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Sample records for knee osteoarthritis pain

  1. Managing the pain of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hrnack, Scott A; Barber, F Alan

    2014-09-01

    Pain from knee osteoarthritis creates a significant burden for symptomatic patients, who are often forced to change their lifestyle because of their symptoms. Activity modification, therapy, weight loss, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, shoe orthotics, bracing, and injections are the nonoperative options available. New technologies are also emerging in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Ultimately, these therapeutic modalities should reduce pain and increase the overall functioning of patients. These nonoperative modalities give the clinician several effective options before surgical management is considered. PMID:25295768

  2. Editorial Commentary: Knee Hyaluronic Acid Viscosupplementation Reduces Osteoarthritis Pain.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to the AAOS knee osteoarthritis guidelines, systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that viscosupplementation with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injection reduces knee osteoarthritis pain and improves function according to the highest level of evidence. PMID:26433240

  3. Editorial Commentary: Platelet-Rich Plasma Improves Knee Pain and Function in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-11-01

    Systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that platelet-rich plasma improves knee pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Ultimately, biologics hold promise for chondroprotection in addition to symptomatic relief. PMID:26542203

  4. The pain-relieving qualities of exercise in knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Susko, Allyn M; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review article is to explore the role of therapeutic exercise in managing the pain associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Therapeutic exercise is often recommended as a first-line conservative treatment for knee OA, and current evidence supports exercise as an effective pain-relieving intervention. We explore the current state of evidence for exercise as a pain-relieving intervention for knee OA. Next, the mechanisms by which knee OA pain occurs and the potential ways in which exercise may act on those mechanisms are discussed. Clinical applicability and future research directions are suggested. Although evidence demonstrates that exercise reduces knee OA pain, optimal exercise mode and dosage have not been determined. In addition, it is not clearly understood whether exercise provides pain relief via peripheral or central mechanisms or a combination of both. Published clinical trials have explored a variety of interventions, but these interventions have not been specifically designed to target pain pathways. Current evidence strongly supports exercise as a pain-relieving option for those with knee OA. Future research needs to illuminate the mechanisms by which exercise reduces the pain associated with knee OA and the development of therapeutic exercise interventions to specifically target these mechanisms.

  5. Determinants of pain in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Behzad; Hajian-Tilaki, Karimollah; Babaei, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several factors are associated with the development or exacerbation of pain in knee osteoarthritis (KOA). In this study, we reviewed this context based on relevant studies. Methods: Recent published studies which have addressed the relationship between pain and KOA were summarized. Results: Correlates of the clinical, demographic features, laboratory tests and abnormalities on radiographic as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the knee pain have been discussed. The results indicated that many factors such as synovitis, synovial effusion, obesity, as well as structural lesions determined by MRI or radiographic examination, serum cytokines, inflammatory markers are determinants of pain in KOA. Conclusion: This context requires further investigations for identification of additional factors which initiate pain in asymptomatic KOA PMID:27757198

  6. Pain hypervigilance is associated with greater clinical pain severity and enhanced experimental pain sensitivity among adults with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Matthew S.; Goodin, Burel R.; Pero, Samuel T.; Schmidt, Jessica K.; Sotolongo, Adriana; Bulls, Hailey W.; Glover, Toni L.; King, Christopher D.; Sibille, Kimberly T.; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Staud, Roland; Fessler, Barri J.; Bradley, Laurence A.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain hypervigilance is an important aspect of the fear-avoidance model of pain that may help explain individual differences in pain sensitivity among persons with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of pain hypervigilance to clinical pain severity and experimental pain sensitivity in persons with symptomatic knee OA. Methods We analyzed cross-sectional data from 168 adults with symptomatic knee OA. Quantitative sensory testing was used to measure sensitivity to heat pain, pressure pain, and cold pain, as well as temporal summation of heat pain, a marker of central sensitization. Results Pain hypervigilance was associated with greater clinical pain severity, as well as greater pressure pain. Pain hypervigilance was also a significant predictor of temporal summation of heat pain. Conclusions Pain hypervigilance may be an important contributor to pain reports and experimental pain sensitivity among persons with knee OA. PMID:24352850

  7. Effects of proprioceptive circuit exercise on knee joint pain and muscle function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck; Kim, Sang-Soo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study applied proprioceptive circuit exercise to patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis and examined its effects on knee joint muscle function and the level of pain. [Subjects] In this study, 14 patients with knee osteoarthritis in two groups, a proprioceptive circuit exercise group (n = 7) and control group (n = 7), were examined. [Methods] IsoMed 2000 (D&R Ferstl GmbH, Hemau, Germany) was used to assess knee joint muscle function, and a Visual Analog Scale was used to measure pain level. [Results] In the proprioceptive circuit exercise group, knee joint muscle function and pain levels improved significantly, whereas in the control group, no significant improvement was observed. [Conclusion] A proprioceptive circuit exercise may be an effective way to strengthen knee joint muscle function and reduce pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  8. Serum Levels of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Painful Knee Osteoarthritis and Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Marta; Ezquerro, Fernando; Marcon Alfieri, Fábio; Vilas Boas, Lucy; Tozetto-Mendoza, Tania Regina; Chen, Janini; Özçakar, Levent; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder in the world. Among the mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis, biomarkers (cytokines profile) may be related to pain and pain intensity, functional capacity, and pressure pain thresholds (PPT). Thus, the study of these relationships may offer useful information about pathophysiology and associated mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the seric concentration of pro (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis and to correlate the levels of these biomarkers with the patients' functional capacity and pressure pain threshold (PPT) values. PMID:25821631

  9. Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. METHODS: Baseli...

  10. The Relationship Between Reductions in Knee Loading and Immediate Pain Response Whilst Wearing Lateral Wedged Insoles in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Richard K.; Chapman, Graham J.; Forsythe, Laura; Parkes, Matthew J.; Felson, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of lateral wedge insoles (LWIs) in medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) have shown reductions in the average external knee adduction moment (EKAM) but no lessening of knee pain. Some treated patients actually experience increases in the EKAM which could explain the overall absence of pain response. We examined whether, in patients with painful medial OA, reductions in the EKAM were associated with lessening of knee pain. Each patient underwent gait analysis whilst walking in a control shoe and two LWI’s. We evaluated the relationship between change in EKAM and change in knee pain using Spearman Rank Correlation coefficients and tested whether dichotomizing patients into biomechanical responders (decreased EKAM) and non-responders (increased EKAM) would identify those with reductions in knee pain. In 70 patients studied, the EKAM was reduced in both LWIs versus control shoe (−5.21% and −6.29% for typical and supported wedges, respectively). The change in EKAM using LWIs was not significantly associated with the direction of knee pain change. Further, 54% were biomechanical responders, but these persons did not have more knee pain reduction than non-responders. Whilst LWIs reduce EKAM, there is no clearcut relationship between change in medial load when wearing LWIs and corresponding change in knee pain. PMID:24903067

  11. Determinants of pain and functioning in knee osteoarthritis: a one-year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Helminen, Eeva-Eerika; Sinikallio, Sanna H; Valjakka, Anna L; Väisänen-Rouvali, Rauni H; Arokoski, Jari PA

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify predictors of pain and disability in knee osteoarthritis. Design: A one-year prospective analysis of determinants of pain and functioning in knee osteoarthritis. Study setting: Primary care providers in a medium-sized city. Patients: A total of 111 patients aged from 35 to 75 with clinical symptoms and radiographic grading (Kellgren-Lawrence 2–4) of knee osteoarthritis who participated in a randomized controlled trial. Main measures: The outcome measures were self-reported pain and function, which were recorded at 0, 3 and 12 months. Disease-specific pain and functioning were assessed using the pain and function subscales of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index. Generic physical and mental functioning were assessed using the RAND-36 subscales for function, and physical and mental component summary scores. Possible baseline predictors for these outcomes were 1) demographic, socioeconomic and disease-related variables, and 2) psychological measures of resources, distress, fear of movement and catastrophizing. Results: Multivariate linear mixed model analyses revealed that normal mood at baseline measured with the Beck Anxiety Inventory predicted significantly better results in all measures of pain (WOMAC P=0.02) and function (WOMAC P=0.002, RAND-36 P=0.002) during the one-year follow-up. Psychological resource factors (pain self-efficacy P=0.012, satisfaction with life P=0.002) predicted better function (RAND-36). Pain catastrophizing predicted higher WOMAC pain levels (P=0.013), whereas fear of movement (kinesiophobia) predicted poorer functioning (WOMAC P=0.046, RAND-36 P=0.024). Conclusions: Multiple psychological factors in people with knee osteoarthritis pain are associated with the development of disability and longer term worse pain. PMID:27496698

  12. Cerebral Cortical Thickness in Chronic Pain Due to Knee Osteoarthritis: The Effect of Pain Duration and Pain Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigates associations between cortical thickness and pain duration, and central sensitization as markers of pain progression in painful knee osteoarthritis. Methods Whole brain cortical thickness and pressure pain thresholds were assessed in 70 participants; 40 patients with chronic painful knee osteoarthritis (age = 66.1± 8.5 years, 21 females, mean duration of pain = 8.5 years), and 30 healthy controls (age = 62.7± 7.4, 17 females). Results Cortical thickness negatively correlated with pain duration mainly in fronto-temporal areas outside of classical pain processing areas (p<0.05, age-controlled, FDR corrected). Pain sensitivity was unrelated to cortical thickness. Patients showed lower cortical thickness in the right anterior insula (p<0.001, uncorrected) with no changes surviving multiple test correction. Conclusion With increasing number of years of suffering from chronic arthritis pain we found increasing cortical thinning in extended cerebral cortical regions beyond recognised pain-processing areas. While the mechanisms of cortical thinning remain to be elucidated, we show that pain progression indexed by central sensitization does not play a major role. PMID:27658292

  13. Future directions in painful knee osteoarthritis: harnessing complexity in a heterogeneous population.

    PubMed

    Kittelson, Andrew J; George, Steven Z; Maluf, Katrina S; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E

    2014-03-01

    This perspective article proposes a conceptual model for the pain experience for individuals diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Pain in knee OA is likely a heterogeneous, multifactorial phenomenon that involves not only the OA disease process but also elements specific to patient psychology and pain neurophysiology. The relevant contributions to the pain experience for any individual patient remain difficult, if not impossible, to definitively determine, and the rationale for many clinical treatment decisions arises primarily from a mechanistic understanding of OA pathophysiology. The Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) recently identified "phenotyping" of OA pain as a research priority to "better target pain therapies to individual patients." This perspective article proposes that contributions from 3 domains--knee pathology, psychological distress, and pain neurophysiology--should be considered equally important in future efforts to understand pain phenotypes in knee OA. Ultimately, characterization of pain phenotypes may aid in the understanding of the pain experience and the development of interventions specific to pain for individual patients.

  14. Sensitivity and sensitisation in relation to pain severity in knee osteoarthritis: trait or state?

    PubMed Central

    Neogi, Tuhina; Frey-Law, Laura; Scholz, Joachim; Niu, Jingbo; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Woolf, Clifford; Nevitt, Michael; Bradley, Laurence; Felson, David T; Kvien, Tore K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives It is not clear whether heightened pain sensitivity in knee osteoarthritis (OA) is related to sensitisation induced by nociceptive input from OA pathology (‘state’) versus other confounding factors. Conversely, some individuals may be predisposed to sensitisation irrespective of OA (‘trait’). Methods The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study is a longitudinal cohort of persons with or at risk of knee OA. We obtained knee X-rays, pain questionnaires and comprehensive assessment of factors that can influence pain sensitivity. We examined the relation of sensitisation and sensitivity assessed by mechanical temporal summation (TS) and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) to knee OA and knee pain severity. To test whether sensitisation and sensitivity is a ‘state’ induced by OA pathology, we examined the relation of PPT and TS to knee OA duration and severity. Results In 2126 subjects (mean age 68, mean body mass index (BMI) 31, 61% female), PPT and TS were not associated with radiographic OA (ORs 0.9–1.0 for PPT and TS; p>0.05). However, PPT and TS were associated with pain severity (ORs: 1.7–2.0 for PPT; 1.3–1.6 for TS; p<0.05). Knee OA duration and radiographic severity were not associated with PPT or TS. Conclusions PPT and TS were associated with OA-related pain, but not radiographic OA after accounting for pertinent confounders in this large cohort. Lack of association with disease duration suggests at least some sensitisation and pain sensitivity may be a trait rather than state. Understanding the relationship between pathological pain and pain sensitivity/sensitisation offers insight into OA pain risk factors and pain management opportunities. PMID:24351516

  15. Increased joint loads during walking--a consequence of pain relief in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjaer, Tine; Lund, Hans; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning

    2006-12-01

    Joint pain is a primary symptom in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but the effect of pain and pain relief on the knee joint mechanics of walking is not clear. In this study, the effects of local knee joint analgesia on knee joint loads during walking were studied in a group of knee osteoarthritis patients. A group of healthy subjects was included as a reference group. The joint loads were calculated from standard gait analysis data obtained with standardised walking speed (4 km/h). The gait analyses were performed before and after pain relief by intra-articular injections of 10 mL lidocaine (1%). Pre-injection measurements revealed lower joint loads in the OA group compared to the reference group. Following injections pain during walking decreased significantly and the joint loads increased in the OA group during the late single support phase to a level comparable to the reference group. Although the patients walked with less compressive knee joint forces compared to the reference group, the effects of pain relief may accelerate the degenerative changes. PMID:17011194

  16. Relationship of Buckling and Knee Injury to Pain Exacerbation in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Web-Based Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Zobel, Isabelle; Erfani, Tahereh; Bennell, Kim L; Makovey, Joanna; Metcalf, Ben; March, Lyn; Zhang, Yuqing; Eckstein, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most frequent causes of limited mobility and diminished quality of life. Pain is the main symptom that drives individuals with knee OA to seek medical care and a recognized antecedent to disability and eventually joint replacement. Evidence shows that patients with symptomatic OA experience fluctuations in pain severity. Mechanical insults to the knee such as injury and buckling may contribute to pain exacerbation. Objective Our objective was to examine whether knee injury and buckling (giving way) are triggers for exacerbation of pain in persons with symptomatic knee OA. Methods We conducted a case-crossover study, a novel methodology in which participants with symptomatic radiographic knee OA who have had knee pain exacerbations were used as their own control (self-matched design), with all data collected via the Internet. Participants were asked to log-on to the study website and complete an online questionnaire at baseline and then at regular 10-day intervals for 3 months (control periods)—a total of 10 questionnaires. They were also instructed to go to the website and complete pain exacerbation questionnaires when they experienced an isolated incident of knee pain exacerbation (case periods). A pain exacerbation “case” period was defined as an increase of ≥2 compared to baseline. At each contact the pain exacerbation was designated a case period, and at all other regular 10-day contacts (control periods) participants were asked about knee injuries during the previous 7 days and knee buckling during the previous 2 days. The relationship of knee injury and buckling to the risk of pain exacerbation was examined using conditional logistic regression models. Results The analysis included 157 participants (66% women, mean age: 62 years, mean BMI: 29.5 kg/m2). Sustaining a knee injury was associated with experiencing a pain exacerbation (odds ratio [OR] 10.2, 95% CI 5.4, 19.3) compared with no injury. Knee

  17. Association of neuropathic pain with ultrasonographic measurements of femoral cartilage thickness and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Mesci, Nilgün; Mesci, Erkan; Külcü, Duygu Geler

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether neuropathic pain is associated with femoral condylar cartilage thickness, electrical pain threshold, and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients over the age of 40 diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were enrolled. The PainDETECT questionnaire, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Short Form-36 questionnaire were completed for all patients. Electrical sensory threshold and electrical pain threshold measurements were obtained. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was determined by means of ultrasound. [Results] PainDETECT scores of 13 or greater were observed in 28 (46.7%) patients, indicating the presence of neuropathic pain. These patients were found to have greater average pain severity, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and depression and anxiety scores and lower Short Form-36 scores than patients without neuropathic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain showed lower knee electrical sensory threshold and pain threshold values on average than patients without neuropathic pain. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was not different between the two groups. [Conclusion] Neuropathic pain is associated with increased pain severity and decreased functional capacity and adversely affects quality of life and mood in patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27630395

  18. Association of neuropathic pain with ultrasonographic measurements of femoral cartilage thickness and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mesci, Nilgün; Mesci, Erkan; Külcü, Duygu Geler

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether neuropathic pain is associated with femoral condylar cartilage thickness, electrical pain threshold, and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients over the age of 40 diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were enrolled. The PainDETECT questionnaire, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Short Form-36 questionnaire were completed for all patients. Electrical sensory threshold and electrical pain threshold measurements were obtained. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was determined by means of ultrasound. [Results] PainDETECT scores of 13 or greater were observed in 28 (46.7%) patients, indicating the presence of neuropathic pain. These patients were found to have greater average pain severity, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and depression and anxiety scores and lower Short Form-36 scores than patients without neuropathic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain showed lower knee electrical sensory threshold and pain threshold values on average than patients without neuropathic pain. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was not different between the two groups. [Conclusion] Neuropathic pain is associated with increased pain severity and decreased functional capacity and adversely affects quality of life and mood in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  19. Association of neuropathic pain with ultrasonographic measurements of femoral cartilage thickness and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mesci, Nilgün; Mesci, Erkan; Külcü, Duygu Geler

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether neuropathic pain is associated with femoral condylar cartilage thickness, electrical pain threshold, and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients over the age of 40 diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were enrolled. The PainDETECT questionnaire, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Short Form-36 questionnaire were completed for all patients. Electrical sensory threshold and electrical pain threshold measurements were obtained. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was determined by means of ultrasound. [Results] PainDETECT scores of 13 or greater were observed in 28 (46.7%) patients, indicating the presence of neuropathic pain. These patients were found to have greater average pain severity, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and depression and anxiety scores and lower Short Form-36 scores than patients without neuropathic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain showed lower knee electrical sensory threshold and pain threshold values on average than patients without neuropathic pain. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was not different between the two groups. [Conclusion] Neuropathic pain is associated with increased pain severity and decreased functional capacity and adversely affects quality of life and mood in patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27630395

  20. Associations between Pressure-Pain Threshold, Symptoms, and Radiographic Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Adam P.; Shi, Xiaoyan A.; Gracely, Richard H.; Renner, Jordan B.; Jordan, Joanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between generalized evoked pressure pain sensitivity with distal pressure-pain threshold (PPT) and the presence, severity, or number of involved knee/hip joints with radiographic osteoarthritis (rOA) or related symptoms. Methods Data for these cross-sectional analyses come from the second follow-up (2008–11) of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project (n=1,602). Pressure-pain threshold measurements were averaged over two trials from both the left and right trapezius. Outcomes of radiographic knee and hip OA were both defined by a Kellgren-Lawrence score of 2–4 and site-specific symptoms were ascertained at clinical interview. Associations were determine with multiple logistic regression models, and two-way interactions were tested at p<0.05. Results The sample was 67.2% female and 31.0% African American. Participants’ mean age was 67.9 (SD 9.0); mean body mass index was 31.5 (SD 7.1); mean Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score was 6.5 (SD 7.4); and mean total PPT was 3.6kg (SD 0.7). Significant associations were found between PPT and self-reported knee/hip symptoms. No significant associations were found between PPT and presence, severity, or number of joints with knee and hip rOA without accompanying symptoms. No significant interactions were found with demographic or clinical characteristics. Conclusion Pressure-pain threshold was significantly associated with self-reported single and multi-joint symptoms. In contrast, after adjustment, PPT measured at the trapezius was not associated with asymptomatic knee or hip rOA. As such, PPT may prove to be a useful indicator of rOA pain processing and of why individuals respond favorably and others do not to treatments targeting rOA. PMID:24643946

  1. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  2. Vitamin D, Race, and Experimental Pain Sensitivity in Older Adults with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Glover, T.L.; Goodin, B.R.; Horgas, A.L.; Kindler, L.L.; King, C.D.; Sibille, K.T.; Peloquin, C.A.; Riley, J.L.; Staud, R.; Bradley, L.A.; Fillingim, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Low levels of serum circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D have been correlated with many health conditions, including chronic pain. Recent clinical practice guidelines define vitamin D levels < 20 ng/mL as deficient and values of 21–29 ng/mL as insufficient. Vitamin D insufficiency, including the most severe levels of deficiency, is more prevalent in black Americans. Ethnic and race group differences have been reported in both clinical and experimental pain, with black Americans reporting increased pain. The purpose of this study was to examine whether variation in vitamin D levels contribute to race differences in knee osteoarthritic pain. Methods The sample consisted of 94 participants (75% female), including 45 blacks and 49 whites with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Average age was 55.8 years (range 45–71 years). Participants completed a questionnaire on knee osteoarthritic symptoms and underwent quantitative sensory testing, including measures of heat and mechanical pain sensitivity. Results Blacks had significantly lower levels of vitamin D compared to whites, demonstrated greater clinical pain, and showed greater sensitivity to mechanical and heat pain. Low levels of vitamin D predicted increased experimental pain sensitivity, but did not predict self-reported clinical pain. Group differences in vitamin D significantly predicted group differences in heat pain and pressure pain thresholds on the index knee and ipsilateral forearm. Conclusion These data demonstrate race differences in experimental pain are mediated by differences in vitamin D level. Vitamin D deficiency may be a risk factor for increased knee osteoarthritic pain in black Americans. PMID:23135697

  3. IS PAIN IN ONE KNEE ASSOCIATED WITH ISOMETRIC MUSCLE STRENGTH IN THE CONTRALATERAL LIMB? - DATA FROM THE OSTEOARTHRITIS INITIATIVE (OAI)

    PubMed Central

    Steidle, E.; Wirth, W.; Glass, N.; Ruhdorfer, A.; Cotofana, S.; Eckstein, F.; Segal, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Knee pain and muscle weakness confer risk for knee osteoarthritis incidence and progression. The purpose of this study was to determine whether unilateral knee pain influences contralateral thigh muscle strength. Design Of 4796 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants, 224 (mean±SD age 63.9±8.9 years) cases could be matched to a control. Cases were defined as having unilateral knee pain (numerical rating scale (NRS)≥4/10; ≥infrequent pain) and one pain-free knee (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Controls were defined as having bilaterally pain-free knees (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Maximal isometric muscle strength [N] was compared between limbs in participants with unilateral pain (cases), and between pain-free limbs of cases and controls. Results Knee extensor/flexor strength in pain-free limbs of cases was lower than in bilaterally pain-free controls (−5.5%/–8.4%; p=0.043/p=0.022). Within cases, maximum extensor/flexor strength was significantly lower in the painful than in the pain-free limb (−6.4%/4.1%; p<0.0001/p=0.015). Conclusions These results suggest that strength in limbs without knee pain is associated with the pain status of the contralateral knee. The strength difference between unilateral pain-free cases and matched bilateral pain-free controls was similar to that between limbs in persons with unilateral knee pain. Lower strength due to contralateral knee pain might be centrally mediated. PMID:25768069

  4. Modifiable lifestyle factors are associated with lower pain levels in adults with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, A Erin; Tucker, Amy J; Kott, Laima S; Wright, Amanda J; Duncan, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With no cure or effective treatments for osteoarthritis (OA), the need to identify modifiable factors to decrease pain and increase physical function is well recognized. OBJECTIVE: To examine factors that characterize OA patients at different levels of pain, and to investigate the relationships among these factors and pain. METHODS: Details of OA characteristics and lifestyle factors were collected from interviews with healthy adults with knee OA (n=197). The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index was used to assess pain. Factors were summarized across three pain score categories, and χ2 and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to examine differences. Multiple linear regression analysis using a stepwise selection procedure was used to examine associations between lifestyle factors and pain. RESULTS: Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that pain was significantly higher with the use of OA medications and higher body mass index category, and significantly lower with the use of supplements and meeting physical activity guidelines (≥150 min/week). Stiffness and physical function scores, bilateral knee OA, body mass index category and OA medication use were significantly higher with increasing pain, whereas self-reported health, servings of fruit, supplement use and meeting physical activity guidelines significantly lower. No significant differences across pain categories were found for sex, age, number of diseases, duration of OA, ever smoked, alcoholic drinks/week, over-the-counter pain medication use, OA supplement use, physical therapy use, servings of vegetables or minutes walked/week. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy weight maintenance, exercise for at least 150 min/week and appropriate use of medications and supplements represent important modifiable factors related to lower knee OA pain. PMID:26125195

  5. Characterizing Pain Flares from the Perspective of Individuals with Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Susan; Lyden, Angela; Kratz, Anna; Fritz, Heather; Williams, David A.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Gammaitoni, Arnold R.; Phillips, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although pain in knee osteoarthritis (OA) commonly affects activity engagement, the daily pain experience has not been fully-characterized. Specifically, the nature and impact of pain flares is not well-understood. This study characterized pain flares, defined by participants with knee OA; pain flare occurrence and experience were measured over 7 days. Methods This was a multiple methods study; qualitative methods were dominant. Data were collected during the baseline portion of a randomized controlled trial. Participants met criteria for knee OA and had moderate to severe pain. They completed questionnaires and a 7-day home monitoring period that captured momentary symptom reports simultaneously with physical activity via accelerometry (N = 45). Participants also provided individual definitions of pain flare which were used throughout the home monitoring period to indicate whether a pain flare occurred. Results Pain flares were described most often by quality (often sharp), followed by timing (seconds-minutes), and by antecedents and consequences. When asked if their definition of a flare agreed with a supplied definition, 49% of the sample reported only “somewhat”, “a little” or “not at all”. Using individual definitions, 78% experienced at least one daily pain flare over the home monitoring period; 24% had a flare on over 50% of the monitored days. Conclusions Pain flares were common, fleeting, and often experienced in the context of activity engagement. Participants’ views on what constitutes a pain flare differ from commonly accepted definitions. Pain flares are an understudied aspect of the knee OA pain experience and require further characterization. PMID:25580697

  6. Knee pain and osteoarthritis in older adults: a review of community burden and current use of primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Peat, G; McCarney, R; Croft, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Osteoarthritis is the single most common cause of disability in older adults, and most patients with the condition will be managed in the community and primary care.
AIM—To discuss case definition of knee osteoarthritis for primary care and to summarise the burden of the condition in the community and related use of primary health care in the United Kingdom.
DESIGN—Narrative review.
METHOD—A literature search identified studies of incidence and prevalence of knee pain, disability, and radiographic osteoarthritis in the general population, and data related to primary care consultations. Findings from UK studies were summarised with reference to European and international studies.
RESULTS—During a one year period 25% of people over 55 years have a persistent episode of knee pain, of whom about one in six in the UK and the Netherlands consult their general practitioner about it in the same time period. The prevalence of painful disabling knee osteoarthritis in people over 55 years is 10%, of whom one quarter are severely disabled.
CONCLUSION—Knee osteoarthritis sufficiently severe to consider joint replacement represents a minority of all knee pain and disability suffered by older people. Healthcare provision in primary care needs to focus on this broader group to impact on community levels of pain and disability.

 PMID:11156538

  7. Exercise for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Baker, K; McAlindon, T

    2000-09-01

    Adverse outcomes in knee osteoarthritis include pain, loss of function, and disability. These outcomes can have devastating effects on the quality of life of those suffering from the disease. Treatments have generally targeted pain, assuming that disability would improve as a direct result of improvements in pain. However, there is evidence to suggest that determinants of pain and disability differ. In general, treatments have been more successful at decreasing pain rather than disability. Many of the factors that lead to disability can be improved with exercise. Exercise, both aerobic and strength training, have been examined as treatments for knee osteoarthritis, with considerable variability in the results. The variability between studies may be due to differences in study design, exercise protocols, and participants in the studies. Although there is variability among studies, it is notable that a majority of the studies had a positive effect on pain and or disability. The mechanism of exercise remains unclear and merits future studies to better define a concise, clear exercise protocol that may have the potential for a public health intervention.

  8. Cingulate GABA levels inversely correlate with the intensity of ongoing chronic knee osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    Reckziegel, Diane; Raschke, Felix; Cottam, William J

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate the role of the mid-anterior cingulate cortex γ-aminobutyric acid levels in chronic nociceptive pain. The molecular mechanisms of pain chronification are not well understood. In fibromyalgia, low mid-anterior cingulate cortex γ-aminobutyric acid was associated with high pain suggesting a role of prefrontal disinhibition. We hypothesize that mid-anterior cingulate cortex GABAergic disinhibition may underpin chronic pain independent of the pain etiology and comorbid negative affect. Proton magnetic resonance spectra were acquired at 3T from the mid-anterior cingulate cortex in 20 patients with chronic painful knee osteoarthritis, and 19 healthy pain-free individuals using a point resolved spectroscopy sequence optimized for detection of γ-aminobutyric acid. Participants underwent questionnaires for negative affect (depression and anxiety) and psychophysical pain phenotyping. Results No differences in mid-anterior cingulate cortex γ-aminobutyric acid or other metabolite levels were detected between groups. Ratings of perceived intensity of ongoing osteoarthritis pain were inversely correlated with γ-aminobutyric acid (r = −0.758, p < 0.001), but no correlations were seen for negative affect or pain thresholds. The pain γ-aminobutyric acid interrelation remained strong when controlling for depression (r = −0.820, p < 0.001). Combined levels of glutamine and glutamate were unrelated to psychometric or to pain thresholds. Conclusion Our study supports mid-anterior cingulate cortex γ-aminobutyric acid as a potential marker of pain severity in chronic nociceptive pain states independent of negative affect. The findings suggest that GABAergic disinhibition of the salience network may underlie sensitization to averse stimuli as a mechanism contributing to pain chronification. PMID:27206661

  9. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization as a Treatment for Medial Knee Pain in Patients with Mild to Moderate Osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Okuno, Yuji; Korchi, Amine Mohamed; Shinjo, Takuma; Kato, Shojiro

    2015-04-15

    PurposeOsteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability. Mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis that is resistant to nonsurgical options and not severe enough to warrant joint replacement represents a challenge in its management. On the basis of the hypothesis that neovessels and accompanying nerves are possible sources of pain, previous work demonstrated that transcatheter arterial embolization for chronic painful conditions resulted in excellent pain relief. We hypothesized that transcatheter arterial embolization can relieve pain associated with knee osteoarthritis.MethodsTranscatheter arterial embolization for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis using imipenem/cilastatin sodium or 75 μm calibrated Embozene microspheres as an embolic agent has been performed in 11 and three patients, respectively. We assessed adverse events and changes in Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores.ResultsAbnormal neovessels were identified within soft tissue surrounding knee joint in all cases by arteriography. No major adverse events were related to the procedures. Transcatheter arterial embolization rapidly improved WOMAC pain scores from 12.2 ± 1.9 to 3.3 ± 2.1 at 1 month after the procedure, with further improvement at 4 months (1.7 ± 2.2) and WOMAC total scores from 47.3 ± 5.8 to 11.6 ± 5.4 at 1 month, and to 6.3 ± 6.0 at 4 months. These improvements were maintained in most cases at the final follow-up examination at a mean of 12 ± 5 months (range 4–19 months).ConclusionTranscatheter arterial embolization for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis was feasible, rapidly relieved resistant pain, and restored knee function.

  10. Effectiveness of exercise interventions in reducing pain symptoms among older adults with knee osteoarthritis: a review.

    PubMed

    Focht, Brian C

    2006-04-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) affects approximately one third of older adults in the United States. The pain accompanying its progression reduces quality of life and leads to activity restriction and physical disability. Evidence suggests that exercise represents a promising treatment for pain among older knee-OA patients. The article provides an overview of the extant research examining the effectiveness of exercise interventions in reducing pain symptoms among older adults with knee OA. Critical evaluation of the literature reveals that aerobic training, strength training, and combination aerobic and strength training result in improvements in pain. The magnitude of pain reduction accompanying exercise interventions varies considerably across studies, however. In addition, most trials have focused on short-term (<6 months) interventions, and the limited number of long-term (>6 months) trials have been plagued by high attrition and poor postintervention maintenance of treatment effects. Given the variability in the effectiveness of exercise interventions, future research is necessary to determine the individual differences that influence older OA patients' responsiveness to exercise interventions and identify more efficacious strategies for promoting the maintenance of long-term exercise.

  11. Sleep, pain catastrophizing and central sensitization in knee osteoarthritis patients with and without insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Claudia M.; Buenaver, Luis F.; Finan, Patrick; Bounds, Sara C.; Redding, Mary; McCauley, Lea; Robinson, Mercedes; Edwards, Robert R.; Smith, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Osteoarthritis, a chronic degenerative joint disorder, is characterized by joint pain. Emerging research demonstrates that a significant number of patients evidence central sensitization (CS), a hyper-excitability in nociceptive pathways, which is known to amplify and maintain clinical pain. The clinical correlates of CS in OA, however, are poorly understood. Insomnia is prevalent in older adults with OA and recent experiments suggest associations between poor sleep and measures of CS. Catastrophizing, a potent predictor of pain outcomes has also been associated with CS, but few studies have investigated possible interactions between catastrophizing, sleep and CS. Methods: We conducted a case controlled study of 4 well characterized groups of adults with insomnia and/or knee osteoarthritis. A total of 208 participants completed multimodal sleep assessments (questionnaire, diary, actigraphy, polysmnography) and extensive evaluation of pain using clinical measures and quantitative sensory testing to evaluate associations between CS, catastrophizing and insomnia. Descriptive characterization of each measure is presented, with specific focus on sleep efficiency and CS. Results: The KOA-Insomnia group demonstrated the greatest degree of CS compared to controls. In the overall sample, we found that catastrophizing moderated the relationship between sleep efficiency and CS. Specifically those with low sleep efficiency and high catastrophizing scores reported increased levels of CS. In addition, CS was significantly associated with increased clinical pain. Conclusions: These findings highlight the importance of assessing sleep efficiency, CS and catastrophizing in chronic pain patients and have important clinical implications for treatment planning. PMID:26041510

  12. Six-week gait retraining program reduces knee adduction moment, reduces pain, and improves function for individuals with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Shull, Pete B; Silder, Amy; Shultz, Rebecca; Dragoo, Jason L; Besier, Thor F; Delp, Scott L; Cutkosky, Mark R

    2013-07-01

    This study examined the influence of a 6-week gait retraining program on the knee adduction moment (KAM) and knee pain and function. Ten subjects with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee pain participated in weekly gait retraining sessions over 6 weeks. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores and a 10-point visual-analog pain scale score were measured at baseline, post-training (end of 6 weeks), and 1 month after training ended. Gait retraining reduced the first peak KAM by 20% (p < 0.01) post-training as a result of a 7° decrease in foot progression angle (i.e., increased internal foot rotation), compared to baseline (p < 0.01). WOMAC pain and function scores were improved at post-training by 29% and 32%, respectively (p < 0.05) and visual-analog pain scale scores improved by two points (p < 0.05). Changes in WOMAC pain and function were approximately 75% larger than the expected placebo effect (p < 0.05). Changes in KAM, foot progression angle, WOMAC pain and function, and visual-analog pain score were retained 1 month after the end of the 6-week training period (p < 0.05). These results show that a 6-week gait retraining program can reduce the KAM and improve symptoms for individuals with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis and knee pain.

  13. Correlation among Radiographic, Arthroscopic and Pain Criteria for the Diagnosis of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bedarakota, Dhanraj; Vidyasagar, JVS; Rapur, Sivaprasad; Karra, Madhulatha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common degenerative joint disorder leading to functional impairment and dependency in older adults. Early detection and intervention is of paramount importance in decreasing the morbidity. Radiography is the first investigation of choice for OA patients presenting with knee pain. But, there is a high degree of discordance between clinical and radiographic findings. Arthroscopy aids in accurate diagnosis of OA knee. Aim In view of the conflicting reports in the literature the present study was undertaken to report the correlation among radiographic, arthroscopic and pain findings in knee OA patients to facilitate early and precise diagnosis. Materials and Methods Twenty eight cases (14 males and 14 females) of primary OA knee (7 each from radiographic grade 1 to 4) were screened and selected for the study. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients (Rho/r estimate) were calculated to determine the relationship between pain, radiographic and arthroscopic grades in patients with knee OA. Results Among 28 patients, 10.71% had grade 1, 14.28% had grade 2, 25% had grade 3 and 50% had grade 4 arthroscopic findings. Overall Spearman’s correlation coefficient (r) for radiographic and arthroscopic grades was 0.8077, 0.8212 for radiographic and pain grades and 0.7634 for arthroscopic and pain grades. Correlation coefficient could not be calculated for individual grades in isolation which would otherwise represent the factual correlation. The Mean arthroscopic grade for radiographic grades 1 to 4 were 1.57, 3.42, 3.57,4.0 respectively and the Mean pain grades for radiographic grades 1 to 4 were1.57, 2.57,3.28, 3.57 respectively. Radiological findings were found to lag behind the arthroscopic findings significantly. Conclusion Arthroscopic findings represent the exact extent and degree of the pathology of OA knee. Kellgren-Lawrence grading read with conventional Antero-posterior standing radiographs of knee underscores the

  14. Traditional Chinese Medications for Knee Osteoarthritis Pain: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Zhan, Hongsheng; Marszalek, Jolanta; Chung, Mei; Lin, Xun; Zhang, Min; Pang, Jian; Wang, Chenchen

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medication (TCM) has analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). We conducted the first systematic review of the best quantitative and qualitative evidence currently available in order to evaluate the effectiveness of TCM in relieving pain in knee OA. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using three English and four Chinese biomedical databases from their inception through March 1, 2015. We included randomized controlled trials of TCM for knee OA with intervention durations of at least two weeks. The effects of TCM on pain and other clinical symptoms were measured with the visual analog scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). The total effectiveness rate, which was used to assess overall pain, physical performance and wellness, was also measured. Two researchers independently extracted data on study design, population characteristics, duration, intervention, outcomes, risk of bias, and primary results. We performed a random-effects meta-analysis when appropriate. We also explored factors that could explain the heterogeneity by conducting subgroup and meta-regression analyses. Twenty-three studies, totaling 2362 subjects, met the eligibility criteria. Treatments were formulated with an average of 8 Chinese herbs and were prescribed based on the traditional Chinese diagnostic method of syndrome differentiation. The mean treatment duration was seven weeks, with oral administration occurring one to three times a day. Compared with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and intra-articular hyaluronate injections, 18 of the studies showed significantly improved VAS pain scores (Mean Difference [MD] [Formula: see text] 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.94; [Formula: see text]), six of the studies showed significantly improved WOMAC pain subscale scores (MD [Formula: see text] 2.23; 95% CI, 0.56 to 3.91; [Formula: see text]), and 16 of the trials

  15. Traditional Chinese Medications for Knee Osteoarthritis Pain: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Zhan, Hongsheng; Marszalek, Jolanta; Chung, Mei; Lin, Xun; Zhang, Min; Pang, Jian; Wang, Chenchen

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medication (TCM) has analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). We conducted the first systematic review of the best quantitative and qualitative evidence currently available in order to evaluate the effectiveness of TCM in relieving pain in knee OA. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using three English and four Chinese biomedical databases from their inception through March 1, 2015. We included randomized controlled trials of TCM for knee OA with intervention durations of at least two weeks. The effects of TCM on pain and other clinical symptoms were measured with the visual analog scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). The total effectiveness rate, which was used to assess overall pain, physical performance and wellness, was also measured. Two researchers independently extracted data on study design, population characteristics, duration, intervention, outcomes, risk of bias, and primary results. We performed a random-effects meta-analysis when appropriate. We also explored factors that could explain the heterogeneity by conducting subgroup and meta-regression analyses. Twenty-three studies, totaling 2362 subjects, met the eligibility criteria. Treatments were formulated with an average of 8 Chinese herbs and were prescribed based on the traditional Chinese diagnostic method of syndrome differentiation. The mean treatment duration was seven weeks, with oral administration occurring one to three times a day. Compared with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and intra-articular hyaluronate injections, 18 of the studies showed significantly improved VAS pain scores (Mean Difference [MD] [Formula: see text] 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.94; [Formula: see text]), six of the studies showed significantly improved WOMAC pain subscale scores (MD [Formula: see text] 2.23; 95% CI, 0.56 to 3.91; [Formula: see text]), and 16 of the trials

  16. Unique aspects of pain reduction in osteoarthritis of the knee with LMWF-5A

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee (OAK) is a common form of arthritis that can lead to substantial pain and disability. This commentary highlights key aspects of the recently published phase 3 A Efficacy and Safety Study of Two Doses of Intra-Articular Injection of Ampion™ in Adults With Pain Due to Osteoarthritis of the Knee (SPRING) study. SPRING (NCT01839331) was a multicenter, randomized, vehicle-controlled, double-blind trial that evaluated the safety and efficacy of the low-molecular-weight fraction of 5% human serum albumin (LMWF-5A) for treatment of pain, measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) pain scale, in patients with symptomatic OAK (N=329). Patients in this study reflected many characteristics of “real-world” individuals with OAK, with a broad range of disease severity and disability. The most important finding from this study was that treatment with a single intra-articular injection of LMWF-5A led to significant pain reduction in the patients with objective radiographic evidence of severe disease and joint deterioration (Kellgren-Lawrence grade 3; P=0.04 and Kellgren-Lawrence grade 4; P=0.02). The magnitude of pain reduction in the entire cohort treated with LMWF-5A was 42% from baseline and the treatment effect compared with vehicle control (estimated difference in WOMAC pain, −0.25; P=0.004) was also notable, especially relative to a previously reported study of hyaluronic acid, in which only a marginally significant treatment effect was observed (mean difference in WOMAC pain compared with control, −0.15; P=0.047). Significant improvement in physical function observed with LMWF-5A (P=0.04) was also noted and suggests that LMWF-5A may provide therapeutic benefit for those who are limited in the activities of daily living. Intra-articular injection of LMWF-5A was well tolerated, and the adverse event profile was similar to that of control. These results demonstrate significant benefit of LMWF-5A for

  17. Knee Pain and a Prior Injury Are Associated With Increased Risk of a New Knee Injury: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Driban, Jeffrey B.; Lo, Grace H.; Eaton, Charles B.; Price, Lori Lyn; Lu, Bing; McAlindon, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We explored if knee pain or a history of knee injury was associated with a knee injury in the following 12 months. Methods We conducted longitudinal knee-based analyses among knees in the Osteoarthritis Initiative. We included both knees of all participants who had at least one follow-up visit with complete data. Our first sets of exposures were knee pain (chronic knee symptoms and severity) at baseline, 12-month, 24-month, and 36-month visits. Another exposure was a history of injury, which we defined as a self-reported injury at any time prior to baseline, 12-month, 24-month, or 36-month visits. The outcome was self-reported knee injury during the past year at 12-month, 24-month, 36-month, and 48-month visits. We evaluated the association between ipsilateral and contralateral knee pain or history of injury and a new knee injury within 12 months of the exposure using generalized linear mixed model for repeated binary outcomes. Results A knee with reported chronic knee symptoms or ipsilateral or contralateral history of an injury was more likely to experience a new knee injury in the following 12 months than a knee without chronic knee symptoms (odds ratio [OR]=1.84, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.57, 2.16) or prior injury (prior ipsilateral knee injury OR=1.81, 95% CI=1.56, 2.09; prior contralateral knee injury OR=1.43, 95% CI=1.23, 1.66). Conclusion Knee pain and a history of injury are associated with new knee injuries. It may be beneficial for individuals with knee pain or a history of injury to participate in injury prevention programs. PMID:26034152

  18. Sensitivity to Change of Patient‐Preference Measures for Pain in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis: Data From Two Trials

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Michael J.; O'Neill, Terence W.; Forsythe, Laura M.; Lunt, Mark; Felson, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective In osteoarthritis (OA) clinical trials, a pain measure that is most sensitive to change is considered optimal. We compared sensitivity to change of patient‐reported pain outcomes, including a patient‐preference measure (where the patient nominates an activity that aggravates their pain). Methods We used data from 2 trials of patients with confirmed (American College of Rheumatology criteria) knee OA: a trial of brace treatment for patellofemoral OA, and a trial of intraarticular steroids in knee OA. Both trials reported an improvement in pain following treatment. Participants rated pain on a 100‐mm visual analog scale (VAS), in the activity that caused them the most knee pain (VASNA), as well as completing questions on overall knee pain and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were also calculated from the KOOS. Standardized changes in each outcome were generated between treatment and control after 6 weeks intervention in the BRACE trial, and 1–2 weeks following intervention in the steroid trial. Results The VASNA produced standardized changes following treatment that were at least as large as other pain outcomes. In the BRACE trial, the between‐groups standardized change with the VASNA was −0.63, compared with the KOOS pain subscale change of −0.33, and pain in the last week VAS change of −0.56. In the steroid study, within‐group change following treatment in the VASNA was −0.60, compared to the last week VAS change of −0.51, and KOOS pain subscale change of −0.58. Conclusion Pain on nominated activity appears to be at least as, and in some cases more, sensitive to change than the KOOS/WOMAC questionnaire. PMID:26713415

  19. Effect of Isometric Quadriceps Exercise on Muscle Strength, Pain, and Function in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to investigate the effects of isometric quadriceps exercise on muscle strength, pain, and function in knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Outpatients (N=42, 21 per group; age range 40–65 years; 13 men and 29 women) with osteoarthritis of the knee participated in the study. The experimental group performed isometric exercises including isometric quadriceps, straight leg raising, and isometric hip adduction exercise 5 days a week for 5 weeks, whereas the control group did not performed any exercise program. The outcome measures or dependent variables selected for this study were pain intensity, isometric quadriceps strength, and knee function. These variables were measured using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), strength gauge device, and reduced WOMAC index, respectively. All the measurements were taken at baseline (week 0) and at the end of the trial at week 5. [Results] In between-group comparisons, the maximum isometric quadriceps strength, reduction in pain intensity, and improvement in function in the isometric exercise group at the end of the 5th week were significantly greater than those of the control group (p<0.05). [Conclusion] The 5-week isometric quadriceps exercise program showed beneficial effects on quadriceps muscle strength, pain, and functional disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. PMID:24926143

  20. Physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Page, Carolyn J; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-05-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic joint disease causing pain and disability. Physiotherapy, which encompasses a number of modalities, is a non-invasive treatment option in the management of OA. This review summarizes the evidence for commonly used physiotherapy interventions. There is strong evidence to show short-term beneficial effects of exercise on pain and function, although the type of exercise does not seem to influence treatment outcome. Delivery modes, including individual, group or home exercise are all effective, although therapist contact may improve benefits. Attention to improving adherence to exercise is needed to maximize outcomes in the longer-term. Knee taping applied with the aim of realigning the patella and unloading soft tissues can reduce pain. There is also evidence to support the use of knee braces in people with knee OA. Biomechanical studies show that lateral wedge shoe insoles reduce knee load but clinical trials do not support symptomatic benefits. Recent studies suggest individual shoe characteristics also affect knee load and there is current interest in the effect of modified shoe designs. Manual therapy, while not to be used as a stand-alone treatment, may be beneficial. In summary, although the research is not equivocal, there is sufficient evidence to indicate that physiotherapy interventions can reduce pain and improve function in those with knee OA.

  1. Knee pain during activities of daily living and its relationship with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fukutani, Naoto; Iijima, Hirotaka; Aoyama, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Yuko; Hiraoka, Masakazu; Miyanobu, Kazuyuki; Jinnouchi, Masashi; Kaneda, Eishi; Tsuboyama, Tadao; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether knee pain during various activities of daily living (ADLs) is associated with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that the painful ADLs associated with decreased physical activity differ according to disease severity. This cross-sectional study enrolled 270 patients with medial knee OA, assigned to either the early (Kellgren Lawrence [K/L] grade 1-2) or the severe group (K/L grade 3-4). Physical activity was assessed using a pedometer. Knee pain during six ADLs (waking up in the morning, walking on a flat surface, ascending stairs, etc.) was evaluated using a questionnaire. We performed multiple regression and quantile regression analysis to investigate whether knee pain during each ADL was associated with physical activity. In the early group, the more knee pain they experienced while ascending stairs, the lower their physical activity was (75th regression coefficient = -1033.70, P = 0.018). In the severe group, the more knee pain they experienced while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up, the lower their physical activity was (unstandardized coefficients = -1850.87, P = 0.026; unstandardized coefficients = -2640.35, P = 0.010). Knee pain while ascending stairs and while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up was a probable limiting factor for physical activity in early and severe knee OA, respectively. These findings suggested that a reduction in task-specific knee pain according to disease severity could improve physical activity levels. PMID:27041381

  2. Knee pain during activities of daily living and its relationship with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fukutani, Naoto; Iijima, Hirotaka; Aoyama, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Yuko; Hiraoka, Masakazu; Miyanobu, Kazuyuki; Jinnouchi, Masashi; Kaneda, Eishi; Tsuboyama, Tadao; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether knee pain during various activities of daily living (ADLs) is associated with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that the painful ADLs associated with decreased physical activity differ according to disease severity. This cross-sectional study enrolled 270 patients with medial knee OA, assigned to either the early (Kellgren Lawrence [K/L] grade 1-2) or the severe group (K/L grade 3-4). Physical activity was assessed using a pedometer. Knee pain during six ADLs (waking up in the morning, walking on a flat surface, ascending stairs, etc.) was evaluated using a questionnaire. We performed multiple regression and quantile regression analysis to investigate whether knee pain during each ADL was associated with physical activity. In the early group, the more knee pain they experienced while ascending stairs, the lower their physical activity was (75th regression coefficient = -1033.70, P = 0.018). In the severe group, the more knee pain they experienced while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up, the lower their physical activity was (unstandardized coefficients = -1850.87, P = 0.026; unstandardized coefficients = -2640.35, P = 0.010). Knee pain while ascending stairs and while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up was a probable limiting factor for physical activity in early and severe knee OA, respectively. These findings suggested that a reduction in task-specific knee pain according to disease severity could improve physical activity levels.

  3. The effects of various physical non-operative modalities on the pain in osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Cherian, J J; Jauregui, J J; Leichliter, A K; Elmallah, R K; Bhave, A; Mont, M A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various non-operative modalities of treatment (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS); neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES); insoles and bracing) on the pain of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. We conducted a systematic review according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines to identify the therapeutic options which are commonly adopted for the management of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. The outcome measurement tools used in the different studies were the visual analogue scale and The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index pain index: all pain scores were converted to a 100-point scale. A total of 30 studies met our inclusion criteria: 13 on insoles, seven on TENS, six on NMES, and four on bracing. The standardised mean difference (SMD) in pain after treatment with TENS was 1.796, which represented a significant reduction in pain. The significant overall effect estimate for NMES on pain was similar to that of TENS, with a SMD of 1.924. The overall effect estimate of insoles on pain was a SMD of 0.992. The overall effect of bracing showed a significant reduction in pain of 1.34. Overall, all four non-operative modalities of treatment were found to have a significant effect on the reduction of pain in OA of the knee. This study shows that non-operative physical modalities of treatment are of benefit when treating OA of the knee. However, much of the literature reviewed evaluates studies with follow-up of less than six months: future work should aim to evaluate patients with longer follow-up.

  4. Anterior knee pain in younger adults as a precursor to subsequent patellofemoral osteoarthritis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA) is a common form of knee OA in middle and older age, but its relation to PF disorders and symptoms earlier in life is unclear. Our aim was to conduct a systematic review to investigate the strength of evidence for an association between anterior knee pain (AKP) in younger adults and subsequent PFOA. Methods The search strategy included electronic databases (Pubmed, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane, PEDro, SportDiscus: inception to December 2009), reference lists of potentially eligible studies and selected reviews. Full text articles in any language, - identified via English titles and abstracts, were included if they were retrospective or prospective in design and contained quantitative data regarding structural changes indicative of PFOA, incident to original idiopathic AKP. Eligibility criteria were applied to titles, abstracts and full-texts by two independent reviewers. Data extraction included study location, design, date, sampling procedure, sample characteristics, AKP/PFOA definitions, follow-up duration and rate, and main findings. Foreign language articles were translated into English prior to examination. Results Seven articles satisfied eligibility (5 English, 2 German). Only one case-control study directly investigated a link between PFOA and prior AKP, providing level 3b evidence in favour of an association (OR 4.4; 95%CI 1.8, 10.6). Rough estimates of the annual risk of PFOA from the remaining six small, uncontrolled, observational studies (mean follow-up range: 5.7 to 23 years) ranged from 0% to 3.4%. This was not the primary aim of these studies, and limitations in design and methodology mean this data should be interpreted with caution. Conclusions There is a paucity of high-quality evidence reporting a link between AKP and PFOA. Further, well-designed cohort studies may be able to fill this evidence gap. PMID:20828401

  5. Predicting Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Woodhouse, Francis G; Besier, Thor F; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Lloyd, David G; Zhang, Lihai; Smith, David W

    2016-01-01

    Treatment options for osteoarthritis (OA) beyond pain relief or total knee replacement are very limited. Because of this, attention has shifted to identifying which factors increase the risk of OA in vulnerable populations in order to be able to give recommendations to delay disease onset or to slow disease progression. The gold standard is then to use principles of risk management, first to provide subject-specific estimates of risk and then to find ways of reducing that risk. Population studies of OA risk based on statistical associations do not provide such individually tailored information. Here we argue that mechanistic models of cartilage tissue maintenance and damage coupled to statistical models incorporating model uncertainty, united within the framework of structural reliability analysis, provide an avenue for bridging the disciplines of epidemiology, cell biology, genetics and biomechanics. Such models promise subject-specific OA risk assessment and personalized strategies for mitigating or even avoiding OA. We illustrate the proposed approach with a simple model of cartilage extracellular matrix synthesis and loss regulated by daily physical activity. PMID:26206679

  6. Acupuncture and other physical treatments for the relief of pain due to osteoarthritis of the knee: network meta-analysis☆

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, M.S.; Rice, S.J.C.; Madurasinghe, V.; Slack, R.; Fayter, D.A.; Harden, M.; Sutton, A.J.; MacPherson, H.; Woolacott, N.F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective To compare the effectiveness of acupuncture with other relevant physical treatments for alleviating pain due to knee osteoarthritis. Design Systematic review with network meta-analysis, to allow comparison of treatments within a coherent framework. Comprehensive searches were undertaken up to January 2013 to identify randomised controlled trials in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, which reported pain. Results Of 156 eligible studies, 114 trials (covering 22 treatments and 9,709 patients) provided data suitable for analysis. Most trials studied short-term effects and many were classed as being of poor quality with high risk of bias, commonly associated with lack of blinding (which was sometimes impossible to achieve). End of treatment results showed that eight interventions: interferential therapy, acupuncture, TENS, pulsed electrical stimulation, balneotherapy, aerobic exercise, sham acupuncture, and muscle-strengthening exercise produced a statistically significant reduction in pain when compared with standard care. In a sensitivity analysis of satisfactory and good quality studies, most studies were of acupuncture (11 trials) or muscle-strengthening exercise (9 trials); both interventions were statistically significantly better than standard care, with acupuncture being statistically significantly better than muscle-strengthening exercise (standardised mean difference: 0.49, 95% credible interval 0.00–0.98). Conclusions As a summary of the current available research, the network meta-analysis results indicate that acupuncture can be considered as one of the more effective physical treatments for alleviating osteoarthritis knee pain in the short-term. However, much of the evidence in this area of research is of poor quality, meaning there is uncertainty about the efficacy of many physical treatments. PMID:23973143

  7. How do people with knee osteoarthritis use osteoarthritis pain medications and does this change over time? Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this analysis was to describe comprehensively the cross-sectional and longitudinal patterns of analgesic and nutraceutical medication use for knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a contemporary US cohort and to investigate associated demographic and clinical factors. Methods Baseline, 12, 24 and 36 month data were obtained retrospectively from the National Institutes of Health Osteoarthritis Initiative. Participants had symptomatic radiographic knee OA. Multiple binary logistic regression models identified characteristics independently associated with the use of analgesics or nutraceuticals. Results We included 987 subjects (55.9% female, mean age 61.5 years, 71.0% white). At baseline, 68.2% reported frequent use of a conventional analgesic or nutraceutical for joint pain (for more than half of the previous month). Non-prescription non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were the most frequently reported medications (26.8%), even in those more than 75-years old. Multiple conventional analgesics were used by 11.9%. Frequent analgesic use was more likely in women (odds ratio (OR) 1.8 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3 to 2.3)) and people with more pain (moderate 1.7 (1.2 to 2.4); severe 3.1 (2.1 to 4.7)); nutraceutical use was less likely in non-whites (0.4 (0.3 to 0.6)), those more than 74-years old (0.6 (0.3 to 0.9)) and those with comorbidities (0.6 (0.5 to 0.9)) and more likely in people with Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade 4 (2.2 (1.5 to 3.3)). Overall there was no change in the proportion of participants frequently using prescription or over the counter (OTC) analgesics at 36 months, although most people had changed medication type; of those using a traditional analgesic at baseline approximately one third were still using the same type at 36 months (ranging from 26.2% of baseline prescription NSAID users to 40.6% of baseline acetaminophen users). All participants reporting baseline analgesic use also reported 36 month analgesic use. Female

  8. Identifying specific profiles in patients with different degrees of painful knee osteoarthritis based on serological biochemical and mechanistic pain biomarkers: a diagnostic approach based on cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Eskehave, Thomas Navndrup; Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Hoeck, Hans Christian; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical and pain biomarkers can be applied to patients with painful osteoarthritis profiles and may provide more details compared with conventional clinical tools. The aim of this study was to identify an optimal combination of biochemical and pain biomarkers for classification of patients with different degrees of knee pain and joint damage. Such profiling may provide new diagnostic and therapeutic options. A total of 216 patients with different degrees of knee pain (maximal pain during the last 24 hours rated on a visual analog scale [VAS]) (VAS 0-100) and 64 controls (VAS 0-9) were recruited. Patients were separated into 3 groups: VAS 10 to 39 (N = 81), VAS 40 to 69 (N = 70), and VAS 70 to 100 (N = 65). Pressure pain thresholds, temporal summation to pressure stimuli, and conditioning pain modulation were measured from the peripatellar and extrasegmental sites. Biochemical markers indicative for autoinflammation and immunity (VICM, CRP, and CRPM), synovial inflammation (CIIIM), cartilage loss (CIIM), and bone degradation (CIM) were analyzed. WOMAC, Lequesne, and pain catastrophizing scores were collected. Principal component analysis was applied to select the optimal variable subset, and cluster analysis was applied to this subset to create distinctly different knee pain profiles. Four distinct knee pain profiles were identified: profile A (N = 27), profile B (N = 59), profile C (N = 85), and profile D (N = 41). Each knee pain profile had a unique combination of biochemical markers, pain biomarkers, physical impairments, and psychological factors that may provide the basis for mechanism-based diagnosis, individualized treatment, and selection of patients for clinical trials evaluating analgesic compounds. These results introduce a new profiling for knee OA and should be regarded as preliminary.

  9. Early knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Favero, Marta; Ramonda, Roberta; Goldring, Mary B; Goldring, Steven R; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Concepts regarding osteoarthritis, the most common joint disease, have dramatically changed in the past decade thanks to the development of new imaging techniques and the widespread use of arthroscopy that permits direct visualisation of intra-articular tissues and structure. MRI and ultrasound allow the early detection of pre-radiographic structural changes not only in the peri-articular bone but also in the cartilage, menisci, synovial membrane, ligaments and fat pad. The significance of MRI findings such as cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions, synovial inflammation/effusions and meniscal tears in patients without radiographic signs of osteoarthritis is not fully understood. Nevertheless, early joint tissue changes are associated with symptoms and, in some cases, with progression of disease. In this short review, we discuss the emerging concept of early osteoarthritis localised to the knee based on recently updated knowledge. We highlight the need for a new definition of early osteoarthritis that will permit the identification of patients at high risk of osteoarthritis progression and to initiate early treatment interventions. PMID:26557380

  10. Resistance Exercise for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Kevin R.; Vincent, Heather K.

    2013-01-01

    The initiation, progression, and severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA) has been associated with decreased muscular strength and alterations in joint biomechanics. Chronic OA pain may lead to anxiety, depression, fear of movement, and poor psychological outlook. The fear of movement may prevent participation in exercise and social events which could lead to further physical and social isolation. Resistance exercise (RX) has been shown to be an effective intervention both for decreasing pain and for improving physical function and self-efficacy. RX may restore muscle strength and joint mechanics while improving physical function. RX may also normalize muscle firing patterns and joint biomechanics leading to reductions in joint pain and cartilage degradation. These physical adaptations could lead to improved self-efficacy and decreased anxiety and depression. RX can be prescribed and performed by patients across the OA severity spectrum. When designing and implementing an RX program for a patient with knee OA, it is important to consider both the degree of OA severity as well as the level of pain. RX, either in the home or at a fitness facility, is an important component of a comprehensive regimen designed to offset the physical and psychological limitations associated with knee OA. Unique considerations for this population include: 1) monitoring pain during and after exercise, 2) providing days of rest when disease flares occur, and 3) infusing variety into the exercise regimen to encourage adherence. PMID:22632702

  11. Treating Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... osteotomy may need knee replacement surgery in the future. Arthroplasty is also called joint or knee replacement therapy. A surgeon removes the part of the knee damaged by osteoarthritis and replaces it with an artificial joint made from metals and plastic. All or part of the knee joint may ...

  12. The Effects of Yoga on Pain, Mobility, and Quality of Life in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiaqi; Yang, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To systematically assess the effects of yoga on pain, mobility, and quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods. Pubmed, Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), and other sources were searched systematically in this study. Two reviewers identified eligible studies and extracted data independently. Downs and Black's Quality Index were used to evaluate the methodological quality of the included studies. Results. A total of 9 articles (6 studies) involving 372 patients with knee osteoarthritis met the inclusion criteria. The most common yoga protocol is 40~90 minutes/session, lasting for at least 8 weeks. The effect of yoga on pain relief and function improvement could be seen after two-week intervention. Conclusion. This systematic review showed that yoga might have positive effects in relieving pain and mobility on patients with KOA, but the effects on quality of life (QOL) are unclear. Besides, more outcome measure related to mental health of yoga effects on people with KOA should be conducted. PMID:27777597

  13. Safety and efficacy of Curcuma longa extract in the treatment of painful knee osteoarthritis: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Madhu, K; Chanda, K; Saji, M J

    2013-04-01

    Curcuma longa Linn. is widely used for the treatment of disorders associated with inflammation and was evaluated for its safety and efficacy in the treatment of painful knee osteoarthritis (OA). This was a randomized, single blind, placebo-controlled trial. Total of 120 patients (37 males and 83 females) with primary knee OA received either placebo (400 mg twice daily) or NR-INF-02 (500 mg twice daily) or glucosamine sulphate (GS) (750 mg twice daily) alone or combination of NR-INF-02 and GS for 42 days. The efficacy was assessed during treatment period, on day 21 and day 42. The decrease in severity of pain symptom and function of affected knee as primary efficacy outcome measure was assessed by Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scale, respectively. The clinical examination of affected joint was measured by an orthopaedic specialist and using a Clinician Global Impression Change (CGIC) scale. The analysis of post-treatment scores following administration of NR-INF-02 using VAS, WOMAC, and CGIC at each clinical visit showed significant decrease (p < 0.05) compared to placebo. NR-INF-02 treated group showed a significant (p < 0.01) decrease in use of rescue medication, along with clinical and subjective improvement compared to placebo. The tolerability and acceptability profile of NR-INF-02 was better during the trial period. The study demonstrates safety and efficacy of NR-INF-02 as a useful treatment option for patients with primary painful knee OA. PMID:23242572

  14. Mixture of Arnebia euchroma and Matricaria chamomilla (Marhame-Mafasel) for pain relief of osteoarthritis of the knee – a two-treatment, two-period crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Soltanian, Ali Reza; Mehdibarzi, Dariush; Naseri, Mohsen; Gerami, Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent chronic non-infective joint arthritis. Because of its chronic disease nature, local drugs are preferred due to lower complications. In the present study, the new herbal pomade Marhame-Mafasel for knee osteoarthritis was used in a double-blind crossover trial. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of Marhame-Mafasel pomade, which consists of several medical herbs including Arnebia euchroma and Matricaria chamomilla, in osteoarthritis of the knee. Material and methods This study was a placebo-controlled double-blind crossover trial. Forty-two patients with pain associated with osteoarthritis of the knee (diagnosed by criteria of the European League against Rheumatism and physical examination) were drawn from patients attending the Clinic of Mostafa-Khomeini Hospital. In this study we assessed efficacy (analgesic effect and improved function) of herbal pomade Marhame-Mafasel, which was used locally in patients with primary osteoarthritis of the knee over three weeks. The instrument of the study was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) LK3.1 standard questionnaires. Results The participants in each group were 21 patients; 30 (71.4%) were women and 12 (28.6%) of them were men. The participants were between 40 and 76 years old. Six patients had mild arthritis, 15 had moderate arthritis and 21 had severe arthritis. The positive analgesic effect of the herbal pomade Marhame-Mafasel in primary knee osteoarthritis was proven. The herbal joint pomade Marhame-Mafasel had a significantly greater mean change in score compared to the placebo group for osteoarthritis severity (p < 0.05). Conclusions Herbal pomade Marhame-Mafasel in comparison to placebo has more effect on reduction of pain of primary knee osteoarthritis. PMID:22427772

  15. Web-Based Study of Risk Factors for Pain Exacerbation in Osteoarthritis of the Knee (SPARK-Web): Design and Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Ben; Zhang, Yuqing; Bennell, Kim; March, Lyn; Hunter, David J

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent cause of limited mobility and diminished quality of life. Pain is the main symptom that drives individuals with knee OA to seek medical care and a recognized antecedent to disability and eventually joint replacement. Many persons with symptomatic knee OA experience recurrent pain exacerbations. Knowledge and clarification of risk factors for pain exacerbation may allow those affected to minimize reoccurrence of these episodes. Objective The aim of this study is to use a Web-based case-crossover design to identify risk factors for knee pain exacerbations in persons with symptomatic knee OA. Methods Web-based case-crossover design is used to study persons with symptomatic knee OA. Participants with knee pain and radiographic knee OA will be recruited and followed for 90 days. Participants will complete an online questionnaire at the baseline and every 10 days thereafter (totaling up to 10 control-period questionnaires); participants will also be asked to report online when they experience an episode of increased knee pain. Pain exacerbation will be defined as an increase in knee pain severity of two points from baseline on a numeric rating scale (NRS 0-10). Physical activity, footwear, knee injury, medication use, climate, psychological factors, and their possible interactions will be assessed as potential triggers for pain exacerbation using conditional logistic regression models. Results This project has been funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). The enrollment for the study has started. So far, 343 participants have been enrolled. The study is expected to be finished in October 2015. Conclusions This study will identify risk factors for pain exacerbations in knee OA. The identification and possible modification/elimination of such risk factors will help to prevent the reoccurrence of pain exacerbation episodes and therefore improve knee OA management. PMID:26156210

  16. Depression and the Overall Burden of Painful Joints: An Examination among Individuals Undergoing Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Zywiel, Michael G; Mahomed, Nizar N; Perruccio, Anthony V

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) report one or more symptomatic joints apart from the one targeted for surgical care. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the burden of multiple symptomatic joints and self-reported depression in patients awaiting joint replacement for OA. Four hundred and seventy-five patients at a single centre were evaluated. Patients self-reported joints that were painful and/or symptomatic most days of the previous month on a homunculus, with nearly one-third of the sample reporting 6 or more painful joints. The prevalence of depression was 12.2% (58/475). When adjusted for age, sex, education level, hip or knee OA, body mass index, chronic condition count, and joint-specific WOMAC scores, each additional symptomatic joint was associated with a 19% increased odds (odds ratio: 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31, P < 0.01)) of self-reported depression. Individuals reporting 6 or more painful joints had 2.5-fold or greater odds of depression when compared to those patients whose symptoms were limited to the surgical joint. A focus on the surgical joint alone is likely to miss a potentially important determinant of postsurgical patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement.

