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Sample records for knees comparative study

  1. Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Comparative Study to the Standard Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dabboussi, Naji; Sakr, Mazen; Girard, Julien; Fakih, Riad

    2012-01-01

    Background: Minimally invasive surgery has gained popularity over the past several years. Early results have shown better functional outcome with early recovery and rapid rehabilitation. Aim: Evaluation of the short-term clinical and functional outcome of minimally invasive surgery total knee arthroplasty (MIS-TKA) compared with the traditional total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Materials and Methods: During 2009, all cases scheduled for primary TKA through the modified mini-mid-vastus approach (MIS group) were studied. This group included 40 knees and was compared to a cohort control group of similar number of patients (40 knees) that underwent the procedure through the standard conventional technique (standard group). Results: Patients in the MIS group showed significant decrease in postoperative pain, blood loss in first 24 hours, and in hospital stay. Furthermore, they achieved motion considerably faster than the standard group with earlier return of quadriceps function and greater early flexion. Conclusion: This study proved that MIS-TPA has the ability to couple the benefits of less invasive surgical approach. PMID:22408753

  2. A pilot study to compare two different hyaluronic acid compounds for treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Iannitti, T; Rottigni, V; Palmieri, B

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is characterized by progressive articular cartilage degeneration, changes in subchondral bone and synovial inflammation, leading to pain and disability. Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid has been widely investigated due to the viscoelastic properties of this compound to manage pain improving the ability to perform daily activities in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In the present study we investigated the clinical effectiveness of viscosupplementation with a new highly cross-linked hyaluronic acid, Variofill, in patients affected by bilateral knee osteoarthritis in comparison with the widely used Synvisc. A total of 20 patients, aged between 24-74 years and affected by bilateral knee osteoarthritis, participated in this pilot randomized triple-blind clinical study. They received two injections (2 ml each) of Synvisc in their left knee and 2 injections (2 ml each) of Variofill in their right knee spaced 15 days apart. Visual Analogue Scale and Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score were used to evaluate the efficacy of hyaluronic acid injections before and 3 and 6 months after treatment. Both treatment regimens resulted in a significant improvement vs baseline in all endpoints at 3 and 6 months (p less than 0.001). Treatment with Variofill resulted in a high percentage improvement in Visual Analogue Scale pain, Western Ontario McMaster universities Osteoarthritis Index score pain and physical activity, when compared to Synvisc viscosupplementation, at 6 months (p less than 0.05). These results are encouraging for larger clinical trials with Variofill in larger cohorts of patients affected by osteoarthritis of the knee. PMID:23298499

  3. Limited femoral navigation versus conventional intramedullary femoral jig based instrumentation for achieving optimal restoration of mechanical axis post total knee arthroplasty: a prospective comparative study of 200 knees.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nilen A; Patil, Hitendra G; Dhawale, Amol S; Khedkar, Bipin M

    2015-04-01

    A prospective comparative study was conducted to compare the mechanical axis post total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between two groups: In the first group of 100 knees (ASM group) Articular Surface Mounted navigation system was used to guide the distal femoral cut. In the second group of 100 knees (JIG group) conventional intramedullary femoral jig was used. The postoperative mechanical axis of the leg was within 3° of neutral alignment in 90% of the TKA in the ASM group (mean 178.12°) as compared to 74% in the JIG group (mean 177.02°). This difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The data presented show that the use of limited femoral navigation leads to more accurate restoration of mechanical axis alignment when compared to conventional intramedullary femoral jigs.

  4. Knee joint position sense of roller hockey players: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Venâncio, João; Lopes, Diogo; Lourenço, Joaquim; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to compare knee joint position sense of roller hockey players with an age-matched group of non-athletes. Forty-three male participants voluntarily participated in this cross-sectional study: 21 roller hockey players (mean age: 23.2 ± 4.2 years old, mean weight: 81.8 ± 9.8 kg, mean height: 180.5 ± 4.1 cm) and 22 age-matched non-athletes (mean age: 23.7 ± 3.9 years old, mean weight: 85.0 ± 6.2 kg, mean height: 181.5 ± 5.0 cm). Knee joint position sense of the dominant limb was evaluated using a technique of open-kinetic chain and active knee positioning. Joint position sense was reported using absolute, relative and variable angular errors. The main results indicated that the group of roller hockey players showed significantly lower absolute (2.4 ± 1.2º vs. 6.5 ± 3.2º, p ≤ 0.001) and relative (1.7 ± 2.1º vs. 5.8 ± 4.4º, p ≤ 0.001) angular errors in comparison with the non-athletes group. In conclusion, the results from this present study suggest that proprioceptive acuity, assessed by measuring joint position sense, is increased in roller hockey players. The enhanced proprioception of the roller hockey players could contribute to injury prevention and improved performance during sporting activities. PMID:27111126

  5. COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN RADIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION AND MACRO AND MICROSCOPIC ANALYSIS ON OSTEOARTHRITIS LESIONS OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Carlos Antônio; Sampaio, Tania Clarete Fonseca Vieira Sales; Ferreira, Frederico de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the modified Ahlbäck radiological classification with macroscopic analysis of knee injuries and locate a chondral lesion in the tibial plateau, and to correlate this with integrity or lack of integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament. Material and Methods: Between July and December 2009, 40 patients of mean age 67.1 years with an indication for total knee arthroplasty were selected. The modified Ahlbäck radiological classification was used. The International Cartilage Repair Society classification was used for macroscopic analysis of the lesions. Chondral injuries were correlated with the integrity or lack of integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament. Results: Regarding the radiological classification of the knees, three (7.5%) were classified as grade 1, two (5%) as grade 2, 17 (42.5%) as grade 3, 16 (40%) as grade 4 and two (5%) as grade 5. The macroscopic analysis of the knee showed that 25 patients (62.5%) had very severe injury and 15 (37.5%), severe. In eight knees (20%) with ruptured ACL, the lesion extended to the posterior region of the medial tibial plateau. When the ACL was intact, the lesion was located in the anterior-central region. Conclusion: Knee osteoarthritis of grades 4 and 5 in the radiological classification, showed agreement with the macroscopic analysis, i.e. very severe chondral injury. However, grades 1, 2 and 3 were discordant. In the cases of osteoarthritis with intact ACL, the lesion was located in the anterior-central region of the medial tibial plateau, and those with ruptured ACL had the lesion extending to the posterior region of the plateau. PMID:27027004

  6. Is the use of computer navigation in total knee arthroplasty improving implant positioning and function? A comparative study of 198 knees operated at a Norwegian district hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There are few Scandinavian studies on the effect of computer assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), compared to conventional technique (CON), and there is little information on effects in pain and function scores. This retrospective study has evaluated the effects of CAOS on radiological parameters and pain, function and quality of life after primary TKA. Methods 198 primary TKAs were operated by one surgeon in two district hospitals; 103 CAOS and 95 CON. The groups were evaluated based on 3 months post-operative radiographs and a questionnaire containing the knee osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS), the EQ-5D index score and a visual analogue scale (VAS) two years after surgery. Multiple linear regression method was used to investigate possible impact from exposure (CON or CAOS). Results On hip-knee-ankle radiographs, 20% of measurements were > ±3° of neutral in the CAOS group and 25% in the CON group (p = 0.37). For the femoral component, the number was 5% for CAOS and 18% for CON (p < 0.01). For the tibial component, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.58). In the sagittal plane, the surgeon tended to apply more femoral flexion and more posterior tibial slope with CAOS. We observed no statistically or clinically significant difference in KOOS score, VAS or ∆EQ-5D (all p values >0.05), but there was a trend towards better scores for CAOS. Operation time was 3 minutes longer for CON (p = 0.37). Conclusions CAOS can improve radiological measurements in primary TKA, and makes it possible to adjust component placement to the patient’s anatomy. Over-all, the two methods are equal in pain, function and quality-of-life scores. PMID:24228727

  7. The prognosis of repaired and intact menisci in unstable knees--a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sommerlath, K

    1988-01-01

    We performed a follow-up study of 40 patients, 6 women and 34 men, all of whom had tears of the anterior cruciate ligament that were repaired. These patients were divided into two groups of matched pairs, 20 patients each. Those in Group I also had tears of the meniscus that were sutured, and in Group II the meniscus was intact. At the minimum of a 6-year follow-up, all knees were unstable despite the cruciate ligament repair, but 85% of the menisci were intact. There was no significant difference in the retear rate between those that were sutured and those that were intact initially. The high incidence of intact menisci at follow-up was attributed at least in part to the fact that these patients reduced their level of physical activity. We concluded that a healed tear of the meniscus has the same chance of survival in an unstable knee as an intact meniscus. The limiting factor is the grade of instability and the activity level of the patient.

  8. Electromagnetic navigation in total knee arthroplasty-a single center, randomized, single-blind study comparing the results with conventional techniques.

    PubMed

    Blyth, Mark J G; Smith, Julie R; Anthony, Iain C; Strict, Neville E; Rowe, Philip J; Jones, Bryn G

    2015-02-01

    We report on the results of a randomized study (n=200) to compare total knee arthroplasty performed using conventional instrumentation or electromagnetic computer assisted surgical technique. 92% of navigated and 85% of conventional knees were implanted within ±3° from neutral mechanical alignment; there was no statistically significant difference between these proportions. There was also no difference in femoral or tibial rotation assessed by CT scan. At 1year follow up there was no statistical difference between the two groups in American Knee Society Score, Oxford Knee Scores, patient satisfaction, quality of life, hospital length of stay, complication rates or other adverse events. Tourniquet time in the navigated group was longer. Proving value for navigation in total knee arthroplasty surgery remains a challenge.

  9. Comparative Study of Clinical and Radiological Outcomes of Unconstrained Bicondylar Total Knee Endoprostheses with Anti-allergic Coating

    PubMed Central

    Bergschmidt, Philipp; Bader, Rainer; Finze, Susanne; Schulze, Christoph; Kundt, Guenther; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hypersensitivity reactions to implant materials have become more important in total knee replacement (TKR). The purpose of this retrospective comparative study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of unconstrained bicondylar total knee prostheses with and without anti-allergic titanium(niobium)nitrite (Ti(Nb)N) coating. Methods: Twenty-four patients (25 TKRs) underwent a preoperative clinical evaluation and then a postoperative evaluation after 26.2 months in the allergy group treated with coated implants (n=13 implants) and after 24.5 months in the control group treated with uncoated implants but identical geometry (n=12) using HSS, WOMAC and SF-36 scores. Radiological evaluations were performed using standard anterior-posterior (a.p.) and lateral X-rays. Results: During follow-up two patients of the allergy group had to undergo revision surgery due to non-implant-related reasons. A comparative analysis of both study groups showed a significant difference in the HSS scores at both evaluation time points (MW test p≤0.050); these findings are remarkable since the control group had a significantly lower score preoperatively (54.0 vs 65.0 points) and a significantly higher score (82.5 vs 75.0 points) postoperatively. The preoperative and postoperative WOMAC and SF-36 scores were comparable in both groups (MW test p≥0.052), although the postoperative increase in the score for the allergy group was lower. The radiological results were comparable in both groups and were unlikely to influence the results. Conclusions: This clinical study demonstrates the restricted outcome in postoperative function and quality of life in the allergy group compared to the control group. PMID:22016754

  10. Comparative study on isokinetic capacity of knee and ankle joints by functional injury.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Seo, Byoung-Do; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To collect basic data for exercise programs designed to enhance functional knee and ankle joint stability based on isokinetic measurement and muscle strength evaluations in normal and impaired functional states. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly assigned to the athlete group and the control group (n = 12 each). Data were collected of isokinetic knee extensor and flexor strength at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and ankle plantar and dorsiflexor strength at 30°/sec and 120°/sec. [Results] Significant intergroup differences were observed in peak torque of the right extensors at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and the right flexors at 240°/sec. Significant differences were observed in peak torque/body weight in the right extensors at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and in the right flexors at 180°/sec and 240°/sec. Significant peak torque differences were noted in the left ankle joint dorsiflexor at 30°/sec and 120°/sec, right plantar flexor at 120°/sec, left plantar flexor at 30°/sec, left dorsiflexor at 30°/sec and 120°/sec, and right dorsiflexor at 120°/sec. [Conclusion] Isokinetic evaluation stimulates muscle contraction at motion-dependent speeds and may contribute to the development of intervention programs to improve knee and ankle joint function and correct lower-extremity instability.

  11. Comparative study on isokinetic capacity of knee and ankle joints by functional injury

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Seo, Byoung-Do; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To collect basic data for exercise programs designed to enhance functional knee and ankle joint stability based on isokinetic measurement and muscle strength evaluations in normal and impaired functional states. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly assigned to the athlete group and the control group (n = 12 each). Data were collected of isokinetic knee extensor and flexor strength at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and ankle plantar and dorsiflexor strength at 30°/sec and 120°/sec. [Results] Significant intergroup differences were observed in peak torque of the right extensors at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and the right flexors at 240°/sec. Significant differences were observed in peak torque/body weight in the right extensors at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and in the right flexors at 180°/sec and 240°/sec. Significant peak torque differences were noted in the left ankle joint dorsiflexor at 30°/sec and 120°/sec, right plantar flexor at 120°/sec, left plantar flexor at 30°/sec, left dorsiflexor at 30°/sec and 120°/sec, and right dorsiflexor at 120°/sec. [Conclusion] Isokinetic evaluation stimulates muscle contraction at motion-dependent speeds and may contribute to the development of intervention programs to improve knee and ankle joint function and correct lower-extremity instability. PMID:26957768

  12. A FUNCTIONAL AND ROENTGENOGRAPHIC PRELIMINARY COMPARATIVE STUDY USING METAL-BACKED AND ALL-POLYETHYLENE TIBIAL COMPONENTS IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Marco Antônio Percope; dos Santos, Juliano Rodrigues; Gonzaga, Luiz Gustavo Alves; Silva, Guilherme Moreira Abreu e

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe and clinically and radiographically compare patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with all-polyethylene (ALP) and metal-backed (MTB) tibial implants. Methods: Patients who underwent TKA between January 1988 and December 2004 were grouped according to the type of implant received: all-polyethylene or metal-backed. Sixty patients came for evaluations, totaling 82 operated knees. Among these, 22 patients had undergone TKA only with ALP (12 unilateral and 10 bilateral cases), 33 patients only with MTB (26 unilateral and 7 bilateral cases) and five patients underwent TKA with ALP in one knee and MTB in the other. The knees were divided thus: group 1, 37 knees with ALP; and group 2, 45 knees with MTB. Results: There were no differences in clinical or functional evaluations between the groups. The mean radiolucency in the femur was 0.838 mm for the patients in group 1 and 0.356 mm for the patients in group 2 (p = 0.049). For the tibia, in the AP view, there was a mean value of 2.703 mm for group 1 and 0.733 mm for group 2 (p = 0.000). In the lateral view, the mean values for osteolysis was 0.405 mm for group 1 and 0.200 mm for group 2 (p = 0.074). Conclusions: There were no differences between the groups in the functional and clinical evaluations. However, greater radiolucency was observed in the arthroplasties with ALP, both in the femur in the lateral view and in the tibia in the AP view. Level of evidence IV – case series study. PMID:27022556

  13. Tranexamic Acid Reduces Hidden Blood Loss in Patients Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Comparative Study and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guang-Ping; Jia, Xu-Feng; Xiang, Zhou; Ji, Yong; Wu, Guo-Yong; Tang, Yi; Li, Jian; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore the efficacy of tranexamic acid (TXA) on reducing hidden blood loss (HBL) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) by conducting a comparative study and meta-analysis. Material/Methods A total of 108 patients underwent TKA was equally distributed to experimental and control groups. The only difference between two groups was the administrations of 15 mg of TXA mixed in 100 mL normal saline for experimental group and 100 mL of normal saline for control group. The volumes of blood loss, red blood loss (RBL) were recorded, calculated and analyzed. Stata 12.0 software was applied for data analysis. Results The intraoperative and postoperative blood loss volume in experimental group were remarkably reduced compared with those in control group (intraoperative: 105.1±12.1 mL vs. 185.5±20.3 mL, P<0.001; postoperative: 220.7±16.8 mL vs. 290.5±22.4 mL, P<0.001). Accordingly, the control group had significantly higher transfusion rate than experimental group (3.7% vs.25.9%, P=0.001). Our results also found that both the measured and hidden RBL were obviously reduced in experimental group compared with control group (measured RBL: 96.9±11.8 mL vs. 135.2±13.5 mL, P<0.001; hidden RBL: 170.8±37.2 mL vs. 364.2±41.5 mL, P<0.001). Furthermore, meta-analysis confirmed that TXA can notably decrease HBL (SMD=2.68, 95%CI=1.55~3.80, P<0.001). Conclusions TXA can significantly reduce the intraoperative and postoperative blood loss and HBL, therefore decreasing the transfusion need in TKA. PMID:26961597

  14. [Cemented total knee replacement: comparative study between the use or not of tourniquet on the inmediate results].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-García, J A; Sierra-Pérez, M; García-Velazco, R A; Salas-Mora, C A; Cisneros-González, V M

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of immediate postoperative results of patients undergoing cemented total knee arthroplasty with and without ischemia. Observational, cross-sectional, retrospective, analytical, single-center study that included 180 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty from 2011 to 2014: 120 without ischemia, 60 with ischemia. Mean age was 70 years with SD ± 7. Criteria to assess the immediate postoperative results include intraoperative bleeding, hemoglobin differential and pain. Exclusion criteria comprised patients being treated at a pain clinic, those on anticoagulants, with a history of bleeding disorders, psychiatric conditions, kidney failure or those intolerant to NSAIDs. In total knee arthroplasty without ischemia there is better pain control (p = 0.026). The hemoglobin differential and intraoperative bleeding were less with ischemia (p = 0.008). 32.8% of patients required blood transfusion, but no statistically significant relationship was established with the use or non-use of ischemia (p = 0.301). The most commonly reported pain was within a VAS of 0-3; 62.2% of cases reported mild pain. Mean hemoglobin differential was 3.7 with SD ± 1.3 with a range from 0 to 7.4. Patients in whom no ischemia was used during the surgical procedure experienced less pain. There was less bleeding and hemoglobin differential with the use of ischemia. However, this did not result in a statistically significant difference in the need for blood transfusion. The use of ischemia with caution and according to the surgeons preference is recommended. PMID:27627771

  15. [Cemented total knee replacement: comparative study between the use or not of tourniquet on the inmediate results].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-García, J A; Sierra-Pérez, M; García-Velazco, R A; Salas-Mora, C A; Cisneros-González, V M

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of immediate postoperative results of patients undergoing cemented total knee arthroplasty with and without ischemia. Observational, cross-sectional, retrospective, analytical, single-center study that included 180 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty from 2011 to 2014: 120 without ischemia, 60 with ischemia. Mean age was 70 years with SD ± 7. Criteria to assess the immediate postoperative results include intraoperative bleeding, hemoglobin differential and pain. Exclusion criteria comprised patients being treated at a pain clinic, those on anticoagulants, with a history of bleeding disorders, psychiatric conditions, kidney failure or those intolerant to NSAIDs. In total knee arthroplasty without ischemia there is better pain control (p = 0.026). The hemoglobin differential and intraoperative bleeding were less with ischemia (p = 0.008). 32.8% of patients required blood transfusion, but no statistically significant relationship was established with the use or non-use of ischemia (p = 0.301). The most commonly reported pain was within a VAS of 0-3; 62.2% of cases reported mild pain. Mean hemoglobin differential was 3.7 with SD ± 1.3 with a range from 0 to 7.4. Patients in whom no ischemia was used during the surgical procedure experienced less pain. There was less bleeding and hemoglobin differential with the use of ischemia. However, this did not result in a statistically significant difference in the need for blood transfusion. The use of ischemia with caution and according to the surgeons preference is recommended.

  16. Clinical efficacy of intra-articular injections in knee osteoarthritis: a prospective randomized study comparing hyaluronic acid and betamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Trueba Davalillo, Cesáreo Ángel; Trueba Vasavilbaso, Cesáreo; Navarrete Álvarez, José Mario; Coronel Granado, Pilar; García Jiménez, Ozcar Alejandro; Gimeno del Sol, Mercedes; Gil Orbezo, Félix

    2015-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease and leading cause of disability. Intra-articular (IA) administration of hyaluronic acid (HA) or corticosteroids (CS) have been previously studied, though using insufficient number of patients or short follow-up periods. Objective We evaluate HA and CS in patients with knee OA in terms of clinical efficacy over 12 months. Methods We used a prospective, randomized study with parallel groups. Randomized patients received IA injections of HA or betamethasone (BM). The primary outcomes were improvement in pain using Visual Analog Scale and function in the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (Likert scale). Follow-up visits were scheduled at 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months. Results A total of 200 patients were included. Pain was significantly reduced in both groups at the first follow-ups. At 12 months, the mean pain reduction in the HA group was 33.6% (95% CI: 31.1–36.1) compared to 8.2% (95% CI: 5.2–11.1) in BM (P<0.0001). Function improvement was higher in HA through every visit, and mean improvement at 12 months was 47.5% (95% CI: 45.6–49.3) in HA patients vs 13.2% (95% CI: 11.4–14.9) in the BM group (P<0.0001). All patients from both groups achieved the Minimal Clinically Important Improvement (MCII) for both pain and function up to 6 months. At 9 months and 12 months, the MCII figures were higher in HA group with ≥80% compared to ≤10% in BM group (P<0.0001). Adverse reactions were rare and related to the administration procedure. Conclusion Both treatments effectively controlled OA symptoms. BM showed higher short-term effectiveness, while HA showed better long-term effectiveness, maintaining clinical efficacy in a large number of patients 1 year after administration. PMID:27790040

  17. A pilot study comparing the efficacy of radiofrequency and microwave diathermy in combination with intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hashimoto, Sanshiro; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Kato, Kazuo; Majima, Tokifumi; Shindo, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Mochizuki, Yusuke; Takai, Shinro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to compare the efficacy of radiofrequency diathermy with that of microwave diathermy in combination with intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid into the knee of patients with osteoarthritis (OA). [Subjects] A total of 17 patients with knee OA were enrolled. The participants were randomly divided into two groups: a radiofrequency diathermy group (RF group, 9 subjects), and a microwave diathermy group (MW group, 8 subjects). [Methods] Subjects received radiofrequency or microwave thermal therapy 3 times at 1-week intervals. Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid was administered 10 min before every thermal therapy session. The outcome was evaluated using the Japan Orthopaedic Association (JOA) and the Lequesne Index (LI) at baseline, at weeks 1 (1 week after the first thermal therapy) and 3 (1 week after the last thermal therapy). [Results] The JOA scale increased significantly after three sessions of thermal therapy in the RF group, while no significant increase was observed in the MW group. LI decreased significantly after 3 weeks in the RF group. In the MW group, there was no significant difference in LI between the two time points. [Conclusion] This study revealed that symptom relief in patients with knee OA was greater with radiofrequency diathermy than with microwave diathermy with concurrent use of hyaluronic acid injection, presumably due to the different heating characteristics of the two methods. PMID:27065540

  18. Comparative effectiveness of a complex Ayurvedic treatment and conventional standard care in osteoarthritis of the kneestudy protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine uses complex treatment approaches, including manual therapies, lifestyle and nutritional advice, dietary supplements, medication, yoga, and purification techniques. Ayurvedic strategies are often used to treat osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee; however, no systematic data are available on their effectiveness in comparison with standard care. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of complex Ayurvedic treatment in comparison with conventional methods of treating OA symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods and design In a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial, 150 patients between 40 and 70 years, diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the knee, following American College of Rheumatology criteria and an average pain intensity of ≥40 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale in the affected knee at baseline will be randomized into two groups. In the Ayurveda group, treatment will include tailored combinations of manual treatments, massages, dietary and lifestyle advice, consideration of selected foods, nutritional supplements, yoga posture advice, and knee massage. Patients in the conventional group will receive self-care advice, pain medication, weight-loss advice (if overweight), and physiotherapy following current international guidelines. Both groups will receive 15 treatment sessions over 12 weeks. Outcomes will be evaluated after 6 and 12 weeks and 6 and 12 months. The primary endpoint is a change in the score on the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) after 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measurements will use WOMAC subscales, a pain disability index, a visual analog scale for pain and sleep quality, a pain experience scale, a quality-of-life index, a profile of mood states, and Likert scales for patient satisfaction, patient diaries, and safety. Using an adapted PRECIS scale, the trial was identified as lying mainly in the middle of the efficacy

  19. A prospective study on knee proprioception after meniscal allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thijs, Y; Witvrouw, E; Evens, B; Coorevits, P; Almqvist, F; Verdonk, R

    2007-06-01

    The meniscus plays an important role in the proprioceptive ability of the knee joint. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the short-term influence of a meniscus replacement on the proprioception of the knee. Fourteen patients who had undergone a fresh meniscal allograft transplantation between May 2001 and June 2003 were tested pre-operatively and 6 months post-operatively. Disability regarding pain, stiffness and functionality of the affected knee during daily activities was measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis (WOMAC) scale. The knee joint position sense was assessed using the Biodex System 3 isokinetic dynamometer. The results of the WOMAC scale showed no significant differences concerning pain, stiffness or knee function between the pre- and post-operative condition of the knee. Assessment of the knee joint position sense at a reference point of 70 degrees of knee flexion revealed a significant improvement of the proprioception of the operated knee at 6 months after surgery compared with the pre-operative condition. The results of this study suggest that although no significant improvement of pain and functionality of the operated knee occurred at this short-term follow-up period, a meniscal allograft transplantation seems to have a significant positive effect on the joint position sense of the previously meniscectomised knee.

  20. A comparative microstructural study of vitamin-E blended and infused highly crosslinked UHMWPE for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Puppulin, Leonardo; Leto, Andrea; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2014-11-01

    The impact of adding antioxidant vitamin-E (α-tocopherol) to the microstructure of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) for total knee arthroplasty has been studied in detail by means of Raman microprobe spectroscopy. Three tibial insert samples prepared by different manufacturing methods were investigated, as follows: (A) a sample manufactured without blending with vitamin E which did not receive any irradiation dose after consolidation but underwent final sterilization in ethylene oxide (EtO); (B) a sample blended with 0.3 wt% of α-tocopherol, an isomer of vitamin E, and manufactured as sample (A); and, (C) a sample in which vitamin E was diffused after being irradiated with 100 kGy dose of γ-ray. Clear microstructural differences were observed in terms of phase contents (i.e., amorphous, crystalline, and intermediate phase fraction), molecular orientation, and the degree of anisotropy between the investigated tibial plates. Vitamin E in the starting resin promoted chain mobility leading to reorganization of the molecular chains. The spectroscopic characterizations helps to rationalize the complex effect of vitamin-E on the UHMWPE microstructure and gives useful information on how significantly any single step of the manufacturing procedures might affect the mechanical properties of the final orthopedic component. PMID:25151446

  1. A comparative microstructural study of vitamin-E blended and infused highly crosslinked UHMWPE for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Puppulin, Leonardo; Leto, Andrea; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2014-11-01

    The impact of adding antioxidant vitamin-E (α-tocopherol) to the microstructure of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) for total knee arthroplasty has been studied in detail by means of Raman microprobe spectroscopy. Three tibial insert samples prepared by different manufacturing methods were investigated, as follows: (A) a sample manufactured without blending with vitamin E which did not receive any irradiation dose after consolidation but underwent final sterilization in ethylene oxide (EtO); (B) a sample blended with 0.3 wt% of α-tocopherol, an isomer of vitamin E, and manufactured as sample (A); and, (C) a sample in which vitamin E was diffused after being irradiated with 100 kGy dose of γ-ray. Clear microstructural differences were observed in terms of phase contents (i.e., amorphous, crystalline, and intermediate phase fraction), molecular orientation, and the degree of anisotropy between the investigated tibial plates. Vitamin E in the starting resin promoted chain mobility leading to reorganization of the molecular chains. The spectroscopic characterizations helps to rationalize the complex effect of vitamin-E on the UHMWPE microstructure and gives useful information on how significantly any single step of the manufacturing procedures might affect the mechanical properties of the final orthopedic component.

  2. High knee valgus in female subjects does not yield higher knee translations during drop landings: a biplane fluoroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Torry, Michael R; Shelburne, Kevin B; Myers, Casey; Giphart, J Erik; Pennington, W Wesley; Krong, Jacob P; Peterson, Daniel S; Steadman, J Richard; Woo, Savio L-Y

    2013-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of peak knee valgus angle and peak knee abductor moment on the anterior, medial, and lateral tibial translations (ATT, MTT, LTT) in the "at risk" female knee during drop landing. Fifteen female subjects performed drop landings from 40 cm. Three-dimension knee motion was simultaneously recorded using a high speed, biplane fluoroscopy system, and a video-based motion analysis system. Valgus knee angles and knee abduction moments were stratified into low, intermediate, and high groups and peak ATT, MTT, and LTT were compared between these groups with ANOVA (α = 0.05). Significant differences were observed between stratified groups in peak knee valgus angle (p < 0.0001) and peak knee abduction moment (p < 0.0001). However, no corresponding differences in peak ATT, LTT, and MTT between groups exhibiting low to high-peak knee valgus angles (ATT: p = 0.80; LTT: p = 0.25; MTT: p = 0.72); or, in peak ATT (p = 0.61), LTT (p = 0.26) and MTT (p = 0.96) translations when stratified according to low to high knee abduction moments, were found. We conclude that the healthy female knee is tightly regulated with regard to translations even when motion analysis derived knee valgus angles and abduction moments are high.

  3. High Knee Valgus in Female Subjects Does Not Yield Higher Knee Translations During Drop Landings: A Biplane Fluoroscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Torry, Michael R.; Shelburne, Kevin B.; Myers, Casey; Giphart, J. Erik; Pennington, W. Wesley; Krong, Jacob P.; Peterson, Daniel S.; Steadman, J. Richard; Woo, Savio L-Y.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of peak knee valgus angle and peak knee abductor moment on the anterior, medial, and lateral tibial translations (ATT, MTT, LTT) in the ‘at risk’ female knee during drop landing. Fifteen female subjects performed drop landings from 40 cm. 3D knee motion was simultaneously recorded using a high speed, biplane fluoroscopy system and a video-based motion analysis system. Valgus knee angles and knee abduction moments were stratified into low, intermediate and high groups and peak ATT, MTT and LTT were compared between these groups with ANOVA (α = .05). Significant differences were observed between stratified groups in peak knee valgus angle (p < .0001) and peak knee abduction moment (p < .0001). However, no corresponding differences in peak ATT, LTT and MTT between groups exhibiting low to high peak knee valgus angles (ATT: p = .80; LTT: p = .25; MTT: p = .72); or, in peak ATT (p = .61), LTT (p = .26) and MTT (p = .96) translations when stratified according to low to high knee abduction moments, were found. We conclude that the healthy female knee is tightly regulated with regard to translations even when motion analysis derived knee valgus angles and abduction moments are high. PMID:22968826

  4. Function after through-knee compared with below-knee and above-knee amputation.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, E; Berlin, O K; Renström, P

    1992-12-01

    Fifty-nine amputees, 24 below-knee (BK), 17 through-knee (TK) and 18 above-knee (AK) who had prosthetic replacements, were evaluated using a questionnaire which provided a quantitative and qualitative assessment scale for the prosthetic function. The ability to apply or don the prosthesis was noted in 100% of the BK, 70% of the TK and 56% of the AK amputations (p < 0.001). Daily use of the prosthesis was recorded in 96% of the BK, 76% of the TK and 50% of the AK amputations (p < 0.001). A higher level of amputation resulted in a significantly lower degree of rehabilitation (p < 0.05). The qualitative evaluation shows that the higher the level of amputation, the lower the usefulness of the prosthesis. Four percent of the BK, 12% of the TK and 39% of the AK amputees had no use whatsoever of their prosthesis (p < 0.01). From a functional standpoint, TK amputation should always be considered as the primary alternative to AK amputation when a BK amputation is not feasible.

  5. Safety and efficacy of multimodal thromboprophylaxis following total knee arthroplasty: a comparative study of preferential aspirin vs. routine coumadin chemoprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Mark W; González Della Valle, Alejandro; Bartolomé García, Sergio; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Ma, Yan; Haas, Steven B; Salvati, Eduardo A

    2013-04-01

    Multimodal thromboprophylaxis encompasses preoperative VTE risk stratification, regional anesthesia, mechanical prophylaxis, and early mobilization. We determined if aspirin can be safely used for adjuvant chemoprophylaxis in patients who have a low thromboembolic risk. 1016 consecutive patients undergoing TKA received multimodal thromboprophylaxis. Aspirin was used in 67% of patients and Coumadin 33% (high risk patients, or who were on Coumadin before surgery). This study group was compared to 1001 consecutive patients who received multimodal thromboprophylaxis and routine Coumadin chemoprophylaxis. There was no significant difference in rates of VTE, PE, bleeding, complications, readmission and 90-day mortality between the two groups. There was a significantly higher rate of wound related complications in the control group (p=0.03). Multimodal thromboprophylaxis with aspirin given to the majority of patients at a low VTE risk is safe and effective in patients undergoing primary TKA.

  6. International Comparative Evaluation of Knee Replacement with Fixed or Mobile Non-Posterior-Stabilized Implants

    PubMed Central

    Namba, Robert; Graves, Stephen; Robertsson, Otto; Furnes, Ove; Stea, Susanna; Puig-Verdié, Lluis; Hoeffel, Daniel; Cafri, Guy; Paxton, Elizabeth; Sedrakyan, Art

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mobile-bearing total knee prostheses were designed to reduce wear and improve implant survivorship following total knee arthroplasty. However, the benefit of mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty remains unproven. Both mobile-bearing and fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty implants are available in posterior-stabilized and non-posterior-stabilized designs. With the latter, the implant does not recreate the function of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) with a posterior-stabilizing cam mechanism. The purpose of the present study was to compare mobile-bearing, non-posterior-stabilized devices with fixed-bearing, non-posterior-stabilized devices used in total knee arthroplasty through a novel multinational study design. Methods: Through the use of a distributed health data network, primary total knee arthroplasties performed for osteoarthritis from 2001 to 2010 were identified from six national and regional total joint arthroplasty registries. Multivariate meta-analysis was performed with use of linear mixed models, with the primary outcome of interest being revision for any reason. Survival probabilities and their standard errors were extracted from each registry for each unique combination of the covariates. Results: A total of 319,616 patients (60% female) underwent non-posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty. A fixed-bearing, non-posterior-stabilized design was used in 258,190 (81%) of the knees and a mobile-bearing, non-posterior-stabilized design in 61,426 (19%) of the knees. Sixty-nine percent of the patients who received a fixed-bearing implant were over sixty-five years of age, compared with 63% of those who received a mobile-bearing implant. Mobile-bearing designs had a higher risk of revision, with a hazard ratio of 1.43 (95% confidence interval, 1.36 to 1.51; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Previous comparisons of mobile-bearing and fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty outcomes have been inconclusive. The current study utilized an advanced

  7. Are static and dynamic kinematics comparable after total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Saevarsson, Stefan K; Romeo, Carolina I; Anglin, Carolyn

    2013-04-01

    Knee kinematics provide information about how the femoral, tibial and patellar bones or prosthetic components move relative to each other. Accurate knowledge of kinematics is valuable for implant design, comparisons between designs or surgical techniques, and to identify differences between patients with good and poor outcomes. Both static and dynamic imaging techniques have been used to evaluate kinematics. In general, static imaging is used to capture better quality images or to capture views that cannot be acquired by dynamic imaging, whereas dynamic imaging is used to capture real-life movements. How well static kinematics represent dynamic kinematics is subject to frequent debate and has not been adequately addressed, especially after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We compared the static and dynamic weightbearing kinematics of 10 female subjects after TKA. Using the same clinical scanner for both methods, static images were taken using our standard protocol, sequential-biplane radiographs at multiple flexion angles, as well as with dynamic video fluoroscopy during a step up activity. The static method can reliably measure all 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) after TKA, however only seven were compared due to the poorer out-of-plane reliability in the single-plane dynamic imaging. No differences were found between the static and dynamic kinematics for nine out of ten subjects. For one subject, however, a difference of 5-8° in internal/external tibial rotation was found. The research question, study purpose and the advantages and disadvantages of each method need to be considered when determining which imaging method to use.

  8. Relationship of Buckling and Knee Injury to Pain Exacerbation in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Web-Based Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Zobel, Isabelle; Erfani, Tahereh; Bennell, Kim L; Makovey, Joanna; Metcalf, Ben; March, Lyn; Zhang, Yuqing; Eckstein, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most frequent causes of limited mobility and diminished quality of life. Pain is the main symptom that drives individuals with knee OA to seek medical care and a recognized antecedent to disability and eventually joint replacement. Evidence shows that patients with symptomatic OA experience fluctuations in pain severity. Mechanical insults to the knee such as injury and buckling may contribute to pain exacerbation. Objective Our objective was to examine whether knee injury and buckling (giving way) are triggers for exacerbation of pain in persons with symptomatic knee OA. Methods We conducted a case-crossover study, a novel methodology in which participants with symptomatic radiographic knee OA who have had knee pain exacerbations were used as their own control (self-matched design), with all data collected via the Internet. Participants were asked to log-on to the study website and complete an online questionnaire at baseline and then at regular 10-day intervals for 3 months (control periods)—a total of 10 questionnaires. They were also instructed to go to the website and complete pain exacerbation questionnaires when they experienced an isolated incident of knee pain exacerbation (case periods). A pain exacerbation “case” period was defined as an increase of ≥2 compared to baseline. At each contact the pain exacerbation was designated a case period, and at all other regular 10-day contacts (control periods) participants were asked about knee injuries during the previous 7 days and knee buckling during the previous 2 days. The relationship of knee injury and buckling to the risk of pain exacerbation was examined using conditional logistic regression models. Results The analysis included 157 participants (66% women, mean age: 62 years, mean BMI: 29.5 kg/m2). Sustaining a knee injury was associated with experiencing a pain exacerbation (odds ratio [OR] 10.2, 95% CI 5.4, 19.3) compared with no injury. Knee

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis is associated with higher 90-day Hospital Readmission Rates Compared to Osteoarthritis after Hip or Knee arthroplasty: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.; Inacio, Maria C.S.; Namba, Robert S.; Paxton, Elizabeth W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine if an underlying diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or osteoarthritis (OA) impacts the 90-day readmission rates after total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA). Methods Prospectively collected data from an integrated healthcare system Total Joint Replacement Registry of adults with RA or OA undergoing unilateral primary THA or TKA during 2009-2011 were analyzed. Adjusted logistic regression models for 90-day readmission were fit. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Study year was an effect modifier for the outcome, therefore separate analyses were conducted for each of the three study years. Results Of the 34,311 patients, 496 had RA and 33,815 had OA. Comparing RA and OA, there were: 73% and 61% women; 45% and 70% Caucasians; and the mean age was lower, 61 vs. 67 years (p<0.001). Respective crude 90-day readmission rates were 8.5% and 6.7%. The adjusted odds of 90-day readmission increased from year to year for RA compared to OA patients, from 0.89 (95% CI, 0.46-1.71) in 2009 to 1.34 (95% CI, 0.69-2.61) in 2010 to 1.74 (95% CI, 1.16-2.60) in 2011. The two most common readmission reasons were: joint prosthesis infection (10.2%) and septicemia (10.2%) in RA; joint prosthesis infection (5.7%) and other postoperative infection (5.1%) in OA. Conclusions RA is a risk factor for 90-day readmission after primary TKA or THA. An increasing risk of readmissions noted in RA in 2011 is concerning and indicates further studies should examine the reasons for this increasing trend. PMID:25302697

  10. Chondropathia patellae and knee muscle control. An electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Hess, T; Gleitz, M; Egert, S; Hopf, T

    1996-01-01

    The activity of knee-related muscles was registered via exercising on a bicycle ergometer by 17 patients with clinically diagnosed chondropathia patellae. M. quadriceps activity was shorter and the hamstring activity longer in the chondropathy group compared with a matched healthy control group. The changes in m. quadriceps occurred to an almost equal extent in lateral and medial sections. In five patients with unilateral complaints, the electromyographic changes were nevertheless noted on both sides. The study shows that chondropathia patellae involves a change in muscle control affecting not only the knee extensors but also the hamstrings. Through the changed innervation pattern the coactivation phase, i.e. the phase of simultaneous activation of knee flexors and extensors at the end of the extension phase, takes place at a higher angle of flexion. Physiotherapy should involve all knee-related muscles and should include not only isometric but also dynamic exercises.

  11. Revision of minimal resection resurfacing unicondylar knee arthroplasty to total knee arthroplasty: results compared with primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Turlough M P; Abouazza, Omar; Neil, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    We compared a cohort of patients undergoing revision of a minimal resection resurfacing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with a cohort of patients undergoing primary TKA. Both cohorts were matched in terms of age, sex, and body mass index. We collected data on preoperative and postoperative range of motion, International Knee Society scores, and radiologic data. We also collected data on the modes of failure of the primary UKA. There were 55 patients in each cohort. The average time the UKA was in place was 48.3 months. The average follow-up period from the time of revision was 39.2 months. The most common reason for revision was subsidence of the tibial base plate (58%). Forty percent of patients required particulate bone grafting for contained defects. Two patients required metal augments, and 1 required stems. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in terms of range of motion, functional outcome, or radiologic outcomes. Revision of these types of implants to TKA is associated with similar results to primary TKA and is superior to revision of other forms of UKA.

  12. Comparative analysis of below-knee prosthetic socket liner materials.

    PubMed

    Emrich, R; Slater, K

    1998-01-01

    Four materials used in lining prosthetic sockets were compared for their potential usefulness in below-knee applications. Tests carried out included determinations of resistance to compression, resistance to flexural abrasion and coefficients (static and dynamic) of friction. These tests were designed, respectively, to assess changes occurring during end-use brought about by extensive application of compressive or shear force, and to predict the ability to retain contact with the body and socket. Of the four materials in the study (Bock-Lite, Pedilin, polyurethane and silicone), Bock-Lite and silicone had high compression resistance, Bock-Lite had good resistance to flexural abrasion, and polyurethane and silicone had high coefficients of frictional resistance. Thus, Bock-Lite will be the most durable of the four materials but, since it had the lowest frictional coefficient, it may slip in use. Conversely, silicone and polyurethane, which will be retained in position more easily, are easily torn or compressed, so are likely to need replacement more frequently.

  13. Less Anterior Knee Pain with a Mobile-bearing Prosthesis Compared with a Fixed-bearing Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sierevelt, Inger N.; Schafroth, Matthias U.; Blankevoort, Leendert; Schaap, Gerard R.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2008-01-01

    Anterior knee pain is one of the major short-term complaints after TKA. Since the introduction of the mobile-bearing TKA, numerous studies have attempted to confirm the theoretical advantages of a mobile-bearing TKA over a fixed-bearing TKA but most show little or no actual benefits. The concept of self-alignment for the mobile bearing suggests the posterior-stabilized mobile-bearing TKA would provide a lower incidence of anterior knee pain compared with a fixed-bearing TKA. We therefore asked whether the posterior-stabilized mobile-bearing knee would in fact reduce anterior knee pain. We randomized 103 patients scheduled for cemented three-component TKA for osteoarthrosis in a prospective, double-blind clinical trial. With a 1-year followup, more patients experienced persistent anterior knee pain in the posterior-stabilized fixed-bearing group (10 of 53, 18.9%) than in the posterior-stabilized mobile-bearing group (two of 47, 4.3%). No differences were observed for range of motion, visual analog scale for pain, Oxford 12-item questionnaire, SF-36, or the American Knee Society score. The posterior-stabilized mobile-bearing knee therefore seems to provide a short-term advantage compared with the posterior-stabilized fixed-bearing knee. Level of Evidence: Level I, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18523833

  14. Computed tomography scanogram compared to long leg radiograph for determining axial knee alignment

    PubMed Central

    Holme, Thomas J; Henckel, Johann; Hartshorn, Kai; Cobb, Justin P; Hart, Alister J

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Supine computed tomography scanogram (CTS) is a commonly used alternative to weight bearing long leg plain radiograph (LLR) in measuring knee alignment. No published studies have validated its use in the native knee and the post-unicompartmental replacement knee (UKR). We quantified the difference in measurements obtained from CTS and LLR for knee alignment. Patients and methods Supine CT scanograms and weight bearing long leg plain anteroposterior radiographs were obtained for 40 knees (in 25 patients), 17 of which were native, and 23 of which were post-UKR. The mechanical and anatomical axes of the tibio-femoral joint were measured. Bland-Altman plots were used to calculate the 1.96 standard deviation limits of agreement between CTS and LLR. Intraclass correlation was used to assess intra-rater and inter-rater reliability (where values > 0.81 indicate very good reliability). Results CTS and LLR were equally reliable in measurement of the mechanical and anatomical axes of the tibio-femoral joint (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) > 0.9 for all parameters). Statistically significant and clinically relevant differences were found between CTS and LLR in measurement of the mechanical axis (limits of agreement: UKR −3.2° to 6.3°; native −3.2° to 5.6°) and the anatomical axis (limits of agreement: UKR −3.7° to 8.7°; native −2.0° to 8.8°). Interpretation Although it is a reliable tool, CTS is not necessarily an accurate one for measurement of knee alignment when compared to LLR. We recommend that CTS should not be used as a substitute for LLR in measurement of the mechanical or anatomical axes of the knee. PMID:25582134

  15. How does surgery compare with advanced intra-articular therapies in knee osteoarthritis: current thoughts

    PubMed Central

    Wehling, Peter; Moser, Carsten; Maixner, William

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of osteoarthritis (OA) management are to reduce pain and inflammation, slow cartilage degradation, improve function and reduce disability. Current strategies for managing knee OA include nonpharmacological interventions, oral pharmacological treatments, localized intra-articular injections, and surgery. It has become evident that the inflammatory response is a key contributor to the development and progression of knee OA. Signaling pathways involving growth factors and cytokines are being investigated for the development of new therapies that target the underlying biological processes causing the disease. This concept of ‘molecular orthopedics’ enables more patient-centered diagnostic and treatment strategies. In contrast to other conservative therapies, which ultimately only address OA symptoms, intra-articular injections, in particular autologous conditioned serum (ACS), provide benefits that have the potential to outweigh those of established pharmacological treatments and surgery. Surgery has historically been considered the final solution for treatment of knee OA, both by treating physicians and by patients; however, there are increasing concerns regarding the lack of randomized clinical trials providing evidence to support this opinion. Intra-articular injection of ACS has demonstrated efficacy as a treatment for knee OA in a number of studies, with a very low rate of adverse events and side effects, compared with surgery. Treatment with ACS utilizes the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines and regenerative growth factors to support the natural healing processes in the knee, and has the potential to provide a valuable alternative to surgical intervention. PMID:27247634

  16. Motor dysfunction of the "non-affected" lower limb: a kinematic comparative study between hemiparetic stroke and total knee prosthesized patients.

    PubMed

    Bagnato, Sergio; Boccagni, Cristina; Boniforti, Filippo; Trinchera, Antonia; Guercio, Giovanni; Letizia, Giulia; Galardi, Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    In patients with hemispheric stroke, abnormal motor performances are described also in the ipsilateral limbs. They may be due to a cortical reorganization in the unaffected hemisphere; moreover, also peripheral mechanisms may play a role. To explore this hypothesis, we studied motor performances in 15 patients with hemispheric stroke and in 14 patients with total knee arthroplasty, which have a reduced motility in the prosthesized leg. Using the unaffected leg, they performed five superimposed circular trajectories in a prefixed pathway on a computerized footboard, while looking at a marker on the computer screen. The average trace error was significantly different between the groups of patients and healthy subjects [F ((2,25)) = 7.9; p = 0.003]; on the contrary, the test time execution did not vary significantly. In conclusion, both groups of patients showed abnormal motor performances of the unaffected leg; this result suggests a likely contribution of peripheral mechanisms.

  17. Anteroposterior Laxity After Bicruciate-Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty Is Closer to the Native Knee Than ACL-Resecting TKA: A Biomechanical Cadaver Study.

    PubMed

    Halewood, Camilla; Traynor, Alison; Bellemans, Johan; Victor, Jan; Amis, Andrew A

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether a bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA would yield anteroposterior (AP) laxity closer to the native knee than a posterior cruciate ligament retaining (CR) TKA. A BCR TKA was designed and compared to CR TKA and the native knee using cadaver specimens. AP laxity with the CR TKA was greater than the native knee (P=0.006) and BCR TKA (P=0.039), but no difference was found between the BCR TKA and the native knee. No significant differences were found in rotations between the prostheses and the native knee. BCR TKA was shown to be surgically feasible, reduced AP laxity versus CR TKA, and may improve knee stability without using conforming geometry in the implant design.

  18. Serum cytokines are increased and circulating micronutrients are not altered in subjects with early compared to advanced knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Barker, Tyler; Rogers, Victoria E; Henriksen, Vanessa T; Aguirre, Dale; Trawick, Roy H; Rasmussen, G Lynn; Momberger, Nathan G

    2014-08-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of physical disability. At the early stage of knee OA, the increase in synovial fluid cytokine concentrations could contribute to the pathogenesis of OA by degrading articular cartilage. It is unknown, however, if inflammatory cytokines increase systemically at the early or advanced stage of knee OA. The systemic increase of inflammatory cytokines could be detrimental to the endogenous status of micronutrients that protect against excessive inflammation and cytokine-mediated events. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that an increase in serum cytokines associate with a decrease in circulating micronutrients in subjects with early compared to advanced knee OA. Advanced knee OA subjects (n=14) displayed radiographic, pain, and muscular weakness symptoms of knee OA. Early knee OA subjects (n=14) were matched (age, gender, and body mass index) to the advanced OA group and displayed one or two of the aforementioned symptoms of knee OA. Inflammatory cytokines, vitamins C (ascorbic acid), D (25-hydroxyvitamin D), and E (α- and γ-tocopherols), and β-carotene were measured in fasting blood samples. In the early OA group, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-13 concentrations were significantly (all p<0.05) increased. Circulating ascorbic acid, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, α- and γ-tocopherol's, and β-carotene concentrations were not significantly different between groups. Based on these preliminary results, we conclude that the systemic increase of inflammatory cytokines is not associated with a decrease in circulating micronutrients in subjects with early compared to advanced knee OA.

  19. Patterns of knee osteoarthritis in Arabian and American knees.

    PubMed

    Hodge, W Andrew; Harman, Melinda K; Banks, Scott A

    2009-04-01

    This study illustrates differences in the cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritic knees in patients with more frequent hyperflexion activities of daily living compared with Western patients. Proximal tibial articular cartilage wear and cruciate ligament condition were assessed in Saudi Arabian and North American patients with varus osteoarthritis undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) intact knees, there were significant differences in wear location, with a clearly more anterior pattern in Saudi Arabian knees. Complete ACL deficiency occurred in 25% of North American knees but only 14% of Saudi Arabian knees. These ACL-deficient knees showed the most severe cartilage wear in both groups and posterior medial wear patterns. Biomechanical descriptions of knee flexion and axial rotation during kneeling or squatting are consistent with the more pronounced anteromedial and posterolateral cartilage wear patterns observed on the Saudi Arabian knees. These observations provide insight into altered knee mechanics in 2 culturally different populations with different demands on knee flexion.

  20. Knee Joint Distraction Compared to Total Knee Arthroplasty for Treatment of End Stage Osteoarthritis: Simulating Long-Term Outcomes and Cost-Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, J. A. D.; Nair, S. C.; Custers, R. J. H.; van Laar, J. M.; Kuchuck, N. O.; Lafeber, F. P. J. G.; Welsing, P. M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective In end-stage knee osteoarthritis the treatment of choice is total knee arthroplasty (TKA). An alternative treatment is knee joint distraction (KJD), suggested to postpone TKA. Several studies reported significant and prolonged clinical improvement of KJD. To make an appropriate decision regarding the position of this treatment, a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis from healthcare perspective for different age and gender categories was performed. Methods A treatment strategy starting with TKA and a strategy starting with KJD for patients of different age and gender was simulated. To extrapolate outcomes to long-term health and economic outcomes a Markov (Health state) model was used. The number of surgeries, QALYs, and treatment costs per strategy were calculated. Costs-effectiveness is expressed using the cost-effectiveness plane and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Results Starting with KJD the number of knee replacing procedures could be reduced, most clearly in the younger age categories; especially revision surgery. This resulted in the KJD strategy being dominant (more effective with cost-savings) in about 80% of simulations (with only inferiority in about 1%) in these age categories when compared to TKA. At a willingness to pay of 20.000 Euro per QALY gained, the probability of starting with KJD to be cost-effective compared to starting with a TKA was already found to be over 75% for all age categories and over 90–95% for the younger age categories. Conclusion A treatment strategy starting with knee joint distraction for knee osteoarthritis has a large potential for being a cost-effective intervention, especially for the relatively young patient. PMID:27171268

  1. Early outcomes of twin-peg mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty compared with primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Z. C.; Lombardi, A. V.; Hurst, J. M.; Morris, M. J.; Adams, J. B.; Berend, K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Since redesign of the Oxford phase III mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) femoral component to a twin-peg design, there has not been a direct comparison to total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Thus, we explored differences between the two cohorts. Patients and Methods A total of 168 patients (201 knees) underwent medial UKA with the Oxford Partial Knee Twin-Peg. These patients were compared with a randomly selected group of 177 patients (189 knees) with primary Vanguard TKA. Patient demographics, Knee Society (KS) scores and range of movement (ROM) were compared between the two cohorts. Additionally, revision, re-operation and manipulation under anaesthesia rates were analysed. Results The mean follow-up for UKA and TKA groups was 5.4 and 5.5 years, respectively. Six TKA (3.2%) versus three UKAs (1.5%) were revised which was not significant (p = 0.269). Manipulation was more frequent after TKA (16; 8.5%) versus none in the UKA group (p < 0.001). UKA patients had higher post-operative KS function scores versus TKA patients (78 versus 66, p < 0.001) with a trend toward greater improvement, but there was no difference in ROM and KS clinical improvement (p = 0.382 and 0.420, respectively). Conclusion We found fewer manipulations, and higher functional outcomes for patients treated with medial mobile-bearing UKA compared with TKA. TKA had twice the revision rate as UKA although this did not reach statistical significance with the numbers available. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(10 Suppl B):28–33. PMID:27694513

  2. Exercise in children with joint hypermobility syndrome and knee pain: a randomised controlled trial comparing exercise into hypermobile versus neutral knee extension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee pain in children with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) is traditionally managed with exercise, however the supporting evidence for this is scarce. No trial has previously examined whether exercising to neutral or into the hypermobile range affects outcomes. This study aimed to (i) determine if a physiotherapist-prescribed exercise programme focused on knee joint strength and control is effective in reducing knee pain in children with JHS compared to no treatment, and (ii) whether the range in which these exercises are performed affects outcomes. Methods A prospective, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial conducted in a tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia compared an 8 week exercise programme performed into either the full hypermobile range or only to neutral knee extension, following a minimum 2 week baseline period without treatment. Randomisation was computer-generated, with allocation concealed by sequentially numbered opaque sealed envelopes. Knee pain was the primary outcome. Quality of life, thigh muscle strength, and function were also measured at (i) initial assessment, (ii) following the baseline period and (iii) post treatment. Assessors were blinded to the participants’ treatment allocation and participants blinded to the difference in the treatments. Results Children with JHS and knee pain (n=26) aged 7-16 years were randomly assigned to the hypermobile (n=12) or neutral (n=14) treatment group. Significant improvements in child-reported maximal knee pain were found following treatment, regardless of group allocation with a mean 14.5 mm reduction on the visual analogue scale (95% CI 5.2 – 23.8 mm, p=0.003). Significant differences between treatment groups were noted for parent-reported overall psychosocial health (p=0.009), specifically self-esteem (p=0.034), mental health (p=0.001) and behaviour (p=0.019), in favour of exercising into the hypermobile range (n=11) compared to neutral only (n=14). Conversely, parent

  3. Reduced knee hyperextension after wearing a robotic knee orthosis during gait training--a case study.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yurong; Lo, Wai Leung; Xu, Guangqing; Li, Leonard Sheungwai; Li, Le; Huang, Dongfeng

    2015-01-01

    This case study describes the effects of a wearable dynamic knee orthosis to supplement walking training in a patient suffering knee hyperextension. The subject was a 57-year old female who was 3.5 years post-brain tumor surgery. She was presented with impaired right lower extremity muscle performance, increased lower extremity muscle tension, and right knee hyperextension. She reported pain at the right knee joint and tibialis anterior after 10 minutes of over-ground walk. Fifteen one-hour sessions of gait training with robotic knee orthosis (RKO) were provided an over 3 weeks period. The subject demonstrated improvement with right lower limb kinematic and kinetic measures of gait. Peak flexion degree and moment increased (from -4.99° to 13.47°, and from 0.18 Nm/kg to 0.20 Nm/kg respectively).Extension peak moment decreased from 1.03 Nm/kg to 0.53 Nm/kg. Knee joint force decreased from 0.68 N to 0.45 N. Ground reaction force (GRF) reduced from 11.06N to 10.11N. Berg Balance Scale (BBS) improved from 45/56 to 51/56. No difference was observed in Fugl-Meyer Assessment of the Lower limb (FMA-LE) scores. Gait training that integrates an intention-based RKO for correcting knee hyperextension can be clinically effective. The persistence and generalizability of these results need to be further investigated.

  4. Pre-radiographic MRI findings are associated with onset of knee symptoms: the most study

    PubMed Central

    Javaid, M. K.; Lynch, J. A.; Tolstykh, I.; Guermazi, A.; Roemer, F.; Aliabadi, P.; McCulloch, C.; Curtis, J.; Felson, D.; Lane, N. E.; Torner, J.; Nevitt, M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greater sensitivity to detect osteoarthritis (OA) damage than radiographs but it is uncertain which MRI findings in early OA are clinically important. We examined MRI abnormalities detected in knees without radiographic OA and their association with incident knee symptoms. Method Participants from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) without frequent knee symptoms (FKS) at baseline were eligible if they also lacked radiographic features of OA at baseline. At 15 months, knees that developed FKS were defined as cases while control knees were drawn from those that remained without FKS. Baseline MRIs were scored at each subregion for cartilage lesions (CARTs); osteophytes (OST); bone marrow lesions (BML) and cysts. We compared cases and controls using marginal logistic regression models, adjusting for age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI), previous injury and clinic site. Results 36 case knees and 128 control knees were analyzed. MRI damage was common in both cases and controls. The presence of a severe CART (P = 0.03), BML (P = 0.02) or OST (P = 0.02) in the whole knee joint was more common in cases while subchondral cysts did not differ significantly between cases and controls (P > 0.1). Case status at 15 months was predicted by baseline damage at only two locations; a BML in the lateral patella (P = 0.047) and at the tibial subspinous subregions (P = 0.01). Conclusion In knees without significant symptoms or radiographic features of OA, MRI lesions of OA in only a few specific locations preceded onset of clinical symptoms and suggest that changes in bone play a role in the early development of knee pain. Confirmation of these findings in other prospective studies of knee OA is warranted. PMID:19919856

  5. Immobilisation of the knee and ankle and its impact on drivers' braking times: a driving simulator study.

    PubMed

    Waton, A; Kakwani, R; Cooke, N J; Litchfield, D; Kok, D; Middleton, H; Irwin, L

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of right leg restriction at the knee, ankle or both, on a driver's braking times. Previous studies have not investigated the effects of knee restriction on braking performance. A total of 23 healthy drivers performed a series of emergency braking tests in a driving simulator in either an above-knee plaster cast, a below-knee cast, or in a knee brace with an increasing range of restriction. The study showed that total braking reaction time was significantly longer when wearing an above-knee plaster cast, a below-knee plaster cast or a knee brace fixed at 0°, compared with braking normally (p < 0.001). Increases in the time taken to move the foot from the accelerator to the brake accounted for some of the increase in the total braking reaction time. Unexpectedly, thinking time also increased with the level of restriction (p < 0.001). The increase in braking time with an above-knee plaster cast in this study would increase the stopping distance at 30 miles per hour by almost 3 m. These results suggest that all patients wearing any lower-limb plaster cast or knee brace are significantly impaired in their ability to perform an emergency stop. We suggest changes to the legislation to prevent patients from driving with lower-limb plaster casts or knee braces.

  6. Relationship of Knee Shear Force and Extensor Moment on Knee Translations in Females Performing Drop Landings: A Biplane Fluoroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Torry, Michael R.; Myers, Casey; Shelburne, Kevin B.; Peterson, Daniel; Giphart, J. Erik; Pennington, W. Wesley; Krong, Jacob P.; Woo, Savio L-Y.; Steadman, J. Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background Research has linked knee extensor moment and knee shear force to the non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury during the landing motion. However, how these biomechanical performance factors relate to knee translations in vivo it is not known as knee translations cannot be obtained with traditional motion capture techniques. The purpose of this study was to combine traditional motion capture with high-speed, biplane fluoroscopy imaging to determine relationships between knee extensor moment and knee shear force profiles with anterior and lateral tibial translations occurring during drop landing in females athletes. Methods 15 females performed drop landings from a height of 40 cm while being recorded using a high speed, biplane fluoroscopy system and simultaneously being recorded using surface marker motion capture techniques to estimate knee joint angle, reaction force and moment profiles. Findings No significant statistical relationships were observed between peak anterior or posterior knee shear force and peak anterior and lateral tibial translations; or, between peak knee extensor moment and peak anterior and lateral tibial translations. Although differences were noted in peak shear force (P = 0.02) and peak knee extensor moment (P < 0.001) after stratification into low and high shear force and moment cohorts, no differences were noted in anterior and lateral tibial translations (all P ≥ 0.18). Interpretation Females exhibiting high knee extensor moment and knee shear force during drop landings do not yield correspondingly high anterior and lateral tibial translations. PMID:21820780

  7. Gait patterns during different walking conditions in older adults with and without knee osteoarthritis--results from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seung-uk; Ling, Shari M; Schreiber, Catherine; Nesbitt, Mark; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2011-02-01

    Biomechanical analysis of lower extremity activities while walking at different speeds and in challenging conditions may help to identify specific gait patterns associated with knee osteoarthritis (knee-OA). We hypothesized that individuals with asymptomatic knee-OA have lower ankle activity, while individuals with symptomatic knee-OA have similar or higher ankle activity compared to individuals without knee-OA, and that such differences are enhanced during challenging gait tasks. We tested this hypothesis by examining gait characteristics in multiple gait tasks using data from 153 Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) participants (112 without knee-OA, 41 with knee-OA; 53-87 years, 52% women). All participants who could walk unassisted were evaluated in the BLSA gait lab while walking at self-selected speed (usual-walking), at maximum speed (fast-walking) and again at self-selected speed after 30-min of walking activities (usual-walking-after-30 min). Knee range of motion was lower for knee-OA participants in the fast-walking and usual-walking-after-30 min tasks (p<0.030). Ankle range of motion for symptomatic knee-OA was greater compared to asymptomatic knee-OA for all walking tasks (p<0.050). Symptomatic knee-OA had greater generative MWE of the ankle compared to asymptomatic knee-OA (p=0.034), while keeping similar absorptive MWE of the knee when compared to no-OA controls (p=0.151). Symptomatic knee-OA individuals seem to adapt an ankle kinematic gait pattern aimed at avoiding knee pain, by enhancing forward propulsion so to minimize knee joint load. Whether these conditions represent subsequent steps in the causal pathway from knee-OA to changes in gait is still not clear.

  8. Prospective Study of the Relation between Landing Biomechanics and Jumper's Knee.

    PubMed

    der Worp, H van; van der Does, H T D; Brink, M S; Zwerver, J; Hijmans, J M

    2016-03-01

    The literature on the relation between jump biomechanics and jumper's knee indicates that a jump with horizontal displacement poses a threat for developing jumper's knee. Subjects with jumper's knee have been shown to display a stiff landing pattern characterized by a small range of motion. However, up to now only cross-sectional studies have been conducted. 6 teams from sports involving repetitive landing were followed prospectively for 2 years. At baseline athletes performed the Landing Error Scoring System jump and 3D kinematics and kinetics were obtained. A comparison was made between subjects who developed jumper's knee and those who did not develop it. 3 subjects developed jumper's knee during the study. Leg stiffness during landing was high compared to the mean of the healthy controls. No common kinematic patterns could be identified in these 3 subjects. The results suggest that athletes with high leg stiffness during landing might have an increased risk for developing jumper's knee, yet this conclusion is based on a very small sample. Subjects who develop jumper's knee do not show a common landing technique. Further research is needed to investigate whether leg stiffness can be used to identify athletes at risk and as a target variable to be used in prevention. PMID:26701825

  9. Rotating platform knees did not improve patellar tracking: a prospective, randomized study of 240 primary total knee arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Pagnano, Mark W; Trousdale, Robert T; Stuart, Michael J; Hanssen, Arlen D; Jacofsky, David J

    2004-11-01

    Renewed interest in mobile-bearing total knee replacement designs has been generated by the concept of self alignment and the suggestion that those designs can accommodate small mismatches in the rotational position of the tibial and femoral components. Self alignment might improve patellar tracking, decrease the prevalence of lateral retinacular release and postoperative patellar tilt or subluxation, improve knee flexion, and improve patellofemoral function during daily activities such as stair climbing. This prospective randomized study of 240 patients used a single posterior-stabilized femoral component and included three groups of 80 patients: an all-polyethylene group, a modular metal-backed group, and a rotating platform tibia group. The prevalence of lateral retinacular release was 3.8% in each group. The prevalence of patellar tilt was 5% (all-polyethylene group), 7% (modular metal-backed group), and 11% (rotating platform group). Preoperative motion was not significantly different and both the 3-month flexion (112 degrees , 110 degrees , and 108 degrees ) and 1-year flexion (116 degrees , 117 degrees , and 115 degrees ) were not significantly different among the all-polyethylene, modular metal-backed, and rotating platform groups, respectively. Preoperative stair climbing scores were not significantly different and both the 3-month (38, 41, and 35 points) and 1-year (44, 46, and 42 points) scores were not significantly different. In this prospective randomized study, the rotating platform knee design did not decrease the prevalence of lateral retinacular release or patellar tilt or subluxation and did not increase knee flexion or improve stair climbing ability at 3 months or at 1 year postoperatively when compared with a posterior-stabilized, fixed-bearing knee.

  10. Displacement of the medial meniscus within the passive motion characteristics of the human knee joint: an RSA study in human cadaver knees.

    PubMed

    Tienen, T G; Buma, P; Scholten, J G F; van Kampen, A; Veth, R P H; Verdonschot, N

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this study was to validate an in vitro human cadaver knee-joint model for the evaluation of the meniscal movement during knee-joint flexion. The question was whether our model showed comparable meniscal displacements to those found in earlier meniscal movement studies in vivo. Furthermore, we determined the influence of tibial torque on the meniscal displacement during knee-joint flexion. Three tantalum beads were inserted in the medial meniscus of six human-cadaver joints. The knee joints were placed and loaded in a loading apparatus, and the movements of the beads were determined by means of RSA during knee-joint flexion and extension with and without internal tibial (IT) and external tibial (ET) torque. During flexion without tibial torque, all menisci moved in posterior and lateral direction. The anterior horn showed significantly greater excursions than the posterior horn in both posterior and lateral direction. Internal tibial torque caused an anterior displacement of the pathway on the tibial plateau. External tibial torque caused a posterior displacement of the pathway. External tibial torque restricted the meniscal displacement during the first 30 degrees of knee-joint flexion. The displacements of the meniscus in this experiment were similar to the displacements described in the in vivo MRI studies. Furthermore, the application of tibial torque confirmed the relative immobility of the posterior horn of the meniscus. During external tibial torque, the posterior displacement of the pathway on the tibial plateau during the first 30 degrees of flexion might be restricted by the attached knee-joint capsule or the femoral condyle. This model revealed representative meniscal displacements during simple knee-joint flexion and also during the outer limits of passive knee-joint motion.

  11. Comparing different data collection and analysis techniques for quantifying healthy knee joint function during stair ascent and descent.

    PubMed

    Whatling, G M; Evans, S L; Holt, C A

    2009-11-01

    There is currently no standard data collection or analysis method for the assessment of stair gait using motion analysis. This makes the comparison of results from different studies difficult. It is important to gain an appreciation of the discrepancies in kinematic and kinetic information generated by employing different computational approaches, as these differences may be critical in cases where methodologies were to change over a long-term study. This study explores the effect of using different methodologies for the assessment of non-pathological knee function of ten subjects during stair ascent and descent. Two methods of computing knee kinematics were compared: (a) using in-house software and a pointer method of anatomical calibration and (b) using commercial software, Visual3D (C-motion, Inc.) and skin-mounted markers. Significant differences were found between the two methods when calculating a frontal plane range of motion (p < 0.05). Three methods of computing knee moments were compared. Knee moments computed using the inverse dynamic analysis (IDA) approach of Visual3D (C-motion, Inc.) were significantly different (p < 0.05) to those calculated using in-house IDA software that ignores the foot and ankle and to those computed using a vector cross-product approach. This study highlights the implications of comparing data generated from different collection and analysis methods.

