. Acute improvement of vertical jump performance after isometric squats depends on knee angle and vertical jumping ability. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2250-2257, 2016-This study examined the acute effects of maximum isometric squats at 2 different knee angles (90 or 140°) on countermovement jump (CMJ) performance in power athletes. Fourteen national-level male track and field power athletes completed 3 main trials (2 experimental and 1 control) in a randomized and counterbalanced order 1 week apart. Countermovement jump performance was evaluated using a force-plate before and 15 seconds, 3, 6, 9, and 12 minutes after 3 sets of 3 seconds maximum isometric contractions with 1-minute rest in between, from a squat position with knee angle set at 90 or 140°. Countermovement jump performance was improved compared with baseline only in the 140° condition by 3.8 ± 1.2% on the 12th minute of recovery (p = 0.027), whereas there was no change in CMJ height in the 90° condition. In the control condition, there was a decrease in CMJ performance over time, reaching -3.6 ± 1.2% (p = 0.049) after 12 minutes of recovery. To determine the possible effects of baseline jump performance on subsequent CMJ performance, subjects were divided into 2 groups ("high jumpers" and "low jumpers"). The baseline CMJ values of "high jumpers" and "low jumpers" differed significantly (CMJ: 45.1 ± 2.2 vs. 37.1 ± 3.9 cm, respectively, p = 0.001). Countermovement jump was increased only in the "high jumpers" group by 5.4 ± 1.4% (p = 0.001) and 7.4 ± 1.2% (p = 0.001) at the knee angles of 90 and 140°, respectively. This improvement was larger at the 140° angle (p = 0.049). Knee angle during isometric squats and vertical jumping ability are important determinants of the acute CMJ performance increase observed after a conditioning activity. PMID:26808841

  9. Knee and ankle joint torque-angle relationships of multi-joint leg extension.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Daniel; Olvermann, Matthias; Richtberg, Jan; Seiberl, Wolfgang; Schwirtz, Ansgar

    2011-07-28

    The force-length-relation (F-l-r) is an important property of skeletal muscle to characterise its function, whereas for in vivo human muscles, torque-angle relationships (T-a-r) represent the maximum muscular capacity as a function of joint angle. However, since in vivo force/torque-length data is only available for rotational single-joint movements the purpose of the present study was to identify torque-angle-relationships for multi-joint leg extension. Therefore, inverse dynamics served for calculation of ankle and knee joint torques of 18 male subjects when performing maximum voluntary isometric contractions in a seated leg press. Measurements in increments of 10° knee angle from 30° to 100° knee flexion resulted in eight discrete angle configurations of hip, knee and ankle joints. For the knee joint we found an ascending-descending T-a-r with a maximum torque of 289.5° ± 43.3 Nm, which closely matches literature data from rotational knee extension. In comparison to literature we observed a shift of optimum knee angle towards knee extension. In contrast, the T-a-r of the ankle joint vastly differed from relationships obtained for isolated plantar flexion. For the ankle T-a-r derived from multi-joint leg extension subjects operated over different sections of the force-length curve, but the ankle T-a-r derived from isolated joint efforts was over the ascending limb for all subjects. Moreover, mean maximum torque of 234.7 ± 56.6 Nm exceeded maximal strength of isolated plantar flexion (185.7 ± 27.8 Nm). From these findings we conclude that muscle function between isolated and more physiological multi-joint tasks differs. This should be considered for ergonomic and sports optimisation as well as for modelling and simulation of human movement.

  10. Effects of electrical stimulation on eccentric and concentric torque-velocity relationships during knee extension in man.

    PubMed

    Westing, S H; Seger, J Y; Thorstensson, A

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of electrical stimulation on torque output during knee extension. Nine well-trained males (19-43 years) performed maximal voluntary, electrically evoked and superimposed eccentric and concentric knee extensions at velocities of 60, 180 and 360 degrees s-1, plus an isometric test (torque was always recorded at a 60 degree knee angle). Fifty-hertz stimulation was applied percutaneously at the maximum tolerated voltage (140-200 V). By superimposing electrical stimulation, eccentric torque could be increased by an average of 21-24% above the voluntary level (P less than 0.05). No corresponding differences were observed between superimposed and voluntary torques under isometric or concentric conditions. Electrically evoked torque also exceeded voluntary torque under eccentric conditions (11-12%, P less than 0.05), but was less under isometric and concentric conditions (-10 to -52%, P less than 0.05). Within the limitations of the study, it was concluded that eccentric knee extension torque under maximal voluntary conditions does not represent the maximal torque-producing capacity. The action of a neural inhibitory mechanism was proposed as an explanation for this finding. If active, this mechanism may protect against the extreme muscle tension that could otherwise develop under truly maximal eccentric conditions.

  11. Intensity-dependent alterations in the excitability of cortical and spinal projections to the knee extensors during isometric and locomotor exercise

    PubMed Central

    Weavil, J. C.; Sidhu, S. K.; Mangum, T. S.; Richardson, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of exercise intensity and associated central motor drive in determining corticomotoneuronal excitability. Ten participants performed a series of nonfatiguing (3 s) isometric single-leg knee extensions (ISO; 10–100% of maximal voluntary contractions, MVC) and cycling bouts (30–160% peak aerobic capacity, Wpeak). At various exercise intensities, electrical potentials were evoked in the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) via transcranial magnetic stimulation (motor-evoked potentials, MEP), and electrical stimulation of both the cervicomedullary junction (cervicomedullary evoked potentials, CMEP) and the femoral nerve (maximal M-waves, Mmax). Whereas Mmax remained unchanged in both muscles (P > 0.40), voluntary electromyographic activity (EMG) increased in an exercise intensity-dependent manner for ISO and cycling exercise in VL and RF (both P < 0.001). During ISO exercise, MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased in VL and RF until a plateau was reached at ∼75% MVC; further increases in contraction intensity did not cause additional changes (P > 0.35). During cycling exercise, VL-MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ∼65% until a plateau was reached at Wpeak. In contrast, RF MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ∼110% throughout the tested cycling intensities without the occurrence of a plateau. Furthermore, alterations in EMG below the plateau influenced corticomotoneuronal excitability similarly between exercise modalities. In both exercise modalities, the MEP-to-CMEP ratio did not change with exercise intensity (P > 0.22). In conclusion, increases in exercise intensity and EMG facilitates the corticomotoneuronal pathway similarly in isometric knee extension and locomotor exercise until a plateau occurs at a submaximal exercise intensity. This facilitation appears to be primarily mediated by increases in excitability of the motoneuron pool. PMID:25876651

  12. Intensity-dependent alterations in the excitability of cortical and spinal projections to the knee extensors during isometric and locomotor exercise.

    PubMed

    Weavil, J C; Sidhu, S K; Mangum, T S; Richardson, R S; Amann, M

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the role of exercise intensity and associated central motor drive in determining corticomotoneuronal excitability. Ten participants performed a series of nonfatiguing (3 s) isometric single-leg knee extensions (ISO; 10-100% of maximal voluntary contractions, MVC) and cycling bouts (30-160% peak aerobic capacity, W peak). At various exercise intensities, electrical potentials were evoked in the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) via transcranial magnetic stimulation (motor-evoked potentials, MEP), and electrical stimulation of both the cervicomedullary junction (cervicomedullary evoked potentials, CMEP) and the femoral nerve (maximal M-waves, M max). Whereas M max remained unchanged in both muscles (P > 0.40), voluntary electromyographic activity (EMG) increased in an exercise intensity-dependent manner for ISO and cycling exercise in VL and RF (both P < 0.001). During ISO exercise, MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased in VL and RF until a plateau was reached at ∼ 75% MVC; further increases in contraction intensity did not cause additional changes (P > 0.35). During cycling exercise, VL-MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ∼ 65% until a plateau was reached at W peak. In contrast, RF MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ∼ 110% throughout the tested cycling intensities without the occurrence of a plateau. Furthermore, alterations in EMG below the plateau influenced corticomotoneuronal excitability similarly between exercise modalities. In both exercise modalities, the MEP-to-CMEP ratio did not change with exercise intensity (P > 0.22). In conclusion, increases in exercise intensity and EMG facilitates the corticomotoneuronal pathway similarly in isometric knee extension and locomotor exercise until a plateau occurs at a submaximal exercise intensity. This facilitation appears to be primarily mediated by increases in excitability of the motoneuron pool. PMID:25876651

  13. The knee-spine syndrome. Association between lumbar lordosis and extension of the knee.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yasuaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamagata, Masatsune; Hanaoka, Eiji; Moriya, Hideshige

    2003-01-01

    Degenerative changes of the knee often cause loss of extension. This may affect aspects of posture such as lumbar lordosis. A total of 366 patients underwent radiological examination of the lumbar spine in a standing position. The knee and body angles were measured by physical examination using a goniometer. Limitation of extension of the knee was significantly greater in patients whose lumbar lordosis was 30 degrees or less. Lumbar lordosis was significantly reduced in patients whose limitation of extension of the knee was more than 5 degrees. It decreased over the age of 70 years, and the limitation of extension of the knee increased over the age of 60 years. Our study indicates that symptoms from the lumbar spine may be caused by degenerative changes in the knee. This may be called the 'knee-spine syndrome'. PMID:12585585

  14. Effects of Series Elasticity on the Human Knee Extension Torque-Angle Relationship in Vivo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubo, Keitaro; Ohgo, Kazuya; Takeishi, Ryuichi; Yoshinaga, Kazunari; Tsunoda, Naoya; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of series elasticity on the torque-angle relationship of the knee extensors in vivo. Forty-two men volunteered to take part in the present study. The participants performed maximal voluntary isometric contractions at eight knee-joint angles (40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110[degree]). The…

  15. Isometric knee extensor fatigue following a Wingate test: peripheral and central mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-del-Olmo, M; Rodriguez, F A; Marquez, G; Iglesias, X; Marina, M; Benitez, A; Vallejo, L; Acero, R M

    2013-02-01

    Central and peripheral fatigue have been explored during and after running or cycling exercises. However, the fatigue mechanisms associated with a short maximal cycling exercise (30 s Wingate test) have not been investigated. In this study, 10 volunteer subjects performed several isometric voluntary contractions using the leg muscle extensors before and after two bouts of cycling at 25% of maximal power output and two bouts of Wingate tests. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electrical motor nerve stimulation (NM) were applied at rest and during the voluntary contractions. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), twitch amplitude evoked by electrical nerve stimulation, M wave and motor potential evoked by TMS (MEP) were recorded. MVC, VA and twitch amplitude evoked at rest by NM decreased significantly after the first and second Wingate tests, indicating central and peripheral fatigue. MVC and VA, but not the twitch amplitude evoked by NM, recovered before the second Wingate test. These results suggest that the Wingate test results in a decrease in MVC associated with peripheral and central fatigue. While the peripheral fatigue is associated with an intramuscular impairment, the central fatigue seems to be the main reason for the Wingate test-induced impairment of MVC.

  16. Isometric knee extensor fatigue following a Wingate test: peripheral and central mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-del-Olmo, M; Rodriguez, F A; Marquez, G; Iglesias, X; Marina, M; Benitez, A; Vallejo, L; Acero, R M

    2013-02-01

    Central and peripheral fatigue have been explored during and after running or cycling exercises. However, the fatigue mechanisms associated with a short maximal cycling exercise (30 s Wingate test) have not been investigated. In this study, 10 volunteer subjects performed several isometric voluntary contractions using the leg muscle extensors before and after two bouts of cycling at 25% of maximal power output and two bouts of Wingate tests. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electrical motor nerve stimulation (NM) were applied at rest and during the voluntary contractions. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), twitch amplitude evoked by electrical nerve stimulation, M wave and motor potential evoked by TMS (MEP) were recorded. MVC, VA and twitch amplitude evoked at rest by NM decreased significantly after the first and second Wingate tests, indicating central and peripheral fatigue. MVC and VA, but not the twitch amplitude evoked by NM, recovered before the second Wingate test. These results suggest that the Wingate test results in a decrease in MVC associated with peripheral and central fatigue. While the peripheral fatigue is associated with an intramuscular impairment, the central fatigue seems to be the main reason for the Wingate test-induced impairment of MVC. PMID:21812824

  17. Characteristics of human knee muscle coordination during isometric contractions in a standing posture: The effect of limb task

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Toran D.; Manal, Kurt; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Buchanan, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Different functional roles for the hands have been demonstrated, however leg control is not as well understood. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate bilateral knee neuromuscular control to determine if the limb receiving greater attention would have more well-tuned control compared to an unattended limb. Surface electrodes were placed on seven muscles of each limb, before standing on two force platforms. Visual feedback was given of the forces and moments of the “focus limb,” but not the “unattended limb.” Static isometric forces were matched with their focus limb, requiring their unattended limb to push in the opposite direction, using a combination of forward-backward-medial-lateral shear forces while muscle activity was collected bilaterally. There was a significant main effect for limb task (p = 0.02), with the medial hamstrings being more specific (p = 0.001) while performing the unattended limb and the lateral hamstring being more well-tuned (p = 0.007) while performing the focus limb task. The focus limb's medial and lateral gastrocnemius were principally active in the forwards direction, but only the unattended limb's lateral gastrocnemius was active in the backwards direction. Findings suggest unique neuromuscular control strategies are used for the legs depending on limb task. PMID:23790392

  18. Influence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in the fluctuation of the submaximal isometric torque of knee extensors in patients with early-grade osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Andressa; Mello, Marco T.; Serrão, Paula R.; Luz, Roberta P.; Bittencourt, Lia R.; Mattiello, Stela M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) alters the fluctuation of submaximal isometric torque of the knee extensors in patients with early-grade osteoarthritis (OA). METHOD: The study included 60 male volunteers, aged 40 to 70 years, divided into four groups: Group 1 (G1) - Control (n=15): without OA and without OSA; Group 2 (G2) (n=15): with OA and without OSA; Group 3 (G3) (n=15): without OA and with OSA; and Group 4 (G4) (n=15) with OA and with OSA. Five patients underwent maximal isometric contractions of 10 seconds duration each, with the knee at 60° of flexion to determine peak torque at 60°. To evaluate the fluctuation of torque, 5 submaximal isometric contractions (50% of maximum peak torque) of 10 seconds each, which were calculated from the standard deviation of torque and coefficient of variation, were performed. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed between groups for maximum peak torque, while G4 showed a lower value compared with G1 (p=0.005). Additionally, for the average torque exerted, G4 showed a lower value compared to the G1 (p=0.036). However, no differences were found between the groups for the standard deviation (p=0.844) and the coefficient of variation (p=0.143). CONCLUSION: The authors concluded that OSA did not change the parameters of the fluctuation of isometric submaximal torque of knee extensors in patients with early-grade OA. PMID:26443974

  19. Lower extremity extension force and electromyography properties as a function of knee angle and their relation to joint torques: implications for strength diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether and how isometric multijoint leg extension strength can be used to assess athletes' muscular capability within the scope of strength diagnosis. External reaction forces (Fext) and kinematics were measured (n = 18) during maximal isometric contractions in a seated leg press at 8 distinct joint angle configurations ranging from 30 to 100° knee flexion. In addition, muscle activation of rectus femoris, vastus medialis, biceps femoris c.l., gastrocnemius medialis, and tibialis anterior was obtained using surface electromyography (EMG). Joint torques for hip, knee, and ankle joints were computed by inverse dynamics. The results showed that unilateral Fext decreased significantly from 3,369 ± 575 N at 30° knee flexion to 1,015 ± 152 N at 100° knee flexion. Despite maximum voluntary effort, excitation of all muscles as measured by EMG root mean square changed with knee flexion angles. Moreover, correlations showed that above-average Fext at low knee flexion is not necessarily associated with above-average Fext at great knee flexion and vice versa. Similarly, it is not possible to deduce high joint torques from high Fext just as above-average joint torques in 1 joint do not signify above-average torques in another joint. From these findings, it is concluded that an evaluation of muscular capability by means of Fext as measured for multijoint leg extension is strongly limited. As practical recommendation, we suggest analyzing multijoint leg extension strength at 3 distinct knee flexion angles or at discipline-specific joint angles. In addition, a careful evaluation of muscular capacity based on measured Fext can be done for knee flexion angles ≥ 80°. For further and detailed analysis of single muscle groups, the use of inverse dynamic modeling is recommended.

  20. Drop-Landing Performance and Knee-Extension Strength After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kuenze, Christopher M.; Foot, Nathaniel; Saliba, Susan A.; Hart, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Context Individuals with a history of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) are at greater risk of reinjury and developing early-onset osteoarthritis due to persistent abnormal joint loading. Real-time clinical assessment tools may help identify patients experiencing abnormal movement patterns after ACLR. Objective To compare performance on the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) between participants with ACLR and uninjured control participants and to determine the relationship between LESS score and knee-extension strength in these participants. Design Controlled laboratory study. Setting Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Forty-six recreationally active participants, consisting of 22 with ACLR (12 men, 10 women; age = 22.5 ± 5.0 years, height = 172.8 ± 7.2 cm, mass = 74.2 ± 15.6 kg, body mass index = 24.6 ± 4.0) and 24 healthy control participants (12 men, 12 women; age = 21.7 ± 3.6 years, height = 168.0 ± 8.8 cm, mass = 69.2 ± 13.6 kg, body mass index = 24.3 ± 3.2) were enrolled. Main Outcome Measure(s) Bilateral normalized knee-extension maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) torque (Nm/kg) and LESS scores were measured during a single testing session. We compared LESS scores between groups using a Mann-Whitney U test and the relationships between LESS scores and normalized knee-extension MVIC torque using Spearman ρ bivariate correlations. Results The ACLR participants had a greater number of LESS errors (6.0 ± 3.6) than healthy control participants (2.8 ± 2.2; t44 = −3.73, P = .002). In ACLR participants, lower normalized knee-extension MVIC torque in the injured limb (ρ = −0.455, P = .03) was associated with a greater number of landing errors. Conclusions Participants with ACLR displayed more errors while landing. The occurrence of landing errors was negatively correlated with knee-extension strength, suggesting that weaker participants had more landing errors. Persistent quadriceps weakness commonly

  1. Validity and reliability of isometric, isokinetic and isoinertial modalities for the assessment of quadriceps muscle strength in patients with total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lienhard, K; Lauermann, S P; Schneider, D; Item-Glatthorn, J F; Casartelli, N C; Maffiuletti, N A

    2013-12-01

    Reliability of isometric, isokinetic and isoinertial modalities for quadriceps strength evaluation, and the relation between quadriceps strength and physical function was investigated in 29 total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients, with an average age of 63 years. Isometric maximal voluntary contraction torque, isokinetic peak torque, and isoinertial one-repetition maximum load of the involved and uninvolved quadriceps were evaluated as well as objective (walking parameters) and subjective physical function (WOMAC). Reliability was good and comparable for the isometric, isokinetic, and isoinertial strength outcomes on both sides (intraclass correlation coefficient range: 0.947-0.966; standard error of measurement range: 5.1-9.3%). Involved quadriceps strength was significantly correlated to walking speed (r range: 0.641-0.710), step length (r range: 0.685-0.820) and WOMAC function (r range: 0.575-0.663), independent from the modality (P < 0.05). Uninvolved quadriceps strength was also significantly correlated to walking speed (r range: 0.413-0.539), step length (r range: 0.514-0.608) and WOMAC function (r range: 0.374-0.554) (P < 0.05), except for WOMAC function/isokinetic peak torque (P > 0.05). In conclusion, isometric, isokinetic, and isoinertial modalities ensure valid and reliable assessment of quadriceps muscle strength in TKA patients.

  2. Knee extensor torque and quadriceps femoris EMG during perceptually-guided isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Pincivero, D M; Coelho, A J; Campy, R M; Salfetnikov, Y; Suter, E

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine superficial quadriceps femoris (QF) EMG and torque at perceived voluntary contraction efforts. Thirty subjects (15 males, 15 females) performed 9, 5 s, sub-maximal contractions at prescribed levels of perceived voluntary effort at points 1-9 on an 11-point scale (0-10), in a random order. Surface electromyograms (EMG) of the vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), and rectus femoris (RF) muscles, as well as QF peak torque (PT), average torque (AT), and torque coefficient of variation (C.V.), were sampled. The raw EMG signals were full-wave rectified and integrated over the middle three s of each contraction. The sampled EMG signals, and PT and AT at each perceived exertion level were normalized to the average of three maximal voluntary contractions. The normalized EMG and torque values at each perceived exertion level were then compared to equivalent percent values (i.e., 10% at a perceived level of 1). The results demonstrated that at all perceived exertion levels, with the exception of the RF at a level of 2 which was equivalent to 20%, and the VL and RF muscles at a level 1 in which activation was greater than 10%, activation was significantly less than the equivalent percent value at each point on the scale. VM EMG was found to be less than the VL and RF from contraction levels 3-9. PT was shown to be less than the equivalent percent values at contraction levels 6-9. The AT was found to be lower than the expected percent value at perceived effort levels 2-9. Torque C.V. was not found to be different across the range of perceived effort. The major findings of this study suggested that humans over-estimate voluntary QF muscle torque when guided by perceptual sensations. It is also suggested that the produced EMG signals revealed a reliance on the VL muscle for knee extensor torque generation at sub-maximal levels.

  3. Comparison of different passive knee extension torque-angle assessments.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Sandro R; Vaz, João R; Bruno, Paula M; Valamatos, Maria J; Mil-Homens, Pedro

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have used isokinetic dynamometry to assess joint torques and angles during passive extension of the knee, often without reporting upon methodological errors and reliability outcomes. In addition, the reliability of the techniques used to measure passive knee extension torque-angle and the extent to which reliability may be affected by the position of the subjects is also unclear. Therefore, we conducted an analysis of the intra- and inter-session reliability of two methods of assessing passive knee extension: (A) a 2D kinematic analysis coupled to a custom-made device that enabled the direct measurement of resistance to stretch and (B) an isokinetic dynamometer used in two testing positions (with the non-tested thigh either flexed at 45° or in the neutral position). The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) of torque, the slope of the torque-angle curve, and the parameters of the mathematical model that were fit to the torque-angle data for the above conditions were measured in sixteen healthy male subjects (age: 21.4 ± 2.1 yr; BMI: 22.6 ± 3.3 kg m(-2); tibial length: 37.4 ± 3.4 cm). The results found were: (1) methods A and B led to distinctly different torque-angle responses; (2) passive torque-angle relationship and stretch tolerance were influenced by the position of the non-tested thigh; and (3) ICCs obtained for torque were higher than for the slope and for the mathematical parameters that were fit to the torque-angle curve. In conclusion, the measurement method that is used and the positioning of subjects can influence the passive knee extension torque-angle outcome.

  4. Interrater Reliability of Isokinetic Measures of Knee Flexion and Extension

    PubMed Central

    Keskula, Douglas R.; Dowling, Jeffrey S.; Davis, Virginia L.; Finley, Paula W.; Dell'Omo, Daniel L.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the interrater reliability of peak torque and total work values obtained with isokinetic measures of knee flexion and extension. Eight male and eight female students were evaluated on four occasions by four different examiners (range of isokinetic test experience: 0 to 10 yrs) using a standardized isokinetic measurement protocol. Subjects were randomly assigned to participate in a test sequence determined by a 4 × 4 balanced Latin square. Peak torque and total work values at 60°/sec and 180°/sec were obtained for the concentric measures of knee extension and flexion. The measures of peak torque and total work were corrected for the effects of gravity. Intraclass correlation coefficients and standard error of measurement estimates were used to estimate the interrater reliability for each test condition (test speed × muscle group). Intraclass correlation coefficient values ranged from .90 to .96 for peak torque and .90 to .95 for total work. Standard error of measurement estimates ranged from 8.9 to 13.3 Nm for peak torque and 11.3 to 16.8 Nm for total work. The results of this investigation demonstrate that reliable measures of isokinetic muscle performance of knee extension and flexion may be obtained by four clinicians with varied experience when following a standardized measurement protocol. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2. PMID:16558330

  5. Knee Extension Range of Motion at 4 Weeks Is Related to Knee Extension Loss at 12 Weeks After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Sarah; Garrison, J. Craig; Bothwell, James; Conway, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is commonly torn, and surgical reconstruction is often required to allow a patient to return to their prior level of activity. Avoiding range of motion (ROM) loss is a common goal, but little research has been done to identify when ROM loss becomes detrimental to a patient’s future function. Purpose: To determine whether there is a relationship between early knee side-to-side extension difference after ACL reconstruction and knee side-to-side extension difference at 12 weeks. The hypothesis was that early (within the first 8 weeks) knee side-to-side extension difference will be predictive of knee side-to-side extension difference seen at 12 weeks. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Knee side-to-side extension difference measures were taken on 74 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction rehabilitation at the initial visit and 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively. Visual analog scores (VAS) and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores were also recorded at these time frames. Results: There was a strong relationship between knee extension ROM at 4 and 12 weeks (r = 0.639, P < .001) and 8 and 12 weeks (r = 0.742, P < .001). When the variables of knee extension ROM at initial visit and 4 and 8 weeks were entered into a regression analysis, the predictor variable explained 61% (R2 = 0.611) of variance for knee extension ROM at 12 weeks, with 4 weeks (R2 = 0.259) explaining the majority of this variance. Conclusion: This study found that a patient’s knee extension at 4 weeks was strongly correlated with knee extension at 12 weeks. Clinical Relevance: This information may be useful for clinicians treating athletic patients who are anxious for return to sport by providing them an initial goal to work toward in hopes of ensuring successful rehabilitation of their knee. PMID:26675061

  6. The effectiveness of posterior knee capsulotomies and knee extension osteotomies in crouched gait in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Daveda; Connor, Justin; Church, Chris; Lennon, Nancy; Henley, John; Niiler, Tim; Miller, Freeman

    2016-11-01

    Crouched gait is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and there are various treatment options. This study evaluated the effectiveness of single-event multilevel surgery including posterior knee capsulotomy or distal femoral extension osteotomy to correct knee flexion contracture in children with CP. Gait analyses were carried out to evaluate gait preoperatively and postoperatively. Significant improvements were found in physical examination and kinematic measures, which showed that children with CP and crouched gait who develop knee flexion contractures can be treated effectively using single-event multilevel surgery including a posterior knee capsulotomy or distal femoral extension osteotomy.

  7. Knee extension and flexion: MR delineation of normal and torn anterior cruciate ligaments

    SciTech Connect

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the effect of joint position of semiflexed and extended knees in MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semiflexed position (average 45{degrees} of flexion) within the magnet bore. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained for both extended and flexed knee positions. Thirty-two knees with intact ACLs and 43 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL tears were evaluated. Two observers compared paired MR images of both extended and flexed positions and rated them by a relative three point scale. Anatomic correlation in MR images was obtained by a cadaveric knee with incremental flexion. The MR images of flexed knees were more useful than of extended knees in 53% of the case reviews of femoral attachments and 36% of reviews of midportions of normal ACLs. Compared with knee extensions, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 48% of reviews of disrupted sites and 52% of residual bundles of torn ACLs. Normal ACL appeared taut in the knee extension and lax in semiflexion. Compared with MR images of knees in extension, MR images of knees in flexion more clearly delineate the femoral side of the ligament with wider space under the intercondylar roof and with decreased volume-averaging artifacts, providing superior visualization of normal and torn ACLs. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Perioperative Rehabilitation Using a Knee Extension Device and Arthroscopic Debridement in the Treatment of Arthrofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs-Kinzer, Angie; Murphy, Brian; Shelbourne, K. Donald; Urch, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Background: Arthrofibrosis is a postoperative complication of intra-articular knee surgery that can be difficult to treat. Evidence suggests that maximizing knee range of motion may improve outcomes in patients with arthrofibrosis who undergo arthroscopic debridement. Hypothesis: Patients who achieve greater knee range of motion will have better subjective scores. Study Design: Retrospective case series analysis. Methods: A review of records was performed for 33 patients with arthrofibrosis who underwent knee arthroscopy and scar resection coupled with perioperative rehabilitation to maximize knee range of motion. Patient demographics and preoperative and postoperative range of motion measurements were extracted from the records. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Form was administered to assess pain, activity, and knee function. Patients performed a preoperative and postoperative rehabilitation program utilizing a knee extension device to maximize knee extension. Results: According to the IKDC range of motion criteria, 27 of 33 patients achieved normal knee extension, and 14 of 33 achieved normal knee flexion at a mean of 8.6 months after surgery. Patients with normal knee motion had a mean IKDC Subjective Knee Form score of 72.6 ± 13.6, which was significantly higher than patients who did not achieve normal motion (P = .04). Overall, mean IKDC Subjective Knee Form scores improved from 45.3 ± 16.7 preoperatively to 67.1 ± 18.0 postoperatively (P < .01) at a mean of 14.7 months after surgery. Conclusions: Perioperative rehabilitation that emphasizes restoration of normal knee range of motion appears to improve outcomes in patients with arthrofibrosis who undergo arthroscopic scar resection. In support of our hypothesis, patients who achieved greater knee range of motion had better subjective knee scores. PMID:23015970

  9. Combined isometric and vibration training does not enhance strength beyond that of isometric training alone.

    PubMed

    Fisher, J; Van-Dongen, M; Sutherland, R

    2014-10-01

    Research considering combined vibration and strength training is extensive yet results are equivocal. However, to date there appears no research which has considered the combination of both direct vibration and whole---body vibration when used in an isometric deadlift position. The aims of this study were to compare groups performing isometric training with and without direct and whole---body vibration. Twenty four participants (19---24 years) were randomly divided into: isometric training with vibration (ST+VT: n=8), isometric training without vibration (ST: n=8), and control (CON: n=8). Within the training groups participants trained twice per week, for 6 weeks, performing 6---sets of maximal isometric deadlift contractions, increasing in duration from 30 seconds to 40 seconds (weeks 1---6). Hip and knee angle was maintained at 60° and 110°, respectively for both testing and training. Training sessions for ST+VT were identical to ST with the addition of a direct vibratory stimulus through hand---held straps and whole---body vibration via standing on vibration a platform. The amplitude remained constant (2mm) throughout the intervention whilst the frequency increased from 35Hz to 50Hz. Pre--- and post---test isometric strength was measured using an isometric deadlift dynamometer. Results revealed significant increases in isometric strength for both ST+VT (p < 0.001, 23.8%) and ST (p < 0.001, 32.5%) compared to CON, with no significant differences between ST+VT and ST training groups. The present study provides evidence to suggest that there are no greater gains to be incurred by the addition of a vibratory stimulus to traditional strength training. PMID:25295625

  10. Local architecture of the vastus intermedius is a better predictor of knee extension force than that of the other quadriceps femoris muscle heads.

    PubMed

    Ando, Ryosuke; Saito, Akira; Umemura, Yoshihisa; Akima, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the muscle architecture of each head of the quadriceps femoris (QF) at multiple regions can be used to predict knee extension force. Muscle thickness and pennation angle were measured using sonographic images from multiple regions on each muscle of the QF with the knee flexed to 90°. The fascicle lengths of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus intermedius (VI) muscles were estimated based on sonographic images taken along the length of the thigh. The muscle architecture of the vastus intermedius was determined in two separate locations using sonographic images of the anterior (ant-VI) and lateral portions (lat-VI). The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was measured during isometric knee extension at a knee joint angle of 90°. The relationship between MVC force and muscle architecture was examined using a stepwise linear regression analysis with MVC force as the dependent variable. The muscle thickness of the ant-VI was selected as an independent variable in the first step of the linear regression analysis (R(2) = 0.66, P<0.01). In the second step, pennation angle of the lat-VI was added to the model (R(2) = 0.91, P<0.01). These results suggest that among the four muscles that make up the QF, the muscle architecture of the VI is the best predictor of knee extension force.

  11. Lifestyle-Related Factors Contributing to Decline in Knee Extension Strength among Elderly Women: A Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Narumi; Kim, Miji; Saito, Kyoko; Yoshida, Hideyo; Yoshida, Yuko; Hirano, Hirohiko; Obuchi, Shuichi; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Takao; Kim, Hunkyung

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional and 4-year longitudinal cohort study aimed to clarify how various lifestyle-related variables affect knee extension strength in elderly Japanese women. The participants were community-dwelling women (n = 575) living in the Itabashi Ward of Tokyo, Japan aged 75–85 years at baseline (in 2008) who returned for a follow-up examination 4 years later (in 2012). Maximum isometric knee extension strength in the dominant leg was measured during comprehensive medical check-ups at baseline and follow-up. Interviews with participants included questions on their history of 11 diseases and lifestyle-related factors such as physical activity as well as dietary, smoking, and drinking habits. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses yielded inconsistent results regarding the associations between lifestyle-related factors and knee extension strength. While going out more frequently and regular physical exercise positively affected baseline knee extension strength, they did not affect knee extension strength in the longitudinal analysis. The longitudinal analysis revealed that more frequent intake of soy products or green and yellow vegetables at baseline decreased age-related knee extension strength decline. The inconsistent results from the cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses indicate that conducting both types of analyses is crucial for researching this type of subject. The present study demonstrates that the age-related decline in muscle strength is lower in those who frequently eat soy products or green and yellow vegetables. Thus, recommending higher intake of soy products, and green and yellow vegetables for the elderly might help maintain their muscle health. PMID:26177292

  12. Knee-Extension Training with a Single-Joint Hybrid Assistive Limb during the Early Postoperative Period after Total Knee Arthroplasty in a Patient with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Hisashi; Kubota, Shigeki; Onishi, Mio; Kanamori, Akihiro; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The knee range of motion is an important outcome of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). According to previous studies, the knee range of motion temporarily decreases for approximately 1 month after TKA due to postoperative pain and quadriceps dysfunction following surgical invasion into the knee extensor mechanism. We describe our experience with a knee-extension training program based on a single-joint hybrid assistive limb (HAL-SJ, Cyberdyne Inc., Tsukuba, Japan) during the acute recovery phase after TKA. HAL-SJ is a wearable robot suit that facilitates the voluntary control of knee joint motion. A 76-year-old man underwent HAL-SJ-based knee-extension training, which enabled him to perform knee function training during the acute phase after TKA without causing increased pain. Thus, he regained the ability to fully extend his knee postoperatively. HAL-SJ-based knee-extension training can be used as a novel post-TKA rehabilitation modality. PMID:27774330

  13. Skeletal muscle oxygen uptake in obese patients: functional evaluation by knee-extension exercise.

    PubMed

    Lazzer, Stefano; Salvadego, Desy; Porcelli, Simone; Rejc, Enrico; Agosti, Fiorenza; Sartorio, Alessandro; Grassi, Bruno

    2013-08-01

    We hypothesized, in a group of obese women (OB), a more significant impairment of aerobic metabolism during knee extension (KE) exercise vs. that described during cycle ergometer exercise, lending support to the role of skeletal muscles in limiting exercise tolerance in OB. Eleven OB (age 29.5 ± 5.5 years, body mass index 43.2 ± 5.4 kg m(-2)) and 10 non-obese controls (CTRL) women were tested. Fat-free mass of a lower-limb (FFMLL) was assessed by a densitometer. Heart rate (HR) and pulmonary O2 uptake (VO2) were determined during incremental exercise tests to voluntary exhaustion carried out on a custom-built KE ergometer and on a cycle ergometer (CE). FFMLL and maximal isometric force of KE muscles were higher in OB vs. CTRL (+42.4 and +46.2 %, respectively). Peak work rate was significantly lower in OB (-18.4 %) vs. CTRL in CE, but not in KE. Expressed in mL min(-1), peak VO2 was not different in OB vs. CTRL in CE and in KE. After it was divided per unit of FFM involved in the exercises, peak VO2 was significantly lower in OB vs. CTRL, both for CE (-19 %) and KE (-33 %). Expressed per unit of exercising muscle mass, peak oxidative function is impaired in OB. The impairment is more pronounced after limitations related to cardiovascular O2 delivery are reduced. In OB muscle hypertrophy and the increased muscle force allow to preserve exercise tolerance during aerobic exercises carried out by relatively small muscle masses.

  14. Quasi-stiffness of the knee joint in flexion and extension during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical understanding of the knee joint during a golf swing is essential to improve performance and prevent injury. In this study, we quantified the flexion/extension angle and moment as the primary knee movement, and evaluated quasi-stiffness represented by moment-angle coupling in the knee joint. Eighteen skilled and 23 unskilled golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras and two force platforms were used to record a swing motion. The anatomical angle and moment were calculated from kinematic and kinetic models, and quasi-stiffness of the knee joint was determined as an instantaneous slope of moment-angle curves. The lead knee of the skilled group had decreased resistance duration compared with the unskilled group (P < 0.05), and the resistance duration of the lead knee was lower than that of the trail knee in the skilled group (P < 0.01). The lead knee of the skilled golfers had greater flexible excursion duration than the trail knee of the skilled golfers, and of both the lead and trail knees of the unskilled golfers. These results provide critical information for preventing knee injuries during a golf swing and developing rehabilitation strategies following surgery.

  15. Quasi-stiffness of the knee joint in flexion and extension during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical understanding of the knee joint during a golf swing is essential to improve performance and prevent injury. In this study, we quantified the flexion/extension angle and moment as the primary knee movement, and evaluated quasi-stiffness represented by moment-angle coupling in the knee joint. Eighteen skilled and 23 unskilled golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras and two force platforms were used to record a swing motion. The anatomical angle and moment were calculated from kinematic and kinetic models, and quasi-stiffness of the knee joint was determined as an instantaneous slope of moment-angle curves. The lead knee of the skilled group had decreased resistance duration compared with the unskilled group (P < 0.05), and the resistance duration of the lead knee was lower than that of the trail knee in the skilled group (P < 0.01). The lead knee of the skilled golfers had greater flexible excursion duration than the trail knee of the skilled golfers, and of both the lead and trail knees of the unskilled golfers. These results provide critical information for preventing knee injuries during a golf swing and developing rehabilitation strategies following surgery. PMID:25651162

  16. An in vivo study of the effect of distal femoral resection on passive knee extension.

    PubMed

    Smith, Conrad K; Chen, Justin A; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2010-10-01

    A previous study showed that 1 mm of distal femoral resection restored knee extension 4.5°. We determined the relationship with a more accurate measurement technique. Twenty-six subjects treated with total knee arthroplasty were studied. Digital photographs of the extended knee with and without 1.5 and 3.0 mm thick augments placed between the femoral component and distal femur were analyzed, and knee extension was measured. One millimeter of distal femoral resection restored 1.8° of extension that is less correction than the previous study reported. Because an attempt to correct a 10° extension deficit by resecting the distal femur could require 5 mm or more of bone removal that moves the joint line too proximal, we recommend exploring other techniques before resecting the femur.

  17. Preliminary analysis of knee stress in Full Extension Landing

    PubMed Central

    Makinejad, Majid Davoodi; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Bayat, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study provides an experimental and finite element analysis of knee-joint structure during extended-knee landing based on the extracted impact force, and it numerically identifies the contact pressure, stress distribution and possibility of bone-to-bone contact when a subject lands from a safe height. METHODS: The impact time and loads were measured via inverse dynamic analysis of free landing without knee flexion from three different heights (25, 50 and 75 cm), using five subjects with an average body mass index of 18.8. Three-dimensional data were developed from computed tomography scans and were reprocessed with modeling software before being imported and analyzed by finite element analysis software. The whole leg was considered to be a fixed middle-hinged structure, while impact loads were applied to the femur in an upward direction. RESULTS: Straight landing exerted an enormous amount of pressure on the knee joint as a result of the body's inability to utilize the lower extremity muscles, thereby maximizing the threat of injury when the load exceeds the height-safety threshold. CONCLUSIONS: The researchers conclude that extended-knee landing results in serious deformation of the meniscus and cartilage and increases the risk of bone-to-bone contact and serious knee injury when the load exceeds the threshold safety height. This risk is considerably greater than the risk of injury associated with walking downhill or flexion landing activities. PMID:24141832

  18. Hand-held dynamometry in patients with haematological malignancies: Measurement error in the clinical assessment of knee extension strength

    PubMed Central

    Knols, Ruud H; Aufdemkampe, Geert; de Bruin, Eling D; Uebelhart, Daniel; Aaronson, Neil K

    2009-01-01

    Background Hand-held dynamometry is a portable and inexpensive method to quantify muscle strength. To determine if muscle strength has changed, an examiner must know what part of the difference between a patient's pre-treatment and post-treatment measurements is attributable to real change, and what part is due to measurement error. This study aimed to determine the relative and absolute reliability of intra and inter-observer strength measurements with a hand-held dynamometer (HHD). Methods Two observers performed maximum voluntary peak torque measurements (MVPT) for isometric knee extension in 24 patients with haematological malignancies. For each patient, the measurements were carried out on the same day. The main outcome measures were the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC ± 95%CI), the standard error of measurement (SEM), the smallest detectable difference (SDD), the relative values as % of the grand mean of the SEM and SDD, and the limits of agreement for the intra- and inter-observer '3 repetition average' and the 'highest value of 3 MVPT' knee extension strength measures. Results The intra-observer ICCs were 0.94 for the average of 3 MVPT (95%CI: 0.86–0.97) and 0.86 for the highest value of 3 MVPT (95%CI: 0.71–0.94). The ICCs for the inter-observer measurements were 0.89 for the average of 3 MVPT (95%CI: 0.75–0.95) and 0.77 for the highest value of 3 MVPT (95%CI: 0.54–0.90). The SEMs for the intra-observer measurements were 6.22 Nm (3.98% of the grand mean (GM) and 9.83 Nm (5.88% of GM). For the inter-observer measurements, the SEMs were 9.65 Nm (6.65% of GM) and 11.41 Nm (6.73% of GM). The SDDs for the generated parameters varied from 17.23 Nm (11.04% of GM) to 27.26 Nm (17.09% of GM) for intra-observer measurements, and 26.76 Nm (16.77% of GM) to 31.62 Nm (18.66% of GM) for inter-observer measurements, with similar results for the limits of agreement. Conclusion The results indicate that there is acceptable relative reliability for

  19. Joint moment contributions to swing knee extension acceleration during gait in children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Evan J; Requejo, Philip S; Fowler, Eileen G

    2010-03-22

    Inadequate peak knee extension during the swing phase of gait is a major deficit in individuals with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). The biomechanical mechanisms responsible for knee extension have not been thoroughly examined in CP. The purpose of this study was to assess the contributions of joint moments and gravity to knee extension acceleration during swing in children with spastic hemiplegic CP. Six children with spastic hemiplegic CP were recruited (age=13.4+/-4.8 years). Gait data were collected using an eight-camera system. Induced acceleration analysis was performed for each limb during swing. Average joint moment and gravity contributions to swing knee extension acceleration were calculated. Total swing and stance joint moment contributions were compared between the hemiplegic and non-hemiplegic limbs using paired t-tests (p<0.05). Swing limb joint moment contributions from the hemiplegic limb decelerated swing knee extension significantly more than those of the non-hemiplegic limb and resulted in significantly reduced knee extension acceleration. Total stance limb joint moment contributions were not statistically different. Swing limb joint moment contributions that decelerated knee extension appeared to be the primary cause of inadequate knee extension acceleration during swing. Stance limb muscle strength did not appear to be the limiting factor in achieving adequate knee extension in children with CP. Recent research has shown that the ability to extend the knee during swing is dependent on the selective voluntary motor control of the limb. Data from individual participants support this concept.

  20. The relationships between active extensibility, and passive and active stiffness of the knee flexors.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, J Troy; Padua, Darin A; Riemann, Bryan L; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2004-12-01

    Insufficient active knee flexor stiffness may predispose the anterior cruciate ligament to injury. Insufficient passive stiffness may result in insufficient active stiffness. Similarly, higher levels of musculotendinous extensibility may inhibit active and passive muscle stiffness, potentially contributing to an increased risk of injury. The literature is both limited and inconsistent concerning relationships between extensibility, passive stiffness, and active stiffness. Extensibility was measured as the maximal active knee extension angle from a supine position with the hip flexed to 90 degrees . Passive stiffness was calculated as the slope of the moment-angle curve resulting from passive knee extension. Active stiffness was assessed via acceleration associated with damped oscillatory motion about the knee. Stepwise multiple regression indicated that passive stiffness accounted for 25% of active muscle stiffness variance. The linear combination of extensibility and passive stiffness explained only 2% more variance compared to passive stiffness alone. Musculotendinous extensibility was moderately related to passive muscle stiffness, and weakly related to active muscle stiffness. The moderate relationship observed between active and passive stiffness emphasizes the dependence of active muscle stiffness on cross-bridge formation, and the relatively smaller contribution from parallel elastic tissues. Additionally, heightened extensibility does not appear to be a predisposing factor for reduced muscle stiffness. PMID:15491843

  1. Greater Hip Extension but Not Hip Abduction Explosive Strength Is Associated With Lesser Hip Adduction and Knee Valgus Motion During a Single-Leg Jump-Cut

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Baker; Johnson, Samuel T.; Chang, Eunwook; Pollard, Christine D.; Norcross, Marc F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationships between hip abductor and extensor strength and frontal plane hip and knee motions that are associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury risk are equivocal. However, previous research on these relationships has evaluated relatively low-level movement tasks and peak torque rather than a time-critical strength measure such as the rate of torque development (RTD). Hypothesis: Females with greater hip abduction and extension RTD would exhibit lesser frontal plane hip and knee motion during a single-leg jump-cutting task. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Forty recreationally active females performed maximal isometric contractions and single-leg jump-cuts. From recorded torque data, hip extension and abduction RTD was calculated from torque onset to 200 ms after onset. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to quantify frontal plane hip and knee kinematics during the movement task. For each RTD measure, jump-cut biomechanics were compared between participants in the highest (high) and lowest (low) RTD tertiles. Results: No differences in frontal plane hip and knee kinematics were identified between high and low hip abduction RTD groups. However, those in the high hip extension RTD group exhibited lower hip adduction (high, 3.8° ± 3.0°; low, 6.5° ± 3.0°; P = .019) and knee valgus (high, –2.5° ± 2.3°; low, –4.4° ± 3.2°; P = .046) displacements during the jump-cut. Conclusion: In movements such as cutting that are performed with the hip in a relatively abducted and flexed position, the ability of the gluteus medius to control hip adduction may be compromised. However, the gluteus maximus, functioning as a hip abductor, may take on a pivotal role in controlling hip adduction and knee valgus motion during these types of tasks. Clinical Relevance: Training with a specific emphasis on increasing explosive strength of the hip extensors may be a means through which to improve frontal plane hip and knee

  2. Voluntary Movement Frequencies in Submaximal One- and Two-Legged Knee Extension Exercise and Pedaling.

    PubMed

    Stang, Julie; Wiig, Håvard; Hermansen, Marte; Hansen, Ernst Albin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of behavior and control of human voluntary rhythmic stereotyped leg movements is useful in work to improve performance, function, and rehabilitation of exercising, healthy, and injured humans. The present study aimed at adding to the existing understanding within this field. To pursue the aim, correlations between freely chosen movement frequencies in relatively simple, single-joint, one- and two-legged knee extension exercise were investigated. The same was done for more complex, multiple-joint, one- and two-legged pedaling. These particular activities were chosen because they could be considered related to some extent, as they shared a key aspect of knee extension, and because they at the same time were different. The activities were performed at submaximal intensities, by healthy individuals (n = 16, thereof eight women; 23.4 ± 2.7 years; 1.70 ± 0.11 m; 68.6 ± 11.2 kg). High and fair correlations (R-values of 0.99 and 0.75) occurred between frequencies generated with the dominant leg and the nondominant leg during knee extension exercise and pedaling, respectively. Fair to high correlations (R-values between 0.71 and 0.95) occurred between frequencies performed with each of the two legs in an activity, and the two-legged frequency performed in the same type of activity. In general, the correlations were higher for knee extension exercise than for pedaling. Correlations between knee extension and pedaling frequencies were of modest occurrence. The correlations between movement frequencies generated separately by each of the legs might be interpreted to support the following working hypothesis, which was based on existing literature. It is likely that involved central pattern generators (CPGs) of the two legs share a common frequency generator or that separate frequency generators of each leg are attuned via interneuronal connections. Further, activity type appeared to be relevant. Thus, the apparent common rhythmogenesis for the two legs appeared

  3. Voluntary Movement Frequencies in Submaximal One- and Two-Legged Knee Extension Exercise and Pedaling

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Julie; Wiig, Håvard; Hermansen, Marte; Hansen, Ernst Albin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of behavior and control of human voluntary rhythmic stereotyped leg movements is useful in work to improve performance, function, and rehabilitation of exercising, healthy, and injured humans. The present study aimed at adding to the existing understanding within this field. To pursue the aim, correlations between freely chosen movement frequencies in relatively simple, single-joint, one- and two-legged knee extension exercise were investigated. The same was done for more complex, multiple-joint, one- and two-legged pedaling. These particular activities were chosen because they could be considered related to some extent, as they shared a key aspect of knee extension, and because they at the same time were different. The activities were performed at submaximal intensities, by healthy individuals (n = 16, thereof eight women; 23.4 ± 2.7 years; 1.70 ± 0.11 m; 68.6 ± 11.2 kg). High and fair correlations (R-values of 0.99 and 0.75) occurred between frequencies generated with the dominant leg and the nondominant leg during knee extension exercise and pedaling, respectively. Fair to high correlations (R-values between 0.71 and 0.95) occurred between frequencies performed with each of the two legs in an activity, and the two-legged frequency performed in the same type of activity. In general, the correlations were higher for knee extension exercise than for pedaling. Correlations between knee extension and pedaling frequencies were of modest occurrence. The correlations between movement frequencies generated separately by each of the legs might be interpreted to support the following working hypothesis, which was based on existing literature. It is likely that involved central pattern generators (CPGs) of the two legs share a common frequency generator or that separate frequency generators of each leg are attuned via interneuronal connections. Further, activity type appeared to be relevant. Thus, the apparent common rhythmogenesis for the two legs appeared

  4. A purpose-built dynamometer to objectively measure static and dynamic knee torque.

    PubMed

    Ugbolue, U C; Kaliarntas, K T; Wearing, S C; Rowe, P J

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports the development of a purpose-built knee dynamometer (PBKD) to evaluate passive range of motion (ROM) and isometric muscle strength measurements of the knee. The PBKD uses a TorqSense rotary torque transducer and objectively measures isometric knee muscle strength in a valid and reliable manner and passive resistance to motion through range. The device and all associated instrumentation underwent dynamic and static calibration to ensure consistent and accurate measurements were obtained in terms of knee joint angular position, passive torque measures, and isometric torque measures. Eleven healthy male participants performed a knee flexion and extension task designed to evaluate knee function. The validation of the PBKD entailed measuring the consistency of measurement and accuracy of measurement. Accuracy of the PBKD was determined by comparing peak isometric muscle strength measurements against a KIN-COM machine. No significant differences were observed both passively and isometrically between cycles and between trials. This device can have widespread applications within the rehabilitation and clinical environment and could be used as a functional outcome measuring tool to distinguish pathological from non-pathological knees. The presented preliminary results indicate that reliable and accurate measurements of knee ROM and muscle strength can be obtained.

  5. Absolute reliability of isokinetic knee flexion and extension measurements adopting a prone position.

    PubMed

    Ayala, F; De Ste Croix, M; Sainz de Baranda, P; Santonja, F

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the absolute and relative reliability of isokinetic peak torque (PT), angle of peak torque (APT), average power (PW) and total work (TW) for knee flexion and extension during concentric and eccentric actions measured in a prone position at 60, 180 and 240° s(-1). A total of 50 recreational athletes completed the study. PT, APT, PW and TW for concentric and eccentric knee extension and flexion were recorded at three different angular velocities (60, 180 and 240° s(-1)) on three different occasions with a 72- to 96-h rest interval between consecutive testing sessions. Absolute reliability was examined through typical percentage error (CV(TE)), percentage change in the mean (ChM) and relative reliability with intraclass correlations (ICC(3,1)). For both the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups, all strength data (except APT during knee flexion movements) demonstrated moderate absolute reliability (ChM < 3%; ICCs > 0·70; and CV(TE) < 20%) independent of the knee movement (flexion and extension), type of muscle action (concentric and eccentric) and angular velocity (60, 180 and 240° s(-1)). Therefore, the current study suggests that the CV(TE) values reported for PT (8-20%), APT (8-18%) (only during knee extension movements), PW (14-20%) and TW (12-28%) may be acceptable to detect the large changes usually observed after rehabilitation programmes, but not acceptable to examine the effect of preventative training programmes in healthy individuals.

  6. Gastrocnemius and soleus are selectively activated when adding knee extensor activity to plantar flexion.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahito; Chino, Kentaro; Fukashiro, Senshi

    2014-08-01

    The gastrocnemius is a biarticular muscle that acts not only as a plantar flexor, but also as a knee flexor, meaning that it is an antagonist during knee extension. In contrast, the soleus is a monoarticular plantar flexor. Based on this anatomical difference, these muscles' activities should be selectively activated during simultaneous plantar flexion and knee extension, which occur during many activities of daily living. This study examined the selective activation of gastrocnemius and soleus activities when voluntary isometric activation of knee extensors was added to voluntary isometric plantar flexion. Ten male volunteers performed isometric plantar flexion at 10%, 20%, and 30% of maximum effort. During each plantar flexion task, isometric knee extension was added at 0%, 50%, and 100% of maximum effort. When knee extension was added, the average rectified value of the electromyographic activity of the medial gastrocnemius was significantly depressed (P=.002), whereas that of the soleus was significantly increased (P<.001) regardless of the plantar flexion level. These results suggest that plantar flexion with concurrent knee extensor activity leads to selective activation of the soleus and depression of the synergistic activity of the gastrocnemius.

  7. Effect of vibration training on neuromuscular output with ballistic knee extensions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jin; McNamara, Brian; Moran, Kieran

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether vibration applied directly to a muscle-tendon could enhance neuromuscular output during and 1.5 and 10 min after a bout of ballistic resistance training. Fourteen participants were exposed to two training conditions in random order: exercise with vibration and exercise with sham vibration. The exercise comprised three sets of ballistic knee extensions with a load of 60-70% of one-repetition maximum. Vibration (1.2 mm amplitude, 65 Hz frequency) was applied with a portable vibrator strapped over the distal tendon of the quadriceps. Knee joint angular velocity, moment, and power, and rectus femoris and vastus lateralis electromyography root-mean-squared were measured during knee extension. During and after training, the vibration did not induce significant changes in peak angular velocity, time to peak angular velocity, peak moment, time to peak moment, peak power, time to peak power, or average EMG of the rectus femoris and vastus lateralis. We conclude that direct vibration, at the selected amplitude and frequency, does not enhance these neuromuscular variables in ballistic knee extensions during or immediately after training.

  8. Muscle Fiber Type Composition and Knee Extension Isometric Strength Fatigue Patterns in Power- and Endurance-Trained Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroll, Walter; And Others

    1980-01-01

    There is a degree of uniqueness in fatigue patterns, particularly between different levels of absolute maximum strength. Caution should be used when analyzing fatigue curves among subjects with unspecified strength levels. (CJ)

  9. Sagittal gait patterns in cerebral palsy: the plantarflexor-knee extension couple index.

    PubMed

    Sangeux, Morgan; Rodda, Jill; Graham, H Kerr

    2015-02-01

    The identification of gait patterns in cerebral palsy offers a common language for clinicians and contributes to management algorithms. We describe a quantitative classification of sagittal gait patterns based on the plantarflexor-knee extension couple index. This consists of a scatter plot based on ankle and knee scores, and allows objective identification of the sagittal gait pattern. Sagittal kinematic data from 200 limbs of 100 patients with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy were utilized to validate the algorithm against the assessment of a clinician with expertise in gait pattern identification. A dataset of 776 cerebral palsy patients, 1552 limbs, was used to compare the sagittal gait patterns against k-means statistical clustering. The classification was further explored with respect to the knee kinetics during the middle of stance and physical examination measurements of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex. Two supplementary materials (Appendices 2 and 3) provide in-depth discussion about statistical properties of the plantarflexor-knee extension couple index as well as its relationship with statistical clustering. The plantarflexor-knee extension index achieved 98% accuracy and may be suitable for the computational classification of large patient cohorts and multicentre studies. The sagittal gait patterns were strongly related to k-means statistical clustering and physical examination of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex. Patients in crouch gait had normal soleus and gastrocnemius lengths but spasticity in the gastrocnemius. Patients in jump gait exhibited a short gastrocnemius and soleus and gastrocnemius spasticity. Patients in true equinus presented with a moderately contracted soleus and gastrocnemius and gastrocnemius spasticity. Patients in apparent equinus did not show abnormal physical examination measurements for the gastrocnemius-soleus complex.

  10. Defining the knee joint flexion-extension axis for purposes of quantitative gait analysis: an evaluation of methods.

    PubMed

    Schache, Anthony G; Baker, Richard; Lamoreux, Larry W

    2006-08-01

    Minimising measurement variability associated with hip axial rotation and avoiding knee joint angle cross-talk are two fundamental objectives of any method used to define the knee joint flexion-extension axis for purposes of quantitative gait analysis. The aim of this experiment was to compare three different methods of defining this axis: the knee alignment device (KAD) method, a method based on the transepicondylar axis (TEA) and an alternative numerical method (Dynamic). The former two methods are common approaches that have been applied clinically in many quantitative gait analysis laboratories; the latter is an optimisation procedure. A cohort of 20 subjects performed three different functional tasks (normal gait; squat; non-weight bearing knee flexion) on repeated occasions. Three-dimensional hip and knee angles were computed using the three alternative methods of defining the knee joint flexion-extension axis. The repeatability of hip axial rotation measurements during normal gait was found to be significantly better for the Dynamic method (p<0.01). Furthermore, both the variance in the knee varus-valgus kinematic profile and the degree of knee joint angle cross-talk were smallest for the Dynamic method across all functional tasks. The Dynamic method therefore provided superior results in comparison to the KAD and TEA-based methods and thus represents an attractive solution for orientating the knee joint flexion-extension axis for purposes of quantitative gait analysis.

  11. Influence of Hip Joint Position on Muscle Activity during Prone Hip Extension with Knee Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Suehiro, Tadanobu; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Okamoto, Mitsuhisa; Ishida, Hiroshi; Kobara, Kenichi; Fujita, Daisuke; Osaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hisashi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the selective activation of the gluteus maximus during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise, with the hip joint in different positions. [Subjects] The subjects were 21 healthy, male volunteers. [Methods] Activities of the right gluteus maximus, right hamstrings, bilateral lumbar erector spinae, and bilateral lumbar multifidus were measured using surface electromyography during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise. Measurements were made with the hip joint in each of 3 positions: (1) a neutral hip joint position, (2) an abduction hip joint position, and (3) an abduction with external rotation hip joint position. [Results] Gluteus maximus activity was significantly higher when the hip was in the abduction with external rotation hip joint position than when it was in the neutral hip joint and abduction hip joint positions. Gluteus maximus activity was also significantly higher in the abduction hip joint position than in the neutral hip joint position. Hamstring activity was significantly lower when the hip was in the abduction with external rotation hip joint position than when it was in the neutral hip joint and abduction hip joint positions. [Conclusion] Abduction and external rotation of the hip during prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise selectively activates the gluteus maximus. PMID:25540492

  12. Within- and between-session reliability of the maximal voluntary knee extension torque and activation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihong; Hopkins, J Ty

    2013-01-01

    A ratio between the torque generated by maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) and exogenous electrical stimulus, central activation ratio (CAR), has been widely used to assess quadriceps function. To date, no data exist regarding between-session reliability of this measurement. Thirteen neurologically sound volunteers underwent three testing sessions (three trials per session) with 48 hours between-session. Subjects performed MVICs of the quadriceps with the knee locked at 90° flexion and the hip at 85°. Once the MVIC reached a plateau, an electrical stimulation from superimposed burst technique (SIB: 125 V with peak output current 450 mA) was manually delivered and transmitted directly to the quadriceps via stimulating electrodes. CAR was calculated by using the following equation: CAR = MVIC torque/MVIC + SIB torque. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated within- (ICC((2,1))) and between-session (ICC((2,k))) for MVIC torques and CAR values. Our data show that quadriceps MVIC and CAR are very reliable both within- (ICC((2,1)) = 0.99 for MVIC; 0.94 for CAR) and between-measurement sessions (ICC((2,k)) = 0.92 for MVIC; 0.86 for CAR) in healthy young adults. For clinical research, more data of the patients with pathological conditions are required to ensure reproducibility of calculation of CAR.

  13. Neuromuscular Activation of the Vastus Intermedius Muscle during Isometric Hip Flexion.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira; Akima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Although activity of the rectus femoris (RF) differs from that of the other synergists in quadriceps femoris muscle group during physical activities in humans, it has been suggested that the activation pattern of the vastus intermedius (VI) is similar to that of the RF. The purpose of present study was to examine activation of the VI during isometric hip flexion. Ten healthy men performed isometric hip flexion contractions at 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction at hip joint angles of 90°, 110° and 130°. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record activity of the four quadriceps femoris muscles and EMG signals were root mean square processed and normalized to EMG amplitude during an isometric knee extension with maximal voluntary contraction. The normalized EMG was significantly higher for the VI than for the vastus medialis during hip flexion at 100% of maximal voluntary contraction at hip joint angles of 110° and 130° (P < 0.05). The onset of VI activation was 230-240 ms later than the onset of RF activation during hip flexion at each hip joint angle, which was significantly later than during knee extension at 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the VI is activated later than the RF during hip flexion. Activity of the VI during hip flexion might contribute to stabilize the knee joint as an antagonist and might help to smooth knee joint motion, such as in the transition from hip flexion to knee extension during walking, running and pedaling.

  14. Identifying the Functional Flexion-extension Axis of the Knee: An In-Vivo Kinematics Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Chen, Kaining; Guo, Lin; Cheng, Liangjun; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to calculate the flexion-extension axis (FEA) of the knee through in-vivo knee kinematics data, and then compare it with two major anatomical axes of the femoral condyles: the transepicondylar axis (TEA) defined by connecting the medial sulcus and lateral prominence, and the cylinder axis (CA) defined by connecting the centers of posterior condyles. Methods The knee kinematics data of 20 healthy subjects were acquired under weight-bearing condition using bi-planar x-ray imaging and 3D-2D registration techniques. By tracking the vertical coordinate change of all points on the surface of femur during knee flexion, the FEA was determined as the line connecting the points with the least vertical shift in the medial and lateral condyles respectively. Angular deviation and distance among the TEA, CA and FEA were measured. Results The TEA-FEA angular deviation was significantly larger than that of the CA-FEA in 3D and transverse plane (3.45° vs. 1.98°, p < 0.001; 2.72° vs. 1.19°, p = 0.002), but not in the coronal plane (1.61° vs. 0.83°, p = 0.076). The TEA-FEA distance was significantly greater than that of the CA-FEA in the medial side (6.7 mm vs. 1.9 mm, p < 0.001), but not in the lateral side (3.2 mm vs. 2.0 mm, p = 0.16). Conclusion The CA is closer to the FEA compared with the TEA; it can better serve as an anatomical surrogate for the functional knee axis. PMID:26039711

  15. Development of estimation system of knee extension strength using image features in ultrasound images of rectus femoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsuneo; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Terabayashi, Nobuo; Hara, Takeshi; Muramatsu, Chisako; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    The word "Locomotive syndrome" has been proposed to describe the state of requiring care by musculoskeletal disorders and its high-risk condition. Reduction of the knee extension strength is cited as one of the risk factors, and the accurate measurement of the strength is needed for the evaluation. The measurement of knee extension strength using a dynamometer is one of the most direct and quantitative methods. This study aims to develop a system for measuring the knee extension strength using the ultrasound images of the rectus femoris muscles obtained with non-invasive ultrasonic diagnostic equipment. First, we extract the muscle area from the ultrasound images and determine the image features, such as the thickness of the muscle. We combine these features and physical features, such as the patient's height, and build a regression model of the knee extension strength from training data. We have developed a system for estimating the knee extension strength by applying the regression model to the features obtained from test data. Using the test data of 168 cases, correlation coefficient value between the measured values and estimated values was 0.82. This result suggests that this system can estimate knee extension strength with high accuracy.

