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Sample records for knee pain randomised

  1. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  2. Exercise in children with joint hypermobility syndrome and knee pain: a randomised controlled trial comparing exercise into hypermobile versus neutral knee extension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee pain in children with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) is traditionally managed with exercise, however the supporting evidence for this is scarce. No trial has previously examined whether exercising to neutral or into the hypermobile range affects outcomes. This study aimed to (i) determine if a physiotherapist-prescribed exercise programme focused on knee joint strength and control is effective in reducing knee pain in children with JHS compared to no treatment, and (ii) whether the range in which these exercises are performed affects outcomes. Methods A prospective, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial conducted in a tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia compared an 8 week exercise programme performed into either the full hypermobile range or only to neutral knee extension, following a minimum 2 week baseline period without treatment. Randomisation was computer-generated, with allocation concealed by sequentially numbered opaque sealed envelopes. Knee pain was the primary outcome. Quality of life, thigh muscle strength, and function were also measured at (i) initial assessment, (ii) following the baseline period and (iii) post treatment. Assessors were blinded to the participants’ treatment allocation and participants blinded to the difference in the treatments. Results Children with JHS and knee pain (n=26) aged 7-16 years were randomly assigned to the hypermobile (n=12) or neutral (n=14) treatment group. Significant improvements in child-reported maximal knee pain were found following treatment, regardless of group allocation with a mean 14.5 mm reduction on the visual analogue scale (95% CI 5.2 – 23.8 mm, p=0.003). Significant differences between treatment groups were noted for parent-reported overall psychosocial health (p=0.009), specifically self-esteem (p=0.034), mental health (p=0.001) and behaviour (p=0.019), in favour of exercising into the hypermobile range (n=11) compared to neutral only (n=14). Conversely, parent

  3. Effect of local anaesthetic infiltration on chronic postsurgical pain after total hip and knee replacement: the APEX randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Wylde, Vikki; Lenguerrand, Erik; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Beswick, Andrew D.; Marques, Elsa; Noble, Sian; Horwood, Jeremy; Pyke, Mark; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) are usually effective at relieving pain; however, 7% to 23% of patients experience chronic postsurgical pain. These trials aimed to investigate the effect of local anaesthetic wound infiltration on pain severity at 12 months after primary THR or TKR for osteoarthritis. Between November 2009 and February 2012, 322 patients listed for THR and 316 listed for TKR were recruited into a single-centre double-blind randomised controlled trial. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive local anaesthetic infiltration and standard care or standard care alone. Participants and outcomes assessors were masked to group allocation. The primary outcome was pain severity on the WOMAC Pain Scale at 12 months after surgery. Analyses were conducted using intention-to-treat and per-protocol approaches. In the hip trial, patients in the intervention group had significantly less pain at 12 months postoperative than patients in the standard care group (differences in means: 4.74; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.95-8.54; P = 0.015), although the difference was not clinically significant. Post hoc analysis found that patients in the intervention group were more likely to have none to moderate pain than severe pain at 12 months than those in the standard care group (odds ratio: 10.19; 95% CI: 2.10-49.55; P = 0.004). In the knee trial, there was no strong evidence that the intervention influenced pain severity at 12 months postoperative (difference in means: 3.83; 95% CI: −0.83 to 8.49; P = 0.107). In conclusion, routine use of infiltration could be beneficial in improving long-term pain relief for some patients after THR. PMID:25659070

  4. Anterior knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... as running, jumping or twisting, skiing, or playing soccer). You have flat feet. Anterior knee pain is ... to the kneecap Runners, jumpers, skiers, bicyclists, and soccer players who exercise often Teenagers and healthy young ...

  5. Non-invasive interactive neurostimulation (InterX ™) reduces acute pain in patients following total knee replacement surgery: a randomised, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adequate post-operative pain relief following total knee replacement (TKR) is very important to optimal post-operative recovery. Faster mobilisation and rehabilitation ultimately results in optimum recovery outcomes, but pain is often the limiting factor. This study evaluates the potential clinical benefit of the InterX neurostimulation device on pain reduction and rehabilitative outcome. Methods A clinical trial under the Hywel Dda Clinical Audit Committee to validate the clinical benefit of Non-invasive Interactive Neurostimulation (NIN) therapy using the InterX device was performed in patients undergoing TKR. 61 patients were randomised to treatment groups in blocks of two from the Theatre Operation List. The control group received the standard hospital course of pain medication and rehabilitation twice daily for 3 post-op days. The experimental group received 8 sessions of NIN therapy over 3 post-op days in addition to the standard course received by the Control group. Pain and range of motion were collected as the primary study measures. Results Sixty one subjects were enrolled and randomised, but 2 subjects (one/group) were excluded due to missing data at Baseline/Final; one subject in the InterX group was excluded due to pre-existing rheumatoid pain conditions confounding the analysis. The experimental group pre- to post-session Verbal Rating Scale for pain (VRS) showed that NIN therapy consistently reduced the pain scores by a mean of 2.3 points (SE 0.11). The NIN pre-treatment score at Final was used for the primary ANCOVA comparison, demonstrating a significantly greater cumulative treatment effect of a mean 2.2 (SE 0.49) points pain reduction (p = 0.002). Control subjects only experienced a mean 0.34 (SE 0.49) point decrease in pain. Ninety degrees ROM was required to discharge the patient and this was attained as an average despite the greater Baseline deficit in the InterX group. Eight control patients and three experimental patients did not

  6. Knee pain in competitive swimming.

    PubMed

    Rodeo, S A

    1999-04-01

    The high volume of training in competitive swimming results in cumulative overload injuries. Knee pain ranks second to shoulder pain as a common complaint in competitive swimmers. Most knee pain occurs on the medial side of the knee and, most commonly, in breaststroke swimmers; however, knee pain may accompany all strokes. This article reviews the incidence of knee pain, the biomechanic and anatomic factors predisposing to injury, specific injury patterns, injury diagnosis, and the treatment and prevention of injury to the knee in swimmers. PMID:10230572

  7. Short-term efficacy of physical interventions in osteoarthritic knee pain. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised placebo-controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Bjordal, Jan M; Johnson, Mark I; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo AB; Bogen, Bård; Chow, Roberta; Ljunggren, Anne E

    2007-01-01

    Background Treatment efficacy of physical agents in osteoarthritis of the knee (OAK) pain has been largely unknown, and this systematic review was aimed at assessing their short-term efficacies for pain relief. Methods Systematic review with meta-analysis of efficacy within 1–4 weeks and at follow up at 1–12 weeks after the end of treament. Results 36 randomised placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) were identified with 2434 patients where 1391 patients received active treatment. 33 trials satisfied three or more out of five methodological criteria (Jadad scale). The patient sample had a mean age of 65.1 years and mean baseline pain of 62.9 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS). Within 4 weeks of the commencement of treatment manual acupuncture, static magnets and ultrasound therapies did not offer statistically significant short-term pain relief over placebo. Pulsed electromagnetic fields offered a small reduction in pain of 6.9 mm [95% CI: 2.2 to 11.6] (n = 487). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, including interferential currents), electro-acupuncture (EA) and low level laser therapy (LLLT) offered clinically relevant pain relieving effects of 18.8 mm [95% CI: 9.6 to 28.1] (n = 414), 21.9 mm [95% CI: 17.3 to 26.5] (n = 73) and 17.7 mm [95% CI: 8.1 to 27.3] (n = 343) on VAS respectively versus placebo control. In a subgroup analysis of trials with assumed optimal doses, short-term efficacy increased to 22.2 mm [95% CI: 18.1 to 26.3] for TENS, and 24.2 mm [95% CI: 17.3 to 31.3] for LLLT on VAS. Follow-up data up to 12 weeks were sparse, but positive effects seemed to persist for at least 4 weeks after the course of LLLT, EA and TENS treatment was stopped. Conclusion TENS, EA and LLLT administered with optimal doses in an intensive 2–4 week treatment regimen, seem to offer clinically relevant short-term pain relief for OAK. PMID:17587446

  8. Duloxetine in OsteoArthritis (DOA) study: study protocol of a pragmatic open-label randomised controlled trial assessing the effect of preoperative pain treatment on postoperative outcome after total hip or knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Blikman, T; Rienstra, W; van Raaij, T M; ten Hagen, A J; Dijkstra, B; Zijlstra, W P; Bulstra, S K; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Stevens, M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Residual pain is a major factor in patient dissatisfaction following total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty (THA/TKA). The proportion of patients with unfavourable long-term residual pain is high, ranging from 7% to 34%. There are studies indicating that a preoperative degree of central sensitisation (CS) is associated with poorer postoperative outcomes and residual pain. It is thus hypothesised that preoperative treatment of CS could enhance postoperative outcomes. Duloxetine has been shown to be effective for several chronic pain syndromes, including knee osteoarthritis (OA), in which CS is most likely one of the underlying pain mechanisms. This study aims to evaluate the postoperative effects of preoperative screening and targeted duloxetine treatment of CS on residual pain compared with care-as-usual. Methods and analysis This multicentre, pragmatic, prospective, open-label, randomised controlled trial includes patients with idiopathic hip/knee OA who are on a waiting list for primary THA/TKA. Patients at risk for CS will be randomly allocated to the preoperative duloxetine treatment programme group or the care-as-usual control group. The primary end point is the degree of postoperative pain 6 months after THA/TKA. Secondary end points at multiple time points up to 12 months postoperatively are: pain, neuropathic pain-like symptoms, (pain) sensitisation, pain catastrophising, joint-associated problems, physical activity, health-related quality of life, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and perceived improvement. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee (METc 2014/087) and will be conducted according to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki (64th, 2013) and the Good Clinical Practice standard (GCP), and in compliance with the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act (WMO). Trial registration number 2013-004313-41; Pre

  9. Total knee replacement with and without patellar resurfacing: a prospective, randomised trial using the profix total knee system.

    PubMed

    Smith, A J; Wood, D J; Li, M-G

    2008-01-01

    We have examined the differences in clinical outcome of total knee replacement (TKR) with and without patellar resurfacing in a prospective, randomised study of 181 osteoarthritic knees in 142 patients using the Profix total knee system which has a femoral component with features considered to be anatomical and a domed patellar implant. The procedures were carried out between February 1998 and November 2002. A total of 159 TKRs in 142 patients were available for review at a mean of four years (3 to 7). The patients and the clinical evaluator were blinded in this prospective study. Evaluation was undertaken annually by an independent observer using the knee pain scale and the Knee Society clinical rating system. Specific evaluation of anterior knee pain, stair-climbing and rising from a seated to a standing position was also undertaken. No benefit was shown of TKR with patellar resurfacing over that without resurfacing with respect to any of the measured outcomes. In 22 of 73 knees (30.1%) with and 18 of 86 knees (20.9%) without patellar resurfacing there was some degree of anterior knee pain (p = 0.183). No revisions related to the patellofemoral joint were performed in either group. Only one TKR in each group underwent a re-operation related to the patellofemoral joint. A significant association between knee flexion contracture and anterior knee pain was observed in those knees with patellar resurfacing (p = 0.006). PMID:18160498

  10. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  11. Single-blinded, randomised preliminary study evaluating the effects of 2 Hz electroacupuncture for postoperative pain in patients with total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Chung-Yuh; Chang, Shih-Liang; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chang, Chu-Ling; Chen, Wen-Gii; Tong, Kwok-Man; Huang, Kui-Chou; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the point-specific clinical effect of 2 Hz electroacupuncture (EA) in treating postoperative pain in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA), Methods In a randomised, partially single-blinded preliminary study, 47patients with TKA were randomly divided into three groups: control group (CG, n=17) using only patient-controlled analgesia (PCA); EA group (EAG, n=16) with 2 Hz EA applied at ST36 (Zusanli) and GB34 (Yanglingquan) contralateral to the operated leg for 30 min on the first two postoperative days, also receiving PCA; and non-point group (NPG, n=14), with EA identical to the EAG except given 1 cm lateral to both ST36 and GB34. The Mann–Whitney test was used to show the difference between two groups and the Kruskal–Wallis test to show the difference between the three groups. Results The time until patients first required PCA in the CG was 34.1±22.0 min, which was significantly shorter than the 92.0±82.7 min in the EAG (p<0.001) and 90.7±94.8 min in the NPG (p<0.001); there was no difference between the EAG and NPG groups (p>0.05). The total dosage of PCA solution given was 4.6±0.9 mL/kg body weight in the CG, 4.2±1.0 mL/kg in the EAG and 4.5±1.0 mL/kg in the NPG; there were no significant differences (p>0.05) among the three groups. Conclusions In this small preliminary study, EA retarded the first demand for PCA in comparison with no EA. No effect was seen on the total dosage of PCA required and no point-specific effect was seen. PMID:25910930

  12. Nonsurgical Management of Knee Pain in Adults.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brandon Q; Covey, Carlton J; Sineath, Marvin H

    2015-11-15

    The role of the family physician in managing knee pain is expanding as recent literature supports nonsurgical management for many patients. Effective treatment depends on the etiology of knee pain. Oral analgesics-most commonly nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen-are used initially in combination with physical therapy to manage the most typical causes of chronic knee pain. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommends against glucosamine/chondroitin supplementation for osteoarthritis. In patients who are not candidates for surgery, opioid analgesics should be used only if conservative pharmacotherapy is ineffective. Exercise-based therapy is the foundation for treating knee osteoarthritis and patellofemoral pain syndrome. Weight loss should be encouraged for all patients with osteoarthritis and a body mass index greater than 25 kg per m2. Aside from stabilizing traumatic knee ligament and tendon tears, the effectiveness of knee braces for chronic knee pain is uncertain, and the use of braces should not replace physical therapy. Foot orthoses can be helpful for anterior knee pain. Corticosteroid injections are effective for short-term pain relief in patients with osteoarthritis. The benefit of hyaluronic acid injections is controversial, and recommendations vary; recent systematic reviews do not support a clinically significant benefit. Small studies suggest that regenerative injections can improve pain and function in patients with chronic knee tendinopathies and osteoarthritis. PMID:26554281

  13. Anterior knee pain following primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shervin, David; Pratt, Katelyn; Healey, Travis; Nguyen, Samantha; Mihalko, William M; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-11-18

    Despite improvements in technique and technology for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), anterior knee pain impacts patient outcomes and satisfaction. Addressing the prosthetic and surgical technique related causes of pain after TKA, specifically as it relates to anterior knee pain, can aid surgeons in addressing these issues with their patients. Design features of the femoral and patellar components which have been reported as pain generators include: Improper femoral as well as patellar component sizing or designs that result in patellofemoral stuffing; a shortened trochlear groove distance from the flange to the intercondylar box; and then surgical technique related issues resulting in: Lateral patellar facet syndrome; overstuffed patella/flange combination; asymmetric patellar resurfacing, improper transverse plane component rotation resulting in patellar subluxation/tilt. Any design consideration that allows impingement of extensor mechanism anatomical elements has the possibility of impacting outcome by becoming a pain generator. As the number of TKA procedures continues to increase, it is increasingly critical to develop improved, evidence based prostheses that maximize function and patient satisfaction while minimizing pain and other complications. PMID:26601061

  14. Anterior knee pain following primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shervin, David; Pratt, Katelyn; Healey, Travis; Nguyen, Samantha; Mihalko, William M; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvements in technique and technology for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), anterior knee pain impacts patient outcomes and satisfaction. Addressing the prosthetic and surgical technique related causes of pain after TKA, specifically as it relates to anterior knee pain, can aid surgeons in addressing these issues with their patients. Design features of the femoral and patellar components which have been reported as pain generators include: Improper femoral as well as patellar component sizing or designs that result in patellofemoral stuffing; a shortened trochlear groove distance from the flange to the intercondylar box; and then surgical technique related issues resulting in: Lateral patellar facet syndrome; overstuffed patella/flange combination; asymmetric patellar resurfacing, improper transverse plane component rotation resulting in patellar subluxation/tilt. Any design consideration that allows impingement of extensor mechanism anatomical elements has the possibility of impacting outcome by becoming a pain generator. As the number of TKA procedures continues to increase, it is increasingly critical to develop improved, evidence based prostheses that maximize function and patient satisfaction while minimizing pain and other complications. PMID:26601061

  15. Managing the pain of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hrnack, Scott A; Barber, F Alan

    2014-09-01

    Pain from knee osteoarthritis creates a significant burden for symptomatic patients, who are often forced to change their lifestyle because of their symptoms. Activity modification, therapy, weight loss, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, shoe orthotics, bracing, and injections are the nonoperative options available. New technologies are also emerging in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Ultimately, these therapeutic modalities should reduce pain and increase the overall functioning of patients. These nonoperative modalities give the clinician several effective options before surgical management is considered. PMID:25295768

  16. Subacute pain after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Axel; Breivik, Harald

    2014-06-01

    Acute pain during and immediately after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can be well controlled by spinal anesthesia, local infiltration analgesia, and peripheral nerve blocks; this enables early or fast-track rehabilitation. However, about half of patients have clinically significant pain in the following weeks. Active movements and rehabilitation of joint function, muscle strength, and ability to maintain balance and prevent falls all become more difficult when the joint is painful on movement. Intensive analgesic and antihyperalgesic treatment during the first few weeks after TKA surgery may reduce the risk of chronic pain after this operation, which is itself intended to remove the patient's chronic osteoarthritis pain. Spinal cord stimulation may be an effective option for patients with mainly neuropathic pain after TKA surgery.

  17. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Volker; Han, Jeong S; Adwanikar, Hita; Fu, Yu; Ji, Guangchen

    2007-03-28

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review.

  18. Review for the generalist: evaluation of anterior knee pain

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Kristin M

    2007-01-01

    Anterior knee pain is common in children and adolescents. Evaluation and management is challenging and requires a thorough history and physical exam, and understanding of the pediatric skeleton. This article will review common causes of chronic anterior knee pain in the pediatric population with a focus on patellofemoral pain. PMID:17550634

  19. Editorial Commentary: Platelet-Rich Plasma Improves Knee Pain and Function in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-11-01

    Systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that platelet-rich plasma improves knee pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Ultimately, biologics hold promise for chondroprotection in addition to symptomatic relief. PMID:26542203

  20. Pain hypervigilance is associated with greater clinical pain severity and enhanced experimental pain sensitivity among adults with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Matthew S.; Goodin, Burel R.; Pero, Samuel T.; Schmidt, Jessica K.; Sotolongo, Adriana; Bulls, Hailey W.; Glover, Toni L.; King, Christopher D.; Sibille, Kimberly T.; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Staud, Roland; Fessler, Barri J.; Bradley, Laurence A.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain hypervigilance is an important aspect of the fear-avoidance model of pain that may help explain individual differences in pain sensitivity among persons with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of pain hypervigilance to clinical pain severity and experimental pain sensitivity in persons with symptomatic knee OA. Methods We analyzed cross-sectional data from 168 adults with symptomatic knee OA. Quantitative sensory testing was used to measure sensitivity to heat pain, pressure pain, and cold pain, as well as temporal summation of heat pain, a marker of central sensitization. Results Pain hypervigilance was associated with greater clinical pain severity, as well as greater pressure pain. Pain hypervigilance was also a significant predictor of temporal summation of heat pain. Conclusions Pain hypervigilance may be an important contributor to pain reports and experimental pain sensitivity among persons with knee OA. PMID:24352850

  1. Diagnostic Algorithm for Residual Pain After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Park, Caroline N; White, Peter B; Meftah, Morteza; Ranawat, Amar S; Ranawat, Chitranjan S

    2016-01-01

    Although total knee arthroplasty is a successful and cost-effective procedure, patient dissatisfaction remains as high as 50%. Postoperative residual knee pain after total knee arthroplasty, with or without crepitation, is a major factor that contributes to patient dissatisfaction. The most common location for residual pain after total knee arthroplasty is anteriorly. Because residual pain has been associated with an un-resurfaced patella, this review includes only registry data and total knee arthroplasty with patella replacement. Some suggest that the pathogenesis of residual knee pain may be related to mechanical stimuli that activate free nerve endings around the patellofemoral joint. Various etiologies have been implicated in residual pain, including (1) low-grade infection, (2) midflexion instability, and (3) component malalignment with patellar maltracking. Less common causes include (4) crepitation and patellar clunk syndrome; (5) patellofemoral symptoms, including overstuffing and avascular necrosis of the patella; (6) early aseptic loosening; (7) hypersensitivity to metal or cement; (8) complex regional pain syndrome; and (9) pseudoaneurysm. Because all of these conditions can lead to residual pain, identifying the etiology can be a difficult diagnostic challenge. Often, patients with persistent pain and normal findings on radiographs and laboratory workup may benefit from a diagnostic injection or further imaging. However, up to 10% to 15% of patients with residual pain may have unexplained pain. This literature review summarizes the findings on the causes of residual pain and presents a diagnostic algorithm to facilitate an accurate diagnosis for residual pain after total knee arthroplasty. PMID:26811953

  2. Painful knee arthroplasty: definition and overview

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Christian; Villano, Marco; Bucciarelli, Giovanni; Martini, Caterina; Innocenti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Summary Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful procedures in Orthopaedic Surgery, with good clinical results and high survival rate in more than 90% of the cases at long-term follow-up. Since the increase of population’s mean age, worsening of articular degenerative alterations, and articular sequelae related to previous fractures, there is a persistent growing of the number of knee arthroplasties in every country each year, with expected increase of complications rates. Painful TKA is considered an unusual complication, but several reports focus on this challenging clinical issue. Common causes of painful TKA may be divided as early or late, and in referred, periarticular or intra-articular. Among the early, we recall implant instability (related to surgical and technical mistakes) and problems of extensor mechanism (patella not resurfaced, malalignment of femoral, tibial, or patellar component, tendons failure or degeneration). Late causes of painful TKA are almost related to aseptic loosening and infection, but also, even if unusual, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, synovitis, and hypersensitivity to metal implants are represented. Hypersensitivity to metal is a clinical issue with significative increase, but to date without a specific characterization. The Authors report about incidence, clinical features, and diagnostic pathways of hypersensitivity to metal implants, focusing on the prevention of this challenging problem. PMID:22461811

  3. The pain-relieving qualities of exercise in knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Susko, Allyn M; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review article is to explore the role of therapeutic exercise in managing the pain associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Therapeutic exercise is often recommended as a first-line conservative treatment for knee OA, and current evidence supports exercise as an effective pain-relieving intervention. We explore the current state of evidence for exercise as a pain-relieving intervention for knee OA. Next, the mechanisms by which knee OA pain occurs and the potential ways in which exercise may act on those mechanisms are discussed. Clinical applicability and future research directions are suggested. Although evidence demonstrates that exercise reduces knee OA pain, optimal exercise mode and dosage have not been determined. In addition, it is not clearly understood whether exercise provides pain relief via peripheral or central mechanisms or a combination of both. Published clinical trials have explored a variety of interventions, but these interventions have not been specifically designed to target pain pathways. Current evidence strongly supports exercise as a pain-relieving option for those with knee OA. Future research needs to illuminate the mechanisms by which exercise reduces the pain associated with knee OA and the development of therapeutic exercise interventions to specifically target these mechanisms.

  4. Early intervention for adolescents with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome - a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Self-reported knee pain is highly prevalent among adolescents. As much as 50% of the non-specific knee pain may be attributed to Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS). In the short term, exercise therapy appears to have a better effect than patient education consisting of written information and general advice on exercise or compared with placebo treatment. But the long-term effect of exercise therapy compared with patient education is conflicting. The purpose of this study is to examine the short- and long-term effectiveness of patient education compared with patient education and multimodal physiotherapy applied at a very early stage of the condition among adolescents. Methods/Design This study is a single blind pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial. Four upper secondary schools have been invited to participate in the study (approximately 2500 students, aged 15-19 years). Students are asked to answer an online questionnaire regarding musculoskeletal pain. The students who report knee pain are contacted by telephone and offered a clinical examination by a rheumatologist. Subjects who fit the inclusion criteria and are diagnosed with PFPS are invited to participate in the study. A minimum of 102 students with PFPS are then cluster-randomised into two intervention groups based on which school they attend. Both intervention groups receive written information and education. In addition to patient education, one group receives multimodal physiotherapy consisting primarily of neuromuscular training of the muscles around the foot, knee and hip and home exercises. The students with PFPS fill out self-reported questionnaires at baseline, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after inclusion in the study. The primary outcome measure is perception of recovery measured on a 7-point Likert scale ranging from "completely recovered" to "worse than ever" at 12 months. Discussion This study is designed to investigate the effectiveness of patient education compared with patient

  5. [A man with a painful knee with restricted flexion].

    PubMed

    Valkering, Lucia J J; Zengerink, Maartje; van Kampen, Albert

    2015-01-01

    A 39-year-old man presented with knee pain and limited knee flexion. MRI showed a mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (celery stalk sign). This rare condition can be treated with arthroscopic debridement with volume reduction of the anterior cruciate ligament. In severe cases, anterior cruciate ligament resection could be considered. PMID:26395568

  6. Osseous fragment in a patient with knee pain.

    PubMed

    Beers, Lauren R; Mabry, Lance M; Sullivan, Robert T

    2015-04-01

    The patient was a 31-year-old man who was currently serving in the military. He was referred to a physical therapist by his primary care physician for a chief complaint of left anterior knee pain. Due to concern over a loose body, the physical therapist ordered radiographs of the left knee, which revealed an osseous fragment.

  7. Editorial Commentary: Knee Hyaluronic Acid Viscosupplementation Reduces Osteoarthritis Pain.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to the AAOS knee osteoarthritis guidelines, systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that viscosupplementation with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injection reduces knee osteoarthritis pain and improves function according to the highest level of evidence. PMID:26433240

  8. Anterior knee pain: an update of physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Werner, Suzanne

    2014-10-01

    Anterior knee pain is one of the most common knee problems in physically active individuals. The reason for anterior knee pain has been suggested to be multifactorial with patella abnormalities or extensor mechanism disorder leading to patellar malalignment during flexion and extension of the knee joint. Some patients complain mostly of non-specific knee pain, while others report patellar instability problems. The patients present with a variety of symptoms and clinical findings, meaning that a thorough clinical examination is the key for optimal treatment. Weakness of the quadriceps muscle, especially during eccentric contractions, is usually present in the majority of anterior knee pain patients. However, irrespective of whether pain or instability is the major problem, hypotrophy and reduced activity of the vastus medialis are often found, which result in an imbalance between vastus medialis and vastus lateralis. This imbalance needs to be corrected before quadriceps exercises are started. The non-operative rehabilitation protocol should be divided into different phases based on the patient's progress. The goal of the first phase is to reduce pain and swelling, improve the balance between vastus medialis and vastus lateralis, restore normal gait, and decrease loading of the patello-femoral joint. The second phase should include improvement of postural control and coordination of the lower extremity, increase of quadriceps strength and when needed hip muscle strength, and restore good knee function. The patient should be encouraged to return to or to start with a suitable regular physical exercise. Therefore, the third phase should include functional exercises. Towards the end of the treatment, single-leg functional tests and functional knee scores should be used for evaluating clinical outcome. A non-operative treatment of patients with anterior knee pain should be tried for at least 3 months before considering other treatment options.

  9. Holistic approach to understanding anterior knee pain. Clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente

    2014-10-01

    Anterior knee pain is one of the most frequent reasons for consultation within knee conditions. The aetiology is not well known, which explains the sometimes unpredictable results of its treatment. Normally, when we see a patient in the office with anterior knee pain, we only study and focus on the knee. If we do this, we are making a big mistake. We must not forget to evaluate the pelvis and proximal femur, as well as the psychological factors that modulate the course of the illness. Both the pelvifemoral dysfunction as well as the psychological factors (anxiety, depression, catastrophization and kinesiophobia) must be included in our therapeutic targets of the multidisciplinary treatment of anterior knee pain. We must not only focus on the knee, we must remember to "look up" to fully understand what is happening and be able to solve this difficult problem. The aetiology of anterior knee pain is multifactorial. Therefore, diagnosis and treatment of patellofemoral disorders must be individualized. Our findings stress the importance of tailoring physiotherapy, surgery and psycho-educational interventions to each patient.

  10. [Chronic knee pain and specific heat phobia. A case report].

    PubMed

    Pepke, W; Neubauer, E; Schiltenwolf, M

    2013-02-01

    This case report presents the medical history of a patient suffering from chronic knee pain with specific heat phobia who had a long history of sick certificates. Using multimodal pain therapy and biofeedback therapy the acquired anxiety disorder could be solved. Long-term working ability could be achieved. PMID:23321701

  11. The impact of including corticosteroid in a periarticular injection for pain control after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, S.; Wakui, M.; Hoshino, A.

    2016-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence about the benefit of using corticosteroid in periarticular injections for pain relief after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We carried out a double-blinded, randomised controlled trial to assess the efficacy of using corticosteroid in a periarticular injection to control pain after TKA. A total of 77 patients, 67 women and ten men, with a mean age of 74 years (47 to 88) who were about to undergo unilateral TKA were randomly assigned to have a periarticular injection with or without corticosteroid. The primary outcome was post-operative pain at rest during the first 24 hours after surgery, measured every two hours using a visual analogue pain scale score. The cumulative pain score was quantified using the area under the curve. The corticosteroid group had a significantly lower cumulative pain score than the no-corticosteroid group during the first 24 hours after surgery (mean area under the curve 139, 0 to 560, and 264, 0 to 1460; p = 0.024). The rate of complications, including surgical site infection, was not significantly different between the two groups up to one year post-operatively. The addition of corticosteroid to the periarticular injection significantly decreased early post-operative pain. Further studies are needed to confirm the safety of corticosteroid in periarticular injection. Take home message: The use of corticosteroid in periarticular injection offered better pain relief during the initial 24 hours after TKA. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:194–200. PMID:26850424

  12. Activity Increase Despite Arthritis (AÏDA): design of a Phase II randomised controlled trial evaluating an active management booklet for hip and knee osteoarthritis [ISRCTN24554946

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Nefyn H; Amoakwa, Elvis; Burton, Kim; Hendry, Maggie; Belcher, John; Lewis, Ruth; Hood, Kerenza; Jones, Jeremy; Bennett, Paul; Edwards, Rhiannon T; Neal, Richard D; Andrew, Glynne; Wilkinson, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Background Hip and knee osteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability, which can be improved by exercise interventions. However, regular exercise is uncommon in this group because the low physical activity level in the general population is probably reduced even further by pain related fear of movement. The best method of encouraging increased activity in this patient group is not known. A booklet has been developed for patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis. It focuses on changing disadvantageous beliefs and encouraging increased physical activity. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of a Phase II randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the effectiveness of this new booklet for patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis in influencing illness and treatment beliefs, and to assess the feasibility of conducting a larger definitive RCT in terms of health status and exercise behaviour. A computerised search of four general medical practice patients' record databases will identify patients older than 50 years of age who have consulted with hip or knee pain in the previous twelve months. A random sample of 120 will be invited to participate in the RCT comparing the new booklet with a control booklet, and we expect 100 to return final questionnaires. This trial will assess the feasibility of recruitment and randomisation, the suitability of the control intervention and outcome measurement tools, and will provide an estimate of effect size. Outcomes will include beliefs about hip and knee pain, beliefs about exercise, fear avoidance, level of physical activity, health status and health service costs. They will be measured at baseline, one month and three months. Discussion We discuss the merits of testing effectiveness in a phase II trial, in terms of intermediate outcome measures, whilst testing the processes for a larger definitive trial. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of testing the psychometric properties of the primary outcome

  13. Successful management of chronic postsurgical pain following total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Vas, Lakshmi; Khandagale, Nishigandha; Pai, Renuka

    2014-10-01

    We report reversal of chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) along with functional restoration after total knee replacement (TKR) in two patients, using a combination therapy that included ultrasonography-guided pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) of nerves supplying the knee to provide pain relief, along with dry needling (DN) to relax myofascial triggers/bands that caused painful stiffness and restricted movement of muscles acting across the knee. Both patients showed demonstrable pain relief, as evidenced by changes in pain as assessed on the Numeric Rating Scale (patient 1: 4-9/10 [pre-treatment] to 0-3/10 [6 months post-treatment]; patient 2: 5-9/10 to 0-4/10), Oxford Knee Score (patient 1: 17 to 40; patient 2: 12 to 39), Self-Administered Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs score (patient 1: 16 to 0; patient 2: 18 to 0), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score (patient 1: 17 to 2; patient 2: 20 to 2). The selection of the PRF-and-DN combination for treating post-TKR CPSP was based on a new idea that CPSP is a neuromyopathic phenomenon involving both sensory and motor neuropathy. It has evolved from our experience of 8 years. Physiotherapy worked synergistically with DN, optimizing muscle performance and pain relief.

  14. Radiology case of the month: recurrent knee pain in a young athlete.

    PubMed

    Nagalingam, Shiva; Weidenhaft, Mandy

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old male collegiate basketball player with a history of right knee pain presents with pain and swelling of his right knee. Physical exam reveals local swelling and tenderness over the right proximal tibial-fibular joint.

  15. Determinants of pain in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Behzad; Hajian-Tilaki, Karimollah; Babaei, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several factors are associated with the development or exacerbation of pain in knee osteoarthritis (KOA). In this study, we reviewed this context based on relevant studies. Methods: Recent published studies which have addressed the relationship between pain and KOA were summarized. Results: Correlates of the clinical, demographic features, laboratory tests and abnormalities on radiographic as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the knee pain have been discussed. The results indicated that many factors such as synovitis, synovial effusion, obesity, as well as structural lesions determined by MRI or radiographic examination, serum cytokines, inflammatory markers are determinants of pain in KOA. Conclusion: This context requires further investigations for identification of additional factors which initiate pain in asymptomatic KOA PMID:27757198

  16. Clinical Testing for Extra-Articular Lateral Knee Pain. A Modification and Combination of Traditional Tests

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Knee pain is one of the most common problems encountered by recreational and competitive athletes. Pain over the lateral aspect of the knee can be the result of intra or extra articular conditions. The purpose of this clinical suggestion is to present the modification of a traditional clinical test to aide in the differential diagnosis of lateral knee pain. This method has not been described elsewhere and anecdotally has been helpful in the evaluation of patients with lateral knee pain. PMID:21509133

  17. Does paracetamol (acetaminophen) reduce the pain of osteoarthritis?: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, W; Jones, A; Doherty, M

    2004-01-01

    Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Data sources: Medline, Embase, Scientific Citation Index, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and conference abstracts in the past 2 years from the British Society for Rheumatology, the European League Against Rheumatism, the American College of Rheumatology, and the Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Subjects: 10 RCTs including 1712 patients with either symptomatic OA of the knee (6 trials) or hip/knee (3 trials) or multiple joints (1 trial). Main outcome measures: (a) effect size (ES) for pain, stiffness, and functional scores from baseline to end point; (b) rate ratio (RR) and number needed to treat for clinical response rate and patient preference for treatment. Results: Paracetamol was effective in relieving pain due to OA (ES = 0.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02 to 0.41). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were better than paracetamol for pain relief (ES = 0.20, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.30). Clinical response rate was higher with NSAIDs than with paracetamol (RR = 1.24, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.41), and the number of patients who preferred NSAIDs was more than twice the number of those preferring paracetamol (RR = 2.46, 95% CI 1.51 to 4.12). NSAIDs were associated with more frequent gastrointestinal discomfort than paracetamol (RR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.75). Conclusion: Paracetamol is an effective agent for pain relief due to OA. Although safer, it is less effective than NSAIDs. For safety reasons paracetamol should be the first line treatment, with NSAIDs reserved for those who do not respond. PMID:15020311

  18. The Relationship Between Reductions in Knee Loading and Immediate Pain Response Whilst Wearing Lateral Wedged Insoles in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Richard K.; Chapman, Graham J.; Forsythe, Laura; Parkes, Matthew J.; Felson, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of lateral wedge insoles (LWIs) in medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) have shown reductions in the average external knee adduction moment (EKAM) but no lessening of knee pain. Some treated patients actually experience increases in the EKAM which could explain the overall absence of pain response. We examined whether, in patients with painful medial OA, reductions in the EKAM were associated with lessening of knee pain. Each patient underwent gait analysis whilst walking in a control shoe and two LWI’s. We evaluated the relationship between change in EKAM and change in knee pain using Spearman Rank Correlation coefficients and tested whether dichotomizing patients into biomechanical responders (decreased EKAM) and non-responders (increased EKAM) would identify those with reductions in knee pain. In 70 patients studied, the EKAM was reduced in both LWIs versus control shoe (−5.21% and −6.29% for typical and supported wedges, respectively). The change in EKAM using LWIs was not significantly associated with the direction of knee pain change. Further, 54% were biomechanical responders, but these persons did not have more knee pain reduction than non-responders. Whilst LWIs reduce EKAM, there is no clearcut relationship between change in medial load when wearing LWIs and corresponding change in knee pain. PMID:24903067

  19. Effects of proprioceptive circuit exercise on knee joint pain and muscle function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck; Kim, Sang-Soo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study applied proprioceptive circuit exercise to patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis and examined its effects on knee joint muscle function and the level of pain. [Subjects] In this study, 14 patients with knee osteoarthritis in two groups, a proprioceptive circuit exercise group (n = 7) and control group (n = 7), were examined. [Methods] IsoMed 2000 (D&R Ferstl GmbH, Hemau, Germany) was used to assess knee joint muscle function, and a Visual Analog Scale was used to measure pain level. [Results] In the proprioceptive circuit exercise group, knee joint muscle function and pain levels improved significantly, whereas in the control group, no significant improvement was observed. [Conclusion] A proprioceptive circuit exercise may be an effective way to strengthen knee joint muscle function and reduce pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  20. Overview of Total Knee Arthroplasty and Modern Pain Control Strategies.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Lacey Giambelluca; Fox, M Patricia; Dasa, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    Perioperative pain management of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains a challenge for physicians and anesthesiologists. Reducing postoperative pain is an essential component of patient satisfaction, functional outcomes, and hospital length of stay. Multimodal pain management regimens have been demonstrated to be superior to monotherapy in achieving adequate pain control, as well as an effective method of limiting side effects of analgesics. In the present investigation, we present literature published over the last year relating to new advancements in perioperative pain management for TKA. While it is widely accepted that methods including peripheral nerve blocks and local anesthetic injections are essential to pain protocols, there is still conflicting evidence over what modalities provide superior relief. The incorporation of cryoneurolysis preoperatively is a new modality which has been incorporated and has been shown to improve pain control in patients undergoing TKA.

  1. Interesting clinical presentation of anterior knee pain causing diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Samer S; Balasubramanian, S; Teanby, D

    2009-09-01

    A diverse variety of lesions may occasionally occur in the patella. In this case report, we are presenting an interesting case of anterior knee pain in middle aged gentleman. Initial investigations including Magnetic Resonance Imaging not showed any abnormality. Due to prolonged continued pain he had bone scan and MRI, which confirmed the diagnosis of Brodie's abscess. We are presenting this case of Brodie's abscess of the patella causing diagnostic dilemma because of its rarity.

  2. Painful Knees: When Damaged Menisci Are the Cause.

    PubMed

    Stuart, M J; Couzens, G S

    1994-03-01

    Damage to the meniscus can lead to knee pain in active people of all ages, from the adolescent basketball player to the senior tennis player. Joint-line tenderness, catching or locking, and other clues revealed during the history and physical exam will help the clinician accurately diagnose meniscus injuries-even without MRI.

  3. Relationship of Buckling and Knee Injury to Pain Exacerbation in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Web-Based Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Zobel, Isabelle; Erfani, Tahereh; Bennell, Kim L; Makovey, Joanna; Metcalf, Ben; March, Lyn; Zhang, Yuqing; Eckstein, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most frequent causes of limited mobility and diminished quality of life. Pain is the main symptom that drives individuals with knee OA to seek medical care and a recognized antecedent to disability and eventually joint replacement. Evidence shows that patients with symptomatic OA experience fluctuations in pain severity. Mechanical insults to the knee such as injury and buckling may contribute to pain exacerbation. Objective Our objective was to examine whether knee injury and buckling (giving way) are triggers for exacerbation of pain in persons with symptomatic knee OA. Methods We conducted a case-crossover study, a novel methodology in which participants with symptomatic radiographic knee OA who have had knee pain exacerbations were used as their own control (self-matched design), with all data collected via the Internet. Participants were asked to log-on to the study website and complete an online questionnaire at baseline and then at regular 10-day intervals for 3 months (control periods)—a total of 10 questionnaires. They were also instructed to go to the website and complete pain exacerbation questionnaires when they experienced an isolated incident of knee pain exacerbation (case periods). A pain exacerbation “case” period was defined as an increase of ≥2 compared to baseline. At each contact the pain exacerbation was designated a case period, and at all other regular 10-day contacts (control periods) participants were asked about knee injuries during the previous 7 days and knee buckling during the previous 2 days. The relationship of knee injury and buckling to the risk of pain exacerbation was examined using conditional logistic regression models. Results The analysis included 157 participants (66% women, mean age: 62 years, mean BMI: 29.5 kg/m2). Sustaining a knee injury was associated with experiencing a pain exacerbation (odds ratio [OR] 10.2, 95% CI 5.4, 19.3) compared with no injury. Knee

  4. Analgesia after total knee replacement: local infiltration versus epidural combined with a femoral nerve blockade. A prospective, randomised pragmatic trial

    PubMed Central

    Goytizolo, Enrique A.; Padgett, Douglas E.; Liu, Spencer S.; Mayman, David J.; Ranawat, Amar S.; Rade, Matthew C.; Westrich, Geoffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    In a randomised controlled pragmatic trial we investigated whether local infiltration analgesia would result in earlier readiness for discharge from hospital after total knee replacement (TKR) than patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) plus femoral nerve block. A total of 45 patients with a mean age of 65 years (49 to 81) received a local infiltration with a peri-articular injection of bupivacaine, morphine, and methylprednisolone, as well as adjuvant analgesics. In 45 PCEA+femoral nerve blockade patients with a mean age of 67 years (50 to 84), analgesia included a bupivacaine nerve block, bupivacaine/hydromorphone PCEA, and adjuvant analgesics. The mean time until ready for discharge was 3.2 days (1 to 14) in the local infiltration group and 3.2 days (1.8 to 7.0) in the PCEA+femoral nerve blockade group. The mean pain scores for patients receiving local infiltration were higher when walking (p = 0.0084), but there were no statistically significant differences at rest. The mean opioid consumption was higher in those receiving local infiltration. The choice between these two analgesic pathways should not be made on the basis of time to discharge after surgery. Most secondary outcomes were similar, but PCEA+femoral nerve blockade patients had lower pain scores when walking and during continuous passive movement. If PCEA+femoral nerve blockade is not readily available, local infiltration provides similar length of stay and similar pain scores at rest following TKR. PMID:23632672

  5. The Non-Operative Treatment of Anterior Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hakim, Wisam; Jaiswal, Parag Kumar; Khan, Wasim; Johnstone, David

    2012-01-01

    Anterior knee pain is a common presenting complaint, and in many cases no identifiable cause can be found. In these circumstances it is commonly known as anterior knee pain syndrome or patellofemoral pain syndrome. The management for this condition is most commonly non-operative. Treatment strategies include physiotherapy, pharmacotherapy, orthoses and combinations of the above. There are many described methods in the literature with a wide spectrum of outcomes, which in itself is testimony to the lack of any generally accepted gold standard of care for these patients. It is thus unclear to the health care professional treating these patients which is the best treatment to offer. In this review we aim to summarise historical and most up to date literature on the subject and in so doing allow the health care professional pick whichever treatment strategy they feel most beneficial and also provide a guide for appropriate patient education. PMID:22896779

  6. Perspectives for patients. Knee pain: safely strengthening your thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    2014-05-01

    Quadriceps are the muscles on the front of your thigh that help you straighten your knee. When these muscles are not strong, you may feel pain under your kneecap. Quadriceps can be strengthened by performing squats and leg extensions. However, when you do not perform these exercises properly, you may also feel knee pain. Understanding the load and stress under the kneecap when you execute squats and leg extensions can help you perform these exercises better and with less pain while you strengthen your quadriceps. A study published in the May 2014 issue of JOSPT provides information intended to help physical therapists and their patients use these exercises to strengthen thigh muscles while minimizing the load under the kneecap.

  7. Iliotibial band syndrome: a common source of knee pain.

    PubMed

    Khaund, Razib; Flynn, Sharon H

    2005-04-15

    Iliotibial band syndrome is a common knee injury. The most common symptom is lateral knee pain caused by inflammation of the distal portion of the iliotibial band. The iliotibial band is a thick band of fascia that crosses the hip joint and extends distally to insert on the patella, tibia, and biceps femoris tendon. In some athletes, repetitive flexion and extension of the knee causes the distal iliotibial band to become irritated and inflamed resulting in diffuse lateral knee pain. Iliotibial band syndrome can cause significant morbidity and lead to cessation of exercise. Although iliotibial band syndrome is easily diagnosed clinically, it can be extremely challenging to treat. Treatment requires active patient participation and compliance with activity modification. Most patients respond to conservative treatment involving stretching of the iliotibial band, strengthening of the gluteus medius, and altering training regimens. Corticosteroid injections should be considered if visible swelling or pain with ambulation persists for more than three days after initiating treatment. A small percentage of patients are refractory to conservative treatment and may require surgical release of the iliotibial band.

  8. Gonyautoxins: First evidence in pain management in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hinzpeter, Jaime; Barrientos, Cristián; Zamorano, Álvaro; Martinez, Álvaro; Palet, Miguel; Wulf, Rodrigo; Barahona, Maximiliano; Sepúlveda, Joaquín M; Guerra, Matias; Bustamante, Tamara; Del Campo, Miguel; Tapia, Eric; Lagos, Nestor

    2016-09-01

    Improvements in pain management techniques in the last decade have had a major impact on the practice of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Gonyautoxin are phycotoxins, whose molecular mechanism of action is a reversible block of the voltage-gated sodium channels at the axonal level, impeding nerve impulse propagation. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of Gonyautoxin infiltration, as a long acting pain blocker in TKA. Fifteen patients received a total dose of 40 μg of Gonyautoxin during the TKA operation. Postoperatively, all patients were given a standard painkiller protocol: 100 mg of intravenous ketoprofen and 1000 mg of oral acetaminophen every 8 hours for 3 days. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain score and range of motion were recorded 12, 36, and 60 hours post-surgery. All patients reported pain of 2 or less on the VAS 12 and 36 hours post-surgery. Moreover, all scored were less than 4 at 60 hours post-surgery. All patients achieved full knee extension at all times. No side effects or adverse reactions to Gonyautoxin were detected in the follow-up period. The median hospital stay was 3 days. For the first time, this study has shown the effect of blocking the neuronal transmission of pain by locally infiltrating Gonyautoxin during TKA. All patients successfully responded to the pain control. The Gonyautoxin infiltration was safe and effective, and patients experienced pain relief without the use of opioids. PMID:27317871

  9. Gonyautoxins: First evidence in pain management in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hinzpeter, Jaime; Barrientos, Cristián; Zamorano, Álvaro; Martinez, Álvaro; Palet, Miguel; Wulf, Rodrigo; Barahona, Maximiliano; Sepúlveda, Joaquín M; Guerra, Matias; Bustamante, Tamara; Del Campo, Miguel; Tapia, Eric; Lagos, Nestor

    2016-09-01

    Improvements in pain management techniques in the last decade have had a major impact on the practice of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Gonyautoxin are phycotoxins, whose molecular mechanism of action is a reversible block of the voltage-gated sodium channels at the axonal level, impeding nerve impulse propagation. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of Gonyautoxin infiltration, as a long acting pain blocker in TKA. Fifteen patients received a total dose of 40 μg of Gonyautoxin during the TKA operation. Postoperatively, all patients were given a standard painkiller protocol: 100 mg of intravenous ketoprofen and 1000 mg of oral acetaminophen every 8 hours for 3 days. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain score and range of motion were recorded 12, 36, and 60 hours post-surgery. All patients reported pain of 2 or less on the VAS 12 and 36 hours post-surgery. Moreover, all scored were less than 4 at 60 hours post-surgery. All patients achieved full knee extension at all times. No side effects or adverse reactions to Gonyautoxin were detected in the follow-up period. The median hospital stay was 3 days. For the first time, this study has shown the effect of blocking the neuronal transmission of pain by locally infiltrating Gonyautoxin during TKA. All patients successfully responded to the pain control. The Gonyautoxin infiltration was safe and effective, and patients experienced pain relief without the use of opioids.

  10. Evidence of Chinese herbal medicine Duhuo Jisheng decoction for knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenming; Wang, Shangquan; Zhang, Ranxing; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Xinjian; Lin, Yanping; Wei, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Duhuo Jisheng decoction (DJD) is considered beneficial for controlling knee osteoarthritis (KOA)-related symptoms in some Asian countries. This review compiles the evidence from randomised clinical trials and quantifies the effects of DJD on KOA. Designs 7 online databases were investigated up to 12 October 2015. Randomised clinical trials investigating treatment of KOA for which DJD was used either as a monotherapy or in combination with conventional therapy compared to no intervention, placebo or conventional therapy, were included. The outcomes included the evaluation of functional activities, pain and adverse effect. The risk of bias was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration tool. The estimated mean difference (MD) and SMD was within a 95% CI with respect to interstudy heterogeneity. Results 12 studies with 982 participants were identified. The quality presented a high risk of bias. Meta-analysis found that DJD combined with glucosamine (MD 4.20 (1.72 to 6.69); p<0.001) or DJD plus meloxicam and glucosamine (MD 3.48 (1.59 to 5.37); p<0.001) had a more significant effect in improving Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (total WOMAC scores). Also, meta-analysis presented more remarkable pain improvement when DJD plus sodium hyaluronate injection (MD 0.89 (0.26 to 1.53); p=0.006) was used. These studies demonstrated that active treatment of DJD in combination should be practiced for at least 4 weeks. Information on the safety of DJD or comprehensive therapies was insufficient in few studies. Conclusions DJD combined with Western medicine or sodium hyaluronate injection appears to have benefits for KOA. However, the effectiveness and safety of DJD is uncertain because of the limited number of trials and low methodological quality. Therefore, practitioners should be cautious when applying DJD in daily practice. Future clinical trials should be well designed; more research is needed. PMID:26729379

  11. The effect of different types of insoles or shoe modifications on medial loading of the knee in persons with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard K; Chapman, Graham J; Parkes, Matthew J; Forsythe, Laura; Felson, David T

    2015-11-01

    Many conservative treatments exist for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) which aims to reduce the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). The objective of this study was to determine the difference between different shoes and lateral wedge insoles on EKAM, knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI), external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort when walking in individuals with medial knee OA. Seventy individuals with medial knee OA underwent three-dimensional walking gait analysis in five conditions (barefoot, control shoe, typical wedge, supported wedge, and mobility shoe) with pain and comfort recorded concurrently. The change in EKAM, KAAI, external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort were assessed using multiple linear regressions and pairwise comparisons. Compared with the control shoe, lateral wedge insoles and barefoot walking significantly reduced early stance EKAM and KAAI. The mobility shoe showed no effect. A significant reduction in latter stance EKAM was seen in the lateral wedge insoles compared to the other conditions, with only the barefoot condition reducing the external knee flexion moment. However, the mobility shoe showed significant immediate knee pain reduction and improved comfort scores. Different lateral wedge insoles show comparable reductions in medial knee loading and in our study, the mobility shoe did not affect medial loading.

  12. The effect of different types of insoles or shoe modifications on medial loading of the knee in persons with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Graham J.; Parkes, Matthew J.; Forsythe, Laura.; Felson, David T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many conservative treatments exist for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) which aims to reduce the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). The objective of this study was to determine the difference between different shoes and lateral wedge insoles on EKAM, knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI), external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort when walking in individuals with medial knee OA. Seventy individuals with medial knee OA underwent three‐dimensional walking gait analysis in five conditions (barefoot, control shoe, typical wedge, supported wedge, and mobility shoe) with pain and comfort recorded concurrently. The change in EKAM, KAAI, external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort were assessed using multiple linear regressions and pairwise comparisons. Compared with the control shoe, lateral wedge insoles and barefoot walking significantly reduced early stance EKAM and KAAI. The mobility shoe showed no effect. A significant reduction in latter stance EKAM was seen in the lateral wedge insoles compared to the other conditions, with only the barefoot condition reducing the external knee flexion moment. However, the mobility shoe showed significant immediate knee pain reduction and improved comfort scores. Different lateral wedge insoles show comparable reductions in medial knee loading and in our study, the mobility shoe did not affect medial loading. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1646–1654, 2015. PMID:25991385

  13. Preoperative widespread pain sensitization and chronic pain after hip and knee replacement: a cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wylde, Vikki; Sayers, Adrian; Lenguerrand, Erik; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Pyke, Mark; Beswick, Andrew D.; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain after joint replacement is common, affecting approximately 10% of patients after total hip replacement (THR) and 20% of patients after total knee replacement (TKR). Heightened generalized sensitivity to nociceptive input could be a risk factor for the development of this pain. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether preoperative widespread pain sensitivity was associated with chronic pain after joint replacement. Data were analyzed from 254 patients receiving THR and 239 patients receiving TKR. Pain was assessed preoperatively and at 12 months after surgery using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Pain Scale. Preoperative widespread pain sensitivity was assessed through measurement of pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at the forearm using an algometer. Statistical analysis was conducted using linear regression and linear mixed models, and adjustments were made for confounding variables. In both the THR and TKR cohort, lower PPTs (heightened widespread pain sensitivity) were significantly associated with higher preoperative pain severity. Lower PPTs were also significantly associated with higher pain severity at 12 months after surgery in the THR cohort. However, PPTs were not associated with the change in pain severity from preoperative to 12 months postoperative in either the TKR or THR cohort. These findings suggest that although preoperative widespread pressure pain sensitivity is associated with pain severity before and after joint replacement, it is not a predictor of the amount of pain relief that patients gain from joint replacement surgery, independent of preoperative pain severity. PMID:25599300

  14. Is acupuncture a useful adjunct to physiotherapy for older adults with knee pain?: The "Acupuncture, Physiotherapy and Exercise" (APEX) study [ISRCTN88597683

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Elaine; Barlas, Panos; Foster, Nadine; Hill, Jonathan; Thomas, Elaine; Young, Julie

    2004-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is a popular non-pharmacological modality for treating musculoskeletal pain. Physiotherapists are one of the largest groups of acupuncture providers within the NHS, and they commonly use it alongside advice and exercise. Conclusive evidence of acupuncture's clinical effectiveness and its superiority over sham interventions is lacking. The Arthritis Research Campaign (arc) has funded this randomised sham-controlled trial which addresses three important questions. Firstly, we will determine the additional benefit of true acupuncture when used by physiotherapists alongside advice and exercise for older people presenting to primary care with knee pain. Secondly, we will evaluate sham acupuncture in the same way. Thirdly, we will investigate the treatment preferences and expectations of both the participants and physiotherapists participating in the study, and explore the effect of these on clinical outcome. We will thus investigate whether acupuncture is a useful adjunct to advice and exercise for treating knee pain and gain insight into whether this effect is due to specific needling properties. Methods/Design This randomised clinical trial will recruit 350 participants with knee pain to three intervention arms. It is based in 43 community physiotherapy departments in 21 NHS Trusts in the West Midlands and Cheshire regions in England. Patients aged 50 years and over with knee pain will be recruited. Outcome data will be collected by self-complete questionnaires before randomisation, and 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months after randomisation and by telephone interview 2 weeks after treatment commences. The questionnaires collect demographic details as well as information on knee-related pain, movement and function, pain intensity and affect, main functional problem, illness perceptions, self-efficacy, treatment preference and expectations, general health and quality of life. Participants are randomised to receive a package of advice and exercise; or

  15. Knee Muscle Forces during Walking and Running in Patellofemoral Pain Patients and Pain-Free Controls

    PubMed Central

    Besier, Thor F.; Fredericson, Michael; Gold, Garry E.; Beaupré, Gary S.; Delp, Scott L.

    2009-01-01

    One proposed mechanism of patellofemoral pain, increased stress in the joint, is dependent on forces generated by the quadriceps muscles. Describing causal relationships between muscle forces, tissue stresses, and pain is difficult due to the inability to directly measure these variables in vivo. The purpose of this study was to estimate quadriceps forces during walking and running in a group of male and female patients with patellofemoral pain (n=27, 16 female; 11 male) and compare these to pain-free controls (n=16, 8 female; 8 male). Subjects walked and ran at self-selected speeds in a gait laboratory. Lower limb kinematics and electromyography (EMG) data were input to an EMG-driven musculoskeletal model of the knee, which was scaled and calibrated to each individual to estimate forces in 10 muscles surrounding the joint. Compared to controls, the patellofemoral pain group had greater co-contraction of quadriceps and hamstrings (p=0.025) and greater normalized muscle forces during walking, even though the net knee moment was similar between groups. Muscle forces during running were similar between groups, but the net knee extension moment was less in the patellofemoral pain group compared to controls. Females displayed 30-50% greater normalized hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle forces during both walking and running compared to males (p<0.05). These results suggest that some patellofemoral pain patients might experience greater joint contact forces and joint stresses than pain-free subjects. PMID:19268945

  16. Pain in the knee associated with osteoporosis of the patella.

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, M; Colston, J R; Tucker, A K

    1977-01-01

    Four patients, all of whom complained of pain in the knee, were found to have radiological evidence of osteoporosis particularly marked in the patella. In 3 a neurological lesion at the appropriate spinal segment was present, and the fourth patient, who was frankly hysterical, had an autonomic disturbance. If radiological porosis is isolated to the patella a distant cause such as nerve irritation should be sought. Images PMID:856068

  17. PAIN FOLLOWING TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY – A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Wilson Mello; Migon, Eduardo Zaniol; Zabeu, Jose Luis Amim

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is known to be a successful procedure. The aging of the population and the growing demand for quality of life have greatly increased the indications for the procedure. Nonetheless, TKA presents some complications that still lack definitive resolution. Pain after TKA is caused by a myriad of reasons that need to be systematically studied in order to reach the correct diagnosis and treatment. History, physical examination, laboratory tests and imaging examinations must all be included in the workup and repeated until a plausible reason has been identified, since if pain is the only indication for TKA revision, the results may be catastrophic. PMID:27022583

  18. Assessment and treatment of knee pain in the child and adolescent athlete.

    PubMed

    Yen, Yi-Meng

    2014-12-01

    Knee pain in children and adolescents is one of the most prevalent complaints in a pediatric practice, accounting for at least a third of musculoskeletal complaints. Accurate diagnosis requires an understanding of knee anatomy and patterns of knee injuries and skill in physical examination. This review covers the most common causes of knee pain in children and adolescents, including overuse issues, such as Osgood-Schlatter and osteochondritis dissecans, as well as traumatic injuries, including tibial spine fractures and anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

  19. A randomised trial of all-polyethylene and metal-backed tibial components in unicompartmental arthroplasty of the knee.

    PubMed

    Hutt, J R B; Farhadnia, P; Massé, V; LaVigne, M; Vendittoli, P-A

    2015-06-01

    This randomised trial evaluated the outcome of a single design of unicompartmental arthroplasty of the knee (UKA) with either a cemented all-polyethylene or a metal-backed modular tibial component. A total of 63 knees in 45 patients (17 male, 28 female) were included, 27 in the all-polyethylene group and 36 in the metal-backed group. The mean age was 57.9 years (39.6 to 76.9). At a mean follow-up of 6.4 years (5 to 9.9), 11 all-polyethylene components (41%) were revised (at a mean of 5.8 years; 1.4 to 8.0) post-operatively and two metal-backed components were revised (at one and five years). One revision in both groups was for unexplained pain, one in the metal-backed group was for progression of osteoarthritis. The others in the all-polyethylene group were for aseptic loosening. The survivorship at seven years calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method for the all-polyethylene group was 56.5% (95% CI 31.9 to 75.2, number at risk 7) and for the metal-backed group was 93.8% (95% CI 77.3 to 98.4, number at risk 16) This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001). At the most recent follow-up, significantly better mean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index Scores were found in the all-polyethylene group (13.4 vs 23.0, p = 0.03) but there was no difference in the mean Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome scores (68.8; 41.4 to 99.0 vs 62.6; 24.0 to 100.0), p = 0.36). There were no significant differences for range of movement (p = 0.36) or satisfaction (p = 0.23). This randomised study demonstrates that all-polyethylene components in this design of fixed bearing UKA had unsatisfactory results with significantly higher rates of failure before ten years compared with the metal-back components.

  20. Biomechanical analysis of knee and trunk in badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand diagonal lunges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Hua, Shiang-Hua; Huang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Liao, Jen-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of core neuromuscular control to the dynamic stability of badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand lunges has not been investigated. Accordingly, this study compared the kinematics of the lower extremity, the trunk movement, the muscle activation and the balance performance of knee-injured and knee-uninjured badminton players when performing backhand stroke diagonal lunges. Seventeen participants with chronic knee pain (injured group) and 17 healthy participants (control group) randomly performed two diagonal backhand lunges in the forward and backward directions, respectively. This study showed that the injured group had lower frontal and horizontal motions of the knee joint, a smaller hip-shoulder separation angle and a reduced trunk tilt angle. In addition, the injured group exhibited a greater left paraspinal muscle activity, while the control group demonstrated a greater activation of the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis and medial gastrocnemius muscle groups. Finally, the injured group showed a smaller distance between centre of mass (COM) and centre of pressure, and a lower peak COM velocity when performing the backhand backward lunge tasks. In conclusion, the injured group used reduced knee and trunk motions to complete the backhand lunge tasks. Furthermore, the paraspinal muscles contributed to the lunge performance of the individuals with knee pain, whereas the knee extensors and ankle plantar flexor played a greater role for those without knee pain.

  1. Biomechanical analysis of knee and trunk in badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand diagonal lunges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Hua, Shiang-Hua; Huang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Liao, Jen-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of core neuromuscular control to the dynamic stability of badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand lunges has not been investigated. Accordingly, this study compared the kinematics of the lower extremity, the trunk movement, the muscle activation and the balance performance of knee-injured and knee-uninjured badminton players when performing backhand stroke diagonal lunges. Seventeen participants with chronic knee pain (injured group) and 17 healthy participants (control group) randomly performed two diagonal backhand lunges in the forward and backward directions, respectively. This study showed that the injured group had lower frontal and horizontal motions of the knee joint, a smaller hip-shoulder separation angle and a reduced trunk tilt angle. In addition, the injured group exhibited a greater left paraspinal muscle activity, while the control group demonstrated a greater activation of the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis and medial gastrocnemius muscle groups. Finally, the injured group showed a smaller distance between centre of mass (COM) and centre of pressure, and a lower peak COM velocity when performing the backhand backward lunge tasks. In conclusion, the injured group used reduced knee and trunk motions to complete the backhand lunge tasks. Furthermore, the paraspinal muscles contributed to the lunge performance of the individuals with knee pain, whereas the knee extensors and ankle plantar flexor played a greater role for those without knee pain. PMID:25574707

  2. Cerebral Cortical Thickness in Chronic Pain Due to Knee Osteoarthritis: The Effect of Pain Duration and Pain Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigates associations between cortical thickness and pain duration, and central sensitization as markers of pain progression in painful knee osteoarthritis. Methods Whole brain cortical thickness and pressure pain thresholds were assessed in 70 participants; 40 patients with chronic painful knee osteoarthritis (age = 66.1± 8.5 years, 21 females, mean duration of pain = 8.5 years), and 30 healthy controls (age = 62.7± 7.4, 17 females). Results Cortical thickness negatively correlated with pain duration mainly in fronto-temporal areas outside of classical pain processing areas (p<0.05, age-controlled, FDR corrected). Pain sensitivity was unrelated to cortical thickness. Patients showed lower cortical thickness in the right anterior insula (p<0.001, uncorrected) with no changes surviving multiple test correction. Conclusion With increasing number of years of suffering from chronic arthritis pain we found increasing cortical thinning in extended cerebral cortical regions beyond recognised pain-processing areas. While the mechanisms of cortical thinning remain to be elucidated, we show that pain progression indexed by central sensitization does not play a major role. PMID:27658292

  3. Effect of the single-leg, lateral oblique, decline squat exercise on sacroiliac joint pain with knee pain

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of the single-leg, lateral oblique, decline squat exercise on sacroiliac joint pain with knee pain. [Subjects and Methods] A 39-year-old female had severe pain in the right medial buttock and right anterior knee. This study assessed the anterior pelvic tilt angle and pain provocation tests before and after single-leg, lateral oblique, decline squat exercise for 4 weeks. [Results] Following the course of exercise, the anterior pelvic tilt angles were increased, and the visual analog scale pain scores for both the right buttock and right knee were 2/10. [Conclusion] Single-leg, lateral oblique, decline squat exercise may be effective for treating SI joint pain with knee pain in females. PMID:27799721

  4. Knee pain and swelling: An atypical presentation of metastatic colon cancer to the patella

    PubMed Central

    Gasagranda, Bethany; Leeman, Kimberly; Heller, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Knee pain is a common reason for a patient to seek medical evaluation. Of the many causes of knee pain, malignancy is one of the least common. When malignancy is the etiology of the pain, it is usually due to a primary tumor of the osseous structures or soft tissues of the knee joint. Metastatic disease involving the knee joint is uncommon, with few cases reported in the literature. Of these reported cases, metastatic colon cancer is exceedingly rare. However, in a patient with new onset knee pain and the proper clinical history, metastatic disease should be considered as a potential explanation of symptoms. We report a case of knee pain and swelling due to metastatic colon cancer to the patella. PMID:27141244

  5. Effects of a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program on the biochemical composition and morphology of cartilage in women with mild knee osteoarthritis: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Symptoms associated with osteoarthritis of the knee result in decreased function, loss of working capacity and extensive social and medical costs. There is a need to investigate and develop effective interventions to minimise the impact of and even prevent the progression of osteoarthritis. Aquatic exercise has been shown to be effective at reducing the impact of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this article is to describe the rationale, design and intervention of a study investigating the effect of an aquatic resistance exercise intervention on cartilage in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis. Methods A minimum of 80 volunteers who meet the inclusion criteria will be recruited from the local population through newspaper advertisements. Following initial assessment volunteers will be randomised into two groups. The intervention group will participate in a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program of 1-hour duration 3 times a week for four months. The control group will be asked to maintain normal care during this period. Primary outcome measure for this study is the biochemical composition of knee cartilage measured using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging; T2 relaxation time and delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques. In addition, knee cartilage morphology as regional cartilage thickness will be studied. Secondary outcomes include measures of body composition and bone traits using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography, pain, function using questionnaires and physical performance tests and quality of life. Measurements will be performed at baseline, after the 4-month intervention period and at one year follow up. Discussion This randomised controlled trial will investigate the effect a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program has on the biochemical composition of cartilage in post-menopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis. This is the first study to

  6. Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  7. Ultrasound imaging for the rheumatologist XXX. Sonographic assessment of the painful knee.

    PubMed

    Meenagh, G; Filippucci, E; Delle Sedie, A; Iagnocco, A; Scirè, C A; Riente, L; Montecucco, C; Valesini, G; Bombardieri, S; Grassi, W

    2010-01-01

    The knee joint is a frequent focus of attention for rheumatologists when assessing patients presenting to a clinic and may represent underlying intra-articular inflammatory pathology or involvement of the surrounding soft tissues. This study describes the correlation between clinical and ultrasound findings in patients presenting with a variety of rheumatic disorders and knee pain. US imaging provides for a sensitive and detailed identification of different intra- and peri-articular pathology responsible for knee pain.