  12. Comparative gravimetric wear analysis in mobile versus fixed-bearing posterior stabilized total knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Delport, Hendrik P; Sloten, Jos Vander; Bellemans, Johan

    2010-06-01

    Polyethylene (PE) wear is the limiting factor for the longevity of a conventional total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Excessive wear leads to loosening and eventual implant failure. The aim of our in vitro study was to investigate wear of a PE tibial insert on a rotating platform as compared to the same insert fixed to the tibial baseplate and articulating with a similar femoral component. All tests were performed at Endolab Laboratories, Rosenheim, Germany using a knee joint simulator following ISO 14243-1. Three specific configurations were tested and compared to a loaded soak control: (1) the rotating platform using machined polyethylene (PE), (2) fixed bearing using machined PE, (3) fixed bearing using compression-moulded PE. Calf serum with a high protein concentration of 30 g/l was chosen as test lubricant. PE wear was measured gravimetrically using the ISO 14243-2 protocol. The total wear rates found for all systems tested were low. The mean wear rate was 1.40 mg per million cycles for the moulded fixed bearing, 4.07 mg per million cycles for the machined fixed bearing type and 0.82 mg per million cycles for the machined rotating platform bearing type. We conclude that the TKA system we tested (Performance, Biomet, Warsaw, IND, USA) demonstrated very low gravimetric wear. The wear rate of the same implant in the fixed mode compared to the rotating platform mode was four times higher.

  13. Relationship of anterior knee laxity to knee translations during drop landings: a bi-plane fluoroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Myers, C.; Pennington, W. W.; Shelburne, K. B.; Krong, J. P.; Giphart, J. E.; Steadman, J. R.; Woo, Savio L-Y

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Passive anterior knee laxity has been linked to non-contact ACL injury risk. High deceleration movements have been implicated in the non-contact ACL injury mechanism, and evidence suggests that greater anterior tibial translations (ATT) may occur in healthy knees that are lax compared to a tight knee. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between anterior knee laxity scores and ATT during drop landings using biplane fluoroscopy. Methods Sixteen healthy adults (10 women; 6 men) performed stiff drop landings (40 cm) while being filmed using a high-speed, biplane fluoroscopy system. Initial, peak and excursions for rotations and translations were calculated and regression analysis used to determine the 6DoF kinematic relationships with KT1000 scores with peak ATT occurring during the landing. Results KT1000 values were (+) correlated with peak ATT values for group (r = 0.89; P < 0.0001) and both genders (males, r = 0.97; P = 0.0003; females, r = 0.93; P = < 0.0001). Regression analysis yielded a significant linear fit for the group (r2 = 0.80; YATT-group = −0.516 + 1.2 × XKT1000-group) and for each gender (females: r2 = 0.86; YATT-females = 0.074 + 1.2 × XKT1000-females and males: r2 = 0.94; YATT-males = −0.79 + 1.2 × XKT1000-males). Conclusion A strong relationship was observed between passive anterior knee laxity measured via KT1000 and peak ATT experienced during dynamic activity in otherwise healthy persons performing a stiff drop-landing motion. PMID:21153545

  14. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W.; Arokoski, Jari P.; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T.; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level. PMID:26926836

  15. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study.

    PubMed

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W; Arokoski, Jari P; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level. PMID:26926836

  16. Quantitative, Comparative Assessment of Gait Between Single-Radius and Multi-Radius Total Knee Arthroplasty Designs.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Bethany; Jacofsky, Marc C; Jacofsky, David J

    2015-06-01

    Gait of single-radius (SR, n=16) and multi-radius (MR, n=16) posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasties was compared, along with controls (n=16), pre-op and 1 year post-op. Computer navigation and standard order sets controlled confounding variables. Post-operatively, SR knees did not differ from controls while MR knees continued to differ in important knee kinetic and kinematic properties. MR knees remained more extended (P=0.019) and had decreased power absorption (P=0.0001) during weight acceptance compared to the SR knees. Both surgical groups had similar KSS for Knee Scores (P=0.22) and Function Scores (P=0.58). The significant biomechanical differences are likely influenced by patella-femoral moment arm geometry and changing ligament laxity throughout the active range of motion.

  17. Knee Kinematics Estimation Using Multi-Body Optimisation Embedding a Knee Joint Stiffness Matrix: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Richard, Vincent; Lamberto, Giuliano; Lu, Tung-Wu; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Dumas, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    The use of multi-body optimisation (MBO) to estimate joint kinematics from stereophotogrammetric data while compensating for soft tissue artefact is still open to debate. Presently used joint models embedded in MBO, such as mechanical linkages, constitute a considerable simplification of joint function, preventing a detailed understanding of it. The present study proposes a knee joint model where femur and tibia are represented as rigid bodies connected through an elastic element the behaviour of which is described by a single stiffness matrix. The deformation energy, computed from the stiffness matrix and joint angles and displacements, is minimised within the MBO. Implemented as a "soft" constraint using a penalty-based method, this elastic joint description challenges the strictness of "hard" constraints. In this study, estimates of knee kinematics obtained using MBO embedding four different knee joint models (i.e., no constraints, spherical joint, parallel mechanism, and elastic joint) were compared against reference kinematics measured using bi-planar fluoroscopy on two healthy subjects ascending stairs. Bland-Altman analysis and sensitivity analysis investigating the influence of variations in the stiffness matrix terms on the estimated kinematics substantiate the conclusions. The difference between the reference knee joint angles and displacements and the corresponding estimates obtained using MBO embedding the stiffness matrix showed an average bias and standard deviation for kinematics of 0.9±3.2° and 1.6±2.3 mm. These values were lower than when no joint constraints (1.1±3.8°, 2.4±4.1 mm) or a parallel mechanism (7.7±3.6°, 1.6±1.7 mm) were used and were comparable to the values obtained with a spherical joint (1.0±3.2°, 1.3±1.9 mm). The study demonstrated the feasibility of substituting an elastic joint for more classic joint constraints in MBO.

  18. Gender difference in symptomatic radiographic knee osteoarthritis in the Knee Clinical Assessment – CAS(K): A prospective study in the general population

    PubMed Central

    Lacey, Rosie J; Thomas, Elaine; Duncan, Rachel C; Peat, George

    2008-01-01

    Background A recent study of adults aged ≥50 years reporting knee pain found an excess of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (knee ROA) in symptomatic males compared to females. This was independent of age, BMI and other clinical signs and symptoms. Since this finding contradicts many previous studies, our objective was to explore four possible explanations for this gender difference: X-ray views, selection, occupation and non-articular conditions. Methods A community-based prospective study. 819 adults aged ≥50 years reporting knee pain in the previous 12 months were recruited by postal questionnaires to a research clinic involving plain radiography (weight-bearing posteroanterior semiflexed, supine skyline and lateral views), clinical interview and physical examination. Any knee ROA, ROA severity, tibiofemoral joint osteoarthritis (TJOA) and patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis (PJOA) were defined using all three radiographic views. Occupational class was derived from current or last job title. Proportions of each gender with symptomatic knee ROA were expressed as percentages, stratified by age; differences between genders were expressed as percentage differences with 95% confidence intervals. Results 745 symptomatic participants were eligible and had complete X-ray data. Males had a higher occurrence (77%) of any knee ROA than females (61%). In 50–64 year olds, the excess in men was mild knee OA (particularly PJOA); in ≥65 year olds, the excess was both mild and moderate/severe knee OA (particularly combined TJOA/PJOA). This male excess persisted when using the posteroanterior view only (64% vs. 52%). The lowest level of participation in the clinic was symptomatic females aged 65+. Within each occupational class there were more males with symptomatic knee ROA than females. In those aged 50–64 years, non-articular conditions were equally common in both genders although, in those aged 65+, they occurred more frequently in symptomatic females (41%) than

  19. Attitudes to knee osteoarthritis and total knee replacement in Arab women: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) is offered to patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the oil-rich countries in the Gulf region without adequate understanding of their perceptions, preferences or pain experiences. This study aimed to explore the pain experience and mobility limitation as well as the patient’s decision making process to undertake TKA among women with knee pain in the waiting list for surgery. Methods Five focus group discussions were conducted comprised of 39 women with severe knee OA from the waiting list for TKA in the only orthopaedic hospital in Kuwait. Discussions were recorded, transcribed and coded for themes to identify the factors considered to be important in decision-making for TKA. Results Experiencing knee pain was central to daily living and affected patients and their families. Mobility limitation was shaped by a strong sense of expected obligation to take care of the family. Two major sources of TKA delay were identified; one was due to late clinical advice to undergo TKA which was the result of receiving several consultations from different clinicians each of whom tried the medical management for OA. The second delay occurred after the clinical advice for TKA and was mainly due to ambivalence of patients because of fear of the operation and the lack of information about TKA that resulted in unclear expectations of the surgery. Conclusions Both verbal and written information about TKA should be provided as part of preoperative rehabilitation. This is critical to improve doctor-patient interactions and facilitate informed decision about the procedure and thus achieve patient-centered healthcare. PMID:24107658

  20. Squat exercise to estimate knee megaprosthesis rehabilitation: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lovecchio, Nicola; Zago, Matteo; Sciumè, Luciana; Lopresti, Maurizio; Sforza, Chiarella

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated a specific rehabilitation protocol using a half squat after total knee reconstruction with distal femur megaprosthesis and tibial allograft-prosthesis composite. [Subject and Methods] Squat execution was recorded by a three-dimensional system before and after a specific rehabilitation program on a 28-year-old patient. Squat duration, body center of mass trajectory, and vertical range of motion were determined. Step width and joint angles and symmetry (hip flexion, extension, and rotation, knee flexion, and ankle dorsal and plantar flexion) were estimated. Knee and hip joint symmetry was computed using a bilateral cyclogram technique. [Results] After rehabilitation, the squat duration was longer (75%), step width was similar, and vertical displacement was higher. Hip flexion increased by over 20%, and ankle dorsiflexion diminished by 14%. The knee had the highest symmetry gain (4.1–3.4%). Angle-angle plot subtended areas decreased from 108° to 40°2 (hip) and from 204° to 85°2 (knee), showing improvement in movement symmetry. [Conclusion] We concluded that the squat is an effective multifactorial exercise to estimate rehabilitation outcomes after megaprosthesis, also considering that compressive and shear forces are minimal up to 60–70° of knee flexion. PMID:26311992

  1. A study of Chinese knee joint geometry for prosthesis design.

    PubMed

    Wang, S W; Feng, C H; Lu, H S

    1992-03-01

    This study for the first time provides the geometric parameters of the knee joint of Chinese, which is indispensible to the design of knee prosthesis used for compatriotic patients. Thirty-five items, including linear, radial and angular measurements, were taken from 105 cadaveric knees and knee X-ray films of 1,100 subjects. The method and calculation for proper correction of the X-ray image magnification and joint cartilage space was established. Correlation was found to exist between the X-ray correction coefficients and the body weight, which formed the basis for individualized correction of X-ray measurements. Statistical analysis revealed that most of the linear and radial measurements were highly related while the angular measurements were independent of others. Principal component analysis showed that the width of femoral condyle might be taken as the leading index in determining the dimension of the knee, and regression functions were established to supply the serial parameters for prosthetic design. Multivariate discriminate functions could aid the selection of knee prosthesis.

  2. Squat exercise to estimate knee megaprosthesis rehabilitation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lovecchio, Nicola; Zago, Matteo; Sciumè, Luciana; Lopresti, Maurizio; Sforza, Chiarella

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated a specific rehabilitation protocol using a half squat after total knee reconstruction with distal femur megaprosthesis and tibial allograft-prosthesis composite. [Subject and Methods] Squat execution was recorded by a three-dimensional system before and after a specific rehabilitation program on a 28-year-old patient. Squat duration, body center of mass trajectory, and vertical range of motion were determined. Step width and joint angles and symmetry (hip flexion, extension, and rotation, knee flexion, and ankle dorsal and plantar flexion) were estimated. Knee and hip joint symmetry was computed using a bilateral cyclogram technique. [Results] After rehabilitation, the squat duration was longer (75%), step width was similar, and vertical displacement was higher. Hip flexion increased by over 20%, and ankle dorsiflexion diminished by 14%. The knee had the highest symmetry gain (4.1-3.4%). Angle-angle plot subtended areas decreased from 108° to 40°(2) (hip) and from 204° to 85°(2) (knee), showing improvement in movement symmetry. [Conclusion] We concluded that the squat is an effective multifactorial exercise to estimate rehabilitation outcomes after megaprosthesis, also considering that compressive and shear forces are minimal up to 60-70° of knee flexion.

  3. Qualitative Study Exploring the Meaning of Knee Symptoms to Adults Ages 35–65 Years

    PubMed Central

    Sale, Joanna; Badley, Elizabeth M.; Jaglal, Susan B.; Davis, Aileen M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective While osteoarthritis (OA) has mainly been viewed as a disease affecting older people, its prevalence in younger adults is substantial. However, there is limited research on how younger adults understand knee symptoms. This article explores the meaning of knee symptoms to adults ages 35–65 years. Methods This qualitative study comprised 6 focus groups and 10 one‐on‐one interviews with 51 participants (median age 49, 61% female), who self‐reported knee OA or reported knee symptoms (i.e., pain, aching, or stiffness) on most days of the past month. Constructivist grounded theory guided the sampling, data collection, and analysis. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative method. Results Central to participants’ understanding of knee symptoms was the perception that symptoms were preventable, meaning that there was the potential to prevent the onset of symptoms and to alter the course of symptoms. This understanding was demonstrated in participants’ explanation of symptoms. Participants commented on the cause, prevention, and course of symptoms. Moreover, participants reflected on their experience with symptoms, indicating that symptoms made them feel older than their current age. However, they did not perceive their symptoms as normal or acceptable. Conclusion Participants interpreted knee symptoms as potentially preventable, suggesting that they may be open to primary and secondary prevention strategies. PMID:26238409

  4. Loss of neuromuscular control related to motion in the acutely ACL-injured knee: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Bonsfills, N; Gómez-Barrena, E; Raygoza, J J; Núñez, A

    2008-10-01

    Ligamentomuscular and muscular stretch reflexes are known to contribute to knee joint stability. After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, a more intense and adjusted muscular response is required to maintain joint stability, but this neuromuscular control of the knee has not been clearly proved. The aim of the study is to record electromyography (EMG) signal and muscular fibre length variations in quadriceps and hamstrings of the knee with and without ACL, and to analyze and integrate the ligament strain and the muscular reaction to forced anterior tibial translation (ATT). In 17 knees from 12 cats, EMG electrodes and ultrasonomicrometry crystals were inserted into four main periarticular muscles, with strain gauges on periarticular ligament insertions. Their output signal was compared before and after ACL surgical section in series of ATT (at 90 degrees and 30 degrees knee flexion), and also during knee flexion and extension. Linear regression analysis was performed between the EMG signal and muscular fibre length variations, and between the EMG signal and the strain on ligament insertions, in the search of this reflex neuromuscular response. In the ACL deficient knees, the studied muscles showed a poor adjustment to motion of EMG firing, inversely to controls. The muscle stretch reflexes showed poorer correlation with post-peak EMG activity than the ligaments. ATT control depended mainly on hamstrings activity in control knees, whereas in unstable knees, quadriceps activity was associated with more tibial translation. Acute ACL-deficient knees showed poor neuromuscular control with weak ligamentomuscular reflexes and no muscular stretch reflexes, suggesting the ineffectiveness of acute muscular reaction to provide early mechanical knee stabilization after injury.

  5. Importance of the different posterolateral knee static stabilizers: biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace; Marques de Almeida, Adriano; Serbino, José Wilson; da Mota Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative importance of the different static stabilizers of the posterolateral corner of the knee in cadavers. METHODS Tests were performed with the application of a varus and external rotation force to the knee in extension at 30 and 60 degrees of flexion using 10 cadaver knees. The forces were applied initially to an intact knee and then repeated after a selective sectioning of the ligaments into the following: section of the lateral collateral ligament; section of the lateral collateral ligament and the popliteofibular complex; and section of the lateral collateral ligament, the popliteofibular complex and the posterolateral capsule. The parameters studied were the angular deformity and stiffness when the knees were submitted to a 15 Newton-meter varus torque and a 6 Newton-meter external tibial torque. Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) and Tukey’s tests. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Our findings showed that the lateral collateral ligament was important in varus stability at 0, 30 and 60 degrees. The popliteofibular complex was the most important structure for external rotation stability at all angles of flexion and was also important for varus stability at 30 and 60 degrees. The posterolateral capsule was important for varus stability at 0 and 30 degrees and for external rotation stability in extension. Level of evidence: Level IV (cadaver study). PMID:20454502

  6. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the treatment of isolated knee chondral lesions: design of a randomised controlled pilot study comparing arthroscopic microfracture versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative mesenchymal stem cell injections

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Julien; Ford, Jon; Bates, Dan; Boyd, Richard; Hahne, Andrew; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cicuttini, Flavia; Huguenin, Leesa; Norsworthy, Cameron; Shah, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The management of intra-articular chondral defects in the knee remains a challenge. Inadequate healing in areas of weight bearing leads to impairment in load transmission and these defects predispose to later development of osteoarthritis. Surgical management of full thickness chondral defects include arthroscopic microfracture and when appropriate autologous chondrocyte implantation. This latter method however is technically challenging, and may not offer significant improvement over microfracture. Preclinical and limited clinical trials have indicated the capacity of mesenchymal stem cells to influence chondral repair. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a pilot randomised controlled trial comparing arthroscopic microfracture alone for isolated knee chondral defects versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative autologous adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell injections. Methods and analysis A pilot single-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. 40 participants aged 18–50 years, with isolated femoral condyle chondral defects and awaiting planned arthroscopic microfracture will be randomly allocated to a control group (receiving no additional treatment) or treatment group (receiving postoperative adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment). Primary outcome measures will include MRI assessment of cartilage volume and defects and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Secondary outcomes will include further MRI assessment of bone marrow lesions, bone area and T2 cartilage mapping, a 0–10 Numerical Pain Rating Scale, a Global Impression of Change score and a treatment satisfaction scale. Adverse events and cointerventions will be recorded. Initial outcome follow-up for publication of results will be at 12 months. Further annual follow-up to assess long-term differences between the two group will occur. Ethics and dissemination This trial has received prospective ethics approval through

  7. A Randomized controlled trial comparing patellar retention versus patellar resurfacing in primary total knee arthroplasty: 5–10 year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The primary purpose of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) was to compare knee-specific outcomes (stiffness, pain, function) between patellar retention and resurfacing up to 10 years after primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Secondarily, we compared re-operation rates. Methods 38 subjects with non-inflammatory arthritis were randomized at primary TKA surgery to receive patellar resurfacing (n = 21; Resurfaced group) or to retain their native patella (n = 17; Non-resurfaced group). Evaluations were performed preoperatively, one, five and 10 years postoperatively by an evaluator who was blinded to group allocation. Self-reported knee-specific stiffness, pain and function, the primary outcomes, were measured by the Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Revision rate was determined at each evaluation and through hospital record review. Results 30 (88%) and 23 (72%) of available subjects completed the five and 10-year review respectively. Knee-specific scores continued to improve for both groups over the 10-years, despite diminishing overall health with no significant group differences seen. All revisions occurred within five years of surgery (three Non-resurfaced subjects; one Resurfaced subject) (p = 0.31). Two revisions in the Non-resurfaced group were due to persistent anterior knee pain. Conclusions We found no differences in knee-specific results between groups at 5–10 years postoperatively. The Non-resurfaced group had two revisions due to anterior knee pain similar to rates reported in other studies. Knee-specific results provide useful postoperative information and should be used in future studies comparing patellar management strategies. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01500252 PMID:22676495

  8. Care-seeking behaviour of adolescents with knee pain: a population-based study among 504 adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee pain is common during adolescence. Adolescents and their parents may think that knee pain is benign and self-limiting and therefore avoid seeking medical care. However, long-term prognosis of knee pain is not favourable and treatment seems to offer greater reductions in pain compared to a “wait-and-see” approach. The purpose of this study was to describe the determinants of care-seeking behaviour among adolescents with current knee pain and investigate what types of treatment are initiated. Methods An online questionnaire was forwarded to 2,846 adolescents aged 15–19 in four upper secondary schools. The questionnaire contained questions on age, gender, height, weight, currently painful body regions, frequency of knee pain, health-related quality of life measured by the EuroQol 5-dimensions, sports participation and if they had sought medical care. Adolescents who reported current knee pain at least monthly or more frequently were telephoned. The adolescents were asked about pain duration, onset of knee pain (traumatic or insidious) and if they were currently being treated for their knee pain. Results 504 adolescents currently reported at least monthly knee pain. 59% of these had sought medical care and 18% were currently under medical treatment . A longer pain duration and higher pain severity increased the odds of seeking medical care. Females with traumatic onset of knee pain were more likely to have sought medical care than females with insidious onset of knee pain. Females with traumatic onset of knee pain and increased pain severity were more likely to be undergoing medical treatment. The most frequently reported treatments were the combination of exercises and orthotics (68% of those undergoing medical treatment). Conclusion Females with insidious onset of knee pain do not seek medical care as often as those with traumatic onset and adolescents of both genders with insidious onset are less likely to be under medical treatment. These

  9. Differences in injury pattern and prevalence of cartilage lesions in knee and ankle joints: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Aurich, Matthias; Hofmann, Gunther O; Rolauffs, Bernd; Gras, Florian

    2014-10-27

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is more common in the knee compared to the ankle joint. This can not be explained exclusively by anatomical and biomechanical differences. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare the injury pattern (clinically) and the cartilage lesions (arthroscopically) of knee and ankle joints in a cohort of patients from the same catchment area. A retrospective study of the clinical data of 3122 patients (2139 outpatients and 983 inpatients) was performed, who were treated due to an injury of the knee and ankle joint. Statistical analysis was performed using SigmaStat 3.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA). There is a higher prevalence of injuries in the ankle as compared to the knee joint in this population from the same catchment area. In contrast, high-grade cartilage lesions are more prevalent in the knee, whereas low grade cartilage lesions are equally distributed between knee and ankle. From this data it can be concluded that the frequency of injuries and the injury pattern of knee versus ankle joints do not correlate with the severity of cartilage lesions and may therefore have no direct influence on the differential incidence of OA in those two joints.

  10. Two Case Studies Related to Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hale, David

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Report on Two Case Studies related to Total Knee Arthroplasty Previously Discussed by AKS Members Methods: Case Series Case 1: A 76 year old woman requiring a right total knee replacement in the presence of marked dystrophic calcification affecting the quadriceps tendon on a background of having sustained a post operative quadriceps tendon rupture post left TKR in 2013 Case 2: Management issues related to performing a TKR in a 80 year old woman with a possible past history of TB affecting the joint Conclusion: Both procedures went smoothly and particularly as advice was given by AKS members, these are presented largely for feedback.

  11. Comparing the mechanical properties of the porcine knee meniscus when hydrated in saline versus synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Emily H; Kline, Courtney L; McFetridge, Peter S; Allen, Kyle D

    2015-12-16

    As research progresses to find a suitable knee meniscus replacement, accurate in vitro testing becomes critical for feasibility and comparison studies of mechanical integrity. Within the knee, the meniscus is bathed in synovial fluid, yet the most common hydration fluid in laboratory testing is phosphate buffered saline (PBS). PBS is a relatively simple salt solution, while synovial fluid is a complex non-Newtonian fluid with multiple lubricating factors. As such, PBS may interact with meniscal tissue differently than synovial fluid, and thus, the hydration fluid may be an important factor in obtaining accurate results during in vitro testing. To evaluate these effects, medial porcine menisci were used to evaluate tissue mechanics in tension (n=11) and compression (n=15). In all tests, two samples from the same meniscus were taken, where one sample was hydrated in PBS and the other was hydrated in synovial fluid. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the mean mechanical properties of samples tested in PBS compared to synovial fluid; however, compressive testing revealed the variability between samples was significantly reduced if samples were tested in synovial fluid. For example, the compressive Young׳s Modulus was 12.69±7.49MPa in PBS versus 12.34±4.27MPa in synovial fluid. These results indicate testing meniscal tissue in PBS will largely not affect the mean value of the mechanical properties, but performing compression testing in synovial fluid may provide more consistent results between samples and assist in reducing sample numbers in some experiments.

  12. Comparing the mechanical properties of the porcine knee meniscus when hydrated in saline versus synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Emily H; Kline, Courtney L; McFetridge, Peter S; Allen, Kyle D

    2015-12-16

    As research progresses to find a suitable knee meniscus replacement, accurate in vitro testing becomes critical for feasibility and comparison studies of mechanical integrity. Within the knee, the meniscus is bathed in synovial fluid, yet the most common hydration fluid in laboratory testing is phosphate buffered saline (PBS). PBS is a relatively simple salt solution, while synovial fluid is a complex non-Newtonian fluid with multiple lubricating factors. As such, PBS may interact with meniscal tissue differently than synovial fluid, and thus, the hydration fluid may be an important factor in obtaining accurate results during in vitro testing. To evaluate these effects, medial porcine menisci were used to evaluate tissue mechanics in tension (n=11) and compression (n=15). In all tests, two samples from the same meniscus were taken, where one sample was hydrated in PBS and the other was hydrated in synovial fluid. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the mean mechanical properties of samples tested in PBS compared to synovial fluid; however, compressive testing revealed the variability between samples was significantly reduced if samples were tested in synovial fluid. For example, the compressive Young׳s Modulus was 12.69±7.49MPa in PBS versus 12.34±4.27MPa in synovial fluid. These results indicate testing meniscal tissue in PBS will largely not affect the mean value of the mechanical properties, but performing compression testing in synovial fluid may provide more consistent results between samples and assist in reducing sample numbers in some experiments. PMID:26592438

  13. A 7-year study on risks and costs of knee injuries in male and female youth participants in 12 sports.

    PubMed

    de Loës, M; Dahlstedt, L J; Thomée, R

    2000-04-01

    Knee injuries are common and account in various sports for 15-50% of all sports injuries. The cost of knee injuries is therefore a large part of the cost for medical care of sports injuries. Furthermore, the risk of acquiring a knee injury during sports is considered higher for females than for males. The nationwide organization "Youth and Sports" represents the major source of organized sports and recreation for Swiss youth and engages annually around 370000 participants in the age group of 14 to 20 years. The purpose of this study was to combine data on knee injuries from two sources, the first being data on the exposure to risk found in the activity registration in "Youth and Sports" and the second injuries with their associated costs resulting from the activities and filed at the Swiss Military Insurance. This allowed calculation of knee injury incidences, to compare risks between males and females and to estimate the costs of medical treatment. The study comprises 3864 knee injuries from 12 sports during 7 years. Females were significantly more at risk in six sports: alpinism, downhill skiing, gymnastics, volleyball, basketball and team handball. The incidences of knee injuries and of cruciate ligament injuries in particular, together with the costs per hour of participation, all displayed the same sports as the top five for both females and males: ice hockey, team handball, soccer, downhill skiing and basketball. Female alpinism and gymnastics had also high rankings. Knee injuries comprised 10% of all injuries in males and 13% in females, but their proportional contribution to the costs per hour of participation was 27% and 33%, respectively. From this study it can be concluded that females were significantly more at risk for knee injuries than males in six sports and that knee injuries accounted for a high proportion of the costs of medical treatment.

  14. The High Prevalence of Knee Osteoarthritis in A Rural Chinese Population: The Wuchuan Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xiaozheng; Fransen, Marlene; Zhang, Yuqing; Li, Hu; Ke, Yan; Lu, Ming; Su, Steve; Song, Xiongying; Guo, Yong; Chen, Jie; Niu, Jingbo; Felson, David; Lin, Jianhao

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of radiographic and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a remote rural region of northern China and compare these with those reported in Beijing and data from the Framingham (Massachusetts, USA) cohort. Methods A population-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among 1030 residents of Wuchuan County, Inner Mongolia, aged 50 years and over. Survey participants, mostly farmers reporting heavy physical occupational activity, completed an interviewer-based questionnaire and obtained bilateral weight-bearing posterior-anterior semi-flexed knee radiographs. Results While the overall prevalence of radiographic knee OA was similar to that demonstrated in the Beijing OA study, men in Wuchuan had about double the prevalence of severe radiographic [prevalence ratio (PR) 2.5, 95% CI 1.6 to 3.8] and symptomatic knee OA (PR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3 to 2.9). Women in Wuchuan also had a higher prevalence of both severe radiographic (PR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0 to 2.0) and symptomatic knee OA (PR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2 to 2.1) compared with their Beijing counterparts. The prevalence of bilateral OA and lateral compartment disease were two to three times higher in both Chinese cohorts compared with estimates from the Framingham OA Study. Conclusions The prevalence of symptomatic knee OA in rural areas of China is much higher than reported from urban regions of China or in the Framingham cohort. The higher representation of bilateral and lateral compartment disease in China suggests a unique phenotype to OA. The findings will be useful to guide the distribution of future health care resources and preventive strategies. PMID:19405001

  15. Knee Kinematics Estimation Using Multi-Body Optimisation Embedding a Knee Joint Stiffness Matrix: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Vincent; Lamberto, Giuliano; Lu, Tung-Wu; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Dumas, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    The use of multi-body optimisation (MBO) to estimate joint kinematics from stereophotogrammetric data while compensating for soft tissue artefact is still open to debate. Presently used joint models embedded in MBO, such as mechanical linkages, constitute a considerable simplification of joint function, preventing a detailed understanding of it. The present study proposes a knee joint model where femur and tibia are represented as rigid bodies connected through an elastic element the behaviour of which is described by a single stiffness matrix. The deformation energy, computed from the stiffness matrix and joint angles and displacements, is minimised within the MBO. Implemented as a “soft” constraint using a penalty-based method, this elastic joint description challenges the strictness of “hard” constraints. In this study, estimates of knee kinematics obtained using MBO embedding four different knee joint models (i.e., no constraints, spherical joint, parallel mechanism, and elastic joint) were compared against reference kinematics measured using bi-planar fluoroscopy on two healthy subjects ascending stairs. Bland-Altman analysis and sensitivity analysis investigating the influence of variations in the stiffness matrix terms on the estimated kinematics substantiate the conclusions. The difference between the reference knee joint angles and displacements and the corresponding estimates obtained using MBO embedding the stiffness matrix showed an average bias and standard deviation for kinematics of 0.9±3.2° and 1.6±2.3 mm. These values were lower than when no joint constraints (1.1±3.8°, 2.4±4.1 mm) or a parallel mechanism (7.7±3.6°, 1.6±1.7 mm) were used and were comparable to the values obtained with a spherical joint (1.0±3.2°, 1.3±1.9 mm). The study demonstrated the feasibility of substituting an elastic joint for more classic joint constraints in MBO. PMID:27314586

  16. A Yoga Strengthening Program Designed to Minimize the Knee Adduction Moment for Women with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Proof-Of-Principle Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    People with knee osteoarthritis may benefit from exercise prescriptions that minimize knee loads in the frontal plane. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether a novel 12-week strengthening program designed to minimize exposure to the knee adduction moment (KAM) could improve symptoms and knee strength in women with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. A secondary objective was to determine whether the program could improve mobility and fitness, and decrease peak KAM during gait. The tertiary objective was to evaluate the biomechanical characteristics of this yoga program. In particular, we compared the peak KAM during gait with that during yoga postures at baseline. We also compared lower limb normalized mean electromyography (EMG) amplitudes during yoga postures between baseline and follow-up. Primary measures included self-reported pain and physical function (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score) and knee strength (extensor and flexor torques). Secondary measures included mobility (six-minute walk, 30-second chair stand, stair climbing), fitness (submaximal cycle ergometer test), and clinical gait analysis using motion capture synchronized with electromyography and force measurement. Also, KAM and normalized mean EMG amplitudes were collected during yoga postures. Forty-five women over age 50 with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, consistent with the American College of Rheumatology criteria, enrolled in our 12-week (3 sessions per week) program. Data from 38 were analyzed (six drop-outs; one lost to co-intervention). Participants experienced reduced pain (mean improvement 10.1–20.1 normalized to 100; p<0.001), increased knee extensor strength (mean improvement 0.01 Nm/kg; p = 0.004), and increased flexor strength (mean improvement 0.01 Nm/kg; p = 0.001) at follow-up compared to baseline. Participants improved mobility on the six-minute walk (mean improvement 37.7 m; p<0.001) and 30-second chair stand (mean improvement 1.3; p = 0.006) at

  17. Better survival of hybrid total knee arthroplasty compared to cemented arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Petursson, Gunnar; Fenstad, Anne Marie; Havelin, Leif Ivar; Gøthesen, Øystein; Lygre, Stein Håkon Låstad; Röhrl, Stephan M; Furnes, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — There have been few comparative studies on total knee replacement (TKR) with cemented tibia and uncemented femur (hybrid TKR). Previous studies have not shown any difference in revision rate between cemented and hybrid fixation, but these studies had few hybrid prostheses. We have evaluated the outcome of hybrid TKR based on data from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR). Patients and methods — We compared 4,585 hybrid TKRs to 20,095 cemented TKRs with risk of revision for any cause as the primary endpoint. We included primary TKRs without patella resurfacing that were reported to the NAR during the years 1999–2012. To minimize the possible confounding effect of prosthesis brands, only brands that were used both as hybrids and cemented in more than 200 cases were included. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression analysis were done with adjustment for age, sex, and preoperative diagnosis. To include death as a competing risk, cumulative incidence function estimates were calculated. Results — Estimated survival at 11 years was 94.3% (95% CI: 93.9–94.7) in the cemented TKR group and 96.3% (CI: 95.3–97.3) in the hybrid TKR group. The adjusted Cox regression analysis showed a lower risk of revision in the hybrid group (relative risk = 0.58, CI: 0.48–0.72, p < 0.001). The hybrid group included 3 brands of prostheses: LCS classic, LCS complete, and Profix. Profix hybrid TKR had lower risk of revision than cemented TKR, but the LCS classic and LCS complete did not. Kaplan-Meier estimated survival at 11 years was 96.8% (CI: 95.6–98.0) in the hybrid Profix group and 95.2% (CI: 94.6–95.8) in the cemented Profix group. Mean operating time was 17 min longer in the cemented group. Interpretation — Survivorship of the hybrid TKR at 11 years was better than that for cemented TKR, or the same, depending on the brand of prosthesis. Hybrid fixation appears to be a safe and time-efficient alternative to cemented fixation in

  18. Medial Compartment Decompression by Fibular Osteotomy to Treat Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zong-You; Chen, Wei; Li, Cun-Xiang; Wang, Juan; Shao, De-Cheng; Hou, Zhi-Yong; Gao, Shi-Jun; Wang, Fei; Li, Ji-Dong; Hao, Jian-Dong; Chen, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-12-01

    Compared with high tibial osteotomy and total knee arthroplasty, the authors found a simpler surgical procedure, partial fibular osteotomy, could effectively relieve knee pain and also correct the varus deformity for patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA). From January 1996 to April 2012, a total of 156 patients with medial compartment OA were treated by proximal fibular osteotomy in the authors' hospital. A 2-cm-long section of fibula was resected 6 to 10 cm below the fibular head. A total of 110 patients with follow-up of more than 2 years were included in the study, including 34 males and 76 females with an average age of 59.2 years. Anteroposterior and lateral weight-bearing radiographs, the femorotibial angle (FTA) and lateral joint space, and the American Knee Society Score (KSS) and the visual analog scale (VAS) score of the knee joint were evaluated preoperatively and at final follow-up, respectively. At final follow-up, mean FTA and lateral joint space were 179.4°±1.8° and 6.9±0.7 mm, respectively, which were significantly smaller than those measured preoperatively (182.7°±2.0° and 12.2±1.1 mm, respectively; both P<.001). Mean KSS at final follow-up was 92.3±31.7, significantly higher than the mean preoperative score of 45.0±21.3 (P<.001). Mean VAS score and interquartile range were 2.0 and 2.0, significantly lower than the preoperative data (7 and 1.0, respectively; P<.001). The authors found that proximal fibular osteotomy can significantly improve both the radiographic appearance and function of the affected knee joint and also achieve long-term pain relief. This procedure may be an alternative treatment option for medial compartment OA.

  19. Medial Compartment Decompression by Fibular Osteotomy to Treat Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zong-You; Chen, Wei; Li, Cun-Xiang; Wang, Juan; Shao, De-Cheng; Hou, Zhi-Yong; Gao, Shi-Jun; Wang, Fei; Li, Ji-Dong; Hao, Jian-Dong; Chen, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-12-01

    Compared with high tibial osteotomy and total knee arthroplasty, the authors found a simpler surgical procedure, partial fibular osteotomy, could effectively relieve knee pain and also correct the varus deformity for patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA). From January 1996 to April 2012, a total of 156 patients with medial compartment OA were treated by proximal fibular osteotomy in the authors' hospital. A 2-cm-long section of fibula was resected 6 to 10 cm below the fibular head. A total of 110 patients with follow-up of more than 2 years were included in the study, including 34 males and 76 females with an average age of 59.2 years. Anteroposterior and lateral weight-bearing radiographs, the femorotibial angle (FTA) and lateral joint space, and the American Knee Society Score (KSS) and the visual analog scale (VAS) score of the knee joint were evaluated preoperatively and at final follow-up, respectively. At final follow-up, mean FTA and lateral joint space were 179.4°±1.8° and 6.9±0.7 mm, respectively, which were significantly smaller than those measured preoperatively (182.7°±2.0° and 12.2±1.1 mm, respectively; both P<.001). Mean KSS at final follow-up was 92.3±31.7, significantly higher than the mean preoperative score of 45.0±21.3 (P<.001). Mean VAS score and interquartile range were 2.0 and 2.0, significantly lower than the preoperative data (7 and 1.0, respectively; P<.001). The authors found that proximal fibular osteotomy can significantly improve both the radiographic appearance and function of the affected knee joint and also achieve long-term pain relief. This procedure may be an alternative treatment option for medial compartment OA. PMID:26652332

  20. Comparative Effects of Periarticular Multimodal Drug Injection and Single-Shot Femoral Nerve Block on Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty and Factors Influencing Their Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Kan, Hiroyuki; Hino, Manabu; Ichimaru, Shohei; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Amaya, Fumimasa; Sawa, Teiji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study compared the analgesic effects of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) and femoral nerve block (FNB) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and assessed factors associated with analgesia obtained by these two methods. Materials and Methods Study subjects included 66 patients (72 knees) who underwent TKA for osteoarthritis of the knee. Pain visual analogue scale (VAS), the amount of analgesics used, number of days to achieve 90° of flexion of the knee joint, date of initiating parallel-bar walking, range of motion of the knee joint at discharge, and adverse events were investigated. Results The VAS scores did not differ significantly between two groups, whereas the amount of analgesics used was significantly lower in the LIA group. Preoperative flexion contracture was significantly more severe in the LIA group with high VAS compared with low VAS. No serious adverse event occurred in the LIA or FNB group. Conclusions The lower analgesic usage in the LIA group than the FNB group indicates that the analgesic effect of LIA was greater than that of singleshot FNB after TKA. There were no serious complications in either group. The postoperative analgesic effect of LIA was smaller in patients with severe than less severe preoperative flexion contracture.

  1. Comparative Effects of Periarticular Multimodal Drug Injection and Single-Shot Femoral Nerve Block on Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty and Factors Influencing Their Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Kan, Hiroyuki; Hino, Manabu; Ichimaru, Shohei; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Amaya, Fumimasa; Sawa, Teiji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study compared the analgesic effects of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) and femoral nerve block (FNB) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and assessed factors associated with analgesia obtained by these two methods. Materials and Methods Study subjects included 66 patients (72 knees) who underwent TKA for osteoarthritis of the knee. Pain visual analogue scale (VAS), the amount of analgesics used, number of days to achieve 90° of flexion of the knee joint, date of initiating parallel-bar walking, range of motion of the knee joint at discharge, and adverse events were investigated. Results The VAS scores did not differ significantly between two groups, whereas the amount of analgesics used was significantly lower in the LIA group. Preoperative flexion contracture was significantly more severe in the LIA group with high VAS compared with low VAS. No serious adverse event occurred in the LIA or FNB group. Conclusions The lower analgesic usage in the LIA group than the FNB group indicates that the analgesic effect of LIA was greater than that of singleshot FNB after TKA. There were no serious complications in either group. The postoperative analgesic effect of LIA was smaller in patients with severe than less severe preoperative flexion contracture. PMID:27595078

  2. Agonist-antagonist active knee prosthesis: a preliminary study in level-ground walking.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Villalpando, Ernesto C; Herr, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    We present a powered knee prosthesis with two series-elastic actuators positioned in parallel in an agonist-antagonist arrangement. To motivate the knee's design, we developed a prosthetic knee model that comprises a variable damper and two series-elastic clutch units that span the knee joint. Using human gait data to constrain the model's joint to move biologically, we varied model parameters using an optimization scheme that minimized the sum over time of the squared difference between the model's joint torque and biological knee values. We then used these optimized values to specify the mechanical and control design of the prosthesis for level-ground walking. We hypothesized that a variable-impedance control design could produce humanlike knee mechanics during steady-state level-ground walking. As a preliminary evaluation of this hypothesis, we compared the prosthetic knee mechanics of an amputee walking at a self-selected gait speed with those of a weight- and height-matched nonamputee. We found qualitative agreement between prosthetic and human knee mechanics. Because the knee's motors never perform positive work on the knee joint throughout the level-ground gait cycle, the knee's electrical power requirement is modest in walking (8 W), decreasing the size of the onboard battery required to power the prosthesis.

  3. Biomechanical study of the tibia in knee replacement revision.

    PubMed

    Quílez, M P; Pérez, M A; Seral-García, B

    2015-01-01

    The best management of severe bone defects following total knee replacement is still controversial. Metal augments, tantalum cones and porous tibial sleeves could help the surgeon to manage any type of bone loss, providing a stable and durable knee joint reconstruction. Five different types of prostheses have been analysed: one prosthesis with straight stem; two prostheses with offset stem, with and without supplement, and two prostheses with sleeves, with and without stem. The purpose of this study is to report a finite element study of revision knee tibial implants. The main objective was to analyse the tibial bone density changes and Von Misses tension changes following different tibial implant designs. In all cases, the bone density decreases in the proximal epiphysis and medullary channels, with a bone density increase also being predicted in the diaphysis and at the bone around the stems tips. The highest value of Von Misses stress has been obtained for the straight tibial stem, and the lowest for the stemless metaphyseal sleeves prosthesis. PMID:25650079

  4. Biomechanical study of the tibia in knee replacement revision.

    PubMed

    Quílez, M P; Pérez, M A; Seral-García, B

    2015-01-01

    The best management of severe bone defects following total knee replacement is still controversial. Metal augments, tantalum cones and porous tibial sleeves could help the surgeon to manage any type of bone loss, providing a stable and durable knee joint reconstruction. Five different types of prostheses have been analysed: one prosthesis with straight stem; two prostheses with offset stem, with and without supplement, and two prostheses with sleeves, with and without stem. The purpose of this study is to report a finite element study of revision knee tibial implants. The main objective was to analyse the tibial bone density changes and Von Misses tension changes following different tibial implant designs. In all cases, the bone density decreases in the proximal epiphysis and medullary channels, with a bone density increase also being predicted in the diaphysis and at the bone around the stems tips. The highest value of Von Misses stress has been obtained for the straight tibial stem, and the lowest for the stemless metaphyseal sleeves prosthesis.

  5. Variable stiffness actuated prosthetic knee to restore knee buckling during stance: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Wentink, E C; Koopman, H F J M; Stramigioli, S; Rietman, J S; Veltink, P H

    2013-06-01

    Most modern intelligent knee prosthesis use dampers to modulate dynamic behavior and prevent excessive knee flexion, but they dissipate energy and do not assist in knee extension. Energy efficient variable stiffness control (VSA) can reduce the energy consumption yet effectively modulate the dynamic behavior and use stored energy during flexion to assist in subsequent extension. A principle design of energy efficient VSA in a prosthetic knee is proposed and analyzed for the specific case of rejection of a disturbed stance phase. The concept is based on the principle that the output stiffness of a spring can be changed without changing the energy stored in the elastic elements of the spring. The usability of this concept to control a prosthetic knee is evaluated using a model. Part of the stance phase of the human leg was modeled by a double pendulum. Specifically the rejection of a common disturbance of transfemoral prosthetic gait, an unlocked knee at heel strike, was evaluated. The ranges of spring stiffnesses were determined such that the angular characteristics of a normal stance phase were preserved, but disturbances could also be rejected. The simulations predicted that energy efficient VSA can be useful for the control of prosthetic knees. PMID:23000012

  6. A Study of Knee Joint Kinematics and Mechanics using a Human FE Model.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Yuichi; Hasegawa, Junji; Yasuki, Tsuyoshi; Iwamoto, Masami; Miki, Kazuo

    2005-11-01

    Posterior translation of the tibia with respect to the femur can stretch the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Fifteen millimeters of relative displacement between the femur and tibia is known as the Injury Assessment Reference Value (IARV) for the PCL injury. Since the anterior protuberance of the tibial plateau can be the first site of contact when the knee is flexed, the knee bolster is generally designed with an inclined surface so as not to directly load the projection in frontal crashes. It should be noted, however, that the initial flexion angle of the occupant knee can vary among individuals and the knee flexion angle can change due to the occupant motion. The behavior of the tibial protuberance related to the knee flexion angle has not been described yet. The instantaneous angle of the knee joint at the timing of restraining the knee should be known to manage the geometry and functions of knee restraint devices. The purposes of this study are first to understand the kinematics of the knee joint during flexion, and second to characterize the mechanics of the knee joint under anterior-posterior loading. A finite element model of the knee joint, extracted from the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS), was used to analyze the mechanism. The model was validated against kinematics and mechanical responses of the human knee joint. By tracking the relative positions and angles between the patella and the tibia in a knee flexing simulation, the magnitude of the tibial anterior protuberance was described as a function of the knee joint angle. The model revealed that the mechanics of the knee joint was characterized as a combination of stiffness of the patella-femur structure and the PCL It was also found that the magnitude of the tibial anterior protuberance determined the amount of initial stretch of the PCL in anterior-posterior loading. Based on the knee joint kinematics and mechanics, an interference boundary was proposed for different knee flexion angles, so

  7. The epidemiology of revision total knee and hip arthroplasty in England and Wales: a comparative analysis with projections for the United States. A study using the National Joint Registry dataset.

    PubMed

    Patel, A; Pavlou, G; Mújica-Mota, R E; Toms, A D

    2015-08-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) are recognised and proven interventions for patients with advanced arthritis. Studies to date have demonstrated a steady increase in the requirement for primary and revision procedures. Projected estimates made for the United States show that by 2030 the demand for primary TKA will grow by 673% and for revision TKA by 601% from the level in 2005. For THA the projected estimates are 174% and 137% for primary and revision surgery, respectively. The purpose of this study was to see if those predictions were similar for England and Wales using data from the National Joint Registry and the Office of National Statistics. Analysis of data for England and Wales suggest that by 2030, the volume of primary and revision TKAs will have increased by 117% and 332%, respectively between 2012 and 2030. The data for the United States translates to a 306% cumulative rate of increase between 2012 and 2030 for revision surgery, which is similar to our predictions for England and Wales. The predictions from the United States for primary TKA were similar to our upper limit projections. For THA, we predicted an increase of 134% and 31% for primary and revision hip surgery, respectively. Our model has limitations, however, it highlights the economic burden of arthroplasty in the future in England and Wales as a real and unaddressed problem. This will have significant implications for the provision of health care and the management of orthopaedic services in the future. PMID:26224824

  8. Do Knee Moments Normalized to Measures of Knee Cartilage Area Better Classify the Severity of Knee Osteoarthritis?

    PubMed

    Brisson, Nicholas M; Stratford, Paul W; Totterman, Saara; Tamez-Peña, José G; Beattie, Karen A; Adachi, Jonathan D; Maly, Monica R

    2015-12-01

    Investigations of joint loading in knee osteoarthritis (OA) typically normalize the knee adduction moment to global measures of body size (eg, body mass, height) to allow comparison between individuals. However, such measurements may not reflect knee size. This study used a morphometric measurement of the cartilage surface area on the medial tibial plateau, which better represents medial knee size. This study aimed to determine whether normalizing the peak knee adduction moment and knee adduction moment impulse during gait to the medial tibial bone-cartilage interface could classify radiographic knee OA severity more accurately than traditional normalization techniques. Individuals with mild (N = 22) and severe (N = 17) radiographic knee OA participated. The medial tibial bone-cartilage interface was quantified from magnetic resonance imaging scans. Gait analysis was performed, and the peak knee adduction moment and knee adduction moment impulse were calculated in nonnormalized units and normalized to body mass, body weight × height, and the medial tibial bone-cartilage interface. Receiver operating characteristic curves compared the ability of each knee adduction moment normalization technique to classify participants according to radiographic disease severity. No normalization technique was superior at distinguishing between OA severities. Knee adduction moments normalized to medial knee size were not more sensitive to OA severity.

  9. Identifying the Functional Flexion-extension Axis of the Knee: An In-Vivo Kinematics Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Chen, Kaining; Guo, Lin; Cheng, Liangjun; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to calculate the flexion-extension axis (FEA) of the knee through in-vivo knee kinematics data, and then compare it with two major anatomical axes of the femoral condyles: the transepicondylar axis (TEA) defined by connecting the medial sulcus and lateral prominence, and the cylinder axis (CA) defined by connecting the centers of posterior condyles. Methods The knee kinematics data of 20 healthy subjects were acquired under weight-bearing condition using bi-planar x-ray imaging and 3D-2D registration techniques. By tracking the vertical coordinate change of all points on the surface of femur during knee flexion, the FEA was determined as the line connecting the points with the least vertical shift in the medial and lateral condyles respectively. Angular deviation and distance among the TEA, CA and FEA were measured. Results The TEA-FEA angular deviation was significantly larger than that of the CA-FEA in 3D and transverse plane (3.45° vs. 1.98°, p < 0.001; 2.72° vs. 1.19°, p = 0.002), but not in the coronal plane (1.61° vs. 0.83°, p = 0.076). The TEA-FEA distance was significantly greater than that of the CA-FEA in the medial side (6.7 mm vs. 1.9 mm, p < 0.001), but not in the lateral side (3.2 mm vs. 2.0 mm, p = 0.16). Conclusion The CA is closer to the FEA compared with the TEA; it can better serve as an anatomical surrogate for the functional knee axis. PMID:26039711

  10. Cost-effectiveness analysis of arthroscopic surgery compared with non-operative management for osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Jacquelyn D; Birmingham, Trevor B; Giffin, J Robert; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Feagan, Brian G; Litchfield, Robert; Willits, Kevin; Fowler, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic surgery in addition to non-operative treatments compared with non-operative treatments alone in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Design, setting and participants We conducted an economic evaluation alongside a single-centre, randomised trial among patients with symptomatic, radiographic knee OA (KL grade ≥2). Interventions Patients received arthroscopic debridement and partial resection of degenerative knee tissues in addition to optimised non-operative therapy, or optimised non-operative therapy only. Main outcome measures Direct and indirect costs were collected prospectively over the 2-year study period. The effectiveness outcomes were the Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Cost-effectiveness was estimated using the net benefit regression framework considering a range of willingness-to-pay values from the Canadian public payer and societal perspectives. We calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and conducted sensitivity analyses using the extremes of the 95% CIs surrounding mean differences in effect between groups. Results 168 patients were included. Patients allocated to arthroscopy received partial resection and debridement of degenerative meniscal tears (81%) and/or articular cartilage (97%). There were no significant differences between groups in use of non-operative treatments. The incremental net benefit was negative for all willingness-to-pay values. Uncertainty estimates suggest that even if willing to pay $400 000 to achieve a clinically important improvement in WOMAC score, or ≥$50 000 for an additional QALY, there is <20% probability that the addition of arthroscopy is cost-effective compared with non-operative therapies only. Our sensitivity analysis suggests that even when assuming the largest treatment effect, the addition of arthroscopic surgery is not economically attractive compared with non

  11. The role of cumulative physical work load in symptomatic knee osteoarthritis – a case-control study in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, Andreas; Bolm-Audorff, Ulrich; Abolmaali, Nasreddin; Elsner, Gine

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To examine the dose-response relationship between cumulative exposure to kneeling and squatting as well as to lifting and carrying of loads and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a population-based case-control study. Methods In five orthopedic clinics and five practices we recruited 295 male patients aged 25 to 70 with radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis associated with chronic complaints. A total of 327 male control subjects were recruited. Data were gathered in a structured personal interview. To calculate cumulative exposure, the self-reported duration of kneeling and squatting as well as the duration of lifting and carrying of loads were summed up over the entire working life. Results The results of our study support a dose-response relationship between kneeling/squatting and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. For a cumulative exposure to kneeling and squatting > 10.800 hours, the risk of having radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis as measured by the odds ratio (adjusted for age, region, weight, jogging/athletics, and lifting or carrying of loads) is 2.4 (95% CI 1.1–5.0) compared to unexposed subjects. Lifting and carrying of loads is significantly associated with knee osteoarthritis independent of kneeling or similar activities. Conclusion As the knee osteoarthritis risk is strongly elevated in occupations that involve both kneeling/squatting and heavy lifting/carrying, preventive efforts should particularly focus on these "high-risk occupations". PMID:18625053

  12. Alternative bearings in total knee arthroplasty: risk of early revision compared to traditional bearings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no substantial clinical evidence for the superiority of alternative bearings in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We compared the short-term revision risk in alternative surface bearing knees (oxidized zirconium (OZ) femoral implants or highly crosslinked polyethylene (HXLPE) inserts) with that for traditional bearings (cobalt-chromium (CoCR) on conventional polyethelene (CPE)). The risk of revision with commercially available HXLPE inserts was also evaluated. Methods All 62,177 primary TKA cases registered in a Total Joint Replacement Registry between April 2001 and December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The endpoints for the analysis were all-cause revisions, septic revisions, or aseptic revisions. Bearing surfaces were categorized as OZ-CPE, CoCr-HXLPE, or CoCr-CPE. HXLPE inserts were stratified according to brand name. Confounding was addressed using propensity score weights. Marginal Cox-regression models adjusting for surgeon clustering were used. Results The proportion of females was 62%. Average age was 68 (SD 9.3) years, and median follow-up time was 2.8 (IQR 1.2–4.9) years. After adjustments, the risks of all-cause, aseptic, and septic revision with CoCr-HXLPE and OZ-CPE bearings were not statistically significantly higher than with traditional CoCr-CPE bearings. No specific brand of HXLPE insert was associated with a higher risk of all-cause, aseptic, or septic revision compared to CoCr-CPE. Interpretation At least in the short term, none of the alternative knee bearings evaluated (CoCr-HXLPE or OZ-CPE) had a greater risk of all-cause, aseptic, and septic revision than traditional CoCr-CPE bearings. PMID:23485105

  13. Knee microfracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee: a 2-year randomised study. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc . 2010 Apr;18(4):519-27. Hurst JM, Steadman JR, O'Brien L, Rodkey WG, Briggs KK. Rehabilitation following microfracture for chondral injury in the knee. ...

  14. Immediate effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on knee joint moments in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Masashi; Takagi, Yui; Goto, Yusuke; Otsuka, Naoki; Koyama, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Masashi; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Footwear modification can beneficially alter knee loading in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This study evaluated the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on reductions in external knee moments in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to examine the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology versus control shoes on the knee adduction and flexion moments in 17 women (mean age, 63.6 years) with radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis. The lateral and anterior trunk lean values, knee flexion and adduction angles, and ground reaction force were also evaluated. The influence of the original walking pattern on the changes in knee moments with Masai Barefoot Technology shoes was evaluated. The knee flexion moment in early stance was significantly reduced while walking with the Masai Barefoot Technology shoes (0.25±0.14Nm/kgm) as compared with walking with control shoes (0.30±0.19 Nm/kgm); whereas the knee adduction moment showed no changes. Masai Barefoot Technology shoes did not increase compensatory lateral and anterior trunk lean. The degree of knee flexion moment in the original walking pattern with control shoes was correlated directly with its reduction when wearing Masai Barefoot Technology shoes by multiple linear regression analysis (adjusted R2=0.44, P<0.01). Masai Barefoot Technology shoes reduced the knee flexion moment during walking without increasing the compensatory trunk lean and may therefore reduce external knee loading in women with knee osteoarthritis.

  15. Clinically important improvement in function is common in people with or at high risk of knee OA: the MOST study

    PubMed Central

    White, Daniel K.; Keysor, Julie J.; LaValley, Michael P.; Lewis, Cora E.; Torner, James C.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Felson, David T.

    2010-01-01

    To calculate the frequency of clinically important improvement in function over 30 months and identify risk factors in people who have or are at risk of knee OA. Subjects were from MOST, a longitudinal study of persons with or at high risk of knee OA. We defined Minimal Clinically Important Improvement (MCII) with WOMAC physical function using three different methods. Baseline risk factors tested for improvement included age, gender, educational attainment, presence of radiographic knee OA (ROA), the number of comorbidities, Body Mass Index (BMI), knee pain, walking speed, isokinetic knee extensor strength, depressive symptoms, physical activity, and medication usage. We used logistic regression to evaluate the association of baseline risk factors with MCII. Of the 1801 subjects (age= 63, BMI= 31, 63% female), most had mild limitations in baseline function (WOMAC = 19 +/− 11). Regardless how defined, a substantial percentage of subjects (24%–39%) reached MCII at 30 months. Compared to their counterparts, people with MCII were less likely to have ROA and to use medications, and were more likely to have a lower BMI, less knee pain, a faster walking speed, more knee strength, and fewer depressive symptoms. After adjustment, MCII was 40% to 50% less likely in those with ROA, and 1.9 to 2.0 times more likely in those walking 1.0 m/s faster than counterparts. Clinically important improvement is frequent in people with or at high risk of knee OA. The absence of ROA and a faster walking speed appear to be associated with clinically important improvements. PMID:20395640

  16. Comparison of knee gait kinematics of workers exposed to knee straining posture to those of non-knee straining workers.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathaly; Hagemeister, Nicola; Poitras, Stéphane; de Guise, Jacques A

    2013-06-01

    Workers exposed to knee straining postures, such as kneeling and squatting, may present modifications in knee gait kinematics that can make them vulnerable to osteoarthritis. In this study, knee kinematics of workers exposed to occupational knee straining postures (KS workers) were compared to those of non-knee straining (non-KS) workers. Eighteen KS workers and 20 non-KS workers participated in the study. Three-dimensional gait kinematic data were recorded at the knee using an electromagnetic motion tracking system. The following parameters were extracted from flexion/extension, adduction/abduction and internal/external rotation angle data and used for group comparisons: knee angle at initial foot contact, peak angles, minimal angles and angle range during the entire gait cycle. Group comparisons were performed with Student t-tests. In the sagittal plane, KS workers had a greater knee flexion angle at initial foot contact, a lower peak knee flexion angle during the swing phase and a lower angle range than non-KS workers (p<0.05). In the frontal plane, all parameters indicated that KS workers had their knees more adducted than non-KS workers. External/internal rotation range was greater for KS workers. This study provides new knowledge on work related to KS postures and knee kinematics. The results support the concept that KS workers might exhibit knee kinematics that are different from those of non-KS workers.

  17. On extracting design principles from biology: II. Case study-the effect of knee direction on bipedal robot running efficiency.

    PubMed

    Haberland, M; Kim, S

    2015-01-01

    Comparing the leg of an ostrich to that of a human suggests an important question to legged robot designers: should a robot's leg joint bend in the direction of running ('forwards') or opposite ('backwards')? Biological studies cannot answer this question for engineers due to significant differences between the biological and engineering domains. Instead, we investigated the inherent effect of joint bending direction on bipedal robot running efficiency by comparing energetically optimal gaits of a wide variety of robot designs sampled at random from a design space. We found that the great majority of robot designs have several locally optimal gaits with the knee bending backwards that are more efficient than the most efficient gait with the knee bending forwards. The most efficient backwards gaits do not exhibit lower touchdown losses than the most efficient forward gaits; rather, the improved efficiency of backwards gaits stems from lower torque and reduced motion at the hip. The reduced hip use of backwards gaits is enabled by the ability of the backwards knee, acting alone, to (1) propel the robot upwards and forwards simultaneously and (2) lift and protract the foot simultaneously. In the absence of other information, designers interested in building efficient bipedal robots with two-segment legs driven by electric motors should design the knee to bend backwards rather than forwards. Compared to common practices for choosing robot knee direction, application of this principle would have a strong tendency to improve robot efficiency and save design resources. PMID:25643285

  18. On extracting design principles from biology: II. Case study-the effect of knee direction on bipedal robot running efficiency.

    PubMed

    Haberland, M; Kim, S

    2015-02-02

    Comparing the leg of an ostrich to that of a human suggests an important question to legged robot designers: should a robot's leg joint bend in the direction of running ('forwards') or opposite ('backwards')? Biological studies cannot answer this question for engineers due to significant differences between the biological and engineering domains. Instead, we investigated the inherent effect of joint bending direction on bipedal robot running efficiency by comparing energetically optimal gaits of a wide variety of robot designs sampled at random from a design space. We found that the great majority of robot designs have several locally optimal gaits with the knee bending backwards that are more efficient than the most efficient gait with the knee bending forwards. The most efficient backwards gaits do not exhibit lower touchdown losses than the most efficient forward gaits; rather, the improved efficiency of backwards gaits stems from lower torque and reduced motion at the hip. The reduced hip use of backwards gaits is enabled by the ability of the backwards knee, acting alone, to (1) propel the robot upwards and forwards simultaneously and (2) lift and protract the foot simultaneously. In the absence of other information, designers interested in building efficient bipedal robots with two-segment legs driven by electric motors should design the knee to bend backwards rather than forwards. Compared to common practices for choosing robot knee direction, application of this principle would have a strong tendency to improve robot efficiency and save design resources.

  19. A qualitative study of the consequences of knee symptoms: ‘It's like you're an athlete and you go to a couch potato’

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Crystal; Jaglal, Susan B; Sale, Joanna; Badley, Elizabeth M; Davis, Aileen M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore the perceived consequences of knee symptoms on the lives of people aged 35–65 years who had diagnosed osteoarthritis (OA) or OA-like symptoms. Design A qualitative study with six focus groups and 10 one-on-one interviews. Constructivist grounded theory guided data collection and analysis. Data were analysed using the constant comparative method. Setting Toronto, Canada. Participants 51 participants (median age 49; 61% female) who self-reported knee OA or reported knee pain, aching or stiffness on most days of the past month participated in the study. Results The core finding, disruption and change, illustrates the range of perceived consequences of knee symptoms in peoples’ lives. Participants described the consequences of symptoms on their physical activity (giving up high-level activities or changing how or how much they performed activities), social life (leisure, family and work) and emotional life. Knee symptoms also altered the way participants thought about their bodies and themselves. They reported that they had a new awareness of their knee and that they no longer trusted their knee. They also conveyed that their sense of self was altered. Conclusions This study illuminates the significant and varied consequences that mild to moderate knee symptoms have on the lives of adults age 35–65 years. Findings highlight the need for clinicians to tailor advice and support to the individual's needs considering their symptoms, the consequences of symptoms on their lives and their personal context. PMID:25324325

  20. Cost Analysis and Surgical Site Infection Rates in Total Knee Arthroplasty Comparing Traditional vs. Single-Use Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Geoffrey W; Patel, Neil N; Milshteyn, Michael A; Buzas, David; Lombardo, Daniel J; Morawa, Lawrence G

    2015-12-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a significant complications in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate if traditional vs. single-use instrumentation had an effect on SSI's. We compared SSI rates and costs of TKAs performed with single-use (449) and traditional (169) TKA instrumentation trays. Total OR Time was, on average, 30 min less when single-use instrumentation was used. SSIs decreased in the single-use group (n=1) compared to the traditional group (n=5) (P=0.006). Single-use instrumentation added $490 in initial costs; however it saved between $480 and $600. Single-use instrumentation may provide a benefit to the patient by potentially decreasing the risk of infection and reducing the overall hospital costs.

  1. Cost Analysis and Surgical Site Infection Rates in Total Knee Arthroplasty Comparing Traditional vs. Single-Use Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Geoffrey W; Patel, Neil N; Milshteyn, Michael A; Buzas, David; Lombardo, Daniel J; Morawa, Lawrence G

    2015-12-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a significant complications in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate if traditional vs. single-use instrumentation had an effect on SSI's. We compared SSI rates and costs of TKAs performed with single-use (449) and traditional (169) TKA instrumentation trays. Total OR Time was, on average, 30 min less when single-use instrumentation was used. SSIs decreased in the single-use group (n=1) compared to the traditional group (n=5) (P=0.006). Single-use instrumentation added $490 in initial costs; however it saved between $480 and $600. Single-use instrumentation may provide a benefit to the patient by potentially decreasing the risk of infection and reducing the overall hospital costs. PMID:26231077

  2. The effect of mechanical massage on early outcome after total knee arthroplasty: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Mi; Kim, Sang-Rim; Lee, Yong Ki; Kim, Bo Ryun; Han, Eun Young

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical massage via Endermologie(®) after total knee arthroplasty in reducing edema and pain and improving knee range of motion, in the early postoperative period. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen patients with knee edema following total knee arthroplasty were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=8) or the control group (n=10). The intervention group received mechanical massage therapy using Endermologie(®) and the control group received conventional physical therapy for 20 minutes a day, 5 times a week from the seventh day postsurgery. Clinical assessments included active knee flexion and extension range of motion, knee pain using a numeric rating scale, the operated limb circumference, the soft tissue cross-sectional area using ultrasonography, the extracelluar fluid volume, and single frequency bioimpedance analysis at 5 kHz using bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy. [Results] Both groups showed significant reduction in edema and pain, and improvement in active knee flexion at the end of treatment. There were no significant inter-group differences before or after treatment. [Conclusion] Mechanical massage could be an alternative way of managing knee edema after total knee arthroplasty in early postoperative recovery.

  3. The effect of mechanical massage on early outcome after total knee arthroplasty: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Mi; Kim, Sang-Rim; Lee, Yong Ki; Kim, Bo Ryun; Han, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical massage via Endermologie® after total knee arthroplasty in reducing edema and pain and improving knee range of motion, in the early postoperative period. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen patients with knee edema following total knee arthroplasty were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=8) or the control group (n=10). The intervention group received mechanical massage therapy using Endermologie® and the control group received conventional physical therapy for 20 minutes a day, 5 times a week from the seventh day postsurgery. Clinical assessments included active knee flexion and extension range of motion, knee pain using a numeric rating scale, the operated limb circumference, the soft tissue cross-sectional area using ultrasonography, the extracelluar fluid volume, and single frequency bioimpedance analysis at 5 kHz using bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy. [Results] Both groups showed significant reduction in edema and pain, and improvement in active knee flexion at the end of treatment. There were no significant inter-group differences before or after treatment. [Conclusion] Mechanical massage could be an alternative way of managing knee edema after total knee arthroplasty in early postoperative recovery. PMID:26696709

  4. Group physical therapy for veterans with knee osteoarthritis: study design and methodology.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kelli D; Bongiorni, Dennis; Walker, Tessa A; Bartle, John; Bosworth, Hayden B; Coffman, Cynthia J; Datta, Santanu K; Edelman, David; Hall, Katherine S; Hansen, Gloria; Jennings, Caroline; Lindquist, Jennifer H; Oddone, Eugene Z; Senick, Margaret J; Sizemore, John C; St John, Jamie; Hoenig, Helen

    2013-03-01

    Physical therapy (PT) is a key component of treatment for knee osteoarthritis (OA) and can decrease pain and improve function. Given the expected rise in prevalence of knee OA and the associated demand for treatment, there is a need for models of care that cost-effectively extend PT services for patients with this condition. This manuscript describes a randomized clinical trial of a group-based physical therapy program that can potentially extend services to more patients with knee OA, providing a greater number of sessions per patient, at lower staffing costs compared to traditional individual PT. Participants with symptomatic knee OA (n = 376) are randomized to either a 12-week group-based PT program (six 1 h sessions, eight patients per group, led by a physical therapist and physical therapist assistant) or usual PT care (two individual visits with a physical therapist). Participants in both PT arms receive instruction in an exercise program, information on joint care and protection, and individual consultations with a physical therapist to address specific functional and therapeutic needs. The primary outcome is the Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (self-reported pain, stiffness, and function), and the secondary outcome is the Short Physical Performance Test Protocol (objective physical function). Outcomes are assessed at baseline and 12-week follow-up, and the primary outcome is also assessed via telephone at 24-week follow-up to examine sustainability of effects. Linear mixed models will be used to compare outcomes for the two study arms. An economic cost analysis of the PT interventions will also be conducted.

  5. The relationship between three-dimensional knee MRI bone shape and total knee replacement—a case control study: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Andrew J.; Dube, Bright; Hensor, Elizabeth M. A.; Kingsbury, Sarah R.; Peat, George; Bowes, Mike A.; Sharples, Linda D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. There is growing understanding of the importance of bone in OA. Our aim was to determine the relationship between 3D MRI bone shape and total knee replacement (TKR). Methods. A nested case-control study within the Osteoarthritis Initiative cohort identified case knees with confirmed TKR for OA and controls that were matched using propensity scores. Active appearance modelling quantification of the bone shape of all knee bones identified vectors between knees having or not having OA. Vectors were scaled such that −1 and +1 represented the mean non-OA and mean OA shapes. Results. Compared to controls (n = 310), TKR cases (n = 310) had a more positive mean baseline 3D bone shape vector, indicating more advanced structural OA, for the femur [mean 0.98 vs −0.11; difference (95% CI) 1.10 (0.88, 1.31)], tibia [mean 0.86 vs −0.07; difference (95% CI) 0.94 (0.72, 1.16)] and patella [mean 0.95 vs 0.03; difference (95% CI) 0.92 (0.65, 1.20)]. Odds ratios (95% CI) for TKR per normalized unit of 3D bone shape vector for the femur, tibia and patella were: 1.85 (1.59, 2.16), 1.64 (1.42, 1.89) and 1.36 (1.22, 1.50), respectively, all P < 0.001. After including Kellgren–Lawrence grade in a multivariable analysis, only the femur 3D shape vector remained significantly associated with TKR [odds ratio 1.24 (1.02, 1.51)]. Conclusion. 3D bone shape was associated with the endpoint of this study, TKR, with femoral shape being most associated. This study contributes to the validation of quantitative MRI bone biomarkers for OA structure-modification trials. PMID:27185958

  6. Factors influencing outcome of knee bone marrow oedema: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Berkem, Levent; Turkmen, Ismail; Unay, Koray; Akcal, Mehmet Akif; Aydemir, Nadir

    2013-10-01

    Bone marrow oedema has a long recovery time. Conservative and surgical treatments have been used. This study aimed at identifying a profile of patients who may benefit from nonsurgical management. We compared the results of periodic clinical and radiological examinations of patients who visited our clinic with knee pain and were diagnosed with bone marrow oedema following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations. Clinically, the patients were evaluated using the Lysholm knee score and a visual analogue scale. The study included 67 patients (31 males, 36 females) who were followed for 6-24 months. Patient age, gender, body mass index, affected area, and concomitant intra-articular pathology were analysed. Of the 67 patients, 63 were treated conservatively, and four underwent decompression. Patients with involvement of both the medial femoral condyle and tibial plateau were found to be more resistant to treatment than those in which only the tibial plateau was affected. Intra-articular pathologies were frequently noted together with bone marrow oedema, causing knee pain to persist after the bone marrow oedema had subsided.

