Science.gov

Sample records for knotted reactor coupled

  1. Activated carbon-modified knotted reactor coupled to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for sensitive determination of arsenic species in medicinal herbs and tea infusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grijalba, Alexander Castro; Martinis, Estefanía M.; Lascalea, Gustavo E.; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G.

    2015-01-01

    A flow injection system based on a modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) knotted reactor (KR) was developed for arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] species preconcentration and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Activated carbon (AC) was immobilized on the inner walls of a PTFE KR by a thermal treatment. A significant increase in analyte retention was obtained with the AC-modified KR (100%) as compared to the regular PTFE KR (25%). The preconcentration method involved the on-line formation of As(III)-ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (As-APDC) complex, followed by its adsorption onto the inner walls of the AC-modified KR. After analyte retention, the complex was eluted with acetone directly into the graphite furnace of ETAAS. The parameters affecting the flow injection system were evaluated with a full central composite face centered design with three center points. Under optimum conditions, a preconcentration factor of 200 was obtained with 10 ml of sample. The detection limit was 4 ng L- 1 and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for six replicate measurements at 0.2 μg L- 1 of As were 4.3% and 4.7% for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The developed methodology was highly selective towards As(III), while As(V), monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic [DMA(V)] were not retained in the AC-modified KR. The proposed method was successfully applied for As speciation analysis in infusions originated from medicinal herbs and tea.

  2. Determination of (ultra)trace amounts of arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) in water by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry coupled with flow injection on-line sorption preconcentration and separation in a knotted reactor.

    PubMed

    Yan, X P; Kerrich, R; Hendry, M J

    1998-11-15

    A method has been developed for determination of (ultra)trace amounts of As(III) and As(V) in water by flow injection on-line sorption preconcentration and separation coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) using a knotted reactor (KR). The determination of As(III) was achieved by selective formation of the As(III)-pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate complex over a sample acidity range of 0.01-0.7 mol L-1 HNO3, its adsorption onto the inner walls of the KR made from 150-cm-long, 0.5-mm-i.d. PTFE tubing, elution with 1 mol L-1 HNO3, and detection by ICPMS. Total inorganic arsenic was determined after prereduction of As(V) to As(III) in a 1% (m/v) L-cysteine-0.03 mol L-1 HNO3 media. The concentration of As(V) was calculated by difference (the total inorganic arsenic and As(III)). Owing to the group-specific character of the chelating agent, and the use of an efficient rinsing step before elution, the interferences encountered in conventional ICPMS from common major matrix, alkali and alkaline earth metals, and chlorides were eliminated. The presence of organoarsenic species such as monomethylarsonate and dimethylarsinate in water samples had no effect on the results of As(III) and As(V). Thus, the method can be applied to the speciation analysis of inorganic arsenic at submicrogram per liter levels in aqueous solutions with high total content of dissolved solid and/or high content of chlorides. Using a preconcentration time of 60 s and a sample flow rate of 5 mL min-1, an enhancement factor of 22 was achieved in comparison with conventional ICPMS. The time required for a single determination was 200 s. The detection limits (3s) was evaluated to be 0.021 microgram L-1 for As(III) and 0.029 microgram L-1 for total inorganic arsenic. The precision for 14 replicate determinations of 1 microgram L-1 As(III) was 2.8% (RSD) with drift correction and 3.9% (RSD) without drift correction. The concentrations of As(III) and As(V) in synthetic mixtures obtained

  3. Tying the knot with next-generation reactors: Can the industry afford a second marriage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This article examines the future of nuclear power beyond the year 2000. The nuclear industry just celebrated 50 years of nuclear technology, but no new plants have been ordered in the US since 1978 and some European countries are giving up on the nuclear option. This article discusses the four US advanced light-water reactor design and safety features, specific design features and parameters for the advanced designs, advanced designs from Europe, features utilities look for in a reactor, evolutionary versus passive designs, gaining public acceptance for new designs, and what alternatives are there to installing next-generation nuclear systems

  4. Three-dimensional printed knotted reactors enabling highly sensitive differentiation of silver nanoparticles and ions in aqueous environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Su, Cheng-Kuan; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Sun, Yuh-Chang

    2016-03-31

    Whether silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) persist or release silver ions (Ag(+)) when discharged into a natural environment has remained an unresolved issue. In this study, we employed a low-cost stereolithographic three-dimensional printing (3DP) technology to fabricate the angle-defined knotted reactors (KRs) to construct a simple differentiation scheme for quantitative assessment of Ag(+) ions and AgNPs in municipal wastewater samples. We chose xanthan/phosphate-buffered saline as a dispersion medium for in situ stabilization of the two silver species, while also facilitating their extraction from complicated wastewater matrices. After method optimization, we measured extraction efficiencies of 54.5 and 32.3% for retaining Ag(+) ions and AgNPs, respectively, in the printed KR (768-turn), with detection limits (DLs) of 0.86 and 0.52 ng L(-1) when determining Ag(+) ions and AgNPs, respectively (sample run at pH 11 without a rinse solution), and 0.86 ng L(-1) when determining Ag(+) ions alone (sample run at pH 12 with a 1.5-mL rinse solution). The proposed scheme is tolerant of the wastewater matrix and provides more reliable differentiation between Ag(+)/AgNPs than does a conventional filtration method. The concept and applicability of adopting 3DP technology to renew traditional KR devices were evidently proven by means of these significantly improved analytical performance. Our analytical data suggested that the concentrations of Ag(+) ions and AgNPs in the tested industrial wastewater sample were both higher than those in domestic wastewater, implying that industrial activity might be a main source of environmental silver species, rather than domestic discharge from AgNP-containing products.

  5. Coupling Schemes for Multiphysics Reactor Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Vijay Mahadeven; Jean Ragusa

    2007-11-01

    This report documents the progress of the student Vijay S. Mahadevan from the Nuclear Engineering Department of Texas A&M University over the summer of 2007 during his visit to the INL. The purpose of his visit was to investigate the physics-based preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method applied to physics relevant to nuclear reactor simulation. To this end he studied two test problems that represented reaction-diffusion and advection-reaction. These two test problems will provide the basis for future work in which neutron diffusion, nonlinear heat conduction, and a twophase flow model will be tightly coupled to provide an accurate model of a BWR core.

  6. A Midsummer Knot's Dream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrich, A.; MacNaughton, N.; Narayan, S.; Pechenik, O.; Silversmith, R.; Townsend, J.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce playing games on the shadows of knots and demonstrate two novel games, namely, "To Knot or Not to Knot" and "Much Ado about Knotting." We discuss winning strategies for these games on certain families of knot shadows and go on to suggest variations of these games for further study.

  7. IET. Coupling station. Man holds flexible couplers to reactor Dolly ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Coupling station. Man holds flexible couplers to reactor Dolly and HTRE rig. Date: April 22, 1955. INEEL negative no. 55-1010 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. Coupled IVPs to Investigate a Nuclear Reactor Poison Burn Up

    SciTech Connect

    Faghihi, F.

    2009-09-09

    A set of coupled IVPs that describe the change rate of an important poison, in a nuclear reactor, has been written herein. Specifically, in this article, we have focused on the samarium-149 (as a poison) burnup in a desired pressurized water nuclear reactor and its concentration are given using our MATLAB-linked 'solver'.

  9. Coupled reactor kinetics and heat transfer model for heat pipe cooled reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.; Houts, Michael

    2001-02-01

    Heat pipes are often proposed as cooling system components for small fission reactors. SAFE-300 and STAR-C are two reactor concepts that use heat pipes as an integral part of the cooling system. Heat pipes have been used in reactors to cool components within radiation tests (Deverall, 1973); however, no reactor has been built or tested that uses heat pipes solely as the primary cooling system. Heat pipe cooled reactors will likely require the development of a test reactor to determine the main differences in operational behavior from forced cooled reactors. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of a systems code capable of modeling the coupling between the reactor kinetics and heat pipe controlled heat transport. Heat transport in heat pipe reactors is complex and highly system dependent. Nevertheless, in general terms it relies on heat flowing from the fuel pins through the heat pipe, to the heat exchanger, and then ultimately into the power conversion system and heat sink. A system model is described that is capable of modeling coupled reactor kinetics phenomena, heat transfer dynamics within the fuel pins, and the transient behavior of heat pipes (including the melting of the working fluid). This paper focuses primarily on the coupling effects caused by reactor feedback and compares the observations with forced cooled reactors. A number of reactor startup transients have been modeled, and issues such as power peaking, and power-to-flow mismatches, and loading transients were examined, including the possibility of heat flow from the heat exchanger back into the reactor. This system model is envisioned as a tool to be used for screening various heat pipe cooled reactor concepts, for designing and developing test facility requirements, for use in safety evaluations, and for developing test criteria for in-pile and out-of-pile test facilities. .

  10. Coupled Reactor Kinetics and Heat Transfer Model for Heat Pipe Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    WRIGHT,STEVEN A.; HOUTS,MICHAEL

    2000-11-22

    Heat pipes are often proposed as cooling system components for small fission reactors. SAFE-300 and STAR-C are two reactor concepts that use heat pipes as an integral part of the cooling system. Heat pipes have been used in reactors to cool components within radiation tests (Deverall, 1973); however, no reactor has been built or tested that uses heat pipes solely as the primary cooling system. Heat pipe cooled reactors will likely require the development of a test reactor to determine the main differences in operational behavior from forced cooled reactors. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of a systems code capable of modeling the coupling between the reactor kinetics and heat pipe controlled heat transport. Heat transport in heat pipe reactors is complex and highly system dependent. Nevertheless, in general terms it relies on heat flowing from the fuel pins through the heat pipe, to the heat exchanger, and then ultimately into the power conversion system and heat sink. A system model is described that is capable of modeling coupled reactor kinetics phenomena, heat transfer dynamics within the fuel pins, and the transient behavior of heat pipes (including the melting of the working fluid). The paper focuses primarily on the coupling effects caused by reactor feedback and compares the observations with forced cooled reactors. A number of reactor startup transients have been modeled, and issues such as power peaking, and power-to-flow mismatches, and loading transients were examined, including the possibility of heat flow from the heat exchanger back into the reactor. This system model is envisioned as a tool to be used for screening various heat pipe cooled reactor concepts, for designing and developing test facility requirements, for use in safety evaluations, and for developing test criteria for in-pile and out-of-pile test facilities.

  11. COUPLED FAST-THERMAL POWER BREEDER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Avery, R.

    1961-07-18

    A nuclear reactor having a region operating predominantly on fast neutrons and another region operating predominantly on slow neutrons is described. The fast region is a plutonium core and the slow region is a natural uranium blanket around the core. Both of these regions are free of moderator. A moderating reflector surrounds the uranium blanket. The moderating material and thickness of the reflector are selected so that fissions in the uranium blanket make a substantial contribution to the reactivity of the reactor.

  12. Reactor modeling of the oxidative coupling of methane in membranes reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.; Ramachandra, A.; Ma, Y.H.