  8. Knee Pain and a Prior Injury Are Associated With Increased Risk of a New Knee Injury: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Driban, Jeffrey B.; Lo, Grace H.; Eaton, Charles B.; Price, Lori Lyn; Lu, Bing; McAlindon, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We explored if knee pain or a history of knee injury was associated with a knee injury in the following 12 months. Methods We conducted longitudinal knee-based analyses among knees in the Osteoarthritis Initiative. We included both knees of all participants who had at least one follow-up visit with complete data. Our first sets of exposures were knee pain (chronic knee symptoms and severity) at baseline, 12-month, 24-month, and 36-month visits. Another exposure was a history of injury, which we defined as a self-reported injury at any time prior to baseline, 12-month, 24-month, or 36-month visits. The outcome was self-reported knee injury during the past year at 12-month, 24-month, 36-month, and 48-month visits. We evaluated the association between ipsilateral and contralateral knee pain or history of injury and a new knee injury within 12 months of the exposure using generalized linear mixed model for repeated binary outcomes. Results A knee with reported chronic knee symptoms or ipsilateral or contralateral history of an injury was more likely to experience a new knee injury in the following 12 months than a knee without chronic knee symptoms (odds ratio [OR]=1.84, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.57, 2.16) or prior injury (prior ipsilateral knee injury OR=1.81, 95% CI=1.56, 2.09; prior contralateral knee injury OR=1.43, 95% CI=1.23, 1.66). Conclusion Knee pain and a history of injury are associated with new knee injuries. It may be beneficial for individuals with knee pain or a history of injury to participate in injury prevention programs. PMID:26034152

  9. Is there a causal link between knee loading and knee osteoarthritis progression? A systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies and randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Marius; Creaby, Mark W; Lund, Hans; Juhl, Carsten; Christensen, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Objective We performed a systematic review, meta-analysis and assessed the evidence supporting a causal link between knee joint loading during walking and structural knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression. Design Systematic review, meta-analysis and application of Bradford Hill's considerations on causation. Data sources We searched MEDLINE, Scopus, AMED, CINAHL and SportsDiscus for prospective cohort studies and randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from 1950 through October 2013. Study eligibility criteria We selected cohort studies and RCTs in which estimates of knee joint loading during walking were used to predict structural knee OA progression assessed by X-ray or MRI. Data analyses Meta-analysis was performed to estimate the combined OR for structural disease progression with higher baseline loading. The likelihood of a causal link between knee joint loading and OA progression was assessed from cohort studies using the Bradford Hill guidelines to derive a 0–4 causation score based on four criteria and examined for confirmation in RCTs. Results Of the 1078 potentially eligible articles, 5 prospective cohort studies were included. The studies included a total of 452 patients relating joint loading to disease progression over 12–72 months. There were very serious limitations associated with the methodological quality of the included studies. The combined OR for disease progression was 1.90 (95% CI 0.85 to 4.25; I2=77%) for each one-unit increment in baseline knee loading. The combined causation score was 0, indicating no causal association between knee loading and knee OA progression. No RCTs were found to confirm or refute the findings from the cohort studies. Conclusions There is very limited and low-quality evidence to support for a causal link between knee joint loading during walking and structural progression of knee OA. Trial registration number CRD42012003253 PMID:25031196

  10. Auricular Acupressure for Managing Postoperative Pain and Knee Motion in Patients with Total Knee Replacement: A Randomized Sham Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ling-hua; Hsu, Chung-Hua; Jong, Gwo-Ping; Ho, Shungtai; Tsay, Shiow-luan; Lin, Kuan-Chia

    2012-01-01

    Background. Postoperative pain management remains a significant challenge for all healthcare providers. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the adjuvant effects of auricular acupressure on relieving postoperative pain and improving the passive range of motion in patients with total knee replacement (TKR). Method. Sixty-two patients who had undergone a TKR were randomly assigned to the acupressure group and the sham control group. The intervention was delivered three times a day for 3 days. A visual analog scale (VAS) and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were used to assess pain intensity. Pain medication consumption was recorded, and the knee motion was measured using a goniometer. Results. The patients experienced a moderately severe level of pain postoperatively (VAS 58.66 ± 20.35) while being on the routine PCA. No differences were found in pain scores between the groups at all points. However, analgesic drug usage in the acupressure group patients was significantly lower than in the sham control group (P < 0.05), controlling for BMI, age, and pain score. On the 3rd day after surgery, the passive knee motion in the acupressure group patients was significantly better than in the sham control group patients (P < 0.05), controlling for BMI. Conclusion. The application of auricular acupressure at specific therapeutic points significantly reduces the opioid analgesia requirement and improves the knee motion in patients with TKR. PMID:22844334

  11. Q-angle in patellofemoral pain: relationship with dynamic knee valgus, hip abductor torque, pain and function☆

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; Silva, Ana Paula de Moura Campos Carvalho e; França, Fábio Jorge Renovato; Magalhães, Maurício Oliveira; Burke, Thomaz Nogueira; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the q-angle and anterior knee pain severity, functional capacity, dynamic knee valgus and hip abductor torque in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Methods This study included 22 women with PFPS. The q-angle was assessed using goniometry: the participants were positioned in dorsal decubitus with the knee and hip extended, and the hip and foot in neutral rotation. Anterior knee pain severity was assessed using a visual analog scale, and functional capacity was assessed using the anterior knee pain scale. Dynamic valgus was evaluated using the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) of the knee, which was recorded using a digital camera during step down, and hip abductor peak torque was recorded using a handheld dynamometer. Results The q-angle did not present any significant correlation with severity of knee pain (r = −0.29; p = 0.19), functional capacity (r = −0.08; p = 0.72), FPPA (r = −0.28; p = 0.19) or isometric peak torque of the abductor muscles (r = −0.21; p = 0.35). Conclusion The q-angle did not present any relationship with pain intensity, functional capacity, FPPA, or hip abductor peak torque in the patients with PFPS. PMID:27069887

  12. Anterior knee pain associated with an anterior superior patellar bony spur: a case report.

    PubMed

    Adekoya-Cole, T O; Enweluzo, G O; Akinmokun, O I; Olugbemi, O O

    2013-01-01

    Anterior knee pain is a common presentation in Orthopaedic out patient practice. However anterior superior patellar spur is an uncommon cause.This case presentation is to highlight an anterior superior patellar spur with quadriceps tendonitis. The patient is a 52 year old man who presented with a recurrent anterior knee pain. The radiographic study revealed an anterio-superior patellar spur. The patient had a depo steroid injection as an adjunct therapy to physiotherapy and has been pain free.

  13. Acupuncture and other physical treatments for the relief of pain due to osteoarthritis of the knee: network meta-analysis☆

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, M.S.; Rice, S.J.C.; Madurasinghe, V.; Slack, R.; Fayter, D.A.; Harden, M.; Sutton, A.J.; MacPherson, H.; Woolacott, N.F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective To compare the effectiveness of acupuncture with other relevant physical treatments for alleviating pain due to knee osteoarthritis. Design Systematic review with network meta-analysis, to allow comparison of treatments within a coherent framework. Comprehensive searches were undertaken up to January 2013 to identify randomised controlled trials in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, which reported pain. Results Of 156 eligible studies, 114 trials (covering 22 treatments and 9,709 patients) provided data suitable for analysis. Most trials studied short-term effects and many were classed as being of poor quality with high risk of bias, commonly associated with lack of blinding (which was sometimes impossible to achieve). End of treatment results showed that eight interventions: interferential therapy, acupuncture, TENS, pulsed electrical stimulation, balneotherapy, aerobic exercise, sham acupuncture, and muscle-strengthening exercise produced a statistically significant reduction in pain when compared with standard care. In a sensitivity analysis of satisfactory and good quality studies, most studies were of acupuncture (11 trials) or muscle-strengthening exercise (9 trials); both interventions were statistically significantly better than standard care, with acupuncture being statistically significantly better than muscle-strengthening exercise (standardised mean difference: 0.49, 95% credible interval 0.00–0.98). Conclusions As a summary of the current available research, the network meta-analysis results indicate that acupuncture can be considered as one of the more effective physical treatments for alleviating osteoarthritis knee pain in the short-term. However, much of the evidence in this area of research is of poor quality, meaning there is uncertainty about the efficacy of many physical treatments. PMID:23973143

  14. Krill Oil Improves Mild Knee Joint Pain: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Minoru; Sakuraba, Keishoku; Sawaki, Keisuke; Sekigawa, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Krill oil is an edible oil extracted from krill, a small red-colored crustacean found in the Antarctic Ocean. The administration of krill oil is reported to mitigate inflammation in patients with cardiac disease, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoarthritis. However, the effect of krill oil on mild knee pain has not yet been determined. Objective To assess the effect of krill oil on mild knee pain. Design A randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial of fifty adults (38–85 years old) with mild knee pain attending the Fukushima Orthopedic Clinic (Tochigi, Japan) between September 2014 and March 2015. Interventions Participants were randomized to receive 2 g per day of either krill oil or an identical placebo for 30 days. Outcomes The primary outcome was improvement in subjective symptoms of knee pain as assessed by the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM) and Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (JOA). Secondary outcomes included blood and urine biochemical parameters. Results Both the placebo and krill oil groups showed significant improvements in the questions in the JKOM and JOA questionnaires after administration. After the intervention, krill oil group showed more improvements than placebo group in two questions regarding the pain and stiffness in knees in JKOM. Controlling for age, sex, weight, and smoking and drinking habits, krill oil significantly mitigated knee pain in sleeping (P < 0.001), standing (P < 0.001) and the range of motion of both right and left knees (both P = 0.011) compared to placebo. Krill oil administration raised plasma EPA (P = 0.048) and EPA/AA ratio (P = 0.003). Conclusion This study indicates that krill oil administration (2 g/day, 30 days) improved the subjective symptoms of knee pain in adults with mild knee pain. Trial registration UMIN-CTR; ID UMIN000014413 PMID:27701428

  15. Impact of Alprazolam on Comorbid Pain and Knee Functions in Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients Diagnosed with Anxiety and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Barış; Kömür, Baran; Aktaş, Erdem; Sonnur Yılmaz, Firdes; Çopuroğlu, Cem; Özcan, Mert; Çiftdemir, Mert; Çopuroğlu, Elif

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Studies report 19-33% postoperative moderate-severe pain and dissatisfaction in uncomplicated total knee arthroplasty (TKA), even after 1 year. High rates of undiagnosed depression and anxiety may have a strong impact on these unfavourable outcomes. Here we aimed to investigate the efficacy of alprazolam on postoperative analgesic use and knee functions. Methods: Seventy-six patients with a mean age of 65 ± 9.3 years (range 46-80) diagnosed with mild-moderate anxiety or depression according to the Hamilton anxiety scale (HAS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) that underwent TKA were evaluated in the study. Group 1 patients were subjected to alprazolam treatment in addition to an analgesic/antiinflammatory drug, whereas Group 2 consisted of patients receiving only the standard postoperative pain management protocol. Visual analog scale (VAS) and postoperative analgesic use (g/day) were calculated to evaluate the magnitude of pain experienced. Preoperative and postoperative knee functions were assessed from the patients’ Knee Society Score and Knee Society Functional Score records. Results: A positive correlation was found between the preoperative HAS, BDI, and total postoperative analgesic use in both groups. Although the decrease in VAS was significant in both groups, postoperative analgesic need (4.25 ± 0.30 g) in Group 1 was less compared to Group 2 (4.81 ± 0.41 g) (p=0.01). The mean change in postoperative (1 month) Knee Society Score and Knee Society Functional Score were also significantly improved in Group1 compared to Group 2. Conclusion: Alprazolam can reduce postoperative analgesic use and improve knee functions by reducing the pain threshold, and enhancing overall mood via its antidepressive and anxiolytic properties in patients undergoing TKA diagnosed with mild-moderate anxiety/depression. PMID:26664498

  16. IS PAIN IN ONE KNEE ASSOCIATED WITH ISOMETRIC MUSCLE STRENGTH IN THE CONTRALATERAL LIMB? - DATA FROM THE OSTEOARTHRITIS INITIATIVE (OAI)

    PubMed Central

    Steidle, E.; Wirth, W.; Glass, N.; Ruhdorfer, A.; Cotofana, S.; Eckstein, F.; Segal, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Knee pain and muscle weakness confer risk for knee osteoarthritis incidence and progression. The purpose of this study was to determine whether unilateral knee pain influences contralateral thigh muscle strength. Design Of 4796 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants, 224 (mean±SD age 63.9±8.9 years) cases could be matched to a control. Cases were defined as having unilateral knee pain (numerical rating scale (NRS)≥4/10; ≥infrequent pain) and one pain-free knee (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Controls were defined as having bilaterally pain-free knees (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Maximal isometric muscle strength [N] was compared between limbs in participants with unilateral pain (cases), and between pain-free limbs of cases and controls. Results Knee extensor/flexor strength in pain-free limbs of cases was lower than in bilaterally pain-free controls (−5.5%/–8.4%; p=0.043/p=0.022). Within cases, maximum extensor/flexor strength was significantly lower in the painful than in the pain-free limb (−6.4%/4.1%; p<0.0001/p=0.015). Conclusions These results suggest that strength in limbs without knee pain is associated with the pain status of the contralateral knee. The strength difference between unilateral pain-free cases and matched bilateral pain-free controls was similar to that between limbs in persons with unilateral knee pain. Lower strength due to contralateral knee pain might be centrally mediated. PMID:25768069

  17. Sensitivity and sensitisation in relation to pain severity in knee osteoarthritis: trait or state?

    PubMed Central

    Neogi, Tuhina; Frey-Law, Laura; Scholz, Joachim; Niu, Jingbo; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Woolf, Clifford; Nevitt, Michael; Bradley, Laurence; Felson, David T; Kvien, Tore K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives It is not clear whether heightened pain sensitivity in knee osteoarthritis (OA) is related to sensitisation induced by nociceptive input from OA pathology (‘state’) versus other confounding factors. Conversely, some individuals may be predisposed to sensitisation irrespective of OA (‘trait’). Methods The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study is a longitudinal cohort of persons with or at risk of knee OA. We obtained knee X-rays, pain questionnaires and comprehensive assessment of factors that can influence pain sensitivity. We examined the relation of sensitisation and sensitivity assessed by mechanical temporal summation (TS) and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) to knee OA and knee pain severity. To test whether sensitisation and sensitivity is a ‘state’ induced by OA pathology, we examined the relation of PPT and TS to knee OA duration and severity. Results In 2126 subjects (mean age 68, mean body mass index (BMI) 31, 61% female), PPT and TS were not associated with radiographic OA (ORs 0.9–1.0 for PPT and TS; p>0.05). However, PPT and TS were associated with pain severity (ORs: 1.7–2.0 for PPT; 1.3–1.6 for TS; p<0.05). Knee OA duration and radiographic severity were not associated with PPT or TS. Conclusions PPT and TS were associated with OA-related pain, but not radiographic OA after accounting for pertinent confounders in this large cohort. Lack of association with disease duration suggests at least some sensitisation and pain sensitivity may be a trait rather than state. Understanding the relationship between pathological pain and pain sensitivity/sensitisation offers insight into OA pain risk factors and pain management opportunities. PMID:24351516

  18. The Effect of Patellar Taping on Squat Depth and the Perception of Pain in People with Anterior Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Amanda M.; Harrington, Elaine

    Patellar taping is a treatment adjunct commonly used in the management of anterior knee pain. The aim of this cross sectional study was to investigate the effects of medial glide patellar taping on sagittal plane lower-limb joint kinematics and knee pain during a unilateral squat in a symptomatic population complaining of anterior knee pain. Ten participants with a history of unilateral or bilateral anterior knee pain were included in the study. Subjects were required to squat on the symptomatic leg under three conditions: placebo tape, patellar tape and no tape. Kinematic data was recorded using the CODA mpx64 motion analysis system and subjects’ pain was assessed using the Numerical Rating Scale. Patellar taping resulted in a significantly greater single-legged squat depth compared to placebo tape (p=0.008) and no tape (p=0.001) and a statistically significant reduction in pain during a squat compared to placebo tape (p=0.001) or no tape (p=0.001). Significant differences were not identified for maximum knee flexion in the patella taping compared to the no tape condition. This study may have significant clinical implications as participants reported less pain and alterations in sagittal plane movement following the application of patellar tape. PMID:24146711

  19. Ultrasonographic Findings in a Large Series of Patients with Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Artul, Suheil; Khazin, Fadi; Hakim, Jeries; Habib, George

    2014-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSKUS) is becoming more and more popular in the evaluation of different musculoskeletal abnormalities. The aim of this retrospective study was to document the prevalence and spectrum of MSKUS findings at the painful knee. Materials and Methods: All the studies of MSKUS that were performed for the evaluation of knee pain during the previous 2 years at the Department of Radiology in Nazareth hospital were reviewed. Demographic and clinical parameters including age, gender, side, and MSKUS findings were documented. Results: Two hundred and seventy-six patients were included in the review. In 21 of them, both knees were evaluated at the same setting (total number of knees evaluated was 297). One hundred and forty-four knees were of the left side. Thirty-three pathologies were identified. 34% of the studies were negative. The most common MSKUS findings were medial meniscal tear (MMT) (20%), Baker's cyst (BC) (16%), and osteoarthritis (OA) (11%). Only one knee of all the knees evaluated in our study showed synovitis. Fifty-three knees (18% of all the knees evaluated) had more than one imaging finding, mosty two and while some had three findings. The most common combination of findings was MMT and BC (8 knees), MMT with OA (8 knees), and MMT with fluid (6 knee). In 67% of the patients who had simultaneous bilateral knee evaluation, at least one knee had no abnormal findings and in 43%, both knees were negative. Conclusions: MSKUS has the potential for revealing huge spectrum of abnormalities. In nearly 90% of the positive studies, degenerative/mechanical abnormalities were reported, with MMT, BC, and osteoarthritic changes being the most common. PMID:25250194

  20. Future directions in painful knee osteoarthritis: harnessing complexity in a heterogeneous population.

    PubMed

    Kittelson, Andrew J; George, Steven Z; Maluf, Katrina S; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E

    2014-03-01

    This perspective article proposes a conceptual model for the pain experience for individuals diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Pain in knee OA is likely a heterogeneous, multifactorial phenomenon that involves not only the OA disease process but also elements specific to patient psychology and pain neurophysiology. The relevant contributions to the pain experience for any individual patient remain difficult, if not impossible, to definitively determine, and the rationale for many clinical treatment decisions arises primarily from a mechanistic understanding of OA pathophysiology. The Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) recently identified "phenotyping" of OA pain as a research priority to "better target pain therapies to individual patients." This perspective article proposes that contributions from 3 domains--knee pathology, psychological distress, and pain neurophysiology--should be considered equally important in future efforts to understand pain phenotypes in knee OA. Ultimately, characterization of pain phenotypes may aid in the understanding of the pain experience and the development of interventions specific to pain for individual patients.

  1. Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. METHODS: Baseli...

  2. [AbstractA woman with knee pain after a fall in childhood].

    PubMed

    van Erp, J H J; Brouwer, R W

    2016-01-01

    A 32-year-old woman presented with pain in her left knee ever since she had fallen down the stairs as a child and had landed on this knee. On the X-ray we saw two large patella fragments. We made the diagnosis of dislocated and subluxated fracture of the patella without consolidation. The previously missed fracture was treated conservatively. PMID:27650016

  3. Lower Limbs Function and Pain Relationships after Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tali, Maie; Maaroos, Jaak

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate gait characteristics, lower limbs joint function, and pain relationships associated with knee osteoarthritis of female patients before and 3 months after total knee arthroplasty at an outpatient clinic rehabilitation department. Gait parameters were registered, the active range of lower extremity joints was…

  4. Unusual Presentation of Anterior Knee Pain in Elite Female Athletes: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinning; Williams, Phillip; Curry, Emily J.; Hannafin, Jo A.

    2016-01-01

    Two elite female athletes presented with anterior knee pain with range of motion and reproducible tenderness to palpation. Diagnostic arthroscopy was performed in both cases resulting in excision of a nodular pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) in the first patient and scar tissue in the second patient. Correct diagnosis of anterior knee pain in the elite female athlete can present a challenge to clinicians. Although patellofe-moral pain is the most common diagnosis, other uncommon causes include PVNS and residual scar formation in patients with a history of surgery or trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images are helpful in confirming the diagnosis, however, in a subset of patients, the physician must rely on clinical suspicion and physical exam to make the proper diagnosis. Given the possibility of a false negative MRI images, patients with persistent anterior knee pain with a history of knee surgeries and focal tenderness reproducible on physical exam may benefit from a diagnostic arthroscopy. PMID:27114812

  5. Influence of patellofemoral bracing on pain, knee extensor torque, and gait function in females with patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Powers, Christopher M; Doubleday, Kathryn L; Escudero, Carina

    2008-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of a patellofemoral brace on pain response, knee extensor torque production, and gait function in females with patellofemoral pain (PFP). Sixteen females between the ages of 14 and 46 with diagnosis of PFP participated. Knee extensor torque was measured by using a LIDO isokinetic dynamometer. Pain levels were documented by using the Visual Analog Pain Scale. Stride characteristics during the conditions of free walk, fast walk, ascend stairs, descend stairs, ascend ramp, and descend ramp were obtained with a stride analyzer unit. EMG activity of the vasti musculature was recorded by using indwelling, bipolar, wire electrodes. Knee joint motion was assessed by using a VICON motion analysis system. All testing was performed with and without the Bauerfeind Genutrain P3 patellofemoral brace. There were no significant differences in torque production, pain levels, and stride characteristics between braced and non-braced trials. In addition, there were no significant differences in mean vasti EMG between braced and non-braced trials. When averaged across all conditions, a small but statistically significant increase in knee flexion was found during the braced trials. Although the current study did not find significant improvements in the clinical measures evaluated, 8 of the 16 subjects did experience a decrease in knee pain. This finding suggests that certain patients with PFP may respond favorably to bracing, and criteria must be established to determine which patients would best benefit from such an intervention.

  6. Care-seeking behaviour of adolescents with knee pain: a population-based study among 504 adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee pain is common during adolescence. Adolescents and their parents may think that knee pain is benign and self-limiting and therefore avoid seeking medical care. However, long-term prognosis of knee pain is not favourable and treatment seems to offer greater reductions in pain compared to a “wait-and-see” approach. The purpose of this study was to describe the determinants of care-seeking behaviour among adolescents with current knee pain and investigate what types of treatment are initiated. Methods An online questionnaire was forwarded to 2,846 adolescents aged 15–19 in four upper secondary schools. The questionnaire contained questions on age, gender, height, weight, currently painful body regions, frequency of knee pain, health-related quality of life measured by the EuroQol 5-dimensions, sports participation and if they had sought medical care. Adolescents who reported current knee pain at least monthly or more frequently were telephoned. The adolescents were asked about pain duration, onset of knee pain (traumatic or insidious) and if they were currently being treated for their knee pain. Results 504 adolescents currently reported at least monthly knee pain. 59% of these had sought medical care and 18% were currently under medical treatment . A longer pain duration and higher pain severity increased the odds of seeking medical care. Females with traumatic onset of knee pain were more likely to have sought medical care than females with insidious onset of knee pain. Females with traumatic onset of knee pain and increased pain severity were more likely to be undergoing medical treatment. The most frequently reported treatments were the combination of exercises and orthotics (68% of those undergoing medical treatment). Conclusion Females with insidious onset of knee pain do not seek medical care as often as those with traumatic onset and adolescents of both genders with insidious onset are less likely to be under medical treatment. These

  7. Comparison of pain perception between open and minimally invasive surgery in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Biagio; Vitale, Elsa; Esposito, Antonio; Colella, Antonio; Cassano, Maria; Notarnicola, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was a well-established procedure that had shown excellent long-term results in terms of reduced pain and increased mobility. Pain was one of the most important outcome measures that contributed to patient dissatisfaction after TKA. After a computerized search of the Medline and Embase databases, we considered articles from January 1st, 1997 to October 31st, 2009 that underlined the impact on patient pain perception of either standard open total knee arthroplasty or minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty. We included articles that used the visual analog scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Knee Score, Hospital for Special Surgery Score (HSS), Oxford Knee Score (OKS) as postoperative pain indicators, and we included studies with a minimum follow-up period of two months. We excluded studies that monitored only functional postoperative knee activities. It was shown that TKA with the open technique was a better treatment for knees with a positive effect on pain and function than the minimally invasive technique. PMID:21042568

  8. Rest Pain and Movement‐Evoked Pain as Unique Constructs in Hip and Knee Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Wylde, Vikki; Lenguerrand, Erik; Beswick, Andrew D.; Gooberman‐Hill, Rachael; Pyke, Mark; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is limited information about the extent to which the association between preoperative and chronic postoperative pain is mediated via pain‐on‐movement or pain‐at‐rest. We explored these associations in patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR). Methods A total of 322 and 316 patients receiving THR and TKR, respectively, were recruited into a single‐center UK cohort (Arthroplasty Pain Experience) study. Preoperative, acute postoperative, and 12‐month pain severity was measured using self‐reported pain instruments. The association between preoperative/acute pain and chronic postoperative pain was investigated using structural equation modeling (SEM). Results Patients with high levels of preoperative pain were more likely to report chronic pain after THR (β = 0.195, P = 0.02) and TKR (β = 0.749, P < 0.0001). Acute postoperative pain‐on‐movement was not associated with chronic pain after TKR or THR after adjusting for preoperative pain; however, acute pain‐at‐rest was associated with chronic pain after THR (β = 0.20, P < 0.0002) but not TKR after adjusting for preoperative pain. Analysis of pain‐at‐rest and pain‐on‐movement highlighted differences between THR and TKR patients. Chronic pain‐at‐rest after THR was weakly associated with pain‐at‐rest during the preoperative (β = 0.11, P = 0.068) and acute postoperative period (β = 0.21, P < 0.0001). In contrast, chronic pain‐on‐movement after TKR was strongly associated with the severity of pain‐on‐movement during the preoperative period (β = 0.51, P = 0.001). Conclusion SEM illustrated the different patterns of association between measures of pain over time in patients undergoing THR and TKR for osteoarthritis. These findings highlight the importance of future work that explores the mechanisms underlying pain‐on‐movement and pain‐at‐rest. PMID:26212349

  9. Increased joint loads during walking--a consequence of pain relief in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjaer, Tine; Lund, Hans; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning

    2006-12-01

    Joint pain is a primary symptom in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but the effect of pain and pain relief on the knee joint mechanics of walking is not clear. In this study, the effects of local knee joint analgesia on knee joint loads during walking were studied in a group of knee osteoarthritis patients. A group of healthy subjects was included as a reference group. The joint loads were calculated from standard gait analysis data obtained with standardised walking speed (4 km/h). The gait analyses were performed before and after pain relief by intra-articular injections of 10 mL lidocaine (1%). Pre-injection measurements revealed lower joint loads in the OA group compared to the reference group. Following injections pain during walking decreased significantly and the joint loads increased in the OA group during the late single support phase to a level comparable to the reference group. Although the patients walked with less compressive knee joint forces compared to the reference group, the effects of pain relief may accelerate the degenerative changes. PMID:17011194

  10. Vitamin D, Race, and Experimental Pain Sensitivity in Older Adults with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Glover, T.L.; Goodin, B.R.; Horgas, A.L.; Kindler, L.L.; King, C.D.; Sibille, K.T.; Peloquin, C.A.; Riley, J.L.; Staud, R.; Bradley, L.A.; Fillingim, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Low levels of serum circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D have been correlated with many health conditions, including chronic pain. Recent clinical practice guidelines define vitamin D levels < 20 ng/mL as deficient and values of 21–29 ng/mL as insufficient. Vitamin D insufficiency, including the most severe levels of deficiency, is more prevalent in black Americans. Ethnic and race group differences have been reported in both clinical and experimental pain, with black Americans reporting increased pain. The purpose of this study was to examine whether variation in vitamin D levels contribute to race differences in knee osteoarthritic pain. Methods The sample consisted of 94 participants (75% female), including 45 blacks and 49 whites with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Average age was 55.8 years (range 45–71 years). Participants completed a questionnaire on knee osteoarthritic symptoms and underwent quantitative sensory testing, including measures of heat and mechanical pain sensitivity. Results Blacks had significantly lower levels of vitamin D compared to whites, demonstrated greater clinical pain, and showed greater sensitivity to mechanical and heat pain. Low levels of vitamin D predicted increased experimental pain sensitivity, but did not predict self-reported clinical pain. Group differences in vitamin D significantly predicted group differences in heat pain and pressure pain thresholds on the index knee and ipsilateral forearm. Conclusion These data demonstrate race differences in experimental pain are mediated by differences in vitamin D level. Vitamin D deficiency may be a risk factor for increased knee osteoarthritic pain in black Americans. PMID:23135697

  11. Calcific tendinitis of biceps femoris: an unusual site and cause for lateral knee pain.

    PubMed

    Chan, Warwick; Chase, Helen Emily; Cahir, John G; Walton, Neil Patrick

    2016-01-01

    A 37-year-old man presented to the acute knee and sports medicine clinic with atraumatic lateral knee pain. He had point tenderness over the lateral aspect of his knee which had not settled with anti-inflammatory medications. Imaging revealed a large opaque lesion lateral to the knee and although there was no clear mechanism, injury to the posterolateral corner was considered. An MRI subsequently revealed a rare case of calcific tendinitis to the biceps femoris tendon insertion. This condition was self-limiting and did not require interventions such as steroid injections. This is the first reported case of calcific tendinitis of biceps femoris as a cause of acute knee pain. PMID:27473032

  12. Five-year results of a randomised controlled trial comparing mobile and fixed bearings in total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Breeman, S; Campbell, M K; Dakin, H; Fiddian, N; Fitzpatrick, R; Grant, A; Gray, A; Johnston, L; MacLennan, G S; Morris, R W; Murray, D W

    2013-04-01

    There is conflicting evidence about the merits of mobile bearings in total knee replacement, partly because most randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have not been adequately powered. We report the results of a multicentre RCT of mobile versus fixed bearings. This was part of the knee arthroplasty trial (KAT), where 539 patients were randomly allocated to mobile or fixed bearings and analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. The primary outcome measure was the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) plus secondary measures including Short Form-12, EuroQol EQ-5D, costs, cost-effectiveness and need for further surgery. There was no significant difference between the groups pre-operatively: mean OKS was 17.18 (sd 7.60) in the mobile-bearing group and 16.49 (sd 7.40) in the fixed-bearing group. At five years mean OKS was 33.19 (sd 16.68) and 33.65 (sd 9.68), respectively. There was no significant difference between trial groups in OKS at five years (-1.12 (95% confidence interval -2.77 to 0.52) or any of the other outcome measures. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with knee-related re-operations or in total costs. In this appropriately powered RCT, over the first five years after total knee replacement functional outcomes, re-operation rates and healthcare costs appear to be the same irrespective of whether a mobile or fixed bearing is used.

  13. Knee Pain and Low Back Pain Additively Disturb Sleep in the General Population: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Nagahama Study

    PubMed Central

    Murase, Kimihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Ito, Hiromu; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Setoh, Kazuya; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Muro, Shigeo; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Kosugi, Shinji; Sekine, Akihiro; Yamada, Ryo; Nakayama, Takeo; Mishima, Michiaki; Matsuda, Shuichi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Chin, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Association of knee and low back pain with sleep disturbance is poorly understood. We aimed to clarify the independent and combined effects of these orthopedic symptoms on sleep in a large-scale general population. Methods Cross-sectional data about sleep and knee/low back pain were collected for 9,611 community residents (53±14 years old) by a structured questionnaire. Sleep duration less than 6 h/d was defined as short sleep. Sleep quality and the presence of knee and low back pain were evaluated by dichotomous questions. Subjects who complained about knee or low back pains were graded by tertiles of a numerical response scale (NRS) score and a Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (RDQ) score respectively. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to determine the correlates of short sleep duration and poor sleep quality. Results Frequency of participants who complained of the orthopedic symptoms was as follows; knee pain, 29.0%; low back pain, 42.0% and both knee and low back pain 17.6%. Both knee and low back pain were significantly and independently associated with short sleep duration (knee pain: odds ratio (OR) = 1.19, p<0.01; low back pain: OR = 1.13, p = 0.01) and poor sleep quality (knee pain: OR = 1.22, p<0.01; low back pain; OR = 1.57, p<0.01). The group in the highest tertile of the NRS or RDQ score had the highest risk for short sleep duration and poor sleep quality except for the relationship between the highest tertile of the RDQ score and short sleep duration.(the highest tertile of the NRS: OR for short sleep duration = 1.31, p<0.01; OR for poor sleep quality = 1.47, p<0.01; the highest tertile of the RDQ: OR for short sleep duration = 1.11, p = 0.12; OR for poor sleep quality = 1.81, p<0.01) Further, coincident knee and low back pain raised the odds ratios for short sleep duration (either of knee or low back pain: OR = 1.10, p = 0.06; both knee and low back pain: OR = 1.40, p<0.01) and poor sleep quality (either of knee or

  14. Pain biology education and exercise classes compared to pain biology education alone for individuals with chronic low back pain: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Cormac G; Gray, Heather G; Newton, Mary; Granat, Malcolm H

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this single-blind pilot RCT was to investigate the effect of pain biology education and group exercise classes compared to pain biology education alone for individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Participants with CLBP were randomised to a pain biology education and group exercise classes group (EDEX) [n = 20] or a pain biology education only group (ED) [n = 18]. The primary outcome was pain (0-100 numerical rating scale), and self-reported function assessed using the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, measured at pre-intervention, post-intervention and three month follow up. Secondary outcome measures were pain self-efficacy, pain related fear, physical performance testing and free-living activity monitoring. Using a linear mixed model analysis, there was a statistically significant interaction effect between time and intervention for both pain (F[2,49] = 3.975, p < 0.05) and pain self-efficacy (F[2,51] = 4.011, p < 0.05) with more favourable results for the ED group. The effects levelled off at the three month follow up point. In the short term, pain biology education alone was more effective for pain and pain self-efficacy than a combination of pain biology education and group exercise classes. This pilot study highlights the need to investigate the combined effects of different interventions.

  15. Characterizing Pain Flares from the Perspective of Individuals with Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Susan; Lyden, Angela; Kratz, Anna; Fritz, Heather; Williams, David A.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Gammaitoni, Arnold R.; Phillips, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although pain in knee osteoarthritis (OA) commonly affects activity engagement, the daily pain experience has not been fully-characterized. Specifically, the nature and impact of pain flares is not well-understood. This study characterized pain flares, defined by participants with knee OA; pain flare occurrence and experience were measured over 7 days. Methods This was a multiple methods study; qualitative methods were dominant. Data were collected during the baseline portion of a randomized controlled trial. Participants met criteria for knee OA and had moderate to severe pain. They completed questionnaires and a 7-day home monitoring period that captured momentary symptom reports simultaneously with physical activity via accelerometry (N = 45). Participants also provided individual definitions of pain flare which were used throughout the home monitoring period to indicate whether a pain flare occurred. Results Pain flares were described most often by quality (often sharp), followed by timing (seconds-minutes), and by antecedents and consequences. When asked if their definition of a flare agreed with a supplied definition, 49% of the sample reported only “somewhat”, “a little” or “not at all”. Using individual definitions, 78% experienced at least one daily pain flare over the home monitoring period; 24% had a flare on over 50% of the monitored days. Conclusions Pain flares were common, fleeting, and often experienced in the context of activity engagement. Participants’ views on what constitutes a pain flare differ from commonly accepted definitions. Pain flares are an understudied aspect of the knee OA pain experience and require further characterization. PMID:25580697

  16. Anterior knee pain following total knee replacement correlates with the OARSI score of the cartilage of the patella

    PubMed Central

    Vorobjov, Sigrid; Lepik, Katrin; Märtson, Aare

    2014-01-01

    Background Attempts to relate patellar cartilage involvement to anterior knee pain (AKP) have yielded conflicting results. We determined whether the condition of the cartilage of the patella at the time of knee replacement, as assessed by the OARSI score, correlates with postsurgical AKP. Patients and methods We prospectively studied 100 patients undergoing knee arthroplasty. At surgery, we photographed and biopsied the articular surface of the patella, leaving the patella unresurfaced. Following determination of the microscopic grade of the patellar cartilage lesion and the stage by analyzing the intraoperative photographs, we calculated the OARSI score. We interviewed the patients 1 year after knee arthroplasty using the HSS patella score for diagnosis of AKP. Results 57 of 95 patients examined had AKP. The average OARSI score of painless patients was 13 (6–20) and that of patients with AKP was 15 (6–20) (p = 0.04). Patients with OARSI scores of 13–24 had 50% higher risk of AKP (prevalence ratio = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0–2.3) than patients with OARSI scores of 0–12. Interpretation The depth and extent of the cartilage lesion of the knee-cap should be considered when deciding between the various options for treatment of the patella during knee replacement. PMID:24954482

  17. Advantage of Minimal Anterior Knee Pain and Long-term Survivorship of Cemented Single Radius Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty without Patella Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hyung-Min; Baek, Ji-Hoon; Ko, Young-Bong

    2015-01-01

    Background The single radius total knee prosthesis was introduced with the advantage of reduced patellar symptoms; however, there is no long-term follow-up study of the same. The purpose of this study was to determine the survival rate of single radius posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty and patellofemoral complication rates in a consecutive series. Methods Seventy-one patients (103 knees) who underwent arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing using a single radius posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis were followed up for a minimum 10 years. Clinical evaluation using Knee Society knee and function scores and radiologic evaluation were performed at regular intervals. Anterior knee pain as well as patellofemoral complications were evaluated with a simple questionnaire. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to estimate survival. Results Seventeen patients (23 knees) were excluded due to death (12 knees) or lost to follow-up (11 knees). Of the 80 knees enrolled, all femoral components and 78 tibial components were well fixed without loosening at final follow-up. Two revisions were performed because of tibial component loosening and periprosthetic joint infection. One patient with tibial component loosening refused to have revision surgery. No obvious tibial insert polyethylene wear was observed. The survivorships at 132 months were 96.7% using revision or pending revision as end points. Anterior knee pain was present in 6 patients (6 knees, 7.5%) at the latest follow-up. No patellofemoral complication requiring revision was encountered. Conclusions The single radius posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis demonstrated an excellent minimum 10-year survivorship. The low rates of implant loosening and 7.5% of anterior knee pain as a patellofemoral complication are comparable with those reported for other modern total knee prosthesis. PMID:25729519

  18. The 30-year wait for treatment of an acutely painful knee

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Dominic; Colaco, Henry B; Edwards, Max R

    2014-01-01

    A 63-year-old retired man presented to our clinic reporting a severely painful, localised knee pain present for around 30 years and associated with a spontaneous palpable lump. He was prompted to seek medical advice at this point because his symptoms were exacerbated when his young grandchildren bumped into the knee. While radiographs were unhelpful, ultrasonography revealed a well-defined, subcutaneous soft tissue mass at the anterior aspect of the knee. Surgical excision was performed as a day case. Histological examination of the mass showed a glomus tumour. This patient had suffered for many years as a result of this painful mass but full resolution of his pain occurred immediately after excision. PMID:25267810

  19. Six-week gait retraining program reduces knee adduction moment, reduces pain, and improves function for individuals with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Shull, Pete B; Silder, Amy; Shultz, Rebecca; Dragoo, Jason L; Besier, Thor F; Delp, Scott L; Cutkosky, Mark R

    2013-07-01

    This study examined the influence of a 6-week gait retraining program on the knee adduction moment (KAM) and knee pain and function. Ten subjects with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee pain participated in weekly gait retraining sessions over 6 weeks. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores and a 10-point visual-analog pain scale score were measured at baseline, post-training (end of 6 weeks), and 1 month after training ended. Gait retraining reduced the first peak KAM by 20% (p < 0.01) post-training as a result of a 7° decrease in foot progression angle (i.e., increased internal foot rotation), compared to baseline (p < 0.01). WOMAC pain and function scores were improved at post-training by 29% and 32%, respectively (p < 0.05) and visual-analog pain scale scores improved by two points (p < 0.05). Changes in WOMAC pain and function were approximately 75% larger than the expected placebo effect (p < 0.05). Changes in KAM, foot progression angle, WOMAC pain and function, and visual-analog pain score were retained 1 month after the end of the 6-week training period (p < 0.05). These results show that a 6-week gait retraining program can reduce the KAM and improve symptoms for individuals with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis and knee pain.

  20. Knee pain during activities of daily living and its relationship with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fukutani, Naoto; Iijima, Hirotaka; Aoyama, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Yuko; Hiraoka, Masakazu; Miyanobu, Kazuyuki; Jinnouchi, Masashi; Kaneda, Eishi; Tsuboyama, Tadao; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether knee pain during various activities of daily living (ADLs) is associated with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that the painful ADLs associated with decreased physical activity differ according to disease severity. This cross-sectional study enrolled 270 patients with medial knee OA, assigned to either the early (Kellgren Lawrence [K/L] grade 1-2) or the severe group (K/L grade 3-4). Physical activity was assessed using a pedometer. Knee pain during six ADLs (waking up in the morning, walking on a flat surface, ascending stairs, etc.) was evaluated using a questionnaire. We performed multiple regression and quantile regression analysis to investigate whether knee pain during each ADL was associated with physical activity. In the early group, the more knee pain they experienced while ascending stairs, the lower their physical activity was (75th regression coefficient = -1033.70, P = 0.018). In the severe group, the more knee pain they experienced while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up, the lower their physical activity was (unstandardized coefficients = -1850.87, P = 0.026; unstandardized coefficients = -2640.35, P = 0.010). Knee pain while ascending stairs and while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up was a probable limiting factor for physical activity in early and severe knee OA, respectively. These findings suggested that a reduction in task-specific knee pain according to disease severity could improve physical activity levels. PMID:27041381

  1. Knee pain during activities of daily living and its relationship with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fukutani, Naoto; Iijima, Hirotaka; Aoyama, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Yuko; Hiraoka, Masakazu; Miyanobu, Kazuyuki; Jinnouchi, Masashi; Kaneda, Eishi; Tsuboyama, Tadao; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether knee pain during various activities of daily living (ADLs) is associated with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that the painful ADLs associated with decreased physical activity differ according to disease severity. This cross-sectional study enrolled 270 patients with medial knee OA, assigned to either the early (Kellgren Lawrence [K/L] grade 1-2) or the severe group (K/L grade 3-4). Physical activity was assessed using a pedometer. Knee pain during six ADLs (waking up in the morning, walking on a flat surface, ascending stairs, etc.) was evaluated using a questionnaire. We performed multiple regression and quantile regression analysis to investigate whether knee pain during each ADL was associated with physical activity. In the early group, the more knee pain they experienced while ascending stairs, the lower their physical activity was (75th regression coefficient = -1033.70, P = 0.018). In the severe group, the more knee pain they experienced while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up, the lower their physical activity was (unstandardized coefficients = -1850.87, P = 0.026; unstandardized coefficients = -2640.35, P = 0.010). Knee pain while ascending stairs and while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up was a probable limiting factor for physical activity in early and severe knee OA, respectively. These findings suggested that a reduction in task-specific knee pain according to disease severity could improve physical activity levels.

  2. The Role of Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Clinical Management of Refractory Anterior Knee Pain.

    PubMed

    Singer, Barbara J; Silbert, Benjamin I; Silbert, Peter L; Singer, Kevin P

    2015-09-01

    Anterior knee pain is a highly prevalent condition affecting largely young to middle aged adults. Symptoms can recur in more than two thirds of cases, often resulting in activity limitation and reduced participation in employment and recreational pursuits. Persistent anterior knee pain is difficult to treat and many individuals eventually consider a surgical intervention. Evidence for long term benefit of most conservative treatments or surgical approaches is currently lacking. Injection of Botulinum toxin type A to the distal region of vastus lateralis muscle causes a short term functional "denervation" which moderates the influence of vastus lateralis muscle on the knee extensor mechanism and increases the relative contribution of the vastus medialis muscle. Initial data suggest that, compared with other interventions for anterior knee pain, Botulinum toxin type A injection, in combination with an active exercise programme, can lead to sustained relief of symptoms, reduced health care utilisation and increased activity participation. The procedure is less invasive than surgical intervention, relatively easy to perform, and is time- and cost-effective. Further studies, including larger randomized placebo-controlled trials, are required to confirm the effectiveness of Botulinum toxin type A injection for anterior knee pain and to elaborate the possible mechanisms underpinning pain and symptom relief. PMID:26308056

  3. The Role of Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Clinical Management of Refractory Anterior Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Barbara J.; Silbert, Benjamin I.; Silbert, Peter L.; Singer, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior knee pain is a highly prevalent condition affecting largely young to middle aged adults. Symptoms can recur in more than two thirds of cases, often resulting in activity limitation and reduced participation in employment and recreational pursuits. Persistent anterior knee pain is difficult to treat and many individuals eventually consider a surgical intervention. Evidence for long term benefit of most conservative treatments or surgical approaches is currently lacking. Injection of Botulinum toxin type A to the distal region of vastus lateralis muscle causes a short term functional “denervation” which moderates the influence of vastus lateralis muscle on the knee extensor mechanism and increases the relative contribution of the vastus medialis muscle. Initial data suggest that, compared with other interventions for anterior knee pain, Botulinum toxin type A injection, in combination with an active exercise programme, can lead to sustained relief of symptoms, reduced health care utilisation and increased activity participation. The procedure is less invasive than surgical intervention, relatively easy to perform, and is time- and cost-effective. Further studies, including larger randomized placebo-controlled trials, are required to confirm the effectiveness of Botulinum toxin type A injection for anterior knee pain and to elaborate the possible mechanisms underpinning pain and symptom relief. PMID:26308056

  4. Gait energetic efficiency in older adults with and without knee pain: results from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seung-Uk; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2015-02-01

    With aging, customary gait patterns change and energetic efficiency declines, but the relationship between these alterations is not well understood. If gait characteristics that develop with aging explain part of the decline in energetic efficiency that occur in most aging individuals, then efforts to modify these characteristics could delay or prevent mobility limitation. This study characterizes gait patterns in older persons with and without knee pain and tests the hypothesis that changes in gait characteristics due to knee pain are associated with increased energetic cost of walking in older adults. Study participants were 364 men and 170 women aged 60 to 96 years enrolled in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), of whom 86 had prevalent knee pain. Gait patterns were assessed at participant self-selected usual pace in the gait laboratory, and the energetic cost of walking was assessed by indirect calorimetry during self-selected usual pace walking over 2.5 min in a tiled corridor using a portable equipment. Participants with knee pain were less energetically efficient than those without pain (oxygen consumption 0.97 vs. 0.88 ml/(10 m · 100 kg); p = 0.002) and had slower gait speed and smaller range of motion (ROM) at the hip and knee joints (p < 0.05, for all). Slower gait speed and lower knee ROM in participants with knee pain and longer double support time and higher ankle ROM in participants without knee pain were associated with lower energetic efficiency (p < 0.05, for all). Slower gait speed and lower knee ROM were correlates of knee pain and were found to mediate the association between age and oxygen consumption. Although knee pain is associated with a higher energetic cost of walking, gait characteristics associated with energetic efficiency differ by pain status which suggests that compensatory strategies both in the presence and absence of pain may impact gait efficiency.

  5. Serum Levels of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Painful Knee Osteoarthritis and Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Marta; Ezquerro, Fernando; Marcon Alfieri, Fábio; Vilas Boas, Lucy; Tozetto-Mendoza, Tania Regina; Chen, Janini; Özçakar, Levent; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder in the world. Among the mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis, biomarkers (cytokines profile) may be related to pain and pain intensity, functional capacity, and pressure pain thresholds (PPT). Thus, the study of these relationships may offer useful information about pathophysiology and associated mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the seric concentration of pro (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis and to correlate the levels of these biomarkers with the patients' functional capacity and pressure pain threshold (PPT) values. PMID:25821631

  6. Implementation of RCGP guidelines for acute low back pain: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Paola; Simpson, Carl W R; Collins, Stuart I; Hodgson, G; Dowrick, Christopher F; Simison, A J M; Rose, M J

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) has produced guidelines for the management of acute low back pain in primary care. AIM: To investigate the impact on patient management of an educational strategy to promote these guidelines among general practitioners (GPs). DESIGN OF STUDY: Group randomised controlled trial, using the health centre as the unit of randomisation. SETTING: Primary care teams in north-west England. METHOD: Twenty-four health centres were randomly allocated to an intervention or control arm. Practices in the intervention arm were offered outreach visits to promote national guidelines on acute low back pain, as well as access to fast-track physiotherapy and to a triage service for patients with persistent symptoms. RESULTS: Twenty-four centres were randomised. Two thousand, one hundred and eighty-seven eligible patients presented with acute low back pain during the study period: 1049 in the intervention group and 1138 in the control group. There were no significant differences between study groups in the proportion of patients who were referred for X-ray, issued with a sickness certificate, prescribed opioids or muscle relaxants, or who were referred to secondary care, but significantly more patients in the intervention group were referred to physiotherapy or the back pain unit (difference in proportion = 12.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.8% to 21.6%). CONCLUSION: The management of patients presenting with low back pain to primary care was mostly unchanged by an outreach educational strategy to promote greater adherence to RCGP guidelines among GPs. An increase in referral to physiotherapy or educational programmes followed the provision of a triage service. PMID:14965404

  7. Determinants of pain and functioning in knee osteoarthritis: a one-year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Helminen, Eeva-Eerika; Sinikallio, Sanna H; Valjakka, Anna L; Väisänen-Rouvali, Rauni H; Arokoski, Jari PA

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify predictors of pain and disability in knee osteoarthritis. Design: A one-year prospective analysis of determinants of pain and functioning in knee osteoarthritis. Study setting: Primary care providers in a medium-sized city. Patients: A total of 111 patients aged from 35 to 75 with clinical symptoms and radiographic grading (Kellgren-Lawrence 2–4) of knee osteoarthritis who participated in a randomized controlled trial. Main measures: The outcome measures were self-reported pain and function, which were recorded at 0, 3 and 12 months. Disease-specific pain and functioning were assessed using the pain and function subscales of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index. Generic physical and mental functioning were assessed using the RAND-36 subscales for function, and physical and mental component summary scores. Possible baseline predictors for these outcomes were 1) demographic, socioeconomic and disease-related variables, and 2) psychological measures of resources, distress, fear of movement and catastrophizing. Results: Multivariate linear mixed model analyses revealed that normal mood at baseline measured with the Beck Anxiety Inventory predicted significantly better results in all measures of pain (WOMAC P=0.02) and function (WOMAC P=0.002, RAND-36 P=0.002) during the one-year follow-up. Psychological resource factors (pain self-efficacy P=0.012, satisfaction with life P=0.002) predicted better function (RAND-36). Pain catastrophizing predicted higher WOMAC pain levels (P=0.013), whereas fear of movement (kinesiophobia) predicted poorer functioning (WOMAC P=0.046, RAND-36 P=0.024). Conclusions: Multiple psychological factors in people with knee osteoarthritis pain are associated with the development of disability and longer term worse pain. PMID:27496698

  8. Two cases of chronic knee pain caused by unusual injuries to the popliteus tendon

    PubMed Central

    DAVALOS, ERIC A.; BARANK, DAVID; VARMA, RAJEEV K.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the popliteus tendon are less frequent than injuries to the menisci or ligamentous structures of the knee. When they do occur, injuries to the popliteus tendon tend to be the result of trauma and associated with injuries to other components of the knee. The most commonly seen injuries include tears at the musculotendinous junction and avulsion tears at the lateral femoral condyle insertion site. This report presents two unusual injuries of the popliteus tendon in patients with chronic knee pain: an isolated split tear of the tendon and a subluxed tendon residing within the lateral joint space. PMID:27386449

  9. Atypical location of an osteoid osteoma with atypical anterior knee pain

    PubMed Central

    Harun, Mutlu; Hayrettin, Yaldız; Serhat, Mutlu; Engin, Cetinkaya; Kamil, Cepni; Armagan, Arslan; Sancar, Parmaksızoglu Atilla

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION An osteoid osteoma is a painful tumor that most commonly affects the extra-articular parts of the long bones. An intra-articular location of an osteoid osteoma is rare. Various differential diagnoses may arise in connection with such an unusual location because it causes atypical clinical signs. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 24-year-old male developed pain in the central region of the right knee. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no clear pathology in the knee joint. A technetium bone scan and computed tomography (CT) were then ordered and confirmed the presence of an osteoid osteoma in the knee joint. The patient was treated through an anteromedial approach to the knee, and the lesion was removed by excisional biopsy under fluoroscopy. DISCUSSION The diagnosis of intra-articular osteoid osteoma is challenging because the clinical presentation can be misleading. MRI is often requested as the first imaging method when dealing with knee symptoms, and radiologists are often unaware of the clinical presentation. Edema seen on MRI can be misleading with respect to the location of the nidus. CT is considered to be the best imaging method because it usually allows for clear visualization of the nidus. Different treatments have been proposed, ranging from open excision to arthroscopic resection. CONCLUSION Osteoid osteoma should be considered in young adult patients with chronic knee pain and no history of trauma. PMID:25462055

  10. Efficacy of myofascial trigger point dry needling in the prevention of pain after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mayoral, Orlando; Salvat, Isabel; Martín, María Teresa; Martín, Stella; Santiago, Jesús; Cotarelo, José; Rodríguez, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) is superior to placebo in the prevention of pain after total knee arthroplasty. Forty subjects were randomised to a true dry needling group (T) or to a sham group (S). All were examined for MTrPs by an experienced physical therapist 4-5 hours before surgery. Immediately following anesthesiology and before surgery started, subjects in the T group were dry needled in all previously diagnosed MTrPs, while the S group received no treatment in their MTrPs. Subjects were blinded to group allocation as well as the examiner in presurgical and follow-up examinations performed 1, 3, and 6 months after arthroplasty. Subjects in the T group had less pain after intervention, with statistically significant differences in the variation rate of the visual analogue scale (VAS) measurements 1 month after intervention and in the need for immediate postsurgery analgesics. Differences were not significant at 3- and 6-month follow-up examinations. In conclusion, a single dry needling treatment of MTrP under anaesthesia reduced pain in the first month after knee arthroplasty, when pain was the most severe. Results show a superiority of dry needling versus placebo. An interesting novel placebo methodology for dry needling, with a real blinding procedure, is presented.

  11. Efficacy of Myofascial Trigger Point Dry Needling in the Prevention of Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mayoral, Orlando; Salvat, Isabel; Martín, María Teresa; Martín, Stella; Santiago, Jesús; Cotarelo, José; Rodríguez, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) is superior to placebo in the prevention of pain after total knee arthroplasty. Forty subjects were randomised to a true dry needling group (T) or to a sham group (S). All were examined for MTrPs by an experienced physical therapist 4–5 hours before surgery. Immediately following anesthesiology and before surgery started, subjects in the T group were dry needled in all previously diagnosed MTrPs, while the S group received no treatment in their MTrPs. Subjects were blinded to group allocation as well as the examiner in presurgical and follow-up examinations performed 1, 3, and 6 months after arthroplasty. Subjects in the T group had less pain after intervention, with statistically significant differences in the variation rate of the visual analogue scale (VAS) measurements 1 month after intervention and in the need for immediate postsurgery analgesics. Differences were not significant at 3- and 6-month follow-up examinations. In conclusion, a single dry needling treatment of MTrP under anaesthesia reduced pain in the first month after knee arthroplasty, when pain was the most severe. Results show a superiority of dry needling versus placebo. An interesting novel placebo methodology for dry needling, with a real blinding procedure, is presented. PMID:23606888

  12. Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement as a Possible Explanation of Recalcitrant Anterior Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Tey, Marc; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with chronic anterior knee pain (AKP) recalcitrant to conservative treatment who returned to our office for severe hip pain secondary to Cam femoroacetabular impingement (Cam FAI) at 10 months after the onset of knee pain. This case highlights the fact that the main problem is not in the patella but in the hip in some patients with AKP. We hypothesize that there is an external femoral rotation in order to avoid the impingement and therefore the hip pain in patients with Cam FAI. This functional femoral rotation could provoke a patellofemoral imbalance that may be, in theory, responsible for patellofemoral pain in this particular patient. In our case, Cam FAI resolution was related to the resolution of AKP. PMID:27247817

  13. Pain relief with lidocaine 5% patch in localized peripheral neuropathic pain in relation to pain phenotype: a randomised, double-blind, and placebo-controlled, phenotype panel study.

    PubMed

    Demant, Dyveke T; Lund, Karen; Finnerup, Nanna B; Vollert, Jan; Maier, Christoph; Segerdahl, Märtha S; Jensen, Troels S; Sindrup, Søren H

    2015-11-01

    In neuropathic pain with irritable nociceptor (IN) phenotype, upregulation of sodium channels on nociceptors is supposed to be an important pain mechanism that may be targeted by topical sodium channel blockade. This randomised, double-blind, phenotype panel, crossover study with 4-week treatment periods of lidocaine 5% patch and placebo was performed to search for phenotype differences in effect. The primary efficacy measure was the total pain intensity on an 11-point numeric rating scale, and the primary objective was to compare the effect of lidocaine in patients with and without IN phenotype as defined by hypersensitivity and preserved small-fibre function determined by quantitative sensory testing. Forty-six patients with neuropathic pain due to nerve injury or postherpetic neuralgia were randomised. The modified intention-to-treat population comprised 15 patients with irritable nociceptor and 25 patients with nonirritable nociceptor. In the total sample, lidocaine reduced pain by 0.3 numeric rating scale points (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.1-0.5) and pain-related sleep disturbance by 0.6 points (95% CI: 0.4-0.8) more than placebo (P = 0.007 and P < 0.001) and relieved pain by 0.4 verbal score (-1-5) points more (P = 0.036). For these measures, there was no significant interaction between treatment and phenotype, but there was a significant interaction for pain paroxysms (0.8, 95% CI: 0.4-1.2, P < 0.001) and deep aching pain (0.6, 95% CI: 0.1-1.0, P = 0.013). In conclusion, lidocaine 5% patch had an effect on peripheral neuropathic pain, and it may be most efficacious in patients with IN phenotype. The lack of significant phenotype differences may be caused by too low statistical power.

  14. Giant Cell Tumor of the Patella Tendon Sheath Presenting as a Painful Locked Knee

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Andreas; Tsoumpos, Pantelis; Tatani, Irini; Iliopoulos, Ilias; Papachristou, Dionysios

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 26 Final Diagnosis: Giant cell tumor of the patella tendon seath Symptoms: Efusion • locking kneepain Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Arthroscopy and open resection of the tumor Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCT-TS) is a benign proliferative synovial tumor manifesting as an intra-articular solitary nodule. When it involves the infrapatellar fat pad it can present acutely as a painful locked knee. Case Report: A 26-year-old white male presented with a 2-week history of painful locking in his right knee. Clinical examination revealed lack of extension by approximately 20°. To help establish the diagnosis, an MRI scan of the right knee was performed, showing a large (5×4×2 cm), oval, well-circumscribed mass with a low-intensity homogenous signal. The size of the mass prohibited the removal by arthroscopy and we therefore proceeded with an open arthrotomy. Histological examination showed a tendosynovial giant cell tumor of the patella tendon sheath. At the latest follow-up, 2 years postoperatively, there was no local tumor recurrence. Conclusions: These rare tumorous lesions should be included in the differential diagnosis of painful locking knee, especially in the absence of definite traumatic history. PMID:26302970

  15. Five-year results of a randomised controlled trial comparing mobile and fixed bearings in total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Breeman, S; Campbell, M K; Dakin, H; Fiddian, N; Fitzpatrick, R; Grant, A; Gray, A; Johnston, L; MacLennan, G S; Morris, R W; Murray, D W

    2013-04-01

    There is conflicting evidence about the merits of mobile bearings in total knee replacement, partly because most randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have not been adequately powered. We report the results of a multicentre RCT of mobile versus fixed bearings. This was part of the knee arthroplasty trial (KAT), where 539 patients were randomly allocated to mobile or fixed bearings and analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. The primary outcome measure was the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) plus secondary measures including Short Form-12, EuroQol EQ-5D, costs, cost-effectiveness and need for further surgery. There was no significant difference between the groups pre-operatively: mean OKS was 17.18 (sd 7.60) in the mobile-bearing group and 16.49 (sd 7.40) in the fixed-bearing group. At five years mean OKS was 33.19 (sd 16.68) and 33.65 (sd 9.68), respectively. There was no significant difference between trial groups in OKS at five years (-1.12 (95% confidence interval -2.77 to 0.52) or any of the other outcome measures. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with knee-related re-operations or in total costs. In this appropriately powered RCT, over the first five years after total knee replacement functional outcomes, re-operation rates and healthcare costs appear to be the same irrespective of whether a mobile or fixed bearing is used. PMID:23539700

  16. Cruciate Retaining Versus Cruciate Stabilising Total Knee Arthroplasty – A Prospective Randomised Kinematic Study

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, T L; Bayan, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While there is a large body of research in regards to cruciate retaining(CR) and cruciate sacrificing total condylar knee replacement, the literature is spars in regards to highly conforming polyetheylene such as the triatholon cruciate stabilising tibial insert (CS).The aim was to determine whether there is a difference in the range of motion, kinematics as well as the functional outcome for Triathlon CS and CR TKJR. Methods: A single hospital consecutive series of one surgeon between 2011 and 2013 were enrolled. Kinematic data recorded prospectively at the time of surgery utilizing imageless navigation included preoperative and post-replacement extension, gravity flexion, passive flexion and rotation. Intraoperative femoral and tibial cuts and definitive implants were also recorded. Statistically analysis performed to compare CS and CR TKJR range of motion, deformity correction, and rotation pre and post-operatively. Oxford functional scores were obtained at the final follow up. 124 patients were randomised to 71 CS and 53 CR TKJR. The demographics were comparable between the two groups. Results: No significant difference was found between the groups’ preoperative range of motion. The net gain in extension for the CS group was 5.65 degrees (4.14-7.17) and for CR 5.64 degrees (4.24-7.04, p=0.99) with no significant difference shown. Post-operative gravity flexion significantly increased in CS TKJR with 129.01 degrees (127.37130.66) compared with 126.35 degrees (124.39-128.30, p =0.04) for CR. A weak positive correlation was shown between the size of distal femoral cut and post-operative extension for both CS and CR TKJR. A weak positive correlation was also shown for the difference between the intraoperative cuts (tibial and femoral) and the size of the implants used, in relation to post-operative extension. Post-operative oxford scores at average of 3.4 year follow up comparable between groups. Conclusion: The kinematics of CS and CR TKJR are

  17. A multicentre, pragmatic, parallel group, randomised controlled trial to compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of three physiotherapy-led exercise interventions for knee osteoarthritis in older adults: the BEEP trial protocol (ISRCTN: 93634563)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise is consistently recommended for older adults with knee pain related to osteoarthritis. However, the effects from exercise are typically small and short-term, likely linked to insufficient individualisation of the exercise programme and limited attention to supporting exercise adherence over time. The BEEP randomised trial aims to improve patients’ short and long-term outcomes from exercise. It will test the overall effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two physiotherapy-led exercise interventions (Individually Tailored Exercise and Targeted Exercise Adherence) to improve the individual tailoring of, and adherence to exercise, compared with usual physiotherapy care. Methods/design Based on the learning from a pilot study (ISRCTN 23294263), the BEEP trial is a multi-centre, pragmatic, parallel group, individually randomised controlled trial, with embedded longitudinal qualitative interviews. 500 adults in primary care, aged 45 years and over with knee pain will be randomised to 1 of 3 treatment groups delivered by fully trained physiotherapists in up to 6 NHS services. These are: Usual Physiotherapy Care (control group consisting of up to 4 treatment sessions of advice and exercise), Individually Tailored Exercise (an individualised, supervised and progressed lower-limb exercise programme) or Targeted Exercise Adherence (supporting patients to adhere to exercise and to engage in general physical activity over the longer-term). The primary outcomes are pain and function as measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis index. A comprehensive range of secondary outcomes are also included. Outcomes are measured at 3, 6 (primary outcome time-point), 9, 18 and 36 months. Data on adverse events will also be collected. Semi-structured, qualitative interviews with a subsample of 30 participants (10 from each treatment group) will be undertaken at two time-points (end of treatment and 12 to 18 months later) and analysed thematically

  18. Knee microfracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee: a 2-year randomised study. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc . 2010 Apr;18(4):519-27. Hurst JM, Steadman JR, O'Brien L, Rodkey WG, Briggs KK. Rehabilitation following microfracture for chondral injury in the knee. ...

  19. Correlation among Radiographic, Arthroscopic and Pain Criteria for the Diagnosis of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bedarakota, Dhanraj; Vidyasagar, JVS; Rapur, Sivaprasad; Karra, Madhulatha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common degenerative joint disorder leading to functional impairment and dependency in older adults. Early detection and intervention is of paramount importance in decreasing the morbidity. Radiography is the first investigation of choice for OA patients presenting with knee pain. But, there is a high degree of discordance between clinical and radiographic findings. Arthroscopy aids in accurate diagnosis of OA knee. Aim In view of the conflicting reports in the literature the present study was undertaken to report the correlation among radiographic, arthroscopic and pain findings in knee OA patients to facilitate early and precise diagnosis. Materials and Methods Twenty eight cases (14 males and 14 females) of primary OA knee (7 each from radiographic grade 1 to 4) were screened and selected for the study. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients (Rho/r estimate) were calculated to determine the relationship between pain, radiographic and arthroscopic grades in patients with knee OA. Results Among 28 patients, 10.71% had grade 1, 14.28% had grade 2, 25% had grade 3 and 50% had grade 4 arthroscopic findings. Overall Spearman’s correlation coefficient (r) for radiographic and arthroscopic grades was 0.8077, 0.8212 for radiographic and pain grades and 0.7634 for arthroscopic and pain grades. Correlation coefficient could not be calculated for individual grades in isolation which would otherwise represent the factual correlation. The Mean arthroscopic grade for radiographic grades 1 to 4 were 1.57, 3.42, 3.57,4.0 respectively and the Mean pain grades for radiographic grades 1 to 4 were1.57, 2.57,3.28, 3.57 respectively. Radiological findings were found to lag behind the arthroscopic findings significantly. Conclusion Arthroscopic findings represent the exact extent and degree of the pathology of OA knee. Kellgren-Lawrence grading read with conventional Antero-posterior standing radiographs of knee underscores the

  20. Preoperative Pain, Symptoms, and Psychological Factors related to Higher Acute Pain Trajectories during Hospitalization for Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Maren Falch; Miaskowski, Christine; Rustøen, Tone; Rosseland, Leiv Arne; Paul, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Unrelieved postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a significant problem. This longitudinal study investigated how preoperative pain intensity, as well as a comprehensive list of preoperative and perioperative factors, influenced the severity of acute average and worst pain after TKA. Methods Prior to surgery, 203 patients completed a demographic questionnaire, Lee Fatigue Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. Brief Pain Inventory was completed prior to surgery as well as through postoperative days (POD) 0 to 4. Clinical data were extracted from medical records. Results Several factors were associated with higher levels of preoperative and postoperative pain. Lower preoperative average and worst pain intensity scores were associated with increases in average and worst postoperative pain from POD1 to POD4. A higher number of comorbidities, higher C-reactive protein values, and higher pain interference with function were associated with higher preoperative levels of average pain. Older age, higher fatigue levels, and higher scores on identity and emotional responses to osteoarthritis (OA) were associated with higher preoperative levels of worst pain. Lower perceived consequences of OA were associated with higher pain from POD1 to POD4. Males and patients with lower preoperative scores for average pain had higher worst pain following surgery. Discussion Patients at higher risk for more severe postoperative pain can be identified through an assessment of pain and other risk factors identified in this study. Future research needs to test the efficacy of interventions that modify patients’ perceptions of living with OA and pain intensity before surgery on short and long term postoperative outcomes. PMID:27583551

  1. Modifiable lifestyle factors are associated with lower pain levels in adults with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, A Erin; Tucker, Amy J; Kott, Laima S; Wright, Amanda J; Duncan, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With no cure or effective treatments for osteoarthritis (OA), the need to identify modifiable factors to decrease pain and increase physical function is well recognized. OBJECTIVE: To examine factors that characterize OA patients at different levels of pain, and to investigate the relationships among these factors and pain. METHODS: Details of OA characteristics and lifestyle factors were collected from interviews with healthy adults with knee OA (n=197). The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index was used to assess pain. Factors were summarized across three pain score categories, and χ2 and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to examine differences. Multiple linear regression analysis using a stepwise selection procedure was used to examine associations between lifestyle factors and pain. RESULTS: Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that pain was significantly higher with the use of OA medications and higher body mass index category, and significantly lower with the use of supplements and meeting physical activity guidelines (≥150 min/week). Stiffness and physical function scores, bilateral knee OA, body mass index category and OA medication use were significantly higher with increasing pain, whereas self-reported health, servings of fruit, supplement use and meeting physical activity guidelines significantly lower. No significant differences across pain categories were found for sex, age, number of diseases, duration of OA, ever smoked, alcoholic drinks/week, over-the-counter pain medication use, OA supplement use, physical therapy use, servings of vegetables or minutes walked/week. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy weight maintenance, exercise for at least 150 min/week and appropriate use of medications and supplements represent important modifiable factors related to lower knee OA pain. PMID:26125195

  2. Comparison of the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold after overhead assembly work and below knee assembly work

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio following overhead work and below-knee work. [Subjects and Methods] Ten men (20–30 years) were recruited to this study. The thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold was measured after both overhead work and below-knee work. [Results] The pressure-pain thresholds of the thoracic erector spinae muscle decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. Similarly, the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. [Conclusion] Below-knee work results in greater thoracic pain than overhead work. Future studies should investigate below-knee work in detail. This study confirmed the thoracic relaxation phenomenon in the mid-position of the thoracic erector spinae. PMID:26957744

  3. Bipartite patella causing knee pain in young adults: a report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Chopra, Surender; Vijay, Vipul; Vaish, Abhishek

    2015-04-01

    We report on 5 patients who underwent arthroscopic excision or open reduction and internal fixation for bipartite patella. All patients presented with refractory anterior knee pain. The diagnosis of bipartite patella was made using radiography, and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic arthrography. All 5 patients achieved complete resolution of symptoms after surgery, and remained pain-free after a mean followup period of 13 months. PMID:25920661

  4. The relationship between psychosocial variables and pain reporting in osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Creamer, P; Hochberg, M C

    1998-02-01

    Psychosocial factors may explain some of the variation in pain reporting among individuals with knee OA. This has important potential implications for management; indeed, several studies (reviewed in ref. 56) have demonstrated that interventions may reduce knee pain without apparent halting or reversing of structural damage. Such interventions have included the simple provision of support by monthly telephone calls (57), self-management programs (58), and cognitive-behavioral approaches designed to teach patients ways of coping with their pain (59). These programs are even more effective if the spouse is involved (60). It should be noted that there may be a large placebo effect in these interventions, and the degree to which patients are responding simply to an interest being taken in them and their problems is unclear; at least one study has shown that formal cognitive-behavioral therapy is no better than didactic education at improving pain and function in knee OA (though both are beneficial) (61). Many studies examining the role of psychosocial factors have suffered from poor design; many, for example, fail to control for radiographic severity. Future studies should define how pain is identified (dichotomous, ever/never/current, severity), differentiate community and hospital subjects, and separate patients by type and location of OA. Studies should also control for other factors potentially associated with pain: obesity, comorbidity, muscle weakness, and aerobic fitness. Prospective studies would allow clarification of the cause and effect relationship between anxiety, depression, and pain, both in the community and in patients who have elected to seek medical help. In this way, we may increase our understanding of the complex interaction between mood, social factors, and pain reporting in knee OA and, thus, improve the effectiveness, already equivalent to many pharmacologic interventions, of treatments designed to address psychosocial factors.