  7. Is there a causal link between knee loading and knee osteoarthritis progression? A systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies and randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Marius; Creaby, Mark W; Lund, Hans; Juhl, Carsten; Christensen, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Objective We performed a systematic review, meta-analysis and assessed the evidence supporting a causal link between knee joint loading during walking and structural knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression. Design Systematic review, meta-analysis and application of Bradford Hill's considerations on causation. Data sources We searched MEDLINE, Scopus, AMED, CINAHL and SportsDiscus for prospective cohort studies and randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from 1950 through October 2013. Study eligibility criteria We selected cohort studies and RCTs in which estimates of knee joint loading during walking were used to predict structural knee OA progression assessed by X-ray or MRI. Data analyses Meta-analysis was performed to estimate the combined OR for structural disease progression with higher baseline loading. The likelihood of a causal link between knee joint loading and OA progression was assessed from cohort studies using the Bradford Hill guidelines to derive a 0–4 causation score based on four criteria and examined for confirmation in RCTs. Results Of the 1078 potentially eligible articles, 5 prospective cohort studies were included. The studies included a total of 452 patients relating joint loading to disease progression over 12–72 months. There were very serious limitations associated with the methodological quality of the included studies. The combined OR for disease progression was 1.90 (95% CI 0.85 to 4.25; I2=77%) for each one-unit increment in baseline knee loading. The combined causation score was 0, indicating no causal association between knee loading and knee OA progression. No RCTs were found to confirm or refute the findings from the cohort studies. Conclusions There is very limited and low-quality evidence to support for a causal link between knee joint loading during walking and structural progression of knee OA. Trial registration number CRD42012003253 PMID:25031196

  8. A comprehensive joint replacement program for total knee arthroplasty: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jon R; Warren, Meghan; Ganley, Kathleen J; Prefontaine, Paul; Wylie, Jack W

    2008-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a commonly performed surgical procedure in the US. It is important to have a comprehensive inpatient TKA program which maximizes outcomes while minimizing adverse events. The purpose of this study was to describe a TKA program – the Joint Replacement Program (JRP) – and report post-surgical outcomes. Methods 74 candidates for a primary TKA were enrolled in the JRP. The JRP was designed to minimize complications and optimize patient-centered outcomes using a team approach including the patient, patient's family, and a multidisciplinary team of health professionals. The JRP consisted of a pre-operative class, standard pathways for medical care, comprehensive peri-operative pain management, aggressive physical therapy (PT), and proactive discharge planning. Measures included functional tests, knee range of motion (ROM), and medical record abstraction of patient demographics, length of stay, discharge disposition, and complications over a 6-month follow-up period. Results All patients achieved medical criteria for hospital discharge. The patients achieved the knee flexion ROM goal of 90° (91.7 ± 5.4°), but did not achieve the knee extension ROM goal of 0° (2.4 ± 2.6°). The length of hospital stay was two days for 53% of the patients, with 39% and 7% discharged in three and four days, respectively. All but three patients were discharged home with functional independence. 68% of these received outpatient physical therapy compared with 32% who received home physical therapy immediately after discharge. Two patients (< 3%) had medical complications during the inpatient hospital stay, and 9 patients (12%) had complications during the 6-month follow-up period. Conclusion The comprehensive JRP for TKA was associated with satisfactory clinical outcomes, short lengths of stay, a high percentage of patients discharged home with outpatient PT, and minimal complications. This JRP may represent an efficient, effective and safe

  9. Retrospective Cohort Study of 207 Cases of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Green, Daniel W.; Arbucci, John; Silberman, Jason; Luderowski, Eva; Uppstrom, Tyler J.; Nguyen, Joseph; Tuca, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Describe the clinical characteristics, image findings, and outcomes of patients with juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (JOCD) of the knee. To our knowledge, this is the largest single-surgeon cohort of JOCD patients. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of knee JOCD patients assessed by a single pediatric orthopaedic surgeon at a tertiary care center between 2005-2015. All diagnoses were confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients with patellar dislocations or osteochondral fractures were excluded. Demographic data, sports played, comorbidities, surgical procedures, and clinical data were extracted from charts. Images were analyzed to identify the location and size of lesions. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests were used to compare discrete variables, and Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis tests to compare continuous variables between groups. P-values of <0.05 were considered significant. Results: Sample consisted of 180 patients (207 knees), 124 boys and 56 girls. Average age at diagnosis was 12.8 years (7.5-17.5). Majority were active in sports (80.8%), primary soccer (36.7%) and basketball (29.4%). JOCD was present bilaterally in 27 patients (15%), 14 knees had bifocal OCD (6.8%), and only 1 patient had bifocal lesions in both knees. Most common location was medial femoral condyle (56.3%) followed by lateral femoral condyle (23.1%), trochlea (11.4%), patella (9%), and tibia (0.5%). In the sagittal view, most common location was the middle third of the condyles (48.7%). Surgery was performed in 72 knees (34.8%), with an average age at surgery of 14.1 years (9.3-18.1). Bilateral JOCD was present in 13 surgical patients (18.8%), but only 3 patients had bilateral surgery. Two operative patients had bifocal JOCD (2.7%) and surgery on both lesions. Location distribution did not differ between surgical and non-surgical lesions. The average normalized area of non-surgical JOCD lesions was 6.8 (0.1-18), whereas surgical lesions averaged a

  10. Flexion-extension gap in cruciate-retaining versus posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Joshua; Chong, Alexander; McQueen, David; O'Guinn, Justin; Wooley, Paul

    2014-05-01

    We re-examined experimental model results using half-body specimens with intact extensor mechanisms and navigation to evaluate cruciate-retaining (CR) and posterior stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) component gaps through an entire range of motion. Six sequential testing regimens were conducted with the knee intact, with a CR TKA in place, and with a PS TKA in place, with and without 22 N traction in place at each stage. Each of 10 knees was taken through six full ranges of motion from 0° to 120° at every stage using a navigated knee system to record component gapping. No significant difference was found between loaded and unloaded component gaps, and no significant differences were found in component gapping between CR and PS TKAs throughout a full range of motion. Flexion-extension gap measurements were significantly different from previously published data (at 90° flexion). No difference was found in kinematics when comparing CR and PS TKA component designs. Our results suggest that intact extensor mechanisms may be required to perform proper kinematic studies of TKA. Our findings provide evidence that the extensor mechanism may play a major role in the flexion-extension gaps in cadaveric knees.

  11. Evaluation of the effects of a physiotherapy program on quality of life in females after unilateral total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hudáková, Zuzana; Zięba, Halina Romualda; Lizis, Paweł; Dvořáková, Vlasta; Cetlová, Lada; Friediger, Teresa; Kobza, Wojciech

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Osteoarthritis is a chronic and degenerative joint disease and is considered to be one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders. This study evaluated the differences in the quality of life of females treated with supervised physiotherapy and a standardized home program after unilateral total knee arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] From January 2012 to May 2015, a total of 40 females were examined at the Central Military Hospital in Ruzomberk, Slovakia. Quality of life was assessed with the Short Form-36. Quality of life and intensity of pain after normal daily activity, according to the visual analog scale, were assessed before total knee arthroplasty, immediately after physiotherapy, 3 months after total knee arthroplasty, and 6 months after total knee arthroplasty. [Results] We found statistically significant improvement of the quality of life results and a decreased intensity of pain at each time point compared with before total knee arthroplasty. [Conclusions] The results of this study provide further evidence indicating that patients who undergo total knee arthroplasty for primary osteoarthritis of the knee can achieve a significant improvement in the quality of life by using supervised physiotherapy compared with a standardized home program. PMID:27313341

  12. Evaluation of the effects of a physiotherapy program on quality of life in females after unilateral total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hudáková, Zuzana; Zięba, Halina Romualda; Lizis, Paweł; Dvořáková, Vlasta; Cetlová, Lada; Friediger, Teresa; Kobza, Wojciech

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Osteoarthritis is a chronic and degenerative joint disease and is considered to be one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders. This study evaluated the differences in the quality of life of females treated with supervised physiotherapy and a standardized home program after unilateral total knee arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] From January 2012 to May 2015, a total of 40 females were examined at the Central Military Hospital in Ruzomberk, Slovakia. Quality of life was assessed with the Short Form-36. Quality of life and intensity of pain after normal daily activity, according to the visual analog scale, were assessed before total knee arthroplasty, immediately after physiotherapy, 3 months after total knee arthroplasty, and 6 months after total knee arthroplasty. [Results] We found statistically significant improvement of the quality of life results and a decreased intensity of pain at each time point compared with before total knee arthroplasty. [Conclusions] The results of this study provide further evidence indicating that patients who undergo total knee arthroplasty for primary osteoarthritis of the knee can achieve a significant improvement in the quality of life by using supervised physiotherapy compared with a standardized home program.

  13. Evaluation of the effects of a physiotherapy program on quality of life in females after unilateral total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hudáková, Zuzana; Zięba, Halina Romualda; Lizis, Paweł; Dvořáková, Vlasta; Cetlová, Lada; Friediger, Teresa; Kobza, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Osteoarthritis is a chronic and degenerative joint disease and is considered to be one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders. This study evaluated the differences in the quality of life of females treated with supervised physiotherapy and a standardized home program after unilateral total knee arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] From January 2012 to May 2015, a total of 40 females were examined at the Central Military Hospital in Ruzomberk, Slovakia. Quality of life was assessed with the Short Form-36. Quality of life and intensity of pain after normal daily activity, according to the visual analog scale, were assessed before total knee arthroplasty, immediately after physiotherapy, 3 months after total knee arthroplasty, and 6 months after total knee arthroplasty. [Results] We found statistically significant improvement of the quality of life results and a decreased intensity of pain at each time point compared with before total knee arthroplasty. [Conclusions] The results of this study provide further evidence indicating that patients who undergo total knee arthroplasty for primary osteoarthritis of the knee can achieve a significant improvement in the quality of life by using supervised physiotherapy compared with a standardized home program. PMID:27313341

  14. Pivot task increases knee frontal plane loading compared with sidestep and drop-jump

    PubMed Central

    CORTES, NELSON; ONATE, JAMES; LUNEN, BONNIE VAN

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess kinematic and kinetic differences between three tasks (drop-jump, sidestep cutting, and pivot tasks) commonly used to evaluate anterior cruciate ligament risk factors. Nineteen female collegiate soccer athletes from a Division I institution participated in this study. Participants performed a drop-jump task, and two unanticipated tasks, sidestep cutting and pivot. Repeated-measures analyses of variance were conducted to assess differences in the kinematic and kinetic parameters between tasks. The pivot task had lower knee flexion (−41.2 ± 8.8°) and a higher valgus angle (−7.6 ± 10.1°) than the sidestep (−53.9 ± 9.4° and −2.9 ± 10.0°, respectively) at maximum vertical ground reaction force. The pivot task (0.8 ± 0.3 multiples of body weight) had higher peak posterior ground reaction force than the drop-jump (0.3 ± 0.06 multiples of body weight) and sidestep cutting (0.3 ± 0.1 multiples of body weight), as well as higher internal varus moments (0.72 ± 0.3 N · m/kg · m) than the drop-jump (0.14 ± 0.07 N · m/kg · m) and sidestep (0.17 ± 0.5 N · m/kg · m) at peak stance. During the pivot task, the athletes presented a more erect posture and adopted strategies that may place higher loads on the knee joint and increase the strain on the anterior cruciate ligament. PMID:21086213

  15. Hydrotherapy after total knee arthroplasty. A follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Giaquinto, S; Ciotola, E; Dall'Armi, V; Margutti, F

    2010-01-01

    The study evaluated the subjective functional outcome following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in participants who underwent hydrotherapy (HT) six months after discharge from a rehabilitation unit. A total of 70 subjects, 12 of which were lost at follow-up, were randomly assigned to either a conventional gym treatment (N=30) or HT (N=28). A prospective design was performed. Participants were interviewed with Western-Ontario McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) at admission, at discharge and six months later. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests were applied for statistical analysis. Both groups improved. The WOMAC subscales, namely pain, stiffness and function, were all positively affected. Statistical analysis indicates that scores on all subscales were significantly lower for the HT group. The benefits gained by the time of discharge were still found after six months. HT is recommended after TKA in a geriatric population.

  16. Sports activities 5 years after total knee or hip arthroplasty: the Ulm Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Huch, K; Muller, K; Sturmer, T; Brenner, H; Puhl, W; Gunther, K

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyse sports activities of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) over lifetime, preoperatively, and 5 years after arthroplasty. Methods: In a longitudinal four centre study, 809 consecutive patients with advanced OA of the hip (420) or the knee (389) joint under the age of 76 years who required total joint replacement were recruited. A completed questionnaire about sports activities at 5 year follow up was received from 636 (79%) of the 809 patients. Results: Although most patients with hip (97%) and knee (94%) OA had performed sports activities during their life, only 36% (hip patients) and 42% (knee patients) had maintained sports activities at the time of surgery. Five years postoperatively, the proportion of patients performing sports activities increased to 52% among patients with hip OA, but further declined to 34% among those with knee OA. Accordingly, the proportion of patients with hip OA performing sports activities for more than 2 hours a week increased from 8 to 14%, whereas this proportion decreased from 12 to 5% among patients with knee OA. Pain in the replaced joint was reported by 9% of patients with hip and by >16% with knee OA. Conclusion: Differences in pain 5 years after joint replacement may explain some of the difference of sports activities between patients with hip and knee OA. Reasons for reduction of sports activities may include the increasing age of the patients, their worries about an "artificial joint", and the advice of their surgeon to be cautious. PMID:15843453

  17. Web-based therapeutic exercise resource center as a treatment for knee osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although beneficial effects of exercise in the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) have been established, only 14 -18% of patients with knee OA receive an exercise from their primary care provider. Patients with knee OA cite lack of physician exercise advice as a major reason why they do not exercise to improve their condition. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate use of a web-based Therapeutic Exercise Resource Center (TERC) as a tool to prescribe strength, flexibility and aerobic exercise as part of knee OA treatment. It was hypothesized that significant change in clinical outcome scores would result from patients’ use of the TERC. Methods Sixty five individuals diagnosed with mild/moderate knee OA based on symptoms and radiographs were enrolled through outpatient physician clinics. Using exercise animations to facilitate proper technique, the TERC assigned and progressed patients through multiple levels of exercise intensity based on exercise history, co-morbidities and a validated measure of pain and function. Subjects completed a modified short form WOMAC (mSF-WOMAC), World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHO-QOL) and Knee Self-Efficacy Scale (K-SES) at baseline and completion of the 8 week program, and a user satisfaction survey. Outcomes were compared over time using paired t-tests and effect sizes calculated using partial point biserial (pr). Results Fifty two participants completed the 8 week program with average duration of knee pain 8.0 ± 11.0 yrs (25 females; 61.0 ± 9.4 yrs; body mass index, 28.8 ± 6.3 kg/m2). During the study period, all outcome measures improved: mSF-WOMAC scores decreased (better pain and function) (p < .001; large effect, pr = 0.70); WHO-QOL physical scores increased (p = .015; medium effect, pr = 0.33); and K-SES scores increased (p < .001; large effect, pr = 0.54). No significant differences were found in study outcomes as a function of gender, age, BMI

  18. Prognostic Criteria in Traumatic Knee Dislocations: A Retrospective Study of 42 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Pehlivanoğlu, Tuna; Balcı, Halil İbrahim; Chodza, Mehmet; Kılıçoğlu, Önder İsmet

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic knee dislocation (TKD) is an orthopaedic emergency, which may include not only knee joint’s structures, but also neurovascular tissues. While such a major trauma can easily be expected to cause significant impairment in knee joint’s functions in long term, individual impact of these injured structures on the outcome needs to be clarified. This study questions the effect of injury type and the effect of the presence of neurovascular injuries on the functional outcome after TKD treatment in a level 3 trauma center. Methods: Between 1997 and 2013, 42 knee joints of 42 patients (mean age 34; range 18 – 80) were diagnosed with TKD and treated accordingly. Patients were reviewed after a mean period of 116 months (range 12 – 204), retrospectively. The type of knee injury was classified according to Schenck’s criteria, accompanying injuries and emergency and elective surgical interventions were recorded. Patients were evaluated radiographically and clinically on the follow-up examination. Clinical outcome parameters were KSS, Lysholm-Tegner, IKDC and SF-36 scores, grouping patients as either “good or excellent” or “poor or fair”. Cut-off values for this stratification was 70 points or higher for KSS, 80 or higher for Tegner-Lysholm and 70 for IKDC score. Effect of injury patterns on the clinical outcome was investigated using frequency tables and Chi-Square test for categorical data and Anova one-way analysis or Kruskal-Wallis test for numerical results. Results: According to Schenck’s classification, 6 knee joints (13.9%) were classified as KDI, 3 joints (6.9%) as KDII, 10 joints (23.2%) as KDIII, 19 joints (44.1%) as KDIV and 3 (6.9%) as KDV. An arterial injury was diagnosed in 11 cases (25.5%), fibular nerve injury in 12 cases (27.9%) and tibial nerve injury in 2 cases (4.6%). An external fixator was placed in 20 patients (46.5%) in the emergency setting. Vascular repair was performed in 6 patients, of which four (9.3%) also

  19. Knee closure in total knee replacement: a randomized prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Masri, B A; Laskin, R S; Windsor, R E; Haas, S B

    1996-10-01

    A randomized prospective study of 75 total knee replacements in 64 patients who were randomized to capsular closure with the knee in full extension or in flexion was done. Thirty-one knees received a posterior cruciate ligament retaining prosthesis and 44 knees received a posterior stabilized prosthesis. Preoperatively, there was no significant difference between the groups, and patients were stratified by surgeon and type of prosthesis. Postoperatively, all patients were evaluated by a physical therapist who did not know the type of prosthesis the patient received. In addition to the range of motion obtained at discharge; the number of days required to achieve unassisted transfer; the number of days required to achieve assisted and unassisted use of a walker, cane, and stairs; and the number of days to discharge from the hospital were recorded. All patients were also evaluated at 2 to 3 months postoperatively, and the Knee Society clinical rating system scores were compared. There was no statistically significant difference in any of the early rehabilitation parameters or in the 2- to 3-month followup data. Moreover, there was no statistically significant difference in the rate of complications. With stratification according to the type of prosthesis used or the surgeon performing the operation, there was still no statistically significant difference in any of the studied parameters. It was therefore concluded that the degree of knee flexion at the time of capsular closure in total knee replacement has no effect on early rehabilitation after total knee replacement.

  20. Stance time variability during stair stepping before and after total knee arthroplasty: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jessica W; Marcus, Robin L; Tracy, Brian L; Foreman, K Bo; Christensen, Jesse C; LaStayo, Paul C

    2016-02-01

    The main objectives of this pilot study were to: (1) investigate stance time variability (STV) during stair stepping in older adults with osteoarthritis (OA) before and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and compare to an age- and sex-matched group of healthy controls with native knees and (2) evaluate the relationship between quadriceps strength and STV during stair stepping before and after TKA. A prospective, observational, pilot study was carried out on 13 individuals (15% male, mean age 62.71±6.84years) before and after TKA using an instrumented stairway, patient-reported outcomes, timed stair stepping test, and quadriceps strength measures. At 6-months post-operatively, STV during stair descent was significantly greater in the TKA-GROUP compared to the CONTROL-GROUP, but was not significantly different at 12-months compared to controls. There were no significant differences in STV for stair ascent between the pre- and post-operative visits, or compared to controls. There was a trend toward significance for the relationship between quadriceps strength and STV during stair ascent (P=0.059) and descent (P=0.073). Variability during stair stepping may provide an important, short-term rehabilitation target for individuals following TKA and may represent another parameter to predict declines in functional mobility.

  1. The effect of knee brace on coordination and neuronal leg muscle control: an early postoperative functional study in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed patients.

    PubMed

    Rebel, M; Paessler, H H

    2001-09-01

    Two studies were carried out after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction to determine the effect of a knee brace on coordination (test 1) and electromyographic muscle activity in drop jumps (test 2). Test 1 studied 25 patients with ACL reconstruction under three test conditions (one-leg static, two-legged static, two-legged dynamic) compared with a control (n=30). The results showed highly significant improvements in all braced conditions. In test 2 ten patients with ACL reconstruction and ten healthy subjects performed a two-legged drop-jump; this was repeated 15 times and again 15 times with a knee brace worn on the reconstructed limb. Changes in electromyographically determined muscle activity (vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, gastrocnemius) were observed, but they were significant in only few cases because of high variability. Drop-jumps with knee brace improved jumping height, increased the maximum knee angle in the ground contact phase, and reduced the maximum knee angle in the landing phase. Patients thus develop an increased confidence in the stability of their knees. We conclude that the benefits of the knee brace are due to the mechanical action, an enhanced coordination, and a psychological effect.

  2. A retrospective comparative provider workload analysis for femoral nerve and adductor canal catheters following knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Michael; Kim, Eugenia; Kim, T Edward; Howard, Steven K; Mudumbai, Seshadri; Giori, Nicholas J; Woolson, Steven; Ganaway, Toni; Mariano, Edward R

    2015-04-01

    Adductor canal catheters preserve quadriceps strength better than femoral nerve catheters and may facilitate postoperative ambulation following total knee arthroplasty. However, the effect of this newer technique on provider workload, if any, is unknown. We conducted a retrospective provider workload analysis comparing these two catheter techniques; all other aspects of the clinical pathway remained the same. The primary outcome was number of interventions recorded per patient postoperatively. Secondary outcomes included infusion duration, ambulation distance, opioid consumption, and hospital length of stay. Adductor canal patients required a median (10-90th percentiles) of 0.0 (0.0-2.6) interventions compared to 1.0 (0.3-3.0) interventions for femoral patients (p < 0.001); 18/23 adductor canal patients (78 %) compared to 2/22 femoral patients (9 %) required no interventions (p < 0.001). Adductor canal catheter infusions lasted 2.0 (1.4-2.0) days compared to 1.5 (1.0-2.7) days in the femoral group (p = 0.016). Adductor canal patients ambulated further [mean (SD)] than femoral patients on postoperative day 1 [24.5 (21.7) vs. 11.9 (14.6) meters, respectively; p = 0.030] and day 2 [44.9 (26.3) vs. 22.0 (22.2) meters, respectively; p = 0.003]. Postoperative opioid consumption and length of stay were similar between groups. We conclude that adductor canal catheters offer both patient and provider benefits when compared to femoral nerve catheters. PMID:25217117

  3. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  4. Study of Wearable Knee Assistive Instruments for Walk Rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yong; Nakamura, Masahiro; Ito, Noritaka; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Horikuchi, Kenichi; Wakabayashi, Shojiro; Takahashi, Rei; Terada, Hidetsugu; Haro, Hirotaka

    A wearable Knee Assistive Instrument for the walk rehabilitation was newly developed. Especially, this system aimed at supporting the rehabilitation for the post-TKA (Total Knee Arthroplasty) which is a popular surgery for aging people. This system consisted of an assisting mechanism for the knee joint, a hip joint support system and a foot pressure sensor system. The driving system of this robot consisted of a CPU board which generated the walking pattern, a Li-ion battery, DC motors with motor drivers, contact sensors to detect the state of foot and potentiometers to detect the hip joint angle. The control method was proposed to reproduce complex motion of knee joint as much as possible, and to increase hip or knee flexion angle. Especially, this method used the timing that heel left from the floor. This method included that the lower limb was raised to prevent a subject's fall. Also, the prototype of knee assisting system was tested. It was confirmed that the assisting system is useful.

  5. Knee stability, athletic performance and sport-specific tasks in non-professional soccer players after ACL reconstruction: comparing trans-tibial and antero-medial portal techniques

    PubMed Central

    Tudisco, Cosimo; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Cosentino, Andrea; Chiozzi, Federica; Piva, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background a wrong position of bone tunnels, in particular on the femur, is one of the most frequent causes of a failed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Several studies demonstrated that drilling the femoral tunnel through the antero-medial portal (AMP) allows a more anatomical placement on the lateral femoral condyle and higher knee stability, compared to trans-tibial (TT) technique. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate two groups of soccer players operated on for ACL reconstruction according to either one of these two techniques. Methods two groups of non-professional soccer players operated on for a single bundle ACL reconstruction with hamstrings autograft using either a TT (20 patients) or an AMP (23 patients) technique were retrospectively evaluated with KT-1000 arthrometer, manual pivot shift test, isokinetic test, the incremental treadmill-running test, athletic and sport specific tasks, and knee scores (IKDC, Lysholm and KOOS). Results the AMP group showed better results at pivot shift test and KOOS, but lower flexion angles at single leg squat test. There were no differences in all the other considered outcomes. Conclusions the better rotational stability of the knee achieved in AMP group did not lead to significantly better clinical and functional results in our patients. Level of evidence III. Treatment study Case-control study. PMID:26605191

  6. Biofeedback to Promote Movement Symmetry After Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    ZENI, JOSEPH; ABUJABER, SUMAYAH; FLOWERS, PORTIA; POZZI, FEDERICO; SNYDER-MACKLER, LYNN

    2014-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Prospective analysis of a longitudinal cohort with an embedded comparison group at a single time point. OBJECTIVES To determine the feasibility and effectiveness of an outpatient rehabilitation protocol that includes movement symmetry biofeedback on functional and biomechanical outcomes after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). BACKGROUND TKA reduces pain and improves functional ability, but many patients experience strength deficits and movement abnormalities in the operated limb, despite outpatient rehabilitation. These asymmetries increase load on the nonoperated limb, and greater asymmetry is related to worse functional outcomes. METHODS Biomechanical and functional metrics were assessed 2 to 3 weeks prior to TKA, at discharge from outpatient physical therapy, and 6 months after TKA in 11 patients (9 men, 2 women; mean ± SD age, 61.4 ± 5.8 years; body mass index, 33.1 ± 5.4 kg/m2) who received 6 to 8 weeks of outpatient physical therapy that included specialized symmetry training. Six-month outcomes were compared to a control group, matched by age, body mass index, and sex (9 men, 2 women; mean ± SD age, 61.8 ± 5 years; body mass index, 34.3 ± 5.1 kg/m2), that did not receive specialized symmetry retraining. RESULTS Of the 11 patients who received added symmetry training, 9 demonstrated clinically meaningful improvements that exceeded the minimal detectable change for all performance-based functional tests at 6 months post-TKA compared to pre-TKA. Six months after TKA, when walking, patients who underwent symmetry retraining had greater knee extension during midstance and had mean sagittal knee moments that were more symmetrical, biphasic, and more representative of normal knee kinetics compared to patients who did not undergo symmetry training. No patients experienced adverse events as the result of the protocol. CONCLUSION Adding symmetry retraining to postoperative protocols is clinically viable, safe, and may have additional benefits compared

  7. Rehabilitation after ACL Injury: A Fluoroscopic Study on the Effects of Type of Exercise on the Knee Sagittal Plane Arthrokinematics

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Sadegh; Esfandiarpour, Fateme; Shakourirad, Ali; Salehi, Reza; Akbar, Mohammad; Farahmand, Farzam

    2013-01-01

    A safe rehabilitation exercise for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries needs to be compatible with the normal knee arthrokinematics to avoid abnormal loading on the joint structures. The objective of this study was to measure the amount of the anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the ACL-deficient knees during selective open and closed kinetic chain exercises. The intact and injured knees of fourteen male subjects with unilateral ACL injury were imaged using uniplanar fluoroscopy, while the subjects performed forward lunge and unloaded/loaded open kinetic knee extension exercises. The ATTs were measured from fluoroscopic images, as the distance between the tibial and femoral reference points, at seven knee flexion angles, from 0° to 90°. No significant differences were found between the ATTs of the ACL-deficient and intact knees at all flexion angles during forward lunge and unloaded open kinetic knee extension (P < 0.05). During loaded open kinetic knee extension, however, the ATTs of the ACL deficient knees were significantly larger than those of the intact knees at 0° (P = 0.002) and 15° (P = 0.012). It was suggested that the forward lunge, as a weight-bearing closed kinetic chain exercise, provides a safer approach for developing muscle strength and functional stability in rehabilitation program of ACL-deficient knees, in comparison with open kinetic knee extension exercise. PMID:24066288

  8. Rehabilitation after ACL injury: a fluoroscopic study on the effects of type of exercise on the knee sagittal plane arthrokinematics.

    PubMed

    Norouzi, Sadegh; Esfandiarpour, Fateme; Shakourirad, Ali; Salehi, Reza; Akbar, Mohammad; Farahmand, Farzam

    2013-01-01

    A safe rehabilitation exercise for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries needs to be compatible with the normal knee arthrokinematics to avoid abnormal loading on the joint structures. The objective of this study was to measure the amount of the anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the ACL-deficient knees during selective open and closed kinetic chain exercises. The intact and injured knees of fourteen male subjects with unilateral ACL injury were imaged using uniplanar fluoroscopy, while the subjects performed forward lunge and unloaded/loaded open kinetic knee extension exercises. The ATTs were measured from fluoroscopic images, as the distance between the tibial and femoral reference points, at seven knee flexion angles, from 0° to 90°. No significant differences were found between the ATTs of the ACL-deficient and intact knees at all flexion angles during forward lunge and unloaded open kinetic knee extension (P < 0.05). During loaded open kinetic knee extension, however, the ATTs of the ACL deficient knees were significantly larger than those of the intact knees at 0° (P = 0.002) and 15° (P = 0.012). It was suggested that the forward lunge, as a weight-bearing closed kinetic chain exercise, provides a safer approach for developing muscle strength and functional stability in rehabilitation program of ACL-deficient knees, in comparison with open kinetic knee extension exercise. PMID:24066288

  9. Older Adults without Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis: Knee Alignment and Knee Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Fahlman, Lissa; Sangeorzan, Emmeline; Chheda, Nimisha; Lambright, Daphne

    2014-01-01

    This study describes knee alignment and active knee range of motion (ROM) in a community-based group of 78-year old adults (n = 143) who did not have radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis in either knee (KL < 2). Although knee malalignment is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, most women and men had either valgus or varus alignments. Notably, no men were valgus in both knees. Women with both knees valgus had significantly greater body mass index (P > 0.001) than women with varus or straight knees. Men and women with valgus or varus knee alignments had generally lower ROM than individuals with both knees straight. In summary, this study highlights the complex relationships among knee alignment, ROM, body mass index, and gender in elderly adults without radiographic knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24453501

  10. Older Adults without Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis: Knee Alignment and Knee Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Lissa; Sangeorzan, Emmeline; Chheda, Nimisha; Lambright, Daphne

    2014-01-12

    This study describes knee alignment and active knee range of motion (ROM) in a community-based group of 78-year old adults (n = 143) who did not have radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis in either knee (KL < 2). Although knee malalignment is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, most women and men had either valgus or varus alignments. Notably, no men were valgus in both knees. Women with both knees valgus had significantly greater body mass index (P > 0.001) than women with varus or straight knees. Men and women with valgus or varus knee alignments had generally lower ROM than individuals with both knees straight. In summary, this study highlights the complex relationships among knee alignment, ROM, body mass index, and gender in elderly adults without radiographic knee osteoarthritis.

  11. An EMG-driven Modeling Approach to Muscle Force and Joint Load Estimations: Case Study in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Rudolph, Katherine S.; Manal, Kurt T.

    2011-01-01

    Summary It is important to know the magnitude and patterns of joint loading in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA), since altered loads are implicated in onset and progression of the disease. We used an EMG-driven forward dynamics model to estimate joint loads during walking in a subject with knee OA and a healthy control subject. Kinematic, kinetic, and surface EMG data were used to predict muscle forces using a Hill-type muscle model. The muscle forces were used to balance the frontal plane moment to obtain medial and lateral condylar loads. Loads were normalized to body weight (BWs) and the mean of three trials taken. The OA subject had greater medial and lower lateral loads compared to the control subject. 75 to 80% of the total load was borne on the medial compartment in the control subject, compared to 90 to 95% in the OA subject. In fact, complete lateral unloading occurred during midstance for the OA subject. Loading for the healthy subject was consistent with the data from instrumented knee studies. In the future, the model can be used to analyze the impact of various interventions to reduce the loads on the medial compartment in people with knee OA. PMID:21901754

  12. Association between meniscal tears and the peak external knee adduction moment and foot rotation during level walking in postmenopausal women without knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Davies-Tuck, Miranda L; Wluka, Anita E; Teichtahl, Andrew J; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Jones, Graeme; Ding, Changhai; Davis, Susan R; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Meniscal injury is a risk factor for the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis, yet little is known about risk factors for meniscal pathology. Joint loading mediated via gait parameters may be associated with meniscal tears, and determining whether such an association exists was the aim of this study. Methods Three-dimensional Vicon gait analyses were performed on the dominant knee of 20 non-osteoarthritic women, and the peak external knee adduction moment during early and late stance was determined. The degree of foot rotation was also examined when the knee adductor moment peaked during early and late stance. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to determine the presence and severity of meniscal lesions in the dominant knee. Results The presence (P = 0.04) and severity (P = 0.01) of medial meniscal tears were positively associated with the peak external knee adduction moment during early stance while a trend for late stance was observed (P = 0.07). They were also associated with increasing degrees of internal foot rotation during late stance, independent of the magnitude of the peak external knee adduction moment occurring at that time (P = 0.03). During level walking among healthy women, the presence and severity of medial meniscal tears were positively associated with the peak external knee adduction moment. Moreover, the magnitude of internal foot rotation was associated with the presence and severity of medial meniscal lesions, independent of the peak knee adductor moment during late stance. Conclusion These data may suggest that gait parameters may be associated with meniscal damage, although longitudinal studies will be required to clarify whether gait abnormalities predate meniscal lesions, or vice versa, and therefore whether modification of gait patterns may be helpful. PMID:18492234

  13. The Quality of Life (QOL) after Total Knee Arthroplasties among Saudi Arabians: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Omran, Abdallah S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is commonly performed in Saudi Arabia but there is very limited published data on outcome and quality of life (QOL) post Knee arthroplasty. To assess the QOL post TKA we performed this retrospective study. Methods: Total Knee arthroplasty was started in mid- 2000’s at the university hospital. Fifty–two patients of TKA who came for follow up during the study period were asked to fill a pre-determined questionnaire and clinical examination, were included in the study. Patients were assessed and at 2 parameters pre and postoperative time-points, for pain [1-9], walking [1-9] and asked whether they would recommend the procedure to their relatives and friends, and finally whether they were satisfied with the outcome. Results: We interviewed 52 patients (9 males and 43 females), mean age of 64.75 ± 7.90 years. Twenty (34.50%) had bilateral TKR, and the rest single sided. The preoperative night pain was 7.72 ± 2.03 compared to postoperative 1.92 ± 1.41 (P<0.001 (5.80 and < 6.47) and pain at walking was 8.39 ± 0.77 versus 2.39 ± 2.05 (P<0.001(5.40 and < 6.55). The overall satisfaction 93% (8.37 ± 1.32) and QOL as assessed preoperatively was 3.60 ± 2.15 and postoperatively was 8.41  ±  1.27 (P<0.001 (4.81and 4.13). Fifty-one (98.07%) patients indicated that they will recommend the procedure to others. Conclusions: The overall satisfaction and improvement of QOL in male patients was 93.77% and female patients 92.77% and all patients indicated that they will recommend others to undergo the similar procedure to improve their QOL. PMID:25324701

  14. Immediate Effects of an Elastic Knee Sleeve on Frontal Plane Gait Biomechanics in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Schween, Raphael; Gehring, Dominic; Gollhofer, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis of the knee affects millions of people. Elastic knee sleeves aim at relieving symptoms. While symptomatic improvements have been demonstrated as a consequence of elastic knee sleeves, evidence for biomechanical alterations only exists for the sagittal plane. We therefore asked what effect an elastic knee sleeve would have on frontal plane gait biomechanics. Methods 18 subjects (8 women, 10 men) with osteoarthritis of the medial tibiofemoral joint walked over ground with and without an elastic knee sleeve. Kinematics and forces were recorded and joint moments were calculated using an inverse dynamics approach. Conditions with sleeve and without sleeve were compared with paired t-Tests. Results With the sleeve, knee adduction angle at ground contact was reduced by 1.9±2.1° (P = 0.006). Peak knee adduction was reduced by 1.5±1.6° (P = 0.004). The first peak knee adduction moment and positive knee adduction impulse were decreased by 10.1% (0.74±0.9 Nm•kg-1; P = 0.002) and 12.9% (0.28±0.3 Nm•s•kg-1; P < 0.004), respectively. Conclusion Our study provides evidence that wearing an elastic knee sleeve during walking can reduce knee adduction angles, moments and impulse in subjects with knee osteoarthritis. As a higher knee adduction moment has previously been identified as a risk factor for disease progression in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis, we speculate that wearing a knee sleeve may be beneficial for this specific subgroup. PMID:25621488

  15. Asymmetric loading and bone mineral density at the asymptomatic knees of subjects with unilateral hip osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Najia; Dua, Anisha; Thorp, Laura; Mikolaitis, Rachel A.; Wimmer, Markus A.; Foucher, Kharma C.; Fogg, Louis F.; Block, Joel A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The contralateral knee of those with unilateral endstage hip OA is known to be at greater risk for endstage knee OA compared to the ipsilateral, same side knee. Likewise, in endstage hip OA, this contralateral knee is known to have increased dynamic joint loads compared to the ipsilateral knee. Here, we study a population with unilateral hip OA, who are asymptomatic at the knees, for early asymmetries in knee loading. Methods Data from 62 subjects with unilateral hip OA were evaluated. Subjects underwent gait analyses for evaluation of dynamic knee loads as well as dual energy X-ray absorptiometry for evaluation of bone mineral density (BMD) at both knees. Differences between knees were compared. Results Peak dynamic knee loads were significantly higher at the contralateral knee compared to the ipsilateral knee (2.46±0.71 vs 2.23±0.81 %BW*ht, p=0.029). Similarly, medial compartment tibial BMD was significantly higher at the contralateral knee compared to the ipsilateral knee (0.897±0.208 vs 0.854±0.206 gm/c2, p=0.033). Interestingly, there was a direct correlation between contralteral:ipsilateral dynamic knee load and contralateral:ipsilateral medial compartment tibial BMD (Spearman’s rho= 0.287, p=0.036). Conclusions This study demonstrates that at the contralateral knees of patients with unilateral hip OA, which are at higher risk of developing progressive symptomatic OA compared to the ipsilateral knees, loading and structural asymmetries appear early in the disease course, while the knees are still asymptomatic. These early biomechanical asymmetries may have corresponding long term consequences, providing further support for the potential role of loading in OA onset and progression. PMID:22127702

  16. An in vivo study of the effect of distal femoral resection on passive knee extension.

    PubMed

    Smith, Conrad K; Chen, Justin A; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2010-10-01

    A previous study showed that 1 mm of distal femoral resection restored knee extension 4.5°. We determined the relationship with a more accurate measurement technique. Twenty-six subjects treated with total knee arthroplasty were studied. Digital photographs of the extended knee with and without 1.5 and 3.0 mm thick augments placed between the femoral component and distal femur were analyzed, and knee extension was measured. One millimeter of distal femoral resection restored 1.8° of extension that is less correction than the previous study reported. Because an attempt to correct a 10° extension deficit by resecting the distal femur could require 5 mm or more of bone removal that moves the joint line too proximal, we recommend exploring other techniques before resecting the femur.

  17. I-ONE therapy in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty: a prospective, randomized and controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often associated with a severe local inflammatory reaction which, unless controlled, leads to persistent pain up to one year after surgery. Standard and accelerated rehabilitation protocols are currently being implemented after TKA, but no consensus exists regarding the long-term effects. Biophysical stimulation with pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) has been demonstrated to exert an anti-inflammatory effect, to promote early functional recovery and to maintain a positive long-term effect in patients undergoing joint arthroscopy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether PEMFs can be used to limit the pain and enhance patient recovery after TKA. Methods A prospective, randomized, controlled study in 30 patients undergoing TKA was conducted. Patients were randomized into experimental PEMFs or a control group. Patients in the experimental group were instructed to use I-ONE stimulator 4hours/day for 60days. Postoperatively, all patients received the same rehabilitation program. Treatment outcome was assessed using the Knee Society Score, SF-36 Health-Survey and VAS. Patients were evaluated pre-operatively and one, two, six and 12 months after TKA. Joint swelling and Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drug (NSAID) consumption were recorded. Comparisons between the two groups were carried out using a two-tail heteroschedastic Student’s t-test. Analysis of variance for each individual subject during the study was performed using ANOVA for multiple comparisons, applied on each group, and a Dunnet post hoc test. A p value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Pre-operatively, no differences were observed between groups in terms of age, sex, weight, height, Knee-Score, VAS, SF-36 and joint swelling, with the exception of the Functional Score. The Knee-Score, SF-36 and VAS demonstrated significantly positive outcomes in the I-ONE stimulated group compared with the controls at follow-ups. In the I

  18. It’s not just a knee, but a whole life: A qualitative descriptive study on patients’ experiences of living with knee osteoarthritis and their expectations for knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Nyvang, Josefina; Hedström, Margareta; Gleissman, Sissel Andreassen

    2016-01-01

    Aim Knee arthroplasties are an increasingly common treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) and the main indication is pain. Previous research states, however, that 15–20% of the operated patients are dissatisfied and 20–30% have persistent pain after surgery. This study is aimed at describing patients’ experiences of living with knee OA when scheduled for surgery and further their expectations for future life after surgery. Methods We interviewed 12 patients with knee OA scheduled for arthroplasty, using semi-structured qualitative interviews. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. Findings Three categories were formulated with an overriding theme: “It's not just a knee, but a whole life.” The three categories were “Change from their earlier lives,” “Coping with knee problems,” and “Ultimate decision to undergo surgery.” The main finding was that knee OA affects the whole body and self, ultimately affecting the patients’ lives on many levels. Further findings were that knee OA was considered to be the central focus in the participants’ lives, which limited their level of activity, their ability to function as desired, their quality of life, and their mental well-being. Although surgery was considered to be the only solution, the expectations regarding the outcome differed. Conclusions The participants were forced to change how they previously had lived their lives resulting in a feeling of loss. Thus, the experienced loss and expectations for future life must be put into the context of the individual's own personality and be taken into account when treating individuals with knee OA. The experience of living with knee OA largely varies between individuals. This mandates that patients’ assessment should be considered on individual basis with regard to each patient. PMID:27036130

  19. Are Western Knee Designs Dimensionally Correct for Korean Women? A Morphometric Study of Resected Femoral Surfaces during Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Suk-Joo; Kang, Hyung Wook

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the shape of the distal femur of Korean women compared with the prostheses currently available in Korea. Methods Morphometric data (5 parameters) were measured in 356 resected femurs of Korean women undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) utilizing the LCS knee implant (DePuy). The data were then compared with 5 additional contemporary TKA implant systems. Results Implant designs based on Caucasian population data do not ideally match the distal femoral morphology of Korean women. Overhang at the anterior mediolateral width was observed in 84.8% for the LCS while a gender-specific implant resulted in undercoverage of the bone in 86%. Posterior overhang was observed in up to 51.2%. Most implant designs have a narrower intercondylar notch than the morphologic data of Korean women. Conclusions Since there is some difference between the shape of distal femur of Korean women and that of the implants, surgeons should have this in mind when selecting an implant for a patient. These data may also be used as a guideline for future prosthetic design options for Korean women population. PMID:27583107

  20. Knee Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Robert C.; Richter, Dustin L.; Wascher, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic knee dislocation is becoming more prevalent because of improved recognition and increased exposure to high-energy trauma, but long-term results are lacking. Purpose: To present 2 cases with minimum 20-year follow-up and a review of the literature to illustrate some of the fundamental principles in the management of the dislocated knee. Study Design: Review and case reports. Methods: Two patients with knee dislocations who underwent multiligamentous knee reconstruction were reviewed, with a minimum 20-year follow-up. These patients were brought back for a clinical evaluation using both subjective and objective measures. Subjective measures include the following scales: Lysholm, Tegner activity, visual analog scale (VAS), Short Form–36 (SF-36), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and a psychosocial questionnaire. Objective measures included ligamentous examination, radiographic evaluation (including Telos stress radiographs), and physical therapy assessment of function and stability. Results: The mean follow-up was 22 years. One patient had a vascular injury requiring repair prior to ligament reconstruction. The average assessment scores were as follows: SF-36 physical health, 52; SF-36 mental health, 59; Lysholm, 92; IKDC, 86.5; VAS involved, 10.5 mm; and VAS uninvolved, 2.5 mm. Both patients had excellent stability and were functioning at high levels of activity for their age (eg, hiking, skydiving). Both patients had radiographic signs of arthritis, which lowered 1 subject’s IKDC score to “C.” Conclusion: Knee dislocations have rare long-term excellent results, and most intermediate-term studies show fair to good functional results. By following fundamental principles in the management of a dislocated knee, patients can be given the opportunity to function at high levels. Hopefully, continued advances in the evaluation and treatment of knee dislocations will improve the long-term outcomes for these patients in the

  1. Occurrence of symptomatic knee osteoarthrosis in rural Finland: a prospective follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Kannus, P; Järvinen, M; Kontiala, H; Bergius, L; Hyssy, E; Salminen, E; Tuomi, A; Unkila, T; Valtanen, I

    1987-01-01

    All visits to physicians in the Orivesi Region Federation of Municipalities for Public Health Work in Finland paid due to symptomatic osteoarthrosis of the knee joint were prospectively recorded over a period of one year. Two hundred and thirty four visits were made, accounting for 0.63% of all visits. The prevalence of knee osteoarthrosis was 1.11% (men 0.45%, women 1.72%), and the incidence was 0.60%. The disease occurred almost twice as often in the right knee than in the left. The study provides basic information about patients needing medical help because of symptomatic knee osteoarthrosis. The results can be used as an aid to the planning of examination and treatment resources and in assessment of the need for such services. PMID:3426287

  2. Genu Recurvatum versus Fixed Flexion after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Amila; Chong, Hwei Chi; Chin, Pak Lin; Chia, Shi Lu; Lo, Ngai Ngung; Yeo, Seng Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background To date, there is no study comparing outcomes between post-total knee replacement genu recurvatum and fixed flexion. This study aims to provide data that will help in deciding which side to err on when neutral extension is not achieved. Methods A prospective cohort study of primary total knee arthroplasties was performed, which compared the 6-month and 2-year clinical outcomes between fixed flexion and genu recurvatum deformities at 6 months. Results At 6 months, knees in genu recurvatum did better than knees in fixed flexion deformity in terms of knee flexion. However, at 2 years, knees in fixed flexion deformity did better in terms of knee scores and showed better improvement in the degree of deformity. Conclusions We conclude that it is better to err on the side of fixed flexion deformity if neutral alignment cannot be achieved. PMID:27583106

  3. Comparing wobble board and jump-landing training effects on knee and ankle movement discrimination.

    PubMed

    Waddington, G; Seward, H; Wrigley, T; Lacey, N; Adams, R

    2000-12-01

    The effects of two training programs on movement discrimination ability, at the ankle and knee, were assessed from the left and right lower limbs of forty-four football players. All players in three Under 18 Victorian Football League (VFL) squads were allocated to either wobble board training, jump landing training, or no-training conditions. Pre-tests to assess discrimination of extent for active movements made while standing were carried out on both ankles and knees of all subjects, using an automated device to accurately set the different movement stop points. Five distances were used, between 10.5 degrees and 14.5 degrees from horizontal for ankle inversion, and between 30.3 degrees and 31.7 degrees from vertical for knee flexion. From a series of 50 inversion movements and 50 knee flexion movements, matrices of absolute judgement by actual movement extent were produced. Non-parametric signal detection analysis was applied to the discrimination score. All subjects were retested after eight weeks. Improvement in discrimination of ankle movements into inversion from pre-test (0.65) to post test (0.70) for the wobble board trained group was significantly larger than the change in the jump-landing trained and the untrained groups (Jump Landing: Pretest: 0.64 to Post-test: 0.64 and Control; Pretest: 0.63 to Post-test: 0.64). Discrimination of knee flexion movements improved significantly from pre-test to post-test in all three groups. These data demonstrate that wobble board training can improve discrimination of discrete ankle inversion movements, an effect interpreted as enabling greater accuracy in the making of inversion movements in foot preparation prior to ground contact.

  4. Incidence of Venous Thromboembolism after Elective Knee Arthroscopic Surgery: A Historical Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Mauck, Karen F.; Froehling, David A.; Daniels, Paul R.; Dahm, Diane L.; Ashrani, Aneel A.; Crusan, Daniel J.; Petterson, Tanya M.; Bailey, Kent R.; Heit, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The incidence of symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) after knee arthroscopy is uncertain. In this study, we estimate the incidence of symptomatic VTE after knee arthroscopy. Objectives To estimate the incidence of symptomatic VTE after arthroscopic knee surgery. Methods In a population-based historical cohort study, all Olmsted County, MN residents undergoing a first arthroscopic knee surgery over the 18-year period, 1988-2005, were followed forward in time for incident deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE). The cumulative incidence of VTE after knee arthroscopy was determined using the Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator. Patient age at surgery, sex, calendar year of surgery, body mass index, anesthesia characteristics and hospitalization were tested as potential predictors of VTE using Cox proportional hazards modeling, both univariately and adjusted for age and sex. Results Among 4833 Olmsted County residents with knee arthroscopy, 18 developed postoperative VTE, all within the first 6 weeks after surgery. The cumulative incidence rates of symptomatic VTE at 7, 14 and 35 days were 0.2%, 0.3% and 0.4%, respectively. The hazard for postoperative VTE was significantly increased for older patient age (HR=1.34 for each ten-year increase in patient age; p=0.03) and hospitalization either prior to or after knee arthroscopy (HR=14.1; p<0.001). Conclusions The incidence of symptomatic VTE after arthroscopic knee surgery is very low. Older age and hospitalization are associated with increased risk. Routine prophylaxis to prevent symptomatic venous thromboembolism is likely not needed in this patient population. PMID:23648016

  5. High systemic bone mineral density increases the risk of incident knee OA and joint space narrowing, but not radiographic progression of existing knee OA: The MOST study

    PubMed Central

    Nevitt, Michael C.; Zhang, Yuqing; Javaid, M. Kassim; Neogi, Tuhina; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Niu, Jingbo; McCulloch, Charles E.; Segal, Neil A.; Felson, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies suggest that high systemic bone mineral density (BMD) is associated with incident knee OA defined by osteophytes, but not with joint space narrowing (JSN), and are inconsistent regarding BMD and progression of existing OA. We tested the association of BMD with incident and progressive tibiofemoral OA in a large, prospective study of men and women ages 50–79 with, or at risk for, knee OA. Methods Baseline and 30-month weight-bearing PA and lateral knee x-rays were scored for K–L grade, JSN and osteophytes. Incident OA was defined as the development of K–L grade ≥2 at follow-up. All knees were classified for increases in grade of JSN and osteophytes from baseline. The association of gender-specific quartiles of baseline BMD with risk of incident and progressive OA was analyzed using logistic regression, adjusting for covariates. Results The mean age of 1,754 subjects was 63.2 (SD, 7.8) and BMI 29.9 (SD, 5.4). In knees without baseline OA, higher femoral neck and whole body BMD were associated with an increased risk of incident OA and increases in grade of JSN and osteophytes (p < 0.01 for trends); adjusted odds were 2.3 to 2.9-fold greater in the highest vs. the lowest BMD quartiles. In knees with existing OA, progression was not significantly related to BMD. Conclusions In knees without OA, higher systemic BMD was associated with a greater risk of the onset of JSN and K–L grade ≥2. The role of systemic BMD in early knee OA pathogenesis warrants further investigation. PMID:19147619

  6. Study of Imaging Pattern in Bone Marrow Oedema in MRI in Recent Knee Injuries and its Correlation with Type of Knee Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Kulamani; Saha, Pramod; Dodia, Jainesh Valjibhai; Raj, Vinay Rajappa; Bhairagond, Shweta Jagadish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The knee is a major weight bearing joint that provides mobility and stability during physical activity as well as balance while standing. If the knee is exposed to forces beyond its physiologic range, risk of injury to bone or soft tissue structures increases. A thorough understanding of knee injury patterns and their mechanisms may help in achieving more accurate assessment of injuries. Aim To identify imaging pattern in bone marrow oedema and to correlate the pattern of bone marrow oedema retrospectively with type of knee injury from clinical history. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was done on all patients referred to Krishna Hospital, Karad for MRI knee with history of recent (< 6 weeks) knee injury. Study was conducted between May 2014 to September 2015 with a sample size of 200 patients. Plain radiograph of knee was done in all patients and they were scanned using 1.5 Tesla Seimens Avanto (Tim + Dot) with Tx/Rx 15 channel knee coil # Tim. Results Among the 200 cases, bone marrow contusion was noted in 138 cases (69%) and absent contusion in 62 cases (31%). Bone marrow contusion showed five patterns (according to Sanders classification) i.e., Clip injury in 39 cases (28.3%), Pivot shift injury in 78 cases (56.5%), Dashboard injury in eight cases (5.8%), Hyperextension injury in four cases (2.9%), Lateral patellar dislocation in three cases (2.2%). In six cases (4.3%) no pattern of bone marrow contusion could be explained and was categorized as unclassified pattern. Conclusion Pivot shift pattern is most common contusion pattern and the most common type/mode of sports related injury. By analysing bone marrow contusion pattern, type/mode can be determined in most of the cases. By applying a biomechanical approach in MR interpretation, it is possible to detect lesions like ligament rupture and osseous contusion, to predict subtle but it might overlook important abnormalities. PMID:27190914

  7. The knee in full flexion: an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Pinskerova, V; Samuelson, K M; Stammers, J; Maruthainar, K; Sosna, A; Freeman, M A R

    2009-06-01

    There has been only one limited report dating from 1941 using dissection which has described the tibiofemoral joint between 120 degrees and 160 degrees of flexion despite the relevance of this arc to total knee replacement. We now provide a full description having examined one living and eight cadaver knees using MRI, dissection and previously published cryosections in one knee. In the range of flexion from 120 degrees to 160 degrees the flexion facet centre of the medial femoral condyle moves back 5 mm and rises up on to the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. At 160 degrees the posterior horn is compressed in a synovial recess between the femoral cortex and the tibia. This limits flexion. The lateral femoral condyle also rolls back with the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus moving with the condyle. Both move down over the posterior tibia at 160 degrees of flexion. Neither the events between 120 degrees and 160 degrees nor the anatomy at 160 degrees could result from a continuation of the kinematics up to 120 degrees . Therefore hyperflexion is a separate arc. The anatomical and functional features of this arc suggest that it would be difficult to design an implant for total knee replacement giving physiological movement from 0 degrees to 160 degrees .

  8. Tranexamic Acid in a Multimodal Blood Loss Prevention Protocol to Decrease Blood Loss in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Cohort Study#

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Andreu, Miguel; Talavera, Gloria; Padilla-Eguiluz, Norma G.; Perez-Chrzanowska, Hanna; Figueredo-Galve, Reyes; Rodriguez-Merchán, Carlos E.; Gómez-Barrena, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify if blood loss and transfusion requirements can be decreased in revision knee surgery through a multimodal blood loss approach with tranexamic acid (TXA) Patients and Methods: A retrospective study was designed in 87 knees (79 patients) that received a knee revision between 2007 and 2013. To avoid heterogeneity in the surgical technique, only revisions with one single implant system were included. A treatment series of 44 knees that received TXA and other techniques in a multimodal blood loss protocol was compared to a control series of 43 knees that received neither TXA nor the rest of the multimodal blood loss protocol. No differences in the complexity of surgeries or case severity were detected. Results: A significant decrease was observed from 58% transfusion rate in the control group to 5% in the treated group. The postoperative haemoglobin drop was also significantly different. Although the use of a blood loss prevention approach including TXA was the most relevant factor in the transfusion risk (OR=15), longer surgical time also associated an increased risk of transfusion (OR=1.15). Conclusion: This study supports the use of a two-dose intravenous TXA under a multimodal blood loss prevention approach in revision knee replacement with significant reduction in the transfusion rate, postoperative blood loss and haemoglobin drop. PMID:27708740

  9. Comparative Packaging Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele; Antonini, David

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a comparative packaging study for use on long duration space missions. The topics include: 1) Purpose; 2) Deliverables; 3) Food Sample Selection; 4) Experimental Design Matrix; 5) Permeation Rate Comparison; and 6) Packaging Material Information.

  10. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  11. Effect studies of Uyghur sand therapy on the hemodynamics of the knee-joint arteries.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rongchang; Mahemut, Dilinaer; Tiyipujiang, Rexiati; Aihemaiti, Kuwahan; Ainiwaierjiang, Nuerya

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of Uyghur sand therapy on dynamics of arterial flow of knee joints via experiments and numerical simulations. Experiments have been carried out on 30 volunteers, with their diameter and flow rate of arteries of knee joints measured before and after Uyghur sand therapy. It has been found that Uyghur sand therapy will increase the inner diameter of knee arteries and speed up the blood flow. Experimental results show that Uyghur sand therapy can help relieve obstacles in local blood flow. By choosing one volunteer for CT scanning, three-dimensional reconstruction of knee-joint arteries via MIMICS software is achieved. Calculation model is the established with numerical calculations performed by ANSYS software. According to the calculations, the blood flow of the knee arteries speeds up and the uniform distribution of velocity enlarges after Uyghur sand therapy, which further confirms the experimental results. Besides, the research also suggests that Uyghur sand therapy has stronger effect on blood flow of knee-joint arteries than the inner diameter.

  12. Differences in Health-Related Quality of Life among Subjects with Frequent Bilateral or Unilateral Knee Pain: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bindawas, Saad; Vennu, Vishal; Snih, Soham Al

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional study. OBJECTIVE To examine associations between frequent bilateral knee pain (BKP) and unilateral knee pain (UKP) and health-related quality of life (QoL). We hypothesized that frequent BKP would be associated with poorer health-related QoL than would frequent UKP and no knee pain. BACKGROUND Knee pain is one of the most frequently reported types of joint pain among adults in the United States. It is the most frequent cause of limited physical function, disability, and reduced QoL. METHODS Data were collected from the Osteoarthritis Initiative public-use data sets. Health-related QoL was assessed in 2481 participants (aged 45–79 years at baseline). The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score QoL subscale (knee-specific measure) and the physical component summary and mental component summary (MCS) scores of the Medical Outcomes Study 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) (generic measure) were used to assess health-related QoL. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relationships between frequent knee pain and health-related QoL, adjusted for sociodemographic and health covariates. RESULTS Compared with subjects with no knee pain, subjects with frequent BKP and UKP had significantly lower scores on the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score QoL subscale (mean difference, −35.2; standard error [SE], 0.86; P<.001 and mean difference, −29.2; SE, 0.93; P<.001; respectively) and the SF-12 physical component summary score (mean difference, −6.25; SE, 0.41; P<.001 and mean difference, −4.10, SE, 0.43; P<.00; respectively), after controlling for sociodemographic and health covariates. The SF-12 MCS score was lower among those with BKP (−1.29; SE, 0.42; P<.001). Frequent UKP was not associated with the SF-12 MCS. CONCLUSIONS Subjects with frequent BKP had lower health-related QoL than those with frequent unilateral or no knee pain, as reflected in lower Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Socre Qo

  13. Comparative assessment of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength measured using a hand-held vs. isokinetic dynamometer

    PubMed Central

    Muff, Guillaume; Dufour, Stéphane; Meyer, Alain; Severac, François; Favret, Fabrice; Geny, Bernard; Lecocq, Jehan; Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare measurements of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength performed using a hand-held dynamometer and an isokinetic dynamometer in apparently healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty adult volunteers underwent knee muscle strength evaluation using an isokinetic or a hand-held dynamometer. [Results] Strong positive correlations were found between the 2 methods, with correlation coefficients r ranging from 0.72 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48−0.86) to 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75−0.94), depending on the muscle group and the isokinetic evaluation mode. The reproducibility of the hand-held dynamometer findings was good, judged by a coefficient of variation of 3.2–4.2%. However, the correlation between the 2 methods for the assessment of flexor/extensor ratios ranged from −0.04 to 0.46. [Conclusion] Knee extensor and flexor muscle strength recorded with a hand-held dynamometer is reproducible and significantly correlated with the isokinetic values, indicating that this method may in some cases be a useful replacement for isokinetic strength measurement. However, for strength ratio assessment, and when judged against the isokinetic standard, a hand-held dynamometer is not a valid option. PMID:27799667

  14. Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  15. The effect of high tibial osteotomy on the results of total knee arthroplasty: a matched case control study

    PubMed Central

    van Raaij, Tom M; Bakker, Wouter; Reijman, Max; Verhaar, Jan AN

    2007-01-01

    Background We performed a matched case control study to assess the effect of prior high tibia valgus producing osteotomy on results and complications of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods From 1996 until 2003 356 patients underwent all cemented primary total knee replacement in our institution. Twelve patients with a history of 14 HTO were identified and matched to a control group of 12 patients with 14 primary TKA without previous HTO. The match was made for gender, age, date of surgery, body mass index, aetiology and type of prosthesis. Clinical and radiographic outcome were evaluated after a median duration of follow-up of 3.7 years (minimum, 2.3 years). The SPSS program was used for statistical analyses. Results The index group had more perioperative blood loss and exposure difficulties with one tibial tuberosity osteotomy and three patients with lateral retinacular releases. No such procedures were needed in the control group. Mid-term HSS, KSS and WOMAC scores were less favourable for the index group, but these differences were not significant. The tibial slope of patients with prior HTO was significantly decreased after this procedure. The tibial posterior inclination angle was corrected during knee replacement but posterior inclination was significantly less compared to the control group. No deep infection or knee component loosening were seen in the group with prior HTO. Conclusion We conclude that TKA after HTO seems to be technically more demanding than a primary knee arthroplasty, but clinical outcome was almost identical to a matched group that had no HTO previously. PMID:17683549

  16. “We’re All Looking for Solutions”: A Qualitative Study of the Management of Knee Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Crystal; Badley, Elizabeth M; Jaglal, Susan B; Sale, Joanna; Davis, Aileen M

    2014-01-01

    Objective While the prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) increases with age, the first signs begin in the fourth or fifth decade. Little is known about how younger adults respond to OA. This study explores how people ages 35–65 years manage knee symptoms. Methods Six focus groups were conducted with 41 participants (mean age 50.9 years, 63% women) who self-reported a diagnosis of OA or reported knee symptoms (i.e., pain, aching, or stiffness) on most days of the past month. Purposive sampling was used, seeking variation in age and sex. The principles of constructivist grounded theory guided data collection and analysis. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative method. Results Participants engaged in a process of proactively trying to find ways to control knee symptoms and disease progression. Their approach to management was not linear, but rather a process that moved back and forth between searching for “solutions” and active management (ongoing use of strategies). During the process, participants consulted health care providers, but often perceived that medical care offered limited options and guidance. Management was constructed as a “never-ending” process that entailed effort and personal resources. Conclusion Participants were proactive in seeking ways to manage knee OA symptoms. There is a mismatch between participants’ proactive approach and the reactive approach of the health care system that has focused on late-stage disease. Programs and supports within the formal and informal health care system are required to enable people to successfully manage knee symptoms across their lifespan. PMID:24403242

  17. Obese patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty have distinct preoperative characteristics: an institutional study of 4718 patients.

    PubMed

    Vulcano, Ettore; Lee, Yuo-Yu; Yamany, Tarek; Lyman, Stephen; Valle, Alejandro González Della

    2013-08-01

    Obesity affects a disproportionate proportion of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients. Our study explores pre-operative characteristics between obese and non-obese patients undergoing TKA surgery. A cohort of 4718 osteoarthritic patients, undergoing primary TKA, was studied. Patients were stratified according to BMI classes. Each class was compared in terms of age, race, gender, level of education, insurance status, pre-operative WOMAC, SF-36, and Elixhauser comorbidities. There was a positive relationship between BMI and female gender, non-white race, Medicaid, private insurance, and self-pay. A negative relationship was observed between BMI and age, Medicare, WOMAC and SF-36. Obese TKA candidates differ from their non-obese counterparts in a number of demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical characteristics. PMID:23523207

  18. The role of the popliteus tendon in total knee arthroplasty: a cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    COTTINO, UMBERTO; BRUZZONE, MATTEO; ROSSO, FEDERICA; DETTONI, FEDERICO; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose this study was conducted to investigate the influence of the popliteus tendon (PT) on the static stability of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods twenty knees were used. In 10 right knees, a cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA trial prosthesis was implanted; in the other ten knees (left knees), the posterior cruciate ligament was cut and a posterior substitution (PS) TKA trial prosthesis was implanted. Lamina spreaders were set at 100 N of tension, one on the medial and one on the lateral articular space. Gaps were then measured with a caliper before and after PT sectioning. Results the correlation between femoral dimensions and popliteus insertion distance from articular surfaces was measured with the Pearson correlation index and considered significant. In the CR-TKA group, medial and lateral gap measurements showed a significant increase after PT sectioning both in flexion and in extension. In the PS-TKA group, lateral gap measurements showed a significant increase after PT sectioning both in flexion and in extension, while the medial gap measurements increased significantly only in flexion. Conclusions PT sectioning destabilized both the lateral and the medial aspects of the knee. A greater effect was observed in the lateral compartment. The most statistically reliable effect was observed with the knee in flexion. In addition, we observed that preserving the PCL does not prevent lateral gap opening after PT sectioning. Clinical relevance PT should always be preserved when performing a TKA, because its resection can affect gap balancing, in flexion and in extension. Type of study controlled laboratory study. PMID:26151034

  19. Individual and occupational risk factors for knee osteoarthritis – Study protocol of a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Klußmann, André; Gebhardt, Hansjuergen; Liebers, Falk; von Engelhardt, Lars Victor; Dávid, Andreas; Bouillon, Bertil; Rieger, Monika A

    2008-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the frequent and functionally impairing disorders of the musculoskeletal system. In the literature, a number of occupational risk factors are discussed as being related to the development and progress of knee joint diseases, e.g. working in kneeling or squatting posture, lifting and carrying of heavy weights. The importance of the single risk factors and the possibility of prevention are currently under discussion. Besides the occupational factors, a number of individual risk factors are important, too. The distinction between work-related factors and individual factors is crucial in assessing the risk and in deriving preventive measures in occupational health. In existing studies, the occupational stress is determined mainly by surveys in employees and/or by making assumptions about individual occupations. Direct evaluation of occupational exposure has been performed only exceptionally. The aim of the research project ArGon is the assessment of different occupational factors in relation to individual factors (e.g. constitutional factors, leisure time activities, sports), which might influence the development and/or progression of knee (OA). The project is designed as a case control study. Methods/Design To raise valid data about the physical stress associated with occupational and leisure time activities, patients with and without knee OA are questioned by means of a standardised questionnaire and an interview. The required sample size was estimated to 800 cases and an equal number of controls. The degree and localisation of the knee cartilage or joint damages in the cases are documented on the basis of radiological, arthroscopic and/or operative findings in a patient record. Furthermore, occupational exposure is analysed at selected workplaces. To evaluate the answers provided in the questionnaire, work analysis is performed. Discussion In this research project, specific information on the correlation of occupational

  20. Unicondylar knee arthroplasty: a cementless perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Michael E.; Englund, Roy E.; Leighton, Ross K.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To compare the results of cementless unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) with those already reported in a similar study on cemented UKA. Design A case-series cross-sectional study. Setting The Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax. Patients Fifty-one patients who underwent a total of 57 UKAs between May 1989 and May 1997. Inclusion criteria were osteoarthritis involving the predominantly the medial compartment of the knee, relative sparing of the other compartments, less than 15° of varus, minimal knee instability, and attendance at the postoperative clinical visit. Intervention Cementless UKA. Main outcome measures Clinical parameters that included pain, range of motion and the Knee Society Clinical Knee Score. Roentgenographic parameters that included α, β, γ and σ angles and the presence of periprosthetic radiolucency or loose beads. Results Age, weight, gender and follow-up interval did not significantly affect the clinical results in terms of pain, range of motion or knee score. Knees with more than 1 mm of radiolucency had significantly lower knee scores than those with no radiolucency. Knees that radiologically had loose beads also had significantly lower knee scores. The clinical outcomes of cementless UKA were comparable to those already reported on cemented UKA. Cementless femurs had less radiolucency than the cemented femurs, whereas cementless tibias had more radiolucency than their cemented counterparts. Conclusions Cementless UKA seems to be as efficacious as cemented UKA. However, there is some concern about the amount of radiolucency in the cementless tibial components. A randomized clinical trial comparing both cementless and cemented tibial components with a cementless femur (hybrid knee) is needed to further assess this controversial issue in UKA. PMID:11129829

  1. A cross sectional study of requests for knee radiographs from primary care

    PubMed Central

    Bedson, John; Jordan, Kelvin P; Croft, Peter R

    2007-01-01

    Background Knee pain is the commonest pain complaint amongst older adults in general practice. General Practitioners (GPs) may use x rays when managing knee pain, but little information exists regarding this process. Our objectives, therefore, were to describe the information GPs provide when ordering knee radiographs in older people, to assess the association between a clinical diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA) and the presence of radiographic knee OA, and to investigate the clinical content of the corresponding radiologists' report. Methods A cross sectional study of GP requests for knee radiographs and their matched radiologists' reports from a local radiology department. Cases, aged over 40, were identified during an 11-week period. The clinical content of the GPs' requests and radiologists' reports was analysed. Associations of radiologists' reporting of i) osteoarthritis, ii) degenerative disease and iii) individual radiographic features of OA, with patient characteristics and clinical details on the GPs' requests, were assessed. Results The study identified 136 cases with x ray requests from 79 GPs and 11 reporting radiologists. OA was identified clinically in 19 (14%) of the requests, and queried in another 31 (23%). The main clinical descriptor was pain in 119 cases (88%). Radiologists' reported OA in 22% of cases, and the features of OA were mentioned in 63%. Variation in reporting existed between radiologists. The commonest description was joint space narrowing in 52 reports (38%). There was an apparent although non significant increase in the reporting of knee OA when the GP had diagnosed or queried it (OR 1.95; 95% CI 0.76, 5.00). Conclusion The features of radiographic OA are commonly reported in those patients over 40 whom GPs send for x ray. If OA is clinically suspected, radiologists appear to be more likely to report its presence. Further research into alternative models of referral and reporting might identify a more appropriate imaging policy in

  2. Computer-assisted navigation in knee arthroplasty: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Muralidharan; Mahadevan, Devendra; Ashford, Robert U

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this review was to appraise the use of computer-assisted navigation in total knee arthroplasty and to assess whether this technology has improved clinical outcomes. Studies were identified through searches in MEDLINE, Embase, and PubMed. Numerous studies have shown improved leg and component alignment using navigation systems. However, the better alignment achieved in navigated knee arthroplasty has not been shown to lead to better clinical outcomes. Navigated knee arthroplasty had lower calculated blood loss and lower incidence of fat embolism compared with conventional knee arthroplasty using intramedullary jigs. It may be most valued when dealing with complex knee deformities, revision surgery, or minimally invasive surgery. Navigated knee arthroplasty, however, is only cost-effective in centers with a high volume of joint replacements. Overall, computer-assisted navigated knee arthroplasty provides some advantages over conventional surgery, but its clinical benefits to date are unclear and remain to be defined on a larger scale.