    1994-12-31

    A reactor model has been developed to analyze the performance of membrane reactors for the high temperature oxidative coupling of methane and to compare their operation with fixed bed reactors. Three reactor configurations of the shell and tube type were this study: a conventional fixed bed reactor, a tubular porous membrane reactor, dense membrane reactor. For the membrane reactors, oxygen is fed on the shell side and methane into the tube side, and the catalyst is present only inside the tube. Both streams are diluted with helium and the feed ratio is maintained at a methane to oxygen ratio of 2:1 for all three configurations. The ratio of the volumetric flow rate of each reactant to the amount of catalyst is kept the same for the three configurations. Kinetic equations for the oxidative coupling of methane have been taken from the simplified mechanism on Li/MgO proposed by Tung and Lobban, where C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O are the reaction products considered. The modeling study indicates an improved performance of the membrane reactors over the conventional packed bed reactor. For the porous membrane reactor, a 4 angstrom pore size membrane gives higher C{sub 2}H{sub 6} selectivities and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} yields than a 40 Angstrom pore size membrane. For the dense membrane reactor, a lower oxygen permeability gives higher C{sub 2}H{sub 6} yield. Of the three types of reactors, the dense membrane reactor offers the highest C{sub 2}H{sub 6} yields but a longer reactor length is needed because of the lower permeation rate of oxygen from the shell to the tube side, and hence the lower oxygen partial pressure and lower reaction rate on the tube side.

  13. Scalable parallel solution coupling for multi-physics reactor simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Tautges, T. J.; Caceres, A.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2009-01-01

    Reactor simulation depends on the coupled solution of various physics types, including neutronics, thermal/hydraulics, and structural mechanics. This paper describes the formulation and implementation of a parallel solution coupling capability being developed for reactor simulation. The coupling process consists of mesh and coupler initialization, point location, field interpolation, and field normalization. We report here our test of this capability on an example problem, namely, a reflector assembly from an advanced burner test reactor. Performance of this coupler in parallel is reasonable for the chosen problem size and range of processor counts. The runtime is dominated by startup costs, which amortize over the entire coupled simulation. Future efforts will include adding more sophisticated interpolation and normalization methods, to accommodate different numerical solvers used in various physics modules and to obtain better conservation properties for certain field types.

  14. Oxidative coupling of methane using inorganic membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.H.; Moser, W.R.; Dixon, A.G.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this research is to improve the oxidative coupling of methane in a catalytic inorganic membrane reactor. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and relatively higher yields than in fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause for decreased selectivity in oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Modeling work which aimed at predicting the observed experimental trends in porous membrane reactors was also undertaken in this research program.

  15. OXIDATIVE COUPLING OF METHANE USING INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Y.H. Ma; Dr. W.R. Moser; Dr. A.G. Dixon; Dr. A.M. Ramachandra; Dr. Y. Lu; C. Binkerd

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this research is to study the oxidative coupling of methane in catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and higher yields than in conventional non-porous, co-feed, fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for the formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause of decreased selectivity in the oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Membrane reactor technology also offers the potential for modifying the membranes both to improve catalytic properties as well as to regulate the rate of the permeation/diffusion of reactants through the membrane to minimize by-product generation. Other benefits also exist with membrane reactors, such as the mitigation of thermal hot-spots for highly exothermic reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane. The application of catalytically active inorganic membranes has potential for drastically increasing the yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity.

  16. Nuclear reactor remote disconnect control rod coupling indicator

    DOEpatents

    Vuckovich, Michael

    1977-01-01

    A coupling indicator for use with nuclear reactor control rod assemblies which have remotely disengageable couplings between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling indicator indicates whether the control rod and the control rod drive shaft are engaged or disengaged. A resistive network, utilizing magnetic reed switches, senses the position of the control rod drive mechanism lead screw and the control rod position indicating tube, and the relative position of these two elements with respect to each other is compared to determine whether the coupling is engaged or disengaged.

  17. Parity in knot theory

    SciTech Connect

    Manturov, Vassily O

    2010-06-29

    In this work we study knot theories with a parity property for crossings: every crossing is declared to be even or odd according to a certain preassigned rule. If this rule satisfies a set of simple axioms related to the Reidemeister moves, then certain simple invariants solving the minimality problem can be defined, and invariant maps on the set of knots can be constructed. The most important example of a knot theory with parity is the theory of virtual knots. Using the parity property arising from Gauss diagrams we show that even a gross simplification of the theory of virtual knots, namely, the theory of free knots, admits simple and highly nontrivial invariants. This gives a solution to a problem of Turaev, who conjectured that all free knots are trivial. In this work we show that free knots are generally not invertible, and provide invariants which detect the invertibility of free knots. The passage to ordinary virtual knots allows us to strengthen known invariants (such as the Kauffman bracket) using parity considerations. We also discuss other examples of knot theories with parity. Bibliography: 27 items.

  18. Tightly Coupled Multiphysics Algorithm for Pebble Bed Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    HyeongKae Park; Dana Knoll; Derek Gaston; Richard Martineau

    2010-10-01

    We have developed a tightly coupled multiphysics simulation tool for the pebble-bed reactor (PBR) concept, a type of Very High-Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR). The simulation tool, PRONGHORN, takes advantages of the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment library, and is capable of solving multidimensional thermal-fluid and neutronics problems implicitly with a Newton-based approach. Expensive Jacobian matrix formation is alleviated via the Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method, and physics-based preconditioning is applied to minimize Krylov iterations. Motivation for the work is provided via analysis and numerical experiments on simpler multiphysics reactor models. We then provide detail of the physical models and numerical methods in PRONGHORN. Finally, PRONGHORN's algorithmic capability is demonstrated on a number of PBR test cases.

  19. Localized patterns in homogeneous networks of diffusively coupled reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Peter K.; Horsthemke, Werner

    2005-06-01

    We study the influence of network topology on instabilities of the homogeneous steady state of diffusively coupled, monostable nonlinear cells. A particular focus are diffusion-induced instabilities, i.e., Turing instabilities. We present various theorems that make it possible to determine analytically the stability properties of networks with arbitrary topologies and general monostable dynamics of the individual cells. This work aims in particular to determine those topologies that will give rise to localized stationary patterns. Specific examples focus on well-stirred chemical reactors. The reactors are coupled by diffusion-like mass transfer, and the kinetics is given by the Lengyel-Epstein model, a two-variable scheme for the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction.

  20. Coupled simulation of the reactor core using CUPID/MASTER

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. R.; Cho, H. K.; Yoon, H. Y.; Jeong, J. J.

    2012-07-01

    The CUPID is a component-scale thermal hydraulics code which is aimed for the analysis of transient two-phase flows in nuclear reactor components such as the reactor vessel, steam generator, containment. This code adopts a three-dimensional, transient, two-phase and three-field model, and includes physical models and correlations of the interfacial mass, momentum, and energy transfer for the closure. In the present paper, a multi-physics simulation was performed by coupling CUPID with a three dimensional neutron kinetics code, MASTER. MASTER is merged into CUPID as a dynamic link library (DLL). The APR1400 reactor core during a control rod drop/ejection accident was simulated as an example by adopting a porous media approach to employ a fuel assembly. The following sections present the numerical modeling for the reactor core, coupling of the kinetics code, and the simulation results. And also, a preliminary study for multi-scale simulation between CUPID and system-scaled thermal hydraulics code, MARS will be introduced as well. (authors)

  1. Knot theory realizations in nematic colloids.

    PubMed

    Čopar, Simon; Tkalec, Uroš; Muševič, Igor; Žumer, Slobodan

    2015-02-10

    Nematic braids are reconfigurable knots and links formed by the disclination loops that entangle colloidal particles dispersed in a nematic liquid crystal. We focus on entangled nematic disclinations in thin twisted nematic layers stabilized by 2D arrays of colloidal particles that can be controlled with laser tweezers. We take the experimentally assembled structures and demonstrate the correspondence of the knot invariants, constructed graphs, and surfaces associated with the disclination loop to the physically observable features specific to the geometry at hand. The nematic nature of the medium adds additional topological parameters to the conventional results of knot theory, which couple with the knot topology and introduce order into the phase diagram of possible structures. The crystalline order allows the simplified construction of the Jones polynomial and medial graphs, and the steps in the construction algorithm are mirrored in the physics of liquid crystals.

  2. Knot theory realizations in nematic colloids

    PubMed Central

    Čopar, Simon; Tkalec, Uroš; Muševič, Igor; Žumer, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Nematic braids are reconfigurable knots and links formed by the disclination loops that entangle colloidal particles dispersed in a nematic liquid crystal. We focus on entangled nematic disclinations in thin twisted nematic layers stabilized by 2D arrays of colloidal particles that can be controlled with laser tweezers. We take the experimentally assembled structures and demonstrate the correspondence of the knot invariants, constructed graphs, and surfaces associated with the disclination loop to the physically observable features specific to the geometry at hand. The nematic nature of the medium adds additional topological parameters to the conventional results of knot theory, which couple with the knot topology and introduce order into the phase diagram of possible structures. The crystalline order allows the simplified construction of the Jones polynomial and medial graphs, and the steps in the construction algorithm are mirrored in the physics of liquid crystals. PMID:25624467

  3. Multiple steady states in coupled flow tank reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Katharine L. C.; Kottalam, J.; Hatlee, Michael D.; Ross, John

    1992-05-01

    Coupling between continuous-flow, stirred tank reactors (CSTR's), each having multiple steady states, can produce new steady states with different concentrations of the chemical species in each of the coupled tanks. In this work, we identify a kinetic potential ψ that governs the deterministic time evolution of coupled tank reactors, when the reaction mechanism permits a single-variable description of the states of the individual tanks; examples include the iodate-arsenous acid reaction, a cubic model suggested by Noyes, and two quintic models. Stable steady states correspond to minima of ψ, and unstable steady states to maxima or saddle points; marginally stable states typically correspond to saddle-node points. We illustrate the variation in ψ due to changes in the rate constant for external material intake (k0) and for exchange between tanks (kx). For fixed k0 values, we analyze the changes in numbers and types of steady states as kx increases from zero. We show that steady states disappear by pairwise coalescence; we also show that new steady states may appear with increasing kx, when the reaction mechanism is sufficiently complex. For fixed initial conditions, the steady state ultimately reached in a mixing experiment may depend on the exchange rate constant as a function of time, kx(t) : Adiabatic mixing is obtained in the limit of slow changes in kx(t) and instantaneous mixing in the limit as kx(t)→∞ while t remains small. Analyses based on the potential ψ predict the outcome of mixing experiments for arbitrary kx(t). We show by explicit counterexamples that a prior theory developed by Noyes does not correctly predict the instability points or the transitions between steady states of coupled tanks, to be expected in mixing experiments. We further show that the outcome of such experiments is not connected to the relative stability of steady states in individual tank reactors. We find that coupling may effectively stabilize the tanks. We provide

  4. Tying quantum knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, D. S.; Ray, M. W.; Tiurev, K.; Ruokokoski, E.; Gheorghe, A. H.; Möttönen, M.

    2016-05-01

    As topologically stable objects in field theories, knots have been put forward to explain various persistent phenomena in systems ranging from atoms and molecules to cosmic textures in the universe. Recent experiments have reported the observation of knots in different classical contexts. However, no experimental observation of knots has yet been reported in quantum matter. Here we demonstrate the experimental creation and detection of knot solitons in the order parameter of a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. The observed texture corresponds to a topologically nontrivial element of the third homotopy group and exhibits the celebrated Hopf fibration, which unites many seemingly unrelated physical phenomena. Our work calls for future studies of the stability and dynamics knot solitons in the quantum regime.

  5. Protein knot server: detection of knots in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Kolesov, Grigory; Virnau, Peter; Kardar, Mehran; Mirny, Leonid A

    2007-07-01

    KNOTS (http://knots.mit.edu) is a web server that detects knots in protein structures. Several protein structures have been reported to contain intricate knots. The physiological role of knots and their effect on folding and evolution is an area of active research. The user submits a PDB id or uploads a 3D protein structure in PDB or mmCIF format. The current implementation of the server uses the Alexander polynomial to detect knots. The results of the analysis that are presented to the user are the location of the knot in the structure, the type of the knot and an interactive visualization of the knot. The results can also be downloaded and viewed offline. The server also maintains a regularly updated list of known knots in protein structures.