  5. Pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) compared to conventional treatment in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Barnhoorn, Karlijn J; van de Meent, Henk; van Dongen, Robert T M; Klomp, Frank P; Groenewoud, Hans; Samwel, Han; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Frölke, Jan Paul M; Staal, J Bart

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) with conventional treatment in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) in a randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Setting The study was conducted at a level 1 trauma centre in the Netherlands. Participants 56 adult patients with CRPS-1 participated. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Interventions Patients received either PEPT in a maximum of five treatment sessions, or conventional treatment following the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline. Measurements Outcomes were assessed at baseline and at 3, 6 and 9 months after randomisation. The primary outcome measure was the Impairment level Sum Score—Restricted Version (ISS-RV), consisting of visual analogue scale for pain (VAS-pain), McGill Pain Questionnaire, active range of motion (AROM) and skin temperature. Secondary outcome measures included Pain Disability Index (PDI); muscle strength; Short Form 36 (SF-36); disability of arm, shoulder and hand; Lower Limb Tasks Questionnaire (LLTQ); 10 m walk test; timed up-and-go test (TUG) and EuroQol-5D. Results The intention-to-treat analysis showed a clinically relevant decrease in ISS-RV (6.7 points for PEPT and 6.2 points for conventional treatment), but the between-group difference was not significant (0.96, 95% CI −1.56 to 3.48). Participants allocated to PEPT experienced a greater improvement in AROM (between-group difference 0.51, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.94; p=0.02). The per protocol analysis showed larger and significant between-group effects on ISS-RV, VAS-pain, AROM, PDI, SF-36, LLTQ and TUG. Conclusions We cannot conclude that PEPT is superior to conventional treatment for patients with CRPS-1. Further high-quality research on the effects of PEPT is warranted given the potential effects as indicated by the per protocol analysis. Trial registration numbers NCT00817128 and NTR 2090. PMID:26628523

  6. Anserina bursitis. A treatable cause of knee pain in patients with degenerative arthritis.

    PubMed

    Brookler, M I; Mongan, E S

    1973-07-01

    The anserina bursa is located on the medial surface of the tibia deep to the tendons of the sartorius, gracilis, and semimembranosus muscles and superficial to the insertion of the tibial collateral ligament. Knee pain, a palpable swelling of the bursa, and tenderness over the medial anterior aspect of the tibia just below the knee are the hallmarks of anserina bursitis. In a three-year period, 24 patients with anserina bursitis were seen in a rheumatology clinic. All but one were women, 18 were obese, and only four were under 50 years old. Knee x-ray studies showed degenerative arthritis in 20 of the 24 patients. In ten, varus knee deformities were present, while three had valgus deformities. Ultrasound or local steroid injections gave dramatic relief in all but one patient.

  7. Anserina Bursitis—A Treatable Cause of Knee Pain in Patients with Degenerative Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Brookler, Morton I.; Mongan, Edward S.

    1973-01-01

    The anserina bursa is located on the medial surface of the tibia deep to the tendons of the sartorius, gracilis, and semimembranosus muscles and superficial to the insertion of the tibial collateral ligament. Knee pain, a palpable swelling of the bursa, and tenderness over the medial anterior aspect of the tibia just below the knee are the hallmarks of anserina bursitis. In a three-year period, 24 patients with anserina bursitis were seen in a rheumatology clinic. All but one were women, 18 were obese, and only four were under 50 years old. Knee x-ray studies showed degenerative arthritis in 20 of the 24 patients. In ten, varus knee deformities were present, while three had valgus deformities. Ultrasound or local steroid injections gave dramatic relief in all but one patient. PMID:4731586

  8. Multivariate Radiological-Based Models for the Prediction of Future Knee Pain: Data from the OAI.

    PubMed

    Galván-Tejada, Jorge I; Celaya-Padilla, José M; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, José G

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the potential of X-ray based multivariate prognostic models to predict the onset of chronic knee pain is presented. Using X-rays quantitative image assessments of joint-space-width (JSW) and paired semiquantitative central X-ray scores from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), a case-control study is presented. The pain assessments of the right knee at the baseline and the 60-month visits were used to screen for case/control subjects. Scores were analyzed at the time of pain incidence (T-0), the year prior incidence (T-1), and two years before pain incidence (T-2). Multivariate models were created by a cross validated elastic-net regularized generalized linear models feature selection tool. Univariate differences between cases and controls were reported by AUC, C-statistics, and ODDs ratios. Univariate analysis indicated that the medial osteophytes were significantly more prevalent in cases than controls: C-stat 0.62, 0.62, and 0.61, at T-0, T-1, and T-2, respectively. The multivariate JSW models significantly predicted pain: AUC = 0.695, 0.623, and 0.620, at T-0, T-1, and T-2, respectively. Semiquantitative multivariate models predicted paint with C-stat = 0.671, 0.648, and 0.645 at T-0, T-1, and T-2, respectively. Multivariate models derived from plain X-ray radiography assessments may be used to predict subjects that are at risk of developing knee pain.

  9. Hip and knee muscle function following aerobic exercise in individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ott, Brittany; Cosby, Nicole L; Grindstaff, Terry L; Hart, Joseph M

    2011-08-01

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a commonly experienced knee disorder that can result in altered muscle activation of the surrounding musculature. There is little evidence on effects of aerobic exercise on quadriceps torque and EMG activation of the vastus medialis obliquus (VMO), vastus lateralis (VL), and gluteus medius (GM). In this study 20 healthy individuals and 20 patients with PFPS had measures of torque and muscle activation taken following aerobic exercise. A modified Balke-Ware protocol was used for the exercise intervention. Baseline and post-aerobic measurements of knee extension torque and VMO, VL, and GM activation during a single leg anterior reaching task. These measurements were only taken on the injured limb. Following exercise, knee extension torque was lower in PFPS patients when compared to controls (p=0.03). Patients reporting no pain after exercise experienced decreases (p=0.021) in GM activation following exercise. There was a decrease in VMO (p=0.010) and VL (p=0.021) activation in PFPS patients with elevated knee pain. Recreationally active individuals with PFPS may experience different responses in the quadriceps and GM after exercise. Responses may be confounded by whether or not pain is exacerbated by exercise.

  10. Treatment of Lateral Knee Pain Using Soft Tissue Mobilization in Four Female Triathletes

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, John

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Prospective case series. Background These case reports present results of the treatment of lateral knee pain in four female amateur triathletes. The athletes were referred to the author’s clinic with either a diagnosis of iliotibial band friction syndrome or patellofemoral pain syndrome, all four having symptoms for longer than seven months. Changes in training routines were identified as the possible cause of the overuse injuries that eventually developed into chronic conditions. Intervention Treatment involved soft tissue mobilization of the musculotendinous structures on the lateral aspect of the knee. Results At four weeks, three of the athletes improved 9 to 19 points on the Lower Extremity Functional Scale, 3 to 5 points on the Global Rating of Change Scale, and demonstrated improvement in hamstring and iliotibial band flexibility. At eight weeks the Global Rating of Change for these three athletes was a 7 (“a very great deal better”) and they had returned to triathlon training with no complaints of lateral knee pain. One athlete did not respond to treatment and eventually underwent arthroscopic surgery for debridement of a lateral meniscus tear. Conclusions After ruling out common causes for lateral knee pain such as lateral meniscus tear, lateral collateral ligament sprain, patellofemoral dysfunction, osteochondral injury, biceps femoris tendonitis, iliotibial band friction syndrome or osteoarthritis, soft tissue restriction should be considered a potential source of dysfunction. In some cases soft tissue restriction is overlooked; athletes go undiagnosed and are limited from sports participation. PMID:25184012

  11. Comparison of Indirect MR Arthrography With Conventional MRI in the Diagnosis of Knee Pathologies in Patients With Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Babaei Jandaghi, Ali; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Mirbolook, Ahmadreza; Emami-Meybodi, Mohammad Kazem; Mohammadzadeh, Solmaz; Farahmand, Maral

    2016-01-01

    Background Knee pain is a common problem in the general population. In order to determine the extent of the injury and the appropriate treatment, MRI provides the most accurate imaging method. This may be done through conventional MRI techniques or by injecting a contrast material (MR arthrography). Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of these two methods. Patients and Methods The study involved the diagnostic evaluation on 60 patients with knee pain who received treatment over the course of a one-year period. Referred patients were randomly divided into two groups: indirect MR arthrography was performed on one group, and conventional MRI was performed on the other group. Both groups then underwent arthroscopy. The results from both groups were compared with the arthroscopic findings. Results In all of the pathologies studied, the sensitivity, specificity, and the positive and negative predictive values were evaluated. A high rate of accuracy was found between MR arthrography and arthroscopy (P < 0.05) for all knee injuries, however a similar rate of accuracy between conventional MRI and arthroscopy was only seen in patients with damage to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), the tibio-femoral articular cartilage, and patella chondromalacia (P < 0.05). The highest rate of accuracy was seen in cases where indirect MR arthrography was used for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) damage (K = 1). Conclusions Our results have shown that indirect MR arthrography had greater diagnostic accuracy in regards to the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values than conventional MRI in knee pathologies.

  12. Comparison of Indirect MR Arthrography With Conventional MRI in the Diagnosis of Knee Pathologies in Patients With Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Babaei Jandaghi, Ali; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Mirbolook, Ahmadreza; Emami-Meybodi, Mohammad Kazem; Mohammadzadeh, Solmaz; Farahmand, Maral

    2016-01-01

    Background Knee pain is a common problem in the general population. In order to determine the extent of the injury and the appropriate treatment, MRI provides the most accurate imaging method. This may be done through conventional MRI techniques or by injecting a contrast material (MR arthrography). Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of these two methods. Patients and Methods The study involved the diagnostic evaluation on 60 patients with knee pain who received treatment over the course of a one-year period. Referred patients were randomly divided into two groups: indirect MR arthrography was performed on one group, and conventional MRI was performed on the other group. Both groups then underwent arthroscopy. The results from both groups were compared with the arthroscopic findings. Results In all of the pathologies studied, the sensitivity, specificity, and the positive and negative predictive values were evaluated. A high rate of accuracy was found between MR arthrography and arthroscopy (P < 0.05) for all knee injuries, however a similar rate of accuracy between conventional MRI and arthroscopy was only seen in patients with damage to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), the tibio-femoral articular cartilage, and patella chondromalacia (P < 0.05). The highest rate of accuracy was seen in cases where indirect MR arthrography was used for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) damage (K = 1). Conclusions Our results have shown that indirect MR arthrography had greater diagnostic accuracy in regards to the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values than conventional MRI in knee pathologies. PMID:27625998

  13. Measuring practitioner/therapist effects in randomised trials of low back pain and neck pain interventions in primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Martyn; Morley, Stephen; van der Windt, Danielle A W M; Hay, Elaine; Jellema, Petra; Dziedzic, Krysia; Main, Chris J

    2010-11-01

    In psychological health treatment studies it has been shown that differences between therapists account for some of the non-specific effect of treatment but this phenomenon has not so far systematically been investigated in musculoskeletal disorders. In this study we evaluated and compared the size and potential influence of the 'practitioner effect' (or 'therapist effect') in three randomised treatment trials of low back pain and neck pain patients in primary care. We calculated the proportion of variance in outcomes attributable to differences across practitioners, i.e. the practitioner-variance partition coefficient (p-vpc). As measures of outcome, we focused on self-reported disability as the primary outcome, but we also investigated assessed psychological outcomes. The p-vpc for the disability measures ranged from 2.6% to 7.1% across trials and time points (post treatment and follow up). Estimates differed between treatment subgroups within trials; being highest in treatment subgroups assigned to psychosocial-based interventions. A 'practitioner effect' does exist and is more pronounced in treatments involving greater psychosocial emphasis. This has implications for both practice and research in this clinical area. It highlights the importance of patient-practitioner interactions, and the need to address practitioner effects in designing and analysing outcome studies in low back pain and neck pain in primary care.

  14. The effect of patient age, gender, and tibial component fixation on pain relief after cementless total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A

    1991-10-01

    Cementless total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) were prospectively evaluated for pain relief in 1110 knees. The effect of screws in the tibial component, the age of the patients, and the gender of the patients were studied to determine the effect of these parameters on pain relief one and two years postsurgery. The group with screws in the tibial component (Ortholoc II) had a significantly higher percentage of pain-free knees at one year than at two years postsurgery, and the older patients had a significantly higher rate of pain-free knees at one- and two years postsurgery than the younger patients. Older female patients with Ortholoc I TKAs had a significantly higher percentage of pain-free knees than did older male patients at one-year postsurgery, but not at two years. The group with screws in the tibial components (Ortholoc II) had a higher percentage of pain-free knees at one-year postsurgery than did the Ortholoc I knees, but there was no difference between Ortholoc I and II at two-years postsurgery. In the Ortholoc II group, there was also no difference in results among sexes or between patients older and younger than 65 years old. The correlation coefficient was calculated to evaluate the relationship between body weight and the degree of pain after TKA. No significant correlation could be found at one and two years after surgery. PMID:1914298

  15. Diagnosis and Management of Extra-articular Causes of Pain After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Manning, Blaine T; Lewis, Natasha; Tzeng, Tony H; Saleh, Jamal K; Potty, Anish G R; Dennis, Douglas A; Mihalko, William M; Goodman, Stuart B; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pain, which has been attributed to poor outcomes after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), remains problematic for many patients. Although the source of TKA pain can often be delineated, establishing a precise diagnosis can be challenging. It is often classified as intra-articular or extra-articular pain, depending on etiology. After intra-articular causes, such as instability, aseptic loosening, infection, or osteolysis, have been ruled out, extra-articular sources of pain should be considered. Physical examination of the other joints may reveal sources of localized knee pain, including diseases of the spine, hip, foot, and ankle. Additional extra-articular pathologies that have potential to instigate pain after TKA include vascular pathologies, tendinitis, bursitis, and iliotibial band friction syndrome. Patients with medical comorbidities, such as metabolic bone disease and psychological illness, may also experience prolonged postoperative pain. By better understanding the diagnosis and treatment options for extra-articular causes of pain after TKA, orthopaedic surgeons may better treat patients with this potentially debilitating complication. PMID:25745922

  16. Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a longitudinal randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is commonly used to reduce pain during labour despite contradictory results. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture with manual stimulation and acupuncture with combined manual and electrical stimulation (electro-acupuncture) compared with standard care in reducing labour pain. Our hypothesis was that both acupuncture stimulation techniques were more effective than standard care, and that electro-acupuncture was most effective. Methods A longitudinal randomised controlled trial. The recruitment of participants took place at the admission to the labour ward between November 2008 and October 2011 at two Swedish hospitals . 303 nulliparous women with normal pregnancies were randomised to: 40 minutes of manual acupuncture (MA), electro-acupuncture (EA), or standard care without acupuncture (SC). Primary outcome: labour pain, assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes: relaxation, use of obstetric pain relief during labour and post-partum assessments of labour pain. The sample size calculation was based on the primary outcome and a difference of 15 mm on VAS was regarded as clinically relevant, this gave 101 in each group, including a total of 303 women. Results Mean estimated pain scores on VAS (SC: 69.0, MA: 66.4 and EA: 68.5), adjusted for: treatment, age, education, and time from baseline, with no interactions did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: mean difference 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.7-6.9 and SC vs EA: mean difference 0.6 [95% CI] -3.6-4.8). Fewer number of women in the EA group used epidural analgesia (46%) than women in the MA group (61%) and SC group (70%) (EA vs SC: odds ratio [OR] 0.35; [95% CI] 0.19-0.67). Conclusions Acupuncture does not reduce women’s experience of labour pain, neither with manual stimulation nor with combined manual and electrical stimulation. However, fewer women in the EA group used epidural analgesia thus indicating that the effect of

  17. Association of neuropathic pain with ultrasonographic measurements of femoral cartilage thickness and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Mesci, Nilgün; Mesci, Erkan; Külcü, Duygu Geler

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether neuropathic pain is associated with femoral condylar cartilage thickness, electrical pain threshold, and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients over the age of 40 diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were enrolled. The PainDETECT questionnaire, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Short Form-36 questionnaire were completed for all patients. Electrical sensory threshold and electrical pain threshold measurements were obtained. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was determined by means of ultrasound. [Results] PainDETECT scores of 13 or greater were observed in 28 (46.7%) patients, indicating the presence of neuropathic pain. These patients were found to have greater average pain severity, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and depression and anxiety scores and lower Short Form-36 scores than patients without neuropathic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain showed lower knee electrical sensory threshold and pain threshold values on average than patients without neuropathic pain. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was not different between the two groups. [Conclusion] Neuropathic pain is associated with increased pain severity and decreased functional capacity and adversely affects quality of life and mood in patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27630395

  18. Association of neuropathic pain with ultrasonographic measurements of femoral cartilage thickness and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mesci, Nilgün; Mesci, Erkan; Külcü, Duygu Geler

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether neuropathic pain is associated with femoral condylar cartilage thickness, electrical pain threshold, and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients over the age of 40 diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were enrolled. The PainDETECT questionnaire, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Short Form-36 questionnaire were completed for all patients. Electrical sensory threshold and electrical pain threshold measurements were obtained. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was determined by means of ultrasound. [Results] PainDETECT scores of 13 or greater were observed in 28 (46.7%) patients, indicating the presence of neuropathic pain. These patients were found to have greater average pain severity, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and depression and anxiety scores and lower Short Form-36 scores than patients without neuropathic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain showed lower knee electrical sensory threshold and pain threshold values on average than patients without neuropathic pain. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was not different between the two groups. [Conclusion] Neuropathic pain is associated with increased pain severity and decreased functional capacity and adversely affects quality of life and mood in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  19. Association of neuropathic pain with ultrasonographic measurements of femoral cartilage thickness and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mesci, Nilgün; Mesci, Erkan; Külcü, Duygu Geler

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether neuropathic pain is associated with femoral condylar cartilage thickness, electrical pain threshold, and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients over the age of 40 diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were enrolled. The PainDETECT questionnaire, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Short Form-36 questionnaire were completed for all patients. Electrical sensory threshold and electrical pain threshold measurements were obtained. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was determined by means of ultrasound. [Results] PainDETECT scores of 13 or greater were observed in 28 (46.7%) patients, indicating the presence of neuropathic pain. These patients were found to have greater average pain severity, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and depression and anxiety scores and lower Short Form-36 scores than patients without neuropathic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain showed lower knee electrical sensory threshold and pain threshold values on average than patients without neuropathic pain. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was not different between the two groups. [Conclusion] Neuropathic pain is associated with increased pain severity and decreased functional capacity and adversely affects quality of life and mood in patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27630395

  20. ¹⁵³Sm-HM for arthritic knee pain. Estimated dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Hardy-Pérez, Alberto E; Torres-García, Eugenio; Arteaga-de-Murphy, Consuelo; Pedraza-López, Martha; Mitsoura, Eleni; Jiménez-Mancilla, Nallely P

    2012-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthropathy and after cardiovascular diseases is the most disabling disease in developing countries. The dosimetry for the clinical application of 153-samarium-hydroxymacroaggregates (¹⁵³Sm-HM) for radiation synovectomy (RSV) and palliative treatment for arthritic pain, as far as we know, has not been reported. The aim of this research was to estimate the radiation dose necessary for synovial ablation and pain palliation with minimum risk to the patient. ¹⁵³Sm-HM (370 MBq) was administered intra-articularly in a patient with severe knee pain and hindered motility. Regions of interest drawn on sequential, conjugated, anterior and posterior scintigraphy images were used to obtain the respective activity. The data was entered into a knee joint histological-geometric model designed with micrometric dimensions to represent the synovial cell layers. The Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the absorbed dose in each of the 12 model-cells representing the distance from the synovial liquid to the cartilage or bone. The absorbed dose in the synovial cavity was 114 Gy which is sufficient energy for RSV. The treated patient referred little pain and higher motility with no adverse reactions. ¹⁵³Sm-HM is a potentially valid radiopharmaceutical for RSV, which effectively palliates knee pain.

  1. Effectiveness of exercise interventions in reducing pain symptoms among older adults with knee osteoarthritis: a review.

    PubMed

    Focht, Brian C

    2006-04-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) affects approximately one third of older adults in the United States. The pain accompanying its progression reduces quality of life and leads to activity restriction and physical disability. Evidence suggests that exercise represents a promising treatment for pain among older knee-OA patients. The article provides an overview of the extant research examining the effectiveness of exercise interventions in reducing pain symptoms among older adults with knee OA. Critical evaluation of the literature reveals that aerobic training, strength training, and combination aerobic and strength training result in improvements in pain. The magnitude of pain reduction accompanying exercise interventions varies considerably across studies, however. In addition, most trials have focused on short-term (<6 months) interventions, and the limited number of long-term (>6 months) trials have been plagued by high attrition and poor postintervention maintenance of treatment effects. Given the variability in the effectiveness of exercise interventions, future research is necessary to determine the individual differences that influence older OA patients' responsiveness to exercise interventions and identify more efficacious strategies for promoting the maintenance of long-term exercise.

  2. Effect of both preoperative andpostoperative cryoceutical treatment on hemostasis and postoperative pain following total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Desteli, Engin Eren; Imren, Yunus; Aydın, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to evaluate the hemostatic effects and the clinical outcomes of preoperative and postoperative cryoceutical treatment (C-tx) following total knee arthroplasty. Patients and method: 42 patients received C-tx both preoperatively, and postoperatively. In the control group, 45 patients did not receive any C-tx. Amount of bloody drainage and verbal rating pain scores were noted. Results: We found significant difference in both the preoperative and postoperative hemoglobin levels and blood drainage (P<0.001). However, there was no significant difference in the average verbally rated pain scores (P>0.05). Conclusion: C-tx performed preoperatively and postoperatively for total knee arthroplasty is effective in decreasing perioperative and postoperative hemorrhage. However, it had no superior effect on the control of postoperative pain. PMID:26770547

  3. Less Anterior Knee Pain with a Mobile-bearing Prosthesis Compared with a Fixed-bearing Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sierevelt, Inger N.; Schafroth, Matthias U.; Blankevoort, Leendert; Schaap, Gerard R.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2008-01-01

    Anterior knee pain is one of the major short-term complaints after TKA. Since the introduction of the mobile-bearing TKA, numerous studies have attempted to confirm the theoretical advantages of a mobile-bearing TKA over a fixed-bearing TKA but most show little or no actual benefits. The concept of self-alignment for the mobile bearing suggests the posterior-stabilized mobile-bearing TKA would provide a lower incidence of anterior knee pain compared with a fixed-bearing TKA. We therefore asked whether the posterior-stabilized mobile-bearing knee would in fact reduce anterior knee pain. We randomized 103 patients scheduled for cemented three-component TKA for osteoarthrosis in a prospective, double-blind clinical trial. With a 1-year followup, more patients experienced persistent anterior knee pain in the posterior-stabilized fixed-bearing group (10 of 53, 18.9%) than in the posterior-stabilized mobile-bearing group (two of 47, 4.3%). No differences were observed for range of motion, visual analog scale for pain, Oxford 12-item questionnaire, SF-36, or the American Knee Society score. The posterior-stabilized mobile-bearing knee therefore seems to provide a short-term advantage compared with the posterior-stabilized fixed-bearing knee. Level of Evidence: Level I, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18523833

  4. Identifying specific profiles in patients with different degrees of painful knee osteoarthritis based on serological biochemical and mechanistic pain biomarkers: a diagnostic approach based on cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Eskehave, Thomas Navndrup; Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Hoeck, Hans Christian; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical and pain biomarkers can be applied to patients with painful osteoarthritis profiles and may provide more details compared with conventional clinical tools. The aim of this study was to identify an optimal combination of biochemical and pain biomarkers for classification of patients with different degrees of knee pain and joint damage. Such profiling may provide new diagnostic and therapeutic options. A total of 216 patients with different degrees of knee pain (maximal pain during the last 24 hours rated on a visual analog scale [VAS]) (VAS 0-100) and 64 controls (VAS 0-9) were recruited. Patients were separated into 3 groups: VAS 10 to 39 (N = 81), VAS 40 to 69 (N = 70), and VAS 70 to 100 (N = 65). Pressure pain thresholds, temporal summation to pressure stimuli, and conditioning pain modulation were measured from the peripatellar and extrasegmental sites. Biochemical markers indicative for autoinflammation and immunity (VICM, CRP, and CRPM), synovial inflammation (CIIIM), cartilage loss (CIIM), and bone degradation (CIM) were analyzed. WOMAC, Lequesne, and pain catastrophizing scores were collected. Principal component analysis was applied to select the optimal variable subset, and cluster analysis was applied to this subset to create distinctly different knee pain profiles. Four distinct knee pain profiles were identified: profile A (N = 27), profile B (N = 59), profile C (N = 85), and profile D (N = 41). Each knee pain profile had a unique combination of biochemical markers, pain biomarkers, physical impairments, and psychological factors that may provide the basis for mechanism-based diagnosis, individualized treatment, and selection of patients for clinical trials evaluating analgesic compounds. These results introduce a new profiling for knee OA and should be regarded as preliminary.

  5. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the treatment of isolated knee chondral lesions: design of a randomised controlled pilot study comparing arthroscopic microfracture versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative mesenchymal stem cell injections

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Julien; Ford, Jon; Bates, Dan; Boyd, Richard; Hahne, Andrew; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cicuttini, Flavia; Huguenin, Leesa; Norsworthy, Cameron; Shah, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The management of intra-articular chondral defects in the knee remains a challenge. Inadequate healing in areas of weight bearing leads to impairment in load transmission and these defects predispose to later development of osteoarthritis. Surgical management of full thickness chondral defects include arthroscopic microfracture and when appropriate autologous chondrocyte implantation. This latter method however is technically challenging, and may not offer significant improvement over microfracture. Preclinical and limited clinical trials have indicated the capacity of mesenchymal stem cells to influence chondral repair. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a pilot randomised controlled trial comparing arthroscopic microfracture alone for isolated knee chondral defects versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative autologous adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell injections. Methods and analysis A pilot single-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. 40 participants aged 18–50 years, with isolated femoral condyle chondral defects and awaiting planned arthroscopic microfracture will be randomly allocated to a control group (receiving no additional treatment) or treatment group (receiving postoperative adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment). Primary outcome measures will include MRI assessment of cartilage volume and defects and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Secondary outcomes will include further MRI assessment of bone marrow lesions, bone area and T2 cartilage mapping, a 0–10 Numerical Pain Rating Scale, a Global Impression of Change score and a treatment satisfaction scale. Adverse events and cointerventions will be recorded. Initial outcome follow-up for publication of results will be at 12 months. Further annual follow-up to assess long-term differences between the two group will occur. Ethics and dissemination This trial has received prospective ethics approval through

  6. Fabella Syndrome as an Uncommon Cause of Posterolateral Knee Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Eriko; Yanai, Takaji; Kohyama, Sho; Kanamori, Akihiro; Yamazaki, Masashi; Tanaka, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    The fabella is a sesamoid bone that is located in the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle and has been identified on magnetic resonance imaging in 31% of Japanese people. In the present case, a 65-year-old woman experienced posterolateral knee pain, accompanied by a clicking “sound” during active knee flexion, after undergoing total knee arthroplasty for knee osteoarthritis. Eight months of conservative therapy failed to produce an improvement, with progressive osteoarthritic change of the fabella identified on plain radiography. Based on this evidence, a diagnosis of fabella syndrome was made and the patient underwent a fabellectomy. Fabellectomy provided immediate resolution of posterolateral knee pain and the clicking sound with knee flexion, with the patient remaining symptom-free 18 months after fabellectomy and with no limitations in knee function. Fabellectomy eliminated symptoms in all of five case reports that have been previously published and is regarded as an effective first choice for treating fabella syndrome after total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27418991

  7. Liposomal bupivacaine versus traditional periarticular injection for pain control after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bagsby, Deren T; Ireland, Phillip H; Meneghini, R Michael

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a novel liposomal bupivacaine to traditional peri-articular injection (PAI) in a multi-modal pain protocol for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A retrospective cohort study compared 85 consecutive patients undergoing TKA with a traditional PAI of ropivacaine, epinephrine and morphine to 65 patients with a liposomal bupivacaine PAI. After the initial 24h, inpatient self-reported pain scores were higher in the liposomal bupivacaine group compared to the traditional PAI group (P = 0.04) and a smaller percentage (16.9%) of patients in the liposomal bupivacaine group rated their pain as "mild" compared to the traditional group (47.6%). Liposomal bupivacaine PAI provided inferior pain control compared to the less expensive traditional PAI in a multi-modal pain control program in patients undergoing TKA.

  8. Cingulate GABA levels inversely correlate with the intensity of ongoing chronic knee osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    Reckziegel, Diane; Raschke, Felix; Cottam, William J

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate the role of the mid-anterior cingulate cortex γ-aminobutyric acid levels in chronic nociceptive pain. The molecular mechanisms of pain chronification are not well understood. In fibromyalgia, low mid-anterior cingulate cortex γ-aminobutyric acid was associated with high pain suggesting a role of prefrontal disinhibition. We hypothesize that mid-anterior cingulate cortex GABAergic disinhibition may underpin chronic pain independent of the pain etiology and comorbid negative affect. Proton magnetic resonance spectra were acquired at 3T from the mid-anterior cingulate cortex in 20 patients with chronic painful knee osteoarthritis, and 19 healthy pain-free individuals using a point resolved spectroscopy sequence optimized for detection of γ-aminobutyric acid. Participants underwent questionnaires for negative affect (depression and anxiety) and psychophysical pain phenotyping. Results No differences in mid-anterior cingulate cortex γ-aminobutyric acid or other metabolite levels were detected between groups. Ratings of perceived intensity of ongoing osteoarthritis pain were inversely correlated with γ-aminobutyric acid (r = −0.758, p < 0.001), but no correlations were seen for negative affect or pain thresholds. The pain γ-aminobutyric acid interrelation remained strong when controlling for depression (r = −0.820, p < 0.001). Combined levels of glutamine and glutamate were unrelated to psychometric or to pain thresholds. Conclusion Our study supports mid-anterior cingulate cortex γ-aminobutyric acid as a potential marker of pain severity in chronic nociceptive pain states independent of negative affect. The findings suggest that GABAergic disinhibition of the salience network may underlie sensitization to averse stimuli as a mechanism contributing to pain chronification. PMID:27206661

  9. Acupuncture for post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We report on the design and implementation of a study protocol entitled Acupuncture randomised trial for post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain - a pilot study (ACUARP) designed to investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy performed in the perioperative period on post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain. Methods/Design The study is designed as a randomised controlled pilot trial with three arms and partial double blinding. We will compare (a) press needle acupuncture, (b) no treatment and (c) press plaster acupressure in a standardised anaesthetic setting. Seventy-five patients scheduled for laparoscopic surgery to the uterus or ovaries will be allocated randomly to one of the three trial arms. The total observation period will begin one day before surgery and end on the second postoperative day. Twelve press needles and press plasters are to be administered preoperatively at seven acupuncture points. The primary outcome measure will be time from extubation to ‘ready for discharge’ from the post anaesthesia care unit (in minutes). The ‘ready for discharge’ end point will be assessed using three different scores: the Aldrete score, the Post Anaesthetic Discharge Scoring System and an In-House score. Secondary outcome measures will comprise pre-, intra- and postoperative variables (which are anxiety, pain, nausea and vomiting, concomitant medication). Discussion The results of this study will provide information on whether acupuncture may improve patient post anaesthetic recovery. Comparing acupuncture with acupressure will provide insight into potential therapeutic differences between invasive and non-invasive acupuncture techniques. Trial registration NCT01816386 (First received: 28 October 2012) PMID:25047046

  10. Exploring the effect of space and place on response to exercise therapy for knee and hip pain—a protocol for a double-blind randomised controlled clinical trial: the CONEX trial

    PubMed Central

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Ulrich, Roger S; Dieppe, Paul A; Roos, Ewa M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Context effects are described as effects of a given treatment, not directly caused by the treatment itself, but rather caused by the context in which treatment is delivered. Exercise is a recommended core treatment in clinical guidelines for musculoskeletal disorders. Although moderately effective overall, variation is seen in size of response to exercise across randomised controlled trial (RCT) studies. Part of this variation may be related to the fact that exercise interventions are performed in different physical environments, which may affect participants differently. The study aims to investigate the effect of exercising in a contextually enhanced physical environment for 8 weeks in people with knee or hip pain. Methods and analysis The study is a double-blind RCT. Eligible participants are 35 years or older with persisting knee and/or hip pain for 3 months. Participants are randomised to one of three groups: (1) exercise in a contextually enhanced environment, (2) exercise in a standard environment and (3) waiting list. The contextually enhanced environment is located in a newly built facility, has large windows providing abundant daylight and overlooks a recreational park. The standard environment is in a basement, has artificial lighting and is marked by years of use; that is, resembling many clinical environments. The primary outcome is the participant's global perceived effect rated on a seven-point Likert scale after 8 weeks exercise. Patient-reported and objective secondary outcomes are included. Ethics and dissemination The Regional Scientific Ethical Committee for Southern Denmark has approved the study. Study findings will be disseminated in peer-reviewed publications and presented at national and international conferences. Trial registration number NCT02043613. PMID:25818278

  11. Catastrophic thinking about pain as a predictor of length of hospital stay after total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Witvrouw, Erik; Pattyn, E; Almqvist, K F; Crombez, G; Accoe, C; Cambier, D; Verdonk, R

    2009-10-01

    This study prospectively investigates whether catastrophizing thinking is associated with length of hospital stay after total knee arthroplasty. Forty-three patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty were included in this study. Prior to their operation all patients were asked to complete the pain catastrophizing scale, and a Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index. A multiple regression analysis identified pain catastrophizing thinking and age as predictors of hospital stay after total knee arthroplasty. Patients with a higher degree of pain catastrophizing prior to the total knee arthroplasty and those with a higher age have a significantly greater risk for a longer hospital stay. Therefore, the results of this study indicate that the pre-operative level of pain catastrophizing in patients determine, in combination with other variables, the length and inter-individual variation in hospital stay after total knee arthroplasty. Reducing catastrophizing thinking about pain through cognitive-behavioral techniques is likely to reduce levels of fear after total knee arthroplasty. As a result, pain and function immediately post-operative might improve, leading to a decrease in length of hospital stay. Although during the last decades the duration of hospital stay is significantly reduced, this study shows that this can be improved when taking into account the contribution of psychological factors such as pain catastrophizing.

  12. PAIN AT THE TIP OF THE STEM AFTER REVISION TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Albino, Rômulo Ballarin; Santos, Lívia Souza; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; lamaguchi, Maurício; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Tirico, Luis Eduardo; Pécora, José Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To correlate parameters of implants with incidence of pain. Methods: 32 knees (31 patients) operated on between 2006 to 2008 in a serie of cases of TKA revision surgery were monitored for evidence of pain at the tip of the stem. In all we used uncemented stem Scorpio TS Total Knee ® Revision System (Stryker ®). Criteria assessed: pain in the leg or thigh without other causes, diameter and length of the nail; position of the rod in the medullary canal, intramedullary canal diameter. Results: Mean age was 66.7 years and mean follow-up was 2.6 years.21,87% of patients reported leg pain, 9.37% thigh pain. The group of pacients with leg pain presented with shaft diameter 14.7 mm, length 80 mm in 71.42% and 155 mm in 28,58%, stem diameter/ intramedullary canal diameter average relation of 0,76, 42.8% had stem malalignment. The group without leg pain presented with shaft diameter 15.2 mm, length 80 mm in 68% and 155 mm in 32%, diameters average relation of 0.80, 20.8% had stem malalignment. The group with thigh pain presented with shaft diameter 18.3 mm, length 80 mm in 66.67% and 155 mm in 33,33%,diameters average relation of 0.75, 0% had stem malalignment The group without thigh pain presented with shaft diameter 16.56 mm, length 80 mm in 70.37% and 155 mm in 29,63%, diameters average relation of 0.79, 14,2% had stem malalignment. Conclusion: There was no association between the assessed criteria and pain in the tip of the stem. PMID:27027084

  13. Dissecting the contribution of knee joint NGF to spinal nociceptive sensitization in a model of OA pain in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, D.R.; Nwosu, L.; Walsh, D.A.; Chapman, V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Although analgesic approaches targeting nerve growth factor (NGF) for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) pain remain of clinical interest, neurophysiological mechanisms by which NGF contribute to OA pain remain unclear. We investigated the impact of local elevation of knee joint NGF on knee joint, vs remote (hindpaw), evoked responses of spinal neurones in a rodent model of OA pain. Design In vivo spinal electrophysiology was carried out in anaesthetised rats with established pain behaviour and joint pathology following intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA), vs injection of saline. Neuronal responses to knee joint extension and flexion, mechanical punctate stimulation of the peripheral receptive fields over the knee and at a remote site (ipsilateral hind paw) were studied before, and following, intra-articular injection of NGF (10 μg/50 μl) or saline. Results MIA-injected rats exhibited significant local (knee joint) and remote (lowered hindpaw withdrawal thresholds) changes in pain behaviour, and joint pathology. Intra-articular injection of NGF significantly (P < 0.05) increased knee extension-evoked firing of spinal neurones and the size of the peripheral receptive fields of spinal neurones (100% increase) over the knee joint in MIA rats, compared to controls. Intra-articular NGF injection did not significantly alter responses of spinal neurones following noxious stimulation of the ipsilateral hind paw in MIA-injected rats. Conclusion The facilitatory effects of intra-articular injection of NGF on spinal neurones receiving input from the knee joint provide a mechanistic basis for NGF mediated augmentation of OA knee pain, however additional mechanisms may contribute to the spread of pain to remote sites. PMID:25623624

  14. Strengthening of the Hip and Core Versus Knee Muscles for the Treatment of Patellofemoral Pain: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ferber, Reed; Bolgla, Lori; Earl-Boehm, Jennifer E.; Emery, Carolyn; Hamstra-Wright, Karrie

    2015-01-01

    Context: Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is the most common injury in running and jumping athletes. Randomized controlled trials suggest that incorporating hip and core strengthening (HIP) with knee-focused rehabilitation (KNEE) improves PFP outcomes. However, no randomized controlled trials have, to our knowledge, directly compared HIP and KNEE programs. Objective: To compare PFP pain, function, hip- and knee-muscle strength, and core endurance between KNEE and HIP protocols after 6 weeks of rehabilitation. We hypothesized greater improvements in (1) pain and function, (2) hip strength and core endurance for patients with PFP involved in the HIP protocol, and (3) knee strength for patients involved in the KNEE protocol. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: Four clinical research laboratories in Calgary, Alberta; Chicago, Illinois; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and Augusta, Georgia. Patients or Other Participants: Of 721 patients with PFP screened, 199 (27.6%) met the inclusion criteria (66 men [31.2%], 133 women [66.8%], age = 29.0 ± 7.1 years, height = 170.4 ± 9.4 cm, weight = 67.6 ± 13.5 kg). Intervention(s): Patients with PFP were randomly assigned to a 6-week KNEE or HIP protocol. Main Outcome Measure(s): Primary variables were self-reported visual analog scale and Anterior Knee Pain Scale measures, which were conducted weekly. Secondary variables were muscle strength and core endurance measured at baseline and at 6 weeks. Results: Compared with baseline, both the visual analog scale and the Anterior Knee Pain Scale improved for patients with PFP in both the HIP and KNEE protocols (P < .001), but the visual analog scale scores for those in the HIP protocol were reduced 1 week earlier than in the KNEE group. Both groups increased in strength (P < .001), but those in the HIP protocol gained more in hip-abductor (P = .01) and -extensor (P = .01) strength and posterior core endurance (P = .05) compared with the KNEE group. Conclusions: Both the HIP and KNEE

  15. Traditional Chinese Medications for Knee Osteoarthritis Pain: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Zhan, Hongsheng; Marszalek, Jolanta; Chung, Mei; Lin, Xun; Zhang, Min; Pang, Jian; Wang, Chenchen

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medication (TCM) has analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). We conducted the first systematic review of the best quantitative and qualitative evidence currently available in order to evaluate the effectiveness of TCM in relieving pain in knee OA. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using three English and four Chinese biomedical databases from their inception through March 1, 2015. We included randomized controlled trials of TCM for knee OA with intervention durations of at least two weeks. The effects of TCM on pain and other clinical symptoms were measured with the visual analog scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). The total effectiveness rate, which was used to assess overall pain, physical performance and wellness, was also measured. Two researchers independently extracted data on study design, population characteristics, duration, intervention, outcomes, risk of bias, and primary results. We performed a random-effects meta-analysis when appropriate. We also explored factors that could explain the heterogeneity by conducting subgroup and meta-regression analyses. Twenty-three studies, totaling 2362 subjects, met the eligibility criteria. Treatments were formulated with an average of 8 Chinese herbs and were prescribed based on the traditional Chinese diagnostic method of syndrome differentiation. The mean treatment duration was seven weeks, with oral administration occurring one to three times a day. Compared with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and intra-articular hyaluronate injections, 18 of the studies showed significantly improved VAS pain scores (Mean Difference [MD] [Formula: see text] 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.94; [Formula: see text]), six of the studies showed significantly improved WOMAC pain subscale scores (MD [Formula: see text] 2.23; 95% CI, 0.56 to 3.91; [Formula: see text]), and 16 of the trials

  16. Traditional Chinese Medications for Knee Osteoarthritis Pain: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Zhan, Hongsheng; Marszalek, Jolanta; Chung, Mei; Lin, Xun; Zhang, Min; Pang, Jian; Wang, Chenchen

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medication (TCM) has analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). We conducted the first systematic review of the best quantitative and qualitative evidence currently available in order to evaluate the effectiveness of TCM in relieving pain in knee OA. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using three English and four Chinese biomedical databases from their inception through March 1, 2015. We included randomized controlled trials of TCM for knee OA with intervention durations of at least two weeks. The effects of TCM on pain and other clinical symptoms were measured with the visual analog scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). The total effectiveness rate, which was used to assess overall pain, physical performance and wellness, was also measured. Two researchers independently extracted data on study design, population characteristics, duration, intervention, outcomes, risk of bias, and primary results. We performed a random-effects meta-analysis when appropriate. We also explored factors that could explain the heterogeneity by conducting subgroup and meta-regression analyses. Twenty-three studies, totaling 2362 subjects, met the eligibility criteria. Treatments were formulated with an average of 8 Chinese herbs and were prescribed based on the traditional Chinese diagnostic method of syndrome differentiation. The mean treatment duration was seven weeks, with oral administration occurring one to three times a day. Compared with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and intra-articular hyaluronate injections, 18 of the studies showed significantly improved VAS pain scores (Mean Difference [MD] [Formula: see text] 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.94; [Formula: see text]), six of the studies showed significantly improved WOMAC pain subscale scores (MD [Formula: see text] 2.23; 95% CI, 0.56 to 3.91; [Formula: see text]), and 16 of the trials

  17. Trajectories of Pain and Function after Primary Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: The ADAPT Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lenguerrand, Erik; Wylde, Vikki; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Sayers, Adrian; Brunton, Luke; Beswick, Andrew D.; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pain and function improve dramatically in the first three months after hip and knee arthroplasty but the trajectory after three months is less well described. It is also unclear how pre-operative pain and function influence short- and long-term recovery. We explored the trajectory of change in function and pain until and beyond 3-months post-operatively and the influence of pre-operative self-reported symptoms. Methods The study was a prospective cohort study of 164 patients undergoing primary hip (n = 80) or knee (n = 84) arthroplasty in the United Kingdom. Self-reported measures of pain and function using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index were collected pre-operatively and at 3 and 12 months post-operatively. Hip and knee arthroplasties were analysed separately, and patients were split into two groups: those with high or low symptoms pre-operatively. Multilevel regression models were used for each outcome (pain and function), and the trajectories of change were charted (0–3 months and 3–12 months). Results Hip: Most improvement occurred within the first 3 months following hip surgery and patients with worse pre-operative scores had greater changes. The mean changes observed between 3 and twelve months were statistically insignificant. One year after surgery, patients with worse pre-operative scores had post-operative outcomes similar to those observed among patients with less severe pre-operative symptoms. Knee: Most improvement occurred in the first 3 months following knee surgery with no significant change thereafter. Despite greater mean change during the first three months, patients with worse pre-operative scores had not ‘caught-up’ with those with less severe pre-operative symptoms 12 months after their surgery. Conclusion Most symptomatic improvement occurred within the first 3 months after surgery with no significant change between 3–12 months. Further investigations are now required to

  18. The effect of triclosan coated sutures on rate of Surgical Site Infection after hip and knee replacement: a protocol for a double-blind randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background 187,000 hip and knee joint replacements are performed every year in the National Health Service (NHS). One of the commonest complications is surgical site infection (SSI), and this represents a significant burden in terms of patient morbidity, mortality and cost to health services around the world. The aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) is to determine if the addition of triclosan coated sutures to a standard regimen can reduce the rate of SSI after total knee replacement (TKR) and total hip replacement (THR). Methods 2400 patients due to undergo a total hip or knee replacement are being recruited into this two-centre RCT. Participants are recruited before surgery and randomised to either standard care or intervention group. Participants, outcome assessors and statistician are blind to treatment allocation throughout the study. The intervention consists of triclosan coated sutures vs. standard non-coated sutures. The primary outcome is the Health protection Agency (HPA) defined superficial surgical site infection at 30 days. Secondary outcomes include HPA defined deep surgical site infection at 12 months, length of hospital stay, critical care stay, and payer costs. Discussion To date there are no orthopaedic randomised controlled trials on this scale assessing the effectiveness of a surgical intervention, particularly those that can be translated across the surgical specialities. The results from this trial will inform evidence-based recommendations for suture selection in the management of patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement. If triclosan coated sutures are found to be an effective intervention, implementation into clinical practice could improve long-term outcomes for patients undergoing hip and knee replacement. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 17807356. PMID:25027459

  19. Does patella resurfacing really matter? Pain and function in 972 patients after primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Espehaug, Birgitte; Havelin, Leif Ivar; Vollset, Stein Emil; Furnes, Ove

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Resurfacing of the patella during primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often recommended based on higher revision rates in non-resurfaced knees. As many of these revisions are insertions of a patella component due to pain, and since only patients with a non-resurfaced patella have the option of secondary resurfacing, we do not really know whether these patients have more pain and poorer function. The main purpose of the present paper was therefore to assess pain and function at least 2 years after surgery for unrevised primary non-resurfaced and resurfaced TKA, and secondary among prosthesis brands. Methods Information needed to calculate subscales from the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) was collected in a questionnaire given to 972 osteoarthritis patients with intact primary TKAs that had been reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. Pain and satisfaction on visual analog scales and improvement in EQ-5D index score ΔEQ-5D) were also used as outcomes. Outcomes were measured on a scale from 0 to 100 units (worst to best). To estimate differences in mean scores, we used multiple linear regression with adjustment for possible confounders. Results We did not observe any differences between resurfacing and non-resurfacing in any outcome, with estimated differences of ≤ 1.4 units and p-values of > 0.4. There was, however, a tendency of better results for the NexGen implant as compared to the reference brand AGC for symptoms (difference = 4.9, p = 0.05), pain (VAS) (difference = 8.3, p = 0.004), and satisfaction (VAS) (difference = 7.9, p = 0.02). However, none of these differences reached the stated level of minimal perceptible clinical difference. Interpretation Resurfacing of the patella has no clinical effect on pain and function after TKA. Differences between the brands investigated were small and they were assumed to be of minor importance. PMID:20158405

  20. Pain and pain-related interference in adults with lower-limb amputation: Comparison of knee-disarticulation, transtibial, and transfemoral surgical sites

    PubMed Central

    Behr, James; Friedly, Janna; Molton, Ivan; Morgenroth, David; Jensen, Mark P.; Smith, Douglas G.

    2011-01-01

    Pain and pain-related interference with physical function have not been thoroughly studied in individuals who have undergone knee-disarticulation amputations. The principal aim of this study was to determine whether individuals with knee-disarticulation amputations have worse pain and pain-related interference with physical function than do individuals with transtibial or transfemoral amputations. We analyzed cross-sectional survey data provided by 42 adults with lower-limb amputations. These individuals consisted of 14 adults reporting knee-disarticulation amputation in one limb and best-matched cases (14 reporting transfemoral amputation and 14 reporting transtibial amputation) from a larger cross-sectional sample of 472 individuals. Participants were rigorously matched based on time since amputation, reason for amputation, age, sex, diabetes diagnosis, and pain before amputation. Continuous outcome variables were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance. Categorical outcomes were analyzed by Pearson chi-square statistic. Given the relatively small sample size and power concerns, mean differences were also described by estimated effect size (Cohen’s d). Of the 42 participants, 83% were male. They ranged in age from 36 to 85 (median = 55.1, standard deviation = 11.0). Most amputations were of traumatic origin (74%), and participants were on average 12.4 years from their amputations at the time of the survey. Individuals with transtibial amputation reported significantly more prosthesis use than did individuals with knee-disarticulation amputation. Amputation levels did not significantly differ in phantom limb pain, residual limb pain, back pain, and pain-related interference with physical function. Estimates of effect size, however, indicated that participants with knee-disarticulation amputation reported less phantom limb pain, phantom limb pain-related interference with physical function, residual limb pain, residual limb pain-related interference with

  1. Pain and pain-related interference in adults with lower-limb amputation: comparison of knee-disarticulation, transtibial, and transfemoral surgical sites.

    PubMed

    Behr, James; Friedly, Janna; Molton, Ivan; Morgenroth, David; Jensen, Mark P; Smith, Douglas G

    2009-01-01

    Pain and pain-related interference with physical function have not been thoroughly studied in individuals who have undergone knee-disarticulation amputations. The principal aim of this study was to determine whether individuals with knee-disarticulation amputations have worse pain and pain-related interference with physical function than do individuals with transtibial or transfemoral amputations. We analyzed cross-sectional survey data provided by 42 adults with lower-limb amputations. These individuals consisted of 14 adults reporting knee-disarticulation amputation in one limb and best-matched cases (14 reporting transfemoral amputation and 14 reporting transtibial amputation) from a larger cross-sectional sample of 472 individuals. Participants were rigorously matched based on time since amputation, reason for amputation, age, sex, diabetes diagnosis, and pain before amputation. Continuous outcome variables were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance. Categorical outcomes were analyzed by Pearson chi-square statistic. Given the relatively small sample size and power concerns, mean differences were also described by estimated effect size (Cohen's d). Of the 42 participants, 83% were male. They ranged in age from 36 to 85 (median = 55.1, standard deviation = 11.0). Most amputations were of traumatic origin (74%), and participants were on average 12.4 years from their amputations at the time of the survey. Individuals with transtibial amputation reported significantly more prosthesis use than did individuals with knee-disarticulation amputation. Amputation levels did not significantly differ in phantom limb pain, residual limb pain, back pain, and pain-related interference with physical function. Estimates of effect size, however, indicated that participants with knee-disarticulation amputation reported less phantom limb pain, phantom limb pain-related interference with physical function, residual limb pain, residual limb pain-related interference with physical

  2. Erdheim–Chester disease and knee pain in a dialysis patient

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Sibylle; Anagnostopoulos, Joannis; Luft, Friedrich C.; Kettritz, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Erdheim–Chester disease is a rare inflammatory condition characterized by a non-Langerhans histiocytic infiltration, involving the skeleton, nervous system, viscera, retroperitoneum and elsewhere. The aetiology is unknown. Positron emission tomography shows areas of involvement. We managed a dialysis patient with knee pain; a bone marrow specimen showed typical CD68 positive, but CD1a negative cells. We initiated interferon-α therapy although other options remain open. In our patient, the simultaneous presence of secondary hyperparathyroidism with tumorous calcifications provided an interesting additional differential diagnostic possibility regarding skeletal pain. PMID:25852919

  3. KOOS Pain as a Marker for Significant Knee Pain Two and Six Years after Primary ACL Reconstruction: A Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) Prospective Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstein, D; Huston, LJ; Nwosu, S; Spindler, KP

    2015-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) approaches 50%, yet the prevalence of significant knee pain is unknown. We applied three different models of Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) thresholds for significant knee pain to an ACLR cohort to identify prevalence and risk factors. Design Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) prospective cohort patients with a unilateral primary ACLR and normal contralateral knee were assessed at 2 and 6 years. Independent variables included patient demographics, validated Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO; Marx activity score, KOOS), and surgical characteristics. Models included: (1) KOOS criteria for a painful knee = quality of life subscale <87.5 and ≥2 of: KOOSpain <86.1, KOOSsymptoms <85.7, KOOSADL <86.8, or KOOSsports/rec <85.0; (2) KOOSpain subscale score ≤72 (≥2 standard deviations below population mean); (3) 10-point KOOSpain drop from 2 to 6 years. Proportional odds models (alpha≤0.05) were used. Results 1,761 patients of median age 23 years, median BMI 24.8 kg/m2 and 56% male met inclusion, with 87% (1530/1761) and 86% (1506/1761) follow-up at 2 and 6 years, respectively. At 6 years, n=592 (39%), n=131 (9%) and n=169 (12%) met criteria for models #1 through #3, respectively. The most consistent and strongest independent risk factor at both time-points was subsequent ipsilateral knee surgery. Low 2-year Marx activity score increased the odds of a painful knee at 6 years. Conclusions Significant knee pain is prevalent after ACLR; with those who undergo subsequent ipsilateral surgery at greatest risk. The relationship between pain and structural OA warrants further study. PMID:26072385

  4. The effect of tibio-femoral traction mobilization on passive knee flexion motion impairment and pain: a case series.

    PubMed

    Maher, Sara; Creighton, Doug; Kondratek, Melodie; Krauss, John; Qu, Xianggui

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this case series was to explore the effects of tibio-femoral (TF) manual traction on pain and passive range of motion (PROM) in individuals with unilateral motion impairment and pain in knee flexion. Thirteen participants volunteered for the study. All participants received 6 minutes of TF traction mobilization applied at end-range passive knee flexion. PROM measurements were taken before the intervention and after 2, 4, and 6 minutes of TF joint traction. Pain was measured using a visual analog scale with the TF joint at rest, at end-range passive knee flexion, during the application of joint traction, and immediately post-treatment. There were significant differences in PROM after 2 and 4 minutes of traction, with no significance noted after 4 minutes. A significant change in knee flexion of 25.9°, which exceeded the MDC(95,) was found when comparing PROM measurements pre- to final intervention. While pain did not change significantly over time, pain levels did change significantly during each treatment session. Pain significantly increased when the participant's knee was passively flexed to end range; it was reduced, although not significantly, during traction mobilization; and it significantly decreased following traction. This case series supports TF joint traction as a means of stretching shortened articular and periarticular tissues without increasing reported levels of pain during or after treatment. In addition, this is the first study documenting the temporal aspects of treatment effectiveness in motion restoration.

  5. Reduced Maximal Force during Acute Anterior Knee Pain Is Associated with Deficits in Voluntary Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Salomoni, Sauro; Tucker, Kylie; Hug, François; McPhee, Megan; Hodges, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Although maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force is reduced during pain, studies using interpolated twitch show no consistent reduction of voluntary muscle drive. The present study aimed to test if the reduction in MVC force during acute experimental pain could be explained by increased activation of antagonist muscles, weak voluntary activation at baseline, or changes in force direction. Twenty-two healthy volunteers performed maximal voluntary isometric knee extensions before, during, and after the effects of hypertonic (pain) and isotonic (control) saline injections into the infrapatellar fat pad. The MVC force, voluntary activation, electromyographic (EMG) activity of agonist, antagonist, and auxiliary (hip) muscles, and pain cognition and anxiety scores were recorded. MVC force was 9.3% lower during pain than baseline (p < 0.001), but there was no systematic change in voluntary activation. Reduced MVC force during pain was variable between participants (SD: 14%), and was correlated with reduced voluntary activation (r = 0.90), baseline voluntary activation (r = − 0.62), and reduced EMG amplitude of agonist and antagonist muscles (all r > 0.52), but not with changes in force direction, pain or anxiety scores. Hence, reduced MVC force during acute pain was mainly explained by deficits in maximal voluntary drive. PMID:27559737

  6. Health beliefs before and after participation on an exercised-based rehabilitation programme for chronic knee pain: Doing is believing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To explore the health beliefs, experiences, treatment and expectations of people with chronic knee pain, and investigate if, how and why these change after taking part on an integrated exercise-based rehabilitation programme - Enabling Self-management and Coping with Arthritis knee Pain through Exercise, ESCAPE-knee pain. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with people with chronic knee pain, before (n = 29) and after (n = 23) participation on the programme. Thematic analysis was used to document people's baseline health beliefs, attitudes and cognitions, and to see if how and why these changed after completing the programme. Results Initially people had poor understanding and negative, fatalistic beliefs about the management or prognosis for knee pain. Following the programme the majority of participants had positive experiences describing improvement in pain, physical and psychosocial functioning, greater knowledge and understanding of their condition and treatment options, and in their ability to use exercise to control symptoms. Beliefs about the causation and prognosis of knee pain were unchanged, but their concerns about possible dangers of exercise had decreased, they appreciated how exercise could reduce symptoms (treatment beliefs) and their confidence in their ability to use exercise to effect improvements (exercise self-efficacy) increased. These improvements were attributed to the content and structure of the programme, and the care and guidance of the physiotherapist. Several expressed a need for on-going support. Conclusions ESCAPE-knee pain appears to achieve improvements by increasing people's treatment belief in safety and the utility of exercise to control symptoms, rather than alteration in their beliefs about causation or prognosis. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN94658828 PMID:20149236

  7. Web-Based Study of Risk Factors for Pain Exacerbation in Osteoarthritis of the Knee (SPARK-Web): Design and Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Ben; Zhang, Yuqing; Bennell, Kim; March, Lyn; Hunter, David J

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent cause of limited mobility and diminished quality of life. Pain is the main symptom that drives individuals with knee OA to seek medical care and a recognized antecedent to disability and eventually joint replacement. Many persons with symptomatic knee OA experience recurrent pain exacerbations. Knowledge and clarification of risk factors for pain exacerbation may allow those affected to minimize reoccurrence of these episodes. Objective The aim of this study is to use a Web-based case-crossover design to identify risk factors for knee pain exacerbations in persons with symptomatic knee OA. Methods Web-based case-crossover design is used to study persons with symptomatic knee OA. Participants with knee pain and radiographic knee OA will be recruited and followed for 90 days. Participants will complete an online questionnaire at the baseline and every 10 days thereafter (totaling up to 10 control-period questionnaires); participants will also be asked to report online when they experience an episode of increased knee pain. Pain exacerbation will be defined as an increase in knee pain severity of two points from baseline on a numeric rating scale (NRS 0-10). Physical activity, footwear, knee injury, medication use, climate, psychological factors, and their possible interactions will be assessed as potential triggers for pain exacerbation using conditional logistic regression models. Results This project has been funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). The enrollment for the study has started. So far, 343 participants have been enrolled. The study is expected to be finished in October 2015. Conclusions This study will identify risk factors for pain exacerbations in knee OA. The identification and possible modification/elimination of such risk factors will help to prevent the reoccurrence of pain exacerbation episodes and therefore improve knee OA management. PMID:26156210

  8. Sensitivity to Change of Patient‐Preference Measures for Pain in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis: Data From Two Trials

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Michael J.; O'Neill, Terence W.; Forsythe, Laura M.; Lunt, Mark; Felson, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective In osteoarthritis (OA) clinical trials, a pain measure that is most sensitive to change is considered optimal. We compared sensitivity to change of patient‐reported pain outcomes, including a patient‐preference measure (where the patient nominates an activity that aggravates their pain). Methods We used data from 2 trials of patients with confirmed (American College of Rheumatology criteria) knee OA: a trial of brace treatment for patellofemoral OA, and a trial of intraarticular steroids in knee OA. Both trials reported an improvement in pain following treatment. Participants rated pain on a 100‐mm visual analog scale (VAS), in the activity that caused them the most knee pain (VASNA), as well as completing questions on overall knee pain and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were also calculated from the KOOS. Standardized changes in each outcome were generated between treatment and control after 6 weeks intervention in the BRACE trial, and 1–2 weeks following intervention in the steroid trial. Results The VASNA produced standardized changes following treatment that were at least as large as other pain outcomes. In the BRACE trial, the between‐groups standardized change with the VASNA was −0.63, compared with the KOOS pain subscale change of −0.33, and pain in the last week VAS change of −0.56. In the steroid study, within‐group change following treatment in the VASNA was −0.60, compared to the last week VAS change of −0.51, and KOOS pain subscale change of −0.58. Conclusion Pain on nominated activity appears to be at least as, and in some cases more, sensitive to change than the KOOS/WOMAC questionnaire. PMID:26713415

  9. Knee pain and osteoarthritis in older adults: a review of community burden and current use of primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Peat, G; McCarney, R; Croft, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Osteoarthritis is the single most common cause of disability in older adults, and most patients with the condition will be managed in the community and primary care.
AIM—To discuss case definition of knee osteoarthritis for primary care and to summarise the burden of the condition in the community and related use of primary health care in the United Kingdom.
DESIGN—Narrative review.
METHOD—A literature search identified studies of incidence and prevalence of knee pain, disability, and radiographic osteoarthritis in the general population, and data related to primary care consultations. Findings from UK studies were summarised with reference to European and international studies.
RESULTS—During a one year period 25% of people over 55 years have a persistent episode of knee pain, of whom about one in six in the UK and the Netherlands consult their general practitioner about it in the same time period. The prevalence of painful disabling knee osteoarthritis in people over 55 years is 10%, of whom one quarter are severely disabled.
CONCLUSION—Knee osteoarthritis sufficiently severe to consider joint replacement represents a minority of all knee pain and disability suffered by older people. Healthcare provision in primary care needs to focus on this broader group to impact on community levels of pain and disability.

 PMID:11156538

  10. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt or diseased, you have knee problems. Knee problems can cause pain and difficulty ...

  11. Does anterior knee pain severity and function relate to the frontal plane projection angle and trunk and hip strength in women with patellofemoral pain?

    PubMed

    Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; Carvalho E Silva, Ana Paula de Moura Campos; França, Fábio Jorge Renovato; Magalhães, Maurício Oliveira; Burke, Thomaz Nogueira; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between knee pain severity and function with the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) and trunk and hip peak torque (PT) in women with patellofemoral pain (PFPS). Twenty-two women with PFPS were assessed. Knee pain severity (KPS) was assessed with an 11-point visual analog scale and function with an Anterior Knee Pain Scale. The FPPA was recorded with a digital camera. PT of extensors, abductors, and the lateral rotators of hip and lateral core stability were measured with a handheld dynamometer. FPPA was the only predictor for the KPS. Regarding predictors of function, PT of lateral core stability and the extensor and abductor of the hip explained 41.4% of the function. Increase in FPPA was associated with greater KPS, and the lowest PT of lateral core stability, hip abductors, and extensors was associated with lower function in women with PFPS.

  12. Does anterior knee pain severity and function relate to the frontal plane projection angle and trunk and hip strength in women with patellofemoral pain?

    PubMed

    Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; Carvalho E Silva, Ana Paula de Moura Campos; França, Fábio Jorge Renovato; Magalhães, Maurício Oliveira; Burke, Thomaz Nogueira; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between knee pain severity and function with the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) and trunk and hip peak torque (PT) in women with patellofemoral pain (PFPS). Twenty-two women with PFPS were assessed. Knee pain severity (KPS) was assessed with an 11-point visual analog scale and function with an Anterior Knee Pain Scale. The FPPA was recorded with a digital camera. PT of extensors, abductors, and the lateral rotators of hip and lateral core stability were measured with a handheld dynamometer. FPPA was the only predictor for the KPS. Regarding predictors of function, PT of lateral core stability and the extensor and abductor of the hip explained 41.4% of the function. Increase in FPPA was associated with greater KPS, and the lowest PT of lateral core stability, hip abductors, and extensors was associated with lower function in women with PFPS. PMID:26118529

  13. Effectiveness of femoral nerve blockade for pain control after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Victor M; Fallis, Wendy M; Slonowsky, Dean; Kwarteng, Kwadwo; Yeung, Colin K L

    2006-10-01

    Control of postoperative pain is a major concern for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to investigate pain control and opioid use, as well as length of stay, ambulation time, antiemetic use, and degree of mobilization for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, comparing those receiving femoral nerve block (FNB) to those receiving no femoral nerve block. Using retrospective patient record data, 133 subjects from an acute care community hospital in western Canada were split into three groups: no FNB (control group, n = 49), single-shot FNB (n = 33), and continuous FNB (n = 51). There was a statistically significant improvement in pain control on day of surgery for the FNB group compared with the no-FNB group, and reduction in opioid usage on days 0, 1, and 2 in the continuous FNB group compared with the no-FNB and single-shot group. Also noted was a statistically significant reduction in antiemetic use in the FNB compared with the no-FNB group on the day after surgery. This study is in accordance with earlier studies that support continuous FNB as an effective method for achieving postoperative pain control and reducing opioid use for patients undergoing TKA.

  14. Healthcare Utilization and Costs of Knee or Hip Replacements versus Pain-Relief Injections

    PubMed Central

    Pasquale, Margaret K.; Louder, Anthony M.; Cheung, Raymond Y.; Reiners, Andrew T.; Mardekian, Jack; Sanchez, Robert J.; Goli, Veerainder

    2015-01-01

    Background Given the dramatic increase in total knee and hip replacement procedures among the US population aged 45 years and older, there is a need to compare the downstream healthcare utilization and costs between patients who undergo joint replacement and those who receive intraarticular injections as a low-cost alternative. Objective To compare changes in osteoarthritis (OA)-related healthcare utilization and costs for Medicare members with OA who underwent knee or hip replacement versus those receiving steroid or viscosupplementation injections. Methods Medicare members aged ≥45 years diagnosed with OA were identified for this retrospective longitudinal study. Data were compared for patients who underwent primary knee or hip replacement surgery between July 1, 2007, and June 30, 2012, and those receiving injection of pain-relief medication during the same period. The date of joint replacement surgery was considered the index date. For the comparison cohort, the index date was 180 days postinjection of the first intraarticular injection. Medical and pharmacy claims were examined longitudinally in 90-day increments, from 180 days preindex until 360 days postindex. Difference-in-difference analyses were conducted to compare the change in OA-related healthcare costs, postindex versus preindex, between the study cohorts. Time-to-event analyses were used to measure rates of readmissions and venous thromboembolism (VTE). Results The mean age was 70.7 years for patients with knee replacement, 71.7 years for those with hip replacement, and 71.1 years for those receiving pain-relief injection (P <.0001). The RxRisk-V comorbidity index scores were 4.7, 4.4, and 4.8, respectively (P <.0001). Difference-in-difference analyses indicated that decreases in OA-related costs were greater for the joint replacement cohorts (coefficient for knee replacement*time: −0.603; hip replacement*time: −0.438; P <.001 for both) than for the comparison cohort. The VTE rates were 5

  15. Acupuncture is Effective for Chronic Knee Pain: A Reanalysis of the Australian Acupuncture Trial.

    PubMed

    Yin Fan, Arthur; Zhou, Kehua; Gu, Sherman; Ming Li, Yong

    2016-03-01

    Context • In the October 2014 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Hinman et al published the results of an Australian clinical trial on acupuncture in a paper entitled "Acupuncture for Chronic Knee Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial" (JAMA report), in which they concluded that neither acupuncture nor laser acupuncture had any greater effects than sham laser acupuncture for pain or function for patients aged 50 y and older with moderate-to-severe knee pain. That study has been criticized extensively by international scholars for its validity because serious methodological flaws existed throughout the study's design, implementation, and conclusions. Objective • The current study intended to re-examine the prior study's conclusions about the efficacy of acupuncture for chronic knee pain. Design • The current research team performed a reanalysis of relevant data from the JAMA report. Intervention • The original study included 4 groups: (1) an acupuncture group, which received needle acupuncture, inferred by the current authors to have been set up to be a positive control in the original study; (2) a laser acupuncture group, which received laser acupuncture; (3) a sham laser acupuncture group, which received sham laser acupuncture and acted as the negative controls for the laser acupuncture intervention; and (4) a control group, which received conventional care but no acupuncture or laser treatments. The study lasted 12 wk. Outcome Measures • The measures included evaluations in the following areas: (1) poststudy modifications-an evaluation of the consistency of the JAMA report with the study's intentions as identified for a grant that was originally approved and funded by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) in 2009, as indicated in the study's trial registration, and as compared with the published protocols and to the study's originally stated objectives; (2) high heterogeneity-an assessment of the

  16. Novel Noxipoint Therapy versus Conventional Physical Therapy for Chronic Neck and Shoulder Pain: Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Koo, Charles C; Lin, Ray S; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Tsauo, Jau-Yih; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yen, Chen-Tung; Biswal, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    As chronic pain affects 115 million people and costs $600B annually in the US alone, effective noninvasive nonpharmacological remedies are desirable. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and the generalisability of Noxipoint therapy (NT), a novel electrotherapy characterised by site-specific stimulation, intensity-and-submodality-specific settings and a immobilization period, for chronic neck and shoulder pain. Ninety-seven heavily pretreated severe chronic neck/shoulder pain patients were recruited; 34 and 44 patients were randomly allocated to different treatment arms in two patient-and-assessor-blinded, randomised controlled studies. The participants received NT or conventional physical therapy including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PT-TENS) for three to six 90-minute sessions. In Study One, NT improved chronic pain (-89.6%, Brief Pain Inventory, p < 0.0001, 95% confidence interval), function (+77.4%, range of motion) and quality of life (+88.1%) at follow-up (from 4 weeks to 5 months), whereas PT-TENS resulted in no significant changes in these parameters. Study Two demonstrated similar advantages of NT over PT-TENS and the generalisability of NT. NT-like treatments in a randomised rat study showed a similar reduction in chronic hypersensitivity (-81%, p < 0.01) compared with sham treatments. NT substantially reduces chronic neck and shoulder pain, restores function, and improves quality of life in a sustained manner. PMID:26552835

  17. Novel Noxipoint Therapy versus Conventional Physical Therapy for Chronic Neck and Shoulder Pain: Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Charles C.; Lin, Ray S.; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Tsauo, Jau-Yih; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yen, Chen-Tung; Biswal, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    As chronic pain affects 115 million people and costs $600B annually in the US alone, effective noninvasive nonpharmacological remedies are desirable. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and the generalisability of Noxipoint therapy (NT), a novel electrotherapy characterised by site-specific stimulation, intensity-and-submodality-specific settings and a immobilization period, for chronic neck and shoulder pain. Ninety-seven heavily pretreated severe chronic neck/shoulder pain patients were recruited; 34 and 44 patients were randomly allocated to different treatment arms in two patient-and-assessor-blinded, randomised controlled studies. The participants received NT or conventional physical therapy including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PT-TENS) for three to six 90-minute sessions. In Study One, NT improved chronic pain (−89.6%, Brief Pain Inventory, p < 0.0001, 95% confidence interval), function (+77.4%, range of motion) and quality of life (+88.1%) at follow-up (from 4 weeks to 5 months), whereas PT-TENS resulted in no significant changes in these parameters. Study Two demonstrated similar advantages of NT over PT-TENS and the generalisability of NT. NT-like treatments in a randomised rat study showed a similar reduction in chronic hypersensitivity (−81%, p < 0.01) compared with sham treatments. NT substantially reduces chronic neck and shoulder pain, restores function, and improves quality of life in a sustained manner. PMID:26552835

  18. Sativex successfully treats neuropathic pain characterised by allodynia: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Nurmikko, Turo J; Serpell, Mick G; Hoggart, Barbara; Toomey, Peter J; Morlion, Bart J; Haines, Derek

    2007-12-15

    Cannabinoids are known to have analgesic properties. We evaluated the effect of oro-mucosal sativex, (THC: CBD), an endocannabinoid system modulator, on pain and allodynia, in 125 patients with neuropathic pain of peripheral origin in a five-week, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel design trial. Patients remained on their existing stable analgesia. A self-titrating regimen was used to optimise drug administration. Sixty-three patients were randomised to receive sativex and 62 placebo. The mean reduction in pain intensity scores (primary outcome measure) was greater in patients receiving sativex than placebo (mean adjusted scores -1.48 points vs. -0.52 points on a 0-10 Numerical Rating Scale (p=0.004; 95% CI: -1.59, -0.32). Improvements in Neuropathic Pain Scale composite score (p=0.007), sleep NRS (p=0.001), dynamic allodynia (p=0.042), punctate allodynia (p=0.021), Pain Disability Index (p=0.003) and Patient's Global Impression of Change (p<0.001) were similarly greater on sativex vs. placebo. Sedative and gastrointestinal side effects were reported more commonly by patients on active medication. Of all participants, 18% on sativex and 3% on placebo withdrew during the study. An open-label extension study showed that the initial pain relief was maintained without dose escalation or toxicity for 52 weeks. PMID:17997224

  19. Novel Noxipoint Therapy versus Conventional Physical Therapy for Chronic Neck and Shoulder Pain: Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Koo, Charles C; Lin, Ray S; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Tsauo, Jau-Yih; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yen, Chen-Tung; Biswal, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    As chronic pain affects 115 million people and costs $600B annually in the US alone, effective noninvasive nonpharmacological remedies are desirable. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and the generalisability of Noxipoint therapy (NT), a novel electrotherapy characterised by site-specific stimulation, intensity-and-submodality-specific settings and a immobilization period, for chronic neck and shoulder pain. Ninety-seven heavily pretreated severe chronic neck/shoulder pain patients were recruited; 34 and 44 patients were randomly allocated to different treatment arms in two patient-and-assessor-blinded, randomised controlled studies. The participants received NT or conventional physical therapy including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PT-TENS) for three to six 90-minute sessions. In Study One, NT improved chronic pain (-89.6%, Brief Pain Inventory, p < 0.0001, 95% confidence interval), function (+77.4%, range of motion) and quality of life (+88.1%) at follow-up (from 4 weeks to 5 months), whereas PT-TENS resulted in no significant changes in these parameters. Study Two demonstrated similar advantages of NT over PT-TENS and the generalisability of NT. NT-like treatments in a randomised rat study showed a similar reduction in chronic hypersensitivity (-81%, p < 0.01) compared with sham treatments. NT substantially reduces chronic neck and shoulder pain, restores function, and improves quality of life in a sustained manner.