  16. Discrepancy between femoral and capillary blood flow kinetics during knee extension exercise.

    PubMed

    Schlup, S J; Ade, C J; Broxterman, R M; Barstow, T J

    2015-12-01

    Capillary blood flow (QCAP) kinetics have previously been shown to be significantly slower than femoral artery (QFA) kinetics following the onset of dynamic knee extension exercise. If the increase in QCAP does not follow a similar time course to QFA, then a substantial proportion of the available blood flow is not distributed to the working muscle. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is that blood flow also increases to the nonworking lower leg muscles. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine if a reduction in lower limb blood flow, via arterial occlusion below the knee, alters the kinetics of QFA and QCAP during knee extension exercise, and thus provide insight into the potential mechanisms controlling the rapid increase in QFA. Subjects performed a ramp max test to determine the work rate at which gas exchange threshold (GET) occurred. At least four constant work rate trials with and without below-knee occlusion were conducted at work rates eliciting ∼ 80% GET. Pulmonary gas exchange, near-infrared spectroscopy and QFA measurements were taken continuously during each exercise bout. Muscle oxygen uptake (VO2m) and deoxy[hemoglobin+myoglobin] were used to estimate QCAP. There was no significant difference between the uncuffed and cuffed conditions in any response (P>0.05). The mean response times (MRT) of QFA were 18.7 ± 14.2s (uncuffed) and 24.6 ± 14.9s (cuffed). QCAP MRTs were 51.8 ± 23.4s (uncuffed) and 56.7 ± 23.2s (cuffed), which were not significantly different from the time constants (τ) of VO2m (39.7 ± 23.2s (uncuffed) and 46.3 ± 24.1s (cuffed). However, the MRT of QFA was significantly faster (P<0.05) than the MRT of QCAP and τVO2m. τVO2m and MRT QCAP were significantly correlated and estimated QCAP kinetics tracked VO2m following exercise onset. Cuffing below the knee did not significantly change the kinetics of QFA, QCAP or VO2m, although an effect size of 1.02 suggested that a significant effect on QFA may have been hidden

  17. Does Success Of Arthroscopic Laser Surgery In The Knee Joint Warrant Its Extension To "Non-Knee" Joints?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Chadwick F.; Johansen, W. Edward; Vangness, C. Thomas; Yamaguchi, Ken; McEleney, Emmett T.; Bales, Peter

    1987-03-01

    One of the authors has performed 162 arthroscopic laser surgeries in the knee joint without any major complication. Other investigators have recently proposed diagnostic arthroscopy and arthroscopic surgery for "non-knee" joints. The authors have proposed that arthroscopic laser surgery he extended to "non-knee" joints. The authors have performed arthroscopic laser surgery on "non-knee" joints of twelve cadavers. One of the authors have performed one successful arthroscopic surgery on a shoulder joint with only a minor, transient complication of subcutaneous emphysema. Is laser arthroscopic surgery safe and effective in "non-knee" joints? The evolving answer appears to be a qualified "Yes," which needs to be verified by a multicenter trial.

  18. Verbal and visual stimulation effects on rectus femoris and biceps femoris muscles during isometric and concentric

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Coactivation may be both desirable (injury prevention) or undesirable (strength measurement). In this context, different styles of muscle strength stimulus have being investigated. In this study we evaluated the effects of verbal and visual stimulation on rectus femoris and biceps femoris muscles contraction during isometric and concentric. Methods We investigated 13 men (age =23.1 ± 3.8 years old; body mass =75.6 ± 9.1 kg; height =1.8 ± 0.07 m). We used the isokinetic dynamometer BIODEX device and an electromyographic (EMG) system. We evaluated the maximum isometric and isokinetic knee extension and flexion at 60°/s. The following conditions were evaluated: without visual nor verbal command (control); verbal command; visual command and; verbal and visual command. In relation to the concentric contraction, the volunteers performed five reciprocal and continuous contractions at 60°/s. With respect to isometric contractions it was made three contractions of five seconds for flexion and extension in a period of one minute. Results We found that the peak torque during isometric flexion was higher in the subjects in the VVC condition (p > 0.05). In relation to muscle coactivation, the subjects presented higher values at the control condition (p > 0.05). Conclusion We suggest that this type of stimulus is effective for the lower limbs. PMID:24099489

  19. An estimation of the influence of force decrease on the mean power spectral frequency shift of the EMG during repetitive maximum dynamic knee extensions.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, J S; Ostlund, N; Larsson, B; Gerdle, B

    2003-10-01

    Frequency analysis of myoelectric (ME) signals, using the mean power spectral frequency (MNF), has been widely used to characterize peripheral muscle fatigue during isometric contractions assuming constant force. However, during repetitive isokinetic contractions performed with maximum effort, output (force or torque) will decrease markedly during the initial 40-60 contractions, followed by a phase with little or no change. MNF shows a similar pattern. In situations where there exist a significant relationship between MNF and output, part of the decrease in MNF may per se be related to the decrease in force during dynamic contractions. This study estimated force effects on the MNF shifts during repetitive dynamic knee extensions. Twenty healthy volunteers participated in the study and both surface ME signals (from the right vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, and rectus femoris muscles) and the biomechanical signals (force, position, and velocity) of an isokinetic dynamometer were measured. Two tests were performed: (i) 100 repetitive maximum isokinetic contractions of the right knee extensors, and (ii) five gradually increasing static knee extensions before and after (i). The corresponding ME signal time-frequency representations were calculated using the continuous wavelet transform. Compensation of the MNF variables of the repetitive contractions was performed with respect to the individual MNF-force relation based on an average of five gradually increasing contractions. Whether or not compensation was necessary was based on the shape of the MNF-force relationship. A significant compensation of the MNF was found for the repetitive isokinetic contractions. In conclusion, when investigating maximum dynamic contractions, decreases in MNF can be due to mechanisms similar to those found during sustained static contractions (force-independent component of fatigue) and in some subjects due to a direct effect of the change in force (force-dependent component of fatigue

  20. Measurement of perioperative flexion-extension mechanics of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Giori, N J; Giori, K L; Woolson, S T; Goodman, S B; Lannin, J V; Schurman, D J

    2001-10-01

    Perioperative knee mechanics currently are evaluated Perioperative knee mechanics currently are evaluated by measuring range of motion. This is an incomplete measurement, however, because the torque applied to achieve the motion is not measured. We hypothesized that a custom goniometer and force transducer could measure the torque required to passively flex a knee through its full range of motion. This measurement was done in the operating room immediately before and after surgery in 20 knees having total knee arthroplasty and 9 having surgery on another limb. Surgery changed the mechanics of 8 knees, whereas unoperated knees remained unchanged. This measurement technique is safe, easy, and repeatable. It improves on the current standard of perioperative knee measurement and can be applied to investigate the effects of surgery and rehabilitation on ultimate knee motion.

  1. Composition Measurements near the Second Knee with the Telescope Array Low-Energy Extension (TALE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belz, J.

    Cosmic rays with energies between 1016.5 and 1018.5 eV exhibit a rich range of features. The energy spectrum changes index at at least two points, known as the "second knee" and the "ankle". There appears to be a composition change in this energy regime as well, which may indicate a shift in predominance from galactic to extragalactic sources. The Telescope Array Low-Energy Extension - planned for construction in Millard County, Utah, USA - stands well poised to make decisive simultaneous measurements of cosmic ray energy spectra and composition in this transition region. Here, we present the results of simulation studies relevant to the design of the TALE detectors, and estimate the sensitivity of TALE to composition changes in the 1017 eV decade.

  2. A Novel Device to Apply Controlled Flexion and Extension to the Rat Knee Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Mark Stasiak M.; Wiznia, Dan; Alzoobae, Saif; Ciccotti, Michael; Imhauser, Carl; Voigt, Clifford; Torzilli, Peter; Deng, Xenghua; Rodeo, Scott

    2013-01-01

    We designed and validated a novel device for applying flexion-extension cycles to a rat knee in an in-vivo model of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R). Our device is intended to simulate rehabilitation motion and exercise post ACL-R to optimize physical rehabilitation treatments for the improved healing of tendon graft ligament reconstructions. The device was validated for repeatability of the knee kinematic motion by measuring the force versus angular rotation response from repeated trials using cadaver rats. The average maximum force required for rotating an ACL reconstructed rat knee through 100 degrees of flexion-extension was 0.4 N with 95 % variability for all trials within ±0.1 N PMID:22667683

  3. Exercise in children with joint hypermobility syndrome and knee pain: a randomised controlled trial comparing exercise into hypermobile versus neutral knee extension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee pain in children with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) is traditionally managed with exercise, however the supporting evidence for this is scarce. No trial has previously examined whether exercising to neutral or into the hypermobile range affects outcomes. This study aimed to (i) determine if a physiotherapist-prescribed exercise programme focused on knee joint strength and control is effective in reducing knee pain in children with JHS compared to no treatment, and (ii) whether the range in which these exercises are performed affects outcomes. Methods A prospective, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial conducted in a tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia compared an 8 week exercise programme performed into either the full hypermobile range or only to neutral knee extension, following a minimum 2 week baseline period without treatment. Randomisation was computer-generated, with allocation concealed by sequentially numbered opaque sealed envelopes. Knee pain was the primary outcome. Quality of life, thigh muscle strength, and function were also measured at (i) initial assessment, (ii) following the baseline period and (iii) post treatment. Assessors were blinded to the participants’ treatment allocation and participants blinded to the difference in the treatments. Results Children with JHS and knee pain (n=26) aged 7-16 years were randomly assigned to the hypermobile (n=12) or neutral (n=14) treatment group. Significant improvements in child-reported maximal knee pain were found following treatment, regardless of group allocation with a mean 14.5 mm reduction on the visual analogue scale (95% CI 5.2 – 23.8 mm, p=0.003). Significant differences between treatment groups were noted for parent-reported overall psychosocial health (p=0.009), specifically self-esteem (p=0.034), mental health (p=0.001) and behaviour (p=0.019), in favour of exercising into the hypermobile range (n=11) compared to neutral only (n=14). Conversely, parent

  4. Flexion-extension gap in cruciate-retaining versus posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Joshua; Chong, Alexander; McQueen, David; O'Guinn, Justin; Wooley, Paul

    2014-05-01

    We re-examined experimental model results using half-body specimens with intact extensor mechanisms and navigation to evaluate cruciate-retaining (CR) and posterior stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) component gaps through an entire range of motion. Six sequential testing regimens were conducted with the knee intact, with a CR TKA in place, and with a PS TKA in place, with and without 22 N traction in place at each stage. Each of 10 knees was taken through six full ranges of motion from 0° to 120° at every stage using a navigated knee system to record component gapping. No significant difference was found between loaded and unloaded component gaps, and no significant differences were found in component gapping between CR and PS TKAs throughout a full range of motion. Flexion-extension gap measurements were significantly different from previously published data (at 90° flexion). No difference was found in kinematics when comparing CR and PS TKA component designs. Our results suggest that intact extensor mechanisms may be required to perform proper kinematic studies of TKA. Our findings provide evidence that the extensor mechanism may play a major role in the flexion-extension gaps in cadaveric knees.

  5. Balance and knee extensibility evaluation of hemiplegic gait using an inertial body sensor network

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most hemiplegic patients have difficulties in their balance and posture control while walking because of the asymmetrical posture and the abnormal body balance. The assessment of rehabilitation of hemiplegic gait is usually made by doctors using clinical scale, but it is difficult and could not be used frequently. It is therefore needed to quantitatively analyze the characteristics of hemiplegic gait. Thus the assessment would be simple, and real-time evaluation of rehabilitation could be carried out. Methods Twenty subjects (ten hemiplegic patients, ten normal subjects) were recruited. The subjects walked straight for five meters at their self-selected comfortable speed towards a target line on the floor. Xsens MTx motion trackers were used for acquiring gestures of body segments to estimate knee joint angles and identify gait cycles. A practical method for data acquisition that does not need to obtain accurate distances between a knee joint and its corresponding sensors is presented. Results The results showed that there were significant differences between the two groups in the three nominated angle amplitudes. The mean values of balance level of each parameter in hemiplegic gait and normal gait were: 0.21 versus 0.01, 0.18 versus 0.03, and 0.92 versus 0.03, respectively. The mean values of added angles of each parameter in hemiplegic gait and normal gait were: 74.64 versus 91.31, -76.48 versus −132.4, and 6.77 versus 35.74. Conclusions It was concluded that the wearable bio-motion acquisition platform provided a practical approach that was effective in discriminating gait symptoms between hemiplegic and asymptomatic subjects. The extensibility of hemiplegic patients’ lower limbs was significantly lower than that of normal subjects, and the hemiplegic gait had worse balance level compared with normal gait. The effect of rehabilitation training of hemiplegic gait could be quantitatively analyzed. PMID:23988116

  6. Patterns in the knee flexion-extension moment profile during stair ascent and descent in patients with total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Jodie A; Feller, Julian A; Menz, Hylton B; Webster, Kate E

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of abnormal knee biomechanical patterns in 40 patients with a modern TKA prosthesis, compared to 40 matched control participants when ascending and descending stairs. Fewer patients were able to ascend (65%) or descend stairs (53%) unassisted than controls (83%). Of the participants who could ascend and descend, cluster analysis classified most patients (up to 77%) as demonstrating a similar knee moment pattern as all controls. A small subgroup of patients who completed the tasks did so with distinctly abnormal biomechanics compared to other patients and controls. These findings suggest that recovery of normal stair climbing is possible. However, rehabilitation might be more effective if it were tailored to account for these differences between patients.

  7. Acute effects of blood flow restriction on muscle activity and endurance during fatiguing dynamic knee extensions at low load.

    PubMed

    Wernbom, Mathias; Järrebring, Rickard; Andreasson, Mikael A; Augustsson, Jesper

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activity and endurance during fatiguing low-intensity dynamic knee extension exercise with and without blood flow restriction. Eleven healthy subjects with strength training experience performed 3 sets of unilateral knee extensions with no relaxation between repetitions to concentric torque failure at 30% of the 1 repetition maximum. One leg was randomized to exercise with cuff occlusion and the other leg to exercise without occlusion. The muscle activity in the quadriceps was recorded with electromyography (EMG). Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and acute pain were collected immediately, and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) was rated before and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. The results demonstrated high EMG levels in both experimental conditions, but there were no significant differences regarding maximal muscle activity, except for a higher EMG in the eccentric phase in set 3 for the nonoccluded condition (p = 0.005). Significantly more repetitions were performed with the nonoccluded leg in every set (p < 0.05). The RPE and acute pain ratings were similar, but DOMS was higher in the nonoccluded leg (p < 0.05). We conclude that blood flow restriction during low-intensity dynamic knee extension decreases the endurance but does not increase the maximum muscle activity compared with training without restriction when both regimes are performed to failure. The high levels of muscle activity suggest that performing low-load dynamic knee extensions in a no-relaxation manner may be a useful method in knee rehabilitation settings when large forces are contraindicated. However, similarly to fatiguing blood flow restricted exercise, this method is associated with ischemic muscle pain, and thus its applications may be limited to highly motivated individuals.

  8. Isometric exercise (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Isometric exercise works muscles and strengthens bone. Increased muscle mass elevates metabolism, which in turn burns fat. Strength training is also called anaerobic exercise, as opposed to aerobic, because ...

  9. Test-retest reliability of isokinetic knee extension and flexion torque measurements in persons with spastic hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Tripp, E J; Harris, S R

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the test-retest reliability of isokinetic torque measurements in the involved and uninvolved knee musculature of 20 subjects with spastic hemiparesis. An isokinetic dynamometer was used to measure maximal voluntary knee extension and flexion at 60 degrees and 120 degrees/s. Peak torque (PT) and average peak torque (APT) data were collected from five repetitions on two separate occasions. Average peak torque was defined as the mean of the PT values obtained during each of the five repetitions. Spasticity was measured in the involved knee musculature prior to isokinetic testing using the Ashworth Scale. Pearson Product-Moment Correlation Coefficients and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were high (greater than or equal to .90) for both knees for PT and APT at both angular velocities. No clinically meaningful differences were found between the Pearson correlation coefficients and the ICCs of the involved versus the uninvolved knee for any testing conditions. We concluded that isokinetic evaluation of torque, as measured by PT and APT in subjects with spastic hemiparesis, can yield reliable results in both extremities.

  10. Cruciate coupling and screw-home mechanism in passive knee joint during extension--flexion.

    PubMed

    Moglo, K E; Shirazi-Adl, A

    2005-05-01

    The screw-home mechanism and coupling between forces in cruciate ligaments during passive knee joint flexion were investigated for various boundary conditions, flexion axis alignments and posterior cruciate ligaments (PCL)/anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) conditions. A developed non-linear 3D finite element model was used to perform detailed elasto-static response analyses of the human tibiofemoral joint as a function of flexion angle varying from 10 degrees hyper-extension to 90 degrees flexion. The tibia rotated internally as the femur flexed and externally as the femur extended. The re-alignment of the flexion axis by +/-5 degrees rotation about the axial (distal-proximal) axis, transection of the ACL and changes in cruciate ligament initial strains substantially influenced the 'screw-home' motion. On the other hand, restraint on this coupled rotation diminished ACL forces in flexion. A remarkable coupling was predicted between ACL and PCL forces in flexion; forces in both cruciate ligaments increased as the initial strain or pretension in one of them increased whereas they both diminished as one of them was cut or became slack. This has important consequences in joint functional biomechanics following a ligament injury or replacement surgery and, hence, in the proper management of joint disorders. PMID:15797589

  11. Knee extension strength and post-operative functional prediction in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, A.; Aoki, K.; Kito, M.; Okamoto, M.; Suzuki, S.; Momose, T.; Kato, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to predict the knee extension strength and post-operative function in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh. Methods A total of 18 patients (14 men, four women) underwent total or partial quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh between 2002 and 2014. The number of resected quadriceps was surveyed, knee extension strength was measured with the Biodex isokinetic dynamometer system (affected side/unaffected side) and relationships between these were examined. The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score, Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS), European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) score and the Short Form 8 were used to evaluate post-operative function and examine correlations with extension strength. The cutoff value for extension strength to expect good post-operative function was also calculated using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and Fisher’s exact test. Results Extension strength decreased when the number of resected quadriceps increased (p < 0.001), and was associated with lower MSTS score, TESS and EQ-5D (p = 0.004, p = 0.005, p = 0.006, respectively). Based on the functional evaluation scales, the cutoff value of extension strength was 56.2%, the equivalent to muscle strength with resection of up to two muscles. Conclusion Good post-operative results can be expected if at least two quadriceps muscles are preserved. Cite this article: A. Tanaka, Y. Yoshimura, K. Aoki, M. Kito, M. Okamoto, S. Suzuki, T. Momose, H. Kato. Knee extension strength and post-operative functional prediction in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:232–238. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.56.2000631. PMID:27317788

  12. Huge Subchondral Cyst Communicating with Medulary Canal of Femur in OA Knee-Treated by Extension Stem and Bone Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Rajani, Amyn M; Kumar, Ritesh; Shyam, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We report an osteoarthritic patient with huge sub-chondral cyst-like lesions in the Anterior part of distal femur. Deep and large bone defects and severe lateral laxity due to Advanced osteoarthritis was successfully treated with semi-constrained type total knee arthroplasty with long stem. Case Report: A 70yrs old Female was admitted in our institution diagnosed with severe bilateral Osteoarthritis. The x-rays showed bone on bone Tricompartment OA Knee with Varus Malalignment. She was posted for Single Stage Bilateral Total Knee Replacement and as planned the Left Knee Was Operated first. After exposure, Proximal Tibial, Distal Femoral Cuts and measurement of extension gaps the synovium from the anterior Femur was removed and sizing was done. The AP cut was then proceeded with. We spotted a small Osteochondral Cyst in the Anterior Femur which was curretted to remove the cystic material, which is when we realised that the cyst was large and communicating with the medulary canal. The remaining Femoral preparations was done keeping in mind the risk of iatrogenic fracture and extension Stem was used in the femur. The defect was then packed cancellous bone graft. Conclusion: If suspected a Preoperative MRI should be done to exclude any sub-chondral cysts osteochondral defects and any surprise during surgery. Usually one should keep extension stems ready for difficult cases. Operating surgeon should know his implants very well, as in many standard implants extension stems can only be used when distal femur cuts are taken accordingly as 5° Valgus. Mini incision should be avoided because it may fail to reveal such surprises and may land into periprosthetic fractures. PMID:27298967

  13. Views of Isometric Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nivens, Ryan Andrew; Peters, Tara Carver; Nivens, Jesse

    2012-01-01

    Current mathematical standards expect students in the upper elementary grades to learn and use three-dimensional models and represent them in two dimensions using isometric and orthogonal representations. In this article, the authors address the challenges of teaching students and teachers alike, including those who have little or no experience…

  14. Muscle activation and knee biomechanics during squatting and lunging after lower extremity fatigue in healthy young women.

    PubMed

    Longpré, Heather S; Acker, Stacey M; Maly, Monica R

    2015-02-01

    Muscle activations and knee joint loads were compared during squatting and lunging before and after lower extremity neuromuscular fatigue. Electromyographic activations of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis and biceps femoris, and the external knee adduction and flexion moments were collected on 25 healthy women (mean age 23.5 years, BMI of 23.7 kg/m(2)) during squatting and lunging. Participants were fatigued through sets of 50 isotonic knee extensions and flexions, with resistance set at 50% of the peak torque achieved during a maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Fatigue was defined as a decrease in peak isometric knee extension or flexion torque ≥25% from baseline. Co-activation indices were calculated between rectus femoris and biceps femoris; and between vastus lateralis and biceps femoris. Fatigue decreased peak isometric extension and flexion torques (p<0.05), mean vastus lateralis activation during squatting and lunging (p<0.05), and knee adduction and flexion moments during lunging (p<0.05). Quadriceps activations were greater during lunging than squatting (p<0.05). Thus, fatigue altered the recruitment strategy of the quadriceps during squatting and lunging. Lunging challenges quadriceps activation more than squatting in healthy, young women.

  15. Chondropathia patellae and knee muscle control. An electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Hess, T; Gleitz, M; Egert, S; Hopf, T

    1996-01-01

    The activity of knee-related muscles was registered via exercising on a bicycle ergometer by 17 patients with clinically diagnosed chondropathia patellae. M. quadriceps activity was shorter and the hamstring activity longer in the chondropathy group compared with a matched healthy control group. The changes in m. quadriceps occurred to an almost equal extent in lateral and medial sections. In five patients with unilateral complaints, the electromyographic changes were nevertheless noted on both sides. The study shows that chondropathia patellae involves a change in muscle control affecting not only the knee extensors but also the hamstrings. Through the changed innervation pattern the coactivation phase, i.e. the phase of simultaneous activation of knee flexors and extensors at the end of the extension phase, takes place at a higher angle of flexion. Physiotherapy should involve all knee-related muscles and should include not only isometric but also dynamic exercises.

  16. Early active extension after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction does not result in increased laxity of the knee.

    PubMed

    Isberg, Jonas; Faxén, Eva; Brandsson, Sveinbjörn; Eriksson, Bengt I; Kärrholm, Johan; Karlsson, Jon

    2006-11-01

    If permission of full active and passive extension immediately after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction will increase the post-operative laxity of the knee has been a subject of discussion. We investigated whether a post-operative rehabilitation protocol including active and passive extension without any restrictions in extension immediately after an ACL reconstruction would increase the post-operative anterior-posterior knee laxity (A-P laxity). Our hypothesis was that full active and passive extension immediately after an ACL reconstruction would have no effect on the A-P laxity and clinical results up to 2 years after the operation. Twenty-two consecutive patients (14 men, 8 women, median age 21 years, range 17-41) were included. All the patients had a unilateral ACL rupture and no other ligament injuries or any other history of previous knee injuries. The surgical procedure was identical in all patients and one experienced surgeon operated on all the patients, using the bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft. The post-operative rehabilitation programme was identical in both groups, except for extension training during the first 4 weeks post-operatively. The patients were randomly allocated to post-operative rehabilitation programmes either allowing (Group A, n=11) or not allowing [Group B (30 to -10 degrees ), n=11] full active and passive extension immediately after the operation. They were evaluated pre-operatively and at 6 months and 2 years after the reconstruction. To evaluate the A-P knee laxity, radiostereometric analysis (RSA) and KT-1000 arthrometer (KT-1000) measurements were used, range of motion, Lysholm score, Tegner activity level, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) evaluation system and one-leg-hop test quotient were used. Pre-operatively, the RSA measurements revealed side-to-side differences in Group A of 8.6 mm (2.3-15.4), median (range) and in Group B of 7.2 mm (2.2-17.4) (n.s.). The corresponding KT-1000

  17. Muscle activation and blood flow do not explain the muscle length-dependent variation in quadriceps isometric endurance.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, R D; de Ruiter, C J; de Haan, A

    2005-03-01

    We investigated the role of central activation in muscle length-dependent endurance. Central activation ratio (CAR) and rectified surface electromyogram (EMG) were studied during fatigue of isometric contractions of the knee extensors at 30 and 90 degrees knee angles (full extension = 0 degree). Subjects (n = 8) were tested on a custom-built ergometer. Maximal voluntary isometric knee extension with supramaximal superimposed burst stimulation (three 100-mus pulses; 300 Hz) was performed to assess CAR and maximal torque capacity (MTC). Surface EMG signals were obtained from vastus lateralis and rectus femoris muscles. At each angle, intermittent (15 s on 6 s off) isometric exercise at 50% MTC with superimposed stimulation was performed to exhaustion. During the fatigue task, a sphygmomanometer cuff around the upper thigh ensured full occlusion (400 mmHg) of the blood supply to the knee extensors. At least 2 days separated fatigue tests. MTC was not different between knee angles (30 degrees : 229.6 +/- 39.3 N.m vs. 90 degrees: 215.7 +/- 13.2 N.m). Endurance times, however, were significantly longer (P < 0.05) at 30 vs. 90 degrees (87.8 +/- 18.7 vs. 54.9 +/- 12.1 s, respectively) despite the CAR not differing between angles at torque failure (30 degrees: 0.95 +/- 0.05 vs. 90 degrees: 0.96 +/- 0.03) and full occlusion of blood supply to the knee extensors. Furthermore, rectified surface EMG values of the vastus lateralis (normalized to prefatigue maximum) were also similar at torque failure (30 degrees : 56.5 +/- 12.5% vs. 90 degrees : 58.3 +/- 15.2%), whereas rectus femoris EMG activity was lower at 30 degrees (44.3 +/- 12.4%) vs. 90 degrees (69.5 +/- 25.3%). We conclude that differences in endurance at different knee angles do not find their origin in differences in central activation and blood flow but may be a consequence of muscle length-related differences in metabolic cost.

  18. Effects of added elastic tubes on open-chain knee extensor strength training.

    PubMed

    Melo, Mónica de Oliveira; Brodt, Guilherme Auler; Gomes, Lara Elena; Candotti, Cláudia Tarragô; La Torre, Marcelo; Loss, Jefferson Fagundes

    2013-06-01

    Attaching elastic tubes (ETs) to resistance training machines can affect the exercise load profile. The purpose of this study was to assess the training effects of added ETs, which were strategically attached to provide additional loads only during the deceleration phase of the knee extension exercise. Twenty-two healthy participants, assigned to either an experimental group (with ETs) or a control group (without ETs), participated in a 12-week strength-training program using a knee extension exercise machine. The acceleration effects were quantified and a method of attaching the ETs to the knee extension machine was developed. The effects of the added ETs were analysed by testing dynamic and isometric maximum contractions at four knee flexion angles (10 degrees, 30 degrees, 50 degrees, and 80 degrees). Analyses of covariance with the initial values as the covariate were used to examine the ETeffects. A greater increase in isometric maximum strength was found in the experimental group than in the control group at knee flexion angles of 10 degrees [effect size (ES) = 2.25] and 30 degrees (ES = 1.18). No significant difference in the dynamic maximum strength was found between the groups. The use of ETs increased strength at smaller knee flexion angles with quadriceps that were relatively short. PMID:23898691

  19. Isokinetic strength training in below-knee amputees.

    PubMed

    Klingenstierna, U; Renström, P; Grimby, G; Morelli, B

    1990-01-01

    Eight below-knee amputees performed isokinetic training of knee extensor- and knee-flexor muscles for a period of 8-12 weeks at angular velocities of 60 degrees/s, 180 degrees/s and 240 degrees/s. Before and after training isokinetic and isometric knee extensor/flexor strength was measured. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis and the cross-sectional area of the thigh muscles was measured with computerized tomography. Peak torque of the amputated leg increased significantly in all knee-extension tests and in knee-flexion at 180 degrees/s, and in the non-amputated leg in extension at 180 degrees/s, 240 degrees/s and for isometric strength at 60 degrees knee angle. Knee-flexion strength increased at 240 degrees/s. The cross-sectional area of the muscle fibers increased in the amputated leg in all patients except one. There was no significant increase in the non-amputated leg which also was trained. The quotient between the cross-sectional areas of type II and type I fibers increased from 1.04 to 1.20 in the amputated leg, demonstrating an increase specially in the type II fibers. There was no difference in the non-amputated leg. The cross-sectional area of the thigh muscles did not show any significant change in either leg. The patients estimated their ability to walk after training to more than double the distance compared to before training. They could also manage better without walking aids. The increase in strength and the synchronous increase in the size of type II (fast twitch) fibers indicate that the training model has activated also these motor units which probably have not been given as much training earlier. PMID:2326608

  20. The functional anatomy of the iliotibial band during flexion and extension of the knee: implications for understanding iliotibial band syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, John; Hayashi, Koji; Toumi, Hechmi; Lyons, Kathleen; Bydder, Graeme; Phillips, Nicola; Best, Thomas M; Benjamin, Mike

    2006-03-01

    Iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome is a common overuse injury in runners and cyclists. It is regarded as a friction syndrome where the ITB rubs against (and 'rolls over') the lateral femoral epicondyle. Here, we re-evaluate the clinical anatomy of the region to challenge the view that the ITB moves antero-posteriorly over the epicondyle. Gross anatomical and microscopical studies were conducted on the distal portion of the ITB in 15 cadavers. This was complemented by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of six asymptomatic volunteers and studies of two athletes with acute ITB syndrome. In all cadavers, the ITB was anchored to the distal femur by fibrous strands, associated with a layer of richly innervated and vascularized fat. In no cadaver, volunteer or patient was a bursa seen. The MR scans showed that the ITB was compressed against the epicondyle at 30 degrees of knee flexion as a consequence of tibial internal rotation, but moved laterally in extension. MR signal changes in the patients with ITB syndrome were present in the region occupied by fat, deep to the ITB. The ITB is prevented from rolling over the epicondyle by its femoral anchorage and because it is a part of the fascia lata. We suggest that it creates the illusion of movement, because of changing tension in its anterior and posterior fibres during knee flexion. Thus, on anatomical grounds, ITB overuse injuries may be more likely to be associated with fat compression beneath the tract, rather than with repetitive friction as the knee flexes and extends.

  1. An analytical model of the knee for estimation of internal forces during exercise.

    PubMed

    Zheng, N; Fleisig, G S; Escamilla, R F; Barrentine, S W

    1998-10-01

    An analytical model of the knee joint was developed to estimate the forces at the knee during exercise. Muscle forces were estimated based upon electromyographic activities during exercise and during maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), muscle fiber length at contraction and the maximum force produced by an unit PCSA under MVIC. Tibiofemoral compressive force and cruciate ligaments' tension were determined by using resultant force and torque at the knee, muscle forces, and orientations and moment arms of the muscles and ligaments. An optimization program was used to minimize the errors caused by the estimation of the muscle forces. The model was used in a ten-subject study of open kinetic chain exercise (seated knee extension) and closed kinetic chain exercises (leg press and squat). Results calculated with this model were compared to those from a previous study which did not consider muscle length and optimization. Peak tibiofemoral compressive forces were 3134 +/- 1040 N during squat, 3155 +/- 755 N during leg press and 3285 +/- 1927 N during knee extension. Peak posterior cruciate ligament tensions were 1868 +/- 878 N during squat, 1866 +/- 383 N during leg press and 959 +/- 300 N for seated knee extension. No significant anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tension was found during leg press and squat. Peak ACL tension was 142 +/- 257 N during seated knee extension. It is demonstrated that the current model provided better estimation of knee forces during exercises, by preventing significant overestimates of tibiofemoral compressive forces and cruciate ligament tensions.

  2. Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching and Kinesiology Taping on Pelvic Compensation During Double-Knee Extension

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Woong; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Shortened hamstrings are likely to restrict the anterior pelvic tilt and induce a slumped posture due to the posterior pelvic tilt. This study was conducted to compare the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching and modified anterior pelvic tilt taping (APTT) on hamstring shortness-associated pelvic compensation while executing seated double-knee extension. Male college students (28 healthy young adults; mean age: 21.4 ± 2.1 years) with hamstring shortness were recruited as study subjects and randomly assigned to either the PNF stretching group (control group) or the APTT group (experimental group). In all the subjects, changes in the movement distance of the centre of gluteal pressure (COGP) as well as rectus abdominis (RA) and semitendinosus (SEM) muscle activities were measured during seated double-knee extension while the respective intervention method was applied. Both groups showed significant decreases in COGP distance and RA muscle activity compared with their respective baseline values (p < 0.05), however, no significant changes were observed in SEM muscle activity. We can infer that not only a direct intervention on the hamstring, such as PNF stretching, but also a modified APTT-mediated pelvic intervention may be used as a method for reducing pelvic compensation induced by hamstring shortness. PMID:26839606

  3. Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching and Kinesiology Taping on Pelvic Compensation During Double-Knee Extension.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Woong; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-12-22

    Shortened hamstrings are likely to restrict the anterior pelvic tilt and induce a slumped posture due to the posterior pelvic tilt. This study was conducted to compare the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching and modified anterior pelvic tilt taping (APTT) on hamstring shortness-associated pelvic compensation while executing seated double-knee extension. Male college students (28 healthy young adults; mean age: 21.4 ± 2.1 years) with hamstring shortness were recruited as study subjects and randomly assigned to either the PNF stretching group (control group) or the APTT group (experimental group). In all the subjects, changes in the movement distance of the centre of gluteal pressure (COGP) as well as rectus abdominis (RA) and semitendinosus (SEM) muscle activities were measured during seated double-knee extension while the respective intervention method was applied. Both groups showed significant decreases in COGP distance and RA muscle activity compared with their respective baseline values (p < 0.05), however, no significant changes were observed in SEM muscle activity. We can infer that not only a direct intervention on the hamstring, such as PNF stretching, but also a modified APTT-mediated pelvic intervention may be used as a method for reducing pelvic compensation induced by hamstring shortness.

  4. Objective measurement of knee extension force based on computer adaptive testing.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Avi; Marcus, Etgar; Mizrahi, Joseph

    2007-02-01

    False impairment is encountered when tested subjects either unintentionally or deliberately put an artificial upper limit on their force, in which case their true capacity cannot be disclosed in a straight forward measurement. The aim of this study was to develop a computer adaptive testing (CAT) system for directing subjects into generating greater forces than they intended. The system was tested on eleven cooperative female subjects who volunteered to take part in this study. The CAT consisted of interactive testing cycles, each containing a series of isometric tasks of differing intensities. While fulfilling these tasks, the tested subjects were asked to take care not to exceed a self-selected upper force limit (F(ssl)) that they were previously trained to memorize (order of 40% of the maximal voluntary contraction). Visual feedback, displaying the applied force exertions, was provided to the tested subjects but was modified by re-scaling the display in an un-anticipated manner. To confirm the subject's ability to remember her F(ssl), repeatability of joint memory was tested one week after the CAT. The CAT results were successful in causing ten out of the eleven tested participants to exert a higher force than they intended to. Additionally, the CAT algorithm caused a statistically significant higher force than the repeatability test. These results demonstrate the potential of CAT methods in improving the clinical evaluation of muscle strength, particularly in those cases where the subject's cooperation is not sufficient.

  5. The effective mechanical advantage of a.L. 129-1a for knee extension.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Adam D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Kramer, Patricia Ann

    2011-09-01

    The functional significance of shape differences between modern human and australopithecine distal femora remains unclear. Here, we examine the morphological component of the effective mechanical advantage (EMA) of the quadriceps muscle group in a sample of hominins that includes the fossil A.L. 129-1a (Australopithecus afarensis) and modern humans. Quadriceps muscle moment arms were calculated from three-dimensional computer models of specimens through a range of knee flexion. All hominins were compared using the same limb positions to allow us to examine, in isolation, the morphological component of the lengths of the pertinent moment arms. After taking into account the differences in bicondylar angle, the morphological component of the EMA was calculated as the ratio of the quadriceps muscle and ground reaction force moment arms. Our analyses reveal that A.L. 129-1a would have possessed a morphological component of the quadriceps muscle EMA expected for a hominin of its body mass. PMID:21809469

  6. Comparison of Proximally Versus Distally Placed Spatially Distributed Sequential Stimulation Electrodes in a Dynamic Knee Extension Task

    PubMed Central

    Laubacher, Marco; Aksöz, Efe A.; Binder-Macleod, Stuart; Hunt, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Spatially distributed sequential stimulation (SDSS) has demonstrated substantial power output and fatigue benefits compared to single electrode stimulation (SES) in the application of functional electrical stimulation (FES). This asymmetric electrode setup brings new possibilities but also new questions since precise placement of the electrodes is one critical factor for good muscle activation. The aim of this study was to compare the power output, fatigue and activation properties of proximally versus distally placed SDSS electrodes in an isokinetic knee extension task simulating knee movement during recumbent cycling. M. vastus lateralis and medialis of seven able-bodied subjects were stimulated with rectangular bi-phasic pulses of constant amplitude of 40 mA and at an SDSS frequency of 35 Hz for 6 min on both legs with both setups (i.e. n=14). Torque was measured during knee-extension movement by a dynamometer at an angular velocity of 110 deg/s. Mean power, peak power and activation time were calculated and compared for the initial and final stimulation phases, together with an overall fatigue index. Power output values (Pmean, Ppeak) were scaled to a standardised reference input pulse width of 100 μs (Pmean,s, Ppeak,s). The initial evaluation phase showed no significant differences between the two setups for all outcome measures. Ppeak and Ppeak,s were both significantly higher in the final phase for the distal setup (25.4 ± 8.1 W vs. 28.2 ± 6.2 W, p=0.0062 and 34.8 ± 9.5 W vs. 38.9 ± 6.7 W, p=0.021, respectively). With distal SDSS, there was modest evidence of higher Pmean and Pmean,s (p=0.071, p=0.14, respectively) but of longer activation time (p=0.096). The rate of fatigue was similar for both setups. For practical FES applications, distal placement of the SDSS electrodes is preferable. PMID:27478563

  7. Model-Based Estimation of Active Knee Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Serge; Hardegger, Michael; Vallery, Heike; List, Renate; Foresti, Mauro; Riener, Robert; Perreault, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Knee joint impedance varies substantially during physiological gait. Quantifying this modulation is critical for the design of transfemoral prostheses that aim to mimic physiological limb behavior. Conventional methods for quantifying joint impedance typically involve perturbing the joint in a controlled manner, and describing impedance as the dynamic relationship between applied perturbations and corresponding joint torques. These experimental techniques, however, are difficult to apply during locomotion without impeding natural movements. In this paper, we propose a method to estimate the elastic component of knee joint impedance that depends on muscle activation, often referred to as active knee stiffness. The method estimates stiffness using a musculoskeletal model of the leg and a model for activation-dependent short-range muscle stiffness. Muscle forces are estimated from measurements including limb kinematics, kinetics and muscle electromyograms. For isometric validation, we compare model estimates to measurements involving joint perturbations; measured stiffness is 17% lower than model estimates for extension, and 42% lower for flexion torques. We show that sensitivity of stiffness estimates to common approaches for estimating muscle force is small in isometric conditions. We also make initial estimates of how knee stiffness is modulated during gait, illustrating how this approach may be used to obtain parameters relevant to the design of transfemoral prostheses. PMID:22275672

  8. Is the Modified Tardieu Scale in Semi-Standing Position Better Associated with Knee Extension and Hamstring Activity in Terminal Swing than the Supine Tardieu?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Irene R.; Nienhuis, Bart; Rijs, Nique P. A. M.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Duysens, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the modified Tardieu scale (MTS) in a semi-standing position, used for the assessment of hamstrings spasticity, was better associated with knee extension and hamstrings activity in terminal swing than the MTS in a supine position in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Seven children diagnosed with…

  9. The validity of an assessment of maximum angular velocity of knee extension (KE) using a gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Arai, Takeshi; Obuchi, Shuichi; Shiba, Yoshitaka; Omuro, Kazuya; Inaba, Yasuko; Kojima, Motonaga

    2012-01-01

    Although it is more important to assess the muscular power of the lower extremities than the strength, no simplified method for doing so has been found. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of the assessment of the angular velocity of KE using a gyroscope. Participants included 105 community-dwelling older people (55 women, 50 men, age ± standard deviation (SD) 75±5.3). Pearson correlation coefficients and Spearman rank-correlation coefficients were used to examine the relationships between the angular velocity of KE and functional performance measurements, a self-efficacy scale and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The data from the gyroscope were significantly correlated with some physical functions such as muscle strength (r=0.304, p<0.01), and walking velocity (r=0.543, p<0.001). In addition, the joint angular velocity was significantly correlated with self-efficacy (r=0.219-0.329, p<0.01-0.05) and HRQOL (r=0.207-0.359, p<0.01-0.05). The absolute value of the correlation coefficient of angular velocity tended to be greater than that of the muscle strength for mobility functions such as walking velocity and the timed-up-and-go (TUG) test. In conclusion, it was found that the assessment of the angular velocity of the knee joint using a gyroscope could be a feasible and meaningful measurement in the geriatrics field.

  10. The role of the rehabilitation brace in restoring knee extension after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Melegati, G; Tornese, D; Bandi, M; Volpi, P; Schonhuber, H; Denti, M

    2003-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of a rehabilitation brace locked in extension for the first week on the recovery of full extension after ACL reconstruction we compared two groups of subjects who underwent ACL bone-patellar tendon-bone reconstruction. The brace was unlocked twice a day for assisted physiotherapy. In Group A, 18 male subjects wore a post-operative brace locked from 0 degrees to 90 degrees. In Group B, 18 male subjects wore the same post-op brace locked in full extension for the first week. In both groups the brace was unlocked (0 degrees -120 degrees ) at the beginning of the second postoperative week, and then removed at the beginning of the third week. All the subjects followed the same rigorous, accelerated rehabilitation protocol. Each subject was evaluated pre and post-operatively (at second, fourth and eighth week) with bubble-level heel height difference (HHD) measurements and KT 1000 arthrometric assessment at the fourth postoperative month. Preoperative bubble-level HHD measurements of the two groups were statistically similar (Group A 0.6 cm, Group B 1 cm; not significant, n.s.). At the fourth week (Group A 2.2 cm, Group B 0.6 cm) and eighth week (Group A 1.6 cm, Group B 0.1 cm) follow-ups, bubble-level HHD measurements showed that the extension of the operated knees of Group B was significantly greater than in Group A. KT 1000 arthrometric scores showed no difference between the two groups (Group A 1.8 mm, Group B 1.5; n.s.).

  11. Fatigue and muscle-tendon stiffness after stretch-shortening cycle and isometric exercise.

    PubMed

    Toumi, Hechmi; Poumarat, Georges; Best, Thomas M; Martin, Alain; Fairclough, John; Benjamin, Mike

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare vertical jump performance after 2 different fatigue protocols. In the first protocol, subjects performed consecutive sets of 10 repetitions of stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) contractions. In the second protocol, successive sets of 10 repetitions of isometric contractions were performed for 10 s with the knee at 90 degrees of flexion. The exercises were stopped when the subjects failed to reach 50% of their maximum voluntary isometric contractions. Maximal isometric force and maximal concentric power were assessed by performing supine leg presses, squat jumps, and drop jumps. Surface EMG was used to determine changes in muscle activation before and after fatigue. In both groups, the fatigue exercises reduced voluntary isometric force, maximal concentric power, and drop jump performance. Kinematic data showed a decrease in knee muscle-tendon stiffness accompanied by a lengthened ground contact time. EMG analysis showed that the squat and drop jumps were performed similarly before and after the fatigue exercise for both groups. Although it was expected that the stiffness would decrease more after SSC than after isometric fatigue (as a result of a greater alteration of the reflex sensitivity SSC), our results showed that both protocols had a similar effect on knee muscle stiffness during jumping exercises. Both fatigue protocols induced muscle fatigue, and the decrease in jump performance was linked to a decrease in the strength and stiffness of the knee extensor muscles. PMID:17111011

  12. A new isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise using EMG-biofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Kesemenli, Cumhur C; Sarman, Hakan; Baran, Tuncay; Memisoglu, Kaya; Binbir, Ismail; Savas, Yilmaz; Isik, Cengiz; Boyraz, Ismail; Koc, Bunyamin

    2014-01-01

    A new isometric contraction quadriceps-strengthening exercise was developed to restore the quadriceps strength lost after knee surgery more rapidly. This study evaluated the results of this new method. Patients were taught to perform the isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise in the unaffected knee in the supine position, and then they performed it in the affected knee. First, patients were taught the classical isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise, and then they were taught our new alternative method: “pull the patella superiorly tightly and hold the leg in the same position for 10 seconds”. Afterward, the quadriceps contraction was evaluated using a non-invasive Myomed 932 EMG-biofeedback device (Enraf-Nonius, The Netherlands) with gel-containing 48 mm electrodes (Türklab, The Turkey) placed on both knees. The isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise performed using our new method had stronger contraction than the classical method (P < 0.01). The new method involving pulling the patella superiorly appears to be a better choice, which can be applied easily, leading to better patient compliance and greater quadriceps force after arthroscopic and other knee surgeries. PMID:25356122

  13. Statistical mapping of the effect of knee extension on thigh muscle viscoelastic properties using magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Barnhill, Eric; Kennedy, Paul; Hammer, Steven; van Beek, Edwin J R; Brown, Colin; Roberts, Neil

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal muscle viscoelastic properties reflect muscle microstructure and neuromuscular activation. Elastographic methods, including magnetic resonance elastography, have been used to characterize muscle viscoelastic properties in terms of region of interest (ROI) measurements. The present study extended this approach to create thresholded pixel-by-pixel maps of viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscle during rest and knee extension in eleven subjects. ROI measurements were taken for individual quadricep muscles and the quadriceps region as a whole, and the viscoelastic parameter map pixels were statistically tested at positive false discovery rate q ≤ 0.25. ROI measurements showed significant (p ≤ 0.05) increase in storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G″), with G″ increasing more than G', in agreement with previous findings. The q-value maps further identified the vastus intermedius as the primary driver of this change, with greater G″/G' increase than surrounding regions. Additionally, a cluster of significant decrease in G″/G' was found in the region of vastus lateralis below the fulcrum point of the lift. Viscoelastic parameter mapping of contracted muscle allows new insight into the relationship between physiology, neuromuscular activation, and human performance.

  14. Uncertainty of knee joint muscle activity during knee joint torque exertion: the significance of controlling adjacent joint torque.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Daichi; Nakazawa, Kimitaka; Akai, Masami

    2005-09-01

    In the single-joint torque exertion task, which has been widely used to control muscle activity, only the relevant joint torque is specified. However, the neglect of the neighboring joint could make the procedure unreliable, considering our previous result that even monoarticular muscle activity level is indefinite without specifying the adjacent joint torque. Here we examined the amount of hip joint torque generated with knee joint torque and its influence on the activity of the knee joint muscles. Twelve healthy subjects were requested to exert various levels of isometric knee joint torque. The knee and hip joint torques were obtained by using a custom-made device. Because no information about hip joint torque was provided to the subjects, the hip joint torque measured here was a secondary one associated with the task. The amount of hip joint torque varied among subjects, indicating that they adopted various strategies to achieve the task. In some subjects, there was a considerable internal variability in the hip joint torque. Such variability was not negligible, because the knee joint muscle activity level with respect to the knee joint torque, as quantified by surface electromyography (EMG), changed significantly when the subjects were requested to change the strategy. This change occurred in a very systematic manner: in the case of the knee extension, as the hip flexion torque was larger, the activity of mono- and biarticular knee extensors decreased and increased, respectively. These results indicate that the conventional single knee joint torque exertion has the drawback that the intersubject and/or intertrial variability is inevitable in the relative contribution among mono- and biarticular muscles because of the uncertainty of the hip joint torque. We discuss that the viewpoint that both joint torques need to be considered will bring insights into various controversial problems such as the shape of the EMG-force relationship, neural factors that help

  15. The Influence of Oral L-Glutamine Supplementation on Muscle Strength Recovery and Soreness Following Unilateral Knee Extension Eccentric Exercise.

    PubMed

    Legault, Zachary; Bagnall, Nicholas; Kimmerly, Derek S

    2015-10-01

    The study aimed to examine the effects that L-glutamine supplementation has on quadriceps muscle strength and soreness ratings following eccentric exercise. It was hypothesized that glutamine ingestion would quicken the recovery rate of peak force production and decrease muscle soreness ratings over a 72-hr recovery period. Sixteen healthy participants (8♀/8♂; 22 ± 4 years) volunteered in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study. Supplement conditions consisted of isoenergetic placebo (maltodextrin, 0.6 g·kg-1·day-1) and L-glutamine (0.3 g·kg-1·day-1 + 0.3 g·kg-1·day-1 maltodextrin) ingestion once per day over 72 hr. Knee extensor peak torque at 0°, 30°, and 180° per second and muscle soreness were measured before, immediately following, 24, 48, and 72 hr posteccentric exercise. Eccentric exercise consisted of 8 sets (10 repetitions/set) of unilateral knee extension at 125% maximum concentric force with 2-min rest intervals. L-glutamine resulted in greater relative peak torque at 180°/sec both immediately after (71 ± 8% vs. 66 ± 9%), and 72 hr (91 ± 8% vs. 86 ± 7%) postexercise (all, p < .01). In men, L-glutamine produced greater (p < .01) peak torques at 30°/ sec postexercise. Men also produced greater normalized peak torques at 30°/sec (Nm/kg) in the L-glutamine condition than women (all, p < .05). In the entire sample, L-glutamine resulted in lower soreness ratings at 24 (2.8 ± 1.2 vs. 3.4 ± 1.2), 48 (2.6 ± 1.4 vs. 3.9 ± 1.2), and 72 (1.7 ± 1.2 vs. 2.9 ± 1.3) hr postexercise (p < .01). The L-glutamine supplementation resulted in faster recovery of peak torque and diminished muscle soreness following eccentric exercise. The effect of L-glutamine on muscle force recovery may be greater in men than women. PMID:25811544

  16. The Influence of Oral L-Glutamine Supplementation on Muscle Strength Recovery and Soreness Following Unilateral Knee Extension Eccentric Exercise.

    PubMed

    Legault, Zachary; Bagnall, Nicholas; Kimmerly, Derek S

    2015-10-01

    The study aimed to examine the effects that L-glutamine supplementation has on quadriceps muscle strength and soreness ratings following eccentric exercise. It was hypothesized that glutamine ingestion would quicken the recovery rate of peak force production and decrease muscle soreness ratings over a 72-hr recovery period. Sixteen healthy participants (8♀/8♂; 22 ± 4 years) volunteered in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study. Supplement conditions consisted of isoenergetic placebo (maltodextrin, 0.6 g·kg-1·day-1) and L-glutamine (0.3 g·kg-1·day-1 + 0.3 g·kg-1·day-1 maltodextrin) ingestion once per day over 72 hr. Knee extensor peak torque at 0°, 30°, and 180° per second and muscle soreness were measured before, immediately following, 24, 48, and 72 hr posteccentric exercise. Eccentric exercise consisted of 8 sets (10 repetitions/set) of unilateral knee extension at 125% maximum concentric force with 2-min rest intervals. L-glutamine resulted in greater relative peak torque at 180°/sec both immediately after (71 ± 8% vs. 66 ± 9%), and 72 hr (91 ± 8% vs. 86 ± 7%) postexercise (all, p < .01). In men, L-glutamine produced greater (p < .01) peak torques at 30°/ sec postexercise. Men also produced greater normalized peak torques at 30°/sec (Nm/kg) in the L-glutamine condition than women (all, p < .05). In the entire sample, L-glutamine resulted in lower soreness ratings at 24 (2.8 ± 1.2 vs. 3.4 ± 1.2), 48 (2.6 ± 1.4 vs. 3.9 ± 1.2), and 72 (1.7 ± 1.2 vs. 2.9 ± 1.3) hr postexercise (p < .01). The L-glutamine supplementation resulted in faster recovery of peak torque and diminished muscle soreness following eccentric exercise. The effect of L-glutamine on muscle force recovery may be greater in men than women.

  17. Relationships between Isometric Muscle Strength, Gait Parameters, and Gross Motor Function Measure in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyung-Ik; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Chung, Chin Youb; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Seung Yeol; Lee, In Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the correlation between isometric muscle strength, gross motor function, and gait parameters in patients with spastic cerebral palsy and to find which muscle groups play an important role for gait pattern in a flexed knee gait. Materials and Methods Twenty-four ambulatory patients (mean age, 10.0 years) with spastic cerebral palsy who were scheduled for single event multilevel surgery, including distal hamstring lengthening, were included. Preoperatively, peak isometric muscle strength was measured for the hip flexor, hip extensor, knee flexor, and knee extensor muscle groups using a handheld dynamometer, and three-dimensional (3D) gait analysis and gross motor function measure (GMFM) scoring were also performed. Correlations between peak isometric strength and GMFM, gait kinematics, and gait kinetics were analyzed. Results Peak isometric muscle strength of all muscle groups was not related to the GMFM score and the gross motor function classification system level. Peak isometric strength of the hip extensor and knee extensor was significantly correlated with the mean pelvic tilt (r=-0.588, p=0.003 and r=-0.436, p=0.033) and maximum pelvic obliquity (r=-0.450, p=0.031 and r=-0.419, p=0.041). There were significant correlations between peak isometric strength of the knee extensor and peak knee extensor moment in early stance (r=0.467, p=0.021) and in terminal stance (r=0.416, p=0.043). Conclusion There is no correlation between muscle strength and gross motor function. However, this study showed that muscle strength, especially of the extensor muscle group of the hip and knee joints, might play a critical role in gait by stabilizing pelvic motion and decreasing energy consumption in a flexed knee gait. PMID:26632404

  18. Knee extension and flexion muscle power after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon graft or hamstring tendons graft: a cross-sectional comparison 3 years post surgery.

    PubMed

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Harald P; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Thomeé, Roland; Roos, Ewa M

    2009-02-01

    Hamstring muscles play a major role in knee-joint stabilization after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Weakness of the knee extensors after ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon (PT) graft, and in the knee flexors after reconstruction with hamstring tendons (HT) graft has been observed up to 2 years post surgery, but not later. In these studies, isokinetic muscle torque was used. However, muscle power has been suggested to be a more sensitive and sport-specific measures of strength. The aim was to study quadriceps and hamstring muscle power in patients with ACL injury treated with surgical reconstruction with PT or HT grafts at a mean of 3 years after surgery. Twenty subjects with PT and 16 subjects with HT grafts (mean age at follow up 30 years, range 20-39, 25% women), who were all included in a prospective study and followed the same goal-based rehabilitation protocol for at least 4 months, were assessed with reliable, valid, and responsive tests of quadriceps and hamstring muscle power at 3 years (SD 0.9, range 2-5) after surgery. The mean difference between legs (injured minus uninjured), the hamstring to quadriceps (H:Q, hamstring divided by quadriceps) ratio, and the limb symmetry index (LSI, injured leg divided by uninjured and multiplied by 100) value, were used for comparisons between the groups (analysis of variance). The mean difference between the injured and uninjured legs was greater in the HT than in the PT group for knee flexion power (-21.3 vs. 7.7 W, p = 0.001). Patients with HT graft had lower H:Q ratio in the injured leg than the patients with PT graft (0.63 vs. 0.77, p = 0.012). They also had lower LSI for knee flexion power than those in the PT group (88 vs. 106%, p < 0.001). No differences were found between the groups for knee extension power. The lower hamstring muscle power, and the lower hamstring to quadriceps ratio in the HT graft group than in the PT graft group 3 years (range 2-5) after ACL reconstruction, reflect imbalance

  19. Knee extensor muscle oxygen consumption in relation to muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, R D; Blaauboer, M E; Born, J R; de Ruiter, C J; de Haan, A

    2006-12-01

    Recently, fatigability and muscle oxygen consumption (mVO(2)) during sustained isometric contractions were found to be less at shorter (30 degrees knee angle; 0 degrees = full extension) compared to longer knee extensor muscle lengths (90 degrees ) and, at low torques, less in the rectus femoris (RF) muscle than in the vastus lateralis and medialis. In the present study we hypothesized that these findings could be accounted for by a knee angle- and a muscle-dependent activation respectively. On two experimental days rectified surface EMG (rsEMG) was obtained as a measure of muscle activation in nine healthy young males. In addition, on day 1 maximal torque capacity (MTC) was carefully determined using superimposed nerve stimulation on brief high intensity contractions (> 70%MVC) at 30, 60 and 90 degrees knee angles. On day 2, subjects performed longer lasting isometric contractions (10-70%MTC) while mVO(2) was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). At 30 degrees , maximal mVO(2) was reached significantly later (11.0 s +/- 6.5 s) and was 57.9 +/- 8.3% less (average +/- SD, across intensities and muscles) than mVO(2) at 60 and 90 degrees (p < 0.05). However, rsEMG was on average only 18.0 +/- 11.8% (p = 0.062) less at the start of the contraction at 30 degrees . At 10%MTC at all knee angles, maximal mVO(2) of the RF occurred significantly later (28.8 +/- 36.0 s) and showed a significantly smaller increase in rsEMG compared to both vasti. In conclusion, it is unlikely that the tendency for less intense muscle activation could fully account for the approximately 60% lower oxygen consumption at 30 degrees , but the later increase in RFmVO(2) seemed to be caused by a less strong activation of the RF.

  20. Active knee joint flexibility and sports activity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, T; Foldspang, A; Vestergaard, E; Ingemann-Hansen, T

    1999-04-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate active knee flexion and active knee extension in athletes and to investigate the potential association of each to different types of sports activity. Active knee extension and active knee flexion was measured in 339 athletes. Active knee extension was significantly higher in women than in men and significantly positively associated with weekly hours of swimming and weekly hours of competitive gymnastics. Active knee flexion was significantly positively associated with participation in basketball, and significantly negatively associated with age and weekly hours of soccer, European team handball and swimming. The results point to sport-specific adaptation of active knee flexion and active knee extension.

  1. Peak torque and average power at flexion/extension of the shoulder and knee when using a mouth guard in adults with mild midline discrepancy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Yeol; Hong, Min-Ho; Choi, Seung-Jun

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the changes in torque and power during flexion and extension of the shoulder and the knee joints caused by midline correction using mouth guards made from different materials in adults with mild midline discrepancy. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were males (n=12) in their 20s who showed a 3-5 mm difference between the midlines of the upper and lower teeth but had normal masticatory function. [Methods] The torque and average power of the lower limb and upper limb were measured during flexion and extension according to various types of mouth guard. [Results] There were significant differences in relative torque and average power between three conditions (no mouth guard, soft-type mouth guard, and hard-type mouth guard) at shoulder flexion and extension. There were no significant differences in relative torque and average power between the three conditions at knee flexion and extension. [Conclusions] These results suggest that use of a mouth guard is a method by which people with a mild midline discrepancy can improve the stability of the entire body.

  2. Training-related changes in the EMG-moment relationship during isometric contractions: Further evidence of improved control of muscle activation in strength-trained men?

    PubMed

    Amarantini, David; Bru, Bertrand

    2015-08-01

    The possibility of using electromyography (EMG) to track muscle activity has raised the question of its relationship with the effort exerted by the muscles around the joints. However, the EMG-moment relationship is yet to be fully defined, and increasing knowledge of this topic could contribute to research in motor control and to the development of EMG-based algorithms and devices. With regards the training-related adaptations at the peripheral and central level, the present study investigated the effect of strength training on EMG-moment relationship. Our aim was to clarify its nature and gain further understanding of how morphological and neural factors may affect its form. The EMG-moment relationship was determined during knee flexion and extension isometric contractions performed by strength-trained male athletes and untrained male participants. The results showed that strength training induced linearity of the EMG-moment relationship concomitantly with enhanced maximum force production capacity and decreased co-activation of knee agonist-antagonist muscle pair. These results clarified discordant results regarding the linear or curved nature of the EMG-moment in isometric conditions and suggested that the remarkable linearity of the EMG-moment found in trained participants could indicate improved control of muscle activation.

  3. Skeletal muscle ATP turnover by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during moderate and heavy bilateral knee extension

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Daniel T; Bimson, William E; Hampson, Sophie A; Bowen, T Scott; Murgatroyd, Scott R; Marwood, Simon; Kemp, Graham J; Rossiter, Harry B

    2014-01-01

    During constant-power high-intensity exercise, the expected increase in oxygen uptake () is supplemented by a  slow component (), reflecting reduced work efficiency, predominantly within the locomotor muscles. The intracellular source of inefficiency is postulated to be an increase in the ATP cost of power production (an increase in P/W). To test this hypothesis, we measured intramuscular ATP turnover with 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and whole-body during moderate (MOD) and heavy (HVY) bilateral knee-extension exercise in healthy participants (n = 14). Unlocalized 31P spectra were collected from the quadriceps throughout using a dual-tuned (1H and 31P) surface coil with a simple pulse-and-acquire sequence. Total ATP turnover rate (ATPtot) was estimated at exercise cessation from direct measurements of the dynamics of phosphocreatine (PCr) and proton handling. Between 3 and 8 min during MOD, there was no discernable (mean ± SD, 0.06 ± 0.12 l min−1) or change in [PCr] (30 ± 8 vs. 32 ± 7 mm) or ATPtot (24 ± 14 vs. 17 ± 14 mm min−1; each P = n.s.). During HVY, the was 0.37 ± 0.16 l min−1 (22 ± 8%), [PCr] decreased (19 ± 7 vs. 18 ± 7 mm, or 12 ± 15%; P < 0.05) and ATPtot increased (38 ± 16 vs. 44 ± 14 mm min−1, or 26 ± 30%; P < 0.05) between 3 and 8 min. However, the increase in ATPtot (ΔATPtot) was not correlated with the during HVY (r2 = 0.06; P = n.s.). This lack of relationship between ΔATPtot and , together with a steepening of the [PCr]– relationship in HVY, suggests that reduced work efficiency during heavy exercise arises from both contractile (P/W) and mitochondrial sources (the O2 cost of ATP resynthesis; P/O). PMID:25281731

  4. Angle- and gender-specific quadriceps femoris muscle recruitment and knee extensor torque.

    PubMed

    Pincivero, Danny M; Salfetnikov, Yuliya; Campy, Robert M; Coelho, Alan J

    2004-11-01

    The objectives were to examine knee angle-, and gender-specific knee extensor torque output and quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle recruitment during maximal effort, voluntary contractions. Fourteen young adult men and 15 young adult women performed three isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC), in a random order, with the knee at 0 degrees (terminal extension), 10 degrees, 30 degrees, 50 degrees, 70 degrees, and 90 degrees flexion. Knee extensor peak torque (PT), and average torque (AT) were expressed in absolute (N m), relative (N m kg(-1)) and allometric-modeled (N m kg(-n)) units. Vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), and rectus femoris (RF) muscle EMG signals were full-wave rectified and integrated over the middle 3 s of each contraction, averaged over the three trials at each knee angle, and normalized to the activity recorded at 0 degrees. Muscle recruitment efficiency was calculated as the ratio of the normalized EMG of each muscle to the allometric-modeled average torque (normalized to the values at 0 degrees flexion), and expressed as a percent. Men generated significantly greater knee extensor PT and AT than women in absolute, relative and allometric-modeled units. Absolute and relative PT and AT were significantly highest at 70 degrees, while allometric-modeled values were observed to increase significantly across knee joint angles 10-90 degrees. VM EMG was significantly greater than the VL and RF muscles across all angles, and followed a similar pattern to absolute knee extensor torque. Recruitment efficiency improved across knee joint angles 10-90 degrees and was highest for the VL muscle. VM recruitment efficiency improved more than the VL and RF muscles across 70-90 degrees flexion. The findings demonstrate angle-, and gender-specific responses of knee extensor torque to maximal-effort contractions, while superficial QF muscle recruitment was most efficient at 90 degrees, and less dependent on gender.