  3. [A novel knee endoprosthesis with a physiological joint shape. Part 1: Biomechanical basics and tribological studies].

    PubMed

    Frosch, K-H; Floerkemeier, T; Abicht, C; Adam, P; Dathe, H; Fanghänel, J; Stürmer, K M; Kubein-Meesenburg, D; Nägerl, H

    2009-02-01

    The natural tibiofemoral joint (TFJ) functions according to a roll-glide mechanism. In the stance phase (0-20 degrees flexion), the femur rolls backwards over the tibia plateau, while further flexion causes increased gliding. This kinematics is based on the principle of a quadruple joint. The four morphological axes of rotation are the midpoints of the curvatures of the medial and lateral femoral condyles and the medial and lateral tibia plateau. In addition, the medial and lateral compartments are shifted a few millimetres in a sagittal direction, the medial tibia plateau being concave and the lateral plateau convex. In most knee arthroplasties, these factors are not taken into account; instead they are equipped with symmetrical medial and lateral joint surfaces. Thereby, the midpoints of the curvatures of the sagittal contours of the lateral and medial joint surfaces, on the femoral as well as on the tibial sides, create a common axis of rotation which does not allow a physiological roll-glide mechanism. The goal of this study was therefore to report on the biomechanical basis of the natural knee and to describe the development of a novel knee endoprosthesis based on a mathematical model. The design of the structurally new knee joint endoprosthesis has, on the lateral side, a convex shape of the tibial joint surface in a sagittal cross section. Furthermore, from a mathematical point of view, this knee endoprosthesis possesses essential kinematic and static properties similar to those of a physiological TFJ. Within the framework of the authorization tests, the endoprosthesis was examined according to ISO/WC 14243 in a knee simulator. The abrasion rates were, thereby, lower than or at least as good as those for conventional endoprostheses. The presented data demonstrate a novel concept in knee arthroplasty, which still has to be clinically confirmed by long term results.

  4. The effect of neuromuscular training on the incidence of knee injury in female athletes. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hewett, T E; Lindenfeld, T N; Riccobene, J V; Noyes, F R

    1999-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the effect of neuromuscular training on the incidence of knee injury in female athletes, we monitored two groups of female athletes, one trained before sports participation and the other not trained, and a group of untrained male athletes throughout the high school soccer, volleyball, and basketball seasons. Weekly reports included the number of practice and competition exposures and mechanism of injury. There were 14 serious knee injuries in the 1263 athletes tracked through the study. Ten of 463 untrained female athletes sustained serious knee injuries (8 noncontact), 2 of 366 trained female athletes sustained serious knee injuries (0 noncontact), and 2 of 434 male athletes sustained serious knee injuries (1 noncontact). The knee injury incidence per 1000 athlete-exposures was 0.43 in untrained female athletes, 0.12 in trained female athletes, and 0.09 in male athletes (P = 0.02, chi-square analysis). Untrained female athletes had a 3.6 times higher incidence of knee injury than trained female athletes (P = 0.05) and 4.8 times higher than male athletes (P = 0.03). The incidence of knee injury in trained female athletes was not significantly different from that in untrained male athletes (P = 0.86). The difference in the incidence of noncontact injuries between the female groups was also significant (P = 0.01). This prospective study demonstrated a decreased incidence of knee injury in female athletes after a specific plyometric training program.

  5. Glucosamine-containing supplement improves locomotor functions in subjects with knee pain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Ono, Yoshiko; Shibata, Hiroshi; Moritani, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a glucosamine-containing supplement to improve locomotor functions in subjects with knee pain. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group comparative study was conducted for 16 weeks in 100 Japanese subjects (age, 51.8±0.8 years) with knee pain. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the two supplements containing 1) 1,200 mg of glucosamine hydrochloride, 60 mg of chondroitin sulfate, 45 mg of type II collagen peptides, 90 mg of quercetin glycosides, 10 mg of imidazole peptides, and 5 μg of vitamin D per day (GCQID group, n=50) or 2) a placebo (placebo group, n=50). Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure, visual analog scale score, normal walking speed, and knee-extensor strength were measured to evaluate the effects of the supplement on knee-joint functions and locomotor functions. Results In subjects eligible for efficacy assessment, there was no significant group × time interaction, and there were improvements in knee-joint functions and locomotor functions in both groups, but there was no significant difference between the groups. In subjects with mild-to-severe knee pain at baseline, knee-extensor strength at week 8 (104.6±5.0% body weight vs 92.3±5.5% body weight, P=0.030) and the change in normal walking speed at week 16 (0.11±0.03 m/s vs 0.05±0.02 m/s, P=0.038) were significantly greater in the GCQID group than in the placebo group. Further subgroup analysis based on Kellgren–Lawrence (K–L) grade showed that normal walking speed at week 16 (1.36±0.05 m/s vs 1.21±0.02 m/s, P<0.05) was significantly greater in the GCQID group than in the placebo group in subjects with K–L grade I. No adverse effect of treatment was identified in the safety assessment. Conclusion In subjects with knee pain, GCQID supplementation was effective for relieving knee pain and improving locomotor functions. PMID:26604721

  6. Alterations in walking knee joint stiffness in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee instability.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Jonathan A; Gorman, Shannon; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Increased walking knee joint stiffness has been reported in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a compensatory strategy to improve knee joint stability. However, presence of episodic self-reported knee instability in a large subgroup of patients with knee OA may be a sign of inadequate walking knee joint stiffness. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in walking knee joint stiffness in patients with knee OA with and without self-reported instability and examine the relationship between walking knee joint stiffness with quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity, and varus knee malalignment. Overground biomechanical data at a self-selected gait velocity was collected for 35 individuals with knee OA without self-reported instability (stable group) and 17 individuals with knee OA and episodic self-reported instability (unstable group). Knee joint stiffness was calculated during the weight-acceptance phase of gait as the change in the external knee joint moment divided by the change in the knee flexion angle. The unstable group walked with lower knee joint stiffness (p=0.01), mainly due to smaller heel-contact knee flexion angles (p<0.01) and greater knee flexion excursions (p<0.01) compared to their knee stable counterparts. No significant relationships were observed between walking knee joint stiffness and quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity or varus knee malalignment. Reduced walking knee joint stiffness appears to be associated with episodic knee instability and independent of quadriceps muscle weakness, knee joint laxity or varus malalignment. Further investigations of the temporal relationship between self-reported knee joint instability and walking knee joint stiffness are warranted.

  7. Soft tissue artifact compensation in knee kinematics by multi-body optimization: Performance of subject-specific knee joint models.

    PubMed

    Clément, Julien; Dumas, Raphaël; Hagemeister, Nicola; de Guise, Jaques A

    2015-11-01

    Soft tissue artifact (STA) distort marker-based knee kinematics measures and make them difficult to use in clinical practice. None of the current methods designed to compensate for STA is suitable, but multi-body optimization (MBO) has demonstrated encouraging results and can be improved. The goal of this study was to develop and validate the performance of knee joint models, with anatomical and subject-specific kinematic constraints, used in MBO to reduce STA errors. Twenty subjects were recruited: 10 healthy and 10 osteoarthritis (OA) subjects. Subject-specific knee joint models were evaluated by comparing dynamic knee kinematics recorded by a motion capture system (KneeKG™) and optimized with MBO to quasi-static knee kinematics measured by a low-dose, upright, biplanar radiographic imaging system (EOS(®)). Errors due to STA ranged from 1.6° to 22.4° for knee rotations and from 0.8 mm to 14.9 mm for knee displacements in healthy and OA subjects. Subject-specific knee joint models were most effective in compensating for STA in terms of abduction-adduction, inter-external rotation and antero-posterior displacement. Root mean square errors with subject-specific knee joint models ranged from 2.2±1.2° to 6.0±3.9° for knee rotations and from 2.4±1.1 mm to 4.3±2.4 mm for knee displacements in healthy and OA subjects, respectively. Our study shows that MBO can be improved with subject-specific knee joint models, and that the quality of the motion capture calibration is critical. Future investigations should focus on more refined knee joint models to reproduce specific OA knee geometry and physiology.

  8. Differences in the stress distribution in the distal femur between patellofemoral joint replacement and total knee replacement: a finite element study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral joint replacement is a successful treatment option for isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. However, results of later conversion to total knee replacement may be compromised by periprosthetic bone loss. Previous clinical studies have demonstrated a decrease in distal femoral bone mineral density after patellofemoral joint replacement. It is unclear whether this is due to periprosthetic stress shielding. The main objective of the current study was to evaluate the stress shielding effect of prosthetic replacement with 2 different patellofemoral prosthetic designs and with a total knee prosthesis. Methods We developed a finite element model of an intact patellofemoral joint, and finite element models of patellofemoral joint replacement with a Journey PFJ prosthesis, a Richards II prosthesis, and a Genesis II total knee prosthesis. For each of these 4 finite element models, the average Von Mises stress in 2 clinically relevant regions of interest were evaluated during a simulated squatting movement until 120 degrees of flexion. Results During deep knee flexion, in the anterior region of interest, the average Von Mises stress with the Journey PFJ design was comparable to the physiological knee, while reduced by almost 25% for both the Richards II design and the Genesis II total knee joint replacement design. The average Von Mises stress in the supracondylar region of interest was similar for both patellofemoral prosthetic designs and the physiological model, with slightly lower stress for the Genesis II design. Conclusions Patellofemoral joint replacement results in periprosthetic stress-shielding, although to a smaller degree than in total knee replacement. Specific patellofemoral prosthetic design properties may result in differences in femoral stress shielding. PMID:22704638

  9. Effects of neuromuscular training (NEMEX-TJR) on patient-reported outcomes and physical function in severe primary hip or knee osteoarthritis: a controlled before-and-after study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The benefits of exercise in mild and moderate knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA) are apparent, but the evidence in severe OA is less clear. We recently reported that neuromuscular training was well tolerated and feasible in patients with severe primary hip or knee OA. The aims of this controlled before-and-after study were to compare baseline status to an age-matched population-based reference group and to examine the effects of neuromuscular training on patient-reported outcomes and physical function in patients with severe primary OA of the hip or knee. Methods 87 patients (60–77 years) with severe primary OA of the hip (n = 38, 55% women) or knee (n = 49, 59% women) awaiting total joint replacement (TJR) had supervised, neuromuscular training (NEMEX-TJR) in groups with individualized level and progression of training. A reference group (n = 43, 53% women) was included for comparison with patients’ data. Assessments included self-reported outcomes (HOOS/KOOS) and measures of physical function (chair stands, number of knee bends/30 sec, knee extensor strength, 20-meter walk test) at baseline and at follow-up before TJR. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used for comparing patients and references and elucidating influence of demographic factors on change. The paired t-test was used for comparisons within groups. Results At baseline, patients reported worse scores than the references in all HOOS/KOOS subscales (hip 27–47%, knee 14–52%, of reference scores, respectively) and had functional limitations (hip 72–85%, knee 42–85%, of references scores, respectively). NEMEX-TJR (mean 12 weeks (SD 5.6) of training) improved self-reported outcomes (hip 9–29%, knee 7–20%) and physical function (hip 3–18%, knee 5–19%) (p < 0.005). Between 42% and 62% of hip OA patients, and 39% and 61% of knee OA patients, displayed a clinically meaningful improvement (≥15%) in HOOS/KOOS subscales by training. The improvement in HOOS

  10. Simple Scoring System and Artificial Neural Network for Knee Osteoarthritis Risk Prediction: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Tae Keun; Kim, Deok Won; Choi, Soo Beom; Oh, Ein; Park, Jee Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease of adults worldwide. Since the treatments for advanced radiographic knee OA are limited, clinicians face a significant challenge of identifying patients who are at high risk of OA in a timely and appropriate way. Therefore, we developed a simple self-assessment scoring system and an improved artificial neural network (ANN) model for knee OA. Methods The Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES V-1) data were used to develop a scoring system and ANN for radiographic knee OA. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of the scoring system. The ANN was constructed using 1777 participants and validated internally on 888 participants in the KNHANES V-1. The predictors of the scoring system were selected as the inputs of the ANN. External validation was performed using 4731 participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic was calculated to compare the prediction models. Results The scoring system and ANN were built using the independent predictors including sex, age, body mass index, educational status, hypertension, moderate physical activity, and knee pain. In the internal validation, both scoring system and ANN predicted radiographic knee OA (AUC 0.73 versus 0.81, p<0.001) and symptomatic knee OA (AUC 0.88 versus 0.94, p<0.001) with good discriminative ability. In the external validation, both scoring system and ANN showed lower discriminative ability in predicting radiographic knee OA (AUC 0.62 versus 0.67, p<0.001) and symptomatic knee OA (AUC 0.70 versus 0.76, p<0.001). Conclusions The self-assessment scoring system may be useful for identifying the adults at high risk for knee OA. The performance of the scoring system is improved significantly by the ANN. We provided an ANN calculator to simply predict the knee OA risk. PMID:26859664

  11. Gait energetic efficiency in older adults with and without knee pain: results from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seung-Uk; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2015-02-01

    With aging, customary gait patterns change and energetic efficiency declines, but the relationship between these alterations is not well understood. If gait characteristics that develop with aging explain part of the decline in energetic efficiency that occur in most aging individuals, then efforts to modify these characteristics could delay or prevent mobility limitation. This study characterizes gait patterns in older persons with and without knee pain and tests the hypothesis that changes in gait characteristics due to knee pain are associated with increased energetic cost of walking in older adults. Study participants were 364 men and 170 women aged 60 to 96 years enrolled in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), of whom 86 had prevalent knee pain. Gait patterns were assessed at participant self-selected usual pace in the gait laboratory, and the energetic cost of walking was assessed by indirect calorimetry during self-selected usual pace walking over 2.5 min in a tiled corridor using a portable equipment. Participants with knee pain were less energetically efficient than those without pain (oxygen consumption 0.97 vs. 0.88 ml/(10 m · 100 kg); p = 0.002) and had slower gait speed and smaller range of motion (ROM) at the hip and knee joints (p < 0.05, for all). Slower gait speed and lower knee ROM in participants with knee pain and longer double support time and higher ankle ROM in participants without knee pain were associated with lower energetic efficiency (p < 0.05, for all). Slower gait speed and lower knee ROM were correlates of knee pain and were found to mediate the association between age and oxygen consumption. Although knee pain is associated with a higher energetic cost of walking, gait characteristics associated with energetic efficiency differ by pain status which suggests that compensatory strategies both in the presence and absence of pain may impact gait efficiency.

  12. Prospective epidemiological study of basketball injuries during one competitive season: ankle sprains and overuse knee injuries.

    PubMed

    Cumps, Elke; Verhagen, Evert; Meeusen, Romain

    2007-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aims to assess the overall incidence of acute and overuse basketball injuries and identifies risk factors associated with ankle sprains and knee overuse injuries. In total, 164 senior players (23.7 years ± 7.0) of all levels of play, and including both men and women, participated voluntarily during one season. A total of 139 acute and 87 overuse injuries were reported, resulting in an overall injury incidence of 9.8 (8.5 to 11.1) per 1,000 hours. The incidence of acute injuries was 6.0/1,000 hours. Ankle sprains (n = 34) accounted for most acute injuries, and 52.9% of all players with ankle sprains reported a previous ankle sprain. Relative Risks (RR) and Odds Ratio (OR) with their 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were calculated to determine significant differences. Landing on an opponent's foot was the major inciting event, significantly more so than non contact mechanisms (RR=2.1 [95% CI: 1.0-4.2]). Acute knee injuries resulted in the highest playing absence (7 weeks 2 days ± 9 weeks 1 day). Overuse injury incidence was 3.8/1,000 hours. The knee (1.5/1,000 hours) was the most common site. Forward players sustained less knee overuse injuries than players of all other playing positions, and significantly less than center players (OR=0.5 [95% CI: 0.2-0.9]). This study showed that ankle sprains and overuse knee injuries are the most common injuries in basketball, both accounting for 14.8%. Injury prevention programmes however should not concentrate on those injuries only, but might one to consider that acute knee injuries, in spite of the fact that they occur less frequently, also merit further research. Key pointsAnkle sprains are the most common acute injuries in basketball with the inciting event being landing on an opponent's foot or changing direction.Anterior knee pain is the most common overuse injury. Etiologic factors are well described in literature, but prevention strategies are lacking.Acute knee injuries account for the

  13. Association between body mass index and risk of total knee replacement, the Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ying-Ying; Allen, John Carson; Noviani, Maria; Ang, Li-Wei; Wang, Renwei; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Data on the association between body mass index (BMI) and risk of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) are sparse for Asian populations who are leaner than Western populations. We evaluated the association between BMI and risk of total knee replacement (TKR) due to severe KOA among Chinese in Singapore. Methods We used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a population based prospective cohort of 63,257 Chinese men and women, aged 45–74 years at enrollment from 1993 to 1998. Information on height, weight, diet and lifestyle factors were obtained via in-person interviews. TKR cases for severe KOA were identified via linkage with the nationwide hospital discharge database through 2011. Cox regression and weighted least squares regression were used in the analysis. Results The mean BMI among cohort participants was 23.1 kg/m2, and more than two-thirds had BMI below 25 kg/m2. A total of 1,649 had TKR attributable to severe KOA. Risk of TKR increased in a strong dose-dependent manner with increasing BMI throughout the 15–32 kg/m2 range and became less clear at BMI > 32 kg/m2. In the BMI range 16–27 kg/m2, there was a 27% increase in TKR risk for each unit increase in BMI (p for trend < 0.001). Compared to BMI 19–20 kg/m2, the risk estimates of TKR were all statistically significant with increasing unit of BMI ≥ 21 kg/m2. Results were similar for men and women. Conclusion Our results provided evidence for a constant mechanical mechanism underlying BMI and KOA initiation and/or progression. PMID:25450848

  14. Wear of sequentially enhanced 9-Mrad polyethylene in 10 million cycle knee simulation study.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Riichiro; Williams, Paul Allen; Shoji, Hiromu; Hirakawa, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Kengo; Tsukamoto, Mikiko; Clarke, Ian C

    2008-07-01

    Highly crosslinked polyethylene (HXPE) has been shown to be effective in reducing wear in total hip replacements. HXPE has not found widespread use in TKR, because the crosslinking inevitably leads to reductions in critical properties such as toughness and fatigue strength. Sequentially enhanced crosslinking (SXPE) have been suggested for improved wear resistance for tibial inserts with maintenance of mechanical properties and anticipated high oxidation resistance superior to conventional polyethylene (XLPE). We compared the wear of SXPE (9Mrad) to XLPE inserts (3Mrad) to 10 million cycles. Triathlon femoral condyles were identical in both. This is the first wear study of SXPE inserts. According to the power law relating irradiation dose to wear of XLPE inserts, wear of 9 Mrad inserts should be reduced by 70% compared to 3Mrad controls. The wear rates of the SXPE inserts were reduced by 86% at 10 million cycles duration, somewhat greater than predicted. The one prior investigation by the manufacturer reported a 79% wear reduction for SXPE compared to controls in a 5 million cycle simulator study in knee design and test parameters. There were important differences between the two studies. Nevertheless there clearly appeared to be a major benefit for sequentially enhanced polyethylene in tibial inserts. This combined wear reduction of 80-85% with improved oxidation resistance and retention of mechanical properties may prove beneficial for active patients who may otherwise risk high wear rates over many years of use.

  15. Operations dashboard: comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramly, Noor Nashriq; Ismail, Ahmad Zuhairi; Aziz, Mohd Haris; Ahmad, Nurul Haszeli

    2011-10-01

    In this present days and age, there are increasing needs for companies to monitor application and infrastructure health. Apart from having proactive measures to secure their application and infrastructure, many see monitoring dashboards as crucial investment in disaster preparedness. As companies struggle to find the best solution to cater for their needs and interest for monitoring their application and infrastructure's health, this paper summarizes the studies made on several known off-the-shelf operations dashboard and in-house developed dashboard. A few criteria of good dashboard are collected from previous studies carried out by several researchers and rank them according to importance and business needs. The finalized criteria that will be discussed in later sections are data visualization, performance indicator, dashboard personalization, audit capability and alert/ notification. Comparative studies between several popular dashboards were then carried out to determine whether they met these criteria that we derived from the first exercise. The findings hopefully can be used to educate and provide an overview of selecting the best IT application and infrastructure operations dashboard that suit business needs, thus become the main contribution of this paper.

  16. Decreased frontal plane hip joint moments in runners with excessive varus excursion at the knee.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dorsey Shelton; Isom, Wesley

    2012-05-01

    Knee varus position and motion have been correlated with increased medial knee loading during gait. The purpose of this study is to determine whether runners with excessive varus excursion (EVE) at the knee demonstrate frontal plane knee and hip kinetics that are different from those of runners with normal varus excursion (NVE). Twelve runners with EVE were compared with 12 NVE subjects using three-dimensional kinematics and kinetics. Frontal plane angles and moments were compared at the knee and hip. Runners with EVE had significantly greater abductor moment of the knee (p = .004) and lower peak abductor moment of the hip (p = .047). Runners with EVE demonstrate knee and hip mechanics thought to be associated with increased medial tibiofemoral loading. Further understanding of how changing hip abductor moments may affect changes in knee abductor moments during running may potentially lead to interventions that augment long-term risk of injury.

  17. Below-knee amputee gait with dynamic elastic response prosthetic feet: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Torburn, L; Perry, J; Ayyappa, E; Shanfield, S L

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate some of the new dynamic elastic response (DER) prosthetic feet compared to the SACH foot and determine if any demonstrated trends of producing the most optimum gait. We investigated the gait of five below-knee amputees while wearing four different DER feet (Flex-Foot, Carbon Copy II, SEATTLE, STEN) and a standard SACH foot. Each subject used each foot for 1 month prior to in-depth gait analysis and energy expenditure testing at the Pathokinesiology Laboratory. Minimal differences in either free or fast walking were noted between the five feet. The Flex-Foot resulted in significantly different gait kinematics at the "ankle" compared to the other four feet, however, this foot did not produce an increased velocity nor an improved energy cost. The results of this pilot study indicated that during free or fast-paced walking on level ground there were no clinically significant advantages of any one of the feet tested. Based on this pilot data, recommendations are made for future studies including appropriate sample size.

  18. Jumper's knee.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, A; Ippolito, E; Mariani, P; Puddu, G

    1983-01-01

    Jumper's knee (patellar or quadriceps tendon tendonitis) is found in a high number of athletes, especially in volleyball and basketball players. Conservative treatment (rest, stretching, physical therapy and antiinflammatory drugs) is usually successful. The athletes often recover completely and resume their sports activity. The purpose of this study is to present the histologic findings and our surgical repair of 18 knees of patients who underwent surgery after failure of conservative treatment. Histologic findings confirm that the so-called "jumper's knee" is a pathology localized at the bone-tendon junction. In all cases the following abnormalities were found: pseudocystic cavities at the borderline between mineralized fibrocartilage and bone, disappearance of the "blue line," increased thickness of the insertional fibrocartilage with myxomatous and hyaline metaplasia, mineralization, and ossification of the fibrocartilage far from the "blue line." Abnormalities of the patellar tendon were observed only in one patient who received local injection of corticosteroids. Eleven of the 18 surgically treated knees obtained a satisfactory result with complete resumption of sports activity.

  19. Comparative waste forms study

    SciTech Connect

    Wald, J.W.; Lokken, R.O.; Shade, J.W.; Rusin, J.M.

    1980-12-01

    A number of alternative process and waste form options exist for the immobilization of nuclear wastes. Although data exists on the characterization of these alternative waste forms, a straightforward comparison of product properties is difficult, due to the lack of standardized testing procedures. The characterization study described in this report involved the application of the same volatility, mechanical strength and leach tests to ten alternative waste forms, to assess product durability. Bulk property, phase analysis and microstructural examination of the simulated products, whose waste loading varied from 5% to 100% was also conducted. The specific waste forms investigated were as follows: Cold Pressed and Sintered PW-9 Calcine; Hot Pressed PW-9 Calcine; Hot Isostatic Pressed PW-9 Calcine; Cold Pressed and Sintered SPC-5B Supercalcine; Hot Isostatic pressed SPC-5B Supercalcine; Sintered PW-9 and 50% Glass Frit; Glass 76-68; Celsian Glass Ceramic; Type II Portland Cement and 10% PW-9 Calcine; and Type II Portland Cement and 10% SPC-5B Supercalcine. Bulk property data were used to calculate and compare the relative quantities of waste form volume produced at a spent fuel processing rate of 5 metric ton uranium/day. This quantity ranged from 3173 L/day (5280 Kg/day) for 10% SPC-5B supercalcine in cement to 83 L/day (294 Kg/day) for 100% calcine. Mechanical strength, volatility, and leach resistance tests provide data related to waste form durability. Glass, glass-ceramic and supercalcine ranked high in waste form durability where as the 100% PW-9 calcine ranked low. All other materials ranked between these two groupings.

  20. Cementless total knee arthroplasty with Profix: a 8- to 10-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hardeman, François; Vandenneucker, Hilde; Van Lauwe, Johan; Bellemans, Johan

    2006-12-01

    A consecutive series of 115 cementless Profix (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, USA) Total Knee Arthroplasties performed in 113 patients were followed in order to determine the functional results and survivorship at 8 to 10 years. All patients were included in a prospective database and were reviewed annually until final follow-up. Patients overall satisfaction was excellent or good in 91.3% of cases. The mean Knee Society's knee and function scores increased respectively from 49.3 and 36.7 preoperatively to 93.1 and 82.2 postoperatively. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of implant survival at 10 years was 97.1%. Two patients underwent revision and were considered as failures. One patient had a fracture of the medial condyle at 4 days post-surgery, and the other was revised for aseptic loosening of the tibial component at 6 years post-surgery. On the basis of this long-term follow-up study, we can conclude that the Profix Total Knee System is effective and safe. PMID:17064905

  1. No association between daily walking and structural changes in people at risk of or with mild knee osteoarthritis. Prospective data from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Øiestad, Britt Elin; Quinn, Emily; White, Daniel; Roemer, Frank; Guermazi, Ali; Nevitt, Michael; Segal, Neil A.; Lewis, Cora E.; Felson, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We investigated the association between objectively measured daily walking and knee structural change, defined either as radiographic worsening or as cartilage loss, in people at risk of or with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Participants from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) study with Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) grades 0–2 and daily walking (measured with the StepWatch) at the 60-month visit, were included. Participants had fixed flexion weight bearing radiographs and knee magnetic resonance images (MRIs) at 60 and 84 months. Radiographic worsening was read in both knees using the OARSI grading, and MRIs were read for one knee using WORMS semiquantitative scoring. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated comparing those in the middle tertile against the lowest and highest tertiles of daily walking using logistic regression models and generalized estimating equations. Data on walking with moderate to vigorous intensity (minutes with >100 steps/min/day) was associated to structural change using multivariate and logistic regression models. Results The 1179 study participants (59% females) were 67.0 (±7.6) years, with a mean (±SD) body mass index of 29.8 (±5.3) kg/m2 who walked 6981 (±2630) steps/day. After adjusting for confounders, we found no significant associations between daily walking and radiographic worsening or cartilage loss. More time spent walking at a moderate to vigorous intensity was not associated with either radiographic worsening or cartilage loss. Conclusion Results from the MOST study indicated no association between daily walking and structural changes over two years in people at risk of or with mild knee OA. PMID:26077404

  2. A comparison of the biomechanical effects of valgus knee braces and lateral wedged insoles in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard K; Nester, Christopher J; Richards, Jim D; Kim, Winston Y; Johnson, David S; Jari, Sanjiv; Laxton, Philip; Tyson, Sarah F

    2013-03-01

    Increases in the external knee adduction moment (EKAM) have been associated with increased mechanical load at the knee and progression of knee osteoarthritis. Valgus knee braces and lateral wedged insoles are common approaches to reducing this loading; however no study has directly compared the biomechanical and clinical effects of these two treatments in patients with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. A cross-over randomised design was used where each intervention was worn by 28 patients for a two week period. Pre- and post-intervention gait kinematic/kinetic data and clinical outcomes were collected to evaluate the biomechanical and clinical effects on the knee joint. The valgus knee brace and the lateral wedged insole significantly increased walking speed, reduced the early stance EKAM by 7% and 12%, and the knee adduction angular impulse by 8.6 and 16.1% respectively. The lateral wedged insole significantly reduced the early stance EKAM compared to the valgus knee brace (p=0.001). The valgus knee brace significantly reduced the knee varus angle compared to the baseline and lateral wedged insole. Improvements in pain and function subscales were comparable for the valgus knee brace and lateral wedged insole. There were no significant differences between the two treatments in any of the clinical outcomes; however the lateral wedged insoles demonstrated greater levels of acceptance by patients. This is the first study to biomechanically compare these two treatments, and demonstrates that given the potential role of knee loading in osteoarthritis progression, that both treatments reduce this but lateral wedge insoles appear to have a greater effect.

  3. Polyurethane unicondylar knee prostheses: simulator wear tests and lubrication studies.

    PubMed

    Scholes, S C; Unsworth, A; Jones, E

    2007-01-01

    Many materials are used as artificial joint bearing surfaces; these include conventional stainless steel or CoCrMo-on-ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), CoCrMo on itself and alumina-on-alumina. However, these joints have a limited lifespan resulting in failure of the prosthesis and the need for revision surgery. A number of materials have been introduced recently in an attempt to overcome these problems. Polycarbonate urethane (PU) is a compliant material that can be used as an artificial joint bearing surface which has been developed to mimic the natural synovial joint more accurately by promoting fluid film lubrication. Tribological tests were performed on CoCrMo-on-PU unicondylar knee prostheses to assess their performance in vitro. The wear produced by these components was considerably lower than that found for conventional joints. They also exhibited low friction and operated close to full-fluid film lubrication with viscosities of lubricant similar to those found in patients with arthritis. These tests gave encouraging results for the tribological performance of this material couple for use as an alternative bearing combination.

  4. Knee Bracing: What Works?

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Knee Bracing: What Works? Knee Bracing: What Works? What are knee braces? Knee braces are supports ... have arthritis in their knees. Do knee braces work? Maybe. Companies that make knee braces claim that ...

  5. Achieving ligament stability and correct rotational alignment of the femur in knee arthroplasty: a study using the Medial Pivot knee.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, David; Kinzel, Vera; Ledger, Michael

    2005-12-01

    In a series of 90 Medial Pivot arthroplasties rotational alignment of the femur was achieved by provisionally reconstructing the lateral side of the joint and tensioning the medial side with feeler gauges. Axial CT scans were employed to measure the rotational alignment relative to surgical epicondylar axis. In valgus knees the cutting block was externally rotated to adjust for posterolateral bone loss. The mean rotational alignment of the femur was 0.6 degrees of external rotation (S.D. 1.3, range 3 degrees of ER to 4 degrees of IR). The mean laxity of the medial ligament was 1 mm in flexion (SD 1, range 0-5 mm) and 0.5 mm in flexion (S.D. 0.5, range 0-2 mm) In those knees in which the medial ligament had been released the CT alignment was perfect, but when internally rotated against the hip 3-4 mm of gapping was noted. In valgus knees the mean rotation of the femoral component was 0.8 degrees of internal rotation (S.D. 1.5, range 1 degrees of IR to 4 degrees of ER). In spite of externally rotating the cutting block there was still a tendency to internally rotate the femur in some knees. This simple technique achieves the two goals of ligament stability and correct rotational alignment in a high proportion of cases. It may be applicable to any instrument system which employs posterior referencing.

  6. Auricular Acupressure for Managing Postoperative Pain and Knee Motion in Patients with Total Knee Replacement: A Randomized Sham Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ling-hua; Hsu, Chung-Hua; Jong, Gwo-Ping; Ho, Shungtai; Tsay, Shiow-luan; Lin, Kuan-Chia

    2012-01-01

    Background. Postoperative pain management remains a significant challenge for all healthcare providers. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the adjuvant effects of auricular acupressure on relieving postoperative pain and improving the passive range of motion in patients with total knee replacement (TKR). Method. Sixty-two patients who had undergone a TKR were randomly assigned to the acupressure group and the sham control group. The intervention was delivered three times a day for 3 days. A visual analog scale (VAS) and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were used to assess pain intensity. Pain medication consumption was recorded, and the knee motion was measured using a goniometer. Results. The patients experienced a moderately severe level of pain postoperatively (VAS 58.66 ± 20.35) while being on the routine PCA. No differences were found in pain scores between the groups at all points. However, analgesic drug usage in the acupressure group patients was significantly lower than in the sham control group (P < 0.05), controlling for BMI, age, and pain score. On the 3rd day after surgery, the passive knee motion in the acupressure group patients was significantly better than in the sham control group patients (P < 0.05), controlling for BMI. Conclusion. The application of auricular acupressure at specific therapeutic points significantly reduces the opioid analgesia requirement and improves the knee motion in patients with TKR. PMID:22844334

  7. Advantage of Minimal Anterior Knee Pain and Long-term Survivorship of Cemented Single Radius Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty without Patella Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hyung-Min; Baek, Ji-Hoon; Ko, Young-Bong

    2015-01-01

    Background The single radius total knee prosthesis was introduced with the advantage of reduced patellar symptoms; however, there is no long-term follow-up study of the same. The purpose of this study was to determine the survival rate of single radius posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty and patellofemoral complication rates in a consecutive series. Methods Seventy-one patients (103 knees) who underwent arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing using a single radius posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis were followed up for a minimum 10 years. Clinical evaluation using Knee Society knee and function scores and radiologic evaluation were performed at regular intervals. Anterior knee pain as well as patellofemoral complications were evaluated with a simple questionnaire. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to estimate survival. Results Seventeen patients (23 knees) were excluded due to death (12 knees) or lost to follow-up (11 knees). Of the 80 knees enrolled, all femoral components and 78 tibial components were well fixed without loosening at final follow-up. Two revisions were performed because of tibial component loosening and periprosthetic joint infection. One patient with tibial component loosening refused to have revision surgery. No obvious tibial insert polyethylene wear was observed. The survivorships at 132 months were 96.7% using revision or pending revision as end points. Anterior knee pain was present in 6 patients (6 knees, 7.5%) at the latest follow-up. No patellofemoral complication requiring revision was encountered. Conclusions The single radius posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis demonstrated an excellent minimum 10-year survivorship. The low rates of implant loosening and 7.5% of anterior knee pain as a patellofemoral complication are comparable with those reported for other modern total knee prosthesis. PMID:25729519

  8. The effect of modern total knee arthroplasty on muscle balance at the knee.

    PubMed

    Buford, William L; Ivey, F; Loveland, Dustin M; Flowers, Christopher W

    2009-01-01

    Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) may affect the muscles operating at the flexion/extension (FE) or internal /external rotation (IE) axes. This study tested the hypothesis that a modern posterior stabilizing TKA will change the mechanical balance of the knee joint by altering the moment arms of muscles acting about two separate axes of rotation. Moment arms were determined for the normal knee, the knee after resection of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (the ACL - knee) and the knee after a PCL-sacrificing TKA. Five fresh cadaver hemi pelvis specimens were used with 5 posterior stabilizing prostheses (a single model available from one manufacturer). Moment arms for the individual muscle tendons were multiplied by the muscle's tension fraction (fractional physiological cross-sectional area [PCSA]) to estimate its potential for moment production relative to the other muscles at the knee, and this value was labeled as the muscle's moment potential. Unlike earlier studies that looked at TKA across many manufacturers' types, this study concluded that there were no significant differences in muscle balance when comparing the intact knee and the posterior stabilized TKA.

  9. Importance of material properties and porosity of bone on mechanical response of articular cartilage in human knee joint--a two-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Venäläinen, Mikko S; Mononen, Mika E; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha; Virén, Tuomas; Korhonen, Rami K

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical behavior of bone is determined by the structure and intrinsic, local material properties of the tissue. However, previously presented knee joint models for evaluation of stresses and strains in joints generally consider bones as rigid bodies or linearly elastic solid materials. The aim of this study was to estimate how different structural and mechanical properties of bone affect the mechanical response of articular cartilage within a knee joint. Based on a cadaver knee joint, a two-dimensional (2D) finite element (FE) model of a knee joint including bone, cartilage, and meniscus geometries was constructed. Six different computational models with varying properties for cortical, trabecular, and subchondral bone were created, while the biphasic fibril-reinforced properties of cartilage and menisci were kept unaltered. The simplest model included rigid bones, while the most complex model included specific mechanical properties for different bone structures and anatomically accurate trabecular structure. Models with different porosities of trabecular bone were also constructed. All models were exposed to axial loading of 1.9 times body weight within 0.2 s (mimicking typical maximum knee joint forces during gait) while free varus-valgus rotation was allowed and all other rotations and translations were fixed. As compared to results obtained with the rigid bone model, stresses, strains, and pore pressures observed in cartilage decreased depending on the implemented properties of trabecular bone. Greatest changes in these parameters (up to -51% in maximum principal stresses) were observed when the lowest modulus for trabecular bone (measured at the structural level) was used. By increasing the trabecular bone porosity, stresses and strains were reduced substantially in the lateral tibial cartilage, while they remained relatively constant in the medial tibial plateau. The present results highlight the importance of long bones, in particular, their mechanical

  10. The effect of anterior cruciate ligament rupture on the timing and amplitude of gastrocnemius muscle activation: a study of alterations in EMG measures and their relationship to knee joint stability.

    PubMed

    Klyne, David M; Keays, Susan L; Bullock-Saxton, Joanne E; Newcombe, Peter A

    2012-06-01

    Changes in hamstring and quadriceps activity are well known in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency (ACLD) to potentially compensate for knee joint instability. However, few studies have explored gastrocnemius activity or its relationship to knee stability. The purpose of this study was therefore to examine the activation characteristics of medial gastrocnemius (MG) in ACLD subjects and relate any changes to knee joint laxity. Two subject cohorts were assessed: those with unilateral ACLD (n=15) and uninjured control subjects (n=11). Surface EMG of the left and right MG were recorded during a controlled single leg hop on each limb. Onset and offset of MG activation relative to take-off, during flight and landing were calculated as well as muscle activity (RMS). Passive antero-posterior knee laxity was measured with a KT1000 arthrometer during a maximal manual displacement test. Medial gastrocnemius activity on the injured side of ACLD participants demonstrated significantly prolonged activation in preparation to hop, minimal muscle inactivity prior to take-off, and increased duration of overall muscle activity when compared to the uninjured side and control subjects (p<0.05). Significant positive correlations were found between passive knee joint laxity and prolonged activation prior to knee bend. RMS of the muscle signal was not significantly different between limbs. Overall, MG on the ACLD side demonstrated longer activation, with minimal rest during the hop test, which may be an attempt to maintain knee stability. Furthermore, the strong relationship between knee laxity and prolonged muscle activation suggests that individuals with a loss of knee stability are more reliant on active control of the gastrocnemius muscle.

  11. Association between Knee Osteoarthritis, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, and the Framingham Risk Score in South Koreans: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Sun; Shin, Joon-Shik; Lee, Jinho; Lee, Yoon Jae; Kim, Me-riong; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Park, Ki Byung; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Joo-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a significant burden on personal health and for social cost, and its prevalence is rising. Recent research has revealed an association between osteoarthritis and cardiovascular disease, and this study uses the Framingham risk score (FRS), which is widely used as a composite index of cardiovascular risk factors, to investigate the association between osteoarthritis and various cardiovascular risk factors. Methods A total 9,514 participants aged 50 years or older who received knee X-ray diagnosis of the 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (total surveyees = 24,173) released by the Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was included for analysis. Knee osteoarthritis patients were defined as participants with K-L grade ≥2 on knee X-ray regardless of knee pain. The association between major cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, diabetes, cholesterol, and smoking habits), FRS, and knee osteoarthritis was analyzed, adjusting for various covariates. Results Prevalence of knee osteoarthritis in Koreans aged ≥50 years was 36.6%, and higher in women (men: 24.9%, women: 45.4%). Prevalence of knee osteoarthritis in participants with hypertension was significantly higher than those without hypertension (fully adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.26; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08–1.48). Knee osteoarthritis prevalence was also higher in participants with impaired fasting glucose or diabetes than those without (age, sex adjusted OR 1.19; 95% CI 1.00–1.41). Also, OR values increased statistically significantly with FRS as a continuous variable (fully adjusted OR 1.007; 95% CI 1.00–1.01). Conclusions Prevalence of knee osteoarthritis was associated with hypertension and diabetes, which are major cardiovascular risk factors, and the FRS. Further studies on FRS pertaining to its relationship with osteoarthritis are warranted. PMID:27764239

  12. Variability of indication criteria in knee and hip replacement: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Total knee (TKR) and hip (THR) replacement (arthroplasty) are effective surgical procedures that relieve pain, improve patients' quality of life and increase functional capacity. Studies on variations in medical practice usually place the indications for performing these procedures to be highly variable, because surgeons appear to follow different criteria when recommending surgery in patients with different severity levels. We therefore proposed a study to evaluate inter-hospital variability in arthroplasty indication. Methods The pre-surgical condition of 1603 patients included was compared by their personal characteristics, clinical situation and self-perceived health status. Patients were asked to complete two health-related quality of life questionnaires: the generic SF-12 (Short Form) and the specific WOMAC (Western Ontario and Mcmaster Universities) scale. The type of patient undergoing primary arthroplasty was similar in the 15 different hospitals evaluated. The variability in baseline WOMAC score between hospitals in THR and TKR indication was described by range, mean and standard deviation (SD), mean and standard deviation weighted by the number of procedures at each hospital, high/low ratio or extremal quotient (EQ5-95), variation coefficient (CV5-95) and weighted variation coefficient (WCV5-95) for 5-95 percentile range. The variability in subjective and objective signs was evaluated using median, range and WCV5-95. The appropriateness of the procedures performed was calculated using a specific threshold proposed by Quintana et al for assessing pain and functional capacity. Results The variability expressed as WCV5-95 was very low, between 0.05 and 0.11 for all three dimensions on WOMAC scale for both types of procedure in all participating hospitals. The variability in the physical and mental SF-12 components was very low for both types of procedure (0.08 and 0.07 for hip and 0.03 and 0.07 for knee surgery patients). However, a moderate

  13. A Blended Intervention for Patients With Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis in the Physical Therapy Practice: Development and a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kloek, Corelien; Snippe, Harm Wouter; Dekker, Joost; de Bakker, Dinny; Veenhof, Cindy

    2016-01-01

    Background Blended care, a combination of online and face-to-face care, is seen as a promising treatment option. However, actual use of blended interventions in practice is disappointing. Objective The objective of this study was two folded. The first aim was to develop a blended exercise therapy intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis that matches the values of the users and that can be implemented in the daily routine of physical therapists. The second aim was to investigate the feasibility through interviews and a pilot study. Methods In this paper, we employed the first 3 steps of the CeHRes road map to develop a blended intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis. We used interviews, a focus group and discussions with stakeholders to explore the needs, values, and requirements with respect to our to-be-developed blended intervention, which we called e-Exercise. The first version of e-Exercise was tested in a pilot study. Feasibility outcomes, including recruitment rates within each practice, website usage (assignments completed and website visits), and user satisfaction, were measured. In addition, therapists and patients from the pilot study were interviewed to investigate users’ experiences. Results The study captured important information about stakeholders’ needs and perspectives. Based on our findings, we created a first version and attuned the application’s content, functionality, and structure. Patients and, to lesser extent, physical therapists were satisfied with the e-Exercise intervention. Eight patients were recruited by 8 physical therapists. Of the 8 patients, 6 completed more than 7 of 12 modules. Conclusions This study outlines the development and feasibility of a blended exercise therapy intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis. E-Exercise offers an alternative approach in the physical therapy treatment of knee and hip osteoarthritis. This study provides valuable information to conduct

  14. Comparative Packaging Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele H.; Oziomek, Thomas V.

    2009-01-01

    Future long duration manned space flights beyond low earth orbit will require the food system to remain safe, acceptable and nutritious. Development of high barrier food packaging will enable this requirement by preventing the ingress and egress of gases and moisture. New high barrier food packaging materials have been identified through a trade study. Practical application of this packaging material within a shelf life test will allow for better determination of whether this material will allow the food system to meet given requirements after the package has undergone processing. The reason to conduct shelf life testing, using a variety of packaging materials, stems from the need to preserve food used for mission durations of several years. Chemical reactions that take place during longer durations may decrease food quality to a point where crew physical or psychological well-being is compromised. This can result in a reduction or loss of mission success. The rate of chemical reactions, including oxidative rancidity and staling, can be controlled by limiting the reactants, reducing the amount of energy available to drive the reaction, and minimizing the amount of water available. Water not only acts as a media for microbial growth, but also as a reactant and means by which two reactants may come into contact with each other. The objective of this study is to evaluate three packaging materials for potential use in long duration space exploration missions.

  15. Trajectories of Pain and Function after Primary Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: The ADAPT Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lenguerrand, Erik; Wylde, Vikki; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Sayers, Adrian; Brunton, Luke; Beswick, Andrew D.; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pain and function improve dramatically in the first three months after hip and knee arthroplasty but the trajectory after three months is less well described. It is also unclear how pre-operative pain and function influence short- and long-term recovery. We explored the trajectory of change in function and pain until and beyond 3-months post-operatively and the influence of pre-operative self-reported symptoms. Methods The study was a prospective cohort study of 164 patients undergoing primary hip (n = 80) or knee (n = 84) arthroplasty in the United Kingdom. Self-reported measures of pain and function using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index were collected pre-operatively and at 3 and 12 months post-operatively. Hip and knee arthroplasties were analysed separately, and patients were split into two groups: those with high or low symptoms pre-operatively. Multilevel regression models were used for each outcome (pain and function), and the trajectories of change were charted (0–3 months and 3–12 months). Results Hip: Most improvement occurred within the first 3 months following hip surgery and patients with worse pre-operative scores had greater changes. The mean changes observed between 3 and twelve months were statistically insignificant. One year after surgery, patients with worse pre-operative scores had post-operative outcomes similar to those observed among patients with less severe pre-operative symptoms. Knee: Most improvement occurred in the first 3 months following knee surgery with no significant change thereafter. Despite greater mean change during the first three months, patients with worse pre-operative scores had not ‘caught-up’ with those with less severe pre-operative symptoms 12 months after their surgery. Conclusion Most symptomatic improvement occurred within the first 3 months after surgery with no significant change between 3–12 months. Further investigations are now required to

  16. Effects of exercise on knee joints with osteoarthritis: a pilot study of biologic markers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautch, J. C.; Malone, D. G.; Vailas, A. C.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of low intensity weight-bearing exercise on osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. METHODS: Synovial fluid keratan sulfate (KS) and hydroxyproline were measured as markers of cartilage degradation. The Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales (AIMS) were used to measure health status, and a visual analog scale for pain assessment was used before and after intervention. An exercise (EX) group (n = 15) received a thrice-weekly 12-week low intensity exercise program and a weekly educational program, and a minimal treatment (Min RX) group (n = 15) received only the education program. RESULTS: Pain levels declined in the EX group, and the Min RX group showed improvement on the AIMS. Synovial fluid was obtained in 11 subjects before and after the intervention. Levels of KS and hydroxyproline did not change. CONCLUSION: Further study of exercise effects should include both clinical and biologic parameters to examine the outcome of exercise as a therapeutic intervention in OA of the knee.

  17. Active knee joint flexibility and sports activity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, T; Foldspang, A; Vestergaard, E; Ingemann-Hansen, T

    1999-04-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate active knee flexion and active knee extension in athletes and to investigate the potential association of each to different types of sports activity. Active knee extension and active knee flexion was measured in 339 athletes. Active knee extension was significantly higher in women than in men and significantly positively associated with weekly hours of swimming and weekly hours of competitive gymnastics. Active knee flexion was significantly positively associated with participation in basketball, and significantly negatively associated with age and weekly hours of soccer, European team handball and swimming. The results point to sport-specific adaptation of active knee flexion and active knee extension.

  18. The effect of Neydharting mud-pack therapy on knee osteoarthritis: a randomized, controlled, double-blind follow-up pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tefner, Ildikó Katalin; Gaál, Ramóna; Koroknai, András; Ráthonyi, Adél; Gáti, Tamás; Monduk, Péter; Kiss, Edit; Kovács, Csaba; Bálint, Géza; Bender, Tamás

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Neydharting mud-pack therapy on the clinical parameters and quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis. In this double-blind, randomized, follow-up study on 53 patients with knee osteoarthritis, one group received hot mud-pack therapy, whereas the other (control) group was treated with hot packs of a substance manufactured on 10 occasions for 2 weeks. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), EuroQoL-5D quality-of-life measure and need for analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were recorded before treatment, at the end of treatment (at Week 2), and at Weeks 6 and 12. The WOMAC and the EQ5D quality-of-life scores improved from the baseline to the end of treatment in both groups, and further improvement was observed during the follow-up period (p < 0.001, respectively, in both groups). The need for medications for knee joint pain improved in both groups, and these changes were significant only in the mud-treated group (p < 0.001), but not in the control group (p = 0.106) compared to baseline. The number of patients requiring medications for knee joint pain showed a continuous downward trend at the subsequent post-treatment visits by the mud-treated group, and these changes became significant by Visit 4 compared to baseline (p = 0.016). The control group showed only temporary and not significant decrease. The difference was not significant between the groups in any of the outcome parameters at any visits. The Neydharting mud pack has a favorable effect on the clinical parameters, quality of life, and need for medications in patients with knee osteoarthritis. To evaluate the chemical effect, the number of patients should be increased.

  19. Patients' and Practitioners' Views of Knee Osteoarthritis and Its Management: A Qualitative Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Alami, Sophie; Boutron, Isabelle; Desjeux, Dominique; Hirschhorn, Monique; Meric, Gwendoline; Rannou, François; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To identify the views of patients and care providers regarding the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to reveal potential obstacles to improving health care strategies. Methods We performed a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews of a stratified sample of 81 patients (59 women) and 29 practitioners (8 women, 11 general practitioners [GPs], 6 rheumatologists, 4 orthopedic surgeons, and 8 [4 GPs] delivering alternative medicine). Results Two main domains of patient views were identified: one about the patient–physician relationship and the other about treatments. Patients feel that their complaints are not taken seriously. They also feel that practitioners act as technicians, paying more attention to the knee than to the individual, and they consider that not enough time is spent on information and counseling. They have negative perceptions of drugs and a feeling of medical uncertainty about OA, which leads to less compliance with treatment and a switch to alternative medicine. Patients believe that knee OA is an inevitable illness associated with age, that not much can be done to modify its evolution, that treatments are of little help, and that practitioners have not much to propose. They express unrealistic fears about the impact of knee OA on daily and social life. Practitioners' views differ from those of patients. Physicians emphasize the difficulty in elaborating treatment strategies and the need for a tool to help in treatment choice. Conclusions This qualitative study suggests several ways to improve the patient–practitioner relationship and the efficacy of treatment strategies, by increasing their acceptability and compliance. Providing adapted and formalized information to patients, adopting more global assessment and therapeutic approaches, and dealing more accurately with patients' paradoxal representation of drug therapy are main factors of improvement that should be addressed. PMID:21573185

  20. Acute injury affects lubricin expression in knee menisci: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Loreto, Carla; Carnazza, Maria Luisa; Cardile, Venera; Leonardi, Rosalia

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate for the first time lubricin expression in intact menisci and in menisci from patients with recent knee joint injury using histology, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and gene expression analysis, to provide insights into pathological processes affecting meniscal tissue. Lubricin expression was studied in vivo in 20 patients (14 males and 6 females) with recent joint injury subjected to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy and in vitro in fibroblast-like cells from meniscus tissue to establish whether it is down-regulated following acute traumatic knee injury. The control group consisted of cadaver donors with normal menisci. Histology demonstrated a normal tissue without structural changes in control samples and structural alterations and clefts in injured menisci. Very strong lubricin immunohistochemical staining was observed in intact menisci; in contrast weak staining was seen in injured menisci. Western blot and mRNA expression analysis also demonstrated strong lubricin expression in control cells and a negligible amount of lubricin in injured fibroblast-like cells. Our data provide information concerning the immediate in vivo response to injury of human knee menisci by documenting early changes in the boundary-lubricating ability of synovial fluid and articular cartilage integrity. These findings may provide the biological basis for developing novel medical therapies to be applied before surgical treatment to preserve tissue function and prevent cartilage damage.

  1. Computed tomographic study of the posterior condylar angle in arthritic knees: its use in the rotational positioning of the femoral implant of total knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Boisgard, S; Moreau, P-E; Descamps, S; Courtalhiac, C; Silbert, H; Moreel, P; Michel, J-L; Levai, J-P

    2003-01-01

    The epicondylar axis is a reliable reference to check the rotation of the femoral implant in total knee prostheses (TKPs). However, during the operation it seems easier to use the posterior condylar axis as a landmark. The angle between these two axes is called the posterior condylar angle (PCA). The aim of this study was to measure the PCA in arthritic knees to assess the reliability of the posterior condylar axis as a reference for the control of the rotation of the femoral implant and to look for correlation with other radiological measurements. This prospective study consisted of 103 arthritic knees (81 varus, 22 valgus) before a TKP had been done in 103 patients (75 women, 28 men). The assessment of the PCA was made by computed tomographic scanning (CT). The HKA, HKS and HKT angles were measured on the pangonogram. The posterior condylar axis was internally rotated with respect to the epicondylar axis. The average value for all the patients was 2.65 degrees degrees with a range from 0 degrees to 7 degrees. The PCA was significantly increased in the valgus knees. There was no correlation between the angles on the pangonogram and the posterior condylar axis. While the preoperative assessment of the PCA by CT scanning is reliable, the results obtained indicate the marked variability in its value. If one wishes to use the posterior condylar axis as a guide for rotation, it is therefore necessary to assess the PCA for each patient using adjustable jigs according to the value obtained. No measurement on standard radiographs allowed an extrapolation of the value of the PCA, and CT scanning seems to be the preferable radiological examination.

  2. Abnormal Subcortical Brain Morphology in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Cui Ping; Bai, Zhi Lan; Zhang, Xiao Na; Zhang, Qiu Juan; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Despite the involvement of subcortical brain structures in the pathogenesis of chronic pain and persistent pain as the defining symptom of knee osteoarthritis (KOA), little attention has been paid to the morphometric measurements of these subcortical nuclei in patients with KOA. The purpose of this study is to explore the potential morphological abnormalities of subcortical brain structures in patients with KOA as compared to the healthy control subjects by using high-resolution MRI. Structural MR data were acquired from 26 patients with KOA and 31 demographically similar healthy individuals. The MR data were analyzed by using FMRIB’s integrated registration and segmentation tool. Both volumetric analysis and surface-based shape analysis were performed to characterize the subcortical morphology. The normalized volumes of bilateral caudate nucleus were significantly smaller in the KOA group than in the control group (P = 0.004). There was also a trend toward smaller volume of the hippocampus in KOA as compared to the control group (P = 0.027). Detailed surface analyses further localized these differences with a greater involvement of the left hemisphere (P < 0.05, corrected) for the caudate nucleus. Hemispheric asymmetry (right larger than left) of the caudate nucleus was found in both KOA and control groups. Besides, no significant correlation was found between the structural data and pain intensities. Our results indicated that patients with KOA had statistically significant smaller normalized volumes of bilateral caudate nucleus and a trend toward smaller volume of the hippocampus as compared to the control subjects. Further investigations are necessary to characterize the role of caudate nucleus in the course of chronicity of pain associated with KOA. PMID:26834629

  3. Single bundle anterior cruciate reconstruction does not restore normal knee kinematics at six months: an upright MRI study.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, J A; Sutherland, A G; Smith, F W

    2011-10-01

    Abnormal knee kinematics following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament may exist despite an apparent resolution of tibial laxity and functional benefit. We performed upright, weight-bearing MR scans of both knees in the sagittal plane at different angles of flexion to determine the kinematics of the knee following unilateral reconstruction (n = 12). The uninjured knee acted as a control. Scans were performed pre-operatively and at three and six months post-operatively. Anteroposterior tibial laxity was determined using an arthrometer and patient function by validated questionnaires before and after reconstruction. In all the knees with deficient anterior cruciate ligaments, the tibial plateau was displaced anteriorly and internally rotated relative to the femur when compared with the control contralateral knee, particularly in extension and early flexion (mean lateral compartment displacement: extension 7.9 mm (sd 4.8), p = 0.002 and 30° flexion 5.1 mm (sd 3.6), p = 0.004). In all ten patients underwent post-operative scans. Reconstruction reduced the subluxation of the lateral tibial plateau at three months, with resolution of anterior displacement in early flexion, but not in extension (p = 0.015). At six months, the reconstructed knee again showed anterior subluxation in both the lateral (mean: extension 4.2 mm (sd 4.2), p = 0.021 and 30° flexion 3.2 mm (sd 3.3), p = 0.024) and medial compartments (extension, p = 0.049). Our results show that despite improvement in laxity and functional benefit, abnormal knee kinematics remain at six months and actually deteriorate from three to six months following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

  4. Catastrophic thinking about pain as a predictor of length of hospital stay after total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Witvrouw, Erik; Pattyn, E; Almqvist, K F; Crombez, G; Accoe, C; Cambier, D; Verdonk, R

    2009-10-01

    This study prospectively investigates whether catastrophizing thinking is associated with length of hospital stay after total knee arthroplasty. Forty-three patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty were included in this study. Prior to their operation all patients were asked to complete the pain catastrophizing scale, and a Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index. A multiple regression analysis identified pain catastrophizing thinking and age as predictors of hospital stay after total knee arthroplasty. Patients with a higher degree of pain catastrophizing prior to the total knee arthroplasty and those with a higher age have a significantly greater risk for a longer hospital stay. Therefore, the results of this study indicate that the pre-operative level of pain catastrophizing in patients determine, in combination with other variables, the length and inter-individual variation in hospital stay after total knee arthroplasty. Reducing catastrophizing thinking about pain through cognitive-behavioral techniques is likely to reduce levels of fear after total knee arthroplasty. As a result, pain and function immediately post-operative might improve, leading to a decrease in length of hospital stay. Although during the last decades the duration of hospital stay is significantly reduced, this study shows that this can be improved when taking into account the contribution of psychological factors such as pain catastrophizing.

  5. Determinants of pain and functioning in knee osteoarthritis: a one-year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Helminen, Eeva-Eerika; Sinikallio, Sanna H; Valjakka, Anna L; Väisänen-Rouvali, Rauni H; Arokoski, Jari PA

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify predictors of pain and disability in knee osteoarthritis. Design: A one-year prospective analysis of determinants of pain and functioning in knee osteoarthritis. Study setting: Primary care providers in a medium-sized city. Patients: A total of 111 patients aged from 35 to 75 with clinical symptoms and radiographic grading (Kellgren-Lawrence 2–4) of knee osteoarthritis who participated in a randomized controlled trial. Main measures: The outcome measures were self-reported pain and function, which were recorded at 0, 3 and 12 months. Disease-specific pain and functioning were assessed using the pain and function subscales of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index. Generic physical and mental functioning were assessed using the RAND-36 subscales for function, and physical and mental component summary scores. Possible baseline predictors for these outcomes were 1) demographic, socioeconomic and disease-related variables, and 2) psychological measures of resources, distress, fear of movement and catastrophizing. Results: Multivariate linear mixed model analyses revealed that normal mood at baseline measured with the Beck Anxiety Inventory predicted significantly better results in all measures of pain (WOMAC P=0.02) and function (WOMAC P=0.002, RAND-36 P=0.002) during the one-year follow-up. Psychological resource factors (pain self-efficacy P=0.012, satisfaction with life P=0.002) predicted better function (RAND-36). Pain catastrophizing predicted higher WOMAC pain levels (P=0.013), whereas fear of movement (kinesiophobia) predicted poorer functioning (WOMAC P=0.046, RAND-36 P=0.024). Conclusions: Multiple psychological factors in people with knee osteoarthritis pain are associated with the development of disability and longer term worse pain. PMID:27496698

  6. Motor control investigation of dystonic cerebral palsy: A pilot study of passive knee trajectory.

    PubMed

    Androwis, Ghaith J; Michael, Peter A; Jewaid, Darine; Nolan, Karen J; Strongwater, Allan; Foulds, Richard A

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to better understand dystonia in CP and be able to objectively distinguish between individuals who experience spasticity, dystonia, or a combination of these conditions while evaluating the effect of 2Hz vestibular stimulation. Selected outcome measures included knee ROM, angular velocity and acceleration and all measures increased post vestibular stimulation; these results are indications of a possible reduction in the level of disability. The current investigation also identified an unexpected and unique behavior of the knee in children with dystonic cerebral palsy (CP) that was noticed while administering the Pendulum Knee Drop test (PKD) at approximately 0.4 rad (a mid-angle between full extension and zero vertical). There was a catch-like phenomenon at the described mid-angle in dystonic individuals. These results may suggest that dystonia is not a velocity dependent hypersensitivity of reflexes, but may include position dependent muscle reflexes and co-contractions. This reinforces the need for a more precise objective measure or perhaps a modified measure such as a mid-angle PKD test. Furthermore, based on the results obtained through the modified technique, beneficial alterations can be made to the form of treatment such as: robotic therapy or physical therapy that specifically accommodates the unique motor control disorder in individuals with dystonic CP. PMID:26737309

  7. Detection of Prosthetic Knee Movement Phases via In-Socket Sensors: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Amr M; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Tan, Kenneth Y S; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach of identifying prosthetic knee movements through pattern recognition of mechanical responses at the internal socket's wall. A quadrilateral double socket was custom made and instrumented with two force sensing resistors (FSR) attached to specific anterior and posterior sites of the socket's wall. A second setup was established by attaching three piezoelectric sensors at the anterior distal, anterior proximal, and posterior sites. Gait cycle and locomotion movements such as stair ascent and sit to stand were adopted to characterize the validity of the technique. FSR and piezoelectric outputs were measured with reference to the knee angle during each phase. Piezoelectric sensors could identify the movement of midswing and terminal swing, pre-full standing, pull-up at gait, sit to stand, and stair ascent. In contrast, FSR could estimate the gait cycle stance and swing phases and identify the pre-full standing at sit to stand. FSR showed less variation during sit to stand and stair ascent to sensitively represent the different movement states. The study highlighted the capacity of using in-socket sensors for knee movement identification. In addition, it validated the efficacy of the system and warrants further investigation with more amputee subjects and different sockets types.

  8. Detection of Prosthetic Knee Movement Phases via In-Socket Sensors: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Amr M.; Tan, Kenneth Y. S.; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach of identifying prosthetic knee movements through pattern recognition of mechanical responses at the internal socket's wall. A quadrilateral double socket was custom made and instrumented with two force sensing resistors (FSR) attached to specific anterior and posterior sites of the socket's wall. A second setup was established by attaching three piezoelectric sensors at the anterior distal, anterior proximal, and posterior sites. Gait cycle and locomotion movements such as stair ascent and sit to stand were adopted to characterize the validity of the technique. FSR and piezoelectric outputs were measured with reference to the knee angle during each phase. Piezoelectric sensors could identify the movement of midswing and terminal swing, pre-full standing, pull-up at gait, sit to stand, and stair ascent. In contrast, FSR could estimate the gait cycle stance and swing phases and identify the pre-full standing at sit to stand. FSR showed less variation during sit to stand and stair ascent to sensitively represent the different movement states. The study highlighted the capacity of using in-socket sensors for knee movement identification. In addition, it validated the efficacy of the system and warrants further investigation with more amputee subjects and different sockets types. PMID:25945365

  9. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sprains A sprain means you've stretched or torn a ligament. Common knee sprains usually involve damage ... A strain means you've partly or completely torn a muscle or tendon. With knee strains, you ...

  10. Biomechanical analysis of knee and trunk in badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand diagonal lunges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Hua, Shiang-Hua; Huang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Liao, Jen-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of core neuromuscular control to the dynamic stability of badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand lunges has not been investigated. Accordingly, this study compared the kinematics of the lower extremity, the trunk movement, the muscle activation and the balance performance of knee-injured and knee-uninjured badminton players when performing backhand stroke diagonal lunges. Seventeen participants with chronic knee pain (injured group) and 17 healthy participants (control group) randomly performed two diagonal backhand lunges in the forward and backward directions, respectively. This study showed that the injured group had lower frontal and horizontal motions of the knee joint, a smaller hip-shoulder separation angle and a reduced trunk tilt angle. In addition, the injured group exhibited a greater left paraspinal muscle activity, while the control group demonstrated a greater activation of the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis and medial gastrocnemius muscle groups. Finally, the injured group showed a smaller distance between centre of mass (COM) and centre of pressure, and a lower peak COM velocity when performing the backhand backward lunge tasks. In conclusion, the injured group used reduced knee and trunk motions to complete the backhand lunge tasks. Furthermore, the paraspinal muscles contributed to the lunge performance of the individuals with knee pain, whereas the knee extensors and ankle plantar flexor played a greater role for those without knee pain.

  11. Biomechanical analysis of knee and trunk in badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand diagonal lunges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Hua, Shiang-Hua; Huang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Liao, Jen-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of core neuromuscular control to the dynamic stability of badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand lunges has not been investigated. Accordingly, this study compared the kinematics of the lower extremity, the trunk movement, the muscle activation and the balance performance of knee-injured and knee-uninjured badminton players when performing backhand stroke diagonal lunges. Seventeen participants with chronic knee pain (injured group) and 17 healthy participants (control group) randomly performed two diagonal backhand lunges in the forward and backward directions, respectively. This study showed that the injured group had lower frontal and horizontal motions of the knee joint, a smaller hip-shoulder separation angle and a reduced trunk tilt angle. In addition, the injured group exhibited a greater left paraspinal muscle activity, while the control group demonstrated a greater activation of the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis and medial gastrocnemius muscle groups. Finally, the injured group showed a smaller distance between centre of mass (COM) and centre of pressure, and a lower peak COM velocity when performing the backhand backward lunge tasks. In conclusion, the injured group used reduced knee and trunk motions to complete the backhand lunge tasks. Furthermore, the paraspinal muscles contributed to the lunge performance of the individuals with knee pain, whereas the knee extensors and ankle plantar flexor played a greater role for those without knee pain. PMID:25574707

  12. The effect of different types of insoles or shoe modifications on medial loading of the knee in persons with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard K; Chapman, Graham J; Parkes, Matthew J; Forsythe, Laura; Felson, David T

    2015-11-01

    Many conservative treatments exist for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) which aims to reduce the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). The objective of this study was to determine the difference between different shoes and lateral wedge insoles on EKAM, knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI), external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort when walking in individuals with medial knee OA. Seventy individuals with medial knee OA underwent three-dimensional walking gait analysis in five conditions (barefoot, control shoe, typical wedge, supported wedge, and mobility shoe) with pain and comfort recorded concurrently. The change in EKAM, KAAI, external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort were assessed using multiple linear regressions and pairwise comparisons. Compared with the control shoe, lateral wedge insoles and barefoot walking significantly reduced early stance EKAM and KAAI. The mobility shoe showed no effect. A significant reduction in latter stance EKAM was seen in the lateral wedge insoles compared to the other conditions, with only the barefoot condition reducing the external knee flexion moment. However, the mobility shoe showed significant immediate knee pain reduction and improved comfort scores. Different lateral wedge insoles show comparable reductions in medial knee loading and in our study, the mobility shoe did not affect medial loading.