  6. CRDIAC: Coupled Reactor Depletion Instrument with Automated Control

    SciTech Connect

    Steven K. Logan

    2012-08-01

    When modeling the behavior of a nuclear reactor over time, it is important to understand how the isotopes in the reactor will change, or transmute, over that time. This is especially important in the reactor fuel itself. Many nuclear physics modeling codes model how particles interact in the system, but do not model this over time. Thus, another code is used in conjunction with the nuclear physics code to accomplish this. In our code, Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) codes and the Multi Reactor Transmutation Analysis Utility (MRTAU) were chosen as the codes to use. In this way, MCNP would produce the reaction rates in the different isotopes present and MRTAU would use cross sections generated from these reaction rates to determine how the mass of each isotope is lost or gained. Between these two codes, the information must be altered and edited for use. For this, a Python 2.7 script was developed to aid the user in getting the information in the correct forms. This newly developed methodology was called the Coupled Reactor Depletion Instrument with Automated Controls (CRDIAC). As is the case in any newly developed methodology for modeling of physical phenomena, CRDIAC needed to be verified against similar methodology and validated against data taken from an experiment, in our case AFIP-3. AFIP-3 was a reduced enrichment plate type fuel tested in the ATR. We verified our methodology against the MCNP Coupled with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) method and validated our work against the Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) data. When compared to MCWO, the difference in concentration of U-235 throughout Cycle 144A was about 1%. When compared to the PIE data, the average bias for end of life U-235 concentration was about 2%. These results from CRDIAC therefore agree with the MCWO and PIE data, validating and verifying CRDIAC. CRDIAC provides an alternative to using ORIGEN-based methodology, which is useful because CRDIAC's depletion code, MRTAU, uses every available isotope in its depletion

  7. Knot Theory with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handa, Yuichi; Mattman, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    There are many interesting explorations that can be done in knot theory, the study of mathematical knots. This article offers some knot theory activities that are appropriate for elementary grade children. These activities teach some basic concepts from knot theory as a natural extension of commonly-taught geometric ideas. (Contains 10 figures.)

  8. Simple Coupling of Reactor Physics Effects and Uncertain Nuances

    2012-08-27

    The "Simple Coupling of Reactor Physics Effects and Uncertain Nuances" (SCORPEUN) code is a simple r-z 1-group neutron diffusion code where each r-mesh is coupled to a single-flow-channel model that represents all flow-channels in that r-mesh. This 1-D model assesses q=m*Cp*deletaT for each z-mesh in that channel. This flow channel model is then coupled to a simple 1-D heat conduction model for ascertaining the peak center-line fuel temperature in a hypothetical pin assigned to thatmore » flow channel. The code has property lookup capability for water, Na, Zirc, HT9, metalic fuel, oxide fuel, etc. It has linear interpolation features for micro-scopic cross-sections with respect to coolant density and fuel temperature. ***This last feature has not been fully tested and may need development***. The interpolated microscopic cross-sections are then combined (using the water density from the T/H calculation) to generate macroscopic diffusion coefficient, removal cross-section and nu-sigmaF for each r-z mesh of the neutron diffusion code.« less

  9. Methane coupling by membrane reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, December 25, 1993--March 24, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-15

    A comparison study was made between a quartz tube non-porous packed bed reactor and a 40 Angstrom pore size porous VYCOR membrane reactor using two different methane coupling catalysts. Comparisons of reactor performance of the two reactors were made on the basis of amount of methane converted, C{sub 2} selectivities and the total C{sub 2} yields. Identical flow and temperature conditions were maintained for the two reactor systems for this study. These studies appear to indicate that improved performance can be obtained in VYCOR membrane reactors. The product stream from the tube side effluent of the porous VYCOR membrane reactor was superior to that from the quartz tube non-porous reactor in terms of improved C{sub 2} selectivity. At the present stage of research, the total effluent from the membrane reactor compared slightly less favorably to the effluent from a non-porous reactor, but studies are continuing on devising a reactor configuration which increases methane throughput in the tube side of the membrane reactor which is expected to demonstrate the overall superiority of the membrane reactor. Simulation results obtained by doing a parameter study for different reactor systems showed that, for the methane coupling reaction, where the desired product formation had a lower kinetic order with respect to oxygen, improved C{sub 2} yields could be achieved in membrane reactors if the residence times were sufficiently high.

  10. Sedimentation of knotted polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piili, J.; Marenduzzo, D.; Kaski, K.; Linna, R. P.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the sedimentation of knotted polymers by means of stochastic rotation dynamics, a molecular dynamics algorithm that takes hydrodynamics fully into account. We show that the sedimentation coefficient s, related to the terminal velocity of the knotted polymers, increases linearly with the average crossing number nc of the corresponding ideal knot. This provides direct computational confirmation of this relation, postulated on the basis of sedimentation experiments by Rybenkov [J. Mol. Biol.10.1006/jmbi.1996.0876 267, 299 (1997)]. Such a relation was previously shown to hold with simulations for knot electrophoresis. We also show that there is an accurate linear dependence of s on the inverse of the radius of gyration Rg-1, more specifically with the inverse of the Rg component that is perpendicular to the direction along which the polymer sediments. When the polymer sediments in a slab, the walls affect the results appreciably. However, Rg-1 remains to a good precision linearly dependent on nc. Therefore, Rg-1 is a good measure of a knot's complexity.

  11. Coupled Monte Carlo neutronics and thermal hydraulics for power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bernnat, W.; Buck, M.; Mattes, M.; Zwermann, W.; Pasichnyk, I.; Velkov, K.

    2012-07-01

    The availability of high performance computing resources enables more and more the use of detailed Monte Carlo models even for full core power reactors. The detailed structure of the core can be described by lattices, modeled by so-called repeated structures e.g. in Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP5 or MCNPX. For cores with mainly uniform material compositions, fuel and moderator temperatures, there is no problem in constructing core models. However, when the material composition and the temperatures vary strongly a huge number of different material cells must be described which complicate the input and in many cases exceed code or memory limits. The second problem arises with the preparation of corresponding temperature dependent cross sections and thermal scattering laws. Only if these problems can be solved, a realistic coupling of Monte Carlo neutronics with an appropriate thermal-hydraulics model is possible. In this paper a method for the treatment of detailed material and temperature distributions in MCNP5 is described based on user-specified internal functions which assign distinct elements of the core cells to material specifications (e.g. water density) and temperatures from a thermal-hydraulics code. The core grid itself can be described with a uniform material specification. The temperature dependency of cross sections and thermal neutron scattering laws is taken into account by interpolation, requiring only a limited number of data sets generated for different temperatures. Applications will be shown for the stationary part of the Purdue PWR benchmark using ATHLET for thermal- hydraulics and for a generic Modular High Temperature reactor using THERMIX for thermal- hydraulics. (authors)

  12. A coupled chemical burster: The chlorine dioxide-iodide reaction in two flow reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolnik, Milos; Epstein, Irving R.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of the chlorine dioxide-iodide reaction has been studied in a system consisting of two continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). The reactors are coupled by computer monitoring of the electrochemical potential in each reactor, which is then used to control the input into the other reactor. Two forms of coupling are employed: reciprocally triggered, exponentially decreasing stimulation, and alternating mass exchange. The reaction, which exhibits oscillatory and excitable behavior in a single CSTR, displays neuronlike bursting behavior with both forms of coupling. Reciprocal stimulation yields bursting in both reactors, while with alternating mass exchange, bursting is observed in one reactor and complex oscillation in the other. A simple model of the reaction gives good agreement between the experimental observations and numerical simulations.

  13. Methane coupling by membrane reactor. Quarterly technical progress report: June 25, 1993--September 24, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yi Hua

    1993-10-28

    Several membranes have been investigated for use in a membrane reactor. Porous VYCOR has been tested for permeability changes with temperature. Three-sectional VYCOR membranes, with a porous central section, have been fabricated and tested in the experimental setup. Catalysts for methane coupling have been reviewed in the literature and five catalysts have been selected. Modeling studies of the methane oxidative coupling reaction in different reactor configurations shows higher C{sub 2} selectivity and yield with membrane reactors as compared to conventional packed bed reactors.

  14. Coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics numerical simulations of a Molten Fast Salt Reactor (MFSR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laureau, A.; Rubiolo, P. R.; Heuer, D.; Merle-Lucotte, E.; Brovchenko, M.

    2014-06-01

    Coupled neutronics and thermalhydraulic numerical analyses of a molten salt fast reactor are presented. These preliminary numerical simulations are carried-out using the Monte Carlo code MCNP and the Computation Fluid Dynamic code OpenFOAM. The main objectives of this analysis performed at steady-reactor conditions are to confirm the acceptability of the current neutronic and thermalhydraulic designs of the reactor, to study the effects of the reactor operating conditions on some of the key MSFR design parameters such as the temperature peaking factor. The effects of the precursor's motion on the reactor safety parameters such as the effective fraction of delayed neutrons have been evaluated.

  15. Linked and knotted chimera filaments in oscillatory systems.

    PubMed

    Lau, Hon Wai; Davidsen, Jörn

    2016-07-01

    While the existence of stable knotted and linked vortex lines has been established in many experimental and theoretical systems, their existence in oscillatory systems and systems with nonlocal coupling has remained elusive. Here, we present strong numerical evidence that stable knots and links such as trefoils and Hopf links do exist in simple, complex, and chaotic oscillatory systems if the coupling between the oscillators is neither too short ranged nor too long ranged. In this case, effective repulsive forces between vortex lines in knotted and linked structures stabilize curvature-driven shrinkage observed for single vortex rings. In contrast to real fluids and excitable media, the vortex lines correspond to scroll wave chimeras [synchronized scroll waves with spatially extended (tubelike) unsynchronized filaments], a prime example of spontaneous synchrony breaking in systems of identical oscillators. In the case of complex oscillatory systems, this leads to a topological superstructure combining knotted filaments and synchronization defect sheets.

  16. Linked and knotted chimera filaments in oscillatory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Hon Wai; Davidsen, Jörn

    2016-07-01

    While the existence of stable knotted and linked vortex lines has been established in many experimental and theoretical systems, their existence in oscillatory systems and systems with nonlocal coupling has remained elusive. Here, we present strong numerical evidence that stable knots and links such as trefoils and Hopf links do exist in simple, complex, and chaotic oscillatory systems if the coupling between the oscillators is neither too short ranged nor too long ranged. In this case, effective repulsive forces between vortex lines in knotted and linked structures stabilize curvature-driven shrinkage observed for single vortex rings. In contrast to real fluids and excitable media, the vortex lines correspond to scroll wave chimeras [synchronized scroll waves with spatially extended (tubelike) unsynchronized filaments], a prime example of spontaneous synchrony breaking in systems of identical oscillators. In the case of complex oscillatory systems, this leads to a topological superstructure combining knotted filaments and synchronization defect sheets.