  5. The flexion-extension axis of the knee and its relationship to the rotational orientation of the tibial plateau.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, Charles M; Noble, Philip C; Ismaily, Sabir K; Stal, Drew; Incavo, Steve J

    2011-09-01

    We measured the optimal rotational alignment of the tibial component with respect to anatomic landmarks. Kinematic data were collected from functional maneuvers simulated in 20 cadaveric knees mounted in a joint simulator. The axis of knee motion was calculated for squatting and lunging activities over the interval of 30° to 90° of knee flexion. We then examined the accuracy and variability of 5 different anatomic axes in predicting the direction of knee motion. No one landmark guaranteed correct alignment of the tibial component and most predictors were highly variable (range, 6°-21°). The most accurate indicators were the medial third of the tibial tubercle (average error: squatting: 3.5° external rotation; lunging: 9.5°), and the medial-lateral axis of the resected tibial surface (6.7° and 1.1° internal rotation). The correct alignment of the tibial component can be best achieved by splitting the difference between these landmarks to eliminate placement of the component in excessive external and excessive internal rotation.

  6. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  7. Preliminary Tests of a Practical Fuzzy FES Controller Based on Cycle-to-Cycle Control in the Knee Flexion and Extension Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takashi; Masuko, Tomoya; Arifin, Achmad

    The fuzzy controller based on cycle-to-cycle control with output value adjustment factors (OAF) was developed for restoring gait of paralyzed subjects by using functional electrical stimulation (FES). Results of maximum knee flexion and extension controls with neurologically intact subjects suggested that the OAFs would be effective in reaching the target within small number of cycles and in reducing the error after reaching the target. Oscillating responses between cycles were also suppressed. The fuzzy controller was expected to be examined to optimize the OAFs with more subjects including paralyzed patients for clinical application.

  8. Shear elastic modulus can be used to estimate an index of individual muscle force during a submaximal isometric fatiguing contraction.

    PubMed

    Bouillard, Killian; Hug, François; Guével, Arnaud; Nordez, Antoine

    2012-11-01

    The present study was designed to determine whether fatigue alters the ability to estimate an index of individual muscle force from shear elastic modulus measurements (experiment I), and to test the ability of this technique to highlight changes in load sharing within a redundant muscle group during an isometric fatiguing task (experiment II). Twelve subjects participated in experiment I, which consisted of smooth linear torque ramps from 0 to 80% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) performed before and after an isometric fatigue protocol, beginning at 40% of MVC and stopped when the force production dropped below 30% of MVC. Although the relationships between modulus and torque were very similar for pre- and postfatigue [root mean square deviation (RMS(deviation)) = 3.7 ± 2.6% of MVC], the relationships between electromyography activity level and torque were greatly altered by fatigue (RMS(deviation) = 10.3 ± 2.6% of MVC). During the fatiguing contraction, shear elastic modulus provided a significantly lower RMS(deviation) between measured torque and estimated torque than electromyography activity level (5.7 ± 0.9 vs. 15.3 ± 3.8% of MVC). Experiment II performed with eight participants consisted of an isometric knee extension at 25% of MVC sustained until exhaustion. Opposite changes in shear elastic modulus were observed between synergists (vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris) of some participants, reflecting changes in load sharing. In conclusion, despite the fact that we did not directly estimate muscle force (in Newtons), this is the first demonstration of an experimental technique to accurately quantify relative changes in force in an individual human muscle during a fatiguing contraction.

  9. The significance of an asymmetric extension gap on routine radiographs after total knee replacement: A new sign and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Liebs, T R; Kloos, S-A; Herzberg, W; Rüther, W; Hassenpflug, J

    2013-04-01

    We investigated whether an asymmetric extension gap seen on routine post-operative radiographs after primary total knee replacement (TKR) is associated with pain at three, six, 12 and 24 months' follow-up. On radiographs of 277 patients after primary TKR we measured the distance between the tibial tray and the femoral condyle on both the medial and lateral sides. A difference was defined as an asymmetric extension gap. We considered three groups (no asymmetric gap, medial-opening and lateral-opening gap) and calculated the associations with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index pain scores over time. Those with an asymmetric extension gap of ≥ 1.5 mm had a significant association with pain scores at three months' follow-up; patients with a medial-opening extension gap reported more pain and patients with a lateral-opening extension gap reported less pain (p = 0.036). This effect was still significant at six months (p = 0.044), but had lost significance by 12 months (p = 0.924). When adjusting for multiple cofounders the improvement in pain was more pronounced in patients with a lateral-opening extension gap than in those with a medial-opening extension gap at three (p = 0.037) and six months' (p = 0.027) follow-up.

  10. The significance of an asymmetric extension gap on routine radiographs after total knee replacement: A new sign and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Liebs, T R; Kloos, S-A; Herzberg, W; Rüther, W; Hassenpflug, J

    2013-04-01

    We investigated whether an asymmetric extension gap seen on routine post-operative radiographs after primary total knee replacement (TKR) is associated with pain at three, six, 12 and 24 months' follow-up. On radiographs of 277 patients after primary TKR we measured the distance between the tibial tray and the femoral condyle on both the medial and lateral sides. A difference was defined as an asymmetric extension gap. We considered three groups (no asymmetric gap, medial-opening and lateral-opening gap) and calculated the associations with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index pain scores over time. Those with an asymmetric extension gap of ≥ 1.5 mm had a significant association with pain scores at three months' follow-up; patients with a medial-opening extension gap reported more pain and patients with a lateral-opening extension gap reported less pain (p = 0.036). This effect was still significant at six months (p = 0.044), but had lost significance by 12 months (p = 0.924). When adjusting for multiple cofounders the improvement in pain was more pronounced in patients with a lateral-opening extension gap than in those with a medial-opening extension gap at three (p = 0.037) and six months' (p = 0.027) follow-up. PMID:23539698

  11. Effects of Lumbosacral Manipulation on Isokinetic Strength of the Knee Extensors and Flexors in Healthy Subjects: A Randomized, Controlled, Single-Blind Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Grant D.; Nitz, Arthur J.; Abel, Mark G.; Symons, T. Brock; Shapiro, Robert; Black, W. Scott; Yates, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of manual manipulations targeting the lumbar spine and/or sacroiliac joint on concentric knee extension and flexion forces. Torque production was measured during isometric and isokinetic contractions. Methods This was a randomized, controlled, single-blind crossover design with 21 asymptomatic, college-aged subjects who had never received spinal manipulation. During 2 separate sessions, subjects’ peak torques were recorded while performing maximal voluntary contractions on an isokinetic dynamometer. Isometric knee extension and flexion were recorded at 60° of knee flexion, in addition to isokinetic measurements obtained at 60°/s and 180°/s. Baseline measurements were acquired before either treatment form of lumbosacral manipulation or sham manipulation, followed by identical peak torque measurements within 5 and 20 minutes posttreatment. Data were analyzed with a repeated measures analysis of variance. Results A statistically significant difference did not occur between the effects of lumbosacral manipulation or the sham manipulation in the percentage changes of knee extension and flexion peak torques at 5 and 20 minutes posttreatment. Similar, nonsignificant results were observed in the overall percentage changes of isometric contractions (spinal manipulation 4.0 ± 9.5 vs sham 1.2 ± 6.3, P = .067), isokinetic contractions at 60°/s (spinal manipulation − 4.0 ± 14.2 vs sham − 0.3 ± 8.2, P = .34), and isokinetic contractions at 180°/s (spinal manipulation − 1.4 ± 13.9 vs sham − 5.5 ± 20.0, P = .18). Conclusion The results of the current study suggest that spinal manipulation does not yield an immediate strength-enhancing effect about the knee in healthy, college-aged subjects when measured with isokinetic dynamometry. PMID:26793035

  12. Physiological alterations of maximal voluntary quadriceps activation by changes of knee joint angle.

    PubMed

    Becker, R; Awiszus, F

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of different angles of the knee joint on voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle, estimating the ability of a subject to activate a muscle maximally by means of voluntary contraction. Isometric torque measurement was performed on 6 healthy subjects in 5 degrees intervals between 30 degrees and 90 degrees of knee joint flexion. Superimposed twitches at maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and at a level of 60% and 40% of the MVC were applied and the voluntary activation estimated. At between 30 degrees and 75 degrees of knee flexion, the maximal extension torque increased at an average rate of 2.67 +/- 0.6 Nm/degree, followed by a decline with further flexion. However, throughout the joint-angle range tested, voluntary activation increased on average by 0.37%/degree with a maximum at 90 degrees of flexion. Due to the influence of joint position it is not possible to generalize results obtained at the knee joint angle of 90 degrees of flexion, which is usually used for the quadriceps twitch-interpolation technique. Consequently, it is useful to investigate voluntary activation deficits in knee joint disorders at a range of knee joint angles that includes, in particular, the more extended joint angles used frequently during daily activity.

  13. Isokinetic and isometric strength-endurance after 6 hours of immersion and 6 degrees head-down tilt in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer-Bailey, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Hutchinson, T. M.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine weight (water) loss levels for onset of muscular strength and endurance changes during deconditioning. METHODS: Seven men (27-40 yr) performed maximal shoulder-, knee-, and ankle-joint isometric (0 degree.s(-1) load) and isokinetic (60 degrees, 120 degrees, 180 degrees.s(-1) velocity) exercise tests during ambulatory control (AC), after 6 h of 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT; dry-bulb temp. = 23.2 +/- SD 0.6 degrees C, relative humidity = 31.1+/- 11.1%) and after 6 h of 80 degrees foot-down head-out water immersion (WI; water temp. = 35.0 +/- SD 0.1 degree C) treatments. RESULTS: Weight (water) loss after HDT (1.10 +/- SE 0.14 kg, 1.4 +/- 0.2% body wt) and WI (1.54+/- 0.19 kg, 2.0 +/- 0.2% body wt) were not different, but urinary excretion with WI (1,354 +/- 142 ml.6 h(-1)) was 28% greater (p < 0.05) than that of 975 +/- 139 ml.6 h(-1) with HDT. Muscular endurance (total work; maximal flexion-extension of the non-dominant knee at 180 degrees.s(-1) for 30 s) was not different between AC and the WI or HDT treatments. Shoulder-, knee-, and ankle-joint strength was unchanged except for three knee-joint peak torques: AC torque (120 degrees.s(-1), 285 +/- 20 Nm) decreased to 268 +/- 21 Nm (delta = -6%, p < 0.05) with WI; and AC torques (180 degrees.s(-1), 260 +/- 19 Nm) decreased to 236 +/- 15 Nm (delta = -9%, p < 0.01) with HDT, and to 235 +/- 19 Nm (delta = -10%, p < 0.01) with WI. CONCLUSION: Thus, the total body hypohydration threshold level for shoulder- and ankle-joint strength and endurance decrements is more than 2% body weight (water) loss, while significant reduction in knee-joint muscular strength-endurance occurred only at moderate (120 degrees.s(-1) and lighter (180 degrees.s(-1)) loads with body weight loss of 1.4-2.0% following WI or HDT, respectively. These weight (water) losses and knee-joint strength decrements are somewhat less than the mean weight loss of 2.6% and knee-joint strength decrements of 6-20% of American astronauts after

  14. REHABILITATION AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER EXTENSIVE SURGICAL DEBRIDEMENT OF A KNEE INFECTED BY FUSOBACTERIUM NECROPHORUM: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Matthew S.; Kegelmeyer, Deborah K.; Kloos, Anne D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Joint infection is a rare but serious complication after knee injury that should be part of a physical therapist's differential diagnosis. This case report presents the care of a 17 year‐old female athlete with septic arthritis from a Fusobacterium infection after sustaining a right lateral meniscus tear. Joint pathology combined with the aggressive infectious agent led to arthrofibrosis of her knee joint and resultant activity limitations and participation restrictions. The purpose of this case report is to highlight a rare and unique pathology, the serious effects that a joint infection can have on musculoskeletal function, and the challenges encountered during the rehabilitation process. Case Description: The subject was a 17 year‐old volleyball player who injured her right knee while playing volleyball. Within 7 days, the subject developed a severe joint infection that spread into surrounding gluteal, quadriceps, and gastrocnemius musculature. The infection was surgically debrided eight times during a 10‐week inpatient hospital stay. A manipulation under anesthesia was performed to restore range of motion in her knee joint. Outpatient physical therapy was initiated 4 days later in order to restore musculoskeletal function. Outcome: Over eight months of physical therapy services were utilized to address the impairments and activity limitations caused by her joint dysfunction. She met her physical therapy goals and made significant improvements on the Knee Outcome Survey and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Success in physical therapy and completion of additional strength training exercise allowed this subject to return to competitive softball at the club level during her freshman year of college. Discussion: Though rare after musculoskeletal injury, joint infection can lead to soft tissue damage, partial or complete degradation of articular cartilage, and arthrofibrosis causing significant disability. Physical therapists must

  15. Preliminary assessment of the efficacy of supplementing knee extension capability in a lower limb exoskeleton with FES.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Hugo A; Farris, Ryan J; Ha, Kevin; Goldfarb, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe a cooperative controller that combines the knee joint actuation of an externally powered lower limb exoskeleton with the torque and power contribution from the electrically stimulated quadriceps muscle group. The efficacy of combining these efforts is experimentally validated with a series of weighted leg lift maneuvers. Measurements from these experiments indicate that the control approach effectively combines the respective efforts of the motor and muscle, such that good control performance is achieved, with substantial torque and energy contributions from both the biological and non-biological actuators. PMID:23366646

  16. [Development and validation of a dynamic model of the knee].

    PubMed

    Mabit, C; Geais, L; Blanchard, B; Elbaroudi, F; Guingand, O

    2007-10-01

    The authors report the methodology of the construction of a multibody model of the knee and the validation of the kinematics of the modelled knee. The construction of the model includes: the rigid bodies represented by osseous components (femur, tibia, fibula, patella), the ligamentous structures (collateral ligaments, patellar ligament, cruciates ligaments), the muscular part represented by the quadriceps. Morphological data were acquired through 3D CT scans for the bones and a biometrical study of the ligaments (insertions, orientation, length, section). Ligament biomechanics was modelled as bilinear springs (in compression the tightness is null; in traction it is a function of length, section and Young modulus of elasticity). The quadriceps was modelled as a sliding channel with a translatory servocommand. Contacts at the interfaces (femur/patella; femur/tibia) were evaluated according to the index of penetration (distance D) between two bodies where effort was: Dx10(5) N/mm(2)). The model was tested simulating a symmetrical kneeling (800 N body weight) and required a ground link modelled as a ball and socket joint. The model was developed under ADAMS software. The validation of the kinematics of the modelled knee was provided according to the data of Wilson et al. who have shown that (i) in normal knees, internal/external rotation, abduction/adduction and all three components of translation are coupled to flexion angle both in passive flexion and extension; (ii) the tibia rotates internally as the knee is flexed. The consistency of the coupled motions support the model's premise that passive knee motion is guided by isometric fascicles in anterior and posterior cruciates, by the medial collateral ligament and by articular contact in the medial and lateral compartments. The main curves (internal/external rotations; posterior/anterior translation) of the model conforms with the framework of Wilson.

  17. Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  18. Measurement of the local muscular metabolism by time-domain near infrared spectroscopy during knee flex-extension induced by functional electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, D.; Spinelli, L.; Torricelli, A.; Ferrante, S.; Pedrocchi, A.; Molteni, F.; Ferrigno, G.; Cubeddu, R.

    2009-02-01

    We present a preliminary study that combines functional electrical stimulation and time-domain near infrared spectroscopy for a quantitative measurement of the local muscular metabolism during rehabilitation of post-acute stroke patients. Seven healthy subjects and nine post-acute stroke patients underwent a protocol of knee flex-extension of the quadriceps induced by functional electrical stimulation. During the protocol time-domain near infrared spectroscopy measurement were performed on both left and right muscle. Hemodynamic parameters (concentration of oxy- and deoxy-genated hemoglobin) during baseline did not show any significant differences between healthy subject and patients, while functional performances (knee angle amplitude) were distinctly different. Nevertheless, even if their clinical histories were noticeably different, there was no differentiation among functional performances of patients. On the basis of the hemodynamic parameters measured during the recovery phase, instead, it was possible to identify two classes of patients showing a metabolic trend similar or very different to the one obtained by healthy subjects. The presented results suggest that the combination of functional and metabolic information can give an additional tool to the clinicians in the evaluation of the rehabilitation in post-acute stroke patients.

  19. Monitoring muscle metabolic indexes by time-domain near-infrared spectroscopy during knee flex-extension induced by functional electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, Simona; Contini, Davide; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Torricelli, Alessandro; Molteni, Franco; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2009-07-01

    A noninvasive methodology, combining functional electrical stimulation and time-domain near-infrared spectroscopy (TD-NIRS), is developed to verify whether stroke-altered muscular metabolism on postacute patients. Seven healthy subjects and nine postacute stroke patients undergo a protocol of knee flex-extension induced by quadricep electrical stimulation. During the protocol, TD-NIRS measurements are performed on both rectus femoris to investigate whether significant differences arise between able-bodied and stroke subjects and between patients' paretic and healthy legs. During baseline, metabolic parameters do not show any significant differences among subjects. During stimulation, paretic limbs produce a knee angle significantly lower than healthy legs. During recovery, patients' healthy limbs show a metabolic behavior correlated to able-bodied subjects. Instead, the correlation between the metabolic behavior of the paretic and able-bodied legs allows the definition of two patients' subgroups: one highly correlated (R>0.87) and the other uncorrelated (R<0.08). This grouping reflects the patient functional condition. The results obtained on the most impaired patients suggest that stroke does not produce any systemic consequences at the muscle, but the metabolic dysfunction seems to be local and unilateral. It is crucial to enlarge the sample size of the two subgroups before making these preliminary results a general finding.

  20. Energy Spectrum of Cosmic Rays in the Knee Region and Studies of Different Components of Extensive Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, G. V.; Fomin, Yu.A.; Kalmykov, N.N.; Kalmykov, V.N.; Kulikov, G.V.; Solovjeva, V.I.; Sulakov, V.P.; Vishnevskaya, E.A.

    2003-07-01

    The energy spectrum of the primary cosmic rays is presented. The spectrum was derived from the electron and muon (with energies above 10 GeV) size spectra obtained with the MSU EAS array and using the contemporary QGSJET model for hadron interactions. The existence of the knee at energy ˜ 3 × 1015 eV in the primary energy spectrum is confirmed. The change of the spectral index before and after the knee amounts ˜ 0.4-0.5. Study of the EAS electron and muon components is being continued with the MSU array. In parallel with the traditional study of the EAS size spectrum considerable attention was paid to investigation of the EAS muon number spectrum. The description of the MSU EAS array is given in [9]. The array covers an area of approximately 0.5 km2 and includes 77 detectors (Geiger counters) of particle density ρ used for determination of the EAS size Ne . For determination of the total number of charged particles in a shower at the observation level it is necessary to know in detail their lateral distribution function (LDF). Our analysis showed that experimental data are described rather well by the function proposed by Greisen [3] and having the form ρ ˜ xs-2 (1 + x)s-4.5 (1 + β x), where s is an age parameter, x = r /r0 , r0 = 80 m at sea level and β ˜ 0.2-0.4. However the best agreement can be achieved for the empirical LDF having more complex form ρ ˜ xs-2 (1 + x)s-4.5 [x(1 + x)]α , where a parameter α depends on the shower axis distance (Fig. 1). Further we used namely this LDF for determining of the particle number Ne . To construct the EAS size spectrum all showers were divided on narrow intervals on Ne (Δ lg Ne = 0.1). In each interval the effective collecting area

  1. Effects of Low-Impact Dance on Blood Biochemistry, Bone Mineral Density, the Joint Range of Motion of Lower Extremities, Knee Extension Torque, and Fall in Females.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui Ying; Tu, Jui Hung; Hsu, Chin Hsing; Tsao, Te Hung

    2016-01-01

    The effect of low-impact dance on blood metabolites, the joint range of motion (ROM) of the lower extremities, knee extension torque, bone mass density (BMD), the number of falls, and the confidence to perform daily activities (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale [MFES]) was examined in older sedentary women (age: 59 ± 4 years) before and after a 16-week intervention. Results showed that the average score for the MFES, some parameters of blood chemistry, and joint ROM were significantly improved after low-impact intervention. In addition to improvements in blood lipids and body fat percentages, the increases shown in the parameters regarding the lower extremities may contribute to confidence in performing common daily activities in older women, although the number of falls did not significantly differ between the two groups during the 16-week period.

  2. [The use of structural proximal tibial allografts coated with human albumin in treating extensive periprosthetic knee-joint bone deficiency and averting late complications. Case report].

    PubMed

    Klára, Tamás; Csönge, Lajos; Janositz, Gábor; Pap, Károly; Lacza, Zsombor

    2015-01-11

    The authors report the history of a 74-year-old patient who underwent surgical treatment for segmental knee-joint periprosthetic bone loss using structural proximal tibial allografts coated with serum albumin. Successful treatment of late complications which occurred in the postoperative period is also described. The authors emphasize that bone replacement with allografts is a physiological process that enables the stable positioning of the implant and the reconstruction of the soft tissues, the replacement of extensive bone loss, and also it is a less expensive operation. It has been already confirmed that treatment of lyophilised allografts with albumin improves the ability of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to adhere and proliferate the surface of the allografts, penetrate the pores and reach deeper layers of the graft. Earlier studies have shown osteoblast activity on the surface and interior of the graft.

  3. A Feasibility Study of Fuzzy FES Controller Based on Cycle-to-Cycle Control: An Experimental Test of Knee Extension Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takashi; Masuko, Tomoya; Arifin, Achmad; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) can be effective in assisting or restoring paralyzed motor functions. The purpose of this study is to examine experimentally the fuzzy controller based on cycle-to-cycle control for FES-induced gait. A basic experimental test was performed on controlling maximum knee extension angle with normal subjects. In most of control trials, the joint angle was controlled well compensating changes in muscle responses to electrical stimulation. The results show that the fuzzy controller would be practical in clinical applications of gait control by FES. An automatic parameter tuning would be required practically for quick responses in reaching the target and in compensating the change in muscle responses without causing oscillating responses.

  4. Dynamic Frequency Analyses of Lower Extremity Muscles during Sit-To-Stand Motion for the Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Yagi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Objective Muscle activities during the sit-to-stand motion (STS) are characterized by coordinated movements between hip extensors and knee extensors. However, previous reports regarding the STS and lower extremity muscle activities have focused on some quantitative assessment, but little qualitative research. This study aimed to examine the muscle activities of the lower extremity both quantitatively and qualitatively. Methods Study participants included 13 patients with knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) and 11 age-matched asymptomatic controls. The task was STS from a chair with a height-adjustable seat. EMG activities were acquired using surface electromyogram. The root mean square signals normalized as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction values (RMS%MVC) and the mean power frequency (MPF) were calculated. Results During STS, knee OA patients had increased RMS%MVC of the vastus medialis and raised MPF of the rectus femoris before buttocks-off. Conclusion These findings suggest that STS of knee OA patients not only increased relative muscle activity of the vastus medialis, but also enlisted the rectus femoris in knee extension to improve muscle contraction force by activating more type II fibers to accomplish buttocks-off. PMID:26807578

  5. Voluntary activation of human knee extensors measured using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Goodall, S; Romer, L M; Ross, E Z

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the applicability and reliability of a transcranial magnetic stimulation twitch interpolation technique for measuring voluntary activation of a lower limb muscle group. Cortical voluntary activation of the knee extensors was determined in nine healthy men on two separate visits by measuring superimposed twitch torques evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation during isometric knee extensions of varying intensity. Superimposed twitch amplitude decreased linearly with increasing voluntary torque between 50 and 100% of mean maximal torque, allowing estimation of resting twitch amplitude and subsequent calculation of voluntary activation. There were no systematic differences for maximal voluntary activation within day (mean +/- s.d. 90.9 +/- 6.2 versus 90.7 +/- 5.9%; P = 0.98) or between days (90.8 +/- 6.0 versus 91.2 +/- 5.7%; P = 0.92). Systematic bias and random error components of the 95% limits of agreement were 0.23 and 9.3% within day versus 0.38 and 7.5% between days. Voluntary activation was also determined immediately after a 2 min maximal voluntary isometric contraction; in four of these subjects, voluntary activation was determined 30 min after the sustained contraction. Immediately after the sustained isometric contraction, maximal voluntary activation was reduced from 91.2 +/- 5.7 to 74.2 +/- 12.0% (P < 0.001), indicating supraspinal fatigue. After 30 min, voluntary activation had recovered to 85.4 +/- 8.8% (P = 0.39 versus baseline). These results demonstrate that transcranial magnetic stimulation enables reliable measurement of maximal voluntary activation and assessment of supraspinal fatigue of the knee extensors.

  6. Indices of electromyographic activity and the "slow" component of oxygen uptake kinetics during high-intensity knee-extension exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Garland, Stephen W; Wang, Wen; Ward, Susan A

    2006-07-01

    The control of pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) kinetics above the lactate threshold (LT) is complex and controversial. Above LT, VO2 for square-wave exercise is greater than predicted from the sub-LT VO2-WR relationship, reflecting the contribution of an additional "slow" component (VO2(sc)). Investigators have argued for a contribution to this slow component from the recruitment of fast-twitch muscle fibres, which are less aerobically efficient than slow-twitch fibres. Six healthy subjects performed a rapid-incremental bilateral knee-extension exercise test to the limit of tolerance for the estimation of VO2(peak), ventilatory threshold (VT), and the difference between VO2(peak) and VO2 at VT (Delta). Subjects then completed three repetitions of square-wave exercise at 30% of VT for 10 min (moderate intensity), and at VT + 25%Delta (heavy intensity) for 20 min. Pulmonary gas exchange was measured breath-by-breath. Surface EMG was recorded from m. rectus femoris; integrated EMG (IEMG) and mean power frequency (MPF) were derived for successive contractions. In comparison to moderate-intensity exercise, the phase 2 VO2 kinetics in heavy exercise were marginally slower than for moderate-intensity exercise (time constant (+/- SD) 25 +/- 9 and 22 +/- 10 s, respectively; NS), with a discernible VO2(sc) (VO2 difference between minutes 6 and 3 of exercise: 74 +/- 21 and 0 +/- 20 ml min(-1), respectively). However, there was no significant change in IEMG or MPF, either in the moderate domain or in the heavy domain over the period when the slow component was manifest. These observations argue against an appreciable preferential recruitment of fast-twitch units with high force-generating characteristics and fast sarcolemmal conduction velocities in concert with the development of the VO2 slow component during heavy-intensity knee-extensor exercise. The underlying mechanism(s) remains to be resolved.

  7. Serratus Anterior and Lower Trapezius Muscle Activities During Multi-Joint Isotonic Scapular Exercises and Isometric Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruike, Masaaki; Ellenbecker, Todd S.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Proper scapular function during humeral elevation, such as upward rotation, external rotation, and posterior tilting of the scapula, is necessary to prevent shoulder injury. However, the appropriate intensity of rehabilitation exercise for the periscapular muscles has yet to be clarified. Objective: To identify the serratus anterior, lower trapezius, infraspinatus, and posterior deltoid muscle activities during 2 free-motion exercises using 3 intensities and to compare these muscle activities with isometric contractions during quadruped shoulder flexion and external rotation and abduction of the glenohumeral joint. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Health Science Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 16 uninjured, healthy, active, male college students (age = 19.5 ± 1.2 years, height = 173.1 ± 6.5 cm, weight = 68.8 ± 6.6 kg). Main Outcome Measure(s): Mean electromyographic activity normalized by the maximal voluntary isometric contraction was analyzed across 3 intensities and 5 exercises. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated for electromyographic activity of the 4 muscles in each free-motion exercise. Results: Significant interactions in electromyographic activity were observed between intensities and exercises (P < .05). The quadruped shoulder-flexion exercise activated all 4 muscles compared with other exercises. Also, the modified robbery free-motion exercise activated the serratus anterior, lower trapezius, and infraspinatus compared with the lawn-mower free-motion exercise. However, neither exercise showed a difference in posterior deltoid electromyographic activity. Conclusions: Three intensities exposed the nature of the periscapular muscle activities across the different exercises. The free-motion exercise in periscapular muscle rehabilitation may not modify serratus anterior, lower trapezius, and infraspinatus muscle activities unless knee-joint extension is limited. PMID:25689561

  8. Force-velocity relationship on a cycle ergometer and knee-extensor strength indices.

    PubMed

    Driss, Tarak; Vandewalle, Henry; Le Chevalier, Jean-Michel; Monod, Hugues

    2002-06-01

    Maximal anaerobic power (Pmax) is often measured on a friction loaded cycle ergometer by means of an all-out exercise against a single braking force or from the force-velocity relationship. The relationship between braking force (F) and peak velocity (V) in cycling is linear: V = V0(1-F/F0) where V0 and F0 correspond to the intercepts with the velocity axis and force axis, respectively. The aim of the present paper was to test the hypothesis that parameter F0 expresses strength ability. The first study (12 male volleyball players) showed significant correlations between F0 and maximal isometric voluntary force (MVF) or maximal isometric rate of force development (MRFD) during isometric knee extension with data expressed either in absolute units (0.66 < r < 0.81, P < 0.01) or related to quadriceps muscle mass kgQ or kgQ2/3 (0.58 < r < 0.82, 0.05 < P < 0.001). In the second study (24 male athletes), F0 was significantly correlated with the peak torques in isokinetic Biodex knee extension at four angular velocities (0, 1.57, 3.14 and 4.19 rad.s-1) with the values expressed in absolute units (0.49 < r < 0.83, 0.05 < P < 0.001). When the results were related to kgQ or kgQ2/3 the correlation coefficients increased with velocity (0.22 < r < 0.69) and were significant (0.05 < P < 0.001) except at 0 rad.s-1. Nevertheless, the interest of the determination of F0 in addition to Pmax is questionable because similar coefficients of correlation were obtained between Pmax and strength performances.

  9. Orientation of tendons in vivo with active and passive knee muscles.

    PubMed

    Aalbersberg, Sietske; Kingma, Idsart; Ronsky, Janet L; Frayne, Richard; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2005-09-01

    Tendon orientations in knee models are often taken from cadaver studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of muscle activation on tendon orientation in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of the knee were made during relaxation and isometric knee extensions and flexions with 0 degrees , 15 degrees and 30 degrees of knee joint flexion. For six tendons, the orientation angles in sagittal and frontal plane were calculated. In the sagittal plane, muscle activation pulled the patellar tendon to a more vertical orientation and the semitendinosus and sartorius tendons to a more posterior orientation. In the frontal plane, the semitendinosus had a less lateral orientation, the biceps femoris a more medial orientation and the patellar tendon less medial orientation in loaded compared to unloaded conditions. The knee joint angle also influenced the tendon orientations. In the sagittal plane, the patellar tendon had a more anterior orientation near full extension and the biceps femoris had an anterior orientation with 0 degrees and 15 degrees flexions and neutral with 30 degrees flexions. Within 0 degrees to 30 degrees of flexion, the biceps femoris cannot produce a posterior shear force and the anterior angle of the patellar tendon is always larger than the hamstring tendons. Therefore, co-contraction of the hamstring and quadriceps is unlikely to reduce anterior shear forces in knee angles up to 30 degrees . Finally, inter-individual variation in tendon angles was large. This suggests that the amount of shear force produced and the potential to counteract shear forces by co-contraction is subject-specific. PMID:16023464

  10. Knee Bracing: What Works?

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Knee Bracing: What Works? Knee Bracing: What Works? What are knee braces? Knee braces are supports ... have arthritis in their knees. Do knee braces work? Maybe. Companies that make knee braces claim that ...

  11. Dynamic splinting for knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Finger, Eric; Willis, F Buck

    2008-01-01

    Total Knee Arthroplasty operations are increasing in frequency, and knee flexion contracture is a common pathology, both pre-existing and post-operative. A 61-year-old male presented with knee flexion contracture following a total knee arthroplasty. Physical therapy alone did not fully reduce the contracture and dynamic splinting was then prescribed for daily low-load, prolonged-duration stretch. After 28 physical therapy sessions, the active range of motion improved from -20 degrees to -12 degrees (stiff knee still lacking full extension), and after eight additional weeks with nightly wear of dynamic splint, the patient regained full knee extension, (active extension improved from -12 degrees to 0 degrees ).

  12. RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF A MODIFIED ISOMETRIC DYNAMOMETER IN THE ASSESSMENT OF MUSCULAR PERFORMANCE IN INDIVIDUALS WITH ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcelos, Rodrigo Antunes; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora; Shimano, Antonio Carlos; Paccola, Cleber Jansen; Salvini, Tânia Fátima; Prado, Christiane Lanatovits; Junior, Wilson A. Mello

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of a modified isometric dynamometer (MID) in performance deficits of the knee extensor and flexor muscles in normal individuals and in those with ACL reconstructions. Methods: Sixty male subjects were invited to participate of the study, being divided into three groups with 20 subjects each: control group (GC), group of individuals with ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon graft (GTP, and group of individuals with ACL reconstruction with hamstrings graft (GTF). All individuals performed isometric tests in the MID, muscular strength deficits collected were subsequently compared to the tests performed on the Biodex System 3 operating in the isometric and isokinetic mode at speeds of 60°/s and 180o/s. Intraclass ICC correlation calculations were done in order to assess MID reliability, specificity, sensitivity and Kappa's consistency coefficient calculations, respectively, for assessing the MID's validity in detecting muscular deficits and intra- and intergroup comparisons when performing the four strength tests using the ANOVA method. Results: The modified isometric dynamometer (MID) showed excellent reliability and good validity in the assessment of the performance of the knee extensor and flexor muscles groups. In the comparison between groups, the GTP showed significantly greater deficits as compared to the GTF and GC groups. Conclusion: Isometric dynamometers connected to mechanotherapy equipments could be an alternative option to collect data concerning performance deficits of the extensor and flexor muscles groups of the knee in subjects with ACL reconstruction. PMID:27004175

  13. The mechanics of activated semitendinosus are not representative of the pathological knee joint condition of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Ateş, Filiz; Temelli, Yener; Yucesoy, Can A

    2016-06-01

    Characteristic cerebral palsy effects in the knee include a restricted joint range of motion and forcefully kept joint in a flexed position. To show whether the mechanics of activated spastic semitendinosus muscle are contributing to these effects, we tested the hypothesis that the muscle's joint range of force exertion is narrow and force production capacity in flexed positions is high. The isometric semitendinosus forces of children with cerebral palsy (n=7, mean (SD)=7years (8months), GMFCS levels III-IV, 12 limbs tested) were measured intra-operatively as a function of knee angle, from flexion (120°) to full extension (0°). Peak force measured in the most flexed position was considered as the benchmark. However, peak force (mean (SD)=112.4N (54.3N)) was measured either at intermediate or even full knee extension (three limbs) indicating no narrow joint range of force exertion. Lack of high force production capacity in flexed knee positions (e.g., at 120° negligible or below 22% of the peak force) was shown except for one limb. Therefore, our hypothesis was rejected for a vast majority of the limbs. These findings and those reported for spastic gracilis agree, indicating that the patients' pathological joint condition must rely on a more complex mechanism than the mechanics of individual spastic muscles. PMID:27128957

  14. Prediction of three dimensional maximum isometric neck strength.

    PubMed

    Fice, Jason B; Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-09-01

    We measured maximum isometric neck strength under combinations of flexion/extension, lateral bending and axial rotation to determine whether neck strength in three dimensions (3D) can be predicted from principal axes strength. This would allow biomechanical modelers to validate their neck models across many directions using only principal axis strength data. Maximum isometric neck moments were measured in 9 male volunteers (29±9 years) for 17 directions. The 3D moments were normalized by the principal axis moments, and compared to unity for all directions tested. Finally, each subject's maximum principal axis moments were used to predict their resultant moment in the off-axis directions. Maximum moments were 30±6 N m in flexion, 32±9 N m in lateral bending, 51±11 N m in extension, and 13±5 N m in axial rotation. The normalized 3D moments were not significantly different from unity (95% confidence interval contained one), except for three directions that combined ipsilateral axial rotation and lateral bending; in these directions the normalized moments exceeded one. Predicted resultant moments compared well to the actual measured values (r2=0.88). Despite exceeding unity, the normalized moments were consistent across subjects to allow prediction of maximum 3D neck strength using principal axes neck strength.

  15. Mini-midvastus vs standard medial parapatellar approach: a prospective, randomized, double-blinded study in patients undergoing bilateral total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Bryan J; Toulson, Charles E; Backus, Sherry I; Lyman, Stephen L; Foote, Kristin L; Windsor, Russell E

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the mini-midvastus approach to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) results in differences in quadriceps muscle strength as well as previously cited advantages in a double blind prospective randomized trial. Twenty-seven patients (54 TKAs) scheduled for bilateral TKA were randomized to undergo mini-midvastus approach on one knee and standard approach on the other. Incision lengths were the same. Postoperative strength was determined by isokinetic and isometric peak torque testing. Range of motion, pain Visual analog scale, side-preference, and gait analysis were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively. The only significant difference in strength testing was increased isokinetic and isometric extension torque at 3 weeks postoperatively for the mini-midvastus approach. No differences between the mini-midvastus and standard approach were observed for stride length, stance time, pain Visual analog scale, or knee range of motion. The mini-midvastus approach has limited benefit compared to the standard approach for TKA.

  16. Cortical voluntary activation of the human knee extensors can be reliably estimated using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Simranjit K; Bentley, David J; Carroll, Timothy J

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) method of quantifying the degree to which the motor cortex drives the muscles during voluntary efforts can be reliably applied to the human knee extensors. Although the technique for estimating "cortical" voluntary activation (VA) is valid and reliable for elbow flexors and wrist extensors, evidence that it can be applied to muscles of the lower limb is necessary if twitch interpolation with TMS is to be widely used in research or clinical practice. Eight subjects completed two identical test sessions involving brief isometric knee extensions at forces ranging from rest to maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Electromyographic (EMG) responses to TMS of the motor cortex and electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve were recorded from the rectus femoris (RF) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles, and knee extension twitch forces evoked by stimulation were measured. The amplitude of TMS-evoked twitch forces decreased linearly between 25% and 100% MVC (r(2) > 0.9), and produced reliable estimations of resting twitch and VA (ICC(2,1) > 0.85). The reliability and size of cortical measures of VA were comparable to those derived from motor nerve stimulation when the resting twitches were estimated on the basis of as few as three TMS trials. Thus, TMS measures of VA may provide a reliable and valid tool in studies investigating central fatigue due to exercise and neurological deficits in neural drive in the lower limbs. PMID:19034956

  17. The neurophysiology of central and peripheral fatigue during sub-maximal lower limb isometric contractions

    PubMed Central

    Berchicci, Marika; Menotti, Federica; Macaluso, Andrea; Di Russo, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue has been defined as an exercise-induced decline in force generation capacity because of changes at both the peripheral and central levels. Movement is preceded and accompanied by brain activities related to the preparation and execution of movement (movement related cortical potentials, MRCP), which have been correlated with the perception of effort (RPE). We combined force measurements, surface electromyography (sEMG), peripheral electrical stimulation (maximal twitch, MT) and MRCP analysis to further our understanding of the neural correlates of peripheral and central changes during a fatiguing task involving the lower limbs. Eighteen healthy volunteers performed 4 blocks of isometric knee extensions at 40% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for a total of 240 2-s contractions. At the baseline and after each block, we measured RPE, MT and MVC. We simultaneously recorded the force of the knee extensor muscles, root mean square (RMS) of the sEMG of the vastus lateralis muscle, and electroencephalography (EEG) from 64 channels. The MRCPs were extracted from the EEG recordings and averaged in the early (Block 1–2) and late (Block 3–4) blocks. Two cohorts were obtained by cluster analysis based on the RPE (i.e., perception of effort) and MT (i.e., peripheral fatigue). We observed a significant decline in both the MVC (−13%) and RMS (−25%) of the sEMG signal over the course of the task; thus, muscle fatigue had occurred in all of the participants regardless of the cohort. The MRCP amplitude was larger in the fatigued than the non-fatigued MT cohort in the supplementary and premotor areas, whereas the MRCP amplitude was larger in the fatigued than the non-fatigued RPE cohort in the aforementioned areas, and also in the primary motor and prefrontal cortices (PFC). The increase in the positive activity of the PFC, along with the perception of effort, represents a novel result, suggesting that it is modulated more by the perception of effort than

  18. Light: Isometric Casing with Lens, South Elevation, North Elevation, Top ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Light: Isometric Casing with Lens, South Elevation, North Elevation, Top Plan, Base Plan; Fresnel Lens: Isometric, Elevation, Plan - Fort Washington, Fort Washington Light, Northeast side of Potomac River at Fort Washington Park, Fort Washington, Prince George's County, MD

  19. Influence of length-restricted strength training on athlete's power-load curves of knee extensors and flexors.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Boris; Kleinöder, Heinz; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated whether different length-restricted strength training regimens affect voluntary explosive concentric power-load curves of the quadriceps femoris (QF) and hamstring (HAM) muscles. Thirty-two athletes were divided into 3 different training groups (G1-G3): G1 performed isometric training at knee joint angles corresponding to long muscle-tendon unit (MTU) length for QF and HAM; G2 conducted concentric-eccentric contraction cycles that were restricted to a knee joint range of motion corresponding to predominantly long MTU length for QF and HAM; and G3 combined the protocols of G1 and G2. Knee joint angle-dependent power-load curves during maximal voluntary explosive concentric knee extensions and flexions were measured for loads corresponding to 40, 60, and 80% of individual 1 repetition maximum at 5 different occasions: 2 times before, after 5 and 8 weeks of training, and 4 weeks post training. Power values of each subject were normalized to the largest value produced at any knee joint position (percent maximum). Obtained by curve fitting, the optimal knee joint angle for power production of QF and HAM remained unaltered throughout the course of the study for all testing loads and training groups. Therefore, different strength training regimens with a common restriction to long MTU lengths failed to induce length-dependent alterations in athlete's voluntary concentric power-load curves of knee extensors and flexors. The approach to develop strength training programs that induce systematic shifts in length-dependent power production of QF and HAM is of direct practical relevance for athletic activities such as cycling, ice skating, and skiing. However, restricting the muscle excursion range during loading seems to be an inappropriate trigger to cause length-dependent alterations in athlete's voluntary concentric power-load curves.

  20. Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint locks and unlocks automatically, at any position within range of bend angles, without manual intervention by wearer. Includes tang and clevis, locks whenever wearer transfers weight to knee and unlocks when weight removed. Locking occurs at any angle between 45 degrees knee bend and full extension.

  1. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sprains A sprain means you've stretched or torn a ligament. Common knee sprains usually involve damage ... A strain means you've partly or completely torn a muscle or tendon. With knee strains, you ...

  2. Model-based estimation of knee stiffness.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Serge; Vallery, Heike; Hardegger, Michael; Riener, Robert; Perreault, Eric J

    2012-09-01

    During natural locomotion, the stiffness of the human knee is modulated continuously and subconsciously according to the demands of activity and terrain. Given modern actuator technology, powered transfemoral prostheses could theoretically provide a similar degree of sophistication and function. However, experimentally quantifying knee stiffness modulation during natural gait is challenging. Alternatively, joint stiffness could be estimated in a less disruptive manner using electromyography (EMG) combined with kinetic and kinematic measurements to estimate muscle force, together with models that relate muscle force to stiffness. Here we present the first step in that process, where we develop such an approach and evaluate it in isometric conditions, where experimental measurements are more feasible. Our EMG-guided modeling approach allows us to consider conditions with antagonistic muscle activation, a phenomenon commonly observed in physiological gait. Our validation shows that model-based estimates of knee joint stiffness coincide well with experimental data obtained using conventional perturbation techniques. We conclude that knee stiffness can be accurately estimated in isometric conditions without applying perturbations, which presents an important step toward our ultimate goal of quantifying knee stiffness during gait.

  3. Model-Based Estimation of Knee Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Serge; Vallery, Heike; Hardegger, Michael; Riener, Robert; Perreault, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    During natural locomotion, the stiffness of the human knee is modulated continuously and subconsciously according to the demands of activity and terrain. Given modern actuator technology, powered transfemoral prostheses could theoretically provide a similar degree of sophistication and function. However, experimentally quantifying knee stiffness modulation during natural gait is challenging. Alternatively, joint stiffness could be estimated in a less disruptive manner using electromyography (EMG) combined with kinetic and kinematic measurements to estimate muscle force, together with models that relate muscle force to stiffness. Here we present the first step in that process, where we develop such an approach and evaluate it in isometric conditions, where experimental measurements are more feasible. Our EMG-guided modeling approach allows us to consider conditions with antagonistic muscle activation, a phenomenon commonly observed in physiological gait. Our validation shows that model-based estimates of knee joint stiffness coincide well with experimental data obtained using conventional perturbation techniques. We conclude that knee stiffness can be accurately estimated in isometric conditions without applying perturbations, which presents an important step towards our ultimate goal of quantifying knee stiffness during gait. PMID:22801482

  4. Feedforward consequences of isometric contractions: effort and ventilation.

    PubMed

    Luu, Billy L; Smith, Janette L; Martin, Peter G; McBain, Rachel A; Taylor, Janet L; Butler, Jane E

    2016-08-01

    The onset of voluntary muscle contractions causes rapid increases in ventilation and is accompanied by a sensation of effort. Both the ventilatory response and perception of effort are proportional to contraction intensity, but these behaviors have been generalized from contractions of a single muscle group. Our aim was to determine how these relationships are affected by simultaneous contractions of multiple muscle groups. We examined the ventilatory response and perceived effort of contraction during separate and simultaneous isometric contractions of the contralateral elbow flexors and of an ipsilateral elbow flexor and knee extensor. Subjects made 10-sec contractions at 25, 50, and 100% of maximum during normocapnia and hypercapnia. For simultaneous contractions, both muscle groups were activated at the same intensities. Ventilation was measured continuously and subjects rated the effort required to produce each contraction. As expected, ventilation and perceived effort increased proportionally with contraction intensity during individual contractions. However, during simultaneous contractions, neither ventilation nor effort reflected the combined muscle output. Rather, the ventilatory response was similar to when contractions were performed separately, and effort ratings showed a small but significant increase for simultaneous contractions. Hypercapnia at rest doubled baseline ventilation, but did not affect the difference in perceived effort between separate and simultaneous contractions. The ventilatory response and the sense of effort at the onset of muscle activity are not related to the total output of the motor pathways, or the working muscles, but arise from cortical regions upstream from the motor cortex. PMID:27482074

  5. Custom Knee Device for Knee Contractures After Internal Femoral Lengthening.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Ong, Peck-Hoon; Standard, Shawn C; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2015-07-01

    The development of knee flexion contractures is among the most common problems and complications associated with lengthening the femur with an internal device or external fixator. Conservative treatment strategies include physical therapy, serial casting, and low-load prolonged stretching with commercially available splinting systems. The authors developed an individually molded, low-cost custom knee device with polyester synthetic conformable casting material to treat knee flexion contractures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the results of treatment with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy in patients who had knee flexion contracture during femoral lengthening with an intramedullary lengthening femoral nail. This retrospective study included 23 patients (27 limbs) who underwent femoral lengthening with an internal device for the treatment of limb length discrepancy. All patients had a knee flexion contracture raging from 10° to 90° during the lengthening process and were treated with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy. The average flexion contracture before treatment was 36°. The mean amount of lengthening was 5.4 cm. After an average of 3.8 weeks of use of the custom knee device, only 2 of 27 limbs (7.5%) had not achieved complete resolution of the flexion contracture. The average final extension was 1.4°. Only 7 of 27 limbs (26%) required additional soft tissue release. The custom knee device is an inexpensive and effective method for treating knee flexion contracture after lengthening with an internal device.

  6. Physiological response to submaximal isometric contractions of the paravertebral muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, B. R.; Jorgensen, K.; Hargens, A. R.; Nielsen, P. K.; Nicolaisen, T.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Brief (30-second) isometric trunk extensions at 5%, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 80% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and 3 minutes of prolonged trunk extension (20% MVC) in erect position were studied in nine healthy male subjects. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the intercorrelation between intramuscular pressure and tissue oxygenation of the paravertebral muscles during submaximal isometric contractions and further, to evaluate paravertebral electromyogram and intramuscular pressure as indicators of force development. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Local physiologic responses to muscle contraction are incompletely understood. METHODS: Relative oxygenation was monitored with noninvasive near-infrared spectroscopy, intramuscular pressure was measured with a transducer-tipped catheter, and surface electromyogram was monitored at three recording sites. RESULTS: The root mean square amplitudes of the paravertebral electromyogram (L4, left and right; T12, right) and intramuscular pressure measured in the lumbar multifidus muscle at L4 increased with greater force development in a curvilinear manner. A significant decrease in the oxygenation of the lumbar paravertebral muscle in response to muscle contraction was found at an initial contraction level of 20% MVC. This corresponded to a paravertebral intramuscular pressure of 30-40 mm Hg. However, during prolonged trunk extension, no further decrease in tissue oxygenation was found compared with the tissue oxygenation level at the end of the brief contractions, indicating that homeostatic adjustments (mean blood pressure and heart rate) over time were sufficient to maintain paravertebral muscle oxygen levels. CONCLUSION: At a threshold intramuscular pressure of 30-40 mm Hg during muscle contraction, oxygenation in the paravertebral muscles is significantly reduced. The effect of further increase in intramuscular pressure on tissue oxygenation over time may be compensated for by an increase in blood pressure and heart

  7. BIOMECHANICAL ACCESS METHOD FOR ANALYZING ISOMETRICITY IN RECONSTRUCTING THE MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT

    PubMed Central

    Sadigursky, David; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pereira, César Augusto Martins; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present a biomechanical device for evaluating medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction and its isometricity. Methods: An accessible biomechanical method that allowed application of physiological and non-physiological forces to the knee using a mechanical arm and application of weights and counterweights was developed, so as to enable many different evaluations and have a very accurate measurement system for distances between different structures, for analysis on experiments. This article describes the assembly of this system, and suggests some practical applications. Six cadaver knees were studied. The knees were prepared in a testing machine developed at the Biomechanics Laboratory of IOT–HCFMUSP, which allowed dynamic evaluation of patellar behavior, with quantification of patellar lateralization between 0° and 120°. The differences between the distances found with and without load applied to the patella were grouped according to the graft fixation angle (0°, 30°, 60° or 90°) and knee position (intact, damaged or reconstructed). Results: There was a tendency for smaller lateral displacement to occur at fixation angles greater than 30 degrees of flexion, especially between the angles of 45° and 60° degrees of flexion, after the reconstruction. For the other angles, there was no statistical significance. Conclusion: The method developed is a useful tool for studies on the patellofemoral joint and the MPFL, and has a very accurate measurement system for distances between different structures. It can be used in institutions with fewer resources available. PMID:27047872

  8. Effect of knee joint angle on side-to-side strength ratios.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Williams, Glenn N

    2014-10-01

    Isometric knee extensor and flexor strength are typically tested at different joint angles due to the differences in length-tension relationships of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles. The efficiency of strength testing can be improved if the same angle can be used to test both the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups. The aim of this study was to determine an optimal angle for isometric knee strength testing by examining the effect of knee angle on side-to-side peak torque ratios. Eighteen active young people (9 males and 9 females) participated in this study. Knee extensor and knee flexor strength were tested on both sides at 30°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion. The effect of knee flexion angle on side-to-side peak torque ratios, raw torque values, and side-to-side flexor-to-extensor torque ratios were assessed. Side-to-side knee extensor peak torque ratios and knee flexor-to-extensor torque ratios differed significantly by knee flexion angle (p = 0.024 and p = 0.011, respectively), but side-to-side knee flexor peak torque ratios did not differ significantly (p = 0.311). When considering both side-to-side peak torque ratios and flexor-to-extensor torque ratios, the values were more symmetrical (i.e., closer to 100%) only at 60° of knee flexion. Our results indicate that both the knee flexors and the knee extensors can be tested clinically at 60° of knee flexion. Our results also indicate that the hamstrings can be tested at any of the 3 angles if the examiner is interested in side-to-side ratios rather than raw torque values. These results may facilitate more efficient and flexible clinical knee strength testing.

  9. Low-intensity eccentric contractions attenuate muscle damage induced by subsequent maximal eccentric exercise of the knee extensors in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Chen, Trevor C; Tseng, Wei-Chin; Huang, Guan-Ling; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Tseng, Kou-Wei; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated whether low-intensity eccentric contractions of the knee extensors would attenuate the magnitude of muscle damage induced by maximal eccentric exercise of the same muscle performed 7 days later using elderly individuals. Healthy older men (66.4 ± 4.6 years) were assigned to control or experimental (Exp) group (n = 13 per group). The control group performed six sets of ten maximal eccentric contractions (MaxECC) of the knee extensors of non-dominant leg. The Exp group performed six sets of ten low-intensity eccentric contractions of the knee extensors on a leg extension machine by lowering a weight of 10 % maximal voluntary isometric knee extension strength (10 %ECC) 7 days prior to MaxECC. Changes in maximal voluntary isokinetic concentric torque (MVC-CON), angle at peak torque, range of motion (ROM), upper thigh circumference, muscle soreness, plasma creatine kinase activity and myoglobin (Mb) concentration and B-mode ultrasound echo-intensity before and for 5 days after MaxECC were compared between groups by a mixed factor ANOVA. No significant changes in any variables were observed following 10 %ECC. Following MaxECC, all variables changed significantly, and changes in all variables except for angle at peak torque were significantly different between groups. MVC-CON and ROM decreased smaller and recovered faster (P < 0.05) for Exp than control group, and changes in other variables were smaller (P < 0.05) for Exp group compared with control group. These results suggest that preconditioning knee extensor muscles with low-intensity eccentric contractions was effective for attenuating muscle damage induced by subsequent MaxECC of the knee extensors for elderly individuals.

  10. Chronic Knee Dislocation After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ross, John P; Brown, Nicholas M; Levine, Brett R

    2015-12-01

    Knee dislocation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), although rare, is a dangerous injury that can lead to neurovascular compromise and permanent disability. Chronic dislocation after TKA is even less common and is defined as dislocation that is present for 4 weeks or more. There are few reports of its management. Chronic dislocation may be complicated further by concomitant extensor mechanism disruption, ligamentous instability, and/or capsular contracture. This article describes 3 cases of chronically dislocated TKAs and the challenges encountered in treating this difficult problem. A higher level of constraint was required to maintain knee stability, and an extensor mechanism allograft was needed in 2 of the 3 reported patients. The preferred technique at the authors' institution is a complete allograft composite, tensioned in full extension. In the setting of a chronically dislocated TKA, the authors now recommend revision surgery with an enhanced measure of constraint (constrained condylar device or hinged knee prosthesis), reconstruction of the extensor mechanism when necessary, and restoration of the joint while compensating for concomitant bony defects. Even when surgeons follow these principles, it is important to inform the patient that long-term outcomes will likely be inferior to those of revision surgery for other causes.

  11. Electromyogram power spectrum and features of the superimposed maximal M-wave during voluntary isometric actions in humans at different activation levels.

    PubMed

    Linnamo, V; Strojnik, V; Komi, P V

    2001-11-01

    The frequency characteristics of the electromyogram (EMG) power spectrum, such as the median or the mean power frequency, as well as the duration of the muscle compound action potential response to a single supramaximal electrical stimulus (maximal M-wave) may both be related to the conduction velocity (CV) of the muscle fibre. To investigate this further, we studied in ten male subjects: the EMG of the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis and rectus femoris muscles during maximal isometric knee extensions at 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction and also the maximal M-wave, elicited by a single supramaximal stimulus to the femoral nerve, of the same muscles at rest or superimposed on the same levels of voluntary contraction. The EMG was recorded during the constant force phase of the voluntary contractions, the duration of which was 2.5-4 s, with a 1.5 min pause between contractions. The average EMG (aEMG) and the median frequency (MF) were then calculated. The results indicated that as aEMG increased with increase in force, MF remained unchanged. However, while the amplitude of the M-wave was not affected, the duration of the M-wave was shorter as the force level increased. The duration of the M-wave may be affected by recruitment of faster motor units, by increased firing rate of the active units and by changes in the muscle fibre length. The shorter duration of the M-wave observed at higher force levels was not, however, accompanied by a corresponding increase in MF. The MF could not therefore be used as a parameter to reflect the changes in voluntary muscle activation and CV. When MF was calculated by overlapping the fast Fourier transform (FFT) windows (0.4 s long window moved data point by data point to the right) for 1 s periods of the isometric plateau phase at each force level, the difference between the lowest and the highest MF was quite substantial. These variations suggest that FFT window placement, i.e. which part of the signal is

  12. Deconditioned Knee: The Effectiveness of a Rehabilitation Program that Restores Normal Knee Motion to Improve Symptoms and Function

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Angela; Gray, Tinker

    2007-01-01

    Background Knee pain can cause a deconditioned knee. Deconditioned is defined as causing one to lose physical fitness. Therefore, a deconditioned knee is defined as a painful syndrome caused by anatomical or functional abnormalities that result in a knee flexion contracture (functional loss of knee extension), decreased strength, and decreased function. To date, no published studies exist examining treatment for a deconditioned knee. Objective To determine the effectiveness of a rehabilitation program focused on increasing range of motion for patients with a deconditioned knee. Methods Fifty patients (mean age 53.2 years) enrolled in the study. Objective evaluation included radiographs, knee range of motion, and isokinetic strength testing. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective questionnaire was used to measure symptoms and function. Patients were given a rehabilitation program to increase knee extension (including hyperextension) and flexion equal to the normal knee, after which patients were instructed in leg strengthening exercises. Results Knee extension significantly improved from a mean deficit of 10° to 3° and knee flexion significantly improved from a mean deficit of 19° to 9°. The IKDC survey scores significantly improved from a mean of 34.5 points to 70.5 points 1 year after beginning treatment. The IKDC subjective pain frequency and severity scores were significantly improved. Conclusions A rehabilitation program that improves knee range of motion can relieve pain and improve function for patients with a deconditioned knee. PMID:21522205

  13. Knee closure in total knee replacement: a randomized prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Masri, B A; Laskin, R S; Windsor, R E; Haas, S B

    1996-10-01

    A randomized prospective study of 75 total knee replacements in 64 patients who were randomized to capsular closure with the knee in full extension or in flexion was done. Thirty-one knees received a posterior cruciate ligament retaining prosthesis and 44 knees received a posterior stabilized prosthesis. Preoperatively, there was no significant difference between the groups, and patients were stratified by surgeon and type of prosthesis. Postoperatively, all patients were evaluated by a physical therapist who did not know the type of prosthesis the patient received. In addition to the range of motion obtained at discharge; the number of days required to achieve unassisted transfer; the number of days required to achieve assisted and unassisted use of a walker, cane, and stairs; and the number of days to discharge from the hospital were recorded. All patients were also evaluated at 2 to 3 months postoperatively, and the Knee Society clinical rating system scores were compared. There was no statistically significant difference in any of the early rehabilitation parameters or in the 2- to 3-month followup data. Moreover, there was no statistically significant difference in the rate of complications. With stratification according to the type of prosthesis used or the surgeon performing the operation, there was still no statistically significant difference in any of the studied parameters. It was therefore concluded that the degree of knee flexion at the time of capsular closure in total knee replacement has no effect on early rehabilitation after total knee replacement.

  14. Epidemiology of jumper's knee.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, A

    1986-01-01

    Jumper's knee is a typical functional overload injury because it affects those athletes who submit their knee extensor mechanisms to intense and repeated stress, e.g. volleyball and basketball players, high and long jumpers. According to the classification of Perugia and colleagues, it is an insertional tendinopathy affecting, in order of frequency, the insertion of the patellar tendon into the patella (65% of cases), attachment of the quadriceps tendon to the patella (25%) and the attachment of the patellar tendon to the tibial tuberosity (10%). The frequent occurrence of this injury in athletes led to the study of factors that may contribute to its onset and aggravation. These factors are divided into extrinsic (i.e. kind of sport practised and training methods used) and intrinsic (i.e. connected with the somatic and morphological characteristics of the athletes). On the basis of our experience and after a review of the literature it appears, contrary to what has been repeatedly claimed in the past, the extrinsic factors are more important than the intrinsic in the aetiology of jumper's knee. The effect of traumatic incidents and use of elastic kneecap guards should also be considered negligible. The intrinsic causes of jumper's knee, can be sought in the mechanical properties of tendons (resistance, elasticity and extensibility) rather than in morphological or biomechanical abnormalities of the knee extensor mechanism.

  15. Comparison of knee gait kinematics of workers exposed to knee straining posture to those of non-knee straining workers.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathaly; Hagemeister, Nicola; Poitras, Stéphane; de Guise, Jacques A

    2013-06-01

    Workers exposed to knee straining postures, such as kneeling and squatting, may present modifications in knee gait kinematics that can make them vulnerable to osteoarthritis. In this study, knee kinematics of workers exposed to occupational knee straining postures (KS workers) were compared to those of non-knee straining (non-KS) workers. Eighteen KS workers and 20 non-KS workers participated in the study. Three-dimensional gait kinematic data were recorded at the knee using an electromagnetic motion tracking system. The following parameters were extracted from flexion/extension, adduction/abduction and internal/external rotation angle data and used for group comparisons: knee angle at initial foot contact, peak angles, minimal angles and angle range during the entire gait cycle. Group comparisons were performed with Student t-tests. In the sagittal plane, KS workers had a greater knee flexion angle at initial foot contact, a lower peak knee flexion angle during the swing phase and a lower angle range than non-KS workers (p<0.05). In the frontal plane, all parameters indicated that KS workers had their knees more adducted than non-KS workers. External/internal rotation range was greater for KS workers. This study provides new knowledge on work related to KS postures and knee kinematics. The results support the concept that KS workers might exhibit knee kinematics that are different from those of non-KS workers.