  17. The relationship between psychosocial variables and pain reporting in osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Creamer, P; Hochberg, M C

    1998-02-01

    Psychosocial factors may explain some of the variation in pain reporting among individuals with knee OA. This has important potential implications for management; indeed, several studies (reviewed in ref. 56) have demonstrated that interventions may reduce knee pain without apparent halting or reversing of structural damage. Such interventions have included the simple provision of support by monthly telephone calls (57), self-management programs (58), and cognitive-behavioral approaches designed to teach patients ways of coping with their pain (59). These programs are even more effective if the spouse is involved (60). It should be noted that there may be a large placebo effect in these interventions, and the degree to which patients are responding simply to an interest being taken in them and their problems is unclear; at least one study has shown that formal cognitive-behavioral therapy is no better than didactic education at improving pain and function in knee OA (though both are beneficial) (61). Many studies examining the role of psychosocial factors have suffered from poor design; many, for example, fail to control for radiographic severity. Future studies should define how pain is identified (dichotomous, ever/never/current, severity), differentiate community and hospital subjects, and separate patients by type and location of OA. Studies should also control for other factors potentially associated with pain: obesity, comorbidity, muscle weakness, and aerobic fitness. Prospective studies would allow clarification of the cause and effect relationship between anxiety, depression, and pain, both in the community and in patients who have elected to seek medical help. In this way, we may increase our understanding of the complex interaction between mood, social factors, and pain reporting in knee OA and, thus, improve the effectiveness, already equivalent to many pharmacologic interventions, of treatments designed to address psychosocial factors.

  18. Effectiveness of acupressure versus isometric exercise on pain, stiffness, and physical function in knee osteoarthritis female patients

    PubMed Central

    Sorour, Amany S.; Ayoub, Amany S.; Abd El Aziz, Eman M.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and a leading cause of disability in older adults. Conservative non-pharmacological strategies, particularly exercise, are recommended by clinical guidelines for its management. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of acupressure versus isometric exercise on pain, stiffness, and physical function in knee OA female patients. This quasi experimental study was conducted at the inpatient and outpatient sections at Al-kasr Al-Aini hospital, Cairo University. It involved three groups of 30 patients each: isometric exercise, acupressure, and control. Data were collected by an interview form and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) scale. The study revealed high initial scores of pain, stiffness, and impaired physical functioning. After the intervention, pain decreased in the two intervention groups compared to the control group (p < 0.001), while the scores of stiffness and impaired physical function were significantly lower in the isometric group (p < 0.001) compared to the other two groups. The decrease in the total WOMAC score was sharper in the two study groups compared to the control group. In multiple linear regression, the duration of illness was a positive predictor of WOMAC score, whereas the intervention is associated with a reduction in the score. In conclusion, isometric exercise and acupressure provide an improvement of pain, stiffness, and physical function in patients with knee OA. Since isometric exercise leads to more improvement of stiffness and physical function, while acupressure acts better on pain, a combination of both is recommended. The findings need further confirmation through a randomized clinical trial. PMID:25685487

  19. [Exercise therapy in hip or knee osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Dekker, Joost; Peter, Wilfred; van der Leeden, Marike; Lems, Willem F

    2011-01-01

    "Exercise is medicine": exercise therapy reduces pain and activity limitations in osteoarthritis of the knee and is likely to have the same effects in osteoarthritis of the hip. Further research into exercise therapy is needed, since disease-modifying drugs are not available, pain medication can cause side effects, and surgical interventions are preferably applied in an advanced stage of disease. Classical exercise therapy is aimed at improving muscle strength, aerobic capacity, range of joint motion, and training of walking and activities of daily living. New modalities of targeted exercise therapy are currently being developed, aimed at the correction of low levels of activity and to correct instability of the knee. Weight loss, preferably combined with exercise therapy, reduces pain and activity limitations in osteoarthritis patients who are overweight. Modalities of exercise therapy adapted to comorbid conditions are currently being developed.

  20. Differences in Health-Related Quality of Life among Subjects with Frequent Bilateral or Unilateral Knee Pain: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bindawas, Saad; Vennu, Vishal; Snih, Soham Al

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional study. OBJECTIVE To examine associations between frequent bilateral knee pain (BKP) and unilateral knee pain (UKP) and health-related quality of life (QoL). We hypothesized that frequent BKP would be associated with poorer health-related QoL than would frequent UKP and no knee pain. BACKGROUND Knee pain is one of the most frequently reported types of joint pain among adults in the United States. It is the most frequent cause of limited physical function, disability, and reduced QoL. METHODS Data were collected from the Osteoarthritis Initiative public-use data sets. Health-related QoL was assessed in 2481 participants (aged 45–79 years at baseline). The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score QoL subscale (knee-specific measure) and the physical component summary and mental component summary (MCS) scores of the Medical Outcomes Study 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) (generic measure) were used to assess health-related QoL. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relationships between frequent knee pain and health-related QoL, adjusted for sociodemographic and health covariates. RESULTS Compared with subjects with no knee pain, subjects with frequent BKP and UKP had significantly lower scores on the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score QoL subscale (mean difference, −35.2; standard error [SE], 0.86; P<.001 and mean difference, −29.2; SE, 0.93; P<.001; respectively) and the SF-12 physical component summary score (mean difference, −6.25; SE, 0.41; P<.001 and mean difference, −4.10, SE, 0.43; P<.00; respectively), after controlling for sociodemographic and health covariates. The SF-12 MCS score was lower among those with BKP (−1.29; SE, 0.42; P<.001). Frequent UKP was not associated with the SF-12 MCS. CONCLUSIONS Subjects with frequent BKP had lower health-related QoL than those with frequent unilateral or no knee pain, as reflected in lower Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Socre Qo

  1. Low-level laser therapy of myofascial pain syndromes of patients with osteoarthritis of knee and hip joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparyan, Levon V.

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of the given research is the comparison of efficiency of conventional treatment of myofascial pain syndromes of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of hip and knee joints and therapy with additional application of low level laser therapy (LLLT) under dynamic control of clinical picture, rheovasographic, electromyographic examinations, and parameters of peroxide lipid oxidation. The investigation was made on 143 patients with OA of hip and knee joints. Patients were randomized in 2 groups: basic group included 91 patients, receiving conventional therapy with a course of LLLT, control group included 52 patients, receiving conventional treatment only. Transcutaneous ((lambda) equals 890 nm, output peak power 5 W, frequency 80 - 3000 Hz) and intravenous ((lambda) equals 633 nm, output 2 mW in the vein) laser irradiation were used for LLLT. Studied showed, that clinical efficiency of LLLT in the complex with conventional treatment of myofascial pain syndromes at the patients with OA is connected with attenuation of pain syndrome, normalization of parameters of myofascial syndrome, normalization of the vascular tension and parameters of rheographic curves, as well as with activation of antioxidant protection system.

  2. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It causes pain, swelling, and reduced motion in your ... it affects your hands, knees, hips or spine. Osteoarthritis breaks down the cartilage in your joints. Cartilage ...

  3. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors regulate central sensitization and pain responses associated with osteoarthritis of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Burston, James J; Sagar, Devi Rani; Shao, Pin; Bai, Mingfeng; King, Emma; Brailsford, Louis; Turner, Jenna M; Hathway, Gareth J; Bennett, Andrew J; Walsh, David A; Kendall, David A; Lichtman, Aron; Chapman, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the joint is a prevalent disease accompanied by chronic, debilitating pain. Recent clinical evidence has demonstrated that central sensitization contributes to OA pain. An improved understanding of how OA joint pathology impacts upon the central processing of pain is crucial for the identification of novel analgesic targets/new therapeutic strategies. Inhibitory cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptors attenuate peripheral immune cell function and modulate central neuro-immune responses in models of neurodegeneration. Systemic administration of the CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 attenuated OA-induced pain behaviour, and the changes in circulating pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines exhibited in this model. Electrophysiological studies revealed that spinal administration of JWH133 inhibited noxious-evoked responses of spinal neurones in the model of OA pain, but not in control rats, indicating a novel spinal role of this target. We further demonstrate dynamic changes in spinal CB2 receptor mRNA and protein expression in an OA pain model. The expression of CB2 receptor protein by both neurones and microglia in the spinal cord was significantly increased in the model of OA. Hallmarks of central sensitization, significant spinal astrogliosis and increases in activity of metalloproteases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the spinal cord were evident in the model of OA pain. Systemic administration of JWH133 attenuated these markers of central sensitization, providing a neurobiological basis for analgesic effects of the CB2 receptor in this model of OA pain. Analysis of human spinal cord revealed a negative correlation between spinal cord CB2 receptor mRNA and macroscopic knee chondropathy. These data provide new clinically relevant evidence that joint damage and spinal CB2 receptor expression are correlated combined with converging pre-clinical evidence that activation of CB2 receptors inhibits central sensitization and its contribution to the manifestation of chronic OA

  4. Obesity, knee osteoarthritis and knee arthroplasty: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of obesity is rising worldwide. Obesity is a risk factor for developing osteoarthritis in the knee. Obesity and knee osteoarthritis are independently disabling conditions and in combination pose difficult therapeutic challenges. This review will discuss obesity, osteoarthritis, and the problems associated with knee osteoarthritis in an obese population. Treatment options including surgery and its success will be discussed. PMID:24304704

  5. Efficacy of balneotherapy on pain, function and quality of life in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Giannitti, Chiara; Bellisai, Barbara; Iacoponi, Francesca; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2012-07-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate whether balneotherapy with mineral sulphate-bicarbonate-calcium water could determine substantial symptomatic improvement, and to detect any changes in the quality of life (QoL) of patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). This was a prospective randomized, single blind controlled trial. Sixty outpatients with primary bilateral knee OA, according to ACR criteria, were included in the study and randomized to one of two groups: group I (30 patients) was treated with a daily sulphate-bicarbonate-calcium mineral water bath; group II (30 patients), the control group, continued their regular outpatient care routine. At baseline, after 15 days and after 12 weeks, patients were evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for spontaneous pain, Lequesne and Womac Index for gonarthrosis, SF-36, Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale (AIMS) and symptomatic drugs consumption. We observed a significant improvement of all parameters at the end of the cycle of balneotherapy which persisted throughout the follow-up period, whereas in the control group no significant differences were noted. This symptomatic effect was confirmed by the significant reduction of symptomatic drugs consumption. The differences between the two groups were significant for all considered parameters already from the 15th day and persisted during follow-up. Tolerability of balneotherapy seemed to be good, with light and transitory side effects. Our results confirm that the beneficial effects of balneotherapy in patients with knee OA last over time, with positive effects on the painful symptomatology, a significant improvement on functional capacities and QoL. Balneotherapy can represent a useful backup to pharmacological treatment of knee OA or a valid alternative for patients who do not tolerate pharmacological treatments.

  6. Efficacy of balneotherapy on pain, function and quality of life in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Giannitti, Chiara; Bellisai, Barbara; Iacoponi, Francesca; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2012-07-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate whether balneotherapy with mineral sulphate-bicarbonate-calcium water could determine substantial symptomatic improvement, and to detect any changes in the quality of life (QoL) of patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). This was a prospective randomized, single blind controlled trial. Sixty outpatients with primary bilateral knee OA, according to ACR criteria, were included in the study and randomized to one of two groups: group I (30 patients) was treated with a daily sulphate-bicarbonate-calcium mineral water bath; group II (30 patients), the control group, continued their regular outpatient care routine. At baseline, after 15 days and after 12 weeks, patients were evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for spontaneous pain, Lequesne and Womac Index for gonarthrosis, SF-36, Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale (AIMS) and symptomatic drugs consumption. We observed a significant improvement of all parameters at the end of the cycle of balneotherapy which persisted throughout the follow-up period, whereas in the control group no significant differences were noted. This symptomatic effect was confirmed by the significant reduction of symptomatic drugs consumption. The differences between the two groups were significant for all considered parameters already from the 15th day and persisted during follow-up. Tolerability of balneotherapy seemed to be good, with light and transitory side effects. Our results confirm that the beneficial effects of balneotherapy in patients with knee OA last over time, with positive effects on the painful symptomatology, a significant improvement on functional capacities and QoL. Balneotherapy can represent a useful backup to pharmacological treatment of knee OA or a valid alternative for patients who do not tolerate pharmacological treatments.

  7. Nonsurgical Management of Knee Pain in Adults.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brandon Q; Covey, Carlton J; Sineath, Marvin H

    2015-11-15

    The role of the family physician in managing knee pain is expanding as recent literature supports nonsurgical management for many patients. Effective treatment depends on the etiology of knee pain. Oral analgesics-most commonly nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen-are used initially in combination with physical therapy to manage the most typical causes of chronic knee pain. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommends against glucosamine/chondroitin supplementation for osteoarthritis. In patients who are not candidates for surgery, opioid analgesics should be used only if conservative pharmacotherapy is ineffective. Exercise-based therapy is the foundation for treating knee osteoarthritis and patellofemoral pain syndrome. Weight loss should be encouraged for all patients with osteoarthritis and a body mass index greater than 25 kg per m2. Aside from stabilizing traumatic knee ligament and tendon tears, the effectiveness of knee braces for chronic knee pain is uncertain, and the use of braces should not replace physical therapy. Foot orthoses can be helpful for anterior knee pain. Corticosteroid injections are effective for short-term pain relief in patients with osteoarthritis. The benefit of hyaluronic acid injections is controversial, and recommendations vary; recent systematic reviews do not support a clinically significant benefit. Small studies suggest that regenerative injections can improve pain and function in patients with chronic knee tendinopathies and osteoarthritis. PMID:26554281

  8. Moxibustion Treatment for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ang; Wei, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Yi; Li, Bo; Guo, Xing; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine whether the administration of moxibustion is an effective treatment for knee osteoarthritis (KOA). We conducted a search of relevant articles using Medline, EMBASE, the Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library published before October 2015. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities’ Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC scale) and the short form 36 questionnaire (SF-36 scale) were assessed. Evidence grading was evaluated according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Four studies containing 746 participants fulfilled the inclusion criteria in the final analysis. In terms of quality of life (QOL), the meta-analysis of 2 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) showed significantly effects of moxibustion only in bodily pain (BP) compared with those in the control group (n = 348; weighted mean difference [WMD], 4.36; 95% confidence intervals [CIs], 2.27–6.44; P < 0.0001; heterogeneity: χ2 = 1.53, P = 0.22, I2 = 34%) in all of the subcategories of the SF-36 scale, with moderate quality. The meta-analysis of the 2 included trials showed that there was not a statistically significant difference in the pain or function subscale for the WOMAC scale when the 2 groups were compared (n = 322; WMD, 17.63; 95% CI, −23.15–58.41; P = 0.40; heterogeneity: χ2 = 19.42, P < 0.0001, I2 = 95%), with low or moderate quality separately. The administration of moxibustion can to some extent alleviate the symptoms of KOA. More rigorous, randomized controlled trials are required in the future. PMID:27057863

  9. Back pain: osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bandilla, K K

    1977-02-01

    Back pain is one of the chief complaints of the elderly. It may be either a chronic deep skeletal muscular pain or an acute circumscribed pain arising from nerve-root irritation. The main causes of back pain in older people are: 1) degenerative changes (spondylosis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing hyperostosis); 2) malignancy (multiple myeloma, metastases from carcinoma or lymphoma); and 3) metabolic disorders (osteoporosis, osteomalacia, chondrocalcinosis, Paget's disease). Mechanisms and variations are discussed in detail.

  10. Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Maddah, Shahpoor; Mahdizadeh, Jamileh

    2015-12-01

    The association of obesity and other metabolic conditions with osteoarthritis is under debate; however, a strong link between metabolic disturbances is suggested to contribute to increased incidences and progression of osteoarthritis. We examined the association of metabolic syndrome and its components with the incidence of knee osteoarthritis in Iranian population. A community-based study was conducted on a total of 625 Iranian volunteers with the complaint of knee pain. Weight-bearing and anteroposterior plain radiographs of both knees were taken on the day of admission. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using the modified Adult Treatment Panel III of the National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. Prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome were 22.5% in males and 11.6% in females (P=0.002). The prevalence rate of knee osteoarthritis was 20.0% in males and 43.8% of females (P<0.001). In both genders, osteoarthritis group had higher serum levels of triglyceride and systolic blood pressure in comparison with non-osteoarthritis group. Women with osteoarthritis had higher Body Mass Index (BMI), however, this association was not observed in men. In females, the presence of osteoarthritis was significantly associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome, with the risk of metabolic syndrome in the osteoarthritis group at 2.187 fold the risk in the non-osteoarthritis group. But, the presence of osteoarthritis was not associated with metabolic syndrome in males. Metabolic syndrome mainly through high BMI is associated with knee osteoarthritis in the Iranian women, but neither metabolic syndrome nor any related components are associated with knee osteoarthritis in men.

  11. Observation on pain release by long-round needle therapy in knee osteoarthritis related with meridian-sinews theory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Shi; Xue, Li-Gong; Ma, Xiao-Jian; Liu, Chun-Shan

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of long-round needle therapy for pain relief in patients with knee osteoarthritis, 192 patients were included in a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial. 97 patients were randomized to the long-round needle therapy group (EG), and 95 patients were randomized to the control group (CG). In EG, the long-round needle therapy was performed once every 7 days for 3 therapy sessions. Ibuprofen sustained-release capsules were administered orally in CG, 1 pill each time, twice daily for 3 weeks. Curative effect was measured after the therapy and was evaluated at a 3-month follow-up interview. In EG, the treatment resulted in a basic cure for 79 patients, was effective for 15 patients, and was ineffective for 1 patient. In CG, the treatment resulted in a basic cure for 30 patients, was effective for 38 patients, and was ineffective for 21 patients. In the follow-up examination in EG, 75 patients were basically cured, and the treatment was effective for 11 patients and ineffective for 9. In CG, 22 were basically cured, 31 found the treatment effective, and 36 found the treatment ineffective. The curative effects in EG after both the treatment and the 3-mouth followup were significantly more superior than that in CG (P < 0.01) which should be adopted more widely.

  12. Oral intake of purple passion fruit peel extract reduces pain and stiffness and improves physical function in adult patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Farid, Reza; Rezaieyazdi, Zahra; Mirfeizi, Zahra; Hatef, Mohamad Reza; Mirheidari, Mahyar; Mansouri, Hassan; Esmaelli, Habib; Bentley, Gayle; Lu, Yinrong; Foo, Yeap; Watson, Ronald Ross

    2010-09-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative joint disorder and a major cause of pain and disability. The hypothesis tested in this study was that the passion fruit peel extract (PFP), a flavonoid-rich dietary supplement, would reduce symptoms due to knee OA. Thirty-three OA patients were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with parallel-group design. Patients received either placebo or PFP pills (150 mg, daily) in a double-blinded fashion for 2 months. The OA clinical symptoms were evaluated monthly with Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index. In the PFP group, there was a significant improvement in total WOMAC score and WOMAC subscale score of physical function after 30 days and pain after 60 days. At 60 days, reductions of 18.6%, 18%, 19.6%, and 19.2% in pain, stiffness, physical function, and composite WOMAC score, respectively, were self-reported in the PFP group. Whereas, in the placebo group, the self-reported WOMAC scores increased in every category. The results of this study show that PFP substantially alleviated osteoarthritis symptoms. This beneficial effect of PFP may be due to its antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties. PMID:20934601

  13. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Persian version of the Intermittent and Constant Osteoarthritis Pain Measure for the knee

    PubMed Central

    Panah, Sara Hojat; Baharlouie, Hamze; Rezaeian, Zahra Sadat; Hawker, Gilian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to translate and evaluate the reliability and validity of the Persian version of the 11-item Intermittent and Constant Osteoarthritis Pain (ICOAP) measure in Iranian subjects with Knee Osteoarthritis (KOA). Materials and Methods: The ICOAP questionnaire was translated according to the Manufacturers Alliance for Productivity and Innovation (MAPI) protocol. The procedure consisted of forward and backward translation, as well as the assessment of the psychometric properties of the Persian version of the questionnaire. A sample of 230 subjects with KOA was asked to complete the Persian versions of ICOAP and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). The ICOAP was readministered to forty subjects five days after the first visit. Test–retest reliability was assessed using Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC), and internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha and item-total correlation. The correlation between ICOAP and KOOS was determined using Spearman's correlation coefficient. Result: Subjects found the Persian-version of the ICOAP to be clear, simple, and unambiguous, confirming its face validity. Spearman correlations between ICOAP total and subscale scores with KOOS scores were between 0.5 and 0.7, confirming construct validity. Cronbach's alpha, used to assess internal consistency, was 0.89, 0.93, and 0.92 for constant pain, intermittent pain, and total pain scores, respectively. The ICC was 0.90 for constant pain and 0.91 for the intermittent pain and total pain score. Conclusion: The Persian version of the ICOAP is a reliable and valid outcome measure that can be used in Iranian subjects with KOA. PMID:27563327

  14. Increased sensitivity to physical activity among individuals with knee osteoarthritis: relation to pain outcomes, psychological factors, and responses to quantitative sensory testing.

    PubMed

    Wideman, Timothy H; Finan, Patrick H; Edwards, Robert R; Quartana, Phillip J; Buenaver, Luis F; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Smith, Michael T

    2014-04-01

    Recent findings suggest that certain individuals with musculoskeletal pain conditions have increased sensitivity to physical activity (SPA) and respond to activities of stable intensity with increasingly severe pain. This study aimed to determine the degree to which individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA) show heightened SPA in response to a standardized walking task and whether SPA cross-sectionally predicts psychological factors, responses to quantitative sensory testing (QST), and different OA-related outcomes. One hundred seven adults with chronic knee OA completed self-report measures of pain, function, and psychological factors, underwent QST, and performed a 6-min walk test. Participants rated their discomfort levels throughout the walking task; an index of SPA was created by subtracting first ratings from peak ratings. Repeated-measure analysis of variance revealed that levels of discomfort significantly increased throughout the walking task. A series of hierarchical regression analyses determined that after controlling for significant covariates, psychological factors, and measures of mechanical pain sensitivity, individual variance in SPA predicted self-report pain and function and performance on the walking task. Analyses also revealed that both pain catastrophizing and the temporal summation of mechanical pain were significant predictors of SPA and that SPA mediated the relationship between catastrophizing and self-reported pain and physical function. The discussion addresses the potential processes contributing to SPA and the role it may play in predicting responses to different interventions for musculoskeletal pain conditions.

  15. Early osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Kon, Elizaveta; Condello, Vincenzo; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Steinwachs, Matthias; Seil, Romain; Berruto, Massimo; Engebretsen, Lars; Filardo, Giuseppe; Angele, Peter

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing awareness on the importance in identifying early phases of the degenerative processes in knee osteoarthritis (OA), the crucial period of the disease when there might still be the possibility to initiate treatments preventing its progression. Early OA may show a diffuse and ill-defined involvement, but also originate in the cartilage surrounding a focal lesion, thus necessitating a separate assessment of these two entities. Early OA can be considered to include a maximal involvement of 50 % of the cartilage thickness based on the macroscopic ICRS classification, reflecting an OARSI grade 4. The purpose of this paper was to provide an updated review of the current status of the diagnosis and definition of early knee OA, including the clinical, radiographical, histological, MRI, and arthroscopic definitions and biomarkers. Based on current evidence, practical classification criteria are presented. As new insights and technologies become available, they will further evolve to better define and treat early knee OA.

  16. Perceived racial discrimination, but not mistrust of medical researchers, predicts the heat pain tolerance of African Americans with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Quyen T.; Glover, Toni L.; Sotolongo, Adriana; King, Christopher D.; Sibille, Kimberly T.; Herbert, Matthew S.; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Sanden, Shelley H.; Staud, Roland; Redden, David T.; Bradley, Laurence A.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Studies have shown that perceived racial discrimination is a significant predictor of clinical pain severity among African Americans. It remains unknown whether perceived racial discrimination also alters the nociceptive processing of painful stimuli, which, in turn, could influence clinical pain severity. This study examined associations between perceived racial discrimination and responses to noxious thermal stimuli among African Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Mistrust of medical researchers was also assessed given its potential to affect responses to the noxious stimuli. Method One hundred and thirty (52% African American, 48% non-Hispanic white) community-dwelling older adults with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis completed two study sessions. In session one, individuals provided demographic, socioeconomic, physical and mental health information. They completed questionnaires related to perceived lifetime frequency of racial discrimination and mistrust of medical researchers. In session two, individuals underwent a series of controlled thermal stimulation procedures to assess heat pain sensitivity, particularly heat pain tolerance. Results African Americans were more sensitive to heat pain and reported greater perceived racial discrimination as well as greater mistrust of medical researchers compared to non-Hispanic whites. Greater perceived racial discrimination significantly predicted lower heat pain tolerance for African Americans but not non-Hispanic whites. Mistrust of medical researchers did not significantly predict heat pain tolerance for either racial group Conclusion These results lend support to the idea that perceived racial discrimination may influence the clinical pain severity of African Americans via the nociceptive processing of painful stimuli. PMID:24219416

  17. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and development of radiographic and painful knee osteoarthritis. A community-based cohort of middle-aged women

    PubMed Central

    Kluzek, Stefan; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Judge, Andrew; Karsdal, Morten A.; Shorthose, Matthew; Spector, Tim; Hart, Deborah; Newton, Julia L.; Arden, Nigel K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context and objective: We evaluated the predictive value of serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (sCOMP) levels over 20 years on the development of radiographic (RKOA) and painful knee osteoarthritis (KOA) in a longitudinal cohort of middle-aged women. Materials and methods: Five hundred and ninety-three women with no baseline KOA underwent 5-year knee radiographs over 20-years and were asked about knee pain a month before each assessment. A repeated measures logistic regression model was used where the outcomes were recorded at 5, 10, 15 and 20-years follow-up. Results: The highest quartile of sCOMP was associated with increased risk of RKOA with overall OR of 1.97 (95% CI: 1.33–2.91) over 20 years when compared with the lowest sCOMP quartile. The association with painful KOA was similar and also independent, but only when the fourth and third sCOMP quartiles were compared. Discussion and conclusion: This study demonstrates that sCOMP levels are predictive of subsequent structural changes and incidence of painful KOA, independently of age and BMI. PMID:26848781

  18. Analgesic effect of raloxifene on back and knee pain in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and/or osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takuo; Fujii, Yoshio; Munezane, Hiromi; Ohue, Mutsumi; Takagi, Yasuyuki

    2010-07-01

    To assess the effect of raloxifene on bone and joint pain, 24 postmenopausal women with back or knee pain or both were randomly divided into two groups, based on the chronological sequence of consultation, to be treated with 60 mg raloxifene and 1 microg alfacalcidol (RA)/day (group RA) or 1 microg alfacalcidol alone (A)/day (group A), respectively, for 6 months. Pain following knee loading (KL) by standing up from a chair and bending the knee by squatting, knee and spine loading (KSL) by walking horizontally and ascending and descending stairs, and spine loading (SL) by lying down supine on a bed and leaving the bed to stand was evaluated by electroalgometry (EAM), based on measurement of the fall of skin impedance, and a visual rating scale (VRS), recording subjective pain on a scale of 0-100 between no pain and unbearable pain. The two groups showed no significant difference as to age, indices of mineral metabolism, back and knee pain, and bone status. RA gave a significantly greater analgesic effect than A by both EAM (P = 0.0158) and VRS (P = 0.0268) on overall comparison of the mean response to all modalities of exercise loading. Paired comparison between pretreatment and posttreatment indicated a significant effect of RA by both EAM (P = 0.0045) and VRS (P = 0.0017), but not that of A. The analgesic effect was more clearly noted on combined knee-spine loading (KSL) and spine loading (SL) than simple knee loading (KL). Monthly comparison of the analgesic effect indicated a significantly better analgesic effect in the fifth month by VRS. RA effect greater than A was more evident by EAM than VRS and during months 3-6 than during 1-2 months, suggesting a slowly progressive effect of RA. Pain evaluation by EAM and VRS mostly gave parallel results, except for a few occasions such as knee loading and spine loading by sitting up and leaving a bed, when EAM detected a positive effect but VRS failed to do so. RA appeared to be more effective on bone and joint pain

  19. Inadequate pain relief and large functional loss among patients with knee osteoarthritis: evidence from a prospective multinational longitudinal study of osteoarthritis real-world therapies

    PubMed Central

    Conaghan, Philip G.; Peloso, Paul M.; Everett, Sharlette V.; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Black, Christopher M.; Mavros, Panagiotis; Arden, Nigel K.; Phillips, Ceri J.; Rannou, François; van de Laar, Mart A. F. J.; Moore, R. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To estimate the prevalence of inadequate pain relief (IPR) among patients with symptomatic knee OA prescribed analgesic therapy and to characterize patients with IPR. Methods. Patients ≥50 years old with physician-diagnosed knee OA who had taken topical or oral pain medication for at least 14 days were recruited for this prospective non-interventional study in six European countries. Pain and function were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the WOMAC; quality of life (QoL) was assessed using the 12-item short form. IPR was defined as an average pain score of >4 out of 10 on BPI question 5. Results. Of 1187 patients enrolled, 68% were female and the mean age was 68 years (s.d. 9); 639 (54%) met the definition of IPR. Patient responses for the BPI average pain question were well correlated with responses on the WOMAC pain subscale (Spearman r = 0.64, P < 0.001). In multivariate logistic regression, patients with IPR had greater odds of being female [adjusted odds ratio (adjOR) 1.90 (95% CI 1.46, 2.48)] and having OA in both knees [adjOR 1.48 (95% CI 1.15, 1.90)], higher BMI, longer OA duration, depression or diabetes. Patients with IPR (vs non-IPR) were more likely to have worse QoL, greater function loss and greater pain interference. Conclusion. IPR is common among patients with knee OA requiring analgesics and is associated with large functional loss and impaired QoL. Patients at particular risk of IPR, as characterized in this study, may require greater attention towards their analgesic treatment options. Trial registration: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ (NCT01294696). PMID:25150513

  20. Knee osteoarthritis prevalence, risk factors, pathogenesis and features: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Behzad

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) a common disease of aged population and one of the leading causes of disability. Incidence of knee OA is rising by increasing average age of general population. Age, weight, trauma to joint due to repetiting movements in particular squatting and kneeling are common risk factors of knee OA. Several factors including cytokines, leptin, and mechanical forces are pathogenic factors of knee OA. In patients with knee pain attribution of pain to knee OA should be considered with caution. Since a proportion of knee OA are asymptomatic and in a number of patients identification of knee OA is not possible due to low sensitivity of radiographic examination. In this review data presented in regard to prevalence, pathogenesis, risk factors. PMID:24024017

  1. Low Vitamin D levels are associated with greater pain and slow walking speed in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The clinical status of patients with knee OA is primarily predicated by their level of pain and their muscle function. Recent studies have shown that vitamin D influences both musculoskeletal health and neuromuscular function. Vitamin D deficiency is common among elders and those with comorbidities....

  2. Annual Incidence of Knee Symptoms and Four Knee Osteoarthritis Outcomes in the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Louise B; Moss, Susan; Do, Barbara T; Helmick, Charles G; Schwartz, Todd A.; Barbour, Kamil E; Renner, Jordan; Kalsbeek, William; Jordan, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate annual incidence rates (IR) of knee symptoms and four knee OA outcomes (radiographic, symptomatic, severe radiographic and severe symptomatic) overall and stratified by socio-demographic characteristics and knee OA risk factors. Methods We analyzed baseline [1991–1997] and first follow-up [1999–2003] data (n=1,518) from Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project. Participants are black and white adults ≥ 45 years living in Johnston County, North Carolina, US. Knee symptoms were pain, aching, or stiffness on most days in a knee. Radiographic OA was K-L grade ≥ 2 (severe radiographic ≥3) in at least one knee. Symptomatic OA was symptoms in a radiographically affected knee; severe symptomatic OA was severe symptoms and severe radiographic OA. Results The median follow-up time was 5.5 years. Average annual IRs were: symptoms=6%, radiographic OA=3%, symptomatic OA=2%, severe radiographic OA=2%, and severe symptomatic OA=0.8%. Across outcomes, IRs were highest among those with the following baseline characteristics: age ≥ 75 years; obese; a history of knee injury; or an annual household income ≤ $15,000. Conclusion The annual onset of knee symptoms and four OA outcomes in Johnston County was high. This may preview the future of knee OA in the US and underscores the urgency of clinical and public health collaborations that reduce risk factors for, and manage the impact of, these outcomes. Inexpensive, convenient and proven strategies (e.g., physical activity, self-management education courses) complement clinical care, and can reduce pain and improve quality of life for people with arthritis. PMID:26097226

  3. Manual for guided home exercises for osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Carvalho, Nilza Aparecida; Bittar, Simoni Teixeira; de Souza Pinto, Flávia Ribeiro; Ferreira, Mônica; Sitta, Robson Roberto

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Physiotherapy is one of the most important components of therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee. The objective of this prospective case series was to assess the efficiency of a guidance manual for patients with osteoarthritis of the knee in relation to pain, range of movement , muscle strength and function, active goniometry, manual strength test and function. METHODS: Thirty-eight adults with osteoarthritis of the knee (≥ 45 years old) who were referred to the physiotherapy service at the university hospital (Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo) were studied. Patients received guidance for the practice of specific physical exercises and a manual with instructions on how to perform the exercises at home. They were evaluated for pain, range of movement, muscle strength and function. These evaluations were performed before they received the manual and three months later. Patients were seen monthly regarding improvements in their exercising abilities. RESULTS: The program was effective for improving muscle strength, controlling pain, maintaining range of movement of the knee joint, and reducing functional incapacity. DISCUSSION: A review of the literature showed that there are numerous clinical benefits to the regular practice of physical therapy exercises by patients with osteoarthritis of the knee(s) in a program with appropriate guidance. This study shows that this guidance can be attained at home with the use of a proper manual. CONCLUSIONS: Even when performed at home without constant supervision, the use of the printed manual for orientation makes the exercises for osteoarthritis of the knee beneficial. PMID:20835554

  4. A phase III placebo- and oxycodone-controlled study of tanezumab in adults with osteoarthritis pain of the hip or knee.

    PubMed

    Spierings, Egilius L H; Fidelholtz, James; Wolfram, Gernot; Smith, Michael D; Brown, Mark T; West, Christine R

    2013-09-01

    Tanezumab is a humanized monoclonal antinerve growth factor antibody in development for treatment of chronic pain. In a phase III, placebo- and active-controlled study, we investigated the efficacy and safety of tanezumab for osteoarthritis (OA) hip or knee pain. Patients (N=610) received up to 2 doses of intravenous tanezumab (5 or 10mg in 8-week intervals), controlled-release oral oxycodone (10 to 40 mg every 12 hours), or placebo. The primary endpoint was mean change from baseline to week 8 in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) Pain score for tanezumab versus placebo and oxycodone. Secondary endpoints included change from baseline in WOMAC Physical Function and Stiffness scores, Patient's Global Assessment (PGA) of OA, and patient response, defined as ≥ 30%, ≥ 50%, ≥ 70%, and ≥ 90% improvement from baseline in WOMAC Pain score. Tolerability and safety also were assessed. Both tanezumab groups demonstrated significant improvements in WOMAC Pain score versus placebo (P<.001) and oxycodone (P ≤.018). Tanezumab also provided significant improvements versus placebo and oxycodone for WOMAC Physical Function and Stiffness scores and PGA of OA (P ≤.002 for all) at week 8. For all analyses, oxycodone did not differ from placebo. Adverse event frequency was higher with oxycodone (63.3%) than tanezumab (40.7% to 44.7%) or placebo (35.5%); serious adverse event frequency was similar among treatments. The adverse event profile for tanezumab was similar to previous tanezumab studies. Results indicate that tanezumab is efficacious in the treatment of OA pain; no new safety signals were identified.

  5. The Safety and Efficacy of an Enzyme Combination in Managing Knee Osteoarthritis Pain in Adults: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bolten, Wolfgang W.; Glade, Michael J.; Raum, Sonja; Ritz, Barry W.

    2015-01-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and comparator-controlled trial evaluated the safety and efficacy of an enzyme combination, as Wobenzym, in adults with moderate-to-severe osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Adults (n = 150) received Wobenzym, diclofenac (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, NSAID), or placebo for 12 weeks. Improvement in pain scores (Lequesne Functional Index) did not differ between subjects treated with Wobenzym or diclofenac, and both treatment groups improved compared to placebo (P < 0.05). Reduction in total WOMAC scores (secondary outcome measure) did not differ between Wobenzym and diclofenac, although only diclofenac emerged as different from placebo (P < 0.05). The median number of rescue medication (paracetamol) tablets consumed was less in the Wobenzym group compared to placebo (P < 0.05), while there was no difference between diclofenac and placebo. Adverse events were similar in frequency in Wobenzym and placebo groups (7.2% and 9.1% of subjects, resp.) and higher in diclofenac group (15.6%). Wobenzym is comparable to the NSAID diclofenac in relieving pain and increasing function in adults with moderate-to-severe painful knee OA and reduces reliance on analgesic medication. Wobenzym is associated with fewer adverse events and, therefore, may be appropriate for long-term use. PMID:25802756

  6. Assessment of quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Marcio Massao; Araújo, Ivan Luis Andrade; Castro, Martha Cavalcante; Matos, Marcos Almeida

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : To assess the quality of life of knee osteoarthritis patients using the SF-36 questionnaire METHODS : Cross-sec-tional study with 93 knee osteoarthritis patients. The sample was categorized according to Ahlbӓck score. All individuals were interviewed with the SF-36 questionnaire RESULTS : The main finding of the study is related to the association of edu-cation level with the functional capacity, functional limitation and pain. Patients with higher education level had better functional capacity when they were compared to patients with basic level of education CONCLUSION : Individuals with osteoarthritis have a low perception of their quality of life in functional capacity, functional limitation and pain. There is a strong association between low level of education and low perception of quality of life. Level of Evidence IV, Clinical Case Series. PMID:27057143

  7. Patterns of knee osteoarthritis in Arabian and American knees.

    PubMed

    Hodge, W Andrew; Harman, Melinda K; Banks, Scott A

    2009-04-01

    This study illustrates differences in the cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritic knees in patients with more frequent hyperflexion activities of daily living compared with Western patients. Proximal tibial articular cartilage wear and cruciate ligament condition were assessed in Saudi Arabian and North American patients with varus osteoarthritis undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) intact knees, there were significant differences in wear location, with a clearly more anterior pattern in Saudi Arabian knees. Complete ACL deficiency occurred in 25% of North American knees but only 14% of Saudi Arabian knees. These ACL-deficient knees showed the most severe cartilage wear in both groups and posterior medial wear patterns. Biomechanical descriptions of knee flexion and axial rotation during kneeling or squatting are consistent with the more pronounced anteromedial and posterolateral cartilage wear patterns observed on the Saudi Arabian knees. These observations provide insight into altered knee mechanics in 2 culturally different populations with different demands on knee flexion.

  8. Strategies for the prevention of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Roos, Ewa M; Arden, Nigel K

    2016-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) has been thought of as a disease of cartilage that can be effectively treated surgically at severe stages with joint arthroplasty. Today, OA is considered a whole-organ disease that is amenable to prevention and treatment at early stages. OA develops slowly over 10-15 years, interfering with activities of daily living and the ability to work. Many patients tolerate pain, and many health-care providers accept pain and disability as inevitable corollaries of OA and ageing. Too often, health-care providers passively await final 'joint death', necessitating knee and hip replacements. Instead, OA should be viewed as a chronic condition, where prevention and early comprehensive-care models are the accepted norm, as is the case with other chronic diseases. Joint injury, obesity and impaired muscle function are modifiable risk factors amenable to primary and secondary prevention strategies. The strategies that are most appropriate for each patient should be identified, by selecting interventions to correct--or at least attenuate--OA risk factors. We must also choose the interventions that are most likely to be acceptable to patients, to maximize adherence to--and persistence with--the regimes. Now is the time to begin the era of personalized prevention for knee OA. PMID:26439406

  9. Benefits of antioxidant supplements for knee osteoarthritis: rationale and reality.

    PubMed

    Grover, Ashok Kumar; Samson, Sue E

    2016-01-05

    Arthritis causes disability due to pain and inflammation in joints. There are many forms of arthritis, one of which is osteoarthritis whose prevalence increases with age. It occurs in various joints including hip, knee and hand with knee osteoarthritis being more prevalent. There is no cure for it. The management strategies include exercise, glucosamine plus chondroitin sulfate and NSAIDs. In vitro and animal studies provide a rationale for the use of antioxidant supplements for its management. This review assesses the reality of the benefits of antioxidant supplements in the management of knee osteoarthritis. Several difficulties were encountered in examining this issue: poorly conducted studies, a lack of uniformity in disease definition and diagnosis, and muddling of conclusions from attempts to isolate the efficacious molecules. The antioxidant supplements with most evidence for benefit for pain relief and function in knee osteoarthritis were based on curcumin and avocado-soya bean unsaponifiables. Boswellia and some herbs used in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine may also be useful. The benefits of cuisines with the appropriate antioxidants should be assessed because they may be more economical and easier to incorporate into the lifestyle.

  10. Benefits of antioxidant supplements for knee osteoarthritis: rationale and reality.

    PubMed

    Grover, Ashok Kumar; Samson, Sue E

    2016-01-01

    Arthritis causes disability due to pain and inflammation in joints. There are many forms of arthritis, one of which is osteoarthritis whose prevalence increases with age. It occurs in various joints including hip, knee and hand with knee osteoarthritis being more prevalent. There is no cure for it. The management strategies include exercise, glucosamine plus chondroitin sulfate and NSAIDs. In vitro and animal studies provide a rationale for the use of antioxidant supplements for its management. This review assesses the reality of the benefits of antioxidant supplements in the management of knee osteoarthritis. Several difficulties were encountered in examining this issue: poorly conducted studies, a lack of uniformity in disease definition and diagnosis, and muddling of conclusions from attempts to isolate the efficacious molecules. The antioxidant supplements with most evidence for benefit for pain relief and function in knee osteoarthritis were based on curcumin and avocado-soya bean unsaponifiables. Boswellia and some herbs used in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine may also be useful. The benefits of cuisines with the appropriate antioxidants should be assessed because they may be more economical and easier to incorporate into the lifestyle. PMID:26728196

  11. Older Adults without Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis: Knee Alignment and Knee Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Fahlman, Lissa; Sangeorzan, Emmeline; Chheda, Nimisha; Lambright, Daphne

    2014-01-01

    This study describes knee alignment and active knee range of motion (ROM) in a community-based group of 78-year old adults (n = 143) who did not have radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis in either knee (KL < 2). Although knee malalignment is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, most women and men had either valgus or varus alignments. Notably, no men were valgus in both knees. Women with both knees valgus had significantly greater body mass index (P > 0.001) than women with varus or straight knees. Men and women with valgus or varus knee alignments had generally lower ROM than individuals with both knees straight. In summary, this study highlights the complex relationships among knee alignment, ROM, body mass index, and gender in elderly adults without radiographic knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24453501

  12. Older Adults without Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis: Knee Alignment and Knee Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Lissa; Sangeorzan, Emmeline; Chheda, Nimisha; Lambright, Daphne

    2014-01-12

    This study describes knee alignment and active knee range of motion (ROM) in a community-based group of 78-year old adults (n = 143) who did not have radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis in either knee (KL < 2). Although knee malalignment is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, most women and men had either valgus or varus alignments. Notably, no men were valgus in both knees. Women with both knees valgus had significantly greater body mass index (P > 0.001) than women with varus or straight knees. Men and women with valgus or varus knee alignments had generally lower ROM than individuals with both knees straight. In summary, this study highlights the complex relationships among knee alignment, ROM, body mass index, and gender in elderly adults without radiographic knee osteoarthritis.

  13. Within-Day Variability of Fatigue and Pain Among African Americans and Non-Hispanic Whites With Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, DYLAN M.; PARMELEE, PATRICIA A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fatigue is common among persons with osteoarthritis (OA), but little is known about racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence, correlates, or dynamics of fatigue in OA. This research therefore used experience sampling methodology (ESM) to examine fatigue and pain at global and momentary levels among African Americans and non-Hispanic whites with OA. Methods Thirty-nine African Americans and 81 non-Hispanic whites with physician-diagnosed knee OA completed a baseline interview and an ESM protocol assessing fatigue, pain, and mood 4 times daily for 7 days. In addition to analyzing basic group differences, multilevel modeling examined within- versus between-subject patterns and correlates of variability in momentary fatigue, controlling for demographics and other potential confounders. Results Both racial groups experienced moderate levels of fatigue; however, there were clear individual differences in both mean fatigue level and variability across momentary assessments. Mean fatigue levels were associated with global pain and depression. Increase in fatigue over the course of the day was much stronger among non-Hispanic whites than African Americans. Momentary fatigue and pain were closely correlated. Mean fatigue predicted variability in mood; at the momentary level, both fatigue and pain were independently associated with mood. Conclusion Fatigue is a significant factor for both African Americans and non-Hispanic whites with OA, and is negatively related to quality of life. Pain symptoms, at both the momentary level and across individuals, were robust predictors of fatigue. Although overall levels of reported symptoms were similar across these 2 groups, the pattern of fatigue symptoms across the day differed. PMID:26315851

  14. Racial and ethnic differences in older adults with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Sibille, Kimberly T.; Goodin, Burel R.; Ruiter, Megan; Bartley, Emily J.; Riley, Joseph L.; King, Christopher D.; Glover, Toni L.; Sotolongo, Adriana; Herbert, Matthew S.; Schmidt, Jessica; Fessler, Barri J.; Staud, Roland; Redden, David; Bradley, Laurence A.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Knee osteoarthritis (OA) contributes significantly to disability in older individuals and racial/ethnic minorities are disproportionately affected. The present study aimed to characterize differences in clinical and experimental pain including pain inhibition among older African-Americans (AAs) and non-Hispanic whites (NHWs) with knee OA. Methods AAs and NHWs with knee OA (n=267) completed clinical and functional pain assessments including quantitative sensory testing (QST). We hypothesized that 1) AAs would display lower pain tolerance and higher heat, mechanical and cold pain ratings compared to NHWs; 2) AAs would display greater temporal summation compared to NHWs; 3) AAs would display reduced pain inhibition compared to NHWs; 4) AAs would demonstrate greater clinical pain and poorer function relative to NHWs; and 5) QST would significantly predict clinical pain within each race/ethnicity. Results AAs displayed increased pain sensitivity, temporal summation and reduced pain inhibition than NHWs. AAs reported greater clinical pain and poorer function than NHWs. Race/ethnic differences in clinical pain became non-significant when controlling for education and income, whereas differences in QST remained highly significant. Although pain inhibition predicted clinical pain in both groups, different QST measures were additionally predictive of clinical pain within groups. Conclusion Our study establishes race/ethnic differences in experimental and clinical pain and function in older individuals with knee OA. Our findings that different QST measures were associated with clinical pain within race/ethnic groups while reduced pain inhibition was important in all participants warrants further study evaluating common and group-specific pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to clinical pain in OA. PMID:24729357

  15. Knee osteoarthritis: a review of management options.

    PubMed

    Hussain, S M; Neilly, D W; Baliga, S; Patil, S; Meek, Rmd

    2016-02-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is a complex peripheral joint disorder with multiple risk factors. The molecular basis of osteoarthritis has been generally accepted; however, the exact pathogenesis is still not known. Management of patients with osteoarthritis involves a comprehensive history, thorough physical examination and appropriate radiological investigation. The relative slow progress in the disease allows a stepwise algorithmic approach in treatment. Non-surgical treatment involves patient education, lifestyle modification and the use of orthotic devises. These can be achieved in the community. Surgical options include joint sparing procedures such as arthroscopyando osteotomy or joint-replacing procedures. Joint-replacing procedures can be isolated to a single compartment such as patellofemoral arthroplasty or unicompartmental knee replacement or total knee arthroplasty. The key to a successful long-term outcome is optimal patient selection, preoperative counselling and good surgical technique. PMID:27330013

  16. [Arthroscopic treatment for osteoarthritis: knee and shoulder].

    PubMed

    Almazán, Arturo; Cruz, Francisco; Pérez, Francisco; Bravo, César; Ibarra, Clemente

    2007-10-01

    We discuss the role of arthroscopy in the treatment of knee and shoulder osteoarthritis. The most widely used arthroscopic techniques used in these joints for the treatment of osteoarthritis are arthroscopic lavage, arthroscopic debridement, abrasion arthrosplasty and microfractures. Even though arthroscopic techniques are only useful for a specific group of patients and that the procedure does not modify disease's natural history, it is an accessible therapeutic option.

  17. Effects of Meditation on Symptoms of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Selfe, Terry Kit; Innes, Kim E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate changes in knee pain, function, and related indices in older adults with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, following an 8-week meditation program. Methods Eleven community-dwelling adults with physician- confirmed knee OA were enrolled in the study. Core outcomes included recommended measures of knee pain (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC] and 11-point numeric rating scale [NRS]), function (WOMAC), and perceived global status (patient global assessment). Additional outcomes included: perceived stress; stress hardiness; mood; sleep; and sympathetic activation. Following baseline assessment, participants were trained briefly in mantra meditation and instructed to meditate for 15–20 minutes twice daily for 8 weeks, and to record each practice session on a daily log. Changes over time were analyzed using paired t-tests. Results Nine participants (82%) completed the study. Participants had statistically significant improvements in all core outcomes: knee pain (WOMAC: 47.7% ± 25.1% reduction, P = 0.001; NRS: 42.6% ± 34.6% reduction, P < 0.01); function (44.8% ± 29.9, P = 0.001); and global status (45.7% ± 36.5, P = 0.01); as well as knee stiffness (P = 0.005), mood (P = 0.05), and a WOMAC proxy for sleep disturbance (P = 0.005). Conclusions Findings from this pilot study suggest that a mantra meditation program may help reduce knee pain and dysfunction, as well as improving mood and related outcomes in adults with knee OA. PMID:26549967

  18. Knee osteoarthritis image registration: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Celaya-Padilla, José M.; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, José G.

    2015-03-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a very common disease, in early stages, changes in joint structures are shown, some of the most common symptoms are; formation of osteophytes, cartilage degradation and joint space reduction, among others. Based on a joint space reduction measurement, Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale, is a very extensive used tool to asses radiological OA knee x-ray images, based on information obtained from these assessments, the objective of this work is to correlate the Kellgren-Lawrence score to the bilateral asymmetry between knees. Using public data from the Osteoarthritis initiative (OAI), a set of images with different Kellgren-Lawrencescores were used to determine a relationship of Kellgren-Lawrence score and the bilateral asymmetry, in order to measure the asymmetry between the knees, the right knee was registered to match the left knee, then a series of similarity metrics, mutual information, correlation, and mean squared error where computed to correlate the deformation (mismatch) of the knees to the Kellgren-Lawrence score. Radiological information was evaluated and scored by OAI radiologist groups. The results of the study suggest an association between Radiological Kellgren-Lawrence score and image registration metrics, mutual information and correlation is higher in the early stages, and mean squared error is higher in advanced stages. This association can be helpful to develop a computer aided grading tool.

  19. Efficacy of Unloader Bracing in Reducing Symptoms of Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ostrander, Roger V; Leddon, Charles E; Hackel, Joshua G; O'Grady, Christopher P; Roth, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    Braces designed to unload the more diseased compartment of the knee have been used to provide symptomatic relief from osteoarthritis (OA). Research on the efficacy of these braces is needed. Thirty-one patients with knee OA were randomized to receive an unloader brace (n = 16) or not to receive a brace (control group, n = 15). Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcomes Score (KOOS) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores were used to evaluate outcomes. KOOS results showed that the brace group had significantly less pain (P < .001), fewer arthritis symptoms (P = .007), and better ability to engage in activities of daily living (P = .008). There was no difference in function in sport and recreation (P = .402) or in knee-related quality of life (P = .718). VAS results showed that the brace group had significantly less pain throughout the day (P = .021) and had improved activity levels (P = .035). There was no difference in ability to sleep (P = .117) or in use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (P = .138). Our study results showed that use of an unloader brace for medial compartment knee OA led to significant improvements in pain, arthritis symptoms, and ability to engage in activities.

  20. Anterior knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... as running, jumping or twisting, skiing, or playing soccer). You have flat feet. Anterior knee pain is ... to the kneecap Runners, jumpers, skiers, bicyclists, and soccer players who exercise often Teenagers and healthy young ...

  1. Gait Using Pneumatic Brace for End-Stage Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Starr, Roland; Chughtai, Morad; Mont, Michael A; Harwin, Steven F; Bhave, Anil

    2016-04-01

    More than 20 million individuals in the United States are affected by knee osteoarthritis (OA), which can lead to altered biomechanics and excessive joint loading. The use of an unloader pneumatic brace with extension assist has been proposed as a nonoperative treatment modality that may improve gait mechanics and correct knee malalignment. We assessed the following parameters in patients who have knee OA treated with and without a brace: (1) changes in temporospatial parameters in gait; (2) knee range of motion, knee extension at heel strike, and foot placement; (3) knee joint moments and impulse; and (4) changes in dynamic stiffness and rate of change of knee flexion during midstance to terminal stance. This 2:1 prospective, randomized, single-blinded trial evaluated 36 patients (24 brace and 12 matching). OA knee patients were randomized to receive either a pneumatic unloader brace or a standard nonoperative treatment regimen as the matching cohort for a 3-month period. They underwent evaluation of gait parameters using a three-dimensional gait analysis system at their initial appointment and at 3 months follow-up. All the testing, pre- and postbracing were performed without wearing the brace to examine for retained effects. Treatment with the brace led to significant improvements versus standard treatment in various gait parameters. Patients in the brace group had improvements in walking speed, knee extension at heel strike, total range of motion, knee joint forces, and rate of knee flexion from midstance to terminal stance when compared with the matching cohort. Knee OA patients who used a pneumatic unloader brace for 3 months for at least 3 hours per day had significant improvements various gait parameters when compared with a standard nonoperative therapy cohort. Braced patients demonstrated gait-modifying affects when not wearing the brace. These results are encouraging and suggest that this device represents a promising treatment modality for knee OA that

  2. Radiographic patterns and associations of osteoarthritis of the knee in patients referred to hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Ledingham, J; Regan, M; Jones, A; Doherty, M

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To investigate differing patterns and associations of osteoarthritis of the knee in patients referred to hospital. METHODS--Two hundred and fifty two consecutive patients (161 women, 91 men; mean age 70 years, range 34-91 years) referred to hospital with osteoarthritis of the knee underwent clinical, radiographic, and synovial fluid screening. RESULTS--Radiographic changes of osteoarthritis of the knee (definite narrowing with or without osteoarthritic features) were bilateral in 85% of patients. Of 470 knees affected, 277 (59%) were affected in two compartments and 28 (6%) in three compartments. Unilateral and isolated medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis were more common in men. Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition was common (synovial fluid identification in 132 (28%) knees; knee chondrocalcinosis in 76 (30%) patients) and associated with disability, bilateral, multicompartmental and severe radiographic osteoarthritis, marked osteophytosis, attrition, and cysts. Multiple clinical nodes (58 (23%) patients) and radiographic polyarticular interphalangeal osteoarthritis (66 (26%) patients) were associated with a higher frequency of inactivity pain, disability, multicompartmental and severe radiographic change. Forestier's disease predominated in men but showed no other associations. CONCLUSIONS--In a group of patients referred to hospital osteoarthritis of the knee is usually bilateral and affects more than one compartment. Severe and multicompartmental radiographic changes are associated with calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition, nodal change, and polyarticular interphalangeal osteoarthritis. PMID:8346979

  3. Effect of vitamin D supplementation on progression of knee pain and cartilage volume loss in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA), a disorder of cartilage and periarticular bone, is a public health problem without effective medical treatments. Some studies have suggested that vitamin D may protect against structural progression. A 2-year randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, clinical trial invo...

  4. Occupational activities and osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is rising and the search for interventions to mitigate risk is intensifying. This review considers the contribution of occupational activities to disease occurrence and the lessons for prevention. Sources Systematic search in Embase and Medline covering the period 1996 to November 2011. Areas of agreement Reasonably good evidence exists that physical work activities (especially kneeling, squatting, lifting, and climbing) can cause and/or aggravate knee OA. These exposures should be reduced where possible. Obese workers with such exposures are at additional risk of knee OA and should therefore particularly be encouraged to lose weight. Areas of uncertainty/research need Workplace interventions and policies to prevent knee OA have seldom been evaluated. Moreover, their implementation can be problematic. However, the need for research to optimise the design of work in relation to knee OA is pressing, given population trends towards extended working life. PMID:22544778

  5. Knee pain in competitive swimming.

    PubMed

    Rodeo, S A

    1999-04-01

    The high volume of training in competitive swimming results in cumulative overload injuries. Knee pain ranks second to shoulder pain as a common complaint in competitive swimmers. Most knee pain occurs on the medial side of the knee and, most commonly, in breaststroke swimmers; however, knee pain may accompany all strokes. This article reviews the incidence of knee pain, the biomechanic and anatomic factors predisposing to injury, specific injury patterns, injury diagnosis, and the treatment and prevention of injury to the knee in swimmers. PMID:10230572

  6. The benefits of bariatric surgery in obese patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gill, R S; Al-Adra, D P; Shi, X; Sharma, A M; Birch, D W; Karmali, S

    2011-12-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common progressive disease leading to joint pain and severe disability. It is a complex multifactorial disease leading to damage of cartilage, deposition of subchondral bone matrix and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Obesity is an emerging epidemic and also an important risk factor for osteoarthritis. Weight loss has been shown to improve pain and function in hip and knee joints with osteoarthritis. Bariatric surgery currently is the only evidence-based approach to marked weight loss in obese individuals. However, there is currently limited literature to evaluate the role of bariatric surgery in hip and knee osteoarthritis. The objective of the present study was to systematically review the literature regarding the effectiveness of bariatric surgery in obese adult patients in improving large weight-bearing joint (hip and knee) osteoarthritis. Published English-language manuscripts were considered for review inclusion. A comprehensive search of electronic databases using broad search terms was completed. From a total of 400 articles, eight articles were identified. A total of six studies were included for qualitative analysis. A general trend was identified indicating improved hip and knee osteoarthritis following marked weight loss secondary to bariatric surgery. This systematic review demonstrates that bariatric surgery may benefit obese patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis. However, this review identifies the need for randomized controlled trials to clarify the role and indications for bariatric surgery.

  7. Average symptom trajectories following incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, Rebecca; Jordan, Kelvin P; Thomas, Elaine; Peat, George

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Previous research has identified the existence of a prodromal phase of symptom worsening beginning on average 2–3 years prior to the first appearance of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). The current study extends these observations to investigate the trajectory of self-reported pain, stiffness, function and other symptoms following the incidence of radiographic OA. Methods Data were from the incidence cohort of the Osteoarthritis Initiative public use data sets. Cases were defined as knees without symptoms at enrolment, which developed incident radiographic OA (Kellgren and Lawrence grade ≥2) at any of the first 4 annual follow-up visits. Symptoms investigated were knee-specific Western Ontario & McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score subscale scores and individual items, available up to 3 years before and 5 years after the incidence of radiographic OA. Trajectories of having at least one of the symptoms from a subscale, and for each individual symptom over time, were fitted using multilevel logistic regression models. Results The probability of symptoms following the initial prodromal phase generally stabilised, whereas the probability of moderate, severe or extreme symptoms was consistently low. Two exceptions were pain frequency, which increased greatly in the lead up to incidence, then decreased slightly, and audible joint sounds, which had a much higher overall probability, and after increasing prior to incident radiographic OA, stabilised then started to increase again at 5 years. Conclusions Following an increase in the risk of symptoms during the prodromal phase, this risk does not continue to increase in the period up to 5 years after the incidence of radiographic OA. PMID:27486528

  8. Conservative biomechanical strategies for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Neil D; Bowling, Frank L

    2011-02-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent forms of this disease, with the medial compartment most commonly affected. The direction of external forces and limb orientation during walking results in an adduction moment that acts around the knee, and this parameter is regarded as a surrogate measure of medial knee compression. The knee adduction moment is intimately linked with the development and progression of knee OA and is, therefore, a target for conservative biomechanical intervention strategies, which are the focus of this Review. We examine the evidence for walking barefoot and the use of lateral wedge insoles and thin-soled, flexible shoes to reduce the knee adduction moment in patients with OA. We review strategies that directly affect the gait, such as walking with the foot externally rotated ('toe-out gait'), using a cane, lateral trunk sway and gait retraining. Valgus knee braces and muscle strengthening are also discussed for their effect upon reducing the knee adduction moment. PMID:21289615

  9. Effects of exercise and physical activity on knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Esser, Stephan; Bailey, Allison

    2011-12-01

    Exercise is one of the most discussed and controversial nonpharmacologic management strategies for osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Health care providers and patients share varied and often pseudoscientific beliefs regarding the effects of exercise on knee OA formulated on outdated notions of the etiology, pathophysiology, and progression of the condition. Based on the contemporary literature, regular light to moderate physical activity has both preventive and therapeutic benefits for individuals with knee OA. Exercise regimens with strong evidence of benefit include those that focus on aerobic/cardiovascular conditioning and lower extremity strength training. Health care providers should confidently incorporate exercise recommendations into clinical management and offer patients evidence-based and individually tailored exercise prescriptions to help manage the painful and often disabling symptoms of this condition.

  10. Subjects with Knee Osteoarthritis Exhibit Widespread Hyperalgesia to Pressure and Cold.

    PubMed

    Moss, Penny; Knight, Emma; Wright, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Hyperalgesia to mechanical and thermal stimuli are characteristics of a range of disorders such as tennis elbow, whiplash and fibromyalgia. This study evaluated the presence of local and widespread mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in individuals with knee osteoarthritis, compared to healthy control subjects. Twenty-three subjects with knee osteoarthritis and 23 healthy controls, matched for age, gender and body mass index, were recruited for the study. Volunteers with any additional chronic pain conditions were excluded. Pain thresholds to pressure, cold and heat were tested at the knee, ipsilateral heel and ipsilateral elbow, in randomized order, using standardised methodology. Significant between-groups differences for pressure pain and cold pain thresholds were found with osteoarthritic subjects demonstrating significantly increased sensitivity to both pressure (p = .018) and cold (p = .003) stimuli, compared with controls. A similar pattern of results extended to the pain-free ipsilateral ankle and elbow indicating widespread pressure and cold hyperalgesia. No significant differences were found between groups for heat pain threshold, although correlations showed that subjects with greater sensitivity to pressure pain were also likely to be more sensitive to both cold pain and heat pain. This study found widespread elevated pain thresholds in subjects with painful knee osteoarthritis, suggesting that altered nociceptive system processing may play a role in ongoing arthritic pain for some patients. PMID:26809009

  11. Subjects with Knee Osteoarthritis Exhibit Widespread Hyperalgesia to Pressure and Cold

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Penny; Knight, Emma; Wright, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Hyperalgesia to mechanical and thermal stimuli are characteristics of a range of disorders such as tennis elbow, whiplash and fibromyalgia. This study evaluated the presence of local and widespread mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in individuals with knee osteoarthritis, compared to healthy control subjects. Twenty-three subjects with knee osteoarthritis and 23 healthy controls, matched for age, gender and body mass index, were recruited for the study. Volunteers with any additional chronic pain conditions were excluded. Pain thresholds to pressure, cold and heat were tested at the knee, ipsilateral heel and ipsilateral elbow, in randomized order, using standardised methodology. Significant between-groups differences for pressure pain and cold pain thresholds were found with osteoarthritic subjects demonstrating significantly increased sensitivity to both pressure (p = .018) and cold (p = .003) stimuli, compared with controls. A similar pattern of results extended to the pain-free ipsilateral ankle and elbow indicating widespread pressure and cold hyperalgesia. No significant differences were found between groups for heat pain threshold, although correlations showed that subjects with greater sensitivity to pressure pain were also likely to be more sensitive to both cold pain and heat pain. This study found widespread elevated pain thresholds in subjects with painful knee osteoarthritis, suggesting that altered nociceptive system processing may play a role in ongoing arthritic pain for some patients. PMID:26809009

  12. Does diabetes hide osteoarthritis pain?

    PubMed

    Leaverton, Paul E; Peregoy, Jennifer; Fahlman, Lissa; Sangeorzan, Emmeline; Barrett, John P

    2012-04-01

    Clinical practice and research efforts related to the highly prevalent and disabling disease, osteoarthritis (OA), have long been hampered by an inadequate case definition. Much of the difficulty is due to a lack of agreement between X-rays evidence of OA and a patient's report of pain at that site. Such discordance between reported pain and radiographic evidence of OA has been attributed to several factors. This paper proposes another possible explanation, for at least a portion of such patients. It is hypothesized that an insidiously increasing diabetic neuropathy, particularly in the lower extremity, while first causing some pain, may gradually inhibit the ability to feel pain which might have otherwise been reported by those patients without neuropathy. Many of these patients with early stage glucose dysmetabolism will proceed to develop overt type 2 diabetes; however, the pain-inhibiting neuropathy caused by glucose metabolism dysfunction may manifest long before such a diagnosis. The high prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetic conditions, especially among the aged population, could mean that a substantial number of individuals with osteoarthritis will have both diseases to varying degrees over time. Validating and quantifying this hypothesized association would be useful to millions of persons and would significantly impact both research and clinical practice dealing with these major diseases of older persons.