  13. The effect of different types of insoles or shoe modifications on medial loading of the knee in persons with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Graham J.; Parkes, Matthew J.; Forsythe, Laura.; Felson, David T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many conservative treatments exist for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) which aims to reduce the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). The objective of this study was to determine the difference between different shoes and lateral wedge insoles on EKAM, knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI), external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort when walking in individuals with medial knee OA. Seventy individuals with medial knee OA underwent three‐dimensional walking gait analysis in five conditions (barefoot, control shoe, typical wedge, supported wedge, and mobility shoe) with pain and comfort recorded concurrently. The change in EKAM, KAAI, external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort were assessed using multiple linear regressions and pairwise comparisons. Compared with the control shoe, lateral wedge insoles and barefoot walking significantly reduced early stance EKAM and KAAI. The mobility shoe showed no effect. A significant reduction in latter stance EKAM was seen in the lateral wedge insoles compared to the other conditions, with only the barefoot condition reducing the external knee flexion moment. However, the mobility shoe showed significant immediate knee pain reduction and improved comfort scores. Different lateral wedge insoles show comparable reductions in medial knee loading and in our study, the mobility shoe did not affect medial loading. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1646–1654, 2015. PMID:25991385

  14. Outcomes of Varus Valgus Constrained Versus Rotating-Hinge Implants in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Tennison L; Bederman, S Samuel; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2016-01-01

    The stability of a total knee arthroplasty is determined by the ability of the prosthesis components in concert with supportive bone and soft tissue structures to sufficiently resist deforming forces transmitted across the knee joint. Constrained prostheses are used in unstable knees due to their ability to resist varus and valgus transformative forces across the knee. Constraint requires inherent rigidity, which can facilitate early implant failure. The purpose of this study was to describe the comparative indications for surgery and postoperative outcomes of varus valgus constrained knee (VVK) and rotating-hinge knee (RHK) total knee arthroplasty prostheses. Seven retrospective observational studies describing 544 VVK and 254 RHK patients with an average follow-up of 66 months (range, 7-197 months) were evaluated. Patients in both groups experienced similar failure rates (P=.74), ranges of motion (P=.81), and Knee Society function scores (P=.29). Average Knee Society knee scores were 4.2 points higher in VVK patients compared with RHK patients, indicating minimal mid-term clinical differences may exist (P<.0001). Absent collateral ligament support is an almost universal indication for RHK implantation vs VVK. Constrained device implantation is routinely guided by inherent stability of the knee, and, when performed, similar postoperative outcomes can be achieved with VVK and RHK prostheses.

  15. Web-Based Study of Risk Factors for Pain Exacerbation in Osteoarthritis of the Knee (SPARK-Web): Design and Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Ben; Zhang, Yuqing; Bennell, Kim; March, Lyn; Hunter, David J

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent cause of limited mobility and diminished quality of life. Pain is the main symptom that drives individuals with knee OA to seek medical care and a recognized antecedent to disability and eventually joint replacement. Many persons with symptomatic knee OA experience recurrent pain exacerbations. Knowledge and clarification of risk factors for pain exacerbation may allow those affected to minimize reoccurrence of these episodes. Objective The aim of this study is to use a Web-based case-crossover design to identify risk factors for knee pain exacerbations in persons with symptomatic knee OA. Methods Web-based case-crossover design is used to study persons with symptomatic knee OA. Participants with knee pain and radiographic knee OA will be recruited and followed for 90 days. Participants will complete an online questionnaire at the baseline and every 10 days thereafter (totaling up to 10 control-period questionnaires); participants will also be asked to report online when they experience an episode of increased knee pain. Pain exacerbation will be defined as an increase in knee pain severity of two points from baseline on a numeric rating scale (NRS 0-10). Physical activity, footwear, knee injury, medication use, climate, psychological factors, and their possible interactions will be assessed as potential triggers for pain exacerbation using conditional logistic regression models. Results This project has been funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). The enrollment for the study has started. So far, 343 participants have been enrolled. The study is expected to be finished in October 2015. Conclusions This study will identify risk factors for pain exacerbations in knee OA. The identification and possible modification/elimination of such risk factors will help to prevent the reoccurrence of pain exacerbation episodes and therefore improve knee OA management. PMID:26156210

  16. Does the rectus femoris nerve block improve knee recurvatum in adult stroke patients? A kinematic and electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Delporte, L; Arsenault, L; Revol, P; Lefevre, M; Clevenot, D; Boisson, D; Mertens, P; Rossetti, Y; Luauté, J

    2014-02-01

    Knee recurvatum (KR) during gait is common in hemiplegic patients. Quadriceps spasticity has been postulated as a cause of KR in this population. The aim of this study was to assess the role of rectus femoris spasticity in KR by using selective motor nerve blocks of the rectus femoris nerve in hemiparetic stroke patients. The data from six adult, post-stroke hemiplegic patients who underwent a rectus femoris nerve block for a stiff-knee gait were retrospectively analyzed. An extensive clinical and functional evaluation was performed and gait was assessed by motion analysis (kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic parameters) before and during the block realized using 2% lidocaine injected under a neurostimulation and ultrasonographic targeting procedure. The main outcome measures were the peak knee extension in stance and peak knee extensor moment obtained during gait analysis. No serious adverse effect of the nerve block was observed. The block allowed a reduction of rectus femoris overactivity in all patients. Peak knee extension and extensor moment in stance did not improve in any patient, but peak knee flexion during the swing phase was significantly higher after block (mean: 31.2° post, 26.4 pre, p < 0.05). Our results provide arguments against the hypothesis that the spasticity of the rectus femoris contributes to KR. PMID:24286615

  17. Optimization of prosthetic foot stiffness to reduce metabolic cost and intact knee loading during below-knee amputee walking: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Fey, Nicholas P; Klute, Glenn K; Neptune, Richard R

    2012-11-01

    Unilateral below-knee amputees develop abnormal gait characteristics that include bilateral asymmetries and an elevated metabolic cost relative to non-amputees. In addition, long-term prosthesis use has been linked to an increased prevalence of joint pain and osteoarthritis in the intact leg knee. To improve amputee mobility, prosthetic feet that utilize elastic energy storage and return (ESAR) have been designed, which perform important biomechanical functions such as providing body support and forward propulsion. However, the prescription of appropriate design characteristics (e.g., stiffness) is not well-defined since its influence on foot function and important in vivo biomechanical quantities such as metabolic cost and joint loading remain unclear. The design of feet that improve these quantities could provide considerable advancements in amputee care. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to couple design optimization with dynamic simulations of amputee walking to identify the optimal foot stiffness that minimizes metabolic cost and intact knee joint loading. A musculoskeletal model and distributed stiffness ESAR prosthetic foot model were developed to generate muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulations of amputee walking. Dynamic optimization was used to solve for the optimal muscle excitation patterns and foot stiffness profile that produced simulations that tracked experimental amputee walking data while minimizing metabolic cost and intact leg internal knee contact forces. Muscle and foot function were evaluated by calculating their contributions to the important walking subtasks of body support, forward propulsion and leg swing. The analyses showed that altering a nominal prosthetic foot stiffness distribution by stiffening the toe and mid-foot while making the ankle and heel less stiff improved ESAR foot performance by offloading the intact knee during early to mid-stance of the intact leg and reducing metabolic cost. The optimal design also

  18. Five-year results of a randomised controlled trial comparing mobile and fixed bearings in total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Breeman, S; Campbell, M K; Dakin, H; Fiddian, N; Fitzpatrick, R; Grant, A; Gray, A; Johnston, L; MacLennan, G S; Morris, R W; Murray, D W

    2013-04-01

    There is conflicting evidence about the merits of mobile bearings in total knee replacement, partly because most randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have not been adequately powered. We report the results of a multicentre RCT of mobile versus fixed bearings. This was part of the knee arthroplasty trial (KAT), where 539 patients were randomly allocated to mobile or fixed bearings and analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. The primary outcome measure was the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) plus secondary measures including Short Form-12, EuroQol EQ-5D, costs, cost-effectiveness and need for further surgery. There was no significant difference between the groups pre-operatively: mean OKS was 17.18 (sd 7.60) in the mobile-bearing group and 16.49 (sd 7.40) in the fixed-bearing group. At five years mean OKS was 33.19 (sd 16.68) and 33.65 (sd 9.68), respectively. There was no significant difference between trial groups in OKS at five years (-1.12 (95% confidence interval -2.77 to 0.52) or any of the other outcome measures. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with knee-related re-operations or in total costs. In this appropriately powered RCT, over the first five years after total knee replacement functional outcomes, re-operation rates and healthcare costs appear to be the same irrespective of whether a mobile or fixed bearing is used.

  19. An open label, prospective, clinical study on a polyherbal formulation in osteoarthritis of knee

    PubMed Central

    Nipanikar, Sanjay U.; Saluja, Manjit; Kuber, Vinod V.; Kadbhane, Kalyan P.; Chopra, Arvind; Khade, Namdev R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Currently, though pharmacological, mechanical, and surgical interventions are used, there is no known cure for osteoarthritis (OA). Objectives: The main aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of “TLPL/AY/03/2008”, a polyherbal formulation on knee joint pain assessed on visual analogue scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Materials and Methods: It was an open label, single center, prospective, clinical study conducted in 36 patients of OA Knee. Two capsules of ‘TLPL/AY/03/2008’ were given to all patients twice daily orally after meals for 180 days. Results: Data describing quantitative measures are expressed as mean ± SD. Comparison of variables representing categorical data was performed using Chi-square test. The mean joint pain (as assessed on VAS) reduced significantly (59.85%; P < 0.05) and the mean WOMAC combined score, WOMAC pain sub-score, WOMAC stiffness sub-score, and WOMAC difficulty sub-score also reduced significantly at the end of the study. The mean time taken by the patients to walk 50 feet too, was reduced significantly (25.26%) at the end of the study. At the end of 4 months of the treatment, no patient needed paracetamol as rescue medicine to control pain. Most of the patients had shown good overall improvement assessed by the physician and by the patients. Majority of the patients showed excellent tolerability to the study drug. No significant change in most of the safety laboratory parameters was observed at the end of the study. Conclusion: The study provides good evidence in support of the efficacy and safety of the ‘TLPL/AY/03/2008’ in OA of knee. PMID:23741160

  20. The epidemiological and clinical features of primary giant cell tumor around the knee: A report from the multicenter retrospective study in china

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fengsong; Hu, Yongcheng; Zhao, Liming; Zhang, Huilin; Yu, Xiuchun; Wang, Zhen; Ye, Zhaoming; Wu, Sujia; Guo, Shibing; Zhang, Guochuan; Wang, Jinghua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to determine the demographic characteristics of giant cell tumor around the knee in China. Methods Between March 2000 and June 2014, patients with primary giant cell tumor around the knee were recruited from 6 institutions located in different regions of China, and were reviewed retrospectively the clinical features according to gender and age. Results 334 qualified patients were included in this study. The sex ratio was 1.14:1 (178/156), with mean ages of 36.9 years in men and 33.1 years in women, constituting a significant difference (P=0.007). The prevalence of pathological fracture was 32.9% overall (28.7% in men and 37.8% in women). The prevalence of simple fracture was significantly higher in women (26.3%) than in men (15.2%), P=0.042. Tumor location and staging did not differ significantly according to sex (P>0.05). However, comparing with >40 years old, those patients aged ≤40 were more likely to have a right knee tumor (56.7% vs. 44.7%, P=0.042), less likely to have Enneking stage 3 disease (18.6% vs. 35.0%, P=0.005), and less likely to have both soft-tissue extension and a mass (18.6% vs. 34.0%, P=0.009). Conclusions Giant cell tumor around the knee was more common in men than in women, although female patients were younger on average. Further, cases among patients ≤40 years old were observed to be milder than cases among older patients. The results suggest that efficient treatment and preservation of function should both be valued for young patients with giant cell tumor around the knee. PMID:26998425

  1. Effects of tai chi program on neuromuscular function for patients with knee osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of disability as well as a burden on healthcare resources. Tai chi has been proposed as an alternative and complementary treatment for the management of knee osteoarthritis, but there appears to be no consensus on its usefulness. This study aims to develop an innovative tai chi rehabilitation program (ITCRP) for patients with knee OA, and to investigate the effect of ITCRP intervention on a range of outcomes including pain, function, balance, neuromuscular response, and biomechanics in knee OA. Methods/Design We will conduct a prospective, single-blind, randomized controlled trial of 140 individuals with symptomatic knee OA. Patients will be randomly assigned into either an ITCRP group or a control group. The ITCRP group will participate in tai chi two or three times a week for 6 months. The control group will receive health education. After the 6-month intervention period, there will be a 6-month follow-up period with no active intervention in either group. The primary and secondary outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Primary outcome measures will be a visual analog scale for pain, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index,and the Lequesne Knee Score. The secondary outcome measures will include the Berg balance scale, knee and ankle proprioception, neuromuscular response, and 3D functional biomechanics. Furthermore, adverse events will be recorded and analyzed. If any participants withdraw from the trial, intention-to-treat analysiswill be performed. Discussion Important features of this trial include the randomization procedures, large sample size, and a standardized protocol for ITCRP for knee OA. This study aims to determine the feasibility of ITCRP for knee OA and provide data on the effects of ITCRP. Hence, our results will be useful for patients with knee OA as well as for medical staff and healthcare decision makers. Trial registration Chinese

  2. Symptomatic knee osteonecrosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lidan; Wu, Xiuhua; Wu, Honghua; Su, Jinmei; Zhang, Wen; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xuan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-08-01

    To explore the associated risk factors of symptomatic knee osteonecrosis (KON) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we conducted a retrospective case-control study to compare the clinical and laboratory features between SLE patients with and without symptomatic KON matched by age and gender. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to evaluate possible associated risk factors. Twenty (one male, nineteen females) out of 3941 lupus patients were identified as symptomatic KON, which was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean age at KON onset was 34.4 (range 12-67) years, and the median course of lupus at KON onset was 72.5 (range 8-123) months. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified that the prevalence of cutaneous vasculitis (OR 5.23; 95 % CI 1.11-24.70), hyperfibrinogenemia (OR 4.75; 95 % CI 1.08-20.85), and elevated IgG levels (OR 6.05; 95 % CI 1.58-23.16) were statistically higher in KON group, and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) usage was statistically lower in KON group (OR 0.27; 95 % CI 0.07-0.97). Glucocorticoid usage, in terms of maximal dose, duration of treatment, and the percentage of receiving methylprednisolone pulse therapy, did not show statistical difference between the two groups (p > 0.05). Symptomatic KON is a relatively rare complication of SLE. Cutaneous vasculitis, hyperfibrinogenemia, and elevated IgG levels are possible risk factors, whereas HCQ may provide a protective effect. Our results suggest that lupus activity as well as hypercoagulation status may play a role in the pathogenesis of KON in lupus. PMID:27230994

  3. Quasi-stiffness of the knee joint in flexion and extension during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical understanding of the knee joint during a golf swing is essential to improve performance and prevent injury. In this study, we quantified the flexion/extension angle and moment as the primary knee movement, and evaluated quasi-stiffness represented by moment-angle coupling in the knee joint. Eighteen skilled and 23 unskilled golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras and two force platforms were used to record a swing motion. The anatomical angle and moment were calculated from kinematic and kinetic models, and quasi-stiffness of the knee joint was determined as an instantaneous slope of moment-angle curves. The lead knee of the skilled group had decreased resistance duration compared with the unskilled group (P < 0.05), and the resistance duration of the lead knee was lower than that of the trail knee in the skilled group (P < 0.01). The lead knee of the skilled golfers had greater flexible excursion duration than the trail knee of the skilled golfers, and of both the lead and trail knees of the unskilled golfers. These results provide critical information for preventing knee injuries during a golf swing and developing rehabilitation strategies following surgery.

  4. Quasi-stiffness of the knee joint in flexion and extension during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical understanding of the knee joint during a golf swing is essential to improve performance and prevent injury. In this study, we quantified the flexion/extension angle and moment as the primary knee movement, and evaluated quasi-stiffness represented by moment-angle coupling in the knee joint. Eighteen skilled and 23 unskilled golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras and two force platforms were used to record a swing motion. The anatomical angle and moment were calculated from kinematic and kinetic models, and quasi-stiffness of the knee joint was determined as an instantaneous slope of moment-angle curves. The lead knee of the skilled group had decreased resistance duration compared with the unskilled group (P < 0.05), and the resistance duration of the lead knee was lower than that of the trail knee in the skilled group (P < 0.01). The lead knee of the skilled golfers had greater flexible excursion duration than the trail knee of the skilled golfers, and of both the lead and trail knees of the unskilled golfers. These results provide critical information for preventing knee injuries during a golf swing and developing rehabilitation strategies following surgery. PMID:25651162

  5. Knee stability before and after total and unicondylar knee replacement: in vivo kinematic evaluation utilizing navigation.

    PubMed

    Casino, Daniela; Martelli, Sandra; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Lopomo, Nicola; Iacono, Francesco; Bignozzi, Simone; Visani, Andrea; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2009-02-01

    Surgical navigation systems are currently used to guide the surgeon in the correct alignment of the implant. The aim of this study was to expand the use of navigation systems by proposing a surgical protocol for intraoperative kinematics evaluations during knee arthroplasty. The protocol was evaluated on 20 patients, half undergoing unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) and half undergoing posterior-substituting, rotating-platform total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The protocol includes a simple acquisition procedure and an original elaboration methodology. Kinematic tests were performed before and after surgery and included varus/valgus stress at 0 and 30 degrees and passive range of motion. Both UKA and TKA improved varus/valgus stability in extension and preserved the total magnitude of screw-home motion during flexion. Moreover, compared to preoperative conditions, values assumed by tibial axial rotation during flexion in TKA knees were more similar to the rotating patterns of UKA knees. The analysis of the anteroposterior displacement of the knee compartments confirmed that the two prostheses did not produce medial pivoting, but achieved a postoperative normal behavior. These results demonstrated that proposed intraoperative kinematics evaluations by a navigation system provided new information on the functional outcome of the reconstruction useful to restore knee kinematics during surgery.

  6. Porous tantalum tibial component prevents periprosthetic loss of bone mineral density after total knee arthroplasty for five years-a matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Yukihide; Kobayashi, Akio; Ikebuchi, Mitsuhiko; Iwaki, Hiroyoshi; Inori, Fumiaki; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    In 21 knees receiving porous tantalum tibial component and 21 knees receiving a cemented cobalt-chromium tibial component, dual x-ray absorptiometry scans were performed for five years post-operatively. The postoperative decrease in the bone mineral density in the lateral aspect of the tibia was significantly less in knees with porous tantalum tibial components (11.6%) than in knees with cemented cobalt-chromium tibial components (29.6%) at five years (p < 0.05). No prosthetic migration or periprosthetic fracture was detected in either group. The present study is one of the studies with the longest follow-up period on bone mineral density after total knee arthroplasty. Porous tantalum tibial component has a favorable effect on the bone mineral density of the proximal tibia after total knee arthroplasty up to five years.

  7. CT Imaging for Evaluation of Calcium Crystal Deposition in the Knee: Initial Experience from The Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) Study

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Devyani; Guermazi, Ali; Sieren, Jered P.; Lynch, John; Torner, James; Neogi, Tuhina; Felson, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Role of intra-articular calcium crystals in osteoarthritis (OA) is unclear. Imaging modalities used to date for its evaluation have limitations in their ability to fully characterize intra-articular crystal deposition. Since Computed Tomography (CT) imaging provides excellent visualization of bones and calcified tissue, in this pilot project we evaluated the utility of CT scan in describing intra-articular calcium crystal deposition in the knees. Method We included 12 subjects with and 4 subjects without radiographic chondrocalcinosis in the most recent visit from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) study, which is a longitudinal cohort of community-dwelling older adults with or at risk for knee OA. All subjects underwent CT scans of bilateral knees. Each knee was divided into 25 subregions and each subregion was read for presence of calcium crystals by a musculoskeletal radiologist. To assess reliability, readings were repeated 4 weeks later. Results CT images permitted visualization of 25 subregions with calcification within and around the tibio-femoral and patello-femoral joints in all 24 knees with radiographic chondrocalcinosis. Intra-articular calcification was seen universally including meniscal cartilage (most common site involved in 21/24 knees), hyaline cartilage, cruciate ligaments, medial collateral ligament and joint capsule. Readings showed good agreement for specific tissues involved with calcium deposition (kappa: 0.70, 95% CI 0.62–0.80). Conclusion We found CT scan to be a useful and reliable tool for describing calcium crystal deposition in the knee and therefore potentially for studying role of calcium crystals in OA. We also confirmed that “chondrocalcinosis” is a misnomer because calcification is present ubiquitously. PMID:25451303

  8. Interpolation function for approximating knee joint behavior in human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the importance of analyzing the kinematic data of the lower limb in gait movement, especially the angular variation of the knee joint, the paper propose an approximation function that can be used for processing the correlation among a multitude of knee cycles. The approximation of the raw knee data was done by Lagrange polynomial interpolation on a signal acquired using Zebris Gait Analysis System. The signal used in approximation belongs to a typical subject extracted from a lot of ten investigated subjects, but the function domain of definition belongs to the entire group. The study of the knee joint kinematics plays an important role in understanding the kinematics of the gait, this articulation having the largest range of motion in whole joints, in gait. The study does not propose to find an approximation function for the adduction-abduction movement of the knee, this being considered a residual movement comparing to the flexion-extension.

  9. Efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban thromboprophylaxis after arthroplasty of the hip or knee: retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, L; Hua, A; Patel, S; Gibbons, C; Vizcaychipi, M P

    2016-09-01

    Introduction Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a potentially fatal complication of hip arthroplasty and knee arthroplasty. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommend rivaroxaban for VTE prevention. Amid concerns over bleeding complications, the modified thromboprophylaxis policy of Chelsea and Westminster Hospital (CWH; London, UK) advises enoxaparin given after surgery in the inpatient setting followed by rivaroxaban upon hospital discharge. This retrospective study investigated the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban in this novel, modified venous-prophylaxis regimen in a surgical orthopaedic cohort at CWH. Methods A total of 479 patients who received modified thromboprophylaxis treatment at CWH after hip arthroplasty or knee arthroplasty between April 2013 and October 2014 formed the study cohort. Seven outcomes based on efficacy and safety while undergoing treatment with rivaroxaban were investigated: symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), death, stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), major bleeding episodes (MBEs) and non-major bleeding episodes (NMBEs). Median follow-up was 369 days. Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney U-tests were adopted to identify associations with these outcomes. Results Prevalence of symptomatic PE, DVT, death, stroke and MI during treatment was zero. One (0.2%) MBE and nine (1.9%) NMBEs occurred. The MBE (a wound haematoma) required a return to theatre for aspiration. Off-treatment VTEs occurred in four (0.8%) patients after completion of a course of rivaroxaban, and were associated with known risk factors. Conclusions Rivaroxaban is an effective and safe anticoagulant for thromboprophylaxis after hip arthroplasty or knee arthroplasty if used in a modified regimen involving enoxaparin administered in the inpatient setting followed by rivaroxaban upon hospital discharge. PMID:27580310

  10. Efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban thromboprophylaxis after arthroplasty of the hip or knee: retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, L; Hua, A; Patel, S; Gibbons, C; Vizcaychipi, M P

    2016-09-01

    Introduction Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a potentially fatal complication of hip arthroplasty and knee arthroplasty. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommend rivaroxaban for VTE prevention. Amid concerns over bleeding complications, the modified thromboprophylaxis policy of Chelsea and Westminster Hospital (CWH; London, UK) advises enoxaparin given after surgery in the inpatient setting followed by rivaroxaban upon hospital discharge. This retrospective study investigated the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban in this novel, modified venous-prophylaxis regimen in a surgical orthopaedic cohort at CWH. Methods A total of 479 patients who received modified thromboprophylaxis treatment at CWH after hip arthroplasty or knee arthroplasty between April 2013 and October 2014 formed the study cohort. Seven outcomes based on efficacy and safety while undergoing treatment with rivaroxaban were investigated: symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), death, stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), major bleeding episodes (MBEs) and non-major bleeding episodes (NMBEs). Median follow-up was 369 days. Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney U-tests were adopted to identify associations with these outcomes. Results Prevalence of symptomatic PE, DVT, death, stroke and MI during treatment was zero. One (0.2%) MBE and nine (1.9%) NMBEs occurred. The MBE (a wound haematoma) required a return to theatre for aspiration. Off-treatment VTEs occurred in four (0.8%) patients after completion of a course of rivaroxaban, and were associated with known risk factors. Conclusions Rivaroxaban is an effective and safe anticoagulant for thromboprophylaxis after hip arthroplasty or knee arthroplasty if used in a modified regimen involving enoxaparin administered in the inpatient setting followed by rivaroxaban upon hospital discharge.

  11. Heat generated by knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, James W

    2006-01-01

    Temperature sensors were placed in 50 knees in 25 patients who had one or both joints replaced. Temperature recordings were made before walking, after walking, and after cycling. The heat generated in healthy, arthritic, and replaced knees was measured. The knee replacements were done using eight different prostheses. A rotating hinge knee prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 7 degrees C in 20 minutes and 9 degrees C in 40 minutes. An unconstrained ceramic femoral prosthesis articulating with a polyethylene tibial prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 4 degrees C compared with a healthy resting knee. The other designs using a cobalt-chrome alloy and high-density polyethylene had temperature increases of 5 degrees-7 degrees C with exercise. Frictional heat generated in a prosthetic knee is not immediately dissipated and may result in wear, creep, and other degenerative processes in the high-density polyethylene. Extended periods of elevated temperature in joints may inhibit cell growth and perhaps contribute to adverse performance via bone resorption or component loosening. Prosthetic knees generate more heat with activity than healthy or arthritic knees. More-constrained knee prostheses generate more heat than less-constrained prostheses. A knee with a ceramic femoral component generates less heat than a knee with the same design using a cobalt-chromium alloy. PMID:16394760

  12. No statistically significant kinematic difference found between a cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilised Triathlon knee arthroplasty: a laboratory study involving eight cadavers examining soft-tissue laxity.

    PubMed

    Hunt, N C; Ghosh, K M; Blain, A P; Rushton, S P; Longstaff, L M; Deehan, D J

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the maximum laxity conferred by the cruciate-retaining (CR) and posterior-stabilised (PS) Triathlon single-radius total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for anterior drawer, varus-valgus opening and rotation in eight cadaver knees through a defined arc of flexion (0º to 110º). The null hypothesis was that the limits of laxity of CR- and PS-TKAs are not significantly different. The investigation was undertaken in eight loaded cadaver knees undergoing subjective stress testing using a measurement rig. Firstly the native knee was tested prior to preparation for CR-TKA and subsequently for PS-TKA implantation. Surgical navigation was used to track maximal displacements/rotations at 0º, 30º, 60º, 90º and 110° of flexion. Mixed-effects modelling was used to define the behaviour of the TKAs. The laxity measured for the CR- and PS-TKAs revealed no statistically significant differences over the studied flexion arc for the two versions of TKA. Compared with the native knee both TKAs exhibited slightly increased anterior drawer and decreased varus-valgus and internal-external roational laxities. We believe further study is required to define the clinical states for which the additional constraint offered by a PS-TKA implant may be beneficial.

  13. Five-year results of a randomised controlled trial comparing mobile and fixed bearings in total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Breeman, S; Campbell, M K; Dakin, H; Fiddian, N; Fitzpatrick, R; Grant, A; Gray, A; Johnston, L; MacLennan, G S; Morris, R W; Murray, D W

    2013-04-01

    There is conflicting evidence about the merits of mobile bearings in total knee replacement, partly because most randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have not been adequately powered. We report the results of a multicentre RCT of mobile versus fixed bearings. This was part of the knee arthroplasty trial (KAT), where 539 patients were randomly allocated to mobile or fixed bearings and analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. The primary outcome measure was the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) plus secondary measures including Short Form-12, EuroQol EQ-5D, costs, cost-effectiveness and need for further surgery. There was no significant difference between the groups pre-operatively: mean OKS was 17.18 (sd 7.60) in the mobile-bearing group and 16.49 (sd 7.40) in the fixed-bearing group. At five years mean OKS was 33.19 (sd 16.68) and 33.65 (sd 9.68), respectively. There was no significant difference between trial groups in OKS at five years (-1.12 (95% confidence interval -2.77 to 0.52) or any of the other outcome measures. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with knee-related re-operations or in total costs. In this appropriately powered RCT, over the first five years after total knee replacement functional outcomes, re-operation rates and healthcare costs appear to be the same irrespective of whether a mobile or fixed bearing is used. PMID:23539700

  14. Frontal Plane Knee Moments in Golf: Effect of Target Side Foot Position at Address

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Scott K.; Noffal, Guillermo J.

    2010-01-01

    Golf has the potential to keep people active well into their later years. Injuries to the target side knee have been reported in golfers, yet no mechanisms for these injuries have been proposed. The loads on the knee during the golf swing may be insufficient to cause acute injury, yet they may be a factor in the progression of overuse/degenerative conditions; therefore, research developing swing modifications that may alter loading of the knee is warranted. It has been suggested that the proper golf set-up position has the target-side foot externally rotated but no reasoning for this modification has been provided. Frontal plane knee moments have been implicated in many knee pathologies. Therefore, this study used a 3-dimensional link segment model to quantify the frontal plane knee moments during the golf swing in a straight (STR) and externally rotated (EXT) target-side foot position. Subjects were 7 collegiate golfers and knee moments were compared between conditions using repeated measures T-tests. The golf swing knee moment magnitudes were also descriptively compared to those reported for two athletic maneuvers (drop jump landing, side-step cutting) and activities of daily living (gait, stair ascent). The EXT condition decreased the peak knee adduction moment as compared to the STR condition; however, foot position had no effect on the peak knee abduction moment. Also, the magnitude of the knee adduction moments during the two activities of daily living were 9-33% smaller than those experienced during the two different golfing conditions. The drop jump landing and golf swing knee moments were of similar magnitude (STR= - 5%, EXT= + 8%); however, the moments associated with side- step cutting were 50-71% larger than those on the target side knee during the golf swing. The loading of the target side knee during the golf swing may be a factor in the development and progression of knee pathologies and further research should examine ways of attenuating these loads

  15. Evaluation of knee joint proprioception and balance of young female volleyball players: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Şahin, Neşe; Bianco, Antonino; Patti, Antonino; Paoli, Antonio; Palma, Antonio; Ersöz, Gülfem

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The main purpose of our study was the evaluation of the effects of long-term volleyball practice on knee joint proprioception and balance of young female athletes. [Subjects and Methods] An observational case-control study was performed. The study enrolled 19 female volleyball players in the experimental group and 19 sedentary counterparts as controls. A Biodex balance system and dynamometer were used for the evaluations. The paired t-test was used to determine the significance of differences between the performance of athletes and controls. [Results] The knee proprioception analysis showed a significant difference at 60° joint position in active and passive tests. A similar trend, but without significance, was found for the 20° joint position. In the postural stability tests both groups showed similar results with no significant differences between them. [Conclusion] In conclusion, the results indicate a significant influence on joint proprioception is elicited by long-term exposure to a team sport like volleyball. However, the postural stability indexes showed similar trends in both groups, highlighting the analogous ontogenesis of the subjects investigated and the low influence of volleyball practice on postural stability. PMID:25729185

  16. Device or ice: the effect of consistent cooling using a device compared with intermittent cooling using an ice bag after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bech, Michelle; Moorhen, Joanne; Cho, Mary; Lavergne, M Ruth; Stothers, Keith; Hoens, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : To determine the comparative effectiveness of consistent cooling using an icing device (DonJoy Iceman, DJO Canada, Mississauga, ON) versus intermittent cooling using an ice bag (usual care) for the first 48 hours after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Method : A sample of 78 patients (intervention group, n=37; control group, n=34) undergoing primary TKA were randomized to intervention (device) or control (ice) groups. The primary outcome was pain intensity, measured by numerical pain rating scale (NPRS). Secondary outcomes were passive range of motion (PROM), nausea or vomiting, opioid use, blood loss, lower limb function, hospital length of stay, and patient-reported compliance and satisfaction. Results : No significant differences in the primary outcome (pain intensity measured via NPRS) were observed between control and intervention groups. Patients in the intervention group were significantly more satisfied (8.4 vs. 6.0, p=0.002); used the device more consistently, day and night (85.7% vs. 29.6% and 87.6% vs. 30.8%, respectively, p<0.001); and were more likely to recommend this method of cooling (96.8% vs. 68.0%, p=0.004). Conclusion : The study found no additional benefit of consistent cryotherapy using the icing device over intermittent ice bags on postoperative pain, PROM, nausea or vomiting, opioid use, blood loss, lower limb function, or length of stay, despite significant differences in patient-reported compliance and satisfaction.

  17. Device or Ice: The Effect of Consistent Cooling Using a Device Compared with Intermittent Cooling Using an Ice Bag after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Moorhen, Joanne; Cho, Mary; Lavergne, M. Ruth; Stothers, Keith; Hoens, Alison M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the comparative effectiveness of consistent cooling using an icing device (DonJoy Iceman, DJO Canada, Mississauga, ON) versus intermittent cooling using an ice bag (usual care) for the first 48 hours after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Method: A sample of 78 patients (intervention group, n=37; control group, n=34) undergoing primary TKA were randomized to intervention (device) or control (ice) groups. The primary outcome was pain intensity, measured by numerical pain rating scale (NPRS). Secondary outcomes were passive range of motion (PROM), nausea or vomiting, opioid use, blood loss, lower limb function, hospital length of stay, and patient-reported compliance and satisfaction. Results: No significant differences in the primary outcome (pain intensity measured via NPRS) were observed between control and intervention groups. Patients in the intervention group were significantly more satisfied (8.4 vs. 6.0, p=0.002); used the device more consistently, day and night (85.7% vs. 29.6% and 87.6% vs. 30.8%, respectively, p<0.001); and were more likely to recommend this method of cooling (96.8% vs. 68.0%, p=0.004). Conclusion: The study found no additional benefit of consistent cryotherapy using the icing device over intermittent ice bags on postoperative pain, PROM, nausea or vomiting, opioid use, blood loss, lower limb function, or length of stay, despite significant differences in patient-reported compliance and satisfaction. PMID:25931653

  18. Gait and clinical measurements in patients with knee osteoarthritis after surgery: a prospective 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Börjesson, M; Weidenhielm, L; Mattsson, E; Olsson, E

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this prospective follow-up study was to determine if gait measurements and/or clinical measurements could detect differences in treatment outcome between two surgical interventions in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The patients were followed for 5 years after surgery. Forty patients, 55-70 years of age, with unilateral knee OA were included. The patients were treated either with a high tibial osteotomy (HTO) (n=18) or a unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) (n=22). Clinical outcome measures were the British Orthopaedic Association (BOA) score, pain during walking, passive range of knee motion (PROM) and patients' subjective opinion. The gait variables were free walking speed, step frequency, step length and single and double-stance phase for each leg. The patients were examined before surgery and 3 months, 1 year and 5 years after surgery. The time-distance variables of gait could detect differences in treatment outcome, 3 months after surgery, while the clinical outcome measures, as given here, could not detect any differences between the two groups of patients. Measurements of free walking speed could be recommended for clinical evaluation, after surgical interventions, in patients with knee OA.

  19. Polyethylene Wear in Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Rajit; Elmallah, Randa D K; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Kurtz, Steven M; Mont, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene (PE) wear and osteolysis are common causes for late revisions of knee arthroplasties. Several implant and surgical factors have been implicated in contributing to the development of wear, such as type of bearing surface used, inaccurate articular geometry, and poor knee kinematics. In addition, patient-related factors, such as younger age and higher activity levels, may also contribute to wear. Our purpose was to evaluate and compare the effect of these variables on wear rates following knee arthroplasty. Recently, technological advancements have been aimed at reducing the incidence of wear by improving the PE manufacturing process, creating implants that minimize contact stresses, and refining our surgical techniques. Furthermore, the development of newer highly cross-linked PEs (HXLPEs) and the introduction of additives, such as vitamin E, to the PEs may improve overall implant survivorship. As a result, with the advent of newer implant and PE designs, wear is no longer the most common cause of early failure, though it remains an important factor in limiting long-term implant survivorship. However, there are a few clinical studies evaluating the long-term outcomes of newer HXLPEs and implant designs, with further evaluations necessary to determine the best implant-PE combination for improved knee arthroplasty survivorship. PMID:26030263

  20. Effect of ACL graft material on anterior knee force during simulated in vivo ovine motion applied to the porcine knee: An in vitro examination of force during 2000 cycles.

    PubMed

    Boguszewski, Daniel V; Wagner, Christopher T; Butler, David L; Shearn, Jason T

    2015-12-01

    This study determined how anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction affected the magnitude and temporal patterns of anterior knee force and internal knee moment during 2000 cycles of simulated gait. Porcine knees were tested using a six degree-of-freedom robot, examining three porcine allograft materials compared with the native ACL. Reconstructions were performed using: (1) bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft (BPTB), (2) reconstructive porcine tissue matrix (RTM), or (3) an RTM-polymer hybrid construct (Hybrid). Forces and moments were measured over the entire gait cycle and contrasted at heel strike, mid stance, toe off, and peak flexion. The Hybrid construct performed the best, as magnitude and temporal changes in both anterior knee force and internal knee moment were not different from the native ACL knee. Conversely, the RTM knees showed greater loss in anterior knee force during 2000 cycles than the native ACL knee at heel strike and toe off, with an average force loss of 46%. BPTB knees performed the least favorably, with significant loss in anterior knee force at all key points and an average force loss of 61%. This is clinically relevant, as increases in post-operative knee laxity are believed to play a role in graft failure and early onset osteoarthritis. PMID:26134453

  1. [The effect of central anatomical single-bundle versus anatomical double-bundle reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament on knee stability. a clinical study].

    PubMed

    Komzák, M; Hart, R; Smíd, P; Puskeiler, M

    2014-01-01

    most important factors in restoring physiological kinematics of the joint after ACL injury. Since there are not many studies comparing knee rotational stability after CASB with that after DB reconstructions, the results presented here may contribute to selecting the optimal method of ACL reconstruction. CONCLUSIONS The results show that, in ACL reconstruction, the DB technique provides better stability to the knee, in both APT and rotation, than the CASB method. The latter has the same effect on knee stability as the presence of the AM bundle alone. When the PL bundle is added, knee stability, in both APT and internal/external rotation, is increased in comparison with central single-bundle ACL repair. Key words:anterior cruciate ligament, navigation, central anatomical single-bundle reconstruction, double-bundle reconstruction.

  2. Military Exercises, Knee and Ankle Joint Position Sense, and Injury in Male Conscripts: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Farshid; Azma, Kamran; Naseh, Iman; Emadifard, Reza; Etemadi, Yasaman

    2013-01-01

    Context: The high incidence of lower limb injuries associated with physical exercises in military conscripts suggests that fatigue may be a risk factor for injuries. Researchers have hypothesized that lower limb injuries may be related to altered ankle and knee joint position sense (JPS) due to fatigue. Objective: To evaluate if military exercises could alter JPS and to examine the possible relation of JPS to future lower extremity injuries in military service. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 50 male conscripts (age = 21.4 ± 2.3 years, height = 174.5 ± 6.4 cm, mass = 73.1 ± 6.3 kg) from a unique military base were recruited randomly. Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants performed 8 weeks of physical activities at the beginning of a military course. In the first part of the study, we instructed participants to recognize predetermined positions before and after military exercises so we could examine the effects of military exercise on JPS. The averages of the absolute error and the variable error of 3 trials were recorded. We collected data on the frequency of lower extremity injuries over 8 weeks. Next, the participants were divided into 2 groups: injured and uninjured. Separate 2 × 2 × 2 (group-by-time-by-joint) mixed-model analyses of variance were used to determine main effects and interactions of these factors for each JPS measure. In the second part of the study, we examined whether the effects of fatigue on JPS were related to the development of injury during an 8-week training program. We calculated Hedges effect sizes for JPS changes postexercise in each group and compared change scores between groups. Results: We found group-by-time interactions for all JPS variables (F range = 2.86–4.05, P < .01). All participants showed increases in JPS errors postexercise (P < .01), but the injured group had greater changes for all the variables (P < .01). Conclusions: Military conscripts who sustained lower

  3. An immunohistochemical study of the sciatic nerve in a rat knee immobilization model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Shinya; Matsuzaki, Taro; Hoso, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to immunohistochemically evaluate changes in the periphery of the sciatic nerve in a rat model of knee immobilization, and to assess the effects of range of motion exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one male rats were divided randomly into three groups: control (C), immobilized (I), and exercise (E group). Rats in the I and E groups had the right knee joint immobilized for 2 weeks. In the E group, range of motion exercise was also performed. After the experimental period, the periphery of the sciatic nerve was immunohistochemically observed. [Results] Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the myelin sheath and the perineurium in all groups were laminin positive. In the C and E groups, all rats showed normal staining. In contrast, 4 rats in the I group exhibited weak labeling. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that immobilization alters the perineurium at a molecular level and the range of motion exercise is essential for maintaining the environment of the perineurium. PMID:27190437

  4. Guidelines for the Design and Conduct of Clinical Studies in Knee Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mithoefer, Kai; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Farr, Jack; Kon, Elizaveta; Zaslav, Kenneth; Cole, Brian J.; Ranstam, Jonas; Yao, Jian; Shive, Matthew; Levine, David; Dalemans, Wilfried; Brittberg, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To summarize current clinical research practice and develop methodological standards for objective scientific evaluation of knee cartilage repair procedures and products. Design: A comprehensive literature review was performed of high-level original studies providing information relevant for the design of clinical studies on articular cartilage repair in the knee. Analysis of cartilage repair publications and synopses of ongoing trials were used to identify important criteria for the design, reporting, and interpretation of studies in this field. Results: Current literature reflects the methodological limitations of the scientific evidence available for articular cartilage repair. However, clinical trial databases of ongoing trials document a trend suggesting improved study designs and clinical evaluation methodology. Based on the current scientific information and standards of clinical care, detailed methodological recommendations were developed for the statistical study design, patient recruitment, control group considerations, study endpoint definition, documentation of results, use of validated patient-reported outcome instruments, and inclusion and exclusion criteria for the design and conduct of scientifically sound cartilage repair study protocols. A consensus statement among the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) and contributing authors experienced in clinical trial design and implementation was achieved. Conclusions: High-quality clinical research methodology is critical for the optimal evaluation of current and new cartilage repair technologies. In addition to generally applicable principles for orthopedic study design, specific criteria and considerations apply to cartilage repair studies. Systematic application of these criteria and considerations can facilitate study designs that are scientifically rigorous, ethical, practical, and appropriate for the question(s) being addressed in any given cartilage repair research project

  5. Relationship between intraosseous pressures and intra-articular pressure in arthritis of the knee. An experimental study in immature dogs.

    PubMed

    Bünger, C; Harving, S; Hjermind, J; Bünger, E H

    1983-04-01

    The influence of chronic synovial inflammation and effusion on the juxta-articular bone haemodynamics in the juvenile knee was studied in 12 immature dogs with Carragheenin-induced unilateral arthritis. Using a fluid filled electromanometric pressure recording system simultaneous pressure measurements were taken from the distal femoral metaphysis, juxta-articular epiphyses and knee joint cavity in general anaesthesia followed by intraosseous phlebographies. During resting conditions the intraosseous pressure of the distal femoral epiphysis and the intra-articular pressure was significantly elevated. The phlebographies showed increased accumulation of contrast in arthritic femoral epiphyses with decreased contrast clearance rate. During increasing intra-articular pressure an augmented vulnerability of the blood supply of the arthritic femoral epiphyses was demonstrated. The results suggests that joint effusion may play an important role in the bone changes in juvenile degenerative arthritis of the knee. PMID:6845993

  6. Venous Thromboembolism Following Hip and Knee Replacement Arthroplasty in Korea: A Nationwide Study Based on Claims Registry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sahnghoon; Hwang, Jee-In; Kim, Yunjung; Yoon, Pil Whan; Ahn, Jeonghoon; Yoo, Jeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and trends of clinically relevant venous thromboembolism (VTE) including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) after hip and knee replacement arthroplasty (HKRA) in Korea. Between January 1 and December 31, 2010, 22,127 hip replacement arthroplasty (HRA) patients and 52,882 knee replacement arthroplasty (KRA) patients were enrolled in the analysis using the administrative claims database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA). All available parameters including procedure history and clinically relevant VTE during the 90 days after HKRA were identified based on diagnostic and electronic data interchange (EDI) codes. The overall incidence of VTE, DVT, and PE during the 90 days was 3.9% (n=853), 2.7% (n=597), and 1.5% (n=327) after HRA, while the incidence was 3.8% (n=1,990), 3.2% (n=1,699), and 0.7% (n=355) after KRA. The incidence of VTE after HKRA was significantly higher in patients who had previous VTE history (odds ratio [OR], 10.8 after HRA, OR, 8.5 after KRA), chronic heart failure (2.1, 1.3), arrhythmia (1.8, 1.7), and atrial fibrillation (3.4, 2.1) than in patients who did not. The VTE incidence in patients with chemoprophylaxis was higher than that in patients without chemoprophylaxis. The incidence of VTEs revealed in this retrospective review was not low compared with the results of the studies targeting other Asian or Caucasian populations. It may warrant routine prevention including employment of chemoprophylaxis. However, the limitation of the reviewed data mandates large scale prospective investigation to affirm this observation. PMID:26770042

  7. Descending Control of Nociceptive Processing in Knee Osteoarthritis Is Associated With Intracortical Disinhibition: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Tarragó, Maria da Graca L; Deitos, Alícia; Brietzke, Aline Patrícia; Vercelino, Rafael; Torres, Iraci L S; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2016-04-01

    Based on the hypothesis that an imbalance in excitatory and inhibitory input is a central mechanism of knee osteoarthritis chronic pain (KOACP), this exploratory study had the following aims: to compare whether the function of the descending inhibitory pain pathway is associated with the state of inhibition in the corticospinal system indexed by the motor-evoked potential (MEP) and the cortical salient period (CSP) in patients with severe osteoarthritis (OA) and healthy controls; and to determine if there is correlation between the measures of intracortical inhibition (CSP, MEP) with changes on the numerical pain scale (NPS [0-10]) in KOACP during a conditioned pain modulation (CPM)-task considering the effect of self-reported function assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and analgesic use.In a cross-sectional study, we included females (n = 21), with disability by pain or stiffness due to KOACP and healthy controls (n = 10), aged 19 to 75 years. The motor cortex excitability parameters (MEP and CSP) were assessed using the transcranial magnetic stimulation. We assessed the pain and disability by the WOMAC, and change on NPS (0-10) during CPM-task.A Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that the adjusted mean (SD) on the MEP amplitude was 13.53% higher in the OA than in healthy subjects (1.33 [0.49] vs 1.15 [0.13]), respectively (P = 0.16). The adjusted mean (SD) on the CSP observed in OA patients was 23.43% lower than in healthy subjects (54.54 [16.10] vs 70.94 [22.87]), respectively (P = 0.01). The function of the descending pain modulatory system assessed by change on NPS (0-10) during a CPM-task was negatively correlated with the cortical excitability parameter indexed by the CSP (P = 0.001). Also, the CSP was negatively correlated with the pain and disability assessed by the WOMAC index.These findings support the hypothesis that the change in cortical plasticity in KOACP is associated

  8. Isokinetic torque levels in hemophiliac knee musculature.

    PubMed

    Strickler, E M; Greene, W B

    1984-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to 1) measure peak torques generated by knee extensors and flexors in hemophilia patients; 2) describe flexor to extensor; 3) record the point in the arc of motion where peak torque was achieved; 4) correlate results with age, degree of hemophilic arthropathy, and presence of flexion contracture; and 5) compare results with reports on healthy subjects. Forty-seven patients (94 knees) with severe hemophilia were tested with a Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer at a speed of 30 degrees per second. Height, weight, thigh girths, and passive knee range of motion were recorded. Standing roentgenograms of the knee were evaluated to assess degree of arthropathy. Subjects were divided into groups by age and degree of arthropathy. Descriptive statistics were generated for all groups. Average peak extensor and flexor torque was similar for adolescents and adults. Increasing degree of arthropathy was associated with significant decreases in both extensor and flexor torque, an increase in flexor to extensor ratios and increasing knee flexion contractures. Across all groups, flexor to extensor ratios were abnormally high, particularly in patients with type IV arthropathy. The point in arc of motion where peak torques occurred did not differ significantly across groups and compared favorably with measures reported in the literature. For all ages, mean peak extensor and flexor torques were less than values reported in the literature for healthy subjects. Results of this study demonstrate the profound decrease in torque produced by knee musculature in hemophilia patients, particularly those with more severe arthropathy and knee flexion deformity.

  9. Knee extension torque variability after exercise in ACL reconstructed knees.

    PubMed

    Goetschius, John; Kuenze, Christopher M; Hart, Joseph M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare knee extension torque variability in patients with ACL reconstructed knees before and after exercise. Thirty two patients with an ACL reconstructed knee (ACL-R group) and 32 healthy controls (control group) completed measures of maximal isometric knee extension torque (90° flexion) at baseline and following a 30-min exercise protocol (post-exercise). Exercise included 30-min of repeated cycles of inclined treadmill walking and hopping tasks. Dependent variables were the coefficient of variation (CV) and raw-change in CV (ΔCV): CV = (torque standard deviation/torque mean x 100), ΔCV = (post-exercise - baseline). There was a group-by-time interaction (p = 0.03) on CV. The ACL-R group demonstrated greater CV than the control group at baseline (ACL-R = 1.07 ± 0.55, control = 0.79 ± 0.42, p = 0.03) and post-exercise (ACL-R = 1.60 ± 0.91, control = 0.94 ± 0.41, p = 0.001). ΔCV was greater (p = 0.03) in the ACL-R group (0.52 ± 0.82) than control group (0.15 ± 0.46). CV significantly increased from baseline to post-exercise (p = 0.001) in the ACL-R group, while the control group did not (p = 0.06). The ACL-R group demonstrated greater knee extension torque variability than the control group. Exercise increased torque variability more in the ACL-R group than control group.

  10. Custom Knee Device for Knee Contractures After Internal Femoral Lengthening.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Ong, Peck-Hoon; Standard, Shawn C; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2015-07-01

    The development of knee flexion contractures is among the most common problems and complications associated with lengthening the femur with an internal device or external fixator. Conservative treatment strategies include physical therapy, serial casting, and low-load prolonged stretching with commercially available splinting systems. The authors developed an individually molded, low-cost custom knee device with polyester synthetic conformable casting material to treat knee flexion contractures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the results of treatment with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy in patients who had knee flexion contracture during femoral lengthening with an intramedullary lengthening femoral nail. This retrospective study included 23 patients (27 limbs) who underwent femoral lengthening with an internal device for the treatment of limb length discrepancy. All patients had a knee flexion contracture raging from 10° to 90° during the lengthening process and were treated with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy. The average flexion contracture before treatment was 36°. The mean amount of lengthening was 5.4 cm. After an average of 3.8 weeks of use of the custom knee device, only 2 of 27 limbs (7.5%) had not achieved complete resolution of the flexion contracture. The average final extension was 1.4°. Only 7 of 27 limbs (26%) required additional soft tissue release. The custom knee device is an inexpensive and effective method for treating knee flexion contracture after lengthening with an internal device.

  11. A new method to measure post-traumatic joint contractures in the rabbit knee.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Kevin A; Holmberg, Michael; Shrive, Nigel

    2003-12-01

    extension (flexion contracture) was demonstrated for the experimental knees using the new methodology where the maximum extension was 35 deg +/- 9 deg, compared to the unoperated knee maximum extension of 11 deg +/- 7 deg, 10 or 12 weeks after the immobilization was discontinued. The custom gripping device coupled to a materials testing machine will serve as a measurement test for future studies characterizing a rabbit knee model of post-traumatic joint contractures.

  12. Factors for Assessing the Effectiveness of Early Rehabilitation after Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Tetsuya; Tamari, Kotaro; Tanaka, Shigeharu; Uchida, Shigehiro; Ito, Hideyuki; Morikawa, Shinya; Kawamura, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of current rehabilitation programs is supported by high-level evidence from the results of randomized controlled trials, but an increasing number of patients are not discharged from the hospital because of the schedule of the critical path (CP). The present study aimed to determine which factors can be used to assess the effectiveness of early rehabilitation. We enrolled 123 patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) who had undergone unilateral minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty for the first time. The following factors were assessed preoperatively: the maximum isometric muscle strength of the knee extensors and flexors, maximum knee and hip joint angle, pain, 5-m maximum walking speed, sex, age, body mass index, exercise habits, Kellgren-Lawrence grade, femorotibial angle, failure side (bilateral or unilateral knee OA), and functional independence measure. We re-evaluated physical function (i.e., muscle strength, joint angle, and pain) and motor function (5-m maximum walking speed) 14 days postoperatively. Changes in physical function, motor function (5-m maximum walking speed), and number of days to independent walking were used as explanatory variables. The postoperative duration of hospitalization (in days) was used as the dependent variable in multivariate analyses. These analyses were adjusted for sex, age, body mass index, exercise habits, Kellgren-Lawrence grade, femorotibial angle, failure side, and functional independence measure. The duration of hospitalization was significantly affected by the number of days to independent walking (p < 0.001, β = 0.507) and a change in the 5-m maximum walking speed (p = 0.016, β = -0.262). Multiple regression analysis showed that the radiographic knee grade (p = 0.029, β = 0.239) was a significant confounding factor. Independent walking and walking speed recovery were considered to reduce the duration of hospitalization. Therefore, these indices can be used to assess the effectiveness of

  13. Factors for Assessing the Effectiveness of Early Rehabilitation after Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Amano, Tetsuya; Tamari, Kotaro; Tanaka, Shigeharu; Uchida, Shigehiro; Ito, Hideyuki; Morikawa, Shinya; Kawamura, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of current rehabilitation programs is supported by high-level evidence from the results of randomized controlled trials, but an increasing number of patients are not discharged from the hospital because of the schedule of the critical path (CP). The present study aimed to determine which factors can be used to assess the effectiveness of early rehabilitation. We enrolled 123 patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) who had undergone unilateral minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty for the first time. The following factors were assessed preoperatively: the maximum isometric muscle strength of the knee extensors and flexors, maximum knee and hip joint angle, pain, 5-m maximum walking speed, sex, age, body mass index, exercise habits, Kellgren-Lawrence grade, femorotibial angle, failure side (bilateral or unilateral knee OA), and functional independence measure. We re-evaluated physical function (i.e., muscle strength, joint angle, and pain) and motor function (5-m maximum walking speed) 14 days postoperatively. Changes in physical function, motor function (5-m maximum walking speed), and number of days to independent walking were used as explanatory variables. The postoperative duration of hospitalization (in days) was used as the dependent variable in multivariate analyses. These analyses were adjusted for sex, age, body mass index, exercise habits, Kellgren-Lawrence grade, femorotibial angle, failure side, and functional independence measure. The duration of hospitalization was significantly affected by the number of days to independent walking (p < 0.001, β = 0.507) and a change in the 5-m maximum walking speed (p = 0.016, β = -0.262). Multiple regression analysis showed that the radiographic knee grade (p = 0.029, β = 0.239) was a significant confounding factor. Independent walking and walking speed recovery were considered to reduce the duration of hospitalization. Therefore, these indices can be used to assess the effectiveness of

  14. Mini-midvastus vs standard medial parapatellar approach: a prospective, randomized, double-blinded study in patients undergoing bilateral total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Bryan J; Toulson, Charles E; Backus, Sherry I; Lyman, Stephen L; Foote, Kristin L; Windsor, Russell E

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the mini-midvastus approach to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) results in differences in quadriceps muscle strength as well as previously cited advantages in a double blind prospective randomized trial. Twenty-seven patients (54 TKAs) scheduled for bilateral TKA were randomized to undergo mini-midvastus approach on one knee and standard approach on the other. Incision lengths were the same. Postoperative strength was determined by isokinetic and isometric peak torque testing. Range of motion, pain Visual analog scale, side-preference, and gait analysis were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively. The only significant difference in strength testing was increased isokinetic and isometric extension torque at 3 weeks postoperatively for the mini-midvastus approach. No differences between the mini-midvastus and standard approach were observed for stride length, stance time, pain Visual analog scale, or knee range of motion. The mini-midvastus approach has limited benefit compared to the standard approach for TKA.

  15. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism and Susceptibility to Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Chien; Peng, Yi-Jen; Lee, Herng-Sheng; Chang, Hung; Chu, Chi-Ming; Huang, Guo-Shu; Chen, Wei-Teing; Tsai, Yu-Jui; Lin, Hong-Ling; Lin, Fu-Huang; Su, Sui-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies of angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion (ACE I/D) polymorphisms and the risks of knee osteoarthritis (OA) have yielded conflicting results. Objective To determine the association between ACE I/D and knee OA, we conducted a combined case-control study and meta-analysis. Methods For the case-control study, 447 knee OA cases and 423 healthy controls were recruited between March 2010 and July 2011. Knee OA cases were defined using the Kellgren-Lawrence grading system, and the ACE I/D genotype was determined using a standard polymerase chain reaction. The association between ACE I/D and knee OA was detected using allele, genotype, dominant, and recessive models. For the meta-analysis, PubMed and Embase databases were systematically searched for prospective observational studies published up until August 2015. Studies of ACE I/D and knee OA with sufficient data were selected. Pooled results were expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the D versus I allele with regard to knee OA risk. Results We found no significant association between the D allele and knee OA [OR: 1.09 (95% CI: 0.76–1.89)] in the present case-control study, and the results of other genetic models were also nonsignificant. Five current studies were included, and there were a total of six study populations after including our case-control study (1165 cases and 1029 controls). In the meta-analysis, the allele model also yielded nonsignificant results [OR: 1.37 (95% CI: 0.95–1.99)] and a high heterogeneity (I2: 87.2%). Conclusions The association between ACE I/D and knee OA tended to yield negative results. High heterogeneity suggests a complex, multifactorial mechanism, and an epistasis analysis of ACE I/D and knee OA should therefore be conducted. PMID:27657933

  16. Effects of kinesiology taping on repositioning error of the knee joint after quadriceps muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin Tae; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of kinesiology taping on repositioning error of the knee joint after quadriceps muscle fatigue. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adults with no orthopaedic or neurological problems participated in this study. [Methods] The repositioning error of the knee joint was measured using a digital goniometer when the subjects extended their dominant-side knee to a random target angle (30°, 45°, or 60°) with their eyes closed, before and after a quadriceps muscle fatigue protocol, and after application of kinesiology tape. [Results] We found that repositioning errors of the dominant-side knee joint increased after quadriceps fatigue compared with no-fatigue conditions. However, kinesiology taping of the quadriceps muscle and patella after quadriceps fatigue significantly decreased repositioning errors of the knee joint. [Conclusion] These results suggest that quadriceps fatigue increases the repositioning error of the knee joint, whereas application of kinesiology tape decreases fatigue-induced joint repositioning error.

  17. Association study of the candidate gene for knee osteoarthritis in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Ji; Kim, Mun-Ju; Kee, Seung-Jung; Song, Sang-Kook; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Shin, Min-Ho; Park, Dong-Jin; Park, Yong-Wook; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Tae-Jong

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7639618 of double von Willebrand factor (DVWA) gene for the association with osteoarthritis (OA) susceptibility in Korean cohort. The study was a part of the Korean cohort study. Two thousand four hundred sixty-two subjects aged 50 years and older who were derived from the cohort and who were assessed for OA at the knee were genotyped. The anteroposterior extended-view weight-bearing radiographs of the knees were obtained. Of the subjects, 725 subjects had radiographic OA. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood using a QIAamp DNA Blood Mini Kit (Qiagen, Valencia, CA). Genotyping was performed using High Resolution Melt or the Taq-Man allelic discrimination assay and the Rotor-Gene 6000 (Corbett Research, Sydney,Australia). Associations were tested by calculating the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), using logistic regression analysis with adjustments for age, gender, and body mass index (BMI). The mean age of the OA patients (females: 554 subjects, 76.4%) was 67.4 (7.9) years. The intraobserver agreement was high for the identification of osteophytes (κ: 0.80) and joint space narrowing (κ: 0.70). There was no significant difference (all P values > 0.05) in the genotype or allele frequencies between the patients with OA and healthy controls. There was also no significant difference when the cases were adjusted by age, gender, and BMI. The associations of DVWA SNPs with OA were noted in previous studies and were not found in the Korean OA cohort.

  18. Hand, hip and knee osteoarthritis in a Norwegian population-based study - The MUST protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowledge about the prevalence and consequences of osteoarthritis (OA) in the Norwegian population is limited. This study has been designed to gain a greater understanding of musculoskeletal pain in the general population with a focus on clinically and radiologically confirmed OA, as well as risk factors, consequences, and management of OA. Methods/Design The Musculoskeletal pain in Ullensaker STudy (MUST) has been designed as an observational study comprising a population-based postal survey and a comprehensive clinical examination of a sub-sample with self-reported OA (MUST OA cohort). All inhabitants in Ullensaker municipality, Norway, aged 40 to 79 years receive the initial population-based postal survey questionnaire with questions about life style, general health, musculoskeletal pain, self-reported OA, comorbidities, health care utilisation, medication use, and functional ability. Participants who self-report OA in their hip, knee and/or hand joints are asked to attend a comprehensive clinical examination at Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, including a comprehensive medical examination, performance-based functional tests, different imaging modalities, cardiovascular assessment, blood and urine samples, and a number of patient-reported questionnaires including five OA disease specific instruments. Data will be merged with six national data registries. A subsample of those who receive the questionnaire has previously participated in postal surveys conducted in 1990, 1994, and 2004 with data on musculoskeletal pain and functional ability in addition to demographic characteristics and a number of health related factors. This subsample constitutes a population based cohort with 20 years follow-up. Discussion This protocol describes the design of an observational population-based study that will involve the collection of data from a postal survey on musculoskeletal pain, and a comprehensive clinical examination on those with self-reported hand, hip and

  19. Pilot Study of Cartilage Repair in the Knee Joint with Multiply Incised Chondral Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Vancsodi, Jozsef; Farkas, Boglarka; Fazekas, Adam; Nagy, Szilvia Anett; Bogner, Peter; Vermes, Csaba; Than, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Focal cartilage lesions in the knee joint have limited capacity to heal. Current animal experiments show that incisions of the deep zone of a cartilage allograft allow acceptable integration for the graft. Questions/Purposes We performed this clinical study to determine (1) if the multiply incised cartilage graft is surgically applicable for focal cartilage lesions, (2) whether this allograft has a potential to integrate to the repair site, and (3) if patients show clinical improvement. Patients and Methods Seven patients with 8 chondral lesions were enrolled into the study. Symptomatic lesions between 2 and 8 cm2 were accepted. Additional injuries were allowed but were addressed simultaneously. Grafts were tailored to match and the deep zone of the cartilage was multiply incised to augment the basal integration before securing in place. Rigorous postoperative physiotherapy followed. At 12 and 24 months the patients’ satisfaction were measured and serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 6 patients. Results Following the implantations no adverse reaction occurred. MRI evaluation postoperatively showed the graft in place in 5 out of 6 patients. In 1 patient, MRI suggested partial delamination at 1 year and graft degeneration at 2 years. Short Form–36 health survey and the Lysholm knee score demonstrated a significant improvement in the first year; however, by 2 years there was a noticeable drop in the scores. Conclusions. Multiply incised pure chondral allograft used for cartilage repair appears to be a relatively safe method. Further studies are necessary to assess its potential in cartilage repair before its clinical use. PMID:26069710

  20. Clinical efficacy of certain Unani herbs in knee osteoarthritis: A pretest and post-test evaluation study

    PubMed Central

    Tarannum, Asfia; Sultana, Arshiya; Ur Rahman, Khaleeq

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of preparations of certain Unani herbs on Lequesne Algo-Functional Index of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Materials and Methods: A prospective, pre- and post test evaluation study was conducted on 20 diagnosed patients of OA recruited from the Nizamia General Hospital, Hyderabad. Internally, a combination (formula) of Unani herbs was administered, which was as follows: 3.5 g powder of Asarun (2 g), Tukhme karafs (2 g), and Filfil daraz (3 g) was administered internally twice daily. Externally, the concoction of Gule baboona (20 g) and Gule tesu (40 g) made in 1 l water was poured over the affected knee, daily once for 40 days. The primary outcome was to assess the efficacy of Unani test drugs with the modified Lequesne Algo-Functional Index for knee OA. Results: The mean percentage reduction of Lequesne Algo-Functional Index score was 71.09%. The mean and standard deviation was 10.55 (1.70) and 3.05 (2.30) before treatment and after treatment, respectively. The pre- and post test evaluation showed reduction in Lequesne Algo-Functional Index score (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: In this study, the Unani treatment module was found to be effective in reducing the severity of disease in patients with osteoarthritis of knees. PMID:27621521

  1. Effect of Isometric Quadriceps Exercise on Muscle Strength, Pain, and Function in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to investigate the effects of isometric quadriceps exercise on muscle strength, pain, and function in knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Outpatients (N=42, 21 per group; age range 40–65 years; 13 men and 29 women) with osteoarthritis of the knee participated in the study. The experimental group performed isometric exercises including isometric quadriceps, straight leg raising, and isometric hip adduction exercise 5 days a week for 5 weeks, whereas the control group did not performed any exercise program. The outcome measures or dependent variables selected for this study were pain intensity, isometric quadriceps strength, and knee function. These variables were measured using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), strength gauge device, and reduced WOMAC index, respectively. All the measurements were taken at baseline (week 0) and at the end of the trial at week 5. [Results] In between-group comparisons, the maximum isometric quadriceps strength, reduction in pain intensity, and improvement in function in the isometric exercise group at the end of the 5th week were significantly greater than those of the control group (p<0.05). [Conclusion] The 5-week isometric quadriceps exercise program showed beneficial effects on quadriceps muscle strength, pain, and functional disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. PMID:24926143

  2. Dynamic loading of the knee and hip joint and compensatory strategies in children and adolescents with varus malalignment.

    PubMed

    Stief, Felix; Böhm, Harald; Schwirtz, Ansgar; Dussa, Chakravarthy Ugandhar; Döderlein, Leonhard

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional gait analysis is a diagnostic tool that can be used to gain a better understanding of the relationship between joint loading and the onset or progression of articular cartilage degeneration in subjects with varus malalignment. The purpose of the present study was to investigate knee and hip joint angles and moments in children and adolescents with pathological varus alignment of the knee without signs of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Moreover, we wanted to know if compensatory mechanisms are present in this young patient group. Fourteen, otherwise healthy patients with varus malalignment of the knee and 15 healthy control subjects were analysed. Patients showed a reduced knee extension and a significantly lower maximum knee extension moment in terminal stance compared to controls. The maximum knee adduction moment in mid and terminal stance and the maximum hip abduction moment in loading response were significantly higher in the patient group. In the transverse plane, abnormally increased knee internal rotation and hip external rotation moments were present in patients with varus malalignment. These findings imply that varus malalignment is not an isolated problem in the frontal plane. In contrast to adult patients with established medial knee OA, the young patients assessed in the present study did not show typical compensatory mechanisms such as increased foot progression angle or reduced walking speed. This suggests that children and adolescents with varus malalignment of the knee probably do not need to alter their spatio-temporal gait parameters in order to decrease knee joint loading.