  16. Prosthetic knee design by simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K; Hollister, A

    1999-07-30

    Although 150,000 total knee replacement surgeries are performed annually in North America, current designs of knee prostheses have mechanical problems that include a limited range of motion, abnormal gait patterns, patellofemoral joint dysfunction, implant loosening or subsidence, and excessive wear. These problems fall into three categories: failure to reproduce normal joint kinematics, which results in altered limb function; bone-implant interface failure; and material failure. Modern computer technology can be used to design, prototype, and test new total knee implants. The design team uses the full range of CAD-CAM to design and produce implant prototypes for mechanical and clinical testing. Closer approximation of natural knee kinematics and kinetics is essential for improved patient function and diminished implant loads. Current knee replacement designs are based on 19th Century theories that the knee moves about a variable axis of rotation. Recent research has shown, however, that knee motion occurs about two fixed, offset axes of rotation. These aces are not perpendicular to the long axes of the bones or to each other, and the axes do not intersect. Bearing surfaces of mechanisms that move about axes of rotation are surfaces of revolution of those axes which advanced CAD technology can produce. Solids with surfaces of revolution for the two axes of rotation for the knee have been made using an HP9000 workstation and Structural Ideas Master Series CAD software at ArthroMotion. The implant's CAD model should closely replicate movements of the normal knee. The knee model will have a range of flexion-extension (FE) from -5 to 120 degrees. Movements include varus, valgus, internal and external rotation, as well as flexion and extension. The patellofemoral joint is aligned perpendicular to the FE axis and replicates the natural joint more closely than those of existing prostheses. The bearing surfaces will be more congruent than current designs and should

  17. Effect of an eccentrically biased hamstring strengthening home program on knee flexor strength and the length-tension relationship.

    PubMed

    Orishimo, Karl F; McHugh, Malachy P

    2015-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to document relative activation intensities of the hamstrings and gluteus maximus during 4 eccentric hamstring strengthening exercises and to assess the effects of a short-term strengthening program comprised of these exercises on knee flexor strength and the length-tension relationship. Twelve healthy subjects participated in this study. Electromyographic (EMG) activities from the biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and gluteus maximus were recorded as subjects performed (a) standing hip extension with elastic resistance, (b) trunk flexion in single limb stance (diver), (c) standing split (glider), and (d) supine sliding bridge (slider). Baseline isometric knee flexor strength was measured at 90, 70, 50, and 30° of flexion at the knee with the subject seated and the hip flexed to 50° from horizontal. After completing the 4-week training program, strength tests were repeated. Repeated-measures analysis of variance were used to compare EMG activity between muscles and to assess angle-specific strength improvements. Hamstring activity exceeded gluteus maximus activity for resisted hip extension, glider, and slider exercises (p < 0.001) but not for the diver (p = 0.087). Hamstring activation was greatest during the slider and resisted hip extension and lowest during the glider and the diver. Knee flexor strength improved by 9.0% (p = 0.005) but was not angle specific (training by angle p = 0.874). The short-term home training program effectively targeted the hamstrings and resulted in strength gains that were similar at short and long muscle lengths. These data demonstrate that hamstring strength can be improved using eccentrically biased unilateral exercises without the use of weights or other equipments. PMID:25226327

  18. The Influence of Vibration on Muscle Activation and Rate of Force Development during Maximal Isometric Contractions.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Brendan; Warman, Geoff; Purton, Jason; Doyle, Tim L A; Dugan, Eric

    2004-03-01

    At present there appears to be a need for research conducted on the effects of vibration on the contractile ability of skeletal muscle tissue. The aim of this study was to address this issue by examining the effects of a superimposed muscle/tendon vibration at 50.42±1.16 Hz (acceleration 13.24 ± 0.18ms(-2): displacement ≈5mm) on muscular activation and maximal isometric contraction. Sixteen participants with a mean age, body mass, and height of 22 ± 4.4 years, 73.2 ± 11.7 kg and 173.1 ± 9.7 cms, respectively, were recruited for this study. Electromyography and accelerometry from the rectus femoris, and maximal isometric force data characteristics were collected from the dominant limb under conditions of vibration, and no-vibration. A superimposed 50 Hz vibration was used during the contraction phase for the maximal isometric leg extension for the condition of vibration. A one-way ANOVA revealed no significant (p > 0.05) differences between the vibration and no-vibration conditions for peak normalized EMGRMS (84.74% Vs 88.1%) values. An ANOVA revealed significant (p > 0.05) differences between the peak fundamental frequencies of the FFT between the conditions vibration (27.1 ± 12.2 Hz) and no-vibration (9.8 ± 3.5 Hz). Peak isometric force, peak rate of force development, rate of force development at times 0.05, 0.01, 0.1, 0.5 seconds, and rate of force development at 50, 75, and 90% of peak force were not significantly different. The results of this study suggest that the application of vibration stimulation at 50 Hz during the contraction does not contribute to muscle activation, or enhance force production for maximal isometric contractions. Key PointsThe application of a vibratory stimulation to the human body increases the normal acceleration resulting in an increase in force and a change in performanceThis study was to address this issue by examining the effects of a direct superimposed muscle/tendon vibration at 50 Hz on isometric strength

  19. Isometric deformations of planar quadrilaterals with constant index

    SciTech Connect

    Zaputryaeva, E S

    2014-05-31

    We consider isometric deformations (motions) of polygons (so-called carpenter's rule problem) in the case of self-intersecting polygons with the additional condition that the index of the polygon is preserved by the motion. We provide general information about isometric deformations of planar polygons and give a complete solution of the carpenter's problem for quadrilaterals. Bibliography: 17 titles.

  20. The Adaptive Range of 1/f Isometric Force Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Valantine, Andrew D.; Newell, Karl M.

    2009-01-01

    The adaptive range of 1/f dynamics in isometric force output was investigated. Participants produced isometric force to targets with predictable demands (constant and sinusoidal) and 1/f noise waveforms (white, pink, brown, and black) that also varied in the frequency bandwidth represented in the force signal (0-4 Hz, 0-8 Hz, and 0-12 Hz). The…

  1. The effect of total knee arthroplasty on knee joint kinematics and kinetics during gait.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Gillian L; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L; Astephen Wilson, Janie L; Dunbar, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    This study determined how total knee arthroplasty (TKA) altered knee motion and loading during gait. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic gait patterns of 42 patients with severe knee osteoarthritis were collected 1 week prior and 1-year post-TKA. Principal component analysis extracted major patterns of variability in the gait waveforms. Overall and midstance knee adduction moment magnitude decreased. Overall knee flexion angle magnitude increased due to an increase during swing. Increases in the early stance knee flexion moment and late stance knee extension moment were found, indicating improved impact attenuation and function. A decrease in the early stance knee external rotation moment indicated alteration in the typical rotation mechanism. Most changes moved toward an asymptomatic pattern and would be considered improvements in motion, function, and loading.

  2. Effect of Preactivation on Torque Enhancement by the Stretch-Shortening Cycle in Knee Extensors.

    PubMed

    Fukutani, Atsuki; Misaki, Jun; Isaka, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    The stretch-shortening cycle is one of the most interesting topics in the field of sport sciences, because the performance of human movement is enhanced by the stretch-shortening cycle (eccentric contraction). The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the influence of preactivation on the torque enhancement by stretch-shortening cycle in knee extensors. Twelve men participated in this study. The following three conditions were conducted for knee extensors: (1) concentric contraction without preactivation (CON), (2) concentric contraction with eccentric preactivation (ECC), and (3) concentric contraction with isometric preactivation (ISO). Muscle contractions were evoked by electrical stimulation to discard the influence of neural activity. The range of motion of the knee joint was set from 80 to 140 degrees (full extension = 180 degrees). Angular velocities of the concentric and eccentric contractions were set at 180 and 90 degrees/s, respectively. In the concentric contraction phase, joint torques were recorded at 85, 95, and 105 degrees, and they were compared among the three conditions. In the early phase (85 degrees) of concentric contraction, the joint torque was larger in the ECC and ISO conditions than in the CON condition. However, these clear differences disappeared in the later phase (105 degrees) of concentric contraction. The results showed that joint torque was clearly different among the three conditions in the early phase whereas this difference disappeared in the later phase. Thus, preactivation, which is prominent in the early phase of contractions, plays an important role in torque enhancement by the stretch-shortening cycle in knee extensors.

  3. Effect of Preactivation on Torque Enhancement by the Stretch-Shortening Cycle in Knee Extensors

    PubMed Central

    Fukutani, Atsuki; Misaki, Jun; Isaka, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    The stretch-shortening cycle is one of the most interesting topics in the field of sport sciences, because the performance of human movement is enhanced by the stretch-shortening cycle (eccentric contraction). The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the influence of preactivation on the torque enhancement by stretch-shortening cycle in knee extensors. Twelve men participated in this study. The following three conditions were conducted for knee extensors: (1) concentric contraction without preactivation (CON), (2) concentric contraction with eccentric preactivation (ECC), and (3) concentric contraction with isometric preactivation (ISO). Muscle contractions were evoked by electrical stimulation to discard the influence of neural activity. The range of motion of the knee joint was set from 80 to 140 degrees (full extension = 180 degrees). Angular velocities of the concentric and eccentric contractions were set at 180 and 90 degrees/s, respectively. In the concentric contraction phase, joint torques were recorded at 85, 95, and 105 degrees, and they were compared among the three conditions. In the early phase (85 degrees) of concentric contraction, the joint torque was larger in the ECC and ISO conditions than in the CON condition. However, these clear differences disappeared in the later phase (105 degrees) of concentric contraction. The results showed that joint torque was clearly different among the three conditions in the early phase whereas this difference disappeared in the later phase. Thus, preactivation, which is prominent in the early phase of contractions, plays an important role in torque enhancement by the stretch-shortening cycle in knee extensors. PMID:27414804

  4. Runner's Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... Over the summer he bought a pair of running shoes and took up jogging. He started with ... bending the knee — when walking, kneeling, squatting, or running, for example. Walking or running downhill or even ...

  5. Knee Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Robert C.; Richter, Dustin L.; Wascher, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic knee dislocation is becoming more prevalent because of improved recognition and increased exposure to high-energy trauma, but long-term results are lacking. Purpose: To present 2 cases with minimum 20-year follow-up and a review of the literature to illustrate some of the fundamental principles in the management of the dislocated knee. Study Design: Review and case reports. Methods: Two patients with knee dislocations who underwent multiligamentous knee reconstruction were reviewed, with a minimum 20-year follow-up. These patients were brought back for a clinical evaluation using both subjective and objective measures. Subjective measures include the following scales: Lysholm, Tegner activity, visual analog scale (VAS), Short Form–36 (SF-36), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and a psychosocial questionnaire. Objective measures included ligamentous examination, radiographic evaluation (including Telos stress radiographs), and physical therapy assessment of function and stability. Results: The mean follow-up was 22 years. One patient had a vascular injury requiring repair prior to ligament reconstruction. The average assessment scores were as follows: SF-36 physical health, 52; SF-36 mental health, 59; Lysholm, 92; IKDC, 86.5; VAS involved, 10.5 mm; and VAS uninvolved, 2.5 mm. Both patients had excellent stability and were functioning at high levels of activity for their age (eg, hiking, skydiving). Both patients had radiographic signs of arthritis, which lowered 1 subject’s IKDC score to “C.” Conclusion: Knee dislocations have rare long-term excellent results, and most intermediate-term studies show fair to good functional results. By following fundamental principles in the management of a dislocated knee, patients can be given the opportunity to function at high levels. Hopefully, continued advances in the evaluation and treatment of knee dislocations will improve the long-term outcomes for these patients in the

  6. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt or diseased, you have knee problems. Knee problems can cause pain and difficulty ...

  7. Dynamic splinting for knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Eric; Willis, F Buck

    2008-01-01

    Total Knee Arthroplasty operations are increasing in frequency, and knee flexion contracture is a common pathology, both pre-existing and post-operative. A 61-year-old male presented with knee flexion contracture following a total knee arthroplasty. Physical therapy alone did not fully reduce the contracture and dynamic splinting was then prescribed for daily low-load, prolonged-duration stretch. After 28 physical therapy sessions, the active range of motion improved from -20° to -12° (stiff knee still lacking full extension), and after eight additional weeks with nightly wear of dynamic splint, the patient regained full knee extension, (active extension improved from -12° to 0°). PMID:19113998

  8. Abnormal coactivation of knee and ankle extensors is related to changes in heteronymous spinal pathways after stroke

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Abnormal coactivation of leg extensors is often observed on the paretic side of stroke patients while they attempt to move. The mechanisms underlying this coactivation are not well understood. This study (1) compares the coactivation of leg extensors during static contractions in stroke and healthy individuals, and (2) assesses whether this coactivation is related to changes in intersegmental pathways between quadriceps and soleus (Sol) muscles after stroke. Methods Thirteen stroke patients and ten healthy individuals participated in the study. Levels of coactivation of knee extensors and ankle extensors were measured in sitting position, during two tasks: maximal isometric voluntary contractions in knee extension and in plantarflexion. The early facilitation and later inhibition of soleus voluntary EMG evoked by femoral nerve stimulation were assessed in the paretic leg of stroke participants and in one leg of healthy participants. Results Coactivation levels of ankle extensors (mean ± SEM: 56 ± 7% of Sol EMG max) and of knee extensors (52 ± 10% of vastus lateralis (VL) EMG max) during the knee extension and the ankle extension tasks respectively were significantly higher in the paretic leg of stroke participants than in healthy participants (26 ± 5% of Sol EMG max and 10 ± 3% of VL EMG max, respectively). Early heteronymous facilitation of Sol voluntary EMG in stroke participants (340 ± 62% of Sol unconditioned EMG) was significantly higher than in healthy participants (98 ± 34%). The later inhibition observed in all control participants was decreased in the paretic leg. Levels of coactivation of ankle extensors during the knee extension task were significantly correlated with both the increased facilitation (Pearson r = 0.59) and the reduced inhibition (r = 0.56) in the paretic leg. Measures of motor impairment were more consistently correlated with the levels of coactivation of biarticular muscles than those of monoarticular muscles

  9. Isometric force production parameters during normal and experimental low back pain conditions

    PubMed Central

    Descarreaux, Martin; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Teasdale, Normand

    2005-01-01

    Background The control of force and its between-trial variability are often taken as critical determinants of motor performance. Subjects performed isometric trunk flexion and extension forces without and with experiment pain to examine if pain yields changes in the control of trunk forces. The objective of this study is to determine if experimental low back pain modifies trunk isometric force production. Methods Ten control subjects participated in this study. They were required to exert 50 and 75% of their isometric maximal trunk flexion and extension torque. In a learning phase preceding the non painful and painful trials, visual and verbal feedbacks were provided. Then, subjects were asked to perform 10 trials without any feedback. Time to peak torque, time to peak torque variability, peak torque variability as well as constant and absolute error in peak torque were calculated. Time to peak and peak dF/dt were computed to determine if the first peak of dF/dt could predict the peak torque achieved. Results Absolute and constant errors were higher in the presence of a painful electrical stimulation. Furthermore, peak torque variability for the higher level of force was increased with in the presence of experimental pain. The linear regressions between peak dF/dt, time to peak dF/dt and peak torque were similar for both conditions. Experimental low back pain yielded increased absolute and constant errors as well as a greater peak torque variability for the higher levels of force. The control strategy, however, remained the same between the non painful and painful condition. Cutaneous pain affects some isometric force production parameters but modifications of motor control strategies are not implemented spontaneously. Conclusions It is hypothesized that adaptation of motor strategies to low back pain is implemented gradually over time. This would enable LBP patients to perform their daily tasks with presumably less pain and more accuracy. PMID:15703067

  10. Force-Time Entropy of Isometric Impulse.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tsung-Yu; Newell, Karl M

    2016-01-01

    The relation between force and temporal variability in discrete impulse production has been viewed as independent (R. A. Schmidt, H. Zelaznik, B. Hawkins, J. S. Frank, & J. T. Quinn, 1979 ) or dependent on the rate of force (L. G. Carlton & K. M. Newell, 1993 ). Two experiments in an isometric single finger force task investigated the joint force-time entropy with (a) fixed time to peak force and different percentages of force level and (b) fixed percentage of force level and different times to peak force. The results showed that the peak force variability increased either with the increment of force level or through a shorter time to peak force that also reduced timing error variability. The peak force entropy and entropy of time to peak force increased on the respective dimension as the parameter conditions approached either maximum force or a minimum rate of force production. The findings show that force error and timing error are dependent but complementary when considered in the same framework with the joint force-time entropy at a minimum in the middle parameter range of discrete impulse.

  11. Isometric strength ratios of the hip musculature in females with patellofemoral pain: a comparison to pain-free controls.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Eduardo; Silva, Ana Paula M C C; Sacramento, Sylvio N; Martin, RobRoy L; Fukuda, Thiago Y

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare hip agonist-antagonist isometric strength ratios between females with patellofemoral pain (PFP) syndrome and pain-free control group. One hundred and twenty females between 15 and 40 years of age (control group: n = 60; PFP group: n = 60) participated in the study. Hip adductor, abductor, medial rotator, lateral rotator, flexor, and extensor isometric strength were measured using a hand-held dynamometer. Comparisons in the hip adductor/abductor and medial/lateral rotator and flexor/extensor strength ratios were made between groups using independent t-tests. Group comparisons also were made between the anteromedial hip complex (adductor, medial rotator, and flexor musculature) and posterolateral hip complex (abductor, lateral rotator, and extensor musculature). On average, the hip adductor/abductor isometric strength ratio in the PFP group was 23% higher when compared with the control group (p = 0.01). The anteromedial/posterolateral complex ratio also was significantly higher in the PFP group (average 8%; p = 0.04). No significant group differences were found for the medial/lateral rotator ratio and flexor/extensor strength ratios. The results of this study demonstrate that females with PFP have altered hip strength ratios when compared with asymptomatic controls. These strength imbalances may explain the tendency of females with PFP to demonstrate kinematic tendencies that increase loading on the patellofemoral joint (i.e., dynamic knee valgus). PMID:23207884

  12. Elevations, Major Component Isometric, Propellant Flow Schematic, and External Tank ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations, Major Component Isometric, Propellant Flow Schematic, and External Tank Connection to Shuttle Main Engines - Space Transportation System, Space Shuttle Main Engine, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  13. 41. OPERATING CORRIDOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, INCLUDING SOME ISOMETRIC DETAILS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. OPERATING CORRIDOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, INCLUDING SOME ISOMETRIC DETAILS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106455. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-P-60 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. 45. Photographic reproduction of construction drawing: "Launch Control Facility, Isometric." ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Photographic reproduction of construction drawing: "Launch Control Facility, Isometric." - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  15. Neuromuscular dysfunction with the experimental arm acting as its own reference following eccentric and isometric exercise.

    PubMed

    Philippou, Anastassios; Bogdanis, Gregory C; Maridaki, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Eccentric exercise has been extensively used as a model to study muscle damage-induced neuromuscular impairment, adopting mainly a bilateral matching task between the reference (unexercised) arm and the indicator (exercised) arm. However, little attention has been given to the muscle proprioceptive function when the exercised arm acts as its own reference. This study investigated muscle proprioception and motor control, with the arm acting both as reference and indicator, following eccentric exercise and compared them with those observed after isometric exercise. Fourteen young male volunteers were equally divided into two groups and performed an eccentric or isometric exercise protocol with the elbow flexors of the non-dominant arm on an isokinetic dynamometer. Both exercise protocols induced significant changes in indicators of muscle damage, that is, muscle soreness, range of motion and maximal isometric force post-exercise (p < 0.05-0.001), and neuromuscular function was similarly affected following both protocols. Perception of force was impaired over the 4-day post-exercise period (p < 0.001), with the applied force being systematically overestimated. Perception of joint position was significantly disturbed (i.e., target angle was underestimated) only at one elbow angle on day 4 post-exercise (p < 0.05). The misjudgements and disturbed motor output observed when the exercised arm acted as its own reference concur with the view that they could be a result of a mismatch between the central motor command and an impaired motor control after muscle damage. PMID:20553224

  16. Reliability and validity of two isometric squat tests.

    PubMed

    Blazevich, Anthony J; Gill, Nicholas; Newton, Robert U

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was first to examine the reliability of isometric squat (IS) and isometric forward hack squat (IFHS) tests to determine if repeated measures on the same subjects yielded reliable results. The second purpose was to examine the relation between isometric and dynamic measures of strength to assess validity. Fourteen male subjects performed maximal IS and IFHS tests on 2 occasions and 1 repetition maximum (1-RM) free-weight squat and forward hack squat (FHS) tests on 1 occasion. The 2 tests were found to be highly reliable (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC](IS) = 0.97 and ICC(IFHS) = 1.00). There was a strong relation between average IS and 1-RM squat performance, and between IFHS and 1-RM FHS performance (r(squat) = 0.77, r(FHS) = 0.76; p < 0.01), but a weak relation between squat and FHS test performances (r < 0.55). There was also no difference between observed 1-RM values and those predicted by our regression equations. Errors in predicting 1-RM performance were in the order of 8.5% (standard error of the estimate [SEE] = 13.8 kg) and 7.3% (SEE = 19.4 kg) for IS and IFHS respectively. Correlations between isometric and 1-RM tests were not of sufficient size to indicate high validity of the isometric tests. Together the results suggest that IS and IFHS tests could detect small differences in multijoint isometric strength between subjects, or performance changes over time, and that the scores in the isometric tests are well related to 1-RM performance. However, there was a small error when predicting 1-RM performance from isometric performance, and these tests have not been shown to discriminate between small changes in dynamic strength. The weak relation between squat and FHS test performance can be attributed to differences in the movement patterns of the tests

  17. Improved Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint improved version of one described in "Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint" (MFS-28633). Locks automatically upon initial application of radial force (wearer's weight) and unlocks automatically, but only when all loads (radial force and bending) relieved. Joints lock whenever wearer applies weight to knee at any joint angle between full extension and 45 degree bend. Both devices offer increased safety and convenience relative to conventional orthotic knee joints.

  18. Comparison of sympathetic nerve responses to neck and forearm isometric exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, S. L. Jr; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although the autonomic and cardiovascular responses to arm and leg exercise have been studied, the sympathetic adjustments to exercise of the neck have not. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric contractions of the neck extensors and 2) to compare sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise of the neck and forearm. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate were measured in nine healthy subjects while performing isometric neck extension (INE) and isometric handgrip (IHG) in the prone position. After a 3-min baseline period, subjects performed three intensities of INE for 2.5 min each: 1) unloaded (supporting head alone), 2) 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 3) 30% MVC, then subjects performed two intensities (10% and 30% MVC) of IHG for 2.5 min. RESULTS: Supporting the head by itself did not significantly change any of the variables. During [NE, MAP significantly increased by 10 +/- 2 and 31 +/- 4 mm Hg and MSNA increased by 67 +/- 46 and 168 +/- 36 units/30 s for 10% and 30% MVC, respectively. IHG and INE evoked similar responses at 10% MVC, but IHG elicited higher peak MAP and MSNA at 30% MVC (37 +/- 7 mm Hg (P < 0.05) and 300 +/- 48 units/30 s (P < 0.01) for IHG, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The data indicate that INE can elicit marked increases in MSNA and cardiovascular responses but that it evokes lower peak responses as compared to IHG. We speculate that possible differences in muscle fiber type composition, muscle mass, and/or muscle architecture of the neck and forearm are responsible for these differences in peak responses.

  19. [Knee endoprosthesis: sports orthopedics possibilities and limitations].

    PubMed

    Kuster, M S; Grob, K; Gächter, A

    2000-08-01

    Many patients would like to resume some sport activities after total knee replacement; however, most recommendations are based on subjective opinion rather than scientific evidence. The following paper presents a literature review of sports after total knee replacement and includes recommendations which are based on biomechanical laws. Most total knee designs show increased conformity near full extension. Beyond a certain knee flexion angle, the conformity ratio decreases due to a reduced femoral radius. Therefore, these designs accept higher loads near full extension than in flexion. In order to recommend suitable physical activities after total knee replacement, both the load and the knee flexion angle of the peak load must be considered. It has been shown that power walking and cycling produce the lowest polyethylene inlay stress of a total knee replacement and seem to be the least demanding endurance activities. Jogging and downhill walking show high inlay stress levels and should be avoided. Hence, for mountain hiking, patients are advised to avoid descents or at least use skipoles and walk slowly downhill to reduce the load on the knee joint. It must also be mentioned that any activity represents additional wear, which may affect the long-term results of total knee replacements. Further clinical studies are necessary to validate the biomechanical investigations. PMID:11013918

  20. Effect of plyometric training on neural and mechanical properties of the knee extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Behrens, M; Mau-Moeller, A; Bruhn, S

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated neuromuscular adaptations of the knee extensors after 8 weeks of plyometric training. 23 subjects were randomly assigned to an intervention group and a control group. We measured isometric maximum voluntary torque (iMVT), rate of torque development (RTD) and impulse (IMP) over different time intervals. The neural drive to muscles was estimated with the interpolated twitch technique and normalized root mean square of the EMG signal. Contractile properties, H reflexes as well as jump height in squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ) were evaluated. Neuromuscular testing was performed at 2 knee angles, i. e., 80° and 45° (0° = full extension). The iMVT at 80° knee flexion was 23.1 N · m (95% CI: 0.1-46.1 N · m, P = 0.049) higher at post-test for the intervention group compared with controls. The same was true for RTD and IMP in the time interval 0-50 ms [308.7 N · m · s(-1) (95% CI: 28.8-588.6 N · m · s(-1), P = 0.033) and 0.32 N · m · s (95% CI: 0.05-0.60 N · m · s, P = 0.026), respectively]. These changes were accompanied by enhanced neural drive to the quadriceps muscle. Jump height in SJ and CMJ was higher at post-test for the intervention group compared with controls. Parameters at 45° knee flexion, contractile properties and evoked potentials did not differ between groups. Although hypertrophic changes were not measured, data suggest that the training regime probably induced mainly neural adaptations that were specifically related to the knee angle. The strength gains at 80° knee flexion likely contributed to the enhanced jump height in SJ and CMJ. PMID:23900900

  1. Minimum-distortion isometric shape correspondence using EM algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sahillioğlu, Yusuf; Yemez, Yücel

    2012-11-01

    We present a purely isometric method that establishes 3D correspondence between two (nearly) isometric shapes. Our method evenly samples high-curvature vertices from the given mesh representations, and then seeks an injective mapping from one vertex set to the other that minimizes the isometric distortion. We formulate the problem of shape correspondence as combinatorial optimization over the domain of all possible mappings, which then reduces in a probabilistic setting to a log-likelihood maximization problem that we solve via the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm. The EM algorithm is initialized in the spectral domain by transforming the sampled vertices via classical Multidimensional Scaling (MDS). Minimization of the isometric distortion, and hence maximization of the log-likelihood function, is then achieved in the original 3D euclidean space, for each iteration of the EM algorithm, in two steps: by first using bipartite perfect matching, and then a greedy optimization algorithm. The optimal mapping obtained at convergence can be one-to-one or many-to-one upon choice. We demonstrate the performance of our method on various isometric (or nearly isometric) pairs of shapes for some of which the ground-truth correspondence is available.

  2. Relationships between force-time characteristics of the isometric midthigh pull and dynamic performance in professional rugby league players.

    PubMed

    West, Daniel J; Owen, Nick J; Jones, Marc R; Bracken, Richard M; Cook, Christian J; Cunningham, Dan J; Shearer, David A; Finn, Charlotte V; Newton, Robert U; Crewther, Blair T; Kilduff, Liam P

    2011-11-01

    There is considerable conflict within the literature regarding the relevance of isometric testing for the assessment of neuromuscular function within dynamic sports. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between isometric measures of force development and dynamic performance. Thirty-nine professional rugby league players participated in this study. Forty-eight hours after trial familiarization, participants performed a maximal isometric midthigh pull, with ∼120-130° bend at the knee, countermovement jump (CMJ), and a 10-m sprint. Force-time data were processed for peak force (PF), force at 100 milliseconds (F100ms), and peak rate of force development (PRFD). Analysis was carried out using Pearson's product moment correlation with significance set at p < 0.05. The PF was not related to dynamic performance; however, when expressed relative to body weight, it was significantly correlated with both 10-m time and CMJ height (r = -0.37 and 0.45, respectively, p < 0.05). The F100ms was inversely related to 10-m time (r = -0.54, p < 0.01); moreover, when expressed relative to body weight, it was significantly related to both 10-m time and CMJ height (r = -0.68 and 0.43, p < 0.01). In addition, significant correlations were found between PRFD and 10-m time (r = -0.66, p < 0.01) and CMJ height (r = 0.387, p < 0.01). In conclusion, this study provides evidence that measures of maximal strength and explosiveness from isometric force-time curves are related to jump and sprint acceleration performance in professional rugby league players.

  3. [Jumper's knee].

    PubMed

    Hagner, W; Sosnowski, S; Kaziński, W; Frankowski, S

    1993-01-01

    A series of 30 athletes aged about 16 years on an average, exposed to activities putting a strain on the patellar tendon during training has been examined. They were involved in competitive sports for 3 years on an average. In 27 per cent of them jumpers knee symptoms have been found.

  4. Jumper's knee.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, A; Ippolito, E; Mariani, P; Puddu, G

    1983-01-01

    Jumper's knee (patellar or quadriceps tendon tendonitis) is found in a high number of athletes, especially in volleyball and basketball players. Conservative treatment (rest, stretching, physical therapy and antiinflammatory drugs) is usually successful. The athletes often recover completely and resume their sports activity. The purpose of this study is to present the histologic findings and our surgical repair of 18 knees of patients who underwent surgery after failure of conservative treatment. Histologic findings confirm that the so-called "jumper's knee" is a pathology localized at the bone-tendon junction. In all cases the following abnormalities were found: pseudocystic cavities at the borderline between mineralized fibrocartilage and bone, disappearance of the "blue line," increased thickness of the insertional fibrocartilage with myxomatous and hyaline metaplasia, mineralization, and ossification of the fibrocartilage far from the "blue line." Abnormalities of the patellar tendon were observed only in one patient who received local injection of corticosteroids. Eleven of the 18 surgically treated knees obtained a satisfactory result with complete resumption of sports activity.

  5. Torque and mechanomyogram relationships during electrically-evoked isometric quadriceps contractions in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Hasnan, Nazirah; Abdul Wahab, Ahmad Khairi; Islam, Md Anamul; Kean, Victor S P; Davis, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between muscle contractions and joint loading produces torques necessary for movements during activities of daily living. However, during neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)-evoked contractions in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), a simple and reliable proxy of torque at the muscle level has been minimally investigated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between muscle mechanomyographic (MMG) characteristics and NMES-evoked isometric quadriceps torques in persons with motor complete SCI. Six SCI participants with lesion levels below C4 [(mean (SD) age, 39.2 (7.9) year; stature, 1.71 (0.05) m; and body mass, 69.3 (12.9) kg)] performed randomly ordered NMES-evoked isometric leg muscle contractions at 30°, 60° and 90° knee flexion angles on an isokinetic dynamometer. MMG signals were detected by an accelerometer-based vibromyographic sensor placed over the belly of rectus femoris muscle. The relationship between MMG root mean square (MMG-RMS) and NMES-evoked torque revealed a very high association (R(2)=0.91 at 30°; R(2)=0.98 at 60°; and R(2)=0.97 at 90° knee angles; P<0.001). MMG peak-to-peak (MMG-PTP) and stimulation intensity were less well related (R(2)=0.63 at 30°; R(2)=0.67 at 60°; and R(2)=0.45 at 90° knee angles), although were still significantly associated (P≤0.006). Test-retest interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for the dependent variables ranged from 0.82 to 0.97 for NMES-evoked torque, between 0.65 and 0.79 for MMG-RMS, and from 0.67 to 0.73 for MMG-PTP. Their standard error of measurements (SEM) ranged between 10.1% and 31.6% (of mean values) for torque, MMG-RMS and MMG-PTP. The MMG peak frequency (MMG-PF) of 30Hz approximated the stimulation frequency, indicating NMES-evoked motor unit firing rate. The results demonstrated knee angle differences in the MMG-RMS versus NMES-isometric torque relationship, but a similar torque related pattern for MMG-PF. These findings

  6. Torque and mechanomyogram relationships during electrically-evoked isometric quadriceps contractions in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Hasnan, Nazirah; Abdul Wahab, Ahmad Khairi; Islam, Md Anamul; Kean, Victor S P; Davis, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between muscle contractions and joint loading produces torques necessary for movements during activities of daily living. However, during neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)-evoked contractions in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), a simple and reliable proxy of torque at the muscle level has been minimally investigated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between muscle mechanomyographic (MMG) characteristics and NMES-evoked isometric quadriceps torques in persons with motor complete SCI. Six SCI participants with lesion levels below C4 [(mean (SD) age, 39.2 (7.9) year; stature, 1.71 (0.05) m; and body mass, 69.3 (12.9) kg)] performed randomly ordered NMES-evoked isometric leg muscle contractions at 30°, 60° and 90° knee flexion angles on an isokinetic dynamometer. MMG signals were detected by an accelerometer-based vibromyographic sensor placed over the belly of rectus femoris muscle. The relationship between MMG root mean square (MMG-RMS) and NMES-evoked torque revealed a very high association (R(2)=0.91 at 30°; R(2)=0.98 at 60°; and R(2)=0.97 at 90° knee angles; P<0.001). MMG peak-to-peak (MMG-PTP) and stimulation intensity were less well related (R(2)=0.63 at 30°; R(2)=0.67 at 60°; and R(2)=0.45 at 90° knee angles), although were still significantly associated (P≤0.006). Test-retest interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for the dependent variables ranged from 0.82 to 0.97 for NMES-evoked torque, between 0.65 and 0.79 for MMG-RMS, and from 0.67 to 0.73 for MMG-PTP. Their standard error of measurements (SEM) ranged between 10.1% and 31.6% (of mean values) for torque, MMG-RMS and MMG-PTP. The MMG peak frequency (MMG-PF) of 30Hz approximated the stimulation frequency, indicating NMES-evoked motor unit firing rate. The results demonstrated knee angle differences in the MMG-RMS versus NMES-isometric torque relationship, but a similar torque related pattern for MMG-PF. These findings

  7. Knee microfracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee: a 2-year randomised study. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc . 2010 Apr;18(4):519-27. Hurst JM, Steadman JR, O'Brien L, Rodkey WG, Briggs KK. Rehabilitation following microfracture for chondral injury in the knee. ...

  8. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Volker; Han, Jeong S; Adwanikar, Hita; Fu, Yu; Ji, Guangchen

    2007-03-28

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review.

  9. An improved OpenSim gait model with multiple degrees of freedom knee joint and knee ligaments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hang; Bloswick, Donald; Merryweather, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Musculoskeletal models are widely used to investigate joint kinematics and predict muscle force during gait. However, the knee is usually simplified as a one degree of freedom joint and knee ligaments are neglected. The aim of this study was to develop an OpenSim gait model with enhanced knee structures. The knee joint in this study included three rotations and three translations. The three knee rotations and mediolateral translation were independent, with proximodistal and anteroposterior translations occurring as a function of knee flexion/extension. Ten elastic elements described the geometrical and mechanical properties of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL), and the medial and lateral collateral ligaments (MCL and LCL). The three independent knee rotations were evaluated using OpenSim to observe ligament function. The results showed that the anterior and posterior bundles of ACL and PCL (aACL, pACL and aPCL, pPCL) intersected during knee flexion. The aACL and pACL mainly provided force during knee flexion and adduction, respectively. The aPCL was slack throughout the range of three knee rotations; however, the pPCL was utilised for knee abduction and internal rotation. The LCL was employed for knee adduction and rotation, but was slack beyond 20° of knee flexion. The MCL bundles were mainly used during knee adduction and external rotation. All these results suggest that the functions of knee ligaments in this model approximated the behaviour of the physical knee and the enhanced knee structures can improve the ability to investigate knee joint biomechanics during various gait activities.

  10. Gait Using Pneumatic Brace for End-Stage Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Starr, Roland; Chughtai, Morad; Mont, Michael A; Harwin, Steven F; Bhave, Anil

    2016-04-01

    More than 20 million individuals in the United States are affected by knee osteoarthritis (OA), which can lead to altered biomechanics and excessive joint loading. The use of an unloader pneumatic brace with extension assist has been proposed as a nonoperative treatment modality that may improve gait mechanics and correct knee malalignment. We assessed the following parameters in patients who have knee OA treated with and without a brace: (1) changes in temporospatial parameters in gait; (2) knee range of motion, knee extension at heel strike, and foot placement; (3) knee joint moments and impulse; and (4) changes in dynamic stiffness and rate of change of knee flexion during midstance to terminal stance. This 2:1 prospective, randomized, single-blinded trial evaluated 36 patients (24 brace and 12 matching). OA knee patients were randomized to receive either a pneumatic unloader brace or a standard nonoperative treatment regimen as the matching cohort for a 3-month period. They underwent evaluation of gait parameters using a three-dimensional gait analysis system at their initial appointment and at 3 months follow-up. All the testing, pre- and postbracing were performed without wearing the brace to examine for retained effects. Treatment with the brace led to significant improvements versus standard treatment in various gait parameters. Patients in the brace group had improvements in walking speed, knee extension at heel strike, total range of motion, knee joint forces, and rate of knee flexion from midstance to terminal stance when compared with the matching cohort. Knee OA patients who used a pneumatic unloader brace for 3 months for at least 3 hours per day had significant improvements various gait parameters when compared with a standard nonoperative therapy cohort. Braced patients demonstrated gait-modifying affects when not wearing the brace. These results are encouraging and suggest that this device represents a promising treatment modality for knee OA that

  11. Examination of knee joint moments on the function of knee-ankle-foot orthoses during walking.

    PubMed

    Andrysek, Jan; Klejman, Susan; Kooy, John

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate clinically relevant biomechanical conditions relating to the setup and alignment of knee-ankle-foot orthoses and the influence of these conditions on knee extension moments and orthotic stance control during gait. Knee moments were collected using an instrumented gait laboratory and concurrently a load transducer embedded at the knee-ankle-foot orthosis knee joint of four individuals with poliomyelitis. We found that knee extension moments were not typically produced in late stance-phase of gait. Adding a dorsiflexion stop at the orthotic ankle significantly decreased the knee flexion moments in late stance-phase, while slightly flexing the knee in stance-phase had a variable effect. The findings suggest that where users of orthoses have problems initiating swing-phase flexion with stance control orthoses, an ankle dorsiflexion stop may be used to enhance function. Furthermore, the use of stance control knee joints that lock while under flexion may contribute to more inconsistent unlocking of the stance control orthosis during gait.

  12. Folded isometric deformations and banana-shaped seedpod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couturier, Etienne

    2016-08-01

    Thin vegetal shells have recently been a significant source of inspiration for the design of smart materials and soft actuators. Herein is presented a novel analytical family of isometric deformations with a family of θ-folds crossing a family of parallel z-folds; it contains the isometric deformations of a banana-shaped surface inspired by a seedpod, which converts a vertical closing into either an horizontal closing or an opening depending on the location of the fold. Similarly to the seedpod, optimum shapes for opening ease are the most elongated ones.

  13. Early recovery after fast-track Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose After total knee arthroplasty with conventional surgical approach, more than half of the quadriceps extension strength is lost in the first postoperative month. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) operated with minimally invasive surgery (MIS) results in less operative trauma. We investigated changes in leg-extension power (LEP) in the first month after MIS Oxford UKA and its relation to pain, knee motion, functional performance, and knee function. Patients and methods In 35 consecutive Oxford UKA patients, LEP was measured 1 week before and 1 month after surgery together with knee motion, knee swelling, the 30-second chair-stand test, and Oxford knee score. Assessment of knee pain at rest and walking was done using a visual analog scale. Results 30 patients were discharged on the day after surgery, and 5 on the second day after surgery. LEP and functional performance reached the preoperative level after 1 month. Only slight postoperative knee swelling was observed with rapid restoration of knee flexion and function. A high level of pain during the first postoperative night and day fell considerably thereafter. None of the patients needed physiotherapy supervision in the first month after discharge. Interpretation Fast-track MIS Oxford UKA with discharge on the day after surgery is safe and leads to early recovery of knee motion and strength even when no physiotherapy is used. PMID:22313368

  14. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, PHOTOCOPY OF ISOMETRIC PORTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, PHOTOCOPY OF ISOMETRIC PORTION OF J.M. WHITAKER'S SURVEY OF THE LIPPITT MILL, SHEET NO. 15912 DATED MARCH 22, 1913. Blue line ozalid print in the collection of the Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, Museum of History and Technology, the Smithsonian Institution. - Lippitt Mill, 825 Main Street, West Warwick, Kent County, RI

  15. Probing disorder in isometric pyrochlore and related complex oxides.

    PubMed

    Shamblin, Jacob; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Joerg; Tracy, Cameron L; Zhang, Fuxiang; Finkeldei, Sarah; Bosbach, Dirk; Zhou, Haidong; Ewing, Rodney C; Lang, Maik

    2016-05-01

    There has been an increased focus on understanding the energetics of structures with unconventional ordering (for example, correlated disorder that is heterogeneous across different length scales). In particular, compounds with the isometric pyrochlore structure, A2B2O7, can adopt a disordered, isometric fluorite-type structure, (A, B)4O7, under extreme conditions. Despite the importance of the disordering process there exists only a limited understanding of the role of local ordering on the energy landscape. We have used neutron total scattering to show that disordered fluorite (induced intrinsically by composition/stoichiometry or at far-from-equilibrium conditions produced by high-energy radiation) consists of a local orthorhombic structural unit that is repeated by a pseudo-translational symmetry, such that orthorhombic and isometric arrays coexist at different length scales. We also show that inversion in isometric spinel occurs by a similar process. This insight provides a new basis for understanding order-to-disorder transformations important for applications such as plutonium immobilization, fast ion conduction, and thermal barrier coatings. PMID:26928636

  16. Near isometric biomass partitioning in forest ecosystems of China.

    PubMed

    Hui, Dafeng; Wang, Jun; Shen, Weijun; Le, Xuan; Ganter, Philip; Ren, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Based on the isometric hypothesis, belowground plant biomass (MB) should scale isometrically with aboveground biomass (MA) and the scaling exponent should not vary with environmental factors. We tested this hypothesis using a large forest biomass database collected in China. Allometric scaling functions relating MB and MA were developed for the entire database and for different groups based on tree age, diameter at breast height, height, latitude, longitude or elevation. To investigate whether the scaling exponent is independent of these biotic and abiotic factors, we analyzed the relationship between the scaling exponent and these factors. Overall MB was significantly related to MA with a scaling exponent of 0.964. The scaling exponent of the allometric function did not vary with tree age, density, latitude, or longitude, but varied with diameter at breast height, height, and elevation. The mean of the scaling exponent over all groups was 0.986. Among 57 scaling relationships developed, 26 of the scaling exponents were not significantly different from 1. Our results generally support the isometric hypothesis. MB scaled near isometrically with MA and the scaling exponent did not vary with tree age, density, latitude, or longitude, but increased with tree size and elevation. While fitting a single allometric scaling relationship may be adequate, the estimation of MB from MA could be improved with size-specific scaling relationships.

  17. Probing disorder in isometric pyrochlore and related complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamblin, Jacob; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Joerg; Tracy, Cameron L.; Zhang, Fuxiang; Finkeldei, Sarah; Bosbach, Dirk; Zhou, Haidong; Ewing, Rodney C.; Lang, Maik

    2016-05-01

    There has been an increased focus on understanding the energetics of structures with unconventional ordering (for example, correlated disorder that is heterogeneous across different length scales). In particular, compounds with the isometric pyrochlore structure, A2B2O7, can adopt a disordered, isometric fluorite-type structure, (A, B)4O7, under extreme conditions. Despite the importance of the disordering process there exists only a limited understanding of the role of local ordering on the energy landscape. We have used neutron total scattering to show that disordered fluorite (induced intrinsically by composition/stoichiometry or at far-from-equilibrium conditions produced by high-energy radiation) consists of a local orthorhombic structural unit that is repeated by a pseudo-translational symmetry, such that orthorhombic and isometric arrays coexist at different length scales. We also show that inversion in isometric spinel occurs by a similar process. This insight provides a new basis for understanding order-to-disorder transformations important for applications such as plutonium immobilization, fast ion conduction, and thermal barrier coatings.

  18. 32. ISOMETRIC VIEW OF PIPING PLAN, SHOWING PATH OF CONDUIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. ISOMETRIC VIEW OF PIPING PLAN, SHOWING PATH OF CONDUIT FROM CONTROL BUNKER TO SHIELDING TANK. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-P-1. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 60 851 151977. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. Near isometric biomass partitioning in forest ecosystems of China.

    PubMed

    Hui, Dafeng; Wang, Jun; Shen, Weijun; Le, Xuan; Ganter, Philip; Ren, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Based on the isometric hypothesis, belowground plant biomass (MB) should scale isometrically with aboveground biomass (MA) and the scaling exponent should not vary with environmental factors. We tested this hypothesis using a large forest biomass database collected in China. Allometric scaling functions relating MB and MA were developed for the entire database and for different groups based on tree age, diameter at breast height, height, latitude, longitude or elevation. To investigate whether the scaling exponent is independent of these biotic and abiotic factors, we analyzed the relationship between the scaling exponent and these factors. Overall MB was significantly related to MA with a scaling exponent of 0.964. The scaling exponent of the allometric function did not vary with tree age, density, latitude, or longitude, but varied with diameter at breast height, height, and elevation. The mean of the scaling exponent over all groups was 0.986. Among 57 scaling relationships developed, 26 of the scaling exponents were not significantly different from 1. Our results generally support the isometric hypothesis. MB scaled near isometrically with MA and the scaling exponent did not vary with tree age, density, latitude, or longitude, but increased with tree size and elevation. While fitting a single allometric scaling relationship may be adequate, the estimation of MB from MA could be improved with size-specific scaling relationships. PMID:24466149

  20. Knee anterior laxity: a risk factor for traumatic knee injury among sportswomen?

    PubMed

    Vauhnik, Renata; Morrissey, Matthew C; Rutherford, Olga M; Turk, Zmago; Pilih, Iztok A; Pohar, Maja

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if knee anterior laxity, measured with an arthrometer, is a risk factor for traumatic knee injury in sportswomen. To allow a more complete analysis, other, easily measured variables such as anthropometry, lower leg characteristics, sport exposure and menstrual cycle characteristics were also evaluated as possible risk factors. Subjects were Slovenian sportswomen aged between 11 and 41 years participating in basketball, team handball and volleyball (N = 540). Sportswomen were tested in the pre-season and followed for one season. The data collection included: written informed consent, background questionnaire, anthropometric tests, leg dominance assessment, navicular drop test (measurement of foot pronation), passive knee extension assessment and measurement of knee anterior laxity with a KT arthrometer. Several sets of data analysis were performed including logistic regression analysis in order to build a model for predicting traumatic knee injury among sportswomen. Height and average hours of training per week were found to differ significantly (P < 0.05) between injured and uninjured sportswomen. More sportswomen injured their non-dominant leg. Traumatic knee injuries among Slovenian sportswomen participating in basketball, team handball and volleyball are associated with higher amounts of training, greater body height and greater knee anterior laxity. Only 1% of the variability in traumatic knee injuries among sportswomen were explained with those variables suggesting that there are many other variables associated with traumatic knee injuries among sportswomen than were tested in this study.

  1. Genu Recurvatum versus Fixed Flexion after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Amila; Chong, Hwei Chi; Chin, Pak Lin; Chia, Shi Lu; Lo, Ngai Ngung; Yeo, Seng Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background To date, there is no study comparing outcomes between post-total knee replacement genu recurvatum and fixed flexion. This study aims to provide data that will help in deciding which side to err on when neutral extension is not achieved. Methods A prospective cohort study of primary total knee arthroplasties was performed, which compared the 6-month and 2-year clinical outcomes between fixed flexion and genu recurvatum deformities at 6 months. Results At 6 months, knees in genu recurvatum did better than knees in fixed flexion deformity in terms of knee flexion. However, at 2 years, knees in fixed flexion deformity did better in terms of knee scores and showed better improvement in the degree of deformity. Conclusions We conclude that it is better to err on the side of fixed flexion deformity if neutral alignment cannot be achieved. PMID:27583106

  2. Locomotor exercise induces long-lasting impairments in the capacity of the human motor cortex to voluntarily activate knee extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Simranjit K; Bentley, David J; Carroll, Timothy J

    2009-02-01

    Muscle fatigue is a reduction in the capacity to exert force and may involve a "central" component originating in the brain and/or spinal cord. Here we examined whether supraspinal factors contribute to impaired central drive after locomotor endurance exercise. On 2 separate days, 10 moderately active individuals completed a locomotor cycling exercise session or a control session. Brief (2 s) and sustained (30 s) isometric knee extension contractions were completed before and after locomotor exercise consisting of eight, 5-min bouts of cycling at 80% of maximum workload. In the control session, subjects completed the isometric contractions in a rested state. Twitch responses to supramaximal motor nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation were obtained to assess peripheral force-generating capacity and voluntary activation. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) force during brief contractions decreased by 23 +/- 6.3% after cycling exercise and remained 12 +/- 2.8% below baseline 45 min later (F(1,9) > 15.5; P < 0.01). Resting twitch amplitudes declined by approximately 45% (F(1,9) = 28.3; P < 0.001). Cortical voluntary activation declined from 90.6 +/- 1.6% at baseline to 80.6 +/- 2.1% after exercise (F(1,9) = 28.0; P < 0.001) and remained significantly reduced relative to control 30-45 min later (80.6 +/- 3.4%; F(1,9) = 10.7; P < 0.01). Thus locomotor exercise caused a long-lasting impairment in the capacity of the motor cortex to drive the knee extensors. Force was reduced more during sustained MVC after locomotor exercise than in the control session. Peripheral mechanisms contributed relatively more to this force reduction in the control session, whereas supraspinal fatigue played a greater role in sustained MVC reduction after locomotor exercise. PMID:19056999

  3. Insulin and glucose responses during bed rest with isotonic and isometric exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolkas, C. B.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of daily intensive isotonic (68% maximum oxygen uptake) and isometric (21% maximum extension force) leg exercise on plasma insulin and glucose responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during 14-day bed-rest (BR) periods were investigated in seven young healthy men. The OGTT was given during ambulatory control and on day 10 of the no-exercise, isotonic, and isometric exercise BR periods during the 15-wk study. The subjects were placed on a controlled diet starting 10 days before each BR period. During BR, basal plasma glucose concentration remained unchanged with no exercise, but increased (P less 0.05) to 87-89 mg/100 ml with both exercise regimens on day 2, and then fell slightly below control levels on day 13. The fall in glucose content during BR was independent of the exercise regimen and was an adjustment for the loss of plasma volume. The intensity of the responses of insulin and glucose to the OGTT was inversely proportional to the total daily energy expenditure during BR. It was estimated that at least 1020 kcal/day must be provided by supplemental exercise to restore the hyperinsulinemia to control levels.

  4. Shear modulus estimation on vastus intermedius of elderly and young females over the entire range of isometric contraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong-Zhi; Li, Tian-Jie; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Elderly people often suffer from sarcopenia in their lower extremities, which gives rise to the increased susceptibility of fall. Comparing the mechanical properties of the knee extensor/flexors on elderly and young subjects is helpful in understanding the underlying mechanisms of the muscle aging process. However, although the stiffness of skeletal muscle has been proved to be positively correlated to its non-fatiguing contraction intensity by some existing methods, this conclusion has not been verified above 50% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) due to the limitation of their measurement range. In this study, a vibro-ultrasound system was set up to achieve a considerably larger measurement range on muscle stiffness estimation. Its feasibility was verified on self-made silicone phantoms by comparing with the mechanical indentation method. The system was then used to assess the stiffness of vastus intermedius (VI), one of the knee extensors, on 10 healthy elderly female subjects (56.7 ± 4.9 yr) and 10 healthy young female subjects (27.6 ± 5.0 yr). The VI stiffness in its action direction was confirmed to be positively correlated to the % MVC level (R2 = 0.999) over the entire range of isometric contraction, i.e. from 0% MVC (relaxed state) to 100% MVC. Furthermore, it was shown that there was no significant difference between the mean VI shear modulus of the elderly and young subjects in a relaxed state (p > 0.1). However, when performing step isometric contraction, the VI stiffness of young female subjects was found to be larger than that of elderly participants (p < 0.001), especially at the relatively higher contraction levels. The results expanded our knowledge on the mechanical property of the elderly's skeletal muscle and its relationship with intensity of active contraction. Furthermore, the vibro-ultrasound system has a potential to become a powerful tool for investigating the elderly's muscle diseases.

  5. Relationship between Isometric Strength of Six Lower Limb Muscle Groups and Motor Skills among Nursing Home Residents.

    PubMed

    Buckinx, F; Croisier, J L; Reginster, J Y; Petermans, J; Goffart, E; Bruyère, O

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to assess the correlation between isometric muscle strength of the lower limb and motor skills. This is a cross sectional study performed among volunteer nursing home residents included in the SENIOR (Sample of Elderly Nursing home Individuals: an Observational Research) cohort. The present analysis focused on isometric muscle strength of 6 lower limb muscle groups (i.e. knee extensors, knee flexors, hip abductors, hip extensors, ankle flexors and ankle extensors), assessed using a validated hand-held dynamometer (i.e. the MicroFET2 device), and motor skills evaluated using the Tinetti test, the Timed Up and Go test, the Short Physical Performance Battery test (SPPB) and the walking speed. The relationship between all these parameters was tested by means of a multiple correlation, adjusted on age, sex and body mass index. 450 nursing home residents (69.8% of women) with a mean age of 83.1±9.4 years were included in this study. Our results showed a significant inverse correlation between lower limb muscle strength and the time required to perform the TUG test or gait speed, except for ankle flexors and ankle extensors. The relationship between the Tinetti test or the SPPB score, and lower limb muscle strength was significant, except for ankle flexors and ankle extensors. In conclusion, a positive association between lower limb muscle strength of the four main muscle groups and motor skills of the elderly nursing residents was found in this research. Therefore, special attention should be given to these muscle groups during rehabilitation programs.

  6. The effect of six weeks endurance training on dynamic muscular control of the knee following fatiguing exercise.

    PubMed

    Hassanlouei, H; Falla, D; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Kersting, U G

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to examine whether six weeks of endurance training minimizes the effects of fatigue on postural control during dynamic postural perturbations. Eighteen healthy volunteers were assigned to either a 6-week progressive endurance training program on a cycle ergometer or a control group. At week 0 and 7, dynamic exercise was performed on an ergometer until exhaustion and immediately after, the anterior-posterior centre of pressure (COP) sway was analyzed during full body perturbations. Maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) of the knee flexors and extensors, muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) of the vastus lateralis and medialis during sustained isometric knee extension contractions, and power output were measured. Following the training protocol, maximum knee extensor and flexor force and power output increased significantly for the training group with no changes observed for the control group. Moreover, the reduction of MFCV due to fatigue changed for the training group only (from 8.6% to 3.4%). At baseline, the fatiguing exercise induced an increase in the centre of pressure sway during the perturbations in both groups (>10%). The fatiguing protocol also impaired postural control in the control group when measured at week 7. However, for the training group, sway was not altered after the fatiguing exercise when assessed at week 7. In summary, six weeks of endurance training delayed the onset of muscle fatigue and improved the ability to control balance in response to postural perturbations in the presence of muscle fatigue. Results implicate that endurance training should be included in any injury prevention program.

  7. The interaction between peripheral and central fatigue at different muscle temperatures during sustained isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Alex; Hodder, Simon; Havenith, George

    2015-08-15

    Changes in central fatigue have been linked to active and passive changes in core temperature, as well as integration of sensory feedback from thermoreceptors in the skin. However, the effects of muscle temperature (Tm), and thereby metaboreceptor and local afferent nerve temperature, on central fatigue (measured using voluntary activation percentage) during sustained, high muscle fatigue exercise remain unexamined. In this study, we investigated Tm across the range of cold to hot, and its effect on voluntary activation percentage during sustained isometric contractions of the knee extensors. The results suggest that contrary to brief contractions, during a sustained fatiguing contraction Tm significantly (P < 0.001) influences force output (-0.7%/°C increase) and central fatigue (-0.5%/°C increase), showing a negative relationship across the Tm continuum in moderately trained individuals. The negative relationship between voluntary activation percentage and Tm indicates muscle temperature may influence central fatigue during sustained and high muscle fatigue exercise. On the basis of on an integrative analysis between the present data and previous literature, the impact of core and muscle temperature on voluntary muscle activation is estimated to show a ratio of 5.5 to 1, respectively. Accordingly, Tm could assume a secondary or tertiary role in the reduction of voluntary muscle activation when body temperature leaves a thermoneutral range.

  8. Attenuation of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage conferred by maximal isometric contractions: a mini review

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Leonardo C. R.; Denadai, Benedito S.

    2015-01-01

    Although, beneficial in determined contexts, eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) might be unwanted during training regimens, competitions and daily activities. There are a vast number of studies investigating strategies to attenuate EIMD response after damaging exercise bouts. Many of them consist of performing exercises that induce EIMD, consuming supplements or using equipment that are not accessible for most people. It appears that performing maximal isometric contractions (ISOs) 2–4 days prior to damaging bouts promotes significant attenuation of EIMD symptoms that are not related to muscle function. It has been shown that the volume of ISOs, muscle length in which they are performed, and interval between them and the damaging bout influence the magnitude of this protection. In addition, it appears that this protection is not long-lived, lasting no longer than 4 days. Although no particular mechanisms for these adaptations were identified, professionals should consider applying this non-damaging stimulus before submitting their patients to unaccustomed exercised. However, it seems not to be the best option for athletes or relatively trained individuals. Future, studies should focus on establishing if ISOs protect other populations (i.e., trained individuals) or muscle groups (i.e., knee extensors) against EIMD, as well as investigate different mechanisms for ISO-induced protection. PMID:26578972

  9. Myofascial pain: relief by post-isometric relaxation.

    PubMed

    Lewit, K; Simons, D G

    1984-08-01

    The post-isometric relaxation technique begins by placing the muscle in a stretched position. Then an isometric contraction is exerted against minimal resistance. Relaxation and then gentle stretch follow as the muscle releases. This technique was applied to tight, tender muscles that are commonly associated with musculoskeletal pain and was systematically tested on 351 muscle groups in 244 patients. The method produced immediate pain relief in 94%, lasting pain relief in 63%, as well as lasting relief of point tenderness in 23% of the sites treated. Patients who practiced autotherapy on a home program were more likely to realize lasting relief. Pain was relieved in both the muscle itself and at tender insertion points. The technique is useful in addition to, or in place of, local anesthetic injection or dry needling. These results confirm other observations that the increased tension of the affected muscles and the resulting pain and dysfunction are both relieved by restoring the full stretch length of the muscle.

  10. Exoskeletal chitin scales isometrically with body size in terrestrial insects.

    PubMed

    Lease, Hilary M; Wolf, Blair O

    2010-06-01

    The skeletal system of animals provides the support for a variety of activities and functions. For animals such as mammals, which have endoskeletons, research has shown that skeletal investment (mass) scales with body mass to the 1.1 power. In this study, we ask how exoskeletal investment in insects scales with body mass. We measured the body mass and mass of exoskeletal chitin of 551 adult terrestrial insects of 245 species, with dry masses ranging from 0.0001 to 2.41 g (0.0002-6.13 g wet mass) to assess the allometry of exoskeletal investment. Our results showed that exoskeletal chitin mass scales isometrically with dry body mass across the Insecta as M(chitin) = a M(dry) (b), where b = 1.03 +/- 0.04, indicating that both large and small terrestrial insects allocate a similar fraction of their body mass to chitin. This isometric chitin-scaling relationship was also evident at the taxonomic level of order, for all insect orders except Coleoptera. We additionally found that the relative exoskeletal chitin investment, indexed by the coefficient, a, varies with insect life history and phylogeny. Exoskeletal chitin mass tends to be proportionally less and to increase at a lower rate with mass in flying than in nonflying insects (M(flying insect chitin) = -0.56 x M(dry) (0.97); M(nonflying insect chitin) = -0.55 x M(dry) (1.03)), and to vary with insect order. Isometric scaling (b = 1) of insect exoskeletal chitin suggests that the exoskeleton in insects scales differently than support structures of most other organisms, which have a positive allometry (b > 1) (e.g., vertebrate endoskeleton, tree secondary tissue). The isometric pattern that we document here additionally suggests that exoskeletal investment may not be the primary limit on insect body size. PMID:20235123

  11. 15. "GENERAL, INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS, ISOMETRIC." Test Area 1120. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. "GENERAL, INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS, ISOMETRIC." Test Area 1-120. Specifications No. ENG04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 6 of 148; file no. 1320/57. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. Surgical approaches for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul; Demesugh, Daniel Mue; Agarwal, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    There are various surgical approaches to the knee joint and its surrounding structures and such approaches are generally designed to allow the best access to an area of pathology whilst safeguarding important surrounding structures. Controversy currently surrounds the optimal surgical approach for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The medial parapatellar arthrotomy, or anteromedial approach, has been the most used and has been regarded as the standard approach for exposure of the knee joint. It provides extensive exposure and is useful for open anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, total knee replacement, and fixation of intra-articular fractures. Because this approach has been implicated in compromise of the patellar circulation, some authors have advocated the subvastus, midvastus, and trivector approaches for exposure of the knee joint. While these approaches expose the knee from the medial side, the anterolateral approach exposes the knee joint from the lateral side. With careful planning and arthrotomy selection, the anterior aspect of the joint can be adequately exposed for TKA in different clinical scenarios. PMID:27182142

  13. The effect of shoulder core exercises on isometric torque of glenohumeral joint movements in healthy young females

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Afsun Nodehi; Mohammadi, Roghayeh; Arab, Amir Massoud; Kazamnajad, Anoshirvan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength improvement of the shoulder muscles is a major goal in rehabilitation or athletic conditioning programs. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of shoulder core exercises on the isometric torque of glenohumeral joint movements. METHODS: A total of 36 healthy females with no history of shoulder injury enrolled in this study. Subjects were randomly assigned into the control group (n = 18, 22 ± 2.19 years of age) or experimental group (n = 18, 21 ± 2.05 years of age). Subjects in experimental group performed shoulder core exercises, using progressive resistance training, three times a week for six weeks. Subjects in control group performed no exercise. The isometric torque of shoulder movements were measured with Dynatorq device in isolated test positions of glenohumeral muscles at the beginning and after six weeks in both groups. RESULTS: shoulder core exercise training led to an increase in maximal isometric torques of shoulder scaption at 0° and 90° arm elevation, external and internal rotation, horizontal adduction and extension movements (p < 0.001 in all instances). No significant difference was found between initial scores and scores after six weeks in the control group (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicated that shoulder core exercise training leads to an increase in peak torque for all glenohumeral movements that can be considered in glenohumeral muscles strengthening programs. PMID:22973363

  14. Alpine Skiing With total knee ArthroPlasty (ASWAP): effects on strength and cardiorespiratory fitness.

    PubMed

    Pötzelsberger, B; Stöggl, T; Lindinger, S J; Dirnberger, J; Stadlmann, M; Buchecker, M; Hofstaedter, T; Gordon, K; Müller, E

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of a 12-week recreational skiing intervention on lower limb muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness in participants with unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Twenty-seven older adults (70 ± 5 years) were assigned to the intervention (n = 13) or control group (n = 14) after surgery (2.5 ± 1 years). Leg muscle strength was measured using an IsoMed 2000 dynamometer and cardiorespiratory fitness was determined by cycle ergometry before and after the intervention as well as after an 8-week retention period. The skiing intervention led to increased muscle strength in the operated leg during unilateral single joint isometric extension (maximal force: 11%; P < 0.05; rate of torque development: 24%; P < 0.05) and during the unilateral multi-joint isokinetic single leg strength test (8%; P < 0.05). This resulted in a decreased asymmetry index in the isokinetic test (13% to 5%; P < 0.05). These adaptations remained unchanged toward the retention test. No effect was observed for cardiorespiratory fitness. The results demonstrate that muscle contraction forces required during recreational skiing in individuals with TKA seem adequate and effective to increase quadriceps and hamstrings muscle strength in the initially weaker operated leg and to reduce an augmented post-operative asymmetry index.