  13. Duloxetine in OsteoArthritis (DOA) study: study protocol of a pragmatic open-label randomised controlled trial assessing the effect of preoperative pain treatment on postoperative outcome after total hip or knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Blikman, T; Rienstra, W; van Raaij, T M; ten Hagen, A J; Dijkstra, B; Zijlstra, W P; Bulstra, S K; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Stevens, M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Residual pain is a major factor in patient dissatisfaction following total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty (THA/TKA). The proportion of patients with unfavourable long-term residual pain is high, ranging from 7% to 34%. There are studies indicating that a preoperative degree of central sensitisation (CS) is associated with poorer postoperative outcomes and residual pain. It is thus hypothesised that preoperative treatment of CS could enhance postoperative outcomes. Duloxetine has been shown to be effective for several chronic pain syndromes, including knee osteoarthritis (OA), in which CS is most likely one of the underlying pain mechanisms. This study aims to evaluate the postoperative effects of preoperative screening and targeted duloxetine treatment of CS on residual pain compared with care-as-usual. Methods and analysis This multicentre, pragmatic, prospective, open-label, randomised controlled trial includes patients with idiopathic hip/knee OA who are on a waiting list for primary THA/TKA. Patients at risk for CS will be randomly allocated to the preoperative duloxetine treatment programme group or the care-as-usual control group. The primary end point is the degree of postoperative pain 6 months after THA/TKA. Secondary end points at multiple time points up to 12 months postoperatively are: pain, neuropathic pain-like symptoms, (pain) sensitisation, pain catastrophising, joint-associated problems, physical activity, health-related quality of life, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and perceived improvement. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee (METc 2014/087) and will be conducted according to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki (64th, 2013) and the Good Clinical Practice standard (GCP), and in compliance with the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act (WMO). Trial registration number 2013-004313-41; Pre

  14. CCR2 chemokine receptor signaling mediates pain in experimental osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rachel E.; Tran, Phuong B.; Das, Rosalina; Ghoreishi-Haack, Nayereh; Ren, Dongjun; Miller, Richard J.; Malfait, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of chronic pain, but almost nothing is known about the mechanisms and molecules that mediate osteoarthritis-associated joint pain. Consequently, treatment options remain inadequate and joint replacement is often inevitable. Here, we use a surgical mouse model that captures the long-term progression of knee osteoarthritis to longitudinally assess pain-related behaviors and concomitant changes in the innervating dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We demonstrate that monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (CCL2) and its high-affinity receptor, chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2), are central to the development of pain associated with knee osteoarthritis. After destabilization of the medial meniscus, mice developed early-onset secondary mechanical allodynia that was maintained for 16 wk. MCP-1 and CCR2 mRNA, protein, and signaling activity were temporarily up-regulated in the innervating DRG at 8 wk after surgery. This result correlated with the presentation of movement-provoked pain behaviors, which were maintained up to 16 wk. Mice that lack Ccr2 also developed mechanical allodynia, but this started to resolve from 8 wk onwards. Despite severe allodynia and structural knee joint damage equal to wild-type mice, Ccr2-null mice did not develop movement-provoked pain behaviors at 8 wk. In wild-type mice, macrophages infiltrated the DRG by 8 wk and this was maintained through 16 wk after surgery. In contrast, macrophage infiltration was not observed in Ccr2-null mice. These observations suggest a key role for the MCP-1/CCR2 pathway in establishing osteoarthritis pain. PMID:23185004

  15. Radiographic knee osteoarthritis in ex-elite table tennis players

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Table tennis involves adoption of the semi-flexed knee and asymmetrical torsional trunk movements creating rotational torques on the knee joint which may predispose players to osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. This study aims to compare radiographic signs of knee OA and associated functional levels in ex-elite male table tennis players and control subjects. Methods Study participants were 22 ex-elite male table tennis players (mean age 56.64 ± 5.17 years) with 10 years of involvement at the professional level and 22 non-athletic males (mean age 55.63 ± 4.08 years) recruited from the general population. A set of three radiographs taken from each knee were evaluated by an experienced radiologist using the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) scale (0-4) to determine radiographic levels of OA severity. The intercondylar distance was taken as a measure of lower limb angulation. Participants also completed the pain, stiffness, and physical function categories of the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) 3.1 questionnaire. Results The results showed 78.3% of the ex-elite table tennis players and 36.3% of controls had varying signs of radiographic knee OA with a significant difference in the prevalence levels of definite radiographic OA (KL scale > 2) found between the two groups (P ≤ 0.001). Based on the WOMAC scores, 68.2% of the ex-elite table tennis players reported symptoms of knee pain compared with 27.3% of the controls (p = 0.02) though no significant differences were identified in the mean physical function or stiffness scores between the two groups. In terms of knee alignment, 73.7% of the ex-elite athletes and 32% of the control group had signs of altered lower limb alignment (genu varum) (p = 0.01). Statistical differences were found in subjects categorized as having radiographic signs of OA and altered lower limb alignment (p = 0.03). Conclusions Ex-elite table tennis players were found to have increased levels of

  16. Management of primary knee osteoarthritis and indications for total knee arthroplasty for general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Van Manen, Mike D; Nace, James; Mont, Michael A

    2012-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, one of the most common causes of disability, continues to increase in prevalence as the older adult and obese populations grow. Often, the general practitioner is the first to evaluate a patient with a painful knee that has arthritis. Evidence-based evaluation and treatment guidelines recommend the use of nonoperative treatments before surgical treatment options such as total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are considered. Understanding available nonoperative treatment options is critical for physicians who first encounter patients with OA of the knee. The authors provide an overview of nonoperative treatment options for patients with OA, including weight loss, aerobic exercise, osteopathic manipulative treatment, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroid injections. The authors also discuss operative treatment options to be considered before TKA and review indications for TKA when other treatment options have been exhausted.

  17. Relationship of bone mineral density to progression of knee osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective. To evaluate the longitudinal relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and BMD changes and the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA), as measured by cartilage outcomes. Methods. We used observational cohort data from the Vitamin D for Knee Osteoarthritis trial. Bilateral femoral ...

  18. Vitamin K deficiency is associated with incident knee osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, with knee osteoarthritis being the leading cause of lower extremity disability among older adults in the US. There are no treatments available to prevent the structural pathology of osteoarthritis. Because of vitamin K’s role in regulating skeleta...

  19. Nonoperative Treatment Approach to Knee Osteoarthritis in the Master Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Huleatt, Joel B.; Campbell, Kevin J.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Middle-age and elderly participants in athletic activities frequently encounter the chronic disabling process of osteoarthritis. Knowledge of the treatment of knee osteoarthritis is needed to keep the master athlete active. Objective: This article reviews the current scientific evidence regarding recommendations for the maturing athlete, specifically discussing the strengths and weaknesses of dietary and lifestyle modifications, physical therapy, bracing, supplements, pharmacotherapies, and biologics in the management of knee osteoarthritis. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Conclusion: These treatment modalities can help keep the aging athlete active, which in itself plays an important role in reducing the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24427443

  20. Stem cell application for osteoarthritis in the knee joint: A minireview.

    PubMed

    Uth, Kristin; Trifonov, Dimitar

    2014-11-26

    Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic, indolent disease that will affect an ever increasing number of patients, especially the elderly and the obese. It is characterized by degeneration of the cartilage substance inside the knee which leads to pain, stiffness and tenderness. By some estimations in 2030, only in the United States, this medical condition will burden 67 million people. While conventional treatments like physiotherapy or drugs offer temporary relief of clinical symptoms, restoration of normal cartilage function has been difficult to achieve. Moreover, in severe cases of knee osteoarthritis total knee replacement may be required. Total knee replacements come together with high effort and costs and are not always successful. The aim of this review is to outline the latest advances in stem cell therapy for knee osteoarthritis as well as highlight some of the advantages of stem cell therapy over traditional approaches aimed at restoration of cartilage function in the knee. In addition to the latest advances in the field, challenges associated with stem cell therapy regarding knee cartilage regeneration and chondrogenesis in vitro and in vivo are also outlined and analyzed. Furthermore, based on their critical assessment of the present academic literature the authors of this review share their vision about the future of stem cell applications in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

  1. MR features of osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Madrid, F; Karvonen, R L; Teitge, R A; Miller, P R; Negendank, W G

    1994-01-01

    A group of patients with idiopathic osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee was surveyed using weight-bearing radiographs and MR imaging to compare the relative value of these methods in disease evaluation. Fifty-two patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of OA of the knee of relatively short duration (87%: < or = 4 yr) were compared to a reference group of 40 age- and sex-comparable subjects with no knee symptoms. All patients had a complete history, physical examination, standard anterior-posterior and lateral weight-bearing radiographs, T1-weighted, and FLASH MR images in both knees. The prevalence of MRI abnormalities was significantly greater in patients with OA of the knee in all radiographic grades (Kellgren and Lawrence) compared to the reference subjects. Significant differences were encountered for synovial thickening (OA, 73%; reference, 0%), synovial fluid (60%; 7%), meniscal degeneration (52%; 7%), osteophytes (67%; 12%), and subchondral bone involvement (65%; 7%), even in the patients at the mild end of the osteoarthritic spectrum, indicating the exquisite sensitivity of MRI compared with weight-bearing radiographs. PMID:7934656

  2. Application of Infrared Thermography as a Diagnostic Tool of Knee Osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfaoui, Ahlem; Bouzid, Mohamed Amine; Pron, Hervé; Taiar, Redha; Polidori, Guillaume

    This paper aimed to study the feasibility of application of infrared thermography to detect osteoarthritis of the knee and to compare the distribution of skin temperature between participants with osteoarthritis and those without pathology. All tests were conducted at LACM (Laboratory of Mechanical Stresses Analysis) and the gymnasium of the University of Reims Champagne Ardennes. IR thermography was performed using an IR camera. Ten participants with knee osteoarthritis and 12 reference healthy participants without OA participated in this study. Questionnaires were also used. The participants with osteoarthritis of the knee were selected on clinical examination and a series of radiographs. The level of pain was recorded by using a simple verbal scale (0-4). Infrared thermography reveals relevant disease by highlighting asymmetrical behavior in thermal color maps of both knees. Moreover, a linear evolution of skin temperature in the knee area versus time has been found whatever the participant group is in the first stage following a given effort. Results clearly show that the temperature can be regarded as a key parameter for evaluating pain. Thermal images of the knee were taken with an infrared camera. The study shows that with the advantage of being noninvasive and easily repeatable, IRT appears to be a useful tool to detect quantifiable patterns of surface temperatures and predict the singular thermal behavior of this pathology. It also seems that this non-intrusive technique enables to detect the early clinical manifestations of knee OA.

  3. Subacute pain after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Axel; Breivik, Harald

    2014-06-01

    Acute pain during and immediately after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can be well controlled by spinal anesthesia, local infiltration analgesia, and peripheral nerve blocks; this enables early or fast-track rehabilitation. However, about half of patients have clinically significant pain in the following weeks. Active movements and rehabilitation of joint function, muscle strength, and ability to maintain balance and prevent falls all become more difficult when the joint is painful on movement. Intensive analgesic and antihyperalgesic treatment during the first few weeks after TKA surgery may reduce the risk of chronic pain after this operation, which is itself intended to remove the patient's chronic osteoarthritis pain. Spinal cord stimulation may be an effective option for patients with mainly neuropathic pain after TKA surgery.

  4. A pilot study to compare two different hyaluronic acid compounds for treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Iannitti, T; Rottigni, V; Palmieri, B

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is characterized by progressive articular cartilage degeneration, changes in subchondral bone and synovial inflammation, leading to pain and disability. Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid has been widely investigated due to the viscoelastic properties of this compound to manage pain improving the ability to perform daily activities in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In the present study we investigated the clinical effectiveness of viscosupplementation with a new highly cross-linked hyaluronic acid, Variofill, in patients affected by bilateral knee osteoarthritis in comparison with the widely used Synvisc. A total of 20 patients, aged between 24-74 years and affected by bilateral knee osteoarthritis, participated in this pilot randomized triple-blind clinical study. They received two injections (2 ml each) of Synvisc in their left knee and 2 injections (2 ml each) of Variofill in their right knee spaced 15 days apart. Visual Analogue Scale and Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score were used to evaluate the efficacy of hyaluronic acid injections before and 3 and 6 months after treatment. Both treatment regimens resulted in a significant improvement vs baseline in all endpoints at 3 and 6 months (p less than 0.001). Treatment with Variofill resulted in a high percentage improvement in Visual Analogue Scale pain, Western Ontario McMaster universities Osteoarthritis Index score pain and physical activity, when compared to Synvisc viscosupplementation, at 6 months (p less than 0.05). These results are encouraging for larger clinical trials with Variofill in larger cohorts of patients affected by osteoarthritis of the knee. PMID:23298499

  5. [The association between sports activity and knee osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Zeller, Lior; Sukenik, Shaul

    2008-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common non-inflammatory joint disease. The hip and knee, the main weight-bearing joints, are most commonly affected. Previous trauma to the joints is strongly associated with OA. Participation in various sports activities, including fitness room activities, intensive running and cycling, is on the rise. These activities offer potential health benefits and have been advocated for the primary and secondary prevention of many diseases, including diabetes and coronary artery disease. However, it has been hypothesized that physical activity might increase cartilage degeneration and thus accelerate knee OA. In this article we review the literature with the purpose of evaluating the purported association between sports activity and knee OA. Previous research did not show a significant association between intense physical activity and knee OA in the general population. A strong association was found in cases of former joint injury and in acquired and congenital joint defects. Moderate physical activity is recommended for people already suffering from OA with the goal of increasing muscle-strength, reducing pain and preserving the range of movement in the affected joints. People who wish to participate in sports activities should be evaluated by their family physician. This evaluation should include assessment of risk factors for knee OA, particularly in patients with previous joint injury. PMID:18686813

  6. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) in Persian Speaking Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Makhmalbaf, Hadi; Birjandinejad, Ali; Keshtan, Farideh Golhasani; Hoseini, Hosein A; Mazloumi, Seyed Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis of the knee is the most common chronic joint disease that involves middle aged and elderly persons. There are different clinical instruments to quantify the health status of patients with knee osteoarthritis and one example is the WOMAC score that has been translated and adapted into different languages. The purpose of this study was cultural adaptation, validation and reliability testing of the Persian version of the WOMAC index in Iranians with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: We translated the original WOMAC questionnaire into Persian by the forward and backward technique, and then its psychometric study was done on 169 native Persian speaking patients with knee degenerative joint disease. Mean age of patients was 53.9 years. The SF-36 and KOOS were used to assess construct validity. Results: Reliability testing resulted in a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.917, showing the internal consistency of the questionnaire to be a reliable tool. Inter-correlation matrix among different scales of the Persian WOMAC index yielded a highly significant correlation between all subscales including stiffness, pain, and physical function. In terms of validity, Pearson`s correlation coefficient was significant between three domains of the WOMAC with PF, RP, BP, GH, VT, and PCS dimensions of the SF-36 health survey (P<0.005) and KOOS (P<0.0001) . Conclusions: The Persian WOMAC index is a valid and reliable patient- reported clinical instrument for knee osteoarthritis. PMID:25207315

  7. Effects of Electroacupuncture for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study aims to verify the effects of electroacupuncture treatment on osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods. MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, AMED, CNKI, and five Korean databases were searched by predefined search strategies to screen eligible randomized controlled studies meeting established criteria. Any risk of bias in the included studies was assessed with the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. Meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan version 5.3 software. Results. Thirty-one randomized controlled studies of 3,187 participants were included in this systematic review. Meta-analysis was conducted with eight studies including a total of 1,220 participants. The electroacupuncture treatment group showed more significant improvement in pain due to knee osteoarthritis than the control group (SMD −1.86, 95% CI −2.33 to −1.39, I2 75%) and in total WOMAC score than the control group (SMD −1.34, CI 95% −1.85 to −0.83, I2 73%). Compared to the control group, the electroacupuncture treatment group showed more significant improvement on the quality of life scale. Conclusion. Electroacupuncture treatment can relieve the pain of osteoarthritis of the knees and improve comprehensive aspects of knee osteoarthritis and the quality of life of patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  8. Pain Coping Strategies in Osteoarthritis Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Investigated the relation of pain coping strategies to pain, health status, and psychological distress in a group of osteoarthritis patients with chronic pain. Patients completed various questionnaires. Medical status variables were also used. The Pain Control and Rational Thinking factor derived from the Coping Strategies Questionnaire proved to…

  9. Investigation the efficacy of intra-articular prolotherapy with erythropoietin and dextrose and intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency on pain level reduction and range of motion improvement in primary osteoarthritis of knee

    PubMed Central

    Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Imani, Farnad; Faiz, Seyed Hamid Reza; Entezary, Saeed Reza; Nasiri, Ali Akbar; Ziaeefard, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis is one of the most common diseases and the knee is the most commonly affected joint. Intra-articular prolotherapy is being utilized in acute and chronic pain management setting. This study was designed to compare the efficacy of three methods of intra-articular knee joint therapies with erythropoietin, dextrose, and pulsed radiofrequency. Materials and Methods: After approval by the Ethics Committee and explaining the therapeutic method to volunteers, 70 patients who were suffering from primary knee osteoarthrosis went through one of the treatment methods (erythropoietin, dextrose, and pulsed radiofrequency). The study was double-blind randomized clinical trial performed from December 2012 to July 2013. Patients’ pain level was assessed through the visual analog pain scale (VAS), and range of motion (ROM) was measured by goniometric method. Furthermore, patients’ satisfaction was assessed before and after different treatment methods in weeks 2, 4, and 12. For analysis, Chi-square, one-way ANOVA, and repeated measured ANOVA were utilized. Results: The demographic results among the three groups did not indicate any statistical difference. The mean VAS in erythropoietin group in the 2nd, 4th, and 12th weeks was 3.15 ± 1.08, 3.15 ± 1.08, and 3.5 ± 1.23, respectively (P ≤ 0.005). Knee joint ROM in the erythropoietin group in the 2nd, 4th, and 12th weeks was 124 ± 1.50, 124 ± 1.4, and 123 ± 1.53 respectively (P ≤ 0.005). Satisfaction score in the 12th week in erythropoietin group was extremely satisfied 15%, satisfied 55%, and moderately satisfied 30%, (P = 0.005). No specific side-effects were observed. Conclusion: Intra-articular prolotherapy with erythropoietin was more effective in terms of pain level reduction and ROM improvement compared with dextrose and pulsed radiofrequency. PMID:25422652

  10. Effectiveness of exercise for osteoarthritis of the knee: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Jun; Sato, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Tsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2011-05-18

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is the most common type of arthritis and the major cause of chronic musculoskeletal pain and mobility disability in the elderly. The objective of this paper is to discuss the effectiveness of exercise for OA of the knee based on a review of the literature. We reviewed the relevant literature, i.e. systematic reviews and meta-analyses searched using PubMed. Muscle strengthening and aerobic exercises are effective in reducing pain and improving physical function in patients with mild to moderate OA of the knee.

  11. A comparison of the biomechanical effects of valgus knee braces and lateral wedged insoles in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard K; Nester, Christopher J; Richards, Jim D; Kim, Winston Y; Johnson, David S; Jari, Sanjiv; Laxton, Philip; Tyson, Sarah F

    2013-03-01

    Increases in the external knee adduction moment (EKAM) have been associated with increased mechanical load at the knee and progression of knee osteoarthritis. Valgus knee braces and lateral wedged insoles are common approaches to reducing this loading; however no study has directly compared the biomechanical and clinical effects of these two treatments in patients with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. A cross-over randomised design was used where each intervention was worn by 28 patients for a two week period. Pre- and post-intervention gait kinematic/kinetic data and clinical outcomes were collected to evaluate the biomechanical and clinical effects on the knee joint. The valgus knee brace and the lateral wedged insole significantly increased walking speed, reduced the early stance EKAM by 7% and 12%, and the knee adduction angular impulse by 8.6 and 16.1% respectively. The lateral wedged insole significantly reduced the early stance EKAM compared to the valgus knee brace (p=0.001). The valgus knee brace significantly reduced the knee varus angle compared to the baseline and lateral wedged insole. Improvements in pain and function subscales were comparable for the valgus knee brace and lateral wedged insole. There were no significant differences between the two treatments in any of the clinical outcomes; however the lateral wedged insoles demonstrated greater levels of acceptance by patients. This is the first study to biomechanically compare these two treatments, and demonstrates that given the potential role of knee loading in osteoarthritis progression, that both treatments reduce this but lateral wedge insoles appear to have a greater effect.

  12. Association between Knee Osteoarthritis, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, and the Framingham Risk Score in South Koreans: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Sun; Shin, Joon-Shik; Lee, Jinho; Lee, Yoon Jae; Kim, Me-riong; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Park, Ki Byung; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Joo-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a significant burden on personal health and for social cost, and its prevalence is rising. Recent research has revealed an association between osteoarthritis and cardiovascular disease, and this study uses the Framingham risk score (FRS), which is widely used as a composite index of cardiovascular risk factors, to investigate the association between osteoarthritis and various cardiovascular risk factors. Methods A total 9,514 participants aged 50 years or older who received knee X-ray diagnosis of the 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (total surveyees = 24,173) released by the Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was included for analysis. Knee osteoarthritis patients were defined as participants with K-L grade ≥2 on knee X-ray regardless of knee pain. The association between major cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, diabetes, cholesterol, and smoking habits), FRS, and knee osteoarthritis was analyzed, adjusting for various covariates. Results Prevalence of knee osteoarthritis in Koreans aged ≥50 years was 36.6%, and higher in women (men: 24.9%, women: 45.4%). Prevalence of knee osteoarthritis in participants with hypertension was significantly higher than those without hypertension (fully adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.26; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08–1.48). Knee osteoarthritis prevalence was also higher in participants with impaired fasting glucose or diabetes than those without (age, sex adjusted OR 1.19; 95% CI 1.00–1.41). Also, OR values increased statistically significantly with FRS as a continuous variable (fully adjusted OR 1.007; 95% CI 1.00–1.01). Conclusions Prevalence of knee osteoarthritis was associated with hypertension and diabetes, which are major cardiovascular risk factors, and the FRS. Further studies on FRS pertaining to its relationship with osteoarthritis are warranted. PMID:27764239

  13. Role of Agnikarma in Sandhigata Vata (osteoarthritis of knee joint)

    PubMed Central

    Jethava, Nilesh G.; Dudhamal, Tukaram S.; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sandhigata Vata is one of Vata Vyadhi characterized by the symptoms such as Sandhishoola (joint pain) and Sandhishopha (swelling of joint). Osteoarthritis (OA) is degenerative joint disorder, represents failure of the diarthrodial (movable, synovial-lined) joint. OA of knee joint comes under the inflammatory group which is almost identical to Sandhigata Vata described in Ayurveda with respect to etiology, pathology, and clinical features. Agnikarma (therapeutic heat burn) is one which gives instant relief from pain by balancing local Vata and Kapha Dosha without any untoward effects. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of Agnikarma with Rajata and Loha Dhatu Shalaka in the management of Janugata Sandhivata (OA of knee joint). Materials and Methods: A total of 28 diagnosed patients of Janugata Sandhivata were registered and randomly divided into two groups. In Group-A, Agnikarma was done with Rajata Shalaka while in Group-B Agnikarma was performed by Loha Shalaka in four sittings. Assessment in relief of signs and symptoms was done by weekly interval, and Student's t-test was applied for statistical analysis. Results: Group-A provided 76.31% relief in pain while Group-B provided 83.77% relief. Relief from crepitus was observed in 57.13% of patients of Group-A, while 57.92% of patients of Group-B. There was statistically insignificant difference between both the groups. Loha Shalaka provided better result in pain relief than Rajata Shalaka. Conclusion: Agnikarma is effective nonpharmacological, parasurgical procedure for pain management in Sandhigata Vata (OA of knee joint). PMID:26730134

  14. Physical disability from knee osteoarthritis: the role of exercise as an intervention.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, W H; Afable, R F

    1994-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a common, nonfatal, chronic condition that causes pain and physical disability in older people. Persons with knee OA report difficulty with activities that require ambulation and transfer from the sitting to the standing position. Physical disability from knee OA is the result of a complex interplay among the severity of disease, pain, comorbid conditions, psychosocial factors, and deficits in physical capacity such as low aerobic work capacity and lower extremity muscle weakness. These deficits in physical capacity may be correctable with exercise training. Short-term studies indicate that persons with knee OA show gains in physical capacity and report less pain and disability with exercise training. However, the long-term effectiveness and safety of exercise in persons with knee OA remains unknown.

  15. Effects of tai chi for patients with knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jiajia; Cai, Shufang; Zhong, Weihong; Cai, Shuhe; Zheng, Qikai

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to seek evidence for the effectiveness of Tai Chi for patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). [Subjects and Methods] Systematic searches were conducted of the China Journals Full-text Database, Pubmed, Medline, Science Direct-Online Journals and CINAHL for studies published between 2000 and 2012. Studies were evaluated based on following inclusion criteria: 1) design: randomized control, clinical trial; 2) subjects: patients with a knee osteoarthritis diagnosis; 3) intervention: exercise involving Tai Chi; 4) studies published in English or Chinese. [Results] Six randomized control studies involving Tai Chi and knee osteoarthritis were found. [Conclusion] Tai Chi was an effective way of relieving pain and improving physical function. Further randomized controlled trials with large sample sizes and long training period are needed to compare groups who perform Tai Chi training with other groups who undergo other forms of physical exercise in order to confirm the efficacy of Tai Chi.

  16. Effects of Tai Chi for Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jiajia; Cai, Shufang; Zhong, Weihong; Cai, Shuhe; Zheng, Qikai

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to seek evidence for the effectiveness of Tai Chi for patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). [Subjects and Methods] Systematic searches were conducted of the China Journals Full-text Database, Pubmed, Medline, Science Direct-Online Journals and CINAHL for studies published between 2000 and 2012. Studies were evaluated based on following inclusion criteria: 1) design: randomized control, clinical trial; 2) subjects: patients with a knee osteoarthritis diagnosis; 3) intervention: exercise involving Tai Chi; 4) studies published in English or Chinese. [Results] Six randomized control studies involving Tai Chi and knee osteoarthritis were found. [Conclusion] Tai Chi was an effective way of relieving pain and improving physical function. Further randomized controlled trials with large sample sizes and long training period are needed to compare groups who perform Tai Chi training with other groups who undergo other forms of physical exercise in order to confirm the efficacy of Tai Chi. PMID:25140112

  17. The Hip and Knee Book: developing an active management booklet for hip and knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Nefyn H; Amoakwa, Elvis; Burton, Kim; Hendry, Maggie; Lewis, Ruth; Jones, Jeremy; Bennett, Paul; Neal, Richard D; Andrew, Glynne; Wilkinson, Clare

    2010-01-01

    Background The pain and disability of hip and knee osteoarthritis can be improved by exercise, but the best method of encouraging this is not known. Aim To develop an evidence-based booklet for patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis, offering information and advice on maintaining activity. Design of study Systematic review of reviews and guidelines, then focus groups. Setting Four general practices in North East Wales. Method Evidence-based messages were developed from a systematic review, synthesised into patient-centred messages, and then incorporated into a narrative. A draft booklet was examined by three focus groups to improve the phrasing of its messages and discuss its usefulness. The final draft was examined in a fourth focus group. Results Six evidence-based guidelines and 54 systematic reviews were identified. The focus groups found the draft booklet to be informative and easy to read. They reported a lack of clarity about the cause of osteoarthritis and were surprised that the pain could improve. The value of exercise and weight loss beliefs was accepted and reinforced, but there was a perceived contradiction about heavy physical work being causative, while moderate exercise was beneficial. There was a fear of dependency on analgesia and misinterpretation of the message on hyaluranon injections. The information on joint replacement empowered patients to discuss referral with their GP. The text was revised to accommodate these issues. Conclusion The booklet was readable, credible, and useful to end-users. A randomised controlled trial is planned, to test whether the booklet influences beliefs about osteoarthritis and exercise. PMID:20132695

  18. Patient preference and willingness to pay for knee osteoarthritis treatments

    PubMed Central

    Posnett, John; Dixit, Sanjeev; Oppenheimer, Brooks; Kili, Sven; Mehin, Nazanin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To review treatments for osteoarthritis of the knee (OAK) received by patients across five European countries, and to obtain patients’ perceptions and willingness to pay for current treatments. Patients and methods A prospective, internet-based, double-blind survey of adults with OAK was conducted in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom. The questionnaire included questions about diagnosis, treatment history, and perceptions of OAK treatments, followed by a discrete choice-based conjoint exercise to identify preferred attributes of OAK treatments, evaluating 14 sets of four unbranded products. Results Two thousand and seventy-three patients with self-reported OAK completed the survey; 17.4% of patients rated their knee pain as drastically affecting their ability to perform normal daily activities, and 39.3% of employed patients reported that they had lost work time because of OAK. The most common treatments were exercise (69.7%), physical therapy (68.2%), and nonprescription oral pain medication (73.9%). Treatments perceived as most effective were: viscosupplement injections (74.1%), narcotics (67.8%), and steroid injection (67.6%). Patient co-pay, duration of pain relief, and type of therapy exhibited the largest impact on patient preference for OAK treatments. The average patient was willing to pay €35 and €64 more in co-pay for steroid and viscosupplement injections, respectively, over the cost of oral over-the-counter painkillers (per treatment course, per knee) (each P<0.05). Conclusion OAK is a debilitating condition that affects normal daily activities. In general, treatments most commonly offered to patients are not those perceived as being the most effective. Patients are willing to pay a premium for treatments that they perceive as being more effective and result in longer-lasting pain relief, and those that can be administered with fewer visits to a physician. PMID:26089650

  19. Clinical effects of Garcinia kola in knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Adegbehingbe, Olayinka O; Adesanya, Saburi A; Idowu, Thomas O; Okimi, Oluwakemi C; Oyelami, Oyesiku A; Iwalewa, Ezekiel O

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Over the past years, there has been a growing number of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) patients who are not willing to comply with long-term non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) treatment and wish to use herbal anti- rheumatic medicine. This study assessed the clinical effects of Garcinia kola (GK) in KOA patients. Patients and methods Prospective randomized, placebo controlled, double blind, clinical trial approved by the institutional medical ethics review board and written informed consent obtained from each patient. All KOA patients presenting at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital complex were recruited into the study. The patients were grouped into four (A = Placebo, B = Naproxen, C = Garcinia kola, D = Celebrex). The drugs and placebo were given twice a day per oral route. Each dose consisted of 200 mg of G. kola, Naproxen (500 mg), Celebrex (200 mg) and Ascorbic acid (100 mg). The primary outcome measure over six weeks study period was the change in mean WOMAC pain visual analogue scales (VAS). Secondary outcome measures included the mean change in joint stiffness and physical function (mobility/walking). Results 143 patients were recruited, 84 (58.7%, males – 24, females – 60) satisfied the selection criteria and completed the study. The effect of knee osteoarthritis bilateralism among the subjects was not significant on their outcome (p > 0.05). The change in the mean WOMAC pain VAS after six weeks of G. kola was significantly reduced compared to the placebo (p < 0.001). Multiple comparisons of the mean VAS pain change of G. kola group was not lowered significantly against the naproxen and celebrex groups (p > 0.05). The onset of G. kola symptomatic pain relief was faster than the placebo (p < 0.001). However, it was slower than the active comparators (p > 0.05). The duration of therapeutic effect of Garcinia kola was longer than the placebo (p > 0.001). G. kola period of effect was less than naproxen and celebrex (p < 0

  20. Immediate effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on knee joint moments in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Masashi; Takagi, Yui; Goto, Yusuke; Otsuka, Naoki; Koyama, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Masashi; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Footwear modification can beneficially alter knee loading in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This study evaluated the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on reductions in external knee moments in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to examine the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology versus control shoes on the knee adduction and flexion moments in 17 women (mean age, 63.6 years) with radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis. The lateral and anterior trunk lean values, knee flexion and adduction angles, and ground reaction force were also evaluated. The influence of the original walking pattern on the changes in knee moments with Masai Barefoot Technology shoes was evaluated. The knee flexion moment in early stance was significantly reduced while walking with the Masai Barefoot Technology shoes (0.25±0.14Nm/kgm) as compared with walking with control shoes (0.30±0.19 Nm/kgm); whereas the knee adduction moment showed no changes. Masai Barefoot Technology shoes did not increase compensatory lateral and anterior trunk lean. The degree of knee flexion moment in the original walking pattern with control shoes was correlated directly with its reduction when wearing Masai Barefoot Technology shoes by multiple linear regression analysis (adjusted R2=0.44, P<0.01). Masai Barefoot Technology shoes reduced the knee flexion moment during walking without increasing the compensatory trunk lean and may therefore reduce external knee loading in women with knee osteoarthritis.

  1. Attitudes to knee osteoarthritis and total knee replacement in Arab women: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) is offered to patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the oil-rich countries in the Gulf region without adequate understanding of their perceptions, preferences or pain experiences. This study aimed to explore the pain experience and mobility limitation as well as the patient’s decision making process to undertake TKA among women with knee pain in the waiting list for surgery. Methods Five focus group discussions were conducted comprised of 39 women with severe knee OA from the waiting list for TKA in the only orthopaedic hospital in Kuwait. Discussions were recorded, transcribed and coded for themes to identify the factors considered to be important in decision-making for TKA. Results Experiencing knee pain was central to daily living and affected patients and their families. Mobility limitation was shaped by a strong sense of expected obligation to take care of the family. Two major sources of TKA delay were identified; one was due to late clinical advice to undergo TKA which was the result of receiving several consultations from different clinicians each of whom tried the medical management for OA. The second delay occurred after the clinical advice for TKA and was mainly due to ambivalence of patients because of fear of the operation and the lack of information about TKA that resulted in unclear expectations of the surgery. Conclusions Both verbal and written information about TKA should be provided as part of preoperative rehabilitation. This is critical to improve doctor-patient interactions and facilitate informed decision about the procedure and thus achieve patient-centered healthcare. PMID:24107658

  2. Epidemiology of knee osteoarthritis in India and related factors

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Chandra Prakash; Singh, Pulkesh; Chaturvedi, Sanjay; Pruthi, Kaushal Kumar; Vij, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Background: Among the chronic rheumatic diseases, hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent and is a leading cause of pain and disability in most countries worldwide. Its prevalence increases with age and generally affects women more frequently than men. OA is strongly associated with aging and heavy physical occupational activity, a required livelihood for many people living in rural communities in developing countries. Determining region-specific OA prevalence and risk factor profiles will provide important information for planning future cost effective preventive strategies and health care services. Materials and Methods: The study was a community based cross sectional study to find out the prevalence of primary knee OA in India which has a population of 1.252 billion. The study was done across five sites in India. Each site was further divided into big city, small city, town, and village. The total sample size was 5000 subjects. Tools consisted of a structured questionnaire and plain skiagrams for confirmation of OA. Diagnosis was done using Kellgren and Lawrence scale for osteoarthritis. Results: Overall prevalence of knee OA was found to be 28.7%. The associated factors were found to be female gender (prevalence of 31.6%) (P = 0.007), obesity (P = 0.04), age (P = 0.001) and sedentary work (P = 0.001). Conclusions: There is scarcity of studies done in India which has varied socio geographical background and communities. We conducted this study for analyzing the current prevalence of OA in different locations. This study has evidenced a large percentage of population as borderline OA; therefore, it depends mainly on the prevention of modifiable risk factors to preserve at ease movement in elderly population through awareness programs. PMID:27746495

  3. CHECK (Cohort Hip and Cohort Knee): similarities and differences with the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Wesseling, J; Dekker, J; van den Berg, W B; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; Boers, M; Cats, H A; Deckers, P; Gorter, K J; Heuts, P H T G; Hilberdink, W K H A; Kloppenburg, M; Nelissen, R G H H; Oosterveld, F G J; Oostveen, J C M; Roorda, L D; Viergever, M A; Wolde, S ten; Lafeber, F P J G; Bijlsma, J W J

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the osteoarthritis study population of CHECK (Cohort Hip and Cohort Knee) in comparison with relevant selections of the study population of the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) based on clinical status and radiographic parameters. Methods In The Netherlands a prospective 10-year follow-up study was initiated by the Dutch Arthritis Association on participants with early osteoarthritis-related complaints of hip and/or knee: CHECK. In parallel in the USA an observational 4-year follow-up study, the OAI, was started by the National Institutes of Health, on patients with or at risk of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. For comparison with CHECK, the entire cohort and a subgroup of individuals excluding those with exclusively hip pain were compared with relevant subpopulations of the OAI. Results At baseline, CHECK included 1002 participants with in general similar characteristics as described for the OAI. However, significantly fewer individuals in CHECK had radiographic knee osteoarthritis at baseline when compared with the OAI (p<0.001). In contrast, at baseline, the CHECK cohort reported higher scores on pain, stiffness and functional disability (Western Ontario and McMaster osteoarthritis index) when compared with the OAI (all p<0.001). These differences were supported by physical health status in contrast to mental health (Short Form 36/12) was at baseline significantly worse for the CHECK participants (p<0.001). Conclusion Although both cohorts focus on the early phase of osteoarthritis, they differ significantly with respect to structural (radiographic) and clinical (health status) characteristics, CHECK expectedly representing participants in an even earlier phase of disease. PMID:18772189

  4. Effect of the Frequency and Duration of Land-based Therapeutic Exercise on Pain Relief for People with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryo; Ozawa, Junya; Kito, Nobuhiro; Moriyama, Hideki

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the influence of land-based exercise frequency and duration on pain relief for people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). [Subjects and Methods] The systematic review included randomized controlled trials that investigated this influence, which were identified by searches of PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. The exercise groups in the identified trials were categorized according to their type, frequency, and duration of exercise, and subgroup analyses were performed. [Results] Data integration of 17 studies (23 exercise groups) revealed a significant effect and a medium effect size. In subgroups involving strengthening exercise programs of ≥9 weeks duration, heterogeneity was found between subjects who performed up to 3 sessions/week and those who performed ≥4 sessions/week. In subgroups involving strengthening exercise programs of up to 3 sessions/week, there was heterogeneity between subjects who exercised for up to 8 weeks and those who exercised for ≥9 weeks. Heterogeneity was not confirmed in aerobic exercise subgroups. [Conclusion] Differences in exercise frequency and duration influence pain relief in effects of strengthening exercises but do not influence the effect size of aerobic exercise for people with knee OA.

  5. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  6. A comparison of radiographic anatomic axis knee alignment measurements and cross-sectional associations with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Goulston, L.M.; Sanchez-Santos, M.T.; D'Angelo, S.; Leyland, K.M.; Hart, D.J.; Spector, T.D.; Cooper, C.; Dennison, E.M.; Hunter, D.; Arden, N.K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Malalignment is associated with knee osteoarthritis (KOA), however, the optimal anatomic axis (AA) knee alignment measurement on a standard limb radiograph (SLR) is unknown. This study compares one-point (1P) and two-point (2P) AA methods using three knee joint centre locations and examines cross-sectional associations with symptomatic radiographic knee osteoarthritis (SRKOA), radiographic knee osteoarthritis (RKOA) and knee pain. Methods AA alignment was measured six different ways using the KneeMorf software on 1058 SLRs from 584 women in the Chingford Study. Cross-sectional associations with principal outcome SRKOA combined with greatest reproducibility determined the optimal 1P and 2P AA method. Appropriate varus/neutral/valgus alignment categories were established using logistic regression with generalised estimating equation models fitted with restricted cubic spline function. Results The tibial plateau centre displayed greatest reproducibility and associations with SRKOA. As mean 1P and 2P values differed by >2°, new alignment categories were generated for 1P: varus <178°, neutral 178–182°, valgus >182° and for 2P methods: varus <180°, neutral 180–185°, valgus >185°. Varus vs neutral alignment was associated with a near 2-fold increase in SRKOA and RKOA, and valgus vs neutral for RKOA using 2P method. Nonsignificant associations were seen for 1P method for SRKOA, RKOA and knee pain. Conclusions AA alignment was associated with SRKOA and the tibial plateau centre had the strongest association. Differences in AA alignment when 1P vs 2P methods were compared indicated bespoke alignment categories were necessary. Further replication and validation with mechanical axis alignment comparison is required. PMID:26700504

  7. Cartilage Degeneration and Alignment in Severe Varus Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Shogo; Yabumoto, Hiromitsu; Tarumi, Eri; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between cartilage, ligament, and meniscus degeneration and radiographic alignment in severe varus knee osteoarthritis in order to understand the development of varus knee osteoarthritis. Design Fifty-three patients (71 knees) with primary varus knee osteoarthritis and who underwent total knee arthroplasty were selected for this study. There were 6 men and 47 women, with 40 right knees and 31 left knees studied; their mean age at operation was 73.5 years. The ligament, meniscus, degeneration of joint cartilage, and radiographic alignments were examined visually. Results The tibial plateau–tibial shaft angle was larger if the condition of the cartilage in the lateral femoral condyle was worse. The femorotibial angle and tibial plateau–tibial shaft angle were larger if the conditions of the lateral meniscus or the cartilage in the lateral tibial plateau were worse. Conclusion Based on the results of this study, progression of varus knee osteoarthritis may occur in the following manner: medial knee osteoarthritis starts in the central portion of the medial tibial plateau, and accompanied by medial meniscal extrusion and anterior cruciate ligament rupture, cartilage degeneration expands from the anterior to the posterior in the medial tibial plateau. Bone attrition occurs in the medial tibial plateau, and the femoro-tibial angle and tibial plateau–tibial shaft angle increase. Therefore, the lateral intercondylar eminence injures the cartilage of the lateral femoral condyle in the longitudinal fissure type. Thereafter, the cartilage degeneration expands in the whole of the knee joints. PMID:26425258

  8. Do early life factors affect the development of knee osteoarthritis in later life: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Antony, Benny; Jones, Graeme; Jin, Xingzhong; Ding, Changhai

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) mainly affects older populations; however, it is possible that early life factors contribute to the development of OA in later life. The aim of this review is to describe the association between childhood or early adulthood risk factors and knee pain, structural imaging markers and development of knee OA in later life. A narrative overview of the literature synthesising the findings of literature retrieved from searches of computerised databases and manual searches was conducted. We found that only a few studies have explored the long-term effect of childhood or early adulthood risk factors on the markers of joint health that predispose people to OA or joint symptoms. High body mass index (BMI) and/or overweight status from childhood to adulthood were independently related to knee pain and OA in later life. The findings regarding the association between strenuous physical activity and knee structures in young adults are still conflicting. However, a favourable effect of moderate physical activity and fitness on knee structures is reported. Childhood physical activity and performance measures had independent beneficial effects on knee structures including knee cartilage in children and young adults. Anterior knee pain syndrome in adolescence could lead to the development of patellofemoral knee OA in the late 40s. Furthermore, weak evidence suggests that childhood malalignment, socioeconomic status and physical abuse are associated with OA in later life. The available evidence suggests that early life intervention may prevent OA in later life. PMID:27623622

  9. CAM use among overweight and obese persons with radiographic knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with knee pain and is an independent predictor of incident knee osteoarthritis (OA); increased pain with movement often leads patients to adopt sedentary lifestyles to avoid pain. Detailed descriptions of pain management strategies by body mass index (BMI) level among OA patients are lacking. The objectives were to describe complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and conventional medication use by BMI level and identify correlates of CAM use by BMI level. Methods Using Osteoarthritis Initiative baseline data, 2,675 patients with radiographic tibiofemoral OA in at least one knee were identified. Use of CAM therapies and conventional medications was determined by interviewers. Potential correlates included SF-12, CES-D, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score quality of life. Multinomial logistic regression models adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical factors provided estimates of the association between BMI levels and treatment use; binary logistic regression identified correlates of CAM use. Results BMI was inversely associated with CAM use (45% users had BMI ≥35 kg/m2; 54% had BMI <25 kg/m2), but positively associated with conventional medication use (54% users had BMI ≥35 kg/m2; 35.1% had BMI <25 kg/m2). Those with BMI ≥30 kg/m2 were less likely to use CAM alone or in combination with conventional medications when compared to patients with BMI <25 kg/m2. Conclusions CAM use is common among people with knee OA but is inversely associated with BMI. Understanding ways to further symptom management in OA among overweight and obese patients is warranted. PMID:24073985

  10. Shea Nut Oil Triterpene Concentrate Attenuates Knee Osteoarthritis Development in Rats: Evidence from Knee Joint Histology

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sheng-Hsiung; Lai, Chun-Fu; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Kong, Zwe-Ling; Wong, Chih-Shung

    2016-01-01

    Background Shea nut oil triterpene concentrate is considered to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Traditionally, it has been used to treat arthritic conditions in humans. This study aimed to investigate the effect of attenuating osteoarthritis (OA)-induced pain and joint destruction in rats by administering shea nut oil triterpene concentrate (SheaFlex75, which is more than 50% triterpenes). Methods An anterior cruciate ligament transaction (ACLT) with medial meniscectomy (MMx) was used to induce OA in male Wistar rats. Different doses of SheaFlex75 (111.6 mg/kg, 223.2 mg/kg, and 446.4 mg/kg) were then intragastrically administered daily for 12 weeks after surgery. Body weight and the width of the knee joint were measured weekly. Additionally, incapacitance tests were performed at weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 to measure the weight bearing of the hind limbs, and the morphology and histopathology of the medial femoral condyles were examined and were evaluated using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. Results This study showed that SheaFlex75 reduced the swelling of the knee joint with OA and rectified its weight bearing after ACLT plus MMx surgery in rats. Treatment with SheaFlex75 also decreased ACLT plus MMx surgery-induced knee joint matrix loss and cartilage degeneration. Conclusion SheaFlex75 relieves the symptoms of OA and protects cartilage from degeneration. SheaFlex75 thus has the potential to be an ideal nutraceutical supplement for joint protection, particularly for injured knee joints. PMID:27583436

  11. Development of criteria for the classification and reporting of osteoarthritis. Classification of osteoarthritis of the knee. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Criteria Committee of the American Rheumatism Association.

    PubMed

    Altman, R; Asch, E; Bloch, D; Bole, G; Borenstein, D; Brandt, K; Christy, W; Cooke, T D; Greenwald, R; Hochberg, M

    1986-08-01

    For the purposes of classification, it should be specified whether osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is of unknown origin (idiopathic, primary) or is related to a known medical condition or event (secondary). Clinical criteria for the classification of idiopathic OA of the knee were developed through a multicenter study group. Comparison diagnoses included rheumatoid arthritis and other painful conditions of the knee, exclusive of referred or para-articular pain. Variables from the medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and radiographs were used to develop sets of criteria that serve different investigative purposes. In contrast to prior criteria, these proposed criteria utilize classification trees, or algorithms.

  12. A Review on the Management of Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Alexander MacDonald; Brock, Timothy M.; Heil, Kieran; Holmes, Rachel; Weusten, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Arthritis is the most common chronic condition affecting patients over the age of 70. The prevalence of osteoarthritis increases with age, and with an aging population, the effect of this disease will represent an ever-increasing burden on health care. The knee is the most common joint affected in osteoarthritis, with up to 41% of limb arthritis being located in the knee, compared to 30% in hands and 19% in hips. We review the current concepts with regard to the disease process and risk factors for developing hip and knee osteoarthritis. We then explore the nonsurgical management of osteoarthritis as well as the operative management of hip and knee arthritis. We discuss the indications for surgical treatment of hip and knee arthritis, looking in particular at the controversies affecting young and obese patients in both hip and knee replacements. Patient and implant related outcomes along with survivorships are addressed as well as the experiences and controversies described in national joint registries. PMID:26464847

  13. Correlation of Adrenomedullin Concentrations with Knee Osteoarthritis Grade

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Linghua; Huang, Ruokun; Ma, Dezhang; Cheng, Wenjun; Feng, Wei; Xing, Danmou; Kan, Wusheng; Xiao, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Background Adrenomedullin, a recently identified myokine, has an anti-inflammatory effect. Therefore, we aimed to assess the correlation of adrenomedullin concentrations with the presence and grade of severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Material/Methods We recruited 187 knee OA patients and 109 healthy subjects. The severity of OA was evaluated using the Kellgren-Lawrence grading system. Results Compared with the control group, the knee OA group revealed markedly higher adrenomedullin concentrations. Serum and synovial fluid (SF) adrenomedullin concentrations increased with increased KL grades. Conclusions Serum and SF adrenomedullin concentrations show a correlation with the severity of knee OA. PMID:27495944

  14. Immediate Effects of an Elastic Knee Sleeve on Frontal Plane Gait Biomechanics in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Schween, Raphael; Gehring, Dominic; Gollhofer, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis of the knee affects millions of people. Elastic knee sleeves aim at relieving symptoms. While symptomatic improvements have been demonstrated as a consequence of elastic knee sleeves, evidence for biomechanical alterations only exists for the sagittal plane. We therefore asked what effect an elastic knee sleeve would have on frontal plane gait biomechanics. Methods 18 subjects (8 women, 10 men) with osteoarthritis of the medial tibiofemoral joint walked over ground with and without an elastic knee sleeve. Kinematics and forces were recorded and joint moments were calculated using an inverse dynamics approach. Conditions with sleeve and without sleeve were compared with paired t-Tests. Results With the sleeve, knee adduction angle at ground contact was reduced by 1.9±2.1° (P = 0.006). Peak knee adduction was reduced by 1.5±1.6° (P = 0.004). The first peak knee adduction moment and positive knee adduction impulse were decreased by 10.1% (0.74±0.9 Nm•kg-1; P = 0.002) and 12.9% (0.28±0.3 Nm•s•kg-1; P < 0.004), respectively. Conclusion Our study provides evidence that wearing an elastic knee sleeve during walking can reduce knee adduction angles, moments and impulse in subjects with knee osteoarthritis. As a higher knee adduction moment has previously been identified as a risk factor for disease progression in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis, we speculate that wearing a knee sleeve may be beneficial for this specific subgroup. PMID:25621488

  15. Chinese adaptation and validation of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Roy T H; Ngai, Shirley P C; Ho, Kevin K W

    2016-10-01

    Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) is a commonly used instrument to assess the symptoms and functional status in people with knee injuries, including knee osteoarthritis. While China ranked the top country in the absolute number of people aged 65 or above, yet there is no validated Chinese version of this outcome measurement. This study translated and validated the KOOS into Chinese version. Chinese KOOS was translated from the original English version following standard forward and backward translation procedures recommended by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research. Survey was then conducted in clinical settings by a questionnaire comprised Chinese KOOS, WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index, and Short Form 36 health survey (SF-36). One hundred Chinese reading patients with knee osteoarthritis were recruited from the orthopaedic out-patient department in hospitals. Internal consistency of the instrument was measured by Cronbach alpha. Construct validity was examined by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (ρ) tests by comparing its score with the validated Chinese version of WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index and SF-36, while the test-retest reliability was evaluated by administering the questionnaires twice. Cronbach alpha values of individual questions and its overall value were above 0.70. Fairly strong association was found between the Chinese KOOS and the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index (ρ = -0.37 to -0.86, p < 0.001). Diverse relationship was observed between Chinese KOOS and SF-36. Excellent test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.89-0.92) was demonstrated. The Chinese translated version of KOOS is a reliable and valid instrument for patients with knee osteoarthritis. The findings of current study might promote multinational investigations in this patient group.

  16. Chinese adaptation and validation of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Roy T H; Ngai, Shirley P C; Ho, Kevin K W

    2016-10-01

    Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) is a commonly used instrument to assess the symptoms and functional status in people with knee injuries, including knee osteoarthritis. While China ranked the top country in the absolute number of people aged 65 or above, yet there is no validated Chinese version of this outcome measurement. This study translated and validated the KOOS into Chinese version. Chinese KOOS was translated from the original English version following standard forward and backward translation procedures recommended by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research. Survey was then conducted in clinical settings by a questionnaire comprised Chinese KOOS, WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index, and Short Form 36 health survey (SF-36). One hundred Chinese reading patients with knee osteoarthritis were recruited from the orthopaedic out-patient department in hospitals. Internal consistency of the instrument was measured by Cronbach alpha. Construct validity was examined by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (ρ) tests by comparing its score with the validated Chinese version of WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index and SF-36, while the test-retest reliability was evaluated by administering the questionnaires twice. Cronbach alpha values of individual questions and its overall value were above 0.70. Fairly strong association was found between the Chinese KOOS and the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index (ρ = -0.37 to -0.86, p < 0.001). Diverse relationship was observed between Chinese KOOS and SF-36. Excellent test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.89-0.92) was demonstrated. The Chinese translated version of KOOS is a reliable and valid instrument for patients with knee osteoarthritis. The findings of current study might promote multinational investigations in this patient group. PMID:27449346

  17. Alterations in walking knee joint stiffness in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee instability.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Jonathan A; Gorman, Shannon; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Increased walking knee joint stiffness has been reported in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a compensatory strategy to improve knee joint stability. However, presence of episodic self-reported knee instability in a large subgroup of patients with knee OA may be a sign of inadequate walking knee joint stiffness. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in walking knee joint stiffness in patients with knee OA with and without self-reported instability and examine the relationship between walking knee joint stiffness with quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity, and varus knee malalignment. Overground biomechanical data at a self-selected gait velocity was collected for 35 individuals with knee OA without self-reported instability (stable group) and 17 individuals with knee OA and episodic self-reported instability (unstable group). Knee joint stiffness was calculated during the weight-acceptance phase of gait as the change in the external knee joint moment divided by the change in the knee flexion angle. The unstable group walked with lower knee joint stiffness (p=0.01), mainly due to smaller heel-contact knee flexion angles (p<0.01) and greater knee flexion excursions (p<0.01) compared to their knee stable counterparts. No significant relationships were observed between walking knee joint stiffness and quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity or varus knee malalignment. Reduced walking knee joint stiffness appears to be associated with episodic knee instability and independent of quadriceps muscle weakness, knee joint laxity or varus malalignment. Further investigations of the temporal relationship between self-reported knee joint instability and walking knee joint stiffness are warranted.

  18. [Nonpharmacological and nonsurgical therapies for osteoarthritis: orthosis, exercises].

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Katherine; Eloumri, Amine; Rannou, Francois; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2010-11-01

    Unloading valgus knee braces may be more effective than knee sleeves, to improve pain and disability for medial knee osteoarthritis, but have more adverse effects. A lateral-wedge insole could reduce pain in medial knee osteoarthritis. Cushioning insoles and footwear with shock absorbance could be proposed for hip osteoarthritis by authors' recommendations. Nocturnal splints for base-of-thumb osteoarthritis are recommended to reduce pain and disability. Aerobic, strengthening, range-of-motion and proprioceptive exercise are recommended to decrease pain and improve function and quality of life in knee and hip osteoarthritis. Strengthening and range-of-motion exercise is recommended for hand osteoarthritis.

  19. Lower Limbs Function and Pain Relationships after Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tali, Maie; Maaroos, Jaak

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate gait characteristics, lower limbs joint function, and pain relationships associated with knee osteoarthritis of female patients before and 3 months after total knee arthroplasty at an outpatient clinic rehabilitation department. Gait parameters were registered, the active range of lower extremity joints was…

  20. Sports activities 5 years after total knee or hip arthroplasty: the Ulm Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Huch, K; Muller, K; Sturmer, T; Brenner, H; Puhl, W; Gunther, K

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyse sports activities of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) over lifetime, preoperatively, and 5 years after arthroplasty. Methods: In a longitudinal four centre study, 809 consecutive patients with advanced OA of the hip (420) or the knee (389) joint under the age of 76 years who required total joint replacement were recruited. A completed questionnaire about sports activities at 5 year follow up was received from 636 (79%) of the 809 patients. Results: Although most patients with hip (97%) and knee (94%) OA had performed sports activities during their life, only 36% (hip patients) and 42% (knee patients) had maintained sports activities at the time of surgery. Five years postoperatively, the proportion of patients performing sports activities increased to 52% among patients with hip OA, but further declined to 34% among those with knee OA. Accordingly, the proportion of patients with hip OA performing sports activities for more than 2 hours a week increased from 8 to 14%, whereas this proportion decreased from 12 to 5% among patients with knee OA. Pain in the replaced joint was reported by 9% of patients with hip and by >16% with knee OA. Conclusion: Differences in pain 5 years after joint replacement may explain some of the difference of sports activities between patients with hip and knee OA. Reasons for reduction of sports activities may include the increasing age of the patients, their worries about an "artificial joint", and the advice of their surgeon to be cautious. PMID:15843453

  1. The Effects of Self-Massage on Osteoarthritis of the Knee: a Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Dorothea V.; Eichler, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Recent research has provided a rationale for the efficacy and use of massage therapy in the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) symptoms. Additionally, research has also implicated the role of the quadriceps muscles in the genesis of knee OA. Although both areas of research have demonstrated strong evidence that the muscles and massage therapy may affect knee OA symptoms, self-massage applied on the quadriceps muscle has received no attention. Methods Conducted at the Lourdes Wellness Center in Collingswood, NJ, the study investigated the outcomes of a self-massage intervention applied to the quadriceps muscle on reported pain, stiffness, physical function, and knee range of motion in adults with diagnosed knee OA. Forty adults with diagnosed knee OA were randomly assigned to either an intervention (n = 21) or a wait list control (n = 19) group. The participants applied a narrated 20-minute self-massage therapy twice weekly during ten supervised and three unsupervised intervention sessions. The control group had four supervised assessments with no intervention. Outcome measures were the Western Ontario and McMaster’s Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and assessment of knee range of motion. Results Between-groups analyses of WOMAC pain, stiffness, function subscales, and total WOMAC scores indicated significant difference between groups (p < .05), n = 36). No significant differences were seen in range of motion. Conclusions The study demonstrated that participants who have OA of the knee benefit from the self-massage intervention therapy. Further studies are needed to clarify the long-term effects of self-massage on the progression and symptoms of knee OA. PMID:23482239

  2. Acupuncture modulates cortical thickness and functional connectivity in knee osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Spaeth, Rosa B.; Retzepi, Kallirroi; Ott, Daniel; Kong, Jian

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated cortical thickness and functional connectivity across longitudinal acupuncture treatments in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Over a period of four weeks (six treatments), we collected resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans from 30 patients before their first, third and sixth treatments. Clinical outcome showed a significantly greater Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) pain score (improvement) with verum acupuncture compared to the sham acupuncture. Longitudinal cortical thickness analysis showed that the cortical thickness at left posterior medial prefrontal cortex (pMPFC) decreased significantly in the sham group across treatment sessions as compared with verum group. Resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) analysis using the left pMPFC as a seed showed that after longitudinal treatments, the rsFC between the left pMPFC and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), medial frontal pole (mFP) and periaquiduct grey (PAG) are significantly greater in the verum acupuncture group as compared with the sham group. Our results suggest that acupuncture may achieve its therapeutic effect on knee OA pain by preventing cortical thinning and decreases in functional connectivity in major pain related areas, therefore modulating pain in the descending pain modulatory pathway. PMID:25258037

  3. Efficacy of action potential simulation and interferential therapy in the rehabilitation of patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Eftekharsadat, Bina; Habibzadeh, Afshin; Kolahi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the main cause of pain, physical impairment and chronic disability in older people. Electrotherapeutic modalities such as interferential therapy (IFT) and action potential simulation (APS) are used for the treatment of knee OA. In this study, we aim to evaluate the therapeutic effects of APS and IFT on knee OA. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 67 patients (94% female and 6% male with mean age of 52.80 ± 8.16 years) with mild and moderate knee OA were randomly assigned to be treated with APS (n = 34) or IFT (n = 33) for 10 sessions in 4 weeks. Baseline and post-treatment Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) subscales, visual analogue scale (VAS) and timed up and go (TUG) test were measured in all patients. Results: VAS and WOMAC subscales were significantly improved after treatment in APS and IFT groups (p < 0.001 for all). TUG was also significantly improved after treatment in APS group (p < 0.001), but TUG changes in IFT was not significant (p = 0.09). There was no significant difference in VAS, TUG and WOMAC subscales values before and after treatment as well as the mean improvement in VAS, TUG and WOMAC subscales during study between groups. Conclusion: Short-term treatment with both APS and IFT could significantly reduce pain and improve physical function in patients with knee OA. PMID:26029268

  4. Automated Internet-based pain coping skills training to manage osteoarthritis pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rini, Christine; Porter, Laura S; Somers, Tamara J; McKee, Daphne C; DeVellis, Robert F; Smith, Meredith; Winkel, Gary; Ahern, David K; Goldman, Roberta; Stiller, Jamie L; Mariani, Cara; Patterson, Carol; Jordan, Joanne M; Caldwell, David S; Keefe, Francis J

    2015-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) places a significant burden on worldwide public health because of the large and growing number of people affected by OA and its associated pain and disability. Pain coping skills training (PCST) is an evidence-based intervention targeting OA pain and disability. To reduce barriers that currently limit access to PCST, we developed an 8-week, automated, Internet-based PCST program called PainCOACH and evaluated its potential efficacy and acceptability in a small-scale, 2-arm randomized controlled feasibility trial. Participants were 113 men and women with clinically confirmed hip or knee OA and associated pain. They were randomized to a group completing PainCOACH or an assessment-only control group. Osteoarthritis pain, pain-related interference with functioning, pain-related anxiety, self-efficacy for pain management, and positive and negative affect were measured before intervention, midway through the intervention, and after intervention. Findings indicated high acceptability and adherence: 91% of participants randomized to complete PainCOACH finished all 8 modules over 8 to 10 weeks. Linear mixed models showed that, after treatment, women who received the PainCOACH intervention reported significantly lower pain than that in women in the control group (Cohen d = 0.33). Intervention effects could not be tested in men because of their low pain and small sample size. Additionally, both men and women demonstrated increases in self-efficacy from baseline to after intervention compared with the control group (d = 0.43). Smaller effects were observed for pain-related anxiety (d = 0.20), pain-related interference with functioning (d = 0.13), negative affect (d = 0.10), and positive affect (d = 0.24). Findings underscore the value of continuing to develop an automated Internet-based approach to disseminate this empirically supported intervention.

  5. A survey of osteoarthritis of the knee in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Forman, M D; Malamet, R; Kaplan, D

    1983-04-01

    We evaluated the signs and symptoms suggestive of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee in 682 elderly people. The results suggest that both the frequency of signs and symptoms and the degree of severity remain constant in the 7th, 8th and 9th decades. Differences between men and women and between blacks and whites were also noted--women and blacks tending to have more frequent and more severe evidence of OA of the knee. These data suggest that OA of the knee is a specific disease that affects only a portion of the population and is not inevitably progressive.

  6. Proprioceptive impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis are not generalized to the ankle and elbow joints.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Camille J; Wrigley, Tim V; Farrell, Michael J; Bennell, Kim L; Hodges, Paul W

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms for proprioceptive changes associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) remain elusive. Observations of proprioceptive changes in both affected knees and other joints imply more generalized mechanisms for proprioceptive impairment. However, evidence for a generalized effect remains controversial. This study examined whether joint repositioning proprioceptive deficits are localized to the diseased joint (knee) or generalized across other joints (elbow and ankle) in people with knee OA. Thirty individuals with right knee OA (17 female, 66±7 [mean±SD] years) of moderate/severe radiographic disease severity and 30 healthy asymptomatic controls of comparable age (17 female, 65±8years) performed active joint repositioning tests of the knee, ankle and elbow in randomised order in supine. Participants with knee OA had a larger relative error for joint repositioning of the knee than the controls (OA: 2.7±2.1°, control: 1.6±1.7°, p=.03). Relative error did not differ between groups for the ankle (OA: 2.2±2.5°, control: 1.9±1.3°, p=.50) or elbow (OA: 2.5±3.3°, control: 2.9±2.8°, p=.58). These results are consistent with a mechanism for proprioceptive change that is localized to the knee joint. This could be mediated by problems with mechanoreceptors, processing/relay of somatosensory input to higher centers, or joint-specific interference with cognitive processes by pain.

  7. Correlation of IL-17 Level in Synovia and Severity of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingsong; Peng, Hao; Meng, Zhao; Wei, Mingzhu

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of interleukin-17 (IL-17) level in synovia and its relationship with the severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Material/Methods We enrolled 226 OA patients and 106 controls in this study. The symptomatic/radiation severity of OA was assessed by the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain score/Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading system. Serum IL-17 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results Synovia IL-17 levels were significantly higher in OA patients compared with controls (P<0.01), and were negatively correlated with OA severity. IL-17 level gradually decreased among different phases but lacked statistical significance. Conclusions IL-17 might play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of OA and is closely related to pain. Blocking the IL-17 signaling pathway may delay pain related to OA. PMID:26076201

  8. Clinical Phenotype Classifications Based on Static Varus Alignment and Varus Thrust in Japanese Patients With Medial Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Hirotaka; Fukutani, Naoto; Fukumoto, Takahiko; Uritani, Daisuke; Kaneda, Eishi; Ota, Kazuo; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between knee pain during gait and 4 clinical phenotypes based on static varus alignment and varus thrust in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Patients in an orthopedic clinic (n = 266) diagnosed as having knee OA (Kellgren/Lawrence [K/L] grade ≥1) were divided into 4 phenotype groups according to the presence or absence of static varus alignment and varus thrust (dynamic varus): no varus (n = 173), dynamic varus (n = 17), static varus (n = 50), and static varus + dynamic varus (n = 26). The knee range of motion, spatiotemporal gait parameters, visual analog scale scores for knee pain, and scores on the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure were used to assess clinical outcomes. Multiple logistic regression analyses identified the relationship between knee pain during gait and the 4 phenotypes, adjusted for possible risk factors, including age, sex, body mass index, K/L grade, and gait velocity. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that varus thrust without varus alignment was associated with knee pain during gait (odds ratio [OR] 3.30, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.08–12.4), and that varus thrust combined with varus alignment was strongly associated with knee pain during gait (OR 17.1, 95% CI 3.19–320.0). Sensitivity analyses applying alternative cutoff values for defining static varus alignment showed comparable results. Conclusion Varus thrust with or without static varus alignment was associated with the occurrence of knee pain during gait. Tailored interventions based on individual malalignment phenotypes may improve clinical outcomes in patients with knee OA. PMID:26017348

  9. Pain relief and improved physical function in knee osteoarthritis patients receiving ongoing hylan G-F 20, a high-molecular-weight hyaluronan, versus other treatment options: data from a large real-world longitudinal cohort in Canada.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Robert J; Wakeford, Craig

    2015-01-01

    From the Southwestern Ontario database, one of the largest primary-care datasets in Canada, 1,263 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of one or both knees were identified who received two consecutive series of intra-articular (IA) injections of hylan G-F 20 preparation and no other prescribed OA medications, and were evaluated fully between 2006 and 2012. A cohort of 3,318 demographically matched OA patients who had not been treated with IA injection therapy was identified from the same database for comparison. Responses to therapy were assessed by means of a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) for pain at rest and after completion of a 6-minute walk test (6 MWT), while physical capacity was measured by performance in the 6 MWT itself. After two cycles of hylan G-F 20 therapy, the average VAS score for pain at rest declined from 7.82 ± 1.27 at baseline to 4.16 ± 1.51 (average change 3.66 ± 1.78, significantly more than the reduction of 3.12 ± 2.03 seen in the reference group [P < 0.012]) and the average VAS score for pain after the 6 MWT decreased by 5.56 ± 1.74 points (from 9.58 ± 0.4 at baseline to 4.02 ± 1.67 at the final assessment), a significantly larger change than that seen in the reference group (Δ2.99 ± 1.85; P<0.001 for intergroup comparison). Distance walked in the 6 MWT increased on average by 115 m, significantly more than that seen in the reference group (Δ91 m; P < 0.001 for intergroup comparison). These findings from a primary-care database suggest sustained benefits in terms of pain and physical function from repeat cycles of IA injections of hylan G-F 20 and no other prescribed OA medications in adults with OA of the knee.