  17. Linked and knotted chimera filaments in oscillatory systems.

    PubMed

    Lau, Hon Wai; Davidsen, Jörn

    2016-07-01

    While the existence of stable knotted and linked vortex lines has been established in many experimental and theoretical systems, their existence in oscillatory systems and systems with nonlocal coupling has remained elusive. Here, we present strong numerical evidence that stable knots and links such as trefoils and Hopf links do exist in simple, complex, and chaotic oscillatory systems if the coupling between the oscillators is neither too short ranged nor too long ranged. In this case, effective repulsive forces between vortex lines in knotted and linked structures stabilize curvature-driven shrinkage observed for single vortex rings. In contrast to real fluids and excitable media, the vortex lines correspond to scroll wave chimeras [synchronized scroll waves with spatially extended (tubelike) unsynchronized filaments], a prime example of spontaneous synchrony breaking in systems of identical oscillators. In the case of complex oscillatory systems, this leads to a topological superstructure combining knotted filaments and synchronization defect sheets. PMID:27575065

  18. Network topology and Turing instabilities in small arrays of diffusively coupled reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsthemke, Werner; Lam, Kwan; Moore, Peter K.

    2004-08-01

    We study the effect of the network structure on the diffusion-induced instability to nonuniform steady states in arrays of diffusively coupled reactors. The kinetics is given by the Lengyel-Epstein model, and we derive the conditions for Turing instabilities in all arrays of two, three, and four reactors.

  19. High-resolution coupled physics solvers for analysing fine-scale nuclear reactor design problems

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Vijay S.; Merzari, Elia; Tautges, Timothy; Jain, Rajeev; Obabko, Aleksandr; Smith, Michael; Fischer, Paul

    2014-01-01

    An integrated multi-physics simulation capability for the design and analysis of current and future nuclear reactor models is being investigated, to tightly couple neutron transport and thermal-hydraulics physics under the SHARP framework. Over several years, high-fidelity, validated mono-physics solvers with proven scalability on petascale architectures have been developed independently. Based on a unified component-based architecture, these existing codes can be coupled with a mesh-data backplane and a flexible coupling-strategy-based driver suite to produce a viable tool for analysts. The goal of the SHARP framework is to perform fully resolved coupled physics analysis of a reactor on heterogeneous geometry, in order to reduce the overall numerical uncertainty while leveraging available computational resources. The coupling methodology and software interfaces of the framework are presented, along with verification studies on two representative fast sodium-cooled reactor demonstration problems to prove the usability of the SHARP framework. PMID:24982250

  20. High-resolution coupled physics solvers for analysing fine-scale nuclear reactor design problems.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Vijay S; Merzari, Elia; Tautges, Timothy; Jain, Rajeev; Obabko, Aleksandr; Smith, Michael; Fischer, Paul

    2014-08-01

    An integrated multi-physics simulation capability for the design and analysis of current and future nuclear reactor models is being investigated, to tightly couple neutron transport and thermal-hydraulics physics under the SHARP framework. Over several years, high-fidelity, validated mono-physics solvers with proven scalability on petascale architectures have been developed independently. Based on a unified component-based architecture, these existing codes can be coupled with a mesh-data backplane and a flexible coupling-strategy-based driver suite to produce a viable tool for analysts. The goal of the SHARP framework is to perform fully resolved coupled physics analysis of a reactor on heterogeneous geometry, in order to reduce the overall numerical uncertainty while leveraging available computational resources. The coupling methodology and software interfaces of the framework are presented, along with verification studies on two representative fast sodium-cooled reactor demonstration problems to prove the usability of the SHARP framework. PMID:24982250

  1. High-resolution coupled physics solvers for analysing fine-scale nuclear reactor design problems.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Vijay S; Merzari, Elia; Tautges, Timothy; Jain, Rajeev; Obabko, Aleksandr; Smith, Michael; Fischer, Paul

    2014-08-01

    An integrated multi-physics simulation capability for the design and analysis of current and future nuclear reactor models is being investigated, to tightly couple neutron transport and thermal-hydraulics physics under the SHARP framework. Over several years, high-fidelity, validated mono-physics solvers with proven scalability on petascale architectures have been developed independently. Based on a unified component-based architecture, these existing codes can be coupled with a mesh-data backplane and a flexible coupling-strategy-based driver suite to produce a viable tool for analysts. The goal of the SHARP framework is to perform fully resolved coupled physics analysis of a reactor on heterogeneous geometry, in order to reduce the overall numerical uncertainty while leveraging available computational resources. The coupling methodology and software interfaces of the framework are presented, along with verification studies on two representative fast sodium-cooled reactor demonstration problems to prove the usability of the SHARP framework.

  2. k/not theory.

    PubMed

    Chowdhry, M

    2000-01-01

    SUMMARY This paper discusses the role of the personal experience in the writing process. Using a personal/journal writing style the author charts the journey of a recent play Skin into Rainbows from first draft to production. The author plays with the constructs of writing and juxtapositions these against a form of Knot Theory to measure their value, playing with math and language techniques in a search for truth.

  3. k/not theory.

    PubMed

    Chowdhry, M

    2000-01-01

    SUMMARY This paper discusses the role of the personal experience in the writing process. Using a personal/journal writing style the author charts the journey of a recent play Skin into Rainbows from first draft to production. The author plays with the constructs of writing and juxtapositions these against a form of Knot Theory to measure their value, playing with math and language techniques in a search for truth. PMID:24802683

  4. Knot probabilities in random diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantarella, Jason; Chapman, Harrison; Mastin, Matt

    2016-10-01

    We consider a natural model of random knotting—choose a knot diagram at random from the finite set of diagrams with n crossings. We tabulate diagrams with 10 and fewer crossings and classify the diagrams by knot type, allowing us to compute exact probabilities for knots in this model. As expected, most diagrams with 10 and fewer crossings are unknots (about 78% of the roughly 1.6 billion 10 crossing diagrams). For these crossing numbers, the unknot fraction is mostly explained by the prevalence of ‘tree-like’ diagrams which are unknots for any assignment of over/under information at crossings. The data shows a roughly linear relationship between the log of knot type probability and the log of the frequency rank of the knot type, analogous to Zipf’s law for word frequency. The complete tabulation and all knot frequencies are included as supplementary data.

  5. Metastable Tight Knots in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Renner, C. Benjamin; Doyle, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Knotted structures can spontaneously occur in polymers such as DNA and proteins, and the formation of knots affects biological functions, mechanical strength and rheological properties. In this work, we calculate the equilibrium size distribution of trefoil knots in linear DNA using off-lattice simulations. We observe metastable knots on DNA, as predicted by Grosberg and Rabin. Furthermore, we extend their theory to incorporate the finite width of chains and show an agreement between our simulations and the modified theory for real chains. Our results suggest localized knots spontaneously occur in long DNA and the contour length in the knot ranges from 600 to 1800 nm. This research was supported by the National Research Foundation Singapore through the Singapore MIT Alliance for Research and Technology's research program in BioSystems and Micromechanics, the National Science Foundation (Grant No. 1335938).

  6. Naughty knot: a case of nasogastric tube knotting.

    PubMed

    Ravind, Rahul; Prameela, Chelakkot G; Gurram, Bharath Chandra; Dinesh, Makuny

    2015-10-13

    Nasogastric intubation is a common procedure for enteral nutritional support in medical practice. Random spontaneous true knot formation in the tube is rarely encountered and is a cause of unanticipated trauma. This is a case of a true knot formation diagnosed with fluoroscopy and managed without untoward trauma.

  7. How superfluid vortex knots untie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleckner, Dustin; Kauffman, Louis H.; Irvine, William T. M.

    2016-07-01

    Knots and links often occur in physical systems, including shaken strands of rope and DNA (ref. ), as well as the more subtle structure of vortices in fluids and magnetic fields in plasmas. Theories of fluid flows without dissipation predict these tangled structures persist, constraining the evolution of the flow much like a knot tied in a shoelace. This constraint gives rise to a conserved quantity known as helicity, offering both fundamental insights and enticing possibilities for controlling complex flows. However, even small amounts of dissipation allow knots to untie by means of `cut-and-splice’ operations known as reconnections. Despite the potentially fundamental role of these reconnections in understanding helicity--and the stability of knotted fields more generally--their effect is known only for a handful of simple knots. Here we study the evolution of 322 elemental knots and links in the Gross-Pitaevskii model for a superfluid, and find that they universally untie. We observe that the centreline helicity is partially preserved even as the knots untie, a remnant of the perfect helicity conservation predicted for idealized fluids. Moreover, we find that the topological pathways of untying knots have simple descriptions in terms of minimal two-dimensional knot diagrams, and tend to concentrate in states which are twisted in only one direction. These results have direct analogies to previous studies of simple knots in several systems, including DNA recombination and classical fluids. This similarity in the geometric and topological evolution suggests there are universal aspects in the behaviour of knots in dissipative fields.

  8. Methane coupling by membrane reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, September 25, 1995--December 24, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-15

    The performance of the third type of catalytic membrane reactor configuration, with catalyst deposited in the membrane and no catalyst or inert materials in the tube side, was evaluated. The C{sub 2} selectivity obtained was about 10% due to the gas phase reaction in the empty tube side of the reactor. The membrane reactor with an oxygen-permeable dense membrane has been built. The use of a dense membrane will eliminate the loss of hydrocarbon from the tube side to the shell side, as observed in the Vycor glass membrane reactor. Also, air can be used as the oxygen source without contaminating the product. La/MgO was synthesized and will be used as the catalyst for the dense membrane reactor. This catalyst was reported in the literature to show significant improvement of C{sub 2} selectivity and yield for oxidative coupling of methane in a packed-bed reactor by using the operation mode of staged-feed of oxygen. A reactor mode for methane oxidative coupling in reactors with both distributed oxygen feed and C{sub 2} product removal was developed based on the general model of cross-flow reactors reported in the last quarterly report. A distributed oxygen feed could give rise to much higher C{sub 2} yield than the co-feed reactor as long as the space time is long enough. In the case of a two-membrane reactor, where oxygen is supplied by one membrane and products are removed through the other membrane, a high separation factor of C{sub 2} product to methane for the product-removal membrane is critical to achieve high C{sub 2} yield.

  9. Methane coupling by membrane reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, June 25, 1994--September 24, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yi Hua

    1995-01-04

    This quarterly report describes results from the experimental studies on oxidative coupling of methane, oxygen conducting perovskite dense membrane synthesis and modeling studies of the methane coupling reaction. The focus of the experimental study is to explore the effects of varying catalyst loading, varying methane to oxygen ratios and feed conditions when the oxygen conversion is much less than 100%. Results from these studies help in understanding the effects of various parameters controlling methane coupling. Dense membrane synthesis and characterization results are presented which describe new approaches to the synthesis and characterization of these membranes. The modeling results described in this report present a theoretical fit to the experimental data on oxidative coupling of methane in fixed bed reactors. The parameters from the fit are used to predict the trends in experimental data obtained from VYCOR membrane reactors. The predicted trends are based on a theoretical model employing simplified methane coupling kinetics.

  10. Limits on the variability of coupling constants from the Oklo natural reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, J. M.

    1983-12-01

    The theoretical basis of prehistoric natural nuclear reactors is summarized and the natural reactor at Oklo in Gabon is discussed. An analysis of isotopic abundances at the Oklo site suggests that the extremely narrow neutron capture resonance in Sm-149 has moved by less than 0.01 eV in the past two billion years. This result is used to place limits on the variability of coupling constants over this period.

  11. Optimal Coupling of a Nuclear Reactor and a Thermal Desalination Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Caruso, G.; Naviglio, A.; Nisan, S.; Bielak, B.; Cinotti, L.; Humphries, J.R.; Martins, N.; Volpi, L.