  15. Torque/velocity properties of human knee muscles: peak and angle-specific estimates.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, G E; Adams, W B; Whetstone, M R

    1993-09-01

    Angle-specific (AS) torque/velocity data have been used to avoid angle related variation in peak torque capacity. However, series elastic structures cause the contractile velocity of active force-producing tissue to differ from external joint velocity except at peak torque. Alternatively, angle related variation may be removed by normalizing peak torque to the isometric maximum at that angular position. The AS, peak (P), and normalized peak (NP) methods were compared in isovelocity knee flexion and extension at velocities between 50 and 250 degrees s-1 for 8 male subjects. The P and NP methods gave more similar torque/velocity relations than the AS method. Further, very little variation in peak torque was attributed to differences in joint angle. Both the P and AS methods illustrate that relative quadriceps/hamstrings torque capability (flexor/extensor ratio) increases slightly with velocity. It is proposed that antagonist muscle torque capabilities should be compared at different angular positions to assess muscular imbalance.

  16. Reduced Maximal Force during Acute Anterior Knee Pain Is Associated with Deficits in Voluntary Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Salomoni, Sauro; Tucker, Kylie; Hug, François; McPhee, Megan; Hodges, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Although maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force is reduced during pain, studies using interpolated twitch show no consistent reduction of voluntary muscle drive. The present study aimed to test if the reduction in MVC force during acute experimental pain could be explained by increased activation of antagonist muscles, weak voluntary activation at baseline, or changes in force direction. Twenty-two healthy volunteers performed maximal voluntary isometric knee extensions before, during, and after the effects of hypertonic (pain) and isotonic (control) saline injections into the infrapatellar fat pad. The MVC force, voluntary activation, electromyographic (EMG) activity of agonist, antagonist, and auxiliary (hip) muscles, and pain cognition and anxiety scores were recorded. MVC force was 9.3% lower during pain than baseline (p < 0.001), but there was no systematic change in voluntary activation. Reduced MVC force during pain was variable between participants (SD: 14%), and was correlated with reduced voluntary activation (r = 0.90), baseline voluntary activation (r = − 0.62), and reduced EMG amplitude of agonist and antagonist muscles (all r > 0.52), but not with changes in force direction, pain or anxiety scores. Hence, reduced MVC force during acute pain was mainly explained by deficits in maximal voluntary drive. PMID:27559737

  17. Microprocessor prosthetic knees.

    PubMed

    Berry, Dale

    2006-02-01

    This article traces the development of microprocessor prosthetic knees from early research in the 1970s to the present. Read about how microprocessor knees work, functional options, patient selection, and the future of this prosthetic.

  18. The effect of modern total knee arthroplasty on muscle balance at the knee.

    PubMed

    Buford, William L; Ivey, F; Loveland, Dustin M; Flowers, Christopher W

    2009-01-01

    Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) may affect the muscles operating at the flexion/extension (FE) or internal /external rotation (IE) axes. This study tested the hypothesis that a modern posterior stabilizing TKA will change the mechanical balance of the knee joint by altering the moment arms of muscles acting about two separate axes of rotation. Moment arms were determined for the normal knee, the knee after resection of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (the ACL - knee) and the knee after a PCL-sacrificing TKA. Five fresh cadaver hemi pelvis specimens were used with 5 posterior stabilizing prostheses (a single model available from one manufacturer). Moment arms for the individual muscle tendons were multiplied by the muscle's tension fraction (fractional physiological cross-sectional area [PCSA]) to estimate its potential for moment production relative to the other muscles at the knee, and this value was labeled as the muscle's moment potential. Unlike earlier studies that looked at TKA across many manufacturers' types, this study concluded that there were no significant differences in muscle balance when comparing the intact knee and the posterior stabilized TKA.

  19. The influence of joint line position on knee stability after condylar knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Martin, J W; Whiteside, L A

    1990-10-01

    Using a special knee-testing device, ten knees obtained at autopsy were subjected to varus-valgus, anterior-posterior, and flexion-rotation analysis in the intact state and after total knee arthroplasty. The ten knees showed no significant change in stability after knee replacement when the joint line was maintained in its natural position. When the femoral component was repositioned 5 mm proximally and 5 mm anteriorly, a significant increase in laxity occurred during midflexion. When the joint line was shifted 5 mm distal and 5 mm posterior to its anatomic location, significant tightening occurred in midrange of motion. Coupled rotation of the tibia with knee flexion was decreased after surgery in all knees with no specific relationship to joint line position. Coupled rotation with varus-valgus testing, however, remained within the normal range through the first 30 degrees of flexion only when the joint line was restored to its normal anatomic position. Stability in condylar knee arthroplasty is in part dependent on position of the joint line. Surgical techniques that rely on restoring the flexion and extension gap without regard to joint line position may result in alteration of varus-valgus or anterior-posterior displacement in midrange flexion. PMID:2208849

  20. Computational Poromechanics of Human Knee Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Mojtaba; Li, LePing

    2012-02-01

    Extensive computer modeling has been performed in the recent decade to investigate the mechanical response of the healthy and repaired knee joints. Articular cartilages and menisci have been commonly modeled as single-phase elastic materials in the previous 3D simulations. A comprehensive study considering the interplay of the collagen fibers and fluid pressurization in the tissues in situ remains challenging. We have developed a 3D model of the human knee accounting for the mechanical function of collagen fibers and fluid flow in the cartilages and menisci. An anatomically accurate structure of the human knee was used for this purpose including bones, articular cartilages, menisci and ligaments. The fluid pressurization in the femoral cartilage and menisci under combined creep loading was investigated. Numerical results showed that fluid flow and pressure in the tissues played an important role in the mechanical response of the knee joint. The load transfer in the joint was clearly seen when the fluid pressure was considered.

  1. [Physical examination of the knee after trauma].

    PubMed

    Rommers, G M; de Jongh, Tjeerd O H; van der Sluis, Corry K; Dekker, Rienk

    2011-01-01

    The practice guideline 'Traumatic knee complaints' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners is aimed at differentiating between intra-articular and extra-articular lesions. The diagnosis is based mainly on a combination of patient history and a limited physical examination of the knee. Specific tests for hydrarthrosis, injuries to the collateral or cruciate ligaments, and meniscal pathology have only a low diagnostic accuracy. Few reliable studies have been conducted into the diagnostic value of specific tests; most studies employed poor methodology, had considerable inter-observer variation and produced widely heterogenous results. Inspection of the knee can provide information regarding the presence of fluids in the knee (hydrarthrosis or haemarthrosis). A restricted active range of movement in flexion and extension may indicate osteoarthritis or arthritis.

  2. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  3. Variable stiffness actuated prosthetic knee to restore knee buckling during stance: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Wentink, E C; Koopman, H F J M; Stramigioli, S; Rietman, J S; Veltink, P H

    2013-06-01

    Most modern intelligent knee prosthesis use dampers to modulate dynamic behavior and prevent excessive knee flexion, but they dissipate energy and do not assist in knee extension. Energy efficient variable stiffness control (VSA) can reduce the energy consumption yet effectively modulate the dynamic behavior and use stored energy during flexion to assist in subsequent extension. A principle design of energy efficient VSA in a prosthetic knee is proposed and analyzed for the specific case of rejection of a disturbed stance phase. The concept is based on the principle that the output stiffness of a spring can be changed without changing the energy stored in the elastic elements of the spring. The usability of this concept to control a prosthetic knee is evaluated using a model. Part of the stance phase of the human leg was modeled by a double pendulum. Specifically the rejection of a common disturbance of transfemoral prosthetic gait, an unlocked knee at heel strike, was evaluated. The ranges of spring stiffnesses were determined such that the angular characteristics of a normal stance phase were preserved, but disturbances could also be rejected. The simulations predicted that energy efficient VSA can be useful for the control of prosthetic knees. PMID:23000012

  4. Design and evaluation of a novel triaxial isometric trunk muscle strength measurement system.

    PubMed

    Azghani, M R; Farahmand, F; Meghdari, A; Vossoughi, G; Parnianpour, M

    2009-08-01

    Maximal strength measurements of the trunk have been used to evaluate the maximum functional capacity of muscles and the potential mechanical overload or overuse of the lumbar spine tissues in order to estimate the risk of developing musculoskeletal injuries. A new triaxial isometric trunk strength measurement system was designed and developed in the present study, and its reliability and performance was investigated. The system consisted of three main revolute joints, equipped with torque sensors, which intersect at L5-S1 and adjustment facilities to fit the body anthropometry and to accommodate both symmetric and asymmetric postures in both seated and standing positions. The dynamics of the system was formulated to resolve validly the moment generated by trunk muscles in the three anatomic planes. The optimal gain and offset of the system were obtained using deadweights based on the least-squares linear regression analysis. The R2 results of calibration for all loading courses of all joints were higher than 0.99, which indicated an excellent linear correlation. The results of the validation analysis of the regression model suggested that the mean absolute error and the r.m.s. error were less than 2 per cent of the applied load. The maximum value of the minimum detectable change was found to be 1.63 Nm for the sagittal plane torque measurement, 0.8 per cent of the full-scale load. The trial-to-trial variability analysis of the device using deadweights provided intra-class correlation coefficients of higher than 0.99, suggesting excellent reliability. The cross-talk analysis of the device indicated maximum cross-talks of 1.7 per cent and 3.4 per cent when the system was subjected to flexion-extension and lateral bending torques respectively. The trial-to-trial variability of the system during in-vivo strength measurement tests resulted in good to excellent reliability, with intra-class correlation coefficients ranging from 0.69 to 0.91. The results of the maximum

  5. Knee arthroscopy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... retinacular release - discharge; Synovectomy - discharge; Patellar debridement - discharge; Meniscus repair - discharge; Lateral release - discharge; Collateral ligament repair - discharge; Knee surgery - ...

  6. The effect of knee joint angle on plantar flexor power in young and old men.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Brian H; Allen, Matti D; Power, Geoffrey A; Vandervoort, Anthony A; Rice, Charles L

    2014-04-01

    Human adult aging is associated with a loss of strength, contractile velocity and hence, power. The principal plantar flexors, consisting of the bi-articular gastrocnemeii and the mono-articular soleus, appear to be affected differently by the aging process. However, the age-related effect of knee joint angle on the torque-angular velocity relationship and power production of this functionally important muscle group is unknown. The purpose was to determine whether flexing the knee, thereby reducing the gastrocnemius contribution to plantar flexion, would exacerbate the age-related decrements in plantar flexion power, or shift the torque-angular velocity relationship differently in older compared with young men. Neuromuscular properties were recorded from 10 young (~25 y) and 10 old (~78 y) men with the knee extended (170°) and flexed (90°), in a randomized order. Participants performed maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVCs), followed by maximal velocity-dependent shortening contractions at pre-set loads, ranging from 15 to 75% MVC. The young men were ~20-25% stronger, ~12% faster and ~30% more powerful than the old for both knee angles (P<0.05). In both age groups, isometric MVC torque was ~17% greater in the extended than flexed knee position, with no differences in voluntary activation (>95%). The young men produced 7-12% faster angular velocities in the extended knee position for loads ≤30% MVC, but no differences at higher loads; whereas there were no detectable differences in angular velocity between knee positions in the old across all relative loads. For both knee angles, young men produced peak power at 43.3±9.0% MVC, whereas the old men produced peak power at 54.8±7.9% MVC. These data indicate that the young, who have faster contracting muscles compared with the old, can rely more on velocity than torque for generating maximal power.

  7. Post-traumatic knee stiffness: surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Pujol, N; Boisrenoult, P; Beaufils, P

    2015-02-01

    Post-traumatic knee stiffness and loss of range of motion is a common complication of injuries to the knee area. The causes of post-traumatic knee stiffness can be divided into flexion contractures, extension contractures, and combined contractures. Post-traumatic stiffness can be due to the presence of dense intra-articular adhesions and/or fibrotic transformation of peri-articular structures. Various open and arthroscopic surgical treatments are possible. A precise diagnosis and understanding of the pathology is mandatory prior to any surgical treatment. Failure is imminent if all pathologies are not addressed correctly. From a general point of view, a flexion contracture is due to posterior adhesions and/or anterior impingement. On the other hand, extension contractures are due to anterior adhesions and/or posterior impingement. This overview will describe the different modern surgical techniques for treating post-traumatic knee stiffness. Any bony impingements must be treated before soft tissue release is performed. Intra-articular stiff knees with a loss of flexion can be treated by an anterior arthroscopic arthrolysis. Extra-articular pathology causing a flexion contracture can be treated by open or endoscopic quadriceps release. Extension contractures can be treated by arthroscopic or open posterior arthrolysis. Postoperative care (analgesia, rehabilitation) is essential to maintaining the range of motion obtained intra-operatively.

  8. In vivo determination of total knee arthroplasty kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Komistek, Richard D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Bertin, Kim; Rosenberg, Aaron; Kennedy, William

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if consistent posterior femoral rollback of an asymmetrical posterior cruciate retaining (PCR) total knee arthroplasty was mostly influenced by the implant design, surgical technique, or presence of a well-functioning posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Three-dimensional femorotibial kinematics was determined for 80 subjects implanted by 3 surgeons, and each subject was evaluated under fluoroscopic surveillance during a deep knee bend. All subjects in this present study having an intact PCL had a well-functioning PCR knee and experienced normal kinematic patterns, although less in magnitude than the normal knee. In addition, a surprising finding was that, on average, subjects without a PCL still achieved posterior femoral rollback from full extension to maximum knee flexion. The findings in this study revealed that implant design did contribute to the normal kinematics demonstrated by subjects having this asymmetrical PCR total knee arthroplasty.

  9. A new method to measure post-traumatic joint contractures in the rabbit knee.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Kevin A; Holmberg, Michael; Shrive, Nigel

    2003-12-01

    A new device and method to measure rabbit knee joint angles are described. The method was used to measure rabbit knee joint angles in normal specimens and in knee joints with obvious contractures. The custom-designed and manufactured gripping device has two clamps. The femoral clamp sits on a pinion gear that is driven by a rack attached to a materials testing system. A 100 N load cell in series with the rack gives force feedback. The tibial clamp is attached to a rotatory potentiometer. The system allows the knee joint multiple degrees-of-freedom (DOF). There are two independent DOF (compression-distraction and internal-external rotation) and two coupled motions (medial-lateral translation coupled with varus-valgus rotation; anterior-posterior translation coupled with flexion-extension rotation). Knee joint extension-flexion motion is measured, which is a combination of the materials testing system displacement (converted to degrees of motion) and the potentiometer values (calibrated to degrees). Internal frictional forces were determined to be at maximum 2% of measured loading. Two separate experiments were performed to evaluate rabbit knees. First, normal right and left pairs of knees from four New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were subjected to cyclic loading. An extension torque of 0.2 Nm was applied to each knee. The average change in knee joint extension from the first to the fifth cycle was 1.9 deg +/- 1.5 deg (mean +/- sd) with a total of 49 tests of these eight knees. The maximum extension of the four left knees (tested 23 times) was 14.6 deg +/- 7.1 deg, and of the four right knees (tested 26 times) was 12.0 deg +/- 10.9 deg. There was no significant difference in the maximum extension between normal left and right knees. In the second experiment, nine skeletally mature NZW rabbits had stable fractures of the femoral condyles of the right knee that were immobilized for five, six or 10 weeks. The left knee served as an unoperated control. Loss of knee joint

  10. Reliability of repeated isometric neck strength and endurance testing in a simulated contact posture.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Danielle M; Handcock, Phil J; Sullivan, S John; Rehrer, Nancy J; Niven, Brian E

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability of repeated isometric measurements of neck strength and endurance in a simulated rugby contact posture. Data were collected from healthy active university students (n = 20) over 3 sessions. Each session consisted of a single maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and endurance trial for extension and flexion. The endurance trials were analyzed to determine the area under the force curve (%AUC) and the time to fatigue (TTF). Reliability was calculated using the SEM and minimal detectable change (MDC). The results revealed that the MVC values for extension were nonsignificant for session (p = 0.21), whereas some session differences were seen for flexion (p = 0.01), where session 1, 115.3 N was less than session 3, 126.4 N (p = 0.03). For %AUC, flexion values (%AUC 86.0) were greater than extension (%AUC 59.4) (p = 0.02). A similar effect was observed for TTF with flexion (125.0 seconds) having significantly greater TTF than extension (86.1 seconds). For peak force, the greatest SEM and MDC were achieved for extension (15.3 and 42.3 N), while flexion produced lower values (11.3 and 31.2 N). In contrast, for the endurance trials, SEM and MDC were greater in flexion than in extension. The findings from this study indicate that the neck musculature can be reliably assessed in a simulated contact posture. For peak force, extension provided more consistent measures across time as there seems to be a learning effect for flexion. Additionally, the SEM and MDC scores provide a useful tool for future assessment of neck strength and endurance. PMID:25226308

  11. Highly conforming polyethylene inlays reduce the in vivo variability of knee joint kinematics after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Daniilidis, Kiriakos; Skwara, Adrian; Vieth, Volker; Fuchs-Winkelmann, Susanne; Heindel, Walter; Stückmann, Volker; Tibesku, Carsten O

    2012-08-01

    The use of highly conforming polyethylene inlays in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) provides improved anteroposterior stability. The aim of this fluoroscopic study was to investigate the in vivo kinematics during unloaded and loaded active extension with a highly conforming inlay and a flat inlay after cruciate retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Thirty one patients (50 knees) received a fixed-bearing cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty (Genesis II, Smith & Nephew, Schenefeld, Germany) for primary knee osteoarthritis. Twenty two of them received a flat polyethylene inlay (PE), nine a deep dished PE and 19 were in the control group (physiological knees). The mean age at the time of surgery was 62 years. Dynamic examination with fluoroscopy was performed to assess the "patella tendon angle" in relation to the knee flexion angle (measure of anteroposterior translation) and the "kinematic index" (measure of reproducibility). Fluoroscopy was performed under active extension and flexion, during unloaded movement, and under full weight bearing, simulated by step climbing. No significant difference was observed between both types of polyethylene inlay designs and the physiological knee during unloaded movement. Anteroposterior (AP) instability was found during weight-bearing movement. The deep-dish inlay resulted in lower AP translation and a non-physiological rollback. Neither inlay types could restore physiological kinematics of the knee. Despite the fact that deep dished inlays reduce the AP translation, centralisation of contact pressure results in non-physiological rollback. The influence of kinematic pattern variability on clinical results warrants further investigation.

  12. Fixed flexion deformity and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Su, E P

    2012-11-01

    Fixed flexion deformities are common in osteoarthritic knees that are indicated for total knee arthroplasty. The lack of full extension at the knee results in a greater force of quadriceps contracture and energy expenditure. It also results in slower walking velocity and abnormal gait mechanics, overloading the contralateral limb. Residual flexion contractures after TKA have been associated with poorer functional scores and outcomes. Although some flexion contractures may resolve with time after surgery, a substantial percentage will become permanent. Therefore, it is essential to correct fixed flexion deformities at the time of TKA, and be vigilant in the post-operative course to maintain the correction. Surgical techniques to address pre-operative flexion contractures include: adequate bone resection, ligament releases, removal of posterior osteophytes, and posterior capsular releases. Post-operatively, extension can be maintained with focused physiotherapy, a specially modified continuous passive motion machine, a contralateral heel lift, and splinting.

  13. Effects of Isometric Scaling on Vertical Jumping Performance

    PubMed Central

    Bobbert, Maarten F.

    2013-01-01

    Jump height, defined as vertical displacement in the airborne phase, depends on vertical takeoff velocity. For centuries, researchers have speculated on how jump height is affected by body size and many have adhered to what has come to be known as Borelli’s law, which states that jump height does not depend on body size per se. The underlying assumption is that the amount of work produced per kg body mass during the push-off is independent of size. However, if a big body is isometrically downscaled to a small body, the latter requires higher joint angular velocities to achieve a given takeoff velocity and work production will be more impaired by the force-velocity relationship of muscle. In the present study, the effects of pure isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance were investigated using a biologically realistic model of the human musculoskeletal system. The input of the model, muscle stimulation over time, was optimized using jump height as criterion. It was found that when the human model was miniaturized to the size of a mouse lemur, with a mass of about one-thousandth that of a human, jump height dropped from 40 cm to only 6 cm, mainly because of the force-velocity relationship. In reality, mouse lemurs achieve jump heights of about 33 cm. By implication, the unfavourable effects of the small body size of mouse lemurs on jumping performance must be counteracted by favourable effects of morphological and physiological adaptations. The same holds true for other small jumping animals. The simulations for the first time expose and explain the sheer magnitude of the isolated effects of isometric downscaling on jumping performance, to be counteracted by morphological and physiological adaptations. PMID:23936494

  14. A magnetorheological fluid-based controllable active knee brace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadkhanlou, Farzad; Zite, Jamaal L.; Washington, Gregory N.

    2007-04-01

    High customization costs and reduction of natural mobility put current rehabilitative knee braces at a disadvantage. A resolution to this problem is to integrate a Magnetorheological (MR) fluid-based joint into the system. A MR joint will allow patients to apply and control a resistive torque to knee flexion and extension. The resistance torque can also be continuously adjusted as a function of extension angle and patient strength (or as a function of time), which is currently impossible with state of the art rehabilitative knee braces. A novel MR fluid-based controllable knee brace is designed and prototyped in this research. The device exhibits large resistive torque in the on-state and low resistance in the offstate. The controllable variable stiffness, compactness, and portability of the system make it a proper alternative to current rehabilitative knee braces.

  15. Isometric immersions of a cone and a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtogrin, Mikhail I.

    2009-02-01

    We thoroughly analyse the method used by Pogorelov to construct piecewise-smooth tubular surfaces in \\mathbb R^3 isometric to the surface of a right circular cylinder. The properties of the inverse images of edges of any tubular surface on its planar unfolding are investigated in detail. We find conditions on plane curves lying on the unfolding that enable them to be the inverse images of edges of some tubular surface. We make a refinement concerning the number of smooth pieces that form a piecewise-smooth tubular surface. We generalize Pogorelov's method from the surface of a right circular cylinder to that of a right circular cone.

  16. Relationships between rapid isometric torque characteristics and vertical jump performance in division I collegiate American football players: influence of body mass normalization.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brennan J; Ryan, Eric D; Sobolewski, Eric J; Smith, Doug B; Akehi, Kazuma; Conchola, Eric C; Buckminster, Tyler

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationships between absolute and body mass-normalized rapid isometric torque variables and vertical jump (VJ) performance of the leg extensors and flexors in elite National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Football Bowl Subdivision collegiate American football players. Thirty-one players performed isometric maximal voluntary contractions of the leg extensor and flexor muscle groups and a countermovement VJ. Rate of torque development (RTD) and the contractile impulse (IMPULSE) were determined from 0 to 30, 0 to 50, 0 to 100, and 0 to 200 milliseconds from the onset of muscular contraction. The relationships between absolute and normalized rapid torque variables and VJ performance were assessed using correlation coefficients (r). There were no significant correlations (p > 0.05) observed between the absolute rapid torque variables and VJ performance, except for leg flexion RTD at 0-200 milliseconds (p = 0.024). All normalized rapid torque variables of the leg extensors and flexors were significantly correlated to VJ performance (p ≤ 0.001-0.026). These findings indicated that normalizing rapid torque variables to body mass improves the relationships between isometric rapid torque variables and VJ performance and normalized leg extension and flexion are both similarly related to VJ performance. Strength and conditioning professionals may use these findings in an attempt to identify and monitor dynamic sport performance. Furthermore, future studies examining the relationship between dynamic on the field performances and laboratory-based isometric strength testing may consider including normalized rapid torque variables.

  17. Are the knee and ankle angles at contact related to the tendon properties of lower limbs in long distance runners?

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Miyazaki, Daisuke; Yamada, Kenji; Shimoju, Shozo; Tsunoda, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the knee and ankle angles at contact during running were related to the elastic properties of tendon structures in knee extensors and plantar flexors and performance in trained long distance runners. Thirty-two highly trained male long distance runners participated in this study. Elongation of tendon structures in knee extensors and plantar flexors were measured using ultrasonography while subjects performed ramp isometric contractions up to the voluntary maximum. The relationship between estimated muscle force and tendon elongation was fit to a linear regression, the slope of which was defined as the stiffness of tendon structures. Knee and ankle angles at contact during running were determined at a speed of 18 km/h on a treadmill. Knee and ankle angles at contact were not correlated to the stiffness of tendon structures in knee extensors and plantar flexors. In addition, the best official record in a 5000-m race was not significantly correlated to knee and ankle joint angles at contact. In conclusion, knee and ankle angles at contact were not related to the elastic properties of tendon structures in knee extensors and plantar flexor and the performance of long distance running.

  18. Knee stability before and after total and unicondylar knee replacement: in vivo kinematic evaluation utilizing navigation.

    PubMed

    Casino, Daniela; Martelli, Sandra; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Lopomo, Nicola; Iacono, Francesco; Bignozzi, Simone; Visani, Andrea; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2009-02-01

    Surgical navigation systems are currently used to guide the surgeon in the correct alignment of the implant. The aim of this study was to expand the use of navigation systems by proposing a surgical protocol for intraoperative kinematics evaluations during knee arthroplasty. The protocol was evaluated on 20 patients, half undergoing unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) and half undergoing posterior-substituting, rotating-platform total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The protocol includes a simple acquisition procedure and an original elaboration methodology. Kinematic tests were performed before and after surgery and included varus/valgus stress at 0 and 30 degrees and passive range of motion. Both UKA and TKA improved varus/valgus stability in extension and preserved the total magnitude of screw-home motion during flexion. Moreover, compared to preoperative conditions, values assumed by tibial axial rotation during flexion in TKA knees were more similar to the rotating patterns of UKA knees. The analysis of the anteroposterior displacement of the knee compartments confirmed that the two prostheses did not produce medial pivoting, but achieved a postoperative normal behavior. These results demonstrated that proposed intraoperative kinematics evaluations by a navigation system provided new information on the functional outcome of the reconstruction useful to restore knee kinematics during surgery.

  19. Reduced knee hyperextension after wearing a robotic knee orthosis during gait training--a case study.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yurong; Lo, Wai Leung; Xu, Guangqing; Li, Leonard Sheungwai; Li, Le; Huang, Dongfeng

    2015-01-01

    This case study describes the effects of a wearable dynamic knee orthosis to supplement walking training in a patient suffering knee hyperextension. The subject was a 57-year old female who was 3.5 years post-brain tumor surgery. She was presented with impaired right lower extremity muscle performance, increased lower extremity muscle tension, and right knee hyperextension. She reported pain at the right knee joint and tibialis anterior after 10 minutes of over-ground walk. Fifteen one-hour sessions of gait training with robotic knee orthosis (RKO) were provided an over 3 weeks period. The subject demonstrated improvement with right lower limb kinematic and kinetic measures of gait. Peak flexion degree and moment increased (from -4.99° to 13.47°, and from 0.18 Nm/kg to 0.20 Nm/kg respectively).Extension peak moment decreased from 1.03 Nm/kg to 0.53 Nm/kg. Knee joint force decreased from 0.68 N to 0.45 N. Ground reaction force (GRF) reduced from 11.06N to 10.11N. Berg Balance Scale (BBS) improved from 45/56 to 51/56. No difference was observed in Fugl-Meyer Assessment of the Lower limb (FMA-LE) scores. Gait training that integrates an intention-based RKO for correcting knee hyperextension can be clinically effective. The persistence and generalizability of these results need to be further investigated.

  20. Older Adults without Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis: Knee Alignment and Knee Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Fahlman, Lissa; Sangeorzan, Emmeline; Chheda, Nimisha; Lambright, Daphne

    2014-01-01

    This study describes knee alignment and active knee range of motion (ROM) in a community-based group of 78-year old adults (n = 143) who did not have radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis in either knee (KL < 2). Although knee malalignment is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, most women and men had either valgus or varus alignments. Notably, no men were valgus in both knees. Women with both knees valgus had significantly greater body mass index (P > 0.001) than women with varus or straight knees. Men and women with valgus or varus knee alignments had generally lower ROM than individuals with both knees straight. In summary, this study highlights the complex relationships among knee alignment, ROM, body mass index, and gender in elderly adults without radiographic knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24453501

  1. Older Adults without Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis: Knee Alignment and Knee Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Lissa; Sangeorzan, Emmeline; Chheda, Nimisha; Lambright, Daphne

    2014-01-12

    This study describes knee alignment and active knee range of motion (ROM) in a community-based group of 78-year old adults (n = 143) who did not have radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis in either knee (KL < 2). Although knee malalignment is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, most women and men had either valgus or varus alignments. Notably, no men were valgus in both knees. Women with both knees valgus had significantly greater body mass index (P > 0.001) than women with varus or straight knees. Men and women with valgus or varus knee alignments had generally lower ROM than individuals with both knees straight. In summary, this study highlights the complex relationships among knee alignment, ROM, body mass index, and gender in elderly adults without radiographic knee osteoarthritis.

  2. Gravitational effects on human cardiovascular responses to isometric muscle contractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonde-Petersen, Flemmig; Suzuki, Yoji; Sadamoto, Tomoko

    Isometric exercise induces profound cardiovascular adaptations increasing mean arterial pressure and heart rate. We investigated effects of simulated +Gz and -Gz respectively on the central and peripheral cardiovascular system. Sustained handgrip exercise was performed at 40% of maximum for 2 minutes in five subjects. This maneuver increased mean arterial pressure by 40-45 mm Hg both during head out water immersion which simulates weightlessness, as well as bedrest during -25, 0, and +25 degrees tilt from the horizontal. Lower body negative pressure (-60 mm Hg for 10 min) attenuated the response to handgrip exercise to 30 mm Hg. It also increased the heart rate minimally by about 20 beats per minute while the water immersion, as well as head up, head down and horizontal bedrest showed increments of about 50 beats per min. It was concluded that the response to isometric contraction is mediated through the high pressure baroreceptors, because similar responses were seen during stresses producing a wide variation in central venous pressure. During lower body negative pressure the increased sympathetic nervous activity itself increased resting heart rate and mean arterial pressure. The responses to static exercise were, therefore, weaker.

  3. Vibromyographic quantification of voluntary isometric contractile force in the brachioradialis.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jason P; Madhavan, Guruprasad; McLeod, Kenneth J

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of vibromyography (VMG) to accurately represent voluntary forearm muscle contractile force during attempted-isometric contraction of the brachioradialis. VMG signals were collected from the brachioradialis of healthy adult men (mean age, 26.6+/-9.8 years, N=24) during attempted-isometric contraction over a force range of 4.45 N to maximum sustained load. The VMG signals were decomposed using wavelet packet analysis techniques, and the corresponding wavelet packets were utilized in a multiple regression model for parameter reduction and identification of signal components which best correlated to muscle force. It was observed that just two wavelet components were sufficient to accurately predict muscle force (R2=0.984, P<0.0001). The signal force relationship observed is monotonic, though quadratic in form. More importantly, the wavelet data was able to predict absolute force output of the brachioradialis without normalization or prior knowledge of a subject's maximum voluntary force. These data show that VMG recordings are capable of providing a monotonic relationship between VMG signal and muscle force. Moreover, in contrast to EMG technology which can only provide relative force levels, VMG appears to be capable of reporting absolute force levels, an observation which is expected to lead to numerous applications in medicine and rehabilitation. PMID:17946062

  4. Cooling Does Not Affect Knee Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Ozmun, John C.; Thieme, Heather A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cooling on proprioception of the knee has not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the movement reproduction (timing and accuracy) aspect of proprioception. Subjects were tested under two conditions: a 20-minute application of ice and control. Proprioceptive accuracy and timing were measured by passively moving the knee, then comparing the subject's active reproduction of the passive movement. Subjects were blindfolded, then tested in three sectors of the knee's range of motion: 90° to 60°, 60° to 30°, and 30° to full extension. Ice application had no apparent effect on the subject's ability to perform accurate movement reproductions in the sectors tested. However, accuracy of the subject's final angle reproduction varied between the sectors as did the total time of the movement. One possible explanation for the difference between sectors is that different receptors are active at different points in the knee's range of motion. We conclude that cooling the knee joint for 20 minutes does not have an adverse effect on proprioception. PMID:16558379

  5. Total condylar knee arthroplasty for valgus and combined valgus-flexion deformity of the knee.

    PubMed

    Ranawat, C S; Rose, H A; Rich, D S

    1984-01-01

    Total condylar knee arthroplasty was performed on 64 knees with fixed valgus or valgus/flexion deformities. The technique for release of tight lateral and posterior structures is important to balance the ligament. Clinical results were rated good and excellent in 95% of the knees. Four patients with excessive flexion deformities required 6 weeks of cast bracing in the immediate postoperative period for instabilities caused by an imbalance in the spacing in flexion and extension. In no joint in the entire series did stability deteriorate with time. There were no patellar complications or nerve palsies noted. Radiographic evaluation revealed well-fixed components in 92% of the arthroplasties. None has required revision for mechanical loosening to date. With proper technique the total condylar prosthesis can be employed in knees with valgus or valgus/flexion deformities to give predictably good results. The total condylar III prosthesis may be required in severe combined deformities for added stability. PMID:6546120

  6. Assessment of Isometric Trunk Strength – The Relevance of Body Position and Relationship between Planes of Movement

    PubMed Central

    Kocjan, Andrej; Sarabon, Nejc

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the differences in maximal isometric trunk extension and flexion strength during standing, sitting and kneeling. Additionally, we were interested in correlations between the maximal strength in sagittal, frontal and transverse plane, measured in the sitting position. Sixty healthy subjects (24 male, 36 female; age 41.3 ± 15.1 yrs; body height 1.70 ± 0.09 m; body mass 72.7 ± 13.3 kg) performed maximal voluntary isometric contractions of the trunk flexor and extensor muscles in standing, sitting and kneeling position. The subjects also performed lateral flexions and rotations in the sitting position. Each task was repeated three times and average of maximal forces was used for data analysis. RANOVA with post-hoc testing was applied to the flexion and extension data. The level of statistical significance was set to p < 0.05. Overall, in both genders together, the highest average force for trunk extension was recorded in sitting posture (910.5 ± 271.5 N), followed by kneeling (834.3 ± 242.9 N) and standing (504.0 ± 165.4 N), compared with flexion, where we observed the opposite trend (508.5 ± 213.0 N, 450.9 ± 165.7 N and 443.4 ± 153.1 N, respectively). Post-hoc tests showed significant differences in all extension positions (p < 0.0001) and between sitting/standing (p = 0.018) and kneeling/standing (p = 0.033) flexion exertions. The extension/flexion ratio for sitting was 2.1 ± 0.4, for kneeling 1.9 ± 0.4, followed by standing, where motion forward approximately equals motion backward (1.1 ± 0.6). Trunk sagittal-transverse strength showed the strongest correlation, followed by frontal-transverse and sagittal-frontal plane correlation pairs (R2 = 0.830, 0.712 and 0.657). The baseline trunk isometric strength data provided by this study should help further strength diagnostics, more precisely, the prevention of low back disorders. Key points Maximal voluntary isometric force of the trunk extensors increased with the angle at

  7. Mobile Sensor Application for Kinematic Detection of the Knees

    PubMed Central

    Suputtitada, Areerat; Khovidhungij, Watcharapong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To correctly measure the knee joint angle, this study utilized a Qualisys motion capture system and also used it as the reference to assess the validity of the study's Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) system that consisted of four IMU sensors and the Knee Angle Recorder software. The validity was evaluated by the root mean square (RMS) of different angles and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values between the Qualisys system and the IMU system. Methods Four functional knee movement tests for ten healthy participants were investigated, which were the knee flexion test, the hip and knee flexion test, the forward step test and the leg abduction test, and the walking test. Results The outcomes of the knee flexion test, the hip and knee flexion test, the forward step test, and the walking test showed that the RMS of different angles were less than 6°. The ICC values were in the range of 0.84 to 0.99. However, the leg abduction test showed a poor correlation in the measurement of the knee abduction-adduction movement. Conclusion The IMU system used in this study is a new good method to measure the knee flexion-extension movement. PMID:26361597

  8. Metabolic and cardiorespiratory responses to maximal intermittent knee isokinetic exercise in young healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Marzorati, M; Perini, R; Milesi, S; Veicsteinas, A

    2000-03-01

    There have been many studies on the effects of isokinetic exercise on muscle performance in training and rehabilitative programmes. On the other hand, the cardiovascular and metabolic responses elicited by this type of exercise have been poorly investigated. This study was specifically designed to describe the relationships, if any, between metabolic and cardiorespiratory responses and power output during maximal intermittent knee isokinetic exercise when a steady state is reached. A group of 18 healthy subjects (10 men and 8 women, age range 25-30 years) were requested to perform at maximal concentric isokinetic knee extensions/flexions 60 degrees. s(-1) and 180 degrees. s(-1) for 5 min, with a 5-s pause interposed between consecutive repetitions. The power output (W) was calculated; before and during the tasks heart rate (f(c)) and arterial blood pressure (AP(a)) were continuously monitored. Pulmonary ventilation (V(E)) and oxygen uptake (VO(2)) were measured at the 4th and at the 5th min of exercise and blood lactate concentration at rest and at the 3rd min of recovery. From the 4th to the 5th min only a slight decrease in W was observed, both at 60 degrees. s(-1) and 180 degrees. s(-1). The VO(2), V(E), f(c) and AP(a) showed similar values in the last 2 min of exercise, suggesting that a steady state had been reached. The VO(2) increased linearly as a function of +W, showing a significantly steeper slope at 60 degrees. s(-1) than at 180 degrees. s(-1). The f(c), in spite of a large interindividual variation, was linearly related to metabolic demand, and was not affected by angular velocity. Systolic and diastolic AP(a) were not related either to VO(2) or to angular velocity. In conclusion it would appear that the metabolic response to maximal intermittent knee isokinetic exercise resembles that of dynamic exercise. Conversely, the cardiocirculatory responses would seem to reflect a relevant role of the isometric postural component, the importance of which

  9. Enhanced muscle activity during lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho-Seong

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pelvic stabilization affects multifidus (MF) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscle activities during dynamic extension exercise. Nine males (age, 25.1±6.3 yr; height, 176.6±2.4 cm; body mass, 74.9±6.7 kg) performed an isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise in an upright seated position with or without pelvic stabilization. The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°. In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise. The MF and IL muscle activities were significantly higher at 110°, 146°, and 182° with pelvic stabilization than that without pelvic stabilization during the isometric lumbar extension strength test (P<0.05) and the dynamic exercise (P<0.05). These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization.

  10. Enhanced muscle activity during lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pelvic stabilization affects multifidus (MF) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscle activities during dynamic extension exercise. Nine males (age, 25.1±6.3 yr; height, 176.6±2.4 cm; body mass, 74.9±6.7 kg) performed an isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise in an upright seated position with or without pelvic stabilization. The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°. In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise. The MF and IL muscle activities were significantly higher at 110°, 146°, and 182° with pelvic stabilization than that without pelvic stabilization during the isometric lumbar extension strength test (P<0.05) and the dynamic exercise (P<0.05). These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization. PMID:26730390

  11. Two-Year Incidence and Predictors of Future Knee Arthroplasty in Persons with Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis: Preliminary Analysis of Longitudinal Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangrong; Jiranek, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective There is little evidence to guide physicians when discussing future likelihood of knee arthroplasty with patients who have symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Data from Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) was used to determine the incidence of and predictors for knee arthroplasty. Methods OAI data were collected on a sample of 778 persons aged 45 to 79 years with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. An extensive set of measurements were obtained at baseline and persons were followed for 2 years to identify who underwent knee arthroplasty. Random forest analysis was used to identify optimal variables that discriminate among those who did and those who did not undergo knee arthroplasty. Results The two year incidence of knee arthroplasty in the cohort was 3.7% (95%CI, 2.6%, 5.3%). Because of the low number of knee arthroplasty procedures, the predictor analysis was preliminary in nature. The analysis identified several variables that could be used to assist in identifying patients at future risk for knee arthroplasty. Conclusion For persons at high risk of knee arthroplasty, the two year incidence of knee arthroplasty is very low. The most powerful predictors were those that accounted for disease severity and functional loss. These data could assist physicians in advising patients with knee osteoarthritis on future surgical care. PMID:19419874

  12. Modern prosthetic knee mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Michael, J W

    1999-04-01

    The plethora of presently available prosthetic knee components can be divided into two groups based on how they are controlled: recent innovations that incorporate an onboard computer and the more familiar purely mechanical devices. These categories then can be subdivided into generic functional classes based on the degree of stance phase stability and swing phase responsiveness offered by each type of knee mechanism. This article summarizes the key advantages and limitations of available prosthetic knee systems and suggests a simple method to match the biomechanical capabilities of specific prosthetic knee components to the individual functional capabilities and goals of the person with an amputated limb.

  13. Fatigue effects on knee joint stability during two jump tasks in women.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alexis; Olson, Sharon L; Etnyre, Bruce; Trudelle-Jackson, Elaine E; Bartlett, William; Venegas-Rios, Heidi L

    2010-04-01

    Dynamic knee joint stability may be affected by the onset of metabolic fatigue during sports participation that could increase the risk for knee injury. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of metabolic fatigue on knee muscle activation, peak knee joint angles, and peak knee internal moments in young women during 2 jumping tasks. Fifteen women (mean age: 24.6 +/- 2.6 years) participated in one nonfatigued session and one fatigued session. During both sessions, peak knee landing flexion and valgus joint angles, peak knee extension and varus/valgus internal moments, electromyographic (EMG) muscle activity of the quadriceps and hamstrings, and quadriceps/hamstring EMG cocontraction ratio were measured. The tasks consisted of a single-legged drop jump from a 40-cm box and a 20-cm, up-down, repeated hop task. The fatigued session included a Wingate anaerobic protocol followed by performance of the 2 tasks. Although participants exhibited greater knee injury-predisposing factors during the fatigued session, such as lesser knee flexion joint angles, greater knee valgus joint angles, and greater varus/valgus internal joint moments for both tasks, only knee flexion during the up-down task was statistically significant (p = 0.028). Metabolic fatigue may perhaps predispose young women to knee injuries by impairing dynamic knee joint stability. Training strength-endurance components and the ability to maintain control of body movements in either rested or fatigued situations might help reduce injuries in young women athletes. PMID:20300024

  14. Patterns of knee osteoarthritis in Arabian and American knees.

    PubMed

    Hodge, W Andrew; Harman, Melinda K; Banks, Scott A

    2009-04-01

    This study illustrates differences in the cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritic knees in patients with more frequent hyperflexion activities of daily living compared with Western patients. Proximal tibial articular cartilage wear and cruciate ligament condition were assessed in Saudi Arabian and North American patients with varus osteoarthritis undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) intact knees, there were significant differences in wear location, with a clearly more anterior pattern in Saudi Arabian knees. Complete ACL deficiency occurred in 25% of North American knees but only 14% of Saudi Arabian knees. These ACL-deficient knees showed the most severe cartilage wear in both groups and posterior medial wear patterns. Biomechanical descriptions of knee flexion and axial rotation during kneeling or squatting are consistent with the more pronounced anteromedial and posterolateral cartilage wear patterns observed on the Saudi Arabian knees. These observations provide insight into altered knee mechanics in 2 culturally different populations with different demands on knee flexion.

  15. Effects of isometric hip movements on electromyographic activities of the trunk muscles during plank exercises.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Soo-Yong; Kang, Myoung-Joo; Yoon, So-Hee; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of isometric hip adduction and abduction on trunk muscle activity during plank exercises. [Subjects and Methods] Nineteen healthy male subjects were recruited for this study. All subjects performed the traditional plank exercise (TP), plank exercise with isometric hip adduction (PHAD), and plank exercise with isometric hip abduction (PHAB) by using an elastic band. Electromyographic (EMG) activities of the internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) were measured during the 3 plank exercises by using an Electromyography system. [Results] Internal oblique and external oblique muscle activities were significantly greater during plank exercise with isometric hip adduction and plank exercise with isometric hip abduction than during traditional plank exercise. Internal oblique and external oblique muscle activities did not differ between the plank exercise with isometric hip adduction and plank exercise with isometric hip abduction conditions. [Conclusion] These findings demonstrate that loaded isometric hip movements may be a useful strategy to increase trunk muscle activity during plank exercises. PMID:27630435

  16. Effects of isometric hip movements on electromyographic activities of the trunk muscles during plank exercises

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Soo-Yong; Kang, Myoung-Joo; Yoon, So-Hee; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of isometric hip adduction and abduction on trunk muscle activity during plank exercises. [Subjects and Methods] Nineteen healthy male subjects were recruited for this study. All subjects performed the traditional plank exercise (TP), plank exercise with isometric hip adduction (PHAD), and plank exercise with isometric hip abduction (PHAB) by using an elastic band. Electromyographic (EMG) activities of the internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) were measured during the 3 plank exercises by using an Electromyography system. [Results] Internal oblique and external oblique muscle activities were significantly greater during plank exercise with isometric hip adduction and plank exercise with isometric hip abduction than during traditional plank exercise. Internal oblique and external oblique muscle activities did not differ between the plank exercise with isometric hip adduction and plank exercise with isometric hip abduction conditions. [Conclusion] These findings demonstrate that loaded isometric hip movements may be a useful strategy to increase trunk muscle activity during plank exercises. PMID:27630435

  17. Effects of isometric hip movements on electromyographic activities of the trunk muscles during plank exercises

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Soo-Yong; Kang, Myoung-Joo; Yoon, So-Hee; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of isometric hip adduction and abduction on trunk muscle activity during plank exercises. [Subjects and Methods] Nineteen healthy male subjects were recruited for this study. All subjects performed the traditional plank exercise (TP), plank exercise with isometric hip adduction (PHAD), and plank exercise with isometric hip abduction (PHAB) by using an elastic band. Electromyographic (EMG) activities of the internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) were measured during the 3 plank exercises by using an Electromyography system. [Results] Internal oblique and external oblique muscle activities were significantly greater during plank exercise with isometric hip adduction and plank exercise with isometric hip abduction than during traditional plank exercise. Internal oblique and external oblique muscle activities did not differ between the plank exercise with isometric hip adduction and plank exercise with isometric hip abduction conditions. [Conclusion] These findings demonstrate that loaded isometric hip movements may be a useful strategy to increase trunk muscle activity during plank exercises.

  18. Gait analysis of dysvascular below-knee and contralateral through-knee bilateral amputees: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Pinzur, M S; Smith, D; Tornow, D; Meade, K; Patwardhan, A

    1993-08-01

    Four elderly peripheral vascular insufficiency below-knee amputees, average age 58, underwent contralateral through-knee amputation for gangrene. All four became household ambulators with end-weight bearing designed prosthetic sockets and four-bar linkage knees. Gait analysis was performed with two AMTI (Newton, Mass) Biomechanics Force Platforms and a Watsmart Motion Monitoring System (Waterloo, Ontario). All four were observed to apparently "lock" the four-bar linkage prosthetic knee into extension during midstance and double limb support phases of gait. All subjectively felt that their through-knee limb was their more stable limb. Weight-bearing occurred during 63% of the gait cycle on the below-knee limb, 54% on the through-knee limb, and 17% in double limb support. Walking propulsion, as measured by forefoot impulse, was similar in the two limbs. The first peak of vertical force, corresponding to the elevation of the center of body weight as it passes over the weight-bearing limb, averaged 98% of body weight on the through-knee limb and only 93% on the below-knee limb. The second peak, corresponding to the kinetic energy of the falling trunk and muscle function providing linear acceleration of the center of body weight during propulsion, averaged 96% of body weight on the through-knee limb, and only 73% on the below-knee limb. Progression of the center of pressure, a qualitative measure of limb stability, was more orderly in the through-knee limbs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Rehabilitation after ACL Injury: A Fluoroscopic Study on the Effects of Type of Exercise on the Knee Sagittal Plane Arthrokinematics

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Sadegh; Esfandiarpour, Fateme; Shakourirad, Ali; Salehi, Reza; Akbar, Mohammad; Farahmand, Farzam

    2013-01-01

    A safe rehabilitation exercise for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries needs to be compatible with the normal knee arthrokinematics to avoid abnormal loading on the joint structures. The objective of this study was to measure the amount of the anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the ACL-deficient knees during selective open and closed kinetic chain exercises. The intact and injured knees of fourteen male subjects with unilateral ACL injury were imaged using uniplanar fluoroscopy, while the subjects performed forward lunge and unloaded/loaded open kinetic knee extension exercises. The ATTs were measured from fluoroscopic images, as the distance between the tibial and femoral reference points, at seven knee flexion angles, from 0° to 90°. No significant differences were found between the ATTs of the ACL-deficient and intact knees at all flexion angles during forward lunge and unloaded open kinetic knee extension (P < 0.05). During loaded open kinetic knee extension, however, the ATTs of the ACL deficient knees were significantly larger than those of the intact knees at 0° (P = 0.002) and 15° (P = 0.012). It was suggested that the forward lunge, as a weight-bearing closed kinetic chain exercise, provides a safer approach for developing muscle strength and functional stability in rehabilitation program of ACL-deficient knees, in comparison with open kinetic knee extension exercise. PMID:24066288

  20. Rehabilitation after ACL injury: a fluoroscopic study on the effects of type of exercise on the knee sagittal plane arthrokinematics.

    PubMed

    Norouzi, Sadegh; Esfandiarpour, Fateme; Shakourirad, Ali; Salehi, Reza; Akbar, Mohammad; Farahmand, Farzam

    2013-01-01

    A safe rehabilitation exercise for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries needs to be compatible with the normal knee arthrokinematics to avoid abnormal loading on the joint structures. The objective of this study was to measure the amount of the anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the ACL-deficient knees during selective open and closed kinetic chain exercises. The intact and injured knees of fourteen male subjects with unilateral ACL injury were imaged using uniplanar fluoroscopy, while the subjects performed forward lunge and unloaded/loaded open kinetic knee extension exercises. The ATTs were measured from fluoroscopic images, as the distance between the tibial and femoral reference points, at seven knee flexion angles, from 0° to 90°. No significant differences were found between the ATTs of the ACL-deficient and intact knees at all flexion angles during forward lunge and unloaded open kinetic knee extension (P < 0.05). During loaded open kinetic knee extension, however, the ATTs of the ACL deficient knees were significantly larger than those of the intact knees at 0° (P = 0.002) and 15° (P = 0.012). It was suggested that the forward lunge, as a weight-bearing closed kinetic chain exercise, provides a safer approach for developing muscle strength and functional stability in rehabilitation program of ACL-deficient knees, in comparison with open kinetic knee extension exercise. PMID:24066288

  1. Fine Level Set Structure of Flat Isometric Immersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornung, Peter

    2011-03-01

    A result by Pogorelov asserts that C 1 isometric immersions u of a bounded domain {S subset mathbb R^2} into {mathbb {R}^3} whose normal takes values in a set of zero area enjoy the following regularity property: the gradient {f := nabla u} is `developable' in the sense that the nondegenerate level sets of f consist of straight line segments intersecting the boundary of S at both endpoints. Motivated by applications in nonlinear elasticity, we study the level set structure of such f when S is an arbitrary bounded Lipschitz domain. We show that f can be approximated by uniformly bounded maps with a simplified level set structure. We also show that the domain S can be decomposed (up to a controlled remainder) into finitely many subdomains, each of which admits a global line of curvature parametrization.

  2. Axial disposition of myosin heads in isometrically contracting muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Juanhuix, J; Bordas, J; Campmany, J; Svensson, A; Bassford, M L; Narayanan, T

    2001-01-01

    Meridional x-ray diffraction diagrams, recorded with high angular resolution, from muscles contracting at the plateau of isometric tension show that the myosin diffraction orders are clusters of peaks. These clusters are due to pronounced interference effects between the myosin diffracting units on either side of the M-line. A theoretical analysis based on the polarity of the myosin (and actin) filaments shows that it is possible to extract phase information from which the axial disposition of the myosin heads can be determined. The results show that each head in a crown pair has a distinct structural disposition. It appears that only one of the heads in the pair stereospecifically interacts with the thin filament at any one time. PMID:11222303

  3. Patient function after a posterior stabilizing total knee arthroplasty: cam-post engagement and knee kinematics.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Jeremy F; Hanson, George R; Park, Sang Eun; Moynihan, Angela L; Li, Guoan

    2008-03-01

    Even though posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty has been widely used in surgery, how the cam-post mechanism (posterior substituting mechanism) affects knee joint kinematics and function in patients is not known. The objective of the present study was to investigate posterior femoral translation, internal tibial rotation, tibiofemoral contact, and cam-post engagement of total knee arthroplasty patients during in vivo weight-bearing flexion. Twenty-four knees with a PS TKA were investigated while performing a single leg weight-bearing lunge from full extension to maximum flexion as images were recorded using a dual fluoroscopic system. The in vivo knee position at each targeted flexion angle was reproduced using 3D TKA models and the fluoroscopic images. The kinematics of the knee was measured from the series of the total knee arthroplasty models. The cam-post engagement was determined when the surface model of the femoral cam overlapped with that of the tibial post. The mean maximum flexion angle for all the subjects was 112.5 +/- 13.1 degrees . The mean flexion angle where cam-post engagement was observed was 91.1 +/- 10.9 degrees . The femur moved anteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees and posteriorly through the rest of the flexion range. The internal tibial rotation increased approximately 6 degrees from full extension to 90 degrees of flexion and decreased slightly with further flexion. Both the medial and lateral contact point moved posteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees , remained relatively constant from 30 degrees to 90 degrees , and then moved further posterior from 90 degrees to maximum flexion. The in vivo cam-post engagement corresponded to increased posterior translation and reduced internal tibial rotation at high flexion of the posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty. The initial cam-post engagement was also mildly correlated with the maximum flexion angle of the knee (R = 0.51, p = 0.019). A later cam-post engagement might

  4. Human arm posture prediction in response to isometric endpoint forces.

    PubMed

    Davoudabadi Farahani, Saeed; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark; Rasmussen, John

    2015-11-26

    The ability to predict the musculoskeletal response to external loads has multiple applications for the design of machines with a human interface and for the prediction of outcomes of musculoskeletal interventions. In this study, we applied an inverse-inverse dynamics technique to investigate its ability to predict arm posture in response to isometric hand forces. For each subject, we made a three-dimensional musculoskeletal model using the AnyBody Modelling System (AMS). Then, we had each subject-specific model hold a weight anteriorly to the right shoulder joint at a distance of half of the arm length. We selected the glenohumeral abduction angle (GHAA) as the only free parameter. Subsequently, we used inverse-inverse dynamics to find the optimal GHAA that minimised a performance criterion with physiological constraints. In this study, we investigated the performance of two different objective functions: summation of squared muscle activity (SSMA) and summation of squared normalised joint torques (SSNJT). To validate the simulation results, arm posture responses to different isometric downward hand forces were measured for six healthy male subjects. Five trials were performed for each loading condition. The results showed that, with an increase in hand load, there was a reduced GHAA in all subjects. Another interesting finding was that self-selected postures for lighter tasks varied more than postures for heavier tasks for all subjects. To understand this, we investigated the curvature of the objective function as a function of the load and observed an increased curvature with increased load. This may explain the reduced intra-subject variations observed for increasing loads. PMID:26482735

  5. Human arm posture prediction in response to isometric endpoint forces.

    PubMed

    Davoudabadi Farahani, Saeed; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark; Rasmussen, John

    2015-11-26

    The ability to predict the musculoskeletal response to external loads has multiple applications for the design of machines with a human interface and for the prediction of outcomes of musculoskeletal interventions. In this study, we applied an inverse-inverse dynamics technique to investigate its ability to predict arm posture in response to isometric hand forces. For each subject, we made a three-dimensional musculoskeletal model using the AnyBody Modelling System (AMS). Then, we had each subject-specific model hold a weight anteriorly to the right shoulder joint at a distance of half of the arm length. We selected the glenohumeral abduction angle (GHAA) as the only free parameter. Subsequently, we used inverse-inverse dynamics to find the optimal GHAA that minimised a performance criterion with physiological constraints. In this study, we investigated the performance of two different objective functions: summation of squared muscle activity (SSMA) and summation of squared normalised joint torques (SSNJT). To validate the simulation results, arm posture responses to different isometric downward hand forces were measured for six healthy male subjects. Five trials were performed for each loading condition. The results showed that, with an increase in hand load, there was a reduced GHAA in all subjects. Another interesting finding was that self-selected postures for lighter tasks varied more than postures for heavier tasks for all subjects. To understand this, we investigated the curvature of the objective function as a function of the load and observed an increased curvature with increased load. This may explain the reduced intra-subject variations observed for increasing loads.

  6. Interpolation function for approximating knee joint behavior in human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the importance of analyzing the kinematic data of the lower limb in gait movement, especially the angular variation of the knee joint, the paper propose an approximation function that can be used for processing the correlation among a multitude of knee cycles. The approximation of the raw knee data was done by Lagrange polynomial interpolation on a signal acquired using Zebris Gait Analysis System. The signal used in approximation belongs to a typical subject extracted from a lot of ten investigated subjects, but the function domain of definition belongs to the entire group. The study of the knee joint kinematics plays an important role in understanding the kinematics of the gait, this articulation having the largest range of motion in whole joints, in gait. The study does not propose to find an approximation function for the adduction-abduction movement of the knee, this being considered a residual movement comparing to the flexion-extension.

  7. Partial knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... You will need to understand what surgery and recovery will be like. Partial knee arthroplasty may be a good choice if you have arthritis in only one side or part of the knee and: You are older, thin, and not very active. You do not ...

  8. Knee arthroscopy - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ligaments are among the ligaments of the knee joint. ... the joint (synovium), and the rest of the joint. Damaged tissues can be removed. Arthroscopy can also be used to help view the inside of the knee while ligaments or tendons are repaired from the outside.

  9. Preventing Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to tearing. Growth Plate Injuries, Fractures, and Dislocations Knee fractures rarely occur in childhood sports, but with any ... is the bump on the front of the knee where the patellar tendon attaches. Fractures to the growth plate in this area often ...

  10. The relationship between femoral cartilage thickness and muscle strength in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tuna, Serpil; Balcı, Nilüfer; Özçakar, Levent

    2016-08-01

    To explore whether femoral cartilage thickness is related (and changes) with muscle strength in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Forty patients (27 F, 13 M) with knee OA-who were under quadriceps muscle strengthening program-were enrolled in the study. Isokinetic/isometric knee muscle strength measurements (at 30-60° angles and 60-180° velocity) were performed at baseline, end of the muscle strengthening program, and third month control visit using a biodex dynamometer. Femoral cartilage thicknesses (at medial/lateral condyle and intercondylar area) were measured using ultrasonography. Seventy-nine knees of 40 patients (27 F, 13 M) aged 52.03 ± 11.72 years (range, 26-71) were analyzed. Mean VAS scores on the first and third months were significantly lower than the initial values (p < 0.001, p = 0.049). Isometric peak torque and total work values at 180 °/s were significantly higher than the baseline measurements at first and third month controls (all p < 0.05). Cartilage thicknesses (at three sites) were significantly higher than the baseline measurements (all p < 0.05) on the third month but not on the first month (all p > 0.05). Femoral cartilage thicknesses were positively correlated with isometric strength values at baseline and third month. We propose that femoral cartilage thicknesses increase on the third month of strengthening therapy. Since this late-phase thickening parallels the earlier increase in muscle strength (starting, on the first month), we speculate that regeneration rather than edema might be the primary underlying cause. PMID:27091650

  11. Hip Strength Deficits in People With Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review With Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Deasy, Margaret; Leahy, Edmund; Semciw, Adam Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Systematic review with meta-analysis. Background A complete understanding of impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis would optimize exercise interventions for people with knee osteoarthritis. Our current understanding of hip strength deficits in this population is based on studies with conflicting findings and small samples. There is a need to systematically review and pool current evidence. Objectives To determine whether hip strength deficits exist in people with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Methods Electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO) were searched through February 2016. Studies comparing hip strength in people diagnosed with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis to healthy control participants were included in the review. A meta-analysis with random effects was applied to relevant data from included studies and a modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach was used to evaluate the quality of evidence for each pooled analysis. Results Five studies were included in the review. Meta-analysis revealed moderate-quality evidence of weaker isometric and isokinetic hip abduction strength in people with knee osteoarthritis (moderate difference: 7% to 24% weaker) and very low-quality evidence of no difference in isometric hip adduction strength. There was very low- to moderate-quality evidence of weaker isokinetic hip strength in the remaining planes of motion (moderate to large differences: 14% to 55% weaker). Conclusion Significant hip strength deficits exist in people with knee osteoarthritis. Hip strength assessment should be considered in clinical practice and may assist with directing targeted management strategies. Level of Evidence Symptom prevalence, level 1a-. J Orthop Sports PhysTher 2016;46(8):629-639. Epub3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6618. PMID:27374011

  12. Use of a turndown quadriceps tendon flap for rupture of the patellar tendon after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lin, Po-Chun; Wang, Jun-Wen

    2007-09-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is a devastating complication after total knee arthroplasty. The results of surgical treatment of this complication were discouraging in most of the reports. We describe a case of rupture of patellar tendon 7 weeks after total knee arthroplasty treated with a turndown quadriceps flap and circumferential wiring. Two years and 6 months after operation, the patient had no extension lag of the knee and knee flexion to 110 degrees .

  13. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement.

    PubMed

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Cates, Harold E; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05). No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups. PMID:27258086

  14. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Cates, Harold E.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05). No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups. PMID:27258086

  15. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement.

    PubMed

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Cates, Harold E; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05). No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups.

  16. Treating Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... osteotomy may need knee replacement surgery in the future. Arthroplasty is also called joint or knee replacement therapy. A surgeon removes the part of the knee damaged by osteoarthritis and replaces it with an artificial joint made from metals and plastic. All or part of the knee joint may ...