  10. Abnormal loading of the major joints in knee osteoarthritis and the response to knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Andrew; Stewart, Caroline; Postans, Neil; Barlow, David; Dodds, Alexander; Holt, Cathy; Whatling, Gemma; Roberts, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is common and patients frequently complain that they are 'overloading' the joints of the opposite leg when they walk. However, it is unknown whether moments or co-contractions are abnormal in the unaffected joints of patients with single joint knee osteoarthritis, or how they change following treatment of the affected knee. Twenty patients with single joint medial compartment knee osteoarthritis were compared to 20 asymptomatic control subjects. Gait analysis was performed for normal level gait and surface EMG recordings of the medial and lateral quadriceps and hamstrings were used to investigate co-contraction. Patients were followed up 12 months post-operatively and the analysis was repeated. Results are presented for the first 14 patients who have attended follow-up. Pre-operatively, adduction moment impulses were elevated at both knees and the contra-lateral hip compared to controls. Co-contraction of hamstrings and quadriceps was elevated bilaterally. Post-operatively, moment waveforms returned to near-normal levels at the affected knee and co-contraction fell in the majority of patients. However, abnormalities persisted in the contra-lateral limb with partial or no recovery of both moment waveforms and co-contraction in the majority. Patients with knee osteoarthritis do experience abnormal loads of their major weight bearing joints bilaterally, and abnormalities persist despite treatment of the affected limb. Further treatment may be required if we are to protect the other major joints following joint arthroplasty.

  11. Greater Step Widths Reduce Internal Knee Abduction Moments in Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis Patients During Stair Ascent.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Max R; Klipple, Gary; Zhang, Songning

    2015-08-01

    Increased step widths have been shown to reduce peak internal knee abduction moments in healthy individuals but not in knee osteoarthritis patients during stair descent. This study aimed to assess effects of increased step widths on peak knee abduction moments and associated variables in adults with medial knee osteoarthritis and healthy older adults during stair ascent. Thirteen healthy older adults and 13 medial knee osteoarthritis patients performed stair ascent using preferred, wide, and wider step widths. Three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction forces (GRFs) using an instrumented staircase were collected. Increased step width reduced first and second peak knee abduction moments, and knee abduction moment impulse. In addition, frontal plane GRF at time of first and second peak knee abduction moment and lateral trunk lean at time of first peak knee abduction moment were reduced with increased step width during stair ascent in both groups. Knee abduction moment variables were not different between knee osteoarthritis patients and healthy controls. Our findings suggest that increasing step width may be an effective simple gait alteration to reduce knee abduction moment variables in both knee osteoarthritis and healthy adults during stair ascent. However, long term effects of increasing step width during stair ascent in knee osteoarthritis and healthy adults remain unknown.

  12. The efficacy of shock wave therapy in patients with knee osteoarthritis and popliteal cyamella.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tien-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Chia-Ling; Chen, Chia-Hsin; Chen, Yi-Jen; Lin, Tz-Yan; Huang, Mao-Hsiung

    2014-07-01

    This randomized, controlled study was performed to compare the effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) and ultrasound on the rehabilitation of knee osteoarthritis with popliteal cyamella. One hundred and twenty patients with bilateral moderate knee osteoarthritis (Altman III) and popliteal cyamella were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (GI-GIV). Patients in Groups I-III received isokinetic muscular strengthening exercises three times weekly for 8 weeks. Group II received pulse ultrasound treatment for popliteal cyamella three times weekly for 8 weeks, Group III received weekly shock wave therapy for popliteal cyamella for the first 6 weeks, and Group IV acted as controls. The therapeutic effects were evaluated by changes in the arthritic knees range of motion (ROM), visual analogue scale, Lequesne's index, and muscle peak torques after treatment and at follow-up 6 months later. Each treated group exhibited increased muscle peak torques and significantly reduced pain and disability after treatment and at follow-ups. However, only patients in Groups II and III showed significant improvements in ROM after treatment, and only participants in Group III showed immediate improvement in ROM after each treatment. Patients in Group III also showed the greatest increase in muscular strength and the greatest decrease in disability after treatment and at the follow-ups. ESWT is better than pulse ultrasound in rehabilitation of patients with knee osteoarthritis and popliteal cyamella results in more functional improvements.

  13. The Monoiodoacetate Model of Osteoarthritis Pain in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pitcher, Thomas; Sousa-Valente, João; Malcangio, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    A major symptom of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) is pain that is triggered by peripheral as well as central changes within the pain pathways. The current treatments for OA pain such as NSAIDS or opiates are neither sufficiently effective nor devoid of detrimental side effects. Animal models of OA are being developed to improve our understanding of OA-related pain mechanisms and define novel pharmacological targets for therapy. Currently available models of OA in rodents include surgical and chemical interventions into one knee joint. The monoiodoacetate (MIA) model has become a standard for modelling joint disruption in OA in both rats and mice. The model, which is easier to perform in the rat, involves injection of MIA into a knee joint that induces rapid pain-like responses in the ipsilateral limb, the level of which can be controlled by injection of different doses. Intra-articular injection of MIA disrupts chondrocyte glycolysis by inhibiting glyceraldehyde-3-phosphatase dehydrogenase and results in chondrocyte death, neovascularization, subchondral bone necrosis and collapse, as well as inflammation. The morphological changes of the articular cartilage and bone disruption are reflective of some aspects of patient pathology. Along with joint damage, MIA injection induces referred mechanical sensitivity in the ipsilateral hind paw and weight bearing deficits that are measurable and quantifiable. These behavioral changes resemble some of the symptoms reported by the patient population, thereby validating the MIA injection in the knee as a useful and relevant pre-clinical model of OA pain. The aim of this article is to describe the methodology of intra-articular injections of MIA and the behavioral recordings of the associated development of hypersensitivity with a mind to highlight the necessary steps to give consistent and reliable recordings. PMID:27214709

  14. Effect of exercise on the plasma BDNF levels in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Wellington F; Lacerda, Ana Cristina R; Mendonça, Vanessa A; Arrieiro, Arthur N; Fonseca, Sueli F; Amorim, Mateus R; Teixeira, Antônio L; Teixeira, Mauro M; Miranda, Aline S; Coimbra, Cândido C; Brito-Melo, Gustavo E A

    2014-06-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a common disease in the elderly population worldwide. The alleviation of the symptoms associated with this disease can be achieved with physical exercise that induces a cascade of molecular and cellular processes. Of the neurotrophins, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) appears to be the most affected by physical activity. Moreover, BDNF seems to have a negative modulatory role in inflammation, and its production by skeletal muscle cells or by cells of the immune system drives the immunoprotective role of physical activity in situations of chronic inflammation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate plasma BDNF concentrations in elderly individuals presenting with knee osteoarthritis. To accomplish this, sixteen volunteers (mean age 67 ± 4.41 years) presenting with clinically and radiographically diagnosed knee osteoarthritis were evaluated during acute exercise (1 session of 20 min on a treadmill) and after chronic exercise (12 weeks of aerobic training, consisting of a 50-min walk 3 times per week). Additionally, both a functional assessment (during a 6-min walk) and a pain perception assessment were performed at the start and at the end of physical exercises (training). The plasma BDNF concentrations were measured by ELISA. For the population studied, acute exercise increased the levels of BDNF only before the 12-week training period (p < 0.001). Moreover, the training augmented the plasma concentrations of BDNF (p < 0.0001) and improved clinical parameters (functional p < 0.001; pain perception p < 0.01).

  15. The effect of different types of insoles or shoe modifications on medial loading of the knee in persons with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard K; Chapman, Graham J; Parkes, Matthew J; Forsythe, Laura; Felson, David T

    2015-11-01

    Many conservative treatments exist for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) which aims to reduce the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). The objective of this study was to determine the difference between different shoes and lateral wedge insoles on EKAM, knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI), external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort when walking in individuals with medial knee OA. Seventy individuals with medial knee OA underwent three-dimensional walking gait analysis in five conditions (barefoot, control shoe, typical wedge, supported wedge, and mobility shoe) with pain and comfort recorded concurrently. The change in EKAM, KAAI, external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort were assessed using multiple linear regressions and pairwise comparisons. Compared with the control shoe, lateral wedge insoles and barefoot walking significantly reduced early stance EKAM and KAAI. The mobility shoe showed no effect. A significant reduction in latter stance EKAM was seen in the lateral wedge insoles compared to the other conditions, with only the barefoot condition reducing the external knee flexion moment. However, the mobility shoe showed significant immediate knee pain reduction and improved comfort scores. Different lateral wedge insoles show comparable reductions in medial knee loading and in our study, the mobility shoe did not affect medial loading.

  16. The effect of different types of insoles or shoe modifications on medial loading of the knee in persons with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Graham J.; Parkes, Matthew J.; Forsythe, Laura.; Felson, David T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many conservative treatments exist for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) which aims to reduce the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). The objective of this study was to determine the difference between different shoes and lateral wedge insoles on EKAM, knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI), external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort when walking in individuals with medial knee OA. Seventy individuals with medial knee OA underwent three‐dimensional walking gait analysis in five conditions (barefoot, control shoe, typical wedge, supported wedge, and mobility shoe) with pain and comfort recorded concurrently. The change in EKAM, KAAI, external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort were assessed using multiple linear regressions and pairwise comparisons. Compared with the control shoe, lateral wedge insoles and barefoot walking significantly reduced early stance EKAM and KAAI. The mobility shoe showed no effect. A significant reduction in latter stance EKAM was seen in the lateral wedge insoles compared to the other conditions, with only the barefoot condition reducing the external knee flexion moment. However, the mobility shoe showed significant immediate knee pain reduction and improved comfort scores. Different lateral wedge insoles show comparable reductions in medial knee loading and in our study, the mobility shoe did not affect medial loading. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1646–1654, 2015. PMID:25991385

  17. Arnica montana gel in osteoarthritis of the knee: an open, multicenter clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Knuesel, Otto; Weber, Michel; Suter, Andy

    2002-01-01

    This open multicenter trial investigated the safety and efficacy of an Arnica montana fresh plant gel, applied twice daily, in 26 men and 53 women with mild to moderate osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. After 3 and 6 weeks, significant decreases in median total scores on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) were evident in the intention-to-treat and per-protocol populations (both P < .0001). Scores on the pain, stiffness, and function subscales also showed significant reductions at these timepoints. The overall local adverse-event rate of 7.6% included only one allergic reaction. Sixty-nine patients (87%) rated the tolerability of the gel as "good" or "fairly good," and 76% would use it again. Topical application of Arnica montana gel for 6 weeks was a safe, well-tolerated, and effective treatment of mild to moderate OA of the knee.

  18. Effect of Sri Lankan traditional medicine and Ayurveda on Sandhigata Vata (osteoarthritis of knee joint).

    PubMed

    Perera, Pathirage Kamal; Perera, Manaram; Kumarasinghe, Nishantha

    2014-01-01

    Reported case was a 63-year-old female with end-stage osteoarthritis (OA) (Sandhigata Vata) of the left knee joint accompanied by exostoses. Radiology (X-ray) report confirmed it as a Kellgren-Lawrence grade III or less with exostoses. At the beginning, the Knee Society Rating System scores of pain, movement and stability were poor, and function score was fair. Srilankan traditional and Ayurveda medicine treatment was given in three regimens for 70 days. After 70 days, external treatment of oleation and 2 capsules of Shallaki (Boswellia serrata Triana and Planch) and two tablets of Jeewya (comprised of Emblica officinalis Gaertn., Tinospora cordifolia [Willd.] Millers. and Terminalia chebula Retz.), twice daily were continued over 5 months. Visual analogue scale for pain, knee scores in the Knee Society online rating system and a Ayurveda clinical assessment criteria was used to evaluate the effects of treatments in weekly basis. After treatment for 70 days, the Knee Society Rating System scores of pain, movement and stability were also improved up to good level and function score was improved up to excellent level. During the follow-up period, joint symptoms and signs and the knee scores were unchanged. In conclusion, this OA patient's quality of life was improved by the combined treatment of Sri Lankan traditional medicine and Ayurveda. PMID:26195904

  19. Current interventions in the management of knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Dinesh; Bejarano, Tatiana; Novo, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is progressive joint disease characterized by joint inflammation and a reparative bone response and is one of the top five most disabling conditions that affects more than one-third of persons > 65 years of age, with an average estimation of about 30 million Americans currently affected by this disease. Global estimates reveal more than 100 million people are affected by OA. The financial expenditures for the care of persons with OA are estimated at a total annual national cost estimate of $15.5-$28.6 billion per year. As the number of people >65 years increases, so does the prevalence of OA and the need for cost-effective treatment and care. Developing a treatment strategy which encompasses the underlying physiology of degenerative joint disease is crucial, but it should be considerate to the different age ranges and different population needs. This paper focuses on different exercise and treatment protocols (pharmacological and non-pharmacological), the outcomes of a rehabilitation center, clinician-directed program versus an at home directed individual program to view what parameters are best at reducing pain, increasing functional independence, and reducing cost for persons diagnosed with knee OA. PMID:23559821

  20. Quality of life and functional capacity of elderly women with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Janice Chaim; Bassitt, Debora Pastore

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To correlate functional ability and quality of life of elderly women with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Cross-sectional study composed of 40 elderly women with knee osteoarthritis. We used the following instruments: identification questionnaire, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-OLD (WHOQOL-OLD). The significance level was 0.05 (5%), and confidence intervals were 95%. For statistical analysis we used parametric statistical tests, descriptive analysis, test for equality of two proportions, Pearson's correlation, correlation test, and analysis of variance. Results: The mean age (± standard deviation) was 74.1 (±6.7) years, and 47.5% of patients had osteoarthritis in both knees. Moderate pain was reported by 45% of patients when they walked on a flat plane and 40% when they were seated or lying down; 55% had severe or very severe pain when climbing or descending stairs; 50% reported moderate joint stiffness after sitting, lying, or resting; and 65% reported moderate or little stiffness after waking. In physical function, 60% of patients had moderate or severe difficulty in descending stairs and 67.5%, when climbing stairs; 60% reported severe or very severe difficulty in getting in and out of the car, and 70%, when performing strenuous housework. The correlation with WHOQOL-OLD and WOMAC was negative and not significant except for autonomy, which was significant. Sedentary and elderly women who used walking aid devices had worse WOMAC functional capacity, but this finding was not statistically significant. In WHOQOL-OLD, volunteers scored higher on social participation and engagement in physical activity on autonomy, which was statistically significant compared with the nonvoluntary and sedentary domains, respectively. Conclusion: It is possible to have a good quality of life even with functional impairment from knee osteoarthritis. PMID:23843063

  1. Use of the KineSpring system in the treatment of medial knee osteoarthritis: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    MADONNA, VINCENZO; CONDELLO, VINCENZO; PIOVAN, GIANLUCA; SCREPIS, DANIELE; ZORZI, CLAUDIO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the purpose of this study was to analyze our preliminary results obtained with the KineSpring system in patients suffering from medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods between September 2012 and May 2014, 53 patients underwent treatment with the KineSpring system. Patient self-assessment was performed pre-operatively and at 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively, and included the KOOS, Tegner activity score, Lysholm functional knee score, VAS knee pain score, and IKDC score. Device- and procedure-related adverse events were recorded. Results mean KOOS subscales, except for the Sport/Recreation subscale at six months, improved over time. Mean WOMAC Pain and Function domains, Lysholm score, IKDC score and VAS knee pain score improved over the follow-up period and were significantly improved at 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively compared to baseline. Mean Tegner score improved slightly over time. In 5 of the 53 (9.4%) patients re-operation was necessary. In 3 patients the device was removed due to infection (one case) or persistent knee pain (two cases). Surgical arthrolysis was performed in two patients. Conclusions in our preliminary experience, the KineSpring system gave good short-term clinical results. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:26889469

  2. Current Surgical Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rönn, Karolin; Reischl, Nikolaus; Gautier, Emanuel; Jacobi, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Osteoathritis (OA) of the knee is common, and the chances of suffering from OA increase with age. Its treatment should be initially nonoperative—and requires both pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment modalities. If conservative therapy fails, surgery should be considered. Surgical treatments for knee OA include arthroscopy, cartilage repair, osteotomy, and knee arthroplasty. Determining which of these procedures is most appropriate depends on several factors, including the location, stage of OA, comorbidities on the one side and patients suffering on the other side. Arthroscopic lavage and débridement is often carried out, but does not alter disease progression. If OA is limited to one compartment, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty or unloading osteotomy can be considered. They are recommended in young and active patients in regard to the risks and limited durability of total knee replacement. Total arthroplasty of the knee is a common and safe method in the elderly patients with advanced knee OA. This paper summarizes current surgical treatment strategies for knee OA, with a focus on the latest developments, indications and level of evidence. PMID:22046517

  3. Altered Frontal and Transverse Plane Tibiofemoral Kinematics and Patellofemoral Malalignments During Downhill Gait in Patients with Mixed Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Meholic, Brad; Chuang, Wei-Neng; Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Tashman, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Patients with knee osteoarthritis often present with signs of mixed tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joint disease. It has been suggested that altered frontal and transverse plane knee joint mechanics play a key role in compartment-specific patterns of knee osteoarthritis, but invivo evidence in support of this premise remains limited. Using Dynamic Stereo X-ray techniques, the aim of this study was to compare the frontal and transverse plane tibiofemoral kinematics and patellofemoral malalignments during the loading response phase of downhill gait in three groups of older adults: patients with medial tibiofemoral compartment and coexisting patellofemoral osteoarthritis (n=11); patients with lateral tibiofemoral compartment and coexisting patellofemoral osteoarthritis (n=10); and an osteoarthritis-free control group (n=22). Patients with lateral compartment osteoarthritis walked with greater and increasing degrees of tibiofemoral abduction compared to the medial compartment osteoarthritis and the control groups who walked with increasing degrees of tibiofemoral adduction. Additionally, the medial and lateral compartment osteoarthritis groups demonstrated reduced degrees of tibiofemoral internal rotation compared to the control group. Both medial and lateral compartment osteoarthritis groups also walked with increasing degrees of lateral patella tilt and medial patella translation during the loading response phase of downhill gait. Our findings suggest that despite the differences in frontal and transverse plane tibiofemoral kinematics between patients with medial and lateral compartment osteoarthritis, the malalignments of their arthritic patellofemoral joint appears to be similar. Further research is needed to determine if these kinematic variations are relevant targets for interventions to reduce pain and disease progression in patients with mixed disease. PMID:26087880

  4. Altered frontal and transverse plane tibiofemoral kinematics and patellofemoral malalignments during downhill gait in patients with mixed knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Meholic, Brad; Chuang, Wei-Neng; Gustafson, Jonathan A; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Tashman, Scott

    2015-07-16

    Patients with knee osteoarthritis often present with signs of mixed tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joint disease. It has been suggested that altered frontal and transverse plane knee joint mechanics play a key role in compartment-specific patterns of knee osteoarthritis, but in-vivo evidence in support of this premise remains limited. Using Dynamic Stereo X-ray techniques, the aim of this study was to compare the frontal and transverse plane tibiofemoral kinematics and patellofemoral malalignments during the loading response phase of downhill gait in three groups of older adults: patients with medial tibiofemoral compartment and coexisting patellofemoral osteoarthritis (n=11); patients with lateral tibiofemoral compartment and coexisting patellofemoral osteoarthritis (n=10); and an osteoarthritis-free control group (n=22). Patients with lateral compartment osteoarthritis walked with greater and increasing degrees of tibiofemoral abduction compared to the medial compartment osteoarthritis and the control groups who walked with increasing degrees of tibiofemoral adduction. Additionally, the medial and lateral compartment osteoarthritis groups demonstrated reduced degrees of tibiofemoral internal rotation compared to the control group. Both medial and lateral compartment osteoarthritis groups also walked with increasing degrees of lateral patella tilt and medial patella translation during the loading response phase of downhill gait. Our findings suggest that despite the differences in frontal and transverse plane tibiofemoral kinematics between patients with medial and lateral compartment osteoarthritis, the malalignments of their arthritic patellofemoral joint appears to be similar. Further research is needed to determine if these kinematic variations are relevant targets for interventions to reduce pain and disease progression in patients with mixed disease.

  5. Physical exercise and reduction of pain in adults with lower limb osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Escalante, Yolanda; Saavedra, Jose M; García-Hermoso, Antonio; Silva, Antonio J; Barbosa, Tiago M

    2010-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease. The knee and hip joints are the most frequently affected. Treatments fall into three main categories: pharmacological, non-pharmacological, and surgical. Treatments can be applied alone or in combination. In the last few years, within the non-pharmacological category have been a growing importance of physical exercise programs aimed to reduce pain in knee and hip joints. The purpose of this review was to summarize evidence for the effectiveness and structure of exercise programs on pain in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis. To that end, several databases were searched, retrieving 33 studies that evaluated the influence of different exercise programs on pain. These studies were grouped according to the characteristics of the exercise program: land-based intervention (strength program, Tai Chi, aerobic program), aquatic intervention (hydrotherapy), and mixed exercise programs. The main conclusions drawn were: (i) despite recommendations for the use of exercise programs as pain therapy in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis, very few randomized clinical studies were conducted; (ii) the structure of the exercise programs (content, duration, frequency and duration of the session) is very heterogeneous; (iii) on overall, exercise programs based on Tai Chi have better results than mixed exercise programs, but without clear differences.

  6. Moxibustion is an Alternative in Treating Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Guo-Min; Tian, Xu; Jin, Ying-Hui; Deng, Yong-Hong; Zhang, Hui; Pang, Xiao-Li; Zhou, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a common disorder in elderly. There is no known cure for KOA, and thus therapeutic strategies of alleviating symptoms are increasingly emphasized. Moxibustion has been widely used to treat KOA; however, results are inconclusive. The aim of our study is to critically reassess the effects of moxibustion on KOA. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Chinese Biomedical Literature database (CBM) through 25 November 2015. Two independent reviewers selected studies and abstracted information, as well as assessed the risk of bias using Cochrane risk of bias tool. The random-effects meta-analyses were performed based on abstracted data. We initially captured 163 citations and added 4 records through checking review. After critical appraisal, 13 RCTs were included. Meta-analyses indicated that moxibustion is not statistically different from oral drug in improving the response rate (MD = 1.09; 95% CI = 1.00, 1.20; P = 0.05), alleviating pain and improving physical function. Our meta-analysis also found that moxibustion is superior to usual care and sham moxibustion in reducing WOMAC score (MD = 7.56; 95% CI = 4.11, 11.00; P = 0.00), pain and function, as well as increasing QoL. Moreover, most AEs caused by moxibustion can heal without medical care. We concluded that moxibustion treatment is equal to the oral drugs and intra-articular injections and may be an alternative in treating patients with KOA. PMID:26871839

  7. Biomechanical Analysis of Stair Descent in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Igawa, Tatsuya; Katsuhira, Junji

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were to investigate the lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics of patients with the knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) during stair descent and clarify the biomechanical factors related to their difficulty in stair descent. [Subjects and Methods] Eight healthy elderly persons and four knee OA patients participated in this study. A 3-D motion analysis system and force plates were employed to measure lower extremity joint angles, ranges of motion, joint moments, joint powers, and ratios of contribution for the joint powers while descending stairs. [Results] Knee joint flexion angle, extension moment, and negative power during the early stance phase in the knee OA group were smaller than those in the healthy subjects group. However, no significant changes in these parameters in the ankle joint were observed between the two subject groups. [Conclusion] Knee OA patients could not use the knee joint to absorb impact during the early stance phase of stair descent. Hence, they might compensate for the roles played by the intact knee joint by mainly using ipsilateral ankle kinematics and kinetics. PMID:24926119

  8. Biomechanical analysis of stair descent in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Igawa, Tatsuya; Katsuhira, Junji

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were to investigate the lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics of patients with the knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) during stair descent and clarify the biomechanical factors related to their difficulty in stair descent. [Subjects and Methods] Eight healthy elderly persons and four knee OA patients participated in this study. A 3-D motion analysis system and force plates were employed to measure lower extremity joint angles, ranges of motion, joint moments, joint powers, and ratios of contribution for the joint powers while descending stairs. [Results] Knee joint flexion angle, extension moment, and negative power during the early stance phase in the knee OA group were smaller than those in the healthy subjects group. However, no significant changes in these parameters in the ankle joint were observed between the two subject groups. [Conclusion] Knee OA patients could not use the knee joint to absorb impact during the early stance phase of stair descent. Hence, they might compensate for the roles played by the intact knee joint by mainly using ipsilateral ankle kinematics and kinetics.

  9. Knee extensor muscle weakness is a risk factor for development of knee osteoarthritis. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Øiestad, B E; Juhl, C B; Eitzen, I; Thorlund, J B

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the association between knee extensor muscle weakness and the risk of developing knee osteoarthritis. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted with literature searches in Medline, SPORTDiscus, EMBASE, CINAHL, and AMED. Eligible studies had to include participants with no radiographic or symptomatic knee osteoarthritis at baseline; have a follow-up time of a minimum of 2 years, and include a measure of knee extensor muscle strength. Hierarchies for extracting data on knee osteoarthritis and knee extensor muscle strength were defined prior to data extraction. Meta-analysis was applied on the basis of the odds ratios (ORs) of developing symptomatic knee osteoarthritis or radiographic knee osteoarthritis in subjects with knee extensor muscle weakness. ORs for knee osteoarthritis and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated and combined using a random effects model. Twelve studies were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis after the initial searches. Five cohort studies with a follow-up time between 2.5 and 14 years, and a total number of 5707 participants (3553 males and 2154 females), were finally included. The meta-analysis showed an overall increased risk of developing symptomatic knee osteoarthritis in participants with knee extensor muscle weakness (OR 1.65 95% CI 1.23, 2.21; I(2) = 50.5%). This systematic review and meta-analysis showed that knee extensor muscle weakness was associated with an increased risk of developing knee osteoarthritis in both men and women.

  10. Teaching Tai Chi to elders with osteoarthritis pain and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jason Y; Tsai, Pao-Feng; Woods, Sheery; Beck, Cornelia; Roberson, Paula K; Rosengren, Karl

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the authors' experience and strategies in teaching Tai Chi, a gentle exercise derived from an ancient Chinese martial art, to mildly cognitively impaired elders to relieve osteoarthritic knee pain. The 12-form Sun-style Tai Chi, a set of Tai Chi forms endorsed by the American Arthritis Foundation, was used in the program. Teaching Tai Chi to elders with mild cognitive impairment requires particular strategies tailored to their physical and cognitive frailty. When effectively taught, Tai Chi can be a unique and cost-effective intervention for elders with knee pain caused by osteoarthritis.

  11. The Truth Behind Subchondral Cysts in Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Audrey, Han Xinyun; Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah Bin; Andrew, Tan Hwee Chye

    2014-01-01

    Background: Subchondral cysts have always been taught to be one of the cardinal radiological features of knee osteoarthritis but are not well understood. We aimed to evaluate the radiological prevalence and epidemiology of subchondral cysts in patients with knee osteoarthritis to determine if they are truly a cardinal radiological feature. Methods: All patients of a single surgeon with symptoms of knee osteoarthritis were selected for this study. All patients had failed a trial of conservative therapy and were planned for total knee arthroplasty. Patients with symptoms of and documentary evidence of inflammatory arthritis, other neurological and orthopaedic problems causing functional deficits were excluded from this study. A total of 806 plain radiographs were analyzed with the aid of an atlas for the presence of narrowed joint space, osteophytes, subchondral sclerosis and subchondral cysts. The radiological prevalence of each feature was then calculated. Demographics and pre-operative measurements were compared between patients with and without radiological evidence of subchondral cysts. Results: Subchondral cysts were only present in 30.6% of the study population. Narrowed joint space was present in 99.5%, osteophytes in 98.1% and subchondral sclerosis in 88.3% of all radiographs. The differences in prevalence were statistically significant. There was a higher proportion of females in patients with radiological evidence of subchondral cysts. These patients also had a greater varus deformity preoperatively. Conclusion: With a radiological prevalence of 30.6%, subchondral cysts should not be considered a cardinal radiological feature of osteoarthritis. Subchondral cysts may be associated with the female gender and genu varum. PMID:24533038

  12. [Platelet-rich plasma in knee osteoarthritis treatment].

    PubMed

    Simental-Mendía, Mario Alberto; Vílchez-Cavazos, José Félix; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    The biological changes that commonly cause degenerative articular cartilage injuries in the knee are primarily associated to misalignment of the joint and metabolic changes related to age, as occurs in osteoarthritis. Furthermore, the capacity for cartilage self-regeneration is quite limited due to the lack of vascularity of the tissue. To date there is no ideal treatment capable to stimulate cartilage regeneration; thus there is a need to seek alternative therapies for the treatment of such conditions. The number of publications demonstrating the therapeutic and regenerative benefits of using platelet-rich plasma as a treatment for knee osteoarthritis has been increasing in recent years. In spite of encouraging results, there are still only a few randomised control studies with strong clinical evidence, lacking clarity on points such as the optimum formulation or the mechanism of action of platelet-rich plasma. Up to this point and based on the results of clinical studies, not all patients can benefit from this therapy. It is important to consider aspects such as the age and grade of cartilage degeneration. The aim of the present paper is to review the recent scientific literature on the treatment of knee osteoarthritis with platelet-rich plasma, and the biological bases of this therapy, as well as presenting the current opinion on this subject.

  13. [Platelet-rich plasma in knee osteoarthritis treatment].

    PubMed

    Simental-Mendía, Mario Alberto; Vílchez-Cavazos, José Félix; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    The biological changes that commonly cause degenerative articular cartilage injuries in the knee are primarily associated to misalignment of the joint and metabolic changes related to age, as occurs in osteoarthritis. Furthermore, the capacity for cartilage self-regeneration is quite limited due to the lack of vascularity of the tissue. To date there is no ideal treatment capable to stimulate cartilage regeneration; thus there is a need to seek alternative therapies for the treatment of such conditions. The number of publications demonstrating the therapeutic and regenerative benefits of using platelet-rich plasma as a treatment for knee osteoarthritis has been increasing in recent years. In spite of encouraging results, there are still only a few randomised control studies with strong clinical evidence, lacking clarity on points such as the optimum formulation or the mechanism of action of platelet-rich plasma. Up to this point and based on the results of clinical studies, not all patients can benefit from this therapy. It is important to consider aspects such as the age and grade of cartilage degeneration. The aim of the present paper is to review the recent scientific literature on the treatment of knee osteoarthritis with platelet-rich plasma, and the biological bases of this therapy, as well as presenting the current opinion on this subject. PMID:26116039

  14. Treatment of knee osteoarthritis with platelet-rich plasma in comparison with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation plus exercise: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Angoorani, Hooman; Mazaherinezhad, Ali; Marjomaki, Omid; Younespour, Shima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis is a disabling musculoskeletal disease with no definite treatment. This study compared the effect of Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) plus exercise in the treatment of patients with knee joint osteoarthritis. Methods: 54 eligible patients with knee osteoarthritis were randomly allocated into two groups. (IRCT2012110611382N) Group A (27 patients) received 2 injections of PRP (4 weeks apart) and group B (27 patients) received 10 sessions of TENS as well as exercise during the study period. Clinical outcome was evaluated using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores (KOOS) questionnaire before the treatment, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks after that the treatment. Pain was also assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Time to an intolerable knee pain during treadmill workout was also evaluated using an objective test. Results: In the PRP group, the mean KOOS symptom score improved significantly from baseline to the end of study, while the change was not significant over this period for the group B. In both groups, significant reductions were observed in VAS scores from baseline till the end of study. The mean time to feel intolerable knee pain during treadmill work out of PRP group increased significantly from baseline to week 4, but no significant changes were found in this parameter over the time of study in the group B. Conclusion: Intraarticular injection of PRP is an effective, safe method for short-term treatment of patients with knee joint osteoarthritis. PMID:26478881

  15. Effect of chronic knee osteoarthritis on flexion-relaxation phenomenon of the erector spinae in elderly females

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yeon-Gyu; Jeong, Yeon-Jae; Koo, Jung-Wan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the flexion-relaxation phenomenon of the erector spinae in elderly women with chronic knee osteoarthritis and determined whether the flexion-relaxation phenomenon can be used as a pain evaluation tool in such cases. [Subjects and Methods] Seventeen elderly females with chronic knee osteoarthritis and 13 healthy young females voluntarily participated in this study. They performed three postural positions in 15 s: trunk flexion, complete trunk flexion, and trunk extension, each for 5 s. While these positions were held, muscle activation of the thoracic and lumbar erector spinae were measured using surface electromyography. The flexion-relaxation rate was determined by dividing the values for trunk extension by those of complete trunk flexion and by dividing the values for trunk flexion by those of complete trunk flexion. [Results] According to our results, the flexion-relaxation phenomenon was different between healthy young and elderly females with chronic knee osteoarthritis. Specifically, there was a difference in the left thoracic erector spinae muscle, but not in the left and right lumbar erector spinae or right thoracic spinae muscle. [Conclusion] Our study demonstrated that the erector spinae muscle flexion-relaxation phenomenon can be used as a pain evaluation tool in elderly females with chronic knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27512244

  16. One-year results of voluntary-based supervised exercise or treatment at orthopedic clinic for radiographic severe knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa, Hirofumi; Ikemoto, Tatsunori; Honjo, Hiroshi; Akao, Machiko; Tsujimoto, Toshiya; Ushida, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] In this study, we investigated the efficacy of supervised physical exercise or conventional treatment on symptomatic knee osteoarthritis with severe morphological degeneration. [Subjects] Sixty-six patients with severe radiographic knee osteoarthritis were enrolled. [Methods] Participants were separated into two groups: in one group patients conducted physical exercise under supervision; while in the other group they were treated by conventional clinical methods for one year. Participants filled out two types of questionnaires; the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure and the Pain Disability Assessment Scale at baseline and one year following enrollment in the study. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance was used to examine the effects over time and by group for a total of 43 participants; consisting of an exercise group (n=20) and a clinical group (n=23) excluding 23 dropouts. [Results] Analysis did not show a significant time-course effect or interaction between time-course and the groups in both questionnaires. On the other hand, there were significant group effects in both questionnaires with an advantage in the exercise group. [Conclusion] These results indicate that patients with knee osteoarthritis under supervised exercise conditions are more likely to maintain a better clinical outcome at one-year follow-up, despite the severe morphological degeneration in their knees. PMID:27134382

  17. Effects of exercise on knee joints with osteoarthritis: a pilot study of biologic markers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautch, J. C.; Malone, D. G.; Vailas, A. C.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of low intensity weight-bearing exercise on osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. METHODS: Synovial fluid keratan sulfate (KS) and hydroxyproline were measured as markers of cartilage degradation. The Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales (AIMS) were used to measure health status, and a visual analog scale for pain assessment was used before and after intervention. An exercise (EX) group (n = 15) received a thrice-weekly 12-week low intensity exercise program and a weekly educational program, and a minimal treatment (Min RX) group (n = 15) received only the education program. RESULTS: Pain levels declined in the EX group, and the Min RX group showed improvement on the AIMS. Synovial fluid was obtained in 11 subjects before and after the intervention. Levels of KS and hydroxyproline did not change. CONCLUSION: Further study of exercise effects should include both clinical and biologic parameters to examine the outcome of exercise as a therapeutic intervention in OA of the knee.

  18. Two-Year Incidence and Predictors of Future Knee Arthroplasty in Persons with Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis: Preliminary Analysis of Longitudinal Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangrong; Jiranek, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective There is little evidence to guide physicians when discussing future likelihood of knee arthroplasty with patients who have symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Data from Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) was used to determine the incidence of and predictors for knee arthroplasty. Methods OAI data were collected on a sample of 778 persons aged 45 to 79 years with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. An extensive set of measurements were obtained at baseline and persons were followed for 2 years to identify who underwent knee arthroplasty. Random forest analysis was used to identify optimal variables that discriminate among those who did and those who did not undergo knee arthroplasty. Results The two year incidence of knee arthroplasty in the cohort was 3.7% (95%CI, 2.6%, 5.3%). Because of the low number of knee arthroplasty procedures, the predictor analysis was preliminary in nature. The analysis identified several variables that could be used to assist in identifying patients at future risk for knee arthroplasty. Conclusion For persons at high risk of knee arthroplasty, the two year incidence of knee arthroplasty is very low. The most powerful predictors were those that accounted for disease severity and functional loss. These data could assist physicians in advising patients with knee osteoarthritis on future surgical care. PMID:19419874

  19. Reliability of a Proposed Ultrasonographic Grading Scale for Severity of Primary Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mortada, Mohamed; Zeid, Ayman; Al-Toukhy, Mirvat Abd El-hamid; Ezzeldin, Nillie; Elgawish, M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The objective of this study was to examine the concordance of a grading scale (0–4) of medial femoral osteophytes in knee joint detected by ultrasound (US) compared with the corresponding grades (0–4) of Kellgren–Lawrence (K&L) scale of conventional radiography and clinical joint examination. PATIENTS AND METHODS A cross-sectional observational study included 160 patients with knee pain who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for knee osteoarthritis (KOA) and 20 patients with knee pain who have not fulfilled the ACR criteria for KOA. All patients were subjected to clinical assessment (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index of Osteoarthritis and global visual analog scale) and radiological assessment in the form of X-ray grading according to K&L grading scale and ultrasonographic assessment of medial femoral osteophytes according to a scale that was proposed by the first author and consisted of five grades (0–4), where grade 0 denoted no osteoarthritis and grade 4 denoted the most advanced grade of KOA. Grade 2 was divided into two subgrades A and B with grade 2B considered as a more advanced stage than grade 2A. RESULTS The proposed US grading scale had high sensitivity and specificity in detecting the different grades of KOA compared with K&L grading scale (a total sensitivity of 94.6% and a total specificity of 93.3%). Intra- and interreader reliability of US was excellent (kappa >0.93 and >0.85, respectively). CONCLUSIONS US can reliably detect the severity of KOA. Good agreement was found between the proposed US grading scale and K&L grading scale. The proposed US grading scale is simple and reliable. PMID:27478389

  20. Do Knee Moments Normalized to Measures of Knee Cartilage Area Better Classify the Severity of Knee Osteoarthritis?

    PubMed

    Brisson, Nicholas M; Stratford, Paul W; Totterman, Saara; Tamez-Peña, José G; Beattie, Karen A; Adachi, Jonathan D; Maly, Monica R

    2015-12-01

    Investigations of joint loading in knee osteoarthritis (OA) typically normalize the knee adduction moment to global measures of body size (eg, body mass, height) to allow comparison between individuals. However, such measurements may not reflect knee size. This study used a morphometric measurement of the cartilage surface area on the medial tibial plateau, which better represents medial knee size. This study aimed to determine whether normalizing the peak knee adduction moment and knee adduction moment impulse during gait to the medial tibial bone-cartilage interface could classify radiographic knee OA severity more accurately than traditional normalization techniques. Individuals with mild (N = 22) and severe (N = 17) radiographic knee OA participated. The medial tibial bone-cartilage interface was quantified from magnetic resonance imaging scans. Gait analysis was performed, and the peak knee adduction moment and knee adduction moment impulse were calculated in nonnormalized units and normalized to body mass, body weight × height, and the medial tibial bone-cartilage interface. Receiver operating characteristic curves compared the ability of each knee adduction moment normalization technique to classify participants according to radiographic disease severity. No normalization technique was superior at distinguishing between OA severities. Knee adduction moments normalized to medial knee size were not more sensitive to OA severity.

  1. A review of the clinical evidence for exercise in osteoarthritis of the hip and knee.

    PubMed

    Bennell, Kim L; Hinman, Rana S

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic joint disease with the hip and knee being commonly affected lower limb sites. Osteoarthritis causes pain, stiffness, swelling, joint instability and muscle weakness, all of which can lead to impaired physical function and reduced quality of life. This review of evidence provides recommendations for exercise prescription in those with hip or knee OA. A narrative review was performed. Conservative non-pharmacological strategies, particularly exercise, are recommended by all clinical guidelines for the management of OA and meta-analyses support these exercise recommendations. Aerobic, strengthening, aquatic and Tai chi exercise are beneficial for improving pain and function in people with OA with benefits seen across the range of disease severities. The optimal exercise dosage is yet to be determined and an individualized approach to exercise prescription is required based on an assessment of impairments, patient preference, co-morbidities and accessibility. Maximising adherence is a key element dictating success of exercise therapy. This can be enhanced by the use of supervised exercise sessions (possibly in class format) in the initial exercise period followed by home exercises. Bringing patients back for intermittent consultations with the exercise practitioner, or attendance at "refresher" group exercise classes may also assist long-term adherence and improved patient outcomes. Few studies have evaluated the effects of exercise on structural disease progression and there is currently no evidence to show that exercise can be disease modifying. Exercise plays an important role in managing symptoms in those with hip and knee OA.

  2. Balneological outpatient treatment for patients with knee osteoarthritis; an effective non-drug therapy option in daily routine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özkuk, Kaǧan; Gürdal, Hatice; Karagülle, Mine; Barut, Yasemin; Eröksüz, Rıza; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to compare the effects of balneological treatments applied at consecutive and intermittent sessions without interfering with their daily routine in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This is a randomized, controlled, single-blind clinical trial. Fifty patients diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were included. The patients were divided into two groups. All patients were given a total of ten sessions of balneological treatment consisting of hydrotherapy and mud pack therapy. Group 1 received consecutive treatment for 2 weeks, while group 2 received intermittent treatment for 5 weeks. Local peloid packs at 45 °C were applied for 20 min, after a tap water (38 °C) bath. Evaluations were conducted before, after treatment, and at 12th week of post-treatment by Pain (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and Short Form-36 (SF-36). Both balneological treatment regimens of knee osteoarthritis had statistically significant clinical effects as well as effects on the quality of life. Patients' well-being continued at 3 months, except for joint stiffness (WOMAC), role-emotional (SF-36), and vitality (SF-36) in group 1 and for mental health (SF-36) in both groups. Both patient groups had improved compared to baseline. However, at 3 months after the treatment, the well-being of group 2 was unable to be maintained in terms of role-physical (SF-36) parameter, while the well-being of group 1 was unable to be maintained in terms of pain, WOMAC (pain, physical functions, total), and SF-36 (physical functioning, role-physical, pain, role-emotional, and mental health) variables, compared to data obtained immediately after treatment. Our study suggests that traditional and intermittent balneological therapies have similar efficacy in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  3. Relationships between physical performance and knee and hip osteoarthritis: findings from the European Project on Osteoarthritis (EPOSA)

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, MH; van der Pas, S; Denkinger, MD; Parsons, C; Jameson, KA; Schaap, L; Zambon, S; Castell, MV; Herbolsheimer, F; Nasell, H; Sanchez-Martinez, M; Otero, A; Nikolaus, T; van Schoor, NM; Pedersen, NL; Maggi, S; Deeg, DJ; Cooper, C; Dennison, E

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor physical performance (PP) is known to be associated with disability, lower quality of life and higher mortality rates. Knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) might be expected to contribute to poor PP, through joint pain and restricted range of movement. Both clinical and self-reported OA are often used for large scale community and epidemiological studies. Objective To examine the relationships between hip and knee OA and PP in a large dataset comprising cohorts from six European countries. Methods 2942 men and women aged 65-85 years from the Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom were recruited. Assessment included an interview and clinical assessment for OA. PP was determined from walking speed, chair rises and balance (range 0-12); low PP was defined as a score of ≤9. Results The mean(SD) age was 74.2(5.1) years. Rates of self-reported OA were much higher than clinical OA. Advanced age, female gender, lower educational attainment, abstinence from alcohol, and higher BMI were independently associated with low PP. Clinical knee OA, hip OA, or both were associated with a higher risk of low PP; OR(95%CI) 2.93(2.36,3.64), 3.79(2.49,5.76), and 7.22(3.63,14.38) respectively, with relationships robust to adjustment for the confounders above as well as pain. Conclusion Lower limb OA at the hip and knee is associated with low PP, and for a clinical diagnosis relationships are robust to adjustment for pain. Those at highest risk have clinical OA at both sites. PMID:24918169

  4. Duhuo Jisheng Tang for treating osteoarthritis of the knee: a prospective clinical observation

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jung-Nien; Chen, Huey-Jeng; Chen, Chao-Chung; Lin, Jer-Huei; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Wang, Jung-Der

    2007-01-01

    Background Little scientific evidence supports the efficacy of herbal medicines in the treatment of degenerative arthritis of the knee. The purpose of this study is to evaluate both the efficacy and safety of a finished Chinese herbal preparation Duhuo Jisheng Tang (DJT) in reducing symptoms of degenerative osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods A prospective follow-up study was carried out in two hospitals in Taipei between April and October 2005. Sixty-eight osteoarthritis patients, with symptoms diagnosed by radiologists, received DJT at a rate of 2.5 g, twice daily for four weeks. Baseline scores were measured on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) index, followed by further measures at the end of weeks 1, 2 and 4. The World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL) assessment was undertaken as a secondary outcome, with pattern identification questionnaires being adopted. Regression models were constructed to explore the score differences between the baseline and at weeks 2 and 4 by various determinants including age, gender, body mass index (BMI), severity at baseline, use of rescue medication, aversion to cold and flaccidity of the lower back and knees. Results Among the 68 participants, there were statistically significant reductions in the WOMAC index scores for pain, stiffness and physical functioning in the second and fourth weeks, with effects first appearing during week 2. By week 4, the mean WOMAC index scores had fallen from 22.2 (± 19.2) to 16.1 (± 16.2) for pain, from 28.1 (± 24.9) to 18.5 (± 20.3) for stiffness, and from 22.6 (± 18.0) to 18.2 (± 17.8) for physical functioning, while the global score for pain under the visual analogue scale (VAS) was reduced from 38.7 (± 21.5) to 27.8 (± 19.8). Conclusion In the treatment of degenerative osteoarthritis of the knee, a 4-week therapy with the Chinese herbal preparation DJT reduced pain and stiffness and improved physical functioning, but it was less effective

  5. Real-Time Tracking of Knee Adduction Moment in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Lee, Song Joo; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Background The external knee adduction moment (EKAM) is closely associated with the presence, progression, and severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is a lack of convenient and practical method to estimate and track in real-time the EKAM of patients with knee OA for clinical evaluation and gait training, especially outside of gait laboratories. New Method A real-time EKAM estimation method was developed and applied to track and investigate the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping on an elliptical trainer in both healthy subjects and a patient with knee OA. Results Substantial changes were observed in the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping in the patient with knee OA. Comparison with Existing Method(s) This is the first study to develop and test feasibility of real-time tracking method of the EKAM on patients with knee OA using 3-D inverse dynamics. Conclusions The study provides us an accurate and practical method to evaluate in real-time the critical EKAM associated with knee OA, which is expected to help us to diagnose and evaluate patients with knee OA and provide the patients with real-time EKAM feedback rehabilitation training. PMID:24361759

  6. Dual Release Paracetamol in Osteoarthritis of Knee: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Raj, D. Gokul; Sharma, Ateet B.; Swami B., Mallikarjun; Batra, Sumit; Acharya, Apurv; Maroo, Sanjaykumar H.; Patel, Ketan R.; Prajapati, Vipul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Paracetamol is recommended as first line agent for pain management in osteoarthritis (OA) by various guidelines. The main problem associated with management of osteoarthritis is long term patient compliance to paracetamol due to its frequent dosing. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Paracetamol 650 mg dual release tablet twice daily (PCM 650 dual release) compared to paracetamol 500mg immediate release tablet thrice daily (PCM 500 IR) in the treatment of Knee OA. Materials and Methods: In this randomized, open label, parallel, active controlled clinical study, 250 patients of OA knee meeting inclusion criteria were randomized to receive either PCM 650 dual release two times daily or PCM 500 IR three times daily for 6 weeks. Patients were assessed at baseline, 2, 4 and 6 weeks. Primary efficacy measures were severity of pain (Visual Analogue Scale) and Knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) subscale for pain at week 2, 4 and 6. Other KOOS subscales (symptoms other than pain, function in daily living, function in sport and recreation, quality of life) and patient’s and physicians global assessment of therapy were included as secondary endpoints. Results: Both treatment groups showed improvement in primary endpoints at each evaluation visit. Patients receiving PCM 650 dual release showed significant improvement of pain in both primary endpoints at each study visit compared to patients receiving PCM 500 IR (p<0.001). PCM 650 dual release was significantly superior to PCM 500 IR for improvement in all KOOS subscales at each study visit (p<0.01). Less number of patients required additional rescue analgesics in PCM 650 dual release group (16% patients vs 26%, PCM 500 IR; p>0.05). Adverse effects were significantly less in PCM 650 dual release group (6% vs. 14% in PCM 500 IR; p<0.05). Patient’s and physician’s global assessment of therapy favoured PCM 650 dual release than PCM 500 IR (p<0.001). Conclusion: Patients with

  7. Effect of eccentric isokinetic strengthening in the rehabilitation of patients with knee osteoarthritis: Isogo, a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Femorotibial knee osteoarthritis is associated with muscle weakness in the lower limbs, particularly in the quadriceps, which results in disease progression. The interest of having muscular strengthening as part of the therapeutic arsenal for the medical treatment of knee osteoarthritis is now well established. The functional disability induced by knee osteoarthritis manifests itself principally when walking, notably downhill, during which the muscles are called upon to contract eccentrically. We can therefore think that eccentric muscular strengthening could bring a functional benefit that is superior to concentric muscular strengthening. Methods/Design This is a prospective, randomized, bicenter, parallel-group, international study. Eighty patients aged from 40 to 75 years old, suffering from medical-stage knee osteoarthritis, will undertake 6 weeks of isokinetic muscular strengthening. Randomization determines the mode of muscular strengthening: either exclusively eccentric or exclusively concentric. The principal objective is to demonstrate the superiority of the improvement in the quadriceps isokinetic torque after isokinetic muscular strengthening by the eccentric mode compared to the concentric mode. The following parameters are also evaluated: the variations in the level of pain, the parameters of walking (maximum speed over 10 and 200 meters, analysis on a computerized Gaitrite™ treadmill), static equilibrium (on a FUSYO™ force platform), and the functional status of the patient using the Western Ontario and MacMaster Universities osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) questionnaire after the strengthening period and at 6 months. Discussion A better knowledge of the most effective mode of muscular strengthening is needed to optimize the functional benefits to the patients. In case of superiority in terms of efficacy of the eccentric mode, the latter could be given priority in the rehabilitation treatment of knee osteoarthritis patients. Trial

  8. Effects of kinesiotherapy, ultrasound and electrotherapy in management of bilateral knee osteoarthritis: prospective clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although recent advances in knee osteoarthritis (OA) treatment and evaluation were achieved, to the best of our knowledge, few studies have evaluated the longitudinal effect of therapeutic modalities on the functional exercise capacity of patients with knee OA. The purpose was to investigate the effects of kinesiotherapy and electrotherapy on functional exercise capacity, evaluated using the six-minute walk test (6-MWT) in patients with bilateral knee OA. Secondary measurements included range of motion (ROM), severity of knee pain (VAS), and a measure of perceived health and physical function, evaluated using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index. Methods A total of 40 women with bilateral knee OA were assigned to three groups: kinesiotherapy (KIN, n = 16), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, n = 12), or ultrasound (US, n = 10). The groups underwent 12 weeks of intervention twice per week. The participants were subjected to the 6-MWT, ROM, VAS and WOMAC index. These tests were performed before and after the intervention. The study was focused on outpatients and was carried out at Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Brazil. Results At follow-up, the KIN and US groups had significantly higher 6-MWT distances (19.8 ± 21.7 and 14.1 ± 22.5%, respectively) compared with their respective pre-intervention values. All treatments were effective for reducing pain and improving the WOMAC index. Conclusions We demonstrated that the 6-MWT is a tool that can be used to evaluate improvements in the functional exercise capacity of patients submitted to a clinical intervention. PMID:22999098

  9. [Effectiveness and safety of intra-articular use of hyaluronic acid (Suplasyn I-Shot) in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Krzysztof, Miśkowiec; Artur, Gadek; Alicja, Jurecka; Justyna, Sówka; Jakub, Slusarski; Henryk, Liszka; Jerzy, Wordliczek

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the leading causes of disability in the elderly. The changes in the lubricating properties of synovial fluid lead to significant pain and loss of function. Viscosupplementation, in which hyaluronic acid (HA) is injected into the knee joint, has evolved into an important part of our current therapeutic regimen in addressing the patient with knee pain due to OA. Intra-articular HA has proven to be an effective, safe, and tolerable treatment for symptomatic knee OA. In an effort to limit cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and renal safety concerns with COX-2 selective and nonselective NSAIDs and maximize HA efficacy, it is even proposed using HA earlier in the treatment paradigm for knee OA and also as part of a comprehensive treatment strategy. Our study reconfirmed effectiveness and safety of intra-articular use of hyaluronic acid (Suplasyn) in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27526423

  10. Serum Calcium Concentration Is Inversely Associated With Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Zeng, Chao; Wei, Jie; Yang, Tuo; Gao, Shu-Guang; Li, Yu-Sheng; Luo, Wei; Xiao, Wen-Feng; Xiong, Yi-Lin; Lei, Guang-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To examine the relationship between serum calcium (Ca) concentration and radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). This study covered a total of 2855 subjects. The serum Ca concentration was detected by the Arsenazo III method. The radiographic OA of the knee was defined as changes equivalent to Kellgren–Lawrence grade 2 on 1 side at least. The serum Ca concentration was categorized into 4 quartiles, which are ≤2.27, 2.28–2.34, 2.35–2.41, and ≥2.42 mmol/L, respectively. The relationship between serum Ca and radiographic knee OA was examined using the multivariable logistic analysis after adjusting a series of potential confounding factors. For each quartile of the relationship between serum Ca concentration and radiographic knee OA, the OR with 95% CI was calculated, and the one with the lowest value was considered to be the reference. An inverse association existed between serum Ca concentration and radiographic OA of the knee in the multivariable model and the model where the factors of age, sex, and BMI were adjusted. The multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) for radiographic knee OA in the second, third, and fourth quartiles of serum Ca concentration were 1.05 (95% CI: 0.83–1.31), 1.01 (95% CI: 0.80–1.27), and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.62–1.00), respectively, in comparison with the reference (first) quartile. A trend approaching to statistical significant (P = 0.06) was observed. Meanwhile, the relative odds of radiographic OA of the knee were decreased by 0.79 times in the fourth quartile in comparison with the reference. There is likely to be an inverse association between serum Ca concentration and radiographic OA of the knee. PMID:26871857

  11. The Dose-Related Effects of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Hong; Kim, Ja-Young; Choi, Cheol-Min; Lee, June-Kyung; Kee, Hoi-Sung; Jung, Kwang-Ik

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dose-related effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for knee osteoarthritis. Methods Seventy-five subjects were recruited, 60 of which met the inclusion criteria. The patients were randomly classified into two groups: group L, which was a low-energy group (n=30; 1,000 shocks/session; energy flux density [EFD], 0.040 mJ/mm2) and group M, which was a medium-energy group (n=30; 1,000 shocks/session; EFD, 0.093 mJ/mm2). For each group, 1,000 shock waves were delivered to the medial tibial plateau area, once a week, for 3 weeks. The main outcome measures were the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Roles and Maudsley (RM) score, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score, and the Lequesne index. Each assessment was performed at the baseline and at 1, 4, and 12 weeks after ESWT. Results In both groups, the VAS, the RM and WOMAC scores, and the Lequesne index were significantly improved over time (p<0.001), and group M showed greater improvement over group L at the 1, 4 and 12 weeks assessments. Conclusion In this study, medium-energy group (group M) showed greater improvement in regard to relieving pain and restoring functional outcome than the low-energy group (group L). Therefore, EFD can be considered to have significant influence when treating with ESWT for knee osteoarthritis. PMID:26361599

  12. Krill Oil Improves Mild Knee Joint Pain: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Minoru; Sakuraba, Keishoku; Sawaki, Keisuke; Sekigawa, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Krill oil is an edible oil extracted from krill, a small red-colored crustacean found in the Antarctic Ocean. The administration of krill oil is reported to mitigate inflammation in patients with cardiac disease, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoarthritis. However, the effect of krill oil on mild knee pain has not yet been determined. Objective To assess the effect of krill oil on mild knee pain. Design A randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial of fifty adults (38–85 years old) with mild knee pain attending the Fukushima Orthopedic Clinic (Tochigi, Japan) between September 2014 and March 2015. Interventions Participants were randomized to receive 2 g per day of either krill oil or an identical placebo for 30 days. Outcomes The primary outcome was improvement in subjective symptoms of knee pain as assessed by the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM) and Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (JOA). Secondary outcomes included blood and urine biochemical parameters. Results Both the placebo and krill oil groups showed significant improvements in the questions in the JKOM and JOA questionnaires after administration. After the intervention, krill oil group showed more improvements than placebo group in two questions regarding the pain and stiffness in knees in JKOM. Controlling for age, sex, weight, and smoking and drinking habits, krill oil significantly mitigated knee pain in sleeping (P < 0.001), standing (P < 0.001) and the range of motion of both right and left knees (both P = 0.011) compared to placebo. Krill oil administration raised plasma EPA (P = 0.048) and EPA/AA ratio (P = 0.003). Conclusion This study indicates that krill oil administration (2 g/day, 30 days) improved the subjective symptoms of knee pain in adults with mild knee pain. Trial registration UMIN-CTR; ID UMIN000014413 PMID:27701428

  13. Physical Exercise and Weight Loss for Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis in Very Old Patients: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Quintrec, Jean-Laurent Le; Verlhac, Bernard; Cadet, Christian; Bréville, Philippe; Vetel, Jean M; Gauvain, Jean B; Jeandel, Claude; Maheu, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Background : Rheumatologic and geriatric scholarly organisations recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis, which emphasise the usefulness of non-pharmacological therapies, are not scaled according to patient’s age and physical condition. We conducted a systematic review of clinical trials on exercise and weight loss in hip and knee osteoarthritis in very old patients. Methods : Electronic search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PASCAL database, systematic search of the Cochrane Reviews, manual search in guidelines, meta-analyses and identified relevant articles. Results : We identified 83 trials, with only 2 on patients aged ≥ 75 years; we therefore lowered the mean age threshold to 70 years and found 15 trials, mainly performed in knee osteoarthritis and outpatients. Physical exercise (8 trials): was effective on pain and function (4 controlled trials), with a persistent effect only in case of self-rehabilitation. Aquatic exercise (5 trials): was as effective as land-based exercise. Weight loss (2 trials): only patients under diet + exercise had significant improvement on symptoms. Conclusion : Our systematic review confirms that international recommendations on exercise for knee osteoarthritis also apply to subjects aged 70-80 years. Long-term effectiveness requires a maintenance strategy. Specific trials on very old patients with various comorbidities are mandatory, given that these subjects are more exposed to drug-related iatrogenesis. PMID:25489352

  14. Clinical Efficacy of Mudpack Therapy in Treating Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jie; Wu, Dongying; Li, Jian’an

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of mudpack therapy for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis and identify the likely factors associated with the high heterogeneity of combined studies. Design The Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials in which mudpack therapy was used to treat knee osteoarthritis. Results Ten publications that reported the results from a total of 1010 subjects were included in this meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of improvement in joint function at the final follow-up visit suggested, given that the follow-up time was less than 4 mos, that the combined effect size of four studies was −0.30 (−0.62 to 0.02) and the difference did not reach the level of statistical significance. When the follow-up time reached 4 mos, the combined effect size was −1.10 (−2.07 to −0.14) and the difference was significant. The I2 values of the two groups were 21.4% and 93.8%. Conclusion Functional improvement of the knee joint in patients treated with mudpack therapy was not significantly different from that of control subjects at the end of the 4-mo follow-up. The quality of current publications was a factor causing heterogeneity. PMID:26203645

  15. Is Lifelong Knee Joint Force from Work, Home, and Sport Related to Knee Osteoarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Ratzlaff, Charles R.; Koehoorn, Mieke; Cibere, Jolanda; Kopec, Jacek A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the association of cumulative lifetime knee joint force on the risk of self-reported medically-diagnosed knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Exposure data on lifetime physical activity type (occupational, household, sport/recreation) and dose (frequency, intensity, duration) were collected from 4,269 Canadian men and women as part of the Physical Activity and Joint Heath cohort study. Subjects were ranked in terms of the “cumulative peak force index”, a measure of lifetime mechanical knee force. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to obtain adjusted effects for mean lifetime knee force on the risk of knee OA. Results. High levels of total lifetime, occupational and household-related force were associated with an increased in risk of OA, with odds ratio's ranging from approximately 1.3 to 2. Joint injury, high BMI and older age were related to risk of knee OA, consistent with previous studies. Conclusions. A newly developed measure of lifetime mechanical knee force from physical activity was employed to estimate the risk of self-reported, medically-diagnosed knee OA. While there are limitations, this paper suggests that high levels of total lifetime force (all domains combined), and occupational force in men and household force in women were risk factors for knee OA. PMID:22848225

  16. Effects of Native Type II Collagen Treatment on Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bakilan, Fulya; Armagan, Onur; Ozgen, Merih; Tascioglu, Funda; Bolluk, Ozge; Alatas, Ozkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this randomized controlled study was to evaluate the efficacy of oral native type II collagen treatment on the symptoms and biological markers of cartilage degradation, when given concomitantly with acetaminophen in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine patients diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were included and randomly distributed into two groups: one treated with 1500 mg/day of acetaminophen (group AC; n=19) and the other treated with 1500 mg/day of acetaminophen plus 10 mg/day of native type II collagen (group AC+CII; n=20) for 3 months. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at rest and during walking, Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) pain, WOMAC function, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) scores, were recorded. Coll2-1, Coll2-1NO2 and Fibulin-3 levels were quantified in urine as biomarkers of disease progression. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02237989. Results: After 3 months of treatment, significant improvements compared to baseline were reported in joint pain (VAS walking), function (WOMAC) and quality of life (SF-36) in the AC+CII group, while only improvements in some subscales of the SF-36 survey and VAS walking were detected in the AC group. Comparisons between the groups revealed a significant difference in VAS walking score in favour of the AC+CII group as compared to AC group. Biochemical markers of cartilage degradation in urine did not significantly improve in any of the groups. Conclusion: All in all, these results suggest that native type II collagen treatment combined with acetaminophen is superior to only acetaminophen for symptomatic treatment of patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27551171

  17. The effect of low frequency pulsing electromagnetic field in treatment of patients with knee joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Aleksandar S; Djurasić, Ljubomir M

    2012-01-01

    Pulsing electromagnetic field represents effective rocedure in treating of diverse diseases and p pathologic conditions, especially in rheumatology, orthopaedics and traumatology. The goal of this research is the objective evaluation of the treapeutic effect of low frequency pulsing electromagnetic field (LFEMF), in comparison with the effect of the other physical procedure: interfererence currents (IFC) and the medicamentous therapy, in treating of patients with knee joint osteoarthritis. This study was made as experimental, randomized, controlled clinical trial, opened type. The examination included 60 patients (40 females and 20 males) with osteoarthritis of the knee joint. All patients were divided in three groups. The first group of 20 persons, composed of patients treated with medicamentous therapy (Diklofenak of 100 mg, 2 tablets per day). The second group consisted of 20 patients treated by LFPEMF and the third group consisted of 20 patients treated by IFC. All procedures were implemented during 10 days All of patients had also the same duration therapeutic exercise. As observing parameter was used: Lattinen test for the evaluation of the pain sensitivity, before and after therapy. For the statistical analysis of the aquired data, was used Student's t-test. After therapy the pain was considerably reduced in each group, but this effect was the most significant in the II group of the examinees, treated by LFPEMF (p< 0.001), than the effects in other groups of patients: I group (p< 0.05) and III group (p< 0.01). According to the results of this study it can be concluded that LFPEMF is very effective therapeutic procedure in treatment of patients with knee joint osteoarthritis.