  20. OPAL: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial of opioid analgesia for the reduction of pain severity in people with acute spinal pain. Trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; McLachlan, Andrew J; Latimer, Jane; Day, Ric O; Billot, Laurent; Koes, Bart W; Maher, Chris G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain and neck pain are extremely prevalent and are responsible for an enormous burden of disease globally. Strong analgesics, such as opioid analgesics, are recommended by clinical guidelines for people with acute low back pain or neck pain who are slow to recover and require more pain relief. Opioid analgesics are widely and increasingly used, but there are no strong efficacy data supporting the use of opioid analgesics for acute low back pain or neck pain. Concerns regarding opioid use are further heightened by the risks of adverse events, some of which can be serious (eg, dependency, misuse and overdose). Methods and analysis OPAL is a randomised, placebo-controlled, triple-blinded trial that will investigate the judicious use of an opioid analgesic in 346 participants with acute low back pain and/or neck pain who are slow to recover. Participants will be recruited from general practice and randomised to receive the opioid analgesic (controlled release oxycodone plus naloxone up to 20 mg per day) or placebo in addition to guideline-based care (eg, reassurance and advice of staying active) for up to 6 weeks. Participants will be followed-up for 3 months for effectiveness outcomes. The primary outcome will be pain severity. Secondary outcomes will include physical functioning and time to recovery. Medication-related adverse events will be assessed and a cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted. We will additionally assess long-term use and risk of misuse of opioid analgesics for up to 12 months. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained. Trial results will be disseminated by publications and conference presentations, and via the media. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000775516: Pre-results. PMID:27558901

  1. A COMPARISON OF TWO TAPING TECHNIQUES (KINESIO AND MCCONNELL) AND THEIR EFFECT ON ANTERIOR KNEE PAIN DURING FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITIES

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Jenie; Dmochowska, Katarzyna; Scariah, Shiju; Varughese, Jincy

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anterior knee pain is a clinical syndrome characterized by pain experienced perceived over the anterior aspect of the knee that can be aggravated by functional activities such as stair climbing and squatting. Two taping techniques commonly used for anterior knee pain in the clinic include the McConnell Taping Technique (MT) and the Kinesio Taping® Method (KT®). Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of KT® and the MT versus no tape in subjects with anterior knee pain during a squat lift and stair climbing. Design: Pretest‐ posttest design. Participants: A total of 20 subjects (15 female, 5 male) with unilateral anterior knee pain were recruited. The mean age of the subjects was 24 (+/–3) years, with a mean weight of 160 (+/–28) pounds. Methods: Each participant was tested during two functional activities; a squat lift with a weighted box (10% of his/her body weight, plus the weight [8.5 pounds] of the box) and stair climbing under three conditions: 1) no tape, 2) MT and 3) KT®. Pain levels were assessed (verbally) using the 0‐10 Numeric Pain Intensity Scale. Results: The median (interquartile range [IQR]) pain during squat lift was 2 (2.75) for no tape, 1 (1) for KT®, and 0.5 (2) for McConnell, with no significant differences between the groups. During the stair activity the median (IQR) pain was 1.5 (2.75) for no tape, 1 (1.75) for KT®, and 1 (1.75) for MT with a significant difference (p=0.024) between the groups. Further analysis determined that the only a significant difference was (p=0.034) between the no tape and the KT® conditions. Conclusion: The results of this study found that both the KT® and the MT may be effective in reducing pain during stair climbing activities. Level of Evidence: Level 2, Prospective Cohort study PMID:23593548

  2. Patients' reasons for electing to undergo total knee arthroplasty impact post-operative pain severity and range of motion.

    PubMed

    Cremeans-Smith, Julie K; Boarts, Jessica M; Greene, Kenneth; Delahanty, Douglas L

    2009-06-01

    The present study examines the reasons cited by 103 patients for their electing to undergo total knee arthroplastic surgery and the relationship between these reasons and their post-operative pain and range of motion. Results suggest that individuals who describe different reasons for undergoing surgery vary in their post-operative recovery. Specifically, patients who cite pain as the reason they are undergoing surgery report greater levels of pain during the early post-operative period. In contrast, patients who describe goals of regaining mobility or a specific activity as their reason for undergoing surgery achieve a greater range of motion during early post-operative physical therapy. Individuals who express avoidance goals for undergoing total knee arthroplasty report more severe post-operative pain at 1 and 3 months following surgery compared to patients who express approach goals. Interventions targeted towards patients reporting pre-operative pain or avoidance goals may decrease subsequent post-operative pain and increase mobility.

  3. Work-related outcomes in randomised placebo-controlled pain trials: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic painful conditions have an important influence on the ability to work. Work-related outcomes, however, are not commonly reported in publications on trials investigating the treatment of chronic painful conditions. We aim to provide an overview of the reporting of work-related outcomes in such trials and investigate the relationship between work-related outcomes and pain outcomes. Methods We conducted a systematic literature search in PubMed with the aim of identifying randomised placebo-controlled clinical trials investigating treatments for chronic painful conditions or rheumatic diseases that also reported on work-related outcomes. Methodological study quality was assessed with the Oxford Quality Scale (OQS). Meta-analyses were conducted for the outcomes of interference with work and number of patients with at least 30% reduction in pain intensity (30% pain responders). The correlation between work-related and pain outcomes was investigated with regression analyses. Results We included 31 publications reporting on 27 datasets from randomised placebo-controlled trials (with a total of 11,434 study participants) conducted in chronic painful or rheumatic diseases and reporting on work-related outcomes. These 31 publications make up only about 0.2% of all publications on randomised placebo-controlled trials in such conditions. The methodological quality of the included studies was high; only nine studies scored less than four (out of a maximum five) points on the OQS. Sixteen different work-related outcomes were reported on in the studies. Of 25 studies testing for the statistical significance of changes in work-related outcomes over the course of the trials, 14 (56%) reported a significant improvement; the others reported non-significant changes. Eight studies reported data on both interference with work and 30% pain responders: meta-analyses demonstrated similar, statistically significant improvements in both these outcomes with active therapy

  4. Acupuncture in acute herpes zoster pain therapy (ACUZoster) – design and protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Fleckenstein, Johannes; Kramer, Sybille; Hoffrogge, Philipp; Thoma, Sarah; Lang, Philip M; Lehmeyer, Lukas; Schober, Gabriel M; Pfab, Florian; Ring, Johannes; Weisenseel, Peter; Schotten, Klaus J; Mansmann, Ulrich; Irnich, Dominik

    2009-01-01

    Background Acute herpes zoster is a prevalent condition. One of its major symptoms is pain, which can highly influence patient's quality of life. Pain therapy is limited. Acupuncture is supposed to soften neuropathic pain conditions and might therefore act as a therapeutic alternative. Objective of the present study is to investigate whether a 4 week semi-standardised acupuncture is non-inferior to sham laser acupuncture and the anticonvulsive drug gabapentine in the treatment of pain associated with herpes zoster. Methods/Design Three-armed, randomised, placebo-controlled trial with a total follow-up time of 6 months. Up to estimated 336 patients (interim analyses) with acute herpes zoster pain (VAS > 30 mm) will be randomised to one of three groups (a) semi-standardised acupuncture (168 patients); (b) gabapentine with individualised dosage between 900–3600 mg/d (84 patients); (c) sham laser acupuncture. Intervention takes place over 4 weeks, all patients will receive analgesic therapy (non-opioid analgesics: metamizol or paracetamol and opioids: tramadol or morphine). Therapy phase includes 4 weeks in which group (a) and (c) consist of 12 sessions per patient, (b) visits depend on patients needs. Main outcome measure is to assess the alteration of pain intensity before and 1 week after treatment sessions (visual analogue scale VAS 0–100 mm). Secondary outcome measure are: alteration of pain intensity and frequency of pain attacks; alteration of different aspects of pain evaluated by standardised pain questionnaires (NPI, PDI, SES); effects on quality of life (SF 36); analgesic demand; alteration of sensoric perception by systematic quantitative sensory testing (QST); incidence of postherpetic neuralgia; side effects and cost effectiveness. Credibility of treatments will be assessed. Discussion This study is the first large-scale randomised placebo controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture compared to gabapentine and sham treatment and will

  5. De Novo Cerebral Palsy Diagnosis in 9-Year-Old Soccer Player Presenting With Knee Pain.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Jérôme; Jevremovic, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    A 9-year-old boy presented to our outpatient specialized sport and exercise medicine clinic complaining of a subacute onset of unilateral knee pain, after an increased level of soccer training. His knee examination was unremarkable. However, he demonstrated significant tenderness on palpation of his ipsilateral hip flexor and adductor tendons. Abnormalities in muscle tone and difficulty in relaxing and resisting the examiner properly were noted and lead to a complete neurological examination. It demonstrated multiple abnormalities such as increased tone and deep tendon reflexes, greater in lower than upper extremities, and abnormal patterning. A mild form of spastic diplegia was suspected and the patient was referred to a pediatric neurologist who confirmed our initial diagnosis. This case draws attention to the importance of maintaining a high level of suspicion for milder forms of diseases that can go unnoticed for years.

  6. Functional Network Architecture Predicts Psychologically Mediated Analgesia Related to Treatment in Chronic Knee Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jian; Spaeth, Rosa; Khan, Sheraz; Kaptchuk, Ted J.

    2014-01-01

    Placebo analgesia is an indicator of how efficiently the brain translates psychological signals conveyed by a treatment procedure into pain relief. It has been demonstrated that functional connectivity between distributed brain regions predicts placebo analgesia in chronic back pain patients. Greater network efficiency in baseline brain networks may allow better information transfer and facilitate adaptive physiological responses to psychological aspects of treatment. Here, we theorized that topological network alignments in resting state scans predict psychologically conditioned analgesic responses to acupuncture treatment in chronic knee osteoarthritis pain patients (n = 45). Analgesia was induced by building positive expectations toward acupuncture treatment with verbal suggestion and heat pain conditioning on a test site of the arm. This procedure induced significantly more analgesia after sham or real acupuncture on the test site than in a control site. The psychologically conditioned analgesia was invariant to sham versus real treatment. Efficiency of information transfer within local networks calculated with graph-theoretic measures (local efficiency and clustering coefficients) significantly predicted conditioned analgesia. Clustering coefficients in regions associated with memory, motivation, and pain modulation were closely involved in predicting analgesia. Moreover, women showed higher clustering coefficients and marginally greater pain reduction than men. Overall, analgesic response to placebo cues can be predicted from a priori resting state data by observing local network topology. Such low-cost synchronizations may represent preparatory resources that facilitate subsequent performance of brain circuits in responding to adaptive environmental cues. This suggests a potential utility of network measures in predicting placebo response for clinical use. PMID:24623770

  7. Sleep, pain catastrophizing and central sensitization in knee osteoarthritis patients with and without insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Claudia M.; Buenaver, Luis F.; Finan, Patrick; Bounds, Sara C.; Redding, Mary; McCauley, Lea; Robinson, Mercedes; Edwards, Robert R.; Smith, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Osteoarthritis, a chronic degenerative joint disorder, is characterized by joint pain. Emerging research demonstrates that a significant number of patients evidence central sensitization (CS), a hyper-excitability in nociceptive pathways, which is known to amplify and maintain clinical pain. The clinical correlates of CS in OA, however, are poorly understood. Insomnia is prevalent in older adults with OA and recent experiments suggest associations between poor sleep and measures of CS. Catastrophizing, a potent predictor of pain outcomes has also been associated with CS, but few studies have investigated possible interactions between catastrophizing, sleep and CS. Methods: We conducted a case controlled study of 4 well characterized groups of adults with insomnia and/or knee osteoarthritis. A total of 208 participants completed multimodal sleep assessments (questionnaire, diary, actigraphy, polysmnography) and extensive evaluation of pain using clinical measures and quantitative sensory testing to evaluate associations between CS, catastrophizing and insomnia. Descriptive characterization of each measure is presented, with specific focus on sleep efficiency and CS. Results: The KOA-Insomnia group demonstrated the greatest degree of CS compared to controls. In the overall sample, we found that catastrophizing moderated the relationship between sleep efficiency and CS. Specifically those with low sleep efficiency and high catastrophizing scores reported increased levels of CS. In addition, CS was significantly associated with increased clinical pain. Conclusions: These findings highlight the importance of assessing sleep efficiency, CS and catastrophizing in chronic pain patients and have important clinical implications for treatment planning. PMID:26041510

  8. A multifaceted workplace intervention for low back pain in nurses' aides: a pragmatic stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Charlotte Diana Nørregaard; Holtermann, Andreas; Bay, Hans; Søgaard, Karen; Birk Jørgensen, Marie

    2015-09-01

    This study established the effectiveness of a workplace multifaceted intervention consisting of participatory ergonomics, physical training, and cognitive-behavioural training (CBT) for low back pain (LBP). Between November 2012 and May 2014, we conducted a pragmatic stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial with 594 workers from eldercare workplaces (nursing homes and home care) randomised to 4 successive time periods, 3 months apart. The intervention lasted 12 weeks and consisted of 19 sessions in total (physical training [12 sessions], CBT [2 sessions], and participatory ergonomics [5 sessions]). Low back pain was the outcome and was measured as days, intensity (worst pain on a 0-10 numeric rank scale), and bothersomeness (days) by monthly text messages. Linear mixed models were used to estimate the intervention effect. Analyses were performed according to intention to treat, including all eligible randomised participants, and were adjusted for baseline values of the outcome. The linear mixed models yielded significant effects on LBP days of -0.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], -1.19 to -0.38), LBP intensity of -0.4 (95% CI, -0.60 to -0.26), and bothersomeness days of -0.5 (95% CI, -0.85 to -0.13) after the intervention compared with the control group. This study shows that a multifaceted intervention consisting of participatory ergonomics, physical training, and CBT can reduce LBP among workers in eldercare. Thus, multifaceted interventions may be relevant for improving LBP in a working population.

  9. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plantar heel pain (plantar fasciitis) is a common and disabling condition, which has a detrimental impact on health-related quality of life. Despite the high prevalence of plantar heel pain, the optimal treatment for this disorder remains unclear. Consequently, an alternative therapy such as dry needling is increasingly being used as an adjunctive treatment by health practitioners. Only two trials have investigated the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain, however both trials were of a low methodological quality. This manuscript describes the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. Methods Eighty community-dwelling men and woman aged over 18 years with plantar heel pain (who satisfy the inclusion and exclusion criteria) will be recruited. Eligible participants with plantar heel pain will be randomised to receive either one of two interventions, (i) real dry needling or (ii) sham dry needling. The protocol (including needling details and treatment regimen) was formulated by general consensus (using the Delphi research method) using 30 experts worldwide that commonly use dry needling for plantar heel pain. Primary outcome measures will be the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and "first step" pain as measured on a visual analogue scale. The secondary outcome measures will be health related quality of life (assessed using the Short Form-36 questionnaire - Version Two) and depression, anxiety and stress (assessed using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale - short version). Primary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks and secondary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Conclusion This study is the first randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. The trial will be reported in

  10. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization as a Treatment for Medial Knee Pain in Patients with Mild to Moderate Osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Okuno, Yuji; Korchi, Amine Mohamed; Shinjo, Takuma; Kato, Shojiro

    2015-04-15

    PurposeOsteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability. Mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis that is resistant to nonsurgical options and not severe enough to warrant joint replacement represents a challenge in its management. On the basis of the hypothesis that neovessels and accompanying nerves are possible sources of pain, previous work demonstrated that transcatheter arterial embolization for chronic painful conditions resulted in excellent pain relief. We hypothesized that transcatheter arterial embolization can relieve pain associated with knee osteoarthritis.MethodsTranscatheter arterial embolization for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis using imipenem/cilastatin sodium or 75 μm calibrated Embozene microspheres as an embolic agent has been performed in 11 and three patients, respectively. We assessed adverse events and changes in Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores.ResultsAbnormal neovessels were identified within soft tissue surrounding knee joint in all cases by arteriography. No major adverse events were related to the procedures. Transcatheter arterial embolization rapidly improved WOMAC pain scores from 12.2 ± 1.9 to 3.3 ± 2.1 at 1 month after the procedure, with further improvement at 4 months (1.7 ± 2.2) and WOMAC total scores from 47.3 ± 5.8 to 11.6 ± 5.4 at 1 month, and to 6.3 ± 6.0 at 4 months. These improvements were maintained in most cases at the final follow-up examination at a mean of 12 ± 5 months (range 4–19 months).ConclusionTranscatheter arterial embolization for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis was feasible, rapidly relieved resistant pain, and restored knee function.

  11. Unique aspects of pain reduction in osteoarthritis of the knee with LMWF-5A

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee (OAK) is a common form of arthritis that can lead to substantial pain and disability. This commentary highlights key aspects of the recently published phase 3 A Efficacy and Safety Study of Two Doses of Intra-Articular Injection of Ampion™ in Adults With Pain Due to Osteoarthritis of the Knee (SPRING) study. SPRING (NCT01839331) was a multicenter, randomized, vehicle-controlled, double-blind trial that evaluated the safety and efficacy of the low-molecular-weight fraction of 5% human serum albumin (LMWF-5A) for treatment of pain, measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) pain scale, in patients with symptomatic OAK (N=329). Patients in this study reflected many characteristics of “real-world” individuals with OAK, with a broad range of disease severity and disability. The most important finding from this study was that treatment with a single intra-articular injection of LMWF-5A led to significant pain reduction in the patients with objective radiographic evidence of severe disease and joint deterioration (Kellgren-Lawrence grade 3; P=0.04 and Kellgren-Lawrence grade 4; P=0.02). The magnitude of pain reduction in the entire cohort treated with LMWF-5A was 42% from baseline and the treatment effect compared with vehicle control (estimated difference in WOMAC pain, −0.25; P=0.004) was also notable, especially relative to a previously reported study of hyaluronic acid, in which only a marginally significant treatment effect was observed (mean difference in WOMAC pain compared with control, −0.15; P=0.047). Significant improvement in physical function observed with LMWF-5A (P=0.04) was also noted and suggests that LMWF-5A may provide therapeutic benefit for those who are limited in the activities of daily living. Intra-articular injection of LMWF-5A was well tolerated, and the adverse event profile was similar to that of control. These results demonstrate significant benefit of LMWF-5A for

  12. The Interactive Relationship between Pain, Psychosis, and Agitation in People with Dementia: Results from a Cluster-Randomised Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Habiger, Torstein F; Flo, Elisabeth; Achterberg, Wilco P; Husebo, Bettina S

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in people with dementia, and pain is thought to be an important underlying factor. Pain has previously been associated with agitation, and pain treatment has been shown to ameliorate agitated behaviour. So far, the association between pain and psychosis and the effect of pain treatment on psychotic symptoms is unclear. Furthermore, the impact of opioid treatment on psychosis is not established. Aim. To investigate the efficacy of a stepwise protocol for treating pain (SPTP) on psychosis and agitation measured with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Nursing Home version, and to explore the impact of opioid analgesics on psychosis. Method. Secondary analyses are from a cluster-randomised controlled trial including 352 patients with advanced dementia and agitation from 18 nursing homes in Western Norway. The intervention group received pain treatment according to SPTP. Results. Pain was associated with disinhibition (adjusted OR: 1.21, 95% CI: 1.10-1.34) and irritability (adjusted OR: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.01-1.21) at baseline. Pain treatment reduced agitation (p < 0.001, df = 1; 300) and aberrant motor behaviour (p = 0.017, df = 1; 300). Psychosis was reduced in people with at least one symptom at baseline (p = 0.034, df = 1; 135). The use of opioid analgesics did not increase psychotic symptoms. Study Registration. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01021696), Norwegian Medicines Agency, EudraCT (EudraCTnr: 2008-007490-20). PMID:27247487

  13. The effect of oxcarbazepine in peripheral neuropathic pain depends on pain phenotype: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phenotype-stratified study.

    PubMed

    Demant, Dyveke T; Lund, Karen; Vollert, Jan; Maier, Christoph; Segerdahl, Märtha; Finnerup, Nanna B; Jensen, Troels S; Sindrup, Søren H

    2014-11-01

    In neuropathic pain it has been suggested that pain phenotype based on putative pain mechanisms may predict response to treatment. This was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and phenotype-stratified study with 2 6-week treatment periods of oxcarbazepine (1800-2400mg) and placebo. The primary efficacy measure was change in median pain intensity between baseline and the last week of treatment measured on an 11-point numeric rating scale, and the primary objective was to compare the effect of oxcarbazepine in patients with and without the irritable nociceptor phenotype as defined by hypersensitivity and preserved small nerve fibre function determined by detailed quantitative sensory testing. Ninety-seven patients with peripheral neuropathic pain due to polyneuropathy, surgical or traumatic nerve injury, or postherpetic neuralgia were randomised. The intention-to-treat population comprised 83 patients: 31 with the irritable and 52 with the nonirritable nociceptor phenotype. In the total sample, oxcarbazepine relieved pain of 0.7 points (on a numeric rating scale 0-10; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.4-1.4) more than placebo (P=0.015) and there was a significant interaction between treatment and phenotype of 0.7 (95% CI 0.01-1.4, P=0.047). The number needed to treat to obtain one patient with more than 50% pain relief was 6.9 (95% CI 4.2-22) in the total sample, 3.9 (95% CI 2.3-12) in the irritable, and 13 (95% CI 5.3-∞) in the nonirritable nociceptor phenotype. In conclusion, oxcarbazepine is more efficacious for relief of peripheral neuropathic pain in patients with the irritable vs the nonirritable nociceptor phenotype.

  14. Analgesic effect of raloxifene on back and knee pain in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and/or osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takuo; Fujii, Yoshio; Munezane, Hiromi; Ohue, Mutsumi; Takagi, Yasuyuki

    2010-07-01

    To assess the effect of raloxifene on bone and joint pain, 24 postmenopausal women with back or knee pain or both were randomly divided into two groups, based on the chronological sequence of consultation, to be treated with 60 mg raloxifene and 1 microg alfacalcidol (RA)/day (group RA) or 1 microg alfacalcidol alone (A)/day (group A), respectively, for 6 months. Pain following knee loading (KL) by standing up from a chair and bending the knee by squatting, knee and spine loading (KSL) by walking horizontally and ascending and descending stairs, and spine loading (SL) by lying down supine on a bed and leaving the bed to stand was evaluated by electroalgometry (EAM), based on measurement of the fall of skin impedance, and a visual rating scale (VRS), recording subjective pain on a scale of 0-100 between no pain and unbearable pain. The two groups showed no significant difference as to age, indices of mineral metabolism, back and knee pain, and bone status. RA gave a significantly greater analgesic effect than A by both EAM (P = 0.0158) and VRS (P = 0.0268) on overall comparison of the mean response to all modalities of exercise loading. Paired comparison between pretreatment and posttreatment indicated a significant effect of RA by both EAM (P = 0.0045) and VRS (P = 0.0017), but not that of A. The analgesic effect was more clearly noted on combined knee-spine loading (KSL) and spine loading (SL) than simple knee loading (KL). Monthly comparison of the analgesic effect indicated a significantly better analgesic effect in the fifth month by VRS. RA effect greater than A was more evident by EAM than VRS and during months 3-6 than during 1-2 months, suggesting a slowly progressive effect of RA. Pain evaluation by EAM and VRS mostly gave parallel results, except for a few occasions such as knee loading and spine loading by sitting up and leaving a bed, when EAM detected a positive effect but VRS failed to do so. RA appeared to be more effective on bone and joint pain

  15. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: ‘SCOPEX’ a randomised control trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have recently undergone a partial medial meniscectomy. Methods/design 62 people aged 30–50 years who have undergone an arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy within the previous 3 to 12 months will be recruited and randomly assigned to a neuromuscular exercise or control group using concealed allocation. The neuromuscular exercise group will attend 8 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and will perform 6 exercises at home, at least 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The control group will not receive the neuromuscular training program. Blinded assessment will be performed at baseline and immediately following the 12-week intervention. The primary outcomes are change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured by 3-dimensional analysis during normal paced walking and one-leg rise. Secondary outcomes include the change in peak external knee adduction moment during fast pace walking and one-leg hop and change in the knee adduction moment impulse during walking, one-leg rise and one-leg hop, knee and hip muscle strength, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, objective measures of physical function, as well as self-reported measures of physical function and symptoms and additional biomechanical parameters. Discussion The findings from this trial will provide evidence regarding the effect of a home-based, physiotherapist

  16. Local anaesthetic infiltration for peri-operative pain control in total hip and knee replacement: systematic review and meta-analyses of short- and long-term effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical pain is managed with multi-modal anaesthesia in total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR). It is unclear whether including local anaesthetic infiltration before wound closure provides additional pain control. Methods We performed a systematic review of randomised controlled trials of local anaesthetic infiltration in patients receiving THR or TKR. We searched MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane CENTRAL to December 2012. Two reviewers screened abstracts, extracted data, and contacted authors for unpublished outcomes and data. Outcomes collected were post-operative pain at rest and during activity after 24 and 48 hours, opioid requirement, mobilisation, hospital stay and complications. When feasible, we estimated pooled treatment effects using random effects meta-analyses. Results In 13 studies including 909 patients undergoing THR, patients receiving local anaesthetic infiltration experienced a greater reduction in pain at 24 hours at rest by standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.61 (95% CI -1.05, -0.16; p = 0.008) and by SMD -0.43 (95% CI -0.78 -0.09; p = 0.014) at 48 hours during activity. In TKR, diverse multi-modal regimens were reported. In 23 studies including 1439 patients undergoing TKR, local anaesthetic infiltration reduced pain on average by SMD -0.40 (95% CI -0.58, -0.22; p < 0.001) at 24 hours at rest and by SMD -0.27 (95% CI -0.50, -0.05; p = 0.018) at 48 hours during activity, compared with patients receiving no infiltration or placebo. There was evidence of a larger reduction in studies delivering additional local anaesthetic after wound closure. There was no evidence of pain control additional to that provided by femoral nerve block. Patients receiving local anaesthetic infiltration spent on average an estimated 0.83 (95% CI 1.54, 0.12; p = 0.022) and 0.87 (95% CI 1.62, 0.11; p = 0.025) fewer days in hospital after THR and TKR respectively, had reduced opioid consumption, earlier

  17. Changes in Knee Biomechanics After a Hip-Abductor Strengthening Protocol for Runners With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ferber, Reed; Kendall, Karen D.; Farr, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Very few authors have investigated the relationship between hip-abductor muscle strength and frontal-plane knee mechanics during running. Objective: To investigate this relationship using a 3-week hip-abductor muscle-strengthening program to identify changes in strength, pain, and biomechanics in runners with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Design: Cohort study. Setting: University-based clinical research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Fifteen individuals (5 men, 10 women) with PFPS and 10 individuals without PFPS (4 men, 6 women) participated. Intervention(s): The patients with PFPS completed a 3-week hip-abductor strengthening protocol; control participants did not. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables of interest were maximal isometric hip-abductor muscle strength, 2-dimensional peak knee genu valgum angle, and stride-to-stride knee-joint variability. All measures were recorded at baseline and 3 weeks later. Between-groups differences were compared using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Results: At baseline, the PFPS group exhibited reduced strength, no difference in peak genu valgum angle, and increased stride-to-stride knee-joint variability compared with the control group. After the 3-week protocol, the PFPS group demonstrated increased strength, less pain, no change in peak genu valgum angle, and reduced stride-to-stride knee-joint variability compared with baseline. Conclusions: A 3-week hip-abductor muscle-strengthening protocol was effective in increasing muscle strength and decreasing pain and stride-to-stride knee-joint variability in individuals with PFPS. However, concomitant changes in peak knee genu valgum angle were not observed. PMID:21391799

  18. The effects of various physical non-operative modalities on the pain in osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Cherian, J J; Jauregui, J J; Leichliter, A K; Elmallah, R K; Bhave, A; Mont, M A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various non-operative modalities of treatment (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS); neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES); insoles and bracing) on the pain of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. We conducted a systematic review according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines to identify the therapeutic options which are commonly adopted for the management of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. The outcome measurement tools used in the different studies were the visual analogue scale and The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index pain index: all pain scores were converted to a 100-point scale. A total of 30 studies met our inclusion criteria: 13 on insoles, seven on TENS, six on NMES, and four on bracing. The standardised mean difference (SMD) in pain after treatment with TENS was 1.796, which represented a significant reduction in pain. The significant overall effect estimate for NMES on pain was similar to that of TENS, with a SMD of 1.924. The overall effect estimate of insoles on pain was a SMD of 0.992. The overall effect of bracing showed a significant reduction in pain of 1.34. Overall, all four non-operative modalities of treatment were found to have a significant effect on the reduction of pain in OA of the knee. This study shows that non-operative physical modalities of treatment are of benefit when treating OA of the knee. However, much of the literature reviewed evaluates studies with follow-up of less than six months: future work should aim to evaluate patients with longer follow-up.

  19. Comparison of Adductor Canal Block and Femoral Nerve Block for Postoperative Pain in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Cui-Cui; Dong, Shu-Ling; He, Fu-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has always been associated with moderate-to-severe pain. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pain control of adductor canal block (ACB) and femoral nerve block (FNB) after TKA. Relevant literatures about the ACB and FNB after TKA for reducing pain were searched from Medline (1996-January, 2015), Embase (1980-January, 2015), PubMed (1980-January, 2015), Web of Science (1980-January, 2015), and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. High-quality RCTs and non-RCTs were picked to evaluate the visual analogue scale (VAS) and other outcome. This systematic review and meta-analysis were performed according to the PRISMA statement criteria. The software RevMan 5.30 was used for the meta-analysis. Eight literatures fitted into the inclusion criteria. There were no significant differences in VAS score with rest or mobilization at 4, 24, and 48 h between ACB group and FNB group. There were also no significant differences in the strength of quadriceps and adductor, the length of hospital stay, and complications of vomiting and nausea. Present meta-analysis indicated that ACB shows no superiority than FNB group. Both of them can reduce the pain score after TKA. As referred to which method to adopt, it is determined by the preference of the surgeons and anesthesiologists. PMID:27015172

  20. Management of chronic neuropathic pain: a protocol for a multiple treatment comparison meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Mulla, Sohail M; Buckley, D Norman; Moulin, Dwight E; Couban, Rachel; Izhar, Zain; Agarwal, Arnav; Panju, Akbar; Wang, Li; Kallyth, Sun Makosso; Turan, Alparslan; Montori, Victor M; Sessler, Daniel I; Thabane, Lehana; Guyatt, Gordon H; Busse, Jason W

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic neuropathic pain is associated with reduced health-related quality of life and substantial socioeconomic costs. Current research addressing management of chronic neuropathic pain is limited. No review has evaluated all interventional studies for chronic neuropathic pain, which limits attempts to make inferences regarding the relative effectiveness of treatments. Methods and analysis We will conduct a systematic review of all randomised controlled trials evaluating therapies for chronic neuropathic pain. We will identify eligible trials, in any language, by a systematic search of CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, AMED, HealthSTAR, DARE, PsychINFO and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials. Eligible trials will be: (1) enrol patients presenting with chronic neuropathic pain, and (2) randomise patients to alternative interventions (pharmacological or non-pharmacological) or an intervention and a control arm. Pairs of reviewers will, independently and in duplicate, screen titles and abstracts of identified citations, review the full texts of potentially eligible trials and extract information from eligible trials. We will use a modified Cochrane instrument to evaluate risk of bias of eligible studies, recommendations from the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) to inform the outcomes we will collect, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system to evaluate our confidence in treatment effects. When possible, we will conduct: (1) in direct comparisons, a random-effects meta-analysis to establish the effect of reported therapies on patient-important outcomes; and (2) a multiple treatment comparison meta-analysis within a Bayesian framework to assess the relative effects of treatments. We will define a priori hypotheses to explain heterogeneity between studies, and conduct meta-regression and subgroup analyses consistent with the current best practices

  1. PREVALENCE OF ANTERIOR KNEE PAIN IN 18–35 YEAR-OLD FEMALES

    PubMed Central

    Curtis Bay, R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Anterior knee pain (AKP), also known as patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), is believed to be common in young, active females. A prevalence rate of 25% has been commonly cited in the literature. However, this rate may be more anecdotal than empirical. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of AKP in females 18 to 35 years of age. Methods: Three cohorts of females, totaling 724 participants between 18 and 35 years of age participated in this study. The mean age of participants was 24.17 years (SD: 2.34), mean height was 165.10 cm (SD: 7.26), mean weight was 65.46 kg (SD: 14.10), and mean BMI was 23.95 kg/m2 (SD: 4.86). Participants completed the Anterior Knee Pain Questionnaire (AKPQ), a functional outcome tool developed to document symptoms of AKP and progress in patients during rehabilitation. Results: The mean score on the AKPQ for the left lower extremity was 93.38 (SD: 10.00) and 93.16 (SD: 11.37) for the right lower extremity. Using a cutoff score of 83 on the AKPQ, 85 of 724 subjects were classified as having AKP in the left lower extremity for a prevalence of 12% (95% CI = 9%-14%) while 94 subjects were classified with AKP in the right lower extremity for a prevalence of 13% (95% CI = 11%-15%). Conclusion: The estimated prevalence of AKP in this sample of 18–35 year old females of 12–13% is much less than the commonly cited value of 25%. The results may provide a better representation of subjects with AKP. Level of Evidence: 3 PMID:22893859

  2. Unexplained Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty – Is Rotational Malalignment the Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon; Roberts, Catherine; Bauman, Alicia; Sperlak, Cynthia; Spangehl, Mark; Clarke, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Malrotation of both tibial and femoral components has been suggested as a potential source of pain following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However previous studies have been small, with variable control groups. The aim of this study was to compare component rotational alignment in TKA patients with unexplained pain to a control group with well-functioning TKA. Method: Seventy-one patients presenting with unexplained pain following primary TKA were included in this retrospective, comparative study. Diagnostic work-up included clinical examination, blood tests, x-rays, long-leg films, and CT scan. Patients with an identifiable diagnosis or with initially well-functioning TKAs were excluded. A control group of 41 patients with well-functioning TKAs also underwent CT scans. Femoral component rotation was measured relative to the surgical epicondylar axis, and tibial component rotation relative to the medial third of the tibial tubercle using a previously validated method involving 3D-image reconstruction. Findings were compared between painful and control TKA groups. Results: We found no difference in femoral component rotation between the painful and control groups (mean 0.6° vs 1.0° external rotation (ER), p=0.4), and no difference in tibial component rotation (mean 11.2° vs 9.5° internal rotation(IR), p=0.3). Fifty-nine percent of patients in the painful group had tibial component rotation >9°IR versus 49% in the control group. 6% of patients in the painful group and 2% in the control group had femoral component rotation >3°IR. There was no difference in overall coronal alignment between groups (mean 1.3° varus vs 0.5° varus, p=0.23). Conclusion: In this the largest study yet reported on component rotation in TKA, we found no difference in the incidence of tibial or femoral component malalignment in painful versus well-functioning TKAs. Tibial component IR in particular appears to be a common finding, and its significance when evaluating the

  3. Evidence of Physiotherapy Interventions for Patients with Chronic Neck Pain: A Systematic Review of Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Pia; Bartels, Else Marie; Ris, Inge; Christensen, Robin; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Chronic neck pain (CNP) is common and costly, and the effect of physiotherapeutic interventions on the condition is unclear. We reviewed the literature for evidence of effect of physiotherapy interventions on patients with CNP. Five bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and PEDro) were systematically searched. Randomised, placebo and active-treatment-controlled trials including physiotherapy interventions for adults with CNP were selected. Data were extracted primary outcome was pain. Risk of bias was appraised. Effect of an intervention was assessed, weighted to risk of bias. 42 trials reporting on randomised comparisons of various physiotherapy interventions and control conditions were eligible for inclusion involving 3919 patients with CNP. Out of these, 23 were unclear or at high risk of bias, and their results were considered moderate- or low-quality evidence. Nineteen were at low risk of bias, and here eight trials found effect on pain of a physiotherapy intervention. Only exercise therapy, focusing on strength and endurance training, and multimodal physiotherapy, cognitive-behavioural interventions, massage, manipulations, laser therapy, and to some extent also TNS appear to have an effect on CNP. However, sufficient evidence for application of a specific physiotherapy modality or aiming at a specific patient subgroup is not available. PMID:27335877

  4. Relationship between self-reported pain sensitivity and pain after total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study of 71 patients 8 weeks after a standardized fast-track program

    PubMed Central

    Valeberg, Berit T; Høvik, Lise H; Gjeilo, Kari H

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose This was a prospective cohort study assessing data from 71 adult patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) following a standardized fast-track program between January and July 2013. The objective was to examine the relationship between self-rated pain sensitivity, as measured by the Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire (PSQ), and postoperative pain after TKA. Methods The baseline questionnaires, PSQ and Brief Pain Inventory, were given to the patients for self-administration at the presurgical evaluation (1–2 weeks prior to surgery). The follow-up questionnaire, Brief Pain Inventory, was administered at the first follow-up, 8 weeks after surgery. Results A statistically significant association was found between average preoperative pain and average pain 8 weeks after surgery (P=0.001). The PSQ-minor was statistically significantly associated with average pain only for patients younger than 70 years (P=0.03). Interpretation This is the first study to examine the relationship between pain sensitivity measured by PSQ and postoperative pain in patients after TKA. We found that a lower score on the PSQ-minor was statistically significantly associated with patients’ pain 8 weeks after TKA surgery, but only for younger patients. Further research is needed to explore whether the PSQ could be a useful screening tool for patients’ pain sensitivity in clinical settings.

  5. Relationship between self-reported pain sensitivity and pain after total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study of 71 patients 8 weeks after a standardized fast-track program

    PubMed Central

    Valeberg, Berit T; Høvik, Lise H; Gjeilo, Kari H

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose This was a prospective cohort study assessing data from 71 adult patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) following a standardized fast-track program between January and July 2013. The objective was to examine the relationship between self-rated pain sensitivity, as measured by the Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire (PSQ), and postoperative pain after TKA. Methods The baseline questionnaires, PSQ and Brief Pain Inventory, were given to the patients for self-administration at the presurgical evaluation (1–2 weeks prior to surgery). The follow-up questionnaire, Brief Pain Inventory, was administered at the first follow-up, 8 weeks after surgery. Results A statistically significant association was found between average preoperative pain and average pain 8 weeks after surgery (P=0.001). The PSQ-minor was statistically significantly associated with average pain only for patients younger than 70 years (P=0.03). Interpretation This is the first study to examine the relationship between pain sensitivity measured by PSQ and postoperative pain in patients after TKA. We found that a lower score on the PSQ-minor was statistically significantly associated with patients’ pain 8 weeks after TKA surgery, but only for younger patients. Further research is needed to explore whether the PSQ could be a useful screening tool for patients’ pain sensitivity in clinical settings. PMID:27660489

  6. Gabapentin for the Management of Chronic Pelvic Pain in Women (GaPP1): A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Steff C.; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Wu, Olivia; Vincent, Katy; Jack, Stuart A.; Critchley, Hilary O. D.; Porter, Maureen A.; Cranley, Denise; Wilson, John A.; Horne, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) affects 2.1–24% of women. Frequently, no underlying pathology is identified, and the pain is difficult to manage. Gabapentin is prescribed for CPP despite no robust evidence of efficacy. We performed a pilot trial in two UK centres to inform the planning of a future multicentre RCT to evaluate gabapentin in CPP management. Our primary objective was to determine levels of participant recruitment and retention. Secondary objectives included estimating potential effectiveness, acceptability to participants of trial methodology, and cost-effectiveness of gabapentin. Women with CPP and no obvious pelvic pathology were assigned to an increasing regimen of gabapentin (300-2700mg daily) or placebo. We calculated the proportion of eligible women randomised, and of randomised participants who were followed up to six months. The analyses by treatment group were by intention-to-treat. Interviews were conducted to evaluate women’s experiences of the trial. A probabilistic decision analytical model was used to estimate cost-effectiveness. Between September 2012–2013, 47 women (34% of those eligible) were randomised (22 to gabapentin, 25 to placebo), and 25 (53%) completed six-month follow-up. Participants on gabapentin had less pain (BPI difference 1.72 points, 95% CI:0.07–3.36), and an improvement in mood (HADS difference 4.35 points, 95% CI:1.97–6.73) at six months than those allocated placebo. The majority of participants described their trial experience favorably. At the UK threshold for willingness-to-pay, the probabilities of gabapentin or no treatment being cost-effective are similar. A pilot trial assessing gabapentin for CPP was feasible, but uncertainty remains, highlighting the need for a large definitive trial. Trial registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN45178534 PMID:27070434

  7. Gabapentin for the Management of Chronic Pelvic Pain in Women (GaPP1): A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Steff C; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Wu, Olivia; Vincent, Katy; Jack, Stuart A; Critchley, Hilary O D; Porter, Maureen A; Cranley, Denise; Wilson, John A; Horne, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) affects 2.1-24% of women. Frequently, no underlying pathology is identified, and the pain is difficult to manage. Gabapentin is prescribed for CPP despite no robust evidence of efficacy. We performed a pilot trial in two UK centres to inform the planning of a future multicentre RCT to evaluate gabapentin in CPP management. Our primary objective was to determine levels of participant recruitment and retention. Secondary objectives included estimating potential effectiveness, acceptability to participants of trial methodology, and cost-effectiveness of gabapentin. Women with CPP and no obvious pelvic pathology were assigned to an increasing regimen of gabapentin (300-2700 mg daily) or placebo. We calculated the proportion of eligible women randomised, and of randomised participants who were followed up to six months. The analyses by treatment group were by intention-to-treat. Interviews were conducted to evaluate women's experiences of the trial. A probabilistic decision analytical model was used to estimate cost-effectiveness. Between September 2012-2013, 47 women (34% of those eligible) were randomised (22 to gabapentin, 25 to placebo), and 25 (53%) completed six-month follow-up. Participants on gabapentin had less pain (BPI difference 1.72 points, 95% CI:0.07-3.36), and an improvement in mood (HADS difference 4.35 points, 95% CI:1.97-6.73) at six months than those allocated placebo. The majority of participants described their trial experience favorably. At the UK threshold for willingness-to-pay, the probabilities of gabapentin or no treatment being cost-effective are similar. A pilot trial assessing gabapentin for CPP was feasible, but uncertainty remains, highlighting the need for a large definitive trial.

  8. Low Vitamin D levels are associated with greater pain and slow walking speed in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The clinical status of patients with knee OA is primarily predicated by their level of pain and their muscle function. Recent studies have shown that vitamin D influences both musculoskeletal health and neuromuscular function. Vitamin D deficiency is common among elders and those with comorbidities....

  9. Intensive lifestyle intervention improves physical function among obese adults with knee pain: Findings from the Look AHEAD trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lifestyle interventions causing weight loss or improved physical fitness in obese individuals may lead to improved physical function. This study involved participants in the Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) trial who reported knee pain at baseline (n = 2,203). The purposes of this study we...

  10. Effect of Isometric Quadriceps Exercise on Muscle Strength, Pain, and Function in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to investigate the effects of isometric quadriceps exercise on muscle strength, pain, and function in knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Outpatients (N=42, 21 per group; age range 40–65 years; 13 men and 29 women) with osteoarthritis of the knee participated in the study. The experimental group performed isometric exercises including isometric quadriceps, straight leg raising, and isometric hip adduction exercise 5 days a week for 5 weeks, whereas the control group did not performed any exercise program. The outcome measures or dependent variables selected for this study were pain intensity, isometric quadriceps strength, and knee function. These variables were measured using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), strength gauge device, and reduced WOMAC index, respectively. All the measurements were taken at baseline (week 0) and at the end of the trial at week 5. [Results] In between-group comparisons, the maximum isometric quadriceps strength, reduction in pain intensity, and improvement in function in the isometric exercise group at the end of the 5th week were significantly greater than those of the control group (p<0.05). [Conclusion] The 5-week isometric quadriceps exercise program showed beneficial effects on quadriceps muscle strength, pain, and functional disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. PMID:24926143

  11. The complete type of suprapatellar plica in a professional baseball pitcher: consideration of a cause of anterior knee pain.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo; Uchio, Yuji; Kawasaki, Kenzo; Yamasaki, Keiichirou

    2004-11-01

    Abstract We report the case of a professional baseball pitcher who achieved complete relief of an anterior knee pain after resection of a complete type of suprapatellar plica under arthroscopy. The 27-year-old male professional baseball pitcher had complained of right anterior knee pain while pitching for more than 2 years. On physical examination, the mobility of his patella was limited and he complained of tenderness along the joint line of his lateral patellofemoral joint. The preoperative patellofemoral axial radiograph showed osteophyte formation on the lateral edge of the patella. On preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, a septum dividing the suprapatellar pouch was found. Arthroscopy revealed obvious cartilaginous damage on the lateral facet of the patella and facing trochlea of the femoral condyle. There was a complete type of suprapatellar plica. The suprapatellar plica seemed to be anchoring the patella, which reduced the mobility of the patella. After resecting the complete type of suprapatellar plica under arthroscopy, the mobility of the patella was improved. Because his anterior knee pain while pitching reduced rapidly postoperatively, he could return to regular baseball. We consider that the main cause of his anterior knee pain was cartilaginous damage on the patella and the trochlea, which might be accelerated by the existence of the suprapatellar plica that reduced the mobility of the patella.

  12. Intensive lifestyle intervention improves physical function among obese adults with knee pain: Findings from the Look AHEAD Trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lifestyle interventions have resulted in weight loss or improved physical fitness among individuals with obesity, which may lead to improved physical function. This prospective investigation involved participants in the Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) trial who reported knee pain at basel...

  13. Advice for the management of low back pain: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Liddle, S Dianne; Gracey, Jacqueline H; Baxter, G David

    2007-11-01

    To synthesise the evidence relating to the effectiveness of advice, the relevance of its content and frequency, and to compare the advice being offered to acute, subacute and chronic low back pain (LBP) patients. A systematic review of Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) using advice, either alone or with another intervention. The QUOROM guidelines and the Cochrane Collaboration Back Review Group Guidelines for Systematic Reviews were followed throughout: methodological assessment identified RCTs of 'high' or 'medium' methodological quality, based on their inclusion of at least 50% of the specified internal validity criteria. Outcome measures were analysed based on five recommended core outcome domains; pain, work disability, back-specific function, generic health status and satisfaction with care. Relevant RCTs (n=56) were scored for methodological quality; 39 RCTs involving 7347 patients qualified for inclusion, based upon their methodological quality. Advice as an adjunct to exercise was most effective for improving pain, back-specific function and work disability in chronic LBP but, for acute LBP, was no more effective for improving these outcomes than simple advice to stay active. Advice as part of a back school was most effective for improving back-specific function in subacute LBP; these trials generally demonstrated long-term positive results. Advice as an adjunct to exercise was the most common form of treatment for acute and chronic LBP; advice as part of a back school was most commonly used for subacute LBP. Fifteen percent of acute LBP trials had a positive outcome, compared to 86% and 74% of subacute and chronic LBP trials respectively. A wide variety of outcome measures were used, making valid comparisons between treatment outcomes difficult. The advice provided to patients with LBP within RCTs varied considerably depending on symptom duration. The findings of this review have important implications for clinical practice, and for the design of further

  14. Patellofemoral knee pain treatment using neuromuscular retraining of the hip musculature in an adolescent female: a case report.

    PubMed

    Frounfelter, Gregory G; Stutzriem, David E

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this case study is to demonstrate the treatment of patella-femoral knee pain in an adolescent female athlete with emphasis on neuromuscular training of the knee and hip in synergy movement strategies. A 1.67-m, 61.5-kg, 15-year-old woman athlete reported to rehabilitation with the complaint of a 1-year history of bilateral knee pain. The patient noted that the symptoms were exacerbated with any sports-specific training. The patient played softball as an infielder. The athlete was referred by her family practice physician. After the patient was assessed, a clinical hypothesis was generated. It was thought that neuromuscular dysfunction of the hips and knees was causing faulty knee mechanics. These abnormal mechanics were presenting as patella-femoral knee pain. Initially, the athlete was assigned a home exercise program of side-lying hip abduction and lateral step-downs. At her first follow-up appointment, she noted increased symptoms that were aggravated with her home program. Upon inspecting her exercise technique, faulty step-down mechanics were contributing to her symptoms. Step-downs were discontinued, and the patient was instructed in and performed a chair squatting exercise, which was added to her home program. At her next follow-up, the patient noted being asymptomatic for 2 days. Her exercises were increased in intensity to include a Stairmaster and hip abduction and adduction on a 4-way hip machine. Eventually, over her treatment course, perturbation and proprioceptive training were initiated. By the sixth visit, the patient reported no symptoms and felt comfortable with self-management. A phone interview 3 months later indicated that the patient had no recurrent symptoms and was participating in sports without difficulty. This case demonstrates effectiveness of using hip and knee joint synergy to treat patella-femoral pain (PFP). The use of this synergy promotes proper patella–femoral alignment and improved knee mechanics. This case also

  15. Patellofemoral knee pain treatment using neuromuscular retraining of the hip musculature in an adolescent female: a case report.

    PubMed

    Frounfelter, Gregory G; Stutzriem, David E

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this case study is to demonstrate the treatment of patella-femoral knee pain in an adolescent female athlete with emphasis on neuromuscular training of the knee and hip in synergy movement strategies. A 1.67-m, 61.5-kg, 15-year-old woman athlete reported to rehabilitation with the complaint of a 1-year history of bilateral knee pain. The patient noted that the symptoms were exacerbated with any sports-specific training. The patient played softball as an infielder. The athlete was referred by her family practice physician. After the patient was assessed, a clinical hypothesis was generated. It was thought that neuromuscular dysfunction of the hips and knees was causing faulty knee mechanics. These abnormal mechanics were presenting as patella-femoral knee pain. Initially, the athlete was assigned a home exercise program of side-lying hip abduction and lateral step-downs. At her first follow-up appointment, she noted increased symptoms that were aggravated with her home program. Upon inspecting her exercise technique, faulty step-down mechanics were contributing to her symptoms. Step-downs were discontinued, and the patient was instructed in and performed a chair squatting exercise, which was added to her home program. At her next follow-up, the patient noted being asymptomatic for 2 days. Her exercises were increased in intensity to include a Stairmaster and hip abduction and adduction on a 4-way hip machine. Eventually, over her treatment course, perturbation and proprioceptive training were initiated. By the sixth visit, the patient reported no symptoms and felt comfortable with self-management. A phone interview 3 months later indicated that the patient had no recurrent symptoms and was participating in sports without difficulty. This case demonstrates effectiveness of using hip and knee joint synergy to treat patella-femoral pain (PFP). The use of this synergy promotes proper patella–femoral alignment and improved knee mechanics. This case also

  16. Associations between Pressure-Pain Threshold, Symptoms, and Radiographic Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Adam P.; Shi, Xiaoyan A.; Gracely, Richard H.; Renner, Jordan B.; Jordan, Joanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between generalized evoked pressure pain sensitivity with distal pressure-pain threshold (PPT) and the presence, severity, or number of involved knee/hip joints with radiographic osteoarthritis (rOA) or related symptoms. Methods Data for these cross-sectional analyses come from the second follow-up (2008–11) of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project (n=1,602). Pressure-pain threshold measurements were averaged over two trials from both the left and right trapezius. Outcomes of radiographic knee and hip OA were both defined by a Kellgren-Lawrence score of 2–4 and site-specific symptoms were ascertained at clinical interview. Associations were determine with multiple logistic regression models, and two-way interactions were tested at p<0.05. Results The sample was 67.2% female and 31.0% African American. Participants’ mean age was 67.9 (SD 9.0); mean body mass index was 31.5 (SD 7.1); mean Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score was 6.5 (SD 7.4); and mean total PPT was 3.6kg (SD 0.7). Significant associations were found between PPT and self-reported knee/hip symptoms. No significant associations were found between PPT and presence, severity, or number of joints with knee and hip rOA without accompanying symptoms. No significant interactions were found with demographic or clinical characteristics. Conclusion Pressure-pain threshold was significantly associated with self-reported single and multi-joint symptoms. In contrast, after adjustment, PPT measured at the trapezius was not associated with asymptomatic knee or hip rOA. As such, PPT may prove to be a useful indicator of rOA pain processing and of why individuals respond favorably and others do not to treatments targeting rOA. PMID:24643946

  17. Acupuncture, counselling or usual care for depression and comorbid pain: secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hopton, A; MacPherson, H; Keding, A; Morley, S

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression with comorbid pain is associated with a poor response to various treatments. The objective in this secondary analysis was to determine whether patients reporting pain have different depression and pain outcomes over time in response to acupuncture, counselling or usual care. Methods Self-reported ratings of depression and pain from 755 patients in a pragmatic randomised controlled trial of acupuncture (302) or counselling (302) compared to usual care alone (151) are described and analysed using a series of regression models and analysis of covariance. Patient-reported outcomes of Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9 for depression, SF36 bodily pain and EQ-5D, all at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Results At baseline, 755 patients reported EQ-5D pain categories; 384 (50.9%) reported moderate-to-extreme pain. Controlling for baseline depression, a linear regression model showed that the presence of pain at baseline was associated with poorer depression outcomes at 3 months mean difference=−1.16, (95% CI 0.12 to 2.2). Participants with moderate-to-extreme pain at baseline did better at 3 months if they received acupuncture (mean reduction in Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9) from baseline=6.0, 95% CI 5.0 to 7.1 and a mean reduction in SF-36 bodily pain=11.2, (95% CI 7.1 to 15.2) compared to improvements for those who received counselling (4.3, 95% CI 3.3 to 5.4; 7.6, 95% CI 3.6 to 11.6) or usual care (2.7, 95% CI 1.50 to 4.0: 7.2, 95% CI 2.3 to 12.1). In comparison, no notable differences were seen between treatment arms within the no pain comparator group. Conclusions Patients with depression and pain at baseline recovered less well from treatment over 3 months than those with depression and no pain. Reductions in both depression and pain were most marked in the acupuncture group, followed by the counselling group and then the usual care group. PMID:24793257

  18. Primary haematogenous osteomyelitis of the patella: a rare cause for anterior knee pain in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Kankate, R; Selvan, T

    2000-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis of the patella is a very rare condition, which commonly affects children between the ages of 5-15 years. Primary haematogenous osteomyelitis in an adult usually occurs in patients with associated risk factors like intravenous drug abuse, HIV infection, and trauma. This report discusses a similar condition in a 46 year old women with no associated predisposing risk factors. The rarity of this condition and its atypical presentation should be borne in mind while treating an adult patient with anterior knee pain. Point tenderness over the patella should alert a physician to the possibility of osteomyelitis of the patella. The value of bone scan and computed tomography in the early stages to help diagnose this condition has been stressed. The literature has been reviewed and discussed briefly.


Keywords: haematogenous osteomyelitis; patella PMID:11060146

  19. Reliability and Validity of the Anterior Knee Pain Scale: Applications for Use as an Epidemiologic Screener

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A screening instrument’s ability to provide clinicians with consistent and reproducible information is crucial to intervention. Despite widespread acceptance and clinical use of the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale (AKPS) in orthopedics and sports medicine, few studies have reported on its reliability and no such studies have concentrated on child or adolescent samples exclusively, segments of the population for which this instrument is often used. The purpose of the current study was to describe and report on the reliability and validity of the AKPS for use with high school female athletes participating in interscholastic athletics. The study was a secondary analysis of prospective epidemiologic data using established scale validation methods. The records of 414 female athletes 11.0 to 18.1 years of age (Mean 13.9 yrs, SD = 1.7 yrs) were used for analysis. Four different approaches to scoring and scale reduction of the AKPS were evaluated, including the original, ordinal 13-item form, a modified, ordinal 6-item form, a modified, dichotomous 13-item form, and a modified, dichotomous 6-item form. Three different types of reliability (internal consistency, equivalence across forms, standard error of measurement) and one type of validity (criterion-related) were estimated for the AKPS in the current sample. The four scoring formats of the AKPS scale were found to have high internal consistency (αcoef = 0.83 to 0.91), equivalence across the short and long forms (r = 0.98), acceptable standard errors of measurement (0.82 to 3.00), and moderate to high criterion related validity—as determined by physican’s diagnosis: 0.92 (13-item form), 0.90 (6-item form). The Kujala AKPS is a valid and reliable measure of anterior knee pain and appropriate for use as an epidemiologic screening tool with adolescent female athletes. PMID:27441381

  20. Correlation between trochlear groove depth and patellar position during open and closed kinetic chain exercises in subjects with anterior knee pain.

    PubMed

    Felicio, Lílian Ramiro; Saad, Marcelo Camargo; Liporaci, Rogério Ferreira; Baffa, Augusto do Prado; dos Santos, Antônio Carlos; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate the trochlear shape and patellar tilt angle and lateral patellar displacement at rest and maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) exercises during open (OKC) and closed kinetic chain (CKC) in subjects with and without anterior knee pain. Subjects were all women, 20 who were clinically healthy and 19 diagnosed with anterior knee pain. All subjects were evaluated and subjected to magnetic resonance exams during OKC and CKC exercise with the knee placed at 15, 30, and 45 degrees of flexion. The parameters evaluated were sulcus angle, patellar tilt angle and patellar displacement using bisect offset. Pearson's r coefficient was used, with p < .05. Our results revealed in knee pain group during CKC and OKC at 15 degrees that the increase in the sulcus angle is associated with a tilt increase and patellar lateral displacement. Comparing sulcus angle, patellar tilt angle and bisect offset values between MVIC in OKC and CKC in the knee pain group, it was observed that patellar tilt angle increased in OKC only with the knee flexed at 30 degrees. Based on our results, we conclude that reduced trochlear depth is correlated with increased lateral patellar tilt and displacement during OKC and CKC at 15 degrees of flexion in people with anterior knee pain. By contrast, 30 degrees of knee flexion in CKC is more recommended in rehabilitation protocols because the patella was more stable than in other positions. PMID:22890436

  1. A randomised controlled trial comparing graded exercise treatment and usual physiotherapy for patients with non-specific neck pain (the GET UP neck pain trial).

    PubMed

    McLean, Sionnadh M; Klaber Moffett, Jennifer A; Sharp, Donald M; Gardiner, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Evidence supports exercise-based interventions for the management of neck pain, however there is little evidence of its superiority over usual physiotherapy. This study investigated the effectiveness of a group neck and upper limb exercise programme (GET) compared with usual physiotherapy (UP) for patients with non-specific neck pain. A total of 151 adult patients were randomised to either GET or UP. The primary measure was the Northwick Park Neck pain Questionnaire (NPQ) score at six weeks, six months and 12 months. Mixed modelling identified no difference in neck pain and function between patients receiving GET and those receiving UP at any follow-up time point. Both interventions resulted in modest significant and clinically important improvements on the NPQ score with a change score of around 9% between baseline and 12 months. Both GET and UP are appropriate clinical interventions for patients with non-specific neck pain, however preferences for treatment and targeted strategies to address barriers to adherence may need to be considered in order to maximise the effectiveness of these approaches.

  2. Acupuncture and rehabilitation of the painful shoulder: study protocol of an ongoing multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN28687220

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Jorge; Perea-Milla, Emilio; Mendez, Camila; Galante, Antonia Herrera; Madrazo, Fernando; Medina, Ivan; Ortega, Caridad; Olmo, Victoria; Fernandez, Francisco Perez; Hernandez, Luz; Seminario, Jose Maria; Brioso, Mauricio; Luna, Francisco; Gordo, Isabel; Godoy, Ana Maria; Jimenez, Carmen; Ruiz, Manuel Anselmo; Montes, Joaquin; Hidalgo, Alonso; Gonzalez-Quevedo, Rosa; Bosch, Pablo; Vazquez, Antonio; Lozano, Juan Vicente

    2005-01-01

    Background Although the painful shoulder is one of the most common dysfunctions of the locomotor apparatus, and is frequently treated both at primary healthcare centres and by specialists, little evidence has been reported to support or refute the effectiveness of the treatments most commonly applied. According to the bibliography reviewed, physiotherapy, which is the most common action taken to alleviate this problem, has not yet been proven to be effective, because of the small size of sample groups and the lack of methodological rigor in the papers published on the subject. No reviews have been made to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating this complaint, but in recent years controlled randomised studies have been made and these demonstrate an increasing use of acupuncture to treat pathologies of the soft tissues of the shoulder. In this study, we seek to evaluate the effectiveness of physiotherapy applied jointly with acupuncture, compared with physiotherapy applied with a TENS-placebo, in the treatment of painful shoulder caused by subacromial syndrome (rotator cuff tendinitis and subacromial bursitis). Methods/design Randomised controlled multicentre study with blind evaluation by an independent observer and blind, independent analysis. A study will be made of 465 patients referred to the rehabilitation services at participating healthcare centres, belonging to the regional public health systems of Andalusia and Murcia, these patients presenting symptoms of painful shoulder and a diagnosis of subacromial syndrome (rotator cuff tendinitis and subacromial bursitis). The patients will be randomised into two groups: 1) experimental (acupuncture + physiotherapy); 2) control (TENS-placebo + physiotherapy); the administration of rescue medication will also be allowed. The treatment period will have a duration of three weeks. The main result variable will be the change produced on Constant's Shoulder Function Assessment (SFA) Scale; as secondary

  3. DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF ATYPICAL AND PERSISTENT ANTEROLATERAL KNEE PAIN IN A 16-YEAR-OLD TRIATHLETE: AN ITERATIVE PROCESS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and Background: The subject of this case study, a 16‐year‐old female triathlete, presented to physiotherapy reporting a 6 month history of anterior knee pain, with symptoms unchanged upon resuming a graduated triathlon training program, despite 3 months rest from all training. Case Description: The case describes the differential diagnosis and management of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS), and discoid lateral meniscus (DLM) in an adolescent female triathlete. Clinical reasoning and rehabilitation strategies are presented with respect to literature base. Final outcome was full resolution of symptoms and return to full athletic function, however, symptoms were relatively persistent and atypical. Purpose: This case report discusses the differential diagnosis and management of persistent and atypical anterior knee pain in a sixteen‐year‐old female triathlete. In such cases, the diagnostic process is often iterative, where intervention serves both therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. Discussion: Recent changes in the understanding of the pathophysiology of ITBS and links between the anterior and lateral knee compartments through highly innervated knee synovial tissue assist the therapist's understanding of how these conditions may occur concomitantly, with resulting atypical symptoms. The potential influences of likely changes in the subject's peripheral and central nervous system on symptom perception is also discussed. Level of Evidence: Level 5; Single case report. PMID:24377071

  4. PACE - The first placebo controlled trial of paracetamol for acute low back pain: design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines recommend that the initial treatment of acute low back pain (LBP) should consist of advice to stay active and regular simple analgesics such as paracetamol 4 g daily. Despite this recommendation in all international LBP guidelines there are no placebo controlled trials assessing the efficacy of paracetamol for LBP at any dose or dose regimen. This study aims to determine whether 4 g of paracetamol daily (in divided doses) results in a more rapid recovery from acute LBP than placebo. A secondary aim is to determine if ingesting paracetamol in a time-contingent manner is more effective than paracetamol taken when required (PRN) for recovery from acute LBP. Methods/Design The study is a randomised double dummy placebo controlled trial. 1650 care seeking people with significant acute LBP will be recruited. All participants will receive advice to stay active and will be randomised to 1 of 3 treatment groups: time-contingent paracetamol dose regimen (plus placebo PRN paracetamol), PRN paracetamol (plus placebo time-contingent paracetamol) or a double placebo study arm. The primary outcome will be time (days) to recovery from pain recorded in a daily pain diary. Other outcomes will be pain intensity, disability, function, global perceived effect and sleep quality, captured at baseline and at weeks 1, 2, 4 and 12 by an assessor blind to treatment allocation. An economic analysis will be conducted to determine the cost-effectiveness of treatment from the health sector and societal perspectives. Discussion The successful completion of the trial will provide the first high quality evidence on the effectiveness of the use of paracetamol, a guideline endorsed treatment for acute LBP. Trail registration ACTRN12609000966291. PMID:20650012

  5. Effect of specific resistance training on forearm pain and work disability in industrial technicians: cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Markus D; Pedersen, Mogens T; Mortensen, Ole S; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Zebis, Mette K

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effect of specific resistance training on forearm pain and work disability in industrial technicians. Design and setting Two-armed cluster randomised controlled trial of 20 weeks performed at two industrial production units in Copenhagen, Denmark. Participants Working-age industrial technicians both with and without pain and disability. Interventions The training group (n=282) performed specific resistance training for the shoulder, neck and arm muscles three times a week. The control group (n=255) was advised to continue normal physical activity. Outcome All participants rated forearm pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale, 0–100 mm) once a week (primary outcome) and replied to a questionnaire on work disability (Disability of the Arm Shoulder and Hand, 0–100) at baseline and follow-up (secondary outcome). Results Questionnaires were sent to 854 workers of which 30 (n=282) and 27 (n=255) clusters were randomised to training and control, respectively. Of these, 211 and 237 participants, respectively, responded to the follow-up questionnaire. Intention-to-treat analyses including both individuals with and without pain showed that from baseline to follow-up, pain intensity and work disability decreased more in the training group than in the control group (4–5 on a scale of 0–100, p<0.01–0.001). Among those with pain >30 mm Visual Analogue Scale at baseline (n=54), the OR for complete recovery at follow-up in the training group compared with the control group was 4.6 (95% CI 1.2 to 17.9). Among those with work disability >30 at baseline (n=113), the OR for complete recovery at follow-up in the training group compared with the control group was 6.0 (95% CI 1.8 to 19.8). Conclusion Specific resistance training of the shoulder, neck and arm reduces forearm pain and work disability among industrial technicians. Trial registration number NCT01071980. PMID:22331386

  6. Effect of virgin olive oil versus piroxicam phonophoresis on exercise-induced anterior knee pain

    PubMed Central

    Nakhostin-Roohi, Babak; Khoshkhahesh, Faegheh; Bohlooli, Shahab

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of virgin olive oil phonophoresis on female athletes' anterior knee pain (AKP). Materials and Methods: A double blinded randomized clinical trial was conducted. Ninety-three female athletes suffering from AKP voluntarily participated in this study. Patients were randomly assigned into olive oil (n=31), piroxicam (n=31) or base gel phonophoresis (n=31) groups. At the baseline visit, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire was filled by subjects who were then treated with olive oil, piroxicam or pure phonophoresis for 12 sessions. After 6 and 12 sessions of physiotherapy, subjects filled the questionnaire again. Main outcomes were significant improvement in pain, stiffness, physical function, and total WOMAC scores. Results: Although, there was a significant reduction in symptoms of AKP at the end of the therapy in all groups (p<0.05), but in olive oil group, this improvement was seen after 6 sessions of treatment (p<0.001). A significant difference between olive oil group and piroxicam and/or phonophoresis group was observed after 6 sessions of therapy (p<0.05). Conclusion: It could be proposed that phonophoresis with virgin olive oil is as effective as piroxicam gel on lowering WOMAC scores of AKP in female athletes and also has several beneficial properties including faster effect and shorter duration of therapy. The exact mechanism of beneficial action of virgin olive oil on AKP is not clear and requires further studies. PMID:27761423

  7. Efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for low back pain: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Koes, B.; Scholten, R.; Mens, J.; Bouter, L.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE—To assess the efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for low back pain.
DATA SOURCES—Computer aided search of published randomised clinical trials and assessment of the methods of the studies.
STUDY SELECTION—26 randomised clinical trials evaluating NSAIDs for low back pain were identified.
DATA EXTRACTION—Score for quality (maximum = 100 points) of the methods based on four categories: study population; interventions; effect measurement; data presentation and analysis. Determination of success rate per study group and evaluation of different contrasts. Statistical pooling of placebo controlled trials in similar patient groups and using similar outcome measures.
RESULTS—The methods scores of the trials ranged from 27 to 83 points. NSAIDs were compared with placebo treatment in 10 studies. The pooled odds ratio in four trials comparing NSAIDs with placebo after one week was 0.53 (95% confidence intervals 0.32 to 0.89) using the fixed effect model, indicating a significant effect in favour of NSAIDs compared with placebo. In nine studies NSAIDs were compared with other (drug) therapies. Of these, only two studies reported better results of NSAIDs compared with paracetamol with and without dextropropoxyphene. In the other trials NSAIDs were not better than the reference treatment. In 11 studies different NSAIDs were compared, of which seven studies reported no differences in effect.
CONCLUSIONS—There are flaws in the design of most studies. The pooled odds ratio must be interpreted with caution because the trials at issue, including the high quality trials, did not use identical outcome measures. The results of the 26 randomised trials that have been carried out to date, suggest that NSAIDs might be effective for short-term symptomatic relief in patients with uncomplicated low back pain, but are less effective or ineffective in patients with low back pain with sciatica and patients with sciatica with nerve

  8. MAGnesium-oral supplementation to reduce PAin in patients with severe PERipheral arterial occlusive disease: the MAG-PAPER randomised clinical trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Venturini, Monica Aida; Zappa, Sergio; Minelli, Cosetta; Bonardelli, Stefano; Lamberti, Laura; Bisighini, Luca; Zangrandi, Marta; Turin, Maddalena; Rizzo, Francesco; Rizzolo, Andrea; Latronico, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Magnesium exerts analgaesic effects in several animal pain models, as well as in patients affected by acute postoperative pain and neuropathic chronic pain. There is no evidence that magnesium can modulate pain in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). We describe the protocol of a single-centre randomised double-blind clinical trial aimed at assessing the efficacy of oral magnesium supplementation in controlling severe pain in patients with advanced PAOD. Methods and analysis Adult patients affected by PAOD at stages III and IV of Lèriche-Fontaine classification, who are opioid-naïve, and who have been admitted to our Acute Pain Service for intractable pain, will be eligible. Patients will be randomised to the control group, treated with standard therapy (oxycodone and pregabalin) plus placebo for 2 weeks, or to the experimental group (standard therapy plus magnesium oxide). Patients will be evaluated on days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 14; the following information will being collected: daily oxycodone dose; average and maximum pain (Numerical Rating Scale); pain relief (Pain Relief Scale); characteristics of the pain (Neuropathic Pain Scale); impact of pain on the patient's daily activities (Brief Pain Inventory). The primary outcome will be oxycodone dosage needed to achieve satisfactory analgaesia on day 14. Secondary outcomes will be pain relief on day 2, time needed to achieve satisfactory analgaesia and time needed to achieve a pain reduction of 50%. A sample size calculation was performed for the primary outcome, which estimated a required sample size of 150 patients (75 per group). Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval of the study protocol has been obtained from Comitato Etico Provinciale di Brescia, Brescia, Italy. Trial results will be disseminated through scientific journal manuscripts and scientific conference presentations. Trial registration number NCT02455726. PMID:26674497

  9. [PAIN MANAGEMENT IN PATIENTS OF RAPID RECOVERY (RR) PROGRAM IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY (TKA)].