  17. Biomechanical Analysis of Stair Descent in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Igawa, Tatsuya; Katsuhira, Junji

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were to investigate the lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics of patients with the knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) during stair descent and clarify the biomechanical factors related to their difficulty in stair descent. [Subjects and Methods] Eight healthy elderly persons and four knee OA patients participated in this study. A 3-D motion analysis system and force plates were employed to measure lower extremity joint angles, ranges of motion, joint moments, joint powers, and ratios of contribution for the joint powers while descending stairs. [Results] Knee joint flexion angle, extension moment, and negative power during the early stance phase in the knee OA group were smaller than those in the healthy subjects group. However, no significant changes in these parameters in the ankle joint were observed between the two subject groups. [Conclusion] Knee OA patients could not use the knee joint to absorb impact during the early stance phase of stair descent. Hence, they might compensate for the roles played by the intact knee joint by mainly using ipsilateral ankle kinematics and kinetics. PMID:24926119

  18. Biomechanical analysis of stair descent in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Igawa, Tatsuya; Katsuhira, Junji

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were to investigate the lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics of patients with the knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) during stair descent and clarify the biomechanical factors related to their difficulty in stair descent. [Subjects and Methods] Eight healthy elderly persons and four knee OA patients participated in this study. A 3-D motion analysis system and force plates were employed to measure lower extremity joint angles, ranges of motion, joint moments, joint powers, and ratios of contribution for the joint powers while descending stairs. [Results] Knee joint flexion angle, extension moment, and negative power during the early stance phase in the knee OA group were smaller than those in the healthy subjects group. However, no significant changes in these parameters in the ankle joint were observed between the two subject groups. [Conclusion] Knee OA patients could not use the knee joint to absorb impact during the early stance phase of stair descent. Hence, they might compensate for the roles played by the intact knee joint by mainly using ipsilateral ankle kinematics and kinetics.

  19. EMGD-FE: an open source graphical user interface for estimating isometric muscle forces in the lower limb using an EMG-driven model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper describes the “EMG Driven Force Estimator (EMGD-FE)”, a Matlab® graphical user interface (GUI) application that estimates skeletal muscle forces from electromyography (EMG) signals. Muscle forces are obtained by numerically integrating a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that simulates Hill-type muscle dynamics and that utilises EMG signals as input. In the current version, the GUI can estimate the forces of lower limb muscles executing isometric contractions. Muscles from other parts of the body can be tested as well, although no default values for model parameters are provided. To achieve accurate evaluations, EMG collection is performed simultaneously with torque measurement from a dynamometer. The computer application guides the user, step-by-step, to pre-process the raw EMG signals, create inputs for the muscle model, numerically integrate the ODEs and analyse the results. Results An example of the application’s functions is presented using the quadriceps femoris muscle. Individual muscle force estimations for the four components as well the knee isometric torque are shown. Conclusions The proposed GUI can estimate individual muscle forces from EMG signals of skeletal muscles. The estimation accuracy depends on several factors, including signal collection and modelling hypothesis issues. PMID:24708668

  20. A reciprocal connection factor for assessing knee-joint function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wangdo; Kohles, Sean S

    2012-01-01

    In the knee joint, interactions between instantaneous kinetics and kinematics associated with ligamentous and articular tissues are not fully understood. These structures may be represented by the instantaneous screw axis ($) (ISA) and static force vectors ($'). Geometric changes to the joint structure affecting motion have not been fully explained, especially after surgical reconstruction and replacement procedures. The ISA offers a joint-characterisation approach, which is dependent on the combined forces of ligaments, articular contacts and muscles. The standard four-bar linkage model in the sagittal plane demonstrates that the normal contact force and the lines of action of the cruciate ligaments always intersect at the centre of rotation of the joint. A kinematic knee model in which the articular surfaces in the lateral and medial compartments as well as the isometric fascicles in the engaged ligaments may be represented as five constraints in a one-degree-of-freedom parallel spatial mechanism. This study provides a theoretical foundation to elucidate the role of each of these elements in the control of the ISA. A recourse to the principle of virtual work explained through d'Alembert's principle for reducing a dynamics problem to an instantaneous static scenario allows screws to be applied to the biomechanics of human motion. The principle of reciprocity links these approaches together to explain the transmitting load between the tibia and the femur as well as the relative motion within the knee joint. A principal clinical implication of this study is the introduction of the reciprocal connection factor to evaluate knee kinematics and kinetics in one simple term, allowing the quantitative assessment of the outcome of knee-joint treatment and rehabilitation methods.

  1. Knee synovial cyst presenting as iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costa, M L; Marshall, T; Donell, S T; Phillips, H

    2004-06-01

    We present the case of a 28-year-old competitive runner with iliotibial band (ITB) friction syndrome associated with a synovial cyst. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not demonstrate a fluid collection. However, open exploration revealed a large cyst beneath the ITB arising from the capsule of the knee proximal to the lateral meniscus. The cyst disappeared on extension. The pre-operative MRI scan may have revealed the cyst, if it had been taken with the knee flexed.

  2. Load-dependent variations in knee kinematics measured with dynamic MRI.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Christopher J; Schmitz, Anne; Reeder, Scott B; Thelen, Darryl G

    2013-08-01

    Subtle changes in knee kinematics may substantially alter cartilage contact patterns and moment generating capacities of soft tissues. The objective of this study was to use dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the influence of the timing of quadriceps loading on in vivo tibiofemoral and patellofemoral kinematics. We tested the hypothesis that load-dependent changes in knee kinematics would alter both the finite helical axis of the tibiofemoral joint and the moment arm of the patellar tendon. Eight healthy young adults were positioned supine in a MRI-compatible device that could impose either elastic or inertial loads on the lower leg in response to cyclic knee flexion-extension. The elastic loading condition induced concentric quadriceps contractions with knee extension, while an inertial loading condition induced eccentric quadriceps contractions with knee flexion. Peak internal knee extension moments ranged from 23 to 33 N m, which is comparable to loadings seen in normal walking. We found that anterior tibia translation, superior patella glide, and anterior patella translation were reduced by an average of 5.1, 5.7 and 2.9 mm when quadriceps loading coincided with knee flexion rather than knee extension. These kinematic variations induced a distal shift in the finite helical axis of the tibiofemoral joint and a reduction in the patellar tendon moment arm. We conclude that it may be important to consider such load-dependent changes in knee kinematics when using models to ascertain soft tissue and cartilage loading during functional tasks such as gait.

  3. Advanced concepts in knee arthrodesis

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jennifer H; Conway, Janet D

    2015-01-01

    The aim is to describe advanced strategies that can be used to diagnose and treat complications after knee arthrodesis and to describe temporary knee arthrodesis to treat infected knee arthroplasty. Potential difficult complications include nonunited knee arthrodesis, limb length discrepancy after knee arthrodesis, and united but infected knee arthrodesis. If a nonunited knee arthrodesis shows evidence of implant loosening or failure, then bone grafting the nonunion site as well as exchange intramedullary nailing and/or supplemental plate fixation are recommended. If symptomatic limb length discrepancy cannot be satisfactorily treated with a shoe lift, then the patient should undergo tibial lengthening over nail with a monolateral fixator or exchange nailing with a femoral internal lengthening device. If a united knee arthrodesis is infected, the nail must be removed. Then the surgeon has the option of replacing it with a long, antibiotic cement-coated nail. The authors also describe temporary knee arthrodesis for infected knee arthroplasty in patients who have the potential to undergo insertion of a new implant. The procedure has two goals: eradication of infection and stabilization of the knee. A temporary knee fusion can be accomplished by inserting both an antibiotic cement-coated knee fusion nail and a static antibiotic cement-coated spacer. These advanced techniques can be helpful when treating difficult complications after knee arthrodesis and treating cases of infected knee arthroplasty. PMID:25793160

  4. A comparison of two gluteus maximus EMG maximum voluntary isometric contraction positions

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Bret; Schoenfeld, Brad J.; Beardsley, Chris; Cronin, John

    2015-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to compare the peak electromyography (EMG) of the most commonly-used position in the literature, the prone bent-leg (90°) hip extension against manual resistance applied to the distal thigh (PRONE), to a novel position, the standing glute squeeze (SQUEEZE). Methods. Surface EMG electrodes were placed on the upper and lower gluteus maximus of thirteen recreationally active females (age = 28.9 years; height = 164 cm; body mass = 58.2 kg), before three maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) trials for each position were obtained in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion. Results. No statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences were observed between PRONE (upper: 91.94%; lower: 94.52%) and SQUEEZE (upper: 92.04%; lower: 85.12%) for both the upper and lower gluteus maximus. Neither the PRONE nor SQUEEZE was more effective between all subjects. Conclusions. In agreement with other studies, no single testing position is ideal for every participant. Therefore, it is recommended that investigators employ multiple MVIC positions, when possible, to ensure accuracy. Future research should investigate a variety of gluteus maximus MVIC positions in heterogeneous samples. PMID:26417543

  5. A comparison of two gluteus maximus EMG maximum voluntary isometric contraction positions.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Bret; Vigotsky, Andrew D; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Beardsley, Chris; Cronin, John

    2015-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to compare the peak electromyography (EMG) of the most commonly-used position in the literature, the prone bent-leg (90°) hip extension against manual resistance applied to the distal thigh (PRONE), to a novel position, the standing glute squeeze (SQUEEZE). Methods. Surface EMG electrodes were placed on the upper and lower gluteus maximus of thirteen recreationally active females (age = 28.9 years; height = 164 cm; body mass = 58.2 kg), before three maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) trials for each position were obtained in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion. Results. No statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences were observed between PRONE (upper: 91.94%; lower: 94.52%) and SQUEEZE (upper: 92.04%; lower: 85.12%) for both the upper and lower gluteus maximus. Neither the PRONE nor SQUEEZE was more effective between all subjects. Conclusions. In agreement with other studies, no single testing position is ideal for every participant. Therefore, it is recommended that investigators employ multiple MVIC positions, when possible, to ensure accuracy. Future research should investigate a variety of gluteus maximus MVIC positions in heterogeneous samples.

  6. Enslaving in a serial chain: interactions between grip force and hand force in isometric tasks.

    PubMed

    Paclet, Florent; Ambike, Satyajit; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2014-03-01

    This study was motivated by the double action of extrinsic hand muscles that produce grip force and also contribute to wrist torque. We explored interactions between grip force and wrist torque in isometric force production tasks. In particular, we tested a hypothesis that an intentional change in one of the two kinetic variables would produce an unintentional change in the other (enslaving). When young healthy subjects produced accurate changes in the grip force, only minor effects on the force produced by the hand (by wrist flexion/extension action) were observed. In contrast, a change in the hand force produced consistent changes in grip force in the same direction. The magnitude of such unintentional grip force change was stronger for intentional hand force decrease as compared to hand force increase. These effects increased with the magnitude of the initial grip force. When the subjects were asked to produce accurate total force computed as the sum of the hand and grip forces, strong negative covariation between the two forces was seen across trials interpreted as a synergy stabilizing the total force. An index of this synergy was higher in the space of "modes," hypothetical signals to the two effectors that could be changed by the controller one at a time. We interpret the complex enslaving effects (positive force covariation) as conditioned by typical everyday tasks. The presence of synergic effects (negative, task-specific force covariation) can be naturally interpreted within the referent configuration hypothesis. PMID:24309747

  7. Enslaving in a serial chain: Interactions between grip force and hand force in isometric tasks

    PubMed Central

    Paclet, Florent; Ambike, Satyajit; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    This study was motivated by the double action of extrinsic hand muscles that produce grip force and also contribute to wrist torque. We explored interactions between grip force and wrist torque in isometric force production tasks. In particular, we tested a hypothesis that an intentional change in one of the two kinetic variables would produce an unintentional change in the other (enslaving). When young healthy subjects produced accurate changes in the grip force, only minor effects on the force produced by the hand (by wrist flexion/extension action) were observed. In contrast, a change in the hand force produced consistent changes in grip force in the same direction. The magnitude of such unintentional grip force change was stronger for intentional hand force decrease as compared to hand force increase. These effects increased with the magnitude of the initial grip force. When the subjects were asked to produce accurate total force computed as the sum of the hand and grip forces, strong negative co-variation between the two forces was seen across trials interpreted as a synergy stabilizing the total force. An index of this synergy was higher in the space of “modes”, hypothetical signals to the two effectors that could be changed by the controller one at a time. We interpret the complex enslaving effects (positive force co-variation) as conditioned by typical everyday tasks. The presence of synergic effects (negative, task-specific force co-variation) can be naturally interpreted within the referent configuration hypothesis. PMID:24309747

  8. The effects of a prophylactic knee brace and two neoprene knee sleeves on the performance of healthy athletes: a crossover randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mortaza, Niyousha; Ebrahimi, Ismail; Jamshidi, Ali Ashraf; Abdollah, Vahid; Kamali, Mohammad; Abas, Wan Abu Bakar Wan; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2012-01-01

    Knee injury is one of the major problems in sports medicine, and the use of prophylactic knee braces is an attempt to reduce the occurrence and/or severity of injuries to the knee joint ligament(s) without inhibiting knee mobility. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of one recently designed prophylactic knee brace and two neoprene knee sleeves upon performance of healthy athletes. Thirty-one healthy male athletes (age = 21.2 ± 1.5) volunteered as participants to examine the effect of prophylactic knee brace/sleeves on performance using isokinetic and functional tests. All subjects were tested in four conditions in a random order: 1. nonbraced (control) 2. using a neoprene knee sleeve 3. using a knee sleeve with four bilateral metal supports and 4. using a prophylactic knee brace. The study design was a crossover, randomized, controlled trial. Subjects completed single leg vertical jump, cross-over hop, and the isokinetic knee flexion and extension (at 60, 180, 300°/sec). Data were collected from the above tests and analyzed for jump height, cross-over hop distance, peak torque to body weight ratio and average power, respectively. Comparisons of these variables in the four testing conditions revealed no statistically significant difference (p>0.05). The selected prophylactic brace/sleeves did not significantly inhibit athletic performance which might verify that their structure and design have caused no complication in the normal function of the knee joint. Moreover, it could be speculated that, if the brace or the sleeves had any limiting effect, our young healthy athletic subjects were well able to generate a mean peak torque large enough to overcome this possible restriction. Further studies are suggested to investigate the long term effect of these prophylactic knee brace and sleeves as well as their possible effect on the adjacent joints to the knee.

  9. The Effects of a Prophylactic Knee Brace and Two Neoprene Knee Sleeves on the Performance of Healthy Athletes: A Crossover Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mortaza, Niyousha; Ebrahimi, Ismail; Jamshidi, Ali Ashraf; Abdollah, Vahid; Kamali, Mohammad; Abas, Wan Abu Bakar Wan; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2012-01-01

    Knee injury is one of the major problems in sports medicine, and the use of prophylactic knee braces is an attempt to reduce the occurrence and/or severity of injuries to the knee joint ligament(s) without inhibiting knee mobility. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of one recently designed prophylactic knee brace and two neoprene knee sleeves upon performance of healthy athletes. Thirty-one healthy male athletes (age = 21.2±1.5) volunteered as participants to examine the effect of prophylactic knee brace/sleeves on performance using isokinetic and functional tests. All subjects were tested in four conditions in a random order: 1. nonbraced (control) 2. using a neoprene knee sleeve 3. using a knee sleeve with four bilateral metal supports and 4. using a prophylactic knee brace. The study design was a crossover, randomized, controlled trial. Subjects completed single leg vertical jump, cross-over hop, and the isokinetic knee flexion and extension (at 60, 180, 300°/sec). Data were collected from the above tests and analyzed for jump height, cross-over hop distance, peak torque to body weight ratio and average power, respectively. Comparisons of these variables in the four testing conditions revealed no statistically significant difference (p>0.05). The selected prophylactic brace/sleeves did not significantly inhibit athletic performance which might verify that their structure and design have caused no complication in the normal function of the knee joint. Moreover, it could be speculated that, if the brace or the sleeves had any limiting effect, our young healthy athletic subjects were well able to generate a mean peak torque large enough to overcome this possible restriction. Further studies are suggested to investigate the long term effect of these prophylactic knee brace and sleeves as well as their possible effect on the adjacent joints to the knee. PMID:23185549

  10. Knee Flexion and Daily Activities in Patients following Total Knee Replacement: A Comparison with ISO Standard 14243

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Markus A.; Nechtow, William; Schwenke, Thorsten; Moisio, Kirsten C.

    2015-01-01

    Walking is only one of many daily activities performed by patients following total knee replacement (TKR). The purpose of this study was to examine the hypotheses (a) that subject activity characteristics are correlated with knee flexion range of motion (ROM) and (b) that there is a significant difference between the subject's flexion/extension excursion throughout the day and the ISO specified input for knee wear testing. In order to characterize activity, the number of walking and stair stepping cycles, the time spent with dynamic and stationary activities, the number of activity sequences, and the knee flexion/extension excursion of 32 TKR subjects were collected during daily activity. Flexion/extension profiles were compared with the ISO 14243 simulator input profile using a level crossing classification algorithm. Subjects took an average of 3102 (range: 343–5857) walking cycles including 65 (range: 0–319) stair stepping cycles. Active and passive ROMs were positively correlated with stair walking time, stair step counts, and stair walking sequences. Simulated knee motion according to ISO showed significantly fewer level crossings at the flexion angles 20–40° and beyond 50° than those measured with the monitor. This suggests that implant wear testing protocols should contain more cycles and a variety of activities requiring higher knee flexion angles with incorporated resting/transition periods to account for the many activity sequences. PMID:26347875

  11. Anterior knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... as running, jumping or twisting, skiing, or playing soccer). You have flat feet. Anterior knee pain is ... to the kneecap Runners, jumpers, skiers, bicyclists, and soccer players who exercise often Teenagers and healthy young ...

  12. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to attach this part. Repair your muscles and tendons around the new joint and close the surgical cut. The surgery takes about 2 hours. Most artificial knees have both metal and plastic parts. Some ...

  13. Total Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... as anti- inflammatory medications, cortisone injections, lubricating injections, physical therapy, or other surgeries A knee that has become ... your function. Other treatment options — including medications, injections, physical therapy, or other types of surgery — will also be ...

  14. The relationship between hip, knee and ankle muscle mechanical characteristics and gait transition speed.

    PubMed

    Ranisavljev, Igor; Ilic, Vladimir; Markovic, Srdjan; Soldatovic, Ivan; Stefanovic, Djordje; Jaric, Slobodan

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the relationship between mechanical characteristics of hip, knee and ankle extensor and flexor muscle groups and gait transition speed. The sample included 29 physically active male adults homogenized regarding their anthropometric dimensions. Isokinetic and isometric leg muscle mechanical characteristics were assessed by an isokinetic dynamometer, while individual walk-to-run (WRT) and run-to-walk transition speeds (RWT) were determined using the standard increment protocol. The relationship between transition speeds and mechanical variables scaled to body size was determined using Pearson correlation and stepwise linear regression. The highest correlations were found for isokinetic power of ankle dorsal flexors and WRT (r=.468, p<.01) and the power of hip extensors and RWT (r=.442, p<.05). These variables were also the best predictors of WRT and RWT revealing approximately 20% of explained variance. Under the isometric conditions, the maximal force and rate of force development of hip flexors and ankle plantar flexors were moderately related with WRT and RWT (ranged from r=.340 to .427). The only knee muscle mechanical variable that correlated with WRT was low velocity knee flexor torque (r=.366, p<.05). The results generally suggest that the muscle mechanical properties, such as the power of ankle dorsal flexors and hip extensors, influence values of WRT and RWT.

  15. The relationship between hip, knee and ankle muscle mechanical characteristics and gait transition speed.

    PubMed

    Ranisavljev, Igor; Ilic, Vladimir; Markovic, Srdjan; Soldatovic, Ivan; Stefanovic, Djordje; Jaric, Slobodan

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the relationship between mechanical characteristics of hip, knee and ankle extensor and flexor muscle groups and gait transition speed. The sample included 29 physically active male adults homogenized regarding their anthropometric dimensions. Isokinetic and isometric leg muscle mechanical characteristics were assessed by an isokinetic dynamometer, while individual walk-to-run (WRT) and run-to-walk transition speeds (RWT) were determined using the standard increment protocol. The relationship between transition speeds and mechanical variables scaled to body size was determined using Pearson correlation and stepwise linear regression. The highest correlations were found for isokinetic power of ankle dorsal flexors and WRT (r=.468, p<.01) and the power of hip extensors and RWT (r=.442, p<.05). These variables were also the best predictors of WRT and RWT revealing approximately 20% of explained variance. Under the isometric conditions, the maximal force and rate of force development of hip flexors and ankle plantar flexors were moderately related with WRT and RWT (ranged from r=.340 to .427). The only knee muscle mechanical variable that correlated with WRT was low velocity knee flexor torque (r=.366, p<.05). The results generally suggest that the muscle mechanical properties, such as the power of ankle dorsal flexors and hip extensors, influence values of WRT and RWT. PMID:25244181

  16. Q-angle in patellofemoral pain: relationship with dynamic knee valgus, hip abductor torque, pain and function☆

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; Silva, Ana Paula de Moura Campos Carvalho e; França, Fábio Jorge Renovato; Magalhães, Maurício Oliveira; Burke, Thomaz Nogueira; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the q-angle and anterior knee pain severity, functional capacity, dynamic knee valgus and hip abductor torque in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Methods This study included 22 women with PFPS. The q-angle was assessed using goniometry: the participants were positioned in dorsal decubitus with the knee and hip extended, and the hip and foot in neutral rotation. Anterior knee pain severity was assessed using a visual analog scale, and functional capacity was assessed using the anterior knee pain scale. Dynamic valgus was evaluated using the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) of the knee, which was recorded using a digital camera during step down, and hip abductor peak torque was recorded using a handheld dynamometer. Results The q-angle did not present any significant correlation with severity of knee pain (r = −0.29; p = 0.19), functional capacity (r = −0.08; p = 0.72), FPPA (r = −0.28; p = 0.19) or isometric peak torque of the abductor muscles (r = −0.21; p = 0.35). Conclusion The q-angle did not present any relationship with pain intensity, functional capacity, FPPA, or hip abductor peak torque in the patients with PFPS. PMID:27069887

  17. Reading Knee-Deep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Freire told his audience at a seminar at the University of Massachusetts, "You need to read knee-deep in texts, for deeper than surface meanings, and you need to know the words to be able to do it" (quoted in Cleary, 2003). In a children's literature class, fifteen teachers and I traveled along a path that moved us toward reading knee-deep as we…

  18. Dashboard (in the) knee.

    PubMed

    Patel, M S; Qureshi, A A; Green, T P

    2015-03-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old individual presenting to an orthopaedic outpatient clinic several months following a dashboard knee injury during a road traffic accident with intermittent mechanical symptoms. Despite unremarkable examination findings and normal magnetic resonance imaging, the patient was identified subsequently as having an intra-articular plastic foreign body consistent with a piece of dashboard on arthroscopic knee assessment, the retrieval of which resulted in a complete resolution of symptoms.

  19. Noncontact knee dislocation in a female basketball player: a case report.

    PubMed

    Putukian, M; McKeag, D B; Nogle, S

    1995-10-01

    Knee ligamentous injuries occur during sport, and when there is extensive injury, they can be associated with subluxation or dislocation. We present the case of a female basketball player who sustained a knee dislocation during noncontact play. An immediate angiogram confirmed vascular integrity, and surgical treatment with ligamentous reconstruction was performed. Peroneal nerve injury was present but resolved in 42 weeks. A review of the literature discussing knee dislocation is presented.

  20. Isometric tubular vacuolization in renal transplant recipient: the first case report in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ruangkanchanasetr, Prajej; Praechinavong, Weerasak; Paueksakon, Paisit; Satirapoj, Bancha; Supasyndh, Ouppatham; Supaporn, Thanom

    2012-05-01

    Cyclosporine can cause acute and chronic nephrotoxicity. Renal biopsy is a reliable tool for the diagnosis of cyclosporine nephrotoxicity. The authors report a 56-year-old Thai female with a history of end-stage renal disease who underwent cadaveric renal transplantation. A transplanted kidney biopsy was performed on day 9 post-transplant to identify the cause of delayed graft function. Light and electron microscopic findings revealed widespread (> 50% involvement) numerous tubules filled with uniformly-sized vacuoles in cytoplasm (isometric vacuolization). Serum cyclosporine trough level was 534 ng/mL. Neither acute rejection nor acute tubular necrosis was seen. Diagnosis of acute cyclosporine nephrotoxicity was made. Isometric vacuolization in more than 50% involvement of the tubules is rare (3%) in biopsy specimens. The tubular isometric vacuolization might not have the strong impact to the long term graft outcome. This is the first case report of isometric tubular vacuolization due to cyclosporine toxicity in renal transplant recipient in Thailand.

  1. Taking care of your new knee joint

    MedlinePlus

    Knee arthroplasty - precautions; Knee replacement - precautions ... After you have knee replacement surgery , you will need to be careful about how you move your knee, especially for the first few ...

  2. The Relationship Between Isometric and Dynamic Strength in College Football Players

    PubMed Central

    McGuigan, Michael R.; Winchester, Jason B.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the importance of both dynamic and isometric maximal strength and rate of force development (RFD) in athletic populations. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between measures of isometric force (PF), RFD, jump performance and strength in collegiate football athletes. The subjects in this study were twenty-two men [(mean ± SD):age 18.4 ± 0.7 years; height 1.88 ± 0.07 m; mass 107.6 ± 22.9 kg] who were Division I college football players. They were tested for PF using the isometric mid thigh pull exercise. Explosive strength was measured as RFD from the isometric force-time curve. The one repetition maximum (1RM) for the squat, bench press and power clean exercises were determined as measures of dynamic strength. The two repetition maximum (2RM) for the split jerk was also determined. Vertical jump height and broad jump was measured to provide an indication of explosive muscular power. There were strong to very strong correlations between measures of PF and 1RM (r = 0. 61 - 0.72, p < 0.05). The correlations were very strong between the power clean 1RM and squat 1RM (r = 0.90, p < 0.05). There were very strong correlations between 2RM split jerk and clean 1RM (r = 0.71, p < 0.05), squat 1RM (r = 0.71, p < 0.05), bench 1RM (r = 0.70, p < 0.05) and PF (r = 0.72, p < 0.05). There were no significant correlations with RFD. The isometric mid thigh pull test does correlate well with 1RM testing in college football players. RFD does not appear to correlate as well with other measures. The isometric mid thigh pull provides an efficient method for assessing isometric strength in athletes. This measure also provides a strong indication of dynamic performance in this population. Key pointsIn Division I college football players the isometric mid thigh pull test correlates well with 1RM testing.Rate of Force Development does not appear to be as closely related to dynamic and isometric strength in college football

  3. Validation and Reliability of a Novel Test of Upper Body Isometric Strength

    PubMed Central

    Bellar, David; Marcus, Lena; Judge, Lawrence W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the association of a novel test of upper body isometric strength against a 1RM bench press measurement. Forty college age adults (n = 20 female, n = 20 male; age 22.8 ± 2.8 years; body height 171.6 ± 10.8 cm; body mass 73.5 ± 16.3 kg; body fat 23.1 ± 5.4%) volunteered for the present investigation. The participants reported to the lab on three occasions. The first visit included anthropometric measurements and familiarization with both the upper body isometric test and bench press exercise. The final visits were conducted in a randomized order, with one being a 1RM assessment on the bench press and the other consisting of three trials of the upper body isometric assessment. For the isometric test, participants were positioned in a “push-up” style position while tethered (stainless steel chain) to a load cell (high frequency) anchored to the ground. The peak isometric force was consistent across all three trials (ICC = 0.98) suggesting good reliability. Multiple regression analysis was completed with the predictors: peak isometric force, gender, against the outcome variable 1RM bench press. The analysis resulted in a significant model (r2 = 0.861, p≤0.001) with all predictor variables attaining significance in the model (p<0.05). Isometric peak strength had the greatest effect on the model (Beta = 5.19, p≤0.001). Results from this study suggest that the described isometric upper body strength assessment is likely a valid and reliable tool to determine strength. Further research is warranted to gather a larger pool of data in regard to this assessment. PMID:26557203

  4. Validation and Reliability of a Novel Test of Upper Body Isometric Strength.

    PubMed

    Bellar, David; Marcus, Lena; Judge, Lawrence W

    2015-09-29

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the association of a novel test of upper body isometric strength against a 1RM bench press measurement. Forty college age adults (n = 20 female, n = 20 male; age 22.8 ± 2.8 years; body height 171.6 ± 10.8 cm; body mass 73.5 ± 16.3 kg; body fat 23.1 ± 5.4%) volunteered for the present investigation. The participants reported to the lab on three occasions. The first visit included anthropometric measurements and familiarization with both the upper body isometric test and bench press exercise. The final visits were conducted in a randomized order, with one being a 1RM assessment on the bench press and the other consisting of three trials of the upper body isometric assessment. For the isometric test, participants were positioned in a "push-up" style position while tethered (stainless steel chain) to a load cell (high frequency) anchored to the ground. The peak isometric force was consistent across all three trials (ICC = 0.98) suggesting good reliability. Multiple regression analysis was completed with the predictors: peak isometric force, gender, against the outcome variable 1RM bench press. The analysis resulted in a significant model (r2 = 0.861, p≤0.001) with all predictor variables attaining significance in the model (p<0.05). Isometric peak strength had the greatest effect on the model (Beta = 5.19, p≤0.001). Results from this study suggest that the described isometric upper body strength assessment is likely a valid and reliable tool to determine strength. Further research is warranted to gather a larger pool of data in regard to this assessment. PMID:26557203

  5. Relationships between rapid isometric torque characteristics and vertical jump performance in division I collegiate American football players: influence of body mass normalization.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brennan J; Ryan, Eric D; Sobolewski, Eric J; Smith, Doug B; Akehi, Kazuma; Conchola, Eric C; Buckminster, Tyler

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationships between absolute and body mass-normalized rapid isometric torque variables and vertical jump (VJ) performance of the leg extensors and flexors in elite National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Football Bowl Subdivision collegiate American football players. Thirty-one players performed isometric maximal voluntary contractions of the leg extensor and flexor muscle groups and a countermovement VJ. Rate of torque development (RTD) and the contractile impulse (IMPULSE) were determined from 0 to 30, 0 to 50, 0 to 100, and 0 to 200 milliseconds from the onset of muscular contraction. The relationships between absolute and normalized rapid torque variables and VJ performance were assessed using correlation coefficients (r). There were no significant correlations (p > 0.05) observed between the absolute rapid torque variables and VJ performance, except for leg flexion RTD at 0-200 milliseconds (p = 0.024). All normalized rapid torque variables of the leg extensors and flexors were significantly correlated to VJ performance (p ≤ 0.001-0.026). These findings indicated that normalizing rapid torque variables to body mass improves the relationships between isometric rapid torque variables and VJ performance and normalized leg extension and flexion are both similarly related to VJ performance. Strength and conditioning professionals may use these findings in an attempt to identify and monitor dynamic sport performance. Furthermore, future studies examining the relationship between dynamic on the field performances and laboratory-based isometric strength testing may consider including normalized rapid torque variables. PMID:23302753

  6. Dislocation after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wazir, N N; Shan, Y; Mukundala, V V; Gunalan, R

    2007-05-01

    Two cases of dislocation of total knee arthroplasty presented to us within the same week. The first patient is a 71-year-old woman who underwent bilateral primary total knee arthroplasty. The left knee dislocated three weeks after the surgery. Due to failure of conservative measures, she underwent revision total knee arthroplasty. The other patient is a 72-year-old woman presenting ten years after primary total knee arthroplasty, with a traumatic dislocation of the knee joint. She was treated as an outpatient with closed manipulative reduction.

  7. Knee pain in competitive swimming.

    PubMed

    Rodeo, S A

    1999-04-01

    The high volume of training in competitive swimming results in cumulative overload injuries. Knee pain ranks second to shoulder pain as a common complaint in competitive swimmers. Most knee pain occurs on the medial side of the knee and, most commonly, in breaststroke swimmers; however, knee pain may accompany all strokes. This article reviews the incidence of knee pain, the biomechanic and anatomic factors predisposing to injury, specific injury patterns, injury diagnosis, and the treatment and prevention of injury to the knee in swimmers. PMID:10230572

  8. Knee joint kinematics during walking influences the spatial cartilage thickness distribution in the knee.

    PubMed

    Koo, Seungbum; Rylander, Jonathan H; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2011-04-29

    The regional adaptation of knee cartilage morphology to the kinematics of walking has been suggested as an important factor in the evaluation of the consequences of alteration in normal gait leading to osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of spatial cartilage thickness distributions of the femur and tibia in the knee to the knee kinematics during walking. Gait data and knee MR images were obtained from 17 healthy volunteers (age 33.2 ± 9.8 years). Cartilage thickness maps were created for the femoral and tibial cartilage. Locations of thickest cartilage in the medial and lateral compartments in the femur and tibia were identified using a numerical method. The flexion-extension (FE) angle associated with the cartilage contact regions on the femur, and the anterior-posterior (AP) translation and internal-external (IE) rotation associated with the cartilage contact regions on the tibia at the heel strike of walking were tested for correlation with the locations of thickest cartilage. The locations of the thickest cartilage had relatively large variation (SD, 8.9°) and was significantly associated with the FE angle at heel strike only in the medial femoral condyle (R(2)=0.41, p<0.01). The natural knee kinematics and contact surface shapes seem to affect the functional adaptation of knee articular cartilage morphology. The sensitivity of cartilage morphology to kinematics at the knee during walking suggests that regional cartilage thickness variations are influenced by both loading and the number of loading cycles. Thus walking is an important consideration in the analysis of the morphological variations of articular cartilage, since it is the dominant cyclic activity of daily living. The sensitivity of cartilage morphology to gait kinematics is also important in understanding the etiology and pathomechanics of osteoarthritis.

  9. Explosive force production during isometric squats correlates with athletic performance in rugby union players.

    PubMed

    Tillin, Neale Anthony; Pain, Matthew Thomas Gerard; Folland, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the association between explosive force production during isometric squats and athletic performance (sprint time and countermovement jump height). Sprint time (5 and 20 m) and jump height were recorded in 18 male elite-standard varsity rugby union players. Participants also completed a series of maximal- and explosive-isometric squats to measure maximal force and explosive force at 50-ms intervals up to 250 ms from force onset. Sprint performance was related to early phase (≤100 ms) explosive force normalised to maximal force (5 m, r = -0.63, P = 0.005; and 20 m, r = -0.54, P = 0.020), but jump height was related to later phase (>100 ms) absolute explosive force (0.51 < r < 0.61; 0.006 < P < 0.035). When participants were separated for 5-m sprint time (< or ≥ 1s), the faster group had greater normalised explosive force in the first 150 ms of explosive-isometric squats (33-67%; 0.001 < P < 0.017). The results suggest that explosive force production during isometric squats was associated with athletic performance. Specifically, sprint performance was most strongly related to the proportion of maximal force achieved in the initial phase of explosive-isometric squats, whilst jump height was most strongly related to absolute force in the later phase of the explosive-isometric squats.

  10. Exercise Alters Gait Pattern but Not Knee Load in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Jia; Chang, Chao-Chin; Chou, You-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Six female patients with bilateral medial knee OA and 6 healthy controls were recruited. Patients with knee OA received a 6-week physiotherapist-supervised and home-based exercise program. Outcome measures, including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and Short Form-36 Health Survey as well as objective biomechanical indices were obtained at baseline and follow-up. After treatment, no significant difference was observed in the knee abductor moment (KAM), lever arm, and ground reaction force. We, however, observed significantly improved pain and physical function as well as altered gait patterns, including a higher hip flexor moment and hip extension angle with a faster walking speed. Although KAM was unchanged, patients with bilateral knee OA showed an improved walking speed and altered the gait pattern after 6 weeks of supervised exercise. This finding suggests that the exercise intervention improves proximal joint mechanics during walking and can be considered for patients with bilateral knee OA. Non-weight-bearing strengthening without external resistance combined with stretching exercise may be an option to improve pain and function in individuals with OA who cannot perform high resistance exercises owing to pain or other reasons. PMID:27725941

  11. Knee osteoarthritis image registration: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Celaya-Padilla, José M.; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, José G.

    2015-03-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a very common disease, in early stages, changes in joint structures are shown, some of the most common symptoms are; formation of osteophytes, cartilage degradation and joint space reduction, among others. Based on a joint space reduction measurement, Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale, is a very extensive used tool to asses radiological OA knee x-ray images, based on information obtained from these assessments, the objective of this work is to correlate the Kellgren-Lawrence score to the bilateral asymmetry between knees. Using public data from the Osteoarthritis initiative (OAI), a set of images with different Kellgren-Lawrencescores were used to determine a relationship of Kellgren-Lawrence score and the bilateral asymmetry, in order to measure the asymmetry between the knees, the right knee was registered to match the left knee, then a series of similarity metrics, mutual information, correlation, and mean squared error where computed to correlate the deformation (mismatch) of the knees to the Kellgren-Lawrence score. Radiological information was evaluated and scored by OAI radiologist groups. The results of the study suggest an association between Radiological Kellgren-Lawrence score and image registration metrics, mutual information and correlation is higher in the early stages, and mean squared error is higher in advanced stages. This association can be helpful to develop a computer aided grading tool.

  12. Extensor tendon ruptures after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, M; Lustig, S; Huten, D

    2016-02-01

    Extensor tendon rupture is a rare but serious complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that impairs active knee extension, thereby severely affecting knee function. Surgery is usually required. Surgical options range from simple suturing to allograft reconstruction of the entire extensor mechanism and include intermediate methods such as reconstruction using neighbouring tendons or muscles, synthetic ligament implantation, and partial allograft repair. Simple suturing carries a high failure rate and should therefore be routinely combined with tissue augmentation using a neighbouring tendon or a synthetic ligament. After allograft reconstruction, outcomes are variable and long-term complications common. Salvage procedures for managing the most severe cases after allograft failure involve reconstruction using gastrocnemius or vastus flaps. Regardless of the technique used, suturing must be performed under tension, with the knee fully extended, and rehabilitation must be conducted with great caution. Weaknesses of available case-series studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity, and inadequate follow-up duration. All treatment options are associated with substantial failure rates. The patient should be informed of this fact and plans made for a salvage option. Here, the main techniques and their outcomes are discussed, and a therapeutic strategy is suggested.

  13. Measurement of force sense reproduction in the knee joint: application of a new dynamometric device.

    PubMed

    Zavieh, Minoo Khalkhali; Amirshakeri, Bahram; Rezasoltani, Asghar; Talebi, Ghadam Ali; Kalantari, Khosro Khademi; Nedaey, Vahab; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of a newly designed dynamometric device for use in frequent force producing/reproducing tasks on the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] In this cross-sectional study (Development & Reliability), 30 young healthy males and females (age 23.4 ± 2.48 years) were selected among students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences by simple randomized selection. The study instrument was designed to measure any isometric contraction force exerted by the knee joint flexor/extensor muscles, known as the ipsilateral and contralateral methods. Participant knees were fixed in 60° flexion, and each participant completed the entire set of measurements twice, 72 hours apart. [Results] The findings showed a good intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.73 to 0.81 for all muscle groups. The standard error of measurement and smallest detectable difference for flexor muscle groups were 0.37 and 1.02, respectively, while the values increased to standard error of measurement=0.38 and smallest detectable difference=1.05 for extensor muscle groups. [Conclusion] The device designed could quantify the forces producing/reproducing tasks on the knee joint with a high rate of reliability, and can probably be applied for outcome measurements in proprioceptive assessment of the knee joint. PMID:27630421

  14. Measurement of force sense reproduction in the knee joint: application of a new dynamometric device.

    PubMed

    Zavieh, Minoo Khalkhali; Amirshakeri, Bahram; Rezasoltani, Asghar; Talebi, Ghadam Ali; Kalantari, Khosro Khademi; Nedaey, Vahab; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of a newly designed dynamometric device for use in frequent force producing/reproducing tasks on the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] In this cross-sectional study (Development & Reliability), 30 young healthy males and females (age 23.4 ± 2.48 years) were selected among students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences by simple randomized selection. The study instrument was designed to measure any isometric contraction force exerted by the knee joint flexor/extensor muscles, known as the ipsilateral and contralateral methods. Participant knees were fixed in 60° flexion, and each participant completed the entire set of measurements twice, 72 hours apart. [Results] The findings showed a good intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.73 to 0.81 for all muscle groups. The standard error of measurement and smallest detectable difference for flexor muscle groups were 0.37 and 1.02, respectively, while the values increased to standard error of measurement=0.38 and smallest detectable difference=1.05 for extensor muscle groups. [Conclusion] The device designed could quantify the forces producing/reproducing tasks on the knee joint with a high rate of reliability, and can probably be applied for outcome measurements in proprioceptive assessment of the knee joint.

  15. Measurement of force sense reproduction in the knee joint: application of a new dynamometric device

    PubMed Central

    Zavieh,, Minoo Khalkhali; Amirshakeri,, Bahram; Rezasoltani,, Asghar; Talebi,, Ghadam Ali; Kalantari,, Khosro Khademi; Nedaey,, Vahab; Baghban,, Alireza Akbarzadeh

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of a newly designed dynamometric device for use in frequent force producing/reproducing tasks on the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] In this cross-sectional study (Development & Reliability), 30 young healthy males and females (age 23.4 ± 2.48 years) were selected among students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences by simple randomized selection. The study instrument was designed to measure any isometric contraction force exerted by the knee joint flexor/extensor muscles, known as the ipsilateral and contralateral methods. Participant knees were fixed in 60° flexion, and each participant completed the entire set of measurements twice, 72 hours apart. [Results] The findings showed a good intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.73 to 0.81 for all muscle groups. The standard error of measurement and smallest detectable difference for flexor muscle groups were 0.37 and 1.02, respectively, while the values increased to standard error of measurement=0.38 and smallest detectable difference=1.05 for extensor muscle groups. [Conclusion] The device designed could quantify the forces producing/reproducing tasks on the knee joint with a high rate of reliability, and can probably be applied for outcome measurements in proprioceptive assessment of the knee joint.

  16. Measurement of force sense reproduction in the knee joint: application of a new dynamometric device

    PubMed Central

    Zavieh,, Minoo Khalkhali; Amirshakeri,, Bahram; Rezasoltani,, Asghar; Talebi,, Ghadam Ali; Kalantari,, Khosro Khademi; Nedaey,, Vahab; Baghban,, Alireza Akbarzadeh

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of a newly designed dynamometric device for use in frequent force producing/reproducing tasks on the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] In this cross-sectional study (Development & Reliability), 30 young healthy males and females (age 23.4 ± 2.48 years) were selected among students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences by simple randomized selection. The study instrument was designed to measure any isometric contraction force exerted by the knee joint flexor/extensor muscles, known as the ipsilateral and contralateral methods. Participant knees were fixed in 60° flexion, and each participant completed the entire set of measurements twice, 72 hours apart. [Results] The findings showed a good intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.73 to 0.81 for all muscle groups. The standard error of measurement and smallest detectable difference for flexor muscle groups were 0.37 and 1.02, respectively, while the values increased to standard error of measurement=0.38 and smallest detectable difference=1.05 for extensor muscle groups. [Conclusion] The device designed could quantify the forces producing/reproducing tasks on the knee joint with a high rate of reliability, and can probably be applied for outcome measurements in proprioceptive assessment of the knee joint. PMID:27630421

  17. Role of gastrocnemius activation in knee joint biomechanics: gastrocnemius acts as an ACL antagonist.

    PubMed

    Adouni, M; Shirazi-Adl, A; Marouane, H

    2016-01-01

    Gastrocnemius is a premier muscle crossing the knee, but its role in knee biomechanics and on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) remains less clear when compared to hamstrings and quadriceps. The effect of changes in gastrocnemius force at late stance when it peaks on the knee joint response and ACL force was initially investigated using a lower extremity musculoskeletal model driven by gait kinematics-kinetics. The tibiofemoral joint under isolated isometric contraction of gastrocnemius was subsequently analyzed at different force levels and flexion angles (0°-90°). Changes in gastrocnemius force at late stance markedly influenced hamstrings forces. Gastrocnemius acted as ACL antagonist by substantially increasing its force. Simulations under isolated contraction of gastrocnemius confirmed this role at all flexion angles, in particular, at extreme knee flexion angles (0° and 90°). Constraint on varus/valgus rotations substantially decreased this effect. Although hamstrings and gastrocnemius are both knee joint flexors, they play opposite roles in respectively protecting or loading ACL. Although the quadriceps is also recognized as antagonist of ACL, at larger joint flexion and in contrast to quadriceps, activity in gastrocnemius substantially increased ACL forces (anteromedial bundle). The fact that gastrocnemius is an antagonist of ACL should help in effective prevention and management of ACL injuries.

  18. NAVIGATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire

    2015-01-01

    Navigation was the most significant advance in instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty over the last decade. It provides surgeons with a precision tool for carrying out surgery, with the possibility of intraoperative simulation and objective control over various anatomical and surgical parameters and references. Since the first systems, which were basically used to control the alignment of bone cutting referenced to the mechanical axis of the lower limb, many other surgical steps have been incorporated, such as component rotation, ligament balancing and arranging the symmetry of flexion and extension spaces, among others. Its efficacy as a precision tool with an effective capacity for promoting better alignment of the lower-limb axis has been widely proven in the literature, but the real value of optimized alignment and the impact of navigation on clinical results and the longevity of arthroplasty have yet to be established. PMID:27026979

  19. Obesity, knee osteoarthritis and knee arthroplasty: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of obesity is rising worldwide. Obesity is a risk factor for developing osteoarthritis in the knee. Obesity and knee osteoarthritis are independently disabling conditions and in combination pose difficult therapeutic challenges. This review will discuss obesity, osteoarthritis, and the problems associated with knee osteoarthritis in an obese population. Treatment options including surgery and its success will be discussed. PMID:24304704

  20. Recovery Kinetics of Knee Flexor and Extensor Strength after a Football Match

    PubMed Central

    Draganidis, Dimitrios; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Avloniti, Alexandra; Barbero-Álvarez, José C.; Mohr, Magni; Malliou, Paraskevi; Gourgoulis, Vassilios; Deli, Chariklia K.; Douroudos, Ioannis I.; Margonis, Konstantinos; Gioftsidou, Asimenia; Fouris, Andreas D.; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Fatouros, Ioannis G.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the temporal changes of isokinetic strength performance of knee flexor (KF) and extensor (KE) strength after a football match. Players were randomly assigned to a control (N = 14, participated only in measurements and practices) or an experimental group (N = 20, participated also in a football match). Participants trained daily during the two days after the match. Match and training overload was monitored with GPS devices. Venous blood was sampled and muscle damage was assessed pre-match, post-match and at 12h, 36h and 60h post-match. Isometric strength as well as eccentric and concentric peak torque of knee flexors and extensors in both limbs (dominant and non-dominant) were measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at baseline and at 12h, 36h and 60h after the match. Functional (KFecc/KEcon) and conventional (KFcon/KEcon) ratios were then calculated. Only eccentric peak torque of knee flexors declined at 60h after the match in the control group. In the experimental group: a) isometric strength of knee extensors and knee flexors declined (P<0.05) at 12h (both limbs) and 36h (dominant limb only), b) eccentric and concentric peak torque of knee extensors and flexors declined (P<0.05) in both limbs for 36h at 60°/s and for 60h at 180°/s with eccentric peak torque of knee flexors demonstrating a greater (P<0.05) reduction than concentric peak torque, c) strength deterioration was greater (P<0.05) at 180°/s and in dominant limb, d) the functional ratio was more sensitive to match-induced fatigue demonstrating a more prolonged decline. Discriminant and regression analysis revealed that strength deterioration and recovery may be related to the amount of eccentric actions performed during the match and athletes' football-specific conditioning. Our data suggest that recovery kinetics of knee flexor and extensor strength after a football match demonstrate strength, limb and velocity specificity and may depend on match physical overload and players' physical

  1. Recovery kinetics of knee flexor and extensor strength after a football match.

    PubMed

    Draganidis, Dimitrios; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Avloniti, Alexandra; Barbero-Álvarez, José C; Mohr, Magni; Malliou, Paraskevi; Gourgoulis, Vassilios; Deli, Chariklia K; Douroudos, Ioannis I; Margonis, Konstantinos; Gioftsidou, Asimenia; Flouris, Andreas D; Fouris, Andreas D; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Fatouros, Ioannis G

    2015-01-01

    We examined the temporal changes of isokinetic strength performance of knee flexor (KF) and extensor (KE) strength after a football match. Players were randomly assigned to a control (N = 14, participated only in measurements and practices) or an experimental group (N = 20, participated also in a football match). Participants trained daily during the two days after the match. Match and training overload was monitored with GPS devices. Venous blood was sampled and muscle damage was assessed pre-match, post-match and at 12 h, 36 h and 60 h post-match. Isometric strength as well as eccentric and concentric peak torque of knee flexors and extensors in both limbs (dominant and non-dominant) were measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at baseline and at 12 h, 36 h and 60 h after the match. Functional (KFecc/KEcon) and conventional (KFcon/KEcon) ratios were then calculated. Only eccentric peak torque of knee flexors declined at 60 h after the match in the control group. In the experimental group: a) isometric strength of knee extensors and knee flexors declined (P<0.05) at 12 h (both limbs) and 36 h (dominant limb only), b) eccentric and concentric peak torque of knee extensors and flexors declined (P<0.05) in both limbs for 36 h at 60°/s and for 60 h at 180°/s with eccentric peak torque of knee flexors demonstrating a greater (P<0.05) reduction than concentric peak torque, c) strength deterioration was greater (P<0.05) at 180°/s and in dominant limb, d) the functional ratio was more sensitive to match-induced fatigue demonstrating a more prolonged decline. Discriminant and regression analysis revealed that strength deterioration and recovery may be related to the amount of eccentric actions performed during the match and athletes' football-specific conditioning. Our data suggest that recovery kinetics of knee flexor and extensor strength after a football match demonstrate strength, limb and velocity specificity and may depend on match physical overload and players

  2. The effect of knee braces on lateral impact loading of the knee.

    PubMed

    Baker, B E; VanHanswyk, E; Bogosian, S P; Werner, F W; Murphy, D

    1989-01-01

    Disruption of the medial supporting structures of the knee occurs commonly in contact sports such as American football and lacrosse. A limited number of clinical and laboratory studies currently document the effectiveness of bracing. The purpose of this project was to determine if commercially available bracing could be shown to produce objective evidence of medial stabilization of the knee. Our model involves the use of a cadaver lower extremity with a fixed foot and suspended femur with a free knee and a lateral impact load applied simulating a clipping injury. Force transducers were placed on the ACL and medial collateral ligament (MCL) and an electrogoniometer was attached to the extremity. The prophylactic braces studied had a limited capacity to protect the MCL from direct lateral stress with the knee in full extension. In flexion or with a change in direction of the load, the protective effect is greatly reduced. The functional braces had a capacity to limit abduction and rotational stresses on the MCL in flexion and extension. PMID:2757126

  3. Correlation between trochlear groove depth and patellar position during open and closed kinetic chain exercises in subjects with anterior knee pain.

    PubMed

    Felicio, Lílian Ramiro; Saad, Marcelo Camargo; Liporaci, Rogério Ferreira; Baffa, Augusto do Prado; dos Santos, Antônio Carlos; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate the trochlear shape and patellar tilt angle and lateral patellar displacement at rest and maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) exercises during open (OKC) and closed kinetic chain (CKC) in subjects with and without anterior knee pain. Subjects were all women, 20 who were clinically healthy and 19 diagnosed with anterior knee pain. All subjects were evaluated and subjected to magnetic resonance exams during OKC and CKC exercise with the knee placed at 15, 30, and 45 degrees of flexion. The parameters evaluated were sulcus angle, patellar tilt angle and patellar displacement using bisect offset. Pearson's r coefficient was used, with p < .05. Our results revealed in knee pain group during CKC and OKC at 15 degrees that the increase in the sulcus angle is associated with a tilt increase and patellar lateral displacement. Comparing sulcus angle, patellar tilt angle and bisect offset values between MVIC in OKC and CKC in the knee pain group, it was observed that patellar tilt angle increased in OKC only with the knee flexed at 30 degrees. Based on our results, we conclude that reduced trochlear depth is correlated with increased lateral patellar tilt and displacement during OKC and CKC at 15 degrees of flexion in people with anterior knee pain. By contrast, 30 degrees of knee flexion in CKC is more recommended in rehabilitation protocols because the patella was more stable than in other positions. PMID:22890436

  4. The relationship between subjective knee scores, isokinetic testing, and functional testing in the ACL-reconstructed knee.

    PubMed

    Wilk, K E; Romaniello, W T; Soscia, S M; Arrigo, C A; Andrews, J R

    1994-08-01

    It is important to examine the functional relationships between commonly performed clinical tests and to resolve inconsistencies in previous investigative results. The purpose of this study was to determine if a correlation exists between three commonly performed clinical tests: isokinetic isolated knee concentric muscular testing, the single-leg hop test, and the subjective knee score in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knees. To determine if a relationship exists would be beneficial to clinicians in determining patient progression, treatment modification, and return-to-sport objective parameters. Several investigators have analyzed two of these parameters, but no one has investigated three parameters to date. Additionally, this study explored the concept of limb acceleration and deceleration during high-speed isokinetics and its relationship to function. Fifty patients were randomly selected (29 males) with a mean age of 23.7 years (range 15-52). The subjects completed a subjective knee score questionnaire that rated symptoms (pain, swelling, giving way) and specific sport function and completed an overall knee score assessment. The patients were then evaluated performing three one-legged functional tests: 1) hop for distance, 2) timed hop, and 3) cross-over triple hop. Isokinetic testing was performed on a Biodex dynamometer at 180, 300, and 450 degrees/sec for knee extension/flexion. The patients' mean value of the self-assessed knee rating was 86 points. Sixty-four percent of the patients exhibited normal limb symmetry (within 85%) on all three single-leg hop tests. Sixteen percent exhibited quadriceps strength at least 90% of the contralateral limb isokinetically. A positive correlation was noted between isokinetic knee extension peak torque (180, 300 degrees/sec) and subjective knee scores, and the three hop tests (p < 0.001). A statistical trend was noted between knee extension acceleration and deceleration range at 180 and 300 degrees/sec for the

  5. Anterior knee pain: an update of physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Werner, Suzanne

    2014-10-01

    Anterior knee pain is one of the most common knee problems in physically active individuals. The reason for anterior knee pain has been suggested to be multifactorial with patella abnormalities or extensor mechanism disorder leading to patellar malalignment during flexion and extension of the knee joint. Some patients complain mostly of non-specific knee pain, while others report patellar instability problems. The patients present with a variety of symptoms and clinical findings, meaning that a thorough clinical examination is the key for optimal treatment. Weakness of the quadriceps muscle, especially during eccentric contractions, is usually present in the majority of anterior knee pain patients. However, irrespective of whether pain or instability is the major problem, hypotrophy and reduced activity of the vastus medialis are often found, which result in an imbalance between vastus medialis and vastus lateralis. This imbalance needs to be corrected before quadriceps exercises are started. The non-operative rehabilitation protocol should be divided into different phases based on the patient's progress. The goal of the first phase is to reduce pain and swelling, improve the balance between vastus medialis and vastus lateralis, restore normal gait, and decrease loading of the patello-femoral joint. The second phase should include improvement of postural control and coordination of the lower extremity, increase of quadriceps strength and when needed hip muscle strength, and restore good knee function. The patient should be encouraged to return to or to start with a suitable regular physical exercise. Therefore, the third phase should include functional exercises. Towards the end of the treatment, single-leg functional tests and functional knee scores should be used for evaluating clinical outcome. A non-operative treatment of patients with anterior knee pain should be tried for at least 3 months before considering other treatment options.

  6. Alterations in walking knee joint stiffness in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee instability.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Jonathan A; Gorman, Shannon; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Increased walking knee joint stiffness has been reported in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a compensatory strategy to improve knee joint stability. However, presence of episodic self-reported knee instability in a large subgroup of patients with knee OA may be a sign of inadequate walking knee joint stiffness. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in walking knee joint stiffness in patients with knee OA with and without self-reported instability and examine the relationship between walking knee joint stiffness with quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity, and varus knee malalignment. Overground biomechanical data at a self-selected gait velocity was collected for 35 individuals with knee OA without self-reported instability (stable group) and 17 individuals with knee OA and episodic self-reported instability (unstable group). Knee joint stiffness was calculated during the weight-acceptance phase of gait as the change in the external knee joint moment divided by the change in the knee flexion angle. The unstable group walked with lower knee joint stiffness (p=0.01), mainly due to smaller heel-contact knee flexion angles (p<0.01) and greater knee flexion excursions (p<0.01) compared to their knee stable counterparts. No significant relationships were observed between walking knee joint stiffness and quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity or varus knee malalignment. Reduced walking knee joint stiffness appears to be associated with episodic knee instability and independent of quadriceps muscle weakness, knee joint laxity or varus malalignment. Further investigations of the temporal relationship between self-reported knee joint instability and walking knee joint stiffness are warranted.

  7. The effects of knee injury on skeletal muscle function, Na+, K+-ATPase content, and isoform abundance

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Ben D; Levinger, Pazit; Morris, Hayden G; Petersen, Aaron C; Garnham, Andrew P; Levinger, Itamar; McKenna, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    While training upregulates skeletal muscle Na+, K+-ATPase (NKA), the effects of knee injury and associated disuse on muscle NKA remain unknown. This was therefore investigated in six healthy young adults with a torn anterior cruciate ligament, (KI; four females, two males; age 25.0 ± 4.9 years; injury duration 15 ± 17 weeks; mean ± SD) and seven age- and BMI-matched asymptomatic controls (CON; five females, two males). Each participant underwent a vastus lateralis muscle biopsy, on both legs in KI and one leg in CON. Muscle was analyzed for muscle fiber type and cross-sectional area (CSA), NKA content ([3H]ouabain binding), and α1–3 and β1–2 isoform abundance. Participants also completed physical activity and knee function questionnaires (KI only); and underwent quadriceps peak isometric strength, thigh CSA and postural sway assessments in both injured and noninjured legs. NKA content was 20.1% lower in the knee-injured leg than the noninjured leg and 22.5% lower than CON. NKA α2 abundance was 63.0% lower in the knee-injured leg than the noninjured leg, with no differences in other NKA isoforms. Isometric strength and thigh CSA were 21.7% and 7.1% lower in the injured leg than the noninjured leg, respectively. In KI, postural sway did not differ between legs, but for two-legged standing was 43% higher than CON. Hence, muscle NKA content and α2 abundance were reduced in severe knee injury, which may contribute to impaired muscle function. Restoration of muscle NKA may be important in rehabilitation of muscle function after knee and other lower limb injury. PMID:25677549

  8. Evaluation of Knee Ligament Mechanics Using Computational Models.

    PubMed

    Guess, Trent M; Razu, Swithin; Jahandar, Hamidreza

    2016-02-01

    The steady maturation of computational biomechanics is providing the musculoskeletal health community with exciting avenues for enhancing orthopedic practice and rehabilitation. Computational knee models deliver tools that may improve the efficiency and outcomes of orthopedic research and methods through analysis of virtual surgeries and devices. They also provide insight into the interaction of knee structures and can predict what cannot be directly measured such as loading on our cartilage and ligaments during movement. This project created subject-specific computational knee models of two young adult females using magnetic resonance imaging-derived knee geometries and passive leg motion measured by a motion capture system. The knee models produced passive ligament lengthening patterns similar to experimental measurements available in the literature. The models also predicted cruciate ligament forces during passive flexion with and without applying anterior-posterior tibia forces that were similar to experimental measurements available in the literature. The biomechanics of the posterior oblique ligament (POL) and the anterior cruciate ligament bundles during combined tibia internal-external rotation torque and anterior-posterior forces through deep flexion were then examined. The study showed that the central arm of the POL: (1) produces a maximum constraining force when the knee is at full extension, (2) constrains internal tibial rotation at extension, and (3) constrains posterior tibial translation at extension. The POL reinforces the constraint of the anterior cruciate ligament to internal rotation at extension and provides constraint for posterior tibial translation at extension, a position where the posterior cruciate ligament provides minimal posterior translation constraint.

  9. Mechanical loading of knee articular cartilage induced by muscle contraction can be assessed by measuring electrical potentials at the surface of the knee.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Buschmann, Michael D; Savard, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Electroarthrography (EAG) consists of recording electrical potentials on the knee surface that originate from streaming potentials within articular cartilage while the joint is undergoing compressive loading. The aim was to investigate how the contraction of specific leg muscles affects the contact force of the knee joint and, in turn, the EAG values. For six normal subjects, voluntary isometric muscle contractions were repeatedly conducted to activate four leg muscle groups while the subject was lying on his back. Two EAG signals were recorded on the medial and lateral sides of the knee, as well as four EMG signals (gastrocnemius, hamstring, quadriceps, tensor fascia latae), and the signal from a force plate fixed against the foot according to the direction of the force. The EAG and force signals were very well correlated: the median of the correlation coefficients between an EAG signal and the corresponding force signal during each loading cycle was 0.91, and 86% of the correlation coefficients were statistically significant (p<5%). Isolated muscle contraction was possible for the gastrocnemius and hamstring, but not always for the quadriceps and tensor fascia latae. Using the clinical loading protocol which consists of a one-legged stance, the quadriceps and hamstring EMGs showed minimal activity; loading cycles with increased EAG amplitude were associated with higher EMG activity from the gastrocnemius, which is involved in antero-posterior balance. These results document the role of the EAG as a "sensor" of the knee contact force and contribute to the development of clinical loading protocols with improved reproducibility.