  18. Preoperative widespread pain sensitization and chronic pain after hip and knee replacement: a cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wylde, Vikki; Sayers, Adrian; Lenguerrand, Erik; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Pyke, Mark; Beswick, Andrew D.; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain after joint replacement is common, affecting approximately 10% of patients after total hip replacement (THR) and 20% of patients after total knee replacement (TKR). Heightened generalized sensitivity to nociceptive input could be a risk factor for the development of this pain. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether preoperative widespread pain sensitivity was associated with chronic pain after joint replacement. Data were analyzed from 254 patients receiving THR and 239 patients receiving TKR. Pain was assessed preoperatively and at 12 months after surgery using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Pain Scale. Preoperative widespread pain sensitivity was assessed through measurement of pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at the forearm using an algometer. Statistical analysis was conducted using linear regression and linear mixed models, and adjustments were made for confounding variables. In both the THR and TKR cohort, lower PPTs (heightened widespread pain sensitivity) were significantly associated with higher preoperative pain severity. Lower PPTs were also significantly associated with higher pain severity at 12 months after surgery in the THR cohort. However, PPTs were not associated with the change in pain severity from preoperative to 12 months postoperative in either the TKR or THR cohort. These findings suggest that although preoperative widespread pressure pain sensitivity is associated with pain severity before and after joint replacement, it is not a predictor of the amount of pain relief that patients gain from joint replacement surgery, independent of preoperative pain severity. PMID:25599300

  19. An open label, prospective, clinical study on a polyherbal formulation in osteoarthritis of knee

    PubMed Central

    Nipanikar, Sanjay U.; Saluja, Manjit; Kuber, Vinod V.; Kadbhane, Kalyan P.; Chopra, Arvind; Khade, Namdev R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Currently, though pharmacological, mechanical, and surgical interventions are used, there is no known cure for osteoarthritis (OA). Objectives: The main aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of “TLPL/AY/03/2008”, a polyherbal formulation on knee joint pain assessed on visual analogue scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Materials and Methods: It was an open label, single center, prospective, clinical study conducted in 36 patients of OA Knee. Two capsules of ‘TLPL/AY/03/2008’ were given to all patients twice daily orally after meals for 180 days. Results: Data describing quantitative measures are expressed as mean ± SD. Comparison of variables representing categorical data was performed using Chi-square test. The mean joint pain (as assessed on VAS) reduced significantly (59.85%; P < 0.05) and the mean WOMAC combined score, WOMAC pain sub-score, WOMAC stiffness sub-score, and WOMAC difficulty sub-score also reduced significantly at the end of the study. The mean time taken by the patients to walk 50 feet too, was reduced significantly (25.26%) at the end of the study. At the end of 4 months of the treatment, no patient needed paracetamol as rescue medicine to control pain. Most of the patients had shown good overall improvement assessed by the physician and by the patients. Majority of the patients showed excellent tolerability to the study drug. No significant change in most of the safety laboratory parameters was observed at the end of the study. Conclusion: The study provides good evidence in support of the efficacy and safety of the ‘TLPL/AY/03/2008’ in OA of knee. PMID:23741160

  20. Wearable sensor-based rehabilitation exercise assessment for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun-Hui; Chen, Po-Chao; Liu, Kai-Chun; Chan, Chia-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Since the knee joint bears the full weight load of the human body and the highest pressure loads while providing flexible movement, it is the body part most vulnerable and susceptible to osteoarthritis. In exercise therapy, the early rehabilitation stages last for approximately six weeks, during which the patient works with the physical therapist several times each week. The patient is afterwards given instructions for continuing rehabilitation exercise by him/herself at home. This study develops a rehabilitation exercise assessment mechanism using three wearable sensors mounted on the chest, thigh and shank of the working leg in order to enable the patients with knee osteoarthritis to manage their own rehabilitation progress. In this work, time-domain, frequency-domain features and angle information of the motion sensor signals are used to classify the exercise type and identify whether their postures are proper or not. Three types of rehabilitation exercise commonly prescribed to knee osteoarthritis patients are: Short-Arc Exercise, Straight Leg Raise, and Quadriceps Strengthening Mini-squats. After ten subjects performed the three kinds of rehabilitation activities, three validation techniques including 10-fold cross-validation, within subject cross validation, and leave-one-subject cross validation are utilized to confirm the proposed mechanism. The overall recognition accuracy for exercise type classification is 97.29% and for exercise posture identification it is 88.26%. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed mechanism which can help patients perform rehabilitation movements and progress effectively. Moreover, the proposed mechanism is able to detect multiple errors at once, fulfilling the requirements for rehabilitation assessment. PMID:25686308

  1. Wearable Sensor-Based Rehabilitation Exercise Assessment for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun-Hui; Chen, Po-Chao; Liu, Kai-Chun; Chan, Chia-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Since the knee joint bears the full weight load of the human body and the highest pressure loads while providing flexible movement, it is the body part most vulnerable and susceptible to osteoarthritis. In exercise therapy, the early rehabilitation stages last for approximately six weeks, during which the patient works with the physical therapist several times each week. The patient is afterwards given instructions for continuing rehabilitation exercise by him/herself at home. This study develops a rehabilitation exercise assessment mechanism using three wearable sensors mounted on the chest, thigh and shank of the working leg in order to enable the patients with knee osteoarthritis to manage their own rehabilitation progress. In this work, time-domain, frequency-domain features and angle information of the motion sensor signals are used to classify the exercise type and identify whether their postures are proper or not. Three types of rehabilitation exercise commonly prescribed to knee osteoarthritis patients are: Short-Arc Exercise, Straight Leg Raise, and Quadriceps Strengthening Mini-squats. After ten subjects performed the three kinds of rehabilitation activities, three validation techniques including 10-fold cross-validation, within subject cross validation, and leave-one-subject cross validation are utilized to confirm the proposed mechanism. The overall recognition accuracy for exercise type classification is 97.29% and for exercise posture identification it is 88.26%. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed mechanism which can help patients perform rehabilitation movements and progress effectively. Moreover, the proposed mechanism is able to detect multiple errors at once, fulfilling the requirements for rehabilitation assessment. PMID:25686308

  2. High-Rosmarinic Acid Spearmint Tea in the Management of Knee Osteoarthritis Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, A. Erin; Tucker, Amy J.; Tulk, Hilary; Catapang, Marisa; Chapman, Lindsey; Sheikh, Natasha; Yurchenko, Svitlana; Fletcher, Ron; Kott, Laima S.; Duncan, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Individuals with medically diagnosed knee osteoarthritis (OA) participated in a randomized, double-blind study to investigate the effects of a high-rosmarinic acid (rosA) spearmint tea. Sixty-two participants were randomized by sex and screening pain score to consume tea brewed from a high-rosA spearmint variety or a commercially available spearmint twice daily for 16 weeks. Pain, quality of life (QoL), and physical function at baseline and week 16 were assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Short-Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36), 6-minute walk test (6MWT), and stair climb test (SCT). Data from 46 participants (mean age=60.7; BMI=32.9 kg/m2) were analyzed. Pain score significantly decreased from week 0 to 16 for the high-rosA group but not for the control group and scores for stiffness and physical disability significantly decreased from week 0 to 16 for both groups. Increased QoL score on the bodily pain index in the SF-36 was observed at week 16 within the high-rosA group only, although no significant differences were observed between the groups. A nonsignificant improvement was observed in the 6MWT at week 16 in the high-rosA group only. There were no changes in the SCT for either group. Therefore, 16-week daily consumption of the high-rosA and commercial spearmint teas significantly improved stiffness and physical disability scores in adults with knee OA, but only the high-rosA tea significantly decreased pain. Consumption of high-rosA tea warrants further consideration as a potential complementary therapy to reduce pain in OA. Clinical Trial Registration Number: NCT01380015. PMID:25058311

  3. Role of the endocannabinoid system in the emotional manifestations of osteoarthritis pain.

    PubMed

    La Porta, Carmen; Bura, S Andreea; Llorente-Onaindia, Jone; Pastor, Antoni; Navarrete, Francisco; García-Gutiérrez, María Salud; De la Torre, Rafael; Manzanares, Jorge; Monfort, Jordi; Maldonado, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in the emotional and cognitive alterations associated with osteoarthritis pain. The monosodium iodoacetate model was used to evaluate the affective and cognitive manifestations of osteoarthritis pain in type 1 (CB1R) and type 2 (CB2R) cannabinoid receptor knockout and wild-type mice and the ability of CB1R (ACEA) and CB2R (JWH133) selective agonists to improve these manifestations during a 3-week time period. The levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) were measured in plasma and brain areas involved in the control of these manifestations. Patients with knee osteoarthritis and healthy controls were recruited to evaluate pain, affective, and cognitive symptoms, as well as plasma endocannabinoid levels and cannabinoid receptor gene expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes. The affective manifestations of osteoarthritis were enhanced in CB1R knockout mice and absent in CB2R knockouts. Interestingly, both ACEA and JWH133 ameliorated the nociceptive and affective alterations, whereas ACEA also improved the associated memory impairment. An increase of 2-AG levels in prefrontal cortex and plasma was observed in this mouse model of osteoarthritis. In agreement, an increase of 2-AG plasmatic levels and an upregulation of CB1R and CB2R gene expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes were observed in patients with osteoarthritis compared with healthy subjects. Changes found in these biomarkers of the ECS correlated with pain, affective, and cognitive symptoms in these patients. The ECS plays a crucial role in osteoarthritis and represents an interesting pharmacological target and biomarker of this disease.

  4. Role of the endocannabinoid system in the emotional manifestations of osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    La Porta, Carmen; Bura, S. Andreea; Llorente-Onaindia, Jone; Pastor, Antoni; Navarrete, Francisco; García-Gutiérrez, María Salud; De la Torre, Rafael; Manzanares, Jorge; Monfort, Jordi; Maldonado, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we investigated the role of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in the emotional and cognitive alterations associated with osteoarthritis pain. The monosodium iodoacetate model was used to evaluate the affective and cognitive manifestations of osteoarthritis pain in type 1 (CB1R) and type 2 (CB2R) cannabinoid receptor knockout and wild-type mice and the ability of CB1R (ACEA) and CB2R (JWH133) selective agonists to improve these manifestations during a 3-week time period. The levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) were measured in plasma and brain areas involved in the control of these manifestations. Patients with knee osteoarthritis and healthy controls were recruited to evaluate pain, affective, and cognitive symptoms, as well as plasma endocannabinoid levels and cannabinoid receptor gene expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes. The affective manifestations of osteoarthritis were enhanced in CB1R knockout mice and absent in CB2R knockouts. Interestingly, both ACEA and JWH133 ameliorated the nociceptive and affective alterations, whereas ACEA also improved the associated memory impairment. An increase of 2-AG levels in prefrontal cortex and plasma was observed in this mouse model of osteoarthritis. In agreement, an increase of 2-AG plasmatic levels and an upregulation of CB1R and CB2R gene expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes were observed in patients with osteoarthritis compared with healthy subjects. Changes found in these biomarkers of the ECS correlated with pain, affective, and cognitive symptoms in these patients. The ECS plays a crucial role in osteoarthritis and represents an interesting pharmacological target and biomarker of this disease. PMID:26067584

  5. State-of-the-Art management of knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fibel, Kenton H; Hillstrom, Howard J; Halpern, Brian C

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis found in the United States’ population and is also the most common disease of joints in adults throughout the world with the knee being the most frequently affected of all joints. As the United States’ population ages along with the increasing trends in obesity prevalence in other parts of the world, it is expected that the burden of OA on the population, healthcare system, and overall economy will continue to increase in the future without making major improvements in managing knee OA. Numerous therapies aim to reduce symptoms of knee OA and continued research has helped to further understand the complex pathophysiology of its disease mechanism attempting to uncover new potential targets for the treatment of OA. This review article seeks to evaluate the current practices for managing knee OA and discusses emerging therapies on the horizon. These practices include non-pharmacological treatments such as providing patient education and self-management strategies, advising weight loss, strengthening programs, and addressing biomechanical issues with bracing or foot orthoses. Oral analgesics and anti-inflammatories are pharmacologicals that are commonly used and the literature overall supports that some of these medications can be helpful for managing knee OA in the short-term but are less effective for long-term management. Additionally, more prolonged use significantly increases the risk of serious associated side effects that are not too uncommon. Disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs are being researched as a treatment modality to potentially halt or slow disease progression but data at this time is limited and continued studies are being conducted to further investigate their effectiveness. Intra-articular injectables are also implemented to manage knee OA ranging from corticosteroids to hyaluronans to more recently platelet-rich plasma and even stem cells while several other injection therapies are

  6. State-of-the-Art management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fibel, Kenton H; Hillstrom, Howard J; Halpern, Brian C

    2015-02-16

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis found in the United States' population and is also the most common disease of joints in adults throughout the world with the knee being the most frequently affected of all joints. As the United States' population ages along with the increasing trends in obesity prevalence in other parts of the world, it is expected that the burden of OA on the population, healthcare system, and overall economy will continue to increase in the future without making major improvements in managing knee OA. Numerous therapies aim to reduce symptoms of knee OA and continued research has helped to further understand the complex pathophysiology of its disease mechanism attempting to uncover new potential targets for the treatment of OA. This review article seeks to evaluate the current practices for managing knee OA and discusses emerging therapies on the horizon. These practices include non-pharmacological treatments such as providing patient education and self-management strategies, advising weight loss, strengthening programs, and addressing biomechanical issues with bracing or foot orthoses. Oral analgesics and anti-inflammatories are pharmacologicals that are commonly used and the literature overall supports that some of these medications can be helpful for managing knee OA in the short-term but are less effective for long-term management. Additionally, more prolonged use significantly increases the risk of serious associated side effects that are not too uncommon. Disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs are being researched as a treatment modality to potentially halt or slow disease progression but data at this time is limited and continued studies are being conducted to further investigate their effectiveness. Intra-articular injectables are also implemented to manage knee OA ranging from corticosteroids to hyaluronans to more recently platelet-rich plasma and even stem cells while several other injection therapies are

  7. Development of a decision support system to predict physicians' rehabilitation protocols for patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hawamdeh, Ziad M; Alshraideh, Mohammad A; Al-Ajlouni, Jihad M; Salah, Imad K; Holm, Margo B; Otom, Ali H

    2012-09-01

    To design a medical decision support system (MDSS) that would accurately predict the rehabilitation protocols prescribed by the physicians for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) using only their demographic and clinical characteristics. The demographic and clinical variables for 170 patients receiving one of three treatment protocols for knee OA were entered into the MDSS. Demographic variables in the model were age and sex. Clinical variables entered into the model were height, weight, BMI, affected side, severity of knee OA, and severity of pain. All patients in the study received one of three treatment protocols for patients with knee OA: (a) hot packs, followed by electrotherapy and exercise, (b) ice packs, followed by ultrasound and exercise and (c) exercise alone. The resilient back propagation artificial neural network algorithm was used, with a ten-fold cross-validation. It was estimated that the MDSS is able to accurately predict the treatment prescribed by the physician for 87% of the patients. We developed an artificial neural network-based decision support system that can viably aid physicians in determining which treatment protocol would best match the anthropometric and clinical characteristics of patients with knee OA. PMID:22508428

  8. How does surgery compare with advanced intra-articular therapies in knee osteoarthritis: current thoughts

    PubMed Central

    Wehling, Peter; Moser, Carsten; Maixner, William

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of osteoarthritis (OA) management are to reduce pain and inflammation, slow cartilage degradation, improve function and reduce disability. Current strategies for managing knee OA include nonpharmacological interventions, oral pharmacological treatments, localized intra-articular injections, and surgery. It has become evident that the inflammatory response is a key contributor to the development and progression of knee OA. Signaling pathways involving growth factors and cytokines are being investigated for the development of new therapies that target the underlying biological processes causing the disease. This concept of ‘molecular orthopedics’ enables more patient-centered diagnostic and treatment strategies. In contrast to other conservative therapies, which ultimately only address OA symptoms, intra-articular injections, in particular autologous conditioned serum (ACS), provide benefits that have the potential to outweigh those of established pharmacological treatments and surgery. Surgery has historically been considered the final solution for treatment of knee OA, both by treating physicians and by patients; however, there are increasing concerns regarding the lack of randomized clinical trials providing evidence to support this opinion. Intra-articular injection of ACS has demonstrated efficacy as a treatment for knee OA in a number of studies, with a very low rate of adverse events and side effects, compared with surgery. Treatment with ACS utilizes the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines and regenerative growth factors to support the natural healing processes in the knee, and has the potential to provide a valuable alternative to surgical intervention. PMID:27247634

  9. Viscosupplementation in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Cianflocco, A J

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a chronic and progressive disease that is the product of failure of the joint to repair cartilage breakdown and wear. This article reviews the physiologic properties and pathological changes in the synovial fluid that occur in patients with OA. Exogenous hyaluronic acid (HA) has analgesic, chondroprotective, and disease-modifying effects. Viscosupplements of HA are useful in the treatment of OA in conjunction with other methods of conservative treatment. Viscosupplementation may be better tolerated than oral medication, which can have significant side effects and drug interactions. Unlike other OA treatments, viscosupplements do not carry precautions for comorbidities, such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease. A number of HA viscosupplements are available for intra-articular injection in the treatment of knee OA. These supplements vary in molecular weight, dosage per injection, residence time in the joint, and number of injections required for treatment. PMID:23391675

  10. Effect of center of pressure modulation on knee adduction moment in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Haim, Amir; Wolf, Alon; Rubin, Guy; Genis, Yulya; Khoury, Mona; Rozen, Nimrod

    2011-11-01

    The knee adduction moment (KAM) provides a major contribution to the elevated load in the medial compartment of the knee. An abnormally high KAM has been linked with the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Footwear-generated biomechanical manipulations reduce the magnitude of this moment by conveying a more laterally shifted trajectory of the foot's center of pressure (COP), reducing the distance between the ground reaction force and the center of the knee joint, thus lowering the magnitude of the torque. We sought to examine the outcome of a COP shift in a cohort of female patients suffering from medial knee OA. Twenty-two female patients suffering from medial compartment knee OA underwent successive gait analysis testing and direct pedobarographic examination of the COP trajectory with a foot-worn biomechanical device allowing controlled manipulation of the COP. Modulation of the COP coronal trajectory from medial to lateral offset resulted in a significant reduction of the KAM. This trend was demonstrated in subjects with mild-to-moderate OA and in patients suffering from severe stages of the disease. Our results indicate that controlled manipulation of knee coronal kinetics in individuals suffering from medial knee OA can be facilitated by customized COP modification.

  11. Effectiveness of phototherapy incorporated into an exercise program for osteoarthritis of the knee: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a chronic disease with a multifactor etiology involving changes in bone alignment, cartilage, and other structures necessary to joint stability. There is a need to investigate therapeutic resources that combine different wavelengths as well as different light sources (low-level laser therapy and light-emitting diode therapy) in the same apparatus for the treatment of osteoarthritis. The aim of the proposed study is to analyze the effect of the incorporation of phototherapy into a therapeutic exercise program for individuals with osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods/Design A double-blind, controlled, randomized clinical trial will be conducted involving patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Evaluations will be performed using functional questionnaires before and after the treatment protocols, in a reserved room with only the evaluator and participant present, and no time constraints placed on the answers or evaluations. The following functional tests will also be performed: stabilometry (balance assessment), dynamometry (muscle strength of gluteus medius and quadriceps), algometry (pain threshold), fleximeter (range of motion), timed up-and-go test (functional mobility), and the functional reach test. The participants will then be allocated to three groups through a randomization process using opaque envelopes: exercise program, exercise program + phototherapy, or exercise program + placebo phototherapy, all of which will last for eight weeks. Discussion The purpose of this randomized clinical trial is to analyze the effect of the incorporation of phototherapy into a therapeutic exercise program for osteoarthritis of the knee. The study will support the practice based on evidence to the use of phototherapy in individuals with a diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the knee. Data will be published after the study is completed. Trial registration The protocol for this study has been submitted to Clinical Trials, registration number

  12. Improved WOMAC score following 16-week treatment with bromelain for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kasemsuk, Thitima; Saengpetch, Nadhaporn; Sibmooh, Nathawut; Unchern, Supeenun

    2016-10-01

    Treatment with bromelain-containing enzyme preparation for 3-4 weeks is effective for treatment of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Here, we aimed to assess 16-week treatment with bromelain in mild-to-moderate knee OA patients. We performed a randomized, single-blind, active-controlled pilot study. Forty knee OA patients were randomized to receive oral bromelain (500 mg/day) or diclofenac (100 mg/day). Primary outcome was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) analyzed by Wilcoxon signed rank test. Secondary outcome was the short-form 36 (SF-36). Plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitrite were measured as oxidative stress markers. There was no difference in WOMAC and SF-36 scores compared between bromelain and diclofenac groups after 4 weeks. At week 4, the improvement of total WOMAC and pain subscales from baseline was observed in both groups; however, two patients given diclofenac had adverse effects leading to discontinuation of diclofenac. However, observed treatment difference was inconclusive. At week 16 of bromelain treatment, the patients had improved total WOMAC scores (12.2 versus 25.5), pain subscales (2.4 versus 5.6), stiffness subscales (0.8 versus 2.0), and function subscales (9.1 versus 17.9), and physical component of SF-36 (73.3 versus 65.4) as compared with baseline values. OA patients had higher plasma MDA, nitrite, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated whole blood but lower plasma α-tocopherol than control subjects. Plasma MDA and LPS-stimulated PGE2 production were decreased at week 16 of bromelain treatment. Bromelain has no difference in reducing symptoms of mild-to-moderate knee OA after 4 weeks when compared with diclofenac.

  13. USE OF COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE AMONG PATIENTS WITH RADIOGRAPHIC CONFIRMED KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Lapane, Kate L.; Sands, Megan; Yang, Shibing; McAlindon, Timothy; Eaton, Charles B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among individuals with radiographic confirmed osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee Methods We included 2,679 participants of the Osteoarthritis Initiative with radiographic tibiofemoral knee OA in at least one knee at baseline. Trained interviewers asked a series of specific questions relating to current OA treatments including CAM therapies (7 categories—alternative medical systems, mind-body interventions, manipulation and body-based methods, energy therapies, and 3 types of biologically based therapies) and conventional medications. Participants were classified as: 1) conventional medication users only, 2) CAM users only; 3) users of both; and 4) users of neither. Polytomous logistic regression identified correlates of treatment approaches including sociodemographics and clinical/functional correlates. Results CAM use was prevalent (47%), with 24% reporting use of both CAM and conventional medication approaches. Multi-joint OA was correlated with all treatments (adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR) conventional medications: 1.62; CAM only: 1.37 and both: 2.16). X-ray evidence of severe narrowing (OARSI grade 3) was associated with use of glucosamine/chondroitin (aOR: 2.20) and use of both (aOR: 1.98). The WOMAC-Pain Score was correlated with conventional medication use, either alone (aOR: 1.28) or in combination with CAM (aOR: 1.41 per one standard deviation change). KOOS-QOL and SF-12 Physical Scale scores were inversely related to all treatments. Conclusion CAM is commonly used to treat joint and arthritis pain among persons with knee OA. The extent to which these treatments are effective in managing symptoms and slowing disease progression remains to be proven. PMID:22033041

  14. Group physical therapy for veterans with knee osteoarthritis: study design and methodology.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kelli D; Bongiorni, Dennis; Walker, Tessa A; Bartle, John; Bosworth, Hayden B; Coffman, Cynthia J; Datta, Santanu K; Edelman, David; Hall, Katherine S; Hansen, Gloria; Jennings, Caroline; Lindquist, Jennifer H; Oddone, Eugene Z; Senick, Margaret J; Sizemore, John C; St John, Jamie; Hoenig, Helen

    2013-03-01

    Physical therapy (PT) is a key component of treatment for knee osteoarthritis (OA) and can decrease pain and improve function. Given the expected rise in prevalence of knee OA and the associated demand for treatment, there is a need for models of care that cost-effectively extend PT services for patients with this condition. This manuscript describes a randomized clinical trial of a group-based physical therapy program that can potentially extend services to more patients with knee OA, providing a greater number of sessions per patient, at lower staffing costs compared to traditional individual PT. Participants with symptomatic knee OA (n = 376) are randomized to either a 12-week group-based PT program (six 1 h sessions, eight patients per group, led by a physical therapist and physical therapist assistant) or usual PT care (two individual visits with a physical therapist). Participants in both PT arms receive instruction in an exercise program, information on joint care and protection, and individual consultations with a physical therapist to address specific functional and therapeutic needs. The primary outcome is the Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (self-reported pain, stiffness, and function), and the secondary outcome is the Short Physical Performance Test Protocol (objective physical function). Outcomes are assessed at baseline and 12-week follow-up, and the primary outcome is also assessed via telephone at 24-week follow-up to examine sustainability of effects. Linear mixed models will be used to compare outcomes for the two study arms. An economic cost analysis of the PT interventions will also be conducted.

  15. The effectiveness of tipi in the treatment of hip and knee osteoarthritis--a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, M B; Pereira, R B; Coelho Andrade, L E; Atra, E

    1991-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common painful inflammatory condition occurring mainly in the later half of life. Hip and knee are the joints mostly affected. Petiveria alliacea (tipi) popularly known as an anti-rheumatic medicine, has been used by OA patients to relief pain. This one-week cross-over double-blind trial has preliminary evaluated the analgesic effect of tipi tea in 14 patients with hip and knee OA. Imperata exaltata (sape) was used as the Placebo tea. The pain assessments that were made at baseline and before the start of the second treatment period by treatment groups were comparable. While taking tipi or placebo tea patients experienced a statistically significant improvement in pain on motion and pain at night. The comparison between the improvements reported while on tipi and placebo tea, however, did not disclose any statistically significant difference. At the conclusion of the study 7 patients preferred tipi tea and 6 preferred placebo tea (NS). Two patients reported insomnia, one during placebo treatment and the other during tipi treatment.

  16. Simple Scoring System and Artificial Neural Network for Knee Osteoarthritis Risk Prediction: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Tae Keun; Kim, Deok Won; Choi, Soo Beom; Oh, Ein; Park, Jee Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease of adults worldwide. Since the treatments for advanced radiographic knee OA are limited, clinicians face a significant challenge of identifying patients who are at high risk of OA in a timely and appropriate way. Therefore, we developed a simple self-assessment scoring system and an improved artificial neural network (ANN) model for knee OA. Methods The Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES V-1) data were used to develop a scoring system and ANN for radiographic knee OA. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of the scoring system. The ANN was constructed using 1777 participants and validated internally on 888 participants in the KNHANES V-1. The predictors of the scoring system were selected as the inputs of the ANN. External validation was performed using 4731 participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic was calculated to compare the prediction models. Results The scoring system and ANN were built using the independent predictors including sex, age, body mass index, educational status, hypertension, moderate physical activity, and knee pain. In the internal validation, both scoring system and ANN predicted radiographic knee OA (AUC 0.73 versus 0.81, p<0.001) and symptomatic knee OA (AUC 0.88 versus 0.94, p<0.001) with good discriminative ability. In the external validation, both scoring system and ANN showed lower discriminative ability in predicting radiographic knee OA (AUC 0.62 versus 0.67, p<0.001) and symptomatic knee OA (AUC 0.70 versus 0.76, p<0.001). Conclusions The self-assessment scoring system may be useful for identifying the adults at high risk for knee OA. The performance of the scoring system is improved significantly by the ANN. We provided an ANN calculator to simply predict the knee OA risk. PMID:26859664

  17. Pharmacologic treatment of knee osteoarthritis in athletic women.

    PubMed

    Altman, Roy D; Fowler, Peter J

    2011-09-01

    There is a greater incidence of anterior cruciate ligament tears due to noncontact sports injuries in women compared with men. Anterior cruciate ligament tears are associated with accelerated development of knee osteoarthritis (OA), which is also more prevalent in women than in men. This article considers therapeutic modalities that are best suited for athletic women with knee OA. Clinical data on the safety and efficacy of pharmacotherapies for knee OA, including acetaminophen, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and topical NSAIDs, are discussed, with attention paid to special considerations for women who participate in athletic activity. Adverse events associated with the use of acetaminophen and oral NSAIDs place potential limits on the dose and duration of therapy and may be of greater concern in female athletes than in other patient groups. Topical NSAIDs, which effect relief through the same mechanism of action as oral NSAIDs, produce dramatically lower systemic NSAID exposure compared with oral NSAIDs and are associated with a lower incidence of systemic adverse events. These findings, along with additional future studies, may have particular relevance to the choice of the most effective treatment options for athletic women with OA of the knee.

  18. Pharmacologic treatment of knee osteoarthritis in athletic women.

    PubMed

    Altman, Roy D; Fowler, Peter J

    2011-09-01

    There is a greater incidence of anterior cruciate ligament tears due to noncontact sports injuries in women compared with men. Anterior cruciate ligament tears are associated with accelerated development of knee osteoarthritis (OA), which is also more prevalent in women than in men. This article considers therapeutic modalities that are best suited for athletic women with knee OA. Clinical data on the safety and efficacy of pharmacotherapies for knee OA, including acetaminophen, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and topical NSAIDs, are discussed, with attention paid to special considerations for women who participate in athletic activity. Adverse events associated with the use of acetaminophen and oral NSAIDs place potential limits on the dose and duration of therapy and may be of greater concern in female athletes than in other patient groups. Topical NSAIDs, which effect relief through the same mechanism of action as oral NSAIDs, produce dramatically lower systemic NSAID exposure compared with oral NSAIDs and are associated with a lower incidence of systemic adverse events. These findings, along with additional future studies, may have particular relevance to the choice of the most effective treatment options for athletic women with OA of the knee. PMID:22030939

  19. SHORT-TERM EFFICACY OF LOW-LEVEL LASER THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: A RANDOMIZED PLACEBO-CONTROLLED, DOUBLE-BLIND CLINICAL TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Vanessa Ovanessian; Fukuda, Thiago Yukio; Guimarães, Márcio; Shiwa, Silvia; de Lima, Bianca Del Cor; Martins, Rodrigo Álvaro Brandão Lopes; Casarotto, Raquel Aparecida; Alfredo, Patrícia Pereira; Bjordal, Jan Magnus; Fucs, Patrícia Maria Moraes Barros

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the short-term efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for improving pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Forty-seven patients with knee osteoarthritis (79 knees), of both genders, participated in this randomized controlled double-blind clinical trial. They were randomly allocated to two groups: laser group with 25 patients (41 knees) and placebo group with 22 patients (38 knees). LLLT was performed three times a week, totaling nine sessions, using a AsGa 904 nm laser with mean power of 60 mW and beam area of 0.5 cm2. Nine points were irradiated on the knee, with energy of 3.0 J/point. The placebo group was treated with the same laser device, but with a sealed probe. Evaluations using Lequesne, visual numerical scale (VNS), Timed Up and Go (TUG), goniometry and dynamometry were conducted before the treatment started and after the nine sessions of LLLT. Results: A significant improvement in pain and function was found in all the assessments applied to the laser group. On comparing the laser group with the placebo group, significant differences were found in the VNS-resting and Lequesne evaluations. Conclusion: Treatment with LLLT improves pain and function over the short term in patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27027049

  20. Comparison of therapeutic duration of therapeutic ultrasound in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yıldırıım, Mustafa Aziz; Uçar, Demet; Öneş, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of study was to compare different durations of ultrasound in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred patients diagnosed with bilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA) were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into two groups. The first group (G1) received 4 minutes of ultrasound. The second group (G2) received the exact same treatment, but the duration of ultrasound was longer at 8 minutes. Patients in both groups underwent a total of 10 ultrasound over 2 weeks. Following treatment, all patients provided self-evaluations of pain via the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), overall physical function with WOMAC, disability via the Lequesne index (Leq), and depressive symptoms with the Beck Depression Index (BDI). [Results] There were no significant differences in VAS, WOMAC Leq, and BDI values between groups 1 and 2. After treatment, VAS, WOMAC, Leq, and BDI values improved for both treatment groups. However, following treatment, G2 had significantly greater values for WOMAC functional and total scores than G1. No statistically significant differences were observed for VAS scores while inactive, WOMAC pain and stiffness scores, and BDI values after treatment between both groups. VAS pain scores while active and Leq index values were significantly lower in G1 than G2. [Conclusion] Patients in both groups demonstrated improved functionality, pain and psychological status following a consistent, 2-week regimen of 4-minute or 8-minute treatments with ultrasound. Yet, patients that experienced longer treatment durations of 8 minutes demonstrated better outcomes in pain and the ability to carry out activities of daily living. PMID:26834328

  1. Management of knee osteoarthritis by combined stromal vascular fraction cell therapy, platelet-rich plasma, and musculoskeletal exercises: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Nathan; Diamond, Rod; Sekyere, Eric O; Thomas, Wayne D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Knee osteoarthritis is associated with persistent joint pain, stiffness, joint deformities, ligament damage, and surrounding muscle atrophy. The complexity of the disease makes treatment difficult. There are no therapeutic drugs available to halt the disease progression, leaving patients dependent on pain medication, anti-inflammatory drugs, or invasive joint replacement surgery. Case presentations Four patients with a history of unresolved symptomatic knee osteoarthritis were investigated for the therapeutic outcome of combining an exercise rehabilitation program with intra-articular injections of autologous StroMed (ie, stromal vascular fraction cells concentrated by ultrasonic cavitation from lipoaspirate) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score questionnaire (KOOS) was administered along with physical function tests over a 12-month period. The first patient achieved a maximum therapeutic outcome of 100 in all five KOOS subscales (left knee), and 100 for four subscales (right knee). The second patient scored 100 in all five KOOS subscales (left knee), and greater than 84 in all subscales (right knee). Treatment of the third patient resulted in improved outcomes in both knees of >93 for four KOOS subscales, and 60 for the Function in Sport and Recreation subscale. The fourth patient improved to 100 in all five KOOS subscales. In all patients, the physical function “Get-up and Go” test and “Stair Climbing Test” returned to normal (a value of zero). Conclusion This case series indicates that improved outcomes may be obtained when autologous stromal vascular fraction (StroMed) cell therapy is combined with traditional exercise practices and PRP for osteoarthritis. Of the seven joints treated: all patients’ scores of pain improved to >96; and quality of life scores to >93. Functional performance measures of mobility returned to normal. This simple treatment appears to be extremely effective for

  2. Individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis show neuromuscular adaptation when perturbed during walking despite functional and structural impairments.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Swanik, Charles Buz; Reisman, Darcy S; Rudolph, Katherine S

    2014-01-01

    Neuromuscular control relies on sensory feedback that influences responses to changing external demands, and the normal response is for movement and muscle activation patterns to adapt to repeated perturbations. People with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are known to have pain, quadriceps weakness, and neuromotor deficits that could affect adaption to external perturbations. The aim of this study was to analyze neuromotor adaptation during walking in people with knee OA (n = 38) and controls (n = 23). Disability, quadriceps strength, joint space width, malalignment, and proprioception were assessed. Kinematic and EMG data were collected during undisturbed walking and during perturbations that caused lateral translation of the foot at initial contact. Knee excursions and EMG magnitudes were analyzed. Subjects with OA walked with less knee motion and higher muscle activation and had greater pain, limitations in function, quadriceps weakness, and malalignment, but no difference was observed in proprioception. Both groups showed increased EMG and decreased knee motion in response to the first perturbation, followed by progressively decreased EMG activity and increased knee motion during midstance over the first five perturbations, but no group differences were observed. Over 30 trials, EMG levels returned to those of normal walking. The results illustrate that people with knee OA respond similarly to healthy individuals when exposed to challenging perturbations during functional weight-bearing activities despite structural, functional, and neuromotor impairments. Mechanisms underlying the adaptive response in people with knee OA need further study. PMID:24072409

  3. Medial Compartment Decompression by Fibular Osteotomy to Treat Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zong-You; Chen, Wei; Li, Cun-Xiang; Wang, Juan; Shao, De-Cheng; Hou, Zhi-Yong; Gao, Shi-Jun; Wang, Fei; Li, Ji-Dong; Hao, Jian-Dong; Chen, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-12-01

    Compared with high tibial osteotomy and total knee arthroplasty, the authors found a simpler surgical procedure, partial fibular osteotomy, could effectively relieve knee pain and also correct the varus deformity for patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA). From January 1996 to April 2012, a total of 156 patients with medial compartment OA were treated by proximal fibular osteotomy in the authors' hospital. A 2-cm-long section of fibula was resected 6 to 10 cm below the fibular head. A total of 110 patients with follow-up of more than 2 years were included in the study, including 34 males and 76 females with an average age of 59.2 years. Anteroposterior and lateral weight-bearing radiographs, the femorotibial angle (FTA) and lateral joint space, and the American Knee Society Score (KSS) and the visual analog scale (VAS) score of the knee joint were evaluated preoperatively and at final follow-up, respectively. At final follow-up, mean FTA and lateral joint space were 179.4°±1.8° and 6.9±0.7 mm, respectively, which were significantly smaller than those measured preoperatively (182.7°±2.0° and 12.2±1.1 mm, respectively; both P<.001). Mean KSS at final follow-up was 92.3±31.7, significantly higher than the mean preoperative score of 45.0±21.3 (P<.001). Mean VAS score and interquartile range were 2.0 and 2.0, significantly lower than the preoperative data (7 and 1.0, respectively; P<.001). The authors found that proximal fibular osteotomy can significantly improve both the radiographic appearance and function of the affected knee joint and also achieve long-term pain relief. This procedure may be an alternative treatment option for medial compartment OA.

  4. Medial Compartment Decompression by Fibular Osteotomy to Treat Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zong-You; Chen, Wei; Li, Cun-Xiang; Wang, Juan; Shao, De-Cheng; Hou, Zhi-Yong; Gao, Shi-Jun; Wang, Fei; Li, Ji-Dong; Hao, Jian-Dong; Chen, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-12-01

    Compared with high tibial osteotomy and total knee arthroplasty, the authors found a simpler surgical procedure, partial fibular osteotomy, could effectively relieve knee pain and also correct the varus deformity for patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA). From January 1996 to April 2012, a total of 156 patients with medial compartment OA were treated by proximal fibular osteotomy in the authors' hospital. A 2-cm-long section of fibula was resected 6 to 10 cm below the fibular head. A total of 110 patients with follow-up of more than 2 years were included in the study, including 34 males and 76 females with an average age of 59.2 years. Anteroposterior and lateral weight-bearing radiographs, the femorotibial angle (FTA) and lateral joint space, and the American Knee Society Score (KSS) and the visual analog scale (VAS) score of the knee joint were evaluated preoperatively and at final follow-up, respectively. At final follow-up, mean FTA and lateral joint space were 179.4°±1.8° and 6.9±0.7 mm, respectively, which were significantly smaller than those measured preoperatively (182.7°±2.0° and 12.2±1.1 mm, respectively; both P<.001). Mean KSS at final follow-up was 92.3±31.7, significantly higher than the mean preoperative score of 45.0±21.3 (P<.001). Mean VAS score and interquartile range were 2.0 and 2.0, significantly lower than the preoperative data (7 and 1.0, respectively; P<.001). The authors found that proximal fibular osteotomy can significantly improve both the radiographic appearance and function of the affected knee joint and also achieve long-term pain relief. This procedure may be an alternative treatment option for medial compartment OA. PMID:26652332

  5. Influence of acupuncture in treatment of knee osteoarthritis and cartilage repairing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Bao, Fei; Wang, Yan; Wu, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    As two major non-operative methods, physiotherapy and acupuncture have been proved to be safe and effective in osteoarthritis (OA) treatment. However, only a little study focused on functions of both methods on cartilage repairing. The main goal of this research is to prove and compare effectiveness of acupuncture and physiotherapy on OA, and to explore their possible efficacy on cartilage repairing. One hundred knees of 50 participants with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) were randomly divided into acupuncture group and physiotherapy group. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) was used to evaluate the motor function of knee joints, followed by MRI scanning to measure T2 values in ten cartilage sub-regions in tibiofemoral joints. Significant lower scores of total WOMAC and three subscales on the 4th weekend were observed in both groups than those of the baseline (P < 0.01). For acupuncture group, scores of total WOMAC and three subscales for pain, stiffness and physical function on 4th weekend were significantly lower than those of the physiotherapy group (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05). T2 values in anterior medial tibial sub-region (MTa) and anterior lateral tibial sub-region (LTa) were significantly lower in acupuncture group on 4th weekend than those of the baseline (P < 0.05). No significant difference in T2 values was detected in physiotherapy group. These results indicate that acupuncture represents certain clinical effect on KOA which is superior compared with physiotherapy, and hint the possible roles of acupuncture in promoting cartilage repairing. PMID:27725880

  6. Muscle force modification strategies are not consistent for gait retraining to reduce the knee adduction moment in individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Shull, Peter B; Huang, Yangjian; Schlotman, Taylor; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A

    2015-09-18

    While gait retraining paradigms that alter knee loads typically focus on modifying kinematics, the underlying muscle force modifications responsible for these kinematic changes remain largely unknown. As humans are generally thought to select uniform gait muscle patterns such as strategies based on fatigue cost functions or energy minimization, we hypothesized that a kinematic gait change known to reduce the knee adduction moment (i.e. toe-in gait) would be accompanied by a uniform muscle force modification strategy for individuals with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Ten subjects with self-reported knee pain and radiographic evidence of medial compartment knee osteoarthritis performed normal gait and toe-in gait modification walking trials. Two hundred muscle-actuated dynamic simulations (10 steps for normal gait and 10 steps from toe-in gait for each subject) were performed to determine muscle forces for each gait. Results showed that subjects internally rotated their feet during toe-in gait, which decreased the foot progression angle by 7° (p<0.01) and reduced the first peak knee adduction moment by 20% (p<0.01). While significant muscle force modifications were evidenced within individuals, there were no consistent muscle force modifications across all subjects. It may be that self-selected muscle pattern changes are not uniform for gait modification particularly for individuals with knee pain. Future studies focused on altering knee loads should not assume consistent muscle force modifications for a given kinematic gait change across subjects and should consider muscle forces in addition to kinematics in gait retraining paradigms.

  7. Intraarticular injections (corticosteroid, hyaluronic acid, platelet rich plasma) for the knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ayhan, Egemen; Kesmezacar, Hayrettin; Akgun, Isik

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex “whole joint” disease pursued by inflammatory mediators, rather than purely a process of “wear and tear”. Besides cartilage degradation, synovitis, subchondral bone remodeling, degeneration of ligaments and menisci, and hypertrophy of the joint capsule take parts in the pathogenesis. Pain is the hallmark symptom of OA, but the extent to which structural pathology in OA contributes to the pain experience is still not well known. For the knee OA, intraarticular (IA) injection (corticosteroids, viscosupplements, blood-derived products) is preferred as the last nonoperative modality, if the other conservative treatment modalities are ineffective. IA corticosteroid injections provide short term reduction in OA pain and can be considered as an adjunct to core treatment for the relief of moderate to severe pain in people with OA. IA hyaluronic acid (HA) injections might have efficacy and might provide pain reduction in mild OA of knee up to 24 wk. But for HA injections, the cost-effectiveness is an important concern that patients must be informed about the efficacy of these preparations. Although more high-quality evidence is needed, recent studies indicate that IA platelet rich plasma injections are promising for relieving pain, improving knee function and quality of life, especially in younger patients, and in mild OA cases. The current literature and our experience indicate that IA injections are safe and have positive effects for patient satisfaction. But, there is no data that any of the IA injections will cause osteophytes to regress or cartilage and meniscus to regenerate in patients with substantial and irreversible bone and cartilage damage. PMID:25035839

  8. Gender difference in symptomatic radiographic knee osteoarthritis in the Knee Clinical Assessment – CAS(K): A prospective study in the general population

    PubMed Central

    Lacey, Rosie J; Thomas, Elaine; Duncan, Rachel C; Peat, George

    2008-01-01

    Background A recent study of adults aged ≥50 years reporting knee pain found an excess of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (knee ROA) in symptomatic males compared to females. This was independent of age, BMI and other clinical signs and symptoms. Since this finding contradicts many previous studies, our objective was to explore four possible explanations for this gender difference: X-ray views, selection, occupation and non-articular conditions. Methods A community-based prospective study. 819 adults aged ≥50 years reporting knee pain in the previous 12 months were recruited by postal questionnaires to a research clinic involving plain radiography (weight-bearing posteroanterior semiflexed, supine skyline and lateral views), clinical interview and physical examination. Any knee ROA, ROA severity, tibiofemoral joint osteoarthritis (TJOA) and patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis (PJOA) were defined using all three radiographic views. Occupational class was derived from current or last job title. Proportions of each gender with symptomatic knee ROA were expressed as percentages, stratified by age; differences between genders were expressed as percentage differences with 95% confidence intervals. Results 745 symptomatic participants were eligible and had complete X-ray data. Males had a higher occurrence (77%) of any knee ROA than females (61%). In 50–64 year olds, the excess in men was mild knee OA (particularly PJOA); in ≥65 year olds, the excess was both mild and moderate/severe knee OA (particularly combined TJOA/PJOA). This male excess persisted when using the posteroanterior view only (64% vs. 52%). The lowest level of participation in the clinic was symptomatic females aged 65+. Within each occupational class there were more males with symptomatic knee ROA than females. In those aged 50–64 years, non-articular conditions were equally common in both genders although, in those aged 65+, they occurred more frequently in symptomatic females (41%) than

  9. Quality of Life and Functional Independence in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Ivan Luis Andrade; Castro, Martha Cavalcante; Daltro, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To verify the association between functional independence (FI) and quality of life (QOL) in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study composed of 93 patients with knee osteoarthritis was performed. Osteoarthritis was stratified according the classification of Ahlbach. For evaluation of the patient's overall FI, the Barthel index was used. The patient's QOL was measured by means of the Medical Outcomes Study 36–Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire. Results The mean age of the patients was 60 years (range, 54.0 to 69.5 years) and only 32 patients (34.3%) were found to be independent. Dependent or independent individuals presented difference in all domains of the QOL including physical function (p=0.001), role-physical (p=0.005), bodily pain (p=0.001), general health (p=0.004), vitality (p=0.009), social function (p=0.010), role-emotional (p=0.002) and mental health (p=0.001). Correlation between FI and QOL was different for all domains of the SF-36. Correlation with FI was strongest for physical function (r=0.609, p<0.001), followed by the domains of bodily pain (r=0.410, p<0.001) and mental health (r=0.402, p<0.001). Conclusions Our data demonstrated a strong association of FI with QOL and positive correlations with all QOL domains, indicating the greater the FI is, the higher the QOL is.

  10. Quality of Life and Functional Independence in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Ivan Luis Andrade; Castro, Martha Cavalcante; Daltro, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To verify the association between functional independence (FI) and quality of life (QOL) in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study composed of 93 patients with knee osteoarthritis was performed. Osteoarthritis was stratified according the classification of Ahlbach. For evaluation of the patient's overall FI, the Barthel index was used. The patient's QOL was measured by means of the Medical Outcomes Study 36–Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire. Results The mean age of the patients was 60 years (range, 54.0 to 69.5 years) and only 32 patients (34.3%) were found to be independent. Dependent or independent individuals presented difference in all domains of the QOL including physical function (p=0.001), role-physical (p=0.005), bodily pain (p=0.001), general health (p=0.004), vitality (p=0.009), social function (p=0.010), role-emotional (p=0.002) and mental health (p=0.001). Correlation between FI and QOL was different for all domains of the SF-36. Correlation with FI was strongest for physical function (r=0.609, p<0.001), followed by the domains of bodily pain (r=0.410, p<0.001) and mental health (r=0.402, p<0.001). Conclusions Our data demonstrated a strong association of FI with QOL and positive correlations with all QOL domains, indicating the greater the FI is, the higher the QOL is. PMID:27595076

  11. Effect of Home Exercise Program Performance in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee or the Spine on the Visual Analog Scale after Discharge from Physical Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hamilton; Onishi, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the effect of the frequency of home exercise program (HEP) performance on pain [10-point visual analog scale (VAS)] in patients with osteoarthritis of the spine or knee after more than 6 months discharge from physical therapy (PT). We performed a retrospective chart review of 48 adult patients with a clinical…

  12. Sensorimotor changes and functional performance in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, M.; Scott, D.; Rees, J.; Newham, D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Muscles are essential components of our sensorimotor system that help maintain balance and perform a smooth gait, but it is unclear whether arthritic damage adversely affects muscle sensorimotor function. Quadriceps sensorimotor function in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) was investigated, and whether these changes were associated with impairment of functional performance.
METHODS—Quadriceps strength, voluntary activation, and proprioceptive acuity (joint position sense acuity) were assessed in 103 patients with knee OA and compared with 25 healthy control subjects. In addition, their postural stability, objective functional performance (the aggregate time for four activities of daily living), and disabilities (Lequesne index) were also investigated.
RESULTS—Compared with the control subjects, the patients with knee OA had weaker quadriceps (differences between group mean 100N, CI 136, 63N), poorer voluntary activation (20% CI 13, 25%) that was associated with quadriceps weakness, and impaired acuity of knee joint position sense (1.28°, CI 0.84, 1.73°). As a group the patients were more unstable (p=0.0017), disabled (10, CI 7, 11), and had poorer functional performance (19.6 seconds, CI 14.3, 24.9 seconds). The most important predictors of disability were objective functional performance and quadriceps strength.
CONCLUSIONS—In patients with knee OA, articular damage may reduce quadriceps motoneurone excitability, which decreases voluntary quadriceps activation thus contributing to quadriceps weakness, and diminishes proprioceptive acuity. The arthrogenic impairment in quadriceps sensorimotor function and decreased postural stability was associated with reduced functional performance of the patients.

 PMID:9462165

  13. Short-term effect of the combination of hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, and keratin matrix on early symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Galluccio, Felice; Barskova, Tatiana; Cerinic, Marco Matucci

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the last years, symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOA) have been vastly studied and have generated considerable interest among clinicians. SYSADOA are generally used as a ground therapy with the main rationale to reduce the consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and thus limit the related adverse events. Material and Methods In this study, we evaluated the short-term effect of an oral combination of hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, and keratin matrix on early symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Forty patients were treated for 1 month and were allowed to assume analgesics or NSAIDs if necessary. Results At 2 months, the mean reduction of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score was 36% (p<0.001), and the mean reduction of the WOMAC pains score was 40% (p<0.001). Only two patients reported a sporadic need to assume analgesics; no patient reported any side effect during the study period. Conclusion This data demonstrates that the oral combination of hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, and keratin matrix is safe, well tolerated, and shows a rapid action reducing pain and improving joint function and stiffness in early symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

  14. Descending Control of Nociceptive Processing in Knee Osteoarthritis Is Associated With Intracortical Disinhibition

    PubMed Central

    Tarragó, Maria da Graca L.; Deitos, Alícia; Brietzke, Aline Patrícia; Vercelino, Rafael; Torres, Iraci L. S.; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Based on the hypothesis that an imbalance in excitatory and inhibitory input is a central mechanism of knee osteoarthritis chronic pain (KOACP), this exploratory study had the following aims: to compare whether the function of the descending inhibitory pain pathway is associated with the state of inhibition in the corticospinal system indexed by the motor-evoked potential (MEP) and the cortical salient period (CSP) in patients with severe osteoarthritis (OA) and healthy controls; and to determine if there is correlation between the measures of intracortical inhibition (CSP, MEP) with changes on the numerical pain scale (NPS [0–10]) in KOACP during a conditioned pain modulation (CPM)-task considering the effect of self-reported function assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and analgesic use. In a cross-sectional study, we included females (n = 21), with disability by pain or stiffness due to KOACP and healthy controls (n = 10), aged 19 to 75 years. The motor cortex excitability parameters (MEP and CSP) were assessed using the transcranial magnetic stimulation. We assessed the pain and disability by the WOMAC, and change on NPS (0–10) during CPM-task. A Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that the adjusted mean (SD) on the MEP amplitude was 13.53% higher in the OA than in healthy subjects (1.33 [0.49] vs 1.15 [0.13]), respectively (P = 0.16). The adjusted mean (SD) on the CSP observed in OA patients was 23.43% lower than in healthy subjects (54.54 [16.10] vs 70.94 [22.87]), respectively (P = 0.01). The function of the descending pain modulatory system assessed by change on NPS (0–10) during a CPM-task was negatively correlated with the cortical excitability parameter indexed by the CSP (P = 0.001). Also, the CSP was negatively correlated with the pain and disability assessed by the WOMAC index. These findings support the hypothesis that the change in cortical plasticity in

  15. Descending Control of Nociceptive Processing in Knee Osteoarthritis Is Associated With Intracortical Disinhibition: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Tarragó, Maria da Graca L; Deitos, Alícia; Brietzke, Aline Patrícia; Vercelino, Rafael; Torres, Iraci L S; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2016-04-01

    Based on the hypothesis that an imbalance in excitatory and inhibitory input is a central mechanism of knee osteoarthritis chronic pain (KOACP), this exploratory study had the following aims: to compare whether the function of the descending inhibitory pain pathway is associated with the state of inhibition in the corticospinal system indexed by the motor-evoked potential (MEP) and the cortical salient period (CSP) in patients with severe osteoarthritis (OA) and healthy controls; and to determine if there is correlation between the measures of intracortical inhibition (CSP, MEP) with changes on the numerical pain scale (NPS [0-10]) in KOACP during a conditioned pain modulation (CPM)-task considering the effect of self-reported function assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and analgesic use.In a cross-sectional study, we included females (n = 21), with disability by pain or stiffness due to KOACP and healthy controls (n = 10), aged 19 to 75 years. The motor cortex excitability parameters (MEP and CSP) were assessed using the transcranial magnetic stimulation. We assessed the pain and disability by the WOMAC, and change on NPS (0-10) during CPM-task.A Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that the adjusted mean (SD) on the MEP amplitude was 13.53% higher in the OA than in healthy subjects (1.33 [0.49] vs 1.15 [0.13]), respectively (P = 0.16). The adjusted mean (SD) on the CSP observed in OA patients was 23.43% lower than in healthy subjects (54.54 [16.10] vs 70.94 [22.87]), respectively (P = 0.01). The function of the descending pain modulatory system assessed by change on NPS (0-10) during a CPM-task was negatively correlated with the cortical excitability parameter indexed by the CSP (P = 0.001). Also, the CSP was negatively correlated with the pain and disability assessed by the WOMAC index.These findings support the hypothesis that the change in cortical plasticity in KOACP is associated

  16. The High Prevalence of Knee Osteoarthritis in A Rural Chinese Population: The Wuchuan Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xiaozheng; Fransen, Marlene; Zhang, Yuqing; Li, Hu; Ke, Yan; Lu, Ming; Su, Steve; Song, Xiongying; Guo, Yong; Chen, Jie; Niu, Jingbo; Felson, David; Lin, Jianhao

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of radiographic and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a remote rural region of northern China and compare these with those reported in Beijing and data from the Framingham (Massachusetts, USA) cohort. Methods A population-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among 1030 residents of Wuchuan County, Inner Mongolia, aged 50 years and over. Survey participants, mostly farmers reporting heavy physical occupational activity, completed an interviewer-based questionnaire and obtained bilateral weight-bearing posterior-anterior semi-flexed knee radiographs. Results While the overall prevalence of radiographic knee OA was similar to that demonstrated in the Beijing OA study, men in Wuchuan had about double the prevalence of severe radiographic [prevalence ratio (PR) 2.5, 95% CI 1.6 to 3.8] and symptomatic knee OA (PR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3 to 2.9). Women in Wuchuan also had a higher prevalence of both severe radiographic (PR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0 to 2.0) and symptomatic knee OA (PR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2 to 2.1) compared with their Beijing counterparts. The prevalence of bilateral OA and lateral compartment disease were two to three times higher in both Chinese cohorts compared with estimates from the Framingham OA Study. Conclusions The prevalence of symptomatic knee OA in rural areas of China is much higher than reported from urban regions of China or in the Framingham cohort. The higher representation of bilateral and lateral compartment disease in China suggests a unique phenotype to OA. The findings will be useful to guide the distribution of future health care resources and preventive strategies. PMID:19405001

  17. Capitalizing on the Teachable Moment: Osteoarthritis Physical Activity and Exercise Net for Improving Physical Activity in Early Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lineker, Sydney; Cibere, Jolanda; Crooks, Valorie A; Jones, Catherine A; Kopec, Jacek A; Lear, Scott A; Pencharz, James; Rhodes, Ryan E; Esdaile, John M

    2013-01-01

    Background Practice guidelines emphasize the use of exercise and weight reduction as the first line of management for knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, less than half of the people with mild OA participate in moderate intensity physical activity. Given that physical activities have been shown to reduce pain, improve quality of life, and have the potential to reduce the progression of joint damage, many people with OA are missing the benefits of this inexpensive intervention. Objective The objectives of this study are (1) to develop a behavioral theory-informed Internet intervention called Osteoarthritis Physical Activity & Exercise Net (OPEN) for people with previously undiagnosed knee OA, and (2) to assess the efficacy of the OPEN website for improving physical activity participation through a proof-of-concept study. Methods OPEN was developed based on the theory of planned behavior. Efficacy of this online intervention is being assessed by an ongoing proof-of-concept, single-blind randomized controlled trial in British Columbia, Canada. We are currently recruiting participants and plan to recruit a total of 252 sedentary people with previously undiagnosed knee OA using a set of validated criteria. Half of the participants will be randomized to use OPEN and receive an OA education pamphlet. The other half only will receive the pamphlet. Participants will complete an online questionnaire at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months about their participation in physical activities, health-related quality of life, and motivational outcomes. In addition, we will perform an aerobic fitness test in a sub-sample of participants (n=20 per study arm). In the primary analysis, we will use logistic regression to compare the proportion of participants reporting being physically active at or above the recommended level in the 2 groups, adjusting for baseline measurement, age, and sex. Results This study evaluates a theory-informed behavioral intervention at a time when people affected

  18. The Healing Effect of Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mehrabani, Davood; Mojtahed Jaberi, Fereidoon; Zakerinia, Maryam; Hadianfard, Mohammad Javad; Jalli, Reza; Tanideh, Nader; Zare, Shahrokh

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic disease impacting on quality of life and has societal and economical burden increasing with age. Yet, no confirmed pharmacological, biological or surgical therapy could prevent the progressive destruction of OA joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with immunosuppressive activities emerged a potential therapy. We describe a magnetic resonance images (MRI) approved 47 years old nomad female suffering from a severe right knee OA. After intra-articular injection of 36×10(6) passage 2 of bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs), the patient's functional status of the knee, the number of stairs she could climb, the pain on visual analog scale (VAS) and walking distance improved after two months post-transplantation. MRI revealed an extension of the repaired tissue over subchondral bone. So as MSC transplantation is a simple technique, resulted into pain relief, minimized donor-site morbidity, provided a better quality of life, significantly improved cartilage quality with no need to hospitalization or surgery, cell transplantation can be considered as a reliable alternative treatment for chronic knee OA. Therefore these findings can be added to the literature on using BMSCs for treatment of OA. PMID:27579273

  19. The Healing Effect of Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabani, Davood; Mojtahed Jaberi, Fereidoon; Zakerinia, Maryam; Hadianfard, Mohammad Javad; Jalli, Reza; Tanideh, Nader; Zare, Shahrokh

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic disease impacting on quality of life and has societal and economical burden increasing with age. Yet, no confirmed pharmacological, biological or surgical therapy could prevent the progressive destruction of OA joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with immunosuppressive activities emerged a potential therapy. We describe a magnetic resonance images (MRI) approved 47 years old nomad female suffering from a severe right knee OA. After intra-articular injection of 36×106 passage 2 of bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs), the patient’s functional status of the knee, the number of stairs she could climb, the pain on visual analog scale (VAS) and walking distance improved after two months post-transplantation. MRI revealed an extension of the repaired tissue over subchondral bone. So as MSC transplantation is a simple technique, resulted into pain relief, minimized donor-site morbidity, provided a better quality of life, significantly improved cartilage quality with no need to hospitalization or surgery, cell transplantation can be considered as a reliable alternative treatment for chronic knee OA. Therefore these findings can be added to the literature on using BMSCs for treatment of OA. PMID:27579273

  20. Decreased Knee Joint Loading Associated With Early Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Gardinier, Emily S.; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J.; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury predisposes individuals to early-onset knee joint osteoarthritis (OA). Abnormal joint loading is apparent after ACL injury and reconstruction. The relationship between altered joint biomechanics and the development of knee OA is unknown. Hypothesis Altered knee joint kinetics and medial compartment contact forces initially after injury and reconstruction are associated with radiographic knee OA 5 years after reconstruction. Study Design Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods Individuals with acute, unilateral ACL injury completed gait analysis before (baseline) and after (posttraining) preoperative rehabilitation and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after reconstruction. Surface electromyographic and knee biomechanical data served as inputs to an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model to estimate knee joint contact forces. Patients completed radiographic testing 5 years after reconstruction. Differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces were compared between patients with and those without radiographic knee OA. Results Patients with OA walked with greater frontal plane interlimb differences than those without OA (nonOA) at baseline (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.00 ± 0.08 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.15 ± 0.09 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .014; peak knee adduction moment impulse difference: −0.001 ± 0.032 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.048 ± 0.031 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .042). The involved limb knee adduction moment impulse of the group with osteoarthritis was also lower than that of the group without osteoarthritis at baseline (0.087 ± 0.023 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs 0.049 ± 0.018 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .023). Significant group differences were absent at posttraining but reemerged 6 months after reconstruction (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.02 ± 0.04 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.06 ± 0.11 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .043). In addition, the OA group walked with lower peak

  1. Involvement of the endocannabinoid system in osteoarthritis pain.

    PubMed

    La Porta, Carmen; Bura, Simona A; Negrete, Roger; Maldonado, Rafael

    2014-02-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease associated with articular cartilage degradation. The major clinical outcome of osteoarthritis is a complex pain state that includes both nociceptive and neuropathic mechanisms. Currently, the therapeutic approaches for osteoarthritis are limited as no drugs are available to control the disease progression and the analgesic treatment has restricted efficacy. Increasing evidence from preclinical studies supports the interest of the endocannabinoid system as an emerging therapeutic target for osteoarthritis pain. Indeed, pharmacological studies have shown the anti-nociceptive effects of cannabinoids in different rodent models of osteoarthritis, and compelling evidence suggests an active participation of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of this disease. The ubiquitous distribution of cannabinoid receptors, together with the physiological role of the endocannabinoid system in the regulation of pain, inflammation and even joint function further support the therapeutic interest of cannabinoids for osteoarthritis. However, limited clinical evidence has been provided to support this therapeutic use of cannabinoids, despite the promising preclinical data. This review summarizes the promising results that have been recently obtained in support of the therapeutic value of cannabinoids for osteoarthritis management.

  2. Use of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcomes Survey (KOOS) in a Normal US Population

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Robby Singh; Williamson, Tyler; Tompkins, Marc; Nelson, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Patient-reported outcome instruments are frequently used for assessing clinical outcomes after injury and surgery. Previously reported normative data for the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Survey (KOOS) instrument is limited to a narrow subset of ages and has not accounted for a history of knee injury. Methods: The KOOS was administered to 1000 patients or accompanying family members who presented to an outpatient orthopaedic clinic in a suburban metropolitan city for an orthopaedic issue unrelated to their knee in July 2014. Participants were eligible if they self-reported a medical history negative for ankle, knee, or hip surgery. KOOS scale means, standard deviations, medians, ranges, interquartile ranges, and percentiles were calculated by sex, age range, laterality, and history of knee injury in the past year. Non-parametric statistical analysis was used to evaluate differences in KOOS scale scores between five age ranges and between those with or without a history of knee injury. Results: There were 402 males and 598 females in the final study cohort. Males scored lower on the Symptoms scale compared to other scales (median score = 96.4 for Symptoms; median score = 100 for all other scales) in all age cohorts except ages 56-64. Females also reported lower scores in the Symptoms scale. Median Symptoms score for females in each of the age groups from 18-55 years old was 96.4, and median score for the 56-64 year old cohort was 92.9. Median scores for Pain and Knee-related Quality of Life scales were lower in the 56-64 year old female cohort (97.2 and 93.8 respectively). Conclusion: Normative values for KOOS scale scores at all age ranges suggest a high level of functioning among participants with no history of knee injury in the past year. Symptoms, Pain, and Knee-related Quality of Life scales showed the greatest variability in KOOS scores for patients, particularly in the youngest and oldest cohorts. This study can aid surgeons in

  3. Traditional Chinese medicine in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Hou, Pu-Wei; Fu, Pin-Kuei; Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate whether the use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM; zhōng yī) influences symptoms or functional outcomes in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee ( xī guān jié yán). A systematic review of randomized control trials was conducted. Searches for studies in PubMed that were performed between 1965 and August 2013, and retrieved studies were subjected to reference screening. The types of studies included in our review were 1) placebo-based or comparative studies; 2) open label, single-blinded or double-blinded studies; 3) studies evaluating the efficacy of TCM for treating OA of the knee; and 4) studies evaluating only TCM or combination preparations. Trials were conducted with participants over 18 years of age with knee pain and at least three of the following characteristics: 1) an age greater than 50 years; 2) morning stiffness lasting for fewer than 30 min; 3) a crackling or grating sensation; 4) bony tenderness of the knee; 5) bony enlargement of the knee; or 6) no detectable warmth of the joint to the touch. Studies were rated for risk of bias and graded for quality. After screening, 104 studies that satisfied the eligibility requirements were identified, and only 18 randomized control trials were included in the quantitative and qualitative synthesis. Upon review, we found "moderate-quality" evidence of effects from acupuncture ( zhēn jiǔ) on pain, which was measured using a visual analogue scale, and physical function, which was measured using qigong ( qì gōng) with motion. "Low-quality" evidence was found regarding the effects of acupuncture on physical function, and no evidence was found regarding the effects of herbal medicine on pain or physical function. Herbal patches ( yào bù) appeared to affect pain and physical and function, but these effects were not found to be significant. The initial findings included in this review suggest that acupuncture is a promising intervention according to the primary outcome measure, pain

  4. Traditional Chinese medicine in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Pu-Wei; Fu, Pin-Kuei; Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether the use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM; 中醫 zhōng yī) influences symptoms or functional outcomes in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee (膝關節炎 xī guān jié yán). A systematic review of randomized control trials was conducted. Searches for studies in PubMed that were performed between 1965 and August 2013, and retrieved studies were subjected to reference screening. The types of studies included in our review were 1) placebo-based or comparative studies; 2) open label, single-blinded or double-blinded studies; 3) studies evaluating the efficacy of TCM for treating OA of the knee; and 4) studies evaluating only TCM or combination preparations. Trials were conducted with participants over 18 years of age with knee pain and at least three of the following characteristics: 1) an age greater than 50 years; 2) morning stiffness lasting for fewer than 30 min; 3) a crackling or grating sensation; 4) bony tenderness of the knee; 5) bony enlargement of the knee; or 6) no detectable warmth of the joint to the touch. Studies were rated for risk of bias and graded for quality. After screening, 104 studies that satisfied the eligibility requirements were identified, and only 18 randomized control trials were included in the quantitative and qualitative synthesis. Upon review, we found “moderate-quality” evidence of effects from acupuncture (針灸 zhēn jiǔ) on pain, which was measured using a visual analogue scale, and physical function, which was measured using qigong (氣功 qì gōng) with motion. “Low-quality” evidence was found regarding the effects of acupuncture on physical function, and no evidence was found regarding the effects of herbal medicine on pain or physical function. Herbal patches (藥布 yào bù) appeared to affect pain and physical and function, but these effects were not found to be significant. The initial findings included in this review suggest that acupuncture is a promising intervention

  5. Traditional Chinese medicine in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Hou, Pu-Wei; Fu, Pin-Kuei; Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate whether the use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM; zhōng yī) influences symptoms or functional outcomes in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee ( xī guān jié yán). A systematic review of randomized control trials was conducted. Searches for studies in PubMed that were performed between 1965 and August 2013, and retrieved studies were subjected to reference screening. The types of studies included in our review were 1) placebo-based or comparative studies; 2) open label, single-blinded or double-blinded studies; 3) studies evaluating the efficacy of TCM for treating OA of the knee; and 4) studies evaluating only TCM or combination preparations. Trials were conducted with participants over 18 years of age with knee pain and at least three of the following characteristics: 1) an age greater than 50 years; 2) morning stiffness lasting for fewer than 30 min; 3) a crackling or grating sensation; 4) bony tenderness of the knee; 5) bony enlargement of the knee; or 6) no detectable warmth of the joint to the touch. Studies were rated for risk of bias and graded for quality. After screening, 104 studies that satisfied the eligibility requirements were identified, and only 18 randomized control trials were included in the quantitative and qualitative synthesis. Upon review, we found "moderate-quality" evidence of effects from acupuncture ( zhēn jiǔ) on pain, which was measured using a visual analogue scale, and physical function, which was measured using qigong ( qì gōng) with motion. "Low-quality" evidence was found regarding the effects of acupuncture on physical function, and no evidence was found regarding the effects of herbal medicine on pain or physical function. Herbal patches ( yào bù) appeared to affect pain and physical and function, but these effects were not found to be significant. The initial findings included in this review suggest that acupuncture is a promising intervention according to the primary outcome measure, pain

  6. Pulsatile dry cupping in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee – a randomized controlled exploratory trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cupping is used in various traditional medicine forms to relieve pain in musculoskeletal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of cupping in relieving the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods In a two-group, randomized controlled exploratory pilot study patients with a clinically and radiological confirmed knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence Grading Scale: 2-4) and a pain intensity > 40 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) were included. 40 Patients were randomized to either 8 sessions of pulsatile dry cupping within 4 weeks or no intervention (control). Paracetamol was allowed on demand for both groups. Outcomes were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) score, the pain intensity on a VAS (0 mm = no pain to 100 mm = maximum intensity) and Quality of Life (SF-36) 4 and 12 weeks after randomization. Use of Paracetamol was documented within the 4-week treatment period. Analyses were performed by analysis of covariance adjusting for the baseline value for each outcome. Results 21 patients were allocated to the cupping group (5 male; mean age 68 ± SD 7.2) and 19 to the control group (8 male; 69 ± 6.8). After 4 weeks the WOMAC global score improved significantly more in the cupping group with a mean of 27.7 (95% confidence interval 22.1; 33.3) compared to 42.2 (36.3; 48.1) in the control group (p = 0.001). After 12 weeks the WOMAC global score were still significantly different in favor for cupping (31.0 (24.9; 37.2) vs. 40.8 (34.4; 47.3) p = 0.032), however the WOMAC subscores for pain and stiffness were not significant anymore. Significantly better outcomes in the cupping group were also observed for pain intensity on VAS and for the SF-36 Physical Component Scale compared to the control group after 4 and 12 weeks. No significant difference was observed for the SF-36 Mental Component Scale and the total number of consumed Paracetamol tablets

  7. Spa therapy: can be a valid option for treating knee osteoarthritis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenti, Sara; Cheleschi, Sara; Galeazzi, Mauro; Fioravanti, Antonella

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) continues to be one of the leading causes of `years lived with disability' worldwide. Symptomatic knee OA is highly prevalent among people aged 50 years and over and is destined to become an ever more important healthcare problem. Current management of knee OA includes non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments. Spa therapy is one of the most commonly used non-pharmacological approaches for OA in many European countries, as well as in Japan and Israel. Despite its long history and popularity, spa treatment is still the subject of debate and its role in modern medicine continues to be unclear. The objective of this review is to summarize the currently available information on clinical effects and mechanisms of action of spa therapy in knee OA. Various randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) were conducted to assess the efficacy and tolerability of balneotherapy and mud-pack therapy in patients with knee OA. Data from these clinical trials support a beneficial effect of spa therapy on pain, function and quality of life in knee OA that lasts over time, until 6-9 months after the treatment. The mechanisms by which immersion in mineral or thermal water or the application of mud alleviate suffering in OA are not fully understood. The net benefit is probably the result of a combination of factors, among which the mechanical, thermal and chemical effects are most prominent. In conclusion, spa therapy seems to have a role in the treatment of knee OA. Additional RCTs and further studies of mechanisms of action with high methodological quality are necessary to prove the effects of spa therapy.