  3. Does a new knee design perform as well as the design it replaces?

    PubMed Central

    Molt, M.; Ljung, P.; Toksvig-Larsen, S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to compare the early migration characteristics and functional outcome of the Triathlon cemented knee prosthesis with its predecessor, the Duracon cemented knee prosthesis (both Stryker). Methods A total 60 patients were prospectively randomised and tibial component migration was measured by radiostereometric analysis (RSA) at three months, one year and two years; clinical outcome was measured by the American Knee Society score and the Knee Osteoarthritis and Injury Outcome Score. Results There were no statistically significant differences in rotation or translation around or along the three coordinal axes, or in the maximum total point motion (MTPM) during the two-year follow-up. Conclusions The Triathlon cemented knee prosthesis has similar early stability and is likely to perform at least as well as the Duracon cemented knee prosthesis over the longer term. PMID:23610663

  4. Return to work after knee replacement: a qualitative study of patient experiences

    PubMed Central

    Bardgett, Michelle; Lally, Joanne; Malviya, Ajay; Deehan, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective An increasing number of patients in the working population are undergoing total knee replacement (TKR) for end-stage osteoarthritis. The timing and success of return to work is becoming increasingly important for this group of patients with social and economic implications for patients, employers and society. There is limited understanding of the patient variables that determine the ability to return to work. Our objective was (from the patient's perspective) to gain an insight into the factors influencing return to work following knee replacement. Setting and participants This qualitative study was undertaken in a secondary-care setting in a large teaching hospital in the north of England. Semistructured interviews were carried out with 10 patients regarding their experiences of returning to work following TKR. Outcomes Interviews were transcribed and analysed using a qualitative thematic approach to identify the factors influencing return to work from the patient's perspective. Results Three themes were identified that influenced the process of return to work, from the patient's perspective. These were delays in surgical intervention, limited and often inconsistent advice from healthcare professionals regarding return to work, and finally the absence of rehabilitation to optimise patient's recovery and facilitate return to work. Conclusions There is currently no consistent process to optimise return to work for patients of working age after TKR. The impact of delayed surgical intervention, limited advice regarding return to work, and a lack of work-focused rehabilitation, all contribute to potential delays in successful return to work. There is a need to change the focus of healthcare provision for this cohort of patients, and provide a tailored healthcare intervention to optimise patient outcomes. PMID:26832426

  5. Correlation study of knee joint proprioception test results using common test methods

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Ji, Zhong-Qiu; Li, Yan-Xia; Liu, Wei-Tong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To study the correlation of the results obtained from different proprioception test methods, namely, the joint angle reset method, the motion minimum threshold measurement method, and the force sense reproduction method, performed on the same subjects’ knees. [Subjects and Methods] Different proprioception test methods, the joint angle reset method, the motion minimum threshold measurement method and the force sense reproduction method were used to test the knees of 30 healthy young men. [Results] Correlations were found in the following descending order from strong to weak: the correlation between the joint angle reset method and the force sense reproduction method (correlation coefficient of 0.41), the correlation between the joint angle reset method and the motion minimum threshold measurement method (correlation coefficient of 0.29), the correlation between the motion minimum threshold measurement method and the force sense reproduce method (correlation coefficient of 0.15). [Conclusion] No correlation was found among the results obtained using the joint angle reset method, the motion minimum threshold measurement method and the force sense reproduction method. Therefore, no correlation was found among the position sense, the motion sense and the force sense represented by these methods. Using the results of only one of the test methods to represent proprioception is one-sided. Force sensation depends more on the sensory input of information from the Golgi tendon organs, motion sense depends more on the input information of the muscle spindles, and position sense relies on the double input information of the muscle spindles and the Golgi tendon organs. PMID:27065533

  6. Cooling Does Not Affect Knee Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Ozmun, John C.; Thieme, Heather A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cooling on proprioception of the knee has not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the movement reproduction (timing and accuracy) aspect of proprioception. Subjects were tested under two conditions: a 20-minute application of ice and control. Proprioceptive accuracy and timing were measured by passively moving the knee, then comparing the subject's active reproduction of the passive movement. Subjects were blindfolded, then tested in three sectors of the knee's range of motion: 90° to 60°, 60° to 30°, and 30° to full extension. Ice application had no apparent effect on the subject's ability to perform accurate movement reproductions in the sectors tested. However, accuracy of the subject's final angle reproduction varied between the sectors as did the total time of the movement. One possible explanation for the difference between sectors is that different receptors are active at different points in the knee's range of motion. We conclude that cooling the knee joint for 20 minutes does not have an adverse effect on proprioception. PMID:16558379

  7. Comparison between the C-leg microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee and non-microprocessor control prosthetic knees: a preliminary study of energy expenditure, obstacle course performance, and quality of life survey.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Ron; Engbretson, Brenda; Kott, Karen; Ordway, Nathaniel; Brooks, Gary; Crannell, Jessica; Hickernell, Elise; Wheeler, Katie

    2007-03-01

    This study investigated energy expenditure and obstacle course negotiation between the C-leg and various non-microprocessor control (NMC) prosthetic knees and compared a quality of life survey (SF-36v2) of use of the C-leg to national norms. Thirteen subjects with unilateral limb loss (12 with trans-femoral and one with a knee disarticulation amputation) participated in the study. The mean age was 46 years, range 30-75. Energy expenditure using both the NMC and C-leg prostheses was measured at self-selected typical and fast walking paces on a motorized treadmill. Subjects were also asked to walk through a standardized walking obstacle course carrying a 4.5 kg (10 lb) basket and with hands free. Finally, the SF-36v2 was completed for subjects while using the C-leg. Statistically significant differences were found in oxygen consumption between prostheses at both typical and fast paces with the C-leg showing decreased values. Use of the C-leg resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the number of steps and time to complete the obstacle course. Scores on a quality of life index for subjects using the C-leg were above the mean for norms for limitation in the use of an arm or leg, equal to the mean for the general United States population for the physical component score and were above this mean for the mental component score. Based on oxygen consumption and obstacle course findings, the C-leg when compared to the NMC prostheses may provide increased functional mobility and ease of performance in the home and community environment. Questionnaire results suggest a minimal quality of life impairment when using a C-leg for this cohort of individuals with amputation.

  8. Ten-Year Comparison of Oxidized Zirconium and Cobalt-Chromium Femoral Components in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Justin; Vioreanu, Mihai; Salmon, Lucy; Waller, Alison; Pinczewski, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if oxidized zirconium femoral components had better outcomes than cobalt-chromium in vivo at medium and long term and if the use of oxidized zirconium components had clinical adverse effects. Methods: Forty consecutive patients (eighty knees) underwent simultaneous bilateral cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty for primary osteoarthritis from January 2002 to December 2003. For each patient, the knees were randomized to receive the oxidized zirconium femoral component, with the contralateral knee receiving the cobalt-chromium component. Outcome measures included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Knee Society score, and British Orthopaedic Association patient satisfaction scale. Radiographic outcomes include the Knee Society total knee arthroplasty roentgenographic evaluation and scoring system and measurement of radiographic wear. Patients and assessors were blinded to the treatment groups and results. Results: There were no significant differences in clinical, subjective, and radiographic outcomes between the two implants at ten years postoperatively. Ten years following surgery, 36% of the patients preferred the cobalt-chromium knee compared with 11% who preferred the oxidized zirconium knee (p = 0.02) and 53% had no preference. Conclusions: Ten-year outcomes after total knee arthroplasty with oxidized zirconium and cobalt-chromium femoral components showed no significant differences in clinical, subjective, and radiographic outcomes. Patients had no preference or preferred the cobalt chromium prosthesis to the oxidized zirconium prosthesis. There were no adverse effects associated with the use of oxidized zirconium femoral implants.

  9. Surgical treatment for septic arthritis of the knee joint in elderly patients: a 10-year retrospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Ming; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Tung-Fu; Chen, Wei-Ming; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung

    2013-04-01

    Septic arthritis is the most rapidly destructive joint disease, but its early diagnosis remains challenging; delayed or inadequate treatment, even by expert physicians, can lead to irreversible joint destruction. Between 25% and 50% of patients develop irreversible loss of joint function, which is especially concerning in elderly patients. To understand the factors influencing the outcome of septic arthritis, the authors reviewed patients aged older than 50 years who had undergone debridement surgery for primary septic arthritis at their institution between 1998 and 2008. Ninety-two patients (92 knees) were enrolled in the study; 14 did not meet inclusion criteria and were excluded from the final analysis. Of the 78 included patients, 7 underwent arthrodesis, 22 underwent total knee arthroplasty, 19 were indicated for total knee arthroplasty for severe knee joint osteoarthritis but did not undergo surgery by the end of this study, and the remaining 30 had no or mild symptoms of osteoarthrosis and did not receive any surgical procedure. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogenic agent (38%), followed by mixed bacterial infection (10%). Several factors negatively influenced the final clinical outcome, including delayed treatment, advanced macroscopic staging made during debridement surgery, performing multiple debridement surgeries, and a larger Lysholm score difference pre- and posttreatment. More antibiotics administered, longer duration of antibiotic treatment, and more pathogenic agents present were also significantly correlated with poor outcome. These findings shed new light on the management of septic arthritis. Accurate diagnoses and effective treatments are important for the clinical outcome of knee joint bacterial infection in elderly patients.

  10. Glucosamine-containing supplement improves locomotor functions in subjects with knee pain – a pilot study of gait analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Otsuka, Yuta; Izumo, Takayuki; Shibata, Hiroshi; Nagao, Hideyuki; Ogawara, Keita; Yamada, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Seiji; Nakamura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Background Previously, we demonstrated that glucosamine-containing supplementation was effective for improving locomotor functions, especially walking speed. However, the biomechanical mechanism of efficacy has not been elucidated. This study aimed to address this challenge in subjects with knee pain, using a motion capture system. Methods An open label study was conducted in 30 Japanese subjects with knee pain. The subjects were administered a daily supplement containing 1,200 mg of glucosamine hydrochloride, 60 mg of chondroitin sulfate, 45 mg of type II collagen peptides, 90 mg of quercetin glycosides, 10 mg of imidazole peptides, 1 mg of proteoglycan, and 5 μg of vitamin D (GCQID). The intervention continued for 16 weeks. Efficacy for locomotor functions involving the knee joint was evaluated mainly using the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM) and the 5-question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale (GLFS-5). To examine the biomechanical mechanism of efficacy for locomotor functions, motions of subjects in a normal walking state were captured. Gait analysis was conducted and efficacy for gait parameters such as normal walking speed, stride length, cadence, and angle of soles was evaluated. Results GCQID significantly improved total scores on the JKOM and GLFS-5. In gait analysis, normal walking speed, stride length, and angle of soles at the end of the stance phase were all significantly increased, but cadence did not change significantly during the intervention period. There were significant intercorrelations of changes in normal walking speed, stride length, and angle of soles at the end of the stance phase, and between changes in stride length and total JKOM score. Conclusion A GCQID supplement may increase walking speed through increased stride length and angle of kicking from the ground during steps, which might be mainly associated with alleviated knee pain. PMID:27382267

  11. Runner's Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... Over the summer he bought a pair of running shoes and took up jogging. He started with ... bending the knee — when walking, kneeling, squatting, or running, for example. Walking or running downhill or even ...

  12. [Comparative studies of face recognition].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2012-07-01

    Every human being is proficient in face recognition. However, the reason for and the manner in which humans have attained such an ability remain unknown. These questions can be best answered-through comparative studies of face recognition in non-human animals. Studies in both primates and non-primates show that not only primates, but also non-primates possess the ability to extract information from their conspecifics and from human experimenters. Neural specialization for face recognition is shared with mammals in distant taxa, suggesting that face recognition evolved earlier than the emergence of mammals. A recent study indicated that a social insect, the golden paper wasp, can distinguish their conspecific faces, whereas a closely related species, which has a less complex social lifestyle with just one queen ruling a nest of underlings, did not show strong face recognition for their conspecifics. Social complexity and the need to differentiate between one another likely led humans to evolve their face recognition abilities.

  13. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt or diseased, you have knee problems. Knee problems can cause pain and difficulty ...

  14. The association between component malalignment and post-operative pain following navigation-assisted total knee arthroplasty: results of a cohort/nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Czurda, Thomas; Fennema, Peter; Baumgartner, Martin; Ritschl, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies have noted an adverse relationship between implant malalignment during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and post-operative pain. Although some evidence exists indicating that computer-assisted surgical navigation for TKA can improve the accuracy of component alignment, its impact on clinical outcomes is currently unknown. The dual goals of the present cohort/nested case-control study were to (1) compare self-reported responses to the Western Ontario-McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire between computer-assisted TKA (123 patients) using the imageless PiGalileo navigation system and conventional TKA (207 patients) [cohort analysis], and (2) to investigate a potential association between malalignment and post-operative pain in 19 painful knees and 19 asymptomatic knees obtained from the cohort analysis using matched sampling [nested case-control study]. In the cohort analysis, a relevant but non-significant (P = 0.06) difference in the occurrence of chronic pain was observed between the navigated (12%) and conventional arms (20%). Median post-operative WOMAC pain score was 100 (range, 50-100) in the conventional group and 100 (range, 65-100) in the navigated group. However, the Mann-Whitney test revealed a significant difference in favor of the navigated group (P = 0.01). In the nested case-control analysis, radiological outcomes and computer tomography (CT) measurements of femoral rotation were compared between the groups. The CT rotation measurements yielded evidence of a relationship between post-operative pain and incorrect rotational alignment of the femoral component of more than 3 degrees (OR: 7; 95% CI: 1.2-42; P = .033). In conclusion, there was no clinical benefit to computer-assisted navigation; however, a statistically significant relationship was observed between incorrect rotational alignment of the femoral component and symptoms of post-operative pain following TKA.

  15. Sports-related knee injuries in female athletes: what gives?

    PubMed

    Dugan, Sheila A

    2005-02-01

    Knee injuries occur commonly in sports, limiting field and practice time and performance level. Although injury etiology relates primarily to sports specific activity, female athletes are at higher risk of knee injury than their male counterparts in jumping and cutting sports. Particular pain syndromes such as anterior knee pain and injuries such as noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries occur at a higher rate in female than male athletes at a similar level of competition. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries can be season or career ending, at times requiring costly surgery and rehabilitation. Beyond real-time pain and functional limitations, previous injury is implicated in knee osteoarthritis occurring later in life. Although anatomical parameters differ between and within the sexes, it is not likely this is the single reason for knee injury rate disparities. Clinicians and researchers have also studied the role of sex hormones and dynamic neuromuscular imbalances in female compared with male athletes in hopes of finding the causes for the increased rate of ACL injury. Understanding gender differences in knee injuries will lead to more effective prevention strategies for women athletes who currently suffer thousands of ACL tears annually. To meet the goal in sports medicine of safely returning an athlete to her sport, our evaluation, assessment, treatments and prevention strategies must reflect not only our knowledge of the structure and innervations of the knee but neuromuscular control in multiple planes and with multiple forces while at play.

  16. Trabecular metal tibial knee component still stable at 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, Anders; Nilsson, Kjell G

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total knee replacement (TKR) in younger patients using cemented components has shown inferior results, mainly due to aseptic loosening. Excellent clinical results have been reported with components made of trabecular metal (TM). In a previous report, we have shown stabilization of the TM tibial implants for up to 5 years. In this study, we compared the clinical and RSA results of these uncemented implants with those of cemented implants. Patients and methods 41 patients (47 knees) aged ≤ 60 years underwent TKR. 22 patients (26 knees) received an uncemented monoblock cruciate-retaining (CR) tibial component (TM) and 19 patients (21 knees) received a cemented NexGen Option CR tibial component. Follow-up examination was done at 10 years, and 16 patients (19 knees) with TM tibial components and 17 patients (18 knees) with cemented tibial components remained for analysis. Results 1 of 19 TM implants was revised for infection, 2 of 18 cemented components were revised for knee instability, and no revisions were done for loosening. Both types of tibial components migrated in the first 3 months, the TM group to a greater extent than the cemented group. After 3 months, both groups were stable during the next 10 years. Interpretation The patterns of migration for uncemented TM implants and cemented tibial implants over the first 10 years indicate that they have a good long-term prognosis regarding fixation PMID:27357222

  17. Trabecular metal tibial knee component still stable at 10 years.

    PubMed

    Henricson, Anders; Nilsson, Kjell G

    2016-10-01

    Background and purpose - Total knee replacement (TKR) in younger patients using cemented components has shown inferior results, mainly due to aseptic loosening. Excellent clinical results have been reported with components made of trabecular metal (TM). In a previous report, we have shown stabilization of the TM tibial implants for up to 5 years. In this study, we compared the clinical and RSA results of these uncemented implants with those of cemented implants. Patients and methods - 41 patients (47 knees) aged ≤ 60 years underwent TKR. 22 patients (26 knees) received an uncemented monoblock cruciate-retaining (CR) tibial component (TM) and 19 patients (21 knees) received a cemented NexGen Option CR tibial component. Follow-up examination was done at 10 years, and 16 patients (19 knees) with TM tibial components and 17 patients (18 knees) with cemented tibial components remained for analysis. Results - 1 of 19 TM implants was revised for infection, 2 of 18 cemented components were revised for knee instability, and no revisions were done for loosening. Both types of tibial components migrated in the first 3 months, the TM group to a greater extent than the cemented group. After 3 months, both groups were stable during the next 10 years. Interpretation - The patterns of migration for uncemented TM implants and cemented tibial implants over the first 10 years indicate that they have a good long-term prognosis regarding fixation. PMID:27357222

  18. Validation of a novel smartphone accelerometer-based knee goniometer.

    PubMed

    Ockendon, Matthew; Gilbert, Robin E

    2012-09-01

    Loss of full knee extension following anterior cruciate ligament surgery has been shown to impair knee function. However, there can be significant difficulties in accurately and reproducibly measuring a fixed flexion of the knee. We studied the interobserver and the intraobserver reliabilities of a novel, smartphone accelerometer-based, knee goniometer and compared it with a long-armed conventional goniometer for the assessment of fixed flexion knee deformity. Five healthy male volunteers (age range 30 to 40 years) were studied. Measurements of knee flexion angle were made with a telescopic-armed goniometer (Lafayette Instrument, Lafayette, IN) and compared with measurements using the smartphone (iPhone 3GS, Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA) knee goniometer using a novel trigonometric technique based on tibial inclination. Bland-Altman analysis of validity and reliability including statistical analysis of correlation by Pearson's method was undertaken. The iPhone goniometer had an interobserver correlation (r) of 0.994 compared with 0.952 for the Lafayette. The intraobserver correlation was r = 0.982 for the iPhone (compared with 0.927). The datasets from the two instruments correlate closely (r = 0.947) are proportional and have mean difference of only -0.4 degrees (SD 3.86 degrees). The Lafayette goniometer had an intraobserver reliability +/- 9.6 degrees. The interobserver reliability was +/- 8.4 degrees. By comparison the iPhone had an interobserver reliability +/- 2.7 degrees and an intraobserver reliability +/- 4.6 degrees. We found the iPhone goniometer to be a reliable tool for the measurement of subtle knee flexion in the clinic setting. PMID:23150162

  19. Effect of Mulligan's and Kinesio knee taping on adolescent ballet dancers knee and hip biomechanics during landing.

    PubMed

    Hendry, D; Campbell, A; Ng, L; Grisbrook, T L; Hopper, D M

    2015-12-01

    Taping is often used to manage the high rate of knee injuries in ballet dancers; however, little is known about the effect of taping on lower-limb biomechanics during ballet landings in the turnout position. This study investigated the effects of Kinesiotape (KT), Mulligan's tape (MT) and no tape (NT) on knee and hip kinetics during landing in three turnout positions. The effect of taping on the esthetic execution of ballet jumps was also assessed. Eighteen pain-free 12-15-year-old female ballet dancers performed ballet jumps in three turnout positions, under the three knee taping conditions. A Vicon Motion Analysis system (Vicon Oxford, Oxford, UK) and Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc. (Watertown, Massa chusetts, USA) force plate collected lower-limb mechanics. The results demonstrated that MT significantly reduced peak posterior knee shear forces (P = 0.025) and peak posterior (P = 0.005), medial (P = 0.022) and lateral (P = 0.014) hip shear forces compared with NT when landing in first position. KT had no effect on knee or hip forces. No significant differences existed between taping conditions in all landing positions for the esthetic measures. MT was able to reduce knee and the hip forces without affecting the esthetic performance of ballet jumps, which may have implications for preventing and managing knee injuries in ballet dancers.

  20. Compensatory mechanism involving the knee joint of the intact limb during gait in unilateral below-knee amputees.

    PubMed

    Beyaert, C; Grumillier, C; Martinet, N; Paysant, J; André, J-M

    2008-08-01

    This study evaluated the asymmetry of knee kinetics during uncomfortable gait induced by prosthesis misalignment to further demonstrate the compensatory function of the knee joint of the intact limb during gait. Three-dimensional gait analysis including knee kinematics and kinetics at the beginning of stance phase was conducted in 15 healthy subjects and 17 unilateral trans-tibial amputees (TTA) walking at self-selected speed in three conditions of prosthetic alignment: initial alignment (IA); initial alignment altered either by 6 degrees of internal rotation (IR) or by 6 degrees of external rotation (ER) applied on the pylon. Patients reported best comfort of gait in IA condition and discomfort mainly in IR condition. Maximum knee flexion and knee total work at power phases K0-K2 were significantly higher in intact limbs compared to prosthetic and control limbs. In intact limbs, these variables had significantly higher values (+10-35%, p<0.05) in IR condition than IA condition whereas these were not altered across conditions in prosthetic limbs. In trans-tibial amputees, inducing uncomfortable gait by internally rotating the prosthetic foot did not alter the knee kinetics of the prosthetic limb, which suggests a protective mechanism. Knee kinetics of the intact limb did alter, which suggests a compensatory mechanism.

  1. Effect of Mulligan's and Kinesio knee taping on adolescent ballet dancers knee and hip biomechanics during landing.

    PubMed

    Hendry, D; Campbell, A; Ng, L; Grisbrook, T L; Hopper, D M

    2015-12-01

    Taping is often used to manage the high rate of knee injuries in ballet dancers; however, little is known about the effect of taping on lower-limb biomechanics during ballet landings in the turnout position. This study investigated the effects of Kinesiotape (KT), Mulligan's tape (MT) and no tape (NT) on knee and hip kinetics during landing in three turnout positions. The effect of taping on the esthetic execution of ballet jumps was also assessed. Eighteen pain-free 12-15-year-old female ballet dancers performed ballet jumps in three turnout positions, under the three knee taping conditions. A Vicon Motion Analysis system (Vicon Oxford, Oxford, UK) and Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc. (Watertown, Massa chusetts, USA) force plate collected lower-limb mechanics. The results demonstrated that MT significantly reduced peak posterior knee shear forces (P = 0.025) and peak posterior (P = 0.005), medial (P = 0.022) and lateral (P = 0.014) hip shear forces compared with NT when landing in first position. KT had no effect on knee or hip forces. No significant differences existed between taping conditions in all landing positions for the esthetic measures. MT was able to reduce knee and the hip forces without affecting the esthetic performance of ballet jumps, which may have implications for preventing and managing knee injuries in ballet dancers. PMID:25091570

  2. Research On The Special Moving Pair. The Moire Contour Fringes On The Femoral Articular Facies Of Knee Of Pongidae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Wenzi; Lan, Zuyun; Zhang, Renxiang

    1987-02-01

    Articulation is the special moving pair in the body of animal. In this article, the different forms and the comparative targets of the moire contour fringes on two condyles of knee of Pongidae, and comparative study of the articulation of knee between the Gorilla, Orangutan and Chimpanzee are given.

  3. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance

    PubMed Central

    D’Lima, Darryl D.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  4. Comparison of the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold after overhead assembly work and below knee assembly work

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio following overhead work and below-knee work. [Subjects and Methods] Ten men (20–30 years) were recruited to this study. The thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold was measured after both overhead work and below-knee work. [Results] The pressure-pain thresholds of the thoracic erector spinae muscle decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. Similarly, the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. [Conclusion] Below-knee work results in greater thoracic pain than overhead work. Future studies should investigate below-knee work in detail. This study confirmed the thoracic relaxation phenomenon in the mid-position of the thoracic erector spinae. PMID:26957744

  5. A double blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical study evaluates the early efficacy of aflapin in subjects with osteoarthritis of knee.

    PubMed

    Vishal, Amar A; Mishra, Artatrana; Raychaudhuri, Siba P

    2011-01-01

    Aflapin(®) is a novel synergistic composition derived from Boswellia serrata gum resin (Indian Patent Application No. 2229/CHE/2008). Aflapin is more efficacious as an anti-inflammatory agent compared to the existing Boswellia products, 5-Loxin(®) and traditional 65% Boswellia extract. A 30-day, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was conducted to validate the efficacy of Aflapin(®) in the management of clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee (Clinical trial registration number: ISRCTN69643551). Sixty eligible OA subjects selected through screening were included in the study. The subjects received either 100 mg (n=30) of Aflapin(®) or placebo (n=30) daily for 30 days. Each subject was evaluated for pain and physical functions by using the standard tools (visual analog scale, Lequesne's Functional Index, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index) at the baseline (day 0), and at days 5, 15 and 30. A series of biochemical tests in serum, urine and hematological parameters established the safety of Aflapin. The observations suggest that Aflapin conferred clinically and statistically significant improvements in pain scores and physical function scores in OA subjects. Aflapin provided significant improvements in pain score and functional ability in as early as 5 days of treatment. In conclusion, our observations suggest that Aflapin is a safe, fast acting and effective alternative intervention in the management of OA. PMID:22022214

  6. The Effects of Common Footwear on Joint Loading in Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Najia; Sengupta, Mondira; Foucher, Kharma C.; Wimmer, Markus A.; Fogg, Louis F.; Block, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Elevated joint loads during walking have been associated with the severity and progression of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Footwear may have the potential to alter these loads. This study compared the effects of several common shoe types on knee loading in subjects with OA of the knee. Methods 31 subjects (10 men, 21 women) with radiographic and symptomatic knee OA underwent gait analyses using an optoelectronic camera system and multi-component force plate. In each case, gait was evaluated barefoot and while wearing 4 different shoes: 1) clogs (Dansko®), 2) stability shoes (Brooks Addiction®), 3) flat walking shoes (Puma H Street®), and 4) flip-flops. Peak knee loads were compared between the different footwear conditions. Results Overall, the clogs and stability shoes, resulted in a significantly higher peak knee adduction moment (3.1±0.7 and 3.0±0.7 %BW*ht, respectively, ~15% higher, p<0.05)) compared with that of flat walking shoes (2.8±0.7%BW*ht), flip-flops (2.7±0.8%BW*ht) and barefoot walking (2.7±0.7%BW*ht). There were no statistically significant differences in knee loads with the flat walking shoes and flip-flops compared to barefoot walking. Conclusions These data confirm that footwear may have significant effects on knee loads during walking in subjects with OA of the knee. Flexibility and heel height may be important differentiating characteristics of shoes which affect knee loads. In light of the strong relationship between knee loading and OA, the design and biomechanical effects of modern footwear should be more closely evaluated in terms of their effects on the disease. PMID:20191571

  7. Sex work: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Bill; Benoit, Cecilia; Jansson, Mikael

    2014-10-01

    Explanations of adult involvement in sex work typically adopt one of two approaches. One perspective highlights a variety of negative experiences in childhood and adolescence, including physical and sexual abuse, family instability, poverty, associations with "pimps" and other exploiters, homelessness, and drug use. An alternative account recognizes that some of these factors may be involved, but underscores the contribution of more immediate circumstances, such as current economic needs, human capital, and employment opportunities. Prior research offers a limited assessment of these contrasting claims: most studies have focused exclusively on people working in the sex industry and they have not assessed the independent effects of life course variables central to these two perspectives. We add to this literature with an analysis that drew on insights from life course and life-span development theories and considered the contributions of factors from childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Our comparative approach examined predictors of employment in sex work relative to two other low-income service or care work occupations: food and beverage serving and barbering and hairstyling. Using data from a study of almost 600 workers from two cities, one in Canada and the other in the United States, we found that both immediate circumstances and negative experiences from early life are related to current sex work involvement: childhood poverty, abuse, and family instability were independently associated with adult sex work, as were limited education and employment experience, adult drug use, and marital status.

  8. Sex work: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Bill; Benoit, Cecilia; Jansson, Mikael

    2014-10-01

    Explanations of adult involvement in sex work typically adopt one of two approaches. One perspective highlights a variety of negative experiences in childhood and adolescence, including physical and sexual abuse, family instability, poverty, associations with "pimps" and other exploiters, homelessness, and drug use. An alternative account recognizes that some of these factors may be involved, but underscores the contribution of more immediate circumstances, such as current economic needs, human capital, and employment opportunities. Prior research offers a limited assessment of these contrasting claims: most studies have focused exclusively on people working in the sex industry and they have not assessed the independent effects of life course variables central to these two perspectives. We add to this literature with an analysis that drew on insights from life course and life-span development theories and considered the contributions of factors from childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Our comparative approach examined predictors of employment in sex work relative to two other low-income service or care work occupations: food and beverage serving and barbering and hairstyling. Using data from a study of almost 600 workers from two cities, one in Canada and the other in the United States, we found that both immediate circumstances and negative experiences from early life are related to current sex work involvement: childhood poverty, abuse, and family instability were independently associated with adult sex work, as were limited education and employment experience, adult drug use, and marital status. PMID:24671729

  9. Alpine Skiing With total knee ArthroPlasty (ASWAP): study design and intervention.

    PubMed

    Kösters, A; Pötzelsberger, B; Dela, F; Dorn, U; Hofstaedter, T; Fink, C; Müller, E

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the long-term effects of skiing on health-related parameters and implant related factors like loosening and wear in patients with total knee arthroplasty. This paper describes the overall study design, general demographics, and physiological demand of the intervention phase. A control group design consisting of an intervention group (n = 14; age: 70.4 ± 4.5 years) and a control group (n = 17; age: 71.5 ± 5.1 years) was utilized in this study. Parameters of interest were measured during pre-, post-, and retention test sessions. During the 12 weeks of intervention, an average of 25.5 days of guided skiing was conducted by each patient. Daily heart rate (HR) profiles and global positioning system data throughout the ski day were recorded. The intervention group completed an average of 3393 vertical meters of downhill skiing, with a total skiing distance of 33.6 km/day. Average skiing speed was 8.2 m/s. In the skiing phase, the average physiological load was 75.9 ± 6.6% of HRmax . Further effects of the 12-week skiing intervention on the tested parameters will be reported in the following papers of this supplementum. PMID:26083696

  10. Changes in the activity of trunk and hip extensor muscles during bridge exercises with variations in unilateral knee joint angle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juseung; Park, Minchul

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared abdominal and hip extensor muscle activity during a bridge exercise with various knee joint angles. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two healthy male subjects performed a bridge exercise in which the knee joint angle was altered. While subjects performed the bridge exercise, external oblique, internal oblique, gluteus maximus, and semitendinosus muscle activity was measured using electromyography. [Results] The bilateral external and internal oblique muscle activity was significantly higher at 0° knee flexion compared to 120°, 90°, and 60°. The bilateral gluteus maximus muscle activity was significantly different at 0° of knee flexion compared to 120°, 90°, and 60°. The ipsilateral semitendinosus muscle activity was significantly increased at 90° and 60° of knee flexion compared to 120°, and significantly decreased at 0° knee flexion compared with 120°, 90°, and 60°. The contralateral semitendinosus muscle activity was significantly higher at 60° of knee flexion than at 120°, and significantly higher at 0° of knee flexion than at 120°, 90°, and 60°. [Conclusion] Bridge exercises performed with knee flexion less than 90° may be used to train the ipsilateral semitendinosus. Furthermore, bridge exercise performed with one leg may be used to train abdominal and hip extensor muscles. PMID:27799688

  11. A Prospective Study of Overuse Knee Injuries Among Female Athletes With Muscle Imbalances and Structural Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Pescatello, Linda S.; Faghri, Pouran; Anderson, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively examine the influence of hamstring-to-quadriceps (H:Q) ratio and structural abnormalities on the prevalence of overuse knee injuries among female collegiate athletes. Design and Setting: We used chi-square 2 × 2 contingency tables and the Fischer exact test to examine associations among H:Q ratios, structural abnormalities, and overuse knee injuries. Subjects: Fifty-three apparently healthy women (age = 19.4 ± 1.3 years, height = 167.6 ± 10.1 cm, mass = 65.0 ± 10.0 kg) from National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I women's field hockey (n = 23), soccer (n = 20), and basketball teams (n = 10) volunteered. Measurements: The H:Q ratio was determined from a preseason isokinetic test on a Biodex system at 60°/s and 300°/s. We measured athletes for genu recurvatum and Q-angles with a 14-in (35.56-cm) goniometer. Iliotibial band flexibility was assessed via the Ober test. Results: Ten overuse knee injuries (iliotibial band friction syndromes = 5, patellar tendinitis = 3, patellofemoral syndrome = 1, pes anserine tendinitis = 1) occurred in 9 athletes. The H:Q ratio below the normal range at 300°/s (P = 0.047) was associated with overuse knee injuries, as was the presence of genu recurvatum (P = 0.004). In addition, athletes possessing lower H:Q ratios at 300°/s and genu recurvatum incurred more overuse knee injuries than athletes without these abnormalities (P = 0.001). Conclusions: The presence of genu recurvatum and an H: Q ratio below normal range was associated with an increased prevalence of overuse knee injuries among female collegiate athletes. Further investigation is needed to clarify which preseason screening procedures may identify collegiate athletes who are susceptible to overuse knee injuries. PMID:15496997

  12. A Prospective Study of Overuse Knee Injuries Among Female Athletes With Muscle Imbalances and Structural Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Devan, Michelle R; Pescatello, Linda S; Faghri, Pouran; Anderson, Jeffrey

    2004-09-01

    OBJECTIVE: To prospectively examine the influence of hamstring-to-quadriceps (H:Q) ratio and structural abnormalities on the prevalence of overuse knee injuries among female collegiate athletes. DESIGN AND SETTING: We used chi-square 2 x 2 contingency tables and the Fischer exact test to examine associations among H:Q ratios, structural abnormalities, and overuse knee injuries. SUBJECTS: Fifty-three apparently healthy women (age = 19.4 +/- 1.3 years, height = 167.6 +/- 10.1 cm, mass = 65.0 +/- 10.0 kg) from National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I women's field hockey (n = 23), soccer (n = 20), and basketball teams (n = 10) volunteered. MEASUREMENTS: The H:Q ratio was determined from a preseason isokinetic test on a Biodex system at 60 degrees /s and 300 degrees /s. We measured athletes for genu recurvatum and Q-angles with a 14-in (35.56-cm) goniometer. Iliotibial band flexibility was assessed via the Ober test. RESULTS: Ten overuse knee injuries (iliotibial band friction syndromes = 5, patellar tendinitis = 3, patellofemoral syndrome = 1, pes anserine tendinitis = 1) occurred in 9 athletes. The H:Q ratio below the normal range at 300 degrees /s (P = 0.047) was associated with overuse knee injuries, as was the presence of genu recurvatum (P = 0.004). In addition, athletes possessing lower H:Q ratios at 300 degrees /s and genu recurvatum incurred more overuse knee injuries than athletes without these abnormalities (P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The presence of genu recurvatum and an H: Q ratio below normal range was associated with an increased prevalence of overuse knee injuries among female collegiate athletes. Further investigation is needed to clarify which preseason screening procedures may identify collegiate athletes who are susceptible to overuse knee injuries. PMID:15496997

  13. A Prospective Study of Overuse Knee Injuries Among Female Athletes With Muscle Imbalances and Structural Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Devan, Michelle R; Pescatello, Linda S; Faghri, Pouran; Anderson, Jeffrey

    2004-09-01

    OBJECTIVE: To prospectively examine the influence of hamstring-to-quadriceps (H:Q) ratio and structural abnormalities on the prevalence of overuse knee injuries among female collegiate athletes. DESIGN AND SETTING: We used chi-square 2 x 2 contingency tables and the Fischer exact test to examine associations among H:Q ratios, structural abnormalities, and overuse knee injuries. SUBJECTS: Fifty-three apparently healthy women (age = 19.4 +/- 1.3 years, height = 167.6 +/- 10.1 cm, mass = 65.0 +/- 10.0 kg) from National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I women's field hockey (n = 23), soccer (n = 20), and basketball teams (n = 10) volunteered. MEASUREMENTS: The H:Q ratio was determined from a preseason isokinetic test on a Biodex system at 60 degrees /s and 300 degrees /s. We measured athletes for genu recurvatum and Q-angles with a 14-in (35.56-cm) goniometer. Iliotibial band flexibility was assessed via the Ober test. RESULTS: Ten overuse knee injuries (iliotibial band friction syndromes = 5, patellar tendinitis = 3, patellofemoral syndrome = 1, pes anserine tendinitis = 1) occurred in 9 athletes. The H:Q ratio below the normal range at 300 degrees /s (P = 0.047) was associated with overuse knee injuries, as was the presence of genu recurvatum (P = 0.004). In addition, athletes possessing lower H:Q ratios at 300 degrees /s and genu recurvatum incurred more overuse knee injuries than athletes without these abnormalities (P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The presence of genu recurvatum and an H: Q ratio below normal range was associated with an increased prevalence of overuse knee injuries among female collegiate athletes. Further investigation is needed to clarify which preseason screening procedures may identify collegiate athletes who are susceptible to overuse knee injuries.

  14. Cementless total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Salvatore; Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Agati, Gabriele; Massè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Interest for uncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has greatly increased in recent years. This technique, less used than cemented knee replacement in the last decades, sees a revival thanks an advance in prosthetic design, instrumentation and operative technique. The related literature in some cases shows conflicting data on survival and on the revision’s rate, but in most cases a success rate comparable to cemented TKA is reported. The optimal fixation in TKA is a subject of debate with the majority of surgeons favouring cemented fixation. PMID:27162779

  15. Load-dependent variations in knee kinematics measured with dynamic MRI.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Christopher J; Schmitz, Anne; Reeder, Scott B; Thelen, Darryl G

    2013-08-01

    Subtle changes in knee kinematics may substantially alter cartilage contact patterns and moment generating capacities of soft tissues. The objective of this study was to use dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the influence of the timing of quadriceps loading on in vivo tibiofemoral and patellofemoral kinematics. We tested the hypothesis that load-dependent changes in knee kinematics would alter both the finite helical axis of the tibiofemoral joint and the moment arm of the patellar tendon. Eight healthy young adults were positioned supine in a MRI-compatible device that could impose either elastic or inertial loads on the lower leg in response to cyclic knee flexion-extension. The elastic loading condition induced concentric quadriceps contractions with knee extension, while an inertial loading condition induced eccentric quadriceps contractions with knee flexion. Peak internal knee extension moments ranged from 23 to 33 N m, which is comparable to loadings seen in normal walking. We found that anterior tibia translation, superior patella glide, and anterior patella translation were reduced by an average of 5.1, 5.7 and 2.9 mm when quadriceps loading coincided with knee flexion rather than knee extension. These kinematic variations induced a distal shift in the finite helical axis of the tibiofemoral joint and a reduction in the patellar tendon moment arm. We conclude that it may be important to consider such load-dependent changes in knee kinematics when using models to ascertain soft tissue and cartilage loading during functional tasks such as gait.

  16. Proprioceptive impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis are not generalized to the ankle and elbow joints.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Camille J; Wrigley, Tim V; Farrell, Michael J; Bennell, Kim L; Hodges, Paul W

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms for proprioceptive changes associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) remain elusive. Observations of proprioceptive changes in both affected knees and other joints imply more generalized mechanisms for proprioceptive impairment. However, evidence for a generalized effect remains controversial. This study examined whether joint repositioning proprioceptive deficits are localized to the diseased joint (knee) or generalized across other joints (elbow and ankle) in people with knee OA. Thirty individuals with right knee OA (17 female, 66±7 [mean±SD] years) of moderate/severe radiographic disease severity and 30 healthy asymptomatic controls of comparable age (17 female, 65±8years) performed active joint repositioning tests of the knee, ankle and elbow in randomised order in supine. Participants with knee OA had a larger relative error for joint repositioning of the knee than the controls (OA: 2.7±2.1°, control: 1.6±1.7°, p=.03). Relative error did not differ between groups for the ankle (OA: 2.2±2.5°, control: 1.9±1.3°, p=.50) or elbow (OA: 2.5±3.3°, control: 2.9±2.8°, p=.58). These results are consistent with a mechanism for proprioceptive change that is localized to the knee joint. This could be mediated by problems with mechanoreceptors, processing/relay of somatosensory input to higher centers, or joint-specific interference with cognitive processes by pain.

  17. Gait Analysis of Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty and Bicruciate Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Triaxial Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Tomite, Takenori; Saito, Hidetomo; Aizawa, Toshiaki; Kijima, Hiroaki; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    One component of conventional total knee arthroplasty is removal of the anterior cruciate ligament, and the knee after total knee arthroplasty has been said to be a knee with anterior cruciate ligament dysfunction. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty is believed to reproduce anterior cruciate ligament function in the implant and provide anterior stability. Conventional total knee arthroplasty was performed on the right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty was performed on the left knee in the same patient, and a triaxial accelerometer was fitted to both knees after surgery. Gait analysis was then performed and is reported here. The subject was a 78-year-old woman who underwent conventional total knee arthroplasty on her right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty on her left knee. On the femoral side with bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional total knee arthroplasty, there was little acceleration in the x-axis direction (anteroposterior direction) in the early swing phase. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty may be able to replace anterior cruciate ligament function due to the structure of the implant and proper anteroposterior positioning. PMID:27648328

  18. Gait Analysis of Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty and Bicruciate Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Triaxial Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hidetomo; Aizawa, Toshiaki; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    One component of conventional total knee arthroplasty is removal of the anterior cruciate ligament, and the knee after total knee arthroplasty has been said to be a knee with anterior cruciate ligament dysfunction. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty is believed to reproduce anterior cruciate ligament function in the implant and provide anterior stability. Conventional total knee arthroplasty was performed on the right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty was performed on the left knee in the same patient, and a triaxial accelerometer was fitted to both knees after surgery. Gait analysis was then performed and is reported here. The subject was a 78-year-old woman who underwent conventional total knee arthroplasty on her right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty on her left knee. On the femoral side with bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional total knee arthroplasty, there was little acceleration in the x-axis direction (anteroposterior direction) in the early swing phase. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty may be able to replace anterior cruciate ligament function due to the structure of the implant and proper anteroposterior positioning. PMID:27648328

  19. Gait Analysis of Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty and Bicruciate Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Triaxial Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hidetomo; Aizawa, Toshiaki; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    One component of conventional total knee arthroplasty is removal of the anterior cruciate ligament, and the knee after total knee arthroplasty has been said to be a knee with anterior cruciate ligament dysfunction. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty is believed to reproduce anterior cruciate ligament function in the implant and provide anterior stability. Conventional total knee arthroplasty was performed on the right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty was performed on the left knee in the same patient, and a triaxial accelerometer was fitted to both knees after surgery. Gait analysis was then performed and is reported here. The subject was a 78-year-old woman who underwent conventional total knee arthroplasty on her right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty on her left knee. On the femoral side with bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional total knee arthroplasty, there was little acceleration in the x-axis direction (anteroposterior direction) in the early swing phase. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty may be able to replace anterior cruciate ligament function due to the structure of the implant and proper anteroposterior positioning.

  20. Effect of shed blood retransfusion on pulmonary perfusion after total knee arthroplasty: a prospective controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Eser; Kose, Kamil Cagri; Fidan, Fatma; Ergan, Volkan; Fidan, Hüseyin

    2006-01-01

    Postoperative shed blood retransfusion (autotransfusion) is a commonly used salvage method following major surgical operations, such as total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The systemic effects of shed blood are still unclear. We studied the effect of residual substances in the retransfused shed blood, on lung perfusion after TKA. Fifteen unilateral and one bilateral TKAs were performed with autotransfusion (the study group) and 15 unilateral and three bilateral TKAs were performed in a control group. Lung X-rays, arterial blood gases (ABG), D-dimer values, and lung perfusion scintigraphies were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. A mean of 300.0 ± 335.6 ml of bank blood was needed in the autotransfusion group and a mean of 685.7 ± 365.5 ml of bank blood was needed in the control group (p=0.001). There was a postoperative segmental perfusion defect at the lateral segment of the superior lobe of the left lung in one patient of the control group and he also had risk factors for thrombosis. Although both groups had a decrease in lung perfusion postoperatively, there were no significant differences among the groups regarding the lung perfusion scintigraphy, chest X-rays, ABG, and D-dimer values. In conclusion, although pulmonary perfusion diminishes following TKA, shed blood retransfusion does not add any risk to pulmonary perfusion. PMID:17115155

  1. Joint unloading implant modifies subchondral bone trabecular structure in medial knee osteoarthritis: 2-year outcomes of a pilot study using fractal signature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Sode, Miki; Fuerst, Thomas; Block, Jon E

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is largely attributable to chronic excessive and aberrant joint loading. The purpose of this pilot study was to quantify radiographic changes in subchondral bone after treatment with a minimally invasive joint unloading implant (KineSpring® Knee Implant System). Methods Nine patients with unilateral medial knee OA resistant to nonsurgical therapy were treated with the KineSpring System and followed for 2 years. Main outcomes included Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain, function, and stiffness subscores and independent core laboratory determinations of joint space width and fractal signature of the tibial cortex. Results WOMAC scores, on average, improved by 92% for pain, 91% for function, and 79% for stiffness over the 2-year follow-up period. Joint space width in the medial compartment of the treated knee significantly increased from 0.9 mm at baseline to 3.1 mm at 2 years; joint space width in the medial compartment of the untreated knee was unchanged. Fractal signatures of the vertically oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment decreased by 2.8% in the treated knee and increased by 2.1% in the untreated knee over 2 years. No statistically significant fractal signature changes were observed in the horizontally oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment or in the horizontal or vertical trabeculae of the lateral compartment in the treated knee. Conclusion Preliminary evidence suggests that the KineSpring System may modify knee OA disease progression by increasing joint space width and improving subchondral bone trabecular integrity, thereby reducing pain and improving joint function. PMID:25670891

  2. Effectiveness of phototherapy incorporated into an exercise program for osteoarthritis of the knee: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a chronic disease with a multifactor etiology involving changes in bone alignment, cartilage, and other structures necessary to joint stability. There is a need to investigate therapeutic resources that combine different wavelengths as well as different light sources (low-level laser therapy and light-emitting diode therapy) in the same apparatus for the treatment of osteoarthritis. The aim of the proposed study is to analyze the effect of the incorporation of phototherapy into a therapeutic exercise program for individuals with osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods/Design A double-blind, controlled, randomized clinical trial will be conducted involving patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Evaluations will be performed using functional questionnaires before and after the treatment protocols, in a reserved room with only the evaluator and participant present, and no time constraints placed on the answers or evaluations. The following functional tests will also be performed: stabilometry (balance assessment), dynamometry (muscle strength of gluteus medius and quadriceps), algometry (pain threshold), fleximeter (range of motion), timed up-and-go test (functional mobility), and the functional reach test. The participants will then be allocated to three groups through a randomization process using opaque envelopes: exercise program, exercise program + phototherapy, or exercise program + placebo phototherapy, all of which will last for eight weeks. Discussion The purpose of this randomized clinical trial is to analyze the effect of the incorporation of phototherapy into a therapeutic exercise program for osteoarthritis of the knee. The study will support the practice based on evidence to the use of phototherapy in individuals with a diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the knee. Data will be published after the study is completed. Trial registration The protocol for this study has been submitted to Clinical Trials, registration number

  3. The influence of simulator input conditions on the wear of total knee replacements: An experimental and computational study

    PubMed Central

    Brockett, Claire L; Abdelgaied, Abdellatif; Haythornthwaite, Tony; Hardaker, Catherine; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    Advancements in knee replacement design, material and sterilisation processes have provided improved clinical results. However, surface wear of the polyethylene leading to osteolysis is still considered the longer-term risk factor. Experimental wear simulation is an established method for evaluating the wear performance of total joint replacements. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of simulation input conditions, specifically input kinematic magnitudes, waveforms and directions of motion and position of the femoral centre of rotation, on the wear performance of a fixed-bearing total knee replacement through a combined experimental and computational approach. Studies were completed using conventional and moderately cross-linked polyethylene to determine whether the influence of these simulation input conditions varied with material. The position of the femoral centre of rotation and the input kinematics were shown to have a significant influence on the wear rates. Similar trends were shown for both the conventional and moderately cross-linked polyethylene materials, although lower wear rates were found for the moderately cross-linked polyethylene due to the higher level of cross-linking. The most important factor influencing the wear was the position of the relative contact point at the femoral component and tibial insert interface. This was dependent on the combination of input displacement magnitudes, waveforms, direction of motion and femoral centre of rotation. This study provides further evidence that in order to study variables such as design and material in total knee replacement, it is important to carefully control knee simulation conditions. This can be more effectively achieved through the use of displacement control simulation. PMID:27160561

  4. The influence of simulator input conditions on the wear of total knee replacements: An experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Brockett, Claire L; Abdelgaied, Abdellatif; Haythornthwaite, Tony; Hardaker, Catherine; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-05-01

    Advancements in knee replacement design, material and sterilisation processes have provided improved clinical results. However, surface wear of the polyethylene leading to osteolysis is still considered the longer-term risk factor. Experimental wear simulation is an established method for evaluating the wear performance of total joint replacements. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of simulation input conditions, specifically input kinematic magnitudes, waveforms and directions of motion and position of the femoral centre of rotation, on the wear performance of a fixed-bearing total knee replacement through a combined experimental and computational approach. Studies were completed using conventional and moderately cross-linked polyethylene to determine whether the influence of these simulation input conditions varied with material. The position of the femoral centre of rotation and the input kinematics were shown to have a significant influence on the wear rates. Similar trends were shown for both the conventional and moderately cross-linked polyethylene materials, although lower wear rates were found for the moderately cross-linked polyethylene due to the higher level of cross-linking. The most important factor influencing the wear was the position of the relative contact point at the femoral component and tibial insert interface. This was dependent on the combination of input displacement magnitudes, waveforms, direction of motion and femoral centre of rotation. This study provides further evidence that in order to study variables such as design and material in total knee replacement, it is important to carefully control knee simulation conditions. This can be more effectively achieved through the use of displacement control simulation. PMID:27160561

  5. Correlation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Levels in Serum and Synovial Fluid with Disease Severity of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Hou, Ruizhi; Yin, Ruofeng; Yin, Weitian

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) levels in serum and synovial fluid (SF) of patients with primary knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to exam its correlation with radiographic and symptomatic severity of the disease. Material/Methods A total of 37 knee OA patients and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Knee OA radiographic grading was performed according to the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading system by evaluating X-ray changes observed in anteroposterior knee radiography. Symptomatic severity of the disease was evaluated according to the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores. BMP-2 levels in serum and SF were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Serum BMP-2 level in patients with knee OA was higher than that in healthy controls. Knee OA patients with KL grade 4 showed significantly elevated BMP-2 levels in the serum and SF compared with those with KL grade 2 and 3. Knee OA patients with KL grade 3 had significant higher SF levels of BMP-2 than those with KL grade 2. BMP-2 levels in the serum and SF of knee OA patients were both positively correlated with KL grades and WOMAC scores. Conclusions BMP2 levels in serum and SF were closely related to the radiographic and symptomatic severity of knee OA and may serve as an alternative biochemical parameter to determine disease severity of primary knee OA. PMID:25644704

  6. Intrarticular treatment of osteoartropaty knee with polynucleotides: a pilot study with medium-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Saggini, R; Di Stefano, A; Cavezza, T; Saladino, G; Bellomo, R G

    2013-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a major cause of disability in the elderly. Many therapies are nowadays available, ranging from non-pharmacologic to pharmacological approaches like visco-supplementation, oral supplements or topical treatments, but a flawless treatment is still to be found. Visco-supplementation represents a valid treatment option for reducing pain associated with knee osteoarthritis and improving function in the affected joint. Many literature data report on the efficacy and safety profiles of hyaluronic acid in knee osteoarthritis, however the efficacy of intra-articular hyaluronic acid remains controversial, in fact while several clinical trials claimed a disease-modifying effect for hyaluronic acid, subsequent meta-analyses have cast doubts on this fact. The ideal intra-articular treatment for osteoarthritis should not only provide a mechanical protection of the cartilage surface, but also restore condrocytes’ homeostasis by restoring the physiological articular micro-environment and supplying nutrients. In this perspective an innovative medical product made up of polynucleotides (Condrotide) has been developed. The aim of this study is to test the 2-months efficacy in pain relief and improving function of intra-articular injections of Condrotide in patients with knee osteoarthritis or with grade III or IV chondropathy. Ninety-five subjects (33 men, 62 women), aged between 53 and 80, were included between May 2011 to July 2012. All subjects received intra-articular injections of Condrotide and were evaluated with the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the NRS scale for pain assessment, the measurement of the range of motion (R.O.M.). In all subjects a significant improvement was found in KOOS score after 60 days. The mean global NRS pain decreased in both groups and there was also a R.O.M. improvement. These results show that the intra-articular administration of nucleotides in subjects with both severe knee arthritis and chondropathy

  7. Associations of cigarette smoking, betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in early radiographic knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zeng, Chao; Wei, Jie; Li, Hui; Yang, Tuo; Yang, Ye; Deng, Zhen-han; Ding, Xiang; Lei, Guanghua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is possibly related to osteoarthritis (OA) progression and a variety of OA-related symptoms. This study aimed to examine associations between cigarette smoking, betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption and hsCRP in early radiographic knee OA. Design Cross-sectional health examination survey. Setting This primary study was conducted in a health examination centre in China. Participants 936 (656 men and 280 women) patients with early radiographic knee OA were included in this cross-sectional study. Primary and secondary outcome measures Smoking status was classified into four levels based on daily smoking habit: 0/day, 1–10/day, 11–20/day and >20/day. Betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption status was divided into ‘Yes’ or ‘No’. Early radiographic knee OA was defined as Kellgren Lawrence (K-L) grade 1 or 2 in at least one leg, and elevated hsCRP was assessed as ≥3.0 mg/L. Results After adjustment for a number of potential confounding factors, a significant positive association between cigarette smoking and hsCRP was observed in the multivariable model. The multivariable-adjusted ORs (95% CI) of elevated hsCRP (≥3.0 mg/L) in the second (1–10/day, n=133), third (11–20/day, n=59) and highest (>20/day, n=104) cigarette smoking categories were 1.54 (95% CI 0.91 to 2.61), 1.27 (95% CI 0.57 to 2.79) and 2.09 (95% CI 1.20 to 3.64), respectively, compared with the non-smoker category (n=640). In addition, there was a positive dose–response relationship between cigarette smoking and elevated hsCRP (p for trend=0.01). No significant associations between betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption and hsCRP were observed in the multivariable model. Conclusions This study indicated that cigarette smoking was positively associated with serum hsCRP level in patients with early radiographic knee OA. However, in view of the nature of cross-sectional designs, the results need to be confirmed by

  8. Safety of desirudin in thrombosis prevention after total knee arthroplasty: the DESIR-ABLE study.

    PubMed

    Jove, Maurice; Maslanka, Marc; Minkowitz, Harold S; Jaffer, Amir K

    2014-01-01

    Desirudin, administered 30 minutes before total hip arthroplasty is superior to enoxaparin in preventing proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) with similar bleeding. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety of desirudin in patients undergoing elective total knee arthroplasty (TKA) when the first dose of desirudin was administered the evening after surgery. This is a case series of patients undergoing TKA who received desirudin 15 mg every 12 hours subcutaneously for an average of 5 days with the first dose administered postoperatively. The primary endpoint was major bleeding; secondary endpoints included wound outcomes (oozing and infection) and new symptomatic DVT or PE. Desirudin has a favorable safety profile when administered postoperatively in patients undergoing TKA with no reports of major bleeding, wound ooze, or infection. No patients experienced symptomatic DVT, but 2 patients had PE detected by computed tomography after experiencing atypical symptoms. The safety profile of desirudin is improved when administered postoperatively. Bleeding and wound outcomes seem to occur less frequently than historical desirudin and enoxaparin controls.

  9. Cruciate Retaining Versus Cruciate Stabilising Total Knee Arthroplasty – A Prospective Randomised Kinematic Study

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, T L; Bayan, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While there is a large body of research in regards to cruciate retaining(CR) and cruciate sacrificing total condylar knee replacement, the literature is spars in regards to highly conforming polyetheylene such as the triatholon cruciate stabilising tibial insert (CS).The aim was to determine whether there is a difference in the range of motion, kinematics as well as the functional outcome for Triathlon CS and CR TKJR. Methods: A single hospital consecutive series of one surgeon between 2011 and 2013 were enrolled. Kinematic data recorded prospectively at the time of surgery utilizing imageless navigation included preoperative and post-replacement extension, gravity flexion, passive flexion and rotation. Intraoperative femoral and tibial cuts and definitive implants were also recorded. Statistically analysis performed to compare CS and CR TKJR range of motion, deformity correction, and rotation pre and post-operatively. Oxford functional scores were obtained at the final follow up. 124 patients were randomised to 71 CS and 53 CR TKJR. The demographics were comparable between the two groups. Results: No significant difference was found between the groups’ preoperative range of motion. The net gain in extension for the CS group was 5.65 degrees (4.14-7.17) and for CR 5.64 degrees (4.24-7.04, p=0.99) with no significant difference shown. Post-operative gravity flexion significantly increased in CS TKJR with 129.01 degrees (127.37130.66) compared with 126.35 degrees (124.39-128.30, p =0.04) for CR. A weak positive correlation was shown between the size of distal femoral cut and post-operative extension for both CS and CR TKJR. A weak positive correlation was also shown for the difference between the intraoperative cuts (tibial and femoral) and the size of the implants used, in relation to post-operative extension. Post-operative oxford scores at average of 3.4 year follow up comparable between groups. Conclusion: The kinematics of CS and CR TKJR are

  10. Epidemiology of jumper's knee.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, A

    1986-01-01

    Jumper's knee is a typical functional overload injury because it affects those athletes who submit their knee extensor mechanisms to intense and repeated stress, e.g. volleyball and basketball players, high and long jumpers. According to the classification of Perugia and colleagues, it is an insertional tendinopathy affecting, in order of frequency, the insertion of the patellar tendon into the patella (65% of cases), attachment of the quadriceps tendon to the patella (25%) and the attachment of the patellar tendon to the tibial tuberosity (10%). The frequent occurrence of this injury in athletes led to the study of factors that may contribute to its onset and aggravation. These factors are divided into extrinsic (i.e. kind of sport practised and training methods used) and intrinsic (i.e. connected with the somatic and morphological characteristics of the athletes). On the basis of our experience and after a review of the literature it appears, contrary to what has been repeatedly claimed in the past, the extrinsic factors are more important than the intrinsic in the aetiology of jumper's knee. The effect of traumatic incidents and use of elastic kneecap guards should also be considered negligible. The intrinsic causes of jumper's knee, can be sought in the mechanical properties of tendons (resistance, elasticity and extensibility) rather than in morphological or biomechanical abnormalities of the knee extensor mechanism.

  11. Effect of hamstring flexibility on isometric knee flexion angle-torque relationship.

    PubMed

    Alonso, J; McHugh, M P; Mullaney, M J; Tyler, T F

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between hamstring flexibility and knee flexion angle-torque relationship. Hamstring flexibility was assessed in 20 subjects (10 men, 10 women) using the straight leg raise (SLR) and active knee extension (AKE) tests. Isometric knee flexion strength was measured at five knee flexion angles while subjects were seated with the test thigh flexed 40 degrees and the trunk flexed 80 degrees . Lower extremities were classified as tight or normal based on the SLR and AKE tests. Peak knee flexion torque, angle of peak torque, and angle-torque relationship were compared between flexibility groups. Peak knee flexion torque was not different between tight and normal groups (SLR P=0.82; AKE P=0.68) but occurred in greater knee flexion (shorter muscle length) in the tight group compared with the normal group (SLR P<0.01; AKE P<0.05). The tight group had higher torque than the normal group at the shortest muscle length tested but lower torque at longer muscle lengths (SLR P<0.001; AKE P<0.001). In conclusion, the angle-torque relationship was shifted to the left in less flexible hamstrings such that knee flexion torque was increased at short muscle lengths and decreased at long muscle lengths when compared with more flexible hamstrings.

  12. Decreased Knee Joint Loading Associated With Early Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Gardinier, Emily S.; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J.; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury predisposes individuals to early-onset knee joint osteoarthritis (OA). Abnormal joint loading is apparent after ACL injury and reconstruction. The relationship between altered joint biomechanics and the development of knee OA is unknown. Hypothesis Altered knee joint kinetics and medial compartment contact forces initially after injury and reconstruction are associated with radiographic knee OA 5 years after reconstruction. Study Design Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods Individuals with acute, unilateral ACL injury completed gait analysis before (baseline) and after (posttraining) preoperative rehabilitation and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after reconstruction. Surface electromyographic and knee biomechanical data served as inputs to an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model to estimate knee joint contact forces. Patients completed radiographic testing 5 years after reconstruction. Differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces were compared between patients with and those without radiographic knee OA. Results Patients with OA walked with greater frontal plane interlimb differences than those without OA (nonOA) at baseline (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.00 ± 0.08 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.15 ± 0.09 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .014; peak knee adduction moment impulse difference: −0.001 ± 0.032 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.048 ± 0.031 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .042). The involved limb knee adduction moment impulse of the group with osteoarthritis was also lower than that of the group without osteoarthritis at baseline (0.087 ± 0.023 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs 0.049 ± 0.018 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .023). Significant group differences were absent at posttraining but reemerged 6 months after reconstruction (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.02 ± 0.04 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.06 ± 0.11 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .043). In addition, the OA group walked with lower peak

  13. Joint moment contributions to swing knee extension acceleration during gait in children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Evan J; Requejo, Philip S; Fowler, Eileen G

    2010-03-22

    Inadequate peak knee extension during the swing phase of gait is a major deficit in individuals with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). The biomechanical mechanisms responsible for knee extension have not been thoroughly examined in CP. The purpose of this study was to assess the contributions of joint moments and gravity to knee extension acceleration during swing in children with spastic hemiplegic CP. Six children with spastic hemiplegic CP were recruited (age=13.4+/-4.8 years). Gait data were collected using an eight-camera system. Induced acceleration analysis was performed for each limb during swing. Average joint moment and gravity contributions to swing knee extension acceleration were calculated. Total swing and stance joint moment contributions were compared between the hemiplegic and non-hemiplegic limbs using paired t-tests (p<0.05). Swing limb joint moment contributions from the hemiplegic limb decelerated swing knee extension significantly more than those of the non-hemiplegic limb and resulted in significantly reduced knee extension acceleration. Total stance limb joint moment contributions were not statistically different. Swing limb joint moment contributions that decelerated knee extension appeared to be the primary cause of inadequate knee extension acceleration during swing. Stance limb muscle strength did not appear to be the limiting factor in achieving adequate knee extension in children with CP. Recent research has shown that the ability to extend the knee during swing is dependent on the selective voluntary motor control of the limb. Data from individual participants support this concept.

  14. Effect of a glucosamine-based combination supplement containing chondroitin sulfate and antioxidant micronutrients in subjects with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nakasone, Yasushi; Watabe, Kazunori; Watanabe, Keita; Tomonaga, Akihito; Nagaoka, Isao; Yamamoto, Tetsuro; Yamaguchi, Hideyo

    2011-09-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate the potential effect of a glucosamine (1,200 mg/day)-based dietary supplement combined with chondroitin sulfate and three antioxidant micronutrients, namely methylsulfonylmethane, guava leaf extract, and vitamin D (test supplement) on osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. A 16-week, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was conducted involving 32 subjects with symptomatic knee OA. Clinical outcomes were measured using the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM) for symptoms and a study diary-based visual analog scale (diary VAS) for pain at baseline and at weeks 4, 8, 12 and 16 during the 16-week intervention period. Furthermore, biomarkers for cartilage type II collagen degradation (C2C) and synovitis hyaluronan (HA) were measured. As compared with the baseline, the JKOM pain subscale was significantly improved at all of the four assessment time points in the test group, but was not at any time point in the placebo group. On the other hand, all of the four symptom subscales and the aggregated total symptoms were significantly improved in the two groups at one or more time points. However, all of these clinical improvements were greater in extent in the test group than in the placebo group, and there were significant differences between groups in the magnitude of changes from baseline for one subscale 'general activities' and the aggregated total symptoms at week 8 (P<0.05). The results of efficacy assessments with the diary VAS showed that all of the three pain subscales were significantly improved only in the test group at almost all the time points. Moreover, serum levels of C2C and HA were decreased by 10 and 25%, respectively, at week 16 in the test group, albeit not statistically significant, without any detectable changes in the placebo group. In conclusion, although the results obtained in this study were not conclusive, the tested glucosamine-based combination supplement is likely to have a

  15. Effect of Planning on Trunk Motion and Knee Moments During a Side Step Cut Task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, Jeff; Gorniak, Stacey; Nicholson, Kristen

    2004-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that alterations in knee biomechanics associated with unanticipated cutting tasks place athletes at higher risk of knee injuries. Besier et al observed alterations in knee moments during unanticipated cutting tasks that were consistent with in-vitro ACL injury mechanisms. During similar tasks, Patla et al observed lateral trunk lean and decreased foot placement, suggesting that full body center of mass control is perturbed during such tasks. The purpose of this study was to compare the trunk and knee frontal plane moments and evaluate a relationship between the two during unanticipated cutting tasks. The results of this study suggest that there is a relationship between the trunk and knee frontal plane moments during the first 200-400ms of the stance phase of gait.

  16. A comparison of radiographic anatomic axis knee alignment measurements and cross-sectional associations with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Goulston, L.M.; Sanchez-Santos, M.T.; D'Angelo, S.; Leyland, K.M.; Hart, D.J.; Spector, T.D.; Cooper, C.; Dennison, E.M.; Hunter, D.; Arden, N.K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Malalignment is associated with knee osteoarthritis (KOA), however, the optimal anatomic axis (AA) knee alignment measurement on a standard limb radiograph (SLR) is unknown. This study compares one-point (1P) and two-point (2P) AA methods using three knee joint centre locations and examines cross-sectional associations with symptomatic radiographic knee osteoarthritis (SRKOA), radiographic knee osteoarthritis (RKOA) and knee pain. Methods AA alignment was measured six different ways using the KneeMorf software on 1058 SLRs from 584 women in the Chingford Study. Cross-sectional associations with principal outcome SRKOA combined with greatest reproducibility determined the optimal 1P and 2P AA method. Appropriate varus/neutral/valgus alignment categories were established using logistic regression with generalised estimating equation models fitted with restricted cubic spline function. Results The tibial plateau centre displayed greatest reproducibility and associations with SRKOA. As mean 1P and 2P values differed by >2°, new alignment categories were generated for 1P: varus <178°, neutral 178–182°, valgus >182° and for 2P methods: varus <180°, neutral 180–185°, valgus >185°. Varus vs neutral alignment was associated with a near 2-fold increase in SRKOA and RKOA, and valgus vs neutral for RKOA using 2P method. Nonsignificant associations were seen for 1P method for SRKOA, RKOA and knee pain. Conclusions AA alignment was associated with SRKOA and the tibial plateau centre had the strongest association. Differences in AA alignment when 1P vs 2P methods were compared indicated bespoke alignment categories were necessary. Further replication and validation with mechanical axis alignment comparison is required. PMID:26700504

  17. Impact of Alprazolam on Comorbid Pain and Knee Functions in Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients Diagnosed with Anxiety and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Barış; Kömür, Baran; Aktaş, Erdem; Sonnur Yılmaz, Firdes; Çopuroğlu, Cem; Özcan, Mert; Çiftdemir, Mert; Çopuroğlu, Elif

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Studies report 19-33% postoperative moderate-severe pain and dissatisfaction in uncomplicated total knee arthroplasty (TKA), even after 1 year. High rates of undiagnosed depression and anxiety may have a strong impact on these unfavourable outcomes. Here we aimed to investigate the efficacy of alprazolam on postoperative analgesic use and knee functions. Methods: Seventy-six patients with a mean age of 65 ± 9.3 years (range 46-80) diagnosed with mild-moderate anxiety or depression according to the Hamilton anxiety scale (HAS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) that underwent TKA were evaluated in the study. Group 1 patients were subjected to alprazolam treatment in addition to an analgesic/antiinflammatory drug, whereas Group 2 consisted of patients receiving only the standard postoperative pain management protocol. Visual analog scale (VAS) and postoperative analgesic use (g/day) were calculated to evaluate the magnitude of pain experienced. Preoperative and postoperative knee functions were assessed from the patients’ Knee Society Score and Knee Society Functional Score records. Results: A positive correlation was found between the preoperative HAS, BDI, and total postoperative analgesic use in both groups. Although the decrease in VAS was significant in both groups, postoperative analgesic need (4.25 ± 0.30 g) in Group 1 was less compared to Group 2 (4.81 ± 0.41 g) (p=0.01). The mean change in postoperative (1 month) Knee Society Score and Knee Society Functional Score were also significantly improved in Group1 compared to Group 2. Conclusion: Alprazolam can reduce postoperative analgesic use and improve knee functions by reducing the pain threshold, and enhancing overall mood via its antidepressive and anxiolytic properties in patients undergoing TKA diagnosed with mild-moderate anxiety/depression. PMID:26664498

  18. Combination of Intra-Articular and Intraosseous Injections of Platelet Rich Plasma for Severe Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Mikel; Delgado, Diego; Sánchez, Pello; Muiños-López, Emma; Paiva, Bruno; Granero-Moltó, Froilán; Prósper, Felipe; Pompei, Orlando; Pérez, Juan Carlos; Azofra, Juan; Padilla, Sabino; Fiz, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess a novel approach to treating severe knee osteoarthritis by targeting synovial membrane, superficial articular cartilage, synovial fluid, and subchondral bone by combining intra-articular injections and intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma. We explored a new strategy consisting of intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma into the subchondral bone in combination with the conventional intra-articular injection in order to tackle several knee joint tissues simultaneously. We assessed the clinical outcomes through osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) and the inflammatory response by quantifying mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid. There was a significant pain reduction in the KOOS from baseline (61.55 ± 14.11) to week 24 (74.60 ± 19.19), after treatment (p = 0.008), in the secondary outcomes (symptoms, p = 0.004; ADL, p = 0.022; sport/rec., p = 0.017; QOL, p = 0.012), as well as VAS score (p < 0.001) and Lequesne Index (p = 0.008). The presence of mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid and colony-forming cells one week after treatment decreased substantially from 7.98 ± 8.21 MSC/μL to 4.04 ± 5.36 MSC/μL (p = 0.019) and from 601.75 ± 312.30 to 139.19 ± 123.61  (p = 0.012), respectively. Intra-articular injections combined with intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma reduce pain and mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid, besides significantly improving knee joint function in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis. This trial is registered on EudraCT with the number 2013-003982-32. PMID:27462609

  19. Combination of Intra-Articular and Intraosseous Injections of Platelet Rich Plasma for Severe Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Pello; Muiños-López, Emma; Prósper, Felipe; Pompei, Orlando; Pérez, Juan Carlos; Padilla, Sabino; Fiz, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess a novel approach to treating severe knee osteoarthritis by targeting synovial membrane, superficial articular cartilage, synovial fluid, and subchondral bone by combining intra-articular injections and intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma. We explored a new strategy consisting of intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma into the subchondral bone in combination with the conventional intra-articular injection in order to tackle several knee joint tissues simultaneously. We assessed the clinical outcomes through osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) and the inflammatory response by quantifying mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid. There was a significant pain reduction in the KOOS from baseline (61.55 ± 14.11) to week 24 (74.60 ± 19.19), after treatment (p = 0.008), in the secondary outcomes (symptoms, p = 0.004; ADL, p = 0.022; sport/rec., p = 0.017; QOL, p = 0.012), as well as VAS score (p < 0.001) and Lequesne Index (p = 0.008). The presence of mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid and colony-forming cells one week after treatment decreased substantially from 7.98 ± 8.21 MSC/μL to 4.04 ± 5.36 MSC/μL (p = 0.019) and from 601.75 ± 312.30 to 139.19 ± 123.61  (p = 0.012), respectively. Intra-articular injections combined with intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma reduce pain and mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid, besides significantly improving knee joint function in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis. This trial is registered on EudraCT with the number 2013-003982-32. PMID:27462609

  20. The use of rapid prototyped implants to simulate knee joint abnormalities for in vitro testing: a validation study with replica implants of the native trochlea.