  10. Biomechanical Analysis of the Human Finger Extensor Mechanism during Isometric Pressing

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dan; Howard, David; Ren, Lei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the finger extensor mechanism on the bone-to-bone contact forces at the interphalangeal and metacarpal joints and also on the forces in the intrinsic and extrinsic muscles during finger pressing. This was done with finger postures ranging from very flexed to fully extended. The role of the finger extensor mechanism was investigated by using two alternative finger models, one which omitted the extensor mechanism and another which included it. A six-camera three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to capture the finger posture during maximum voluntary isometric pressing. The fingertip loads were recorded simultaneously using a force plate system. Two three-dimensional biomechanical finger models, a minimal model without extensor mechanism and a full model with extensor mechanism (tendon network), were used to calculate the joint bone-to-bone contact forces and the extrinsic and intrinsic muscle forces. If the full model is assumed to be realistic, then the results suggest some useful biomechanical advantages provided by the tendon network of the extensor mechanism. It was found that the forces in the intrinsic muscles (interosseus group and lumbrical) are significantly reduced by 22% to 61% due to the action of the extensor mechanism, with the greatest reductions in more flexed postures. The bone-to-bone contact force at the MCP joint is reduced by 10% to 41%. This suggests that the extensor mechanism may help to reduce the risk of injury at the finger joints and also to moderate the forces in intrinsic muscles. These apparent biomechanical advantages may be a result of the extensor mechanism's distinctive interconnected fibrous structure, through which the contraction of the intrinsic muscles as flexors of the MCP joint can generate extensions at the DIP and PIP joints. PMID:24732789

  11. Biomechanical analysis of the human finger extensor mechanism during isometric pressing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Howard, David; Ren, Lei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the finger extensor mechanism on the bone-to-bone contact forces at the interphalangeal and metacarpal joints and also on the forces in the intrinsic and extrinsic muscles during finger pressing. This was done with finger postures ranging from very flexed to fully extended. The role of the finger extensor mechanism was investigated by using two alternative finger models, one which omitted the extensor mechanism and another which included it. A six-camera three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to capture the finger posture during maximum voluntary isometric pressing. The fingertip loads were recorded simultaneously using a force plate system. Two three-dimensional biomechanical finger models, a minimal model without extensor mechanism and a full model with extensor mechanism (tendon network), were used to calculate the joint bone-to-bone contact forces and the extrinsic and intrinsic muscle forces. If the full model is assumed to be realistic, then the results suggest some useful biomechanical advantages provided by the tendon network of the extensor mechanism. It was found that the forces in the intrinsic muscles (interosseus group and lumbrical) are significantly reduced by 22% to 61% due to the action of the extensor mechanism, with the greatest reductions in more flexed postures. The bone-to-bone contact force at the MCP joint is reduced by 10% to 41%. This suggests that the extensor mechanism may help to reduce the risk of injury at the finger joints and also to moderate the forces in intrinsic muscles. These apparent biomechanical advantages may be a result of the extensor mechanism's distinctive interconnected fibrous structure, through which the contraction of the intrinsic muscles as flexors of the MCP joint can generate extensions at the DIP and PIP joints. PMID:24732789

  12. A cadaver knee simulator to evaluate the biomechanics of rectus femoris transfer.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Michael C; Brown, Nicholas A T; Bachus, Kent N; Macwilliams, Bruce A

    2009-07-01

    A cadaver knee simulator has been developed to model surgical transfer of the rectus femoris. The simulator allows knee specimens six degrees of freedom and is capable of modeling both the swing and stance phases of human gait. Experiments were conducted using a mechanical hinge analog of the knee to verify that time, flexion angle, and knee extension force measurements recorded when using the simulator were not influenced by its design or operation. A ballistic double pendulum model was used to model the swing phase of gait, and the contributions of hip and ankle torques and hamstrings cocontraction were included when modeling the stance phase of gait. When modeling swing, range of motion and time to peak knee flexion in swing for the hinge knee were similar to those of in vivo test subjects. Measurements of hinge knee extension force when modeling stance under various biomechanical conditions matched those predicted using an analytical model. Future studies using cadaver knee specimens will apply techniques described in this paper to further our understanding of changes in knee biomechanics caused by rectus femoris transfer surgery. PMID:19403312

  13. Dynamic loading of the knee and hip joint and compensatory strategies in children and adolescents with varus malalignment.

    PubMed

    Stief, Felix; Böhm, Harald; Schwirtz, Ansgar; Dussa, Chakravarthy Ugandhar; Döderlein, Leonhard

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional gait analysis is a diagnostic tool that can be used to gain a better understanding of the relationship between joint loading and the onset or progression of articular cartilage degeneration in subjects with varus malalignment. The purpose of the present study was to investigate knee and hip joint angles and moments in children and adolescents with pathological varus alignment of the knee without signs of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Moreover, we wanted to know if compensatory mechanisms are present in this young patient group. Fourteen, otherwise healthy patients with varus malalignment of the knee and 15 healthy control subjects were analysed. Patients showed a reduced knee extension and a significantly lower maximum knee extension moment in terminal stance compared to controls. The maximum knee adduction moment in mid and terminal stance and the maximum hip abduction moment in loading response were significantly higher in the patient group. In the transverse plane, abnormally increased knee internal rotation and hip external rotation moments were present in patients with varus malalignment. These findings imply that varus malalignment is not an isolated problem in the frontal plane. In contrast to adult patients with established medial knee OA, the young patients assessed in the present study did not show typical compensatory mechanisms such as increased foot progression angle or reduced walking speed. This suggests that children and adolescents with varus malalignment of the knee probably do not need to alter their spatio-temporal gait parameters in order to decrease knee joint loading.

  14. Cementless total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Salvatore; Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Agati, Gabriele; Massè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Interest for uncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has greatly increased in recent years. This technique, less used than cemented knee replacement in the last decades, sees a revival thanks an advance in prosthetic design, instrumentation and operative technique. The related literature in some cases shows conflicting data on survival and on the revision’s rate, but in most cases a success rate comparable to cemented TKA is reported. The optimal fixation in TKA is a subject of debate with the majority of surgeons favouring cemented fixation. PMID:27162779

  15. Muscle strategies for leg extensions on a "Reformer" apparatus.

    PubMed

    Cantergi, Débora; Loss, Jefferson Fagundes; Jinha, Azim; Brodt, Guilherme Auler; Herzog, Walter

    2015-04-01

    Considering the kinematics of leg extensions performed on a Reformer apparatus, one would expect high activation of hip and knee extensor muscle groups. However, because of the bi-articular nature of some lower limb muscles, and the possibility to vary the direction of force application on the Reformer bar, muscles can be coordinated theoretically in a variety of ways and still achieve the desired outcome. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the knee and hip moments during leg extensions performed on the Reformer apparatus and to estimate the forces in individual muscles crossing these joints using static optimization. Fifteen subjects performed leg extensions exercises on the Reformer apparatus using an individually chosen resistance. To our big surprise, we found that subjects performed the exercise using two conceptually different strategies (i) the first group used simultaneous hip and knee extension moments, (ii) while the second group used simultaneous hip flexion and knee extension moments to perform the exercise. These different strategies were achieved by changing the direction of the resultant force applied by the subject's feet on the Reformer bar. While leg extensions on the Reformer apparatus have been thought to strengthen the hip and knee extensors muscles, our results demonstrate that patients can perform the exercise in a different and unexpected way. In order to control the hip and knee moments and achieve the desired outcome of the exercise, the direction of force application on the Reformer bar must be controlled carefully. PMID:25262161

  16. Analysis of the Flexion Gap on In Vivo Knee Kinematics Using Fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shinichiro; Ito, Hiromu; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Komistek, Richard D; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2015-07-01

    There is a paucity of information on the relationships between postoperative knee laxity and in vivo knee kinematics. The correlations were analyzed in 22 knees with axial radiographs and fluoroscopy based 3D model fitting approach after a tri-condylar total knee arthroplasty. During deep knee bend activities, the medial flexion gap had significant correlations with the medial contact point (r=0.529, P=0.011) and axial rotation at full extension. During kneeling activities, a greater medial flexion gap caused larger anterior translation at complete contact (r=0.568, P=0.011). Meanwhile, the lateral flexion gap had less effect. In conclusion, laxity of the medial collateral ligament should be avoided because the magnitude of medial flexion stability was crucial for postoperative knee kinematics. PMID:25680453

  17. Impaired Varus-Valgus Proprioception and Neuromuscular Stabilization in Medial Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alison H.; Lee, Song Joo; Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Impaired proprioception and poor muscular stabilization in the frontal plane may lead to knee instability during functional activities, a common complaint in persons with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Understanding these frontal plane neuromechanical properties in KOA will help elucidate the factors contributing to knee instability and aid in the development of targeted intervention strategies. The study objectives were to compare knee varus-valgus proprioception, isometric muscle strength, and active muscular contribution to stability between persons with medial KOA and healthy controls. We evaluated knee frontal plane neuromechanical parameters in 14 participants with medial KOA and 14 age- and gender-matched controls, using a joint driving device (JDD) with a customized motor and a 6-axis force sensor. Analysis of covariance with BMI as a covariate was used to test the differences in varus-valgus neuromechanical parameters between these two groups. The KOA group had impaired varus proprioception acuity (1.08 ± 0.59° vs. 0.69 ± 0.49°, p < 0.05), decreased normalized varus muscle strength (1.31 ± 0.75% vs. 1.79 ± 0.84% body weight, p < 0.05), a trend toward decreased valgus strength (1.29 ± 0.67% vs. 1.88 ± 0.99%, p = 0.054), and impaired ability to actively stabilize the knee in the frontal plane during external perturbation (4.67 ± 2.86 vs. 8.26 ± 5.95 Nm/degree, p < 0.05). The knee frontal plane sensorimotor control system is compromised in persons with medial KOA. Our findings suggest varus-valgus control deficits in both the afferent input (proprioceptive acuity) and muscular effectors (muscle strength and capacity to stabilize the joint). PMID:24321442

  18. The effects of isometric trunk exercises and dynamic trunk exercises on gait in elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nyeon-Jun; Kim, Ji-Sung; Wang, Joong-San; Park, Joo-Hyun; Choi, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of dynamic trunk exercises and isometric trunk exercises on gait in elderly people. [Subjects] This study randomly allocated 20 elderly people to an isometric trunk exercise group (n=10) and a dynamic trunk exercise group (n=10). The exercises were performed for 30 minutes three times a week for 12 weeks. Gait speed, stride length, cadence, and step width were measured at a normal pace using GAITRite. All groups were evaluated before and after 12 weeks. [Results] The isometric exercise group showed a significant change in gait velocity, cadence, and left and right step lengths. The dynamic trunk exercise group showed a significant change in gait velocity, cadence, left and right step lengths, left and right step times, and left and right stride lengths. Moreover, a comparison of the exercise effect between the two groups showed a significant difference in gait velocity. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that isometric trunk exercises and dynamic trunk exercises have a positive effect on gait function in elderly people. In particular, isometric trunk exercises are recommended to promote gait velocity. PMID:26180298

  19. Adapting relative phase of bimanual isometric force coordination through scaling visual information intermittency.

    PubMed

    Lafe, Charley W; Pacheco, Matheus M; Newell, Karl M

    2016-06-01

    Visual information plays an adaptive role in the relation between bimanual force coupling and error corrective processes of isometric force control. In the present study, the evolving distribution of the relative phase properties of bimanual isometric force coupling was examined by scaling within a trial the temporal feedback rate of visual intermittency (short to long presentation intervals and vice versa). The force error (RMSE) was reduced, and time-dependent irregularity (SampEn) of the force output was increased with greater amounts of visual information (shorter intermittency). Multi-stable coordination patterns of bimanual isometric force control were differentially shifted toward and away from the intrinsic dynamics by the changing the intermittency of visual information. The distribution of Hilbert transformed relative phase values showed progressively a predominantly anti-phase mode under less intermittent visual information to predominantly an in-phase mode with limited (almost no) visual information. Correlation between the hands showed a continuous reduction, rather than abrupt "transition," with increase in visual information, although no mean negative correlation was realized, despite the tendency towards an anti-phase distribution. Lastly, changes in both the performance outcome and bimanual isometric force coordination occurred at visual feedback rates faster than the minimal visual processing times established from single limb movement and isometric force protocols.

  20. Isometric Gluteus Medius Muscle Torque and Frontal Plane Pelvic Motion During Running

    PubMed Central

    Burnet, Evie N.; Pidcoe, Peter E.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between isometric GM torque and the degree of frontal plane pelvic drop during running. Twenty-one healthy, recreational runners (9 males, 12 females) who ran 8.05 km or more per week were obtained from a sample of convenience. GM maximal isometric torque was collected prior to the run. Subjects then ran on a treadmill for 30 minutes while bilateral three-dimensional pelvic kinematic data were collected for 10 seconds at each 2 minute increment. Left side pelvic drop showed a slight increase (effect size = 0.61); while, the right side pelvic drop remained stable (effect size = 0.18). Pearson’s Correlations showed no relationship between GM isometric torque and frontal plane pelvic drop for any of the data collection periods during the 30-minute run. These results suggest that isometric GM torque was a poor predictor of frontal plane pelvic drop. One should question whether a dynamic rather than static measure of GM strength would be more appropriate. Future research is needed to identify dynamic strength measures that would better predict biomechanical components of running gait. Key points There is a lack of research linking static, clinical measures to dynamic running gait observations. Isometric gluteus medius muscle torque is a poor predictor of frontal plane pelvic drop in running. Future studies should identify dynamic strength measures that correlate with elements of running biomechanics. PMID:24149539

  1. Structure, Sex, and Strength and Knee and Hip Kinematics During Landing

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Jennifer S; Fazio, Melisa A.; Mattacola, Carl G.; Uhl, Timothy L.; Jacobs, Cale A.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Researchers have observed that medial knee collapse is a mechanism of knee injury. Lower extremity alignment, sex, and strength have been cited as contributing to landing mechanics. Objective: To determine the relationship among measurements of asymmetry of unilateral hip rotation (AUHR); mobility of the foot, which we described as relative arch deformity (RAD); hip abduction–external rotation strength; sex; and me-dial collapse of the knee during a single-leg jump landing. We hypothesized that AUHR and RAD would be positively correlated with movements often associated with medial collapse of the knee, including hip adduction and internal rotation excursions and knee abduction and rotation excursions. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty women and 15 men (age = 21 ± 2 years, height = 171.7 ± 9.5 cm, mass = 68.4 ± 9.5 kg) who had no history of surgery or recent injury and who participated in regular physical activity volunteered. Interventions : Participants performed 3 double-leg forward jumps with a single-leg landing. Three-dimensional kinematic data were sampled at 100 Hz using an electromagnetic tracking system. We evaluated AUHR and RAD on the preferred leg and evaluated isometric peak hip abductor–external rotation torque. We assessed AUHR by calculating the difference between internal and external hip rotation in the prone position (AUHR = internal rotation – external rotation). We evaluated RAD using the Arch Height Index Measurement System. Correlations and linear regression analyses were used to assess relationships among AUHR, RAD, sex, peak hip abduction–external rotation torque, and kinematic variables for 3-dimensional motion of the hip and knee. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables were joint angles at contact and joint excursions between contact and peak knee flexion. Results: We found that AUHR was correlated with hip adduction excursion (R = 0

  2. Arthroscopic-assisted Arthrodesis of the Knee Joint With the Ilizarov Technique: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Waszczykowski, Michal; Niedzielski, Kryspin; Radek, Maciej; Fabis, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Arthrodesis of the knee joint is a mainly a salvage surgical procedure performed in cases of infected total knee arthroplasty, tumor, failed knee arthroplasty or posttraumatic complication.The authors report the case of 18-year-old male with posttraumatic complication of left knee because of motorbike accident 1 year before. He was treated immediately after the injury in the local Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. The examination in the day of admission to our department revealed deformation of the left knee, massive scar tissue adhesions to the proximal tibial bone and multidirectional instability of the knee. The plain radiographs showed complete lack of lateral compartment of the knee joint and patella. The patient complained of severe instability and pain of the knee and a consecutive loss of supporting function of his left limb. The authors decided to perform an arthroscopic-assisted fusion of the knee with Ilizarov external fixator because of massive scar tissue in the knee region and the prior knee infection.In the final follow-up after 54 months a complete bone fusion, good functional and clinical outcome were obtained.This case provides a significant contribution to the development and application of low-invasive techniques in large and extensive surgical procedures in orthopedics and traumatology. Moreover, in this case fixation of knee joint was crucial for providing good conditions for the regeneration of damaged peroneal nerve. PMID:26817899

  3. Arthroscopic-assisted Arthrodesis of the Knee Joint With the Ilizarov Technique: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Waszczykowski, Michal; Niedzielski, Kryspin; Radek, Maciej; Fabis, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Arthrodesis of the knee joint is a mainly a salvage surgical procedure performed in cases of infected total knee arthroplasty, tumor, failed knee arthroplasty or posttraumatic complication.The authors report the case of 18-year-old male with posttraumatic complication of left knee because of motorbike accident 1 year before. He was treated immediately after the injury in the local Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. The examination in the day of admission to our department revealed deformation of the left knee, massive scar tissue adhesions to the proximal tibial bone and multidirectional instability of the knee. The plain radiographs showed complete lack of lateral compartment of the knee joint and patella. The patient complained of severe instability and pain of the knee and a consecutive loss of supporting function of his left limb. The authors decided to perform an arthroscopic-assisted fusion of the knee with Ilizarov external fixator because of massive scar tissue in the knee region and the prior knee infection.In the final follow-up after 54 months a complete bone fusion, good functional and clinical outcome were obtained.This case provides a significant contribution to the development and application of low-invasive techniques in large and extensive surgical procedures in orthopedics and traumatology. Moreover, in this case fixation of knee joint was crucial for providing good conditions for the regeneration of damaged peroneal nerve.

  4. The use of knee braces, part 1: Prophylactic knee braces in contact sports.

    PubMed

    Najibi, Soheil; Albright, John P

    2005-04-01

    Surrogate knee model biomechanical studies have indicated that off-the-shelf braces provide 20% to 30% greater resistance to a lateral blow when the knee is in full extension. Custom functional braces doubled the protective effects and proved effective with the knee in some flexion. Although functional performance studies are not consistent, preventive knee braces may slow straight-ahead sprint speed, cause early fatigue, and increase muscular relaxation pressures, energy expenditure, blood lactate levels, maximal torque output, oxygen consumption, and heart rate. Two epidemiologic studies have been performed. At West Point, a randomized control study of 71 injuries in 1396 cadets indicated knee brace effectiveness with a statistically higher rate of injury in the control group (3.4/1000 exposures) than in the braced group (1.5/1000 exposures), with the most significance for medial collateral ligament sprains in defensive players. The Big Ten Conference conducted a descriptive study of 100 medial collateral ligament sprains among 987 players in different positions, strings, and types of session. Brace-wear tendency varied directly with the unbraced player counterpart's risk of medial collateral ligament sprain, with the nonplayer linemen experiencing both the greatest risk of unbraced practice session injury (0.0801 injuries/1000 exposures) and the highest incidence of brace wear (85%). During practices, there was a nonsignificant but very consistent reduction in injury rate for braced players in every position and string. During games, there was also a reduced rate for linemen and the linebacker/tight end group. The study concluded that although the issue is not closed, preventive knee braces appear to offer some protection to the medial collateral ligament from a contact injury involving a valgus blow, but there may be negative effects on performance level, leg cramping, and fatigue symptoms. PMID:15788733

  5. Heat generated by knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, James W

    2006-01-01

    Temperature sensors were placed in 50 knees in 25 patients who had one or both joints replaced. Temperature recordings were made before walking, after walking, and after cycling. The heat generated in healthy, arthritic, and replaced knees was measured. The knee replacements were done using eight different prostheses. A rotating hinge knee prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 7 degrees C in 20 minutes and 9 degrees C in 40 minutes. An unconstrained ceramic femoral prosthesis articulating with a polyethylene tibial prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 4 degrees C compared with a healthy resting knee. The other designs using a cobalt-chrome alloy and high-density polyethylene had temperature increases of 5 degrees-7 degrees C with exercise. Frictional heat generated in a prosthetic knee is not immediately dissipated and may result in wear, creep, and other degenerative processes in the high-density polyethylene. Extended periods of elevated temperature in joints may inhibit cell growth and perhaps contribute to adverse performance via bone resorption or component loosening. Prosthetic knees generate more heat with activity than healthy or arthritic knees. More-constrained knee prostheses generate more heat than less-constrained prostheses. A knee with a ceramic femoral component generates less heat than a knee with the same design using a cobalt-chromium alloy. PMID:16394760

  6. Bilateral knee replacements for treatment of acute septic arthritis in both knees.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Muhammad Omer; Asumu, Theophilus

    2013-11-01

    A case report of bilateral acute septic arthritis of knees is presented, which was managed with staged total knee replacements for both knees. A literature review on septic arthritis treated with knee arthroplasty is also presented.

  7. Effects of 24-week Tai Chi exercise on the knee and ankle proprioception of older women.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuwan; Zhou, Jihe; Hong, Youlian; Sun, Wei; Cong, Yan; Qin, Meiqin; Lian, Jianhua; Yao, Jian; Li, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of regular Tai Chi (TC) exercise on the kinaesthesia of the knee and ankle joints of older women. A total of 43 women aged 55-68 years participated in this study. In a 24-week study period, the TC group (n = 22) underwent an organized TC exercise, whereas the control group (n = 21) maintained a sedentary lifestyle. Customized instruments were used to measure the threshold for the detection of the passive motion of the knee and ankle joints. After 24 weeks, the TC group showed a significantly smaller threshold for the detection of passive motion of knee extension (31.4%, p = 0.009), knee flexion (27.0%, p = 0.044), and ankle dorsal flexion (28.9%, p = 0.014) than the control group. Other comparisons showed no significant differences. The 24-week TC exercise benefited the lower-limb kinaesthesia of the knee joint flexion and extension and ankle dorsal flexion.

  8. EMG activity and voluntary activation during knee-extensor concentric torque generation.

    PubMed

    Babault, Nicolas; Pousson, Michel; Michaut, Anne; Ballay, Yves; Hoecke, Jacques Van

    2002-04-01

    This study was designed to re-examine and compare the neural drive of the knee extensors during isokinetic concentric muscular actions by means of the twitch interpolation technique (activation level, AL) and surface electromyographic (EMG) recordings (root mean square, RMS). Torque, AL and RMS amplitudes of three knee extensors and one knee flexor were measured in nine subjects during maximal and sub-maximal voluntary contractions, performed under concentric (60 degrees.s(-1) and 120 degrees.s(-1); Con60 and Con120, respectively) and isometric (Iso) conditions. Mean (SD) maximal voluntary torque was significantly lower ( P<0.01) during concentric contractions [Con60: 208.6 (26.8) Nm and Con120: 184.7 (26.4) Nm] compared with isometric contractions [327.4 (52.0) Nm]. A significantly lower AL ( P<0.05) was recorded during Con60 [80.9 (8.8)%] compared with Iso [87.9 (5.1)%] and Con120 [88.2 (6.6)%] maximal contractions. Simultaneously, a lower knee extensor average RMS amplitudes (av.RMS) was measured during Con60 maximal contractions compared with Iso and Con120 maximal contractions. The antagonist biceps femoris RMS values were not different between maximal Iso, Con60 and Con120 contractions. During sub-maximal voluntary contractions, the RMS/torque relationships were similar whatever the muscle considered (vastus lateralis, vastus medialis or rectus femoris) and the AL/av.RMS relationships did not reveal any noticeable differences between each contractile condition. The results of the present study indicate that av.RMS and AL describe similarly the neural drive during maximal and sub-maximal efforts and indicate that during maximal voluntary efforts, neural drive is dependent upon concentric angular velocity (up to 120 degrees.s(-1)). Thus, our results suggest that when applying different contractile conditions, the torque output is regulated via complex interactions between intrinsic muscular properties and the neural drive.

  9. Hypermobility and Knee Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Mark E.

    1987-01-01

    A review of research on the effect of hypermobility on knee injury indicates that greater than normal joint flexibility may be necessary for some athletic endeavors and that it may be possible to change one's underlying flexibility through training. However, for most athletes, inherited flexibility probably plays only a small role, if any, in…

  10. Effect of topical cheek surface anesthesia on isometric contractions of the human masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L V; Robbins, D M

    1988-02-01

    To study the possibility of interactions between buccal cutaneous sensory receptors and voluntary maximum isometric contractions of the masseter muscles, six adult subjects exercised maximum teeth clenching before and after spraying the right cheek surface with aerosol containing 20% benzocaine. The right cheek and masseter muscle served as the experimental side, the left cheek and masseter muscle as the control side. Isometric motor outputs, on the right and left sides, were monitored by integrated surface electromyography over periods of 10 seconds. Topical surface anesthesia provided no evidence of motor modulation by cutaneous tactile receptors. Before and after anesthesia, the two muscles showed nearly identical and well-coordinated motor innervation patterns. It is suggested that the cortical motor commands of maximum isometric contractions, with recruitment of practically all available motor units, overrule all modulatory inputs except those of fatigue.

  11. Isometric squeeze relaxation (progressive relaxation) vs meditation: absorption and focusing as predictors of state effects.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, M; Smith, J C

    1992-12-01

    We taught isometric squeeze relaxation (a variant of progressive relaxation) or meditation to 52 anxious subjects (16 men, 36 women). For meditation, pretreatment high absorption correlated with reductions in state cognitive and somatic anxiety as well as increments in state focusing. For isometric squeeze relaxation, pretreatment low state focusing correlated with reductions in somatic anxiety and increments in focusing. Results suggest that isometric squeeze relaxation (and progressive relaxation) may be more appropriate for individuals who have difficulty focusing, and meditation for those who already possess well-developed relaxation skills at a trait level. The results appear more consistent with Smith's cognitive-behavioral model of relaxation than with Benson's relaxation response or Davidson and Schwartz's specific effects models.

  12. Isometric Arm Strength and Subjective Rating of Upper Limb Fatigue in Two-Handed Carrying Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai Way; Chiu, Wen-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Sustained carrying could result in muscular fatigue of the upper limb. Ten male and ten female subjects were recruited for measurements of isometric arm strength before and during carrying a load for a period of 4 minutes. Two levels of load of carrying were tested for each of the male and female subjects. Exponential function based predictive equations for the isometric arm strength were established. The mean absolute deviations of these models in predicting the isometric arm strength were in the range of 3.24 to 17.34 N. Regression analyses between the subjective ratings of upper limb fatigue and force change index (FCI) for the carrying were also performed. The results indicated that the subjective rating of muscular fatigue may be estimated by multiplying the FCI with a constant. The FCI may, therefore, be adopted as an index to assess muscular fatigue for two-handed carrying tasks. PMID:25794159

  13. Higher Neuromuscular Manifestations of Fatigue in Dynamic than Isometric Pull-Up Tasks in Rock Climbers

    PubMed Central

    Boccia, Gennaro; Pizzigalli, Luisa; Formicola, Donato; Ivaldi, Marco; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular assessment of rock climbers has been mainly focused on forearm muscles in the literature. We aimed to extend the body of knowledge investigating on two other upper limb muscles during sport-specific activities in nine male rock climbers. We assessed neuromuscular manifestations of fatigue recording surface electromyographic signals from brachioradialis and teres major muscles, using multi-channel electrode arrays. Participants performed two tasks until volitional exhaustion: a sequence of dynamic pull-ups and an isometric contraction sustaining the body at half-way of a pull-up (with the elbows flexed at 90°). The tasks were performed in randomized order with 10 minutes of rest in between. The normalized rate of change of muscle fiber conduction velocity was calculated as the index of fatigue. The time-to-task failure was significantly shorter in the dynamic (31 ±10 s) than isometric contraction (59 ±19 s). The rate of decrease of muscle fiber conduction velocity was found steeper in the dynamic than isometric task both in brachioradialis (isometric: −0.2 ±0.1%/s; dynamic: −1.2 ±0.6%/s) and teres major muscles (isometric: −0.4±0.3%/s; dynamic: −1.8±0.7%/s). The main finding was that a sequence of dynamic pull-ups lead to higher fatigue than sustaining the body weight in an isometric condition at half-way of a pull-up. Furthermore, we confirmed the possibility to properly record physiological CV estimates from two muscles, which had never been studied before in rock climbing, in highly dynamic contractions. PMID:26557188

  14. Squat exercise to estimate knee megaprosthesis rehabilitation: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lovecchio, Nicola; Zago, Matteo; Sciumè, Luciana; Lopresti, Maurizio; Sforza, Chiarella

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated a specific rehabilitation protocol using a half squat after total knee reconstruction with distal femur megaprosthesis and tibial allograft-prosthesis composite. [Subject and Methods] Squat execution was recorded by a three-dimensional system before and after a specific rehabilitation program on a 28-year-old patient. Squat duration, body center of mass trajectory, and vertical range of motion were determined. Step width and joint angles and symmetry (hip flexion, extension, and rotation, knee flexion, and ankle dorsal and plantar flexion) were estimated. Knee and hip joint symmetry was computed using a bilateral cyclogram technique. [Results] After rehabilitation, the squat duration was longer (75%), step width was similar, and vertical displacement was higher. Hip flexion increased by over 20%, and ankle dorsiflexion diminished by 14%. The knee had the highest symmetry gain (4.1–3.4%). Angle-angle plot subtended areas decreased from 108° to 40°2 (hip) and from 204° to 85°2 (knee), showing improvement in movement symmetry. [Conclusion] We concluded that the squat is an effective multifactorial exercise to estimate rehabilitation outcomes after megaprosthesis, also considering that compressive and shear forces are minimal up to 60–70° of knee flexion. PMID:26311992

  15. Squat exercise to estimate knee megaprosthesis rehabilitation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lovecchio, Nicola; Zago, Matteo; Sciumè, Luciana; Lopresti, Maurizio; Sforza, Chiarella

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated a specific rehabilitation protocol using a half squat after total knee reconstruction with distal femur megaprosthesis and tibial allograft-prosthesis composite. [Subject and Methods] Squat execution was recorded by a three-dimensional system before and after a specific rehabilitation program on a 28-year-old patient. Squat duration, body center of mass trajectory, and vertical range of motion were determined. Step width and joint angles and symmetry (hip flexion, extension, and rotation, knee flexion, and ankle dorsal and plantar flexion) were estimated. Knee and hip joint symmetry was computed using a bilateral cyclogram technique. [Results] After rehabilitation, the squat duration was longer (75%), step width was similar, and vertical displacement was higher. Hip flexion increased by over 20%, and ankle dorsiflexion diminished by 14%. The knee had the highest symmetry gain (4.1-3.4%). Angle-angle plot subtended areas decreased from 108° to 40°(2) (hip) and from 204° to 85°(2) (knee), showing improvement in movement symmetry. [Conclusion] We concluded that the squat is an effective multifactorial exercise to estimate rehabilitation outcomes after megaprosthesis, also considering that compressive and shear forces are minimal up to 60-70° of knee flexion.

  16. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  6. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  7. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  8. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  9. Cilnidipine but not amlodipine suppresses sympathetic activation elicited by isometric exercise in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Koike, Yumi; Kawabe, Tetsuya; Nishihara, Kanami; Iwane, Naomi; Hano, Takuzo

    2015-01-01

    Pupillometry was used to evaluate the effects of the calcium channel blockers cilnidipine (CL) and amlodipine (AM) on changes in autonomic nervous activity induced by isometric exercise in patients with hypertension. After handgrip exercise, the velocity of miosis increased in both the CL and AM groups. However, the velocity of mydriasis increased in only the AM group. Velocity slopes of miosis and mydriasis were smaller in the CL group than in the AM group. The low-to-high frequency ratio obtained from pulse wave analysis increased in only the AM group. Sympathetic activation elicited by isometric exercise was suppressed more effectively by CL than by AM. PMID:25977982

  10. Validation of a novel smartphone accelerometer-based knee goniometer.

    PubMed

    Ockendon, Matthew; Gilbert, Robin E

    2012-09-01

    Loss of full knee extension following anterior cruciate ligament surgery has been shown to impair knee function. However, there can be significant difficulties in accurately and reproducibly measuring a fixed flexion of the knee. We studied the interobserver and the intraobserver reliabilities of a novel, smartphone accelerometer-based, knee goniometer and compared it with a long-armed conventional goniometer for the assessment of fixed flexion knee deformity. Five healthy male volunteers (age range 30 to 40 years) were studied. Measurements of knee flexion angle were made with a telescopic-armed goniometer (Lafayette Instrument, Lafayette, IN) and compared with measurements using the smartphone (iPhone 3GS, Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA) knee goniometer using a novel trigonometric technique based on tibial inclination. Bland-Altman analysis of validity and reliability including statistical analysis of correlation by Pearson's method was undertaken. The iPhone goniometer had an interobserver correlation (r) of 0.994 compared with 0.952 for the Lafayette. The intraobserver correlation was r = 0.982 for the iPhone (compared with 0.927). The datasets from the two instruments correlate closely (r = 0.947) are proportional and have mean difference of only -0.4 degrees (SD 3.86 degrees). The Lafayette goniometer had an intraobserver reliability +/- 9.6 degrees. The interobserver reliability was +/- 8.4 degrees. By comparison the iPhone had an interobserver reliability +/- 2.7 degrees and an intraobserver reliability +/- 4.6 degrees. We found the iPhone goniometer to be a reliable tool for the measurement of subtle knee flexion in the clinic setting. PMID:23150162

  11. Importance of the different posterolateral knee static stabilizers: biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace; Marques de Almeida, Adriano; Serbino, José Wilson; da Mota Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative importance of the different static stabilizers of the posterolateral corner of the knee in cadavers. METHODS Tests were performed with the application of a varus and external rotation force to the knee in extension at 30 and 60 degrees of flexion using 10 cadaver knees. The forces were applied initially to an intact knee and then repeated after a selective sectioning of the ligaments into the following: section of the lateral collateral ligament; section of the lateral collateral ligament and the popliteofibular complex; and section of the lateral collateral ligament, the popliteofibular complex and the posterolateral capsule. The parameters studied were the angular deformity and stiffness when the knees were submitted to a 15 Newton-meter varus torque and a 6 Newton-meter external tibial torque. Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) and Tukey’s tests. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Our findings showed that the lateral collateral ligament was important in varus stability at 0, 30 and 60 degrees. The popliteofibular complex was the most important structure for external rotation stability at all angles of flexion and was also important for varus stability at 30 and 60 degrees. The posterolateral capsule was important for varus stability at 0 and 30 degrees and for external rotation stability in extension. Level of evidence: Level IV (cadaver study). PMID:20454502

  12. Three-dimensional geometrical changes of the human tibialis anterior muscle and its central aponeurosis measured with three-dimensional ultrasound during isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Raiteri, Brent J; Cresswell, Andrew G; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Muscles not only shorten during contraction to perform mechanical work, but they also bulge radially because of the isovolumetric constraint on muscle fibres. Muscle bulging may have important implications for muscle performance, however quantifying three-dimensional (3D) muscle shape changes in human muscle is problematic because of difficulties with sustaining contractions for the duration of an in vivo scan. Although two-dimensional ultrasound imaging is useful for measuring local muscle deformations, assumptions must be made about global muscle shape changes, which could lead to errors in fully understanding the mechanical behaviour of muscle and its surrounding connective tissues, such as aponeurosis. Therefore, the aims of this investigation were (a) to determine the intra-session reliability of a novel 3D ultrasound (3DUS) imaging method for measuring in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis deformations and (b) to examine how contraction intensity influences in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis strains during isometric contractions. Methods. Participants (n = 12) were seated in a reclined position with their left knee extended and ankle at 90° and performed isometric dorsiflexion contractions up to 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. 3DUS scans of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle belly were performed during the contractions and at rest to assess muscle volume, muscle length, muscle cross-sectional area, muscle thickness and width, fascicle length and pennation angle, and central aponeurosis width and length. The 3DUS scan involved synchronous B-mode ultrasound imaging and 3D motion capture of the position and orientation of the ultrasound transducer, while successive cross-sectional slices were captured by sweeping the transducer along the muscle. Results. 3DUS was shown to be highly reliable across measures of muscle volume, muscle length, fascicle length and central aponeurosis length (ICC ≥ 0.98, CV < 1%). The TA remained isovolumetric

  13. Three-dimensional geometrical changes of the human tibialis anterior muscle and its central aponeurosis measured with three-dimensional ultrasound during isometric contractions

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Andrew G.; Lichtwark, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Muscles not only shorten during contraction to perform mechanical work, but they also bulge radially because of the isovolumetric constraint on muscle fibres. Muscle bulging may have important implications for muscle performance, however quantifying three-dimensional (3D) muscle shape changes in human muscle is problematic because of difficulties with sustaining contractions for the duration of an in vivo scan. Although two-dimensional ultrasound imaging is useful for measuring local muscle deformations, assumptions must be made about global muscle shape changes, which could lead to errors in fully understanding the mechanical behaviour of muscle and its surrounding connective tissues, such as aponeurosis. Therefore, the aims of this investigation were (a) to determine the intra-session reliability of a novel 3D ultrasound (3DUS) imaging method for measuring in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis deformations and (b) to examine how contraction intensity influences in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis strains during isometric contractions. Methods. Participants (n = 12) were seated in a reclined position with their left knee extended and ankle at 90° and performed isometric dorsiflexion contractions up to 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. 3DUS scans of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle belly were performed during the contractions and at rest to assess muscle volume, muscle length, muscle cross-sectional area, muscle thickness and width, fascicle length and pennation angle, and central aponeurosis width and length. The 3DUS scan involved synchronous B-mode ultrasound imaging and 3D motion capture of the position and orientation of the ultrasound transducer, while successive cross-sectional slices were captured by sweeping the transducer along the muscle. Results. 3DUS was shown to be highly reliable across measures of muscle volume, muscle length, fascicle length and central aponeurosis length (ICC ≥ 0.98, CV < 1%). The TA remained isovolumetric

  14. Three-dimensional geometrical changes of the human tibialis anterior muscle and its central aponeurosis measured with three-dimensional ultrasound during isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Raiteri, Brent J; Cresswell, Andrew G; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Muscles not only shorten during contraction to perform mechanical work, but they also bulge radially because of the isovolumetric constraint on muscle fibres. Muscle bulging may have important implications for muscle performance, however quantifying three-dimensional (3D) muscle shape changes in human muscle is problematic because of difficulties with sustaining contractions for the duration of an in vivo scan. Although two-dimensional ultrasound imaging is useful for measuring local muscle deformations, assumptions must be made about global muscle shape changes, which could lead to errors in fully understanding the mechanical behaviour of muscle and its surrounding connective tissues, such as aponeurosis. Therefore, the aims of this investigation were (a) to determine the intra-session reliability of a novel 3D ultrasound (3DUS) imaging method for measuring in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis deformations and (b) to examine how contraction intensity influences in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis strains during isometric contractions. Methods. Participants (n = 12) were seated in a reclined position with their left knee extended and ankle at 90° and performed isometric dorsiflexion contractions up to 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. 3DUS scans of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle belly were performed during the contractions and at rest to assess muscle volume, muscle length, muscle cross-sectional area, muscle thickness and width, fascicle length and pennation angle, and central aponeurosis width and length. The 3DUS scan involved synchronous B-mode ultrasound imaging and 3D motion capture of the position and orientation of the ultrasound transducer, while successive cross-sectional slices were captured by sweeping the transducer along the muscle. Results. 3DUS was shown to be highly reliable across measures of muscle volume, muscle length, fascicle length and central aponeurosis length (ICC ≥ 0.98, CV < 1%). The TA remained isovolumetric

  15. Combined Anterior and Anterolateral Stabilization of the Knee With the Iliotibial Band.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Christian; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Imbert, Pierre; Barbosa, Nuno Camelo; Tuteja, Sanesh; Jaeger, Jean-Henri

    2016-04-01

    Interest and knowledge on the anatomy, function, and biomechanical properties of the anterolateral ligament has led to the recognition of the importance of this structure in rotational control of the knee. This article describes a technique that allows for a combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and anterolateral reconstruction, using an Iliotibial band (ITB) autograft. The graft is detached from the vastus lateralis from proximal to distal, at the center portion from ITB, preserving its distal insertion on the Gerdy tubercle. Its width is 1 cm for the distal part, used for the anterolateral ligament reconstruction, and 3 cm for the proximal part. An outside-in femoral tunnel is drilled respecting both the preferred favorable isometric femoral insertion site and the femoral ACL footprint. An ACL reconstruction combined with a lateral tenodesis with a continuous ITB graft respects the anatomical and isometric rules providing superior internal rotational control of the knee in comparison with a stand-alone ACL reconstruction.

  16. Combined Anterior and Anterolateral Stabilization of the Knee With the Iliotibial Band.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Christian; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Imbert, Pierre; Barbosa, Nuno Camelo; Tuteja, Sanesh; Jaeger, Jean-Henri

    2016-04-01

    Interest and knowledge on the anatomy, function, and biomechanical properties of the anterolateral ligament has led to the recognition of the importance of this structure in rotational control of the knee. This article describes a technique that allows for a combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and anterolateral reconstruction, using an Iliotibial band (ITB) autograft. The graft is detached from the vastus lateralis from proximal to distal, at the center portion from ITB, preserving its distal insertion on the Gerdy tubercle. Its width is 1 cm for the distal part, used for the anterolateral ligament reconstruction, and 3 cm for the proximal part. An outside-in femoral tunnel is drilled respecting both the preferred favorable isometric femoral insertion site and the femoral ACL footprint. An ACL reconstruction combined with a lateral tenodesis with a continuous ITB graft respects the anatomical and isometric rules providing superior internal rotational control of the knee in comparison with a stand-alone ACL reconstruction. PMID:27354943

  17. Spontaneous Knee Ankylosis through Heterotopic Ossification after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boulezaz, Samuel; Gibon, Emmanuel; Loriaut, Philippe; Casabianca, Laurent; Rousseau, Romain; Dallaudiere, Benjamin; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a case of total ankylosis of the knee after a cruciate-sacrificing cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA). An 82-year-old female patient previously underwent primary TKA for osteoarthritis twenty years ago in our institution. She had recovered uneventfully and returned to her regular activities. There was no history of postsurgical trauma; however, she progressively lost knee range of motion. Radiographs revealed severe bridging heterotopic ossification. PMID:27119034

  18. Weightlifting performance is related to kinematic and kinetic patterns of the hip and knee joints.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Kristof; Redden, Josh; Sabick, Michelle B; Harris, Chad

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations between biomechanical outcome measures and weightlifting performance. Joint kinematics and kinetics of the hip, knee, and ankle were calculated while 10 subjects performed a clean at 85% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM). Kinematic and kinetic time-series patterns were extracted with principal components analysis. Discrete scores for each time-series pattern were calculated and used to determine how each pattern was related to body mass-normalized 1RM. Two hip kinematic and 2 knee kinetic patterns were significantly correlated with relative 1RM. The kinematic patterns captured hip and trunk motions during the first pull and hip joint motion during the movement transition between the first and second pulls. The first kinetic pattern captured a peak in the knee extension moment during the second pull. The second kinetic pattern captured a spatiotemporal shift in the timing and amplitude of the peak knee extension moment. The kinematic results suggest that greater lift mass was associated with steady trunk position during the first pull and less hip extension motion during the second-knee bend transition. Further, the kinetic results suggest that greater lift mass was associated with a smaller knee extensor moments during the first pull, but greater knee extension moments during the second pull, and an earlier temporal transition between knee flexion-extension moments at the beginning of the second pull. Collectively, these results highlight the importance of controlled trunk and hip motions during the first pull and rapid employment of the knee extensor muscles during the second pull in relation to weightlifting performance.

  19. Effects of 17-day spaceflight on knee extensor muscle function and size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesch, Per A.; Berg, Hans E.; Bring, Daniel; Evans, Harlan J.; LeBlanc, Adrian D.

    2005-01-01

    It is generally held that space travelers experience muscle dysfunction and atrophy during exposure to microgravity. However, observations are scarce and reports somewhat inconsistent with regard to the time course, specificity and magnitude of such changes. Hence, we examined four male astronauts (group mean approximately 43 years, 86 kg and 183 cm) before and after a 17-day spaceflight (Space Transport System-78). Knee extensor muscle function was measured during maximal bilateral voluntary isometric and iso-inertial concentric, and eccentric actions. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the knee extensor and flexor, and gluteal muscle groups was assessed by means of magnetic resonance imaging. The decrease in strength (P<0.05) across different muscle actions after spaceflight amounted to 10%. Eight ambulatory men, examined on two occasions 20 days apart, showed unchanged (P>0.05) muscle strength. CSA of the knee extensor and gluteal muscles, each decreased (P<0.05) by 8%. Knee flexor muscle CSA showed no significant (P>0.05) change. The magnitude of these changes concord with earlier results from ground-based studies of similar duration. The results of this study, however, do contrast with the findings of no decrease in maximal voluntary ankle plantar flexor force previously reported in the same crew.

  20. Maximal voluntary isokinetic knee flexion torque is associated with femoral shaft bone strength indices in knee replacement patients.

    PubMed

    Rantalainen, T; Valtonen, A; Sipilä, S; Pöyhönen, T; Heinonen, A

    2012-03-01

    It is currently unknown whether knee replacement-associated bone loss is modified by rehabilitation programs. Thus, a sample of 45 (18 men and 25 women) persons with unilateral knee replacement were recruited; age 66 years (sd 6), height 169 cm (sd 8), body mass 83 kg (sd 15), time since operation 10 months (sd 4) to explore the associations between maximal torque/power in knee extension/flexion and femoral mid-shaft bone traits (Cortical cross-sectional area (CoA, mm(2)), cortical volumetric bone mineral density (CoD, mg/mm(3)) and bone bending strength index (SSI, mm(3))). Bone traits were calculated from a single computed tomography slice from the femoral mid-shaft. Pain in the operated knee was assessed with the WOMAC questionnaire. Stepwise regression models were built for the operated leg bone traits, with knee extension and flexion torque and power, age, height, body mass, pain score and time since operation as independent variables. CoA was 2.3% (P=0.015), CoD 1.2% (P<0.001) and SSI 1.6% (P=0.235) lower in the operated compared to non-operated leg. The overall proportions of the variation explained by the regression models were 50%, 29% and 55% for CoA, CoD and SSI, respectively. Body mass explained 12% of Coa, 11% of CoD and 11% of SSI (P≤0.003). Maximal knee flexion torque explained 38% of Coa, 7% of CoD and 44% of SSI (p≤0.047). For CoD time since operation also became a significant predictor (11%, P=0.045). Knee flexion torque of the operated leg was positively associated with bone strength in the operated leg. Thus, successful rehabilitation may diminish bone loss in the operated leg.

  1. The effect of mechanical massage on early outcome after total knee arthroplasty: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Mi; Kim, Sang-Rim; Lee, Yong Ki; Kim, Bo Ryun; Han, Eun Young

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical massage via Endermologie(®) after total knee arthroplasty in reducing edema and pain and improving knee range of motion, in the early postoperative period. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen patients with knee edema following total knee arthroplasty were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=8) or the control group (n=10). The intervention group received mechanical massage therapy using Endermologie(®) and the control group received conventional physical therapy for 20 minutes a day, 5 times a week from the seventh day postsurgery. Clinical assessments included active knee flexion and extension range of motion, knee pain using a numeric rating scale, the operated limb circumference, the soft tissue cross-sectional area using ultrasonography, the extracelluar fluid volume, and single frequency bioimpedance analysis at 5 kHz using bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy. [Results] Both groups showed significant reduction in edema and pain, and improvement in active knee flexion at the end of treatment. There were no significant inter-group differences before or after treatment. [Conclusion] Mechanical massage could be an alternative way of managing knee edema after total knee arthroplasty in early postoperative recovery.

  2. The effect of mechanical massage on early outcome after total knee arthroplasty: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Mi; Kim, Sang-Rim; Lee, Yong Ki; Kim, Bo Ryun; Han, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical massage via Endermologie® after total knee arthroplasty in reducing edema and pain and improving knee range of motion, in the early postoperative period. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen patients with knee edema following total knee arthroplasty were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=8) or the control group (n=10). The intervention group received mechanical massage therapy using Endermologie® and the control group received conventional physical therapy for 20 minutes a day, 5 times a week from the seventh day postsurgery. Clinical assessments included active knee flexion and extension range of motion, knee pain using a numeric rating scale, the operated limb circumference, the soft tissue cross-sectional area using ultrasonography, the extracelluar fluid volume, and single frequency bioimpedance analysis at 5 kHz using bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy. [Results] Both groups showed significant reduction in edema and pain, and improvement in active knee flexion at the end of treatment. There were no significant inter-group differences before or after treatment. [Conclusion] Mechanical massage could be an alternative way of managing knee edema after total knee arthroplasty in early postoperative recovery. PMID:26696709

  3. Knee arthroplasty rating.

    PubMed

    Binazzi, R; Soudry, M; Mestriner, L A; Insall, J N

    1992-06-01

    A number of rating systems used to evaluate the results of total knee arthroplasty exist. Many of these systems are based on different concepts, and might be expected to give divergent results. To see if this was so, the authors examined a consecutive series of 235 posterior stabilized knee arthroplasties recording the results according to five rating systems: HSS (The Hospital for Special Surgery), Brigham, Freeman, BOA (British Orthopaedic Association), and the VENN diagram. In spite of their apparent differences, all point systems and the BOA gave almost identical results, while the VENN diagram proved to be the most stringent. The authors suggest that any of the current point systems may be used to "score" arthroplasties, but the results should also be rated with the VENN diagram in order to see the quality of the arthroplasty and a comparison between the different series.

  4. Eccrine Spiradenoma in Knee

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, A; Sengupta, P; Das, Anjan Kumar; Nigam, Manish Kumar; Chattopadhya, S

    2014-01-01

    Eccrine spiradenoma is an uncommon benign adnexal tumor of the eccrine sweat glands. Although it can occur at any age, it is most common in young adults without any sex predilection. Malignant transformation is rare, presenting as rapid increase in size of a long-standing lesion. Here, we report a case of eccrine spiradenoma in a 35-year-old man who presented with swelling over the right knee, with cytological atypia but no recurrence until date. PMID:25284865

  5. The effect of tendon on muscle force in dynamic isometric contractions: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    van Soest, A J; Huijing, P A; Solomonow, M

    1995-07-01

    Recently, Baratta and Solomonow J. Biomechanics 24, 109-116 (1991) studied the effect of tendon on muscle-tendon complex behavior in cat tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. This was done by determining the relation between neural stimulation and muscle force in a dynamic isometric experiment, both before and after the removal of the distal tendon. From their results, Baratta and Solomonow concluded that in isometric and concentric contractions at mid-range force levels, tendon behaves as a rigid force conductor. This conclusion is in conflict with literature in which several functions are attributed to the elastic behavior of the series elastic element (SEE), of which tendon is the major part. The present study investigates the expected generalizability of their findings, by simulating the experiments using a straightforward Hill-type muscle model. First, model predictions are shown to be in line with the experimental results on cat TA: in dynamic isometric experiments at mid-range force levels, the effect of SEE removal is indeed negligible. Second, the effect of SEE removal is predicted to vary largely among muscles. Third, the most important determinants of the effect of SEE removal in dynamic isometric contractions are shown to be maximum fiber shortening velocity and the ratio of SEE slack length to fibre optimum length. PMID:7657678

  6. Relationship Between Erectores Spinae Voltage and Back-Lift Strength for Isometric, Concentric, and Eccentric Contractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, T. Edwin J.; Singh, Mohan

    1975-01-01

    This study determined the maximal mean values for concentric and eccentric back-lift strength as well as isometric, and examined and compared the relationships between the mean peak voltage of the erectores spinae muscle(s) and maximal force exerted for the three types of muscle contractions. (RC)

  7. Sets meeting isometric copies of the lattice Z2 in exactly one point

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Steve; Mauldin, R. Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The construction of a subset S of ℝ2 such that each isometric copy of ℤ2 (the lattice points in the plane) meets S in exactly one point is indicated. This provides a positive answer to a problem of H. Steinhaus [Sierpiński, W. (1958) Fund. Math. 46, 191–194]. PMID:12466499

  8. Interaction of Rate of Force Development and Duration of Rate in Isometric Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Donald

    A study attempted to determine whether force and duration parameters are programmed in an interactive or independent fashion prior to executing ballistic type isometric contractions of graded intensities. Four adult females each performed 360 trials of producing ballistic type forces representing 25, 40, 55, and 75 percent of their maximal…

  9. Efficacy of Interactive Whiteboard on Psychomotor Skills Achievement of Students in Isometric and Orthographic Projection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambari, Isiaka A.; Balogun, Sherifat A.; Alfa, Ahmadu S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses importance of technology education and evidences of declining performance of junior secondary school students in basic technology subject. Potentials on interactive whiteboard (IWB) as one of the new technologies to meet the challenges of the 21st century are also discussed. The efficacy of IWB for teaching Isometric and…

  10. Reliability of ultrasound thickness measurement of the abdominal muscles during clinical isometric endurance tests.

    PubMed

    ShahAli, Shabnam; Arab, Amir Massoud; Talebian, Saeed; Ebrahimi, Esmaeil; Bahmani, Andia; Karimi, Noureddin; Nabavi, Hoda

    2015-07-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the intra-examiner reliability of ultrasound (US) thickness measurement of abdominal muscles activity when supine lying and during two isometric endurance tests in subjects with and without Low back pain (LBP). A total of 19 women (9 with LBP, 10 without LBP) participated in the study. Within-day reliability of the US thickness measurements at supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests were assessed in all subjects. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess the relative reliability of thickness measurement. The standard error of measurement (SEM), minimal detectable change (MDC) and the coefficient of variation (CV) were used to evaluate the absolute reliability. Results indicated high ICC scores (0.73-0.99) and also small SEM and MDC scores for within-day reliability assessment. The Bland-Altman plots of agreement in US measurement of the abdominal muscles during the two isometric endurance tests demonstrated that 95% of the observations fall between the limits of agreement for test and retest measurements. Together the results indicate high intra-tester reliability for the US measurement of the thickness of abdominal muscles in all the positions tested. According to the study's findings, US imaging can be used as a reliable method for assessment of abdominal muscles activity in supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests employed, in participants with and without LBP.

  11. Estimating the Mechanical Behavior of the Knee Joint During Crouch Gait: Implications for Real-Time Motor Control of Robotic Knee Orthoses.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Zachary F; Damiano, Diane L; Bulea, Thomas C

    2016-06-01

    Individuals with cerebral palsy frequently exhibit crouch gait, a pathological walking pattern characterized by excessive knee flexion. Knowledge of the knee joint moment during crouch gait is necessary for the design and control of assistive devices used for treatment. Our goal was to 1) develop statistical models to estimate knee joint moment extrema and dynamic stiffness during crouch gait, and 2) use the models to estimate the instantaneous joint moment during weight-acceptance. We retrospectively computed knee moments from 10 children with crouch gait and used stepwise linear regression to develop statistical models describing the knee moment features. The models explained at least 90% of the response value variability: peak moment in early (99%) and late (90%) stance, and dynamic stiffness of weight-acceptance flexion (94%) and extension (98%). We estimated knee extensor moment profiles from the predicted dynamic stiffness and instantaneous knee angle. This approach captured the timing and shape of the computed moment (root-mean-squared error: 2.64 Nm); including the predicted early-stance peak moment as a correction factor improved model performance (root-mean-squared error: 1.37 Nm). Our strategy provides a practical, accurate method to estimate the knee moment during crouch gait, and could be used for real-time, adaptive control of robotic orthoses.

  12. Selectively Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael D. (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Baker, Kevin J. (Inventor); Rice, Darron C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A knee brace for aiding in rehabilitation of damaged leg muscles includes upper and lower housings normally pivotable one relative to the other about the knee joint axis of a patient. The upper housing is attachable to the thigh of the patient above the knee joint while the lower housing is secured to a stirrup which extends downwardly along the patient's leg and is attached to the patient's shoe. An actuation rod is carried within the lower housing and is coupled to a cable. The upper and lower housings carry cooperative clutch/brake elements which normally are disengaged to permit relative movement between the upper and lower housings. When the cable is extended the clutch/brake elements engage and lock the housings together. A heel strike mechanism fastened to the stirrup and the heel of the shoe is connected to the cable to selectively extend the cable and lock the brace in substantially any position when the patient places weight on the heel.

  13. Selectively lockable knee brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Neill (Inventor); Shadoan, Mike (Inventor); Forbes, John (Inventor); Baker, Kevin (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A knee brace for aiding in rehabilitation of damaged leg muscles includes upper and lower housings, normally pivotable, one relative to the other about the knee joint axis of a patient. The upper housing is attachable to the thigh of the patient above the knee joint, while the lower housing is secured to a stirrup which extends downwardly along the patient's leg and is attached to the patient's shoe. An actuation rod is carried within the lower housing and is coupled to a cable. The upper and lower housings carry cooperative clutch/brake elements which normally are disengaged to permit relative movement between the upper and lower housings. When the cable is extended, the clutch/brake elements engage and lock the housings together. A heel strike mechanism fastened to the stirrup and the heel of the shoe is connected to the cable to selectively extend the cable and lock the brace in substantially any position when the patient places weight on the heel.

  14. Synovial plicae of the knee

    SciTech Connect

    Apple, J.S.; Martinez, S.; Daffner, R.H.; Gehweiler, J.A.; Hardaker, W.T.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the anatomy, patho-physiology, clinical, and radiographic findings, and treatment of the synovial plicae of the knee joint. The suprapatellar plica is a synovial fold present in the suprapatellar pouch of the knee joint in approximately 20% of the population. This fold may become symptomatic after injury and cause symptoms similar to other common internal derangements of the knee. Double contrast arthrography of the knee can be used to identify the presence of plicae. Although arthrography can identify the presence of a plica, its clinical significance requires close correlation with symptoms and an accurate clinical examination.

  15. Effect of submaximal repetitive exercise on knee coactivation in young and middle-aged women.

    PubMed

    Hodder, Joanne N; Plashkes, Tova E; Franklin, Regan A; Hickey, Heather K; Maly, Monica R

    2014-04-01

    Coactivation of the knee extensors and flexors increases knee joint contact forces, which may lead to degradation of the articular surfaces. This study investigated the effect of neuromuscular fatigue induced by submaximal, repetitive, dynamic contractions on coactivation of knee musculature in young and middle-aged women. Data from 10 young women (24.6±1.8 years) and 8 middle-aged women (55.4±4.2 years) were analyzed. Measures included peak knee extension and flexion torques and the average amplitude of surface electromyography of rectus femoris and biceps femoris. Coactivation ratios were calculated from these activations. To induce fatigue, participants completed up to ten sets of 50 concentric knee extension and flexion contractions at 60°/s. A two-factor analysis of variance was used to determine the effect of age and fatigue. The young group showed higher peak torque compared with the middle-aged group (P<.001). During flexion, biceps femoris activity increased after fatigue when both groups were considered together (P=.018). During extension, biceps femoris activity was higher in the middle-aged than young group (P=.043). Middle-aged women exhibited a trend for greater coactivation during knee extension compared with young women (P=.066). This coactivation likely contributed to extension torque decrements in middle-aged women.

  16. Effects of isotonic and isometric exercises with mist sauna bathing on cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, and metabolic functions.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Satoshi; Kawahara, Yuko; Nishimura, Naoki; Nishimura, Rumiko; Sugenoya, Junichi; Miwa, Chihiro; Takada, Masumi

    2014-08-01

    To clarify the effects of isometric and isotonic exercise during mist sauna bathing on the cardiovascular function, thermoregulatory function, and metabolism, six healthy young men (22 ± 1 years old, height 173 ± 4 cm, weight 65.0 ± 5.0 kg) were exposed to a mist sauna for 10 min at a temperature of 40 °C, and relative humidity of 100 % while performing or not performing ∼30 W of isometric or isotonic exercise. The effect of the exercise was assessed by measuring tympanic temperature, heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, chest sweat rate, chest skin blood flow, and plasma catecholamine and cortisol, glucose, lactate, and free fatty acid levels. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no significant differences in blood pressure, skin blood flow, sweat rate, and total amount of sweating. Tympanic temperature increased more during isotonic exercise, and heart rate increase was more marked during isotonic exercise. The changes in lactate indicated that fatigue was not very great during isometric exercise. The glucose level indicated greater energy expenditure during isometric exercise. The free fatty acid and catecholamine levels indicated that isometric exercise did not result in very great energy expenditure and stress, respectively. The results for isotonic exercise of a decrease in lactate level and an increase in plasma free fatty acid level indicated that fatigue and energy expenditure were rather large while the perceived stress was comparatively low. We concluded that isotonic exercise may be a more desirable form of exercise during mist sauna bathing given the changes in glucose and free fatty acid levels.

  17. A comparison of methods for determining the rate of force development during isometric midthigh clean pulls.

    PubMed

    Haff, G Gregory; Ruben, Ryan P; Lider, Joshua; Twine, Corey; Cormie, Prue

    2015-02-01

    Twelve female division I collegiate volleyball players were recruited to examine the reliability of several methods for calculating the rate of force development (RFD) during the isometric midthigh clean pull. All subjects were familiarized with the isometric midthigh clean pull and participated in regular strength training. Two isometric midthigh clean pulls were performed with 2 minutes rest between each trail. All measures were performed in a custom isometric testing device that included a step-wise adjustable bar and a force plate for measuring ground reaction forces. The RFD during predetermined time zone bands (0-30, 0-50, 0-90, 0-100, 0-150, 0-200, and 0-250 milliseconds) was then calculated by dividing the force at the end of the band by the band's time interval. The peak RFD was then calculated with the use of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 milliseconds sampling windows. The average RFD (avgRFD) was calculated by dividing the peak force (PF) by the time to achieve PF. All data were analyzed with the use of intraclass correlation alpha (ICCα) and the coefficient of variation (CV) and 90% confidence intervals. All predetermined RFD time bands were deemed reliable based on an ICCα >0.95 and a CV <4%. Conversely, the avgRFD failed to meet the reliability standards set for this study. Overall, the method used to assess the RFD during an isometric midthigh clean pull impacts the reliability of the measure and predetermined RFD time bands should be used to quantify the RFD. PMID:25259470

  18. A comparison of methods for determining the rate of force development during isometric midthigh clean pulls.

    PubMed

    Haff, G Gregory; Ruben, Ryan P; Lider, Joshua; Twine, Corey; Cormie, Prue

    2015-02-01

    Twelve female division I collegiate volleyball players were recruited to examine the reliability of several methods for calculating the rate of force development (RFD) during the isometric midthigh clean pull. All subjects were familiarized with the isometric midthigh clean pull and participated in regular strength training. Two isometric midthigh clean pulls were performed with 2 minutes rest between each trail. All measures were performed in a custom isometric testing device that included a step-wise adjustable bar and a force plate for measuring ground reaction forces. The RFD during predetermined time zone bands (0-30, 0-50, 0-90, 0-100, 0-150, 0-200, and 0-250 milliseconds) was then calculated by dividing the force at the end of the band by the band's time interval. The peak RFD was then calculated with the use of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 milliseconds sampling windows. The average RFD (avgRFD) was calculated by dividing the peak force (PF) by the time to achieve PF. All data were analyzed with the use of intraclass correlation alpha (ICCα) and the coefficient of variation (CV) and 90% confidence intervals. All predetermined RFD time bands were deemed reliable based on an ICCα >0.95 and a CV <4%. Conversely, the avgRFD failed to meet the reliability standards set for this study. Overall, the method used to assess the RFD during an isometric midthigh clean pull impacts the reliability of the measure and predetermined RFD time bands should be used to quantify the RFD.

  19. Effects of isotonic and isometric exercises with mist sauna bathing on cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, and metabolic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Satoshi; Kawahara, Yuko; Nishimura, Naoki; Nishimura, Rumiko; Sugenoya, Junichi; Miwa, Chihiro; Takada, Masumi

    2014-08-01

    To clarify the effects of isometric and isotonic exercise during mist sauna bathing on the cardiovascular function, thermoregulatory function, and metabolism, six healthy young men (22 ± 1 years old, height 173 ± 4 cm, weight 65.0 ± 5.0 kg) were exposed to a mist sauna for 10 min at a temperature of 40 °C, and relative humidity of 100 % while performing or not performing ˜30 W of isometric or isotonic exercise. The effect of the exercise was assessed by measuring tympanic temperature, heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, chest sweat rate, chest skin blood flow, and plasma catecholamine and cortisol, glucose, lactate, and free fatty acid levels. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no significant differences in blood pressure, skin blood flow, sweat rate, and total amount of sweating. Tympanic temperature increased more during isotonic exercise, and heart rate increase was more marked during isotonic exercise. The changes in lactate indicated that fatigue was not very great during isometric exercise. The glucose level indicated greater energy expenditure during isometric exercise. The free fatty acid and catecholamine levels indicated that isometric exercise did not result in very great energy expenditure and stress, respectively. The results for isotonic exercise of a decrease in lactate level and an increase in plasma free fatty acid level indicated that fatigue and energy expenditure were rather large while the perceived stress was comparatively low. We concluded that isotonic exercise may be a more desirable form of exercise during mist sauna bathing given the changes in glucose and free fatty acid levels.