  8. Spa therapy: can be a valid option for treating knee osteoarthritis?

    PubMed

    Tenti, Sara; Cheleschi, Sara; Galeazzi, Mauro; Fioravanti, Antonella

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) continues to be one of the leading causes of 'years lived with disability' worldwide. Symptomatic knee OA is highly prevalent among people aged 50 years and over and is destined to become an ever more important healthcare problem. Current management of knee OA includes non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments. Spa therapy is one of the most commonly used non-pharmacological approaches for OA in many European countries, as well as in Japan and Israel. Despite its long history and popularity, spa treatment is still the subject of debate and its role in modern medicine continues to be unclear. The objective of this review is to summarize the currently available information on clinical effects and mechanisms of action of spa therapy in knee OA. Various randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) were conducted to assess the efficacy and tolerability of balneotherapy and mud-pack therapy in patients with knee OA. Data from these clinical trials support a beneficial effect of spa therapy on pain, function and quality of life in knee OA that lasts over time, until 6-9 months after the treatment. The mechanisms by which immersion in mineral or thermal water or the application of mud alleviate suffering in OA are not fully understood. The net benefit is probably the result of a combination of factors, among which the mechanical, thermal and chemical effects are most prominent. In conclusion, spa therapy seems to have a role in the treatment of knee OA. Additional RCTs and further studies of mechanisms of action with high methodological quality are necessary to prove the effects of spa therapy.

  9. Soft drink intake and progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis: data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bing; Ahmad, Oneeb; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Driban, Jeffrey B; Duryea, Jeffrey; Lapane, Kate L; McAlindon, Timothy; Eaton, Charles B

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We examine the prospective association of soft drink consumption with radiographic progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Design Prospective cohort study. Setting This study used data from the osteoarthritis initiative (OAI). Participants In OAI, 2149 participants with radiographic knee OA and having dietary data at baseline were followed up to 12, 24, 36 and 48 months. Measures The soft drink consumption was assessed with a Block Brief Food Frequency Questionnaire completed at baseline. To evaluate knee OA progression, we used quantitative medial tibiofemoral joint space width (JSW) based on plain radiographs. The multivariate linear models for repeated measures were used to test the independent association between soft drink intake and the change in JSW over time, while adjusting for body mass index and other potential confounding factors. Results In stratified analyses by gender, we observed a significant dose–response relationship between baseline soft drink intake and adjusted mean change of JSW in men. With increasing levels of soft drink intake (none, ≤1, 2–4 and ≥5 times/week), the mean decreases of JSW were 0.31, 0.39, 0.34 and 0.60 mm, respectively. When we further stratified by obesity, a stronger dose–response relationship was found in non-obese men. In obese men, only the highest soft drink level (≥5 times/week) was associated with increased change in JSW compared with no use. In women, no significant association was observed. Conclusions Our results suggest that frequent consumption of soft drinks may be associated with increased OA progression in men. Replication of these novel findings in other studies demonstrating the reduction in soft drink consumption leads to delay in OA progression is needed. PMID:23872291

  10. A Yoga Strengthening Program Designed to Minimize the Knee Adduction Moment for Women with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Proof-Of-Principle Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    People with knee osteoarthritis may benefit from exercise prescriptions that minimize knee loads in the frontal plane. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether a novel 12-week strengthening program designed to minimize exposure to the knee adduction moment (KAM) could improve symptoms and knee strength in women with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. A secondary objective was to determine whether the program could improve mobility and fitness, and decrease peak KAM during gait. The tertiary objective was to evaluate the biomechanical characteristics of this yoga program. In particular, we compared the peak KAM during gait with that during yoga postures at baseline. We also compared lower limb normalized mean electromyography (EMG) amplitudes during yoga postures between baseline and follow-up. Primary measures included self-reported pain and physical function (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score) and knee strength (extensor and flexor torques). Secondary measures included mobility (six-minute walk, 30-second chair stand, stair climbing), fitness (submaximal cycle ergometer test), and clinical gait analysis using motion capture synchronized with electromyography and force measurement. Also, KAM and normalized mean EMG amplitudes were collected during yoga postures. Forty-five women over age 50 with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, consistent with the American College of Rheumatology criteria, enrolled in our 12-week (3 sessions per week) program. Data from 38 were analyzed (six drop-outs; one lost to co-intervention). Participants experienced reduced pain (mean improvement 10.1–20.1 normalized to 100; p<0.001), increased knee extensor strength (mean improvement 0.01 Nm/kg; p = 0.004), and increased flexor strength (mean improvement 0.01 Nm/kg; p = 0.001) at follow-up compared to baseline. Participants improved mobility on the six-minute walk (mean improvement 37.7 m; p<0.001) and 30-second chair stand (mean improvement 1.3; p = 0.006) at

  11. Interpretation of movement during stair ascent for predicting severity and prognosis of knee osteoarthritis in elderly women using support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Tae Keun; Kim, Sung Kean; Choi, Soo Beom; Kim, Deog Young; Kim, Deok Won

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that pathologic movement changes in knee osteoarthritis (OA) may contribute to disease progression. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between movement changes during stair ascent and pain, radiographic severity, and prognosis of knee OA in the elderly women using machine learning (ML) over a seven-year follow-up period. Eighteen elderly female patients with knee OA and 20 healthy controls were enrolled. Kinematic data for stair ascent were obtained using a 3D-motion analysis system at baseline. Kinematic factors were analyzed based on one of the popular ML methods, support vector machines (SVM). SVM was used to search kinematic predictors associated with pain, radiographic severity of knee OA, and unfavorable outcomes, which were defined as persistent knee pain as reported at the seven-year follow-up or as having undergone total knee replacement during the follow-up period. Six patients (46.2%) had unfavorable outcomes at the seven-year follow-up. SVM showed accuracy of detection of knee OA (97.4%), prediction of pain (83.3%), radiographic severity (83.3%), and unfavorable outcomes (69.2%). The predictors with SVM included the time of stair ascent, maximal anterior pelvis tilting, knee flexion at initial foot contact, and ankle dorsiflexion at initial foot contact. The interpretation of movement during stair ascent using ML may be helpful for physicians not only in detecting knee OA, but also in evaluating pain and radiographic severity.

  12. Association of physical activity measured by accelerometer, knee joint abnormalities and cartilage T2-measurements obtained from 3T MRI: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, M.; Lin, W.; Nardo, L.; Joseph, G. B.; Dunlop, D. D.; Heilmeier, U.; Nevitt, M. C.; Alizai, H.; McCulloch, C. E.; Lynch, J. A.; Link, T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the cross-sectional association between physical activity measured with an accelerometer, structural knee abnormalities and cartilage T2-values assessed with 3T MRI. Methods We included 274 subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative cohort without definite radiographic osteoarthritis (KL 0 and 1) and at most mild pain, stiffness and functional limitation in the study knee (WOMAC 0–1), which had not limited their activity due to knee pain. Physical activity was measured over seven days with an ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer. Subjects were categorized by quartile of physical activity based on the average daily minutes of moderate/vigorous activity (mv-PA). MR images of the right knee (at 48-months visit) were assessed for structural abnormalities using a modified WORMS score and for T2-relaxation times derived from segmented cartilage of 4 femorotibial regions and the patella. WORMS-grades and T2-measurements were compared between activity quartiles using a linear regression model. Covariates included age, sex, BMI, knee injury, family history of knee replacement, knee symptoms, hip and ankle pain and daily wear time of the accelerometer. Results Higher mv-PA was associated with increased severity (p=0.0087) and number of lesions of the medial meniscus (p=0.0089) and severity of bone marrow edema lesions (p=0.0053). No association between cartilage lesions and mv-PA was found. T2-values of cartilage (loss, damage, abnormalities) tended to be greater in the higher quartiles of mv-PA, but the differences were non-significant. Conclusion In knees without radiographic osteoarthritis in subjects with no or mild knee pain, higher physical activity levels were associated with increases in meniscal and BMEP lesions. PMID:25777255

  13. Intraosseous infiltration of platelet-rich plasma for severe knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Mikel; Fiz, Nicolás; Guadilla, Jorge; Padilla, Sabino; Anitua, Eduardo; Sánchez, Pello; Delgado, Diego

    2014-12-01

    We describe a new technique of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) infiltration for the treatment of severe knee osteoarthritis. PRP intra-articular infiltration is a promising treatment for knee osteoarthritis, but it still has some limitations in high-degree osteoarthritis. Diagnosis of osteoarthritis is based on clinical and radiographic findings, and patients with grade III or IV knee tibiofemoral osteoarthritis based on the Ahlbäck scale are considered candidates for this technique. The technique consists of performing intraosseous infiltration of PRP into the subchondral bone, which acts on this tissue and consequently on cartilage-bone communication. Although the intraosseous injection hinders the conventional knee intra-articular infiltration, it allows an extension of the range of action of the PRP, which acts directly on the subchondral bone, which is involved in the progression of osteoarthritis. Thus this technique involves a new administration of PRP that can delay knee arthroplasty; moreover, it can be applied for not only severe osteoarthritis but also other pathologies in which the subchondral bone is critical in the etiology, such as necrosis and osteochondral lesions. PMID:25685680

  14. [Cross cultural adaptation of the lequesne algofunctional indices for german speaking patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and the knee].

    PubMed

    Ludwig, F J; Melzer, Ch; Grimmig, H; Daalmann, H H

    2002-08-01

    The Lequesne Algofunctional Index is a widespread international instrument and recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for outcome measurement in hip and knee diseases. Up to now there has been no German version of the questionnaire fulfilling the guidelines for cross-cultural adaptation and providing satisfactory metric quality. Based on these guidelines, we developed the German version of the Lequesne Algofunctional Index regarding osteoarthritis of the hip and knee joints presented in this article. All of the questions it contains have been worded as whole sentences, questions concerning walking performance have been substantiated by examples. In testing of the metric outcome (hip: n = 112; knee: n = 83), both questionnaires showed an excellent reliability (IKK > 0,88). As a validity criterion, the correlation with the WOMAC score was tested. We received a Spearman coefficient between 0,63 and 0,81, indicating a high correlation. Time needed to fill in the Lequesne score was 2 min. in patients, physicians took 1,2 min. to evaluate the questionnaire. Regarding the questionnaires handed back, the Lequesne score showed better results than the WOMAC index. Sensitivity, measured by the "standardized response mean", was good in both regions for the total score. Comparing the data received on pain-related questions, the WOMAC score however showed a better sensitivity. The German version of the Lequesne Algofunctional Index is a suitable outcome instrument to measure the intensity of pain, walking capacity and activity of daily life in patients with osteoarthritis of hip and knee joints. PMID:12168149

  15. Effects of tai chi program on neuromuscular function for patients with knee osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of disability as well as a burden on healthcare resources. Tai chi has been proposed as an alternative and complementary treatment for the management of knee osteoarthritis, but there appears to be no consensus on its usefulness. This study aims to develop an innovative tai chi rehabilitation program (ITCRP) for patients with knee OA, and to investigate the effect of ITCRP intervention on a range of outcomes including pain, function, balance, neuromuscular response, and biomechanics in knee OA. Methods/Design We will conduct a prospective, single-blind, randomized controlled trial of 140 individuals with symptomatic knee OA. Patients will be randomly assigned into either an ITCRP group or a control group. The ITCRP group will participate in tai chi two or three times a week for 6 months. The control group will receive health education. After the 6-month intervention period, there will be a 6-month follow-up period with no active intervention in either group. The primary and secondary outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Primary outcome measures will be a visual analog scale for pain, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index,and the Lequesne Knee Score. The secondary outcome measures will include the Berg balance scale, knee and ankle proprioception, neuromuscular response, and 3D functional biomechanics. Furthermore, adverse events will be recorded and analyzed. If any participants withdraw from the trial, intention-to-treat analysiswill be performed. Discussion Important features of this trial include the randomization procedures, large sample size, and a standardized protocol for ITCRP for knee OA. This study aims to determine the feasibility of ITCRP for knee OA and provide data on the effects of ITCRP. Hence, our results will be useful for patients with knee OA as well as for medical staff and healthcare decision makers. Trial registration Chinese

  16. Anterior knee pain following primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shervin, David; Pratt, Katelyn; Healey, Travis; Nguyen, Samantha; Mihalko, William M; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-11-18

    Despite improvements in technique and technology for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), anterior knee pain impacts patient outcomes and satisfaction. Addressing the prosthetic and surgical technique related causes of pain after TKA, specifically as it relates to anterior knee pain, can aid surgeons in addressing these issues with their patients. Design features of the femoral and patellar components which have been reported as pain generators include: Improper femoral as well as patellar component sizing or designs that result in patellofemoral stuffing; a shortened trochlear groove distance from the flange to the intercondylar box; and then surgical technique related issues resulting in: Lateral patellar facet syndrome; overstuffed patella/flange combination; asymmetric patellar resurfacing, improper transverse plane component rotation resulting in patellar subluxation/tilt. Any design consideration that allows impingement of extensor mechanism anatomical elements has the possibility of impacting outcome by becoming a pain generator. As the number of TKA procedures continues to increase, it is increasingly critical to develop improved, evidence based prostheses that maximize function and patient satisfaction while minimizing pain and other complications. PMID:26601061

  17. Anterior knee pain following primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shervin, David; Pratt, Katelyn; Healey, Travis; Nguyen, Samantha; Mihalko, William M; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvements in technique and technology for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), anterior knee pain impacts patient outcomes and satisfaction. Addressing the prosthetic and surgical technique related causes of pain after TKA, specifically as it relates to anterior knee pain, can aid surgeons in addressing these issues with their patients. Design features of the femoral and patellar components which have been reported as pain generators include: Improper femoral as well as patellar component sizing or designs that result in patellofemoral stuffing; a shortened trochlear groove distance from the flange to the intercondylar box; and then surgical technique related issues resulting in: Lateral patellar facet syndrome; overstuffed patella/flange combination; asymmetric patellar resurfacing, improper transverse plane component rotation resulting in patellar subluxation/tilt. Any design consideration that allows impingement of extensor mechanism anatomical elements has the possibility of impacting outcome by becoming a pain generator. As the number of TKA procedures continues to increase, it is increasingly critical to develop improved, evidence based prostheses that maximize function and patient satisfaction while minimizing pain and other complications. PMID:26601061

  18. Defining and evaluating a novel outcome measure representing end-stage knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    PubMed

    Driban, Jeffrey B; Price, Lori Lyn; Lynch, John; Nevitt, Michael; Lo, Grace H; Eaton, Charles B; McAlindon, Timothy E

    2016-10-01

    We described a definition of end-stage knee osteoarthritis (esKOA) and evaluated its association with health outcomes and osteoarthritis risk factors. We included Osteoarthritis Initiative participants with or at risk for knee osteoarthritis who had complete baseline data. We defined esKOA by adapting a validated appropriateness algorithm for total knee replacement based on data from baseline and the first four follow-up visits. We performed person-based analyses, including both knees from all participants. Participants met the definition of esKOA at the visit at which ≥1 knee reached the esKOA criteria. We assessed differences in individual characteristics between groups at baseline and over time and tested if incident esKOA (outcome) was associated with osteoarthritis risk factors (e.g., age, maximum adult weight, and quadriceps strength). The cohort consisted of 3916 participants with mean age of 61 (SD = 9) years and mean body mass index of 28.4 (4.7) kg/m(2); 59 % were female and 9.7 % developed incident esKOA. Those with incident esKOA had poorer health outcomes at baseline and greater declines in health outcomes, with the exception of SF-12 mental health score. Five out of nine tested risk factors were associated with incident esKOA in unadjusted analyses, with older age (≥65 years; odds ratio = 1.44, 95 % confidence interval = 1.19 to 1.83) and quadriceps weakness (odds ratio = 0.78, 95 % confidence interval = 0.71 to 0.86) remaining significant in adjusted models. Older age and quadriceps weakness predicted esKOA. esKOA is also characterized by poor health-related outcomes. This definition of esKOA could be a new clinically relevant outcome measure for osteoarthritis research.

  19. Three-dimensional dynamic analysis of knee joint during gait in medial knee osteoarthritis using loading axis of knee.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Katsutoshi; Omori, Go; Koga, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Koichi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Tanabe, Yuji; Tanaka, Masaei; Arakawa, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    We recently developed a new method for three-dimensional evaluation of mechanical factors affecting knee joint in order to help identify factors that contribute to the progression of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). This study aimed to verify the clinical validity of our method by evaluating knee joint dynamics during gait. Subjects were 41 individuals (14 normal knees; 8 mild KOAs; 19 severe KOAs). The positions of skin markers attached to the body were captured during gait, and bi-planar X-ray images of the lower extremities were obtained in standing position. The positional relationship between the markers and femorotibial bones was determined from the X-ray images. Combining this relationship with gait capture allowed for the estimation of relative movement between femorotibial bones. We also calculated the point of intersection of loading axis of knee on the tibial proximal surface (LAK point) to analyze knee joint dynamics. Knee flexion range in subjects with severe KOA during gait was significantly smaller than that in those with normal knees (p=0.011), and knee adduction in those with severe KOA was significantly larger than in those with mild KOA (p<0.000). LAK point was locally loaded on the medial compartment of the tibial surface as KOA progressed, with LAK point of subjects with severe KOA rapidly shifting medially during loading response. Local loading and medial shear force were applied to the tibial surface during stance phase as medial KOA progressed. Our findings suggest that our method is useful for the quantitative evaluation of mechanical factors that affect KOA progression.

  20. Three-dimensional dynamic analysis of knee joint during gait in medial knee osteoarthritis using loading axis of knee.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Katsutoshi; Omori, Go; Koga, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Koichi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Tanabe, Yuji; Tanaka, Masaei; Arakawa, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    We recently developed a new method for three-dimensional evaluation of mechanical factors affecting knee joint in order to help identify factors that contribute to the progression of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). This study aimed to verify the clinical validity of our method by evaluating knee joint dynamics during gait. Subjects were 41 individuals (14 normal knees; 8 mild KOAs; 19 severe KOAs). The positions of skin markers attached to the body were captured during gait, and bi-planar X-ray images of the lower extremities were obtained in standing position. The positional relationship between the markers and femorotibial bones was determined from the X-ray images. Combining this relationship with gait capture allowed for the estimation of relative movement between femorotibial bones. We also calculated the point of intersection of loading axis of knee on the tibial proximal surface (LAK point) to analyze knee joint dynamics. Knee flexion range in subjects with severe KOA during gait was significantly smaller than that in those with normal knees (p=0.011), and knee adduction in those with severe KOA was significantly larger than in those with mild KOA (p<0.000). LAK point was locally loaded on the medial compartment of the tibial surface as KOA progressed, with LAK point of subjects with severe KOA rapidly shifting medially during loading response. Local loading and medial shear force were applied to the tibial surface during stance phase as medial KOA progressed. Our findings suggest that our method is useful for the quantitative evaluation of mechanical factors that affect KOA progression. PMID:26002602

  1. An 8-Week Knee Osteoarthritis Treatment Program of Hyaluronic Acid Injection, Deliberate Physical Rehabilitation, and Patient Education is Cost Effective at 2 Years Follow-up: The OsteoArthritis Centers of AmericaSM Experience

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Block, Jon E

    2014-01-01

    Numerous nonsurgical interventions have been reported to improve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA) over the short term. However, longer follow-up is required to accurately characterize outcomes such as cost effectiveness and delayed arthroplasty. A total of 553 patients with symptomatic knee OA who previously underwent a single 8-week multimodal treatment program were contacted at 1 year (n = 336) or 2 years (n = 217) follow-up. The percentage of patients who underwent knee arthroplasty was 10% at 1 year and 18% at 2 years following program completion. The treatment program was highly cost effective at $12,800 per quality-adjusted life year at 2 years. Cost effectiveness was maintained under a variety of plausible assumptions and regardless of gender, age, body mass index, disease severity, or knee pain severity. In summary, a single 8-week multimodal knee OA treatment program is cost effective and may lower knee arthroplasty utilization through 2 years follow-up. PMID:25574144

  2. Effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma in the treatment of moderate knee osteoarthritis: a randomized prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kavadar, Gulis; Demircioglu, Demet Tekdos; Celik, Memet Yusuf; Emre, Tuluhan Yunus

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] To assess the effects of different numbers of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) applications on pain and physical function in grade 3 knee osteoarthritis (OA). [Subjects and Methods] A total of 102 patients with grade 3 knee OA were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1 received a single injection of PRP, Group 2 received two injections of PRP two weeks apart, Group 3 received three injections of PRP at 2-weeks intervals. All patients were evaluated with a visual analog scale (VAS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and the Timed-Up and Go test (TUG) before the treatment and at 1, 3 and 6 months after the treatment. [Results] Ninety-eight patients (15 males, 83 females) completed the study. The mean ages of the patients were 53.5±6.6, 54.9±5.3, and 55.1±5.6 years in Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3, respectively. Statistically significant improvements were noted in all of the evaluated measures in all of the groups. The mean differences of Group 1-Group 2 and Group 1-Group 3 WOMAC total, WOMAC pain, WOMAC stiffness, and WOMAC function scores were statistically significant. [Conclusion] PRP is an effective treatment for functional status and pain in moderate knee osteoarthritis and a minimum of two injections is appropriate. PMID:26834369

  3. Osteoarthritis: Research Findings | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements Education to help people better manage their osteoarthritis Exercise and weight loss to improve mobility and decrease pain Researchers are learning about sex differences that explain why ... to osteoarthritis. These include structural differences of the knee joint ...

  4. Inflammatory Pathways in Knee Osteoarthritis: Potential Targets for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Or, David; Rael, Leonard T.; Thomas, Gregory W.; Brody, Edward N.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a wide-spread, debilitating disease that is prominent in Western countries. It is associated with old age, obesity, and mechanical stress on the knee joint. By examining the recent literature on the effect of the anti-inflammatory prostaglandins 15d-PGJ2 and Δ12-PGJ2, we propose that new therapeutic agents for this disease could facilitate the transition from the COX-2-dependent pro-inflammatory synthesis of the prostaglandin PGE2 (catalyzed by mPGES-1), to the equally COX-2-dependent synthesis of the aforementioned anti-inflammatory prostaglandins. This transition could be instrumental in halting the breakdown of cartilage via matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and aggrecanases, as well as promoting the matrix regeneration and synthesis of cartilage by chondrocytes. Another desirable property of new OA therapeutics could involve the recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells to the damaged cartilage and bone, possibly resulting in the generation of chondrocytes, synoviocytes, and, in the case of bone, osteoblasts. Moreover, we propose that research promoting this transition from pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory prostaglandins could aid in the identification of new OA therapeutics.

  5. Comparison of pain perception between open and minimally invasive surgery in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Biagio; Vitale, Elsa; Esposito, Antonio; Colella, Antonio; Cassano, Maria; Notarnicola, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was a well-established procedure that had shown excellent long-term results in terms of reduced pain and increased mobility. Pain was one of the most important outcome measures that contributed to patient dissatisfaction after TKA. After a computerized search of the Medline and Embase databases, we considered articles from January 1st, 1997 to October 31st, 2009 that underlined the impact on patient pain perception of either standard open total knee arthroplasty or minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty. We included articles that used the visual analog scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Knee Score, Hospital for Special Surgery Score (HSS), Oxford Knee Score (OKS) as postoperative pain indicators, and we included studies with a minimum follow-up period of two months. We excluded studies that monitored only functional postoperative knee activities. It was shown that TKA with the open technique was a better treatment for knees with a positive effect on pain and function than the minimally invasive technique. PMID:21042568

  6. Neural correlates of hyperalgesia in the monosodium iodoacetate model of osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    Abaei, Maryam; Sagar, Devi R; Stockley, Elizabeth G; Spicer, Clare H; Prior, Malcolm; Auer, Dorothee P

    2016-01-01

    Background The mechanisms driving osteoarthritic pain remain poorly understood, but there is increasing evidence for a role of the central nervous system in the chronification of pain. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the influence of a model of unilateral knee osteoarthritis on nociceptive processing. Results Four to five weeks post intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA, 1 mg) into the left knee, Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized for functional magnetic resonance imaging studies to characterize the neural response to a noxious stimulus (intra-articular capsaicin injection). In a two-arm cross-over design, 5 µM/50 µl capsaicin was injected into either the left knee (n = 8, CAPS-MIA) or right control knee (n = 8, CAPS-CON), preceded by contralateral vehicle (SAL) injection. To assess neural correlates of mechanical hyperalgesia, hindpaws were stimulated with von Frey hairs (8 g: MIA; 15 g: control knee, based on behavioral withdrawal responses). The CAPS-MIA group exhibited significant activation of the periaqueductal gray, unilateral thalamus and bilateral mensencephalon, superior-colliculus, and hippocampus, with no significant activation in the other groups/conditions. Capsaicin injection increased functional connectivity in the mid-brain network and mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, hippocampus, and globus pallidus, which was significantly stronger in CAPS-MIA compared to CAPS-CON groups. Mechanical stimulation of the hyperalgesic (ipsilateral to MIA knee) and normalgesic (contralateral) hindpaws evoked qualitatively different brain activation with more widespread brainstem and anterior cingulate (ACC) activation when stimulating the hyperalgesic paw, and clearer frontal sensory activation from the normalgesic paw. Conclusions We provide evidence for modulation of nociceptive processing in a chronic knee osteoarthritis pain model with stronger brain activation and alteration of brain networks

  7. Tanezumab for Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhi-Fang; Chen, Ling-Xiao; Bi, Ming-Chao; Sun, Jing-Cheng; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Objective Tanezumab is a new therapeutic intervention for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. We performed the present meta-analysis to appraise the efficacy and safety of tanezumab for patients with knee OA. Methods We systematically searched randomized controlled trials from PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). The primary outcomes were mean change in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain, the WOMAC physical function and patient's global assessment (PGA). Outcomes were reported as the standard mean difference (SMD) or relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). We assessed the pooled data using a random-effects model. Results Of the identified studies, four were eligible and were included in this meta-analysis (N = 1839 participants). Compared with the placebo groups, tanezumab yielded a significant reduction in mean change in the WOMAC pain (SMD = 0.51, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.69, P<0.00001), the WOMAC physical function (SMD = 0.56, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.74, P<0.00001) and PGA (SMD = 0.34, 95% CI 0.22 to 0.47, P<0.00001). There was no significant difference in serious adverse events (RR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.92, P = 0.84) between the tanezumab and placebo groups. Tanezumab significantly increased discontinuations due to adverse events (RR = 2.89, 95% CI 1.59 to 5.26, P = 0.0005), abnormal peripheral sensations (RR = 3.14, 95% CI 2.12 to 4.66, P<0.00001), and peripheral neuropathy (RR = 6.05, 95% CI 2.32 to 15.81, P = 0.0002). Conclusion Tanezumab can alleviate pain and improve function for patients with OA of the knee. However, considering the limited number of studies, this conclusion should be interpreted cautiously and more clinical randomized controlled trials are needed to verify the efficacy and safety of tanezumab for OA of the knee. PMID:27294371

  8. Efficacy of Blood Flow-Restricted Low-Load Resistance Training For Quadriceps Strengthening in Men at Risk of Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Maria D.; Mikesky, Alan E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Greater quadriceps strength has been associated with lower risk of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in older adults. However, factors that confer elevated risk of knee OA (eg, sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and knee injury) also contribute to a reduced tolerance of resistance training programs at ≥60% 1-repetition maximum (1RM). Therefore, the current study assessed whether concurrent application of blood flow restriction (BFR) to low-load resistance training is an efficacious and tolerable means of improving quadriceps strength in men at risk of symptomatic knee OA. Methods: Men older than age 45, with a history of knee injury or elevated body mass index (BMI), were randomized to low-load resistance training (30% 1RM) either with or without concurrent BFR. Isotonic double-leg press strength and isokinetic knee extensor strength were assessed before and after 4 weeks of training 3 times/wk. Knee pain (Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score) was assessed for tolerance. Results: Of the 42 men (mean age 56.1 ± 7.7 years) who were randomized, 41 completed the program. There were no significant intergroup differences in age, BMI, knee pathology, or muscle strength at baseline. Although leg press 1RM improved in both control and BFR groups, there were no significant intergroup differences in primary or secondary measures of muscle strength. The BFR was not associated with worsening of knee pain, but there was a significant improvement in knee pain in the control group. Conclusions: In comparison with training without BFR, addition of BFR to 30% 1RM resistance training for 4 weeks did not confer significantly greater increases in leg press or quadriceps strength in older men with risk factors for symptomatic knee OA. PMID:26328230

  9. What is the current status of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis?

    PubMed

    Henrotin, Yves; Marty, Marc; Mobasheri, Ali

    2014-07-01

    Chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate exert beneficial effects on the metabolism of in vitro models of cells derived from synovial joints: chondrocytes, synoviocytes and cells from subchondral bone, all of which are involved in osteoarthritis (OA). They increase type II collagen and proteoglycan synthesis in human articular chondrocytes and are able to reduce the production of some pro-inflammatory mediators and proteases, to reduce the cellular death process, and improve the anabolic/catabolic balance of the extracellular cartilage matrix (ECM). Clinical trials have reported a beneficial effect of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate on pain and function. The structure-modifying effects of these compounds have been reported and analyzed in recent meta-analyses. The results for knee OA demonstrate a small but significant reduction in the rate of joint space narrowing. Chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulphate are recommended by several guidelines from international societies for the management of knee and hip OA, while others do not recommend these products or recommend only under condition. This comprehensive review clarifies the role of these compounds in the therapeutic arsenal for patients with knee OA.

  10. Ultrasonographic Findings in a Large Series of Patients with Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Artul, Suheil; Khazin, Fadi; Hakim, Jeries; Habib, George

    2014-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSKUS) is becoming more and more popular in the evaluation of different musculoskeletal abnormalities. The aim of this retrospective study was to document the prevalence and spectrum of MSKUS findings at the painful knee. Materials and Methods: All the studies of MSKUS that were performed for the evaluation of knee pain during the previous 2 years at the Department of Radiology in Nazareth hospital were reviewed. Demographic and clinical parameters including age, gender, side, and MSKUS findings were documented. Results: Two hundred and seventy-six patients were included in the review. In 21 of them, both knees were evaluated at the same setting (total number of knees evaluated was 297). One hundred and forty-four knees were of the left side. Thirty-three pathologies were identified. 34% of the studies were negative. The most common MSKUS findings were medial meniscal tear (MMT) (20%), Baker's cyst (BC) (16%), and osteoarthritis (OA) (11%). Only one knee of all the knees evaluated in our study showed synovitis. Fifty-three knees (18% of all the knees evaluated) had more than one imaging finding, mosty two and while some had three findings. The most common combination of findings was MMT and BC (8 knees), MMT with OA (8 knees), and MMT with fluid (6 knee). In 67% of the patients who had simultaneous bilateral knee evaluation, at least one knee had no abnormal findings and in 43%, both knees were negative. Conclusions: MSKUS has the potential for revealing huge spectrum of abnormalities. In nearly 90% of the positive studies, degenerative/mechanical abnormalities were reported, with MMT, BC, and osteoarthritic changes being the most common. PMID:25250194

  11. Efficacy of home-based kinesthesia, balance & agility exercise training among persons with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Matthew W; Tamulevicius, Nauris; Semple, Stuart J; Krkeljas, Zarko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a home-based kinesthesia, balance and agility (KBA) exercise program to improve symptoms among persons age ≥ 50 years with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Forty-four persons were randomly assigned to 8-weeks, 3 times per week KBA, resistance training (RT), KBA + RT, or Control. KBA utilized walking agility exercises and single-leg static and dynamic balancing. RT used elastic resistance bands for open chain lower extremity exercises. KBA + RT performed selected exercises from each technique. Control applied inert lotion daily. Outcomes included the OA specific WOMAC Index of Pain, Stiffness, and Physical Function (PF), community activity level, exercise self-efficacy, self-report knee stability, and 15m get up & go walk (GUG). Thirty-three participants [70.7 (SD 8.5) years] completed the trial. Analysis of variance comparing baseline, mid-point, and follow-up measures revealed significant (p < 0.05) improvements in WOMAC scores among KBA, RT, KBA + RT, and Control, with no differences between groups. However, Control WOMAC improvements peaked at mid-point, whereas improvement in the exercise conditions continued at 8-weeks. There were no significant changes in community activity level. Only Control improved exercise self-efficacy. Knee stability was improved in RT and Control. GUG improved in RT and KBA+RT. These results indicate that KBA, RT, or a combination of the two administered as home exercise programs are effective in improving symptoms and quality of life among persons with knee OA. Control results indicate a strong placebo effect in the short term. A combination of KBA and RT should be considered as part of the rehabilitation program, but KBA or RT alone may be appropriate for some patients. Studies with more statistical power are needed to confirm or refute these results. Patient presentation, preferences, costs, and convenience should be considered when choosing an exercise rehabilitation approach

  12. Efficacy of home-based kinesthesia, balance & agility exercise training among persons with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Matthew W; Tamulevicius, Nauris; Semple, Stuart J; Krkeljas, Zarko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a home-based kinesthesia, balance and agility (KBA) exercise program to improve symptoms among persons age ≥ 50 years with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Forty-four persons were randomly assigned to 8-weeks, 3 times per week KBA, resistance training (RT), KBA + RT, or Control. KBA utilized walking agility exercises and single-leg static and dynamic balancing. RT used elastic resistance bands for open chain lower extremity exercises. KBA + RT performed selected exercises from each technique. Control applied inert lotion daily. Outcomes included the OA specific WOMAC Index of Pain, Stiffness, and Physical Function (PF), community activity level, exercise self-efficacy, self-report knee stability, and 15m get up & go walk (GUG). Thirty-three participants [70.7 (SD 8.5) years] completed the trial. Analysis of variance comparing baseline, mid-point, and follow-up measures revealed significant (p < 0.05) improvements in WOMAC scores among KBA, RT, KBA + RT, and Control, with no differences between groups. However, Control WOMAC improvements peaked at mid-point, whereas improvement in the exercise conditions continued at 8-weeks. There were no significant changes in community activity level. Only Control improved exercise self-efficacy. Knee stability was improved in RT and Control. GUG improved in RT and KBA+RT. These results indicate that KBA, RT, or a combination of the two administered as home exercise programs are effective in improving symptoms and quality of life among persons with knee OA. Control results indicate a strong placebo effect in the short term. A combination of KBA and RT should be considered as part of the rehabilitation program, but KBA or RT alone may be appropriate for some patients. Studies with more statistical power are needed to confirm or refute these results. Patient presentation, preferences, costs, and convenience should be considered when choosing an exercise rehabilitation approach

  13. Curcuminoid treatment for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Yunes; Rahimnia, Ali-Reza; Sharafi, Mojtaba; Alishiri, Gholamhossein; Saburi, Amin; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2014-11-01

    Treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) is challenging owing to the inefficacy and long-term adverse events of currently available medications including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Curcuminoids are polyphenolic phytochemicals with established anti-inflammatory properties and protective effects on chondrocytes. The aim of this study is to investigate the clinical efficacy of curcuminoids in patients suffering from knee OA. A pilot randomized double-blind placebo-control parallel-group clinical trial was conducted among patients with mild-to-moderate knee OA. Patients were assigned to curcuminoids (1500 mg/day in 3 divided doses; n = 19) or matched placebo (n = 21) for 6 weeks. Efficacy measures were changes in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), visual analogue scale (VAS) and Lequesne's pain functional index (LPFI) scores during the study. There was no significant difference in age, gender, body mass index, and VAS, WOMAC and LPFI scores between the study groups at baseline (p > 0.05). Treatment with curcuminoids was associated with significantly greater reductions in WOMAC (p = 0.001), VAS (p < 0.001) and LPFI (p = 0.013) scores compared with placebo. With respect to WOMAC subscales, there were significant improvements in the pain and physical function scores (p < 0.001) but not stiffness score (p > 0.05). There was no considerable adverse effect in both groups. To conclude, curcuminoids represent an effective and safe alternative treatment for OA. PMID:24853120

  14. Exercise Alters Gait Pattern but Not Knee Load in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Jia; Chang, Chao-Chin; Chou, You-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Six female patients with bilateral medial knee OA and 6 healthy controls were recruited. Patients with knee OA received a 6-week physiotherapist-supervised and home-based exercise program. Outcome measures, including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and Short Form-36 Health Survey as well as objective biomechanical indices were obtained at baseline and follow-up. After treatment, no significant difference was observed in the knee abductor moment (KAM), lever arm, and ground reaction force. We, however, observed significantly improved pain and physical function as well as altered gait patterns, including a higher hip flexor moment and hip extension angle with a faster walking speed. Although KAM was unchanged, patients with bilateral knee OA showed an improved walking speed and altered the gait pattern after 6 weeks of supervised exercise. This finding suggests that the exercise intervention improves proximal joint mechanics during walking and can be considered for patients with bilateral knee OA. Non-weight-bearing strengthening without external resistance combined with stretching exercise may be an option to improve pain and function in individuals with OA who cannot perform high resistance exercises owing to pain or other reasons. PMID:27725941

  15. High plasma levels of vitamin C and E are associated with incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies suggest that the antioxidants vitamins C and E may protect against development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). We examined the association of circulating levels of vitamin C and E with incident whole knee radiographic OA (WKROA). We performed a nested case-control study of incident WKR...

  16. A pilot randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial to investigate the efficacy and safety of an extract of Artemisia annua administered over 12 weeks, for managing pain, stiffness, and functional limitation associated with osteoarthritis of the hip and knee.

    PubMed

    Stebbings, Simon; Beattie, Elizabeth; McNamara, Debra; Hunt, Sheena

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of a dietary supplement, Arthrem, containing an extract from the medicinal plant Artemisia annua, on pain, stiffness, and functional limitation in osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. Forty-two patients were randomized to one of three groups (n = 14 in each group): 150-mg Artemisia annua extract (ART) twice daily (BD) (ART low dose), 300-mg ART BD (ART high dose), or placebo BD administered over 12 weeks. Efficacy was assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC®) and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain. Participants treated with ART low dose demonstrated significant improvement in WOMAC total scores from baseline to 12 weeks (mean change, -12.2; standard deviation, [SD] 13.84; p = 0.0159); improvement was not shown in the placebo group (mean change, -7.8; SD, 19.80; p = 0.1029). Statistically significant reductions were seen from baseline in the ART low-dose group for individual WOMAC components stiffness and physical function. VAS pain scores were statistically significantly reduced from baseline to 12 weeks in the ART low-dose group (mean change, -21.4 mm; SD, 23.48 mm; p = 0.0082) but not the placebo group (mean change, -11.5 mm; SD, 28.97 mm, p = 0.1757). No statistically significant changes occurred from baseline in the placebo or ART high-dose groups for any parameter. ART low dose was well tolerated. ART has potential as an anti-inflammatory/analgesic in OA. Treatment with ART 150 mg BD is associated with clinically relevant reductions in pain over 12 weeks. Further studies are warranted. PMID:26631103

  17. Hand, hip and knee osteoarthritis in a Norwegian population-based study - The MUST protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowledge about the prevalence and consequences of osteoarthritis (OA) in the Norwegian population is limited. This study has been designed to gain a greater understanding of musculoskeletal pain in the general population with a focus on clinically and radiologically confirmed OA, as well as risk factors, consequences, and management of OA. Methods/Design The Musculoskeletal pain in Ullensaker STudy (MUST) has been designed as an observational study comprising a population-based postal survey and a comprehensive clinical examination of a sub-sample with self-reported OA (MUST OA cohort). All inhabitants in Ullensaker municipality, Norway, aged 40 to 79 years receive the initial population-based postal survey questionnaire with questions about life style, general health, musculoskeletal pain, self-reported OA, comorbidities, health care utilisation, medication use, and functional ability. Participants who self-report OA in their hip, knee and/or hand joints are asked to attend a comprehensive clinical examination at Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, including a comprehensive medical examination, performance-based functional tests, different imaging modalities, cardiovascular assessment, blood and urine samples, and a number of patient-reported questionnaires including five OA disease specific instruments. Data will be merged with six national data registries. A subsample of those who receive the questionnaire has previously participated in postal surveys conducted in 1990, 1994, and 2004 with data on musculoskeletal pain and functional ability in addition to demographic characteristics and a number of health related factors. This subsample constitutes a population based cohort with 20 years follow-up. Discussion This protocol describes the design of an observational population-based study that will involve the collection of data from a postal survey on musculoskeletal pain, and a comprehensive clinical examination on those with self-reported hand, hip and

  18. Effectiveness and Safety of Manufactured Chinese Herbal Formula for Knee Osteoarthritis: Insights from a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liguo; Yang, Shaofeng; Wang, Shangquan; Gong, Hao; Li, Linghui; Wei, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the current clinical evidence of manufactured Chinese herbal formulae (MCHF) for knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Methods. Seven databases were searched from inception to May 2015. Eligible randomized controlled trials investigating the effectiveness of MCHF for KOA were included. Data extraction, methodological assessment, and meta-analyses were conducted according to the Cochrane standards. Results. A total of 17 kinds of MCHF were identified from the twenty-six included trials. Meta-analyses showed that MCHF significantly relieved the global pain of knee joints, either used alone or combined with routine treatments. Additionally, MCHF plus routine treatments significantly decreased the scores of WOMAC and Lequesne index. However, there were no statistical differences between MCHF group and routine treatment group in walk-related pain and WOMAC scores. No significant differences were found in Lysholm scores. There were twenty-one trials that mentioned adverse events. A pooled analysis showed that adverse events occurred more frequently in control group compared with MCHF group. Conclusions. Our results indicated that MCHF showed some potential benefits for KOA. However, we still cannot draw firm conclusions due to the poor methodological quality of included trials. More high-quality RCTs would help to confirm the evidence. PMID:26609310

  19. Effectiveness and Safety of Manufactured Chinese Herbal Formula for Knee Osteoarthritis: Insights from a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liguo; Yang, Shaofeng; Wang, Shangquan; Gong, Hao; Li, Linghui; Wei, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the current clinical evidence of manufactured Chinese herbal formulae (MCHF) for knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Methods. Seven databases were searched from inception to May 2015. Eligible randomized controlled trials investigating the effectiveness of MCHF for KOA were included. Data extraction, methodological assessment, and meta-analyses were conducted according to the Cochrane standards. Results. A total of 17 kinds of MCHF were identified from the twenty-six included trials. Meta-analyses showed that MCHF significantly relieved the global pain of knee joints, either used alone or combined with routine treatments. Additionally, MCHF plus routine treatments significantly decreased the scores of WOMAC and Lequesne index. However, there were no statistical differences between MCHF group and routine treatment group in walk-related pain and WOMAC scores. No significant differences were found in Lysholm scores. There were twenty-one trials that mentioned adverse events. A pooled analysis showed that adverse events occurred more frequently in control group compared with MCHF group. Conclusions. Our results indicated that MCHF showed some potential benefits for KOA. However, we still cannot draw firm conclusions due to the poor methodological quality of included trials. More high-quality RCTs would help to confirm the evidence. PMID:26609310

  20. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W.; Arokoski, Jari P.; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T.; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level. PMID:26926836

  1. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study.

    PubMed

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W; Arokoski, Jari P; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level. PMID:26926836

  2. Evaluation of mean platelet volume (MPV) levels in patients with synovitis associated with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Balbaloglu, Ozlem; Korkmaz, Murat; Yolcu, Sadiye; Karaaslan, Fatih; Beceren, N Gökben Çetin

    2014-01-01

    Platelet count, C-reactive protein (CRP) and neutrophile countings are markers those reflect the inflammatory response. Mean platelet volume (MPV) is a simple indicator of platelet size and has been known to be a marker of platelet activity. Some platelet markers, including MPV, have been investigated to have relation with inflammation. MPV is inversely correlated with inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis, as shown in the previous studies. In this study, we aimed to investigate the levels of MPV in patients with synovitis of knee osteoarthritis. 147 patients diagnosed with synovitis associated to osteoarthritis, 191 patients with knee osteoarthritis, and 121 patients between the same age range who did not have joint complaints (control group), totally 459 participants were included to our study. MPV results of these groups were compared. We found a significant difference between the patient group with synovitis associated with osteoarthritis of knee and patients with knee osteoarthritis in MPV blood level (p < 0.0001), similarly a significant difference was found between the patient group with synovitis associated with osteoarthritis of knee and the control group (p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference between the knee osteoarthritis patient group and the control group (p = 0.78). We found a significant relation between MPV and ESR in the patient group with synovitis of osteoarthritis (p = 0.004). According to the Pearson correlation, it is found that there is a negative relationship between CRP and MPV variables in those of knee osteoarthritis patients. This correlation coefficient is statistically significant at the 10% level (p = 0.058). We could not find a relation between CRP and MPV in patients with the osteoarthritis group, but we found negative correlation (p = 0.65). Significant relationship was not found between ESR and MPV variables at the 10% level; the p value is 0.34. In the control

  3. Daily verbal and nonverbal expression of osteoarthritis pain and spouse responses.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Stephanie J; Martire, Lynn M; Keefe, Francis J; Mogle, Jacqueline A; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Schulz, Richard

    2013-10-01

    The current study applied a model of pain communication to examine the distinction between verbal and nonverbal pain expression in their prediction of punishing, empathic, and solicitous spouse responses to patient pain. It was hypothesized that on days when patients engaged in more nonverbal expression, spouses would respond more positively (ie, with less punishing and more solicitous and empathic behavior). The same pattern was predicted for verbal expression. In addition, it was expected that associations between patient nonverbal pain expression and positive spouse responses would be strengthened, and that the association with punishing responses would be weakened, on days when levels of verbal pain expression were higher than usual, regardless of daily pain severity. In a 22-day diary study, 144 individuals with knee osteoarthritis and their spouses completed daily measures of pain expression, spouse responses, health, and affect. The predicted positive main effect of nonverbal expression on empathic and solicitous responses was supported by the data, as was the positive main effect for verbal pain expression. Results from moderation analyses partially supported our hypothesis in that patients' nonverbal pain expression was even more strongly related to empathic and solicitous spouse responses on days of high verbal pain expression, and patients were buffered from spouse punishing responses on days when both nonverbal and verbal expression were high. These findings suggest that pain expression in both verbal and nonverbal modes of communication is important for positive and negative spousal responses.

  4. Combination of Intra-Articular and Intraosseous Injections of Platelet Rich Plasma for Severe Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Mikel; Delgado, Diego; Sánchez, Pello; Muiños-López, Emma; Paiva, Bruno; Granero-Moltó, Froilán; Prósper, Felipe; Pompei, Orlando; Pérez, Juan Carlos; Azofra, Juan; Padilla, Sabino; Fiz, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess a novel approach to treating severe knee osteoarthritis by targeting synovial membrane, superficial articular cartilage, synovial fluid, and subchondral bone by combining intra-articular injections and intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma. We explored a new strategy consisting of intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma into the subchondral bone in combination with the conventional intra-articular injection in order to tackle several knee joint tissues simultaneously. We assessed the clinical outcomes through osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) and the inflammatory response by quantifying mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid. There was a significant pain reduction in the KOOS from baseline (61.55 ± 14.11) to week 24 (74.60 ± 19.19), after treatment (p = 0.008), in the secondary outcomes (symptoms, p = 0.004; ADL, p = 0.022; sport/rec., p = 0.017; QOL, p = 0.012), as well as VAS score (p < 0.001) and Lequesne Index (p = 0.008). The presence of mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid and colony-forming cells one week after treatment decreased substantially from 7.98 ± 8.21 MSC/μL to 4.04 ± 5.36 MSC/μL (p = 0.019) and from 601.75 ± 312.30 to 139.19 ± 123.61  (p = 0.012), respectively. Intra-articular injections combined with intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma reduce pain and mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid, besides significantly improving knee joint function in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis. This trial is registered on EudraCT with the number 2013-003982-32. PMID:27462609

  5. Combination of Intra-Articular and Intraosseous Injections of Platelet Rich Plasma for Severe Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Pello; Muiños-López, Emma; Prósper, Felipe; Pompei, Orlando; Pérez, Juan Carlos; Padilla, Sabino; Fiz, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess a novel approach to treating severe knee osteoarthritis by targeting synovial membrane, superficial articular cartilage, synovial fluid, and subchondral bone by combining intra-articular injections and intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma. We explored a new strategy consisting of intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma into the subchondral bone in combination with the conventional intra-articular injection in order to tackle several knee joint tissues simultaneously. We assessed the clinical outcomes through osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) and the inflammatory response by quantifying mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid. There was a significant pain reduction in the KOOS from baseline (61.55 ± 14.11) to week 24 (74.60 ± 19.19), after treatment (p = 0.008), in the secondary outcomes (symptoms, p = 0.004; ADL, p = 0.022; sport/rec., p = 0.017; QOL, p = 0.012), as well as VAS score (p < 0.001) and Lequesne Index (p = 0.008). The presence of mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid and colony-forming cells one week after treatment decreased substantially from 7.98 ± 8.21 MSC/μL to 4.04 ± 5.36 MSC/μL (p = 0.019) and from 601.75 ± 312.30 to 139.19 ± 123.61  (p = 0.012), respectively. Intra-articular injections combined with intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma reduce pain and mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid, besides significantly improving knee joint function in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis. This trial is registered on EudraCT with the number 2013-003982-32. PMID:27462609

  6. Evidence based factors influencing outcome of arthroscopy in osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Dearing, Jonathan; Nutton, Richard W

    2008-06-01

    Arthroscopy continues to be widely used in the management of knee osteoarthritis despite concerns regarding its effectiveness. The Scottish Arthroplasty Project has demonstrated a three-fold variation in rates of arthroscopy for osteoarthritis of the knee across different regions of Scotland. This has clear ramifications for the utilisation of finite health care resources. In light of such variations in national clinical practice this review identifies the evidence based factors which permit identification of patients who will obtain sustained benefit from arthroscopic treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Such a patient should have symptoms of short duration affecting the medial compartment of the knee, have localised tenderness at the medial joint line, mechanical symptoms and positive findings on meniscal stress testing. There should be neither significant mechanical malalignment nor flexion contracture, there should be preservation of the joint space on radiographs and the patient should not be obese. If these criteria are fulfilled the likelihood for long lasting reduction in symptoms is increased. PMID:18378147

  7. Sport and early osteoarthritis: the role of sport in aetiology, progression and treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vannini, F; Spalding, T; Andriolo, L; Berruto, M; Denti, M; Espregueira-Mendes, J; Menetrey, J; Peretti, G M; Seil, R; Filardo, G

    2016-06-01

    Sports activities are considered favourable for general health; nevertheless, a possible influence of sports practice on the development of early osteoarthritis (OA) is a cause for concern. A higher incidence of OA in knees and ankles of former high-impact sports players than in those of the normal population has been shown and it is still debatable whether the cause is either to be recognized generically in the higher number of injuries or in a joint overload. The possibility to address knee OA in its early phases may be strictly connected to the modification of specific extrinsic or intrinsic factors, related to the patient in order to save the joint from further disease progression; these include sport practice, equipment and load. Non-surgical therapies such as continuative muscles reinforce and training play a strong role in the care of athletes with early OA, particularly if professional. There is an overall agreement on the need of an early restoring of a proper meniscal, ligament and cartilage integrity in order to protect the knee and resume sports safely, whereas alignment is a point still strongly debatable especially for professional athletes. Remaining questions still to be answered are the risks of different sports in relation to one another, although an actual protective effect of low-impact sports, such as walking, swimming or cycling, has been recognized on the appearance or worsening of OA, the effect of continuing or ceasing to practice a sport on the natural history of early OA, and even following appropriate treatment is still unknown. PMID:27043343

  8. Sport and early osteoarthritis: the role of sport in aetiology, progression and treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vannini, F; Spalding, T; Andriolo, L; Berruto, M; Denti, M; Espregueira-Mendes, J; Menetrey, J; Peretti, G M; Seil, R; Filardo, G

    2016-06-01

    Sports activities are considered favourable for general health; nevertheless, a possible influence of sports practice on the development of early osteoarthritis (OA) is a cause for concern. A higher incidence of OA in knees and ankles of former high-impact sports players than in those of the normal population has been shown and it is still debatable whether the cause is either to be recognized generically in the higher number of injuries or in a joint overload. The possibility to address knee OA in its early phases may be strictly connected to the modification of specific extrinsic or intrinsic factors, related to the patient in order to save the joint from further disease progression; these include sport practice, equipment and load. Non-surgical therapies such as continuative muscles reinforce and training play a strong role in the care of athletes with early OA, particularly if professional. There is an overall agreement on the need of an early restoring of a proper meniscal, ligament and cartilage integrity in order to protect the knee and resume sports safely, whereas alignment is a point still strongly debatable especially for professional athletes. Remaining questions still to be answered are the risks of different sports in relation to one another, although an actual protective effect of low-impact sports, such as walking, swimming or cycling, has been recognized on the appearance or worsening of OA, the effect of continuing or ceasing to practice a sport on the natural history of early OA, and even following appropriate treatment is still unknown.

  9. Gait patterns during different walking conditions in older adults with and without knee osteoarthritis--results from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seung-uk; Ling, Shari M; Schreiber, Catherine; Nesbitt, Mark; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2011-02-01

    Biomechanical analysis of lower extremity activities while walking at different speeds and in challenging conditions may help to identify specific gait patterns associated with knee osteoarthritis (knee-OA). We hypothesized that individuals with asymptomatic knee-OA have lower ankle activity, while individuals with symptomatic knee-OA have similar or higher ankle activity compared to individuals without knee-OA, and that such differences are enhanced during challenging gait tasks. We tested this hypothesis by examining gait characteristics in multiple gait tasks using data from 153 Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) participants (112 without knee-OA, 41 with knee-OA; 53-87 years, 52% women). All participants who could walk unassisted were evaluated in the BLSA gait lab while walking at self-selected speed (usual-walking), at maximum speed (fast-walking) and again at self-selected speed after 30-min of walking activities (usual-walking-after-30 min). Knee range of motion was lower for knee-OA participants in the fast-walking and usual-walking-after-30 min tasks (p<0.030). Ankle range of motion for symptomatic knee-OA was greater compared to asymptomatic knee-OA for all walking tasks (p<0.050). Symptomatic knee-OA had greater generative MWE of the ankle compared to asymptomatic knee-OA (p=0.034), while keeping similar absorptive MWE of the knee when compared to no-OA controls (p=0.151). Symptomatic knee-OA individuals seem to adapt an ankle kinematic gait pattern aimed at avoiding knee pain, by enhancing forward propulsion so to minimize knee joint load. Whether these conditions represent subsequent steps in the causal pathway from knee-OA to changes in gait is still not clear.

  10. Knee Joint Loading during Gait in Healthy Controls and Individuals with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Manal, Kurt T.; Rudolph, Katherine S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective People with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are thought to walk with high loads at the knee which are yet to be quantfied using modeling techniques that account for subject specific EMG patterns, kinematics and kinetics. The objective was to estimate medial and lateral loading for people with knee OA and controls using an approach that is sensitive to subject specific muscle activation patterns. Methods 16 OA and 12 control (C) subjects walked while kinematic, kinetic and EMG data were collected. Muscle forces were calculated using an EMG-Driven model and loading was calculated by balancing the external moments with internal muscle and contact forces Results OA subjects walked slower and had greater laxity, static and dynamic varus alignment, less flexion and greater knee adduction moment (KAM). Loading (normalized to body weight) was no different between the groups but OA subjects had greater absolute medial load than controls and maintained a greater %total load on the medial compartment. These patterns were associated with body mass, sagittal and frontal plane moments, static alignment and close to signficance for dynamic alignment. Lateral compartment unloading during mid-late stance was observed in 50% of OA subjects. Conclusions Loading for control subjects was similar to data from instrumented prostheses. Knee OA subjects had high medial contact loads in early stance and half of the OA cohort demonstared lateral compartment lift-off. Results suggest that interventions aimed at reducing body weight and dynamic malalignment might be effective in reducing medial compartment loading and establishing normal medio-lateral load sharing patterns. PMID:23182814

  11. Rehabilitation for the management of knee osteoarthritis using comprehensive traditional Chinese medicine in community health centers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is becoming increasingly necessary for community health centers to make rehabilitation services available to patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. However, for a number of reasons, including a lack of expertise, the small size of community health centers and the availability of only simple medical equipment, conventional rehabilitation therapy has not been widely used in China. Consequently, most patients with knee osteoarthritis seek treatment in high-grade hospitals. However, many patients cannot manage the techniques that they were taught in the hospital. Methods such as acupuncture, tuina, Chinese medical herb fumigation-washing and t’ai chi are easy to do and have been reported to have curative effects in those with knee osteoarthritis. To date, there have been no randomized controlled trials validating comprehensive traditional Chinese medicine for the rehabilitation of knee osteoarthritis in a community health center. Furthermore, there is no standard rehabilitation protocol using traditional Chinese medicine for knee osteoarthritis. The aim of the current study is to develop a comprehensive rehabilitation protocol using traditional Chinese medicine for the management of knee osteoarthritis in a community health center. Method/design This will be a randomized controlled clinical trial with blinded assessment. There will be a 4-week intervention utilizing rehabilitation protocols from traditional Chinese medicine and conventional therapy. Follow-up will be conducted for a period of 12 weeks. A total of 722 participants with knee osteoarthritis will be recruited. Participants will be randomly divided into two groups: experimental and control. Primary outcomes will include range of motion, girth measurement, the visual analogue scale, and results from the manual muscle, six-minute walking and stair-climbing tests. Secondary outcomes will include average daily consumption of pain medication, ability to perform daily tasks and health

  12. The prevalence of symptomatic knee and distal interphalangeal joint osteoarthritis in the urban population of Antalya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kaçar, C; Gilgil, E; Urhan, S; Arikan, V; Dündar, U; Oksüz, M C; Sünbüloglu, G; Yildirim, C; Tekeoglu, I; Bütün, B; Apaydin, A; Tuncer, T

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence and risk factors of symptomatic knee and distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint osteoarthritis (OA) in the elderly (> or =50 years of age) urban population of Antalya, Turkey. According to the 1997 national census, Antalya's population was 508,840. By random cluster sampling, 655 individuals aged 50 years or more were interviewed face-to-face and subjected to structured interviews regarding knee pain, worsening pain on exertion, and the gelling phenomenon. They were also asked about performing namaz (a fundamental act of worship in Islam performed five times a day), smoking, type of residence, type of toilet, work style, and duration of walking per day. They were also questioned about swelling in DIP joints. In the case of suspicion of knee OA, the individuals were invited to the hospital for further evaluation by physical examination and direct roentgenogram. The diagnosis of knee OA was based on clinical or clinical and radiographic findings. The prevalence of symptomatic knee OA was determined as 14.8% in the population aged 50 years or over. Advanced age, female sex, namaz, and type of residence were found to be associated with knee OA. The rate of symptomatic knee OA was significantly lower in smokers and those walking more than 2 h per day. Female sex was also strongly associated with OA DIP joints. OA of DIP joints was found significantly associated with symptomatic knee OA. The latter is a major health problem in the elderly population, especially in about one fourth of women aged 50 years or over. These data suggest that advanced age, female sex, and type of residence are risk factors.

  13. Chinese Herbal Bath Therapy for the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Zhan, Hongsheng; Chung, Mei; Lin, Xun; Zhang, Min; Pang, Jian; Wang, Chenchen

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Chinese herbal bath therapy (CHBT) has traditionally been considered to have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. We conducted the first meta-analysis evaluating its benefits for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. We searched three English and four Chinese databases through October, 2014. Randomized trials evaluating at least 2 weeks of CHBT for knee OA were selected. The effects of CHBT on clinical symptoms included both pain level (via the visual analog scale) and total effectiveness rate, which assessed pain, physical performance, and wellness. We performed random-effects meta-analyses using mean difference. Results. Fifteen studies totaling 1618 subjects met eligibility criteria. Bath prescription included, on average, 13 Chinese herbs with directions to steam and wash around the knee for 20-40 minutes once or twice daily. Mean treatment duration was 3 weeks. Results from meta-analysis showed superior pain improvement (mean difference = -0.59 points; 95% confidence intervals [CI], -0.83 to -0.36; p < 0.00001) and higher total effectiveness rate (risk ratio = 1.21; 95% CI, 1.15 to 1.28; p < 0.00001) when compared with standard western treatment. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion. Chinese herbal bath therapy may be a safe, effective, and simple alternative treatment modality for knee OA. Further rigorously designed, randomized trials are warranted. PMID:26483847

  14. Static postural sway, proprioception, and maximal voluntary quadriceps contraction in patients with knee osteoarthritis and normal control subjects

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, B; Mockett, S; Doherty, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate whether subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) have reduced static postural control, knee proprioceptive acuity, and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the quadriceps compared with normal controls, and to determine possible independent predictors of static postural sway.
METHODS—77 subjects with symptomatic and radiographic knee OA (58 women, 19 men; mean age 63.4 years, range 36-82) and 63 controls with asymptomatic and clinically normal knees (45 women, 18 men; mean age 63 years, range 46-85) underwent assessment of static postural sway. 108 subjects (59 patients, 49 controls) also underwent assessment of knee proprioceptive activity and MVC (including calculation of quadriceps activation). In patients with knee OA knee pain, stiffness, and functional disability were assessed using the WOMAC Index. The height (m) and weight (kg) of all subjects was assessed.
RESULTS—Compared with controls, patients with knee OA were heavier (mean difference 15.3 kg, p<0.001), had increased postural lateral sway (controls: median 2.3, interquartile (IQ) range 1.8-2.9; patients: median 4.7, IQ range 1.9-4.7, p<0.001), reduced proprioceptive acuity (controls: mean 7.9, 95% CI 6.9 to 8.9; patients: mean 12.0, 95% CI 10.5 to 13.6, p<0.001), weaker quadriceps strength (controls: mean 22.5, 95% CI 19.9 to 24.6; patients: mean 14.7, 95% CI 12.5 to 16.9, p<0.001), and less percentage activation of quadriceps (controls: mean 87.4, 95% CI 80.7 to 94.2; patients: mean 66.0, 95% CI 58.8 to 73.2, p<0.001). The significant predictors of postural sway were knee pain and the ratio of MVC/body weight.
CONCLUSIONS—Compared with age and sex matched controls, subjects with symptomatic knee OA have quadriceps weakness, reduced knee proprioception, and increased postural sway. Pain and muscle strength may particularly influence postural sway. The interaction between physiological, structural, and functional abnormalities in knee OA

  15. Prehabilitation before total knee arthroplasty increases strength and function in older adults with severe osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Swank, Ann M; Kachelman, Joseph B; Bibeau, Wendy; Quesada, Peter M; Nyland, John; Malkani, Arthur; Topp, Robert V

    2011-02-01

    Preparing for the stress of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery by exercise training (prehabilitation) may improve strength and function before surgery and, if effective, has the potential to contribute to postoperative recovery. Subjects with severe osteoarthritis (OA), pain intractable to medicine and scheduled for TKA were randomized into a usual care (UC) group (n = 36) or usual care and exercise (UC + EX) group (n = 35). The UC group maintained normal daily activities before their TKA. The UC + EX group performed a comprehensive prehabilitation program that included resistance training using bands, flexibility, and step training at least 3 times per week for 4-8 weeks before their TKA in addition to UC. Leg strength (isokinetic peak torque for knee extension and flexion) and ability to perform functional tasks (6-minute walk, 30 second sit-to-stand repetitions, and the time to ascend and descend 2 flights of stairs) were assessed before randomization at baseline (T1) and 1 week before the subject's TKA (T2). Repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated a significant group by time interaction (p < 0.05) for the 30-second sit-to-stand repetitions, time to ascend the first flight of stairs, and peak torque for knee extension in the surgical knee. Prehabilitation increased leg strength and the ability to perform functional tasks for UC + EX when compared to UC before TKA. Short term (4-8 weeks) of prehabilitation was effective for increasing strength and function for individuals with severe OA. The program studied is easily transferred to a home environment, and clinicians working with this population should consider prehabilitation before TKA.