    PubMed

    Marina Fernández, Rosa; Ginés Mateos, Gracia; Arco Pérez, Ma Carmen; Nuevo Gayoso, Montse; Faura Vendrell, Teresa

    2015-06-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a surgery consisting on the artificial joint replacement, due to a traumatic injury or a degenerative process or arthrosis. This surgery causes an important pain to patients, and sometimes affects negatively on their recovery. The choice of the prostheses will depend on the anatomical features of the patient and the surgeon criterion. The concept of a "rapid recovery surgery" was introduced in 1997 by Khelet and meant the beginning of the Fast Track model or the Rapid Recovery (RR) linked to an accelerated rehabilitation, an early discharge and the optimization of all the aspects of pre, intra and post-operative patient experience. Fast recovery is a surgical process which aims to achieve maximum autonomy of the patient through education, pain control and early mobilization. The key of the rapid recovery is to get the involvement of the patient thanks to the empowerment, which means a preoperative patient education that will help to reduce anxiety and it will make easier to engage in their own recovery. Furthermore the patient will take part of an effective post-operative physical therapy, using all the necessary tools to increase their ability to manage their own health problems. The empowerment of these patients is part of the Nursing Model in the Hospital Clinic de Barcelona (HCB), adopted by the Nursing Management in December of 2012. In Catalonia, until the start of the RR surgery, 14,132 interventions in 2008 where done by TKA conventional surgery, needing subsequent conventional hospitalization. This article describes the care and outcomes of nurse interventions, defined in the RR of TKA clinical way, which is focused on the pain's minimization and the impact on patients' mobilization. It was performed in a monographic unit from a tertiary-level hospital in Barcelona in 2013.

  10. Maintained physical activity and physiotherapy in the management of distal upper limb pain – a protocol for a randomised controlled trial (the arm pain trial)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Distal upper limb pain (pain affecting the elbow, forearm, wrist, or hand) can be non-specific, or can arise from specific musculoskeletal disorders. It is clinically important and costly, the best approach to clinical management is unclear. Physiotherapy is the standard treatment and, while awaiting treatment, advice is often given to rest and avoid strenuous activities, but there is no evidence base to support these strategies. This paper describes the protocol of a randomised controlled trial to determine, among patients awaiting physiotherapy for distal arm pain, (a) whether advice to remain active and maintain usual activities results in a long-term reduction in arm pain and disability, compared with advice to rest; and (b) whether immediate physiotherapy results in a long-term reduction in arm pain and disability, compared with physiotherapy delivered after a seven week waiting list period. Methods/Design Between January 2012 and January 2014, new referrals to 14 out-patient physiotherapy departments were screened for potential eligibility. Eligible and consenting patients were randomly allocated to one of the following three groups in equal numbers: 1) advice to remain active, 2) advice to rest, 3) immediate physiotherapy. Patients were and followed up at 6, 13, and 26 weeks post-randomisation by self-complete postal questionnaire and, at six weeks, patients who had not received physiotherapy were offered it at this time. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients free of disability at 26 weeks, as determined by the modified DASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand) questionnaire. We hypothesise (a) that advice to maintain usual activities while awaiting physiotherapy will be superior than advice to rest the arm; and (b) that fast-track physiotherapy will be superior to normal (waiting list) physiotherapy. These hypotheses will be examined using an intention-to-treat analysis. Discussion Results from this trial will contribute to

  11. Pulsed radiofrequency of the composite nerve supply to the knee joint as a new technique for relieving osteoarthritic pain: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Vas, Lakshmi; Pai, Renuka; Khandagale, Nishigandha; Pattnaik, Manorama

    2014-01-01

    We report a new technique for pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) of the entire nerve supply of the knee as an option in treating osteoarthritis (OA) of knee. We targeted both sensory and motor nerves supplying all the structures around the knee: joint, muscles, and skin to address the entire nociception and stiffness leading to peripheral and central sensitization in osteoarthritis. Ten patients with pain, stiffness, and loss of function in both knees were treated with ultrasonography (USG) guided PRF of saphenous, tibial, and common peroneal nerves along with subsartorial, peripatellar, and popliteal plexuses. USG guided PRF of the femoral nerve was also done to address the innervation of the quadriceps muscle. Assessment of pain (Numerical Rating Scale [NRS], pain DETECT, knee function [Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index- WOMAC]) were documented pre and post PRF at 3 and 6 months. Knee radiographs (Kellgren-Lawrence [K-L] grading) were done before PRF and one week later. All the patients showed a sustained improvement of NRS, pain DETECT, and WOMAC at 3 and 6 months. The significant improvement of patellar position and tibio-femoral joint space was concordant with the patient's reporting of improvement in stiffness and pain. The sustained pain relief and muscle relaxation enabled the patients to optimize physiotherapy thereby improving endurance training to include the daily activities of life. We conclude that OA knee pain is a product of neuromyopathy and that PRF of the sensory and motor nerves appeared to be a safe, effective, and minimally invasive technique. The reduction of pain and stiffness improved the knee function and probably reduced the peripheral and central sensitization.

  12. Glucosamine-containing supplement improves locomotor functions in subjects with knee pain – a pilot study of gait analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Otsuka, Yuta; Izumo, Takayuki; Shibata, Hiroshi; Nagao, Hideyuki; Ogawara, Keita; Yamada, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Seiji; Nakamura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Background Previously, we demonstrated that glucosamine-containing supplementation was effective for improving locomotor functions, especially walking speed. However, the biomechanical mechanism of efficacy has not been elucidated. This study aimed to address this challenge in subjects with knee pain, using a motion capture system. Methods An open label study was conducted in 30 Japanese subjects with knee pain. The subjects were administered a daily supplement containing 1,200 mg of glucosamine hydrochloride, 60 mg of chondroitin sulfate, 45 mg of type II collagen peptides, 90 mg of quercetin glycosides, 10 mg of imidazole peptides, 1 mg of proteoglycan, and 5 μg of vitamin D (GCQID). The intervention continued for 16 weeks. Efficacy for locomotor functions involving the knee joint was evaluated mainly using the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM) and the 5-question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale (GLFS-5). To examine the biomechanical mechanism of efficacy for locomotor functions, motions of subjects in a normal walking state were captured. Gait analysis was conducted and efficacy for gait parameters such as normal walking speed, stride length, cadence, and angle of soles was evaluated. Results GCQID significantly improved total scores on the JKOM and GLFS-5. In gait analysis, normal walking speed, stride length, and angle of soles at the end of the stance phase were all significantly increased, but cadence did not change significantly during the intervention period. There were significant intercorrelations of changes in normal walking speed, stride length, and angle of soles at the end of the stance phase, and between changes in stride length and total JKOM score. Conclusion A GCQID supplement may increase walking speed through increased stride length and angle of kicking from the ground during steps, which might be mainly associated with alleviated knee pain. PMID:27382267

  13. Medially posted insoles consistently influence foot pronation in runners with and without anterior knee pain.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Pedro; Chang, Ryan; TenBroek, Trampas; Hamill, Joseph

    2013-04-01

    Anterior knee pain (AKP) is a common injury among runners and effectively treated with posted insoles and foot orthotics. While clinically effective, the underlying biomechanical mechanisms that bring about these improvements remain debatable. Several methodological factors contribute to the inconsistent biomechanical findings, including errors associated with removing and reattaching markers, inferring foot motion from markers placed externally on a shoe, and redefining segmental coordinate systems between conditions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of medially posted insoles on lower extremity kinematics in runners with and without AKP while trying to limit the influence of these methodological factors. Kinematics of 16 asymptomatic and 17 runners with AKP were collected while running with and without insoles. Reflective markers were attached to the surface of the calcaneus and kept in place (as opposed to detached) between conditions, eliminating the error associated with reattaching markers and redefining segmental coordinate systems. Using these methods, no significant interactions between insole and injury and the main effect of injury were detected (p>0.05); therefore, means were pooled across injury. Insoles, on average, reduced peak eversion by 3.6° (95% confidence interval -2.9° to -4.3°), peak eversion velocity by 53.2°/s (95% confidence interval -32.9 to -73.4) and eversion range of motion by 1.33 (95% confidence interval -0.8 to -1.9). However, while insoles systematically reduced eversion variables, they had small influences on the transverse plane kinematics of the tibia or knee, indicating that they may bring about their clinical effect by influencing other variables.

  14. Anterior knee pain in younger adults as a precursor to subsequent patellofemoral osteoarthritis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA) is a common form of knee OA in middle and older age, but its relation to PF disorders and symptoms earlier in life is unclear. Our aim was to conduct a systematic review to investigate the strength of evidence for an association between anterior knee pain (AKP) in younger adults and subsequent PFOA. Methods The search strategy included electronic databases (Pubmed, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane, PEDro, SportDiscus: inception to December 2009), reference lists of potentially eligible studies and selected reviews. Full text articles in any language, - identified via English titles and abstracts, were included if they were retrospective or prospective in design and contained quantitative data regarding structural changes indicative of PFOA, incident to original idiopathic AKP. Eligibility criteria were applied to titles, abstracts and full-texts by two independent reviewers. Data extraction included study location, design, date, sampling procedure, sample characteristics, AKP/PFOA definitions, follow-up duration and rate, and main findings. Foreign language articles were translated into English prior to examination. Results Seven articles satisfied eligibility (5 English, 2 German). Only one case-control study directly investigated a link between PFOA and prior AKP, providing level 3b evidence in favour of an association (OR 4.4; 95%CI 1.8, 10.6). Rough estimates of the annual risk of PFOA from the remaining six small, uncontrolled, observational studies (mean follow-up range: 5.7 to 23 years) ranged from 0% to 3.4%. This was not the primary aim of these studies, and limitations in design and methodology mean this data should be interpreted with caution. Conclusions There is a paucity of high-quality evidence reporting a link between AKP and PFOA. Further, well-designed cohort studies may be able to fill this evidence gap. PMID:20828401

  15. Novel Three-Day, Community-Based, Nonpharmacological Group Intervention for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain (COPERS): A Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Stephanie J. C.; Carnes, Dawn; Homer, Kate; Kahan, Brennan C.; Hounsome, Natalia; Eldridge, Sandra; Spencer, Anne; Pincus, Tamar; Underwood, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide. The effectiveness of pharmacological treatments for chronic pain is often limited, and there is growing concern about the adverse effects of these treatments, including opioid dependence. Nonpharmacological approaches to chronic pain may be an attractive alternative or adjunctive treatment. We describe the effectiveness of a novel, theoretically based group pain management support intervention for chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods and Findings We conducted a multi-centre, pragmatic, randomised, controlled effectiveness and cost-effectiveness (cost–utility) trial across 27 general practices and community musculoskeletal services in the UK. We recruited 703 adults with musculoskeletal pain of at least 3 mo duration between August 1, 2011, and July 31, 2012, and randomised participants 1.33:1 to intervention (403) or control (300). Intervention participants were offered a participative group intervention (COPERS) delivered over three alternate days with a follow-up session at 2 wk. The intervention introduced cognitive behavioural approaches and was designed to promote self-efficacy to manage chronic pain. Controls received usual care and a relaxation CD. The primary outcome was pain-related disability at 12 mo (Chronic Pain Grade [CPG] disability subscale); secondary outcomes included the CPG disability subscale at 6 mo and the following measured at 6 and 12 mo: anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]), pain acceptance (Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire), social integration (Health Education Impact Questionnaire social integration and support subscale), pain-related self-efficacy (Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire), pain intensity (CPG pain intensity subscale), the census global health question (2011 census for England and Wales), health utility (EQ-5D-3L), and health care resource use. Analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle

  16. One-year postoperative knee pain in patients with semi-extended tibial nailing versus control group.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, David L; Daubs, Gregory M; Horwitz, Daniel S; Kubiak, Erik N

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether patients with a tibia fracture who were treated with an intramedullary nail using a semi-extended, extra-articular, parapatellar approach had anterior knee pain at a higher than acceptable incidence compared with control patients. Eighteen patients with OTA type 42 A-C tibia fractures nailed using this approach were compared with an uninjured control group (n = 22). Lysholm Knee Score questionnaires were given to all participants and compared between groups. Fracture patients completed the LKS at 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. Additional data collected included age, sex, mechanism of injury, OTA classification, Gustilo/Anderson and Tscherne classification, nail-apex distance, complications, weight-bearing status, additional fixation needed, and postoperative procedures. Mean age and demographics were similar between the fracture and control group: 42.9 vs 47.9 years, respectively, (P=.36) and 11 vs 9 men, respectively (P=.11). Lysholm Knee Scores among the subgroups (age, sex, medial vs lateral parapatellar approach, soft-tissue status, and nail-apex distance) showed no statistically significant differences (P>05 for all comparisons). Mean nail-apex distance was -16.3 mm. Mean LKS score 1-year postoperatively was 87.3 (range, 59-100) in the fracture group and 89.7 (range, 23-100) in the control group (P=.69). At 1-year postoperatively, patients in the fracture group did not have increased anterior knee pain compared with the control group.

  17. Effectiveness of mat Pilates or equipment-based Pilates in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic low back pain is an expensive and difficult condition to treat. One of the interventions widely used by physiotherapists in the treatment of chronic non-specific low back pain is exercise therapy based upon the Pilates principles. Pilates exercises can be performed with or without specific equipment. These two types of Pilates exercises have never been compared on a high-quality randomised controlled trial. Methods/design This randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor will evaluate eighty six patients of both genders with chronic low back pain, aged between 18 and 60 years, from one Brazilian private physiotherapy clinic. The patients will be randomly allocated into two groups: Mat Group will perform the exercises on the ground while the Equipment-based Group will perform the Pilates method exercises on the following equipment: Cadillac, Reformer, Ladder Barrel, and Step Chair. The general and specific disability of the patient, kinesiophobia, pain intensity and global perceived effect will be evaluated by a blinded assessor before randomisation and at six weeks and six months after randomisation. In addition, the expectation of the participants and their confidence with the treatment will be evaluated before randomisation and after the first treatment session, respectively. Discussion This will be the first study aiming to compare the effectiveness of Mat and Equipment-based Pilates exercises in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. The results may help health-care professionals in clinical decision-making and could potentially reduce the treatment costs of this condition. Trial registration Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials RBR-7tyg5j PMID:23298183

  18. Electroacupuncture as a complement to usual care for patients with non-acute pain after back surgery: a study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Man-Suk; Heo, Kwang-Ho; Cho, Hyun-Woo; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Lee, Hyeon-Yeop; Heo, In; Kim, Nam-Kwen; Choi, Byung-Kwan; Son, Dong-Wuk; Hwang, Eui-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recurrent or persistent low back pain is common after back surgery but is typically not well controlled. Previous randomised controlled trials on non-acute pain after back surgery were flawed. In this article, the design and protocol of a randomised controlled trial to treat pain and improve function after back surgery are described. Methods and analysis This study is a pilot randomised, active-controlled, assessor-blinded trial. Patients with recurring or persistent low back pain after back surgery, defined as a visual analogue scale value of ≥50 mm, with or without leg pain, will be randomly assigned to an electroacupuncture-plus-usual-care group or to a usual-care-only group. Patients assigned to both groups will have usual care management, including physical therapy and patient education, twice a week during a 4-week treatment period that would begin at randomisation. Patients assigned to the electroacupuncture-plus-usual-care group will also have electroacupuncture twice a week during the 4-week treatment period. The primary outcome will be measured with the 100 mm pain visual analogue scale of low back pain by a blinded evaluator. Secondary outcomes will be measured with the EuroQol 5-Dimension and the Oswestry Disability Index. The primary and secondary outcomes will be measured at 4 and 8 weeks after treatment. Ethics and dissemination Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of Pusan National University Korean Hospital in September 2013 (IRB approval number 2013012). The study findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international conferences. Trial registration number This trial was registered with the US National Institutes of Health Clinical Trials Registry: NCT01966250. PMID:25652804

  19. The value of indium 111 leukocyte scanning in the evaluation of painful or infected total knee arthroplasties

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, J.A.; Brown, M.L. )

    1990-10-01

    Evaluation of painful total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) for infection can be difficult. Indium 111 ({sup 111}In) leukocyte bone scanning provides a minimally invasive technique for evaluation of possible infection. Thirty-eight patients with a painful TKA who had surgical exploration after {sup 111}In leukocyte scanning were reviewed. The scan had an accuracy of 84%, a sensitivity of 83%, and a specificity of 85%. The {sup 111}In leukocyte scans must be interpreted in conjunction with the clinical evaluation of the patient because they are less accurate for study of TKAs than of total hip arthroplasties.

  20. Two cases of medial knee pain involving the medial coronary ligament in adolescents treated with conservative rehabilitation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hudes, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This case study chronicled the assessment, treatment and management of two adolescent patients presenting with acute knee pain, diagnosed as medial meniscus tear, with or without a medial collateral ligament sprain, with coronary ligament involvement. Cases Patient 1: A 16 year old male football player presented with right medial knee pain of 2 days duration after having been tackled during practice from the left side. Patient 2: A 16 year old female presented with right medial knee pain that began 1 week prior to presentation after a fall down the stairs. Treatment: Treatment was initiated in both cases using inflammatory control techniques of icing and fascial stripping and progressed to rehabilitative exercises including VMO (vastus medialis oblique) exercises and squatting exercises to strengthen the quadriceps femoris musculature and proprioceptive exercise. Rehabilitation occurred over a four week duration in both cases with progression of exercises on an individual basis. Both cases resolved within four weeks and return to normal activities resumed at the three week mark including a return to play in patient 1. Both patients reported complete resolution of symptoms at the four week mark with no recurrence on follow up a number of months later. Summary: Conservative management, including icing, fascial stripping, and rehabilitative exercises may be beneficial in the treatment of medial meniscus tears with coronary ligament involvement in adolescents. PMID:21629464

  1. Depression and the Overall Burden of Painful Joints: An Examination among Individuals Undergoing Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Zywiel, Michael G; Mahomed, Nizar N; Perruccio, Anthony V

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) report one or more symptomatic joints apart from the one targeted for surgical care. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the burden of multiple symptomatic joints and self-reported depression in patients awaiting joint replacement for OA. Four hundred and seventy-five patients at a single centre were evaluated. Patients self-reported joints that were painful and/or symptomatic most days of the previous month on a homunculus, with nearly one-third of the sample reporting 6 or more painful joints. The prevalence of depression was 12.2% (58/475). When adjusted for age, sex, education level, hip or knee OA, body mass index, chronic condition count, and joint-specific WOMAC scores, each additional symptomatic joint was associated with a 19% increased odds (odds ratio: 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31, P < 0.01)) of self-reported depression. Individuals reporting 6 or more painful joints had 2.5-fold or greater odds of depression when compared to those patients whose symptoms were limited to the surgical joint. A focus on the surgical joint alone is likely to miss a potentially important determinant of postsurgical patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement.

  2. The effects of kinesiology taping therapy on degenerative knee arthritis patients’ pain, function, and joint range of motion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwansub; Yi, Chae-Woo; Lee, Sangyong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of kinesiology taping therapy on degenerative knee arthritis patients’ pain, function, and joint range of motion. [Subjects] To conduct the experiment in the present study, 30 patients with degenerative knee arthritis were divided into a control group (the conservative treatment group) of 15 patients, who received conservative physical therapy, and an experimental group (the kinesiology taping group) of 15 patients, who received kinesiology taping therapy. [Methods] All patients received treatment three times per week for four weeks. The kinesiology taping group had elastic tapes applied to the hamstring muscles, anterior tibialis, quadriceps femoris, and gastrocnemius. The range of motion was measured using joint goniometers, pain was measured using visual analog scales, and functional evaluation was conducted using the Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. [Results] In intragroup comparisons of the kinesiology taping group and the conservative treatment group, the visual analog scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores significantly decreased, and the range of motion increased more than significantly. In intergroup comparisons, the kinesiology taping group showed significantly lower visual analog scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores and significantly larger ranges of motion than the conservative treatment group. [Conclusion] Kinesiology taping therapy is considered to be an effective nonsurgical intervention method for pain relief, daily living activities, and range of motion of degenerative knee arthritis patients. PMID:26957729

  3. The effects of kinesiology taping therapy on degenerative knee arthritis patients' pain, function, and joint range of motion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwansub; Yi, Chae-Woo; Lee, Sangyong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of kinesiology taping therapy on degenerative knee arthritis patients' pain, function, and joint range of motion. [Subjects] To conduct the experiment in the present study, 30 patients with degenerative knee arthritis were divided into a control group (the conservative treatment group) of 15 patients, who received conservative physical therapy, and an experimental group (the kinesiology taping group) of 15 patients, who received kinesiology taping therapy. [Methods] All patients received treatment three times per week for four weeks. The kinesiology taping group had elastic tapes applied to the hamstring muscles, anterior tibialis, quadriceps femoris, and gastrocnemius. The range of motion was measured using joint goniometers, pain was measured using visual analog scales, and functional evaluation was conducted using the Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. [Results] In intragroup comparisons of the kinesiology taping group and the conservative treatment group, the visual analog scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores significantly decreased, and the range of motion increased more than significantly. In intergroup comparisons, the kinesiology taping group showed significantly lower visual analog scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores and significantly larger ranges of motion than the conservative treatment group. [Conclusion] Kinesiology taping therapy is considered to be an effective nonsurgical intervention method for pain relief, daily living activities, and range of motion of degenerative knee arthritis patients.

  4. Novel Three-Day, Community-Based, Nonpharmacological Group Intervention for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain (COPERS): A Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Stephanie J. C.; Carnes, Dawn; Homer, Kate; Kahan, Brennan C.; Hounsome, Natalia; Eldridge, Sandra; Spencer, Anne; Pincus, Tamar; Underwood, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide. The effectiveness of pharmacological treatments for chronic pain is often limited, and there is growing concern about the adverse effects of these treatments, including opioid dependence. Nonpharmacological approaches to chronic pain may be an attractive alternative or adjunctive treatment. We describe the effectiveness of a novel, theoretically based group pain management support intervention for chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods and Findings We conducted a multi-centre, pragmatic, randomised, controlled effectiveness and cost-effectiveness (cost–utility) trial across 27 general practices and community musculoskeletal services in the UK. We recruited 703 adults with musculoskeletal pain of at least 3 mo duration between August 1, 2011, and July 31, 2012, and randomised participants 1.33:1 to intervention (403) or control (300). Intervention participants were offered a participative group intervention (COPERS) delivered over three alternate days with a follow-up session at 2 wk. The intervention introduced cognitive behavioural approaches and was designed to promote self-efficacy to manage chronic pain. Controls received usual care and a relaxation CD. The primary outcome was pain-related disability at 12 mo (Chronic Pain Grade [CPG] disability subscale); secondary outcomes included the CPG disability subscale at 6 mo and the following measured at 6 and 12 mo: anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]), pain acceptance (Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire), social integration (Health Education Impact Questionnaire social integration and support subscale), pain-related self-efficacy (Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire), pain intensity (CPG pain intensity subscale), the census global health question (2011 census for England and Wales), health utility (EQ-5D-3L), and health care resource use. Analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle

  5. Patients’ experiences of acupuncture and counselling for depression and comorbid pain: a qualitative study nested within a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hopton, Ann; Eldred, Janet; MacPherson, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Depression and pain frequently occur together and impact on outcomes of existing treatment for depression. Additional treatment options are required. This study aimed to explore patients’ experiences of depression, the processes of change within acupuncture and counselling, and the elements that contributed to longer-term change. Methods In a substudy nested within a randomised controlled trial of acupuncture or counselling compared with usual care alone for depression, semistructured interviews of 52 purposively sampled participants were conducted and analysed using thematic analysis. Results Differences were reported by participants regarding their experience of depression with comorbid pain compared with depression alone. Along with physical symptoms often related to fatigue and sleep, participants with depression and comorbid pain generally had fewer internal and external resources available to manage their depression effectively. Those who had physical symptoms and were receiving acupuncture commonly reported that these were addressed as part of the treatment. For those receiving counselling, there was less emphasis on physical symptoms and more on help with gaining an understanding of themselves and their situation. Over the course of treatment, most participants in both groups reported receiving support to cope with depression and pain independently of treatment, with a focus on relevant lifestyle and behaviour changes. The establishment of a therapeutic relationship and their active engagement as participants were identified as important components of treatment. Conclusions Participants with and without comorbid pain received acupuncture or counselling for depression, and reported specific identifiable treatment effects. The therapeutic relationship and participants’ active engagement in recovery may play distinct roles in driving long-term change. Patients who present with depression and physical symptoms of care may wish to consider a

  6. Enhanced implementation of low back pain guidelines in general practice: study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines may improve treatment quality, but the uptake of guideline recommendations is often incomplete and slow. Recently new low back pain guidelines are being launched in Denmark. The guidelines are considered to reduce personal and public costs. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether a complex, multifaceted implementation strategy of the low back pain guidelines will reduce secondary care referral and improve patient outcomes compared to the usual simple implementation strategy. Methods/design In a two-armed cluster randomised trial, 100 general practices (clusters) and 2,700 patients aged 18 to 65 years from the North Denmark region will be included. Practices are randomly allocated 1:1 to a simple or a complex implementation strategy. Intervention practices will receive a complex implementation strategy, including guideline facilitator visits, stratification tools, and quality reports on low back pain treatment. Primary outcome is referral to secondary care. Secondary outcomes are pain, physical function, health-related quality of life, patient satisfaction with care and treatment outcome, employment status, and sick leave. Primary and secondary outcomes pertain to the patient level. Assessments of outcomes are blinded and follow the intention-to-treat principle. Additionally, a process assessment will evaluate the degree to which the intervention elements will be delivered as planned, as well as measure changes in beliefs and behaviours among general practitioners and patients. Discussion This study provides knowledge concerning the process and effect of an intervention to implement low back pain guidelines in general practice, and will provide insight on essential elements to include in future implementation strategies in general practice. Trial registration Registered as NCT01699256 on ClinicalTrials.gov. PMID:24139140

  7. The hard work of self-management: Living with chronic knee pain

    PubMed Central

    ONG, BIE NIO; JINKS, CLARE; MORDEN, ANDREW

    2011-01-01

    Self-management is a key policy initiative in many western countries, and most approaches are designed for people with long-term conditions based upon giving support and advice in order to manage the impact of the condition(s). Less attention has been paid to what people already do themselves. In this paper we focus on the meaning and enactment of self-management in everyday life and the hard work associated with devising and maintaining routine adaptive strategies. This UK-based qualitative study examined how people live with knee pain. From the interviews (22 at baseline, 15 at 6 months) and monthly diaries, it emerged that self-management could be based on implicit and incremental learning from experience or on explicit evaluation of actions. Either way, embodied and emotional hard work was involved in maintaining a daily life that allowed people to fulfil social roles and relationships. This individual and contextualised work needs to be recognised and drawn upon before specific self-management approaches are promoted. PMID:21760837

  8. Differences in Health-Related Quality of Life among Subjects with Frequent Bilateral or Unilateral Knee Pain: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bindawas, Saad; Vennu, Vishal; Snih, Soham Al

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional study. OBJECTIVE To examine associations between frequent bilateral knee pain (BKP) and unilateral knee pain (UKP) and health-related quality of life (QoL). We hypothesized that frequent BKP would be associated with poorer health-related QoL than would frequent UKP and no knee pain. BACKGROUND Knee pain is one of the most frequently reported types of joint pain among adults in the United States. It is the most frequent cause of limited physical function, disability, and reduced QoL. METHODS Data were collected from the Osteoarthritis Initiative public-use data sets. Health-related QoL was assessed in 2481 participants (aged 45–79 years at baseline). The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score QoL subscale (knee-specific measure) and the physical component summary and mental component summary (MCS) scores of the Medical Outcomes Study 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) (generic measure) were used to assess health-related QoL. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relationships between frequent knee pain and health-related QoL, adjusted for sociodemographic and health covariates. RESULTS Compared with subjects with no knee pain, subjects with frequent BKP and UKP had significantly lower scores on the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score QoL subscale (mean difference, −35.2; standard error [SE], 0.86; P<.001 and mean difference, −29.2; SE, 0.93; P<.001; respectively) and the SF-12 physical component summary score (mean difference, −6.25; SE, 0.41; P<.001 and mean difference, −4.10, SE, 0.43; P<.00; respectively), after controlling for sociodemographic and health covariates. The SF-12 MCS score was lower among those with BKP (−1.29; SE, 0.42; P<.001). Frequent UKP was not associated with the SF-12 MCS. CONCLUSIONS Subjects with frequent BKP had lower health-related QoL than those with frequent unilateral or no knee pain, as reflected in lower Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Socre Qo

  9. Safety and efficacy of Curcuma longa extract in the treatment of painful knee osteoarthritis: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Madhu, K; Chanda, K; Saji, M J

    2013-04-01

    Curcuma longa Linn. is widely used for the treatment of disorders associated with inflammation and was evaluated for its safety and efficacy in the treatment of painful knee osteoarthritis (OA). This was a randomized, single blind, placebo-controlled trial. Total of 120 patients (37 males and 83 females) with primary knee OA received either placebo (400 mg twice daily) or NR-INF-02 (500 mg twice daily) or glucosamine sulphate (GS) (750 mg twice daily) alone or combination of NR-INF-02 and GS for 42 days. The efficacy was assessed during treatment period, on day 21 and day 42. The decrease in severity of pain symptom and function of affected knee as primary efficacy outcome measure was assessed by Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scale, respectively. The clinical examination of affected joint was measured by an orthopaedic specialist and using a Clinician Global Impression Change (CGIC) scale. The analysis of post-treatment scores following administration of NR-INF-02 using VAS, WOMAC, and CGIC at each clinical visit showed significant decrease (p < 0.05) compared to placebo. NR-INF-02 treated group showed a significant (p < 0.01) decrease in use of rescue medication, along with clinical and subjective improvement compared to placebo. The tolerability and acceptability profile of NR-INF-02 was better during the trial period. The study demonstrates safety and efficacy of NR-INF-02 as a useful treatment option for patients with primary painful knee OA. PMID:23242572

  10. Continuous Local Infiltration Analgesia for Pain Control After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Lei; Zhao, Zhi-Hu; Ma, Jian-Xiong; Li, Feng-Bo; Li, Yan-Jun; Meng, Xin-Min; Ma, Xin-Long

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has always been associated with moderate to severe pain. As more research is conducted on the use of continuous local infiltration analgesia (CLIA) to manage pain after a TKA, it is necessary to reassess the efficacy and safety of the TKA method. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pain control of CLIA versus placebo after a TKA. In January 2015, a systematic computer-based search was conducted in the Medline, Embase, PubMed, CENTRAL (Cochrane Controlled Trials Register), Web of Science, Google database, and Chinese Wanfang databases. This systematic review and meta-analysis were performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses statement criteria. The primary endpoint was the visual analog scale score after a TKA with rest or mobilization at 24, 48, and 72 hours, which represents the effect of pain control after TKA. The complications of infection, nausea, and whether it prolonged wound drainage were also compiled to assess the safety of CLIA. RevMan 5.30 software was used for the meta-analysis. After testing for publication bias and heterogeneity across studies, data were aggregated for random-effects modeling when necessary. Ten studies involving 735 patients met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis revealed that continuous infusion analgesia provided better pain control with rest at 24 hours (mean difference [MD] −12.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] −16.63 to 8.45), and with mobilization at 24 hours (MD −18.27, 95% CI −27.52 to 9.02) and 48 hours (MD −14.19, 95% CI −21.46 to 6.93). There was no significant difference with respect to the visual analog scale score at 48 hours (MD −6.15, 95% CI −13.51 to 1.22, P = 0.10) and 72 hours (MD −3.63, 95% CI −10.43 to 3.16, P = 0.29) with rest and at 72 hours with mobilization (MD −4.25, 95% CI

  11. TREATMENT OF SUBACUTE POSTERIOR KNEE PAIN IN AN ADOLESCENT BALLET DANCER UTILIZING TRIGGER POINT DRY NEEDLING: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Tansey, Kimberly A.; Westrick, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design: Case Report. Background and Purpose: Dry needling (DN) is an increasingly popular intervention used by clinicians as a treatment of regional neuromusculoskeletal pain. DN is an invasive procedure that involves insertion of a thin monofilament needle directly into a muscle trigger point (MTP) with the intent of stimulating a local twitch response. Current evidence is somewhat limited, but recent literature supports the use of this intervention in specific neuromusculoskeletal conditions. The purpose of this case report is to present the outcomes of DN as a primary treatment intervention in an adolescent subject with subacute posterior knee pain. Case Description: The subject was a 16‐year‐old female competitive ballet dancer referred to physical therapy with a two month history of right posterior knee pain. Palpation identified MTPs which reproduced the patient’s primary symptoms. In addition to an exercise program promoting lower extremity flexibility and hip stability, the subject was treated with DN to the right gastrocnemius, soleus, and popliteus muscles. Outcomes: The subject reported being pain free on the Numerical Pain Scale and a +7 improvement in perceived change in recovery on the Global Rating of Change at final follow‐up. Physical examination demonstrated no observed impairments or functional limitations, including normal mobility, full strength, and unrestricted execution of dance maneuvers. Discussion: The patient was able to return to high level dance training and competition without physical limitations and resumed pre‐injury dynamic movement activities including dancing, running, jumping, and pivoting without pain. DN can be an effective and efficient intervention to assist patients in decreasing pain and returning to high intensity physical activity. Additional research is needed to determine if DN is effective for other body regions and has long‐term positive outcomes. Level of Evidence: Level 4 PMID:24567862

  12. Effect of pretreatment diclofenac sodium on postendodontic pain: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Metri, Malasiddappa; Hegde, Swaroop; Bhandi, Shilpa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Effective management of endodontic pain represents a continuing challenge. Many of the dental professionals are facing significant problems associated with postendodontic pain. Hence, the postendodontic pain has to be prevented at its primary stage without waiting for its occurrence. This trial was carried out to evaluate the use of a preoperative, single oral dose of diclofenac sodium for the prevention and control of postendodontic pain. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients were randomly assigned to two groups, placebo and diclofenac sodium (100 mg). The medications were administered 30 min before the start of standard endodontic treatment. Postoperative pain was assessed after 6, 12, and 24 h by using a visual analog scale. Results: Postendodontic pain showed a statistically significant difference between both groups at 6 and 12 h (P < 0.05) and there was no significant difference at 24 h. Conclusion: Postendodontic pain was substantially reduced by preoperative administration of single oral dose of diclofenac sodium. It is thus possible to conclude that these favorable results might help to prevent postendodontic pain, especially in patients with a low pain threshold. PMID:26957785

  13. The effect of distant reiki on pain in women after elective Caesarean section: a double-blinded randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    vanderVaart, Sondra; Berger, Howard; Tam, Carolyn; Goh, Y Ingrid; Gijsen, Violette M G J; de Wildt, Saskia N; Taddio, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 25% of all babies in North America are delivered via Caesarean section (C-section). Though a common surgical procedure, C-section recovery can be painful. Opioids, specifically codeine, are commonly used to ease pain; however, its active metabolite, morphine, passes into breast milk, and may produce unwanted side effects in neonates; therefore, alternatives to opioids are being sought. Reiki is an ancient Japanese form of healing where practitioners transfer healing energy through light touch and positive healing intention. Although 1.2 million Americans use reiki to reduce pain or depression, there is a lack of strong evidence supporting its effectiveness. A recent systematic review showed existing studies to be of poor methodological quality, with the common limitation of lack of blinding. To overcome this issue, the authors used distant reiki to assess its effectiveness in reducing pain following an elective C-section. Methods In this randomised, double-blinded study, women who underwent an elective C-section were allocated to either usual care (control, n=40) or three distant reiki sessions in addition to usual care (n=40). Pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The primary endpoint was the Area Under the VAS-Time Curve (AUC) for days 1–3. Secondary measures included: the proportion of women who required opioid medications and dose consumed, rate of healing and vital signs. Results AUC for pain was not significantly different in the distant reiki and control groups (mean±SD; 212.1±104.7 vs 223.1±117.8; p=0.96). There were no significant differences in opioid consumption or rate of healing; however, the distant reiki group had a significantly lower heart rate (74.3±8.1 bpm vs 79.8±7.9 bpm, p=0.003) and blood pressure (106.4±9.7 mm Hg vs 111.9±11.0 mm Hg, p=0.02) post surgery. Conclusion Distant reiki had no significant effect on pain following an elective C-section. Clinical Trial Registration

  14. Factors Related to Postoperative Pain Trajectories following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Longitudinal Study of Patients Admitted to a Russian Orthopaedic Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Kornilov, Nikolai; Lindberg, Maren Falch; Gay, Caryl; Saraev, Alexander; Kuliaba, Taras; Rosseland, Leiv Arne; Muniz, Konstantin; Lerdal, Anners

    2016-01-01

    This study explores sociodemographic, clinical, and surgical factors in relation to pain trajectories during the first 3 days following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). 100 patients (mean age 63.5 ± 7.8 years and 93% female) consecutively admitted for uncomplicated primary TKA were prospectively included. Postoperative pain was assessed using pain diaries. Measures of preoperative pain, symptoms, daily functioning, quality of life, comorbidities, knee function, perioperative characteristics, and physical/biochemical parameters were also evaluated. All pain ratings decreased in the three days following surgery (p < .001) as well as the reported number of daily hours in moderate/severe pain (p < .001). Women reported more pain than men (p = .009). Pain trajectories did not differ by education, employment, cohabitation, or any patient clinical and biochemical characteristics but were significantly related to preoperative anxiety (p = .029). Patients reporting moderate/severe pain prior to surgery also reported more hours in moderate/severe pain on days 0–3 postoperatively (p = .029). Patients with surgeries longer than 90 min reported more hours of moderate/severe pain compared with patients who had shorter surgeries (p = .008), and similar results were observed for ratings of pain with activity (p = .012). In this sample, only female gender, higher levels of preoperative pain and anxiety, and longer surgical duration were associated with increased pain after TKA. PMID:26885390

  15. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors regulate central sensitization and pain responses associated with osteoarthritis of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Burston, James J; Sagar, Devi Rani; Shao, Pin; Bai, Mingfeng; King, Emma; Brailsford, Louis; Turner, Jenna M; Hathway, Gareth J; Bennett, Andrew J; Walsh, David A; Kendall, David A; Lichtman, Aron; Chapman, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the joint is a prevalent disease accompanied by chronic, debilitating pain. Recent clinical evidence has demonstrated that central sensitization contributes to OA pain. An improved understanding of how OA joint pathology impacts upon the central processing of pain is crucial for the identification of novel analgesic targets/new therapeutic strategies. Inhibitory cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptors attenuate peripheral immune cell function and modulate central neuro-immune responses in models of neurodegeneration. Systemic administration of the CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 attenuated OA-induced pain behaviour, and the changes in circulating pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines exhibited in this model. Electrophysiological studies revealed that spinal administration of JWH133 inhibited noxious-evoked responses of spinal neurones in the model of OA pain, but not in control rats, indicating a novel spinal role of this target. We further demonstrate dynamic changes in spinal CB2 receptor mRNA and protein expression in an OA pain model. The expression of CB2 receptor protein by both neurones and microglia in the spinal cord was significantly increased in the model of OA. Hallmarks of central sensitization, significant spinal astrogliosis and increases in activity of metalloproteases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the spinal cord were evident in the model of OA pain. Systemic administration of JWH133 attenuated these markers of central sensitization, providing a neurobiological basis for analgesic effects of the CB2 receptor in this model of OA pain. Analysis of human spinal cord revealed a negative correlation between spinal cord CB2 receptor mRNA and macroscopic knee chondropathy. These data provide new clinically relevant evidence that joint damage and spinal CB2 receptor expression are correlated combined with converging pre-clinical evidence that activation of CB2 receptors inhibits central sensitization and its contribution to the manifestation of chronic OA

  16. Pregabalin and pain after total knee arthroplasty: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multidose trial†

    PubMed Central

    YaDeau, J. T.; Lin, Y.; Mayman, D. J.; Goytizolo, E. A.; Alexiades, M. M.; Padgett, D. E.; Kahn, R. L.; Jules-Elysee, K. M.; Ranawat, A. S.; Bhagat, D. D.; Fields, K. G.; Goon, A. K.; Curren, J.; Westrich, G. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pregabalin may reduce postoperative pain and opioid use. Higher doses may be more effective, but may cause sedation and confusion. This prospective, randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled study tested the hypothesis that pregabalin reduces pain at 2 weeks after total knee arthroplasty, but increases drowsiness and confusion. Methods Patients (30 per group) received capsules containing pregabalin (0, 50, 100, or 150 mg); two capsules before surgery, one capsule twice a day until postoperative day (POD) 14, one on POD15, and one on POD16. Multimodal analgesia included femoral nerve block, epidural analgesia, oxycodone–paracetamol, and meloxicam. The primary outcome was pain with flexion (POD14). Results Pregabalin did not reduce pain at rest, with ambulation, or with flexion at 2 weeks (P=0.69, 0.23, and 0.90, respectively). Pregabalin increased POD1 drowsiness (34.5, 37.9, 55.2, and 58.6% in the 0, 50, 100, and 150 mg arms, respectively; P=0.030), but did not increase confusion (0, 3.5, 0, and 3.5%, respectively; P=0.75). Pregabalin had no effect on acute or chronic pain, opioid consumption, or analgesic side-effects. Pregabalin reduced POD14 patient satisfaction [1–10 scale, median (first quartile, third quartile): 9 (8, 10), 8 (7, 10), 8 (5, 9), and 8 (6, 9.3), respectively; P=0.023). Protocol compliance was 63% by POD14 (50.0, 70.0, 76.7, and 56.7% compliance, respectively), with no effect of dose on compliance. Per-protocol analysis of compliant patients showed no effect of pregabalin on pain scores. Conclusions Pregabalin had no beneficial effects, but increased sedation and decreased patient satisfaction. This study does not support routine perioperative pregabalin for total knee arthroplasty patients. Clinical trial registration. ClinicalTrials.gov: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT01333956. PMID:26170351

  17. Preoperative Determinants of Patient-reported Pain and Physical Function Levels Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lungu, E.; Vendittoli, P-A.; Desmeules, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A sound knowledge of the determinants of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) outcomes could help in patient selection, preparation and education. We aimed to assess the current status of the literature evaluating preoperative determinants of early and medium term patient-reported pain and disability following TKA. Method: A search in Medline, Pubmed, Embase and CINAHL until October 2014 was undertaken. Selection criteria included: 1- participants undergoing primary unilateral TKA with a follow-up from 6 months to 2 years, 2- validated disease-specific patient-reported outcome measures assessing pain and/or function used as outcome measure and 3- identification of preoperative determinants obtained via multivariate analyses. Risk of bias was assessed using a modified version of the Methodology checklist for prognostic studies. Results: Thirty-three prognostic explanatory studies were included. Mean total score of the methodological quality was 80.7±12.2 %. Sociodemographic and psychosocial determinants included greater socioeconomic deprivation (both studies), greater levels of depression and/or anxiety (7 out of 10 studies) and greater preoperative pain catastrophizing (all 3 studies). Significant clinical determinants included worse pre-operative knee related pain or disability (20 out of 22 studies), presence or greater levels of comorbidity (12 out of 23 studies), back pain (4 out of 5 studies) and lower general health (all 11 studies). Conclusion: Several significant determinants of short to medium-term pain and functional outcomes following TKA have been summarized by studies with moderate-to-high methodological quality. No conclusions can be reached regarding the strength of the associations between significant determinants and TKA results because of heterogeneity of study methodologies and results. Further high-quality research is required. PMID:27398109

  18. Low-dose laser acupuncture for non-specific chronic low back pain: a double-blind randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Glazov, Gregory; Yelland, Michael; Emery, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if infrared laser acupuncture (LA) may have a specific effect in reducing pain and disability in treatment of chronic low back pain (LBP). Methods This was a double-blind sham laser controlled trial performed in general practices in Perth, Western Australia. The participants were 144 adults with chronic non-specific LBP. They were randomised to receive eight once-weekly treatments. Laser machines (20 mW, 840 nm diode, power density 0.1 W/cm2) stimulated points in three treatment groups: sham (0 joules/point), low dose (0.2 J/point) and high dose (0.8 joules/point). Participants were followed-up at 1 and 6 weeks, and 6 and 12 months post treatment. Primary outcomes were pain (Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS)) and disability (Oswestry Disability Inventory (ODI)) at 6 weeks post treatment. Secondary outcomes included numerical rating scale for limitation of activity, global assessment of improvement, analgesic usage and adverse effects after treatment. Results The analysis showed no difference between sham and the laser groups at 6 weeks for pain or disability. There was a significant reduction in mean pain and disability in all groups at 6 weeks (p<0.005); NPRS: sham (−1.5 (95% CI −2.1 to −0.8)), low dose (−1.3 (−2.0 to −0.8)), high dose (−1.1 (−1.7 to −0.5)). ODI: sham (−4.0 (−7.1 to −1.0)), low dose (−4.1, (−6.7 to −1.5)), high dose (−2.6 (−5.7 to 0.5)). All secondary outcomes also showed clinical improvement over time but with no differences between groups. Conclusions LA using energy density range (0–4 J/cm2) for the treatment of chronic non-specific LBP resulted in clinical improvement unrelated to laser stimulation. Trial registration http://www.anzctr.org.au ACTRN12610000043033. PMID:24280948

  19. Efficacy of nonsurgical interventions for anterior knee pain: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Collins, Natalie J; Bisset, Leanne M; Crossley, Kay M; Vicenzino, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Anterior knee pain is a chronic condition that presents frequently to sports medicine clinics, and can have a long-term impact on participation in physical activity. Conceivably, effective early management may prevent chronicity and facilitate physical activity. Although a variety of nonsurgical interventions have been advocated, previous systematic reviews have consistently been unable to reach conclusions to support their use. Considering a decade has lapsed since publication of the most recent data in these reviews, it is timely to provide an updated synthesis of the literature to assist sports medicine practitioners in making informed, evidence-based decisions. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the evidence for nonsurgical interventions for anterior knee pain. A comprehensive search strategy was used to search MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Pre-CINAHL, PEDro, PubMed, SportDiscus, Web of Science, BIOSIS Previews, and the full Cochrane Library, while reference lists of included papers and previous systematic reviews were hand searched. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they were randomized clinical trials that used a measure of pain to evaluate at least one nonsurgical intervention over at least 2 weeks in participants with anterior knee pain. A modified version of the PEDro scale was used to rate methodological quality and risk of bias. Effect size calculation and meta-analyses were based on random effects models. Of 48 suitable studies, 27 studies with low-to-moderate risk of bias were included. There was minimal opportunity for meta-analysis because of heterogeneity of interventions, comparators and follow-up times. Meta-analysis of high-quality clinical trials supports the use of a 6-week multimodal physiotherapy programme (standardized mean difference [SMD] 1.08, 95% CI 0.73, 1.43), but does not support the addition of electromyography biofeedback to an exercise programme in the short-term (4 weeks: SMD -0.21, 95% CI -0.64, 0

  20. Effect of eucalyptus oil inhalation on pain and inflammatory responses after total knee replacement: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Jun, Yang Suk; Kang, Purum; Min, Sun Seek; Lee, Jeong-Min; Kim, Hyo-Keun; Seol, Geun Hee

    2013-01-01

    Eucalyptus oil has been reported effective in reducing pain, swelling, and inflammation. This study aimed to investigate the effects of eucalyptus oil inhalation on pain and inflammatory responses after total knee replacement (TKR) surgery. Participants were randomized 1 : 1 to intervention group (eucalyptus inhalation group) or control group (almond oil inhalation group). Patients inhaled eucalyptus or almond oil for 30 min of continuous passive motion (CPM) on 3 consecutive days. Pain on a visual analog scale (VAS), blood pressure, heart rate, C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration, and white blood cell (WBC) count were measured before and after inhalation. Pain VAS on all three days (P < .001) and systolic (P < .05) and diastolic (P = .03) blood pressure on the second day were significantly lower in the group inhaling eucalyptus than that inhaling almond oil. Heart rate, CRP, and WBC, however, did not differ significantly in the two groups. In conclusion, inhalation of eucalyptus oil was effective in decreasing patient's pain and blood pressure following TKR, suggesting that eucalyptus oil inhalation may be a nursing intervention for the relief of pain after TKR.

  1. The Design and Methods of Genetic Studies on Acute and Chronic Postoperative Pain in Patients after Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Belfer, Inna; Greco, Carol M.; Lokshin, Anna; Vulakovich, Katie; Landsittel, Douglas; Dai, Feng; Crossett, Lawrence; Chelly, Jacques E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Total knee replacement (TKR) is the treatment option of choice for the millions of individuals whose osteoarthritis pain can no longer be managed through non-invasive methods. Over 500,000 TKRs are performed annually in the United States. Although most patients report improvement in pain and functioning following TKR, up to 30% report persistent pain that interferes with daily function. However, the reasons for poor outcomes are not clear. To best determine which patients are at risk for pain post TKR, a detailed and comprehensive approach is needed. In this article, we present the methodology of a study designed to identify a set of genetic, proteomic, clinical, demographic, psychosocial, and psychophysical risk factors for severe acute and chronic pain post TKR. Design Prospective longitudinal observational study. Setting University Hospital System. Subjects Patients scheduled for unilateral TKR with a target number of 150. Methods Prior to surgery, we collect demographic, psychosocial, and pain data. Biological data, including blood samples for genetic analyses, and serum, urine, and joint fluid for cytokine assessment are collected intraoperatively. Pain assessments as well as medication use are collected during each of the three days postsurgery. Additionally, pain and psychosocial information is collected 6 and 12 months following surgery. Conclusions This study, for the first time, captures the information on both genetic and “environmental” risk factors for acute and chronic pain post-TKR and has the potential to lead to the next step—multicenter large-scale studies on predictors and biomarkers of poor TKR outcomes as well as on tailored interventions and personalized medicine approaches for those at risk. PMID:25040948

  2. Efficacy of balneotherapy on pain, function and quality of life in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Giannitti, Chiara; Bellisai, Barbara; Iacoponi, Francesca; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2012-07-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate whether balneotherapy with mineral sulphate-bicarbonate-calcium water could determine substantial symptomatic improvement, and to detect any changes in the quality of life (QoL) of patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). This was a prospective randomized, single blind controlled trial. Sixty outpatients with primary bilateral knee OA, according to ACR criteria, were included in the study and randomized to one of two groups: group I (30 patients) was treated with a daily sulphate-bicarbonate-calcium mineral water bath; group II (30 patients), the control group, continued their regular outpatient care routine. At baseline, after 15 days and after 12 weeks, patients were evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for spontaneous pain, Lequesne and Womac Index for gonarthrosis, SF-36, Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale (AIMS) and symptomatic drugs consumption. We observed a significant improvement of all parameters at the end of the cycle of balneotherapy which persisted throughout the follow-up period, whereas in the control group no significant differences were noted. This symptomatic effect was confirmed by the significant reduction of symptomatic drugs consumption. The differences between the two groups were significant for all considered parameters already from the 15th day and persisted during follow-up. Tolerability of balneotherapy seemed to be good, with light and transitory side effects. Our results confirm that the beneficial effects of balneotherapy in patients with knee OA last over time, with positive effects on the painful symptomatology, a significant improvement on functional capacities and QoL. Balneotherapy can represent a useful backup to pharmacological treatment of knee OA or a valid alternative for patients who do not tolerate pharmacological treatments.

  3. Efficacy of balneotherapy on pain, function and quality of life in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Giannitti, Chiara; Bellisai, Barbara; Iacoponi, Francesca; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2012-07-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate whether balneotherapy with mineral sulphate-bicarbonate-calcium water could determine substantial symptomatic improvement, and to detect any changes in the quality of life (QoL) of patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). This was a prospective randomized, single blind controlled trial. Sixty outpatients with primary bilateral knee OA, according to ACR criteria, were included in the study and randomized to one of two groups: group I (30 patients) was treated with a daily sulphate-bicarbonate-calcium mineral water bath; group II (30 patients), the control group, continued their regular outpatient care routine. At baseline, after 15 days and after 12 weeks, patients were evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for spontaneous pain, Lequesne and Womac Index for gonarthrosis, SF-36, Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale (AIMS) and symptomatic drugs consumption. We observed a significant improvement of all parameters at the end of the cycle of balneotherapy which persisted throughout the follow-up period, whereas in the control group no significant differences were noted. This symptomatic effect was confirmed by the significant reduction of symptomatic drugs consumption. The differences between the two groups were significant for all considered parameters already from the 15th day and persisted during follow-up. Tolerability of balneotherapy seemed to be good, with light and transitory side effects. Our results confirm that the beneficial effects of balneotherapy in patients with knee OA last over time, with positive effects on the painful symptomatology, a significant improvement on functional capacities and QoL. Balneotherapy can represent a useful backup to pharmacological treatment of knee OA or a valid alternative for patients who do not tolerate pharmacological treatments.

  4. Systematic review of randomised controlled trials of interventions for painful shoulder: selection criteria, outcome assessment, and efficacy.

    PubMed Central

    Green, S.; Buchbinder, R.; Glazier, R.; Forbes, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the efficacy of common interventions for shoulder pain. DESIGN: All randomised controlled trials of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, intra-articular and subacromial glucocorticosteroid injection, oral glucocorticosteroid treatment, physiotherapy, manipulation under anaesthesia, hydrodilatation, and surgery for shoulder pain that were identified by computerised and hand searches of the literature and had a blinded assessment of outcome were included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Methodological quality (score out of 40), selection criteria, and outcome measures. Effect sizes were calculated and combined in a pooled analysis if study population, end point, and intervention were comparable. RESULTS: Thirty one trials met inclusion criteria. Mean methodological quality score was 16.8 (9.5-22). Selection criteria varied widely, even for the same diagnostic label. There was no uniformity in the outcome measures used, and their measurement properties were rarely reported. Effect sizes for individual trials were small (range -1.4 to 3.0). The results of only three studies investigating "rotator cuff tendinitis" could be pooled. The only positive finding was that subacromial steroid injection is better than placebo in improving the range of abduction (weighted difference between means 35 degrees (95% confidence interval 14 to 55)). CONCLUSIONS: There is little evidence to support or refute the efficacy of common interventions for shoulder pain. As well as the need for further well designed clinical trials, more research is needed to establish a uniform method of defining shoulder disorders and developing outcome measures which are valid, reliable, and responsive in affected people. PMID:9487172

  5. The Effects of Yoga on Pain, Mobility, and Quality of Life in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiaqi; Yang, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To systematically assess the effects of yoga on pain, mobility, and quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods. Pubmed, Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), and other sources were searched systematically in this study. Two reviewers identified eligible studies and extracted data independently. Downs and Black's Quality Index were used to evaluate the methodological quality of the included studies. Results. A total of 9 articles (6 studies) involving 372 patients with knee osteoarthritis met the inclusion criteria. The most common yoga protocol is 40~90 minutes/session, lasting for at least 8 weeks. The effect of yoga on pain relief and function improvement could be seen after two-week intervention. Conclusion. This systematic review showed that yoga might have positive effects in relieving pain and mobility on patients with KOA, but the effects on quality of life (QOL) are unclear. Besides, more outcome measure related to mental health of yoga effects on people with KOA should be conducted. PMID:27777597

  6. Low-level laser therapy of myofascial pain syndromes of patients with osteoarthritis of knee and hip joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparyan, Levon V.

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of the given research is the comparison of efficiency of conventional treatment of myofascial pain syndromes of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of hip and knee joints and therapy with additional application of low level laser therapy (LLLT) under dynamic control of clinical picture, rheovasographic, electromyographic examinations, and parameters of peroxide lipid oxidation. The investigation was made on 143 patients with OA of hip and knee joints. Patients were randomized in 2 groups: basic group included 91 patients, receiving conventional therapy with a course of LLLT, control group included 52 patients, receiving conventional treatment only. Transcutaneous ((lambda) equals 890 nm, output peak power 5 W, frequency 80 - 3000 Hz) and intravenous ((lambda) equals 633 nm, output 2 mW in the vein) laser irradiation were used for LLLT. Studied showed, that clinical efficiency of LLLT in the complex with conventional treatment of myofascial pain syndromes at the patients with OA is connected with attenuation of pain syndrome, normalization of parameters of myofascial syndrome, normalization of the vascular tension and parameters of rheographic curves, as well as with activation of antioxidant protection system.

  7. Effectiveness of acupressure versus isometric exercise on pain, stiffness, and physical function in knee osteoarthritis female patients

    PubMed Central

    Sorour, Amany S.; Ayoub, Amany S.; Abd El Aziz, Eman M.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and a leading cause of disability in older adults. Conservative non-pharmacological strategies, particularly exercise, are recommended by clinical guidelines for its management. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of acupressure versus isometric exercise on pain, stiffness, and physical function in knee OA female patients. This quasi experimental study was conducted at the inpatient and outpatient sections at Al-kasr Al-Aini hospital, Cairo University. It involved three groups of 30 patients each: isometric exercise, acupressure, and control. Data were collected by an interview form and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) scale. The study revealed high initial scores of pain, stiffness, and impaired physical functioning. After the intervention, pain decreased in the two intervention groups compared to the control group (p < 0.001), while the scores of stiffness and impaired physical function were significantly lower in the isometric group (p < 0.001) compared to the other two groups. The decrease in the total WOMAC score was sharper in the two study groups compared to the control group. In multiple linear regression, the duration of illness was a positive predictor of WOMAC score, whereas the intervention is associated with a reduction in the score. In conclusion, isometric exercise and acupressure provide an improvement of pain, stiffness, and physical function in patients with knee OA. Since isometric exercise leads to more improvement of stiffness and physical function, while acupressure acts better on pain, a combination of both is recommended. The findings need further confirmation through a randomized clinical trial. PMID:25685487

  8. Acute Effects of Contract-Relax Stretching vs. TENS in Young Subjects With Anterior Knee Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Valenza, Marie C; Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Valenza-Demet, Gerald; Cano-Cappellacci, Marcelo

    2016-08-01

    Valenza, MC, Torres-Sánchez, I, Cabrera-Martos, I, Valenza-Demet, G, and Cano-Cappellacci, M. Acute effects of contract-relax stretching vs. TENS in young subjects with anterior knee pain: A randomized controlled trial. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2271-2278, 2016-The aim of this study was to examine the immediate effects on pressure point tenderness, range of motion (ROM), and vertical jump (VJ) of contract-relax stretching vs. transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) therapy in individuals with anterior knee pain (AKP). Eighty-four subjects with AKP were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 different intervention groups: a contract-relax stretching group (n = 28), a TENS intervention group (n = 28), and a control group (n = 28). The participants included in the sample were both sex (37.5% men vs. 62.5% women) at a mean age of 21 years, with mean values of height and weight of 169 cm and 64 kg, respectively. The main outcome measures were knee ROM, pressure pain threshold (PPT), and VJ. The participants were assessed at baseline and immediately after treatment. In the case of VJ, at baseline, immediately after the intervention, at 3 and at 6 minutes posttreatment. The data analysis showed that PPT scores of participants in the stretching and TENS group significantly increased from pretest to posttest (p ≤ 0.05). A significant increase pre- to posttreatment in ROM (p < 0.001) was also observed in both treatment groups. In VJ measures, TENS and stretching groups showed significant differences between preintervention and all postintervention values (p ≤ 0.05), whereas no significant differences were found in the control group. In conclusion, the results show significant pre-to-post-treatment effects in PPT, ROM, and VJ from both contract-relax stretching and TENS in young subjects with AKP. PMID:27457916

  9. Music during interventional radiological procedures, effect on sedation, pain and anxiety: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, S; Johnson, P C D; Kettles, S; Kasthuri, R S

    2012-01-01

    Objective : To assess the effects of playing patient-selected music during interventional procedures on (1) the doses of sedation and analgesia and (2) anxiety levels. Methods : Patients undergoing interventional radiological procedures were randomised to either the intervention (music) or the control (no music) group. Patients in the intervention group had music of their choice played via headphones during the procedure. The primary outcomes were reductions in the doses of drugs for sedation (midazolam) and analgesia (fentanyl). Anxiety levels were assessed both before and after the procedure using the validated State Anxiety Inventory. Mean pulse rate and average of mean blood pressures were also recorded before and during the procedures as surrogate indicators of anxiety levels. Results : 100 patients were randomised in a 1:1 ratio. There were 58 males and 42 females, with a mean age of 58 years. Sedation was required in 21 (42%) patients in the music group compared with 30 (60%) patients in the control group (p=0.046). The mean [standard deviation (SD)] midazolam dose was 2.1 mg (2.3 mg) in the control group and 1.3 mg (2.2 mg) in the music group (p=0.027). The mean (SD) fentanyl dose was 29 mg (40 mg) in the control group and 18 mg (34 mg) in the music group (p=0.055). There was no significant effect of music on the change from baseline in anxiety levels (p=0.74), pulse rate (p=0.56) or blood pressure (p=0.34). Conclusion : Sedation requirements are significantly reduced by playing self-selected music to the patient during interventional radiology procedures. By lowering sedation during interventional radiology, music makes the procedure safer. It also contributes favourably to the overall patient experience. PMID:22422386

  10. The use of McConnell taping to correct abnormal biomechanics and muscle activation patterns in subjects with anterior knee pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Leibbrandt, Dominique C; Louw, Quinette A

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this review was to present the available evidence for the effect of McConnell taping on knee biomechanics in individuals with anterior knee pain. [Methods] The PubMed, Medline, Cinahl, SPORTDiscus, PEDro and ScienceDirect electronic databases were searched from inception until September 2014. Experimental research on knee biomechanical or EMG outcomes of McConnell taping compared with no tape or placebo tape were included. Two reviewers completed the searches, selected the full text articles, and assessed the risk of bias of eligible studies. Authors were contacted for missing data. [Results] Eight heterogeneous studies with a total sample of 220 were included in this review. All of the studies had a moderate to low risk of bias. Pooling of data was possible for three outcomes: average knee extensor moment, average VMO/VL ratio and average VMO-VL onset timing. None of these outcomes revealed significant differences. [Conclusion] The evidence is currently insufficient to justify routine use of the McConnell taping technique in the treatment of anterior knee pain. There is a need for more evidence on the aetiological pathways of anterior knee pain, level one evidence, and studies investigating other potential mechanisms of McConnell taping. PMID:26311990

  11. The use of McConnell taping to correct abnormal biomechanics and muscle activation patterns in subjects with anterior knee pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Leibbrandt, Dominique C; Louw, Quinette A

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this review was to present the available evidence for the effect of McConnell taping on knee biomechanics in individuals with anterior knee pain. [Methods] The PubMed, Medline, Cinahl, SPORTDiscus, PEDro and ScienceDirect electronic databases were searched from inception until September 2014. Experimental research on knee biomechanical or EMG outcomes of McConnell taping compared with no tape or placebo tape were included. Two reviewers completed the searches, selected the full text articles, and assessed the risk of bias of eligible studies. Authors were contacted for missing data. [Results] Eight heterogeneous studies with a total sample of 220 were included in this review. All of the studies had a moderate to low risk of bias. Pooling of data was possible for three outcomes: average knee extensor moment, average VMO/VL ratio and average VMO-VL onset timing. None of these outcomes revealed significant differences. [Conclusion] The evidence is currently insufficient to justify routine use of the McConnell taping technique in the treatment of anterior knee pain. There is a need for more evidence on the aetiological pathways of anterior knee pain, level one evidence, and studies investigating other potential mechanisms of McConnell taping. PMID:26311990

  12. Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of non-specific acute low back pain: a randomised controlled multicentre trial protocol [ISRCTN65814467

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Jorge; Perea-Milla, Emilio; Mendez, Camila; Silva, Luis Carlos; Herrera Galante, Antonia; Aranda Regules, Jose Manuel; Martinez Barquin, Dulce M; Aguilar, Inmaculada; Faus, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    Background Low back pain and its associated incapacitating effects constitute an important healthcare and socioeconomic problem, as well as being one of the main causes of disability among adults of working age. The prevalence of non-specific low back pain is very high among the general population, and 60–70% of adults are believed to have suffered this problem at some time. Nevertheless, few randomised clinical trials have been made of the efficacy and efficiency of acupuncture with respect to acute low back pain. The present study is intended to assess the efficacy of acupuncture for acute low back pain in terms of the improvement reported on the Roland Morris Questionnaire (RMQ) on low back pain incapacity, to estimate the specific and non-specific effects produced by the technique, and to carry out a cost-effectiveness analysis. Methods/Design Randomised four-branch controlled multicentre prospective study made to compare semi-standardised real acupuncture, sham acupuncture (acupuncture at non-specific points), placebo acupuncture and conventional treatment. The patients are blinded to the real, sham and placebo acupuncture treatments. Patients in the sample present symptoms of non specific acute low back pain, with a case history of 2 weeks or less, and will be selected from working-age patients, whether in paid employment or not, referred by General Practitioners from Primary Healthcare Clinics to the four clinics participating in this study. In order to assess the primary and secondary result measures, the patients will be requested to fill in a questionnaire before the randomisation and again at 3, 12 and 48 weeks after starting the treatment. The primary result measure will be the clinical relevant improvement (CRI) at 3 weeks after randomisation. We define CRI as a reduction of 35% or more in the RMQ results. Discussion This study is intended to obtain further evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture on acute low back pain and to isolate the

  13. Intensive lifestyle intervention improves physical function among obese adults with knee pain: findings from the Look AHEAD trial.