    2002-07-01

    The present study, performed in the framework of the EURODESAL Project (5. EU FWP), deals with the analysis of the 'optimum' coupling of a PWR and of a HTGR plant with a thermal desalination plant, based on the Multiple Effects process. The reference reactors are the AP600 and the PWR900 as Pressurized reactors and the GT-MHR as Gas reactor. The calculations performed show that there are several technical solutions allowing to couple PWRs and GRs to a ME desalination plant. The optimization criteria concern the technical feasibility of the coupling, producing the maximum quantity of fresh water at the lower cost, without unacceptable reduction of the electrical power produced and without undue health hazard for population. (authors)

  12. Methane coupling by membrane reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, June 25--September 24, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.H.

    1997-11-02

    A new reactor module was constructed as a porous membrane reactor or radial flow reactor for the study of methane oxidative coupling. A Mn-W-Na/SiO{sub 2} catalyst was prepared by the slurry mixing method and its catalytic activity was evaluated in a porous alumina membrane reactor. Experimental results showed that the Mn-W-Na/SiO{sub 2} catalyst calcined at 900 C was not stable during methane oxidative coupling. After 1,050 C calcination the catalyst became stable, however its activity was not as good as the one prepared by incipient wetness impregnation. The dense membrane tube obtained from Eltron Research Inc. was tested in a membrane reactor for the catalytic oxidative coupling of methane. The Mn-W-Na/SiO{sub 2} catalyst prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation method was packed inside the membrane tube. The initial oxygen flux was 0.02 cc/cm{sup 2}-min. It increased to 0.34 cc/cm{sup 2}-min after reaction and remained unchanged during a period of 31 days on stream. In a temperature range of 688 C to 977 C, the increase in oxygen flux with temperature obeyed the Arrhenius law. The C{sub 2} yield was about 10% at a methane conversion of 20%. The yield of the membrane reactor with Eltron membrane tube was higher than that with the Argonne membrane tube.

  13. Neutronic/Thermalhydraulic Coupling Technigues for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Ragusa; Andrew Siegel; Jean-Michel Ruggieri

    2010-09-28

    The objective of this project was to test new coupling algorithms and enable efficient and scalable multi-physics simulations of advanced nuclear reactors, with considerations regarding the implementation of such algorithms in massively parallel environments. Numerical tests were carried out to verify the proposed approach and the examples included some reactor transients. The project was directly related to the Sodium Fast Reactor program element of the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative and the Advanced Fuel cycle Initiative, and, supported the requirement of high-fidelity simulation as a mean of achieving the goals of the presidential Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) vision.

  14. Continuous flow Sonogashira C-C coupling using a heterogeneous palladium-copper dual reactor.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li-Min; Sem, Zhi-Yu; Chong, Wei-Yuan; Liu, Xiaoqian; Hendra; Kwan, Wei Lek; Lee, Chi-Lik Ken

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of a heterogeneous catalyst system on continuous flow chemistry. A palladium (Pd) coated tubular reactor was placed in line with copper (Cu) tubing using a continuous flow platform, and a Sonogashira C-C coupling reaction was used to evaluate the performance. The reactions were favorably carried out in the Cu reactor, catalyzed by the traces of leached Pd from the Pd reactor. The leached Pd and Cu were trapped with a metal scavaging resin at the back-end of the continuous flow system, affording a genuine approach toward green chemistry. PMID:23248977

  15. Specification of the Advanced Burner Test Reactor Multi-Physics Coupling Demonstration Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Shemon, E. R.; Grudzinski, J. J.; Lee, C. H.; Thomas, J. W.; Yu, Y. Q.

    2015-12-21

    This document specifies the multi-physics nuclear reactor demonstration problem using the SHARP software package developed by NEAMS. The SHARP toolset simulates the key coupled physics phenomena inside a nuclear reactor. The PROTEUS neutronics code models the neutron transport within the system, the Nek5000 computational fluid dynamics code models the fluid flow and heat transfer, and the DIABLO structural mechanics code models structural and mechanical deformation. The three codes are coupled to the MOAB mesh framework which allows feedback from neutronics, fluid mechanics, and mechanical deformation in a compatible format.

  16. A coupled nuclear reactor thermal energy storage system for enhanced load following operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alameri, Saeed A.

    Nuclear power plants usually provide base-load electric power and operate most economically at a constant power level. In an energy grid with a high fraction of renewable energy sources, future nuclear reactors may be subject to significantly variable power demands. These variable power demands can negatively impact the effective capacity factor of the reactor and result in severe economic penalties. Coupling the reactor to a large Thermal Energy Storage (TES) block will allow the reactor to better respond to variable power demands. In the system described in this thesis, a Prismatic-core Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PAHTR) operates at constant power with heat provided to a TES block that supplies power as needed to a secondary energy conversion system. The PAHTR is designed to have a power rating of 300 MW th, with 19.75 wt% enriched Tri-Structural-Isotropic UO 2 fuel and a five year operating cycle. The passive molten salt TES system will operate in the latent heat region with an energy storage capacity of 150 MWd. Multiple smaller TES blocks are used instead of one large block to enhance the efficiency and maintenance complexity of the system. A transient model of the coupled reactor/TES system is developed to study the behavior of the system in response to varying load demands. The model uses six-delayed group point kinetics and decay heat models coupled to thermal-hydraulic and heat transfer models of the reactor and TES system. Based on the transient results, the preferred TES design consists of 1000 blocks, each containing 11000 LiCl phase change material tubes. A safety assessment of major reactor events demonstrates the inherent safety of the coupled system. The loss of forced circulation study determined the minimum required air convection heat removal rate from the reactor core and the lowest possible reduced primary flow rate that can maintain the reactor in a safe condition. The loss of ultimate heat sink study demonstrated the ability of the TES

  17. Knots and Preons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Robert J.

    It is shown that the four quantum trefoil solitons that are described by the irreducible representations { D}3/2mm' of the quantum algebra SLq(2) [and that may be identified with the four families of elementary fermions (e, μ, τ νeνμντd, s, b; u, c, t)] may be built out of three preons, chosen from two charged preons with charges (1/3, -1/3) and two neutral preons. These preons are fermions and are described by the { D}1/2mm' representation of SLq(2). There are also four bosonic preons described by the { D}1mm^' and { D}000 representations of SLq(2). The knotted standard theory may be replicated at the preon level and the conjectured particles are in principle indirectly observable.

  18. Periodic forces trigger knot untying during translocation of knotted proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    Proteins need to be unfolded when translocated through the pores in mitochondrial and other cellular membranes. Knotted proteins, however, might get stuck during this process, jamming the pore, since the diameter of the pore is smaller than the size of maximally tightened knot. The jamming probability dramatically increases as the magnitude of the driving force exceeds a critical value, Fc. In this numerical study, we show that for deep knots Fc lies below the force range over which molecular import motors operate, which suggest that in these cases the knots will tighten and block the pores. Next, we show how such topological traps might be prevented by using a pulling protocol of a repetitive, on-off character. Such a repetitive pulling is biologically relevant, since the mitochondrial import motor, like other molecular motors transforms chemical energy into directed motions via nucleotide-hydrolysis-mediated conformational changes, which are cyclic in character.

  19. Periodic forces trigger knot untying during translocation of knotted proteins

    PubMed Central

    Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Proteins need to be unfolded when translocated through the pores in mitochondrial and other cellular membranes. Knotted proteins, however, might get stuck during this process, jamming the pore, since the diameter of the pore is smaller than the size of maximally tightened knot. The jamming probability dramatically increases as the magnitude of the driving force exceeds a critical value, Fc. In this numerical study, we show that for deep knots Fc lies below the force range over which molecular import motors operate, which suggest that in these cases the knots will tighten and block the pores. Next, we show how such topological traps might be prevented by using a pulling protocol of a repetitive, on-off character. Such a repetitive pulling is biologically relevant, since the mitochondrial import motor, like other molecular motors transforms chemical energy into directed motions via nucleotide-hydrolysis-mediated conformational changes, which are cyclic in character. PMID:26996878

  20. Periodic forces trigger knot untying during translocation of knotted proteins.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Proteins need to be unfolded when translocated through the pores in mitochondrial and other cellular membranes. Knotted proteins, however, might get stuck during this process, jamming the pore, since the diameter of the pore is smaller than the size of maximally tightened knot. The jamming probability dramatically increases as the magnitude of the driving force exceeds a critical value, Fc. In this numerical study, we show that for deep knots Fc lies below the force range over which molecular import motors operate, which suggest that in these cases the knots will tighten and block the pores. Next, we show how such topological traps might be prevented by using a pulling protocol of a repetitive, on-off character. Such a repetitive pulling is biologically relevant, since the mitochondrial import motor, like other molecular motors transforms chemical energy into directed motions via nucleotide-hydrolysis-mediated conformational changes, which are cyclic in character. PMID:26996878

  1. Capacitively coupled RF diamond-like-carbon reactor

    DOEpatents

    Devlin, David James; Coates, Don Mayo; Archuleta, Thomas Arthur; Barbero, Robert Steven

    2000-01-01

    A process of coating a non-conductive fiber with diamond-like carbon, including passing a non-conductive fiber between a pair of parallel metal grids within a reaction chamber, introducing a hydrocarbon gas into the reaction chamber, forming a plasma within the reaction chamber for a sufficient period of time whereby diamond-like carbon is formed upon the non-conductive fiber, is provided together with a reactor chamber for deposition of diamond-like carbon upon a non-conductive fiber, including a vacuum chamber, a cathode assembly including a pair of electrically isolated opposingly parallel metal grids spaced apart at a distance of less than about 1 centimeter, an anode, a means of introducing a hydrocarbon gas into said vacuum chamber, and a means of generating a plasma within said vacuum chamber.

  2. Study of hydrogen generation plant coupled to high temperature gas cooled reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Nicholas Robert

    Hydrogen generation using a high temperature nuclear reactor as a thermal driving vector is a promising future option for energy carrier production. In this scheme, the heat from the nuclear reactor drives an endothermic water-splitting plant, via coupling, through an intermediate heat exchanger. While both high temperature nuclear reactors and hydrogen generation plants have high individual degrees of development, study of the coupled plant is lacking. Particularly absent are considerations of the transient behavior of the coupled plant, as well as studies of the safety of the overall plant. The aim of this document is to contribute knowledge to the effort of nuclear hydrogen generation. In particular, this study regards identification of safety issues in the coupled plant and the transient modeling of some leading candidates for implementation in the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). The Sulfur Iodine (SI) and Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) cycles are considered as candidate hydrogen generation schemes. Several thermodynamically derived chemical reaction chamber models are coupled to a well-known reference design of a high temperature nuclear reactor. These chemical reaction chamber models have several dimensions of validation, including detailed steady state flowsheets, integrated loop test data, and bench scale chemical kinetics. Eight unique case studies are performed based on a thorough literature review of possible events. The case studies are: (1) feed flow failure from one section of the chemical plant to another, (2) product flow failure (recycle) within the chemical plant, (3) rupture or explosion within the chemical plant, (4) nuclear reactor helium inlet overcooling due to a process holding tank failure, (5) helium inlet overcooling as an anticipated transient without SCRAM, (6) total failure of the chemical plant, (7) parametric study of the temperature in an individual reaction chamber, and (8) control rod insertion in the nuclear reactor. Various parametric

  3. Assessement of Codes and Standards Applicable to a Hydrogen Production Plant Coupled to a Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Russell

    2006-06-01

    This is an assessment of codes and standards applicable to a hydrogen production plant to be coupled to a nuclear reactor. The result of the assessment is a list of codes and standards that are expected to be applicable to the plant during its design and construction.