    PubMed

    Van Haver, Annemieke; De Roo, Karel; De Beule, Matthieu; Van Cauter, Sofie; Labey, Luc; De Baets, Patrick; Claessens, Tom; Verdonk, Peter

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the biomechanical effect of skeletal knee joint abnormalities, the authors propose to implant pathologically shaped rapid prototyped implants in cadaver knee specimens. This new method was validated by replacing the native trochlea by a replica implant on four cadaver knees with the aid of cadaver-specific guiding instruments. The accuracy of the guiding instruments was assessed by measuring the rotational errors of the cutting planes (on average 3.01° in extension and 1.18° in external/internal rotation). During a squat and open chain simulation, the patella showed small differences in its articulation with the native trochlea and the replica trochlea, which could partially be explained by the rotational errors of the implants. This study concludes that this method is valid to investigate the effect of knee joint abnormalities with a replica implant as a control condition to account for the influence of material properties and rotational errors of the implant.

  1. Effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma in the treatment of moderate knee osteoarthritis: a randomized prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kavadar, Gulis; Demircioglu, Demet Tekdos; Celik, Memet Yusuf; Emre, Tuluhan Yunus

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] To assess the effects of different numbers of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) applications on pain and physical function in grade 3 knee osteoarthritis (OA). [Subjects and Methods] A total of 102 patients with grade 3 knee OA were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1 received a single injection of PRP, Group 2 received two injections of PRP two weeks apart, Group 3 received three injections of PRP at 2-weeks intervals. All patients were evaluated with a visual analog scale (VAS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and the Timed-Up and Go test (TUG) before the treatment and at 1, 3 and 6 months after the treatment. [Results] Ninety-eight patients (15 males, 83 females) completed the study. The mean ages of the patients were 53.5±6.6, 54.9±5.3, and 55.1±5.6 years in Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3, respectively. Statistically significant improvements were noted in all of the evaluated measures in all of the groups. The mean differences of Group 1-Group 2 and Group 1-Group 3 WOMAC total, WOMAC pain, WOMAC stiffness, and WOMAC function scores were statistically significant. [Conclusion] PRP is an effective treatment for functional status and pain in moderate knee osteoarthritis and a minimum of two injections is appropriate. PMID:26834369

  2. Self-reported previous knee injury and low knee function increase knee injury risk in adolescent female football.

    PubMed

    Clausen, M B; Tang, L; Zebis, M K; Krustrup, P; Hölmich, P; Wedderkopp, N; Andersen, L L; Christensen, K B; Møller, M; Thorborg, K

    2016-08-01

    Knee injuries are common in adolescent female football. Self-reported previous knee injury and low Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) are proposed to predict future knee injuries, but evidence regarding this in adolescent female football is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale score as risk factors for future knee injuries in adolescent female football. A sample of 326 adolescent female football players, aged 15-18, without knee injury at baseline, were included. Data on self-reported previous knee injury and KOOS questionnaires were collected at baseline. Time-loss knee injuries and football exposures were reported weekly by answers to standardized text-message questions, followed by injury telephone interviews. A priori, self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale scores (< 80 points) were chosen as independent variables in the risk factor analyses. The study showed that self-reported previous knee injury significantly increased the risk of time-loss knee injury [relative risk (RR): 3.65, 95% confidence (CI) 1.73-7.68; P < 0.001]. Risk of time-loss knee injury was also significantly increased in players with low KOOS subscale scores (< 80 points) in Activities of Daily Living (RR: 5.0), Sport/Recreational (RR: 2.2) and Quality of Life (RR: 3.0) (P < 0.05). In conclusion, self-reported previous knee injury and low scores in three KOOS subscales significantly increase the risk of future time-loss knee injury in adolescent female football. PMID:26179111

  3. In vitro response of the natural cadaver knee to the loading profiles specified in a standard for knee implant wear testing.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Levi G; Werner, Frederick W; Haider, Hani; Hamblin, Tracy; Clabeaux, Jonathan J

    2010-08-10

    The purpose of this study was to examine how a natural knee responds to the inputs of a total knee replacement testing standard developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). This load control standard prescribes forces to be used for wear testing of knee replacements independent of implant size or design. A parallel ISO standard provides wear testing inputs that are displacement based instead of force based. Eight fresh frozen cadaveric knees were potted and tested in a 6 degree of freedom knee simulator using the load-control standard. The resulting displacements during load-control testing were compared to the prescribed displacements of the ISO displacement standard. At half the tibial torque prescribed by the load standard there was three times more average internal tibial rotation (20.3 degrees) than is prescribed by the displacement standard (5.7 degrees). The AP motion resulting from load testing was much different than is specified by the displacement standard. All eight knees had anterior tibial translation with respect to the femur during swing phase while the displacement standard specifies posterior tibial displacement. The variation in these motions among knees and their difference from the ISO displacement standard may be one factor that explains why wear results of total knee replacements based on ISO load or displacement testing frequently do not agree with each other or with clinical retrievals.

  4. [Jumper's knee].

    PubMed

    Hagner, W; Sosnowski, S; Kaziński, W; Frankowski, S

    1993-01-01

    A series of 30 athletes aged about 16 years on an average, exposed to activities putting a strain on the patellar tendon during training has been examined. They were involved in competitive sports for 3 years on an average. In 27 per cent of them jumpers knee symptoms have been found.

  5. Clinical effects of lateral wedge arch support insoles in knee osteoarthritis: A prospective double-blind randomized study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ru-Lan; Lee, Wen-Chung

    2016-07-01

    We compared the short-term efficacy of rigid versus soft lateral wedge arch support (LWAS) insoles for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), as assessed using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) system, through a prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial.Participants who fulfilled the combined radiographic and clinical criteria for knee OA, as defined by the American College of Rheumatology, were randomly prescribed 1 pair of rigid or soft LWAS insoles. Body functions and structures were evaluated according to Kellgren-Lawrence scores, the Foot Posture Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, the pain-pressure threshold, postural stability, dynamic balance, and fall risk; activities and participation were assessed according to 10-m fast speed walking, stair climbing and chair rising times, and Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire responses; and knee OA-related health status was evaluated using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, the pain-pressure threshold, physical activity, balance, Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire responses, and the KOOS were recorded before treatment and at 1-, 2-, and 3-month follow-ups.We enrolled 90 participants, 70 women and 20 men, with mean ages of 60.6 ± 10.8 and 63.1 ± 10.8 years in the rigid and soft LWAS insole groups, respectively. Repeated-measures analysis of covariance revealed significant time × group effect improvements in pain (P = 0.008 for the KOOS), stair ascent time (P = 0.003), daily living function (P = 0.003 for the KOOS), sports and recreation function (P = 0.012 for the KOOS), and quality of life (P = 0.021 for the KOOS) in the soft LWAS insole group.Patients with knee OA who used soft LWAS insoles for a short term showed more significant improvement than did those who used rigid LWAS insoles in pain, physical activity, daily living function, sports and recreation function

  6. Clinical effects of lateral wedge arch support insoles in knee osteoarthritis: A prospective double-blind randomized study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ru-Lan; Lee, Wen-Chung

    2016-07-01

    We compared the short-term efficacy of rigid versus soft lateral wedge arch support (LWAS) insoles for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), as assessed using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) system, through a prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial.Participants who fulfilled the combined radiographic and clinical criteria for knee OA, as defined by the American College of Rheumatology, were randomly prescribed 1 pair of rigid or soft LWAS insoles. Body functions and structures were evaluated according to Kellgren-Lawrence scores, the Foot Posture Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, the pain-pressure threshold, postural stability, dynamic balance, and fall risk; activities and participation were assessed according to 10-m fast speed walking, stair climbing and chair rising times, and Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire responses; and knee OA-related health status was evaluated using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, the pain-pressure threshold, physical activity, balance, Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire responses, and the KOOS were recorded before treatment and at 1-, 2-, and 3-month follow-ups.We enrolled 90 participants, 70 women and 20 men, with mean ages of 60.6 ± 10.8 and 63.1 ± 10.8 years in the rigid and soft LWAS insole groups, respectively. Repeated-measures analysis of covariance revealed significant time × group effect improvements in pain (P = 0.008 for the KOOS), stair ascent time (P = 0.003), daily living function (P = 0.003 for the KOOS), sports and recreation function (P = 0.012 for the KOOS), and quality of life (P = 0.021 for the KOOS) in the soft LWAS insole group.Patients with knee OA who used soft LWAS insoles for a short term showed more significant improvement than did those who used rigid LWAS insoles in pain, physical activity, daily living function, sports and recreation function

  7. Patient-Specific CT-Based Instrumentation versus Conventional Instrumentation in Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study on Clinical Outcomes and In-Hospital Data

    PubMed Central

    Kotela, Andrzej; Lorkowski, Jacek; Kucharzewski, Marek; Wilk-Frańczuk, Magdalena; Śliwiński, Zbigniew; Frańczuk, Bogusław; Łęgosz, Paweł  ; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a frequently performed procedure in orthopaedic surgery. Recently, patient-specific instrumentation was introduced to facilitate correct positioning of implants. The aim of this study was to compare the early clinical results of TKA performed with patient-specific CT-based instrumentation and conventional technique. A prospective, randomized controlled trial on 112 patients was performed between January 2011 and December 2011. A group of 112 patients who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled in this study and randomly assigned to an experimental or control group. The experimental group comprised 52 patients who received the Signature CT-based implant positioning system, and the control group consisted of 60 patients with conventional instrumentation. Clinical outcomes were evaluated with the KSS scale, WOMAC scale, and VAS scales to assess knee pain severity and patient satisfaction with the surgery. Specified in-hospital data were recorded. Patients were followed up for 12 months. At one year after surgery, there were no statistically significant differences between groups with respect to clinical outcomes and in-hospital data, including operative time, blood loss, hospital length of stay, intraoperative observations, and postoperative complications. Further high-quality investigations of various patient-specific systems and longer follow-up may be helpful in assessing their utility for TKA. PMID:26301241

  8. A clinical study of the rotational alignment of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Liangjia; Liu, Xiaomin; Liu, Changlu; Liu, Yingli

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The reasons for femorotibial rotational malalignment after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were analyzed to provide evidence for clinical knee joint surgery and to reduce complications. [Subjects and Methods] Ninety knees of 60 patients were selected and randomly divided into two groups (n=30). For one group, rotational alignment of the femoral component was determined by the transepicondylar axis and TKA was performed. For the other group, rotational alignment of the femoral component was conducted through 3° external rotation of the posterior femoral condyles. Knee joint specimens were operated with TKA and various biomechanical indices were measured. [Results] The femoral epicondylar axis was a constant, reliable reference for femoral component rotational alignment. When the femoral component was rotated by 0° versus the epicondylar axis, the peak contact pressure on the patellofemoral joint was optimal. When the femoral component was arranged in parallel with Whiteside’s line, the peak contact pressure on the patellofemoral joint varied largely. The patellofemoral contact areas of the two groups were similar. [Conclusion] Axial rotational alignment of the femoral component influenced the contact pressure of patellofemoral joints in TKA more significantly than external rotation of the femoral condyles. It is more reliable to use the femoral epicondylar axis as the reference for the rotational alignment of the femoral component. PMID:26311929

  9. Anatomic Versus Mechanically Aligned Total Knee Arthroplasty for Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Toliopoulos, Panagiota; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Hutt, Jonathan; Lavigne, Martin; Desmeules, Francois; Vendittoli, Pascal-Andre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the intra-operative benefits and the clinical outcomes from kinematic or mechanical alignment for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients undergoing revision of failed unicompartmental kneel arthroplasty (UKA) to TKA. Methods: Ten revisions were performed with a kinematic alignment technique and 11 with a mechanical alignment. Measurements of the hip-knee-ankle angle (HKA), the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA), and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) were performed using long-leg radiographs. The need for augments, stems, and constrained inserts was compared between groups. Clinical outcomes were compared using the WOMAC score along with maximum distance walked as well as knee range of motion obtained prior to discharge. All data was obtained by a retrospective review of patient files. Results: The kinematic group required less augments, stems, and constrained inserts than the mechanical group and thinner polyethylene bearings. There were significant differences in the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA) and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) between the two groups (p<0.05). The mean WOMAC score obtained at discharge was better in the kinematic group as was mean knee flexion. At last follow up of 34 months for the kinematic group and 58 months for the mechanical group, no orthopedic complications or reoperations were recorded. Conclusion: Although this study has a small patient cohort, our results suggest that kinematic alignment for TKA after UKA revision is an attractive method. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27563365

  10. Comparative Studies in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazurek, Kas, Ed.; Winzer, Margret A., Ed.

    This text presents 26 case studies which examine special education provisions for children in the world today. The reports focus on the current state of special education in selected nations and major issues and controversies in the field of special education within those nations. Each case study addresses the following themes: (1) prevalence of…

  11. Accurate joint space quantification in knee osteoarthritis: a digital x-ray tomosynthesis phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Tanzania S.; Piacsek, Kelly L.; Heckel, Beth A.; Sabol, John M.

    2011-03-01

    The current imaging standard for diagnosis and monitoring of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is projection radiography. However radiographs may be insensitive to markers of early disease such as osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN). Relative to standard radiography, digital X-ray tomosynthesis (DTS) may provide improved visualization of the markers of knee OA without the interference of superimposed anatomy. DTS utilizes a series of low-dose projection images over an arc of +/-20 degrees to reconstruct tomographic images parallel to the detector. We propose that DTS can increase accuracy and precision in JSN quantification. The geometric accuracy of DTS was characterized by quantifying joint space width (JSW) as a function of knee flexion and position using physical and anthropomorphic phantoms. Using a commercially available digital X-ray system, projection and DTS images were acquired for a Lucite rod phantom with known gaps at various source-object-distances, and angles of flexion. Gap width, representative of JSW, was measured using a validated algorithm. Over an object-to-detector-distance range of 5-21cm, a 3.0mm gap width was reproducibly measured in the DTS images, independent of magnification. A simulated 0.50mm (+/-0.13) JSN was quantified accurately (95% CI 0.44-0.56mm) in the DTS images. Angling the rods to represent knee flexion, the minimum gap could be precisely determined from the DTS images and was independent of flexion angle. JSN quantification using DTS was insensitive to distance from patient barrier and flexion angle. Potential exists for the optimization of DTS for accurate radiographic quantification of knee OA independent of patient positioning.

  12. Use of knee height for the estimation of body height in Thai adult women.

    PubMed

    Chumpathat, Nopphanath; Rangsin, Ram; Changbumrung, Supranee; Soonthornworasiri, Ngamphol; Durongritichai, Vanida; Kwanbunjan, Karunee

    2016-01-01

    Knee height has been the most frequently used measure for height prediction where full height is difficult to measure. The aim of this study was to develop and validate predictive equations using knee height to estimate the height of Thai women. The female participants were 18-59 years of age and lived in Bangkok or three surrounding provinces. They were assigned to one of two groups; the equation development group (n=488) and the equation validation group (n=188). Standing height and knee height were measured in duplicate using a stadiometer and a knee height calliper. Age and physical characteristics of the equation development group and the validate group were comparable. The measured heights showed a significant strongly positive correlation with the mean knee height (r=0.84, p<0.001). Mean knee height in a regression model exhibited the most accurate height prediction (adjusted R(2)=0.718, standard error of estimate=2.80), according to the equation "Height=38.1+2.45 (average knee height) - 0.051(age)". This study proposes a new height estimation equation for Thai adult women using knee height. The equation shows more estimation power than the previous studies conducted in Thailand. PMID:27440676

  13. KOOS Pain as a Marker for Significant Knee Pain Two and Six Years after Primary ACL Reconstruction: A Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) Prospective Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstein, D; Huston, LJ; Nwosu, S; Spindler, KP

    2015-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) approaches 50%, yet the prevalence of significant knee pain is unknown. We applied three different models of Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) thresholds for significant knee pain to an ACLR cohort to identify prevalence and risk factors. Design Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) prospective cohort patients with a unilateral primary ACLR and normal contralateral knee were assessed at 2 and 6 years. Independent variables included patient demographics, validated Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO; Marx activity score, KOOS), and surgical characteristics. Models included: (1) KOOS criteria for a painful knee = quality of life subscale <87.5 and ≥2 of: KOOSpain <86.1, KOOSsymptoms <85.7, KOOSADL <86.8, or KOOSsports/rec <85.0; (2) KOOSpain subscale score ≤72 (≥2 standard deviations below population mean); (3) 10-point KOOSpain drop from 2 to 6 years. Proportional odds models (alpha≤0.05) were used. Results 1,761 patients of median age 23 years, median BMI 24.8 kg/m2 and 56% male met inclusion, with 87% (1530/1761) and 86% (1506/1761) follow-up at 2 and 6 years, respectively. At 6 years, n=592 (39%), n=131 (9%) and n=169 (12%) met criteria for models #1 through #3, respectively. The most consistent and strongest independent risk factor at both time-points was subsequent ipsilateral knee surgery. Low 2-year Marx activity score increased the odds of a painful knee at 6 years. Conclusions Significant knee pain is prevalent after ACLR; with those who undergo subsequent ipsilateral surgery at greatest risk. The relationship between pain and structural OA warrants further study. PMID:26072385

  14. [Loss of strength and regeneration of knee extensor musculature after operations of the knee ligaments. EMG studies of the effect of the injury pattern, surgical procedure and after-care with special reference to electromyostimulation].

    PubMed

    Hörster, G; Kedziora, O

    1993-08-01

    Clinically relevant losses of the capacity of the extensor muscles of the thigh to contract voluntarily are usual after open knee joint operations and are known to lead frequently to a major delay in healing. In the present paper, a randomized prospective comparative study is presented in which the negative effect of the injury and surgical trauma on the extensor musculature of the thigh is compared between open and arthroscopically controlled cruciate ligament operations. The surface electromyogram is measured. The values found make it evident that an equally pronounced loss of strength amounting to more than 90% results after injuries in the region of the cruciate ligament apparatus and in open as well as arthroscopically controlled reconstruction operations. The alterations are mainly attributable to the surgical trauma. The injury on its own only leads to a roughly 25% loss of strength in the preoperative investigation. With an appropriate programme of follow-up treatment, the strength values are only partially restored after about six weeks. In the follow-up treatment, electromyostimulation has a significantly positive effect on the rectus femoris muscle, but not on the vastus lateralis muscle. According to our investigations, it is of preeminent importance to consider how to avoid the negative effect of the operation (with particular consideration of the arthroscopic procedure) on the function of the thigh musculature.

  15. Proprioception in the ACL-ruptured knee: the contribution of the medial collateral ligament and patellar ligament. An in vivo experimental study in the cat.

    PubMed

    Bonsfills, N; Raygoza, J J; Boemo, E; Garrido, J; Núñez, A; Gómez-Barrena, E

    2007-01-01

    In the absence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), secondary restraints such as menisci, ligaments, and tendons restrict anterior knee laxity. Strain detection at these sites could define the contribution of this alternative signalling system to knee proprioception after ACL injury. The hypothesis in this study questions if measurements of anterior tibial translation (ATT) from surface strain gauges on the insertions of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and the patellar tendon (PT) are sufficiently sensitive and specific to differentiate normal, stable knees from acutely unstable knees due to ACL section. Twelve cats received miniaturized strain gauges on the surface of MCL and PT distal insertions. A purpose-made receiver transformed into measurements any voltage variation obtained during passive knee flexion-extension and anterior tibial translation manoeuvres. Variables under evaluation included first peak latency, normalized amplitude, and slope of voltage along time. Femorotibial displacements were video recorded, digitized, and used as the ATT reference. The proposed system detected significant changes in the slope of the voltage/time signal, with higher specificity and sensitivity during ATT after experimental ACL section. Changes were not significant during flexion or extension. It was found that a pattern of earlier and more intense strain in MCL and PT distal insertions was found during ATT in the ACL deficient knee. Enhanced pattern recognition learning from these structures could be a future target for proprioceptive training after ACL injury.

  16. Unique Anatomic Feature of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament in Knees Associated With Osteochondritis Dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masakazu; Adachi, Nobuo; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Nakamae, Atsuo; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Ikuta, Yasunari; Hayashi, Seiju; Deie, Masataka; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee is a disorder in juveniles and young adults; however, its etiology still remains unclear. For OCD at the medial femoral condyle (MFC), it is sometimes observed that the lesion has a connection with fibers of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Although this could be important information related to the etiology of MFC OCD, there is no report examining an association between the MFC OCD and the PCL anatomy. Purpose: To investigate the anatomic features of knees associated with MFC OCD, focusing especially on the femoral attachment of the PCL, and to compare them with knees associated with lateral femoral condyle (LFC) OCD and non-OCD lesions. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients (46 knees) with OCD lesions who had undergone surgical treatment. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, the PCL attachment at the lateral wall of the MFC was measured on the coronal sections, and the knee flexion angle was also measured on the sagittal sections. As with non-OCD knees, we reviewed and analyzed 25 knees with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and 16 knees with meniscal injuries. Results: MRIs revealed that the femoral PCL footprint was located in a significantly more distal position in the patients with MFC OCD compared with patients with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. There was no significant difference in knee flexion angle among the 4 groups. Conclusion: The PCL in patients with MFC OCD attached more distally at the lateral aspect of the MFC compared with knees with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. PMID:27294170

  17. Biomechanics of knee joint — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeti, Bhaskar Kumar; Chalamalasetti, Srinivasa Rao; Bolla Pragada, S. K. Sundara siva rao

    2015-06-01

    The present paper is to know how the work is carried out in the field of biomechanics of knee. Various model formulations are discussed and further classified into mathematical model, two-dimensional model and three-dimensional model. Knee geometry is a crucial part of human body movement, in which how various views of knee is shown in different planes and how the forces act on tibia and femur are studied. It leads to know the forces acting on the knee joint. Experimental studies of knee geometry and forces acting on knee shown by various researchers have been discussed, and comparisons of results are made. In addition, static and dynamic analysis of knee has been also discussed respectively to some extent.

  18. Factors Related to Postoperative Pain Trajectories following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Longitudinal Study of Patients Admitted to a Russian Orthopaedic Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Kornilov, Nikolai; Lindberg, Maren Falch; Gay, Caryl; Saraev, Alexander; Kuliaba, Taras; Rosseland, Leiv Arne; Muniz, Konstantin; Lerdal, Anners

    2016-01-01

    This study explores sociodemographic, clinical, and surgical factors in relation to pain trajectories during the first 3 days following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). 100 patients (mean age 63.5 ± 7.8 years and 93% female) consecutively admitted for uncomplicated primary TKA were prospectively included. Postoperative pain was assessed using pain diaries. Measures of preoperative pain, symptoms, daily functioning, quality of life, comorbidities, knee function, perioperative characteristics, and physical/biochemical parameters were also evaluated. All pain ratings decreased in the three days following surgery (p < .001) as well as the reported number of daily hours in moderate/severe pain (p < .001). Women reported more pain than men (p = .009). Pain trajectories did not differ by education, employment, cohabitation, or any patient clinical and biochemical characteristics but were significantly related to preoperative anxiety (p = .029). Patients reporting moderate/severe pain prior to surgery also reported more hours in moderate/severe pain on days 0–3 postoperatively (p = .029). Patients with surgeries longer than 90 min reported more hours of moderate/severe pain compared with patients who had shorter surgeries (p = .008), and similar results were observed for ratings of pain with activity (p = .012). In this sample, only female gender, higher levels of preoperative pain and anxiety, and longer surgical duration were associated with increased pain after TKA. PMID:26885390

  19. The Columbus Knee System: 4-Year Results of a New Deep Flexion Design Compared to the NexGen Full Flex Implant.

    PubMed

    Goebel, D; Schultz, W

    2012-01-01

    The Columbus knee system is designed as a standard knee implant to allow high flexion without additional bone resection. Between August, 2004 and March, 2010 we performed 109 total knee arthroplasties of the Columbus knee system in 101 consecutive patients suffering from primary arthrosis of the knee. Mean age was 72.4 years in women and 70.3 years in men. Mean followup was 47.3 months. The 4-year results of a group of patients who received the NexGen Full Flex implant operated by the same surgeon were used for comparison. Mean total knee score was Columbus: 175.6 and NexGen Flex: 183.4; P = 0.037. Mean operation time was 53 min for Columbus and 66 min for NexGen Flex; P < 0.001. With new streamlined instruments operative time became 60 min for the Columbus; P > 0.05. Radiological assessment showed no signs of loosening for both groups. Therefore, the Columbus knee system can be recommended for flexion angles up to 140°.

  20. Effects of closed versus open kinetic chain knee extensor resistance training on knee laxity and leg function in patients during the 8- to 14-week post-operative period after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Perry, Mark C; Morrissey, Matthew C; King, John B; Morrissey, Dylan; Earnshaw, Peter

    2005-07-01

    Open kinetic chain (OKC) knee extensor resistance training has lost favour in ACLR rehabilitation due to concerns that this exercise is harmful to the graft and will be less effective in improving function. In this randomized, single-blind clinical trial OKC and closed kinetic chain (CKC) knee extensor training were compared for their effects on knee laxity and function in the middle period of ACLR rehabilitation. The study subjects were 49 patients recovering from ACLR surgery (37 M, 12 F; mean age=33 years). Tests were carried out at 8 and 14 weeks after ACLR with knee laxity measured using a ligament arthrometer and function with the Hughston Clinic knee self-assessment questionnaire and single leg, maximal effort jump testing (post-test only). Between tests, subjects trained using either OKC or CKC resistance of their knee and hip extensors as part of formal physical therapy sessions three times per week. No statistically significant (one-way ANOVA, p>0.05) differences were found between the treatment groups in knee laxity or leg function. OKC and CKC knee extensor training in the middle period of rehabilitation after ACLR surgery do not differ in their effects on knee laxity or leg function. Exercise dosages are described in this study and further research is required to assess whether the findings in this study are dosage specific.

  1. Knee Control and Jump-Landing Technique in Young Basketball and Floorball Players.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, M; Pasanen, K; Kulmala, J-P; Kujala, U M; Krosshaug, T; Kannus, P; Perttunen, J; Vasankari, T; Parkkari, J

    2016-04-01

    Poor knee alignment is associated with increased loading of the joints, ligaments and tendons, and may increase the risk of injury. The study purpose was to compare differences in knee kinematics between basketball and floorball players during a vertical drop jump (VDJ) task. We wanted to investigate whether basketball players, whose sport includes frequent jump-landings, exhibited better knee control compared with floorball players, whose sport involves less jumping. Complete data was obtained from 173 basketball and 141 floorball players. Peak knee valgus and flexion angles during the VDJ were analyzed by 3D motion analysis.Larger knee valgus angles were observed among basketball players (- 3.2°, 95%CI -4.5 to - 2.0) compared with floorball players (- 0.9°, 95%CI -2.3 to 0.6) (P=0.022). Basketball players landed with a decreased peak knee flexion angle (83.1°, 95%CI 81.4 to 84.8) compared with floorball players (86.5°, 95%CI 84.6 to 88.4) (P=0.016). There were no significant differences in height, weight or BMI between basketball and floorball players. Female athletes exhibited significantly greater valgus angles than males. This study revealed that proper knee control during jump-landing does not seem to develop in young athletes simply by playing the sport, despite the fact that jump-landings occur frequently in practice and games. PMID:26701826

  2. Knee Control and Jump-Landing Technique in Young Basketball and Floorball Players.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, M; Pasanen, K; Kulmala, J-P; Kujala, U M; Krosshaug, T; Kannus, P; Perttunen, J; Vasankari, T; Parkkari, J

    2016-04-01

    Poor knee alignment is associated with increased loading of the joints, ligaments and tendons, and may increase the risk of injury. The study purpose was to compare differences in knee kinematics between basketball and floorball players during a vertical drop jump (VDJ) task. We wanted to investigate whether basketball players, whose sport includes frequent jump-landings, exhibited better knee control compared with floorball players, whose sport involves less jumping. Complete data was obtained from 173 basketball and 141 floorball players. Peak knee valgus and flexion angles during the VDJ were analyzed by 3D motion analysis.Larger knee valgus angles were observed among basketball players (- 3.2°, 95%CI -4.5 to - 2.0) compared with floorball players (- 0.9°, 95%CI -2.3 to 0.6) (P=0.022). Basketball players landed with a decreased peak knee flexion angle (83.1°, 95%CI 81.4 to 84.8) compared with floorball players (86.5°, 95%CI 84.6 to 88.4) (P=0.016). There were no significant differences in height, weight or BMI between basketball and floorball players. Female athletes exhibited significantly greater valgus angles than males. This study revealed that proper knee control during jump-landing does not seem to develop in young athletes simply by playing the sport, despite the fact that jump-landings occur frequently in practice and games.

  3. An analytical model of the knee for estimation of internal forces during exercise.

    PubMed

    Zheng, N; Fleisig, G S; Escamilla, R F; Barrentine, S W

    1998-10-01

    An analytical model of the knee joint was developed to estimate the forces at the knee during exercise. Muscle forces were estimated based upon electromyographic activities during exercise and during maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), muscle fiber length at contraction and the maximum force produced by an unit PCSA under MVIC. Tibiofemoral compressive force and cruciate ligaments' tension were determined by using resultant force and torque at the knee, muscle forces, and orientations and moment arms of the muscles and ligaments. An optimization program was used to minimize the errors caused by the estimation of the muscle forces. The model was used in a ten-subject study of open kinetic chain exercise (seated knee extension) and closed kinetic chain exercises (leg press and squat). Results calculated with this model were compared to those from a previous study which did not consider muscle length and optimization. Peak tibiofemoral compressive forces were 3134 +/- 1040 N during squat, 3155 +/- 755 N during leg press and 3285 +/- 1927 N during knee extension. Peak posterior cruciate ligament tensions were 1868 +/- 878 N during squat, 1866 +/- 383 N during leg press and 959 +/- 300 N for seated knee extension. No significant anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tension was found during leg press and squat. Peak ACL tension was 142 +/- 257 N during seated knee extension. It is demonstrated that the current model provided better estimation of knee forces during exercises, by preventing significant overestimates of tibiofemoral compressive forces and cruciate ligament tensions.

  4. Regaining Native Knee Kinematics Following Joint Arthroplasty: A Novel Biomimetic Design with ACL and PCL Preservation.

    PubMed

    Zumbrunn, Thomas; Varadarajan, Kartik Mangudi; Rubash, Harry E; Malchau, Henrik; Li, Guoan; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2015-12-01

    Lack of ACL and non-anatomic articular surfaces in contemporary total knee implants result in kinematic abnormalities. We hypothesized that such abnormalities may be addressed with a biomimetic bi-cruciate retaining (BCR) design having anatomical articular surfaces. We used dynamic computer simulations to compare kinematics among the biomimetic BCR, a contemporary BCR and cruciate-retaining implant for activities of daily living. During simulated deep knee bend, chair-sit and walking, the biomimetic BCR implant showed activity dependent kinematics similar to healthy knees in vivo. Restoring native knee geometry together with ACL preservation provided these kinematic improvements over contemporary ACL-preserving and ACL-sacrificing implants. Further clinical studies are required to determine if such biomimetic implants can result in more normal feeling knees and improve quality of life for active patients.

  5. The effect of total knee arthroplasty on knee joint kinematics and kinetics during gait.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Gillian L; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L; Astephen Wilson, Janie L; Dunbar, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    This study determined how total knee arthroplasty (TKA) altered knee motion and loading during gait. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic gait patterns of 42 patients with severe knee osteoarthritis were collected 1 week prior and 1-year post-TKA. Principal component analysis extracted major patterns of variability in the gait waveforms. Overall and midstance knee adduction moment magnitude decreased. Overall knee flexion angle magnitude increased due to an increase during swing. Increases in the early stance knee flexion moment and late stance knee extension moment were found, indicating improved impact attenuation and function. A decrease in the early stance knee external rotation moment indicated alteration in the typical rotation mechanism. Most changes moved toward an asymptomatic pattern and would be considered improvements in motion, function, and loading.

  6. Radiographic knee osteoarthritis in ex-elite table tennis players

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Table tennis involves adoption of the semi-flexed knee and asymmetrical torsional trunk movements creating rotational torques on the knee joint which may predispose players to osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. This study aims to compare radiographic signs of knee OA and associated functional levels in ex-elite male table tennis players and control subjects. Methods Study participants were 22 ex-elite male table tennis players (mean age 56.64 ± 5.17 years) with 10 years of involvement at the professional level and 22 non-athletic males (mean age 55.63 ± 4.08 years) recruited from the general population. A set of three radiographs taken from each knee were evaluated by an experienced radiologist using the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) scale (0-4) to determine radiographic levels of OA severity. The intercondylar distance was taken as a measure of lower limb angulation. Participants also completed the pain, stiffness, and physical function categories of the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) 3.1 questionnaire. Results The results showed 78.3% of the ex-elite table tennis players and 36.3% of controls had varying signs of radiographic knee OA with a significant difference in the prevalence levels of definite radiographic OA (KL scale > 2) found between the two groups (P ≤ 0.001). Based on the WOMAC scores, 68.2% of the ex-elite table tennis players reported symptoms of knee pain compared with 27.3% of the controls (p = 0.02) though no significant differences were identified in the mean physical function or stiffness scores between the two groups. In terms of knee alignment, 73.7% of the ex-elite athletes and 32% of the control group had signs of altered lower limb alignment (genu varum) (p = 0.01). Statistical differences were found in subjects categorized as having radiographic signs of OA and altered lower limb alignment (p = 0.03). Conclusions Ex-elite table tennis players were found to have increased levels of

  7. Knee Flexion and Daily Activities in Patients following Total Knee Replacement: A Comparison with ISO Standard 14243

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Markus A.; Nechtow, William; Schwenke, Thorsten; Moisio, Kirsten C.

    2015-01-01

    Walking is only one of many daily activities performed by patients following total knee replacement (TKR). The purpose of this study was to examine the hypotheses (a) that subject activity characteristics are correlated with knee flexion range of motion (ROM) and (b) that there is a significant difference between the subject's flexion/extension excursion throughout the day and the ISO specified input for knee wear testing. In order to characterize activity, the number of walking and stair stepping cycles, the time spent with dynamic and stationary activities, the number of activity sequences, and the knee flexion/extension excursion of 32 TKR subjects were collected during daily activity. Flexion/extension profiles were compared with the ISO 14243 simulator input profile using a level crossing classification algorithm. Subjects took an average of 3102 (range: 343–5857) walking cycles including 65 (range: 0–319) stair stepping cycles. Active and passive ROMs were positively correlated with stair walking time, stair step counts, and stair walking sequences. Simulated knee motion according to ISO showed significantly fewer level crossings at the flexion angles 20–40° and beyond 50° than those measured with the monitor. This suggests that implant wear testing protocols should contain more cycles and a variety of activities requiring higher knee flexion angles with incorporated resting/transition periods to account for the many activity sequences. PMID:26347875

  8. Clinical evaluation of 292 Genesis II posterior stabilized high-flexion total knee arthroplasty: range of motion and predictors.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Mathijs C H W; Janssen, Rob P A

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the range of motion and complications after Genesis II total knee arthroplasty with high-flexion tibia insert (TKA-HF). Furthermore, difference in knee flexion between high flexion and standard inserts was compared. The hypothesis was that knee flexion is better after high-flexion TKA. A total of 292 TKA-HF were retrospectively reviewed. Mean follow-up was 24.3 months. The range of motion was compared between TKA-HF (high-flexion group) and a comparable cohort of 86 Genesis II TKA with a standard tibia insert (control group). Surgeries were performed by one experienced knee orthopedic surgeon. Knee flexion in the high-flexion group increased from 114.8° preoperatively to 118.0° postoperatively (P < 0.01). Knee extension in the high-flexion group increased from -4.5° preoperatively to -0.4° after surgery (P < 0.01). Mean knee flexion was 5.52° (± 1.46°) better in the high-flexion group compared with the control group (P < 0.01). Preoperative range of motion, body mass index, diabetes mellitus and patellofemoral pain significantly influenced range of motion. Few complications occurred after TKA-HF. The Genesis II TKA-HF showed good short-term results with limited complications. Knee flexion after Genesis II TKA-HF was better compared with a standard tibia insert.

  9. Physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Page, Carolyn J; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-05-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic joint disease causing pain and disability. Physiotherapy, which encompasses a number of modalities, is a non-invasive treatment option in the management of OA. This review summarizes the evidence for commonly used physiotherapy interventions. There is strong evidence to show short-term beneficial effects of exercise on pain and function, although the type of exercise does not seem to influence treatment outcome. Delivery modes, including individual, group or home exercise are all effective, although therapist contact may improve benefits. Attention to improving adherence to exercise is needed to maximize outcomes in the longer-term. Knee taping applied with the aim of realigning the patella and unloading soft tissues can reduce pain. There is also evidence to support the use of knee braces in people with knee OA. Biomechanical studies show that lateral wedge shoe insoles reduce knee load but clinical trials do not support symptomatic benefits. Recent studies suggest individual shoe characteristics also affect knee load and there is current interest in the effect of modified shoe designs. Manual therapy, while not to be used as a stand-alone treatment, may be beneficial. In summary, although the research is not equivocal, there is sufficient evidence to indicate that physiotherapy interventions can reduce pain and improve function in those with knee OA.

  10. Leukocyte and Platelet Rich Plasma (L-PRP) Versus Leukocyte and Platelet Rich Fibrin (L-PRF) For Articular Cartilage Repair of the Knee: A Comparative Evaluation in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Davoud; Fakhrjou, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Background: Articular cartilage injuries of the knee are among the most debilitating injuries leading to osteoarthritis due to limited regenerative capability of cartilaginous tissue. The use of platelet concentrates containing necessary growth factors for cartilage healing has recently emerged as a new treatment method. Objectives: The efficacy of two types of different platelet concentrates were compared in the treatment of acute articular cartilage injuries of the knee in an animal model. Materials and Methods: Eighteen adult Iranian mixed breed male dogs were used to conduct this experimental study. Full thickness articular cartilage defects (diameter 6 mm, depth 5 mm) were created in the weight bearing area of femoral condyles of both hind limbs in all dogs (n = 72). Twelve dogs were randomly selected to receive treatment and their right and left hind limb defects were treated by L-PRP and L-PRF implantation respectively, while no treatment was undertaken in six other dogs as controls. The animals were euthanized at 4, 16 and 24 weeks following surgery and the resultant repair tissue was investigated macroscopically and microscopically. At each sampling time, 4 treated dogs and 2 control dogs were euthanized, therefore 8 defects per group were evaluated. Results: Mean macroscopic scores of the treated defects were higher than the controls at all sampling times with significant differences (P < 0.05) observed between L-PRF treated and control defects (10.13 vs. 8.37) and L-PRP treated and control defects (10 vs. 8.5) at 4 and 16 weeks, respectively. A similar trend in mean total microscopic scores was observed with a significant difference (P < 0.05) between L-PRP treated and control defects at 4 (9.87 vs. 7.62) and 16 (13.38 vs. 11) weeks. No significant difference was observed between the platelet concentrate treated defects in either mean macroscopic scores or mean total microscopic scores. Conclusions: Both L-PRP and L-PRF could be used to effectively

  11. A multicentre, pragmatic, parallel group, randomised controlled trial to compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of three physiotherapy-led exercise interventions for knee osteoarthritis in older adults: the BEEP trial protocol (ISRCTN: 93634563)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise is consistently recommended for older adults with knee pain related to osteoarthritis. However, the effects from exercise are typically small and short-term, likely linked to insufficient individualisation of the exercise programme and limited attention to supporting exercise adherence over time. The BEEP randomised trial aims to improve patients’ short and long-term outcomes from exercise. It will test the overall effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two physiotherapy-led exercise interventions (Individually Tailored Exercise and Targeted Exercise Adherence) to improve the individual tailoring of, and adherence to exercise, compared with usual physiotherapy care. Methods/design Based on the learning from a pilot study (ISRCTN 23294263), the BEEP trial is a multi-centre, pragmatic, parallel group, individually randomised controlled trial, with embedded longitudinal qualitative interviews. 500 adults in primary care, aged 45 years and over with knee pain will be randomised to 1 of 3 treatment groups delivered by fully trained physiotherapists in up to 6 NHS services. These are: Usual Physiotherapy Care (control group consisting of up to 4 treatment sessions of advice and exercise), Individually Tailored Exercise (an individualised, supervised and progressed lower-limb exercise programme) or Targeted Exercise Adherence (supporting patients to adhere to exercise and to engage in general physical activity over the longer-term). The primary outcomes are pain and function as measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis index. A comprehensive range of secondary outcomes are also included. Outcomes are measured at 3, 6 (primary outcome time-point), 9, 18 and 36 months. Data on adverse events will also be collected. Semi-structured, qualitative interviews with a subsample of 30 participants (10 from each treatment group) will be undertaken at two time-points (end of treatment and 12 to 18 months later) and analysed thematically

  12. Telerehabilitation after total knee replacement in Italy: cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a mixed telerehabilitation-standard rehabilitation programme compared with usual care

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Francesco; Turchetti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess cost-effectiveness and cost utility of telerehabilitation (TR) versus standard rehabilitation (SR) after total knee replacement (TKR). Design Markov decision modelling of cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis based on patient-level and secondary data sources employing Italian National Health Service (NHS; Ita-NHS) and Society perspectives. Setting Primary care units (PCUs) in Italy. Participants Patients discharged after TKR. Interventions Mixed SR-TR service (10 face-to-face sessions and 10 telesessions) versus SR (20 face-to-face sessions) Primary and secondary outcome measures The incremental cost per additional knee flexion range of motion (ROM) and per QALY gained by SR-TR compared with SR. Second, we considered the probability of being cost-effective and the probability of being more effective and less expensive. Results TR appears to be the cost-effective in the base case and in all of the considered scenarios, but is no longer more effective and less expensive if transportation costs are excluded. Comparing SR-TR with SR, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) adopting the Ita-NHS perspective for the base case was −€117/ROM gained. The cost-effectiveness probability for SR-TR was 0.98 (ceiling ratio: €50/ROM), while the joint probability of being more effective and less expensive was 0.87. Assuming that TR would increase health-related quality of life (HRQOL) utilities by 2.5%, the ICER adopting Ita-NHS perspective is −€960/QALY (cost-effectiveness probability: 1; ceiling ratio: €30 000/QALY). All the performed sensitivity analyses did not change the conclusions, but if transportation costs were excluded, the probability for SR-TR of being more clinically effective and less expensive reduced to 0.56. Conclusions The analysis suggested SR-TR to be cost-effective, even less expensive and more effective if the PCUs provide ambulance transportations. However, the uncertainty related to TR costs, HRQOL and long

  13. 0.2-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging of internal lesions of the knee joint: a prospective arthroscopically controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Riel, K A; Reinisch, M; Kersting-Sommerhoff, B; Hof, N; Merl, T

    1999-01-01

    The results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compared with those of arthroscopy in a prospective series of 244 patients. A dedicated system for MRI of limbs and peripheral joints--the 0.2-T Artoscan (Esaote, Italy)--was used for imaging knee joint lesions. T1-weighted spin-echo sagittal images, T2-weighted gradient-echo coronal images, and axial views for lesions of the femoropatellar joint were acquired. Paraxial sagittal and oblique coronal views were obtained for imaging of the cruciate ligaments. This protocol allowed excellent visualization of the cruciate ligaments and medial and lateral meniscus in almost all patients. Compared with arthroscopy performed within 48 h after imaging, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were respectively 93%, 97%, and 95% for tears of the medial meniscus; 82%, 96%, and 93% for tears of the lateral meniscus; 100%, 100%, and 100% for tears of the posterior cruciate ligament; 98%, 98%, and 97% for tears of the anterior cruciate ligament; and 72%, 100%, and 92% for full-thickness articular cartilage lesions. The examination can be performed within 30-45 min at lower cost than diagnostic arthroscopy. MRI with a 0.2-T magnet is a safe and valuable adjunct to the clinical examination of the knee and an aid to efficient preoperative planning.

  14. The Change in Knee Angle during the Gait by Applying Elastic Tape to the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to verify how the application of elastic tape to the anterior surface of the thigh changes the knee angle pattern during gait. [Subjects] The subjects were 10 people who showed an abnormal knee angle change pattern during usual walking. They did not show the so-called double knee action. [Methods] Subjects were asked to walk as usual, and then to walk with elastic tape attached to the anterior surface of the thigh. The knee angle was measured during gait with an electronic goniometer. We graphed the temporal changes of the knee angle and compared them with the normal gait pattern. [Results] The knee angle gait pattern of six of the 10 subjects improved after application of the tape and became like a normal gait pattern. The changes in the knee angle resulted from a stimulus via the skin, rather than voluntary muscular adjustment, suggesting that the changes may have originated due to differences in reflexive tensile strength. [Conclusion] In normal speed gait, it is suggested that the knee angle was altered such that it exhibited a normal pattern by applying elastic tape to the anterior surface of the thigh. We suspect that application of the elastic tape may change the muscle tonus. PMID:25140100

  15. CONTRAST-ENHANCED MRI OF SUBCHONDRAL CYSTS IN PATIENTS WITH OR AT RISK FOR KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: THE MOST STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Crema, M.D.; Roemer, F.W.; Marra, M.D.; Niu, J.; Lynch, J.A.; Felson, D.T.; Guermazi, A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was 1) to evaluate contrast enhancement patterns of subchondral cysts on magnetic resonance imaging and 2) to discuss possible radiological explanations of cyst enhancement based on existing theories of subchondral cyst formation in osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods The Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) Study is a NIH-funded longitudinal observational study for individuals who have or are at high risk for knee osteoarthritis. All subjects with available non-enhanced and contrast enhanced MRI were included. The tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints were divided in 14 subregions. The presence and size of subchondral cysts and bone marrow edema-like lesions (BMLs) were scored semiquantitatively in each subregion on non-contrast enhanced MRI from 0 to 3. Enhancement of subchondral cysts was evaluated on contrast enhanced MRI as grade 0 (absent), grade 1 (partial enhancement), or grade 2 (full enhancement). The adjacent articular cartilage was scored in each subregion on non-enhanced MRI as grade 0 (intact), grade 1 (partial thickness loss), or grade 2 (full thickness loss). Results Four hundred knees were included (1 knee per person, 5600 subregions). Subchondral cysts were detected in 260 subregions (4.6%). After intravenous contrast administration, 245 cysts (94.2%) showed full enhancement, 12 (4.6%) showed partial enhancement and 3 (1.2%) showed no enhancement. Enhancing BMLs were found in 237 (91.2%) subregions containing cysts, which were located adjacent or in the middle of BMLs. In 121 subregions (46.5%) having cysts, no adjacent full thickness cartilage loss was detected. Conclusion Most subchondral cysts demonstrated full or partial contrast enhancement, and were located adjacent or in the midst of enhancing BMLs. As pure cystic lesions are not expected to enhance on MRI, the term “subchondral cyst-like bone marrow lesion” might be appropriate to describe these lesions. PMID:19767165

  16. Advantages of Pure Platelet-Rich Plasma Compared with Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Plasma in Treating Rabbit Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wen-Jing; Xu, Hai-Tao; Sheng, Jia-Gen; An, Zhi-Quan; Guo, Shang-Chun; Xie, Xue-Tao; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Concentrated leukocytes in leukocyte- and platelet-rich plasma (L-PRP) may deliver increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines to activate the NF-κB signaling pathway, to counter the beneficial effects of growth factors on osteoarthritic cartilage. However, to date no relevant studies have substantiated that in vivo. MATERIAL AND METHODS Autologous L-PRP and pure platelet-rich plasma (P-PRP) were prepared, measured for componential composition, and injected intra-articularly after 4, 5, and 6 weeks post-anterior cruciate ligament transection. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) was injected intraperitoneally to inhibit NF-κB activation. All rabbits were sacrificed after 8 weeks postoperative. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to determine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations in the synovial fluid, Indian ink staining was performed for gross morphological assessment, and hematoxylin and eosin staining and toluidine blue staining were performed for histological assessment. RESULTS Compared with L-PRP, P-PRP injections achieved better outcomes regarding the prevention of cartilage destruction, preservation of cartilaginous matrix, and reduction of IL-1β and PGE2 concentrations. CAPE injections reversed the increased IL-1β and PGE2 concentrations in the synovial fluid after L-PRP injections and improved the outcome of L-PRP injections to a level similar to P-PRP injections, while they had no influence on the therapeutic efficacy of P-PRP injections. CONCLUSIONS Concentrated leukocytes in L-PRP may release increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines to activate the NF-κB signaling pathway, to counter the beneficial effects of growth factors on osteoarthritic cartilage, and finally, result in a inferior efficacy of L-PRP to P-PRP for the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:27086145

  17. Advantages of Pure Platelet-Rich Plasma Compared with Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Plasma in Treating Rabbit Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wen-Jing; Xu, Hai-Tao; Sheng, Jia-Gen; An, Zhi-Quan; Guo, Shang-Chun; Xie, Xue-Tao; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background Concentrated leukocytes in leukocyte- and platelet-rich plasma (L-PRP) may deliver increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines to activate the NF-κB signaling pathway, to counter the beneficial effects of growth factors on osteoarthritic cartilage. However, to date no relevant studies have substantiated that in vivo. Material/Methods Autologous L-PRP and pure platelet-rich plasma (P-PRP) were prepared, measured for componential composition, and injected intra-articularly after 4, 5, and 6 weeks post-anterior cruciate ligament transection. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) was injected intraperitoneally to inhibit NF-κB activation. All rabbits were sacrificed after 8 weeks postoperative. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to determine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations in the synovial fluid, Indian ink staining was performed for gross morphological assessment, and hematoxylin and eosin staining and toluidine blue staining were performed for histological assessment. Results Compared with L-PRP, P-PRP injections achieved better outcomes regarding the prevention of cartilage destruction, preservation of cartilaginous matrix, and reduction of IL-1β and PGE2 concentrations. CAPE injections reversed the increased IL-1β and PGE2 concentrations in the synovial fluid after L-PRP injections and improved the outcome of L-PRP injections to a level similar to P-PRP injections, while they had no influence on the therapeutic efficacy of P-PRP injections. Conclusions Concentrated leukocytes in L-PRP may release increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines to activate the NF-κB signaling pathway, to counter the beneficial effects of growth factors on osteoarthritic cartilage, and finally, result in a inferior efficacy of L-PRP to P-PRP for the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:27086145

  18. Effect of proprioceptive training on foot posture, lower limb alignment, and knee adduction moment in patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yumi; Kim, Minkyu; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of proprioceptive training on foot progression angle, weight-bearing ratio, and knee adduction moment in patients with degenerative osteoarthritis of the knee. [Subjects] The subjects were 37 patients diagnosed with Kellgren-Lawrence grade 2 or 3 degenerative knee osteoarthritis. They were randomly allocated to three groups: a proprioceptive training group (PT group), quadriceps strengthening group (QS group), and control group. [Methods] The study parameters of the three groups were compared before and after a 12-week training period. Therapeutic exercises were performed twice per week for 12 weeks. Outcomes included the foot progression angle, weight-bearing ratio, and knee adduction moment. [Results] First, a significant difference in the foot progression angle was observed among the groups, significantly increasing in the PTG compared with the CG. Second, a significant difference in the weight-bearing ratio was observed among the groups, significantly increasing in the PTG compared with the CG. Third, a significant difference in the first peak knee adduction moment was observed among the groups, significantly decreasing in the PTG compared with the CG. [Conclusion] The results of the present study indicate that proprioceptive training increased the foot progression angle and weight-bearing ratio and decreased the first peak knee adduction moment. Moreover, incorporating proprioceptive training into a physical therapy exercise program could improve functional ability and delay the progression of degenerative osteoarthritis. PMID:25729170

  19. Effect of proprioceptive training on foot posture, lower limb alignment, and knee adduction moment in patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yumi; Kim, Minkyu; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of proprioceptive training on foot progression angle, weight-bearing ratio, and knee adduction moment in patients with degenerative osteoarthritis of the knee. [Subjects] The subjects were 37 patients diagnosed with Kellgren-Lawrence grade 2 or 3 degenerative knee osteoarthritis. They were randomly allocated to three groups: a proprioceptive training group (PT group), quadriceps strengthening group (QS group), and control group. [Methods] The study parameters of the three groups were compared before and after a 12-week training period. Therapeutic exercises were performed twice per week for 12 weeks. Outcomes included the foot progression angle, weight-bearing ratio, and knee adduction moment. [Results] First, a significant difference in the foot progression angle was observed among the groups, significantly increasing in the PTG compared with the CG. Second, a significant difference in the weight-bearing ratio was observed among the groups, significantly increasing in the PTG compared with the CG. Third, a significant difference in the first peak knee adduction moment was observed among the groups, significantly decreasing in the PTG compared with the CG. [Conclusion] The results of the present study indicate that proprioceptive training increased the foot progression angle and weight-bearing ratio and decreased the first peak knee adduction moment. Moreover, incorporating proprioceptive training into a physical therapy exercise program could improve functional ability and delay the progression of degenerative osteoarthritis.

  20. Deconditioned Knee: The Effectiveness of a Rehabilitation Program that Restores Normal Knee Motion to Improve Symptoms and Function

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Angela; Gray, Tinker

    2007-01-01

    Background Knee pain can cause a deconditioned knee. Deconditioned is defined as causing one to lose physical fitness. Therefore, a deconditioned knee is defined as a painful syndrome caused by anatomical or functional abnormalities that result in a knee flexion contracture (functional loss of knee extension), decreased strength, and decreased function. To date, no published studies exist examining treatment for a deconditioned knee. Objective To determine the effectiveness of a rehabilitation program focused on increasing range of motion for patients with a deconditioned knee. Methods Fifty patients (mean age 53.2 years) enrolled in the study. Objective evaluation included radiographs, knee range of motion, and isokinetic strength testing. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective questionnaire was used to measure symptoms and function. Patients were given a rehabilitation program to increase knee extension (including hyperextension) and flexion equal to the normal knee, after which patients were instructed in leg strengthening exercises. Results Knee extension significantly improved from a mean deficit of 10° to 3° and knee flexion significantly improved from a mean deficit of 19° to 9°. The IKDC survey scores significantly improved from a mean of 34.5 points to 70.5 points 1 year after beginning treatment. The IKDC subjective pain frequency and severity scores were significantly improved. Conclusions A rehabilitation program that improves knee range of motion can relieve pain and improve function for patients with a deconditioned knee. PMID:21522205

  1. Effects of Specialized Footwear on Joint Loads in Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Najia; Lidtke, Roy H.; Sengupta, Mondira; Fogg, Louis F.; Block, Joel A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Elevated dynamic joint loads have been associated with the severity and progression of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. This study compared the effects of a specialized shoe (the mobility shoe) designed to lower dynamic loads at the knee with self-chosen conventional walking shoes and with a commercially available walking shoe as a control. Methods Subjects with knee OA were evaluated in 2 groups. Group A (n = 28) underwent gait analyses with both their self-chosen walking shoes and the mobility shoes. Group B (n = 20) underwent gait analyses with a control shoe and the mobility shoe. Frontal plane knee loads were compared between the different footwear conditions. Results Group A demonstrated an 8% reduction in the peak external knee adduction moment with the mobility shoe compared with self-chosen walking shoes (mean ± SD 49 ± 0.80 versus 2.71 ± 0.84 %BW × H; P < 0.05). Group B demonstrated a 12% reduction in the peak external knee adduction moment with the mobility shoe compared with the control shoe (mean ± SD 2.66 ± 0.69 versus 3.07 ± 0.75 %BW × H; P < 0.05). Conclusion Specialized footwear can effectively reduce joint loads in subjects with knee OA, compared with self-chosen shoes and control walking shoes. Footwear may represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of knee OA. The types of shoes worn by subjects with knee OA should be evaluated more closely in terms of their effects on the disease. PMID:18759313

  2. Single- vs. double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a new aspect of knee assessment during activities involving dynamic knee rotation.

    PubMed

    Czamara, Andrzej; Królikowska, Aleksandra; Szuba, Łukasz; Widuchowski, Wojciech; Kentel, Maciej

    2015-02-01

    Few studies have compared single-bundle (SB) and double-bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in the knee joint during activities involving change-of-direction maneuvers and knee rotation. This study examined whether the type of ACLR contributes to postphysiotherapy outcomes, with an emphasis on knee function assessment during activities involving dynamic knee rotation. Fifteen male patients after SB ACLR and 15 male patients after DB ACLR took part in the same physiotherapy program. Twenty-four weeks after ACLR, both groups underwent anterior laxity measurement, pivot shift tests, range of movement and joint circumference measurements, subjective assessment of pain and stability levels in the knee joint, peak torque measurement of the muscles rotating the tibia toward the femur, and a run test with maximal speed and change-of-direction maneuvers. Comparative analysis did not show any differences between the results of anterior tibial translation, pivot shift test, range of movement and joint circumference, and subjective assessment of pain and knee joint stability levels. No differences were noted between the groups in peak torque values obtained from the muscles responsible for internal and external tibial rotation or results of the run test. The data obtained from this study can be used by research teams to monitor and compare the effectiveness of various study protocols involving surgical and physiotherapy treatment. The data are especially useful when combined with the clinical assessment of patients who would like to return to sport.

  3. Single- vs. double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a new aspect of knee assessment during activities involving dynamic knee rotation.

    PubMed

    Czamara, Andrzej; Królikowska, Aleksandra; Szuba, Łukasz; Widuchowski, Wojciech; Kentel, Maciej

    2015-02-01

    Few studies have compared single-bundle (SB) and double-bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in the knee joint during activities involving change-of-direction maneuvers and knee rotation. This study examined whether the type of ACLR contributes to postphysiotherapy outcomes, with an emphasis on knee function assessment during activities involving dynamic knee rotation. Fifteen male patients after SB ACLR and 15 male patients after DB ACLR took part in the same physiotherapy program. Twenty-four weeks after ACLR, both groups underwent anterior laxity measurement, pivot shift tests, range of movement and joint circumference measurements, subjective assessment of pain and stability levels in the knee joint, peak torque measurement of the muscles rotating the tibia toward the femur, and a run test with maximal speed and change-of-direction maneuvers. Comparative analysis did not show any differences between the results of anterior tibial translation, pivot shift test, range of movement and joint circumference, and subjective assessment of pain and knee joint stability levels. No differences were noted between the groups in peak torque values obtained from the muscles responsible for internal and external tibial rotation or results of the run test. The data obtained from this study can be used by research teams to monitor and compare the effectiveness of various study protocols involving surgical and physiotherapy treatment. The data are especially useful when combined with the clinical assessment of patients who would like to return to sport. PMID:25148470

  4. Comparison of conventional resistance training and the fly-wheel ergometer for training the quadriceps muscle group in patients with unilateral knee injury.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Jim; Morrissey, Matthew C; Rutherford, Olga M; Narici, Marco V

    2007-12-01

    A fly-wheel ergometer (FWE) offering resistance training of the knee extensors has been designed for space travel and found to be effective during bed rest. The possibility exists that this device is also effective in training the knee extensors after knee injury. The purpose of this study was to compare the FWE to standard knee extensor training equipment for their effects on individuals with a history of knee injury, a group who commonly suffer from weakness of the knee extensors that effects their function. Twenty-nine subjects completed the study, which included tests of knee self-assessment, knee extensor static and dynamic muscle strength, size and neural activation as well as single leg power output, standing balance and vertical jump performance. Both groups showed statistically significant (P < 0.05) improvements in these variables over the 3-month training period but no differences were noted between the groups. The FWE appears to be as effective as standard resistance training equipment for improving knee extensor muscle group size and performance after knee injury.

  5. Registration of knee joint surfaces for the in vivo study of joint injuries based on magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Rita W. T.; Habib, Ayman F.; Frayne, Richard; Ronsky, Janet L.

    2006-03-01

    In-vivo quantitative assessments of joint conditions and health status can help to increase understanding of the pathology of osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease that affects a large population each year. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a non-invasive and accurate means to assess and monitor joint properties, and has become widely used for diagnosis and biomechanics studies. Quantitative analyses and comparisons of MR datasets require accurate alignment of anatomical structures, thus image registration becomes a necessary procedure for these applications. This research focuses on developing a registration technique for MR knee joint surfaces to allow quantitative study of joint injuries and health status. It introduces a novel idea of translating techniques originally developed for geographic data in the field of photogrammetry and remote sensing to register 3D MR data. The proposed algorithm works with surfaces that are represented by randomly distributed points with no requirement of known correspondences. The algorithm performs matching locally by identifying corresponding surface elements, and solves for the transformation parameters relating the surfaces by minimizing normal distances between them. This technique was used in three applications to: 1) register temporal MR data to verify the feasibility of the algorithm to help monitor diseases, 2) quantify patellar movement with respect to the femur based on the transformation parameters, and 3) quantify changes in contact area locations between the patellar and femoral cartilage at different knee flexion angles. The results indicate accurate registration and the proposed algorithm can be applied for in-vivo study of joint injuries with MRI.

  6. Stiff-knee gait in cerebral palsy: how do patients adapt to uneven ground?

    PubMed

    Böhm, Harald; Hösl, Matthias; Schwameder, Hermann; Döderlein, Leonhard

    2014-04-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to reduced toe clearance mostly caused by a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). The aim of this study was to investigate adaptive mechanism to an uneven surface in stiff-knee walkers with cerebral palsy. Sixteen patients with bilateral cerebral palsy, GMFCS I-II and stiff-knee gait, mean age 14.1 (SD=6.2) years, were compared to 13 healthy controls with mean age 13.5 (SD=4.8) years. Gait analysis including EMG was performed under even and uneven surface conditions. Similar strategies to improve leg clearance were found in patients as well as in controls. Both adapted with significantly reduced speed and cadence, increased outward foot rotation, knee and hip flexion as well as anterior pelvic tilt. Therefore cerebral palsy and stiff-knee gait did not affect the adaptation capacity on the uneven surface. On the uneven surface an average increase in knee flexion of 7° (SD=3°) and 12° (SD=5°) was observed in controls and patients with cerebral palsy, respectively. Although rectus femoris activity was increased in patients with cerebral palsy, they were able to increase their knee flexion during swing. The results of this study suggest that walking on uneven surface has the potential to improve knee flexion in stiff-knee walkers. Therefore training on uneven surface could be used as a conservative treatment regime alone, in combination with Botulinum neurotoxin or in the rehabilitation of surgery.

  7. Role of flexors in knee stability.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Y; Jiang, C C; Jan, M H; Lai, J S

    1995-05-01

    The muscle strength of knee extensors is commonly used as an indicator of a patient's functional recovery following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The knee flexors are dynamic stabilizers that prevent tibial anterior displacement and may reinforce the function of the ACL. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of knee flexor performance assessed by isokinetic dynamometer and clinical evaluations including KT-1000 stability tests, shuttle run tests, thigh and calf circumference and range of motion of the knee joint. Ten patients who received ACL reconstruction over a 3- to 5-year period were included in this study, as were 15 normal controls who were tested for comparison. There was no significant difference in the time taken for the shuttle run test between normal controls and patients who underwent ACL, but there was a positive correlation between the shuttle run test and laxity of the knee joint. The knee laxity of ACL patients was significantly greater than that of the normal controls under passive anterior force. However, no significant difference was seen in the stability test under active contraction of the knee extensors. In addition, a positive correlation was seen between the KT-1000 knee ligament arthrometry test results and both torque acceleration energy and the average power of the flexors. These results suggest that physical therapy for patients following ACL reconstruction should emphasize the explosiveness of knee flexors to help strengthen the dynamic stability of the knee joint and motor performance.

  8. Surgical and Functional Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Total Knee Replacement With Patient-Specific Implants Compared With “Off-the-Shelf” Implants

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Brodsky, Merrick; Garcia, Giancarlo A.; Gomoll, Andreas H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) instrumentation and implant designs have been evolving, with one of the current innovations being patient-specific implants (PSIs). Purpose To evaluate whether there is a significant difference in surgical time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative range of motion, and length of stay between PSI and conventional TKA. Study Design Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods A consecutive series of 621 TKA patients, 307 with PSIs and 314 with conventional implants, was reviewed. Differences in estimated blood loss, length of stay, range of motion, and surgical time/tourniquet time between the 2 cohorts were analyzed. Results Linear regression analysis demonstrated that PSI decreased estimated blood loss by 44.72 mL (P < .01), decreased length of stay by 0.39 days (P < .01), decreased postoperative range of motion by 3.90° (P < .01), and had a negligible difference on surgical and tourniquet time. Conclusion The use of PSI is associated with decreased estimated blood loss, decreased length of stay, decreased range of motion, and no discernible difference in surgical or tourniquet time, all of which are unlikely to be clinically significant. PMID:26673037

  9. Krill Oil Improves Mild Knee Joint Pain: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Minoru; Sakuraba, Keishoku; Sawaki, Keisuke; Sekigawa, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Krill oil is an edible oil extracted from krill, a small red-colored crustacean found in the Antarctic Ocean. The administration of krill oil is reported to mitigate inflammation in patients with cardiac disease, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoarthritis. However, the effect of krill oil on mild knee pain has not yet been determined. Objective To assess the effect of krill oil on mild knee pain. Design A randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial of fifty adults (38–85 years old) with mild knee pain attending the Fukushima Orthopedic Clinic (Tochigi, Japan) between September 2014 and March 2015. Interventions Participants were randomized to receive 2 g per day of either krill oil or an identical placebo for 30 days. Outcomes The primary outcome was improvement in subjective symptoms of knee pain as assessed by the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM) and Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (JOA). Secondary outcomes included blood and urine biochemical parameters. Results Both the placebo and krill oil groups showed significant improvements in the questions in the JKOM and JOA questionnaires after administration. After the intervention, krill oil group showed more improvements than placebo group in two questions regarding the pain and stiffness in knees in JKOM. Controlling for age, sex, weight, and smoking and drinking habits, krill oil significantly mitigated knee pain in sleeping (P < 0.001), standing (P < 0.001) and the range of motion of both right and left knees (both P = 0.011) compared to placebo. Krill oil administration raised plasma EPA (P = 0.048) and EPA/AA ratio (P = 0.003). Conclusion This study indicates that krill oil administration (2 g/day, 30 days) improved the subjective symptoms of knee pain in adults with mild knee pain. Trial registration UMIN-CTR; ID UMIN000014413 PMID:27701428

  10. Sports Activity after Low-contact-stress Total Knee Arthroplasty - A long term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Vielgut, Ines; Leitner, Lukas; Kastner, Norbert; Radl, Roman; Leithner, Andreas; Sadoghi, Patrick

    2016-04-19

    The purpose of this study was to provide comprehensive long-term data about sports activity levels in patients following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and to determine the impact of pre-operative function, pain and specific performed sports on the results. 236 patients who have undergone TKA for severe osteoarthritis of the knee were asked to provide specific information regarding exercised types of sports before surgery and after at least 10 years following TKA. Pre- and postoperative function and pain were evaluated by the use of Tegner-, WOMAC- and VAS Score. After a mean of 14.9 years, a significant improvement regarding pain and function was observed. Pre-operative Tegner- and WOMAC scores revealed significant positive correlations with the post-operative Tegner-Score. Accordingly, a high percentage of patients (70.9%) stayed actively involved in sports. Nevertheless, the number of performing patients has decreased according to the sports impact. 71.3% continued practising low-impact-, 43.7% intermediate-impact sports whereas only 16.4% kept performing high impact sports. We conclude that TKA is highly effective in long-time pain reduction as well as improvement of function. Additionally, we found considerable sports activities preserved in the investigated series. However, sports activities in particular, seem to decrease according to the impact of sports.