    PubMed

    Foy, Capri G; Lewis, Cora E; Hairston, Kristen G; Miller, Gary D; Lang, Wei; Jakicic, John M; Rejeski, W Jack; Ribisl, Paul M; Walkup, Michael P; Wagenknecht, Lynne E

    2011-01-01

    Lifestyle interventions have resulted in weight loss or improved physical fitness among individuals with obesity, which may lead to improved physical function. This prospective investigation involved participants in the Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) trial who reported knee pain at baseline (n = 2,203). The purposes of this investigation were to determine whether an Intensive Lifestyle Intervention (ILI) condition resulted in improvement in self-reported physical function from baseline to 12 months vs. a Diabetes Support and Education (DSE) condition, and whether changes in weight or fitness mediated the effect of the ILI. Outcome measures included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain, stiffness, and physical function subscales, and WOMAC summary score. ILI participants exhibited greater adjusted mean weight loss (s.e.) vs. DSE participants (-9.02 kg (0.48) vs. -0.78 kg (0.49); P < 0.001)). ILI participants also demonstrated more favorable change in WOMAC summary scores vs. DSE participants (β (s.e.) = -1.81 (0.63); P = 0.004). Multiple regression mediation analyses revealed that weight loss was a mediator of the effect of the ILI intervention on change in WOMAC pain, function, and summary scores (P < 0.001). In separate analyses, increased fitness also mediated the effect of the ILI intervention upon WOMAC summary score (P < 0.001). The ILI condition resulted in significant improvement in physical function among overweight and obese adults with diabetes and knee pain. The ILI condition also resulted in significant weight loss and improved fitness, which are possible mechanisms through which the ILI condition improved physical function.

  14. Intensive Lifestyle Intervention Improves Physical Function Among Obese Adults With Knee Pain: Findings From the Look AHEAD Trial

    PubMed Central

    Foy, Capri G.; Lewis, Cora E.; Hairston, Kristen G.; Miller, Gary D.; Lang, Wei; Jakicic, John M.; Rejeski, W. Jack; Ribisl, Paul M.; Walkup, Michael P.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.

    2011-01-01

    Lifestyle interventions have resulted in weight loss or improved physical fitness among individuals with obesity, which may lead to improved physical function. This prospective investigation involved participants in the Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) trial who reported knee pain at baseline (n = 2,203). The purposes of this investigation were to determine whether an Intensive Lifestyle Intervention (ILI) condition resulted in improvement in self-reported physical function from baseline to 12 months vs. a Diabetes Support and Education (DSE) condition, and whether changes in weight or fitness mediated the effect of the ILI. Outcome measures included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain, stiffness, and physical function subscales, and WOMAC summary score. ILI participants exhibited greater adjusted mean weight loss (s.e.) vs. DSE participants (−9.02 kg (0.48) vs. −0.78 kg (0.49); P < 0.001)). ILI participants also demonstrated more favorable change in WOMAC summary scores vs. DSE participants (β (s.e.) = −1.81 (0.63); P = 0.004). Multiple regression mediation analyses revealed that weight loss was a mediator of the effect of the ILI intervention on change in WOMAC pain, function, and summary scores (P < 0.001). In separate analyses, increased fitness also mediated the effect of the ILI intervention upon WOMAC summary score (P < 0.001). The ILI condition resulted in significant improvement in physical function among overweight and obese adults with diabetes and knee pain. The ILI condition also resulted in significant weight loss and improved fitness, which are possible mechanisms through which the ILI condition improved physical function. PMID:20559303

  15. Glucosamine-containing supplement improves locomotor functions in subjects with knee pain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Ono, Yoshiko; Shibata, Hiroshi; Moritani, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a glucosamine-containing supplement to improve locomotor functions in subjects with knee pain. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group comparative study was conducted for 16 weeks in 100 Japanese subjects (age, 51.8±0.8 years) with knee pain. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the two supplements containing 1) 1,200 mg of glucosamine hydrochloride, 60 mg of chondroitin sulfate, 45 mg of type II collagen peptides, 90 mg of quercetin glycosides, 10 mg of imidazole peptides, and 5 μg of vitamin D per day (GCQID group, n=50) or 2) a placebo (placebo group, n=50). Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure, visual analog scale score, normal walking speed, and knee-extensor strength were measured to evaluate the effects of the supplement on knee-joint functions and locomotor functions. Results In subjects eligible for efficacy assessment, there was no significant group × time interaction, and there were improvements in knee-joint functions and locomotor functions in both groups, but there was no significant difference between the groups. In subjects with mild-to-severe knee pain at baseline, knee-extensor strength at week 8 (104.6±5.0% body weight vs 92.3±5.5% body weight, P=0.030) and the change in normal walking speed at week 16 (0.11±0.03 m/s vs 0.05±0.02 m/s, P=0.038) were significantly greater in the GCQID group than in the placebo group. Further subgroup analysis based on Kellgren–Lawrence (K–L) grade showed that normal walking speed at week 16 (1.36±0.05 m/s vs 1.21±0.02 m/s, P<0.05) was significantly greater in the GCQID group than in the placebo group in subjects with K–L grade I. No adverse effect of treatment was identified in the safety assessment. Conclusion In subjects with knee pain, GCQID supplementation was effective for relieving knee pain and improving locomotor functions. PMID:26604721

  16. Patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Kay M; Callaghan, Michael J; van Linschoten, Robbart

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain refers to pain behind or around the patella (also known as patellofemoral pain syndrome, anterior knee pain, runner's knee, and, formerly, chondromalacia patellae). Patellofemoral pain is common, accounting for 11-17% of all knee pain presentations to general practice.(1 2) While it typically occurs in physically active people aged <40 years, it also affects people of all activity levels and ages.(1 2) Patellofemoral pain can be diagnosed in the clinic, and evidence based treatments can reduce pain and improve function, allowing patients to maintain a physically active lifestyle. PMID:26834209

  17. A comparison of the biomechanical effects of valgus knee braces and lateral wedged insoles in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard K; Nester, Christopher J; Richards, Jim D; Kim, Winston Y; Johnson, David S; Jari, Sanjiv; Laxton, Philip; Tyson, Sarah F

    2013-03-01

    Increases in the external knee adduction moment (EKAM) have been associated with increased mechanical load at the knee and progression of knee osteoarthritis. Valgus knee braces and lateral wedged insoles are common approaches to reducing this loading; however no study has directly compared the biomechanical and clinical effects of these two treatments in patients with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. A cross-over randomised design was used where each intervention was worn by 28 patients for a two week period. Pre- and post-intervention gait kinematic/kinetic data and clinical outcomes were collected to evaluate the biomechanical and clinical effects on the knee joint. The valgus knee brace and the lateral wedged insole significantly increased walking speed, reduced the early stance EKAM by 7% and 12%, and the knee adduction angular impulse by 8.6 and 16.1% respectively. The lateral wedged insole significantly reduced the early stance EKAM compared to the valgus knee brace (p=0.001). The valgus knee brace significantly reduced the knee varus angle compared to the baseline and lateral wedged insole. Improvements in pain and function subscales were comparable for the valgus knee brace and lateral wedged insole. There were no significant differences between the two treatments in any of the clinical outcomes; however the lateral wedged insoles demonstrated greater levels of acceptance by patients. This is the first study to biomechanically compare these two treatments, and demonstrates that given the potential role of knee loading in osteoarthritis progression, that both treatments reduce this but lateral wedge insoles appear to have a greater effect.

  18. Can a post-operative brace in slight hyperextension prevent extension deficit after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction? A prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, C; Cerulli, G; Lorenzini, M; Bergstrand, G; Werner, S

    2003-09-01

    It has been our observation that post-operative anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) braces together with the post-operative bandages do not always allow the knee to reach full extension. In ten uninjured knees with known hyperextension, the knees were bandaged in the same way as after an ACL-reconstruction. The knees were then studied radiologically in a Hypex brace set at 0 degrees, -5 degrees and -10 degrees of knee extension. Not a single knee was found to be straight in the brace set at 0 degrees. At -5 degrees most of the knees were straight or in slight hyperextension. It took -10 degrees to get all knees straight or in hyperextension. In a prospective randomised study 44 patients who underwent an arthroscopic ACL-reconstruction with a bone patellar tendon bone graft were randomised to use either a brace set at -5 degrees or a straight brace (0 degrees ) for at least the first three postoperative weeks. Before and three months after surgery range of motion was determined, using a goniometer with long arms, and sagittal knee laxity was measured with a KT-2000 arthrometer at manual max. Pre- and post-operative pain was evaluated with the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The same examiner (blindfolded to what type of brace was used) performed all the measurements. At three months, two of the 22 patients with the brace set at -5 degrees and twelve of the 22 patients with the straight brace had a loss of full extension of 2 degrees or more ( p<0.001). No significant differences were found between the groups in terms of knee flexion, sagittal knee laxity or post-operative pain. Although extension deficit after ACL-reconstruction can be prevented also in other ways, a Hypex brace set at -5 degrees seems to be an easy way of ensuring full knee extension.

  19. Acupuncture in patients with acute low back pain: a multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Vas, Jorge; Aranda, José Manuel; Modesto, Manuela; Benítez-Parejo, Nicolás; Herrera, Antonia; Martínez-Barquín, Dulce María; Aguilar, Inmaculada; Sánchez-Araujo, Max; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco

    2012-09-01

    Reviews of the efficacy of acupuncture as a treatment for acute low back pain have concluded that there is insufficient evidence for its efficacy and that more research is needed to evaluate it. A multicentre randomized controlled trial was conducted at 4 primary-care centres in Spain to evaluate the effects of acupuncture in patients with acute nonspecific low back pain in the context of primary care. A total of 275 patients with nonspecific acute low back pain (diagnosed by their general practitioner) were recruited and assigned randomly to 4 different groups: conventional treatment either alone or complemented by 5 sessions over a 2-week period of true acupuncture, sham acupuncture, or placebo acupuncture per patient. Patients were treated from February 2006 to January 2008. The primary outcome was the reduction in Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire scores of 35% or more after 2weeks' treatment. The patients in the 3 types of acupuncture groups were blinded to the treatments, but those who received conventional treatment alone were not. In the analysis adjusted for the total sample (true acupuncture relative risk 5.04, 95% confidence interval 2.24-11.32; sham acupuncture relative risk 5.02, 95% confidence interval 2.26-11.16; placebo acupuncture relative risk 2.57 95% confidence interval 1.21-5.46), as well as for the subsample of occupationally active patients, all 3 modalities of acupuncture were better than conventional treatment alone, but there was no difference among the 3 acupuncture modalities, which implies that true acupuncture is not better than sham or placebo acupuncture. PMID:22770838

  20. Inadequate pain relief and large functional loss among patients with knee osteoarthritis: evidence from a prospective multinational longitudinal study of osteoarthritis real-world therapies

    PubMed Central

    Conaghan, Philip G.; Peloso, Paul M.; Everett, Sharlette V.; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Black, Christopher M.; Mavros, Panagiotis; Arden, Nigel K.; Phillips, Ceri J.; Rannou, François; van de Laar, Mart A. F. J.; Moore, R. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To estimate the prevalence of inadequate pain relief (IPR) among patients with symptomatic knee OA prescribed analgesic therapy and to characterize patients with IPR. Methods. Patients ≥50 years old with physician-diagnosed knee OA who had taken topical or oral pain medication for at least 14 days were recruited for this prospective non-interventional study in six European countries. Pain and function were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the WOMAC; quality of life (QoL) was assessed using the 12-item short form. IPR was defined as an average pain score of >4 out of 10 on BPI question 5. Results. Of 1187 patients enrolled, 68% were female and the mean age was 68 years (s.d. 9); 639 (54%) met the definition of IPR. Patient responses for the BPI average pain question were well correlated with responses on the WOMAC pain subscale (Spearman r = 0.64, P < 0.001). In multivariate logistic regression, patients with IPR had greater odds of being female [adjusted odds ratio (adjOR) 1.90 (95% CI 1.46, 2.48)] and having OA in both knees [adjOR 1.48 (95% CI 1.15, 1.90)], higher BMI, longer OA duration, depression or diabetes. Patients with IPR (vs non-IPR) were more likely to have worse QoL, greater function loss and greater pain interference. Conclusion. IPR is common among patients with knee OA requiring analgesics and is associated with large functional loss and impaired QoL. Patients at particular risk of IPR, as characterized in this study, may require greater attention towards their analgesic treatment options. Trial registration: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ (NCT01294696). PMID:25150513

  1. Increased sensitivity to physical activity among individuals with knee osteoarthritis: relation to pain outcomes, psychological factors, and responses to quantitative sensory testing.

    PubMed

    Wideman, Timothy H; Finan, Patrick H; Edwards, Robert R; Quartana, Phillip J; Buenaver, Luis F; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Smith, Michael T

    2014-04-01

    Recent findings suggest that certain individuals with musculoskeletal pain conditions have increased sensitivity to physical activity (SPA) and respond to activities of stable intensity with increasingly severe pain. This study aimed to determine the degree to which individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA) show heightened SPA in response to a standardized walking task and whether SPA cross-sectionally predicts psychological factors, responses to quantitative sensory testing (QST), and different OA-related outcomes. One hundred seven adults with chronic knee OA completed self-report measures of pain, function, and psychological factors, underwent QST, and performed a 6-min walk test. Participants rated their discomfort levels throughout the walking task; an index of SPA was created by subtracting first ratings from peak ratings. Repeated-measure analysis of variance revealed that levels of discomfort significantly increased throughout the walking task. A series of hierarchical regression analyses determined that after controlling for significant covariates, psychological factors, and measures of mechanical pain sensitivity, individual variance in SPA predicted self-report pain and function and performance on the walking task. Analyses also revealed that both pain catastrophizing and the temporal summation of mechanical pain were significant predictors of SPA and that SPA mediated the relationship between catastrophizing and self-reported pain and physical function. The discussion addresses the potential processes contributing to SPA and the role it may play in predicting responses to different interventions for musculoskeletal pain conditions.

  2. Efficacy and safety of intramuscular glucosamine sulfate in osteoarthritis of the knee. A randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, A; Förster, K K; Fischer, M; Rovati, L C; Setnikar, I

    1994-01-01

    Glucosamine sulfate (Dona, CAS 29031-19-4) is a drug used in the treatment of osteoarthritis. When orally given, it is more effective than placebo and at least as effective as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in relieving osteoarthritis symptoms. The aim of this multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group study was to assess the efficacy and safety of glucosamine sulfate intramuscularly given on the same parameters. 155 out-patients with knee osteoarthritis (Lequesne's criteria), radiological stage between I and III, Lequesne's severity index of at least 4 points and symptoms for at least 6 months, were treated with i.m. glucosamine sulfate (or placebo) 400 mg twice a week for 6 weeks. Clinic visits were performed at enrollment, after a 2-week baseline, at weekly intervals during treatment and 2 weeks after drug discontinuation. Responders to treatment were considered those patients with a reduction of at least 3 points in the Lequesne index, together with a positive overall judgement by the investigator. The Lequesne index was slightly over 10 points in average in both groups at the beginning of treatment. A significant decrease in the index was observed for glucosamine compared to placebo (3.3 vs. 2.0 points in average, respectively; p < 0.05, Student's t-test). The responder rate in the evaluable patients was 55% with glucosamine (n = 73) and only 33% (n = 69) with placebo (p = 0.012, Fisher's Exact Test). According to the intention-to-treat approach, considering also drop-outs, these proportions were 51% vs. 30% (p = 0.015).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8135881

  3. Improving patient outcomes through advanced pain management techniques in total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Barrington, John W; Dalury, David F; Emerson, Roger H; Hawkins, Richard J; Joshi, Girish P; Stulberg, Bernard N

    2013-10-01

    Pain following orthopedic surgery is common and often suboptimally managed, with many patients reporting acute moderate to severe pain following surgery. Opioids are often used to manage this pain, yet this can result in significant side effects and complications, including constipation, nausea, vomiting, respiratory distress, and other central nervous system issues. Multimodal therapy that includes surgical site infiltration with extended release local anesthetic has been seen as a new way to minimize this pain for patients, which can result in improved quality of life and shorter length of hospital stay. This article examines the use of bupivacaine liposome injectable suspension (EXPAREL®; Pacira Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, California), a non-opioid product for pain management. Liposomal bupivacaine uses DepoFoam® technology that allows for the extended release of injected drugs. When used as the foundation of a multimodal regimen, it is effective in reducing postsurgical pain for up to 72 hours while reducing the need for opioids for pain relief.

  4. Comparison of the effects of elcatonin and risedronate on back and knee pain by electroalgometry using fall of skin impedance and quality of life assessment using SF-36.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takuo; Ohue, Mutsumi; Nakajima, Mikio; Fujii, Yoshio; Miyauchi, Akimitsu; Takagi, Yasuyuki

    2011-09-01

    Back and knee pain is a widespread health problem and a serious threat to the quality of life (QOL) in middle-aged and older adults, as it frequently accompanies osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. In order to compare the effects of elcatonin and risedronate on such pain, 20 units of elcatonin was intramuscularly injected to 18 patients, and 5 mg of risedronate was orally administered daily to 20 others with similar backgrounds. Exercise-induced pain was analyzed by measuring the fall of skin impedance by electroalgometry (EAM), and subjective pain was recorded by a visual rating system (VRS) on a scale of 0 (no pain) to 100 (unbearable pain). In patients treated with elcatonin, the mean EAM-estimated pain was significantly reduced after 4, 5 and 6 months of treatment, and the VRS score after 3, 5 and 6 months, indicating a significant analgesic effect. In the risedronate group, however, improvement was less remarkable. Two-way analysis of variance using pain as a dependent variable and treatment group and time as independent variables revealed a significantly greater effect of elcatonin over risedronate on both the EAM and VRS scores, and the influence of treatment time on pain was indistinguishable between the two treatment groups. Effect of exercise load on pain was less on knee load than knee and spine load and spine load, but indistinguishable between the two groups. Changes in QOL were evaluated by the SF-36 system. Norm-based scoring showed significant improvements in 3 of 4 categories for elcatonin and in 2 of 4 for risedronate, suggesting comparable effects on the physical aspects of QOL, whereas responses to emotionally and socially directed questions indicated significant improvements in all 4 categories for risedronate, but none for elcatonin, suggesting a more physical than emotional component in elcatonin effects compared to risedronate.

  5. Acupuncture at Houxi (SI 3) acupoint for acute neck pain caused by stiff neck: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhong-ren; Yue, Jin-huan; Tian, Hong-zhao; Zhang, Qin-hong

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The use of acupuncture has been suggested for the treatment of acute neck pain caused by stiff neck in China. However, current evidence is insufficient to draw any conclusions about its efficacy. Therefore this pilot study was designed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of acupuncture at the Houxi (SI3) acupoint for treatment of acute neck pain. Methods/analysis This pilot study will be a two-parallel-group, assessor-blinded, randomised controlled trial. Thirty-six stiff neck participants with acute neck pain will be recruited and randomly divided into two groups in a 1:1 ratio. Participants in the control group will receive massage on the local neck region (5 min each session, three times a day for 3 days). In addition to massage, patients in the treatment group will receive acupuncture (one session a day for 3 days). Measures will be taken at 0, 3 and 15 days. The primary outcome is the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). The secondary outcome is the Short Form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ). Ethics/dissemination The protocol for this pilot randomised clinical trial has undergone ethics scrutiny and been approved by the ethics review boards of the First Affiliated Hospital of Heilongjiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Permission number: HZYLL201303502). The findings of this study will provide important clinical evidence on the feasibility and efficacy of acupuncture treatment for stiff neck patients with acute neck pain. In addition, it will explore the feasibility of further acupuncture research. Trial registration number ChiCTR-TRC-13003911. PMID:25537784

  6. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a novel, group self-management course for adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain: study protocol for a multicentre, randomised controlled trial (COPERS)

    PubMed Central

    Carnes, Dawn; Taylor, Stephanie JC; Homer, Kate; Eldridge, Sandra; Bremner, Stephen; Pincus, Tamar; Rahman, Anisur; Underwood, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a common condition that often responds poorly to treatment. Self-management courses have been advocated as a non-drug pain management technique, although evidence for their effectiveness is equivocal. We designed and piloted a self-management course based on evidence for effectiveness for specific course components and characteristics. Methods/analysis COPERS (coping with persistent pain, effectiveness research into self-management) is a pragmatic randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an intensive, group, cognitive behavioural-based, theoretically informed and manualised self-management course for chronic pain patients against a control of best usual care: a pain education booklet and a relaxation CD. The course lasts for 15 h, spread over 3 days, with a –2 h follow-up session 2 weeks later. We aim to recruit 685 participants with chronic musculoskeletal pain from primary, intermediate and secondary care services in two UK regions. The study is powered to show a standardised mean difference of 0.3 in the primary outcome, pain-related disability. Secondary outcomes include generic health-related quality of life, healthcare utilisation, pain self-efficacy, coping, depression, anxiety and social engagement. Outcomes are measured at 6 and 12 months postrandomisation. Pain self-efficacy is measured at 3 months to assess whether change mediates clinical effect. Ethics/dissemination Ethics approval was given by Cambridgeshire Ethics 11/EE/046. This trial will provide robust data on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an evidence-based, group self-management programme for chronic musculoskeletal pain. The published outcomes will help to inform future policy and practice around such self-management courses, both nationally and internationally. Trial registration ISRCTN24426731. PMID:23358564

  7. How Accurate Are Patients at Diagnosing the Cause of Their Knee Pain With the Help of a Web-based Symptom Checker?

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, Leslie J.; Komm, Jorden T.; Bernas, Geoffrey A.; Fineberg, Marc S.; Marzo, John M.; Rauh, Michael A.; Smolinski, Robert J.; Wind, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Researching medical information is the third most popular activity online, and there are a variety of web-based symptom checker programs available. Purpose: This study evaluated a patient’s ability to self-diagnose their knee pain from a list of possible diagnoses supplied by an accurate symptom checker. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: All patients older than 18 years who presented to the office of 7 different fellowship-trained sports medicine surgeons over an 8-month period with a complaint of knee pain were asked to participate. A web-based symptom checker for knee pain was used; the program has a reported accuracy of 89%. The symptom checker generates a list of potential diagnoses after patients enter symptoms and links each diagnosis to informative content. After exploring the informative content, patients selected all diagnoses they felt could explain their symptoms. Each patient was later examined by a physician who was blinded to the differential generated by the program as well as the patient-selected diagnoses. A blinded third party compared the diagnoses generated by the program with those selected by the patient as well as the diagnoses determined by the physician. The level of matching between the patient-selected diagnoses and the physician’s diagnoses determined the patient’s ability to correctly diagnose their knee pain. Results: There were 163 male and 165 female patients, with a mean age of 48 years (range, 18-76 years). The program generated a mean 6.6 diagnoses (range, 2-15) per patient. Each patient had a mean 1.7 physician diagnoses (range, 1-4). Patients selected a mean 2 diagnoses (range, 1-9). The patient-selected diagnosis matched the physician’s diagnosis 58% of the time. Conclusion: With the aid of an accurate symptom checker, patients were able to correctly identify the cause of their knee pain 58% of the time. PMID:26962542

  8. Intravenous Paracetamol Versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia With Morphine for the Pain Management Following Diagnostic Knee Arthroscopy in Trauma Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Seyed Masoud; Esmaeelijah, Aliakbar; Golzari, Samad; Keyhani, Sohrab; Maserrat, Azita; Mohseni, Gholamreza; Ardehali, Seyed Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most patients undergoing outpatient surgeries have the unpleasant experience of high level pain after surgery. Compared with open surgeries, arthroscopic procedures are less painful; however, inadequate pain management could be associated with significant concerns. Opioids alone or in combination with local anesthetics are frequently used for diminishing postoperative pain using intravenous or epidural infusion pumps. Despite morphine various disadvantages, it is commonly used for controlling pain after surgery. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare intravenous paracetamol and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with morphine for the pain management following diagnostic knee arthroscopy in trauma patients. Patients and Methods: Sixty trauma patients who were scheduled to undergo knee arthroscopy were randomly divided into two groups. Patients immediately received intravenous infusion of 1 g paracetamol within 15 minutes after surgery and every 6 hours to 24 hours in the paracetamol group. The patient-controlled analgesia group received morphine through PCA infusion pump at 2 mL/h base rate and 1mL bolus every 15 minutes. Pain level, nausea and vomiting, and sedation were measured and recorded during entering the recovery, 15 and 30 minutes after entering the recovery, 2, 6, and 24 hours after starting morphine pump infusion in the morphine and paracetamol in the paracetamol groups. Results: There was no significant difference regarding the pain level at different times after entering the recovery between the two groups. No one from the paracetamol group developed drug complications. However, 22.3% in the PCA morphine suffered from postoperative nausea; there was a statistically significant difference regarding the sedation level, nausea, and vomiting at various times between the two groups. Conclusions: Intravenous administration of paracetamol immediately after knee arthroscopy improved postoperative pain, decreased analgesic administration

  9. A pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) investigating the effectiveness of reflexology for managing pregnancy low back and/or pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Close, Ciara; Sinclair, Marlene; Cullough, Julie Mc; Liddle, Dianne; Hughes, Ciara

    2016-05-01

    Many pregnant women with low back and/or pelvic pain (LBPP) use pain medications to manage this pain, much of which is self-prescribed and potentially harmful. Therefore, there is a need to find effective nonpharmacological treatments for the condition. Reflexology has previously been shown to help nonspecific low back pain. Therefore; a pilot RCT was conducted investigating reflexology in the management of pregnancy-LBPP. 90 primiparous women were randomised to either usual care, a reflexology or footbath intervention. Primary outcome measures were; the Pain Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). 64 women completed the RCT; retention rates for the reflexology group were 80%, usual care group 83.33% and footbath group 50%. The reflexology group demonstrated a Clinically Important Change (CIC) in pain frequency (1.64 cm). Results indicate it is feasible to conduct an RCT in this area, although a footbath is an unsuitable sham treatment. Reflexology may help manage pregnancy-LBPP; however a fully powered trial is needed to confirm this.

  10. Biomechanics of Lower Limbs during Walking among Candidates for Total Knee Arthroplasty with and without Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, David R.; Campbell-Kyureghyan, Naira H.; Topp, Robert V.; Quesada, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of joint pathologies, such as unilateral knee osteoarthritis (UKOA) or low back pain (LBP), on bilateral gait symmetry has gained increased attention during the past decade. This study is the first to compare gait patterns between patients with UKOA and LBP in combination and with UKOA only. Temporal, kinematic, and kinetic variables were measured bilaterally during gait stance phase in 31 subjects with UKOA and LBP (Group I) and 11 subjects with only UKOA (Group II). Group I patients exhibited less hip rotation in the affected limb (A) than in the nonaffected (NA) limb during walking in contrast to Group II patients. Group I patients had minimal bilateral differences in hip abduction and flexion, but Group II patients displayed significantly larger values in the NA limb compared to the A limb for both parameters. Hip flexion patterns were significantly different between Groups I and II. Subjects in both groups adapted gait patterns that minimized vertical ground reaction force, knee flexion motion, and stance time on the UKOA affected limb. The distinct kinematic gait patterns that were revealed in this study may provide clinical value for assessment of patients with UKOA in conjunction with LBP. PMID:26171387

  11. Rocker-sole footwear versus prefabricated foot orthoses for the treatment of pain associated with first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis affecting the first metatarsophalangeal joint of the foot is a common condition which results in pain, stiffness and impaired ambulation. Footwear modifications and foot orthoses are widely used in clinical practice to treat this condition, but their effectiveness has not been rigorously evaluated. This article describes the design of a randomised trial comparing the effectiveness of rocker-sole footwear and individualised prefabricated foot orthoses in reducing pain associated with first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis. Methods Eighty people with first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis will be randomly allocated to receive either a pair of rocker-sole shoes (MBT® Matwa, Masai Barefoot Technology, Switzerland) or a pair of individualised, prefabricated foot orthoses (Vasyli Customs, Vasyli Medical™, Queensland, Australia). At baseline, the biomechanical effects of the interventions will be examined using a wireless wearable sensor motion analysis system (LEGSys™, BioSensics, Boston, MA, USA) and an in-shoe plantar pressure system (Pedar®, Novel GmbH, Munich, Germany). The primary outcome measure will be the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ), measured at baseline and 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measures will include the function, footwear and general foot health subscales of the FHSQ, severity of pain and stiffness at the first metatarsophalangeal joint (measured using 100 mm visual analog scales), global change in symptoms (using a 15-point Likert scale), health status (using the Short-Form-12® Version 2.0 questionnaire), use of rescue medication and co-interventions to relieve pain, the frequency and type of self-reported adverse events and physical activity levels (using the Incidental and Planned Activity Questionnaire). Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Discussion This study is the first randomised trial to compare the effectiveness of rocker

  12. The effect of intraarticular levobupivacaine and bupivacaine injection on the postoperative pain management in total knee artroplastic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Nurcan; Taspinar, Vildan; Karasu, Derya; Tezcan, Aysu; Dikmen, Bayazit; Gogus, Nermin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with considerable postoperative pain. We compared the effects of intraoperative intraarticular levobupivacaine and bupivacaine on postoperative analgesia and analgesic consumption after total knee arthroplasty. Methods: Sixty ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) physical status II-III, 18-75 years old patients scheduled for unilateral TKA were included in this study. For the operative procedure combined spinal epidural anesthesia was given by injecting 15mg levobupivacaine in subarachnoid space at L3-4/L4-5 in sitting position for all patients. In Group L 20ml levobupivacaine(0.5%), in Group B 20ml bupivacaine (0.5%) was injected intraarticularly 10 minutes before opening of the tourniquet at the end of the surgery. For all patients postoperative analgesia was provided with PCEA (levobupivacaine+fentanyl) and oral 1gr paracetamol four times a day. Patients’ intraoperative-postoperative hemodynamical data, postoperative sensorial-motor block characteristics, side effects, PCEA demand ratios and bolus volumes, total analgesic consumption, VAS values, first mobilization time, hospitalization time were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS version 13.00 software. Results: There was no intergroup difference in demographic data, hemodynamical data, PCEA demand ratios, total analgesic consumption, first mobilization time, hospitalization time and VAS values at 0,2,72 hour. Postoperative lower VAS values were determined at 4,8,12,24 hours in Group B and at 48th hour in Group L(p<0.05). Conclusions: Intraarticular local anesthetic administration in addition to PCEA for post operative pain relief provides good analgesia after TKA surgery. PMID:25674125

  13. Neck exercises, physical and cognitive behavioural-graded activity as a treatment for adult whiplash patients with chronic neck pain: Design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many patients suffer from chronic neck pain following a whiplash injury. A combination of cognitive, behavioural therapy with physiotherapy interventions has been indicated to be effective in the management of patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders. The objective is to present the design of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of a combined individual physical and cognitive behavioural-graded activity program on self-reported general physical function, in addition to neck function, pain, disability and quality of life in patients with chronic neck pain following whiplash injury compared with a matched control group measured at baseline and 4 and 12 months after baseline. Methods/Design The design is a two-centre, RCT-study with a parallel group design. Included are whiplash patients with chronic neck pain for more than 6 months, recruited from physiotherapy clinics and an out-patient hospital department in Denmark. Patients will be randomised to either a pain management (control) group or a combined pain management and training (intervention)group. The control group will receive four educational sessions on pain management, whereas the intervention group will receive the same educational sessions on pain management plus 8 individual training sessions for 4 months, including guidance in specific neck exercises and an aerobic training programme. Patients and physiotherapists are aware of the allocation and the treatment, while outcome assessors and data analysts are blinded. The primary outcome measures will be Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF36), Physical Component Summary (PCS). Secondary outcomes will be Global Perceived Effect (-5 to +5), Neck Disability Index (0-50), Patient Specific Functioning Scale (0-10), numeric rating scale for pain bothersomeness (0-10), SF-36 Mental Component Summary (MCS), TAMPA scale of Kinesiophobia (17-68), Impact of Event Scale (0-45), EuroQol (0-1), craniocervical

  14. Effects of Therapeutic Exercise and Hydrotherapy on Pain Severity and Knee Range of Motion in Patients with Hemophilia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mazloum, Vahid; Rahnama, Nader; Khayambashi, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain and limited range of motion (ROM) are the crucial subsequent results of joint hemorrhages in individuals with bleeding disorders and hemophilia. Exercise interventions are particularly recommended in treatment of such patients. The purpose of this study was to detect the influences of conventional exercise therapy and hydrotherapy on the knee joint complications in patients with hemophilia. Methods: A total of 40 patients engaging hemophilia A were randomized into one of three groups: Therapeutic exercise (N = 13), hydrotherapy (N = 14) or control (N = 13). While the first two groups followed their specific programs for 4 weeks, routine life-style was maintained by subjects in the control group in this period. To evaluate the pain level and knee ROM the visual analog scale and standard goniometer were utilized, respectively. The outcome was measured at baseline and after completing the prescribed protocols. Data analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance and Scheffe statistical tests (P < 0.05). Results: Both experimental groups experienced more significant decreasing in pain level (P < 0.001) and knee flexion and extension ROM (P < 0.001) in comparison to the control group. Although the pain was significantly (P < 0.01) more alleviated in participants treated through hydrotherapy in comparison to exercise therapy, the difference in ROM improvement was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Using hydrotherapy in addition to usual rehabilitation training can result in beneficial effect in terms of pain and knee joint ROM. However, it appears that hydrotherapy is more effective in reducing pain. PMID:24554996

  15. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DRY NEEDLING AND STRETCHING VS. STRETCHING ALONE ON HAMSTRING FLEXIBILITY IN PATIENTS WITH KNEE PAIN: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Michael; Dolbeer, Jeffery; Morris, Jamie; Terry, Aspen; Koppenhaver, Shane; Goss, Donald Lee

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, dry needling has emerged as a popular treatment for muscular pain and impairments. While there are numerous studies detailing the benefits of dry needling for pain, few studies exist examining the effects on soft tissue mobility. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if the addition of hamstring dry needling to a standard stretching program results in greater improvements in hamstring flexibility compared to sham dry needling and stretching in subjects with atraumatic knee pain. Additionally, squat range of motion, knee pain, and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale were compared between the two groups. Study Design Double blinded randomized controlled trial. Methods Thirty-nine subjects were randomized to receive either dry needling (n = 20) or sham (n = 19) dry needling in addition to hamstring stretching, to all detected hamstring trigger points on two visits. All dependent variables were measured at baseline, immediately post intervention, and 1, 3, and 7 days after the initial treatment. Each subject also performed hamstring stretching three times daily for one week. Results Significant improvements in hamstring range of motion and all other dependent variables were observed across time regardless of treatment group. However, the lack of significant time by group interactions indicated the improvements were not different between dry needling and sham dry needling groups. Conclusions The results of the current randomized controlled trial suggest that two sessions of dry needling did not improve hamstring range of motion or other knee pain-related impairments more than sham dry needling in a young active population with atraumatic knee pain. Level of Evidence Therapy, Level 2 PMID:27757280

  16. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for the control of pain during rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty: A randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rakel, Barbara A; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Geasland, Katharine; Embree, Jennie; Clark, Charles R; Noiseux, Nicolas O; Callaghan, John J; Herr, Keela; Walsh, Deirdre; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in reducing pain and hyperalgesia and increasing function after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We hypothesized that participants using TENS during rehabilitation exercises would report significantly lower pain during range-of-motion (ROM) activity and fast walking but not at rest, would have less hyperalgesia, and would have better function than participants receiving placebo-TENS or standard care. We also hypothesized that change in ROM pain would differ based on psychological characteristics (trait anxiety, pain catastrophizing, and depression) and treatment group. This prospective, randomized study used intent-to-treat analyses in 317 participants after primary, unilateral TKA. Assessors, blinded to treatment allocation, measured pain, function (ROM and gait speed), and hyperalgesia (quantitative sensory tests) postoperatively and 6 weeks after surgery. Analgesic intake, anxiety, depression, and pain catastrophizing were also assessed. TENS participants used it 1 to 2 times per day at 42 mA (on average) and had less pain postoperatively during active knee extension (P=.019) and fast walking (P=.006) than standard care participants. TENS and placebo-TENS were not significantly different. TENS participants who scored low on anxiety and pain catastrophizing had a greater reduction in ROM pain at 6 weeks than those who scored high on these factors (P=.002 and P=.03). Both TENS and placebo-TENS participants had less postoperative mechanical hyperalgesia (P=.03-.01) than standard care participants. Supplementing pharmacologic analgesia with TENS during rehabilitation exercises reduces movement pain postoperatively, but a placebo influence exists and the effect is gone by 6 weeks. Patients with low anxiety and pain catastrophizing may benefit most from TENS.

  17. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) for the Control of Pain during Rehabilitation Following Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA): A Randomized, Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rakel, Barbara; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Geasland, Katharine; Embree, Jennie; Clark, Charles R; Noiseux, Nicolas O; Callaghan, John J; Herr, Keela; Walsh, Deirdre; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of TENS in reducing pain and hyperalgesia and increasing function following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We hypothesized participants using TENS during rehabilitation exercises would: 1) report significantly lower pain during range-of-motion (ROM) and fast walking but not at rest; 2) have less hyperalgesia; and, 3) have better function than participants receiving Placebo-TENS or Standard Care. We also hypothesized that change in ROM pain would differ based on psychological characteristics (trait anxiety, pain catastrophizing and depression) and treatment group. This prospective, randomized study used intent-to-treat analyses on 317 subjects after primary, unilateral TKA. Assessors, blinded to treatment allocation, measured pain, function (ROM and gait speed), and hyperalgesia (quantitative sensory tests) postoperatively and 6 weeks after surgery. Analgesic intake, anxiety, depression, and pain catastrophizing were also assessed. TENS participants used it 1–2 times/day at 42 mA (on average) and had less pain postoperatively during active knee extension (p=0.019) and fast walking (p=0.006) than Standard Care participants. TENS and Placebo-TENS were not significantly different. TENS participants who scored low on anxiety and pain catastrophizing had a greater reduction in ROM pain at 6 weeks than those scoring high on these factors (p=0.002 and 0.03). Both TENS and Placebo-TENS participants had less postoperative mechanical hyperalgesia (p=0.03 – 0.01) than Standard Care participants. Supplementing pharmacologic analgesia with TENS during rehabilitation exercises reduces movement pain postoperatively but a placebo influence exists and the effect is gone by 6 weeks. Patients with low anxiety and pain catastrophizing may benefit most from TENS. PMID:25270585

  18. Effects of Group-Based Exercise on Range of Motion, Muscle Strength, Functional Ability, and Pain During the Acute Phase After Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Yoshinori; Kamitani, Tsukasa; Wada, Osamu; Mizuno, Kiyonori; Yamada, Minoru

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Prospective observational study including a historical control group. Background The extent to which group-based exercise (G-EXE) improves knee range of motion (ROM), quadriceps strength, and gait ability is similar to that of individualized exercise (I-EXE) at 6 weeks and 8 months after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, the benefits of G-EXE for patients during the acute recovery phase after TKA remain unclear. Objective To determine the effects of G-EXE during the acute recovery phase after TKA on knee ROM, quadriceps strength, functional ability, and knee pain. Methods Two hundred thirty-one patients participated in G-EXE in addition to regular ambulation and activities-of-daily-living exercises twice daily during the hospital stay. Outcomes were compared to those of a retrospectively identified, historical control group (I-EXE group [n = 206]) that included patients who performed exercises identical to those performed by the G-EXE group. The outcomes included knee ROM, quadriceps strength, pain intensity, and timed up-and-go test score at 1 month before surgery and at discharge. Analyses were adjusted for age, body mass index, sex, length of hospital stay, and preoperative values. Results Changes in ROM of knee flexion and extension (P<.001) and quadriceps strength (P<.001) were significantly better in the G-EXE group than those in the I-EXE group at discharge. The pain intensity improved more in the G-EXE group than in the I-EXE group at discharge (P<.001). However, the changes in the timed up-and-go scores were not significantly different. Conclusion Patients performing G-EXE in addition to regular ambulation and activities-of-daily-living exercises demonstrated greater changes in knee ROM, quadriceps strength, and knee pain than those performing I-EXE in addition to regular ambulation and activities-of-daily-living exercises. The nonrandomized, asynchronous design decreases certainty of these findings. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 2b

  19. Improving patient outcomes through advanced pain management techniques in total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Barrington, John W; Dalury, David F; Emerson, Roger H; Hawkins, Richard J; Joshi, Girish P; Stulberg, Bernard N

    2013-10-01

    Pain following orthopedic surgery is common and often suboptimally managed, with many patients reporting acute moderate to severe pain following surgery. Opioids are often used to manage this pain, yet this can result in significant side effects and complications, including constipation, nausea, vomiting, respiratory distress, and other central nervous system issues. Multimodal therapy that includes surgical site infiltration with extended release local anesthetic has been seen as a new way to minimize this pain for patients, which can result in improved quality of life and shorter length of hospital stay. This article examines the use of bupivacaine liposome injectable suspension (EXPAREL®; Pacira Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, California), a non-opioid product for pain management. Liposomal bupivacaine uses DepoFoam® technology that allows for the extended release of injected drugs. When used as the foundation of a multimodal regimen, it is effective in reducing postsurgical pain for up to 72 hours while reducing the need for opioids for pain relief. PMID:24911371

  20. Physiotherapy informed by Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (PACT): protocol for a randomised controlled trial of PACT versus usual physiotherapy care for adults with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, Emma; Galea Holmes, Melissa; Wileman, Vari; McCracken, Lance; Moss-Morris, Rona; Pallet, John; Sanders, Duncan; Barcellona, Massimo; Critchley, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a common condition and source of significant suffering, disability and healthcare costs. Current physiotherapy treatment is moderately effective. Combining theory-based psychological methods with physiotherapy could improve outcomes for people with CLBP. The primary aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) is to evaluate the efficacy of Physiotherapy informed by Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (PACT) on functioning in patients with CLBP. Methods and analysis The PACT trial is a two-armed, parallel-group, multicentre RCT to assess the efficacy of PACT in comparison with usual physiotherapy care (UC). 240 patients referred to physiotherapy with CLBP will be recruited from three National Health Service (NHS) hospitals trusts. Inclusion criteria are: age ≥18 years, CLBP ≥12-week duration, scoring ≥3 points on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and adequate understanding of spoken and written English to participate. Patients will be randomised to PACT or UC (120 per arm stratified by centre) by an independent randomisation service and followed up at 3 and 12 months post randomisation. The sample size of 240 will provide adequate power to detect a standardised mean difference of 0.40 in the primary outcome (RMDQ; 5% significance, 80% power) assuming attrition of 20%. Analysis will be by intention to treat conducted by the trial statistician, blind to treatment group, following a prespecified analysis plan. Estimates of treatment effect at the follow-up assessments will use an intention-to-treat framework, implemented using a linear mixed-effects model. Ethics and dissemination This trial has full ethical approval (14/SC/0277). It will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. The results will enable clinicians, patients and health service managers to make informed decisions regarding the efficacy of PACT for patients with CLBP. Trial registration number ISRCTN

  1. Proprioceptive impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis are not generalized to the ankle and elbow joints.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Camille J; Wrigley, Tim V; Farrell, Michael J; Bennell, Kim L; Hodges, Paul W

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms for proprioceptive changes associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) remain elusive. Observations of proprioceptive changes in both affected knees and other joints imply more generalized mechanisms for proprioceptive impairment. However, evidence for a generalized effect remains controversial. This study examined whether joint repositioning proprioceptive deficits are localized to the diseased joint (knee) or generalized across other joints (elbow and ankle) in people with knee OA. Thirty individuals with right knee OA (17 female, 66±7 [mean±SD] years) of moderate/severe radiographic disease severity and 30 healthy asymptomatic controls of comparable age (17 female, 65±8years) performed active joint repositioning tests of the knee, ankle and elbow in randomised order in supine. Participants with knee OA had a larger relative error for joint repositioning of the knee than the controls (OA: 2.7±2.1°, control: 1.6±1.7°, p=.03). Relative error did not differ between groups for the ankle (OA: 2.2±2.5°, control: 1.9±1.3°, p=.50) or elbow (OA: 2.5±3.3°, control: 2.9±2.8°, p=.58). These results are consistent with a mechanism for proprioceptive change that is localized to the knee joint. This could be mediated by problems with mechanoreceptors, processing/relay of somatosensory input to higher centers, or joint-specific interference with cognitive processes by pain.

  2. Study protocol: Improving patient choice in treating low back pain (IMPACT - LBP): A randomised controlled trial of a decision support package for use in physical therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a common and costly condition. There are several treatment options for people suffering from back pain, but there are few data on how to improve patients' treatment choices. This study will test the effects of a decision support package (DSP), designed to help patients seeking care for back pain to make better, more informed choices about their treatment within a physiotherapy department. The package will be designed to assist both therapist and patient. Methods/Design Firstly, in collaboration with physiotherapists, patients and experts in the field of decision support and decision aids, we will develop the DSP. The work will include: a literature and evidence review; secondary analysis of existing qualitative data; exploration of patients' perspectives through focus groups and exploration of experts' perspectives using a nominal group technique and a Delphi study. Secondly, we will carry out a pilot single centre randomised controlled trial within NHS Coventry Community Physiotherapy. We will randomise physiotherapists to receive either training for the DSP or not. We will randomly allocate patients seeking treatment for non specific low back pain to either a physiotherapist trained in decision support or to receive usual care. Our primary outcome measure will be patient satisfaction with treatment at three month follow-up. We will also estimate the cost-effectiveness of the intervention, and assess the value of conducting further research. Discussion Informed shared decision-making should be an important part of any clinical consultation, particularly when there are several treatments, which potentially have moderate effects. The results of this pilot will help us determine the benefits of improving the decision-making process in clinical practice on patient satisfaction. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN46035546 PMID:21352528

  3. Using an internet intervention to support self-management of low back pain in primary care: protocol for a randomised controlled feasibility trial (SupportBack)

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Adam W A; Stanford, Rosie; Little, Paul; Roberts, Lisa; Foster, Nadine E; Hill, Jonathan C; Hay, Elaine; Stuart, Beth; Turner, David; Yardley, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent and costly condition. The majority of patients experiencing LBP are managed in primary care, where first-line care recommendations consist of advice to self-manage and remain active. Internet interventions present a potential means of providing patients with tailored self-management advice and evidence-based support for increasing physical activity. Methods/analysis This protocol describes a single-blind, randomised controlled feasibility trial of an internet intervention developed to support the self-management of LBP in primary care. Patients are being randomised to 1 of 3 groups receiving either usual primary care, usual primary care with the addition of an internet intervention or an internet intervention with physiotherapist telephone support. Patients are followed up at 3 months. Primary outcomes are the feasibility of (1) the trial design/methods, (2) the delivery of the internet intervention and (3) the provision of telephone support by physiotherapists. Secondary outcomes will include exploratory analysis of estimates and variation in clinical outcomes of pain and disability, in order to inform a future main trial. Ethics/dissemination This feasibility trial has undergone ethical scrutiny and been approved by the National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee, REC Reference 13/SC/0202. The feasibility findings will be disseminated to the research community through presentations at conferences and publication in peer review journals. Broader dissemination will come following a definitive trial. Trial registration number ISRCTN 31034004. PMID:26399575

  4. Perceived racial discrimination, but not mistrust of medical researchers, predicts the heat pain tolerance of African Americans with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Quyen T.; Glover, Toni L.; Sotolongo, Adriana; King, Christopher D.; Sibille, Kimberly T.; Herbert, Matthew S.; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Sanden, Shelley H.; Staud, Roland; Redden, David T.; Bradley, Laurence A.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Studies have shown that perceived racial discrimination is a significant predictor of clinical pain severity among African Americans. It remains unknown whether perceived racial discrimination also alters the nociceptive processing of painful stimuli, which, in turn, could influence clinical pain severity. This study examined associations between perceived racial discrimination and responses to noxious thermal stimuli among African Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Mistrust of medical researchers was also assessed given its potential to affect responses to the noxious stimuli. Method One hundred and thirty (52% African American, 48% non-Hispanic white) community-dwelling older adults with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis completed two study sessions. In session one, individuals provided demographic, socioeconomic, physical and mental health information. They completed questionnaires related to perceived lifetime frequency of racial discrimination and mistrust of medical researchers. In session two, individuals underwent a series of controlled thermal stimulation procedures to assess heat pain sensitivity, particularly heat pain tolerance. Results African Americans were more sensitive to heat pain and reported greater perceived racial discrimination as well as greater mistrust of medical researchers compared to non-Hispanic whites. Greater perceived racial discrimination significantly predicted lower heat pain tolerance for African Americans but not non-Hispanic whites. Mistrust of medical researchers did not significantly predict heat pain tolerance for either racial group Conclusion These results lend support to the idea that perceived racial discrimination may influence the clinical pain severity of African Americans via the nociceptive processing of painful stimuli. PMID:24219416

  5. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and development of radiographic and painful knee osteoarthritis. A community-based cohort of middle-aged women

    PubMed Central

    Kluzek, Stefan; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Judge, Andrew; Karsdal, Morten A.; Shorthose, Matthew; Spector, Tim; Hart, Deborah; Newton, Julia L.; Arden, Nigel K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context and objective: We evaluated the predictive value of serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (sCOMP) levels over 20 years on the development of radiographic (RKOA) and painful knee osteoarthritis (KOA) in a longitudinal cohort of middle-aged women. Materials and methods: Five hundred and ninety-three women with no baseline KOA underwent 5-year knee radiographs over 20-years and were asked about knee pain a month before each assessment. A repeated measures logistic regression model was used where the outcomes were recorded at 5, 10, 15 and 20-years follow-up. Results: The highest quartile of sCOMP was associated with increased risk of RKOA with overall OR of 1.97 (95% CI: 1.33–2.91) over 20 years when compared with the lowest sCOMP quartile. The association with painful KOA was similar and also independent, but only when the fourth and third sCOMP quartiles were compared. Discussion and conclusion: This study demonstrates that sCOMP levels are predictive of subsequent structural changes and incidence of painful KOA, independently of age and BMI. PMID:26848781

  6. Vascular leiomyoma presenting as medial joint line pain of the knee.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, V; D'Ambrosio, U; Olive, M; Marsecano, C; Guerrisi, I; Medvedyeva, E; Maldur, V; Di Segni, M; Malpassini, F; Pepe, A; Bassetti, E

    2009-12-01

    Vascular leiomyoma or angioleiomyoma is a rare benign solitary smooth muscle tumor that occurs mostly in the extremities. Most of these tumors are composed of venous vessels, but in some reports small arteries have been detected in the tumors.We present a rare case of a 60-year-old man with a subcutaneous vascular leiomyoma of the right knee. Clinical findings, ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance (MR), and histopathologic features are reported, and the literature is reviewed. The knowledge of specific imaging findings allows to include vascular leiomyoma in the differential diagnosis of lower extremity subcutaneous masses and to achieve an early accurate diagnosis.

  7. The association between component malalignment and post-operative pain following navigation-assisted total knee arthroplasty: results of a cohort/nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Czurda, Thomas; Fennema, Peter; Baumgartner, Martin; Ritschl, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies have noted an adverse relationship between implant malalignment during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and post-operative pain. Although some evidence exists indicating that computer-assisted surgical navigation for TKA can improve the accuracy of component alignment, its impact on clinical outcomes is currently unknown. The dual goals of the present cohort/nested case-control study were to (1) compare self-reported responses to the Western Ontario-McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire between computer-assisted TKA (123 patients) using the imageless PiGalileo navigation system and conventional TKA (207 patients) [cohort analysis], and (2) to investigate a potential association between malalignment and post-operative pain in 19 painful knees and 19 asymptomatic knees obtained from the cohort analysis using matched sampling [nested case-control study]. In the cohort analysis, a relevant but non-significant (P = 0.06) difference in the occurrence of chronic pain was observed between the navigated (12%) and conventional arms (20%). Median post-operative WOMAC pain score was 100 (range, 50-100) in the conventional group and 100 (range, 65-100) in the navigated group. However, the Mann-Whitney test revealed a significant difference in favor of the navigated group (P = 0.01). In the nested case-control analysis, radiological outcomes and computer tomography (CT) measurements of femoral rotation were compared between the groups. The CT rotation measurements yielded evidence of a relationship between post-operative pain and incorrect rotational alignment of the femoral component of more than 3 degrees (OR: 7; 95% CI: 1.2-42; P = .033). In conclusion, there was no clinical benefit to computer-assisted navigation; however, a statistically significant relationship was observed between incorrect rotational alignment of the femoral component and symptoms of post-operative pain following TKA.

  8. Activity-Modifying Behaviour Mediates the Relationship between Pain Severity and Activity Limitations among Adults with Emergent Knee Pain.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Clayon B; Maly, Monica R; Clark, Jessica M; Speechley, Mark; Petrella, Robert J; Chesworth, Bert M

    2013-01-01

    Objectif : Déterminer si un comportement modifiant les activités peut influer sur la relation entre la sévérité d'une douleur au genou et chacune des fonctions physiques et la qualité de vie associée au genou. Méthode : Au total, 105 participants avec douleur au genou interne et aucun diagnostic d'arthrose du genou (âge moyen de 52,2 ans; écart type de 6,7 ans) ont rempli deux questionnaires d'auto-évaluation. Le questionnaire pour déterminer les symptômes au genou (Questionnaire to Identify Knee Symptoms, QuIKS) visait à évaluer les comportements qui modifient les activités; le pointage obtenu au questionnaire sur les blessures au genou et l'arthrose (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, KOOS) permettait d'évaluer la sévérité de la douleur, la fonction physique et la qualité de vie associée au genou. Une analyse de médiation simple a été réalisée à l'aide d'un modèle de régression linéaire. Résultats : Le coefficient de régression non normalisé (±erreur type) du comportement modifiant l'activité a révélé une réduction partielle de l'effet de la sévérité de la douleur sur la fonction physique (0,31±0,09, p<0,001) et sur la qualité de vie associée au genou (0,24±0,07, p<0,001). Après la mise en place d'un comportement modifiant l'activité, la variation de la fonction physique causée par la douleur est passée de 45 % à 15 %, et la variation dans la qualité de vie associée au genou provoquée par la douleur est passée de 64 % à 25 %. Conclusion : Un comportement qui modifie l'activité réduit partiellement la relation entre la sévérité de la douleur et la fonction physique et entre la sévérité de la douleur et la qualité de vie associée au genou. On a donc recours à une modification de l'activité chez les personnes aux prises avec une douleur émergente au genou, et cette modification pourrait contrer les effets de la douleur au genou sur la fonction physique et sur la qualité de

  9. Medical decision-making among Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites with chronic back and knee pain: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders affect all racial and ethnic groups, including Hispanics. Because these disorders are not life-threatening, decision-making is generally preference-based. Little is known about whether Hispanics in the U.S. differ from non-Hispanic Whites with respect to key decision making preferences. Methods We assembled six focus groups of Hispanic and non-Hispanic White patients with chronic back or knee pain at an urban medical center to discuss management of their conditions and the roles they preferred in medical decision-making. Hispanic groups were further stratified by socioeconomic status, using neighborhood characteristics as proxy measures. Discussions were led by a moderator, taped, transcribed and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Results The analysis revealed ethnic differences in several areas pertinent to medical decision-making. Specifically, Hispanic participants were more likely to permit their physician to take the predominant role in making health decisions. Also, Hispanics of lower socioeconomic status generally preferred to use non-internet sources of health information to make medical decisions and to rely on advice obtained by word of mouth. Hispanics emphasized the role of faith and religion in coping with musculoskeletal disability. The analysis also revealed broad areas of concordance across ethnic strata including the primary role that pain and achieving pain relief play in patients' experiences and decisions. Conclusions These findings suggest differences between Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites in preferred information sources and decision-making roles. These findings are hypothesis-generating. If confirmed in further research, they may inform the development of interventions to enhance preference-based decision-making among Hispanics. PMID:21510880

  10. Rationale, design and methods of the Study of Work and Pain (SWAP): a cluster randomised controlled trial testing the addition of a vocational advice service to best current primary care for patients with musculoskeletal pain (ISRCTN 52269669)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal pain is a major contributor to short and long term work absence. Patients seek care from their general practitioner (GP) and yet GPs often feel ill-equipped to deal with work issues. Providing a vocational case management service in primary care, to support patients with musculoskeletal problems to remain at or return to work, is one potential solution but requires robust evaluation to test clinical and cost-effectiveness. Methods/Design This protocol describes a cluster randomised controlled trial, with linked qualitative interviews, to investigate the effect of introducing a vocational advice service into general practice, to provide a structured approach to managing work related issues in primary care patients with musculoskeletal pain who are absent from work or struggling to remain in work. General practices (n = 6) will be randomised to offer best current care or best current care plus a vocational advice service. Adults of working age who are absent from or struggling to remain in work due to a musculoskeletal pain problem will be invited to participate and 330 participants will be recruited. Data collection will be through patient completed questionnaires at baseline, 4 and 12 months. The primary outcome is self-reported work absence at 4 months. Incremental cost-utility analysis will be undertaken to calculate the cost per additional QALY gained and incremental net benefits. A linked interview study will explore the experiences of the vocational advice service from the perspectives of GPs, nurse practitioners (NPs), patients and vocational advisors. Discussion This paper presents the rationale, design, and methods of the Study of Work And Pain (SWAP) trial. The results of this trial will provide evidence to inform primary care practice and guide the development of services to provide support for musculoskeletal pain patients with work-related issues. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN52269669. PMID:25012813

  11. Efficacy of two cannabis based medicinal extracts for relief of central neuropathic pain from brachial plexus avulsion: results of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Berman, Jonathan S; Symonds, Catherine; Birch, Rolfe

    2004-12-01

    The objective was to investigate the effectiveness of cannabis-based medicines for treatment of chronic pain associated with brachial plexus root avulsion. This condition is an excellent human model of central neuropathic pain as it represents an unusually homogenous group in terms of anatomical location of injury, pain descriptions and patient demographics. Forty-eight patients with at least one avulsed root and baseline pain score of four or more on an 11-point ordinate scale participated in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three period crossover study. All patients had intractable symptoms regardless of current analgesic therapy. Patients entered a baseline period of 2 weeks, followed by three, 2-week treatment periods during each of which they received one of three oromucosal spray preparations. These were placebo and two whole plant extracts of Cannabis sativa L.: GW-1000-02 (Sativex), containing Delta(9)tetrahydrocannabinol (THC):cannabidiol (CBD) in an approximate 1:1 ratio and GW-2000-02, containing primarily THC. The primary outcome measure was the mean pain severity score during the last 7 days of treatment. Secondary outcome measures included pain related quality of life assessments. The primary outcome measure failed to fall by the two points defined in our hypothesis. However, both this measure and measures of sleep showed statistically significant improvements. The study medications were generally well tolerated with the majority of adverse events, including intoxication type reactions, being mild to moderate in severity and resolving spontaneously. Studies of longer duration in neuropathic pain are required to confirm a clinically relevant, improvement in the treatment of this condition. PMID:15561385

  12. Mixture of Arnebia euchroma and Matricaria chamomilla (Marhame-Mafasel) for pain relief of osteoarthritis of the knee – a two-treatment, two-period crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Soltanian, Ali Reza; Mehdibarzi, Dariush; Naseri, Mohsen; Gerami, Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent chronic non-infective joint arthritis. Because of its chronic disease nature, local drugs are preferred due to lower complications. In the present study, the new herbal pomade Marhame-Mafasel for knee osteoarthritis was used in a double-blind crossover trial. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of Marhame-Mafasel pomade, which consists of several medical herbs including Arnebia euchroma and Matricaria chamomilla, in osteoarthritis of the knee. Material and methods This study was a placebo-controlled double-blind crossover trial. Forty-two patients with pain associated with osteoarthritis of the knee (diagnosed by criteria of the European League against Rheumatism and physical examination) were drawn from patients attending the Clinic of Mostafa-Khomeini Hospital. In this study we assessed efficacy (analgesic effect and improved function) of herbal pomade Marhame-Mafasel, which was used locally in patients with primary osteoarthritis of the knee over three weeks. The instrument of the study was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) LK3.1 standard questionnaires. Results The participants in each group were 21 patients; 30 (71.4%) were women and 12 (28.6%) of them were men. The participants were between 40 and 76 years old. Six patients had mild arthritis, 15 had moderate arthritis and 21 had severe arthritis. The positive analgesic effect of the herbal pomade Marhame-Mafasel in primary knee osteoarthritis was proven. The herbal joint pomade Marhame-Mafasel had a significantly greater mean change in score compared to the placebo group for osteoarthritis severity (p < 0.05). Conclusions Herbal pomade Marhame-Mafasel in comparison to placebo has more effect on reduction of pain of primary knee osteoarthritis. PMID:22427772

  13. A prospective randomised controlled trial comparing chronic groin pain and quality of life in lightweight versus heavyweight polypropylene mesh in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Pradeep; Bansal, Virinder Kumar; Misra, Mahesh Chandra; Babu, Divya; Sagar, Rajesh; Krishna, Asuri; Kumar, Subodh; Rewari, Vimi; Subramaniam, Rajeshwari

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of our study was to compare chronic groin pain and quality of life (QOL) after laparoscopic lightweight (LW) and heavyweight (HW) mesh repair for groin hernia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and forty adult patients with uncomplicated inguinal hernia were randomised into HW mesh group or LW mesh group. Return to activity, chronic groin pain and recurrence rates were assessed. Short form-36 v2 health survey was used for QOL analysis. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-one completed follow-up of 3 months, 66 in HW mesh group and 65 in LW mesh group. Early post-operative convalescence was better in LW mesh group in terms of early return to walking (P = 0.01) and driving (P = 0.05). The incidence of early post-operative pain, chronic groin pain and QOL and recurrences were comparable. CONCLUSION: Outcomes following laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair using HW and LW mesh are comparable in the short-term as well as long-term. PMID:27073309

  14. Lateral Knee Pain after Outside-in Anatomic Double-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using the TightRope RT

    PubMed Central

    Kuribayashi, So; Nakayama, Shuichi; Nakazato, Keisuke; Fukubayashi, Toru; Okinaga, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) TightRope RT (TR) was recently introduced as a novel cortical suspension device for ACL reconstruction. It has an adjustable graft loop that gives the surgeon some advantages during ACL reconstruction. We report three patients who required removal of the TR after an outside-in anatomical ACL reconstruction because of lateral knee pain. We assumed that the knee pain was associated with friction between the TR button of the posterolateral bundle and iliotibial band (ITB). Placing the TR button close to the lateral epicondyle and tissue interposition between the TR button and lateral femoral cortex may be potential risk factors for ITB irritation. Therefore, we recommend not placing the TR button close to the top of the lateral epicondyle and reducing the tissue interposition between the TR button and lateral femoral cortex as much as possible. PMID:26955618

  15. Lateral Knee Pain after Outside-in Anatomic Double-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using the TightRope RT.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Kohei; Kuribayashi, So; Nakayama, Shuichi; Nakazato, Keisuke; Fukubayashi, Toru; Okinaga, Shuji

    2016-03-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) TightRope RT (TR) was recently introduced as a novel cortical suspension device for ACL reconstruction. It has an adjustable graft loop that gives the surgeon some advantages during ACL reconstruction. We report three patients who required removal of the TR after an outside-in anatomical ACL reconstruction because of lateral knee pain. We assumed that the knee pain was associated with friction between the TR button of the posterolateral bundle and iliotibial band (ITB). Placing the TR button close to the lateral epicondyle and tissue interposition between the TR button and lateral femoral cortex may be potential risk factors for ITB irritation. Therefore, we recommend not placing the TR button close to the top of the lateral epicondyle and reducing the tissue interposition between the TR button and lateral femoral cortex as much as possible. PMID:26955618

  16. Comparative Effects of Periarticular Multimodal Drug Injection and Single-Shot Femoral Nerve Block on Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty and Factors Influencing Their Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Kan, Hiroyuki; Hino, Manabu; Ichimaru, Shohei; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Amaya, Fumimasa; Sawa, Teiji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study compared the analgesic effects of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) and femoral nerve block (FNB) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and assessed factors associated with analgesia obtained by these two methods. Materials and Methods Study subjects included 66 patients (72 knees) who underwent TKA for osteoarthritis of the knee. Pain visual analogue scale (VAS), the amount of analgesics used, number of days to achieve 90° of flexion of the knee joint, date of initiating parallel-bar walking, range of motion of the knee joint at discharge, and adverse events were investigated. Results The VAS scores did not differ significantly between two groups, whereas the amount of analgesics used was significantly lower in the LIA group. Preoperative flexion contracture was significantly more severe in the LIA group with high VAS compared with low VAS. No serious adverse event occurred in the LIA or FNB group. Conclusions The lower analgesic usage in the LIA group than the FNB group indicates that the analgesic effect of LIA was greater than that of singleshot FNB after TKA. There were no serious complications in either group. The postoperative analgesic effect of LIA was smaller in patients with severe than less severe preoperative flexion contracture.