  4. Real time chemical imaging of a working catalytic membrane reactor during oxidative coupling of methane.

    PubMed

    Vamvakeros, A; Jacques, S D M; Middelkoop, V; Di Michiel, M; Egan, C K; Ismagilov, I Z; Vaughan, G B M; Gallucci, F; van Sint Annaland, M; Shearing, P R; Cernik, R J; Beale, A M

    2015-08-18

    We report the results from an operando XRD-CT study of a working catalytic membrane reactor for the oxidative coupling of methane. These results reveal the importance of the evolving solid state chemistry during catalytic reaction, particularly the chemical interaction between the catalyst and the oxygen transport membrane.

  5. Effects of Knots on Protein Folding Properties

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Miguel A.; Faísca, Patrícia F. N.

    2013-01-01

    This work explores the impact of knots, knot depth and motif of the threading terminus in protein folding properties (kinetics, thermodynamics and mechanism) via extensive Monte Carlo simulations of lattice models. A knotted backbone has no effect on protein thermodynamic stability but it may affect key aspects of folding kinetics. In this regard, we found clear evidence for a functional advantage of knots: knots enhance kinetic stability because a knotted protein unfolds at a distinctively slower rate than its unknotted counterpart. However, an increase in knot deepness does not necessarily lead to more effective changes in folding properties. In this regard, a terminus with a non-trivial conformation (e.g. hairpin) can have a more dramatic effect in enhancing kinetic stability than knot depth. Nevertheless, our results suggest that the probability of the denatured ensemble to keep knotted is higher for proteins with deeper knots, indicating that knot depth plays a role in determining the topology of the denatured state. Refolding simulations starting from denatured knotted conformations show that not every knot is able to nucleate folding and further indicate that the formation of the knotting loop is a key event in the folding of knotted trefoils. They also show that there are specific native contacts within the knotted core that are crucial to keep a native knotting loop in denatured conformations which otherwise have no detectable structure. The study of the knotting mechanism reveals that the threading of the knotting loop generally occurs towards late folding in conformations that exhibit a significant degree of structural consolidation. PMID:24023962

  6. Knots in finite memory walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwath, Eric; Clisby, Nathan; Virnau, Peter

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the occurrence and size of knots in a continuum polymer model with finite memory via Monte Carlo simulations. Excluded volume interactions are local and extend only to a fixed number of successive beads along the chain, ensuring that at short length scales the excluded volume effect dominates, while at longer length scales the polymer behaves like a random walk. As such, this model may be useful for understanding the behavior of polymers in a melt or semi-dilute solution, where exactly the same crossover is believed to occur. In particular, finite memory walks allow us to investigate the role of local interactions in the transition from highly knotted ideal polymers to almost unknotted self-avoiding polymers. Even though knotting decreases substantially when a few next-nearest neighbor interactions are considered, we find that the knotting probability of a polymer chain of modest length of 500 steps only decays slowly as a function of the range of the excluded volume interaction. In this context, we also find evidence that for length scales up to the interaction length the knotting behavior of the finite memory walk resembles that of a self-avoiding walk (effectively suppressing small knots), while for larger length scales it resembles that of a random walk.

  7. Numerical Simulations of Low Pressure Inductively Coupled Plasmas in Geometrically Complex Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ben; Wu, Hanming; Krishnan, Anantha

    1996-10-01

    A two-dimensional fluid model has been developed for simulation of low pressure inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactors. The model obtains solutions for the plasma density, electron temperature, and electric field for the given operating conditions. The physical phenomena and processes such as ambipolar diffusion, thermal diffusion, quasi-neutrality, ionization, inductive Joule heating, and excitations are considered in the model. A significant feature of the model is its capability of handling complex geometries that are often encountered in industrial reactors. Complex reactor geometries are modeled by a body-fitted-coordinate (BFC) formulation. A series of numerical experiments have been conducted using the model to study effects of various parameters such as chamber pressure, size of the wafer, position of the inductive coil, and the power input into the plasma. Different reactor geometries such as the GEC ICP reference cell and the belljar reactor have been simulated. The results of the parametric experiments are presented to show certain systematic trends in performance parameters such as uniformity and processing rates. The ICP model has been coupled to a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (capable of 3D simulations) that obtains the flow and pressure distribution inside the chamber. The ICP model will use pressure predictions (from the CFD model) to compute the local ionization rates. Chemical source/sink terms from the plasma dissociation model will be used by the CFD code to account for local reactant depletion effects.

  8. Osiris: A Modern, High-Performance, Coupled, Multi-Physics Code For Nuclear Reactor Core Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R J; Chand, K K; Clouse, C J; Ferencz, R M; Grandy, J M; Henshaw, W D; Kramer, K J; Parsons, I D

    2007-02-26

    To meet the simulation needs of the GNEP program, LLNL is leveraging a suite of high-performance codes to be used in the development of a multi-physics tool for modeling nuclear reactor cores. The Osiris code project, which began last summer, is employing modern computational science techniques in the development of the individual physics modules and the coupling framework. Initial development is focused on coupling thermal-hydraulics and neutral-particle transport, while later phases of the project will add thermal-structural mechanics and isotope depletion. Osiris will be applicable to the design of existing and future reactor systems through the use of first-principles, coupled physics models with fine-scale spatial resolution in three dimensions and fine-scale particle-energy resolution. Our intent is to replace an existing set of legacy, serial codes which require significant approximations and assumptions, with an integrated, coupled code that permits the design of a reactor core using a first-principles physics approach on a wide range of computing platforms, including the world's most powerful parallel computers. A key research activity of this effort deals with the efficient and scalable coupling of physics modules which utilize rather disparate mesh topologies. Our approach allows each code module to use a mesh topology and resolution that is optimal for the physics being solved, and employs a mesh-mapping and data-transfer module to effect the coupling. Additional research is planned in the area of scalable, parallel thermal-hydraulics, high-spatial-accuracy depletion and coupled-physics simulation using Monte Carlo transport.

  9. On ambiguity in knot polynomials for virtual knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.; Morozov, And.; Popolitov, A.

    2016-06-01

    We claim that HOMFLY polynomials for virtual knots, defined with the help of the matrix-model recursion relations, contain more parameters, than just the usual q and A =qN. These parameters preserve topological invariance and do not show up in the case of ordinary (non-virtual) knots and links. They are most conveniently observed in the hypercube formalism: then they substitute q-dimensions of certain fat graphs, which are not constrained by recursion and can be chosen arbitrarily. The number of these new topological invariants seems to grow fast with the number of non-virtual crossings: 0, 1, 1, 5, 15, 91, 784, 9160, ... This number can be decreased by imposing the factorization requirement for composites, in addition to topological invariance - still freedom remains. None of these new parameters, however, appears in HOMFLY for Kishino unknot, which thus remains unseparated from the ordinary unknots even by this enriched set of knot invariants.

  10. Spontaneous knotting of an agitated string.

    PubMed

    Raymer, Dorian M; Smith, Douglas E

    2007-10-16

    It is well known that a jostled string tends to become knotted; yet the factors governing the "spontaneous" formation of various knots are unclear. We performed experiments in which a string was tumbled inside a box and found that complex knots often form within seconds. We used mathematical knot theory to analyze the knots. Above a critical string length, the probability P of knotting at first increased sharply with length but then saturated below 100%. This behavior differs from that of mathematical self-avoiding random walks, where P has been proven to approach 100%. Finite agitation time and jamming of the string due to its stiffness result in lower probability, but P approaches 100% with long, flexible strings. We analyzed the knots by calculating their Jones polynomials via computer analysis of digital photos of the string. Remarkably, almost all were identified as prime knots: 120 different types, having minimum crossing numbers up to 11, were observed in 3,415 trials. All prime knots with up to seven crossings were observed. The relative probability of forming a knot decreased exponentially with minimum crossing number and Möbius energy, mathematical measures of knot complexity. Based on the observation that long, stiff strings tend to form a coiled structure when confined, we propose a simple model to describe the knot formation based on random "braid moves" of the string end. Our model can qualitatively account for the observed distribution of knots and dependence on agitation time and string length.

  11. Hidden structures of knot invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleptsov, Alexey

    2014-11-01

    We discuss a connection of HOMFLY polynomials with Hurwitz covers and represent a generating function for the HOMFLY polynomial of a given knot in all representations as Hurwitz partition function, i.e. the dependence of the HOMFLY polynomials on representation R is naturally captured by symmetric group characters (cut-and-join eigenvalues). The genus expansion and the loop expansion through Vassiliev invariants explicitly demonstrate this phenomenon. We study the genus expansion and discuss its properties. We also consider the loop expansion in details. In particular, we give an algorithm to calculate Vassiliev invariants, give some examples and discuss relations among Vassiliev invariants. Then we consider superpolynomials for torus knots defined via double affine Hecke algebra. We claim that the superpolynomials are not functions of Hurwitz type: symmetric group characters do not provide an adequate linear basis for their expansions. Deformation to superpolynomials is, however, straightforward in the multiplicative basis: the Casimir operators are beta-deformed to Hamiltonians of the Calogero-Moser-Sutherland system. Applying this trick to the genus and Vassiliev expansions, we observe that the deformation is fully straightforward only for the thin knots. Beyond the family of thin knots additional algebraically independent terms appear in the Vassiliev expansions. This can suggest that the superpolynomials do in fact contain more information about knots than the colored HOMFLY and Kauffman polynomials.

  12. Physics-based multiscale coupling for full core nuclear reactor simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gaston, Derek R.; Permann, Cody J.; Peterson, John W.; Slaughter, Andrew E.; Andrš, David; Wang, Yaqi; Short, Michael P.; Perez, Danielle M.; Tonks, Michael R.; Ortensi, Javier; Zou, Ling; Martineau, Richard C.

    2015-10-01

    Numerical simulation of nuclear reactors is a key technology in the quest for improvements in efficiency, safety, and reliability of both existing and future reactor designs. Historically, simulation of an entire reactor was accomplished by linking together multiple existing codes that each simulated a subset of the relevant multiphysics phenomena. Recent advances in the MOOSE (Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment) framework have enabled a new approach: multiple domain-specific applications, all built on the same software framework, are efficiently linked to create a cohesive application. This is accomplished with a flexible coupling capability that allows for a variety of different data exchanges to occur simultaneously on high performance parallel computational hardware. Examples based on the KAIST-3A benchmark core, as well as a simplified Westinghouse AP-1000 configuration, demonstrate the power of this new framework for tackling—in a coupled, multiscale manner—crucial reactor phenomena such as CRUD-induced power shift and fuel shuffle. 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-SA license

  13. Physics-based multiscale coupling for full core nuclear reactor simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gaston, Derek R.; Permann, Cody J.; Peterson, John W.; Slaughter, Andrew E.; Andrš, David; Wang, Yaqi; Short, Michael P.; Perez, Danielle M.; Tonks, Michael R.; Ortensi, Javier; et al

    2015-10-01

    Numerical simulation of nuclear reactors is a key technology in the quest for improvements in efficiency, safety, and reliability of both existing and future reactor designs. Historically, simulation of an entire reactor was accomplished by linking together multiple existing codes that each simulated a subset of the relevant multiphysics phenomena. Recent advances in the MOOSE (Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment) framework have enabled a new approach: multiple domain-specific applications, all built on the same software framework, are efficiently linked to create a cohesive application. This is accomplished with a flexible coupling capability that allows for a variety of different datamore » exchanges to occur simultaneously on high performance parallel computational hardware. Examples based on the KAIST-3A benchmark core, as well as a simplified Westinghouse AP-1000 configuration, demonstrate the power of this new framework for tackling—in a coupled, multiscale manner—crucial reactor phenomena such as CRUD-induced power shift and fuel shuffle. 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-SA license« less

  14. Analysis and Numerical Solution for Multi-Physics Coupling of Neutron Diffusion and Thermomechanics in Spherical Fast Burst Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Samet Y. Kadioglu; Dana A. Knoll; Cassiano de Oliveira

    2009-05-01

    Coupling neutronics to thermomechanics is important for the analysis of fast burst reactors, because the criticality and safety study of fast burst reactors heavily depends on the thermomechanical behavior of fuel materials. For instance, the shut down mechanism or the transition between super and sub-critical states are driven by the fuel material expansion or contraction. The material expansion or contraction is due to temperature gradient which results from fission power. In this paper, we introduce a numerical model for coupling of neutron diffusion and thermomechanics in fast burst reactors. We also provide some analysis of the coupled system. We studied material behaviors corresponding to different levels of power pulses.