  20. Electromyographic analysis of hip and knee musculature during running.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, W H; Pink, M; Perry, J

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the firing pattern of 11 hip and knee muscles during running. Thirty recreational runners volunteered to run at 3 different paces with indwelling electromyographic electrodes while being filmed at 100 frames per second. Results demonstrated that medial and lateral vasti muscles acted together for knee extension during terminal swing and loading response, possibly providing a patella stabilizing role. The vastus intermedius muscle functioned with the other vasti, plus eccentrically controlled knee flexion during swing phase. The rectus femoris muscle fired with the vastus intermedius muscle and assisted the iliacus muscle with hip flexion. The hamstrings fired primarily to eccentrically control hip flexion. The adductor magnus, tensor fascia lata, and gluteus maximus muscles afforded pelvic stabilization while assisting with hip flexion and extension. Forward propulsion was provided mainly by hip flexion and knee extension, which is contrary to the view that posterior calf muscles provide propulsion during toe off. Faster running paces lead to increased activity in the muscles. This may lead to more injuries, primarily in the muscles that were contracting eccentrically.

  1. Load-Dependent Variations in Knee Kinematics Measured with Dynamic MRI

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Christopher; Schmitz, Anne; Reeder, Scott B.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2013-01-01

    Subtle changes in knee kinematics may substantially alter cartilage contact patterns and moment generating capacities of soft tissues. The objective of this study was to use dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the influence of the timing of quadriceps loading on in vivo tibiofemoral and patellofemoral kinematics. We tested the hypothesis that load-dependent changes in knee kinematics would alter both the finite helical axis of the tibiofemoral joint and the moment arm of the patellar tendon. Eight healthy young adults were positioned supine in a MRI-compatible device that could impose either elastic or inertial loads on the lower leg in response to cyclic knee flexion-extension. The elastic loading condition induced concentric quadriceps contractions with knee extension, while an inertial loading condition induced eccentric quadriceps contractions with knee flexion. Peak internal knee extension moments ranged from 23–33 Nm, which is comparable to loadings seen in normal walking. We found that anterior tibia translation, superior patella glide, and anterior patella translation were reduced by an average of 5.1 mm, 5.8 mm and 2.9 mm when quadriceps loading coincided with knee flexion rather than knee extension. These kinematic variations induced a distal shift in the finite helical axis of the tibiofemoral joint and a reduction in the patellar tendon moment arm. We conclude that it may be important to consider such load-dependent changes in knee kinematics when using models to ascertain soft tissue and cartilage loading during functional tasks such as gait. PMID:23806309

  2. Dynamic knee stability estimated by finite helical axis methods during functional performance approximately twenty years after anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Grip, Helena; Tengman, Eva; Häger, Charlotte K

    2015-07-16

    Finite helical axis (FHA) measures of the knee joint during weight-bearing tasks may capture dynamic knee stability following Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury. The aim was to investigate dynamic knee stability during two-leg squat (TLS) and one-leg side hop (SH) in a long-term follow-up of ACL injury, and to examine correlations with knee laxity (KT-1000), osteoarthritis (OA, Kellgren-Lawrence) and knee function (Lysholm score). Participants were injured 17-28 years ago and then treated with surgery (n=33, ACLR) or physiotherapy only (n=37, ACLPT) and healthy-knee controls (n=33) were tested. Movements were registered with an optical motion capture system. We computed three FHA inclination angles, its' Anterior-Posterior (A-P) position, and an index quantifying directional changes (DI), during stepwise knee flexion intervals of ∼15°. Injured knees were less stable compared to healthy controls' and to contralateral non-injured knees, regardless of treatment: the A-P intersection was more anterior (indicating a more anterior positioning of tibia relative to femur) positively correlating with high laxity/low knee function, and during SH, the FHA was more inclined relative to the flexion-extension axis, possibly due to reduced rotational stability. During the TLS, A-P intersection was more anterior in the non-injured knee than the injured, and DI was higher, probably related to higher load on the non-injured knee. ACLR had less anterior A-P intersection than ACLPT, suggesting that surgery enhanced stability, although rotational stability may remain reduced. More anterior A-P intersection and greater inclination between the FHA and the knee flexion-extension axis best revealed reduced dynamic stability ∼23 years post-injury.

  3. Dynamic knee stability estimated by finite helical axis methods during functional performance approximately twenty years after anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Grip, Helena; Tengman, Eva; Häger, Charlotte K

    2015-07-16

    Finite helical axis (FHA) measures of the knee joint during weight-bearing tasks may capture dynamic knee stability following Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury. The aim was to investigate dynamic knee stability during two-leg squat (TLS) and one-leg side hop (SH) in a long-term follow-up of ACL injury, and to examine correlations with knee laxity (KT-1000), osteoarthritis (OA, Kellgren-Lawrence) and knee function (Lysholm score). Participants were injured 17-28 years ago and then treated with surgery (n=33, ACLR) or physiotherapy only (n=37, ACLPT) and healthy-knee controls (n=33) were tested. Movements were registered with an optical motion capture system. We computed three FHA inclination angles, its' Anterior-Posterior (A-P) position, and an index quantifying directional changes (DI), during stepwise knee flexion intervals of ∼15°. Injured knees were less stable compared to healthy controls' and to contralateral non-injured knees, regardless of treatment: the A-P intersection was more anterior (indicating a more anterior positioning of tibia relative to femur) positively correlating with high laxity/low knee function, and during SH, the FHA was more inclined relative to the flexion-extension axis, possibly due to reduced rotational stability. During the TLS, A-P intersection was more anterior in the non-injured knee than the injured, and DI was higher, probably related to higher load on the non-injured knee. ACLR had less anterior A-P intersection than ACLPT, suggesting that surgery enhanced stability, although rotational stability may remain reduced. More anterior A-P intersection and greater inclination between the FHA and the knee flexion-extension axis best revealed reduced dynamic stability ∼23 years post-injury. PMID:25935685

  4. Design and Characterization of a Novel Knee Articulation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinski, M.; Gronowicz, A.; Handke, A.; Ceccarelli, M.

    2016-08-01

    The paper is focused on designing a novel controllable and adjustable mechanism for reproducing human knee joint's complex motion by taking into account the flexion/extension movement in the sagittal plane, in combination with roll and slide. Main requirements for a knee rehabilitation supporting device are specified by researching the knee's anatomy and already existing mechanisms. A three degree of freedom (3 DOF) system (four-bar like linkage with controlled variable lengths of rockers) is synthesised to perform the reference path of instantaneous centre of rotation (ICR). Finally, a preliminary design of the adaptive mechanism is elaborated and a numerical model is built in Adams. Numerical results are derived from simulations that are presented to evaluate the accuracy of the reproduced movement and the mechanism's capabilities.

  5. Radiographic and scintigraphic evaluation of total knee arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, R.; Soudry, M.

    1986-04-01

    Various radiographic and scintigraphic methods are used to supplement clinical findings in the evaluation of total knee arthroplasty and its complications. Serial roentgenograms offer reliable information for diagnosing mechanical loosening. Wide and extensive radiolucency at the cement-bone interface and shift in position and alignment of prosthetic components can be seen in almost all cases by the time revision is necessary. Radiographic abnormalities are usually not present in acute infection, but are often present in chronic infection. Bone scanning has a high sensitivity for diagnosis of infection or loosening, but is nonspecific because increased uptake is often present around asymptomatic total knee arthroplasties with normal radiographs. Differential bone and Gallium scanning and scanning with Indium 111-labeled leukocytes have a greater specificity for diagnosis of infection than does bone or Gallium scanning alone. Routine radiographic and scintigraphic studies have shown a high incidence of deep vein thrombosis in the calf after total knee arthroplasty. Clinically significant pulmonary embolization is infrequent.

  6. Exercise and the Knee Joint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    This report by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports examines the effects of various forms of physical exercise on the knee joint which, because of its vulnerability, is especially subject to injury. Discussion centers around the physical characteristics of the joint, commonly used measurements for determining knee stability,…

  7. New Generation Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A knee brace that uses Space Shuttle propulsion technology has moved a step closer to being available to help knee injury and stroke patients and may possibly benefit patients with birth defects, spinal cord injuries, and post-polio conditions. After years of hard work, inventors at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have turned over the final design and prototype to industry partners at Horton's Orthotic Lab in Little Rock, Arkansas for further clinical testing. The device, called the Selectively Lockable Knee Brace, may mean faster, less painful rehabilitation for patients by allowing the knee to move when weight is not on the heel. Devices currently on the market lock the knee in a rigid, straight-leg position, or allow continuous free motion. Pictured here is a knee brace prototype being tested and fitted at Horton's Orthotic Lab. The knee brace is just one example of how space technology is being used to improve the lives of people on Earth. NASA's MSFC inventors Michael Shadoan and Neill Myers are space propulsion engineers who use the same mechanisms and materials to build systems for rockets that they used to design and develop the knee brace.

  8. Automatic locking orthotic knee device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An articulated tang in clevis joint for incorporation in newly manufactured conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices or for replacing such joints in conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices is discussed. The instant tang in clevis joint allows the user the freedom to extend and bend the knee normally when no load (weight) is applied to the knee and to automatically lock the knee when the user transfers weight to the knee, thus preventing a damaged knee from bending uncontrollably when weight is applied to the knee. The tang in clevis joint of the present invention includes first and second clevis plates, a tang assembly and a spacer plate secured between the clevis plates. Each clevis plate includes a bevelled serrated upper section. A bevelled shoe is secured to the tank in close proximity to the bevelled serrated upper section of the clevis plates. A coiled spring mounted within an oblong bore of the tang normally urges the shoes secured to the tang out of engagement with the serrated upper section of each clevic plate to allow rotation of the tang relative to the clevis plate. When weight is applied to the joint, the load compresses the coiled spring, the serrations on each clevis plate dig into the bevelled shoes secured to the tang to prevent relative movement between the tang and clevis plates. A shoulder is provided on the tang and the spacer plate to prevent overextension of the joint.

  9. Comparison of trunk and hip muscle activity during different degrees of lumbar and hip extension.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Min; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the activity of trunk and hip muscles during different degrees of lumbar and hip extension. [Subjects] The study enrolled 18 participants. [Methods] Two exercises (hip and lumbar extension) and two ranges (180° and <180°) were studied. [Results] Differences in degree of extension affected the percentage maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the lumbar erector spinae and biceps femoris muscles, with significantly higher average values at >180° than at 180° lumbar extension. No significant differences were found in gluteus maximus activity according to exercise type or range. [Conclusion] Hip extension may be more effective and safer for lumbar rehabilitation than lumbar extension.

  10. Measurement of fatigue in knee flexor and extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Y; Senda, M; Oka, T; Yagata, Y; Takahara, Y; Nagashima, H; Inoue, H

    2000-04-01

    In order to examine fatigue of the knee flexor and extensor muscles and to investigate the characteristics of muscular fatigue in different sports, a Cybex machine was used to measure muscle fatigue and recovery during isokinetic knee flexion and extension. Eighteen baseball players, 12 soccer players and 13 marathon runners were studied. Each subject was tested in the sitting position and made to perform 50 consecutive right knee bends and stretches at maximum strength. This was done 3 times with an interval of 10 min between each series. The peak torque to body weight ratio and the fatigue rate were determined in each case. In all subjects, the peak torque to body weight ratio was higher for extensors than flexors. Over the 3 trials, the fatigue rate of extensors showed little change, while that of flexors had a tendency to increase. In each subject, knee extensors showed a high fatigue rate but a quick recovery, while knee flexors showed a low fatigue rate but a slow recovery. As the marathon runners had the smallest fatigue rates for both flexors and extensors, we concluded that marathon runners had more stamina than baseball players and soccer players.

  11. Recovery patterns in electroencephalographic global field power during maximal isometric force production.

    PubMed

    Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Flanagan, Shawn D; Comstock, Brett A; Maresh, Carl M; Volek, Jeff S; Denegar, Craig R; Kupchak, Brian R; Kraemer, William J

    2011-10-01

    In previous work, cortical activity decreased with fatigue following novel movements or small muscle group actions. These muscle actions, however, do not appear related to the cortical activity seen with biologically relevant and highly trained movement patterns (i.e., ingrained patterns). The cortical recovery response to ingrained patterns-and how it differs with altered load, speed, or volume - is unknown. The purpose of this balanced, within-group study was to investigate differences in cortical activity 24 hours after physically distinct variations of a highly trained squat exercise (n = 7, minimum 4 years resistance training experience). Four resistance protocols were chosen: rate of force development (PWR, 6 × 3 squat jumps at 30% of 1 repetition maximum [1RM]); magnitude of force development (FOR, 6 × 3 squat at 95% of 1RM); volume of force development (VOL, 6 × 10 squat at 80% of their 1RM); and control (CTRL, 6 sets unracking an empty bar). Twenty-four hours later, subjects performed a peak isometric squat while electroencephalographic and biochemical markers of exertion and fatigue were obtained. Global field power detected the quantity of activity superficial to motor regions. Waveforms of activity throughout the isometric squats were obtained and grand averages calculated to produce quantitative depictions of cortical activity. Significance was P ≤ 0.05. Peak isometric squat force was not statistically different 24 hours postexercise (Force [N]: PWR: 2828.79 ± 461.17; FOR: 2887.64 ± 453.09; VOL: 2910.17 ± 625.81; CTRL 2768.53 ± 374.85). Subjects produced similar and characteristic cortical activity patterns during isometric squats despite varying indices of fatigue. Differences were observed based upon the use or nonuse of aerobic endurance exercise in their training program. Patterns of activity in data seem to have emerged based on differences in training preference. Global Field Power (uV) during the isometric squat for PWR was 26.98 ± 14

  12. Enhanced knee joint function due to accelerated rehabilitation exercise after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery in Korean male high school soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myungchun; Sung, Dong Jun; Lee, Joohyung; Oh, Inyoung; Kim, Sojung; Kim, Seungho; Kim, Jooyoung

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted on Korean male high school soccer players who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) to identify the effects of an accelerated rehabilitation exercise (ARE) program on knee joint isometric strength, thigh circumference, Lysholm score, and active balance agility. We assigned eight test participants each to a physical therapy group (PTG) and an accelerated rehabilitation exercise group (AREG), and compared differences between the groups. Both the PTG and AREG showed significant increases in 30° away and 60° toward isometric strength after treatment. In addition, significant differences were observed in these strength tests between the two groups. Both groups also showed significant increases in thigh circumference, Lysholm score, and active balance agility after treatment, but no significant differences were observed between the two groups. We conclude that the ARE treatment was more effective for improving isometric strength of the knee joint than that of physical therapy, and that an active rehabilitation exercise program after ACLR had positive effects on recovery performance of patients with an ACL injury and their return to the playing field. PMID:26933657

  13. Enhanced knee joint function due to accelerated rehabilitation exercise after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery in Korean male high school soccer players.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myungchun; Sung, Dong Jun; Lee, Joohyung; Oh, Inyoung; Kim, Sojung; Kim, Seungho; Kim, Jooyoung

    2016-02-01

    This study was conducted on Korean male high school soccer players who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) to identify the effects of an accelerated rehabilitation exercise (ARE) program on knee joint isometric strength, thigh circumference, Lysholm score, and active balance agility. We assigned eight test participants each to a physical therapy group (PTG) and an accelerated rehabilitation exercise group (AREG), and compared differences between the groups. Both the PTG and AREG showed significant increases in 30° away and 60° toward isometric strength after treatment. In addition, significant differences were observed in these strength tests between the two groups. Both groups also showed significant increases in thigh circumference, Lysholm score, and active balance agility after treatment, but no significant differences were observed between the two groups. We conclude that the ARE treatment was more effective for improving isometric strength of the knee joint than that of physical therapy, and that an active rehabilitation exercise program after ACLR had positive effects on recovery performance of patients with an ACL injury and their return to the playing field.

  14. Enhanced knee joint function due to accelerated rehabilitation exercise after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery in Korean male high school soccer players.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myungchun; Sung, Dong Jun; Lee, Joohyung; Oh, Inyoung; Kim, Sojung; Kim, Seungho; Kim, Jooyoung

    2016-02-01

    This study was conducted on Korean male high school soccer players who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) to identify the effects of an accelerated rehabilitation exercise (ARE) program on knee joint isometric strength, thigh circumference, Lysholm score, and active balance agility. We assigned eight test participants each to a physical therapy group (PTG) and an accelerated rehabilitation exercise group (AREG), and compared differences between the groups. Both the PTG and AREG showed significant increases in 30° away and 60° toward isometric strength after treatment. In addition, significant differences were observed in these strength tests between the two groups. Both groups also showed significant increases in thigh circumference, Lysholm score, and active balance agility after treatment, but no significant differences were observed between the two groups. We conclude that the ARE treatment was more effective for improving isometric strength of the knee joint than that of physical therapy, and that an active rehabilitation exercise program after ACLR had positive effects on recovery performance of patients with an ACL injury and their return to the playing field. PMID:26933657

  15. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  20. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  1. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) § 572.176 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) The knee assembly for the purpose of this test is the part of the leg assembly shown in drawing...

  2. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  3. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  4. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  5. Changes in Knee Biomechanics After a Hip-Abductor Strengthening Protocol for Runners With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ferber, Reed; Kendall, Karen D.; Farr, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Very few authors have investigated the relationship between hip-abductor muscle strength and frontal-plane knee mechanics during running. Objective: To investigate this relationship using a 3-week hip-abductor muscle-strengthening program to identify changes in strength, pain, and biomechanics in runners with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Design: Cohort study. Setting: University-based clinical research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Fifteen individuals (5 men, 10 women) with PFPS and 10 individuals without PFPS (4 men, 6 women) participated. Intervention(s): The patients with PFPS completed a 3-week hip-abductor strengthening protocol; control participants did not. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables of interest were maximal isometric hip-abductor muscle strength, 2-dimensional peak knee genu valgum angle, and stride-to-stride knee-joint variability. All measures were recorded at baseline and 3 weeks later. Between-groups differences were compared using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Results: At baseline, the PFPS group exhibited reduced strength, no difference in peak genu valgum angle, and increased stride-to-stride knee-joint variability compared with the control group. After the 3-week protocol, the PFPS group demonstrated increased strength, less pain, no change in peak genu valgum angle, and reduced stride-to-stride knee-joint variability compared with baseline. Conclusions: A 3-week hip-abductor muscle-strengthening protocol was effective in increasing muscle strength and decreasing pain and stride-to-stride knee-joint variability in individuals with PFPS. However, concomitant changes in peak knee genu valgum angle were not observed. PMID:21391799

  6. Altered cell metabolism in tissues of the knee joint in a rabbit model of Botulinum toxin A-induced quadriceps muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Leumann, A; Longino, D; Fortuna, R; Leonard, T; Vaz, M A; Hart, D A; Herzog, W

    2012-12-01

    Quadriceps muscle weakness is frequently associated with knee injuries in sports. The influence of quadriceps weakness on knee joint homeostasis remains undefined. We hypothesized that quadriceps weakness will lead to tissue-specific alterations in the cell metabolism of tissues of the knee. Quadriceps weakness was induced with repetitive injections of Botulinum toxin A in six 1-year-old New Zealand White rabbits for 6 months. Five additional animals served as controls with injections of saline/dextrose. Muscle weakness was assessed by muscle wet mass, isometric knee extensor torque, and histological morphology analysis. Cell metabolism was assessed for patellar tendon, medial and lateral collateral ligament, and medial and lateral meniscus by measuring the total RNA levels and specific mRNA levels for collagen I, collagen III, MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, TGF-β, biglycan, IL-1, and bFGF by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction. While the total RNA levels did not change, tissue-specific mRNA levels were lower for relevant anabolic and catabolic molecules, indicating potential changes in tissue mechanical set points. Quadriceps weakness may lead to adaptations in knee joint tissue cell metabolism by altering a subset of anabolic and catabolic mRNA levels corresponding to a new functional and metabolic set point for the knee that may contribute to the high injury rate of athletes with muscle weakness.

  7. The Attenborough total knee prosthesis. Results of 25 operations evaluated according to two different assessment systems.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, H

    1981-10-01

    The Attenborough stabilized gliding total knee prosthesis was used in cases of severely damaged, highly unstable or deformed knees. Twenty-five operated cases were followed for 1 1/2 years (range 12-28 months). The results were assessed according to two different knee evaluation systems: The Lotke & Ecker knee evaluation index and the knee function assessment chart (BOA chart) suggested by the British Orthopaedic Association. The overall results were excellent or good in 84 per cent (21/25) of the cases according to both systems, but when considering the improvement in individual clinical features the BOA chart results were more optimistic. Neither of the systems takes into consideration that the results are influenced by possible disorders in other joints. If only the function of the knees was being judged the results of the operations with the Attenborough prosthesis were excellent or good in 96 per cent (24/25) in this series. In general the results to be as good as those obtained in less disabled knees treated with compartmental prostheses. As more extensive surgery and bone resection is needed for insertion of the Attenborough prosthesis compared with compartmental prostheses, its use should be restricted to severely damaged knees which would otherwise be treated with a hinged prosthesis or an arthrodesis.

  8. The relationship between leg preference and knee mechanics during sidestepping in collegiate female footballers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Scott R; Wang, Henry; Dickin, D Clark; Weiss, Kaitlyn J

    2014-11-01

    This study examined the relationship between leg preference and knee mechanics in females during sidestepping. Three-dimensional data were recorded on 16 female collegiate footballers during a planned 45° sidestep manoeuvre with their preferred and non-preferred kicking leg. Knee kinematics and kinetics during initial contact, weight acceptance, peak push-off, and final push-off phases of sidestepping were analysed in both legs. The preferred leg showed trivial to small increases (ES = 0.19-0.36) in knee flexion angle at initial contact, weight acceptance, and peak push-off, and small increases (ES = 0.21-0.34) in peak power production and peak knee extension velocity. The non-preferred leg showed a trivial increase (ES = 0.10) in knee abduction angle during weight acceptance; small to moderate increases (ES = 0.22-0.64) in knee internal rotation angle at weight acceptance, peak push-off, and final push-off; a small increase (ES = 0.22) in knee abductor moment; and trivial increases (ES = 0.09-0.14) in peak power absorption and peak knee flexion velocity. The results of this study show that differences do exist between the preferred and non-preferred leg in females. The findings of this study will increase the knowledge base of anterior cruciate ligament injury in females and can aid in the design of more appropriate neuromuscular, plyometric, and strength training protocols for injury prevention.

  9. The relationship between leg preference and knee mechanics during sidestepping in collegiate female footballers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Scott R; Wang, Henry; Dickin, D Clark; Weiss, Kaitlyn J

    2014-11-01

    This study examined the relationship between leg preference and knee mechanics in females during sidestepping. Three-dimensional data were recorded on 16 female collegiate footballers during a planned 45° sidestep manoeuvre with their preferred and non-preferred kicking leg. Knee kinematics and kinetics during initial contact, weight acceptance, peak push-off, and final push-off phases of sidestepping were analysed in both legs. The preferred leg showed trivial to small increases (ES = 0.19-0.36) in knee flexion angle at initial contact, weight acceptance, and peak push-off, and small increases (ES = 0.21-0.34) in peak power production and peak knee extension velocity. The non-preferred leg showed a trivial increase (ES = 0.10) in knee abduction angle during weight acceptance; small to moderate increases (ES = 0.22-0.64) in knee internal rotation angle at weight acceptance, peak push-off, and final push-off; a small increase (ES = 0.22) in knee abductor moment; and trivial increases (ES = 0.09-0.14) in peak power absorption and peak knee flexion velocity. The results of this study show that differences do exist between the preferred and non-preferred leg in females. The findings of this study will increase the knowledge base of anterior cruciate ligament injury in females and can aid in the design of more appropriate neuromuscular, plyometric, and strength training protocols for injury prevention. PMID:25204331

  10. Stance control knee mechanism for lower-limb support in hybrid neuroprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    To, Curtis S.; Kobetic, Rudi; Bulea, Thomas C.; Audu, Musa L.; Schnellenberger, John R.; Pinault, Gilles; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    A hydraulic stance control knee mechanism (SCKM) was developed to fully support the knee against flexion during stance and allow uninhibited motion during swing for individuals with paraplegia using functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) for gait assistance. The SCKM was optimized for maximum locking torque for body-weight support and minimum resistance when allowing for free knee motion. Ipsilateral and contralateral position and force feedback were used to control the SCKM. Through bench and nondisabled testing, the SCKM was shown to be capable of supporting up to 70 N-m, require no more than 13% of the torque achievable with FNS to facilitate free motion, and responsively and repeatedly unlock under an applied flexion knee torque of up to 49 N-m. Preliminary tests of the SCKM with an individual with paraplegia demonstrated that it could support the body and maintain knee extension during stance without the stimulation of the knee extensor muscles. This was achieved without adversely affecting gait, and knee stability was comparable to gait assisted by knee extensor stimulation during stance. PMID:21938668

  11. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D. W.; Liddle, A. D.; Dodd, C. A. F.; Pandit, H.

    2015-01-01

    There is a large amount of evidence available about the relative merits of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty (UKA and TKA). Based on the same evidence, different people draw different conclusions and as a result, there is great variability in the usage of UKA. The revision rate of UKA is much higher than TKA and so some surgeons conclude that UKA should not be performed. Other surgeons believe that the main reason for the high revision rate is that UKA is easy to revise and, therefore, the threshold for revision is low. They also believe that UKA has many advantages over TKA such as a faster recovery, lower morbidity and mortality and better function. They therefore conclude that UKA should be undertaken whenever appropriate. The solution to this argument is to minimise the revision rate of UKA, thereby addressing the main disadvantage of UKA. The evidence suggests that this will be achieved if surgeons use UKA for at least 20% of their knee arthroplasties and use implants that are appropriate for these broad indications. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B(10 Suppl A):3–8. PMID:26430080

  12. Exercise for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Baker, K; McAlindon, T

    2000-09-01

    Adverse outcomes in knee osteoarthritis include pain, loss of function, and disability. These outcomes can have devastating effects on the quality of life of those suffering from the disease. Treatments have generally targeted pain, assuming that disability would improve as a direct result of improvements in pain. However, there is evidence to suggest that determinants of pain and disability differ. In general, treatments have been more successful at decreasing pain rather than disability. Many of the factors that lead to disability can be improved with exercise. Exercise, both aerobic and strength training, have been examined as treatments for knee osteoarthritis, with considerable variability in the results. The variability between studies may be due to differences in study design, exercise protocols, and participants in the studies. Although there is variability among studies, it is notable that a majority of the studies had a positive effect on pain and or disability. The mechanism of exercise remains unclear and merits future studies to better define a concise, clear exercise protocol that may have the potential for a public health intervention.

  13. Ways of increasing muscular activity by means of isometric muscular exertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalik, A. V.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of isometric muscular exertion on the human body was investigated by having subjects perform basic movements in a sitting position in the conventional manner with additional muscle tension at 50% maximum force and at maximum force. The pulse, arterial pressure, skin temperature, respiratory rate, minute respiratory volume and electrical activity of the muscles involved were all measured. Performance of the exercises with maximum muscular exertion for 20 sec and without movement resulted in the greatest shifts in these indices; in the conventional manner substantial changes did not occur; and with isometric muscular exertion with 50% maximum force with and without movement, optimal functional shifts resulted. The latter is recommended for use in industrial exercises for the prevention of hypodynamia. Ten exercises are suggested.

  14. Stochastic order parameter equation of isometric force production revealed by drift-diffusion estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, T. D.; Friedrich, R.; Beek, P. J.

    2006-11-01

    We address two questions that are central to understanding human motor control variability: what kind of dynamical components contribute to motor control variability (i.e., deterministic and/or random ones), and how are those components structured? To this end, we derive a stochastic order parameter equation for isometric force production from experimental data using drift-diffusion estimates. We show that the force variability increases with the required force output because of a decrease of deterministic stability and an accompanying increase of noise intensity. A structural analysis reveals that the deterministic component consists of a linear control loop, while the random component involves a noise source that scales with force output. In addition, we present evidence for the existence of a subject-independent overall noise level of human isometric force production.

  15. Cerebral mechanisms underlying the effects of music during a fatiguing isometric ankle-dorsiflexion task.

    PubMed

    Bigliassi, Marcelo; Karageorghis, Costas I; Nowicky, Alexander V; Orgs, Guido; Wright, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    The brain mechanisms by which music-related interventions ameliorate fatigue-related symptoms during the execution of fatiguing motor tasks are hitherto under-researched. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of music on brain electrical activity and psychophysiological measures during the execution of an isometric fatiguing ankle-dorsiflexion task performed until the point of volitional exhaustion. Nineteen healthy participants performed two fatigue tests at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction while listening to music or in silence. Electrical activity in the brain was assessed by use of a 64-channel EEG. The results indicated that music downregulated theta waves in the frontal, central, and parietal regions of the brain during exercise. Music also induced a partial attentional switching from associative thoughts to task-unrelated factors (dissociative thoughts) during exercise, which led to improvements in task performance. Moreover, participants experienced a more positive affective state while performing the isometric task under the influence of music.

  16. 'Diving reflex' in man - Its relation to isometric and dynamic exercise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, S. A., Jr.; Campbell, J. K.; Wildenthal, K.

    1972-01-01

    To test the influence of physical activity on the diving reflex, 10 normal men held their breath with their faces immersed in 15 C water during rest, bicycle exercise, and sustained isometric handgrip contraction. At all conditions, a slight but statistically significant elevation of blood pressure and a marked decrease in heart rate occurred during each dive. During moderate bicycle exercise heart rate fell more rapidly than at rest and the final level of bradycardia approached that achieved at rest, despite the fact that predive heart rates were much higher during exercise. When diving occurred in combination with isometric exercise, bradycardia was less severe than during resting dives and final heart rates could be represented as the sum of the expected responses to each intervention alone. In all conditions apnea without face immersion caused bradycardia that was less severe than during wet dives.

  17. Energy metabolism in human calf muscle performing isometric plantar flexion superimposed by 20-Hz vibration.

    PubMed

    Zange, Jochen; Haller, Timo; Müller, Klaus; Liphardt, Anna-Maria; Mester, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Vibration training is commonly expected to induce an active muscle contraction via a complex reflex mechanism. In calf muscles of 20 untrained subjects, the additional energy consumption in response to vibration superimposed on an isometric contraction was examined by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by near infrared spectroscopy. Subjects performed 3 min of isometric plantar flexion exercise at 40% MVC under four conditions: with (VIB) and without (CON) superimposed 20 Hz vibration at +/-2 mm amplitude, both combined with or without arterial occlusion (AO). After contraction under all conditions, the decreases in oxygenated haemoglobin were not significantly different. After VIB + AO consumption of ATP was increased by 60% over CON + AO, visible by significant decreases in [PCr] and intracellular pH (P < 0.05). The additional energy consumption by vibration was not detectable under natural perfusion. Probably without AO the additional energy consumption by vibration was compensated by oxidative phosphorylation enabled by additional perfusion.

  18. Description and validation of isometric tetanic muscle force test in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Guilherme; Kremer, Thomas; Willems, Wouter F; Friedrich, Patricia F; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2012-01-01

    Isometric tetanic muscle force has been described in a rat model to evaluate motor recovery in a segmental sciatic nerve defect reconstructions. However, to test longer nerve defects, an alternative and larger animal model is necessary. The purpose of this study is to describe and validate a technique for isometric force measurement of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle in New Zealand rabbits. Muscle preload and electrical stimulation parameters were optimized to obtain the highest tetanic contraction bilaterally in 10 animals. Electrophysiology, muscle weight, peroneal nerve length, and histomorphometry were also analyzed. Only the peroneal nerve length and the ratio of highest muscle force/muscle weight demonstrated the equivalence between the sides. A small variability of TA muscle force and TA muscle weight was observed between the sides suggesting dominance. Optimization of electrical stimulation and preload as well as the use of correct anesthesia were fundamental to acquire the highest muscle force. PMID:22113792

  19. Adiabatic isometric mapping algorithm for embedding 2-surfaces in Euclidean 3-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Shannon; Miller, Warner A.; Alsing, Paul M.; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2015-12-01

    Alexandrov proved that any simplicial complex homeomorphic to a sphere with strictly non-negative Gaussian curvature at each vertex can be isometrically embedded uniquely in {{{R}}}3 as a convex polyhedron. Due to the nonconstructive nature of his proof, there have yet to be any algorithms, that we know of, that realizes the Alexandrov embedding in polynomial time. Following his proof, we developed the adiabatic isometric mapping (AIM) algorithm. AIM uses a guided adiabatic pull-back procedure on a given polyhedral metric to produce an embedding that approximates the unique Alexandrov polyhedron. Tests of AIM applied to two different polyhedral metrics suggests that its run time is sub cubic with respect to the number of vertices. Although Alexandrov’s theorem specifically addresses the embedding of convex polyhedral metrics, we tested AIM on a broader class of polyhedral metrics that included regions of negative Gaussian curvature. One test was on a surface just outside the ergosphere of a Kerr black hole.

  20. Maximal anaerobic performance of the knee extensor muscles during growth.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, C; Lagassé, P; Bouchard, C; Simoneau, J A

    1991-09-01

    The extent of the growth changes in maximal work output during 10 s (MWO10), 30 s (MWO30), and 90 s (MWO90) of maximal repetitive knee flexions and extensions assessed on a modified Hydra-Gym machine was investigated in 84 boys and 83 girls, 9-19 yr of age. Body weight, fat mass and fat free mass by underwater weighing, and thigh volume and cross-sectional area were also determined. No difference was observed in the absolute MWO10, MWO30, and MWO90 between girls and boys at 9 and 11 yr of age. However, significant differences appeared between genders from 13 yr of age onward, anaerobic performances of the knee extensor muscles of girls representing about 75% or even less of those of boys. The analysis of variance revealed that maximal work ouput during the three knee extension tests was significantly greater in males as well as in females from 9 to 18 yr, regardless how performance was related to morphological characteristics. Performance in absolute values or expressed per unit of body weight, fat free mass, and thigh cross-sectional area for the MWO10, MWO30, and MWO90 tests were almost always significantly lower in both genders when performances of the 9-yr-old group were compared with those of the 13-yr-old group or older groups. Improvement in maximal work output during the 10-s, 30-s, or 90-s knee extension tests with age occurred mainly between 9 and 15 yr in both genders. The results of the present study show that there are gender differences in predominantly anaerobic performances during growth and reveal that increase in muscle mass does not appear to be the only factor responsible for the age-related increment in the anaerobic working capacity of the knee extensor muscles.

  1. Sex difference in substrate oxidation during low-intensity isometric exercise in young adults.

    PubMed

    Sarafian, Delphine; Schutz, Yves; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Dulloo, Abdul G; Miles-Chan, Jennifer L

    2016-09-01

    Low-intensity physical activity is increasingly promoted as an alternative to sedentary behavior. However, much research to date has focused on moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity, and in particular dynamic work, with the effect of low-intensity isometric exercise (<4 METs) on substrate utilization yet to be explored. Here we investigate the effects of such exercise on respiratory quotient (RQ) and determine the extent of intra- and inter-individual variability in response. Energy expenditure, RQ, and substrate oxidation were measured by ventilated-hood indirect calorimetry at rest and in response to standardized, intermittent, low-level isometric leg-press exercises at 5 loads (+5, +10, +15, +20, +25 kg) in 26 healthy, young adults. Nine participants repeated the experiment on 3 separate days to assess within-subject, between-day variability. There was no significant difference in energy cost and heart rate responses to low-intensity isometric exercise (<2 METs) between men and women. However, a sex difference was apparent in terms of substrate oxidation - with men increasing both fat and carbohydrate oxidation, and women only increasing fat oxidation while maintaining carbohydrate oxidation at baseline, resting levels. This sex difference was repeatable and persisted when substrate oxidation was adjusted for differences in body weight or body composition. Individual variability in RQ was relatively low, with both intra- and inter-individual coefficients of variation in the range of 3%-6% in both sexes. These results suggest that women preferentially increase fat oxidation during low-level isometric exercise. Whether such physical activity could be incorporated into treatment/prevention strategies aimed at optimizing fat oxidation in women warrants further investigation.

  2. Comparison in muscle damage between maximal voluntary and electrically evoked isometric contractions of the elbow flexors.

    PubMed

    Jubeau, Marc; Muthalib, Makii; Millet, Guillaume Y; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2012-02-01

    This study compared between maximal voluntary (VOL) and electrically stimulated (ES) isometric contractions of the elbow flexors for changes in indirect markers of muscle damage to investigate whether ES would induce greater muscle damage than VOL. Twelve non-resistance-trained men (23-39 years) performed VOL with one arm and ES with the contralateral arm separated by 2 weeks in a randomised, counterbalanced order. Both VOL and ES (frequency 75 Hz, pulse duration 250 μs, maximally tolerated intensity) exercises consisted of 50 maximal isometric contractions (4-s on, 15-s off) of the elbow flexors at a long muscle length (160°). Changes in maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque (MVC), range of motion, muscle soreness, pressure pain threshold and serum creatine kinase (CK) activity were measured before, immediately after and 1, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h following exercise. The average peak torque over the 50 isometric contractions was greater (P < 0.05) for VOL (32.9 ± 9.8 N m) than ES (16.9 ± 6.3 N m). MVC decreased greater and recovered slower (P < 0.05) after ES (15% lower than baseline at 96 h) than VOL (full recovery). Serum CK activity increased (P < 0.05) only after ES, and the muscles became more sore and tender after ES than VOL (P < 0.05). These results showed that ES induced greater muscle damage than VOL despite the lower torque output during ES. It seems likely that higher mechanical stress imposed on the activated muscle fibres, due to the specificity of motor unit recruitment in ES, resulted in greater muscle damage. PMID:21573775

  3. Isometric immersions of generalized Berger spheres in S4(1) and CP2(4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qichao

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we classify the isometric immersions of generalized Berger spheres (S3, gGB) in S4(1) and CP2(4) (under proper assumption in the latter case) and show the explicit expressions of gGB. As an application, we obtain infinitely many generalized Berger spheres admitting conformal immersions in R4, which is closely related to a question of Peng and Tang (2010).

  4. Sex difference in substrate oxidation during low-intensity isometric exercise in young adults.

    PubMed

    Sarafian, Delphine; Schutz, Yves; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Dulloo, Abdul G; Miles-Chan, Jennifer L

    2016-09-01

    Low-intensity physical activity is increasingly promoted as an alternative to sedentary behavior. However, much research to date has focused on moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity, and in particular dynamic work, with the effect of low-intensity isometric exercise (<4 METs) on substrate utilization yet to be explored. Here we investigate the effects of such exercise on respiratory quotient (RQ) and determine the extent of intra- and inter-individual variability in response. Energy expenditure, RQ, and substrate oxidation were measured by ventilated-hood indirect calorimetry at rest and in response to standardized, intermittent, low-level isometric leg-press exercises at 5 loads (+5, +10, +15, +20, +25 kg) in 26 healthy, young adults. Nine participants repeated the experiment on 3 separate days to assess within-subject, between-day variability. There was no significant difference in energy cost and heart rate responses to low-intensity isometric exercise (<2 METs) between men and women. However, a sex difference was apparent in terms of substrate oxidation - with men increasing both fat and carbohydrate oxidation, and women only increasing fat oxidation while maintaining carbohydrate oxidation at baseline, resting levels. This sex difference was repeatable and persisted when substrate oxidation was adjusted for differences in body weight or body composition. Individual variability in RQ was relatively low, with both intra- and inter-individual coefficients of variation in the range of 3%-6% in both sexes. These results suggest that women preferentially increase fat oxidation during low-level isometric exercise. Whether such physical activity could be incorporated into treatment/prevention strategies aimed at optimizing fat oxidation in women warrants further investigation. PMID:27540628

  5. Isometric immersions via compensated compactness for slowly decaying negative Gauss curvature and rough data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoforou, Cleopatra; Slemrod, Marshall

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the method of compensated compactness is applied to the problem of isometric immersion of a two-dimensional Riemannian manifold with negative Gauss curvature into three-dimensional Euclidean space. Previous applications of the method to this problem have required decay of order t -4 in the Gauss curvature. Here, we show that the decay of Hong (Commun Anal Geom 1:487-514, 1993) t -2- δ/2 where δ ∈ (0, 4) suffices.

  6. Isometric immersions, energy minimization and self-similar buckling in non-Euclidean elastic sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmer, John; Sharon, Eran; Shearman, Toby; Venkataramani, Shankar C.

    2016-04-01

    The edges of torn plastic sheets and growing leaves often display hierarchical buckling patterns. We show that this complex morphology i) emerges even in zero strain configurations, and ii) is driven by a competition between the two principal curvatures, rather than between bending and stretching. We identify the key role of branch point (or “monkey saddle”) singularities in generating complex wrinkling patterns in isometric immersions, and show how they arise naturally from minimizing the elastic energy.

  7. Alternative Methods for Measuring Scapular Muscles Protraction and Retraction Maximal Isometric Forces

    PubMed Central

    Roush, James R.; Davies, George J.; Ellenbecker, Todd S.; Rauh, Mitchell J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The importance of the scapular stabilizing muscles has led to an increased interest in quantitative measurements of their strength. Few studies have measured isometric or concentric isokinetic forces. Additionally, limited reports exist on the reliability of objective measures for testing scapular protraction and retraction muscle strength or scapular testing that does not involve the glenohumeral joint. Objective To determine the reliability of four new methods of measuring the maximal isometric strength of key scapular stabilizing muscles for the actions of protraction and retraction, both with and without the involvement of the glenohumeral (GH) joint. Methods The Isobex® stationary tension dynamometer was used to measure the maximal isometric force (kg) on thirty healthy females (ages 22–26 years). Three measures were taken for each method that was sequentially randomized for three separate testing sessions on three nonconsecutive days. Results Intraclass correlations (ICC2,3) for intrasession reliability and (ICC3,3) for intersession reliability ranged from 0.95 to 0.98, and 0.94 to 0.96 respectively. The standard errors of measurement (95% confidence interval [CI]) were narrow. Scatter grams for both protraction and retraction testing methods demonstrated a significant relationship, 0.92 for protraction (95% CI 0.83 to 0.96) and 0.93 for retraction (95% CI 0.87 to 0.97). Bland-Altman plots indicated good agreement between the two methods for measuring protraction strength but a weaker agreement for the two methods measuring retraction strength. Discussion/Conclusion The four new methods assessed in this study indicate reliable options for measuring scapular protraction or retraction isometric strength with or without involving the GH joint for young healthy females. PMID:21509104

  8. The Isometric Handgrip Exercise As a Test for Unmasking Hypertension in the Offsprings of Hypertensive Parents

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rinku; Malhotra, Varun; Dhar, Usha; Tripathi, Yogesh

    2013-01-01

    Background: A familial history of hypertension increases the risk of hypertension in the offsprings. Aims and objectives: The present study was undertaken to assess the underlying hypertension by using the Isometric Handgrip (IHG) exercise test in the offsprings of hypertensive parents and to compare it with age-matched controls of normotensive parents. Material and Methods: The isometric handgrip test was performed in the study and control groups. The resting blood pressure was recorded before exercise and afterwards the subjects were asked to perform the isometric handgrip exercise with the dominant hand for 2 minutes. Then the blood pressure was recorded in the sitting position during and 5 minutes after the completion of the exercise. Statistical Analysis: The analysis of the results was done by ANOVA with SPSS, version 17.0, by using the unpaired ‘t’ test. Results: The results showed that the Resting Systolic (SBP), Diastolic (DBP) and the Mean (MBP) Blood Pressures were higher (p <0.001) in the offsprings of the hypertensive parents as compared to those in the control subjects of normotensive parents. During the isometric handgrip exercise test, the rise in the systolic, diastolic and the mean blood pressures was significantly higher (p<0.001) in the offsprings of the hypertensive parents. After 5 minutes of exercise, the SBP, DBP and the MBP were found to be significantly higher (p<0.001) in the study group as compared to those in the control group. Conclusions: An early and a regular screening of the children of hypertensive parents is necessary to prevent any future cardiovascular complications. PMID:23905088

  9. New Generation Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A knee brace that uses Space Shuttle propulsion technology has moved a step closer to being available to help knee injury and stroke patients and may possibly benefit patients with birth defects, spinal cord injuries, and post-polio conditions. After years of hard work, inventors at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have turned over the final design and prototype to industry partners at Horton's Orthotic Lab in Little Rock, Arkansas for further clinical testing. The device, called the Selectively Lockable Knee Brace, may mean faster, less painful rehabilitation for patients by allowing the knee to move when weight is not on the heel. Devices currently on the market lock the knee in a rigid, straight-leg position, or allow continuous free motion. The knee brace is just one example of how space technology is being used to improve the lives of people on Earth. NASA's MSFC inventors Michael Shadoan and Neill Myers are space propulsion engineers who use the same mechanisms and materials to build systems for rockets that they used to design and develop the knee brace.

  10. Physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Page, Carolyn J; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-05-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic joint disease causing pain and disability. Physiotherapy, which encompasses a number of modalities, is a non-invasive treatment option in the management of OA. This review summarizes the evidence for commonly used physiotherapy interventions. There is strong evidence to show short-term beneficial effects of exercise on pain and function, although the type of exercise does not seem to influence treatment outcome. Delivery modes, including individual, group or home exercise are all effective, although therapist contact may improve benefits. Attention to improving adherence to exercise is needed to maximize outcomes in the longer-term. Knee taping applied with the aim of realigning the patella and unloading soft tissues can reduce pain. There is also evidence to support the use of knee braces in people with knee OA. Biomechanical studies show that lateral wedge shoe insoles reduce knee load but clinical trials do not support symptomatic benefits. Recent studies suggest individual shoe characteristics also affect knee load and there is current interest in the effect of modified shoe designs. Manual therapy, while not to be used as a stand-alone treatment, may be beneficial. In summary, although the research is not equivocal, there is sufficient evidence to indicate that physiotherapy interventions can reduce pain and improve function in those with knee OA.

  11. A component analysis of the generation and release of isometric force in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, N; Sagar, H J; Cooper, J A

    1992-01-01

    Paradigms of isometric force control allow study of the generation and release of movement in the absence of complications due to disordered visuomotor coordination. The onset and release of isometric force in Parkinson's disease (PD) was studied, using computerised determinants of latency of response and rate of force generation and release. Components of isometric force control were related to measures of cognitive, affective and clinical motor disability. The effects of treatment were determined by longitudinal study of de novo patients. Patients with PD showed impairment in latency and rate of force change for movement release as well as onset. Rate of force change correlated with depression, clinical motor disability and memory quotient but latency showed no correlation with any of these measures. Treatment improved rate of force release, in concert with clinical motor disability, but not latency. These results suggest dissociations between latency and rate of force change that may be linked to different neurochemical deficits. Further, they demonstrate akinetic deficits in force release that argue against the "neural energy hypothesis" of akinesia. PMID:1640233

  12. Shoulder muscular activity during isometric three-point kneeling exercise on stable and unstable surfaces.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Rodrigo Cappato; de Andrade, Rodrigo; Tucci, Helga Tatiana; Martins, Jaqueline; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if performing isometric 3-point kneeling exercises on a Swiss ball influenced the isometric force output and EMG activities of the shoulder muscles when compared with performing the same exercises on a stable base of support. Twenty healthy adults performed the isometric 3-point kneeling exercises with the hand placed either on a stable surface or on a Swiss ball. Surface EMG was recorded from the posterior deltoid, pectoralis major, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, upper trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles using surface differential electrodes. All EMG data were reported as percentages of the average root mean square (RMS) values obtained in maximum voluntary contractions for each muscle studied. The highest load value was obtained during exercise on a stable surface. A significant increase was observed in the activation of glenohumeral muscles during exercises on a Swiss ball. However, there were no differences in EMG activities of the scapulothoracic muscles. These results suggest that exercises performed on unstable surfaces may provide muscular activity levels similar to those performed on stable surfaces, without the need to apply greater external loads to the musculoskeletal system. Therefore, exercises on unstable surfaces may be useful during the process of tissue regeneration.

  13. Interactive effect of aging and local muscle heating on renal vasoconstriction during isometric handgrip.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Nathan T; Sauder, Charity L; Kearney, Matthew L; Ray, Chester A

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the interactive effect of aging and forearm muscle heating on renal vascular conductance and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during ischemic isometric handgrip. A tube-lined, water-perfused sleeve was used to heat the forearm in 12 young (27 +/- 1 yr) and 9 older (63 +/- 1 yr) subjects. Ischemic isometric handgrip was performed before and after heating. Muscle temperature (intramuscular thermistor) was 34.3 +/- 0.2 and 38.7 +/- 0.1 degrees C during normothermia and heating, respectively. At rest, heating had no effect on renal blood velocity (Doppler ultrasound) or renal vascular conductance in either group (young, n = 12; older, n = 8). Heating compared with normothermia caused a significantly greater increase in renal vasoconstriction during exercise and postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) in both groups. However, the increase in renal vasoconstriction during heating was greater in the older compared with the young subjects (18 +/- 3 vs. 8 +/- 3%). During handgrip, heating elicited greater increases in MSNA responses in the older group (young, n = 12; older, n = 6), whereas no statistical difference was observed between groups during PEMI. In summary, aging augments renal vascular responses to ischemic isometric handgrip during heating of the exercising muscle. The greater renal vasoconstriction was associated with augmented MSNA in the older subjects.

  14. Cardiovascular responses to sustained maximal isometric contractions of the finger flexors.

    PubMed

    Smith, D L; Misner, J E; Bloomfield, D K; Essandoh, L K

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated cardiovascular responses to 2 min sustained submaximal (20% MVC) and maximal (100% MVC) voluntary isometric contractions of the finger flexors in healthy young women. Cardiovascular variables investigated were: heart rate (fc), mean arterial pressure (Pa), and stroke volume (SV). Doppler echocardiography was used to estimate SV from measures of aortic diameter (AD) and time-velocity integrals. Preliminary studies indicated that AD did not change significantly after 2 min sustained 100% MVC. Therefore, pre-exercise AD values were used to calculate SV before, during and after exercise. During the 2-min 100% MVC period, fc and Pa increased significantly during the first 30 s of contraction. fc then remained constant during the remainder of the 2-min contraction period, while Pa continued to rise. SV did not change significantly during the 100% MVC task but increased significantly during recovery from sustained 100% MVC. The data suggest that the magnitude of cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise is dependent on the specific task performed, and that there is a different pattern of response for fc, Pa, and SV during 20% and 100% MVC tasks. Unlike fc and Pa, SV did not change significantly during isometric exercise, but increased significantly after sustained 100% MVC. PMID:8375365

  15. Dynamical degrees of freedom and correlations in isometric finger force production.

    PubMed

    James, Eric G

    2012-12-01

    Prior research has concluded that the correlations of isometric finger forces represent the extent to which the fingers are controlled as a single unit. If this is the case, finger force correlations should be consistent with estimates of the controlled (dynamical) degrees of freedom in finger forces. The present study examined the finger force correlations and the dynamical degrees of freedom in four isometric force tasks. The tasks were to produce a preferred level of force with the (a) Index, (b) Ring, (c) Both fingers and also to (d) Rest the fingers on the load cells. Dynamical degrees of freedom in finger forces were lowest in the Both finger force task and progressively higher in the Ring, Index and Resting finger force tasks. The finger force correlations were highest in the Resting and lowest in the Index and Ring finger tasks. The results for the dynamical degrees of freedom in finger forces were consistent with a reduction in degrees of freedom in response to the degrees of freedom problem and the task constraints. The results for the finger force correlations were inconsistent with a reduction in the dynamical degrees of freedom. These findings indicate that finger force correlations do not necessarily reflect the coupling of finger forces. The findings also highlight the value of time-domain analyses to reveal the organization of control in isometric finger forces.

  16. In vivo human gastrocnemius architecture with changing joint angle at rest and during graded isometric contraction.

    PubMed

    Narici, M V; Binzoni, T; Hiltbrand, E; Fasel, J; Terrier, F; Cerretelli, P

    1996-10-01

    1. Human gastrocnemius medialis architecture was analysed in vivo, by ultrasonography, as a function of joint angle at rest and during voluntary isometric contractions up to the maximum force (MCV). maximum force (MVC). 2. At rest, as ankle joint angle increased from 90 to 150 deg, pennation increased from 15.8 to 27.7 deg, fibre length decreased from 57.0 to 34.0 mm and the physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) increased from 42.1 to 63.5 cm2. 3. From rest to MVC, at a fixed ankle joint angle of 110 deg, pennation angle increased from 15.5 to 33.6 deg and fibre length decreased from 50.8 to 32.9 mm, with no significant change in the distance between the aponeuroses. As a result of these changes the PCSA increased by 34.8%. 4. Measurements of pennation angle, fibre length and distance between the aponeuroses of the gastrocnemius medialis were also performed by ultrasound on a cadaver leg and found to be in good agreement with direct anatomical measurements. 5. It is concluded that human gastrocnemius medialis architecture is significantly affected both by changes of joint angle at rest and by isometric contraction intensity. The remarkable shortening observed during isometric contraction suggests that, at rest, the gastrocnemius muscle and tendon are considerably slack. The extrapolation of muscle architectural data obtained from cadavers to in vivo conditions should be made only for matching muscle lengths.

  17. Use of post-isometric relaxation in the chiropractic management of a 55-year-old man with cervical radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Emary, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This case report chronicles the successful management of a 55-year-old patient diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy using spinal manipulative therapy and cervical paraspinal post-isometric relaxation stretches. PMID:22457537

  18. Low-intensity isometric handgrip exercise has no transient effect on blood pressure in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Goessler, Karla; Buys, Roselien; Cornelissen, Véronique A

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation reduces blood pressure (BP). However, less is known about the transient effect of a single bout of exercise on BP. Isometric handgrip exercise has been proposed as a new nonpharmacologic tool to lower BP. We aimed to investigate the acute effect of isometric handgrip exercise on BP in CAD patients. Twenty-one male CAD patients were included. All patients completed two experimental sessions in random order: one control and one low-intensity isometric handgrip session. BP was measured by means of a 24-hour ambulatory BP monitor preintervention, for 1 hour in the office and subsequently for 24 hours. Our results suggest that isometric handgrip exercise performed at low intensity is safe in patients with CAD but does not induce a transient reduction in BP.

  19. Isometric exercise and cognitive function: an investigation of acute dose-response effects during submaximal fatiguing contractions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Denver M Y; Bray, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the dose-response relationship between exercise and cognitive performance using an acute bout of isometric exercise. University students (N = 55) were randomly assigned to control, 30%, 50% and 70% of maximum voluntary handgrip contraction groups. Participants performed a modified Stroop task before and after completion of an isometric handgrip endurance trial at their assigned exercise intensity. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and forearm muscle activation (EMG) showed linear trends of progressively greater RPE and muscle activation at greater exercise intensity levels. Regression analysis showed significant (P < .05) linear degradations in frequency of errors on the Stroop task with increasing exercise intensity. We conclude that performing isometric exercise until exhaustion is associated with reduced cognitive performance and that higher intensity isometric exercise leads to greater performance impairments in a linear dose-response manner.

  20. C*-algebras associated with reversible extensions of logistic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwaśniewski, Bartosz K.

    2012-10-01

    The construction of reversible extensions of dynamical systems presented in a previous paper by the author and A.V. Lebedev is enhanced, so that it applies to arbitrary mappings (not necessarily with open range). It is based on calculating the maximal ideal space of C*-algebras that extends endomorphisms to partial automorphisms via partial isometric representations, and involves a new set of 'parameters' (the role of parameters is played by chosen sets or ideals). As model examples, we give a thorough description of reversible extensions of logistic maps and a classification of systems associated with compression of unitaries generating homeomorphisms of the circle. Bibliography: 34 titles.

  1. C*-algebras associated with reversible extensions of logistic maps

    SciTech Connect

    Kwasniewski, Bartosz K

    2012-10-31

    The construction of reversible extensions of dynamical systems presented in a previous paper by the author and A.V. Lebedev is enhanced, so that it applies to arbitrary mappings (not necessarily with open range). It is based on calculating the maximal ideal space of C*-algebras that extends endomorphisms to partial automorphisms via partial isometric representations, and involves a new set of 'parameters' (the role of parameters is played by chosen sets or ideals). As model examples, we give a thorough description of reversible extensions of logistic maps and a classification of systems associated with compression of unitaries generating homeomorphisms of the circle. Bibliography: 34 titles.

  2. Fatigability and recovery of arm muscles with advanced age for dynamic and isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Tejin; Schlinder-Delap, Bonnie; Hunter, Sandra K

    2013-02-01

    This study determined whether age-related mechanisms can increase fatigue of arm muscles during maximal velocity dynamic contractions, as it occurs in the lower limb. We compared elbow flexor fatigue of young (n=10, 20.8±2.7 years) and old men (n=16, 73.8±6.1 years) during and in recovery from a dynamic and an isometric postural fatiguing task. Each task was maintained until failure while supporting a load equivalent to 20% of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) torque. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to assess supraspinal fatigue (superimposed twitch, SIT) and muscle relaxation. Time to failure was longer for the old men than for the young men for the isometric task (9.5±3.1 vs. 17.2±7.0 min, P=0.01) but similar for the dynamic task (6.3±2.4 min vs. 6.0±2.0 min, P=0.73). Initial peak rate of relaxation was slower for the old men than for the young men, and was associated with a longer time to failure for both tasks (P<0.05). Low initial power during elbow flexion was associated with the greatest difference (reduction) in time to failure between the isometric task and the dynamic task (r=-0.54, P=0.015). SIT declined after both fatigue tasks similarly with age, although the recovery of SIT was associated with MVIC recovery for the old (both sessions) but not for the young men. Biceps brachii and brachioradialis EMG activity (% MVIC) of the old men were greater than that of the young men during the dynamic fatiguing task (P<0.05), but were similar during the isometric task. Muscular mechanisms and greater relative muscle activity (EMG activity) explain the greater fatigue during the dynamic task for the old men compared with the young men in the elbow flexor muscles. Recovery of MVC torque however relies more on the recovery of supraspinal fatigue among the old men than among the young men.

  3. EEG signatures of arm isometric exertions in preparation, planning and execution.

    PubMed

    Nasseroleslami, Bahman; Lakany, Heba; Conway, Bernard A

    2014-04-15

    The electroencephalographic (EEG) activity patterns in humans during motor behaviour provide insight into normal motor control processes and for diagnostic and rehabilitation applications. While the patterns preceding brisk voluntary movements, and especially movement execution, are well described, there are few EEG studies that address the cortical activation patterns seen in isometric exertions and their planning. In this paper, we report on time and time-frequency EEG signatures in experiments in normal subjects (n=8), using multichannel EEG during motor preparation, planning and execution of directional centre-out arm isometric exertions performed at the wrist in the horizontal plane, in response to instruction-delay visual cues. Our observations suggest that isometric force exertions are accompanied by transient and sustained event-related potentials (ERP) and event-related (de-)synchronisations (ERD/ERS), comparable to those of a movement task. Furthermore, the ERPs and ERD/ERS are also observed during preparation and planning of the isometric task. Comparison of ear-lobe-referenced and surface Laplacian ERPs indicates the contribution of superficial sources in supplementary and pre-motor (FC(z)), parietal (CP(z)) and primary motor cortical areas (C₁ and FC₁) to ERPs (primarily negative peaks in frontal and positive peaks in parietal areas), but contribution of deep sources to sustained time-domain potentials (negativity in planning and positivity in execution). Transient and sustained ERD patterns in μ and β frequency bands of ear-lobe-referenced and surface Laplacian EEG indicate the contribution of both superficial and deep sources to ERD/ERS. As no physical displacement happens during the task, we can infer that the underlying mechanisms of motor-related ERPs and ERD/ERS patterns do not only depend on change in limb coordinate or muscle-length-dependent ascending sensory information and are primary generated by motor preparation, direction

  4. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FARQUHAR, R.N.

    AUSTRALIAN AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION HAS LONG EMPHASIZED TECHNICAL ADVISORY SERVICE AT THE EXPENSE OF THE SOCIOECONOMIC ASPECTS OF FARM PRODUCTION AND FARM LIFE. ONLY IN TASMANIA HAS FARM MANAGEMENT BEEN STRESSED. DEMANDS FOR THE WHOLE-FARM APPROACH HAVE PRODUCED A TREND TOWARD GENERALISM FOR DISTRICT OFFICERS IN MOST STATES. THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT,…

  5. Posterolateral knee reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Djian, P

    2015-02-01

    Injury to the cruciate ligaments of the knee commonly occurs in association with posterolateral instability, which can cause severe functional disability including varus, posterior translation, and external rotational instability. Failure to diagnose and treat an injury of the posterolateral corner in a patient who has a tear of the cruciate ligament can also result in the failure of the reconstructed cruciate ligament. There seems to be a consensus of opinion that injury to the posterolateral corner, whether isolated or combined, is best treated by reconstructing the posterolateral corner along with the coexisting cruciate ligament injury, if combined. Commonly proposed methods of reconstructing the posterolateral corner have focused on the reconstruction of the popliteus, the popliteofibular ligament, and the lateral collateral ligament. The aim of this conference is to describe the posterolateral corner reconstruction technique and to provide an algorithm of treatment. PMID:25596981

  6. Perspectives for patients. Knee pain: safely strengthening your thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    2014-05-01

    Quadriceps are the muscles on the front of your thigh that help you straighten your knee. When these muscles are not strong, you may feel pain under your kneecap. Quadriceps can be strengthened by performing squats and leg extensions. However, when you do not perform these exercises properly, you may also feel knee pain. Understanding the load and stress under the kneecap when you execute squats and leg extensions can help you perform these exercises better and with less pain while you strengthen your quadriceps. A study published in the May 2014 issue of JOSPT provides information intended to help physical therapists and their patients use these exercises to strengthen thigh muscles while minimizing the load under the kneecap.

  7. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  8. Knee injuries in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, M R; Ireland, M L

    1995-04-01

    Female athletes are at increased risk for certain sports-related injuries, particularly those involving the knee. Factors that contribute to this increased risk are the differences in sports undertaken and in gender anatomy and structure. Gender differences include baseline level of conditioning, lower extremity alignment, physiological laxity, pelvis width, tibial rotation and foot alignment. Sports like gymnastics and cheerleading create a noncontact environment, but can result in significant knee injuries. In quick stopping and cutting sports, females have an increased incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury by noncontact mechanisms. Patellofemoral (PF) disorders are also very common in female athletes. Awareness of these facts helps the sports medicine professional make an accurate diagnosis and institute earlier treatment-focused rehabilitation with or without surgery. Further prospective and retrospective research is needed in areas of epidemiology, mechanisms, severity and types of knee injuries. The goal is to lessen the severity of certain knee injuries and to prevent others. PMID:7604201

  9. Displacement of the medial meniscus within the passive motion characteristics of the human knee joint: an RSA study in human cadaver knees.

    PubMed

    Tienen, T G; Buma, P; Scholten, J G F; van Kampen, A; Veth, R P H; Verdonschot, N

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this study was to validate an in vitro human cadaver knee-joint model for the evaluation of the meniscal movement during knee-joint flexion. The question was whether our model showed comparable meniscal displacements to those found in earlier meniscal movement studies in vivo. Furthermore, we determined the influence of tibial torque on the meniscal displacement during knee-joint flexion. Three tantalum beads were inserted in the medial meniscus of six human-cadaver joints. The knee joints were placed and loaded in a loading apparatus, and the movements of the beads were determined by means of RSA during knee-joint flexion and extension with and without internal tibial (IT) and external tibial (ET) torque. During flexion without tibial torque, all menisci mo