  17. Comparative Effects of Periarticular Multimodal Drug Injection and Single-Shot Femoral Nerve Block on Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty and Factors Influencing Their Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Kan, Hiroyuki; Hino, Manabu; Ichimaru, Shohei; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Amaya, Fumimasa; Sawa, Teiji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study compared the analgesic effects of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) and femoral nerve block (FNB) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and assessed factors associated with analgesia obtained by these two methods. Materials and Methods Study subjects included 66 patients (72 knees) who underwent TKA for osteoarthritis of the knee. Pain visual analogue scale (VAS), the amount of analgesics used, number of days to achieve 90° of flexion of the knee joint, date of initiating parallel-bar walking, range of motion of the knee joint at discharge, and adverse events were investigated. Results The VAS scores did not differ significantly between two groups, whereas the amount of analgesics used was significantly lower in the LIA group. Preoperative flexion contracture was significantly more severe in the LIA group with high VAS compared with low VAS. No serious adverse event occurred in the LIA or FNB group. Conclusions The lower analgesic usage in the LIA group than the FNB group indicates that the analgesic effect of LIA was greater than that of singleshot FNB after TKA. There were no serious complications in either group. The postoperative analgesic effect of LIA was smaller in patients with severe than less severe preoperative flexion contracture. PMID:27595078

  18. STOP!: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the efficacy and safety of methoxyflurane for the treatment of acute pain

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Frank; Wright, John; Hartshorn, Stuart; Hunt, Paul; Locker, Thomas; Mirza, Kazim; Dissmann, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the short-term efficacy and safety of methoxyflurane for the treatment of acute pain in patients presenting to an emergency department (ED) with minor trauma. Methods STOP! was a randomised, double-blind, multicentre, placebo-controlled study conducted at six sites in the UK. A total of 300 patients, 90 of whom were adolescent patients (age 12–17 years), were randomised 150:150 to receive either methoxyflurane via a Penthrox inhaler or placebo. The primary end point of the study was the change in pain intensity as measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS) from baseline to 5, 10, 15 and 20 min after the start of study drug inhalation. Patients were supplied with one inhaler containing 3 mL methoxyflurane or 5 mL placebo after enrolment and initial assessments. Age group (adolescent/adult) and baseline VAS score were controlled for in the statistical analyses. Results A total of 149 patients received methoxyflurane, and 149 patients received placebo. Demographic and baseline characteristics were comparable between the groups. Methoxyflurane reduced pain severity significantly more than placebo (p<0.0001) at all time points tested, with the greatest estimated treatment effect of −18.5 mm (adjusted change from baseline) seen at 15 min after the start of treatment. Methoxyflurane was well tolerated, with the majority of adverse reactions being mild, transient and in line with anticipated pharmacological action. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that methoxyflurane administered via the Penthrox inhaler is an efficacious, safe, and rapidly acting analgesic. Trial registration number: NCT01420159. PMID:24743584

  19. Efficacy of adding the kinesio taping method to guideline-endorsed conventional physiotherapy in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic nonspecific low back pain is a significant health condition with high prevalence worldwide and it is associated with enormous costs to society. Clinical practice guidelines show that many interventions are available to treat patients with chronic low back pain, but the vast majority of these interventions have a modest effect in reducing pain and disability. An intervention that has been widespread in recent years is the use of elastic bandages called Kinesio Taping. Although Kinesio Taping has been used extensively in clinical practice, current evidence does not support the use of this intervention; however these conclusions are based on a small number of underpowered studies. Therefore, questions remain about the effectiveness of the Kinesio Taping method as an additional treatment to interventions, such as conventional physiotherapy, that have already been recommended by the current clinical practice guidelines in robust and high-quality randomised controlled trials. We aim to determine the effectiveness of the addition of the use of Kinesio Taping in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain who receive guideline-endorsed conventional physiotherapy. Methods/design One hundred and forty-eight patients will be randomly allocated to receive either conventional physiotherapy, which consists of a combination of manual therapy techniques, general exercises, and specific stabilisation exercises (Guideline-Endorsed Conventional Physiotherapy Group) or to receive conventional physiotherapy with the addition of Kinesio Taping to the lumbar spine (Conventional Physiotherapy plus Kinesio Taping Group) over a period of 5 weeks (10 sessions of treatment). Clinical outcomes (pain intensity, disability and global perceived effect) will be collected at baseline and at 5 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after randomisation. We will also collect satisfaction with care and adverse effects after treatment. Data will be collected by a blinded assessor. All

  20. Spironolactone for People Age 70 Years and Older With Osteoarthritic Knee Pain: A Proof‐of‐Concept Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sumukadas, Deepa; Donnan, Peter T.; Cvoro, Vera; Rauchhaus, Petra; Argo, Ishbel; Waldie, Helen; Littleford, Roberta; Struthers, Allan D.; Witham, Miles D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether spironolactone could benefit older people with osteoarthritis (OA), based on a previous study showing that spironolactone improved quality of life. Methods This parallel‐group, randomized, placebo‐controlled, double‐blind trial randomized community‐dwelling people ages ≥70 years with symptomatic knee OA to 12 weeks of 25 mg daily oral spironolactone or matching placebo. The primary outcome was between‐group difference in change in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale scores. Secondary outcomes included WOMAC stiffness and physical function subscores, EuroQol 5‐domain (EQ‐5D) 3L score, and mechanistic markers. Analysis was by intent to treat, using mixed‐model regression, adjusting for baseline values of test variables. Results A total of 421 people had eligibility assessed, and 86 were randomized. Mean ± SD age was 77 ± 5 years and 53 of 86 (62%) were women. Adherence to study medication was 99%, and all participants completed the 12‐week assessment. No significant improvement was seen in the WOMAC pain score (adjusted treatment effect 0.5 points [95% confidence interval (95% CI) − 0.3, 1.3]; P = 0.19). No improvement was seen in WOMAC stiffness score (0.2 points [95% CI −0.6, 1.1]; P = 0.58), WOMAC physical function score (0.0 points [95% CI −0.7, 0.8]; P = 0.98), or EQ‐5D 3L score (0.04 points [95% CI −0.04, 0.12]; P = 0.34). Cortisol, matrix metalloproteinase 3, and urinary C‐telopeptide of type II collagen were not significantly different between groups. More minor adverse events were noted in the spironolactone group (47 versus 32), but no increase in death or hospitalization was evident. Conclusion Spironolactone did not improve symptoms, physical function, or health‐related quality of life in older people with knee OA. PMID:26413749

  1. Efficacy of graded activity versus supervised exercises in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a relevant public health problem, being an important cause of work absenteeism worldwide, as well as affecting the quality of life of sufferers and their individual functional performances. Supervised active physical routines and of cognitive-behavioral therapies are recommended for the treatment of chronic Low back pain, although evidence to support the effectiveness of different techniques is missing. Accordingly, the aim of this study is to contrast the effectiveness of two types of exercises, graded activity or supervised, in decreasing symptoms of chronic low back pain. Methods/design Sample will consist of 66 patients, blindly allocated into one of two groups: 1) Graded activity which, based on an operant approach, will use time-contingent methods aiming to increase participants’ activity levels; 2) Supervised exercise, where participants will be trained for strengthening, stretching, and motor control targeting different muscle groups. Interventions will last one hour, and will happen twice a week for 6 weeks. Outcomes (pain, disability, quality of life, global perceived effect, return to work, physical activity, physical capacity, and kinesiophobia) will be assessed at baseline, at treatment end, and three and six months after treatment end. Data collection will be conducted by an investigator blinded to treatment allocation. Discussion This project describes the randomisation method that will be used to compare the effectiveness of two different treatments for chronic low back pain: graded activity and supervised exercises. Since optimal approach for patients with chronic back pain have yet not been defined based on evidence, good quality studies on the subject are necessary. Trial registration NCT01719276 PMID:23336703

  2. Individualised cognitive functional therapy compared with a combined exercise and pain education class for patients with non-specific chronic low back pain: study protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, Mary; Purtill, Helen; Kennedy, Norelee; O'Sullivan, Peter; Dankaerts, Wim; Tighe, Aidan; Allworthy, Lars; Dolan, Louise; Bargary, Norma; O'Sullivan, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP) is a very common and costly musculoskeletal disorder associated with a complex interplay of biopsychosocial factors. Cognitive functional therapy (CFT) represents a novel, patient-centred intervention which directly challenges pain-related behaviours in a cognitively integrated, functionally specific and graduated manner. CFT aims to target all biopsychosocial factors that are deemed to be barriers to recovery for an individual patient with NSCLBP. A recent randomised controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated the superiority of individualised CFT for NSCLBP compared to manual therapy combined with exercise. However, several previous RCTs have suggested that class-based interventions are as effective as individualised interventions. Therefore, it is important to examine whether an individualised intervention, such as CFT, demonstrates clinical effectiveness compared to a relatively cheaper exercise and education class. The current study will compare the clinical effectiveness of individualised CFT with a combined exercise and pain education class in people with NSCLBP. Methods and analysis This study is a multicentre RCT. 214 participants, aged 18–75 years, with NSCLBP for at least 6 months will be randomised to one of two interventions across three sites. The experimental group will receive individualised CFT and the length of the intervention will be varied in a pragmatic manner based on the clinical progression of participants. The control group will attend six classes which will be provided over a period of 6–8 weeks. Participants will be assessed preintervention, postintervention and after 6 and12 months. The primary outcomes will be functional disability and pain intensity. Non-specific predictors, moderators and mediators of outcome will also be analysed. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the Mayo General Hospital Research Ethics Committee (MGH-14-UL). Outcomes will

  3. Improving the care for people with acute low-back pain by allied health professionals (the ALIGN trial): A cluster randomised trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Variability between clinical practice guideline recommendations and actual clinical practice exists in many areas of health care. A 2004 systematic review examining the effectiveness of guideline implementation interventions concluded there was a lack of evidence to support decisions about effective interventions to promote the uptake of guidelines. Further, the review recommended the use of theory in the development of implementation interventions. A clinical practice guideline for the management of acute low-back pain has been developed in Australia (2003). Acute low-back pain is a common condition, has a high burden, and there is some indication of an evidence-practice gap in the allied health setting. This provides an opportunity to develop and test a theory-based implementation intervention which, if effective, may provide benefits for patients with this condition. Aims This study aims to estimate the effectiveness of a theory-based intervention to increase allied health practitioners' (physiotherapists and chiropractors in Victoria, Australia) compliance with a clinical practice guideline for acute non-specific low back pain (LBP), compared with providing practitioners with a printed copy of the guideline. Specifically, our primary objectives are to establish if the intervention is effective in reducing the percentage of acute non-specific LBP patients who are either referred for or receive an x-ray, and improving mean level of disability for patients three months post-onset of acute LBP. Methods The design of the study is a cluster randomised trial. Restricted randomisation was used to randomise 210 practices (clusters) to an intervention or control group. Practitioners in the control group received a printed copy of the guideline. Practitioners in the intervention group received a theory-based intervention developed to address prospectively identified barriers to practitioner compliance with the guideline. The intervention primarily consisted of

  4. IMPLEmenting a clinical practice guideline for acute low back pain evidence-based manageMENT in general practice (IMPLEMENT): Cluster randomised controlled trial study protocol

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Joanne E; French, Simon D; O'Connor, Denise A; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Mortimer, Duncan; Michie, Susan; Francis, Jill; Spike, Neil; Schattner, Peter; Kent, Peter M; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Green, Sally E

    2008-01-01

    Background Evidence generated from reliable research is not frequently implemented into clinical practice. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines are a potential vehicle to achieve this. A recent systematic review of implementation strategies of guideline dissemination concluded that there was a lack of evidence regarding effective strategies to promote the uptake of guidelines. Recommendations from this review, and other studies, have suggested the use of interventions that are theoretically based because these may be more effective than those that are not. An evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the management of acute low back pain was recently developed in Australia. This provides an opportunity to develop and test a theory-based implementation intervention for a condition which is common, has a high burden, and for which there is an evidence-practice gap in the primary care setting. Aim This study aims to test the effectiveness of a theory-based intervention for implementing a clinical practice guideline for acute low back pain in general practice in Victoria, Australia. Specifically, our primary objectives are to establish if the intervention is effective in reducing the percentage of patients who are referred for a plain x-ray, and improving mean level of disability for patients three months post-consultation. Methods/Design This study protocol describes the details of a cluster randomised controlled trial. Ninety-two general practices (clusters), which include at least one consenting general practitioner, will be randomised to an intervention or control arm using restricted randomisation. Patients aged 18 years or older who visit a participating practitioner for acute non-specific low back pain of less than three months duration will be eligible for inclusion. An average of twenty-five patients per general practice will be recruited, providing a total of 2,300 patient participants. General practitioners in the control arm will receive access

  5. The reliability of surface electromyography to assess quadriceps fatigue during multi joint tasks in healthy and painful knees.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Michael J; McCarthy, Christopher J; Oldham, Jacqueline A

    2009-02-01

    This study's aim was to determine the between days reliability of surface EMG recordings from the superficial quadriceps during a multi joint sub-maximal fatiguing protocol. Three subject groups (healthy n=29; patellofemoral pain syndrome n=74; knee osteoarthritis n=55) performed the task at 60 maximum voluntary isometric contraction on three separate days. Spectral and amplitude EMG parameters were recorded from vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis and rectus femoris and were analysed for between days reliability using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC((2,1))), the standard errors of measure and smallest detectable differences. For frequency results, initial and final frequency values had 'good' or 'excellent' reliability in all groups for all muscles. ICCs for median frequency slopes for vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris respectively, in the osteoarthritis group were 0.04, 0.55, and 0.72; in the patellofemoral pain group were 0.41, 0.17, and 0.33; in the healthy group were 0.68, 0.64, and 0.31. The standard errors of measurement and smallest detectable differences for all groups and for all muscles were unacceptably high. For amplitude results, ICC root mean squared initial and final values were 'good' to 'excellent' for all groups and all muscles, albeit with high measurement error. The ICCs for root mean squared slopes in all tests were 'poor' with extremely high measurement error. The poor between days reliability and high measurement error suggests that surface EMG should not be adopted to assess fatigue during multi joint sub-maximal isometric quadriceps testing.

  6. Perioperative pain control after total knee arthroplasty: An evidence based review of the role of peripheral nerve blocks

    PubMed Central

    Danninger, Thomas; Opperer, Mathias; Memtsoudis, Stavros G

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, the number of total knee arthroplasty procedures performed in the United States has been increasing dramatically. This very successful intervention, however, is associated with significant postoperative pain, and adequate postoperative analgesia is mandatory in order to allow for successful rehabilitation and recovery. The use of regional anesthesia and peripheral nerve blocks has facilitated and improved this goal. Many different approaches and techniques for peripheral nerve blockades, either landmark or, more recently, ultrasound guided have been described over the last decades. This includes but is not restricted to techniques discussed in this review. The introduction of ultrasound has improved many approaches to peripheral nerves either in success rate and/or time to block. Moreover, ultrasound has enhanced the safety of peripheral nerve blocks due to immediate needle visualization and as consequence needle guidance during the block. In contrast to patient controlled analgesia using opioids, patients with a regional anesthetic technique suffer from fewer adverse events and show higher patient satisfaction; this is important as hospital rankings and advertisement have become more common worldwide and many patients use these factors in order to choose a certain institution for a specific procedure. This review provides a short overview of currently used regional anesthetic and analgesic techniques focusing on related implications, considerations and outcomes. PMID:25035824

  7. Observation on pain release by long-round needle therapy in knee osteoarthritis related with meridian-sinews theory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Shi; Xue, Li-Gong; Ma, Xiao-Jian; Liu, Chun-Shan

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of long-round needle therapy for pain relief in patients with knee osteoarthritis, 192 patients were included in a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial. 97 patients were randomized to the long-round needle therapy group (EG), and 95 patients were randomized to the control group (CG). In EG, the long-round needle therapy was performed once every 7 days for 3 therapy sessions. Ibuprofen sustained-release capsules were administered orally in CG, 1 pill each time, twice daily for 3 weeks. Curative effect was measured after the therapy and was evaluated at a 3-month follow-up interview. In EG, the treatment resulted in a basic cure for 79 patients, was effective for 15 patients, and was ineffective for 1 patient. In CG, the treatment resulted in a basic cure for 30 patients, was effective for 38 patients, and was ineffective for 21 patients. In the follow-up examination in EG, 75 patients were basically cured, and the treatment was effective for 11 patients and ineffective for 9. In CG, 22 were basically cured, 31 found the treatment effective, and 36 found the treatment ineffective. The curative effects in EG after both the treatment and the 3-mouth followup were significantly more superior than that in CG (P < 0.01) which should be adopted more widely.

  8. The Effect of Intra-Articular Meperidine and Bupivacaine 0.5% on Postoperative Pain of Arthroscopic Knee Surgery; a Randomized Double Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farnad; Entezary, Saeidreza; Razi, Mohammad; Jafarian, Ali Akbar; Yousefshahi, Fardin; Etemadi, Hasan; Safari, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic knee surgeries have a painful postoperative course, which often necessitates acute pain management. Among different analgesia techniques, Intra-articular injection is the technique of choice for many pain specialists, based on its confined effect to the surgical site (knee), lack of systemic effects and promotion of safe early ambulation. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare analgesic effects of intra-articular meperidine, bupivacaine 0.5% or their combination after knee arthroscopic surgery. Patients and Methods: Sixty ASA class I-II patients’ candidates for arthroscopy knee surgery enrolled in a randomized double blind study to receive either 20 mL of bupivacaine 0.5%; 100 mg meperidine (diluted in normal saline) or bupivacaine 0.5% along with 100 mg meperidine. A written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Postoperative analgesia duration, VAS at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours, the first analgesic request time, total fentanyl consumption in first 24 hours, patients’ satisfaction and adverse effects were recorded. Results: The bupivacaine-meperidine group had better duration of postoperative analgesia (P = 0.001), latter first analgesic request (P ≤ 0.001), lower total fentanyl consumption in first 24 hours after the operation (P = 0.001), less mean VAS at 2 hours (P = 0.001) and more patients’ overall satisfaction (P = 0.01) compared with each medication alone. VAS at 6, 12 and 24 postoperative hours were not different between the groups of study. No adverse effects were observed. Conclusions: Although postoperative intra-articular meperidine is a better alternative for bupivacaine, their combination could improve their analgesic effects compared with each other alone. PMID:25830119

  9. The Analgesic Effects of Morphine and Tramadol Added to Intra-articular Levobupivacaine-Tenoxicam Combination for Arthroscopic Knee Surgery on Postoperative Pain; a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Oral, Ebru Gelici; Hanci, Ayse; Ulufer Sivrikaya, Gulcihan; Dobrucali, Hale; Turkoglu Kilinc, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic knee surgery is commonly performed as an outpatient procedure and is often associated with postoperative pain. Objectives: We aimed to compare the effects of intra-articular levobupivacaine-tenoxicam-tramadol and levobupivacaine-tenoxicam-morphine combinations on postoperative pain in patients undergoing elective arthroscopic knee surgery. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 ASA I-II patients undergoing elective arthroscopic meniscectomy under general anesthesia were enrolled. The participants were randomly allocated to three groups to receive the following intra-articular medications after completion of the surgery and before deflation of the tourniquet: Group S, 20 mL of saline; Group T, 35 mg of levobupivacaine, 20 mg of tenoxicam, and 100 mg of tramadol in 20 mL saline; and Group M, 35 mg of levobupivacaine, 20 mg of tenoxicam, and 4 mg of morphine in 20 mL saline. Visual analogue scale values at rest (VASr) and at active flexion of knee (VASa) at postoperation hours 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24, duration of analgesia, total analgesic consumption, and number of rescue analgesia at 24 hours were evaluated. Results: VASr and VASa were significantly higher in group S in comparison to other groups (P < 0.05). Duration of analgesia was significantly longer in Group T and Group M than in Group S (P < 0.05). The difference between group T and group M was also significant (P < 0.05). Number of rescue analgesia and total analgesic consumption at postoperative hour 24 was significantly fewer in group M compared with other groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Intra-articular levobupivacaine-tenoxicam-morphine combination provides effective pain relief, longer analgesic duration, and less analgesic requirement when compared with intra-articular levobupivacaine-tenoxicam-tramadol combination and saline after knee arthroscopic surgery. PMID:26161321

  10. Continuous Local Infiltration Analgesia for Pain Control After Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Lei; Zhao, Zhi-Hu; Ma, Jian-Xiong; Li, Feng-Bo; Li, Yan-Jun; Meng, Xin-Min; Ma, Xin-Long

    2015-11-01

    A total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has always been associated with moderate to severe pain. As more research is conducted on the use of continuous local infiltration analgesia (CLIA) to manage pain after a TKA, it is necessary to reassess the efficacy and safety of the TKA method. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pain control of CLIA versus placebo after a TKA. In January 2015, a systematic computer-based search was conducted in the Medline, Embase, PubMed, CENTRAL (Cochrane Controlled Trials Register), Web of Science, Google database, and Chinese Wanfang databases. This systematic review and meta-analysis were performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses statement criteria. The primary endpoint was the visual analog scale score after a TKA with rest or mobilization at 24, 48, and 72 hours, which represents the effect of pain control after TKA. The complications of infection, nausea, and whether it prolonged wound drainage were also compiled to assess the safety of CLIA. RevMan 5.30 software was used for the meta-analysis. After testing for publication bias and heterogeneity across studies, data were aggregated for random-effects modeling when necessary. Ten studies involving 735 patients met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis revealed that continuous infusion analgesia provided better pain control with rest at 24 hours (mean difference [MD] -12.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] -16.63 to 8.45), and with mobilization at 24 hours (MD -18.27, 95% CI -27.52 to 9.02) and 48 hours (MD -14.19, 95% CI -21.46 to 6.93). There was no significant difference with respect to the visual analog scale score at 48 hours (MD -6.15, 95% CI -13.51 to 1.22, P = 0.10) and 72 hours (MD -3.63, 95% CI -10.43 to 3.16, P = 0.29) with rest and at 72 hours with mobilization (MD -4.25, 95% CI -16.27 to 7.77, P = 0

  11. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Persian version of the Intermittent and Constant Osteoarthritis Pain Measure for the knee

    PubMed Central

    Panah, Sara Hojat; Baharlouie, Hamze; Rezaeian, Zahra Sadat; Hawker, Gilian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to translate and evaluate the reliability and validity of the Persian version of the 11-item Intermittent and Constant Osteoarthritis Pain (ICOAP) measure in Iranian subjects with Knee Osteoarthritis (KOA). Materials and Methods: The ICOAP questionnaire was translated according to the Manufacturers Alliance for Productivity and Innovation (MAPI) protocol. The procedure consisted of forward and backward translation, as well as the assessment of the psychometric properties of the Persian version of the questionnaire. A sample of 230 subjects with KOA was asked to complete the Persian versions of ICOAP and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). The ICOAP was readministered to forty subjects five days after the first visit. Test–retest reliability was assessed using Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC), and internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha and item-total correlation. The correlation between ICOAP and KOOS was determined using Spearman's correlation coefficient. Result: Subjects found the Persian-version of the ICOAP to be clear, simple, and unambiguous, confirming its face validity. Spearman correlations between ICOAP total and subscale scores with KOOS scores were between 0.5 and 0.7, confirming construct validity. Cronbach's alpha, used to assess internal consistency, was 0.89, 0.93, and 0.92 for constant pain, intermittent pain, and total pain scores, respectively. The ICC was 0.90 for constant pain and 0.91 for the intermittent pain and total pain score. Conclusion: The Persian version of the ICOAP is a reliable and valid outcome measure that can be used in Iranian subjects with KOA. PMID:27563327

  12. Single, intra-articular treatment with 6 ml hylan G-F 20 in patients with symptomatic primary osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomised, multicentre, double-blind, placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, X; Jerosch, J; Goupille, P; van Dijk, N; Luyten, F P; Scott, D L; Bailleul, F; Pavelka, K

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The primary objective was to compare a single, 6 ml, intra-articular injection of hylan G-F 20 with placebo in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. The safety of a repeat injection of hylan G-F 20 was also assessed. Methods: Patients with primary osteoarthritis knee pain were randomly assigned to arthrocentesis plus a 6 ml intra-articular injection of either hylan G-F 20 or placebo in a prospective, double-blind (one injector/one blinded observer) study. Results were evaluated at 4, 8, 12, 18 and 26 weeks post-injection. The primary outcome criterion was change from baseline over 26 weeks in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index A pain. Secondary outcome measures included WOMAC A1 and C, patient global assessment (PGA) and clinical observer global assessment (COGA) and Outcome Measures in Rheumatology, Osteoarthritis Research Society International responder rates. A 4-week, open, repeat treatment phase evaluated safety only. Results: A total of 253 patients (Kellgren–Lawrence grade II or III) was randomly assigned. Patients receiving hylan G-F 20 experienced statistically significantly greater improvements in WOMAC A pain scores (−0.15, SE 0.076, p = 0.047), and several of the secondary outcome measures (WOMAC A1, PGA and COGA), than patients receiving placebo. There was no difference between the safety results of the two groups. No increased risk of local adverse events was observed in the open, repeat treatment phase. Conclusions: This placebo-controlled study demonstrated that, in patients with knee osteoarthritis, a single 6 ml intra-articular injection of hylan G-F 20 is safe and effective in providing statistically significant, clinically relevant pain relief over 26 weeks, with a modest difference versus placebo. Trial registration number: NCT00131352. PMID:19304567

  13. Isolated iliotibial band rupture after corticosteroid injection as a cause of subjective instability and knee pain in a military special warfare trainee.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Sandeep R; Solomon, Daniel J; Gross, Daniel J; Golijanin, Petar; Provencher, Matthew T

    2014-04-01

    Iliotibial band friction syndrome (ITBFS) of the knee is a common overuse injury in athletes, especially in runners. The syndrome occurs when the ITB, a lateral thickening of the fascia lata of the thigh moves repetitively over the lateral femoral condyle. A variety of nonoperative measures are used for ITBFS treatment, including stretching, core strengthening, and therapeutic injection. Isolated distal ITB rupture is a rare entity and has never yet to be reported in the orthopedic literature. We present a case of isolated ITB rupture as a cause of varus instability and knee pain in a Naval Special Warfare candidate diagnosed with ITBFS and previously treated with several local corticosteroid injections before ITB rupture. Because of continued knee pain and a sense of instability, along with an inability to return to his military special warfare duties, the ITB was surgically repaired. This case highlights the presentation and management of isolated distal ITB rupture and discusses some of the potential risk factors for rupture, including prior local corticosteroid injection.

  14. Adjunctive use of combination of super-pulsed laser and light-emitting diodes phototherapy on nonspecific knee pain: double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Johnson, Douglas Scott; Saltmarche, Anita; Demchak, Timothy

    2014-11-01

    Phototherapy with low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) has arisen as an interesting alternative to drugs in treatments of musculoskeletal disorders. However, there is a lack of studies investigating the effects of combined use of different wavelengths from different light sources like lasers and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in skeletal muscle disorders. With this perspective in mind, this study aimed to investigate the effects of phototherapy with combination of different light sources on nonspecific knee pain. It was performed a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial. Eighty-six patients rated 30 or greater on the pain visual analogue scale (VAS) were recruited and included in study. Patients of LLLT group received 12 treatments with active phototherapy (with 905 nm super-pulsed laser and 875 and 640 nm LEDs, Manufactured by Multi Radiance Medical, Solon, OH, USA) and conventional treatment (physical therapy or chiropractic care), and patients of placebo group were treated at same way but with placebo phototherapy device. Pain assessments (VAS) were performed at baseline, 4th, 7th, and 10th treatments, after the completion of treatments and at 1-month follow-up visit. Quality of life assessments (SF-36®) were performed at baseline, after the completion of treatments and at 1-month follow-up visit. Our results demonstrate that phototherapy significantly decreased pain (p < 0.05) from 10th treatment to follow-up assessments and significantly improved (p < 0.05) SF-36® physical component summary at posttreatments and follow-up assessments compared to placebo. We conclude that combination of super-pulsed laser, red and infrared LEDs is effective to decrease pain and improve quality of life in patients with knee pain.

  15. Promoting physical activity in low back pain patients: six months follow-up of a randomised controlled trial comparing a multicomponent intervention with a low intensity intervention

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Andrea; Dintsios, Charalabos-Markos; Icks, Andrea; Reibling, Nadine; Froboese, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess a comprehensive multicomponent intervention against a low intensity intervention for promoting physical activity in chronic low back pain patients. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Inpatient rehabilitation and aftercare. Subjects: A total of 412 patients with chronic low back pain. Interventions: A multicomponent intervention (Movement Coaching) comprising of small group intervention (twice during inpatient rehabilitation), tailored telephone aftercare (twice after rehabilitation) and internet-based aftercare (web 2.0 platform) versus a low level intensity intervention (two general presentations on physical activity, download of the presentations). Main measures: Physical activity was measured using a questionnaire. Primary outcome was total physical activity; secondary outcomes were setting specific physical activity (transport, workplace, leisure time) and pain. Comparative group differences were evaluated six months after inpatient rehabilitation. Results: At six months follow-up, 92 participants in Movement Coaching (46 %) and 100 participants in the control group (47 %) completed the postal follow-up questionnaire. No significant differences between the two groups could be shown in total physical activity (P = 0.30). In addition to this, workplace (P = 0.53), transport (P = 0.68) and leisure time physical activity (P = 0.21) and pain (P = 0.43) did not differ significantly between the two groups. In both groups, physical activity decreased during the six months follow-up. Conclusions: The multicomponent intervention was no more effective than the low intensity intervention in promoting physical activity at six months follow-up. The decrease in physical activity in both groups is an unexpected outcome of the study and indicates the need for further research. PMID:27496696

  16. Preliminary results, methodological considerations and recruitment difficulties of a randomised clinical trial comparing two treatment regimens for patients with headache and neck pain

    PubMed Central

    De Hertogh, Willem; Vaes, Peter; Devroey, Dirk; Louis, Paul; Carpay, Hans; Truijen, Steven; Duquet, William; Oostendorp, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Background Headache is a highly prevalent disorder. Irrespective of the headache diagnosis it is often accompanied with neck pain and -stiffness. Due to this common combination of headache and neck pain, physical treatments of the cervical spine are often considered. The additional value of these treatments to standard medical care or usual care (UC) is insufficiently documented. We therefore wanted to compare the treatment effects of UC alone and in combination with manual therapy (MT) in patients with a combination of headache and neck pain. UC consisted of a stepped treatment approach according to the Dutch General Practitioners Guideline for headache, the additional MT consisted of articular mobilisations and low load exercises. Due to insufficient enrolment the study was terminated prematurely. We aim to report not only our preliminary clinical findings but also to discuss the encountered difficulties and to formulate recommendations for future research. Methods A randomised clinical trial was conducted. Thirty-seven patients were included and randomly allocated to one of both treatment groups. The treatment period was 6 weeks, with follow-up measurements at weeks 7, 12 and 26. Primary outcome measures were global perceived effect (GPE) and the impact of the headache using the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6). Reduction in headache frequency, pain intensity, medication intake, absenteeism and the use of additional professional help were secondary outcome measures Results Significant improvements on primary and secondary outcome measures were recorded in both treatment groups. No significant differences between both treatment groups were found. The number of recruited patients remained low despite various strategies. Conclusion It appears that both treatment strategies can have equivalent positive influences on headache complaints. Additional studies with larger study populations are needed to draw firm conclusions. Recommendations to increase patient inflow in

  17. Manual therapy for the management of pain and limited range of motion in subjects with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Calixtre, L B; Moreira, R F C; Franchini, G H; Alburquerque-Sendín, F; Oliveira, A B

    2015-11-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about the effectiveness of manual therapy (MT) on subjects with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of this systematic review is to synthetise evidence regarding the isolated effect of MT in improving maximum mouth opening (MMO) and pain in subjects with signs and symptoms of TMD. MEDLINE(®) , Cochrane, Web of Science, SciELO and EMBASE(™) electronic databases were consulted, searching for randomised controlled trials applying MT for TMD compared to other intervention, no intervention or placebo. Two authors independently extracted data, PEDro scale was used to assess risk of bias, and GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) was applied to synthetise overall quality of the body of evidence. Treatment effect size was calculated for pain, MMO and pressure pain threshold (PPT). Eight trials were included, seven of high methodological quality. Myofascial release and massage techniques applied on the masticatory muscles are more effective than control (low to moderate evidence) but as effective as toxin botulinum injections (moderate evidence). Upper cervical spine thrust manipulation or mobilisation techniques are more effective than control (low to high evidence), while thoracic manipulations are not. There is moderate-to-high evidence that MT techniques protocols are effective. The methodological heterogeneity across trials protocols frequently contributed to decrease quality of evidence. In conclusion, there is widely varying evidence that MT improves pain, MMO and PPT in subjects with TMD signs and symptoms, depending on the technique. Further studies should consider using standardised evaluations and better study designs to strengthen clinical relevance.

  18. Manual therapy for the management of pain and limited range of motion in subjects with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Calixtre, L B; Moreira, R F C; Franchini, G H; Alburquerque-Sendín, F; Oliveira, A B

    2015-11-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about the effectiveness of manual therapy (MT) on subjects with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of this systematic review is to synthetise evidence regarding the isolated effect of MT in improving maximum mouth opening (MMO) and pain in subjects with signs and symptoms of TMD. MEDLINE(®) , Cochrane, Web of Science, SciELO and EMBASE(™) electronic databases were consulted, searching for randomised controlled trials applying MT for TMD compared to other intervention, no intervention or placebo. Two authors independently extracted data, PEDro scale was used to assess risk of bias, and GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) was applied to synthetise overall quality of the body of evidence. Treatment effect size was calculated for pain, MMO and pressure pain threshold (PPT). Eight trials were included, seven of high methodological quality. Myofascial release and massage techniques applied on the masticatory muscles are more effective than control (low to moderate evidence) but as effective as toxin botulinum injections (moderate evidence). Upper cervical spine thrust manipulation or mobilisation techniques are more effective than control (low to high evidence), while thoracic manipulations are not. There is moderate-to-high evidence that MT techniques protocols are effective. The methodological heterogeneity across trials protocols frequently contributed to decrease quality of evidence. In conclusion, there is widely varying evidence that MT improves pain, MMO and PPT in subjects with TMD signs and symptoms, depending on the technique. Further studies should consider using standardised evaluations and better study designs to strengthen clinical relevance. PMID:26059857

  19. The Effect of Gabapentin on Acute Postoperative Pain in Patients Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Lifeng; Song, Zhoufeng; Liu, Kang

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of gabapentin versus placebo for pain control after total knee arthroplasty (TKA).In December 2015, a systematic computer-based search was conducted in the Medline, Embase, PubMed, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL), Web of Science, Google, and Chinese Wanfang databases. This systematic review and meta-analysis were performed according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement criteria. The primary endpoint was the visual analogue scale (VAS) score after TKA with rest or mobilization at 24 and 48 hours, representing the efficacy of pain control after TKA. Cumulative morphine consumption via patient controlled anesthesia (PCA) was also assessed to determine the morphine-spare effect. Complications such as dizziness, pruritus, vomiting, nausea, and sedation were also compiled to assess the safety of gabapentin. Stata 12.0 software was used for the meta-analysis. After testing for publication bias and heterogeneity across studies, the data were aggregated for random-effects modeling whenever necessary.Six studies involving 769 patients met the inclusion criteria. Our meta-analysis revealed that gabapentin resulted in superior pain relief compared to the control group in terms of VAS score with rest at 24 hours (mean difference [MD] = -3.47; 95% confidence interval [CI] -6.16 to -0.77; P = 0.012) and at 48 hours postoperatively (MD = -2.25; 95% CI -4.21 to -0.30; P = 0.024). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups with respect to the VAS score at 24 hours postoperatively (MD = 1.05; 95% CI -3.31 to 5.42; P = 0.636) or at 48 hours (MD = 1.71; 95% CI -0.74 to 4.15; P = 0.171). These results indicated that the perioperative administration of gabapentin decreases the cumulative morphine

  20. Combination of Comfrey Root Extract Plus Methyl Nicotinate in Patients with Conditions of Acute Upper or Low Back Pain: A Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pabst, Helmut; Schaefer, Axel; Staiger, Christiane; Junker-Samek, Marc; Predel, Hans-Georg

    2013-01-01

    This randomised, multicentre, double-blind, three-arm, placebo-controlled trial compared a topical combination of 35% comfrey root extract plus 1.2% methyl nicotinate versus a single preparation of methyl nicotinate or placebo cream for relief of acute upper or low back pain. 379 patients were randomly assigned to three groups (combination, n = 163; methyl nicotinate, n = 164; placebo, n = 52). They applied a 12 cm layer of cream three times daily for 5 days. The primary efficacy variable was the area under the curve (AUC) of the visual analogue scale (VAS) on active standardised movement values at visits 1 to 4. Secondary measures included back pain at rest, pressure algometry, consumption of analgesic medication, functional impairment measured with Oswestry Disability Index, and global assessment of response. The AUC of the VAS on active standardised movement was markedly smaller in the combination treatment group than in the methyl nicotinate and in the placebo group (ANOVA: p < 0.0001). The combination demonstrated superiority to the two other treatment arms, while methyl nicotinate displayed a considerable effect as well. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:22887778

  1. Combination of comfrey root extract plus methyl nicotinate in patients with conditions of acute upper or low back pain: a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Helmut; Schaefer, Axel; Staiger, Christiane; Junker-Samek, Marc; Predel, Hans-Georg

    2013-06-01

    This randomised, multicentre, double-blind, three-arm, placebo-controlled trial compared a topical combination of 35% comfrey root extract plus 1.2% methyl nicotinate versus a single preparation of methyl nicotinate or placebo cream for relief of acute upper or low back pain. 379 patients were randomly assigned to three groups (combination, n = 163; methyl nicotinate, n = 164; placebo, n = 52). They applied a 12 cm layer of cream three times daily for 5 days. The primary efficacy variable was the area under the curve (AUC) of the visual analogue scale (VAS) on active standardised movement values at visits 1 to 4. Secondary measures included back pain at rest, pressure algometry, consumption of analgesic medication, functional impairment measured with Oswestry Disability Index, and global assessment of response. The AUC of the VAS on active standardised movement was markedly smaller in the combination treatment group than in the methyl nicotinate and in the placebo group (ANOVA: p < 0.0001). The combination demonstrated superiority to the two other treatment arms, while methyl nicotinate displayed a considerable effect as well.

  2. Corticosteroids in peri-radicular infiltration for radicular pain: a randomised double blind controlled trial. One year results and subgroup analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Leslie; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Sell, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of corticosteroids in patients with radicular pain due to lumbar disc herniation or lumbar spinal stenosis through a prospective randomised, double blind controlled trial, and whether there was an effect on subsequent interventions such as additional root blocks or surgery. Peri-radicular infiltration of corticosteroids has previously been shown to offer no additional benefit in patients with sciatica compared to local anaesthetic alone. It is not known if the response to peri-radicular infiltration is less marked in certain subgroups of patients such as those with radicular pain due to lumbar spinal stenosis. Previous studies have suggested that peri-radicular infiltration of corticosteroids may obviate the need for subsequent interventions and we therefore further investigated this in the current study. We randomised 150 patients to receive a single injection with either bupivacaine alone or bupivacaine and methylprednisolone. Patients were assessed at 6 weeks and 3 months after the injection using standard outcome measures including Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analogue score for leg pain and patient’s subjective assessment of outcome. At 1-year follow-up, we looked at the outcome in terms of the need for subsequent interventions such as additional root blocks or surgery. At 3-month follow-up, there was no statistically significant difference in the standard outcome measures between the two injection groups. At a minimum 1-year post injection, there was no difference in the need for subsequent interventions in either group. Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis had a less marked reduction in the ODI at 3 months with a mean change of 3.3 points when compared with 15 points for patients with lumbar disc herniation. In conclusion, peri-radicular infiltration of corticosteroids for sciatica does not provide any additional benefit when compared to local anaesthetic injection alone. Corticosteroids

  3. The Safety and Efficacy of an Enzyme Combination in Managing Knee Osteoarthritis Pain in Adults: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bolten, Wolfgang W.; Glade, Michael J.; Raum, Sonja; Ritz, Barry W.

    2015-01-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and comparator-controlled trial evaluated the safety and efficacy of an enzyme combination, as Wobenzym, in adults with moderate-to-severe osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Adults (n = 150) received Wobenzym, diclofenac (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, NSAID), or placebo for 12 weeks. Improvement in pain scores (Lequesne Functional Index) did not differ between subjects treated with Wobenzym or diclofenac, and both treatment groups improved compared to placebo (P < 0.05). Reduction in total WOMAC scores (secondary outcome measure) did not differ between Wobenzym and diclofenac, although only diclofenac emerged as different from placebo (P < 0.05). The median number of rescue medication (paracetamol) tablets consumed was less in the Wobenzym group compared to placebo (P < 0.05), while there was no difference between diclofenac and placebo. Adverse events were similar in frequency in Wobenzym and placebo groups (7.2% and 9.1% of subjects, resp.) and higher in diclofenac group (15.6%). Wobenzym is comparable to the NSAID diclofenac in relieving pain and increasing function in adults with moderate-to-severe painful knee OA and reduces reliance on analgesic medication. Wobenzym is associated with fewer adverse events and, therefore, may be appropriate for long-term use. PMID:25802756

  4. Oral intake of purple passion fruit peel extract reduces pain and stiffness and improves physical function in adult patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Farid, Reza; Rezaieyazdi, Zahra; Mirfeizi, Zahra; Hatef, Mohamad Reza; Mirheidari, Mahyar; Mansouri, Hassan; Esmaelli, Habib; Bentley, Gayle; Lu, Yinrong; Foo, Yeap; Watson, Ronald Ross

    2010-09-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative joint disorder and a major cause of pain and disability. The hypothesis tested in this study was that the passion fruit peel extract (PFP), a flavonoid-rich dietary supplement, would reduce symptoms due to knee OA. Thirty-three OA patients were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with parallel-group design. Patients received either placebo or PFP pills (150 mg, daily) in a double-blinded fashion for 2 months. The OA clinical symptoms were evaluated monthly with Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index. In the PFP group, there was a significant improvement in total WOMAC score and WOMAC subscale score of physical function after 30 days and pain after 60 days. At 60 days, reductions of 18.6%, 18%, 19.6%, and 19.2% in pain, stiffness, physical function, and composite WOMAC score, respectively, were self-reported in the PFP group. Whereas, in the placebo group, the self-reported WOMAC scores increased in every category. The results of this study show that PFP substantially alleviated osteoarthritis symptoms. This beneficial effect of PFP may be due to its antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties. PMID:20934601

  5. Does a continuous local anaesthetic pain treatment after immediate tissue expander reconstruction in breast carcinoma patients more efficiently reduce acute postoperative pain - a prospective randomised study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immediate breast reconstruction with an expander is a reasonable option for properly selected patients. After reconstruction, patients have severe postoperative pain, which responds poorly to opioids. Our aim was to evaluate if continuous wound infusion of a local anaesthetic into the surgical wound reduces postoperative pain, consumption of opioids and incidence of chronic pain compared to standard intravenous piritramide after primary breast reconstruction in breast carcinoma patients. Methods Altogether, 60 patients were enrolled in our study; one half in the group with wound infusion of a local anaesthetic, and the other half in the standard (piritramide) group. Parameters measured included: pain intensity (visual analogue scale), drug requirements, alertness, hospitalisation, side-effects and late complications. A p-value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results In the recovery room, the test group reported less acute pain at rest (P = 0.03) and at activity (P = 0.01), and on the day of the surgical procedure they reported less pain at activity (P = 0.003). Consumption of piritramide and metoclopramide was lower in this group (P < 0.0001), but their alertness after the surgical procedure was higher compared to the standard group (P < 0.001). After three months, the test group reported less chronic pain (P = 0.01). Conclusions After primary tissue expander breast reconstruction, wound infusion of a local anaesthetic significantly reduces acute pain and enables reduced opioid consumption, resulting in less postoperative sedation and reduced need for antiemetic drugs. Wound infusion of a local anaesthetic reduces chronic pain. PMID:24433317

  6. The Effect of Traditional Cupping on Pain and Mechanical Thresholds in Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Randomised Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Hohmann, Claudia; Choi, Kyung-Eun; Rampp, Thomas; Saha, Felix Joyonto; Musial, Frauke; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Cupping has been used since antiquity in the treatment of pain conditions. In this pilot study, we investigated the effect of traditional cupping therapy on chronic nonspecific neck pain (CNP) and mechanical sensory thresholds. Methods. Fifty CNP patients were randomly assigned to treatment (TG, n = 25) or waiting list control group (WL, n = 25). TG received a single cupping treatment. Pain at rest (PR), pain related to movement (PM), quality of life (SF-36), Neck Disability Index (NDI), mechanical detection (MDT), vibration detection (MDT), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were measured before and three days after a single cupping treatment. Patients also kept a pain and medication diary (PaDi, MeDi) during the study. Results. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. After cupping TG reported significantly less pain (PR: −17.9 mm VAS, 95%CI −29.2 to −6.6; PM: −19.7, 95%CI −32.2 to −7.2; PaDi: −1.5 points on NRS, 95%CI −2.5 to −0.4; all P < 0.05) and higher quality of life than WL (SF-36, Physical Functioning: 7.5, 95%CI 1.4 to 13.5; Bodily Pain: 14.9, 95%CI 4.4 to 25.4; Physical Component Score: 5.0, 95%CI 1.4 to 8.5; all P < 0.05). No significant effect was found for NDI, MDT, or VDT, but TG showed significantly higher PPT at pain-areas than WL (in lg(kPa); pain-maximum: 0.088, 95%CI 0.029 to 0.148, pain-adjacent: 0.118, 95%CI 0.038 to 0.199; both P < 0.01). Conclusion. A single application of traditional cupping might be an effective treatment for improving pain, quality of life, and hyperalgesia in CNP. PMID:22203873

  7. Evaluation of a Theory-Informed Implementation Intervention for the Management of Acute Low Back Pain in General Medical Practice: The IMPLEMENT Cluster Randomised Trial

    PubMed Central

    French, Simon D.; McKenzie, Joanne E.; O'Connor, Denise A.; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.; Mortimer, Duncan; Francis, Jill J.; Michie, Susan; Spike, Neil; Schattner, Peter; Kent, Peter; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Page, Matthew J.; Green, Sally E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This cluster randomised trial evaluated an intervention to decrease x-ray referrals and increase giving advice to stay active for people with acute low back pain (LBP) in general practice. Methods General practices were randomised to either access to a guideline for acute LBP (control) or facilitated interactive workshops (intervention). We measured behavioural predictors (e.g. knowledge, attitudes and intentions) and fear avoidance beliefs. We were unable to recruit sufficient patients to measure our original primary outcomes so we introduced other outcomes measured at the general practitioner (GP) level: behavioural simulation (clinical decision about vignettes) and rates of x-ray and CT-scan (medical administrative data). All those not involved in the delivery of the intervention were blinded to allocation. Results 47 practices (53 GPs) were randomised to the control and 45 practices (59 GPs) to the intervention. The number of GPs available for analysis at 12 months varied by outcome due to missing confounder information; a minimum of 38 GPs were available from the intervention group, and a minimum of 40 GPs from the control group. For the behavioural constructs, although effect estimates were small, the intervention group GPs had greater intention of practising consistent with the guideline for the clinical behaviour of x-ray referral. For behavioural simulation, intervention group GPs were more likely to adhere to guideline recommendations about x-ray (OR 1.76, 95%CI 1.01, 3.05) and more likely to give advice to stay active (OR 4.49, 95%CI 1.90 to 10.60). Imaging referral was not statistically significantly different between groups and the potential importance of effects was unclear; rate ratio 0.87 (95%CI 0.68, 1.10) for x-ray or CT-scan. Conclusions The intervention led to small changes in GP intention to practice in a manner that is consistent with an evidence-based guideline, but it did not result in statistically significant changes in actual

  8. Effect of Intraoperative Platelet-Rich-Plasma Treatment on Post Operative Donor Site Knee Pain in Patellar Tendon Autograft ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brian L.; Hobart, Sarah; Porter, David; Hogan, Daniel E.; McHugh, Malachy P.; Bedford, Benjamin B.; Nicholas, Stephen J.; Klein, Devon; Harousseau, Kendall

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Donor site morbidity in the form of anterior knee pain is a frequent complication after bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this Level I study was to examine the effect of the intraoperative administration of platelet-rich plasma on post operative knee pain and patellar defect healing. Methods: Fifty-nine patients (29±12 y/o) undergoing BPTB ACL reconstruction and eligible to enter the study, were randomized to the treatment (PRP; n=31) or non treatment (sham n=28) arms of the study just prior to surgery. In either case, 10 cc of venous blood was drawn prior to the induction of anesthesia and either discarded (sham) or processed (PRP) for preparation of a PRP gel to be later mixed with donor site bone chips and inserted into the patellar defect. At 12 weeks and 6 months after surgery, patients completed IKDC forms and VAS pain scores for ADLs and kneeling (0-10 scale). Healing indices at the donor site were assessed by MRI at 6 months and included the following measurements taken from axial sequences: AP tendon dimensions at the level of the superior tibial cortex, roof of the intercondylar notch and width at the largest patella graft deficit. Mixed model ANOVA was used to assess the effect of PRP on patient symptoms and MRI indices of donor site healing. The primary dependent variable was VAS kneeling pain. It was estimated that with 25 patients per group there would be 80% power to detect a 1.5-point difference in kneeling pain between treatments at P<0.05. A between group difference of 1.5-points in VAS for kneeling pain was deemed to represent a clinically relevant difference. Results: VAS Kneeling Pain at 12 weeks tended to be lower in the PRP versus placebo group (4.5±3.6 vs. 6.2±2.4, P=0.051) but no difference was apparent at 6 months (3.7±3.2 vs. 4.4±2.9, P=0.41). Kneeling pain decreased from 12 weeks to 6 months (P<0.001) with a trend for a greater decrease in the placebo group (Time by Treatment P

  9. Acupuncture and dry needling in the management of myofascial trigger point pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Tough, Elizabeth A; White, Adrian R; Cummings, T Michael; Richards, Suzanne H; Campbell, John L

    2009-01-01

    Pain from myofascial trigger points is often treated by needling, with or without injection, although evidence is inconclusive on whether this is effective. We aimed to review the current evidence on needling without injection, by conducting a systematic literature review. We searched electronic databases to identify relevant randomised controlled trials, and included studies where at least one group were treated by needling directly into the myofascial trigger points, and where the control was either no treatment, or usual care; indirect local dry needling or some form of placebo intervention. We extracted data on pain, using VAS scores as the standard. Seven studies were included. One study concluded that direct dry needling was superior to no intervention. Two studies, comparing direct dry needling to needling elsewhere in the muscle, produced contradictory results. Four studies used a placebo control and were included in a meta-analysis. Combining these studies (n=134), needling was not found to be significantly superior to placebo (standardised mean difference, 14.9 [95%CI, -5.81 to 33.99]), however marked statistical heterogeneity was present (I(2)=88%). In conclusion, there is limited evidence deriving from one study that deep needling directly into myofascial trigger points has an overall treatment effect when compared with standardised care. Whilst the result of the meta-analysis of needling compared with placebo controls does not attain statistically significant, the overall direction could be compatible with a treatment effect of dry needling on myofascial trigger point pain. However, the limited sample size and poor quality of these studies highlights and supports the need for large scale, good quality placebo controlled trials in this area.

  10. Rationale, design, and implementation protocol of the Dutch clinical practice guideline Pain in patients with cancer: a cluster randomised controlled trial with short message service (SMS) and interactive voice response (IVR)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One-half of patients with cancer have pain. In nearly one out of two cancer patients with pain, this was undertreated. Inadequate pain control still remains an important problem in this group of patients. Therefore, in 2008 a national, evidence-based multidisciplinary clinical practice guideline 'pain in patients with cancer' has been developed. Yet, publishing a guideline is not enough. Implementation is needed to improve pain management. An innovative implementation strategy, Short Message Service with Interactive Voice Response (SVS-IVR), has been developed and pilot tested. This study aims to evaluate on effectiveness of this strategy to improve pain reporting, pain measurement and adequate pain therapy. In addition, whether the active role of the patient and involvement of caregivers in pain management may change. Methods/design A cluster randomised controlled trial with two arms will be performed in six oncology outpatient clinics of hospitals in the Southeastern region of the Netherlands, with three hospitals in the intervention and three in the control condition. Follow-up measurements will be conducted in all hospitals to study the long-term effect of the intervention. The intervention includes training of professionals (medical oncologists, nurses, and general practitioners) and SMS-IVR to report pain in patients with cancer to improve pain reporting by patients, pain management by medical oncologists, nurses, and general practitioners, and decrease pain intensity. Discussion This innovative implementation strategy with technical tools and the involvement of patients, may enhance the use of the guideline 'pain in patients with cancer' for pain management. Short Message Service alerts may serve as a tool to support self-management of patients. Therefore, the SMS-IVR intervention may increase the feeling of having control over one's life. Trail registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2739 PMID:22142327

  11. A Supplemental Report to a Randomized Cluster Trial of a 20-Week Sun-Style Tai Chi for Osteoarthritic Knee Pain in Elders with Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Pao-Feng; Chang, Jason Y.; Beck, Cornelia; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Keefe, Francis J.; Rosengren, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Objective This was a secondary data analysis of a cluster-randomized clinical trial that tested the efficacy of a 20-week Sun-style Tai Chi (TC) program in reducing pain in community-dwelling elders with cognitive impairment and knee osteoarthritis (OA). The study also examined whether elders’ level of cognitive function was related to the outcomes of the TC program. Method Elders (N=55) were recruited from 8 study sites. Each site was randomly assigned to participate in either a 20-week TC or an education program. Verbal report of pain was measured by a Verbal Descriptor Scale (VDS) at Weeks 1, 5, 9, 13, 17 and 21 (designated as Times 1-6). Pain behaviors and analgesic intake were also recorded at Times 1-6. Results At post-test, scores on the VDS and observed pain behaviors were significantly better in the TC group than in the control group (p=.008-.048). The beneficial effects of TC were not associated with cognitive ability. Conclusion These results suggest that TC can be used as an adjunct to pharmacological intervention to relieve OA pain in elders with cognitive impairment. PMID:26275650

  12. Self-hypnosis for intrapartum pain management in pregnant nulliparous women: a randomised controlled trial of clinical effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Downe, S; Finlayson, K; Melvin, C; Spiby, H; Ali, S; Diggle, P; Gyte, G; Hinder, S; Miller, V; Slade, P; Trepel, D; Weeks, A; Whorwell, P; Williamson, M

    2015-01-01

    Objective (Primary) To establish the effect of antenatal group self-hypnosis for nulliparous women on intra-partum epidural use. Design Multi-method randomised control trial (RCT). Setting Three NHS Trusts. Population Nulliparous women not planning elective caesarean, without medication for hypertension and without psychological illness. Methods Randomisation at 28–32 weeks’ gestation to usual care, or to usual care plus brief self-hypnosis training (two × 90-minute groups at around 32 and 35 weeks’ gestation; daily audio self-hypnosis CD). Follow up at 2 and 6 weeks postnatal. Main outcome measures Primary: epidural analgesia. Secondary: associated clinical and psychological outcomes; cost analysis. Results Six hundred and eighty women were randomised. There was no statistically significant difference in epidural use: 27.9% (intervention), 30.3% (control), odds ratio (OR) 0.89 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.64–1.24], or in 27 of 29 pre-specified secondary clinical and psychological outcomes. Women in the intervention group had lower actual than anticipated levels of fear and anxiety between baseline and 2 weeks post natal (anxiety: mean difference −0.72, 95% CI −1.16 to −0.28, P = 0.001); fear (mean difference −0.62, 95% CI −1.08 to −0.16, P = 0.009) [Correction added on 7 July 2015, after first online publication: ‘Mean difference’ replaced ‘Odds ratio (OR)’ in the preceding sentence.]. Postnatal response rates were 67% overall at 2 weeks. The additional cost in the intervention arm per woman was £4.83 (CI −£257.93 to £267.59). Conclusions Allocation to two-third-trimester group self-hypnosis training sessions did not significantly reduce intra-partum epidural analgesia use or a range of other clinical and psychological variables. The impact of women's anxiety and fear about childbirth needs further investigation. Tweetable abstract Going to 2 prenatal self-hypnosis groups didn't reduce labour epidural use but did

  13. High volume acupuncture clinic (HVAC) for chronic knee pain--audit of a possible model for delivery of acupuncture in the National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, Saul; Cummings, Mike; Perrin, Chris; Ito, Rieko

    2008-03-01

    Recent research has established the efficacy, effectiveness and cost effectiveness of acupuncture for some forms of chronic musculoskeletal pain. However, there are practical problems with delivery which currently prevent its large scale implementation in the National Health Service. We have developed a delivery model at our hospital, a 'high volume' acupuncture clinic (HVAC) in which patients are treated in a group setting for single conditions using standardised or semi-standardised electroacupuncture protocols by practitioners with basic training. We discuss our experiences using this model for chronic knee pain and present an outcome audit for the first 77 patients, demonstrating satisfactory initial (eight week) clinical results. Longer term (one year) data are currently being collected and the model should next be tested in primary care to confirm its feasibility.

  14. Alcoholic Chlorhexidine or Alcoholic Iodine Skin Antisepsis (ACAISA): protocol for cluster randomised controlled trial of surgical skin preparation for the prevention of superficial wound complications in prosthetic hip and knee replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    Peel, T N; Cheng, A C; Buising, K L; Dowsey, M M; Choong, P F M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Wound complications following arthroplasty are associated with significant impact on the patient and healthcare system. Skin cleansing prior to surgical incision is a simple and effective method to prevent wound complications however, the question of which agent is superior for surgical skin antisepsis is unresolved. Methods and analysis This cluster randomised controlled trial aims to compare the incidence of superficial wound complications in patients undergoing elective prosthetic hip or knee replacement surgery receiving surgical skin antisepsis with either: 0.5% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) in 70% alcohol or 10% povidone in 70% alcohol. The trial will be conducted at an Australian tertiary, university affiliated hospital over a 3-year period involving 750 participants. Participants will be drawn from the surgical waiting list. Consent for this study will be ‘opt-out’ consent. On a given day, all eligible participants will have skin preparation either with 0.5% chlorhexidine in 70% alcohol or 10% povidone iodine in 70% alcohol. The primary outcome is superficial wound complications (comprised of superficial incisional surgical site infections (SSI) and/or prolonged wound ooze) in the first 30 days following prosthetic joint replacement surgery. Secondary outcomes will include the incidence of wound complications according to the joint replaced, assessment of the causative agents of SSI and cost-effectiveness analysis. The primary analysis is an intention-to-treat analysis including all participants who undergo randomisation and will be performed at the individual level taking into account the clustering effect. Ethics and dissemination The study design and protocol was reviewed and approved by the St Vincent's Hospital Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC-A 016/14 10/3/2014). Study findings will be disseminated in the printed media, and learned forums. A written lay summary will be available to study participants on request. Trial

  15. The use of gabapentin in the management of postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty: A PRISMA-compliant meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Han, Chao; Li, Xiao-Dan; Jiang, Hong-Qiang; Ma, Jian-Xiong; Ma, Xin-Long

    2016-06-01

    Pain management after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) varies and has been widely studied in recent years. Some randomized controlled studies have carried out to evaluate the effects of gabapentin on pain relief after TKA. However, no solid result was made about it. The purpose of this Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) was to estimate the overall effect of pain control of gabapentin versus placebo after a TKA. An electronic-based search using the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial from 1966 to June 2015. RCTs involving gabapentin and placebo for total knee arthroplasty were included. The meta-analysis was performed following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Six trials with 859 participants met the inclusion criteria. The primary endpoint was cumulative narcotic consumption and the visual analog scale scores at 12 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours, postoperatively. The knee flexion degree and treatment side effects were also compiled to evaluate the safety of gabapentin. After testing for the heterogeneity and publication bias among studies, data were aggregated for random-effects modeling when necessary. There was a significant decrease in morphine consumption at 12 hours (MD = -4.69, 95% CI: -7.18 to -2.21, P = 0.0002), 24 hours (MD = -5.30, 95% CI: -9.94 to -0.66, P = 0.03), and 48 hours (MD = -17.80, 95% CI: -31.95 to -3.64, P = 0.01), respectively. Compared with the control group, the rate of pruritus was less in the gabapentin group (RR 0.20, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.38, P = 0.00). In summary, the administration of gabapentin was effective in decreasing postoperative narcotic consumption and the incidence of pruritus. There was a high risk of selection bias and a higher heterogeneity of knee flexion range in this analysis. More high-quality large randomized controlled trials with long follow

  16. The efficacy of multimodal high-volume wound infiltration in primary total knee replacement in facilitating immediate post-operative pain relief and attainment of early rehabilitation milestones.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Purnajyoti

    2014-05-01

    Inadequate pain relief after lower limb joint replacement surgery has been a well-recognised limiting factor affecting post-operative mobilisation and length of hospital stay. Multimodal local wound infiltration with local anaesthetics, adrenaline and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents can lower the opiate intake, reduce the length of stay and enhance early mobilisation in knee replacement patients. A retrospective review of 64 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement was undertaken. Thirty-two patients (cases) had their wounds infiltrated with ropivacaine, adrenaline and ketorolac by the operating surgeon, intraoperatively. Subsequently, a 19G wound catheter placed into the knee joint. They received two further top-up doses of the same combination at 10 and 20 h post-operatively. This group was compared with a control group of 32 patients who did not receive any local infiltration. Both groups were comparable in terms of BMI and age. Post-operative opiate drug consumption in first 48 h after surgery, length of hospital stays and time taken to mobilise after surgery were recorded. There was significant reduction in opiate consumption in the treatment group with an average consumption of 49.35 mg of morphine compared to 71.48 mg in the control group (p = 0.004). The median length of hospital stay was significantly reduced from 5 days in the control group to 4 days in the treatment group (p = 0.03). The patients in the treatment group mobilised around 19 h earlier (p = 0.001). No major post-operative complications were encountered in either group. Wound infiltration is an effective and safe technique that promotes early rehabilitation and discharge of patients following primary total knee replacement.

  17. A 40-month multicentre, randomised placebo-controlled study to assess the efficacy and carry-over effect of repeated intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid in knee osteoarthritis: the AMELIA project

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Sarabia, F; Coronel, P; Collantes, E; Navarro, F J; de la Serna, A Rodriguez; Naranjo, A; Gimeno, M; Herrero-Beaumont, G

    2011-01-01

    Objective AMELIA (OsteoArthritis Modifying Effects of Long-term Intra-articular Adant) was designed to compare against placebo the efficacy and safety of repeated injections of hyaluronic acid (HA) and its effect on disease progression over 40 months. Methods A multicentre, randomised, patient and evaluator-blinded, controlled study in 306 patients fulfilling American College of Rheumatology criteria for knee osteoarthritis, radiological grades II–III (Kellgren–Lawrence) and joint space width ≥2 mm. Patients received four cycles of five intra-articular HA or placebo injections with a follow-up of 6 months after the first and second cycles, and 1 year after the third and fourth cycles. Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) 2004 responder criteria were used to assess efficacy. The consumption of rescue medication was a secondary outcome. Adverse events were recorded for safety purposes. Results At the 40-month visit significantly more patients responded to HA compared with placebo (OARSI 2004, p=0.004). The number of responders to HA increased through the study, whereas those to placebo did not change. Significant differences were also found in favour of HA for each individual component of the OARSI 2004. No safety problems were recorded. Conclusions The results of AMELIA offer pioneer evidence that repeated cycles of intra-articular injections of HA not only improve knee osteoarthritis symptoms during the in-between cycle period but also exert a marked carry-over effect for at least 1 year after the last cycle. In this respect, it is not possible to establish if this carry-over effect reflects true osteoarthritis remission or just a modification of the disease's natural course. ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00669032 PMID:21852252

  18. Complementary therapies for labour and birth study: a randomised controlled trial of antenatal integrative medicine for pain management in labour

    PubMed Central

    Levett, Kate M; Smith, C A; Bensoussan, A; Dahlen, H G

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of an antenatal integrative medicine education programme in addition to usual care for nulliparous women on intrapartum epidural use. Design Open-label, assessor blind, randomised controlled trial. Setting 2 public hospitals in Sydney, Australia. Population 176 nulliparous women with low-risk pregnancies, attending hospital-based antenatal clinics. Methods and intervention The Complementary Therapies for Labour and Birth protocol, based on the She Births and acupressure for labour and birth courses, incorporated 6 evidence-based complementary medicine techniques: acupressure, visualisation and relaxation, breathing, massage, yoga techniques, and facilitated partner support. Randomisation occurred at 24–36 weeks’ gestation, and participants attended a 2-day antenatal education programme plus standard care, or standard care alone. Main outcome measures Rate of analgesic epidural use. Secondary: onset of labour, augmentation, mode of birth, newborn outcomes. Results There was a significant difference in epidural use between the 2 groups: study group (23.9%) standard care (68.7%; risk ratio (RR) 0.37 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.55), p≤0.001). The study group participants reported a reduced rate of augmentation (RR=0.54 (95% CI 0.38 to 0.77), p<0.0001); caesarean section (RR=0.52 (95% CI 0.31 to 0.87), p=0.017); length of second stage (mean difference=−0.32 (95% CI −0.64 to 0.002), p=0.05); any perineal trauma (0.88 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.98), p=0.02) and resuscitation of the newborn (RR=0.47 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.87), p≤0.015). There were no statistically significant differences found in spontaneous onset of labour, pethidine use, rate of postpartum haemorrhage, major perineal trauma (third and fourth degree tears/episiotomy), or admission to special care nursery/neonatal intensive care unit (p=0.25). Conclusions The Complementary Therapies for Labour and Birth study protocol significantly reduced epidural use and caesarean section. This

  19. Comparison of Adductor Canal Block and Femoral Nerve Block for Postoperative Pain in Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Cui-Cui; Dong, Shu-Ling; He, Fu-Cheng

    2016-03-01

    A total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has always been associated with moderate-to-severe pain. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pain control of adductor canal block (ACB) and femoral nerve block (FNB) after TKA.Relevant literatures about the ACB and FNB after TKA for reducing pain were searched from Medline (1996-January, 2015), Embase (1980-January, 2015), PubMed (1980-January, 2015), Web of Science (1980-January, 2015), and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. High-quality RCTs and non-RCTs were picked to evaluate the visual analogue scale (VAS) and other outcome. This systematic review and meta-analysis were performed according to the PRISMA statement criteria. The software RevMan 5.30 was used for the meta-analysis.Eight literatures fitted into the inclusion criteria. There were no significant differences in VAS score with rest or mobilization at 4, 24, and 48 h between ACB group and FNB group. There were also no significant differences in the strength of quadriceps and adductor, the length of hospital stay, and complications of vomiting and nausea.Present meta-analysis indicated that ACB shows no superiority than FNB group. Both of them can reduce the pain score after TKA. As referred to which method to adopt, it is determined by the preference of the surgeons and anesthesiologists. PMID:27015172

  20. Altering Knee Abduction Angular Impulse Using Wedged Insoles for Treatment of Patellofemoral Pain in Runners: A Six-Week Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lewinson, Ryan T.; Wiley, J. Preston; Humble, R. Neil; Worobets, Jay T.; Stefanyshyn, Darren J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Determine if a change in internal knee abduction angular impulse (KAAI) is related to pain reduction for runners with patellofemoral pain (PFP) by comparing lateral and medial wedge insole interventions, and increased KAAI and decreased KAAI groups. Design Randomized controlled clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov ID# NCT01332110). Setting Biomechanics laboratory and community. Patients Thirty-six runners with physician-diagnosed PFP enrolled in the trial, and 27 were analyzed. Interventions Runners with PFP were randomly assigned to either an experimental 3 mm lateral wedge or control 6 mm medial wedge group. Participants completed a biomechanical gait analysis to quantify KAAIs with their assigned insole, and then used their assigned insole for six-weeks during their regular runs. Usual pain during running was measured at baseline and at six-week follow-up using a visual analog scale. Statistical tests were performed to identify differences between wedge types, differences between biomechanical response types (i.e. increase or decrease KAAI), as well as predictors of pain reduction. Main Outcome Measures Percent change in KAAI relative to neutral, and % change in pain over six weeks. Results Clinically meaningful reductions in pain (>33%) were measured for both footwear groups; however, no significant differences between footwear groups were found (p = 0.697). When participants were regrouped based on KAAI change (i.e., increase or decrease), again, no significant differences in pain reduction were noted (p = 0.146). Interestingly, when evaluating absolute change in KAAI, a significant relationship between absolute % change in KAAI and % pain reduction was observed (R2 = 0.21; p = 0.030), after adjusting for baseline pain levels. Conclusion The greater the absolute % change in KAAI during running, the greater the % reduction in pain over six weeks, regardless of wedge type, and whether KAAIs increased or decreased. Lateral and medial wedge insoles were

  1. How Does Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Pain Neuromatrix Affect Brain Excitability and Pain Perception? A Randomised, Double-Blind, Sham-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Vaseghi, Bita; Zoghi, Maryam; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2015-01-01

    Background Integration of information between multiple cortical regions of the pain neuromatrix is thought to underpin pain modulation. Although altered processing in the primary motor (M1) and sensory (S1) cortices is implicated in separate studies, the simultaneous changes in and the relationship between these regions are unknown yet. The primary aim was to assess the effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) over superficial regions of the pain neuromatrix on M1 and S1 excitability. The secondary aim was to investigate how M1 and S1 excitability changes affect sensory (STh) and pain thresholds (PTh). Methods Twelve healthy participants received 20 min a-tDCS under five different conditions including a-tDCS of M1, a-tDCS of S1, a-tDCS of DLPFC, sham a-tDCS, and no-tDCS. Excitability of dominant M1 and S1 were measured before, immediately, and 30 minutes after intervention respectively. Moreover, STh and PTh to peripheral electrical and mechanical stimulation were evaluated. All outcome measures were assessed at three time-points of measurement by a blind rater. Results A-tDCS of M1 and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) significantly increased brain excitability in M1 (p < 0.05) for at least 30 min. Following application of a-tDCS over the S1, the amplitude of the N20-P25 component of SEPs increased immediately after the stimulation (p < 0.05), whilst M1 stimulation decreased it. Compared to baseline values, significant STh and PTh increase was observed after a-tDCS of all three stimulated areas. Except in M1 stimulation, there was significant PTh difference between a-tDCS and sham tDCS. Conclusion a-tDCS of M1 is the best spots to enhance brain excitability than a-tDCS of S1 and DLPFC. Surprisingly, a-tDCS of M1 and S1 has diverse effects on S1 and M1 excitability. A-tDCS of M1, S1, and DLPFC increased STh and PTh levels. Given the placebo effects of a-tDCS of M1 in pain perception, our results should be interpreted with caution

  2. A phase III placebo- and oxycodone-controlled study of tanezumab in adults with osteoarthritis pain of the hip or knee.

    PubMed

    Spierings, Egilius L H; Fidelholtz, James; Wolfram, Gernot; Smith, Michael D; Brown, Mark T; West, Christine R

    2013-09-01

    Tanezumab is a humanized monoclonal antinerve growth factor antibody in development for treatment of chronic pain. In a phase III, placebo- and active-controlled study, we investigated the efficacy and safety of tanezumab for osteoarthritis (OA) hip or knee pain. Patients (N=610) received up to 2 doses of intravenous tanezumab (5 or 10mg in 8-week intervals), controlled-release oral oxycodone (10 to 40 mg every 12 hours), or placebo. The primary endpoint was mean change from baseline to week 8 in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) Pain score for tanezumab versus placebo and oxycodone. Secondary endpoints included change from baseline in WOMAC Physical Function and Stiffness scores, Patient's Global Assessment (PGA) of OA, and patient response, defined as ≥ 30%, ≥ 50%, ≥ 70%, and ≥ 90% improvement from baseline in WOMAC Pain score. Tolerability and safety also were assessed. Both tanezumab groups demonstrated significant improvements in WOMAC Pain score versus placebo (P<.001) and oxycodone (P ≤.018). Tanezumab also provided significant improvements versus placebo and oxycodone for WOMAC Physical Function and Stiffness scores and PGA of OA (P ≤.002 for all) at week 8. For all analyses, oxycodone did not differ from placebo. Adverse event frequency was higher with oxycodone (63.3%) than tanezumab (40.7% to 44.7%) or placebo (35.5%); serious adverse event frequency was similar among treatments. The adverse event profile for tanezumab was similar to previous tanezumab studies. Results indicate that tanezumab is efficacious in the treatment of OA pain; no new safety signals were identified.