  15. Coupling a Knudsen reactor with the short lived radioactive tracer (13)N for atmospheric chemistry studies.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, S; Kerbrat, M; Huthwelker, T; Birrer, M; Ammann, M

    2013-03-01

    A Knudsen cell flow reactor was coupled to an online gas phase source of the short-lived radioactive tracer (13)N to study the adsorption of nitrogen oxides on ice at temperatures relevant for the upper troposphere. This novel approach has several benefits over the conventional coupling of a Knudsen cell with a mass spectrometer. Experiments at lower partial pressures close to atmospheric conditions are possible. The uptake to the substrate is a direct observable of the experiment. Operation of the experiment in continuous or pulse mode allows to retrieve steady state uptake kinetics and more details of adsorption and desorption kinetics.

  16. Coupling a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle to a Helium-Cooled Reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, Bobby; Pasch, James Jay; Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Walker, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the thermodynamics of a supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) recompression closed Brayton cycle (RCBC) coupled to a Helium-cooled nuclear reactor. The baseline reactor design for the study is the AREVA High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). Using the AREVA HTGR nominal operating parameters, an initial thermodynamic study was performed using Sandia's deterministic RCBC analysis program. Utilizing the output of the RCBC thermodynamic analysis, preliminary values of reactor power and of Helium flow rate through the reactor were calculated in Sandia's HelCO2 code. Some research regarding materials requirements was then conducted to determine aspects of corrosion related to both Helium and to sCO2 , as well as some mechanical considerations for pressures and temperatures that will be seen by the piping and other components. This analysis resulted in a list of materials-related research items that need to be conducted in the future. A short assessment of dry heat rejection advantages of sCO2> Brayton cycles was also included. This assessment lists some items that should be investigated in the future to better understand how sCO2 Brayton cycles and nuclear can maximally contribute to optimizing the water efficiency of carbon free power generation

  17. Oxide ion transport for selective oxidative coupling of methane with new membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, Takao; Fujimoto, Kaoru . Dept. of Synthetic Chemistry)

    1994-05-01

    Oxidative coupling of methane was conducted by using membrane reactors. The nonporous membrane film that consisted of PbO modified by alkaline or alkaline earth compound was supported on porous SiO[sub 2]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] tube. Higher hydrocarbons were successfully synthesized with high selectivity (about 90%). A kinetic analysis was conducted to clarify whether oxide ion transportation through PbO film participated in the oxidative coupling of methane. The evaluated value of the diffusion coefficient of oxide ion transport based on the methane oxidation agreed well with that of published data. The simulated gradient of the oxide ion concentration through the PbO membrane agreed well with that measured by electron probe X-ray microanalyzer. A transient response simulated by using kinetic parameters evaluated from steady-state analysis also agreed well with the experiment. These results prove the validity of the reaction model that consists of surface reactions of methane with oxide ion which is transferred from inside to outside of the membrane reactor. Alkali modifiers on the PbO membrane surface exhibited a promotional effect on the surface reaction of methane coupling. Another membrane reactor containing Bi[sub 2]O[sub 3] showed higher activity than the PbO membrane.

  18. Relation between strings and ribbon knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, E.; El-Rifai, E. A.; Abdellatif, R. A.

    1991-02-01

    A ribbon knot can be represented as the propagation of an open string in (Euclidean) space-time. By imposing physical conditions plus an ansatz on the string scattering amplitude, we get invariant polynomials of ribbon knots which correspond to Jones and Wadati et al. polynomials for ordinary knots. Motivated by the string scattering vertices, we derive an algebra which is a generalization of Hecke and Murakami-Birman-Wenzel (BMW) algebras of knots.

  19. Knotted stents: Case report and outcome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ha Na; Hwang, Hokyeong

    2015-01-01

    A knotted ureteral stent is an extremely rare condition, with fewer than 20 cases reported in the literature; however, it is difficult to treat. We report a case in which a folded Terumo guidewire was successfully used to remove a knotted stent percutaneously without anesthesia. We also review the current literature on predisposing factors and management strategies for knotted ureteral stents. PMID:25964843

  20. Second IBEX Map Unties the Knot

    NASA Video Gallery

    One of the clear features visible in the IBEX maps is an apparent knot in the ribbon. The second map showed that the knot in the ribbon somehow spread out. It is as if the knot in the ribbon was li...

  1. POST Quantum Cryptography from Mutant Prime Knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuoli, Annalisa; Palumbo, Giandomenico

    By resorting to basic features of topological knot theory we propose a (classical) cryptographic protocol based on the `difficulty' of decomposing complex knots generated as connected sums of prime knots and their mutants. The scheme combines an asymmetric public key protocol with symmetric private ones and is intrinsecally secure against quantum eavesdropper attacks.

  2. Methane coupling by membrane reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, September 25--December 24, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.H.

    1997-03-10

    A new catalyst, 1.9%(wt) Mn-5%(wt) Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} was synthesized by the incipient wetness impregnation method. X-ray diffraction studies of the catalyst calcined at 800 C showed that cristobalite, Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}, and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} were the three phases that coexisted in the catalyst. Calcination at 1,000 C resulted in the formation of a new SiO{sub 2} phase (tridymite). The new catalyst was characterized by running the methane oxidative coupling reactions in a conventional packed bed reactor. The highest C{sub 2} yield obtained was 25%. The Mn-W-Na/SiO{sub 2} catalyst was coated on the inside wall of the SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub 3{minus}x} dense membrane tube. A methane oxidative coupling experiment was conducted with the new catalyst in a dense membrane reactor. The oxygen permeance of the dense membrane tube coated with the catalyst was about 0.05 cc/min/cm{sup 2} at 850 C. By co-feeding methane and oxygen to the tube side of the reactor, C{sub 2} yields up to 7% were observed in these runs. To prepare the membrane tube for the radial flow reactor, silica was deposited on a lanthanum stabilized gamma alumina membrane tube and gas permeances were measured after the membrane tube was calcined at different temperatures. The pressure drop across the membrane was high enough for the membrane to be used in the radial flow reactor.

  3. Commercial-Scale Performance Predictions for High-Temperature Electrolysis Plants Coupled to Three Advanced Reactor Types

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2007-09-01

    This report presents results of system analyses that have been developed to assess the hydrogen production performance of commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plants driven by three different advanced reactor – power-cycle combinations: a high-temperature helium cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle, a supercritical CO2-cooled reactor coupled to a direct recompression cycle, and a sodium-cooled fast reactor coupled to a Rankine cycle. The system analyses were performed using UniSim software. The work described in this report represents a refinement of previous analyses in that the process flow diagrams include realistic representations of the three advanced reactors directly coupled to the power cycles and integrated with the high-temperature electrolysis process loops. In addition, this report includes parametric studies in which the performance of each HTE concept is determined over a wide range of operating conditions. Results of the study indicate that overall thermal-to- hydrogen production efficiencies (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) in the 45 - 50% range can be achieved at reasonable production rates with the high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept, 42 - 44% with the supercritical CO2-cooled reactor and about 33 - 34% with the sodium-cooled reactor.

  4. Development of a coupling code for PWR reactor cavity radiation streaming calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Z.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.; Zheng, Y.; Zhang, H.; Wang, M.

    2012-07-01

    PWR reactor cavity radiation streaming is important for the safe of the personnel and equipment, thus calculation has to be performed to evaluate the neutron flux distribution around the reactor. For this calculation, the deterministic codes have difficulties in fine geometrical modeling and need huge computer resource; and the Monte Carlo codes require very long sampling time to obtain results with acceptable precision. Therefore, a coupling method has been developed to eliminate the two problems mentioned above in each code. In this study, we develop a coupling code named DORT2MCNP to link the Sn code DORT and Monte Carlo code MCNP. DORT2MCNP is used to produce a combined surface source containing top, bottom and side surface simultaneously. Because SDEF card is unsuitable for the combined surface source, we modify the SOURCE subroutine of MCNP and compile MCNP for this application. Numerical results demonstrate the correctness of the coupling code DORT2MCNP and show reasonable agreement between the coupling method and the other two codes (DORT and MCNP). (authors)

  5. Coupling of MIC-3 overexpression with the chromosome 11 and 14 root-knot nematode (RKN) (Meloidogyne incognita) resistance QTLs provides insights into the regulation of the RKN resistance response in Upland cotton...

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High levels of resistance to root-knot nematode (RKN) (Meloidogyne incognita) in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is mediated by two major quantitative trait loci (QTL) located on chromosomes 11 and 14. We had previously determined that MIC-3 expression played a direct role in suppressing RKN egg...

  6. Method for coupled three-dimensional analysis of reactor vessel blowdowns with internal structures. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, S.A.; Gross, M.B.; Santee, G.E. Jr.; Chang, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    The STEALTH 3D and WHAMSE 3D computer codes have been combined to perform three-dimensional coupled fluid/structure calculations of the blowdown response of a pressure vessel with internal structures typical of a pressurized water reactor. The fluid/structure coupling, which is performed cycle by cycle during a calculation, is described. The coupled fluid/structure code, STEALTH/WHAMSE 3D, has been used to simulate the decompression of test V31.1 from the HDR blowdown test series. Calculations of fluid pressure, differential fluid pressure and hoop strain compare favorably with the experimental data from test V31.1. The computed peak axial stain compares less favorably with the experimental data, probably due to coarseness of the structural grid. 14 refs.

  7. Simulating High Flux Isotope Reactor Core Thermal-Hydraulics via Interdimensional Model Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, Adam R

    2014-05-01

    A coupled interdimensional model is presented for the simulation of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the High Flux Isotope Reactor core at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model consists of two domains a solid involute fuel plate and the surrounding liquid coolant channel. The fuel plate is modeled explicitly in three-dimensions. The coolant channel is approximated as a twodimensional slice oriented perpendicular to the fuel plate s surface. The two dimensionally-inconsistent domains are linked to one another via interdimensional model coupling mechanisms. The coupled model is presented as a simplified alternative to a fully explicit, fully three-dimensional model. Involute geometries were constructed in SolidWorks. Derivations of the involute construction equations are presented. Geometries were then imported into COMSOL Multiphysics for simulation and modeling. Both models are described in detail so as to highlight their respective attributes in the 3D model, the pursuit of an accurate, reliable, and complete solution; in the coupled model, the intent to simplify the modeling domain as much as possible without affecting significant alterations to the solution. The coupled model was created with the goal of permitting larger portions of the reactor core to be modeled at once without a significant sacrifice to solution integrity. As such, particular care is given to validating incorporated model simplifications. To the greatest extent possible, the decrease in solution time as well as computational cost are quantified versus the effects such gains have on the solution quality. A variant of the coupled model which sufficiently balances these three solution characteristics is presented alongside the more comprehensive 3D model for comparison and validation.