  11. The influence of immediate physiotherapy in the out-patient management of acute knee injuries: a controlled study.

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, M A; Venner, R M; Ford, I; Todd, B D

    1990-01-01

    All patients who presented to our Accident & Emergency Department over a 6-month period with an acute knee injury were randomly assigned to receive either immediate physiotherapy or not prior to further follow up at an out-patient clinic. Patients with trivial injuries not requiring follow up and patients with severe injuries requiring immediate admission were excluded from the study. Patients not immediately referred for physiotherapy could be referred if this was thought necessary at later follow up. There was no statistical difference in the number of outpatient follow up appointments or the length of time to discharge from the clinic between the groups. Those patients referred for physiotherapy immediately had a significantly greater number of total attendances at the physiotherapy department. However more patients in the 'no physiotherapy' group ultimately required arthroscopy for suspected meniscal injury. We conclude that a blanket referral of all acute knee injury patients is unjustified and wasteful of resources. However physiotherapy may be indicated in patients initially suspected of having meniscal injury. PMID:2099163

  12. Dynamic impact force and association with structural damage to the knee joint: an ex-vivo study.

    PubMed

    Brill, Richard; Wohlgemuth, Walther A; Hempfling, Harald; Bohndorf, Klaus; Becker, Ursula; Welsch, Ulrich; Kamp, Alexander; Roemer, Frank W

    2014-12-01

    No systematic, histologically confirmed data are available concerning the association between magnitude of direct dynamic impact caused by vertical impact trauma and the resulting injury to cartilage and subchondral bone. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between dynamic impact and the resulting patterns of osteochondral injury in an ex-vivo model. A mechanical apparatus was employed to perform ex-vivo controlled dynamic vertical impact experiments in 110 pig knees with the femur positioned in a holding fixture. A falling body with a thrust plate and photo sensor was applied. The direct impact to the trochlear articular surface was registered and the resulting osteochondral injuries macroscopically and histologically correlated and categorized. The relationship between magnitude of direct impact and injury severity could be classified as stage I injuries (impact <7.3MPa): elastic deformation, no histological injury; stage II injuries (impact 7.3-9.6MPa): viscoelastic imprint of the cartilaginous surface, subchondral microfractures; stage III injuries (impact 9.6-12.7MPa): disrupted cartilage surface, chondral fissures and subchondral microfractures; stage IV injuries (impact >12.7MPa): osteochondral impression, histologically imprint and osteochondral macrofractures. The impact ranges and histologic injury stages determined from this vertical dynamic impact experiment allowed for a biomechanical classification of direct, acute osteochondral injury. In contrast to static load commonly applied in ex-vivo experiments, dynamic impact more realistically represents actual trauma to the knee joint.

  13. Sports Activity after Low-contact-stress Total Knee Arthroplasty – A long term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Vielgut, Ines; Leitner, Lukas; Kastner, Norbert; Radl, Roman; Leithner, Andreas; Sadoghi, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide comprehensive long-term data about sports activity levels in patients following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and to determine the impact of pre-operative function, pain and specific performed sports on the results. 236 patients who have undergone TKA for severe osteoarthritis of the knee were asked to provide specific information regarding exercised types of sports before surgery and after at least 10 years following TKA. Pre- and postoperative function and pain were evaluated by the use of Tegner-, WOMAC- and VAS Score. After a mean of 14.9 years, a significant improvement regarding pain and function was observed. Pre-operative Tegner- and WOMAC scores revealed significant positive correlations with the post-operative Tegner-Score. Accordingly, a high percentage of patients (70.9%) stayed actively involved in sports. Nevertheless, the number of performing patients has decreased according to the sports impact. 71.3% continued practising low-impact-, 43.7% intermediate-impact sports whereas only 16.4% kept performing high impact sports. We conclude that TKA is highly effective in long-time pain reduction as well as improvement of function. Additionally, we found considerable sports activities preserved in the investigated series. However, sports activities in particular, seem to decrease according to the impact of sports. PMID:27090945

  14. Parametric modelling of a knee joint prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Khoo, L P; Goh, J C; Chow, S L

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the establishment of a parametric model of knee joint prosthesis. Four different sizes of a commercial prosthesis are used as an example in the study. A reverse engineering technique was employed to reconstruct the prosthesis on CATIA, a CAD (computer aided design) system. Parametric models were established as a result of the analysis. Using the parametric model established and the knee data obtained from a clinical study on 21 pairs of cadaveric Asian knees, the development of a prototype prosthesis that suits a patient with a very small knee joint is presented. However, it was found that modification to certain parameters may be inevitable due to the uniqueness of the Asian knee. An avenue for rapid modelling and eventually economical production of a customized knee joint prosthesis for patients is proposed and discussed.

  15. Knee model sensitivity to cruciate ligaments parameters: a stability simulation study for a living subject.

    PubMed

    Bertozzi, Luigi; Stagni, Rita; Fantozzi, Silvia; Cappello, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    If the biomechanic function of the different anatomical sub-structures of the knee joint was needed in physiological conditions, the only possible way is a modelling approach. Subject-specific geometries and kinematic data, acquired from the same living subject, were the foundations of the 3D quasi-static knee model developed. Each cruciate ligament was modelled by means of 25 elastic springs, paying attention to the anatomical twisting of the fibres. The sensitivity of the model to the cross-sectional area was performed during the anterior/posterior tibial translations, the sensitivity to all the cruciate ligaments parameters was performed during the internal/external rotations. The model reproduced very well the mechanical behaviour reported in literature during anterior/posterior translations, in particular considering 30% of the mean insertional area. During the internal/external tibial rotations, similar behaviour of the axial torques was obtained in the three sensitivity analyses. The overlapping of the ligaments was assessed at about 25 degrees of internal axial rotation. The presented model featured a good level of accuracy in combination with a low computational weight, and it could provide an in vivo estimation of the role of the cruciate ligaments during the execution of daily living activities.

  16. Mathematical study on the guidance of the tibiofemoral joint as theoretical background for total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Christoph; Gezzi, Riccardo; Frosch, Karl-Heinz; Wachowski, Martin Michael; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar; Dörner, Jochen; Fanghänel, Jochen; Nägerl, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The mathematical approach presented allows main features of kinematics and force transfer in the loaded natural tibiofemoral joint (TFJ) or in loaded knee endoprostheses with asymmetric condyles to be deduced from the spatial curvature morphology of the articulating surfaces. The mathematical considerations provide the theoretical background for the development of total knee replacements (TKR) which closely reproduce biomechanical features of the natural TFJ. The model demonstrates that in flexion/extension such kinematic features as centrodes or slip ratios can be implemented in distinct curvature designs of the contact trajectories in such a way that they conform to the kinematics of the natural TFJ in close approximation. Especially the natural roll back in the stance phase during gait can be reproduced. Any external compressive force system, applied to the TFJ or the TKR, produces two joint reaction forces which--when applying screw theory--represent a force wrench. It consists of a force featuring a distinct spatial location of its line and a torque parallel to it. The dependence of the geometrical configuration of the force wrench on flexion angle, lateral/medial distribution of the joint forces, and design of the slopes of the tuberculum intercondylare is calculated. The mathematical considerations give strong hints about TKR design and show how main biomechanical features of the natural TFJ can be reproduced.

  17. Effects of radial tears and partial meniscectomy of lateral meniscus on the knee joint mechanics during the stance phase of the gait cycle--A 3D finite element study.

    PubMed

    Mononen, Mika E; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Korhonen, Rami K

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate influences of radial tears and partial meniscectomy of lateral meniscus on the knee joint mechanics during normal walking by using computational modeling. A 3D geometry of a knee joint of a healthy patient was obtained from our previous study, whereas the data of normal walking were taken from the literature. Cartilage tissue was modeled as a fibril reinforced poroviscoelastic material, whereas meniscal tissue was modeled as a transverse isotropic elastic material. The realistic gait cycle data were implemented into the computational model and the effects of radial tears and partial meniscectemy of lateral meniscus on the knee joint mechanics were simulated. Middle, posterior, and anterior radial tears in lateral meniscus increased stresses by 300%, 430%, and 1530%, respectively, at the ends of tears compared to corresponding areas in the model with intact lateral meniscus. Meniscus tears did not alter stresses and strains at the tibial cartilage surface, whereas partial meniscectomy increased contact pressures, stresses, strains and pore pressures in the tibial cartilage by 50%, 44%, 21%, and 43%, respectively. Increased stresses and strains were observed primarily during the first ∼50% of the stance phase of the gait cycle. The present study suggests that anterior radial tear causes the highest risk for the development of total meniscal rupture, whereas partial meniscectomy increases the risk for the development of OA in lateral tibial cartilage. Highest risks for meniscus and cartilage failures are suggested to occur during the loading response and mid-stance of the gait cycle. In the future, the present modeling may be further developed to offer a clinical tool for aid in decision making of clinical interventions for patients with knee joint injuries.

  18. Application of Infrared Thermography as a Diagnostic Tool of Knee Osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfaoui, Ahlem; Bouzid, Mohamed Amine; Pron, Hervé; Taiar, Redha; Polidori, Guillaume

    This paper aimed to study the feasibility of application of infrared thermography to detect osteoarthritis of the knee and to compare the distribution of skin temperature between participants with osteoarthritis and those without pathology. All tests were conducted at LACM (Laboratory of Mechanical Stresses Analysis) and the gymnasium of the University of Reims Champagne Ardennes. IR thermography was performed using an IR camera. Ten participants with knee osteoarthritis and 12 reference healthy participants without OA participated in this study. Questionnaires were also used. The participants with osteoarthritis of the knee were selected on clinical examination and a series of radiographs. The level of pain was recorded by using a simple verbal scale (0-4). Infrared thermography reveals relevant disease by highlighting asymmetrical behavior in thermal color maps of both knees. Moreover, a linear evolution of skin temperature in the knee area versus time has been found whatever the participant group is in the first stage following a given effort. Results clearly show that the temperature can be regarded as a key parameter for evaluating pain. Thermal images of the knee were taken with an infrared camera. The study shows that with the advantage of being noninvasive and easily repeatable, IRT appears to be a useful tool to detect quantifiable patterns of surface temperatures and predict the singular thermal behavior of this pathology. It also seems that this non-intrusive technique enables to detect the early clinical manifestations of knee OA.

  19. Obesity is not associated with increased knee joint torque and power during level walking.

    PubMed

    DeVita, Paul; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2003-09-01

    While it is widely speculated that obesity causes increased loads on the knee leading to joint degeneration, this concept is untested. The purpose of the study was to identify the effects of obesity on lower extremity joint kinetics and energetics during walking. Twenty-one obese adults were tested at self-selected (1.29m/s) and standard speeds (1.50m/s) and 18 lean adults were tested at the standard speed. Motion analysis and force platform data were combined to calculate joint torques and powers during the stance phase of walking. Obese participants were more erect with 12% less knee flexion and 11% more ankle plantarflexion in self-selected compared to standard speeds (both p<0.02). Obese participants were still more erect than lean adults with approximately 6 degrees more extension at all joints (p<0.05, for each joint) at the standard speed. Knee and ankle torques were 17% and 11% higher (p<0.034 and p<0.041) and negative knee work and positive ankle work were 68% and 11% higher (p<0.000 and p<0.048) in obese participants at the standard speed compared to the slower speed. Joint torques and powers were statistically identical at the hip and knee but were 88% and 61% higher (both p<0.000) at the ankle in obese compared to lean participants at the standard speed. Obese participants used altered gait biomechanics and despite their greater weight, they had less knee torque and power at their self-selected walking speed and equal knee torque and power while walking at the same speed as lean individuals. We propose that the ability to reorganize neuromuscular function during gait may enable some obese individuals to maintain skeletal health of the knee joint and this ability may also be a more accurate risk indicator for knee osteoarthritis than body weight.

  20. The knee-spine syndrome. Association between lumbar lordosis and extension of the knee.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yasuaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamagata, Masatsune; Hanaoka, Eiji; Moriya, Hideshige

    2003-01-01

    Degenerative changes of the knee often cause loss of extension. This may affect aspects of posture such as lumbar lordosis. A total of 366 patients underwent radiological examination of the lumbar spine in a standing position. The knee and body angles were measured by physical examination using a goniometer. Limitation of extension of the knee was significantly greater in patients whose lumbar lordosis was 30 degrees or less. Lumbar lordosis was significantly reduced in patients whose limitation of extension of the knee was more than 5 degrees. It decreased over the age of 70 years, and the limitation of extension of the knee increased over the age of 60 years. Our study indicates that symptoms from the lumbar spine may be caused by degenerative changes in the knee. This may be called the 'knee-spine syndrome'. PMID:12585585

  1. Template-Directed Instrumentation Reduces Cost and Improves Efficiency for Total Knee Arthroplasty: An Economic Decision Analysis and Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    McLawhorn, Alexander S; Carroll, Kaitlin M; Blevins, Jason L; DeNegre, Scott T; Mayman, David J; Jerabek, Seth A

    2015-10-01

    Template-directed instrumentation (TDI) for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may streamline operating room (OR) workflow and reduce costs by preselecting implants and minimizing instrument tray burden. A decision model simulated the economics of TDI. Sensitivity analyses determined thresholds for model variables to ensure TDI success. A clinical pilot was reviewed. The accuracy of preoperative templates was validated, and 20 consecutive primary TKAs were performed using TDI. The model determined that preoperative component size estimation should be accurate to ±1 implant size for 50% of TKAs to implement TDI. The pilot showed that preoperative template accuracy exceeded 97%. There were statistically significant improvements in OR turnover time and in-room time for TDI compared to an historical cohort of TKAs. TDI reduces costs and improves OR efficiency. PMID:26021908

  2. Template-Directed Instrumentation Reduces Cost and Improves Efficiency for Total Knee Arthroplasty: An Economic Decision Analysis and Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    McLawhorn, Alexander S; Carroll, Kaitlin M; Blevins, Jason L; DeNegre, Scott T; Mayman, David J; Jerabek, Seth A

    2015-10-01

    Template-directed instrumentation (TDI) for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may streamline operating room (OR) workflow and reduce costs by preselecting implants and minimizing instrument tray burden. A decision model simulated the economics of TDI. Sensitivity analyses determined thresholds for model variables to ensure TDI success. A clinical pilot was reviewed. The accuracy of preoperative templates was validated, and 20 consecutive primary TKAs were performed using TDI. The model determined that preoperative component size estimation should be accurate to ±1 implant size for 50% of TKAs to implement TDI. The pilot showed that preoperative template accuracy exceeded 97%. There were statistically significant improvements in OR turnover time and in-room time for TDI compared to an historical cohort of TKAs. TDI reduces costs and improves OR efficiency.

  3. How crouch gait can dynamically induce stiff-knee gait.

    PubMed

    van der Krogt, Marjolein M; Bregman, Daan J J; Wisse, Martijn; Doorenbosch, Caroline A M; Harlaar, Jaap; Collins, Steven H

    2010-04-01

    Children with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). Stiff-knee gait is often accompanied by an overly flexed knee during stance (crouch gait). Studies on stiff-knee gait have mostly focused on excessive knee muscle activity during (pre)swing, but the passive dynamics of the limbs may also have an important effect. To examine the effects of a crouched posture on swing knee flexion, we developed a forward-dynamic model of human walking with a passive swing knee, capable of stable cyclic walking for a range of stance knee crouch angles. As crouch angle during stance was increased, the knee naturally flexed much less during swing, resulting in a 'stiff-knee' gait pattern and reduced foot clearance. Reduced swing knee flexion was primarily due to altered gravitational moments around the joints during initial swing. We also considered the effects of increased push-off strength and swing hip flexion torque, which both increased swing knee flexion, but the effect of crouch angle was dominant. These findings demonstrate that decreased knee flexion during swing can occur purely as the dynamical result of crouch, rather than from altered muscle function or pathoneurological control alone.

  4. An Implementation Study of Two Evidence-Based Exercise and Health Education Programmes for Older Adults with Osteoarthritis of the Knee and Hip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, O. R. W.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Tak, E. C. M. P.; Klazinga, N. S.

    2004-01-01

    Implementation studies are recommended to assess the feasibility and effectiveness in real-life of programmes which have been tested in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We report on an implementation study of two evidence-based exercise and health education programmes for older adults with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee or hip. Three types of…

  5. Lifestyle-Related Factors Contributing to Decline in Knee Extension Strength among Elderly Women: A Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Narumi; Kim, Miji; Saito, Kyoko; Yoshida, Hideyo; Yoshida, Yuko; Hirano, Hirohiko; Obuchi, Shuichi; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Takao; Kim, Hunkyung

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional and 4-year longitudinal cohort study aimed to clarify how various lifestyle-related variables affect knee extension strength in elderly Japanese women. The participants were community-dwelling women (n = 575) living in the Itabashi Ward of Tokyo, Japan aged 75–85 years at baseline (in 2008) who returned for a follow-up examination 4 years later (in 2012). Maximum isometric knee extension strength in the dominant leg was measured during comprehensive medical check-ups at baseline and follow-up. Interviews with participants included questions on their history of 11 diseases and lifestyle-related factors such as physical activity as well as dietary, smoking, and drinking habits. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses yielded inconsistent results regarding the associations between lifestyle-related factors and knee extension strength. While going out more frequently and regular physical exercise positively affected baseline knee extension strength, they did not affect knee extension strength in the longitudinal analysis. The longitudinal analysis revealed that more frequent intake of soy products or green and yellow vegetables at baseline decreased age-related knee extension strength decline. The inconsistent results from the cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses indicate that conducting both types of analyses is crucial for researching this type of subject. The present study demonstrates that the age-related decline in muscle strength is lower in those who frequently eat soy products or green and yellow vegetables. Thus, recommending higher intake of soy products, and green and yellow vegetables for the elderly might help maintain their muscle health. PMID:26177292

  6. An innovative care model coordinated by a physical therapist and nurse practitioner for osteoarthritis of the hip and knee in specialist care: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Voorn, Veronique M A; Vermeulen, Henricus M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Huizinga, Tom W J; Leijerzapf, Nicolette A C; Kroon, Herman M; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van der Linden, Henrica M J

    2013-07-01

    The subject of the study is to investigate whether health-related quality of life (HRQoL), pain and function of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) improves after a specialist care intervention coordinated by a physical therapist and a nurse practitioner (NP) and to assess satisfaction with this care at 12 weeks. This observational study included all consecutive patients with hip or knee OA referred to an outpatient orthopaedics clinic. The intervention consisted of a single, standardized visit (assessment and individually tailored management advice, to be executed in primary care) and a telephone follow-up, coordinated by a physical therapist and a NP, in cooperation with an orthopaedic surgeon. Assessments at baseline and 10 weeks thereafter included the short form-36 (SF-36), EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), hip or knee disability and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS or KOOS), the intermittent and constant osteoarthritis pain questionnaire (ICOAP) for hip or knee and a multidimensional satisfaction questionnaire (23 items; 4 point scale). Eighty-seven patients (57 female), mean age 68 years (SD 10.9) were included, with follow-up data available in 63 patients (72 %). Statistically significant improvements were seen regarding the SF-36 physical summary component score, the EQ-5D, the ICOAP scores for hip and knee, the HOOS subscale sports and the KOOS subscales pain, symptoms and activities of daily living. The proportions of patients reporting to be satisfied ranged from 79 to 98 % per item. In patients with hip and knee OA pain, function and HRQoL improved significantly after a single-visit multidisciplinary OA management intervention in specialist care, with high patient satisfaction.

  7. Physics studies in Europe; a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenstrup, S.; Donà dalle Rose, L. F.; Jones, W. G.; Tugulea, L.; van Steenwijk, F. J.

    2002-09-01

    What are the differences and similarities between physics studies at different universities across Europe (here the definition of Europe is broad)? How much does a student have to work to obtain a degree in physics? Questions like those prompted EUPEN (European Physics Education Network) to make a survey. During 1997 and 1998 the working groups of EUPEN sent out a number of questionnaires to a number of institutions and to individual students. In this report we focus on issues relating to the workload to obtain a degree in physics as expressed in contact hours - lectures, problem solving, laboratory work - and private study time. The different teaching/learning styles are also considered. Some of the results have already been presented at conferences.

  8. Duloxetine in OsteoArthritis (DOA) study: study protocol of a pragmatic open-label randomised controlled trial assessing the effect of preoperative pain treatment on postoperative outcome after total hip or knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Blikman, T; Rienstra, W; van Raaij, T M; ten Hagen, A J; Dijkstra, B; Zijlstra, W P; Bulstra, S K; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Stevens, M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Residual pain is a major factor in patient dissatisfaction following total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty (THA/TKA). The proportion of patients with unfavourable long-term residual pain is high, ranging from 7% to 34%. There are studies indicating that a preoperative degree of central sensitisation (CS) is associated with poorer postoperative outcomes and residual pain. It is thus hypothesised that preoperative treatment of CS could enhance postoperative outcomes. Duloxetine has been shown to be effective for several chronic pain syndromes, including knee osteoarthritis (OA), in which CS is most likely one of the underlying pain mechanisms. This study aims to evaluate the postoperative effects of preoperative screening and targeted duloxetine treatment of CS on residual pain compared with care-as-usual. Methods and analysis This multicentre, pragmatic, prospective, open-label, randomised controlled trial includes patients with idiopathic hip/knee OA who are on a waiting list for primary THA/TKA. Patients at risk for CS will be randomly allocated to the preoperative duloxetine treatment programme group or the care-as-usual control group. The primary end point is the degree of postoperative pain 6 months after THA/TKA. Secondary end points at multiple time points up to 12 months postoperatively are: pain, neuropathic pain-like symptoms, (pain) sensitisation, pain catastrophising, joint-associated problems, physical activity, health-related quality of life, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and perceived improvement. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee (METc 2014/087) and will be conducted according to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki (64th, 2013) and the Good Clinical Practice standard (GCP), and in compliance with the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act (WMO). Trial registration number 2013-004313-41; Pre

  9. Total Knee Arthroplasty Designed to Accommodate the Presence or Absence of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Harman, Melinda K.; Bonin, Stephanie J.; Leslie, Chris J.; Banks, Scott A.; Hodge, W. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for selecting the same total knee arthroplasty prosthesis whether the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is retained or resected is rarely documented. This study reports prospective midterm clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes of a fixed-bearing design implanted using two different surgical techniques. The PCL was completely retained in 116 knees and completely resected in 43 knees. For the entire cohort, clinical knee (96 ± 7) and function (92 ± 13) scores and radiographic outcomes were good to excellent for 84% of patients after 5–10 years in vivo. Range of motion averaged 124° ± 9°, with 126 knees exhibiting ≥120° flexion. Small differences in average knee flexion and function scores were noted, with the PCL-resected group exhibiting an average of 5° more flexion but an average function score that was 7 points lower compared to the PCL-retained group. Fluoroscopic analysis of 33 knees revealed stable tibiofemoral translations. This study demonstrates that a TKA articular design with progressive congruency in the lateral compartment can provide for femoral condyle rollback in maximal flexion activities and achieve good clinical and functional performance in patients with PCL-retained and PCL-resected TKA. This TKA design proved suitable for use with either surgical technique, providing surgeons with the choice of maintaining or sacrificing the PCL. PMID:25374697

  10. The fatigue effect of a simulated futsal match protocol on isokinetic knee torque production.

    PubMed

    Dal Pupo, Juliano; Detanico, Daniele; Santos, Saray Giovana Dos

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of a simulated futsal match protocol on isokinetic knee torque production. Twenty-one young futsal players participated in this study and performed a futsal-specific protocol comprising two blocks of 20-minute activities to simulate the match demands. At pre-protocol, half-time, and post-protocol, the concentric and eccentric isokinetic peak torque of the knee flexor and extensor muscles, the angle of peak torque, and the conventional and functional torque ratios were assessed. ANOVA was used to compare the variables (significance level p <  0.05). A decrease of knee flexor and extensor eccentric torque and knee flexor concentric torque was found, in which the pre-protocol levels were higher than those at half-time, with both being larger than those at post-protocol. The knee extensor concentric torque reduced at half-time. The angle of eccentric torque of knee flexors increased, and the conventional and functional torque ratios decreased at post-protocol. In conclusion, the protocol produced a time-dependent reduction of knee flexor and extensor torque in both concentric and eccentric actions. These findings suggested a possible impairment of performance and the emergence of risk factors for hamstring strains during a futsal match.

  11. Influence of meniscus shape in the cross sectional plane on the knee contact mechanics.

    PubMed

    Łuczkiewicz, Piotr; Daszkiewicz, Karol; Witkowski, Wojciech; Chróścielewski, Jacek; Zarzycki, Witold

    2015-06-01

    We present a three dimensional finite element analysis of stress distribution and menisci deformation in the human knee joint. The study is based on the Open Knee model with the geometry of the lateral meniscus which shows some degenerative disorders. The nonlinear analysis of the knee joint under compressive axial load is performed. We present results for intact knee, knee with complete radial posterior meniscus root tear and knee with total meniscectomy of medial or lateral meniscus. We investigate how the meniscus shape in the cross sectional plane influences knee-joint mechanics by comparing the results for flat (degenerated) lateral and normal medial meniscus. Specifically, the deformation of the menisci in the coronal plane and the corresponding stress values in cartilages are studied. By analysing contact resultant force acting on the menisci in axial plane we have shown that restricted extrusion of the torn lateral meniscus can be attributed to small slope of its cross section in the coronal plane. Additionally, the change of the contact area and the resultant force acting on the menisci as the function of compressive load are investigated.

  12. Greater Step Widths Reduce Internal Knee Abduction Moments in Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis Patients During Stair Ascent.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Max R; Klipple, Gary; Zhang, Songning

    2015-08-01

    Increased step widths have been shown to reduce peak internal knee abduction moments in healthy individuals but not in knee osteoarthritis patients during stair descent. This study aimed to assess effects of increased step widths on peak knee abduction moments and associated variables in adults with medial knee osteoarthritis and healthy older adults during stair ascent. Thirteen healthy older adults and 13 medial knee osteoarthritis patients performed stair ascent using preferred, wide, and wider step widths. Three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction forces (GRFs) using an instrumented staircase were collected. Increased step width reduced first and second peak knee abduction moments, and knee abduction moment impulse. In addition, frontal plane GRF at time of first and second peak knee abduction moment and lateral trunk lean at time of first peak knee abduction moment were reduced with increased step width during stair ascent in both groups. Knee abduction moment variables were not different between knee osteoarthritis patients and healthy controls. Our findings suggest that increasing step width may be an effective simple gait alteration to reduce knee abduction moment variables in both knee osteoarthritis and healthy adults during stair ascent. However, long term effects of increasing step width during stair ascent in knee osteoarthritis and healthy adults remain unknown.

  13. Comparison of Two-dimensional Measurement Techniques for Predicting Knee Angle and Moment during a Drop Vertical Jump

    PubMed Central

    Mizner, Ryan L.; Chmielewski, Terese L.; Toepke, John J.; Tofte, Kari B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of two dimensional (2D) video-based techniques and three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis to assess potential knee injury risk factors during jump landing. Design Observational study Setting Research Laboratory Participants Thirty-six female athletes in cutting and pivoting sports. Assessment Athletes performed a drop vertical jump during which movement was recorded with a motion analysis system and a digital video camera positioned in the frontal plane. Main Outcome Measures The 2D variables were the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA), the angle formed between thigh and leg, and the knee:ankle separation ratio, the distance between knee joints divided by the distance between ankles. The 3D variables were knee abduction angle and external abduction moment. All variables were assessed at peak knee flexion. Linear regression assessed the relationship between the 2D and 3D variables. In addition, intraclass correlation coefficients determined rater reliability for the 2D variables and compared the 2D measurements made from digital video to the same measurements from the motion analysis. Results The knee:ankle separation ratio accounted for a higher variance of 3D knee abduction angle (r2 =0.350) and knee abduction moment (r2=0.394) when compared to the FPPA (r2=0.145, 0.254). The digital video measures had favorable rater reliability (ICC:0.89–0.94) and were comparable to the motion analysis system (ICC≥0.92). Conclusion When compared to the FPPA, the knee:ankle separation ratio had better association with previously cited knee injury risk factors in female athletes. The 2D measures have adequate consistency and validity to merit further clinical consideration in jump landing assessments. PMID:22544058

  14. An improved OpenSim gait model with multiple degrees of freedom knee joint and knee ligaments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hang; Bloswick, Donald; Merryweather, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Musculoskeletal models are widely used to investigate joint kinematics and predict muscle force during gait. However, the knee is usually simplified as a one degree of freedom joint and knee ligaments are neglected. The aim of this study was to develop an OpenSim gait model with enhanced knee structures. The knee joint in this study included three rotations and three translations. The three knee rotations and mediolateral translation were independent, with proximodistal and anteroposterior translations occurring as a function of knee flexion/extension. Ten elastic elements described the geometrical and mechanical properties of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL), and the medial and lateral collateral ligaments (MCL and LCL). The three independent knee rotations were evaluated using OpenSim to observe ligament function. The results showed that the anterior and posterior bundles of ACL and PCL (aACL, pACL and aPCL, pPCL) intersected during knee flexion. The aACL and pACL mainly provided force during knee flexion and adduction, respectively. The aPCL was slack throughout the range of three knee rotations; however, the pPCL was utilised for knee abduction and internal rotation. The LCL was employed for knee adduction and rotation, but was slack beyond 20° of knee flexion. The MCL bundles were mainly used during knee adduction and external rotation. All these results suggest that the functions of knee ligaments in this model approximated the behaviour of the physical knee and the enhanced knee structures can improve the ability to investigate knee joint biomechanics during various gait activities.

  15. Maximum recovery after knee replacement – the MARKER study rationale and protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; March, Lyn; Crosbie, Jack; Crawford, Ross; Graves, Stephen; Naylor, Justine; Harmer, Alison; Jan, Stephen; Bennell, Kim; Harris, Ian; Parker, David; Moffet, Helene; Fransen, Marlene

    2009-01-01

    Background There is little scientific evidence to support the usual practice of providing outpatient rehabilitation to patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery (TKR) immediately after discharge from the orthopaedic ward. It is hypothesised that the lack of clinical benefit is due to the low exercise intensity tolerated at this time, with patients still recovering from the effects of major orthopaedic surgery. The aim of the proposed clinical trial is to investigate the clinical and cost effectiveness of a novel rehabilitation strategy, consisting of an initial home exercise programme followed, approximately six weeks later, by higher intensity outpatient exercise classes. Methods/Design In this multicentre randomised controlled trial, 600 patients undergoing primary TKR will be recruited at the orthopaedic pre-admission clinic of 10 large public and private hospitals in Australia. There will be no change to the medical or rehabilitative care usually provided while the participant is admitted to the orthopaedic ward. After TKR, but prior to discharge from the orthopaedic ward, participants will be randomised to either the novel rehabilitation strategy or usual rehabilitative care as provided by the hospital or recommended by the orthopaedic surgeon. Outcomes assessments will be conducted at baseline (pre-admission clinic) and at 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months following randomisation. The primary outcomes will be self-reported knee pain and physical function. Secondary outcomes include quality of life and objective measures of physical performance. Health economic data (health sector and community service utilisation, loss of productivity) will be recorded prospectively by participants in a patient diary. This patient cohort will also be followed-up annually for five years for knee pain, physical function and the need or actual incidence of further joint replacement surgery. Discussion The results of this pragmatic clinical trial can be directly

  16. Effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement and weight-bearing exercise on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity in patients with stroke: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    An, Chang-Man; Won, Jong-Im

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity, compared with weight-bearing exercise in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects with chronic stroke were divided into three groups: MWM (n = 12), WBE (n = 8), and control (n = 10). All groups attended physical therapy sessions 3 times a week for 5 weeks. Subjects in the MWM group performed mobilization with movement exercises, whilst participants in the WBE group performed weight-bearing exercises. Knee peak torque, ankle range of motion, and spatiotemporal gait parameters were evaluated before and after the interventions. [Results] Knee extensor peak torque increased significantly in both MWM and WBE groups. However, only the MWM group showed significant improvement in passive and active ankle range of motion and gait velocity, among the three groups. [Conclusion] Ankle joint mobilization with movement intervention is more effective than simple weight-bearing intervention in improving gait speed in stroke patients with limited ankle motion.

  17. Study rationale and protocol: prospective randomized comparison of metal ion concentrations in the patient's plasma after implantation of coated and uncoated total knee prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Lützner, Jörg; Dinnebier, Gerd; Hartmann, Albrecht; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Kirschner, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Background Any metal placed in a biological environment undergoes corrosion. Thus, with their large metallic surfaces, TKA implants are particularly prone to corrosion with subsequent release of metal ions into the human body which may cause local and systemic toxic effects and hypersensitivity reactions, and increase cancer risk. To address this problem, a new 7-layer zirconium coating developed especially for cobalt-chrome orthopaedic implants was tested biomechanically and found to lower metal ion release. The purpose of the proposed clinical trial is to compare the metal ion concentration in patients' plasma before and after implantation of a coated or uncoated TKA implant. Methods/Design In this randomised controlled trial, 120 patients undergoing primary TKA will be recruited at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of the University Hospital in Dresden, Germany, and randomised to either the coated or uncoated prosthesis. Outcome assessments will be conducted preoperatively and at 3 months, 12 months and 5 years postoperatively. The primary clinical endpoint will be the chromium ion concentration in the patient's plasma after 1 and 5 years. Secondary outcomes include cobalt, molybdenum and nickel ion concentrations after 1 and 5 years, allergy testing for hypersensitivity against one of these metals, the Knee Society Score to assess clinical and physical function of the knee joint, the self-assessment Oxford Score and the Short Form 36 quality of live questionnaire. Discussion The metal ion concentration in the patient's plasma has been shown to increase after TKA, its eventual adverse effects being widely debated. In the light of this discussion, ways to reduce metal ion release from orthopaedic implants should be studied in detail. The results of this investigation may lead to a new method to achieve this goal. Trials register Clinicaltrials registry NCT00862511 PMID:19828019

  18. Injury tolerance and moment response of the knee joint to combined valgus bending and shear loading.

    PubMed

    Bose, Dipan; Bhalla, Kavi S; Untaroiu, Costin D; Ivarsson, B Johan; Crandall, Jeff R; Hurwitz, Shepard

    2008-06-01

    Valgus bending and shearing of the knee have been identified as primary mechanisms of injuries in a lateral loading environment applicable to pedestrian-car collisions. Previous studies have reported on the structural response of the knee joint to pure valgus bending and lateral shearing, as well as the estimated injury thresholds for the knee bending angle and shear displacement based on experimental tests. However, epidemiological studies indicate that most knee injuries are due to the combined effects of bending and shear loading. Therefore, characterization of knee stiffness for combined loading and the associated injury tolerances is necessary for developing vehicle countermeasures to mitigate pedestrian injuries. Isolated knee joint specimens (n=40) from postmortem human subjects were tested in valgus bending at a loading rate representative of a pedestrian-car impact. The effect of lateral shear force combined with the bending moment on the stiffness response and the injury tolerances of the knee was concurrently evaluated. In addition to the knee moment-angle response, the bending angle and shear displacement corresponding to the first instance of primary ligament failure were determined in each test. The failure displacements were subsequently used to estimate an injury threshold function based on a simplified analytical model of the knee. The validity of the determined injury threshold function was subsequently verified using a finite element model. Post-test necropsy of the knees indicated medial collateral ligament injury consistent with the clinical injuries observed in pedestrian victims. The moment-angle response in valgus bending was determined at quasistatic and dynamic loading rates and compared to previously published test data. The peak bending moment values scaled to an average adult male showed no significant change with variation in the superimposed shear load. An injury threshold function for the knee in terms of bending angle and shear

  19. Genitourinary Procedures as Risk Factors for Prosthetic Hip or Knee Infection: A Hospital-Based Prospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Arjun; Osmon, Douglas R.; Hanssen, Arlen D.; Lightner, Deborah J.; Wilson, Walter R.; Steckelberg, James M.; Baddour, Larry M.; Harmsen, William S.; Mandrekar, Jay N.; Berbari, Elie F.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) as a complication of routine genitourinary (GU) procedures in patients with total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and to study the impact of antibiotic prophylaxis administered prior to these procedures. Methods. We conducted a prospective, single-center, case-control study between December 1, 2001 and May 31, 2006. Case patients were hospitalized with total hip or knee PJI. Control subjects underwent a THA or TKA and were hospitalized during the same period on the same orthopedic floor without a PJI. Data regarding demographic features and potential risk factors were collected. The outcome measure was the odds ratio (OR) of PJI after GU procedures performed within 2 years of admission. Results. A total of 339 case patients and 339 control subjects were enrolled in the study. Of these, 52 cases (15%) and 55 controls (16%) had undergone a GU procedure in the preceding 2 years. There was no increased risk of PJI for patients undergoing a GU procedure with or without antibiotic prophylaxis (adjusted OR [aOR] = 1.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2–4.5, P = .95 and aOR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.6–1.7, P = .99, respectively). Results were similar in a subset of patients with a joint age less than 6 months, less than 1 year, or greater than 1 year. Conclusions. Genitourinary procedures were not risk factors for subsequent PJI. The use of antibiotic prophylaxis before GU procedures did not decrease the risk of subsequent PJI in our study. PMID:26258154

  20. The effect of varus tilt on contact stresses in total knee arthroplasty: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, S; Whiteside, L A; White, S E

    1999-03-01

    The contact stress produced in the tibiofemoral joint from a varus-tilted tibial component was tested in five total knee prostheses. Peak and mean stresses were measured with a digital electronic sensor under compressive load at 15 degrees and 90 degrees flexion. Stresses were measured with the tibial component tilted 0 degrees and 5 degrees in the mediolateral direction. At a 5 degree tilt, the Advantim, the Miller-Galante II, and the Omnifit prostheses, which have a flat configuration on the femoral and tibial surfaces in the coronal plane, had significantly greater stresses than the LCS and the Profix prostheses, which have tibial and femoral components with matching curved surfaces in the coronal plane. These results suggest that the femoral component surface should have a radius of curvature that matches that of the tibial articular surface in the coronal plane to achieve a large contact area even in varus-valgus tilting. PMID:10192260

  1. An electromechanical swing-phase-controlled prosthetic knee joint for conversion of physiological energy to electrical energy: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Andrysek, Jan; Chau, Gilbert

    2007-12-01

    Microprocessor-controlled prostheses facilitate a more natural and efficient gait for individuals with above-knee amputations by continually adjusting the level of swing-phase damping. One caveat associated with these technologies is that the user must charge the onboard batteries on a daily basis. It is, therefore, the aim of this study to examine the feasibility of using an electromechanical system to provide prosthetic swing-phase damping and, concomitantly, the function of converting physiological energy that is normally dissipated during the swing phase, to electrical energy. Gait data from a single subject and data from a kinematic simulator were used to develop an empirical model. The findings in this study indicate that an electromagnetic system has appropriate characteristics for use in swing-phase control and also has the potential to recover energy under particular conditions.

  2. Synovial chemokine expression and relationship with knee symptoms in patients with meniscal tears

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anjali; Gan, Justin; Bush-Joseph, Charles; Verma, Nikhil; Tetreault, Matthew W.; Saha, Kanta; Margulis, Arkady; Fogg, Louis; Scanzello, Carla R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In patients with knee OA, synovitis is associated with knee pain and symptoms. We previously identified synovial mRNA expression of a set of chemokines (CCL19, IL-8, CCL5, XCL-1, CCR7) associated with synovitis in patients with meniscal tears but without radiographic OA. CCL19 and CCR7 were also associated with knee symptoms. This study sought to validate expression of these chemokines and association with knee symptoms in more typical patients presenting for meniscal arthroscopy, many who have pre-existing OA. Design Synovial biopsies and fluid (SF) were collected from patients undergoing meniscal arthroscopy. Synovial mRNA expression was measured using quantitative RT-PCR. The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was administered preoperatively. Regression analyses determined if associations between chemokine mRNA levels and KOOS scores were independent of other factors including radiographic OA. CCL19 in SF was measured by ELISA, and compared to patients with advanced knee OA and asymptomatic organ donors. Results 90% of patients had intra-operative evidence of early cartilage degeneration. CCL19, IL-8, CCL5, XCL1, CCR7 transcripts were detected in all patients. Synovial CCL19 mRNA levels independently correlated with KOOS Activities of Daily Living scores (95% CI [-8.071, -0.331], p= 0.036), indicating higher expression was associated with more knee-related dysfunction. SF CCL19 was detected in 7 of 10 patients, compared to 4 of 10 asymptomatic donors. Conclusion In typical patients presenting for meniscal arthroscopy, synovial CCL19 mRNA expression was associated with knee-related difficulty with activities of daily living, independent of other factors including presence of radiographic knee OA. PMID:25724256

  3. Cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R; Ribeiro, F; Oliveira, J

    2010-03-01

    The effects of cryotherapy on joint position sense are not clearly established; however it is paramount to understand its impact on peripheral feedback to ascertain the safety of using ice therapy before resuming exercise on sports or rehabilitation settings. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cryotherapy, when applied over the quadriceps and over the knee joint, on knee position sense. This within-subjects repeated-measures study encompassed fifteen subjects. Knee position sense was measured by open kinetic chain technique and active positioning at baseline and after cryotherapy application. Knee angles were determined by computer analysis of the videotape images. Twenty-minute ice bag application was applied randomly, in two sessions 48 h apart, over the quadriceps and the knee joint. The main effect for cryotherapy application was significant (F (1.14)=7.7, p=0.015) indicating an increase in both absolute and relative angular errors after the application. There was no significant main effect for the location of cryotherapy application, indicating no differences between the application over the quadriceps and the knee joint. In conclusion, cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense in normal knees. This deleterious effect is similar when cryotherapy is applied over the quadriceps or the knee joint.

  4. Cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R; Ribeiro, F; Oliveira, J

    2010-03-01

    The effects of cryotherapy on joint position sense are not clearly established; however it is paramount to understand its impact on peripheral feedback to ascertain the safety of using ice therapy before resuming exercise on sports or rehabilitation settings. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cryotherapy, when applied over the quadriceps and over the knee joint, on knee position sense. This within-subjects repeated-measures study encompassed fifteen subjects. Knee position sense was measured by open kinetic chain technique and active positioning at baseline and after cryotherapy application. Knee angles were determined by computer analysis of the videotape images. Twenty-minute ice bag application was applied randomly, in two sessions 48 h apart, over the quadriceps and the knee joint. The main effect for cryotherapy application was significant (F (1.14)=7.7, p=0.015) indicating an increase in both absolute and relative angular errors after the application. There was no significant main effect for the location of cryotherapy application, indicating no differences between the application over the quadriceps and the knee joint. In conclusion, cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense in normal knees. This deleterious effect is similar when cryotherapy is applied over the quadriceps or the knee joint. PMID:20221997

  5. Does knee replacement surgery lead to chronic limb ischemia?

    PubMed

    Dawson, Alan G; Bachoo, Paul; Sutherland, Alasdair G

    2010-12-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) may be associated with chronic limb ischemia (CLI) due to arterial injury intraoperatively. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of CLI after TKR surgery. Patients who received a unilateral TKR in 2003-2004 were identified from our database. Patients with diabetes mellitus and preexisting peripheral arterial disease were excluded. Patient assessment was by collection of demographic details, completion of the Oxford Knee Score, Short Form-12 Health Survey, and King's College Hospital's Vascular Quality of Life Questionnaire, and measurement of the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI). Of the 209 eligible patients, 86 (41%) participated (median age, 73 years; 50% male). Five (5.8%) patients had a reduced ABPI compared with population norms of 4.6 to 7%. Patients with reduced ABPI measurements had higher Oxford Knee Scores, but no relationships between other variables were demonstrated. TKR surgery does not appear to increase the risk of CLI. PMID:21446628

  6. IS PAIN IN ONE KNEE ASSOCIATED WITH ISOMETRIC MUSCLE STRENGTH IN THE CONTRALATERAL LIMB? - DATA FROM THE OSTEOARTHRITIS INITIATIVE (OAI)

    PubMed Central

    Steidle, E.; Wirth, W.; Glass, N.; Ruhdorfer, A.; Cotofana, S.; Eckstein, F.; Segal, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Knee pain and muscle weakness confer risk for knee osteoarthritis incidence and progression. The purpose of this study was to determine whether unilateral knee pain influences contralateral thigh muscle strength. Design Of 4796 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants, 224 (mean±SD age 63.9±8.9 years) cases could be matched to a control. Cases were defined as having unilateral knee pain (numerical rating scale (NRS)≥4/10; ≥infrequent pain) and one pain-free knee (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Controls were defined as having bilaterally pain-free knees (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Maximal isometric muscle strength [N] was compared between limbs in participants with unilateral pain (cases), and between pain-free limbs of cases and controls. Results Knee extensor/flexor strength in pain-free limbs of cases was lower than in bilaterally pain-free controls (−5.5%/–8.4%; p=0.043/p=0.022). Within cases, maximum extensor/flexor strength was significantly lower in the painful than in the pain-free limb (−6.4%/4.1%; p<0.0001/p=0.015). Conclusions These results suggest that strength in limbs without knee pain is associated with the pain status of the contralateral knee. The strength difference between unilateral pain-free cases and matched bilateral pain-free controls was similar to that between limbs in persons with unilateral knee pain. Lower strength due to contralateral knee pain might be centrally mediated. PMID:25768069

  7. Principal component analysis in construction of 3D human knee joint models using a statistical shape model method.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Li, Jing-Sheng; Wang, Shaobai; Li, Pingyue; Kwon, Young-Min; Li, Guoan

    2015-01-01

    The statistical shape model (SSM) method that uses 2D images of the knee joint to predict the three-dimensional (3D) joint surface model has been reported in the literature. In this study, we constructed a SSM database using 152 human computed tomography (CT) knee joint models, including the femur, tibia and patella and analysed the characteristics of each principal component of the SSM. The surface models of two in vivo knees were predicted using the SSM and their 2D bi-plane fluoroscopic images. The predicted models were compared to their CT joint models. The differences between the predicted 3D knee joint surfaces and the CT image-based surfaces were 0.30 ± 0.81 mm, 0.34 ± 0.79 mm and 0.36 ± 0.59 mm for the femur, tibia and patella, respectively (average ± standard deviation). The computational time for each bone of the knee joint was within 30 s using a personal computer. The analysis of this study indicated that the SSM method could be a useful tool to construct 3D surface models of the knee with sub-millimeter accuracy in real time. Thus, it may have a broad application in computer-assisted knee surgeries that require 3D surface models of the knee.

  8. Rehabilitation for the management of knee osteoarthritis using comprehensive traditional Chinese medicine in community health centers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is becoming increasingly necessary for community health centers to make rehabilitation services available to patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. However, for a number of reasons, including a lack of expertise, the small size of community health centers and the availability of only simple medical equipment, conventional rehabilitation therapy has not been widely used in China. Consequently, most patients with knee osteoarthritis seek treatment in high-grade hospitals. However, many patients cannot manage the techniques that they were taught in the hospital. Methods such as acupuncture, tuina, Chinese medical herb fumigation-washing and t’ai chi are easy to do and have been reported to have curative effects in those with knee osteoarthritis. To date, there have been no randomized controlled trials validating comprehensive traditional Chinese medicine for the rehabilitation of knee osteoarthritis in a community health center. Furthermore, there is no standard rehabilitation protocol using traditional Chinese medicine for knee osteoarthritis. The aim of the current study is to develop a comprehensive rehabilitation protocol using traditional Chinese medicine for the management of knee osteoarthritis in a community health center. Method/design This will be a randomized controlled clinical trial with blinded assessment. There will be a 4-week intervention utilizing rehabilitation protocols from traditional Chinese medicine and conventional therapy. Follow-up will be conducted for a period of 12 weeks. A total of 722 participants with knee osteoarthritis will be recruited. Participants will be randomly divided into two groups: experimental and control. Primary outcomes will include range of motion, girth measurement, the visual analogue scale, and results from the manual muscle, six-minute walking and stair-climbing tests. Secondary outcomes will include average daily consumption of pain medication, ability to perform daily tasks and health

  9. Individuals with high bone mass have an increased prevalence of radiographic knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, S A; Dieppe, P; Gregson, C L; Arden, N K; Spector, T D; Hart, D J; Edwards, M H; Dennison, E M; Cooper, C; Sayers, A; Williams, M; Davey Smith, G; Tobias, J H

    2015-02-01

    We previously reported an association between high bone mass (HBM) and a bone-forming phenotype of radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA). As knee and hip OA have distinct risk factors, in this study we aimed to determine (i) whether HBM is also associated with knee OA, and (ii) whether the HBM knee OA phenotype demonstrates a similar pattern of radiographic features to that observed at the hip. HBM cases (defined by DXA BMD Z-scores) from the UK-based HBM study were compared with unaffected family controls and general population controls from the Chingford and Hertfordshire cohort studies. A single blinded observer graded AP weight-bearing knee radiographs for features of OA (Kellgren-Lawrence score, osteophytes, joint space narrowing (JSN), sclerosis) using an atlas. Analyses used logistic regression, adjusting a priori for age and gender, and additionally for BMI as a potential mediator of the HBM-OA association, using Stata v12. 609 HBM knees in 311 cases (mean age 60.8years, 74% female) and 1937 control knees in 991 controls (63.4years, 81% female) were analysed. The prevalence of radiographic knee OA, defined as Kellgren-Lawrence grade≥2, was increased in cases (31.5% vs. 20.9%), with age and gender adjusted OR [95% CI] 2.38 [1.81, 3.14], p<0.001. The association between HBM and osteophytosis was stronger than that for JSN, both before and after adjustment for BMI which attenuated the ORs for knee OA and osteophytes in cases vs. controls by approximately 50%. Our findings support a positive association between HBM and knee OA. This association was strongest for osteophytes, suggesting HBM confers a general predisposition to a subtype of OA characterised by increased bone formation.

  10. Changes in bone marrow lesions in response to weight-loss in obese knee osteoarthritis patients: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients are susceptible for knee osteoarthritis (KOA) with increasing age and obesity and KOA is expected to become a major disabling disease in the future. An important feature of KOA on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is changes in the subchondral bone, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), which are related to the future degeneration of the knee joint as well as prevalent clinical symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in BMLs after a 16-week weight-loss period in obese subjects with KOA and relate changes in BMLs to the effects of weight-loss on clinical symptoms. Methods This prospective cohort study included patients with a body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2, an age ≥ 50 years and primary KOA. Patients underwent a 16 weeks supervised diet program which included formula products and dietetic counselling (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00655941). BMLs in tibia and femur were assessed on MRI before and after the weight-loss using the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score. Response to weight-loss in BML scores was dichotomised to patients experiencing a decrease in BML scores (responders) and patients who did not (non-responders). The association of BMLs to weight-loss was assessed by logistic regressions and correlation analyses. Results 39 patients (23%) were classified as responders in the sum of all BML size scores whereas 130 patients (77%) deteriorated or remained stable and were categorized as non-responders. Logistic regression analyses revealed no association between weight-loss < or ≥ 10% and response in BMLs in the most affected compartment (OR 1.86 [CI 0.66 to 5.26, p=0.24]). There was no association between weight-loss and response in maximum BML score (OR 1.13 [CI 0.39 to 3.28, p=0.81]). The relationship between changes in BMLs and clinical symptoms revealed that an equal proportion of patients classified as BML responders and non-responders experienced an OMERACT-OARSI response (69 vs. 71%, p=0.86). Conclusions Weight-loss did not

  11. Evaluation of the gait performance of above-knee amputees while walking with 3R20 and 3R15 knee joints

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, AliReza; Karimi, Mohammad Taghi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The performance of the subjects with above-knee amputation is noticeably poorer than normal subjects. Various types of components have been designed to compensate their performance. Among various prosthetic components, the knee joint has great influence on the function. Two types of knee joints (3R15, 3R20) have been used broadly for above-knee prostheses. However, there is not enough research to highlight the influence of these joints on the gait performance of the subjects. Therefore, an aim of this research was to investigate the performance of the above-knee amputees while walking with 3R15 and 3R20 knee joints. Materials and Methods: 7 above-knee amputees were recruited in this research study. They were asked to walk with a comfortable speed to investigate the gait function of the subjects with 3 cameras 3D motion analysis system (Kinematrix system). The difference between the performances of the subjects with these joints was compared by use of paired t-test. Results: The results of this study showed that, the performances of the subjects with 3R20 were better than that with 3R15. The walking speed of the subjects with 3R20 was 66.7 m/min compared to 30.4 m/min (P-value = 0.045). Moreover; the symmetry of walking with 3R20 was more than that with 3R15, based on the spatio- temporal gait parameters values (P-value <0.05). Conclusion: The difference between the performances of the subjects with 3R20 and 3R15 knee joints was related to the walking speed, which improved while walking with 3R20 joint. PMID:23267378

  12. Neuromuscular adaptations and correlates of knee functionality following ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Adam L; Kelly, Jason; Hohmann, Erik

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to examine the dynamic restraint mechanism by establishing the neuromuscular characteristics of lower extremity muscles in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) subjects. This study also investigated neuromuscular variables that relate to post-ACLR functional outcome. Thirteen patients having undergone ACLR using the bone patella tendon bone graft at least 6 months prior participated in this study. Knee functionality (0- to 100-point scale) was rated using the Cincinnati Knee Rating System. The median frequency of the electromyographic (EMG) recordings from the vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles together with the isokinetic quadriceps torque generated in 10 degrees intervals between 80 degrees and 10 degrees knee flexion was determined for the noninvolved and involved limbs. Lower limb musculotendinous stiffness was also assessed for the noninvolved and involved limbs. Limb symmetry indexes were calculated for each of the physiological measures. Compared to the noninvolved limb, the median frequency of the EMG from the involved limb VM and VL muscles was significantly lower as was the quadriceps torque generated at the seven knee flexion intervals. In contrast, musculotendinous stiffness was significantly higher in the involved lower limb compared to the noninvolved limb. Significant, moderate correlations were identified between knee functionality and symmetry indexes for all variables except for the isokinetic quadriceps torque produced between 80 degrees -70 degrees and 20 degrees -10 degrees knee flexion. More functional ACLR subjects demonstrated enhanced motor unit recruitment reflective of less quadriceps muscle fiber atrophy together with increased quadriceps strength and musculotendinous stiffness of the lower limb musculature.

  13. Nonsurgical Management of Knee Pain in Adults.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brandon Q; Covey, Carlton J; Sineath, Marvin H

    2015-11-15

    The role of the family physician in managing knee pain is expanding as recent literature supports nonsurgical management for many patients. Effective treatment depends on the etiology of knee pain. Oral analgesics-most commonly nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen-are used initially in combination with physical therapy to manage the most typical causes of chronic knee pain. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommends against glucosamine/chondroitin supplementation for osteoarthritis. In patients who are not candidates for surgery, opioid analgesics should be used only if conservative pharmacotherapy is ineffective. Exercise-based therapy is the foundation for treating knee osteoarthritis and patellofemoral pain syndrome. Weight loss should be encouraged for all patients with osteoarthritis and a body mass index greater than 25 kg per m2. Aside from stabilizing traumatic knee ligament and tendon tears, the effectiveness of knee braces for chronic knee pain is uncertain, and the use of braces should not replace physical therapy. Foot orthoses can be helpful for anterior knee pain. Corticosteroid injections are effective for short-term pain relief in patients with osteoarthritis. The benefit of hyaluronic acid injections is controversial, and recommendations vary; recent systematic reviews do not support a clinically significant benefit. Small studies suggest that regenerative injections can improve pain and function in patients with chronic knee tendinopathies and osteoarthritis. PMID:26554281

  14. [Knee endoprosthesis: sports orthopedics possibilities and limitations].

    PubMed

    Kuster, M S; Grob, K; Gächter, A

    2000-08-01

    Many patients would like to resume some sport activities after total knee replacement; however, most recommendations are based on subjective opinion rather than scientific evidence. The following paper presents a literature review of sports after total knee replacement and includes recommendations which are based on biomechanical laws. Most total knee designs show increased conformity near full extension. Beyond a certain knee flexion angle, the conformity ratio decreases due to a reduced femoral radius. Therefore, these designs accept higher loads near full extension than in flexion. In order to recommend suitable physical activities after total knee replacement, both the load and the knee flexion angle of the peak load must be considered. It has been shown that power walking and cycling produce the lowest polyethylene inlay stress of a total knee replacement and seem to be the least demanding endurance activities. Jogging and downhill walking show high inlay stress levels and should be avoided. Hence, for mountain hiking, patients are advised to avoid descents or at least use skipoles and walk slowly downhill to reduce the load on the knee joint. It must also be mentioned that any activity represents additional wear, which may affect the long-term results of total knee replacements. Further clinical studies are necessary to validate the biomechanical investigations. PMID:11013918

  15. Prophylactic Knee Braces: Where Do They Stand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Paul

    1988-01-01

    The effectiveness of knee braces in preventing knee injuries in football is inconclusive. This article reviews research from epidemiologic, cadaver, and surrogate studies; discusses reasons for conflicting study results, including research design problems; and describes alternative approaches that have been suggested. (IAH)

  16. Evaluation of a temporary prosthetic insert in the rehabilitation of elderly ischaemic below-knee amputees: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hallam, F M; Jull, G A

    1988-01-01

    The physiotherapy management of elderly, ischaemic below knee amputees is often compromised by delayed and/or complicated wound healing. Such patients are often unable to ambulate on a prosthesis for prolonged periods. Problems concommitant with immobilization such as weakness, contractures, and decreased morale tend to arise. This pilot study investigated the efficacy of incorporating a shaped Dunlopillo insert into a temporary prosthetic socket to allow the at risk group to ambulate as soon as the sutures were removed regardless of the state of wound healing. Two parameters were evaluated, namely wound healing and stump maturation. A total of eighteen subjects were observed in a control and an experimental group. Both wound healing (p < 0.05) and stump maturation (p < 0.05) were significantly enhanced by the inclusion of a Dunlopillo insert.

  17. Increased joint loads during walking--a consequence of pain relief in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjaer, Tine; Lund, Hans; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning

    2006-12-01

    Joint pain is a primary symptom in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but the effect of pain and pain relief on the knee joint mechanics of walking is not clear. In this study, the effects of local knee joint analgesia on knee joint loads during walking were studied in a group of knee osteoarthritis patients. A group of healthy subjects was included as a reference group. The joint loads were calculated from standard gait analysis data obtained with standardised walking speed (4 km/h). The gait analyses were performed before and after pain relief by intra-articular injections of 10 mL lidocaine (1%). Pre-injection measurements revealed lower joint loads in the OA group compared to the reference group. Following injections pain during walking decreased significantly and the joint loads increased in the OA group during the late single support phase to a level comparable to the reference group. Although the patients walked with less compressive knee joint forces compared to the reference group, the effects of pain relief may accelerate the degenerative changes. PMID:17011194

  18. Mechanical correction of dynamometer moment for the effects of segment motion during isometric knee-extension tests.

    PubMed

    Tsaopoulos, Dimitrios E; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Richards, Paula J; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of dynamometer and joint axis misalignment on measured isometric knee-extension moments using inverse dynamics based on the actual joint kinematic information derived from the real-time X-ray video and to compare the errors when the moments were calculated using measurements from external anatomical surface markers or obtained from the isokinetic dynamometer. Six healthy males participated in this study. They performed isometric contractions at 90° and 20° of knee flexion, gradually increasing to maximum effort. For the calculation of the actual knee-joint moment and the joint moment relative to the knee-joint center, determined using the external marker, two free body diagrams were used of the Cybex arm and the lower leg segment system. In the first free body diagram, the mean center of the circular profiles of the femoral epicondyles was used as the knee-joint center, whereas in the second diagram, the joint center was assumed to coincide with the external marker. Then, the calculated knee-joint moments were compared with those measured by the dynamometer. The results indicate that 1) the actual knee-joint moment was different from the dynamometer recorded moment (difference ranged between 1.9% and 4.3%) and the moment calculated using the skin marker (difference ranged between 2.5% and 3%), and 2) during isometric knee extension, the internal knee angle changed significantly from rest to the maximum contraction state by about 19°. Therefore, these differences cannot be neglected if the moment-knee-joint angle relationship or the muscle mechanical properties, such as length-tension relationship, need to be determined. PMID:21474701

  19. Real-Time Tracking of Knee Adduction Moment in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Lee, Song Joo; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Background The external knee adduction moment (EKAM) is closely associated with the presence, progression, and severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is a lack of convenient and practical method to estimate and track in real-time the EKAM of patients with knee OA for clinical evaluation and gait training, especially outside of gait laboratories. New Method A real-time EKAM estimation method was developed and applied to track and investigate the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping on an elliptical trainer in both healthy subjects and a patient with knee OA. Results Substantial changes were observed in the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping in the patient with knee OA. Comparison with Existing Method(s) This is the first study to develop and test feasibility of real-time tracking method of the EKAM on patients with knee OA using 3-D inverse dynamics. Conclusions The study provides us an accurate and practical method to evaluate in real-time the critical EKAM associated with knee OA, which is expected to help us to diagnose and evaluate patients with knee OA and provide the patients with real-time EKAM feedback rehabilitation training. PMID:24361759

  20. Impact of Preemptive Analgesia on inflammatory responses and Rehabilitation after Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Controlled Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Jianda, Xu; Yuxing, Qu; Yi, Gao; Hong, Zhao; Libo, Peng; Jianning, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of preemptive analgesia on the inflammatory response and rehabilitation in TKA. 75 patients with unilateral primary knee osteoarthritis were conducted in this prospective study. All patients were randomly divided into two groups (MMA with/without preemptive analgesia group). The following parameters were used to evaluate analgesic efficacy: knee flexion, pain at rest and walking, functional walking capacity (2 MWT and 6 MWT), WOMAC score, and hs-CRP level. Patients in MMA with preemptive analgesia group had lower hs-CRP level and less pain at rest and walking during the first week postoperatively (P < 0.05). The 2 MWT was significantly better in MMA with preemptive analgesia group (17.13 ± 3.82 VS 14.19 ± 3.56, P = 0.001). The 6 MWT scores and WOMAC scores increased significantly within Groups (P = 0.020, 0.000), but no difference between groups postoperatively (P > 0.05). Less cumulative consumption of morphine was found in MMA with preemptive analgesia group at 48 h (P = 0.017, 0.023), but no difference at total requirement (P = 0.113). Preemptive analgesia added to a multimodal analgesic regime improved analgesia, reduced inflammatory reaction and accelerated functional recovery at the first week postoperatively, but not improved long-term function. PMID:27578313

  1. Impact of Preemptive Analgesia on inflammatory responses and Rehabilitation after Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Controlled Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Jianda, Xu; Yuxing, Qu; Yi, Gao; Hong, Zhao; Libo, Peng; Jianning, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of preemptive analgesia on the inflammatory response and rehabilitation in TKA. 75 patients with unilateral primary knee osteoarthritis were conducted in this prospective study. All patients were randomly divided into two groups (MMA with/without preemptive analgesia group). The following parameters were used to evaluate analgesic efficacy: knee flexion, pain at rest and walking, functional walking capacity (2 MWT and 6 MWT), WOMAC score, and hs-CRP level. Patients in MMA with preemptive analgesia group had lower hs-CRP level and less pain at rest and walking during the first week postoperatively (P < 0.05). The 2 MWT was significantly better in MMA with preemptive analgesia group (17.13 ± 3.82 VS 14.19 ± 3.56, P = 0.001). The 6 MWT scores and WOMAC scores increased significantly within Groups (P = 0.020, 0.000), but no difference between groups postoperatively (P > 0.05). Less cumulative consumption of morphine was found in MMA with preemptive analgesia group at 48 h (P = 0.017, 0.023), but no difference at total requirement (P = 0.113). Preemptive analgesia added to a multimodal analgesic regime improved analgesia, reduced inflammatory reaction and accelerated functional recovery at the first week postoperatively, but not improved long-term function. PMID:27578313

  2. Energy Spectrum of Cosmic Rays in the Knee Region and Studies of Different Components of Extensive Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, G. V.; Fomin, Yu.A.; Kalmykov, N.N.; Kalmykov, V.N.; Kulikov, G.V.; Solovjeva, V.I.; Sulakov, V.P.; Vishnevskaya, E.A.

    2003-07-01

    The energy spectrum of the primary cosmic rays is presented. The spectrum was derived from the electron and muon (with energies above 10 GeV) size spectra obtained with the MSU EAS array and using the contemporary QGSJET model for hadron interactions. The existence of the knee at energy ˜ 3 × 1015 eV in the primary energy spectrum is confirmed. The change of the spectral index before and after the knee amounts ˜ 0.4-0.5. Study of the EAS electron and muon components is being continued with the MSU array. In parallel with the traditional study of the EAS size spectrum considerable attention was paid to investigation of the EAS muon number spectrum. The description of the MSU EAS array is given in [9]. The array covers an area of approximately 0.5 km2 and includes 77 detectors (Geiger counters) of particle density ρ used for determination of the EAS size Ne . For determination of the total number of charged particles in a shower at the observation level it is necessary to know in detail their lateral distribution function (LDF). Our analysis showed that experimental data are described rather well by the function proposed by Greisen [3] and having the form ρ ˜ xs-2 (1 + x)s-4.5 (1 + β x), where s is an age parameter, x = r /r0 , r0 = 80 m at sea level and β ˜ 0.2-0.4. However the best agreement can be achieved for the empirical LDF having more complex form ρ ˜ xs-2 (1 + x)s-4.5 [x(1 + x)]α , where a parameter α depends on the shower axis distance (Fig. 1). Further we used namely this LDF for determining of the particle number Ne . To construct the EAS size spectrum all showers were divided on narrow intervals on Ne (Δ lg Ne = 0.1). In each interval the effective collecting area

  3. Effects of soft tissue artifacts on differentiating kinematic differences between natural and replaced knee joints during functional activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Chung; Lu, Tung-Wu; Lu, Hsuan-Lun; Kuo, Mei-Ying; Hsu, Horng-Chaung

    2016-05-01

    Functional performance of total knee replacement (TKR) is often assessed using skin marker-based stereophotogrammetry, which can be affected by soft tissue artifacts (STA). The current study aimed to compare the STA and their effects on the kinematics of the knee between twelve patients with TKR and twelve healthy controls during sit-to-stand, and to assess the effects of STA on the statistical between-group comparisons. Each subject performed the sit-to-stand task while motions of the skin markers and the knees were measured by a motion capture system integrated with a three-dimensional fluoroscopy technique. The bone motions measured by the three-dimensional fluoroscopy were taken as the gold standard, with respect to which the STA of the markers were obtained. The STA were found to affect the calculated segmental poses and knee kinematics between the groups differently. The STA resulted in artefactual posterior displacements of the knee joint center, with magnitudes significantly greater in TKR than controls (p<0.01). The STA-induced knee external rotations in TKR were smaller than those in controls with mean differences of 2.3-3.0°. These between-group differences in the STA effects on knee kinematics in turn concealed the true between-group differences in the anterior-posterior translation and internal/external rotation of knee while leading to false significant between-group differences in the abduction/adduction and proximal-distal translation.

  4. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Volker; Han, Jeong S; Adwanikar, Hita; Fu, Yu; Ji, Guangchen

    2007-03-28

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review.

  5. Wearing knee wraps affects mechanical output and performance characteristics of back squat exercise.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jason P; Carden, Patrick J C; Shorter, Kath A

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of wearing knee wraps on mechanical output and performance characteristics of back squat exercise. Ten resistance trained men (back squat 1 repetition maximum [1RM]: 160.5 ± 18.4 kg) performed 6 single back squats with 80% 1RM, 3 wearing knee wraps, 3 without. Mechanical output was obtained from ground reaction force, performance characteristics from digitized motion footage obtained from a single high-speed digital camera. Wearing knee wraps led to a 39% reduction (0.09 compared with 0.11 m, p = 0.037) in horizontal barbell displacement that continued during the lifting phase. Lowering phase vertical impulse remained within 1% across conditions; however, the lowering phase was performed 45% faster (1.13 compared with 1.57 seconds). This demonstrated that vertical force applied to the center of mass during the lowering phase was considerably larger and was likely a consequence of the generation and storage of elastic energy within the knee wrap. Subsequent vertical impulse applied to the center of mass was 10% greater (192 compared with 169 N·s, p = 0.018). Mechanical work involved in vertically displacing the center of mass was performed 20% faster and was reflected by a 10% increase in peak power (2,121 compared with 1,841 W, p = 0.019). The elastic properties of knee wraps increased mechanical output but altered back squat technique in a way that is likely to alter the musculature targeted by the exercise and possibly compromise the integrity of the knee joint. Knee wraps should not be worn during the strength and condition process, and perceived weakness in the knee joint should be assessed and treated.

  6. Effect of Closed Suction Drain on Blood Loss and Transfusion Rates in Simultaneous Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Gautam M.; Gupta, Vinay; Saxena, Purvi; Singh, Nidhi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with excessive blood loss and morbidity arising from postoperative reduction in hemoglobin (Hb). The purpose of this prospective randomized study was to determine if drains have any effect on blood loss, postoperative reduction in Hb levels and transfusion rates compared to no drainage in simultaneous bilateral TKAs. Materials and Methods Two hundred and thirty patients who underwent simultaneous bilateral TKA by a single surgeon were randomly allotted to drain or no-drain group (n=115 in each group). Postoperative Hb level, blood loss volume and transfusion rate were compared between the two groups. Results The mean postoperative Hb level (p=0.38), blood loss volume (p=0.33) and transfusion rate (p=0.52) in the drain group were not significantly different compared to the no-drain group. No statistical difference was found in terms of complications, readmissions and mortality rates between the two groups. Conclusions No significant difference was observed in the two groups with respect to blood loss and blood transfusion. Non-drainage does not offer an advantage over drainage with respect to conserving blood in simultaneous bilateral TKA. PMID:27595073

  7. Teaching the Comparative Approach to American Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaberg, Stanley

    The rationale behind this book of five suggested or sample comparative units contains several elements: 1) an interdisciplinary social science approach to studying the American past, present, and future; and 2) a view of our country's history in terms of a world setting and in the light on contemporary concerns. The global comparative method…

  8. Comparative Rhetoric: Applications in African Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neher, William W.

    Comparative rhetoric studies the mode of public address among a specified group of people and the theories and values governing their public address in specific cultural contexts. Two ways to consider the subject o