  16. Safety and Feasibility of a KineSpring Knee System for the Treatment of Osteoarthritis: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, David A; Waller, Craig S; Li, Chuan Silvia; Vannabouathong, Christopher; Sprague, Sheila; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    The treatment gap between conservative management and total knee arthroplasty may leave patients with moderate cases of knee osteoarthritis (OA) without an ideal treatment option. The KineSpring® Knee Implant System may be a viable treatment option to fill the treatment gap for patients with knee OA who are not willing or inappropriate candidates for total knee arthroplasty, yet do not demonstrate relief with conservative treatments. This current paper reports a series of patients who received the KineSpring System and were followed for five years. Twelve patients were included in the case series. All 12 patients were diagnosed with symptomatic OA of the medial compartment of the knee. Pain and functional problems associated with OA improved with treatment using the KineSpring System. Furthermore, these improvements were seen over the course of five years. The findings of this study show the KineSpring System as a promising intervention for early-onset OA and warrant further investigation regarding its effectiveness. PMID:26279631

  17. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in middle-aged patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis: a protocol for a double-blind, randomized sham-controlled multi-centre trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy has been shown to be of no benefit to patients with concomitant knee osteoarthritis, but the optimal treatment of a degenerative meniscus tear in patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis is unknown. This article describes the rationale and methodology of a randomized sham-controlled trial to assess the benefit of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of a medial meniscus tear in patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis. The objective of the study is to test whether the benefit from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with knee pain, medial meniscus lesion and mild/no knee osteoarthritis, is greater after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy than following sham surgery. Methods We will conduct a randomized controlled trial of treatment for degenerative meniscus tears in middle-aged patients (aged 35–55 years) with an MRI-verified medial meniscus lesion and mild or no knee radiographic osteoarthritis (grade 0–2 on the Kellgren & Lawrence scale). Patients will be randomized to receive either conventional arthroscopic partial meniscectomy or a sham surgery procedure. The primary outcome will be the KOOS5 derived from the ‘Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score’ at 2 years follow-up. Secondary outcomes at 2 years will include all five individual subscales of the KOOS, a global perceived effect score, the Short-Form-36 health status score, EQ-5D for economic appraisal and objective tests of muscle strength and physical function. Radiographic knee osteoarthritis will be evaluated at 5 years. Discussion Demonstration of no additional benefit from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy on pain and function should lead to a change in clinical care of patients with a degenerative meniscus tear. The results of this study will provide empirical evidence for the potential benefit/harm of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy compared to a masked sham-therapeutics intervention. Trial registration NCT01264991 PMID

  18. The Effects of Prolotherapy With Hypertonic Dextrose Versus Prolozone (Intraarticular Ozone) in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Masoud; Jalili, Parviz; Mennati, Shirin; Koosha, Alireza; Rohanifar, Ramin; Madadi, Firouz; Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Taheri, Farinaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a common disabling disease. Limited studies have demonstrated that prolotherapy with dextrose or with prolozone can be helpful in the treatment of patients with KOA. Objectives: In the current study, we compared the results between these two treatment methods. Patients and Methods: In the current randomized clinical trial, 80 patients with mild to moderate KOA were randomly assigned equally into two groups (ozone group and dextrose group). In each group, injections were repeated three times with 10-day intervals. Before the treatment and 3 months after the injections, the pain intensity was measured by using a visual analogue scale and the Western Ontario and McMaster university arthritis index scores. Finally, the results were compared between the two groups. Results: In the two groups, the pain intensity and WOMAC scores significantly decreased and increased, respectively (P < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions: Prolotherapy with dextrose and with prolozone result in the same pain relief or functional improvement in patients with mild to moderate KOA. PMID:26587401

  19. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Volker; Han, Jeong S; Adwanikar, Hita; Fu, Yu; Ji, Guangchen

    2007-03-28

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review.

  20. Serum cytokines are increased and circulating micronutrients are not altered in subjects with early compared to advanced knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Barker, Tyler; Rogers, Victoria E; Henriksen, Vanessa T; Aguirre, Dale; Trawick, Roy H; Rasmussen, G Lynn; Momberger, Nathan G

    2014-08-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of physical disability. At the early stage of knee OA, the increase in synovial fluid cytokine concentrations could contribute to the pathogenesis of OA by degrading articular cartilage. It is unknown, however, if inflammatory cytokines increase systemically at the early or advanced stage of knee OA. The systemic increase of inflammatory cytokines could be detrimental to the endogenous status of micronutrients that protect against excessive inflammation and cytokine-mediated events. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that an increase in serum cytokines associate with a decrease in circulating micronutrients in subjects with early compared to advanced knee OA. Advanced knee OA subjects (n=14) displayed radiographic, pain, and muscular weakness symptoms of knee OA. Early knee OA subjects (n=14) were matched (age, gender, and body mass index) to the advanced OA group and displayed one or two of the aforementioned symptoms of knee OA. Inflammatory cytokines, vitamins C (ascorbic acid), D (25-hydroxyvitamin D), and E (α- and γ-tocopherols), and β-carotene were measured in fasting blood samples. In the early OA group, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-13 concentrations were significantly (all p<0.05) increased. Circulating ascorbic acid, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, α- and γ-tocopherol's, and β-carotene concentrations were not significantly different between groups. Based on these preliminary results, we conclude that the systemic increase of inflammatory cytokines is not associated with a decrease in circulating micronutrients in subjects with early compared to advanced knee OA.

  1. Ochronosis of the knee with secondary osteoarthritis requiring total knee replacement in a patient with cryptogenic organising pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Jorrit; Metsaars, Wieneke; Jansen, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Ochronosis is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disease caused by homogentisic acid oxidase enzyme deficiency. High homogentisic acid levels will eventually result in black deposits in skin, sclerae, connective tissues and urine (alkaptonuria). It can lead to early degeneration of connective tissues and cartilage. Ochronosis can damage normal cartilage, leading to secondary osteoarthritis. The diagnosis is often delayed because of its low prevalence and non-specific early symptoms. In our patient, the secondary osteoarthritis due to ochronosis deposits in the cartilage was treated by total knee arthroplasty, with good clinical outcome. This article reports the first case of ochronosis with secondary osteoarthritis of the knee in a patient previously diagnosed with cryptogenic organising pneumonia (COP). PMID:27207988

  2. Ochronosis of the knee with secondary osteoarthritis requiring total knee replacement in a patient with cryptogenic organising pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Jorrit; Metsaars, Wieneke; Jansen, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Ochronosis is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disease caused by homogentisic acid oxidase enzyme deficiency. High homogentisic acid levels will eventually result in black deposits in skin, sclerae, connective tissues and urine (alkaptonuria). It can lead to early degeneration of connective tissues and cartilage. Ochronosis can damage normal cartilage, leading to secondary osteoarthritis. The diagnosis is often delayed because of its low prevalence and non-specific early symptoms. In our patient, the secondary osteoarthritis due to ochronosis deposits in the cartilage was treated by total knee arthroplasty, with good clinical outcome. This article reports the first case of ochronosis with secondary osteoarthritis of the knee in a patient previously diagnosed with cryptogenic organising pneumonia (COP).

  3. An innovative care model coordinated by a physical therapist and nurse practitioner for osteoarthritis of the hip and knee in specialist care: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Voorn, Veronique M A; Vermeulen, Henricus M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Huizinga, Tom W J; Leijerzapf, Nicolette A C; Kroon, Herman M; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van der Linden, Henrica M J

    2013-07-01

    The subject of the study is to investigate whether health-related quality of life (HRQoL), pain and function of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) improves after a specialist care intervention coordinated by a physical therapist and a nurse practitioner (NP) and to assess satisfaction with this care at 12 weeks. This observational study included all consecutive patients with hip or knee OA referred to an outpatient orthopaedics clinic. The intervention consisted of a single, standardized visit (assessment and individually tailored management advice, to be executed in primary care) and a telephone follow-up, coordinated by a physical therapist and a NP, in cooperation with an orthopaedic surgeon. Assessments at baseline and 10 weeks thereafter included the short form-36 (SF-36), EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), hip or knee disability and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS or KOOS), the intermittent and constant osteoarthritis pain questionnaire (ICOAP) for hip or knee and a multidimensional satisfaction questionnaire (23 items; 4 point scale). Eighty-seven patients (57 female), mean age 68 years (SD 10.9) were included, with follow-up data available in 63 patients (72 %). Statistically significant improvements were seen regarding the SF-36 physical summary component score, the EQ-5D, the ICOAP scores for hip and knee, the HOOS subscale sports and the KOOS subscales pain, symptoms and activities of daily living. The proportions of patients reporting to be satisfied ranged from 79 to 98 % per item. In patients with hip and knee OA pain, function and HRQoL improved significantly after a single-visit multidisciplinary OA management intervention in specialist care, with high patient satisfaction.

  4. Joint unloading implant modifies subchondral bone trabecular structure in medial knee osteoarthritis: 2-year outcomes of a pilot study using fractal signature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Sode, Miki; Fuerst, Thomas; Block, Jon E

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is largely attributable to chronic excessive and aberrant joint loading. The purpose of this pilot study was to quantify radiographic changes in subchondral bone after treatment with a minimally invasive joint unloading implant (KineSpring® Knee Implant System). Methods Nine patients with unilateral medial knee OA resistant to nonsurgical therapy were treated with the KineSpring System and followed for 2 years. Main outcomes included Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain, function, and stiffness subscores and independent core laboratory determinations of joint space width and fractal signature of the tibial cortex. Results WOMAC scores, on average, improved by 92% for pain, 91% for function, and 79% for stiffness over the 2-year follow-up period. Joint space width in the medial compartment of the treated knee significantly increased from 0.9 mm at baseline to 3.1 mm at 2 years; joint space width in the medial compartment of the untreated knee was unchanged. Fractal signatures of the vertically oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment decreased by 2.8% in the treated knee and increased by 2.1% in the untreated knee over 2 years. No statistically significant fractal signature changes were observed in the horizontally oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment or in the horizontal or vertical trabeculae of the lateral compartment in the treated knee. Conclusion Preliminary evidence suggests that the KineSpring System may modify knee OA disease progression by increasing joint space width and improving subchondral bone trabecular integrity, thereby reducing pain and improving joint function. PMID:25670891

  5. Hip Strength Deficits in People With Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review With Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Deasy, Margaret; Leahy, Edmund; Semciw, Adam Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Systematic review with meta-analysis. Background A complete understanding of impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis would optimize exercise interventions for people with knee osteoarthritis. Our current understanding of hip strength deficits in this population is based on studies with conflicting findings and small samples. There is a need to systematically review and pool current evidence. Objectives To determine whether hip strength deficits exist in people with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Methods Electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO) were searched through February 2016. Studies comparing hip strength in people diagnosed with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis to healthy control participants were included in the review. A meta-analysis with random effects was applied to relevant data from included studies and a modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach was used to evaluate the quality of evidence for each pooled analysis. Results Five studies were included in the review. Meta-analysis revealed moderate-quality evidence of weaker isometric and isokinetic hip abduction strength in people with knee osteoarthritis (moderate difference: 7% to 24% weaker) and very low-quality evidence of no difference in isometric hip adduction strength. There was very low- to moderate-quality evidence of weaker isokinetic hip strength in the remaining planes of motion (moderate to large differences: 14% to 55% weaker). Conclusion Significant hip strength deficits exist in people with knee osteoarthritis. Hip strength assessment should be considered in clinical practice and may assist with directing targeted management strategies. Level of Evidence Symptom prevalence, level 1a-. J Orthop Sports PhysTher 2016;46(8):629-639. Epub3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6618. PMID:27374011

  6. Platelet-Rich Plasma Treatment in Symptomatic Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gobbi, Alberto; Karnatzikos, Georgios; Mahajan, Vivek; Malchira, Somanna

    2012-01-01

    Background: With increasing frequency, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparations have been used to treat cartilage lesions to regenerate tissue homeostasis and retard the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of intra-articular PRP injections in active patients with knee OA and to evaluate clinical outcomes in patients with and without previous surgical treatment for cartilage lesions. Study Design: Case series. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with knee OA were followed for a minimum of 12 months. All were treated with 2 intra-articular injections of autologous PRP. Twenty-five patients had undergone a previous operative intervention for cartilage lesions, whereas 25 had not. Operated patients had undergone either cartilage shaving or microfracture. Multiple evaluative scores were collected at pretreatment and at 6 and 12 months posttreatment. The required sample of patients was determined beforehand by using statistical power analysis; International Knee Documentation Committee (subjective) score was defined as the primary parameter. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. General linear model–repeated measure test evaluated within-time improvement for each variable for all patients. Post hoc test with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons was performed to investigate the significance in improvement within time evaluations for each variable for the total sample. The differences in improvement between operated and nonoperated patients were also investigated, as were those between sexes. Results: All patients showed significant improvement in all scores at 6 and 12 months (P < 0.01) and returned to previous activities. No significant difference in improvement was found between the evaluated subgroups (P < 0.01). Conclusions: The PRP treatment showed positive effects in patients with knee OA. Operated and nonoperated patients showed significant improvement by means of diminishing

  7. Prospective Case Series of NMES for Quadriceps Weakness and Decrease Function in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Jeffery J; McElroy, Mark J; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Bhave, Anil; Mont, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee can lead to substantial disability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of a neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) device in a small case series of treatment of quadriceps muscle weakness and decreased function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. We evaluated isokinetic quadriceps muscle strength, objective functional improvement, subjective functional improvement, quality of life, and pain relief. Patients were then matched with a previously studied cohort with similar osteoarthritic characteristics. Testing demonstrated improvement in isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength, as well as several functional and patient-reported metrics. Conversely, patients reported a decrease in Knee Society Score (KSS) functional score, short-form 36 health survey (SF-36), lower extremity functional scale (LEFS), and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain; however, no changes were observed in relation to the mean reported VAS pain score and SF-36 physical component. Control cohort analysis of the patient reported outcomes showed that patients improved from their first visit to 3 months follow-up in functional KSS, SF-36 physical component, and LEFS. However, VAS pain score and objective KSS were unchanged at follow-up. Similarly, a decrease was observed in the scores of the SF-36 mental component. In conclusion, the use of NMES for quadriceps muscle weakness has been shown to improve muscle strength. Additionally, NMES was shown to potentially improve functionality but demonstrated minimal effects on quality of life and patient-reported outcomes compared with the initial visit. However, larger, longer-term, prospective, randomized studies are needed to better evaluate these outcomes. PMID:26852638

  8. Clinical effects of lateral wedge arch support insoles in knee osteoarthritis: A prospective double-blind randomized study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ru-Lan; Lee, Wen-Chung

    2016-07-01

    We compared the short-term efficacy of rigid versus soft lateral wedge arch support (LWAS) insoles for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), as assessed using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) system, through a prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial.Participants who fulfilled the combined radiographic and clinical criteria for knee OA, as defined by the American College of Rheumatology, were randomly prescribed 1 pair of rigid or soft LWAS insoles. Body functions and structures were evaluated according to Kellgren-Lawrence scores, the Foot Posture Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, the pain-pressure threshold, postural stability, dynamic balance, and fall risk; activities and participation were assessed according to 10-m fast speed walking, stair climbing and chair rising times, and Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire responses; and knee OA-related health status was evaluated using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, the pain-pressure threshold, physical activity, balance, Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire responses, and the KOOS were recorded before treatment and at 1-, 2-, and 3-month follow-ups.We enrolled 90 participants, 70 women and 20 men, with mean ages of 60.6 ± 10.8 and 63.1 ± 10.8 years in the rigid and soft LWAS insole groups, respectively. Repeated-measures analysis of covariance revealed significant time × group effect improvements in pain (P = 0.008 for the KOOS), stair ascent time (P = 0.003), daily living function (P = 0.003 for the KOOS), sports and recreation function (P = 0.012 for the KOOS), and quality of life (P = 0.021 for the KOOS) in the soft LWAS insole group.Patients with knee OA who used soft LWAS insoles for a short term showed more significant improvement than did those who used rigid LWAS insoles in pain, physical activity, daily living function, sports and recreation function

  9. Clinical effects of lateral wedge arch support insoles in knee osteoarthritis: A prospective double-blind randomized study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ru-Lan; Lee, Wen-Chung

    2016-07-01

    We compared the short-term efficacy of rigid versus soft lateral wedge arch support (LWAS) insoles for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), as assessed using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) system, through a prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial.Participants who fulfilled the combined radiographic and clinical criteria for knee OA, as defined by the American College of Rheumatology, were randomly prescribed 1 pair of rigid or soft LWAS insoles. Body functions and structures were evaluated according to Kellgren-Lawrence scores, the Foot Posture Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, the pain-pressure threshold, postural stability, dynamic balance, and fall risk; activities and participation were assessed according to 10-m fast speed walking, stair climbing and chair rising times, and Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire responses; and knee OA-related health status was evaluated using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, the pain-pressure threshold, physical activity, balance, Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire responses, and the KOOS were recorded before treatment and at 1-, 2-, and 3-month follow-ups.We enrolled 90 participants, 70 women and 20 men, with mean ages of 60.6 ± 10.8 and 63.1 ± 10.8 years in the rigid and soft LWAS insole groups, respectively. Repeated-measures analysis of covariance revealed significant time × group effect improvements in pain (P = 0.008 for the KOOS), stair ascent time (P = 0.003), daily living function (P = 0.003 for the KOOS), sports and recreation function (P = 0.012 for the KOOS), and quality of life (P = 0.021 for the KOOS) in the soft LWAS insole group.Patients with knee OA who used soft LWAS insoles for a short term showed more significant improvement than did those who used rigid LWAS insoles in pain, physical activity, daily living function, sports and recreation function

  10. Efficacy of Elaeagnus Angustifolia extract in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Panahi, Yunes; Alishiri, Gholam Hossein; Bayat, Noushin; Hosseini, Seyed Morteza; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders all over the world. Available anti-arthritic medications have only partial efficacy and their long-term use is associated with adverse events. Elaeagnus Angustifolia (EA) is a medicinal plant with analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study evaluated the impact of two doses of EA extract compared with ibuprofen on the severity of disease in patients with knee OA. This study was designed as a randomized, double blind, active-controlled and parallel group trial. Patients with OA were randomized to receive 300 mg/day (n=33) or 600 mg/day (n=32) of EA aqueous extract, or 800 mg/day ibuprofen (n=32) for 7 weeks. EA extract contained 0.21 % (w/w) kaempferol according to HPLC. Efficacy of treatment was assessed using Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) of pain, Lequesne's Pain-Function Index (LPFI), and patient's global assessment (PGA) index. The amount of kaempferol in the extract was determined by HPLC method to be 0.21 % w/w. There were significant reductions in WOMAC, VAS, LPFI and PGA scores by the end of trial with all three interventions. Comparison of the changes in WOMAC, VAS and LPFI scores among the treatment groups did not reveal any significant difference between EA and ibuprofen, and between low and high doses of EA. EA was safe and well tolerated during the course of trial and no adverse event was reported. The present results suggest beneficial effects of aqueous EA extract in reducing the symptoms of OA with an efficacy comparable to that of ibuprofen. PMID:27330526

  11. Moxibustion Treatment for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Wei, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Yi; Li, Bo; Guo, Xing; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-04-01

    To determine whether the administration of moxibustion is an effective treatment for knee osteoarthritis (KOA).We conducted a search of relevant articles using Medline, EMBASE, the Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library published before October 2015. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities' Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC scale) and the short form 36 questionnaire (SF-36 scale) were assessed. Evidence grading was evaluated according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation system.Four studies containing 746 participants fulfilled the inclusion criteria in the final analysis. In terms of quality of life (QOL), the meta-analysis of 2 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) showed significantly effects of moxibustion only in bodily pain (BP) compared with those in the control group (n = 348; weighted mean difference [WMD], 4.36; 95% confidence intervals [CIs], 2.27-6.44; P < 0.0001; heterogeneity: χ = 1.53, P = 0.22, I = 34%) in all of the subcategories of the SF-36 scale, with moderate quality. The meta-analysis of the 2 included trials showed that there was not a statistically significant difference in the pain or function subscale for the WOMAC scale when the 2 groups were compared (n = 322; WMD, 17.63; 95% CI, -23.15-58.41; P = 0.40; heterogeneity: χ = 19.42, P < 0.0001, I = 95%), with low or moderate quality separately.The administration of moxibustion can to some extent alleviate the symptoms of KOA. More rigorous, randomized controlled trials are required in the future. PMID:27057863

  12. The benefits and barriers to physical activity and lifestyle interventions for osteoarthritis affecting the adult knee

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis prevalence is increasing, placing greater demands on healthcare and future socioeconomic costing models. Exercise and non-pharmacological methods should be employed to manage this common and disabling disease. Expectations at all stages of disease are increasing with a desire to remain active and independent. Three key areas have been reviewed; the evidence for physical activity, lifestyle changes and motivational techniques concerning knee osteoarthritis and the barriers to instituting such changes. Promotion of activity in primary care is discussed and evidence for compliance has been reviewed. This article reviews a subject that is integral to all professionals involved with osteoarthritis care. PMID:22462601

  13. The Effects of Adherence to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Factors Influencing Drug Adherence in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of knee osteoarthritis patients according to drug adherence; and to find out the factors the affecting those outcomes. We analyzed the drug adherence and clinical outcomes in 1,334 primary knee osteoarthritis patients who took non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for 3 weeks. Clinical outcomes of Pain Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and EQ-5D were compared at baseline and 3 weeks’ follow-up between the two groups of adherent group and non-adherent group (1,167 vs. 167 patients). Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the factors affecting the adherence, and the reasons for the non-adherence were asked. The follow-up clinical outcomes of NRS and KOOS symptom, pain and activity of daily life were significantly higher in the adherence group (P = 0.003, P = 0.048, P = 0.005, and P = 0.003, respectively). The adherence was better in the elderly and in the male group (P = 0.042 and P = 0.034, respectively) and the top reason for no strict adherence was “symptom improved” (21.5%) followed by side effects. In this study, the patients with better adherence to NSAIDs showed better outcomes compared to those with poor adherence. This study can contribute to the patient education for the pharmacological treatment in knee OA patients. PMID:27134504

  14. Future directions for the management of pain in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sofat, Nidhi; Kuttapitiya, Anasuya

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the predominant form of arthritis worldwide, resulting in a high degree of functional impairment and reduced quality of life owing to chronic pain. To date, there are no treatments that are known to modify disease progression of OA in the long term. Current treatments are largely based on the modulation of pain, including NSAIDs, opiates and, more recently, centrally acting pharmacotherapies to avert pain. This review will focus on the rationale for new avenues in pain modulation, including inhibition with anti-NGF antibodies and centrally acting analgesics. The authors also consider the potential for structure modification in cartilage/bone using growth factors and stem cell therapies. The possible mismatch between structural change and pain perception will also be discussed, introducing recent techniques that may assist in improved patient phenotyping of pain subsets in OA. Such developments could help further stratify subgroups and treatments for people with OA in future. PMID:25018771

  15. Regeneration of Cartilage in Human Knee Osteoarthritis with Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells and Autologous Extracellular Matrix.

    PubMed

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Kwang Seung; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    This clinical case series demonstrates that percutaneous injections of autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and homogenized extracellular matrix (ECM) in the form of adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF), along with hyaluronic acid (HA) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) activated by calcium chloride, could regenerate cartilage-like tissue in human knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Autologous lipoaspirates were obtained from adipose tissue of the abdominal origin. Afterward, the lipoaspirates were minced to homogenize the ECM. These homogenized lipoaspirates were then mixed with collagenase and incubated. The resulting mixture of ADSCs and ECM in the form of SVF was injected, along with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, into knees of three Korean patients with OA. The same affected knees were reinjected weekly with additional PRP activated by calcium chloride for 3 weeks. Pretreatment and post-treatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, functional rating index, range of motion (ROM), and pain score data were then analyzed. All patients' MRI data showed cartilage-like tissue regeneration. Along with MRI evidence, the measured physical therapy outcomes in terms of ROM, subjective pain, and functional status were all improved. This study demonstrates that percutaneous injection of ADSCs with ECM contained in autologous adipose SVF, in conjunction with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, is a safe and potentially effective minimally invasive therapy for OA of human knees. PMID:27588219

  16. Regeneration of Cartilage in Human Knee Osteoarthritis with Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells and Autologous Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Kwang Seung; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This clinical case series demonstrates that percutaneous injections of autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and homogenized extracellular matrix (ECM) in the form of adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF), along with hyaluronic acid (HA) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) activated by calcium chloride, could regenerate cartilage-like tissue in human knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Autologous lipoaspirates were obtained from adipose tissue of the abdominal origin. Afterward, the lipoaspirates were minced to homogenize the ECM. These homogenized lipoaspirates were then mixed with collagenase and incubated. The resulting mixture of ADSCs and ECM in the form of SVF was injected, along with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, into knees of three Korean patients with OA. The same affected knees were reinjected weekly with additional PRP activated by calcium chloride for 3 weeks. Pretreatment and post-treatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, functional rating index, range of motion (ROM), and pain score data were then analyzed. All patients' MRI data showed cartilage-like tissue regeneration. Along with MRI evidence, the measured physical therapy outcomes in terms of ROM, subjective pain, and functional status were all improved. This study demonstrates that percutaneous injection of ADSCs with ECM contained in autologous adipose SVF, in conjunction with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, is a safe and potentially effective minimally invasive therapy for OA of human knees. PMID:27588219

  17. It’s not just a knee, but a whole life: A qualitative descriptive study on patients’ experiences of living with knee osteoarthritis and their expectations for knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Nyvang, Josefina; Hedström, Margareta; Gleissman, Sissel Andreassen

    2016-01-01

    Aim Knee arthroplasties are an increasingly common treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) and the main indication is pain. Previous research states, however, that 15–20% of the operated patients are dissatisfied and 20–30% have persistent pain after surgery. This study is aimed at describing patients’ experiences of living with knee OA when scheduled for surgery and further their expectations for future life after surgery. Methods We interviewed 12 patients with knee OA scheduled for arthroplasty, using semi-structured qualitative interviews. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. Findings Three categories were formulated with an overriding theme: “It's not just a knee, but a whole life.” The three categories were “Change from their earlier lives,” “Coping with knee problems,” and “Ultimate decision to undergo surgery.” The main finding was that knee OA affects the whole body and self, ultimately affecting the patients’ lives on many levels. Further findings were that knee OA was considered to be the central focus in the participants’ lives, which limited their level of activity, their ability to function as desired, their quality of life, and their mental well-being. Although surgery was considered to be the only solution, the expectations regarding the outcome differed. Conclusions The participants were forced to change how they previously had lived their lives resulting in a feeling of loss. Thus, the experienced loss and expectations for future life must be put into the context of the individual's own personality and be taken into account when treating individuals with knee OA. The experience of living with knee OA largely varies between individuals. This mandates that patients’ assessment should be considered on individual basis with regard to each patient. PMID:27036130

  18. Mechanisms of Osteoarthritis in the Knee: MR Imaging Appearance

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Lauren M.; McWalter, Emily J.; Son, Min-Sun; Levenston, Marc; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Gold, Garry E.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis has grown to become a widely prevalent disease that has major implications in both individual and public health. Although originally considered to be a degenerative disease driven by “wear and tear” of the articular cartilage, recent evidence has led to a consensus that osteoarthritis pathophysiology should be perceived in the context of the entire joint and multiple tissues. MRI is becoming an increasingly more important modality for imaging osteoarthritis, due to its excellent soft tissue contrast and ability to acquire morphological and biochemical data. This review will describe the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis as it is associated with various tissue types, highlight several promising MR imaging techniques for osteoarthritis and illustrate the expected appearance of osteoarthritis with each technique. PMID:24677706

  19. Gait and clinical measurements in patients with knee osteoarthritis after surgery: a prospective 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Börjesson, M; Weidenhielm, L; Mattsson, E; Olsson, E

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this prospective follow-up study was to determine if gait measurements and/or clinical measurements could detect differences in treatment outcome between two surgical interventions in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The patients were followed for 5 years after surgery. Forty patients, 55-70 years of age, with unilateral knee OA were included. The patients were treated either with a high tibial osteotomy (HTO) (n=18) or a unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) (n=22). Clinical outcome measures were the British Orthopaedic Association (BOA) score, pain during walking, passive range of knee motion (PROM) and patients' subjective opinion. The gait variables were free walking speed, step frequency, step length and single and double-stance phase for each leg. The patients were examined before surgery and 3 months, 1 year and 5 years after surgery. The time-distance variables of gait could detect differences in treatment outcome, 3 months after surgery, while the clinical outcome measures, as given here, could not detect any differences between the two groups of patients. Measurements of free walking speed could be recommended for clinical evaluation, after surgical interventions, in patients with knee OA.

  20. Trends in Prescription of Opioids from 2003–2009 in Persons with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Elizabeth A.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Abrams, Stanley; Solomon, Daniel H.; Losina, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Objective Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a painful condition affecting ~13% of persons >65 years old. We sought to examine whether the use of opioids in older persons with OA has increased over the past decade and what patient characteristics may correlate with their use. Methods We assembled national cohorts of individuals with knee OA using data from 2003, 2006, and 2009 waves of the Medicare Beneficiary Survey (MCBS). Survey data contained demographics, health status and prescribed medications linked to Medicare claims. We used multivariate logistic regression to establish whether opioid use changed over time and identify factors associated with greater opioids use. The outcome was defined as receiving ≥1 opioid prescription in the study year. Results Mean age and sex were similar across years (77 years, 69% females). There was a significant increase in opioid prescribing between 2003 and 2009, with 31% of the patients receiving opioids in 2003, 39% in 2006 and 40% in 2009 (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1, 2.0 for 2006 and 2009 compared to 2003). Independent correlates of opioid use across time periods included: female sex (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.2, 2.0), functional limitation (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.6, 2.7), poor self-reported health status (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2, 2.0), COPD (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0, 1.8) and musculoskeletal disease besides OA (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2, 2.8). Conclusion As prevalence and incidence of knee OA continues to increase, the public health impact of greater opioid use should be monitored carefully. PMID:24782079

  1. Compliance to exercise therapy in older participants with knee osteoarthritis: implications for treating disability.

    PubMed

    Rejeski, W J; Brawley, L R; Ettinger, W; Morgan, T; Thompson, C

    1997-08-01

    This investigation examined predictors of compliance with exercise therapy in a clinical trial involving older adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The study sample was partitioned into tertiles by level of compliance to determine its effect on several clinical outcome measures in the trial (i.e., knee pain, difficulty with activities of daily living, and performance-related disability). The participants (N = 439) first completed all baseline assessments and were then randomly assigned to one of three treatment conditions: health education control, aerobic exercise, or resistance exercise. The two exercise treatments involved a 3-month center-based phase and a 15-month home-based phase. Variables in five categories (i.e., demographic, fitness, health-related quality of life, performance-related disability, and prior exercise behavior) were entered as predictors of attendance and time spent exercising during each session for three different periods of time across the course of the study. Results of these analyses revealed that it was possible to explain more variance for time spent exercising (approximately 40%) during the first 3 months than for attendance (approximately 10%). Furthermore, once participants completed the first 3 months of their training, prior behavior was the strongest predictor of exercise compliance. In most cases, the regression models accounted anywhere from 26 to 46% of the variance in attendance or time spent exercising (7 of the 8 P values < 0.01). In general, demographic, fitness, psychosocial, and disability-related measures did not predict compliance with any consistency across the various phases of the trial. Analysis of the dose-response data suggest that, in the use of aerobic exercise to deter disability in older people with knee OA, consideration should be given to prescribing frequent bouts of activity (at least 3 times each week) of moderate duration (approximately 35 min).

  2. Review for the generalist: evaluation of anterior knee pain

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Kristin M

    2007-01-01

    Anterior knee pain is common in children and adolescents. Evaluation and management is challenging and requires a thorough history and physical exam, and understanding of the pediatric skeleton. This article will review common causes of chronic anterior knee pain in the pediatric population with a focus on patellofemoral pain. PMID:17550634

  3. Comparative effectiveness of a complex Ayurvedic treatment and conventional standard care in osteoarthritis of the knee – study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine uses complex treatment approaches, including manual therapies, lifestyle and nutritional advice, dietary supplements, medication, yoga, and purification techniques. Ayurvedic strategies are often used to treat osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee; however, no systematic data are available on their effectiveness in comparison with standard care. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of complex Ayurvedic treatment in comparison with conventional methods of treating OA symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods and design In a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial, 150 patients between 40 and 70 years, diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the knee, following American College of Rheumatology criteria and an average pain intensity of ≥40 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale in the affected knee at baseline will be randomized into two groups. In the Ayurveda group, treatment will include tailored combinations of manual treatments, massages, dietary and lifestyle advice, consideration of selected foods, nutritional supplements, yoga posture advice, and knee massage. Patients in the conventional group will receive self-care advice, pain medication, weight-loss advice (if overweight), and physiotherapy following current international guidelines. Both groups will receive 15 treatment sessions over 12 weeks. Outcomes will be evaluated after 6 and 12 weeks and 6 and 12 months. The primary endpoint is a change in the score on the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) after 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measurements will use WOMAC subscales, a pain disability index, a visual analog scale for pain and sleep quality, a pain experience scale, a quality-of-life index, a profile of mood states, and Likert scales for patient satisfaction, patient diaries, and safety. Using an adapted PRECIS scale, the trial was identified as lying mainly in the middle of the efficacy

  4. Synergistic effect of using a transcutaneous electrical joint stimulator and an unloading brace in treating osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S; Maclaughlin, Edmund J; Mines, Craig M; Deveshwar, Shaili; Elliott, Cynthia; Tuber, Jack S; Principe, John R; Ford, Theresa Lawrence; Schechtman, Joy; Zizic, Thomas M

    2013-10-01

    Medical treatments and less invasive surgical approaches for knee osteoarthritis are variably effective, and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is generally reserved for the most severe cases. The care gap between more conservative treatments and TKA leaves many patients with unresolved pain and loss of function for long periods. We conducted a study to determine if incorporating the BioniCare stimulator into an unloading brace would produce more rapid improvement and result in increased adherence and efficacy. Two hundred eighty-nine patients treated only with BioniCare served as historical controls and were compared with 225 patients treated with BioniCare combined with an unloading brace. Means and standard deviations of the changes in scores for pain intensity in the past 48 hours, pain and associated symptoms, patient global assessment, pain on going up or down stairs, and pain on walking on a flat surface and the effect sizes at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months, as well as the percentages of patients achieving at least 20% improvement, and at least 50% improvement, demonstrated that treatment with stimulator and unloading brace combined was significantly superior to treatment with the stimulator alone.

  5. Clinical effectiveness in severe knee osteoarthritis after intra-articular platelet-rich plasma therapy in association with hyaluronic acid injection: three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Hsuan; Kuan, Ta-Shen; Kao, Mu-Jung; Wu, Wei-Ting; Chou, Li-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disorder resulting from loss of joint cartilage and underlying bone and causes pain and loss of function. The treatment of knee OA is still a challenge because of the poor self-regeneration capacity of cartilage. The nonsurgical interventions include control of the aggravating factor (such as weight control and the use of walking aids), symptomatic treatment (such as acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), prolotherapy, and viscosupplementation. However, the combination of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and hyaluronic acid (HA) has not been widely used because of lack of clinical evidence and several limitations in patients with severe knee OA. Three patients who suffered from knee pain and poor walking endurance were diagnosed with advanced knee OA. They underwent PRP treatment in association with intra-articular HA injection and showed pain relief and functional improvement. The follow-up standard weight-bearing X-ray images of knees also confirmed the improvement and indicated the possibility of regeneration of the articular cartilage. These cases provide clinical and radiographic evidence for a new therapy for advanced knee OA. This treatment strategy of PRP in association with HA injection can offer a chance to treat severe knee OA, rather than immediate surgery, or a chance for those who cannot undergo surgery. It can also postpone the need of arthroplasty and can significantly improve the daily activity function. PMID:27660427

  6. Clinical effectiveness in severe knee osteoarthritis after intra-articular platelet-rich plasma therapy in association with hyaluronic acid injection: three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Hsuan; Kuan, Ta-Shen; Kao, Mu-Jung; Wu, Wei-Ting; Chou, Li-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disorder resulting from loss of joint cartilage and underlying bone and causes pain and loss of function. The treatment of knee OA is still a challenge because of the poor self-regeneration capacity of cartilage. The nonsurgical interventions include control of the aggravating factor (such as weight control and the use of walking aids), symptomatic treatment (such as acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), prolotherapy, and viscosupplementation. However, the combination of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and hyaluronic acid (HA) has not been widely used because of lack of clinical evidence and several limitations in patients with severe knee OA. Three patients who suffered from knee pain and poor walking endurance were diagnosed with advanced knee OA. They underwent PRP treatment in association with intra-articular HA injection and showed pain relief and functional improvement. The follow-up standard weight-bearing X-ray images of knees also confirmed the improvement and indicated the possibility of regeneration of the articular cartilage. These cases provide clinical and radiographic evidence for a new therapy for advanced knee OA. This treatment strategy of PRP in association with HA injection can offer a chance to treat severe knee OA, rather than immediate surgery, or a chance for those who cannot undergo surgery. It can also postpone the need of arthroplasty and can significantly improve the daily activity function.

  7. Activity Increase Despite Arthritis (AÏDA): design of a Phase II randomised controlled trial evaluating an active management booklet for hip and knee osteoarthritis [ISRCTN24554946

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Nefyn H; Amoakwa, Elvis; Burton, Kim; Hendry, Maggie; Belcher, John; Lewis, Ruth; Hood, Kerenza; Jones, Jeremy; Bennett, Paul; Edwards, Rhiannon T; Neal, Richard D; Andrew, Glynne; Wilkinson, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Background Hip and knee osteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability, which can be improved by exercise interventions. However, regular exercise is uncommon in this group because the low physical activity level in the general population is probably reduced even further by pain related fear of movement. The best method of encouraging increased activity in this patient group is not known. A booklet has been developed for patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis. It focuses on changing disadvantageous beliefs and encouraging increased physical activity. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of a Phase II randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the effectiveness of this new booklet for patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis in influencing illness and treatment beliefs, and to assess the feasibility of conducting a larger definitive RCT in terms of health status and exercise behaviour. A computerised search of four general medical practice patients' record databases will identify patients older than 50 years of age who have consulted with hip or knee pain in the previous twelve months. A random sample of 120 will be invited to participate in the RCT comparing the new booklet with a control booklet, and we expect 100 to return final questionnaires. This trial will assess the feasibility of recruitment and randomisation, the suitability of the control intervention and outcome measurement tools, and will provide an estimate of effect size. Outcomes will include beliefs about hip and knee pain, beliefs about exercise, fear avoidance, level of physical activity, health status and health service costs. They will be measured at baseline, one month and three months. Discussion We discuss the merits of testing effectiveness in a phase II trial, in terms of intermediate outcome measures, whilst testing the processes for a larger definitive trial. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of testing the psychometric properties of the primary outcome

  8. Abnormal Subcortical Brain Morphology in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Cui Ping; Bai, Zhi Lan; Zhang, Xiao Na; Zhang, Qiu Juan; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Despite the involvement of subcortical brain structures in the pathogenesis of chronic pain and persistent pain as the defining symptom of knee osteoarthritis (KOA), little attention has been paid to the morphometric measurements of these subcortical nuclei in patients with KOA. The purpose of this study is to explore the potential morphological abnormalities of subcortical brain structures in patients with KOA as compared to the healthy control subjects by using high-resolution MRI. Structural MR data were acquired from 26 patients with KOA and 31 demographically similar healthy individuals. The MR data were analyzed by using FMRIB’s integrated registration and segmentation tool. Both volumetric analysis and surface-based shape analysis were performed to characterize the subcortical morphology. The normalized volumes of bilateral caudate nucleus were significantly smaller in the KOA group than in the control group (P = 0.004). There was also a trend toward smaller volume of the hippocampus in KOA as compared to the control group (P = 0.027). Detailed surface analyses further localized these differences with a greater involvement of the left hemisphere (P < 0.05, corrected) for the caudate nucleus. Hemispheric asymmetry (right larger than left) of the caudate nucleus was found in both KOA and control groups. Besides, no significant correlation was found between the structural data and pain intensities. Our results indicated that patients with KOA had statistically significant smaller normalized volumes of bilateral caudate nucleus and a trend toward smaller volume of the hippocampus as compared to the control subjects. Further investigations are necessary to characterize the role of caudate nucleus in the course of chronicity of pain associated with KOA. PMID:26834629

  9. Chronic joint pain in the lower body is associated with gait differences independent from radiographic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    de Kruijf, Marjolein; Verlinden, Vincentius J A; Huygen, Frank J P M; Hofman, Albert; van der Geest, Jos N; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Ikram, M Arfan; van Meurs, Joyce B J

    2015-09-01

    Gait is an important indicator of health. Chronic lower body pain may impair gait and lead to morbidity and mortality. We investigated the associations between lower body pain and gait in community-dwelling individuals, independent from osteoarthritis (OA). This population based cohort study included 2304 Rotterdam Study participants who underwent electronic walkway gait assessment. Thirty different variables resulting from gait assessment were summarized into seven gait domains using principle components analysis: i.e. Rhythm, Variability, Phases, Pace, Tandem, Turning, and Base of Support. Chronic lower body pain was assessed using pain drawings. OA was defined as a Kellgren & Lawrence score of 2 or higher on radiographs of the hip and/or knee. Linear regression analysis was used to study associations. Participants with chronic pain in the leg and hip, had lower Rhythm, Phases, and Pace, independent from OA. Additionally, we found unilateral pain to associate with larger gait asymmetry. No associations were found between chronic pain and the other gait domains, including gait variability. However, within individuals with hip pain, gait variability was higher in individuals with radiographic OA compared to those without OA. This is the first population based study showing chronic lower body pain associates with gait differences independent from OA. Participants with pain were found to walk with slower and smaller steps, longer double support and more asymmetry. Proper care and treatment of chronic pain could be a way of reducing gait problems and thereby fall risk and associated mortality. In addition, gait assessment may help identifying individuals with OA from those having pain due to other causes.

  10. KOOS Pain as a Marker for Significant Knee Pain Two and Six Years after Primary ACL Reconstruction: A Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) Prospective Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstein, D; Huston, LJ; Nwosu, S; Spindler, KP

    2015-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) approaches 50%, yet the prevalence of significant knee pain is unknown. We applied three different models of Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) thresholds for significant knee pain to an ACLR cohort to identify prevalence and risk factors. Design Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) prospective cohort patients with a unilateral primary ACLR and normal contralateral knee were assessed at 2 and 6 years. Independent variables included patient demographics, validated Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO; Marx activity score, KOOS), and surgical characteristics. Models included: (1) KOOS criteria for a painful knee = quality of life subscale <87.5 and ≥2 of: KOOSpain <86.1, KOOSsymptoms <85.7, KOOSADL <86.8, or KOOSsports/rec <85.0; (2) KOOSpain subscale score ≤72 (≥2 standard deviations below population mean); (3) 10-point KOOSpain drop from 2 to 6 years. Proportional odds models (alpha≤0.05) were used. Results 1,761 patients of median age 23 years, median BMI 24.8 kg/m2 and 56% male met inclusion, with 87% (1530/1761) and 86% (1506/1761) follow-up at 2 and 6 years, respectively. At 6 years, n=592 (39%), n=131 (9%) and n=169 (12%) met criteria for models #1 through #3, respectively. The most consistent and strongest independent risk factor at both time-points was subsequent ipsilateral knee surgery. Low 2-year Marx activity score increased the odds of a painful knee at 6 years. Conclusions Significant knee pain is prevalent after ACLR; with those who undergo subsequent ipsilateral surgery at greatest risk. The relationship between pain and structural OA warrants further study. PMID:26072385

  11. Hylan G-F 20: Review of its Safety and Efficacy in the Management of Joint Pain in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, A.; Giovannangeli, F.; Granata, M.; Laganà, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative joint disease that is a clinically and economically important disease. The increased prevalence of OA with aging, coupled to the demographics of aging populations, make OA a high priority health care problem. Viscosupplementation (VS) is a well-established treatment option in knee OA that is included in the professional guidelines for treatment of this joint disease, and could potentially provide a useful alternative in treating such patients with painful OA. Theoretically VS is an approach that should apply to all synovial joints. Objectives: The aim of this review is to assess the efficacy and safety of viscosupplementation with Hylan GF-20 (Synvisc®) in the management of joint pain in osteoarthritis. Methods: The following databases were searched: Medline, Database of Abstract on Reviews and Effectiveness, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Furthermore, the lists of references of retrieved publications were manually checked for additional references. The search terms Review, Viscosupplementation, Osteoarthritis, Hyaluronic acid, Hyaluronan, Sodium Hyaluronate, Hylan GF-20, Synvisc, intra-articular injection were used to identify all studies relating to the use of Synvisc® viscosupplementation therapy in OA. Results: Hylan GF-20 is a safe and effective treatment for decreasing pain and improving function in patients suffering from knee and hip OA but new evidences are emerging for its use in other joints. PMID:21151854

  12. TIBIAL PLATEAU PROXIMAL AND DISTAL BONE BEHAVE SIMILARLY: BOTH ARE ASSOCIATED WITH FEATURES OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a growing imperative to understand how changes in peri-articular bone relate to pathological progression of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Peri-articular bone density can be measured using dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The medial:lateral tibial BMD ratio (M:L BMD) is associated with MRI and...

  13. Development of a Decision Support System to Predict Physicians' Rehabilitation Protocols for Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawamdeh, Ziad M.; Alshraideh, Mohammad A.; Al-Ajlouni, Jihad M.; Salah, Imad K.; Holm, Margo B.; Otom, Ali H.

    2012-01-01

    To design a medical decision support system (MDSS) that would accurately predict the rehabilitation protocols prescribed by the physicians for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) using only their demographic and clinical characteristics. The demographic and clinical variables for 170 patients receiving one of three treatment protocols for knee…

  14. Physical and Psychological Correlates of Disability among a Cohort of Individuals with Knee Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Ray

    2007-01-01

    While the physical correlates of knee osteoarthritis are well documented, less well documented are aspects of psychological functioning that may affect overall health and functional status. This paper describes the findings of a cross-sectional analysis that examined the strength of the relationship between selected psychological factors and the…

  15. The efficacy of Curcuma Longa L. extract as an adjuvant therapy in primary knee osteoarthritis: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Pinsornsak, Piya; Niempoog, Sunyarn

    2012-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) is one of the most commonly use medication for treatment of knee osteoarthritis which has the analgesic and anti-inflammation by inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis via COX-1 and COX-2 isoenzyme. The problem of prolong using NSAIDs has side effect on kidney, liver and GI system. Curcumin longa extract Curcumin) is the Asian herbal medicine that has the anti-inflammatory effect by down regulate activation of NF-kappaB and proinflammatory cytokines such as Tumor Necrotic Factor-alpha, Interleukin-1, Interleukin-8, and Nitric Oxide Syntase. Many research data had advocate for the combination therapy which can increase safety and efficacy with less side effect compare with monotherapy regimen especially when the medicine has the different mechanism of action. The present study is the double blind prospective randomized control trial to evaluate the efficacy of curcumin as an adjuvant therapy of diclofenac in primary knee osteoarthritis. 44 patients were randomized to take NSAIDs (diclofenac) 75 mg/d with placebo and the other 44 took NSAIDs (diclofenac) 75 mg/d with curcumin 1,000 mg/d for 3 months. The authors evaluated the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) every month for 3 months. At the end of study 36 patients were completed for the first group and 37 for the study group. There was no difference in VAS [p-value = 0.923 (F = 0.009)]. The KOOS was analyzed in 5 categories symptom, pain, function in daily living, function in sport and recreation and knee related quality of life. The curcumin with diclofenac group had tendency to be better in Pain and Function in daily living, but there were no statistic different in all group [p-value = 0.412 (F = 0.683), p-value = 0.814 (F = 0.056), p-value = 0.446 (F = 0.589), p-value = 0.224 (F = 1.511) and p-value = 0.938 (F = 0.006)]. In conclusion, the adjuvant therapy ofcurcumin with diclofenac has the potential beneficial

  16. Diagnostic Algorithm for Residual Pain After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Park, Caroline N; White, Peter B; Meftah, Morteza; Ranawat, Amar S; Ranawat, Chitranjan S

    2016-01-01

    Although total knee arthroplasty is a successful and cost-effective procedure, patient dissatisfaction remains as high as 50%. Postoperative residual knee pain after total knee arthroplasty, with or without crepitation, is a major factor that contributes to patient dissatisfaction. The most common location for residual pain after total knee arthroplasty is anteriorly. Because residual pain has been associated with an un-resurfaced patella, this review includes only registry data and total knee arthroplasty with patella replacement. Some suggest that the pathogenesis of residual knee pain may be related to mechanical stimuli that activate free nerve endings around the patellofemoral joint. Various etiologies have been implicated in residual pain, including (1) low-grade infection, (2) midflexion instability, and (3) component malalignment with patellar maltracking. Less common causes include (4) crepitation and patellar clunk syndrome; (5) patellofemoral symptoms, including overstuffing and avascular necrosis of the patella; (6) early aseptic loosening; (7) hypersensitivity to metal or cement; (8) complex regional pain syndrome; and (9) pseudoaneurysm. Because all of these conditions can lead to residual pain, identifying the etiology can be a difficult diagnostic challenge. Often, patients with persistent pain and normal findings on radiographs and laboratory workup may benefit from a diagnostic injection or further imaging. However, up to 10% to 15% of patients with residual pain may have unexplained pain. This literature review summarizes the findings on the causes of residual pain and presents a diagnostic algorithm to facilitate an accurate diagnosis for residual pain after total knee arthroplasty. PMID:26811953

  17. Effect of a blend of comfrey root extract (Symphytum officinale L.) and tannic acid creams in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee: randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multiclinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Doug B.; Jacobson, Bert H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 2 concentrations of topical, comfrey-based botanical creams containing a blend of tannic acid and eucalyptus to a eucalyptus reference cream on pain, stiffness, and physical functioning in those with primary osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods Forty-three male and female subjects (45-83 years old) with diagnosed primary osteoarthritis of the knee who met the inclusion criteria were entered into the study. The subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups: 10% or 20% comfrey root extract (Symphytum officinale L.) or a placebo cream. Outcomes of pain, stiffness, and functioning were done on the Western Ontario and MacMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. Participants applied the cream 3× a day for 6 weeks and were evaluated every 2 weeks during the treatment. Results Repeated-measures analyses of variance yielded significant differences in all of the Western Ontario and MacMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index categories (pain P < .01, stiffness P < .01, daily function P < .01), confirming that the 10% and 20% comfrey-based creams were superior to the reference cream. The active groups each had 2 participants who had temporary and minor adverse reactions of skin rash and itching, which were rapidly resolved by modifying applications. Conclusion Both active topical comfrey formulations were effective in relieving pain and stiffness and in improving physical functioning and were superior to placebo in those with primary osteoarthritis of the knee without serious adverse effects. PMID:22014903

  18. Catastrophic thinking about pain as a predictor of length of hospital stay after total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Witvrouw, Erik; Pattyn, E; Almqvist, K F; Crombez, G; Accoe, C; Cambier, D; Verdonk, R

    2009-10-01

    This study prospectively investigates whether catastrophizing thinking is associated with length of hospital stay after total knee arthroplasty. Forty-three patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty were included in this study. Prior to their operation all patients were asked to complete the pain catastrophizing scale, and a Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index. A multiple regression analysis identified pain catastrophizing thinking and age as predictors of hospital stay after total knee arthroplasty. Patients with a higher degree of pain catastrophizing prior to the total knee arthroplasty and those with a higher age have a significantly greater risk for a longer hospital stay. Therefore, the results of this study indicate that the pre-operative level of pain catastrophizing in patients determine, in combination with other variables, the length and inter-individual variation in hospital stay after total knee arthroplasty. Reducing catastrophizing thinking about pain through cognitive-behavioral techniques is likely to reduce levels of fear after total knee arthroplasty. As a result, pain and function immediately post-operative might improve, leading to a decrease in length of hospital stay. Although during the last decades the duration of hospital stay is significantly reduced, this study shows that this can be improved when taking into account the contribution of psychological factors such as pain catastrophizing.

  19. MRI in knee osteoarthritis. Application in diet intervention.

    PubMed

    Gudbergsen, Henrik

    2013-03-01

    This thesis examines two main hypotheses: 1. Obese knee osteoarthritis (KOA) patients can achieve symptomatic improvements following diet intervention regardless of their level of structural damage and overall joint malfunctioning: 2. Rapid weight-loss in obese patients with KOA will lead to improvements in KOA related pathology that can be assessed and evaluated by MRI. Data for the studies were obtained from obese KOA patients who were recruited for a 16 week diet intervention trial, the CAROT-trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identification no.: NCT00655941). Inclusion criteria were age ≥ 50 years, BMI ≥ 30 kg/square metro plus symptomatic and verified KOA. Patients underwent a 16 weeks dietary programme with formula products and counselling. Baseline and week 16 assessments included clinical examinations, MRI and CR of the most symptomatic knee, muscle strength tests, gait analyses, blood samples and collection of patient-reported outcomes with a variety of generic and specific health status questionnaires. MRI scans were graded by the BLOKS and CR was analysed by measuring the mJSW and grading the knee as described by KL. 388 possible subjects were pre-screened, 192 were enrolled. Following the 16 weeks diet intervention 175 patients remained in the study. 187 (97%) MRI scans were completed at baseline, 172 (98 %) MRI scans obtained at week 16 and this left the study with 169 (97%) patients with complete MRI datasets at week 16. No statistical significant differences were detected between baseline characteristics of all the initially included patients (n = 192) and the 169 patients included in the per protocol analyses performed in study III (p < 0.05). In order to apply BLOKS, an extensive MRI scoring system, in study II and III we examined the inter- and intra-observer reliability of the various BLOKS items in study I. Results showed that our assessment team performed as described in the original study defining BLOKS and that the patients in the CAROT-trial were

  20. Effects of a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program on the biochemical composition and morphology of cartilage in women with mild knee osteoarthritis: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Symptoms associated with osteoarthritis of the knee result in decreased function, loss of working capacity and extensive social and medical costs. There is a need to investigate and develop effective interventions to minimise the impact of and even prevent the progression of osteoarthritis. Aquatic exercise has been shown to be effective at reducing the impact of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this article is to describe the rationale, design and intervention of a study investigating the effect of an aquatic resistance exercise intervention on cartilage in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis. Methods A minimum of 80 volunteers who meet the inclusion criteria will be recruited from the local population through newspaper advertisements. Following initial assessment volunteers will be randomised into two groups. The intervention group will participate in a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program of 1-hour duration 3 times a week for four months. The control group will be asked to maintain normal care during this period. Primary outcome measure for this study is the biochemical composition of knee cartilage measured using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging; T2 relaxation time and delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques. In addition, knee cartilage morphology as regional cartilage thickness will be studied. Secondary outcomes include measures of body composition and bone traits using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography, pain, function using questionnaires and physical performance tests and quality of life. Measurements will be performed at baseline, after the 4-month intervention period and at one year follow up. Discussion This randomised controlled trial will investigate the effect a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program has on the biochemical composition of cartilage in post-menopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis. This is the first study to

  1. Painful knee arthroplasty: definition and overview

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Christian; Villano, Marco; Bucciarelli, Giovanni; Martini, Caterina; Innocenti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Summary Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful procedures in Orthopaedic Surgery, with good clinical results and high survival rate in more than 90% of the cases at long-term follow-up. Since the increase of population’s mean age, worsening of articular degenerative alterations, and articular sequelae related to previous fractures, there is a persistent growing of the number of knee arthroplasties in every country each year, with expected increase of complications rates. Painful TKA is considered an unusual complication, but several reports focus on this challenging clinical issue. Common causes of painful TKA may be divided as early or late, and in referred, periarticular or intra-articular. Among the early, we recall implant instability (related to surgical and technical mistakes) and problems of extensor mechanism (patella not resurfaced, malalignment of femoral, tibial, or patellar component, tendons failure or degeneration). Late causes of painful TKA are almost related to aseptic loosening and infection, but also, even if unusual, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, synovitis, and hypersensitivity to metal implants are represented. Hypersensitivity to metal is a clinical issue with significative increase, but to date without a specific characterization. The Authors report about incidence, clinical features, and diagnostic pathways of hypersensitivity to metal implants, focusing on the prevention of this challenging problem. PMID:22461811

  2. Level and Determinants of Knowledge of Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis among Railway Workers in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Menke, J. Michael; Challakere Ramaswamy, Vasudeva Murthy; Abdul Manaf, Rizal; Alabsi, Aied M.; Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman

    2014-01-01

    Background. Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, an ancient malady greatly impairing modern population quality of life, has stimulated global attention to find effective modes of prevention and intervention. Purpose. This study aimed to assess factors affecting knowledge of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) among Malaysian railway workers. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 513 railway workers involving eight major states within Peninsular Malaysia using population-based sampling. The assessment instrument was a face-validated, prepiloted, self-administered instrument with sociodemographics and knowledge items on knee OA. Results. Mean (±SD) age of the respondents was 41.4 (±10.7), with the majority aged 50 years or older (34.9%). Of the total respondents, 53.6% had low levels of knowledge of knee OA disease. Multivariate analysis found that four demographic predictors, age ≥50 years, family history of knee OA, self-awareness, and clinical diagnosis of the disease entity, were significantly associated with knowledge scores. Conclusion. The finding of a low level knee OA knowledge among Malaysian railway workers points to an urgent need for massive information to be disseminated among the workers at risk to foster primary prevention and self-care. PMID:24701573

  3. Knee loading inhibits osteoclast lineage in a mouse model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinle; Yang, Jing; Liu, Daquan; Li, Jie; Niu, Kaijun; Feng, Shiqing; Yokota, Hiroki; Zhang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a whole joint disorder that involves cartilage degradation and periarticular bone response. Changes of cartilage and subchondral bone are associated with development and activity of osteoclasts from subchondral bone. Knee loading promotes bone formation, but its effects on OA have not been well investigated. Here, we hypothesized that knee loading regulates subchondral bone remodeling by suppressing osteoclast development, and prevents degradation of cartilage through crosstalk of bone-cartilage in osteoarthritic mice. Surgery-induced mouse model of OA was used. Two weeks application of daily dynamic knee loading significantly reduced OARSI scores and CC/TAC (calcified cartilage to total articular cartilage), but increased SBP (subchondral bone plate) and B.Ar/T.Ar (trabecular bone area to total tissue area). Bone resorption of osteoclasts from subchondral bone and the differentiation of osteoclasts from bone marrow-derived cells were completely suppressed by knee loading. The osteoclast activity was positively correlated with OARSI scores and negatively correlated with SBP and B.Ar/T.Ar. Furthermore, knee loading exerted protective effects by suppressing osteoclastogenesis through Wnt signaling. Overall, osteoclast lineage is the hyper responsiveness of knee loading in osteoarthritic mice. Mechanical stimulation prevents OA-induced cartilage degeneration through crosstalk with subchondral bone. Knee loading might be a new potential therapy for osteoarthritis patients. PMID:27087498

  4. A double blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical study evaluates the early efficacy of aflapin in subjects with osteoarthritis of knee.

    PubMed

    Vishal, Amar A; Mishra, Artatrana; Raychaudhuri, Siba P

    2011-01-01

    Aflapin(®) is a novel synergistic composition derived from Boswellia serrata gum resin (Indian Patent Application No. 2229/CHE/2008). Aflapin is more efficacious as an anti-inflammatory agent compared to the existing Boswellia products, 5-Loxin(®) and traditional 65% Boswellia extract. A 30-day, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was conducted to validate the efficacy of Aflapin(®) in the management of clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee (Clinical trial registration number: ISRCTN69643551). Sixty eligible OA subjects selected through screening were included in the study. The subjects received either 100 mg (n=30) of Aflapin(®) or placebo (n=30) daily for 30 days. Each subject was evaluated for pain and physical functions by using the standard tools (visual analog scale, Lequesne's Functional Index, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index) at the baseline (day 0), and at days 5, 15 and 30. A series of biochemical tests in serum, urine and hematological parameters established the safety of Aflapin. The observations suggest that Aflapin conferred clinically and statistically significant improvements in pain scores and physical function scores in OA subjects. Aflapin provided significant improvements in pain score and functional ability in as early as 5 days of treatment. In conclusion, our observations suggest that Aflapin is a safe, fast acting and effective alternative intervention in the management of OA. PMID:22022214

  5. Safety and Treatment Effectiveness of a Single Autologous Protein Solution Injection in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    van Drumpt, Rogier A M; van der Weegen, Walter; King, William; Toler, Krista; Macenski, Mitchell M

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative condition characterized by pain and loss of function. A pathological biochemical environment with excess inflammatory and catabolic proteins is a major contributor to OA. nSTRIDE(®) Autologous Protein Solution (APS) is a new therapy under development for the treatment of OA. This therapy is formed from a patient's blood and contains high concentrations of anti-inflammatory and anabolic proteins. This study assessed the safety and treatment effects of APS. Eleven subjects with early to moderate OA were injected with APS. Subjects were closely monitored for adverse events (AE) following the injection. Treatment outcome measures were obtained before injection. AE and clinical outcomes were assessed at 1 and 2 weeks postinjection and 1, 3, and 6 months postinjection. There were no serious AE or AE that were reported by the investigator as greater than mild in severity. There were no AE that were related to the device. There were minor AE related to the injection procedure, including injection site discomfort (1/11), injection site joint pain (1/11), and procedural nausea (1/11), which resolved quickly and did not require treatment. Mean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) composite scores and pain, stiffness, and function subscale scores all showed significant improvement compared to baseline by 2 weeks postinjection. The data presented here suggest that the treatment is safe and show a complication profile that is mild and consistent with similar treatments. A single injection of APS for treatment of early to moderate knee OA led to symptom improvement over the study course. Based on these results, an adequately powered, well-controlled, randomized multicenter study to establish clinical efficacy is warranted. PMID:27668131

  6. Safety and Treatment Effectiveness of a Single Autologous Protein Solution Injection in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    van Drumpt, Rogier A.M.; van der Weegen, Walter; King, William; Toler, Krista; Macenski, Mitchell M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative condition characterized by pain and loss of function. A pathological biochemical environment with excess inflammatory and catabolic proteins is a major contributor to OA. nSTRIDE® Autologous Protein Solution (APS) is a new therapy under development for the treatment of OA. This therapy is formed from a patient's blood and contains high concentrations of anti-inflammatory and anabolic proteins. This study assessed the safety and treatment effects of APS. Eleven subjects with early to moderate OA were injected with APS. Subjects were closely monitored for adverse events (AE) following the injection. Treatment outcome measures were obtained before injection. AE and clinical outcomes were assessed at 1 and 2 weeks postinjection and 1, 3, and 6 months postinjection. There were no serious AE or AE that were reported by the investigator as greater than mild in severity. There were no AE that were related to the device. There were minor AE related to the injection procedure, including injection site discomfort (1/11), injection site joint pain (1/11), and procedural nausea (1/11), which resolved quickly and did not require treatment. Mean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) composite scores and pain, stiffness, and function subscale scores all showed significant improvement compared to baseline by 2 weeks postinjection. The data presented here suggest that the treatment is safe and show a complication profile that is mild and consistent with similar treatments. A single injection of APS for treatment of early to moderate knee OA led to symptom improvement over the study course. Based on these results, an adequately powered, well-controlled, randomized multicenter study to establish clinical efficacy is warranted.

  7. Safety and Treatment Effectiveness of a Single Autologous Protein Solution Injection in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    van Drumpt, Rogier A.M.; van der Weegen, Walter; King, William; Toler, Krista; Macenski, Mitchell M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative condition characterized by pain and loss of function. A pathological biochemical environment with excess inflammatory and catabolic proteins is a major contributor to OA. nSTRIDE® Autologous Protein Solution (APS) is a new therapy under development for the treatment of OA. This therapy is formed from a patient's blood and contains high concentrations of anti-inflammatory and anabolic proteins. This study assessed the safety and treatment effects of APS. Eleven subjects with early to moderate OA were injected with APS. Subjects were closely monitored for adverse events (AE) following the injection. Treatment outcome measures were obtained before injection. AE and clinical outcomes were assessed at 1 and 2 weeks postinjection and 1, 3, and 6 months postinjection. There were no serious AE or AE that were reported by the investigator as greater than mild in severity. There were no AE that were related to the device. There were minor AE related to the injection procedure, including injection site discomfort (1/11), injection site joint pain (1/11), and procedural nausea (1/11), which resolved quickly and did not require treatment. Mean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) composite scores and pain, stiffness, and function subscale scores all showed significant improvement compared to baseline by 2 weeks postinjection. The data presented here suggest that the treatment is safe and show a complication profile that is mild and consistent with similar treatments. A single injection of APS for treatment of early to moderate knee OA led to symptom improvement over the study course. Based on these results, an adequately powered, well-controlled, randomized multicenter study to establish clinical efficacy is warranted. PMID:27668131

  8. Web-based therapeutic exercise resource center as a treatment for knee osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although beneficial effects of exercise in the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) have been established, only 14 -18% of patients with knee OA receive an exercise from their primary care provider. Patients with knee OA cite lack of physician exercise advice as a major reason why they do not exercise to improve their condition. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate use of a web-based Therapeutic Exercise Resource Center (TERC) as a tool to prescribe strength, flexibility and aerobic exercise as part of knee OA treatment. It was hypothesized that significant change in clinical outcome scores would result from patients’ use of the TERC. Methods Sixty five individuals diagnosed with mild/moderate knee OA based on symptoms and radiographs were enrolled through outpatient physician clinics. Using exercise animations to facilitate proper technique, the TERC assigned and progressed patients through multiple levels of exercise intensity based on exercise history, co-morbidities and a validated measure of pain and function. Subjects completed a modified short form WOMAC (mSF-WOMAC), World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHO-QOL) and Knee Self-Efficacy Scale (K-SES) at baseline and completion of the 8 week program, and a user satisfaction survey. Outcomes were compared over time using paired t-tests and effect sizes calculated using partial point biserial (pr). Results Fifty two participants completed the 8 week program with average duration of knee pain 8.0 ± 11.0 yrs (25 females; 61.0 ± 9.4 yrs; body mass index, 28.8 ± 6.3 kg/m2). During the study period, all outcome measures improved: mSF-WOMAC scores decreased (better pain and function) (p < .001; large effect, pr = 0.70); WHO-QOL physical scores increased (p = .015; medium effect, pr = 0.33); and K-SES scores increased (p < .001; large effect, pr = 0.54). No significant differences were found in study outcomes as a function of gender, age, BMI

  9. Dietary supplements for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Philip J; Sperry, Morgan; Wilson, Amy Friedman

    2008-01-15

    A large number of dietary supplements are promoted to patients with osteoarthritis and as many as one third of those patients have used a supplement to treat their condition. Glucosamine-containing supplements are among the most commonly used products for osteoarthritis. Although the evidence is not entirely consistent, most research suggests that glucosamine sulfate can improve symptoms of pain related to osteoarthritis, as well as slow disease progression in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Chondroitin sulfate also appears to reduce osteoarthritis symptoms and is often combined with glucosamine, but there is no reliable evidence that the combination is more effective than either agent alone. S-adenosylmethionine may reduce pain but high costs and product quality issues limit its use. Several other supplements are promoted for treating osteoarthritis, such as methylsulfonylmethane, Harpagophytum procumbens (devil's claw), Curcuma longa (turmeric), and Zingiber officinale (ginger), but there is insufficient reliable evidence regarding long-term safety or effectiveness. PMID:18246887

  10. A kinetic and kinematic analysis of the effect of stochastic resonance electrical stimulation and knee sleeve during gait in osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Collins, Amber; Blackburn, Troy; Olcott, Chris; Jordan, Joanne M; Yu, Bing; Weinhold, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Extended use of knee sleeves in populations at risk for knee osteoarthritis progression has shown functional and quality of life benefits; however, additional comprehensive kinematic and kinetic analyses are needed to determine possible physical mechanisms of these benefits which may be due to the sleeve's ability to enhance knee proprioception. A novel means of extending these enhancements may be through stochastic resonance stimulation. Our goal was to determine whether the use of a knee sleeve alone or combined with stochastic resonance electrical stimulation improves knee mechanics in knee osteoarthritis. Gait kinetics and kinematics were assessed in subjects with medial knee osteoarthritis when presented with four conditions: control1, no electrical stimulation/sleeve, 75% threshold stimulation/sleeve, and control2. An increase in knee flexion angle throughout stance and a decrease in flexion moment occurring immediately after initial contact were seen in the stimulation/sleeve and sleeve alone conditions; however, these treatment conditions did not affect the knee adduction angle and internal knee abduction moment during weight acceptance. No differences were found between the sleeve alone and the stochastic resonance with sleeve conditions. A knee sleeve can improve sagittal-plane knee kinematics and kinetics, although adding the current configuration of stochastic resonance did not enhance these effects.