  3. Within-Day Variability of Fatigue and Pain Among African Americans and Non-Hispanic Whites With Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, DYLAN M.; PARMELEE, PATRICIA A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fatigue is common among persons with osteoarthritis (OA), but little is known about racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence, correlates, or dynamics of fatigue in OA. This research therefore used experience sampling methodology (ESM) to examine fatigue and pain at global and momentary levels among African Americans and non-Hispanic whites with OA. Methods Thirty-nine African Americans and 81 non-Hispanic whites with physician-diagnosed knee OA completed a baseline interview and an ESM protocol assessing fatigue, pain, and mood 4 times daily for 7 days. In addition to analyzing basic group differences, multilevel modeling examined within- versus between-subject patterns and correlates of variability in momentary fatigue, controlling for demographics and other potential confounders. Results Both racial groups experienced moderate levels of fatigue; however, there were clear individual differences in both mean fatigue level and variability across momentary assessments. Mean fatigue levels were associated with global pain and depression. Increase in fatigue over the course of the day was much stronger among non-Hispanic whites than African Americans. Momentary fatigue and pain were closely correlated. Mean fatigue predicted variability in mood; at the momentary level, both fatigue and pain were independently associated with mood. Conclusion Fatigue is a significant factor for both African Americans and non-Hispanic whites with OA, and is negatively related to quality of life. Pain symptoms, at both the momentary level and across individuals, were robust predictors of fatigue. Although overall levels of reported symptoms were similar across these 2 groups, the pattern of fatigue symptoms across the day differed. PMID:26315851

  4. The clinical course of low back pain: a meta-analysis comparing outcomes in randomised clinical trials (RCTs) and observational studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that the course of low back pain (LBP) symptoms in randomised clinical trials (RCTs) follows a pattern of large improvement regardless of the type of treatment. A similar pattern was independently observed in observational studies. However, there is an assumption that the clinical course of symptoms is particularly influenced in RCTs by mere participation in the trials. To test this assumption, the aim of our study was to compare the course of LBP in RCTs and observational studies. Methods Source of studies CENTRAL database for RCTs and MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and hand search of systematic reviews for cohort studies. Studies include individuals aged 18 or over, and concern non-specific LBP. Trials had to concern primary care treatments. Data were extracted on pain intensity. Meta-regression analysis was used to compare the pooled within-group change in pain in RCTs with that in cohort studies calculated as the standardised mean change (SMC). Results 70 RCTs and 19 cohort studies were included, out of 1134 and 653 identified respectively. LBP symptoms followed a similar course in RCTs and cohort studies: a rapid improvement in the first 6 weeks followed by a smaller further improvement until 52 weeks. There was no statistically significant difference in pooled SMC between RCTs and cohort studies at any time point:- 6 weeks: RCTs: SMC 1.0 (95% CI 0.9 to 1.0) and cohorts 1.2 (0.7to 1.7); 13 weeks: RCTs 1.2 (1.1 to 1.3) and cohorts 1.0 (0.8 to 1.3); 27 weeks: RCTs 1.1 (1.0 to 1.2) and cohorts 1.2 (0.8 to 1.7); 52 weeks: RCTs 0.9 (0.8 to 1.0) and cohorts 1.1 (0.8 to 1.6). Conclusions The clinical course of LBP symptoms followed a pattern that was similar in RCTs and cohort observational studies. In addition to a shared ‘natural history’, enrolment of LBP patients in clinical studies is likely to provoke responses that reflect the nonspecific effects of seeking and receiving care, independent of the study design. PMID:24607083

  5. Intra-Articular Injections of Platelet-Rich Plasma versus Hyaluronic Acid in the Treatment of Osteoarthritic Knee Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial in the Context of the Spanish National Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Montañez-Heredia, Elvira; Irízar, Sofia; Huertas, Pedro J; Otero, Esperanza; Del Valle, Marta; Prat, Isidro; Díaz-Gallardo, Macarena S; Perán, Macarena; Marchal, Juan A; Hernandez-Lamas, María Del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Intra-articular injection of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been established as a suitable treatment for knee osteoarthritis. Here, we present a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial, conducted in a public Hospital of the Spanish National Health Care System, to evaluate the efficacy of injecting autologous PRP versus hyaluronic acid (HA) in knee osteoarthritis. PRP was manufactured in Malaga's Regional Blood Center (Spain). Patients that met the eligibility criteria were randomized into a PRP group or a HA group. Pain and functional improvements were assessed pre- and post-treatment (three and six months follow-up) using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS); the Knee and Osteoarthritis Outcome System (KOOS) scale and the European Quality of Life scale (EUROQOL). Both groups presented pain reduction at six months. The VAS scores for the PRP group improved by at least 50% from their initial value, particularly at three months following the final infiltration, with results resembling those of the HA group at six months. PRP was more effective in patients with lower osteoarthritis grades. Both treatments improved pain in knee osteoarthritis patients without statistically significant differences between them. However, PRP injection was proved to improve pain three months after the final infiltration and to be more effective in lower osteoarthritis grades. PMID:27384560

  6. Intra-Articular Injections of Platelet-Rich Plasma versus Hyaluronic Acid in the Treatment of Osteoarthritic Knee Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial in the Context of the Spanish National Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    Montañez-Heredia, Elvira; Irízar, Sofia; Huertas, Pedro J.; Otero, Esperanza; del Valle, Marta; Prat, Isidro; Díaz-Gallardo, Macarena S.; Perán, Macarena; Marchal, Juan A.; Hernandez-Lamas, María del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Intra-articular injection of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been established as a suitable treatment for knee osteoarthritis. Here, we present a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial, conducted in a public Hospital of the Spanish National Health Care System, to evaluate the efficacy of injecting autologous PRP versus hyaluronic acid (HA) in knee osteoarthritis. PRP was manufactured in Malaga’s Regional Blood Center (Spain). Patients that met the eligibility criteria were randomized into a PRP group or a HA group. Pain and functional improvements were assessed pre- and post-treatment (three and six months follow-up) using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS); the Knee and Osteoarthritis Outcome System (KOOS) scale and the European Quality of Life scale (EUROQOL). Both groups presented pain reduction at six months. The VAS scores for the PRP group improved by at least 50% from their initial value, particularly at three months following the final infiltration, with results resembling those of the HA group at six months. PRP was more effective in patients with lower osteoarthritis grades. Both treatments improved pain in knee osteoarthritis patients without statistically significant differences between them. However, PRP injection was proved to improve pain three months after the final infiltration and to be more effective in lower osteoarthritis grades. PMID:27384560

  7. Evaluation of computed tomography in patients with atypical angina or chest pain clinically referred for invasive coronary angiography: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rief, Matthias; Martus, Peter; Kendziora, Benjamin; Feger, Sarah; Dreger, Henryk; Priem, Sascha; Knebel, Fabian; Böhm, Marko; Schlattmann, Peter; Hamm, Bernd; Schönenberger, Eva; Laule, Michael; Zimmermann, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether invasive coronary angiography or computed tomography (CT) should be performed in patients clinically referred for coronary angiography with an intermediate probability of coronary artery disease. Design Prospective randomised single centre trial. Setting University hospital in Germany. Participants 340 patients with suspected coronary artery disease and a clinical indication for coronary angiography on the basis of atypical angina or chest pain. Interventions 168 patients were randomised to CT and 172 to coronary angiography. After randomisation one patient declined CT and 10 patients declined coronary angiography, leaving 167 patients (88 women) and 162 patients (78 women) for analysis. Allocation could not be blinded, but blinded independent investigators assessed outcomes. Main outcome measure The primary outcome measure was major procedural complications within 48 hours of the last procedure related to CT or angiography. Results Cardiac CT reduced the need for coronary angiography from 100% to 14% (95% confidence interval 9% to 20%, P<0.001) and was associated with a significantly greater diagnostic yield from coronary angiography: 75% (53% to 90%) v 15% (10% to 22%), P<0.001. Major procedural complications were uncommon (0.3%) and similar across groups. Minor procedural complications were less common in the CT group than in the coronary angiography group: 3.6% (1% to 8%) v 10.5% (6% to 16%), P=0.014. CT shortened the median length of stay in the angiography group from 52.9 hours (interquartile range 49.5-76.4 hours) to 30.0 hours (3.5-77.3 hours, P<0.001). Overall median exposure to radiation was similar between the CT and angiography groups: 5.0 mSv (interquartile range 4.2-8.7 mSv) v 6.4 mSv (3.4-10.7 mSv), P=0.45. After a median follow-up of 3.3 years, major adverse cardiovascular events had occurred in seven of 167 patients in the CT group (4.2%) and six of 162 (3.7%) in the coronary angiography group (adjusted hazard

  8. Preoperative housing in an enriched environment significantly reduces the duration of post-operative pain in a rat model of knee inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Anne F; Marcus, Marco A E; Honig, Wiel M M; Joosten, Elbert A J

    2010-01-22

    The influence of the environment on clinical post-operative pain received recently more attention in human. A very common paradigm in experimental pain research to model the effect of housing conditions is the enriched environment (EE). During EE-housing, rats are housed in a large cage (i.e. social stimulation), usually containing additional tools like running wheels (i.e. physical stimulation). Interestingly, only postsurgical housing effect on post-operative pain was developed during clinical and experimental studies while little is known on the influence of preoperative housing. In this study, our aim was to investigate the influence of housing conditions prior to an operation on the development of post-operative pain, using a rat model of carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain. Four housing conditions were used: a 3-week pre-housing in standard conditions (S-) followed by a post-housing in an EE; a 3-week pre-housing in EE followed by a post-operation S-housing; a pre- and post-housing in EE; a pre- and post-S-housing. The development of mechanical allodynia was assessed by the means of the von Frey test, preoperatively and at day post-operative (DPO) 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, 17, 21, 24 and 28. Our results show that a 3-week preoperative exposure to EE leads to a significant reduction in the duration of the carrageenan-induced mechanical allodynia, comparable with a post-operative exposure to EE. Strikingly, when rats were housed in EE prior to as well as after the carrageenan injection into the knee, mechanical allodynia lasted only 2 weeks, as compared to 4 weeks in S-housed rats.

  9. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study to Assess the Efficacy of Nonopioid Analgesics on Pain following Arthroscopic Knee Surgery.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Susanne; Eckhardt, Regina; Netter, Ute; Abdulla, Walied

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. In a randomized, double-blind trial, the efficacy of nonopioid analgesics on postoperative piritramide consumption was compared for pain relief during the first 24 h in patients recovering from arthroscopic knee surgery. Methods. 120 patients were treated with normal saline and/or one of the nonopioid analgesics (parecoxib, metamizole, paracetamol) in addition to piritramide using the PCA pump. Beginning in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU), patients were asked to quantify their pain experience at rest while piritramide consumption was recorded. Results. Piritramide consumption upon arrival in the PACU was high in all groups. However, cumulative consumption in the parecoxib group was significantly lower than that in the placebo group at 6 and 12 h after surgery. At discharge from the PACU, VAS scores dropped in all groups and were significantly lower in the parecoxib group. In the PACU, satisfaction of the patients was moderate and improved with time after surgery. Conclusions. There was statistically significant opioid-saving effect by administering parecoxib with better VAS scores and satisfaction level compared to placebo. The high pain score in the PACU in all groups immediately after recovering from remifentanil-based anesthesia would be prevented if local anesthetics were administered intra-articularly as part of a multimodal analgesic approach.

  10. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain. PMID:26616176

  11. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain.

  12. A randomised controlled trial of preventive spinal manipulation with and without a home exercise program for patients with chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence indicates that supervised home exercises, combined or not with manual therapy, can be beneficial for patients with non-specific chronic neck pain (NCNP). The objective of the study is to investigate the efficacy of preventive spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) compared to a no treatment group in NCNP patients. Another objective is to assess the efficacy of SMT with and without a home exercise program. Methods Ninety-eight patients underwent a short symptomatic phase of treatment before being randomly allocated to either an attention-group (n = 29), a SMT group (n = 36) or a SMT + exercise group (n = 33). The preventive phase of treatment, which lasted for 10 months, consisted of meeting with a chiropractor every two months to evaluate and discuss symptoms (attention-control group), 1 monthly SMT session (SMT group) or 1 monthly SMT session combined with a home exercise program (SMT + exercise group). The primary and secondary outcome measures were represented by scores on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS), active cervical ranges of motion (cROM), the neck disability index (NDI) and the Bournemouth questionnaire (BQ). Exploratory outcome measures were scored on the Fear-avoidance Behaviour Questionnaire (FABQ) and the SF-12 Questionnaire. Results Our results show that, in the preventive phase of the trial, all 3 groups showed primary and secondary outcomes scores similar to those obtain following the non-randomised, symptomatic phase. No group difference was observed for the primary, secondary and exploratory variables. Significant improvements in FABQ scores were noted in all groups during the preventive phase of the trial. However, no significant change in health related quality of life (HRQL) was associated with the preventive phase. Conclusions This study hypothesised that participants in the combined intervention group would have less pain and disability and better function than participants from the 2 other groups during the preventive phase

  13. Effect of spinal manipulation on sensorimotor functions in back pain patients: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP) is a recognized public health problem, impacting up to 80% of US adults at some point in their lives. Patients with LBP are utilizing integrative health care such as spinal manipulation (SM). SM is the therapeutic application of a load to specific body tissues or structures and can be divided into two broad categories: SM with a high-velocity low-amplitude load, or an impulse "thrust", (HVLA-SM) and SM with a low-velocity variable-amplitude load (LVVA-SM). There is evidence that sensorimotor function in people with LBP is altered. This study evaluates the sensorimotor function in the lumbopelvic region, as measured by postural sway, response to sudden load and repositioning accuracy, following SM to the lumbar and pelvic region when compared to a sham treatment. Methods/Design A total of 219 participants with acute, subacute or chronic low back pain are being recruited from the Quad Cities area located in Iowa and Illinois. They are allocated through a minimization algorithm in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive either 13 HVLA-SM treatments over 6 weeks, 13 LVVA-SM treatments over 6 weeks or 2 weeks of a sham treatment followed by 4 weeks of full spine "doctor's choice" SM. Sensorimotor function tests are performed before and immediately after treatment at baseline, week 2 and week 6. Self-report outcome assessments are also collected. The primary aims of this study are to 1) determine immediate pre to post changes in sensorimotor function as measured by postural sway following delivery of a single HVLA-SM or LVVA-SM treatment when compared to a sham treatment and 2) to determine changes from baseline to 2 weeks (4 treatments) of HVLA-SM or LVVA-SM compared to a sham treatment. Secondary aims include changes in response to sudden loads and lumbar repositioning accuracy at these endpoints, estimating sensorimotor function in the SM groups after 6 weeks of treatment, and exploring if changes in sensorimotor function are associated with changes in

  14. Comparing the clinical-effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an internet-delivered Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) intervention with a waiting list control among adults with chronic pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sara; Hogan, Michael; Dowd, Haulie; Doherty, Edel; O'Higgins, Siobhan; Nic Gabhainn, Saoirse; MacNeela, Padraig; Murphy, Andrew W; Kropmans, Thomas; O'Neill, Ciaran; Newell, John; McGuire, Brian E

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Internet-delivered psychological interventions among people with chronic pain have the potential to overcome environmental and economic barriers to the provision of evidence-based psychological treatment in the Irish health service context. While the use of internet-delivered cognitive–behavioural therapy programmes has been consistently shown to have small-to-moderate effects in the management of chronic pain, there is a paucity in the research regarding the effectiveness of an internet-delivered Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) programme among people with chronic pain. The current study will compare the clinical-effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an online ACT intervention with a waitlist control condition in terms of the management of pain-related functional interference among people with chronic pain. Methods and analysis Participants with non-malignant pain that persists for at least 3 months will be randomised to one of two study conditions. The experimental group will undergo an eight-session internet-delivered ACT programme over an 8-week period. The control group will be a waiting list group and will be offered the ACT intervention after the 3-month follow-up period. Participants will be assessed preintervention, postintervention and at a 3-month follow-up. The primary outcome will be pain-related functional interference. Secondary outcomes will include: pain intensity, depression, global impression of change, acceptance of chronic pain and quality of life. A qualitative evaluation of the perspectives of the participants regarding the ACT intervention will be completed after the trial. Ethics and dissemination The study will be performed in agreement with the Declaration of Helsinki and is approved by the National University of Ireland Galway Research Ethics Committee (12/05/05). The results of the trial will be published according to the CONSORT statement and will be presented at conferences and reported in peer

  15. Effectiveness of a biopsychosocial e-learning intervention on the clinical judgements of medical students and GP trainees regarding future risk of disability in patients with chronic lower back pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Christopher P; MacNeela, Pádraig; Reynolds, Bronagh; Hamm, Robert M; Main, Christopher J; O'Connor, Laura L; Conneely, Sinéad; Taheny, Darragh; Slattery, Brian W; O'Neill, Ciaran; NicGabhainn, Saoirse; Murphy, Andrew W; Kropmans, Thomas; McGuire, Brian E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic lower back pain (CLBP) is a major healthcare problem with wide ranging effects. It is a priority for appropriate management of CLBP to get individuals back to work as early as possible. Interventions that identify biopsychosocial barriers to recovery have been observed to lead to successfully reduced pain-related work absences and increased return to work for individuals with CLBP. Modern conceptualisations of pain adopt a biopsychosocial approach, such as the flags approach. Biopsychosocial perspectives have been applied to judgements about future adjustment, recovery from pain and risk of long-term disability; and provide a helpful model for understanding the importance of contextual interactions between psychosocial and biological variables in the experience of pain. Medical students and general practitioner (GP) trainees are important groups to target with education about biopsychosocial conceptualisations of pain and related clinical implications. Aim The current study will compare the effects of an e-learning intervention that focuses on a biopsychosocial model of pain, on the clinical judgements of medical students and trainees. Methods and analysis Medical student and GP trainee participants will be randomised to 1 of 2 study conditions: (1) a 20 min e-learning intervention focused on the fundamentals of the flags approach to clinical judgement-making regarding risk of future pain-related disability; compared with a (2) wait-list control group on judgement accuracy and weighting (ie, primary outcomes); flags approach knowledge, attitudes and beliefs towards pain, judgement speed and empathy (ie, secondary outcomes). Participants will be assessed at preintervention and postintervention. Ethics and dissemination The study will be performed in agreement with the Declaration of Helsinki and is approved by the National University of Ireland Galway Research Ethics Committee. The results of the trial will be published according to the

  16. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better. No 7. Did you have a whiplash-type injury in the past, or do you have pain and/or stiffness every day in your neck, hands, knees, hips or other joints? Yes Your pain may be from DEGENERATIVE CERVICAL ARTHRITIS, a disorder that affects the bones and ...

  17. Resection and Resolution of Bone Marrow Lesions Associated with an Improvement of Pain after Total Knee Replacement: A Novel Case Study Using a 3-Tesla Metal Artefact Reduction MRI Sequence.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Thomas; Kerslake, Robert; Haywood, Brett; Pearson, Richard G; Scammell, Brigitte E

    2016-01-01

    We present our case report using a novel metal artefact reduction magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence to observe resolution of subchondral bone marrow lesions (BMLs), which are strongly associated with pain, in a patient after total knee replacement surgery. Large BMLs were seen preoperatively on the 3-Tesla MRI scans in a patient with severe end stage OA awaiting total knee replacement surgery. Twelve months after surgery, using a novel metal artefact reduction MRI sequence, we were able to visualize the bone-prosthesis interface and found complete resection and resolution of these BMLs. This is the first reported study in the UK to use this metal artefact reduction MRI sequence at 3-Tesla showing that resection and resolution of BMLs in this patient were associated with an improvement of pain and function after total knee replacement surgery. In this case it was associated with a clinically significant improvement of pain and function after surgery. Failure to eradicate these lesions may be a cause of persistent postoperative pain that is seen in up to 20% of patients following TKR surgery.

  18. Resection and Resolution of Bone Marrow Lesions Associated with an Improvement of Pain after Total Knee Replacement: A Novel Case Study Using a 3-Tesla Metal Artefact Reduction MRI Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, Brett; Pearson, Richard G.; Scammell, Brigitte E.

    2016-01-01

    We present our case report using a novel metal artefact reduction magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence to observe resolution of subchondral bone marrow lesions (BMLs), which are strongly associated with pain, in a patient after total knee replacement surgery. Large BMLs were seen preoperatively on the 3-Tesla MRI scans in a patient with severe end stage OA awaiting total knee replacement surgery. Twelve months after surgery, using a novel metal artefact reduction MRI sequence, we were able to visualize the bone-prosthesis interface and found complete resection and resolution of these BMLs. This is the first reported study in the UK to use this metal artefact reduction MRI sequence at 3-Tesla showing that resection and resolution of BMLs in this patient were associated with an improvement of pain and function after total knee replacement surgery. In this case it was associated with a clinically significant improvement of pain and function after surgery. Failure to eradicate these lesions may be a cause of persistent postoperative pain that is seen in up to 20% of patients following TKR surgery.

  19. Resection and Resolution of Bone Marrow Lesions Associated with an Improvement of Pain after Total Knee Replacement: A Novel Case Study Using a 3-Tesla Metal Artefact Reduction MRI Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, Brett; Pearson, Richard G.; Scammell, Brigitte E.

    2016-01-01

    We present our case report using a novel metal artefact reduction magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence to observe resolution of subchondral bone marrow lesions (BMLs), which are strongly associated with pain, in a patient after total knee replacement surgery. Large BMLs were seen preoperatively on the 3-Tesla MRI scans in a patient with severe end stage OA awaiting total knee replacement surgery. Twelve months after surgery, using a novel metal artefact reduction MRI sequence, we were able to visualize the bone-prosthesis interface and found complete resection and resolution of these BMLs. This is the first reported study in the UK to use this metal artefact reduction MRI sequence at 3-Tesla showing that resection and resolution of BMLs in this patient were associated with an improvement of pain and function after total knee replacement surgery. In this case it was associated with a clinically significant improvement of pain and function after surgery. Failure to eradicate these lesions may be a cause of persistent postoperative pain that is seen in up to 20% of patients following TKR surgery. PMID:27648327

  20. Resection and Resolution of Bone Marrow Lesions Associated with an Improvement of Pain after Total Knee Replacement: A Novel Case Study Using a 3-Tesla Metal Artefact Reduction MRI Sequence.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Thomas; Kerslake, Robert; Haywood, Brett; Pearson, Richard G; Scammell, Brigitte E

    2016-01-01

    We present our case report using a novel metal artefact reduction magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence to observe resolution of subchondral bone marrow lesions (BMLs), which are strongly associated with pain, in a patient after total knee replacement surgery. Large BMLs were seen preoperatively on the 3-Tesla MRI scans in a patient with severe end stage OA awaiting total knee replacement surgery. Twelve months after surgery, using a novel metal artefact reduction MRI sequence, we were able to visualize the bone-prosthesis interface and found complete resection and resolution of these BMLs. This is the first reported study in the UK to use this metal artefact reduction MRI sequence at 3-Tesla showing that resection and resolution of BMLs in this patient were associated with an improvement of pain and function after total knee replacement surgery. In this case it was associated with a clinically significant improvement of pain and function after surgery. Failure to eradicate these lesions may be a cause of persistent postoperative pain that is seen in up to 20% of patients following TKR surgery. PMID:27648327

  1. How do people with knee osteoarthritis use osteoarthritis pain medications and does this change over time? Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this analysis was to describe comprehensively the cross-sectional and longitudinal patterns of analgesic and nutraceutical medication use for knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a contemporary US cohort and to investigate associated demographic and clinical factors. Methods Baseline, 12, 24 and 36 month data were obtained retrospectively from the National Institutes of Health Osteoarthritis Initiative. Participants had symptomatic radiographic knee OA. Multiple binary logistic regression models identified characteristics independently associated with the use of analgesics or nutraceuticals. Results We included 987 subjects (55.9% female, mean age 61.5 years, 71.0% white). At baseline, 68.2% reported frequent use of a conventional analgesic or nutraceutical for joint pain (for more than half of the previous month). Non-prescription non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were the most frequently reported medications (26.8%), even in those more than 75-years old. Multiple conventional analgesics were used by 11.9%. Frequent analgesic use was more likely in women (odds ratio (OR) 1.8 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3 to 2.3)) and people with more pain (moderate 1.7 (1.2 to 2.4); severe 3.1 (2.1 to 4.7)); nutraceutical use was less likely in non-whites (0.4 (0.3 to 0.6)), those more than 74-years old (0.6 (0.3 to 0.9)) and those with comorbidities (0.6 (0.5 to 0.9)) and more likely in people with Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade 4 (2.2 (1.5 to 3.3)). Overall there was no change in the proportion of participants frequently using prescription or over the counter (OTC) analgesics at 36 months, although most people had changed medication type; of those using a traditional analgesic at baseline approximately one third were still using the same type at 36 months (ranging from 26.2% of baseline prescription NSAID users to 40.6% of baseline acetaminophen users). All participants reporting baseline analgesic use also reported 36 month analgesic use. Female

  2. A Predictive Model to Estimate Knee-Abduction Moment: Implications for Development of a Clinically Applicable Patellofemoral Pain Screening Tool in Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Myer, Gregory D.; Ford, Kevin R.; Foss, Kim D. Barber; Rauh, Mitchell J.; Paterno, Mark V.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Prospective measures of high external knee-abduction moment (KAM) during landing identify female athletes at increased risk of patellofemoral pain (PFP). A clinically applicable screening protocol is needed. Objective: To identify biomechanical laboratory measures that would accurately quantify KAM loads during landing that predict increased risk of PFP in female athletes and clinical correlates to laboratory-based measures of increased KAM status for use in a clinical PFP injury-risk prediction algorithm. We hypothesized that we could identify clinical correlates that combine to accurately determine increased KAM associated with an increased risk of developing PFP. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Biomechanical laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Adolescent female basketball and soccer players (n = 698) from a single-county public school district. Main Outcome Measure(s): We conducted tests of anthropometrics, maturation, laxity, flexibility, strength, and landing biomechanics before each competitive season. Pearson correlation and linear and logistic regression modeling were used to examine high KAM (>15.4 Nm) compared with normal KAM as a surrogate for PFP injury risk. Results: The multivariable logistic regression model that used the variables peak knee-abduction angle, center-of-mass height, and hip rotational moment excursion predicted KAM associated with PFP risk (>15.4 NM of KAM) with 92% sensitivity and 74% specificity and a C statistic of 0.93. The multivariate linear regression model that included the same predictors accounted for 70% of the variance in KAM. We identified clinical correlates to laboratory measures that combined to predict high KAM with 92% sensitivity and 47% specificity. The clinical prediction algorithm, including knee-valgus motion (odds ratio [OR] = 1.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.31, 1.63), center-of-mass height (OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.15, 1.26), and hamstrings strength/body fat percentage (OR

  3. Relative effectiveness and adverse effects of cervical manipulation, mobilisation and the activator instrument in patients with sub-acute non-specific neck pain: results from a stopped randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Neck pain of a mechanical nature is a common complaint seen by practitioners of manual medicine, who use a multitude of methods to treat the condition. It is not known, however, if any of these methods are superior in treatment effectiveness. This trial was stopped due to poor recruitment. The purposes of this report are (1) to describe the trial protocol, (2) to report on the data obtained from subjects who completed the study, (3) to discuss the problems we encountered in conducting this study. Methods A pragmatic randomised clinical trial was undertaken. Patients who met eligibility criteria were randomised into three groups. One group was treated using specific segmental high velocity low amplitude manipulation (diversified), another by specific segmental mobilisation, and a third group by the Activator instrument. All three groups were also treated for any myofascial distortions and given appropriate exercises and advice. Participants were treated six times over a three-week period or until they reported being pain free. The primary outcome measure for the study was Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC); secondary outcome measures included the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36v2), the neck Bournemouth Questionnaire, and the numerical rating scale for pain intensity. Participants also kept a diary of any pain medication taken and noted any perceived adverse effects of treatment. Outcomes were measured at four points: end of treatment, and 3, 6, and 12 months thereafter. Results Between January 2007 and March 2008, 123 patients were assessed for eligibility, of these 47 were considered eligible, of which 16 were allocated to manipulation, 16 to the Activator instrument and 15 to the mobilisation group. Comparison between the groups on the PGIC adjusted for baseline covariants did not show a significant difference for any of the endpoints. Within group analyses for change from baseline to the 12-month follow up for secondary outcomes were

  4. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors.

  5. Acupuncture with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) versus acupuncture or NSAIDs alone for the treatment of chronic neck pain: an assessor-blinded randomised controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae-Heung; Nam, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Tack; Lee, Jun-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility and sample size required for a full-scale randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of acupuncture with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for chronic neck pain compared with acupuncture or NSAID treatment alone. Methods A total of 45 patients with chronic neck pain participated in the study. For 3 weeks the acupuncture with NSAIDs treatment group took NSAIDs (zaltoprofen, 80 mg) daily while receiving acupuncture treatment three times a week. The acupuncture treatment group received treatment three times a week and the NSAID treatment group took NSAIDs daily. The primary outcomes were to determine the feasibility and to calculate the sample size. As secondary outcomes, pain intensity and pain-related symptoms for chronic neck pain were measured. Results With regard to enrolment and dropout rates, 88.2% of patients consented to be recruited to the trial and 15.6% of participants were lost to follow-up. The sample size for a full-scale trial was estimated to be 120 patients. Although preliminary, there was a significant change in the visual analogue scale (VAS) for neck pain intensity between the baseline measurement and each point of assessment in all groups. However, there was no difference in VAS scores between the three groups. Conclusions This pilot study has provided the feasibility and sample size for a full-scale trial of acupuncture with NSAIDs for chronic neck pain compared with acupuncture or NSAID treatment alone. Further research is needed to validate the effects of acupuncture with NSAIDs. Clinical Trial Registration NIH ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01205958. PMID:24171895

  6. Acupuncture as analgesia for non-emergent acute non-specific neck pain, ankle sprain and primary headache in an emergency department setting: a protocol for a parallel group, randomised, controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Hyung; Ryu, Ji Ho; Park, Maeng Real; Kim, Yong In; Min, Mun Ki; Park, Yong Myeon; Kim, Yu Ri; Noh, Seung Hee; Kang, Min Joo; Kim, Young Jun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Lee, Byung Ryul; Choi, Jun Yong; Yang, Gi Young

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to assess the feasibility of acupuncture as an add-on intervention for patients with non-emergent acute musculoskeletal pain and primary headache in an emergency department (ED) setting. Methods and analysis A total of 40 patients who present to the ED and are diagnosed to have acute non-specific neck pain, ankle sprain or primary headache will be recruited by ED physicians. An intravenous or intramuscular injection of analgesics will be provided as the initial standard pain control intervention for all patients. Patients who still have moderate to severe pain after the 30 min of initial standard ED management will be considered eligible. These patients will be allocated in equal proportions to acupuncture plus standard ED management or to standard ED management alone based on computer-generated random numbers concealed in opaque, sealed, sequentially numbered envelopes. A 30 min session of acupuncture treatment with manual and/or electrical stimulation will be provided by qualified Korean medicine doctors. All patients will receive additional ED management at the ED physician's discretion and based on each patient's response to the allocated intervention. The primary outcome will be pain reduction measured at discharge from the ED by an unblinded assessor. Adverse events in both groups will be documented. Other outcomes will include the patient-reported overall improvement, disability due to neck pain (only for neck-pain patients), the treatment response rate, the use of other healthcare resources and the patients’ perceived effectiveness of the acupuncture treatment. A follow-up telephone interview will be conducted by a blinded assessor 72±12 h after ED discharge. Ethics and dissemination Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The study has been approved by the Institutional Review Boards (IRBs). The results of this study will guide a full-scale randomised trial of acupuncture in an ED context

  7. Investigation the efficacy of intra-articular prolotherapy with erythropoietin and dextrose and intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency on pain level reduction and range of motion improvement in primary osteoarthritis of knee

    PubMed Central

    Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Imani, Farnad; Faiz, Seyed Hamid Reza; Entezary, Saeed Reza; Nasiri, Ali Akbar; Ziaeefard, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis is one of the most common diseases and the knee is the most commonly affected joint. Intra-articular prolotherapy is being utilized in acute and chronic pain management setting. This study was designed to compare the efficacy of three methods of intra-articular knee joint therapies with erythropoietin, dextrose, and pulsed radiofrequency. Materials and Methods: After approval by the Ethics Committee and explaining the therapeutic method to volunteers, 70 patients who were suffering from primary knee osteoarthrosis went through one of the treatment methods (erythropoietin, dextrose, and pulsed radiofrequency). The study was double-blind randomized clinical trial performed from December 2012 to July 2013. Patients’ pain level was assessed through the visual analog pain scale (VAS), and range of motion (ROM) was measured by goniometric method. Furthermore, patients’ satisfaction was assessed before and after different treatment methods in weeks 2, 4, and 12. For analysis, Chi-square, one-way ANOVA, and repeated measured ANOVA were utilized. Results: The demographic results among the three groups did not indicate any statistical difference. The mean VAS in erythropoietin group in the 2nd, 4th, and 12th weeks was 3.15 ± 1.08, 3.15 ± 1.08, and 3.5 ± 1.23, respectively (P ≤ 0.005). Knee joint ROM in the erythropoietin group in the 2nd, 4th, and 12th weeks was 124 ± 1.50, 124 ± 1.4, and 123 ± 1.53 respectively (P ≤ 0.005). Satisfaction score in the 12th week in erythropoietin group was extremely satisfied 15%, satisfied 55%, and moderately satisfied 30%, (P = 0.005). No specific side-effects were observed. Conclusion: Intra-articular prolotherapy with erythropoietin was more effective in terms of pain level reduction and ROM improvement compared with dextrose and pulsed radiofrequency. PMID:25422652

  8. Study protocol of effectiveness of a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in the evolution of non-speficic sub-acute low back pain in the working population: cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Non-specific low back pain is a common cause for consultation with the general practitioner, generating increased health and social costs. This study will analyse the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary intervention to reduce disability, severity of pain, anxiety and depression, to improve quality of life and to reduce the incidence of chronic low back pain in the working population with non-specific low back pain, compared to usual clinical care. Methods/Design A Cluster randomised clinical trial will be conducted in 38 Primary Health Care Centres located in Barcelona, Spain and its surrounding areas. The centres are randomly allocated to the multidisciplinary intervention or to usual clinical care. Patients between 18 and 65 years old (n = 932; 466 per arm) and with a diagnostic of a non-specific sub-acute low back pain are included. Patients in the intervention group are receiving the recommendations of clinical practice guidelines, in addition to a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention consisting of group educational sessions lasting a total of 10 hours. The main outcome is change in the score in the Roland Morris disability questionnaire at three months after onset of pain. Other outcomes are severity of pain, quality of life, duration of current non-specific low back pain episode, work sick leave and duration, Fear Avoidance Beliefs and Goldberg Questionnaires. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Analysis will be by intention to treat. The intervention effect will be assessed through the standard error of measurement and the effect-size. Responsiveness of each scale will be evaluated by standardised response mean and receiver-operating characteristic method. Recovery according to the patient will be used as an external criterion. A multilevel regression will be performed on repeated measures. The time until the current episode of low back pain takes to subside will be analysed by Cox regression. Discussion We hope

  9. Knee Bracing: What Works?

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Knee Bracing: What Works? Knee Bracing: What Works? What are knee braces? Knee braces are supports ... have arthritis in their knees. Do knee braces work? Maybe. Companies that make knee braces claim that ...

  10. Shockwave therapy in the management of complex regional pain syndrome in medial femoral condyle of the knee.

    PubMed

    Notarnicola, Angela; Moretti, Lorenzo; Tafuri, Silvio; Panella, Antonio; Filipponi, Marco; Casalino, Alessio; Panella, Michele; Moretti, Biagio

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the efficacy of shockwave (SW) therapy in the management of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In this study, 30 patients (pts) who were affected by CRPS of the medial femoral condyle and unresponsive to previous standard physiotherapeutic and pharmacological treatment underwent 3 SW sessions at 72-h intervals, each consisting of 4000 shocks emitted by a MiniLith SL1 Storz electromagnetic generator. An energy flux density (EFD) of 0.035 or 0.09 mJ/mm(2) was used, depending on how well the patient endured the pain during the treatment. Satisfactory results were observed in 76.7% of the cases (23 pts) at the 2-month follow-up (FU) visit, and in 80% (24 pts) at the 6-month FU visit. The therapeutic effects of SW were caused by decreasing pain. The significant improvements we obtained bear witness to the potential value of SW therapy in the management of CRPS.

  11. Physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Page, Carolyn J; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-05-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic joint disease causing pain and disability. Physiotherapy, which encompasses a number of modalities, is a non-invasive treatment option in the management of OA. This review summarizes the evidence for commonly used physiotherapy interventions. There is strong evidence to show short-term beneficial effects of exercise on pain and function, although the type of exercise does not seem to influence treatment outcome. Delivery modes, including individual, group or home exercise are all effective, although therapist contact may improve benefits. Attention to improving adherence to exercise is needed to maximize outcomes in the longer-term. Knee taping applied with the aim of realigning the patella and unloading soft tissues can reduce pain. There is also evidence to support the use of knee braces in people with knee OA. Biomechanical studies show that lateral wedge shoe insoles reduce knee load but clinical trials do not support symptomatic benefits. Recent studies suggest individual shoe characteristics also affect knee load and there is current interest in the effect of modified shoe designs. Manual therapy, while not to be used as a stand-alone treatment, may be beneficial. In summary, although the research is not equivocal, there is sufficient evidence to indicate that physiotherapy interventions can reduce pain and improve function in those with knee OA.

  12. Alpine Skiing With total knee ArthroPlasty (ASWAP): physical self-concept, pain, and life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Amesberger, G; Müller, E; Würth, S

    2015-08-01

    Physical self-concept in the elderly is assumed to be structured in terms of different domains and to contribute substantially to life satisfaction. However, little is known about the role of the physical self-concept in older persons that are engaged in physical activity while suffering from typical age-related impairments or chronic diseases. The present study aimed to investigate the structure of physical self-concept in a group of older persons with total knee arthroplasty (TKA), its development throughout a 12-week skiing intervention, and its importance to life satisfaction. Factor analyses of the present data reveal that the physical self-concept consists of four dimensions addressing strength, flexibility/coordination, endurance, and sportiness. One higher order factor extracted by hierarchical factor analyses reflects a global physical self-concept. The 12-week skiing intervention had no substantial impact in terms of an improvement of self-concept. Life satisfaction is best predicted by positive changes in the subjective ratings between pre- and post-test (i.e., global physical self-concept, flexibility and coordination, and perceived sportiness) and not by objective physical performance (isokinetic strength, endurance, or coordination). Results support the assumption that physical self-concept of older people with TKA is only marginally sensitive to a 12-week skiing intervention.

  13. Theory-driven group-based complex intervention to support self-management of osteoarthritis and low back pain in primary care physiotherapy: protocol for a cluster randomised controlled feasibility trial (SOLAS)

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Deirdre A; Hall, Amanda M; Currie-Murphy, Laura; Pincus, Tamar; Kamper, Steve; Maher, Chris; McDonough, Suzanne M; Lonsdale, Chris; Walsh, Nicola E; Guerin, Suzanne; Segurado, Ricardo; Matthews, James

    2016-01-01

    Introduction International clinical guidelines consistently endorse the promotion of self-management (SM), including physical activity for patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and osteoarthritis (OA). Patients frequently receive individual treatment and advice to self-manage from physiotherapists in primary care, but the successful implementation of a clinical and cost-effective group SM programme is a key priority for health service managers in Ireland to maximise long-term outcomes and efficient use of limited and costly resources. Methods/analysis This protocol describes an assessor-blinded cluster randomised controlled feasibility trial of a group-based education and exercise intervention underpinned by self-determination theory designed to support an increase in SM behaviour in patients with CLBP and OA in primary care physiotherapy. The primary care clinic will be the unit of randomisation (cluster), with each clinic randomised to 1 of 2 groups providing the Self-management of Osteoarthritis and Low back pain through Activity and Skills (SOLAS) intervention or usual individual physiotherapy. Patients are followed up at 6 weeks, 2 and 6 months. The primary outcomes are the (1) acceptability and demand of the intervention to patients and physiotherapists, (2) feasibility and optimal study design/procedures and sample size for a definitive trial. Secondary outcomes include exploratory analyses of: point estimates, 95% CIs, change scores and effect sizes in physical function, pain and disability outcomes; process of change in target SM behaviours and selected mediators; and the cost of the intervention to inform a definitive trial. Ethics/dissemination This feasibility trial protocol was approved by the UCD Human Research Ethics—Sciences Committee (LS-13-54 Currie-Hurley) and research access has been granted by the Health Services Executive Primary Care Research Committee in January 2014. The study findings will be disseminated to the research

  14. Deconditioned Knee: The Effectiveness of a Rehabilitation Program that Restores Normal Knee Motion to Improve Symptoms and Function

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Angela; Gray, Tinker

    2007-01-01

    Background Knee pain can cause a deconditioned knee. Deconditioned is defined as causing one to lose physical fitness. Therefore, a deconditioned knee is defined as a painful syndrome caused by anatomical or functional abnormalities that result in a knee flexion contracture (functional loss of knee extension), decreased strength, and decreased function. To date, no published studies exist examining treatment for a deconditioned knee. Objective To determine the effectiveness of a rehabilitation program focused on increasing range of motion for patients with a deconditioned knee. Methods Fifty patients (mean age 53.2 years) enrolled in the study. Objective evaluation included radiographs, knee range of motion, and isokinetic strength testing. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective questionnaire was used to measure symptoms and function. Patients were given a rehabilitation program to increase knee extension (including hyperextension) and flexion equal to the normal knee, after which patients were instructed in leg strengthening exercises. Results Knee extension significantly improved from a mean deficit of 10° to 3° and knee flexion significantly improved from a mean deficit of 19° to 9°. The IKDC survey scores significantly improved from a mean of 34.5 points to 70.5 points 1 year after beginning treatment. The IKDC subjective pain frequency and severity scores were significantly improved. Conclusions A rehabilitation program that improves knee range of motion can relieve pain and improve function for patients with a deconditioned knee. PMID:21522205

  15. Radiosynovectomy of Painful Synovitis of Knee Joints Due to Rheumatoid Arthritis by Intra-Articular Administration of 177Lu-Labeled Hydroxyapatite Particulates: First Human Study and Initial Indian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Shinto, Ajit S.; Kamaleshwaran, K. K.; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Vyshakh, K.; Thirumalaisamy, S. G.; Karthik, S.; Nagaprabhu, V. N.; Vimalnath, K. V.; Das, Tapas; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of Radiosynovectomy (RSV) using 177Lu-labeled hydroxyapatite (177Lu-HA) in the treatment of painful synovitis and recurrent joint effusion of knee joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Ten patients, diagnosed with RA and suffering from chronic painful resistant synovitis of the knee joints were referred for RSV. The joints were treated with 333 ± 46 MBq of 177Lu-HA particles administered intra-articularly. Monitoring of activity distribution was performed by static imaging of knee joint and whole-body gamma imaging. The patients were evaluated clinically before RSV and at 6 months after the treatment by considering the pain improvement from baseline values in terms of a 100-point visual analog scale (VAS), the improvement of knee flexibility and the pain remission during the night. RSV response was classified as poor (VAS < 25), fair (VAS ≥ 25-50), good (VAS ≥ 50-75) and excellent (VAS ≥ 75), with excellent and good results considered to be success, while fair and poor as failure and also by range of motion. Three phase bone scan (BS) was repeated after 6 months and changes in the second phase of BS3 were assessed visually, using a four-degree scale and in the third phase, semiquantitatively with J/B ratio to see the response. Biochemical analysis of C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen was repeated after 48 h, 4 and 24 weeks. In all 10 patients, no leakage of administered activity to nontarget organs was visible in the whole-body scan. Static scans of the joint at 1 month revealed complete retention of 177Lu-HA in the joints. All patients showed decreased joint swelling and pains, resulting in increased joint motion after 6 months. The percentage of VAS improvement from baseline values was 79.5 ± 20.0% 6 months after RS and found to be significantly related to patients' age (P = 0.01) and duration of the disease (P = 0.03). Knees with Steinbrocker's Grades 0 and I responded better than those with more

  16. Radiosynovectomy of Painful Synovitis of Knee Joints Due to Rheumatoid Arthritis by Intra-Articular Administration of (177)Lu-Labeled Hydroxyapatite Particulates: First Human Study and Initial Indian Experience.

    PubMed

    Shinto, Ajit S; Kamaleshwaran, K K; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Vyshakh, K; Thirumalaisamy, S G; Karthik, S; Nagaprabhu, V N; Vimalnath, K V; Das, Tapas; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of Radiosynovectomy (RSV) using (177)Lu-labeled hydroxyapatite ((177)Lu-HA) in the treatment of painful synovitis and recurrent joint effusion of knee joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Ten patients, diagnosed with RA and suffering from chronic painful resistant synovitis of the knee joints were referred for RSV. The joints were treated with 333 ± 46 MBq of (177)Lu-HA particles administered intra-articularly. Monitoring of activity distribution was performed by static imaging of knee joint and whole-body gamma imaging. The patients were evaluated clinically before RSV and at 6 months after the treatment by considering the pain improvement from baseline values in terms of a 100-point visual analog scale (VAS), the improvement of knee flexibility and the pain remission during the night. RSV response was classified as poor (VAS < 25), fair (VAS ≥ 25-50), good (VAS ≥ 50-75) and excellent (VAS ≥ 75), with excellent and good results considered to be success, while fair and poor as failure and also by range of motion. Three phase bone scan (BS) was repeated after 6 months and changes in the second phase of BS3 were assessed visually, using a four-degree scale and in the third phase, semiquantitatively with J/B ratio to see the response. Biochemical analysis of C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen was repeated after 48 h, 4 and 24 weeks. In all 10 patients, no leakage of administered activity to nontarget organs was visible in the whole-body scan. Static scans of the joint at 1 month revealed complete retention of (177)Lu-HA in the joints. All patients showed decreased joint swelling and pains, resulting in increased joint motion after 6 months. The percentage of VAS improvement from baseline values was 79.5 ± 20.0% 6 months after RS and found to be significantly related to patients' age (P = 0.01) and duration of the disease (P = 0.03). Knees with Steinbrocker's Grades 0 and I responded better than those

  17. Which treatment for low back pain? A factorial randomised controlled trial comparing intravenous analgesics with oral analgesics in the emergency department and a centrally acting muscle relaxant with placebo over three days [ISRCTN09719705].

    PubMed

    Havel, Christof; Sieder, Anna; Herkner, Harald; Domanovits, Hans; Schmied, Mascha; Segel, Rudolf; Koreny, Maria; Laggner, Anton N; Müllner, Marcus

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: About two thirds of adults suffer from backpain at some time during their life. In the emergency room many patients with acute back pain are treated with intravenous non-steroidal analgesics. Whether this treatment is superior to oral administration of non-steroidal analgesics is unknown. Intravenous administration, however, requires considerable amounts of resources and accounts for high workload in busy clinics. In the further course centrally acting muscle relaxants are prescribed but the effectiveness remains unclear. The objective of this study is on the one hand to compare the effectiveness of intravenous with oral non-steroidal analgesics for acute treatment and on the other hand to compare the effectiveness of a centrally active muscle relaxant with placebo given for three days after presentation to the ED (emergency department). METHODS/DESIGN: This study is intended as a randomised controlled factorial trial mainly for two reasons: (1) the sequence of treatments resembles the actual proceedings in every-day clinical practice, which is important for the generalisability of the results and (2) this design allows to take interactions between the two sequential treatment strategies into account. There is a patient preference arm included because patients preference is an important issue providing valuable information: (1) it allows to assess the interaction between desired treatment and outcome, (2) results can be extrapolated to a wider group while (3) conserving the advantages of a fully randomised controlled trial. CONCLUSION: We hope to shed more light on the effectiveness of treatment modalities available for acute low back pain.

  18. Which treatment for low back pain? A factorial randomised controlled trial comparing intravenous analgesics with oral analgesics in the emergency department and a centrally acting muscle relaxant with placebo over three days [ISRCTN09719705

    PubMed Central

    Havel, Christof; Sieder, Anna; Herkner, Harald; Domanovits, Hans; Schmied, Mascha; Segel, Rudolf; Koreny, Maria; Laggner, Anton N; Müllner, Marcus

    2001-01-01

    Background About two thirds of adults suffer from backpain at some time during their life. In the emergency room many patients with acute back pain are treated with intravenous non-steroidal analgesics. Whether this treatment is superior to oral administration of non-steroidal analgesics is unknown. Intravenous administration, however, requires considerable amounts of resources and accounts for high workload in busy clinics. In the further course centrally acting muscle relaxants are prescribed but the effectiveness remains unclear. The objective of this study is on the one hand to compare the effectiveness of intravenous with oral non-steroidal analgesics for acute treatment and on the other hand to compare the effectiveness of a centrally active muscle relaxant with placebo given for three days after presentation to the ED (emergency department). Methods/Design This study is intended as a randomised controlled factorial trial mainly for two reasons: (1) the sequence of treatments resembles the actual proceedings in every-day clinical practice, which is important for the generalisability of the results and (2) this design allows to take interactions between the two sequential treatment strategies into account. There is a patient preference arm included because patients preference is an important issue providing valuable information: (1) it allows to assess the interaction between desired treatment and outcome, (2) results can be extrapolated to a wider group while (3) conserving the advantages of a fully randomised controlled trial. Conclusion We hope to shed more light on the effectiveness of treatment modalities available for acute low back pain. PMID:11716789

  19. ESCAPS study protocol: a feasibility randomised controlled trial of ‘Early electrical stimulation to the wrist extensors and wrist flexors to prevent the post-stroke complications of pain and contractures in the paretic arm’

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher-Smith, Joanna C; Walker, Dawn-Marie; Sprigg, Nikola; James, Marilyn; Walker, Marion F; Allatt, Kate; Mehta, Rajnikant; Pandyan, Anand D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 70% of patients with stroke experience impaired arm function, which is persistent and disabling for an estimated 40%. Loss of function reduces independence in daily activities and impacts on quality of life. Muscles in those who do not recover functional movement in the stroke affected arm are at risk of atrophy and contractures, which can be established as early as 6 weeks following stroke. Pain is also common. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial to test the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of delivering early intensive electrical stimulation (ES) to prevent post-stroke complications in the paretic upper limb. Methods and analysis This is a feasibility randomised controlled trial (n=40) with embedded qualitative studies (patient/carer interviews and therapist focus groups) and feasibility economic evaluation. Patients will be recruited from the Stroke Unit at the Nottingham University Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Trust within 72 h after stroke. Participants will be randomised to receive usual care or usual care and early ES to the wrist flexors and extensors for 30 min twice a day, 5 days a week for 3 months. The initial treatment(s) will be delivered by an occupational therapist or physiotherapist who will then train the patient and/or their nominated carer to self-manage subsequent treatments. Ethics and dissemination This study has been granted ethical approval by the National Research Ethics Service, East Midlands Nottingham1 Research Ethics Committee (ref: 15/EM/0006). To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind of the early application (within 72 h post-stroke) of ES to both the wrist extensors and wrist flexors of stroke survivors with upper limb impairment. The results will inform the design of a definitive randomised controlled trial. Dissemination will include 2 peer-reviewed journal publications and presentations at national conferences. Trial

  20. The Hip and Knee Book: developing an active management booklet for hip and knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Nefyn H; Amoakwa, Elvis; Burton, Kim; Hendry, Maggie; Lewis, Ruth; Jones, Jeremy; Bennett, Paul; Neal, Richard D; Andrew, Glynne; Wilkinson, Clare

    2010-01-01

    Background The pain and disability of hip and knee osteoarthritis can be improved by exercise, but the best method of encouraging this is not known. Aim To develop an evidence-based booklet for patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis, offering information and advice on maintaining activity. Design of study Systematic review of reviews and guidelines, then focus groups. Setting Four general practices in North East Wales. Method Evidence-based messages were developed from a systematic review, synthesised into patient-centred messages, and then incorporated into a narrative. A draft booklet was examined by three focus groups to improve the phrasing of its messages and discuss its usefulness. The final draft was examined in a fourth focus group. Results Six evidence-based guidelines and 54 systematic reviews were identified. The focus groups found the draft booklet to be informative and easy to read. They reported a lack of clarity about the cause of osteoarthritis and were surprised that the pain could improve. The value of exercise and weight loss beliefs was accepted and reinforced, but there was a perceived contradiction about heavy physical work being causative, while moderate exercise was beneficial. There was a fear of dependency on analgesia and misinterpretation of the message on hyaluranon injections. The information on joint replacement empowered patients to discuss referral with their GP. The text was revised to accommodate these issues. Conclusion The booklet was readable, credible, and useful to end-users. A randomised controlled trial is planned, to test whether the booklet influences beliefs about osteoarthritis and exercise. PMID:20132695

  1. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sprains A sprain means you've stretched or torn a ligament. Common knee sprains usually involve damage ... A strain means you've partly or completely torn a muscle or tendon. With knee strains, you ...

  2. The effects of the Bowen technique on hamstring flexibility over time: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Marr, Michelle; Baker, Julian; Lambon, Nicky; Perry, Jo

    2011-07-01

    The hamstring muscles are regularly implicated in recurrent injuries, movement dysfunction and low back pain. Links between limited flexibility and development of neuromusculoskeletal symptoms are frequently reported. The Bowen Technique is used to treat many conditions including lack of flexibility. The study set out to investigate the effect of the Bowen Technique on hamstring flexibility over time. An assessor-blind, prospective, randomised controlled trial was performed on 120 asymptomatic volunteers. Participants were randomly allocated into a control group or Bowen group. Three flexibility measurements occurred over one week, using an active knee extension test. The intervention group received a single Bowen treatment. A repeated measures univariate analysis of variance, across both groups for the three time periods, revealed significant within-subject and between-subject differences for the Bowen group. Continuing increases in flexibility levels were observed over one week. No significant change over time was noted for the control group.

  3. Promoting physical activity in low back pain patients: six months follow-up of a randomised controlled trial comparing a multicomponent intervention with a low intensity intervention

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Andrea; Dintsios, Charalabos-Markos; Icks, Andrea; Reibling, Nadine; Froboese, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess a comprehensive multicomponent intervention against a low intensity intervention for promoting physical activity in chronic low back pain patients. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Inpatient rehabilitation and aftercare. Subjects: A total of 412 patients with chronic low back pain. Interventions: A multicomponent intervention (Movement Coaching) comprising of small group intervention (twice during inpatient rehabilitation), tailored telephone aftercare (twice after rehabilitation) and internet-based aftercare (web 2.0 platform) versus a low level intensity intervention (two general presentations on physical activity, download of the presentations). Main measures: Physical activity was measured using a questionnaire. Primary outcome was total physical activity; secondary outcomes were setting specific physical activity (transport, workplace, leisure time) and pain. Comparative group differences were evaluated six months after inpatient rehabilitation. Results: At six months follow-up, 92 participants in Movement Coaching (46 %) and 100 participants in the control group (47 %) completed the postal follow-up questionnaire. No significant differences between the two groups could be shown in total physical activity (P = 0.30). In addition to this, workplace (P = 0.53), transport (P = 0.68) and leisure time physical activity (P = 0.21) and pain (P = 0.43) did not differ significantly between the two groups. In both groups, physical activity decreased during the six months follow-up. Conclusions: The multicomponent intervention was no more effective than the low intensity intervention in promoting physical activity at six months follow-up. The decrease in physical activity in both groups is an unexpected outcome of the study and indicates the need for further research. PMID:27496696

  4. Moving in an Environment of Induced Sensorimotor Incongruence Does Not Influence Pain Sensitivity in Healthy Volunteers: A Randomised Within-Subject Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Wand, Benedict Martin; Szpak, Lareina; George, Pamela J.; Bulsara, Max K.; O’Connell, Neil Edward; Moseley, G. Lorimer

    2014-01-01

    Objectives It has been proposed that in the same way that conflict between vestibular and visual inputs leads to motion sickness, conflict between motor commands and sensory information associated with these commands may contribute to some chronic pain states. Attempts to test this hypothesis by artificially inducing a state of sensorimotor incongruence and assessing self-reported pain have yielded equivocal results. To help clarify the effect sensorimotor incongruence has on pain we investigated the effect of moving in an environment of induced incongruence on pressure pain thresholds (PPT) and the pain experienced immediately on completion of PPT testing. Methods Thirty-five healthy subjects performed synchronous and asynchronous upper-limb movements with and without mirror visual feedback in random order. We measured PPT over the elbow and the pain evoked by testing. Generalised linear mixed-models were performed for each outcome. Condition (four levels) and baseline values for each outcome were within-subject factors. Results There was no effect of condition on PPT (p = 0.887) or pressure-evoked pain (p = 0.771). A sensitivity analysis using only the first PPT measure after each condition confirmed the result (p = 0.867). Discussion Inducing a state of movement related sensorimotor incongruence in the upper-limb of healthy volunteers does not influence PPT, nor the pain evoked by testing. We found no evidence that sensorimotor incongruence upregulates the nociceptive system in healthy volunteers. PMID:24709995

  5. Exercise for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Baker, K; McAlindon, T

    2000-09-01

    Adverse outcomes in knee osteoarthritis include pain, loss of function, and disability. These outcomes can have devastating effects on the quality of life of those suffering from the disease. Treatments have generally targeted pain, assuming that disability would improve as a direct result of improvements in pain. However, there is evidence to suggest that determinants of pain and disability differ. In general, treatments have been more successful at decreasing pain rather than disability. Many of the factors that lead to disability can be improved with exercise. Exercise, both aerobic and strength training, have been examined as treatments for knee osteoarthritis, with considerable variability in the results. The variability between studies may be due to differences in study design, exercise protocols, and participants in the studies. Although there is variability among studies, it is notable that a majority of the studies had a positive effect on pain and or disability. The mechanism of exercise remains unclear and merits future studies to better define a concise, clear exercise protocol that may have the potential for a public health intervention.

  6. Study protocol of cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in the evolution of non-specific sub-acute low back pain in the working population: cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP), with high incidence and prevalence rate, is one of the most common reasons to consult the health system and is responsible for a significant amount of sick leave, leading to high health and social costs. The objective of the study is to assess the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a multidisciplinary biopsychosocial educational group intervention (MBEGI) of non-specific sub-acute LBP in comparison with the usual care in the working population recruited in primary healthcare centres. Methods/design The study design is a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a MBEGI in comparison with the usual care of non-specific sub-acute LBP. Measures on effectiveness and costs of both interventions will be obtained from a cluster randomised controlled clinical trial carried out in 38 Catalan primary health care centres, enrolling 932 patients between 18 and 65 years old with a diagnosis of non-specific sub-acute LBP. Effectiveness measures are: pharmaceutical treatments, work sick leave (% and duration in days), Roland Morris disability, McGill pain intensity, Fear Avoidance Beliefs (FAB) and Golberg Questionnaires. Utility measures will be calculated from the SF-12. The analysis will be performed from a social perspective. The temporal horizon is at 3 months (change to chronic LBP) and 12 months (evaluate the outcomes at long term). Assessment of outcomes will be blinded and will follow the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion We hope to demonstrate the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of MBEGI, see an improvement in the patients' quality of life, achieve a reduction in the duration of episodes and the chronicity of non-specific low back pain, and be able to report a decrease in the social costs. If the intervention is cost-effectiveness and cost-utility, it could be applied to Primary Health Care Centres. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN58719694 PMID:21859489

  7. Effect of antenatal education in small classes versus standard auditorium-based lectures on use of pain relief during labour and of obstetric interventions: results from the randomised NEWBORN trial

    PubMed Central

    Brixval, Carina Sjöberg; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Axelsen, Solveig Forberg; Gluud, Christian; Winkel, Per; Lindschou, Jane; Weber, Tom; Due, Pernille; Koushede, Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of an antenatal education programme in small classes versus standard auditorium-based lectures. Design Randomised trial using random-generated web-based 1:1 allocation. Setting The largest birth site in the Capital Region of Denmark, from August 2012 to May 2014. Participants 1766 pregnant women. Inclusion criteria ≥18 years, pregnant with a single child, and able to speak and understand Danish. Women were enrolled in the trial from 10+0 to 20+0 weeks of gestation. Interventions The intervention programme consisted of three times 2.5 hours of antenatal education in small classes (n=6–8 women), and focused on improving information and problem-solving skills for expectant parents in order to ease birth and the transition to parenthood. The control group received standard auditorium-based lectures consisting of two times 2 hours in an auditorium with participation of ∼250 people. Main outcome measures The primary trial outcome was use of epidural analgesia. Other types of pain relief and obstetric interventions were analysed as explorative outcomes. Results There was no statistically significant difference in use of epidural analgesia between participants in the intervention group (30.9%) versus the control group (29.1%), adjusted OR 1.10 (95% CI 0.87 to 1.34). Also, the two groups did not differ regarding other types of pain relief or obstetric interventions. Concomitant birth preparation was common in both groups and highest in the control group, but did not seem to influence our results noticeably. Conclusions Antenatal education in small groups versus standard auditorium-based lectures did not differ regarding use of epidural analgesia, other pain relief, or obstetric interventions. Trial registration number NCT01672437; Results. PMID:27288375

  8. Pre-emptive 8 mg dexamethasone and 120 mg etoricoxib for pain prevention after periodontal surgery: A randomised controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Konuganti, Kranti; Rangaraj, Mani; Elizabeth, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Several anti-inflammatory drugs have been used to reduce pain and discomfort after periodontal surgeries. This study evaluates the efficacy of using etoricoxib and dexamethasone for pain prevention after open-flap debridement surgery. In this study, 60 patients who were undergoing open flap debridment surgery were randomly assigned to receive a single dose preoperative medication 1 hour prior to surgery. The patients were divided into three groups. In Group 1, 20 patients were given placebo drug orally. In Group 2, 20 patients were given 8 mg Dexamethasone orally and in Group 3, 20 patients were given 120 mg Etoricoxib orally. Patients were instructed to complete a pain diary hourly for the first 8 hours after each surgery and three times a day on the following 3 days. The four point verbal rating scale (VRS 4) and Numerical rate scale were used to assess discomfort. Post-operative Assessment of Pain and Discomfort showed that persistent discomfort and pain were found to be more in the placebo group compared to dexamethasone and etoricoxib group. The adoption of a preemptive medication protocol using either etoricoxib or dexamethasone may be considered effective for pain and discomfort prevention after open-flap debridement surgeries. PMID:26392703

  9. New Generation Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A knee brace that uses Space Shuttle propulsion technology has moved a step closer to being available to help knee injury and stroke patients and may possibly benefit patients with birth defects, spinal cord injuries, and post-polio conditions. After years of hard work, inventors at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have turned over the final design and prototype to industry partners at Horton's Orthotic Lab in Little Rock, Arkansas for further clinical testing. The device, called the Selectively Lockable Knee Brace, may mean faster, less painful rehabilitation for patients by allowing the knee to move when weight is not on the heel. Devices currently on the market lock the knee in a rigid, straight-leg position, or allow continuous free motion. Pictured here is a knee brace prototype being tested and fitted at Horton's Orthotic Lab. The knee brace is just one example of how space technology is being used to improve the lives of people on Earth. NASA's MSFC inventors Michael Shadoan and Neill Myers are space propulsion engineers who use the same mechanisms and materials to build systems for rockets that they used to design and develop the knee brace.

  10. Overuse injuries of the knee in basketball.

    PubMed

    Molnar, T J; Fox, J M

    1993-04-01

    Overuse injuries of the knee are abundant in basketball players. This article discusses the pathophysiology of overuse and the principles of treatment. The diagnosis and clinical management of jumper's knee, patellofemoral pain, and stress fractures are outlined with specific attention to rehabilitation techniques and training.

  11. Effect of the Frequency and Duration of Land-based Therapeutic Exercise on Pain Relief for People with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryo; Ozawa, Junya; Kito, Nobuhiro; Moriyama, Hideki

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the influence of land-based exercise frequency and duration on pain relief for people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). [Subjects and Methods] The systematic review included randomized controlled trials that investigated this influence, which were identified by searches of PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. The exercise groups in the identified trials were categorized according to their type, frequency, and duration of exercise, and subgroup analyses were performed. [Results] Data integration of 17 studies (23 exercise groups) revealed a significant effect and a medium effect size. In subgroups involving strengthening exercise programs of ≥9 weeks duration, heterogeneity was found between subjects who performed up to 3 sessions/week and those who performed ≥4 sessions/week. In subgroups involving strengthening exercise programs of up to 3 sessions/week, there was heterogeneity between subjects who exercised for up to 8 weeks and those who exercised for ≥9 weeks. Heterogeneity was not confirmed in aerobic exercise subgroups. [Conclusion] Differences in exercise frequency and duration influence pain relief in effects of strengthening exercises but do not influence the effect size of aerobic exercise for people with knee OA.

  12. Study protocol for a pilot, randomised, double-blinded, placebo controlled trial of perineural local anaesthetics and steroids for chronic post-traumatic neuropathic pain in the ankle and foot: the PREPLANS study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Anuj; Bril, Vera; Brull, Richard T; Perruccio, Anthony; Wijeysundera, Duminda; Alvi, Sabbeh; Lau, Johnny; Gandhi, Rajiv; Mahomed, Nizar; Davis, Aileen M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP) associated with trauma is often refractory to treatment. Administration of local anaesthetics (LA) and steroids around injured nerves has been proposed as an option for patients unresponsive to conventional treatments for refractory PNP following trauma. There is insufficient evidence to support a large, potentially expensive, full-scale randomised controlled trial (RCT) that involves comparison of effects of perineural steroids and LA against LA or saline injections on analgesia, physical and psychological functioning, and quality of life. There is also a lack of data that would allow estimation of analgesic efficacy or sample size for the full-scale RCT. The objective of this pilot RCT is to yield information to support planning of a full-scale RCT in this population. Methods and Analysis 30 participants with post-traumatic PNP in the ankle and foot of moderate-to-severe intensity and duration of more than 3 months will be enrolled in this pilot RCT. Participants will be randomised to receive three ultrasound-guided perineural injections of 0.9% saline, 0.25% bupivacaine (a long-acting LA) or a combination of 0.25% bupivacaine and a steroid (methylprednisolone 16 mg per nerve) at weekly intervals. The primary objectives are to determine the feasibility and sample size of a full-scale RCT in this population. The secondary objectives are to evaluate the effect of study interventions on analgesia, persistence of neuropathic pain, psychological and physical function, quality of life and participants' global impression of change at 1 and 3 months after the interventions. In addition, adverse effects associated with perineural injections and with systemic absorption of steroids will also be recorded. Ethics and Dissemination The protocol was approved by the University Health Network Research Ethics Board (UHN REB number 15-9584-A). The results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals and at scientific

  13. Patient-reported improvements in health are maintained 2 years after completing a short course of cognitive behaviour therapy, exercise or both treatments for chronic widespread pain: long-term results from the MUSICIAN randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Marcus; Prescott, Gordon J; Scotland, Graham; McBeth, John; Lovell, Karina; Keeley, Phil; Hannaford, Philip C; Symmons, Deborah P M; MacDonald, Ross I R; Woby, Steve; Macfarlane, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The MUSICIAN study has previously shown short-term benefit but only marginal cost-effectiveness for two non-pharmacological interventions for chronic widespread pain (CWP). We wished to determine their long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Methods A 2×2 factorial randomised controlled trial based in primary care in the UK. People were eligible if they were aged ≥25 years with CWP for which they had consulted their general practitioner. The interventions were a 6-month telephone cognitive behaviour therapy (tCBT) and/or a tailored exercise programme, in comparison to usual care. The primary outcome was patient-reported change in health. Results 884 persons were eligible, 442 were randomised and 81.7% were followed up 24 months post-treatment. In comparison to usual care (positive outcome 12.8%), tCBT (35.4%; OR 3.7 95% CI (1.8 to 8.0)), exercise (29.3%; OR 2.8 95% CI (1.3 to 6.0)) and both interventions (31.2%; OR 3.1 95% CI (1.3 to 6.0)) were significantly more effective. There was only a small decrease in effectiveness over time for individual and combined treatments. Those with more intense/disabling pain, higher distress and those who exhibited passive coping at baseline were more likely to have a positive outcome with tCBT than persons without these characteristics. tCBT was associated with the greatest increase in quality of life and lowest costs. Cost per quality adjusted life year was £3957–£5917 depending on method of analysis. Conclusions A short course of tCBT for people with CWP was effective long-term and was highly cost-effective. Exercise was also effective but delivered positive outcome for fewer patients at greater cost, and there was no advantage for patients receiving both interventions. Trial registration number ISRCTN67013851. PMID:26509056

  14. Home-Based versus Hospital-Based Rehabilitation Program after Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    López-Liria, Remedios; Padilla-Góngora, David; Catalan-Matamoros, Daniel; Rocamora-Pérez, Patricia; Pérez-de la Cruz, Sagrario; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To compare home-based rehabilitation with the standard hospital rehabilitation in terms of improving knee joint mobility and recovery of muscle strength and function in patients after a total knee replacement. Materials and Methods. A non-randomised controlled trial was conducted. Seventy-eight patients with a prosthetic knee were included in the study and allocated to either a home-based or hospital-based rehabilitation programme. Treatment included various exercises to restore strength and joint mobility and to improve patients' functional capacity. The primary outcome of the trial was the treatment effectiveness measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Results. The groups did not significantly differ in the leg side (right/left) or clinical characteristics (P > 0.05). After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements (P < 0.001) from the baseline values in the level of pain (visual analogue scale), the range of flexion-extension motion and muscle strength, disability (Barthel and WOMAC indices), balance, and walking. Conclusions. This study reveals that the rehabilitation treatments offered either at home or in hospital settings are equally effective. PMID:25961017

  15. Do early quadriceps exercises affect the outcome of ACL reconstruction? A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Triston; Williams, Marie T; Chipchase, Lucy S

    2005-01-01

    A prospective, blinded, randomised controlled trial investigated the effectiveness of quadriceps exercises following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A treatment group (Quadriceps exercise group) performed straight leg raises and isometric quadriceps contractions throughout the first two postoperative weeks, and a second group (No quadriceps exercise group) did not. A battery of outcome measu