  11. Leukocyte-poor PRP application for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    FILARDO, GIUSEPPE; KON, ELIZAVETA; DI MATTEO, BERARDO; DI MARTINO, ALESSANDRO; SESSA, ANDREA; MERLI, MARIA LETIZIA; MARCACCI, MAURILIO

    2013-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to describe the clinical results obtained after intra-articular injection of a leukocyte-poor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparation for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods forty-five patients (mean age: 59 years, mean BMI: 27) were included and treated with a cycle of three weekly injections of autologous conditioned plasma. Six patients were affected by bilateral symptomatic OA, therefore 51 knees in total were treated. The patients were divided into two groups: those affected by early/moderate OA and those affected by severe OA. The patients were submitted to baseline evaluation and evaluation after a mean follow-up of 14.5 months (range: 6–24 months), performed using the following outcome measures: IKDC-subjective, EQ-VAS, Tegner, and KOOS scores. Adverse events and patient satisfaction were also recorded. The results in the two groups of patients (“early/moderate” vs “severe OA”) were analyzed separately. Results the overall clinical outcome was positive and the treatment proved to be safe. In the “early/moderate OA” group, the IKDC-subjective score increased from 36.4 at the baseline evaluation to 57.3 at the follow-up (p<0.0005) and a similar trend was shown by the EQ-VAS, Tegner, and KOOS scores. Although an improvement was also recorded in the “severe OA” group, the clinical outcome of the patients in this group was significantly poorer and they reported less benefit. In the “early/moderate OA” group, BMI and longer symptom duration before treatment were found to be correlated with clinical outcome. Conclusions PRP injections are capable of reducing pain and improving knee functional status at short-term follow-up. The patients with a lower degree of joint degeneration were the best responders, whereas in severe osteoarthritic knees this biological treatment, used as a “salvage procedure”, produced a less favorable outcome. Level of evidence level IV; therapeutic case series. PMID

  12. Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee with Bracing: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Steven; Silvia Li, Chuan; Phillips, Mark; Bischoff, Markus; Ali, Pervez; Chahal, Jas; Snider, Matthew; Bhandari, Mohit

    2016-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a leading cause of disability around the world. Knee bracing provides a conservative management option for symptom relief. A variety of different bracing types, manufacturers and products are currently available on the market. The goal of this study is to examine the current state of the literature regarding the treatment of knee osteoarthritis with unloader bracing, specifically examining the representation of specific brace types, manufacturers and models within the literature. A scoping review technique was used because of its ability to evaluate research activity within an area of study and identify gaps within the literature. A thorough search of the MEDLINE database was conducted for articles where a knee brace model was identified, and we identified characteristics of the studies to evaluate important information about the body of literature related to knee bracing for the treatment of osteoarthritis. Fifty eligible studies were identified. The majority of studies have been published in the United States, and a large increase in the number of publications in this field was seen between 2010-2014. The most prominent study type was prospective comparative studies (44%), however there is a lack of randomized controlled trials (6%) within the literature. The most prominent hinge type within the literature is the dual hinge push brace, followed by the single hinge pull. While a large increase in the number of studies evaluating the treatment of knee osteoarthritis with bracing has occurred in the past 5 years, there is a lack of high quality studies evaluating the efficacy of the technique, as well as a lack of studies comparing bracing types and models. PMID:27433297

  13. Marked disability and high use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs associated with knee osteoarthritis in rural China: a cross-sectional population-based survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The burden of disability, analgesia, and health services use associated with knee pain and osteoarthritis (OA) in developing countries is relatively unknown, despite a high proportion of these populations required to be engaged in heavy occupational physical activity throughout their life span. The aim of this survey was to estimate the burden of disability, analgesia, and health services use associated with knee pain in rural China. Methods This was a population-based cross-sectional survey among residents, aged 50 years and older, of Wuchuan County, Inner Mongolia. Participants completed an interviewer-based questionnaire, evaluating knee pain and associated disability, analgesia, and health services use, and obtained bilateral standardized weight-bearing knee radiographs. Results Of the 1,027 participants, 513 (50%) reported knee pain on most days of at least 1 month in the past year, with 109 (21%) also demonstrating radiographic OA (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥2) in the symptomatic knee. Adjusting for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), education, and back pain, the presence of knee pain was associated with significantly greater difficulty in walking, climbing 10 steps, stooping, completing cleaning chores, and preparing meals. Among the 513 subjects with knee pain, the additional presence of radiographic evidence of OA was significantly associated with more occasions of "unbearable" pain (59% versus 36%) and restricted activity (64% versus 39%), as well as increased use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (88% versus 78%) and the reported number of doctor visits (59% versus 33%) in the past year. The use of paracetamol for knee pain was rare (6% versus 2%). Conclusions Knee pain is highly prevalent in rural northern China. The associated significant disability and marked preferential use of NSAIDs as analgesia should be of concern in these communities reliant on heavy occupational physical activity for their livelihood. The findings

  14. Fabella Syndrome as an Uncommon Cause of Posterolateral Knee Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Eriko; Yanai, Takaji; Kohyama, Sho; Kanamori, Akihiro; Yamazaki, Masashi; Tanaka, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    The fabella is a sesamoid bone that is located in the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle and has been identified on magnetic resonance imaging in 31% of Japanese people. In the present case, a 65-year-old woman experienced posterolateral knee pain, accompanied by a clicking “sound” during active knee flexion, after undergoing total knee arthroplasty for knee osteoarthritis. Eight months of conservative therapy failed to produce an improvement, with progressive osteoarthritic change of the fabella identified on plain radiography. Based on this evidence, a diagnosis of fabella syndrome was made and the patient underwent a fabellectomy. Fabellectomy provided immediate resolution of posterolateral knee pain and the clicking sound with knee flexion, with the patient remaining symptom-free 18 months after fabellectomy and with no limitations in knee function. Fabellectomy eliminated symptoms in all of five case reports that have been previously published and is regarded as an effective first choice for treating fabella syndrome after total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27418991

  15. Multivariate Radiological-Based Models for the Prediction of Future Knee Pain: Data from the OAI.

    PubMed

    Galván-Tejada, Jorge I; Celaya-Padilla, José M; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, José G

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the potential of X-ray based multivariate prognostic models to predict the onset of chronic knee pain is presented. Using X-rays quantitative image assessments of joint-space-width (JSW) and paired semiquantitative central X-ray scores from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), a case-control study is presented. The pain assessments of the right knee at the baseline and the 60-month visits were used to screen for case/control subjects. Scores were analyzed at the time of pain incidence (T-0), the year prior incidence (T-1), and two years before pain incidence (T-2). Multivariate models were created by a cross validated elastic-net regularized generalized linear models feature selection tool. Univariate differences between cases and controls were reported by AUC, C-statistics, and ODDs ratios. Univariate analysis indicated that the medial osteophytes were significantly more prevalent in cases than controls: C-stat 0.62, 0.62, and 0.61, at T-0, T-1, and T-2, respectively. The multivariate JSW models significantly predicted pain: AUC = 0.695, 0.623, and 0.620, at T-0, T-1, and T-2, respectively. Semiquantitative multivariate models predicted paint with C-stat = 0.671, 0.648, and 0.645 at T-0, T-1, and T-2, respectively. Multivariate models derived from plain X-ray radiography assessments may be used to predict subjects that are at risk of developing knee pain.

  16. Improvements in spinal alignment after high tibial osteotomy in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Dorj, Ariunzaya; Han, Ahreum; Kim, Kyungsoo; Nha, Kyung Wook

    2016-07-01

    Since the correlation between spinal and lower extremity alignments is high, high tibial osteotomy (HTO) surgery may also affect spinal alignment, where the spinal alignment parameters are the most important parameters for the evaluation of spinal disorders. In this study, the effect of HTO surgery on spinal alignment during gait was investigated by comparing spinal alignment parameters between patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and healthy young controls. Eight patients (age, 55.0±5.1years; height, 160.3±7.0cm; weight, 71.3±14.1kg) with a medial compartment knee OA participated in the gait experiment two times approximately one week before and one year after HTO surgery and eight healthy young controls (age, 26.7±1.7years; height, 163.4±6.5cm; weight, 58.4±11.3kg) participated only once. Cervical curvature angle, thoracic curvature angle, lumbar curvature angle, coronal vertical axis, and coronal pelvic tilt in the coronal plane and cervical lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, sagittal vertical axis, and sagittal pelvic tilt in the sagittal plane were estimated using motion analysis system with skin markers. All spinal alignment parameters after HTO surgery were significantly closer to those of healthy young subjects than those before HTO, especially in the coronal plane. These findings suggest that the HTO had a positive effect on spinal alignment, as well as lower extremity alignment, and moreover, reduced the abnormality that may result in spinal problems such as degeneration or pain.

  17. High tibial osteotomy in the ACL-deficient knee with medial compartment osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Herman, Benjamin V; Giffin, J Robert

    2016-09-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) has traditionally been used to treat varus gonarthrosis in younger, active patients. Varus malalignment increases the risk of progression of medial compartment osteoarthritis and an HTO can be performed to realign the mechanical axis of the lower limb towards the lateral compartment, thereby decreasing contact pressures in the medial compartment. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency may lead to post-traumatic arthritis due to altered joint loading and associated injuries to the menisci and articular cartilage. Understanding the importance of posterior tibial slope and its role in sagittal knee stability has led to the development of biplane osteotomies designed to flatten the posterior tibial slope in the ACL deficient knee. Altering the alignment in both the sagittal and coronal planes helps improve stability as well as alter the load in the medial compartment. Detailed history, physical exam and radiographic analysis guide treatment decisions in this high demand patient population. Lateral closing wedge (LCW) and medial opening wedge (MOW) HTOs have been performed and their potential advantages and disadvantages have been well described. Given the triangular shape of the proximal tibia, it is imperative that the surgeon pay close attention to the geometry of the osteotomy "gap" when performing MOW HTO to avoid inadvertently increasing the posterior tibial slope. Simultaneous ACL reconstruction may require technique modifications depending on the type of HTO and ACL graft chosen. With appropriate patient selection and good surgical technique, it is reasonable to expect patients to return to activities of daily living and recreational sports without debilitating pain or instability. PMID:27358200

  18. Concentrated Bone Marrow Aspirate for the Treatment of Chondral Injuries and Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Serra Cruz, Raphael; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) has emerged as a novel treatment for pathology of the knee. Despite containing a limited number of stem cells, BMAC serves as a source of growth factors that are thought to play an important role as a result of their anabolic and anti-inflammatory effects. To our knowledge, there is no systematic review regarding the outcomes of bone marrow aspirate concentrate used for the treatment of chondral defects and osteoarthritis of the knee. Purpose: To perform a systematic review on the outcomes of bone marrow aspirate concentrate for the treatment of chondral defects and osteoarthritis of the knee. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was performed using the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, and MEDLINE from 1980 to present. Inclusion criteria were as follows: use of BMAC for treatment of chondral defects and osteoarthritis of the knee, English language, and human studies. We excluded cadaveric studies, animal studies, basic science articles, editorial articles, surveys, and studies that did not include the knee. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, studies were evaluated for efficacy and safety of BMAC for treatment of articular cartilage knee pathologies. Results: Eleven studies were considered. Of these, 5 were prospective studies, 1 was a retrospective study, 2 were case series, and 3 were case reports. Three comparative studies (2 with level 2 evidence, 1 with level 3 evidence) were found in our search; none of them were randomized. Three studies investigated the clinical efficacy of BMAC in the treatment of osteoarthritis, and 8 studies evaluated the efficacy of BMAC on focal cartilage injuries. All 3 studies regarding osteoarthritis and all 8 studies regarding focal chondral defects reported good to excellent overall outcomes with the use of BMAC. Conclusion: Although a

  19. Sagittal alignment of the spine-pelvis-lower extremity axis in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W. J.; Liu, F.; Zhu, Y.W.; Sun, M.H.; Qiu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Normal sagittal spine-pelvis-lower extremity alignment is crucial in humans for maintaining an ergonomic upright standing posture, and pathogenesis in any segment leads to poor balance. The present study aimed to investigate how this sagittal alignment can be affected by severe knee osteoarthritis (KOA), and whether associated changes corresponded with symptoms of lower back pain (LBP) in this patient population. Methods Lateral radiograph films in an upright standing position were obtained from 59 patients with severe KOA and 58 asymptomatic controls free from KOA. Sagittal alignment of the spine, pelvis, hip and proximal femur was quantified by measuring several radiographic parameters. Global balance was accessed according to the relative position of the C7 plumb line to the sacrum and femoral heads. The presence of chronic LBP was documented. Comparisons between the two groups were carried by independent samples t-tests or chi-squared test. Results Patients with severe KOA showed significant backward femoral inclination (FI), hip flexion, forward spinal inclination, and higher prevalence of global imbalance (27.1% versus 3.4%, p < 0.001) compared with controls. In addition, patients with FI of 10° (n = 23) showed reduced lumbar lordosis and significant forward spinal inclination compared with controls, whereas those with FI > 10° (n = 36) presented with significant pelvic anteversion and hip flexion. A total of 39 patients with KOA (66.1%) suffered from LBP. There was no significant difference in sagittal alignment between KOA patients with and without LBP. Conclusions The sagittal alignment of spine-pelvis-lower extremity axis was significantly influenced by severe KOA. The lumbar spine served as the primary source of compensation, while hip flexion and pelvic anteversion increased for further compensation. Changes in sagittal alignment may not be involved in the pathogenesis of LBP in this patient population. Cite this article: W. J. Wang, F. Liu

  20. Treatment of Lateral Knee Pain Using Soft Tissue Mobilization in Four Female Triathletes

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, John

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Prospective case series. Background These case reports present results of the treatment of lateral knee pain in four female amateur triathletes. The athletes were referred to the author’s clinic with either a diagnosis of iliotibial band friction syndrome or patellofemoral pain syndrome, all four having symptoms for longer than seven months. Changes in training routines were identified as the possible cause of the overuse injuries that eventually developed into chronic conditions. Intervention Treatment involved soft tissue mobilization of the musculotendinous structures on the lateral aspect of the knee. Results At four weeks, three of the athletes improved 9 to 19 points on the Lower Extremity Functional Scale, 3 to 5 points on the Global Rating of Change Scale, and demonstrated improvement in hamstring and iliotibial band flexibility. At eight weeks the Global Rating of Change for these three athletes was a 7 (“a very great deal better”) and they had returned to triathlon training with no complaints of lateral knee pain. One athlete did not respond to treatment and eventually underwent arthroscopic surgery for debridement of a lateral meniscus tear. Conclusions After ruling out common causes for lateral knee pain such as lateral meniscus tear, lateral collateral ligament sprain, patellofemoral dysfunction, osteochondral injury, biceps femoris tendonitis, iliotibial band friction syndrome or osteoarthritis, soft tissue restriction should be considered a potential source of dysfunction. In some cases soft tissue restriction is overlooked; athletes go undiagnosed and are limited from sports participation. PMID:25184012

  1. Subgroups of older adults with osteoarthritis based upon differing comorbid symptom presentations and potential underlying pain mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Although people with knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) seek treatment because of pain, many of these individuals have commonly co-occurring symptoms (for example, fatigue, sleep problems, mood disorders). The purpose of this study was to characterize adults with OA by identifying subgroups with the above comorbid symptoms along with illness burden (a composite measure of somatic symptoms) to begin to examine whether subsets may have differing underlying pain mechanisms. Methods Community-living older adults with symptomatic knee and hip OA (n = 129) participated (68% with knee OA, 38% with hip OA). Hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis was used. To determine the relative contribution of each variable in a cluster, multivariate analysis of variance was used. Results We found three clusters. Cluster 1 (n = 45) had high levels of pain, fatigue, sleep problems, and mood disturbances. Cluster 2 (n = 38) had intermediate degrees of depression and fatigue, but low pain and good sleep. Cluster 3 (n = 42) had the lowest levels of pain, fatigue, and depression, but worse sleep quality than Cluster 2. Conclusions In adults with symptomatic OA, three distinct subgroups were identified. Although replication is needed, many individuals with OA had symptoms other than joint pain and some (such as those in Cluster 1) may have relatively stronger central nervous system (CNS) contributions to their symptoms. For such individuals, therapies may need to include centrally-acting components in addition to traditional peripheral approaches. PMID:21864381

  2. Reduced rate of knee extensor torque development in older adults with knee osteoarthritis is associated with intrinsic muscle contractile deficits.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Damien M; Tourville, Timothy W; Slauterbeck, James R; Ades, Philip A; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer; Beynnon, Bruce D; Toth, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    We examined the effect of knee osteoarthritis on the rate of torque development (RTD) of the knee extensors in older adults with advanced-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA; n=15) and recreationally-active controls (n=15) of similar age, sex and health status, as well as the relationship between RTD and the size and contractility of single muscle fibers. OA participants had lower RTD when expressed in absolute terms (Nm/ms). There were sex differences in peak RTD (P<0.05), with greater RTD in men, but no group by sex interaction effects for any variables. The lower RTD in OA versus controls was not explained by variation between groups in the fiber type admixture of the muscle, and was mitigated when RTD was normalized to peak torque (PT). In knee OA volunteers, we found strong correlations between the RTD expressed relative to PT and the velocity of contraction of single myosin heavy chain (MHC) I and IIA/X muscle fibers (r=0.652 and 0.862; both P<0.05) and power output of MHC I fibers (r=0.642; P<0.05). In controls, RTD relative to PT was related to fiber cross-sectional area of MHC IIA/X fibers (r=0.707; P<0.05), but not measures of single fiber contractile performance. To our knowledge, these results represent the first demonstration that variation in whole muscle contractile kinetics in patients with advanced-stage knee osteoarthritis and healthy older adults is related, in part, to the size and function of single muscle fibers.

  3. Lifetime medical costs of knee osteoarthritis management in the United States: Impact of extending indications for total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Losina, Elena; Paltiel, A. David; Weinstein, Alexander M.; Yelin, Edward; Hunter, David J.; Chen, Stephanie P.; Klara, Kristina; Suter, Lisa G.; Solomon, Daniel H.; Burbine, Sara A.; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Katz, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The impact of increasing utilization of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) on lifetime costs in persons with knee OA is under-studied. Methods We used the Osteoarthritis Policy Model to estimate total lifetime costs and TKA utilization under a range of TKA eligibility criteria among US persons with symptomatic knee OA. Current TKA utilization was estimated from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study and calibrated to Health Care Utilization Project (HCUP) data. OA treatment efficacy and toxicity were drawn from published literature. Costs in 2013 USD were derived from Medicare reimbursement schedules and Red Book Online®. Time costs were derived from published literature and the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Results Estimated average discounted (3%/year) lifetime costs for persons diagnosed with knee OA were $140,300. Direct medical costs were $129,600, with $12,400 (10%) attributable to knee OA over 28 years. OA patients spent, on average, 13 (SD 10) years waiting for TKA after failing non-surgical regimens. Under current TKA eligibility criteria, 54% of knee OA patients underwent TKA over their lifetimes. Estimated OA-related discounted lifetime direct medical costs ranged from $12,400 (54% TKA uptake) when TKA eligibility was limited to K-L 3 or 4 to $16,000 (70% TKA uptake) when eligibility was expanded to include symptomatic OA with a lesser degree of structural damage. Conclusion Due to low efficacy of non-surgical regimens, knee OA treatment-attributable costs are low, representing a small portion of all costs for OA patients. Expanding TKA eligibility increases OA-related costs substantially for a population, underscoring the need for more effective non-operative therapies. PMID:25048053

  4. Intraarticular Injections of Platelet-rich Plasma (PRP) in the Management of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E. Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The clinical use of PRP therapy in the practical setting of orthopaedic fields is increasing partly because of the accessibility of devices that are used in outpatient preparation and delivery. Another reason is the strong advertisement of PRP procedures as the ultimate treatment and novel technology for knee problems by a few orthopaedic surgeons based on claims of abundant scientific evidence. Hence, PubMed articles related to the clinical use of PRP in knee osteoarthritis were searched using the key words: PRP, knee and osteoarthritis in order to study these claims. A total of 20 reports were found directly related to the topic. The aforementioned clinical studies suggest that intraarticular injections of PRP could have preventive effects against osteoarthritis progression. However, presently there is no clear evidence from well-designed clinical trials that intraarticular injections of PRP are efficacious in osteoarthritis. Therefore, at this time the efficacy of PRP requires more investigation, wherein better scientific studies should be performed that include high powered randomized controlled trials. PMID:25207275

  5. Pulsed radiofrequency of the composite nerve supply to the knee joint as a new technique for relieving osteoarthritic pain: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Vas, Lakshmi; Pai, Renuka; Khandagale, Nishigandha; Pattnaik, Manorama

    2014-01-01

    We report a new technique for pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) of the entire nerve supply of the knee as an option in treating osteoarthritis (OA) of knee. We targeted both sensory and motor nerves supplying all the structures around the knee: joint, muscles, and skin to address the entire nociception and stiffness leading to peripheral and central sensitization in osteoarthritis. Ten patients with pain, stiffness, and loss of function in both knees were treated with ultrasonography (USG) guided PRF of saphenous, tibial, and common peroneal nerves along with subsartorial, peripatellar, and popliteal plexuses. USG guided PRF of the femoral nerve was also done to address the innervation of the quadriceps muscle. Assessment of pain (Numerical Rating Scale [NRS], pain DETECT, knee function [Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index- WOMAC]) were documented pre and post PRF at 3 and 6 months. Knee radiographs (Kellgren-Lawrence [K-L] grading) were done before PRF and one week later. All the patients showed a sustained improvement of NRS, pain DETECT, and WOMAC at 3 and 6 months. The significant improvement of patellar position and tibio-femoral joint space was concordant with the patient's reporting of improvement in stiffness and pain. The sustained pain relief and muscle relaxation enabled the patients to optimize physiotherapy thereby improving endurance training to include the daily activities of life. We conclude that OA knee pain is a product of neuromyopathy and that PRF of the sensory and motor nerves appeared to be a safe, effective, and minimally invasive technique. The reduction of pain and stiffness improved the knee function and probably reduced the peripheral and central sensitization.

  6. Rest Pain and Movement‐Evoked Pain as Unique Constructs in Hip and Knee Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Wylde, Vikki; Lenguerrand, Erik; Beswick, Andrew D.; Gooberman‐Hill, Rachael; Pyke, Mark; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is limited information about the extent to which the association between preoperative and chronic postoperative pain is mediated via pain‐on‐movement or pain‐at‐rest. We explored these associations in patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR). Methods A total of 322 and 316 patients receiving THR and TKR, respectively, were recruited into a single‐center UK cohort (Arthroplasty Pain Experience) study. Preoperative, acute postoperative, and 12‐month pain severity was measured using self‐reported pain instruments. The association between preoperative/acute pain and chronic postoperative pain was investigated using structural equation modeling (SEM). Results Patients with high levels of preoperative pain were more likely to report chronic pain after THR (β = 0.195, P = 0.02) and TKR (β = 0.749, P < 0.0001). Acute postoperative pain‐on‐movement was not associated with chronic pain after TKR or THR after adjusting for preoperative pain; however, acute pain‐at‐rest was associated with chronic pain after THR (β = 0.20, P < 0.0002) but not TKR after adjusting for preoperative pain. Analysis of pain‐at‐rest and pain‐on‐movement highlighted differences between THR and TKR patients. Chronic pain‐at‐rest after THR was weakly associated with pain‐at‐rest during the preoperative (β = 0.11, P = 0.068) and acute postoperative period (β = 0.21, P < 0.0001). In contrast, chronic pain‐on‐movement after TKR was strongly associated with the severity of pain‐on‐movement during the preoperative period (β = 0.51, P = 0.001). Conclusion SEM illustrated the different patterns of association between measures of pain over time in patients undergoing THR and TKR for osteoarthritis. These findings highlight the importance of future work that explores the mechanisms underlying pain‐on‐movement and pain‐at‐rest. PMID:26212349

  7. Altered Tibiofemoral Joint Contact Mechanics and Kinematics in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis and Episodic Complaints of Joint Instability

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Voycheck, Carrie A.; Klatt, Brian A.; Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Tashman, Scott; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate knee joint contact mechanics and kinematics during the loading response phase of downhill gait in knee osteoarthritis patients with self-reported instability. Methods Forty-three subjects, 11 with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis and self-reported instability (unstable), 7 with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis but no reports of instability (stable), and 25 without knee osteoarthritis or instability (control) underwent Dynamic Stereo X-ray analysis during a downhill gait task on a treadmill. Findings The medial compartment contact point excursions were longer in the unstable group compared to the stable (p=0.046) and the control groups (p=0.016). The peak medial compartment contact point velocity was also greater for the unstable group compared to the stable (p=0.047) and control groups (p=0.022). Additionally, the unstable group demonstrated a coupled movement pattern of knee extension and external rotation after heel contact which was different than the coupled motion of knee flexion and internal rotation demonstrated by stable and control groups. Interpretation Our findings suggest that knee joint contact mechanics and kinematics are altered during the loading response phase of downhill gait in knee osteoarthritis patients with self-reported instability. The observed longer medial compartment contact point excursions and higher velocities represent objective signs of mechanical instability that may place the arthritic knee joint at increased risk for disease progression. Further research is indicated to explore the clinical relevance of altered contact mechanics and kinematics during other common daily activities and to assess the efficacy of rehabilitation programs to improve altered joint biomechanics in knee osteoarthritis patients with self-reported instability. PMID:24856791

  8. Dissecting the contribution of knee joint NGF to spinal nociceptive sensitization in a model of OA pain in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, D.R.; Nwosu, L.; Walsh, D.A.; Chapman, V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Although analgesic approaches targeting nerve growth factor (NGF) for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) pain remain of clinical interest, neurophysiological mechanisms by which NGF contribute to OA pain remain unclear. We investigated the impact of local elevation of knee joint NGF on knee joint, vs remote (hindpaw), evoked responses of spinal neurones in a rodent model of OA pain. Design In vivo spinal electrophysiology was carried out in anaesthetised rats with established pain behaviour and joint pathology following intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA), vs injection of saline. Neuronal responses to knee joint extension and flexion, mechanical punctate stimulation of the peripheral receptive fields over the knee and at a remote site (ipsilateral hind paw) were studied before, and following, intra-articular injection of NGF (10 μg/50 μl) or saline. Results MIA-injected rats exhibited significant local (knee joint) and remote (lowered hindpaw withdrawal thresholds) changes in pain behaviour, and joint pathology. Intra-articular injection of NGF significantly (P < 0.05) increased knee extension-evoked firing of spinal neurones and the size of the peripheral receptive fields of spinal neurones (100% increase) over the knee joint in MIA rats, compared to controls. Intra-articular NGF injection did not significantly alter responses of spinal neurones following noxious stimulation of the ipsilateral hind paw in MIA-injected rats. Conclusion The facilitatory effects of intra-articular injection of NGF on spinal neurones receiving input from the knee joint provide a mechanistic basis for NGF mediated augmentation of OA knee pain, however additional mechanisms may contribute to the spread of pain to remote sites. PMID:25623624

  9. Does patella resurfacing really matter? Pain and function in 972 patients after primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Espehaug, Birgitte; Havelin, Leif Ivar; Vollset, Stein Emil; Furnes, Ove

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Resurfacing of the patella during primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often recommended based on higher revision rates in non-resurfaced knees. As many of these revisions are insertions of a patella component due to pain, and since only patients with a non-resurfaced patella have the option of secondary resurfacing, we do not really know whether these patients have more pain and poorer function. The main purpose of the present paper was therefore to assess pain and function at least 2 years after surgery for unrevised primary non-resurfaced and resurfaced TKA, and secondary among prosthesis brands. Methods Information needed to calculate subscales from the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) was collected in a questionnaire given to 972 osteoarthritis patients with intact primary TKAs that had been reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. Pain and satisfaction on visual analog scales and improvement in EQ-5D index score ΔEQ-5D) were also used as outcomes. Outcomes were measured on a scale from 0 to 100 units (worst to best). To estimate differences in mean scores, we used multiple linear regression with adjustment for possible confounders. Results We did not observe any differences between resurfacing and non-resurfacing in any outcome, with estimated differences of ≤ 1.4 units and p-values of > 0.4. There was, however, a tendency of better results for the NexGen implant as compared to the reference brand AGC for symptoms (difference = 4.9, p = 0.05), pain (VAS) (difference = 8.3, p = 0.004), and satisfaction (VAS) (difference = 7.9, p = 0.02). However, none of these differences reached the stated level of minimal perceptible clinical difference. Interpretation Resurfacing of the patella has no clinical effect on pain and function after TKA. Differences between the brands investigated were small and they were assumed to be of minor importance. PMID:20158405

  10. Efficacy of Blood Flow Restricted Low-Load Resistance Training in Women with Risk Factors for Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Neil A.; Williams, Glenn N.; Davis, Maria; Wallace, Robert B.; Mikesky, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether concurrent blood flow restriction (BFR) during low-load resistance training is an efficacious and tolerable means of improving quadriceps strength and volume in women with risk factors for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). Design: Randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial Setting: Exercise training clinical research laboratory Participants: Women over age 45 years with risk factors for symptomatic knee OA. Methods: Participants were randomized to either low-load resistance training (30% 1RM) alone (control) or with concurrent BFR and completed 4 weeks of 3 times per week leg-press resistance training. Those randomized to BFR wore a cuff that progressively restricted femoral blood flow over the weeks of training. Inter-group differences in outcome measures were compared using regression methods, while adjusting for BMI. Main Outcome Measures: Isotonic bilateral leg press strength, isokinetic knee extensor strength, and quadriceps volume by MRI were assessed before and after participation. Secondary measures included lower limb muscle power (leg press and stair climb). Knee pain was assessed to determine tolerance. Results: Forty women completed the program out of 45 who consented. There were no significant inter-group differences in baseline characteristics except that BMI was lower in the BFR group (p=.0223). Isotonic 1RM improved significantly more in the BFR group (28.3±4.8 kg) than in the control group (15.6±4.5 kg) (p=.0385). Isokinetic knee extensor strength scaled to body mass increased significantly more in the BFR group (0.07±0.03 Nm/kg) than in the control group (-0.05±0.03 Nm/kg) (p=.0048). Changes in quadriceps volume, leg press power, and knee-related pain did not significantly differ between groups. Conclusions: Addition of BFR to a 30% 1RM resistance training program was effective in increasing leg press and knee extensor strength in women at risk for knee OA, in comparison with the same program without BFR

  11. The effect of Neydharting mud-pack therapy on knee osteoarthritis: a randomized, controlled, double-blind follow-up pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tefner, Ildikó Katalin; Gaál, Ramóna; Koroknai, András; Ráthonyi, Adél; Gáti, Tamás; Monduk, Péter; Kiss, Edit; Kovács, Csaba; Bálint, Géza; Bender, Tamás

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Neydharting mud-pack therapy on the clinical parameters and quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis. In this double-blind, randomized, follow-up study on 53 patients with knee osteoarthritis, one group received hot mud-pack therapy, whereas the other (control) group was treated with hot packs of a substance manufactured on 10 occasions for 2 weeks. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), EuroQoL-5D quality-of-life measure and need for analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were recorded before treatment, at the end of treatment (at Week 2), and at Weeks 6 and 12. The WOMAC and the EQ5D quality-of-life scores improved from the baseline to the end of treatment in both groups, and further improvement was observed during the follow-up period (p < 0.001, respectively, in both groups). The need for medications for knee joint pain improved in both groups, and these changes were significant only in the mud-treated group (p < 0.001), but not in the control group (p = 0.106) compared to baseline. The number of patients requiring medications for knee joint pain showed a continuous downward trend at the subsequent post-treatment visits by the mud-treated group, and these changes became significant by Visit 4 compared to baseline (p = 0.016). The control group showed only temporary and not significant decrease. The difference was not significant between the groups in any of the outcome parameters at any visits. The Neydharting mud pack has a favorable effect on the clinical parameters, quality of life, and need for medications in patients with knee osteoarthritis. To evaluate the chemical effect, the number of patients should be increased.

  12. The role of cumulative physical work load in symptomatic knee osteoarthritis – a case-control study in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, Andreas; Bolm-Audorff, Ulrich; Abolmaali, Nasreddin; Elsner, Gine

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To examine the dose-response relationship between cumulative exposure to kneeling and squatting as well as to lifting and carrying of loads and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a population-based case-control study. Methods In five orthopedic clinics and five practices we recruited 295 male patients aged 25 to 70 with radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis associated with chronic complaints. A total of 327 male control subjects were recruited. Data were gathered in a structured personal interview. To calculate cumulative exposure, the self-reported duration of kneeling and squatting as well as the duration of lifting and carrying of loads were summed up over the entire working life. Results The results of our study support a dose-response relationship between kneeling/squatting and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. For a cumulative exposure to kneeling and squatting > 10.800 hours, the risk of having radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis as measured by the odds ratio (adjusted for age, region, weight, jogging/athletics, and lifting or carrying of loads) is 2.4 (95% CI 1.1–5.0) compared to unexposed subjects. Lifting and carrying of loads is significantly associated with knee osteoarthritis independent of kneeling or similar activities. Conclusion As the knee osteoarthritis risk is strongly elevated in occupations that involve both kneeling/squatting and heavy lifting/carrying, preventive efforts should particularly focus on these "high-risk occupations". PMID:18625053

  13. ¹⁵³Sm-HM for arthritic knee pain. Estimated dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Hardy-Pérez, Alberto E; Torres-García, Eugenio; Arteaga-de-Murphy, Consuelo; Pedraza-López, Martha; Mitsoura, Eleni; Jiménez-Mancilla, Nallely P

    2012-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthropathy and after cardiovascular diseases is the most disabling disease in developing countries. The dosimetry for the clinical application of 153-samarium-hydroxymacroaggregates (¹⁵³Sm-HM) for radiation synovectomy (RSV) and palliative treatment for arthritic pain, as far as we know, has not been reported. The aim of this research was to estimate the radiation dose necessary for synovial ablation and pain palliation with minimum risk to the patient. ¹⁵³Sm-HM (370 MBq) was administered intra-articularly in a patient with severe knee pain and hindered motility. Regions of interest drawn on sequential, conjugated, anterior and posterior scintigraphy images were used to obtain the respective activity. The data was entered into a knee joint histological-geometric model designed with micrometric dimensions to represent the synovial cell layers. The Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the absorbed dose in each of the 12 model-cells representing the distance from the synovial liquid to the cartilage or bone. The absorbed dose in the synovial cavity was 114 Gy which is sufficient energy for RSV. The treated patient referred little pain and higher motility with no adverse reactions. ¹⁵³Sm-HM is a potentially valid radiopharmaceutical for RSV, which effectively palliates knee pain.

  14. Reliability of principal components and discrete parameters of knee angle and moment gait waveforms in individuals with moderate knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Shawn M; Astephen Wilson, Janie L; Rutherford, Derek J; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L

    2013-07-01

    Gait measures are used to evaluate change in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), but reliability has not been fully established in this population. This study examined test-retest reliability of knee angle and moment gait waveform characteristics captured using discrete parameters and principal component analysis (PCA) in individuals with moderate knee OA. Participants (n=20) underwent three-dimensional gait analysis on two occasions. Motion and force data were captured using two camera banks, infrared light emitting diodes and force plate during self-selected walking. Knee angle and moment waveforms were calculated and analyzed using discrete parameters and by identifying waveform characteristics using PCA. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2,k) examined test-retest reliability of discrete parameters and PCA derived scores (PC-scores). ICC2,k values ranged from 0.57 to 0.93 for discrete parameters, 0.52-0.86 for knee angle PC-scores and 0.30-0.94 for the knee moment PC-scores. However, 10 of 13 discrete parameters, six of nine knee angle PC-scores and seven of nine knee moment PC-scores had ICC2,k values greater than or equal to 0.70. Discrete parameters and PC-scores from flexion angles and adduction moments had the highest ICC2,k values while adduction angles, rotation angles, and rotation moments had the lowest. Most knee angle and moment waveform characteristics demonstrated ICC2,k values that could be interpreted as acceptable. Caution should be used when examining adduction and rotation angle magnitudes and early/mid-stance rotation moment magnitudes due to lower ICC2,k values.

  15. What Symptoms Are More Important for Korean Patients in Knee Osteoarthritis? Development and Validation of the Korean Knee Score

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Jin Goo; Wang, Joon Ho

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a novel knee evaluation instrument, the Korean Knee Score (KKS), to reflect a floor life style with high knee flexion. In addition, we aimed to assess the importance of high knee flexion activity for Korean patients. Materials and Methods The KKS was developed following the guidelines of the International Society of Arthroscopy, Knee Surgery and Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. During development step, generated items were asked to 50 patients to determine importance and obtain an impact score for each item. A total of 634 patients were included in the validation survey. Results Forty one items were generated and impact scores of each item about floor life style were higher than other items. The KKS exhibited excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.931) and strong internal consistency (Cronbach's α=0.973). The content validity was good, with no ceiling or floor effect. The construct, convergent, and divergent validities were good. Moderate responsiveness was evident, with a standardized response mean of 0.74. Conclusions The KKS, has good validity, reliability, and responsiveness. The KKS includes items for floor life style, which are thought more important for Korean patients. The KKS can be used as a good evaluation questionnaire for Korean knee osteoarthritis patients. PMID:22977792

  16. The effect of healing touch on the pain and mobility of persons with osteoarthritis: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Der-Fa; Hart, Laura K; Lutgendorf, Susan K; Perkhounkova, Yelena

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this pilot study were to investigate the effects of Healing Touch (HT) on the pain level, joint function, mobility, and depression in persons with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee joint(s). A randomized controlled trial using a repeated measures design was used. Cognitively intact persons (institutionalized and community) with a diagnosis of OA of the knee joint(s) received either HT sessions three times per week for 6 weeks (n = 12) or weekly friendly visits (FV) (n = 7). The HT sessions were delivered by a team of two nurses certified as HT practitioners and the FV was conducted by a nurse. All subjects continued to receive their standard care including the methods they had been using to relieve their joint pain. The two groups were similar regarding demographic variables, number of knees affected, co-morbidities, pain medications used and outcome variables at baseline. Two pain outcome measures (intensity and life interference) produced significant interaction effects. Two joint outcome measures (extension and extensor lag) also produced significant interaction effects. Furthermore, the HT group demonstrated significant improvements in 9 of the 12 outcome variables (75%) while no significant improvements occurred in the FV group. The HT group exhibited sustained effects (3 weeks post treatments) in three outcome variables. The reduction in joint pain and improvement in joint function suggest that biofield therapies could be effective non-pharmacological adjuncts to treatment of OA.

  17. The effect of healing touch on the pain and mobility of persons with osteoarthritis: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Der-Fa; Hart, Laura K; Lutgendorf, Susan K; Perkhounkova, Yelena

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this pilot study were to investigate the effects of Healing Touch (HT) on the pain level, joint function, mobility, and depression in persons with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee joint(s). A randomized controlled trial using a repeated measures design was used. Cognitively intact persons (institutionalized and community) with a diagnosis of OA of the knee joint(s) received either HT sessions three times per week for 6 weeks (n = 12) or weekly friendly visits (FV) (n = 7). The HT sessions were delivered by a team of two nurses certified as HT practitioners and the FV was conducted by a nurse. All subjects continued to receive their standard care including the methods they had been using to relieve their joint pain. The two groups were similar regarding demographic variables, number of knees affected, co-morbidities, pain medications used and outcome variables at baseline. Two pain outcome measures (intensity and life interference) produced significant interaction effects. Two joint outcome measures (extension and extensor lag) also produced significant interaction effects. Furthermore, the HT group demonstrated significant improvements in 9 of the 12 outcome variables (75%) while no significant improvements occurred in the FV group. The HT group exhibited sustained effects (3 weeks post treatments) in three outcome variables. The reduction in joint pain and improvement in joint function suggest that biofield therapies could be effective non-pharmacological adjuncts to treatment of OA. PMID:23835011

  18. Preoperative Pain, Symptoms, and Psychological Factors related to Higher Acute Pain Trajectories during Hospitalization for Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Maren Falch; Miaskowski, Christine; Rustøen, Tone; Rosseland, Leiv Arne; Paul, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Unrelieved postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a significant problem. This longitudinal study investigated how preoperative pain intensity, as well as a comprehensive list of preoperative and perioperative factors, influenced the severity of acute average and worst pain after TKA. Methods Prior to surgery, 203 patients completed a demographic questionnaire, Lee Fatigue Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. Brief Pain Inventory was completed prior to surgery as well as through postoperative days (POD) 0 to 4. Clinical data were extracted from medical records. Results Several factors were associated with higher levels of preoperative and postoperative pain. Lower preoperative average and worst pain intensity scores were associated with increases in average and worst postoperative pain from POD1 to POD4. A higher number of comorbidities, higher C-reactive protein values, and higher pain interference with function were associated with higher preoperative levels of average pain. Older age, higher fatigue levels, and higher scores on identity and emotional responses to osteoarthritis (OA) were associated with higher preoperative levels of worst pain. Lower perceived consequences of OA were associated with higher pain from POD1 to POD4. Males and patients with lower preoperative scores for average pain had higher worst pain following surgery. Discussion Patients at higher risk for more severe postoperative pain can be identified through an assessment of pain and other risk factors identified in this study. Future research needs to test the efficacy of interventions that modify patients’ perceptions of living with OA and pain intensity before surgery on short and long term postoperative outcomes. PMID:27583551

  19. Serum and Synovial Fluid Levels of CCL18 are Correlated with Radiographic Grading of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yun; Chen, Juwu; Yang, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    Background Chemokines are involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). CCL18, a member of the chemokines family, is observed in synovial fluid (SF) of OA patients. The aim of this study was to determine the association between CCL18 levels in serum and SF with radiographic knee OA. Material/Methods This study was conducted in a population of 308 patients with knee OA. The radiological knee OA was graded by the Kellgren-Lawrence grading system. Results Serum levels of CCL18 in knee OA patients were markedly higher than those in healthy controls. Serum and SF levels of CCL18 increased with the severity of KL grades and were correlated with disease severity. Conclusions The CCL18 levels in serum and SF are correlated with the severity of OA. PMID:25794928

  20. Knee Locking in Osteoarthritis due to Synovial Lipoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    S Amarjit, Kataria; Budhiraja, Shivali; Chandramouleeswari, K; Anita, S

    2013-08-01

    Intra-articular synovial lipomas are very rare and only few cases have been reported till now. We are reporting a rare case of a unilateral intra-articular lipoma of osteoarthritic knee joint in a 62 years old male. Patient had two episodes of sudden locking of knee joint, which resolved spontaneously. A plain X-ray showed changes which were suggestive of osteoarthritis. Clinically, patient was diagnosed as a case of loose bodies in left knee joint. An arthrotomy was performed. After a Histopathological Examination (HPE) of loose bodies, a diagnosis of an intra-articular synovial lipoma was made. Due to wide differentials and varied clinical behaviour of loose bodies, lipoma should be included in differential diagnosis of osteroarthritic patients who complain of episodic locking of knees. Intraarticular lipomas, on arthroscopic guided excision, get cured permanently, with no recurrence. The differentiation of an intra-articular lipoma from a relatively more common entity, Lipoma arborescens, has also been discussed.

  1. Patterns and Influencing Factors of Medial Meniscus Tears in Varus Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Do; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Cho, Hye-Yong; Kim, Kwang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the patterns of medial meniscus (MM) tears in patients with varus knee osteoarthritis who underwent total knee arthroplasty and analyze the factors that could affect MM tears. Materials and Methods The patients (365 knees, 268 patients) were classified into three groups; group I with MM posterior horn (PH) tear only; group II with MM root tear only; and group III with MMPH plus root tear. The following factors were evaluated: age, gender, body mass index, varus deviation of the mechanical axis, medial proximal tibial angle, posterior tibial slope (PTS), and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) integrity (normal, degeneration, and tear or absence). Results MM tears were identified in all knees. The patterns of the combined MMPH tears in group III were less complex than those in group I. Varus deviation and PTS were significantly greater in group III than groups I and II. In group III, there were significantly more cases of ACL tear or absence than groups I and II. The others showed no differences among three groups. Conclusions Severe varus knee osteoarthritis was always accompanied by MM tears. Risk factors for MMPH plus root tears were severe varus deformity, great PTS, and ACL tear or absence. PMID:27274471

  2. Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) in the treatment of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sit, Regina WS; Chung, Vincent CH; Reeves, Kenneth D.; Rabago, David; Chan, Keith KW; Chan, Dicken CC; Wu, Xinyin; Ho, Robin ST; Wong, Samuel YS

    2016-01-01

    Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) is an emerging treatment for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) but its efficacy is uncertain. We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis to synthesize clinical evidence on the effect of prolotherapy for knee OA. Fifteen electronic databases were searched from their inception to September 2015. The primary outcome of interest was score change on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of moderate risk of bias and one quasi–randomized trial were included, with data from a total of 258 patients. In the meta-analysis of two eligible studies, prolotherapy is superior to exercise alone by a standardized mean difference (SMD) of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.18 to 1.45, p = 0.012), 0.78 (95% CI: 0.25 to 1.30, p = 0.001) and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.04 to 1.20, p = 0.035) on the WOMAC composite scale; and WOMAC function and pain subscale scores respectively. Moderate heterogeneity exists in all cases. Overall, prolotherapy conferred a positive and significant beneficial effect in the treatment of knee OA. Adequately powered, longer-term trials with uniform end points are needed to better elucidate the efficacy of prolotherapy. PMID:27146849

  3. The Effects of Common Footwear on Joint Loading in Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Najia; Sengupta, Mondira; Foucher, Kharma C.; Wimmer, Markus A.; Fogg, Louis F.; Block, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Elevated joint loads during walking have been associated with the severity and progression of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Footwear may have the potential to alter these loads. This study compared the effects of several common shoe types on knee loading in subjects with OA of the knee. Methods 31 subjects (10 men, 21 women) with radiographic and symptomatic knee OA underwent gait analyses using an optoelectronic camera system and multi-component force plate. In each case, gait was evaluated barefoot and while wearing 4 different shoes: 1) clogs (Dansko®), 2) stability shoes (Brooks Addiction®), 3) flat walking shoes (Puma H Street®), and 4) flip-flops. Peak knee loads were compared between the different footwear conditions. Results Overall, the clogs and stability shoes, resulted in a significantly higher peak knee adduction moment (3.1±0.7 and 3.0±0.7 %BW*ht, respectively, ~15% higher, p<0.05)) compared with that of flat walking shoes (2.8±0.7%BW*ht), flip-flops (2.7±0.8%BW*ht) and barefoot walking (2.7±0.7%BW*ht). There were no statistically significant differences in knee loads with the flat walking shoes and flip-flops compared to barefoot walking. Conclusions These data confirm that footwear may have significant effects on knee loads during walking in subjects with OA of the knee. Flexibility and heel height may be important differentiating characteristics of shoes which affect knee loads. In light of the strong relationship between knee loading and OA, the design and biomechanical effects of modern footwear should be more closely evaluated in terms of their effects on the disease. PMID:20191571

  4. The effects of kinesiology taping therapy on degenerative knee arthritis patients’ pain, function, and joint range of motion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwansub; Yi, Chae-Woo; Lee, Sangyong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of kinesiology taping therapy on degenerative knee arthritis patients’ pain, function, and joint range of motion. [Subjects] To conduct the experiment in the present study, 30 patients with degenerative knee arthritis were divided into a control group (the conservative treatment group) of 15 patients, who received conservative physical therapy, and an experimental group (the kinesiology taping group) of 15 patients, who received kinesiology taping therapy. [Methods] All patients received treatment three times per week for four weeks. The kinesiology taping group had elastic tapes applied to the hamstring muscles, anterior tibialis, quadriceps femoris, and gastrocnemius. The range of motion was measured using joint goniometers, pain was measured using visual analog scales, and functional evaluation was conducted using the Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. [Results] In intragroup comparisons of the kinesiology taping group and the conservative treatment group, the visual analog scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores significantly decreased, and the range of motion increased more than significantly. In intergroup comparisons, the kinesiology taping group showed significantly lower visual analog scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores and significantly larger ranges of motion than the conservative treatment group. [Conclusion] Kinesiology taping therapy is considered to be an effective nonsurgical intervention method for pain relief, daily living activities, and range of motion of degenerative knee arthritis patients. PMID:26957729

  5. The effects of kinesiology taping therapy on degenerative knee arthritis patients' pain, function, and joint range of motion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwansub; Yi, Chae-Woo; Lee, Sangyong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of kinesiology taping therapy on degenerative knee arthritis patients' pain, function, and joint range of motion. [Subjects] To conduct the experiment in the present study, 30 patients with degenerative knee arthritis were divided into a control group (the conservative treatment group) of 15 patients, who received conservative physical therapy, and an experimental group (the kinesiology taping group) of 15 patients, who received kinesiology taping therapy. [Methods] All patients received treatment three times per week for four weeks. The kinesiology taping group had elastic tapes applied to the hamstring muscles, anterior tibialis, quadriceps femoris, and gastrocnemius. The range of motion was measured using joint goniometers, pain was measured using visual analog scales, and functional evaluation was conducted using the Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. [Results] In intragroup comparisons of the kinesiology taping group and the conservative treatment group, the visual analog scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores significantly decreased, and the range of motion increased more than significantly. In intergroup comparisons, the kinesiology taping group showed significantly lower visual analog scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores and significantly larger ranges of motion than the conservative treatment group. [Conclusion] Kinesiology taping therapy is considered to be an effective nonsurgical intervention method for pain relief, daily living activities, and range of motion of degenerative knee arthritis patients.

  6. Chondroprotective effects of pomegranate juice on monoiodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis of the knee joint of mice.

    PubMed

    Hadipour-Jahromy, Mahsa; Mozaffari-Kermani, Reza

    2010-02-01

    To study the effectiveness of pomegranate juice on osteoarthritis, mono-iodoacetate induced loss of articular cartilage in the mouse tibiofemoral joint was used as a model. Mono-iodoacetate is an inhibitor of glycolysis which promotes osteoarthritis similar to that noted in human osteoarthritis. The histopathology of the subchondral bone and cartilage of mouse knee joints treated with a single intra-articular injection of mono-iodoacetate (0.1 mg) and killed at 1, 14 and 28 days post injection was investigated. The effect of pomegranate juice (4 mL/kg, 10 mL/kg, 20 mL/kg, orally) was studied in different groups. Histopathological changes in knee joints were seen after 2 weeks. Early osteoarthritis was characterized by areas of chondrocyte degeneration, which sometimes involved the entire thickness of the articular cartilage in the tibial plateaus and femoral condyles. Changes to the subchondral bone and proteoglycan contents, focal fragmentation and collapse of bony trabeculae with fibrosis and necrosis, and synovial cell proliferation were observed. The administration of pomegranate juice dose dependently prevented the negative effects of iodoacetate. Chondrocyte damage was significantly prevented, with proteoglycan less affected, especially in the groups receiving a high amount of pomegranate juice. No cell proliferation or inflammatory cells were detected in the synovial fluid. The effectiveness of pomegranate juice in improving histopathological damage is emphasized and its chondroprotective effect in vivo highlighted.

  7. Does paracetamol (acetaminophen) reduce the pain of osteoarthritis?: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, W; Jones, A; Doherty, M

    2004-01-01

    Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Data sources: Medline, Embase, Scientific Citation Index, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and conference abstracts in the past 2 years from the British Society for Rheumatology, the European League Against Rheumatism, the American College of Rheumatology, and the Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Subjects: 10 RCTs including 1712 patients with either symptomatic OA of the knee (6 trials) or hip/knee (3 trials) or multiple joints (1 trial). Main outcome measures: (a) effect size (ES) for pain, stiffness, and functional scores from baseline to end point; (b) rate ratio (RR) and number needed to treat for clinical response rate and patient preference for treatment. Results: Paracetamol was effective in relieving pain due to OA (ES = 0.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02 to 0.41). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were better than paracetamol for pain relief (ES = 0.20, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.30). Clinical response rate was higher with NSAIDs than with paracetamol (RR = 1.24, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.41), and the number of patients who preferred NSAIDs was more than twice the number of those preferring paracetamol (RR = 2.46, 95% CI 1.51 to 4.12). NSAIDs were associated with more frequent gastrointestinal discomfort than paracetamol (RR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.75). Conclusion: Paracetamol is an effective agent for pain relief due to OA. Although safer, it is less effective than NSAIDs. For safety reasons paracetamol should be the first line treatment, with NSAIDs reserved for those who do not respond. PMID:15020311

  8. Effectiveness and safety of Glucosamine, chondroitin, the two in combination, or celecoxib in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chao; Wei, Jie; Li, Hui; Wang, Yi-lun; Xie, Dong-xing; Yang, Tuo; Gao, Shu-guang; Li, Yu-sheng; Luo, Wei; Lei, Guang-hua

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness and safety of glucosamine, chondroitin, the two in combination, or celecoxib in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis (OA). PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library were searched through from inception to February 2015. A total of 54 studies covering 16427 patients were included. Glucosamine plus chondroitin, glucosamine alone, and celecoxib were all more effective than placebo in pain relief and function improvement. Specifically, celecoxib is most likely to be the best treatment option, followed by the combination group. All treatment options showed clinically significant improvement from baseline pain, but only glucosamine plus chondroitin showed clinically significant improvement from baseline function. In terms of the structure-modifying effect, both glucosamine alone and chondroitin alone achieved a statistically significant reduction in joint space narrowing. Although no significant difference was observed among the five options with respect to the three major adverse effects (withdrawal due to adverse events, serious adverse events and the number of patients with adverse events), the additional classical meta-analysis showed that celecoxib exhibited a higher rate of gastrointestinal adverse effect comparing with the placebo group. The present study provided evidence for the symptomatic efficacy of glucosamine plus chondroitin in the treatment of knee OA. PMID:26576862

  9. Elevated marrow inflammatory cells and osteoclasts in subchondral osteosclerosis in human knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Jeroen; Patel, Amit; Hirschmann, Michael T; Pagenstert, Geert I; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Valderrabano, Victor; Hügle, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Subchondral osteosclerosis, characterized by an increase of hypomineralized bone material, is a pathological hallmark of osteoarthritis. The cellular components in the subchondral marrow compartment that participate in this aberrant bone remodeling process remain to be elucidated. This study assessed the presence of marrow inflammatory cells and their relative abundance between nonsclerotic and sclerotic tissues in knee osteoarthritis. Bone samples from osteoarthritic knee tibial plateaus were stratified for histological analyses using computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry. Immunohistological analysis revealed the presence of CD20 (B-lymphocyte) and CD68 (macrophage), but not CD3 (T-lymphocyte) immunoreactive mononuclear cells in subchondral marrow tissues and their relative abundance was significantly increased in sclerotic compared with nonsclerotic bone samples. Multinucleated osteoclasts that stained positive for CD68 and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, predominantly associated with CD34-positive blood vessels and their abundance was strongly increased in sclerotic samples. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase activity in outgrowth osteoblasts was induced by conditioned medium from nonsclerotic, but not sclerotic, bone pieces. These results suggest that an interaction between bone-resident cells and marrow inflammatory cells might play a role in aberrant bone remodeling leading to subchondral osteosclerosis. Elevated osteoclast activity in sclerotic bone suggests that bone formation and resorption activities are increased, yet uncoupled, in human knee osteoarthritis. PMID:26250062

  10. Metabolic Syndrome Increases the Risk for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huajun; Cheng, Yanmei; Shao, Decheng; Chen, Junyuan; Sang, Yuan; Gui, Tao; Luo, Simin; Li, Jieruo; Chen, Chao; Ye, Yongguang; Yang, Yong; Li, Yikai

    2016-01-01

    Background. Studies revealed that metabolic factors might contribute substantially to osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis. There has been an increasing interest to understand the relationship between knee OA and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). The purpose of this study was to explore the association between metabolic syndrome and knee osteoarthritis using meta-analysis. Methods. Databases, including PUBMED, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library, were searched to get relevant studies. Data were extracted separately by two authors and pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. Results. The meta-analysis was finished with 8 studies with a total of 3202 cases and 20968 controls finally retrieved from the database search. The crude pooled OR is 2.24 (95% CI = 1.38–3.64). Although there was significant heterogeneity among these studies, which was largely accounted for by a single study, the increase in risk was still significant after exclusion of that study. The pooled adjusted OR remained significant with pooled adjusted OR 1.05 (95% CI = 1.03–1.07, p < 0.00001). No publication bias was found in the present meta-analysis. Conclusions. The synthesis of available evidence supports that metabolic syndrome increases the risk for knee osteoarthritis, even after adjustment for many risk factors. PMID:27807463

  11. Osteoarthritis and meniscus disorders of the knee as occupational diseases of miners

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, G; Nichols, L

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether kneeling or squatting for prolonged periods is sufficiently causally associated with an increased risk of injury or degenerative disease of the knee joint as to meet the classic criteria to be considered an occupational disease of coal miners for whom these are or have been routine working postures. Method: Systematic literature searches were made for studies relating to kneeling and squatting as part of the working environment of coal mines and the role of these postures in causation of knee disorders in coal miners, analogous occupations, populations, and communities. The working environment and potentially damaging forces on the knee when kneeling or squatting were described. Papers on the incidence or prevalence of knee disorders in occupational and other groups were scored against five criteria independently by each author, and from this a single consensus score representing the overall strength of evidence given by the research was awarded. The evidence was then weighed against the criteria for an occupational disease. Results: Nineteen published papers were scored, the majority of which focussed on osteoarthritis as the outcome of interest. Few of the studies found focussed specifically on miners, and those that did tended to involve small numbers of subjects and were carried out before 1960, when the mining population was at its largest but epidemiological evidence of the risk factors for knee disorders was not well established. The non-mining studies in the review represent groups of workers with a similar or lesser kneeling content in their work. Conclusion: The papers reviewed provide sufficient evidence to conclude that work involving kneeling and/or squatting is causally associated with an increased risk of osteoarthritis of the knee. In some of the more recent epidemiologically sound studies, frequent or prolonged kneeling or squatting doubles the general risk of osteoarthritis of the knees found in the general population

  12. A Positive Association Between Foot Posture Index and Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis in Moroccan People

    PubMed Central

    F.E, Abourazzak; N, Kadi; H, Azzouzi; F, Lazrak; A, Najdi; C, Nejjari; T, Harzy

    2014-01-01

    Objectives : To compare foot posture in people with and without medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA), and to assess association between its abnormalities and medial compartment knee OA. Methods : We compared the foot posture of patients with clinically and radiographically-confirmed medial compartment knee OA and asymptomatic healthy controls using the foot posture index (FPI), navicular height, and the medial arch. Results : We included 100 patients and 80 asymptomatic controls. The mean age of patients was 59 ± 7 (44-76) years and 48 ± 9 (28-60) years in the control (p=0.06). Patients group have more pronated foot for FPI (1.50 ± 2.68 vs 0.72 ± 2.63; p=0.05), more flat foot (42% vs 22%; p=0.03), and less pes cavus than the control group (58% vs 77%; p=0.004). However, there was no significant difference between the groups in the navicular height (3.90 ± 0.85 cm vs 4.00 ± 0.76 cm; p=0.41). In multivariate statistical analysis, after adjusting for age and body mass index, pronated foot in FPI (OR=1.22, 95%IC= [1.06-1.40], p=0.005), and pes cavus (OR=0.32, 95%IC= [0.11-0.93], p=0.03) had a significant correlation with the knee osteoarthritis. Conclusion : Pronated foot posture and flat foot are significantly associated with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. PMID:25553141

  13. Layer-specific femorotibial cartilage T2 relaxation time in knees with and without early knee osteoarthritis: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI)

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, W.; Maschek, S.; W. Roemer, F.; Eckstein, F.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based spin-spin relaxation time (T2) mapping has been shown to be associated with cartilage matrix composition (hydration, collagen content & orientation). To determine the impact of early radiographic knee osteoarthritis (ROA) and ROA risk factors on femorotibial cartilage composition, we studied baseline values and one-year change in superficial and deep cartilage T2 layers in 60 subjects (age 60.6 ± 9.6 y; BMI 27.8 ± 4.8) with definite osteophytes in one knee (earlyROA, n = 32) and with ROA risk factors in the contralateral knee (riskROA, n = 28), and 89 healthy subjects (age 55.0 ± 7.5 y; BMI 24.4 ± 3.1) without signs or risk factors of ROA. Baseline T2 did not differ significantly between earlyROA and riskROA knees in the superficial (48.0 ± 3.5 ms vs. 48.1 ± 3.1 ms) or the deep layer (37.3 ± 2.5 ms vs. 37.3 ± 1.8 ms). However, healthy knees showed significantly lower superficial layer T2 (45.4 ± 2.3 ms) than earlyROA or riskROA knees (p ≤ 0.001) and significantly lower deep layer T2 (35.8 ± 1.8 ms) than riskROA knees (p = 0.006). Significant longitudinal change in T2 (superficial: 0.5 ± 1.4 ms; deep: 0.8 ± 1.3 ms) was only detected in healthy knees. These results do not suggest an association of early ROA (osteophytes) with cartilage composition, as assessed by T2 mapping, whereas cartilage composition was observed to differ between knees with and without ROA risk factors. PMID:27670272

  14. Effect of Weight Maintenance on Symptoms of Knee Osteoarthritis in Obese Patients: A Twelve-Month Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Robin; Henriksen, Marius; Leeds, Anthony R; Gudbergsen, Henrik; Christensen, Pia; Sørensen, Tina J; Bartels, Else M; Riecke, Birgit F; Aaboe, Jens; Frederiksen, Rikke; Boesen, Mikael; Lohmander, L Stefan; Astrup, Arne; Bliddal, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare results of obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) who, after an intensive weight loss regimen, received 1 year of either dietary support (D), a knee-exercise program (E), or “no attention” (C; control group). Methods We conducted a randomized, 2-phase, parallel-group trial. A total of 192 obese participants with knee OA were enrolled; the mean age was 62.5 years and 81% were women with a mean entry weight of 103.2 kg. In phase 1, all participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups and began a dietary regimen of 400–810 and 1,250 kcal/day for 16 weeks (2 8-week phases) to achieve a major weight loss. Phase 2 consisted of 52 weeks' maintenance in either group D, E, or C. Outcomes were changes from randomization in pain on a 100-mm visual analog scale, weight, and response according to the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology-Osteoarthritis Research Society International criteria. Results Mean weight loss for phase 1 was 12.8 kg. After 1 year on maintenance therapy, the D group sustained a lower weight (11.0 kg, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 9.0, 12.8 kg) than those in the E (6.2, 95% CI 4.4, 8.1 kg) and C (8.2, 95% CI 6.4, 10.1 kg) groups (P = 0.002 by analysis of covariance [ANCOVA]). Adherence was low in the E group. All groups had statistically significant pain reduction (D: 6.1; E: 5.6; and C: 5.5 mm) with no difference between groups (P = 0.98 by ANCOVA). In each group 32 (50%), 26 (41%), and 33 (52%) participants responded to treatment in the D, E, and C groups, respectively, with no statistically significant difference in the number of responders (P = 0.41). Conclusion A significant weight reduction with a 1-year maintenance program improves knee OA symptoms irrespective of maintenance program. PMID:25370359

  15. Intra-Articular Injections of Platelet-Rich Plasma versus Hyaluronic Acid in the Treatment of Osteoarthritic Knee Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial in the Context of the Spanish National Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Montañez-Heredia, Elvira; Irízar, Sofia; Huertas, Pedro J; Otero, Esperanza; Del Valle, Marta; Prat, Isidro; Díaz-Gallardo, Macarena S; Perán, Macarena; Marchal, Juan A; Hernandez-Lamas, María Del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Intra-articular injection of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been established as a suitable treatment for knee osteoarthritis. Here, we present a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial, conducted in a public Hospital of the Spanish National Health Care System, to evaluate the efficacy of injecting autologous PRP versus hyaluronic acid (HA) in knee osteoarthritis. PRP was manufactured in Malaga's Regional Blood Center (Spain). Patients that met the eligibility criteria were randomized into a PRP group or a HA group. Pain and functional improvements were assessed pre- and post-treatment (three and six months follow-up) using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS); the Knee and Osteoarthritis Outcome System (KOOS) scale and the European Quality of Life scale (EUROQOL). Both groups presented pain reduction at six months. The VAS scores for the PRP group improved by at least 50% from their initial value, particularly at three months following the final infiltration, with results resembling those of the HA group at six months. PRP was more effective in patients with lower osteoarthritis grades. Both treatments improved pain in knee osteoarthritis patients without statistically significant differences between them. However, PRP injection was proved to improve pain three months after the final infiltration and to be more effective in lower osteoarthritis grades. PMID:27384560

  16. Intra-Articular Injections of Platelet-Rich Plasma versus Hyaluronic Acid in the Treatment of Osteoarthritic Knee Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial in the Context of the Spanish National Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    Montañez-Heredia, Elvira; Irízar, Sofia; Huertas, Pedro J.; Otero, Esperanza; del Valle, Marta; Prat, Isidro