  8. Accelerator Reactor Coupling for Energy Production in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Heidet, Florent; Haj Tahar, Malek

    2016-01-01

    This article is a review of several accelerator–reactor interface issues and nuclear fuel cycle applications of acceleratordriven subcritical systems. The systems considered here have the primary goal of energy production, but that goal is accomplished via a specific application in various proposed nuclear fuel cycles, such as breed-and-burn of fertile material or burning of transuranic material. Several basic principles are reviewed, starting from the proton beam window including the target, blanket, reactor core, and up to the fuel cycle. We focus on issues of interest, such as the impact of the energy required to run the accelerator and associated systemsmore » on the potential electricity delivered to the grid. Accelerator-driven systems feature many of the constraints and issues associated with critical reactors, with the added challenges of subcritical operation and coupling to an accelerator. Reliable accelerator operation and avoidance of beam trips are critically important. One interesting challenge is measurement of blanket subcriticality level during operation. We also review the potential benefits of accelerator-driven systems in various nuclear fuel cycle applications. Ultimately, accelerator-driven subcritical systems with the goal of transmutation of transuranic material have lower 100,000-year radioactivity than a critical fast reactor with recycling of uranium and plutonium.« less

  9. Accelerator Reactor Coupling for Energy Production in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Heidet, Florent; Haj Tahar, Malek

    2016-01-01

    This article is a review of several accelerator–reactor interface issues and nuclear fuel cycle applications of acceleratordriven subcritical systems. The systems considered here have the primary goal of energy production, but that goal is accomplished via a specific application in various proposed nuclear fuel cycles, such as breed-and-burn of fertile material or burning of transuranic material. Several basic principles are reviewed, starting from the proton beam window including the target, blanket, reactor core, and up to the fuel cycle. We focus on issues of interest, such as the impact of the energy required to run the accelerator and associated systems on the potential electricity delivered to the grid. Accelerator-driven systems feature many of the constraints and issues associated with critical reactors, with the added challenges of subcritical operation and coupling to an accelerator. Reliable accelerator operation and avoidance of beam trips are critically important. One interesting challenge is measurement of blanket subcriticality level during operation. We also review the potential benefits of accelerator-driven systems in various nuclear fuel cycle applications. Ultimately, accelerator-driven subcritical systems with the goal of transmutation of transuranic material have lower 100,000-year radioactivity than a critical fast reactor with recycling of uranium and plutonium.

  10. Accelerator-Reactor Coupling for Energy Production in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidet, Florent; Brown, Nicholas R.; Haj Tahar, Malek

    This article is a review of several accelerator-reactor interface issues and nuclear fuel cycle applications of accelerator-driven subcritical systems. The systems considered here have the primary goal of energy production, but that goal is accomplished via a specific application in various proposed nuclear fuel cycles, such as breed-and-burn of fertile material or burning of transuranic material. Several basic principles are reviewed, starting from the proton beam window including the target, blanket, reactor core, and up to the fuel cycle. We focus on issues of interest, such as the impact of the energy required to run the accelerator and associated systems on the potential electricity delivered to the grid. Accelerator-driven systems feature many of the constraints and issues associated with critical reactors, with the added challenges of subcritical operation and coupling to an accelerator. Reliable accelerator operation and avoidance of beam trips are critically important. One interesting challenge is measurement of blanket subcriticality level during operation. We also review the potential benefits of accelerator-driven systems in various nuclear fuel cycle applications. Ultimately, accelerator-driven subcritical systems with the goal of transmutation of transuranic material have lower 100,000-year radioactivity than a critical fast reactor with recycling of uranium and plutonium.

  11. The elusive quest for RNA knots

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Aaron S.; Di Stefano, Marco; Lehman, Niles; Orland, Henri; Micheletti, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Physical entanglement, and particularly knots arise spontaneously in equilibrated polymers that are sufficiently long and densely packed. Biopolymers are no exceptions: knots have long been known to occur in proteins as well as in encapsidated viral DNA. The rapidly growing number of RNA structures has recently made it possible to investigate the incidence of physical knots in this type of biomolecule, too. Strikingly, no knots have been found to date in the known RNA structures. In this Point of View Article we discuss the absence of knots in currently available RNAs and consider the reasons why knots in RNA have not yet been found, despite the expectation that they should exist in Nature. We conclude by singling out a number of RNA sequences that, based on the properties of their predicted secondary structures, are good candidates for knotted RNAs. PMID:26828280

  12. Factorization of colored knot polynomials at roots of unity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononov, Ya.; Morozov, A.

    2015-07-01

    HOMFLY polynomials are the Wilson-loop averages in Chern-Simons theory and depend on four variables: the closed line (knot) in 3d space-time, representation R of the gauge group SU (N) and exponentiated coupling constant q. From analysis of a big variety of different knots we conclude that at q, which is a 2m-th root of unity, q2m = 1, HOMFLY polynomials in symmetric representations [ r ] satisfy recursion identity: Hr+m =Hr ṡHm for any A =qN, which is a generalization of the property Hr = H1r for special polynomials at m = 1. We conjecture a further generalization to arbitrary representation R, which, however, is checked only for torus knots. Next, Kashaev polynomial, which arises from HR at q2 = e 2 πi / | R |, turns equal to the special polynomial with A substituted by A| R |, provided R is a single-hook representations (including arbitrary symmetric) - what provides a q - A dual to the similar property of Alexander polynomial. All this implies non-trivial relations for the coefficients of the differential expansions, which are believed to provide reasonable coordinates in the space of knots - existence of such universal relations means that these variables are still not unconstrained.

  13. Biomechanical evaluation of the Nice knot

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Shannon W.; Chapman, Christopher R.; Adeeb, Samer; Duke, Kajsa; Beaupre, Lauren; Bouliane, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Nice knot is a bulky double-stranded knot. Biomechanical data supporting its use as well as the number of half hitches required to ensure knot security is lacking. Materials and Methods: Nice knots with, one, two, or three half-hitches were compared with the surgeon's and Tennessee slider knots with three half hitches. Each knot was tied 10 times around a fixed diameter using four different sutures: FiberWire (Arthrex, Naples, FL), Ultrabraid (Smith and Nephew, Andover, MA), Hi-Fi (ConMed Linvatec, Largo, FL) and Force Fiber (Teleflex Medical OEM, Gurnee, IL). Cyclic testing was performed for 10 min between 10N and 45N, resulting in approximately 1000 cycles. Displacement from an initial 10N load was recorded. Knots surviving cyclic testing were subjected to a load to failure test at a rate of 60 mm/min. Load at clinical failure: 3 mm slippage or opening of the suture loop was recorded. Bulk, mode of ultimate failure, opening of the loop past clinical failure, was also recorded. Results: During cyclic testing, the Nice knots with one or more half-hitches performed the best, slipping significantly less than the surgeon's and Tennessee Slider (P < 0.002). After one half-hitch, the addition of half-hitches did not significantly improve Nice knot performance during cyclic testing (P > 0.06). The addition of half-hitches improved the strength of the Nice knot during the force to failure test, however after two half-hitches, increase of strength was not significant (P = 0.59). While FiberWire was the most bulky of the sutures tested, it also performed the best, slipping the least. Conclusion: The Nice knot, especially using FiberWire, is biomechanically superior to the surgeon's and Tennessee slider knots. Two half hitches are recommended to ensure adequate knot security. PMID:26980985

  14. KnotProt: a database of proteins with knots and slipknots

    PubMed Central

    Jamroz, Michal; Niemyska, Wanda; Rawdon, Eric J.; Stasiak, Andrzej; Millett, Kenneth C.; Sułkowski, Piotr; Sulkowska, Joanna I.

    2015-01-01

    The protein topology database KnotProt, http://knotprot.cent.uw.edu.pl/, collects information about protein structures with open polypeptide chains forming knots or slipknots. The knotting complexity of the cataloged proteins is presented in the form of a matrix diagram that shows users the knot type of the entire polypeptide chain and of each of its subchains. The pattern visible in the matrix gives the knotting fingerprint of a given protein and permits users to determine, for example, the minimal length of the knotted regions (knot's core size) or the depth of a knot, i.e. how many amino acids can be removed from either end of the cataloged protein structure before converting it from a knot to a different type of knot. In addition, the database presents extensive information about the biological functions, families and fold types of proteins with non-trivial knotting. As an additional feature, the KnotProt database enables users to submit protein or polymer chains and generate their knotting fingerprints. PMID:25361973

  15. An assessment of coupling algorithms for nuclear reactor core physics simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hamilton, Steven; Berrill, Mark; Clarno, Kevin; Pawlowski, Roger; Toth, Alex; Kelley, C. T.; Evans, Thomas; Philip, Bobby

    2016-04-01

    Here we evaluate the performance of multiphysics coupling algorithms applied to a light water nuclear reactor core simulation. The simulation couples the k-eigenvalue form of the neutron transport equation with heat conduction and subchannel flow equations. We compare Picard iteration (block Gauss–Seidel) to Anderson acceleration and multiple variants of preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK). The performance of the methods are evaluated over a range of energy group structures and core power levels. A novel physics-based approximation to a Jacobian-vector product was developed to mitigate the impact of expensive on-line cross section processing steps. Numerical simulations demonstrating the efficiency of JFNK andmore » Anderson acceleration relative to standard Picard iteration are performed on a 3D model of a nuclear fuel assembly. Finally, both criticality (k-eigenvalue) and critical boron search problems are considered.« less

  16. An assessment of coupling algorithms for nuclear reactor core physics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Steven; Berrill, Mark; Clarno, Kevin; Pawlowski, Roger; Toth, Alex; Kelley, C. T.; Evans, Thomas; Philip, Bobby

    2016-04-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of multiphysics coupling algorithms applied to a light water nuclear reactor core simulation. The simulation couples the k-eigenvalue form of the neutron transport equation with heat conduction and subchannel flow equations. We compare Picard iteration (block Gauss-Seidel) to Anderson acceleration and multiple variants of preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK). The performance of the methods are evaluated over a range of energy group structures and core power levels. A novel physics-based approximation to a Jacobian-vector product has been developed to mitigate the impact of expensive on-line cross section processing steps. Numerical simulations demonstrating the efficiency of JFNK and Anderson acceleration relative to standard Picard iteration are performed on a 3D model of a nuclear fuel assembly. Both criticality (k-eigenvalue) and critical boron search problems are considered.

  17. Design Configurations and Coupling High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor and Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Steven Sherman

    2008-04-01

    The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood.

  18. Viscous effects on motion and heating of electrons in inductively coupled plasma reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Bose, D.

    1999-10-01

    A transport model is developed for nonlocal effects on motion and heating of electrons in inductively coupled plasma reactors. The model is based on the electron momentum equation derived from the Boltzmann equation, retaining anisotropic stress components which in fact are viscous stresses. The resulting model consists of transport equations for the magnitude of electron velocity oscillation and terms representing energy dissipation due to viscous stresses in the electron energy equation. In this model, electrical current is obtained in a nonlocal manner due to viscous effects, instead of Ohm's law or the electron momentum equation without viscous effects, while nonlocal heating of electrons is represented by the viscous dissipation. Computational results obtained by two-dimensional numerical simulations show that nonlocal determination of electrical current indeed is important, and viscous dissipation becomes an important electron heating mechanism at low pressures. It is suspected that viscous dissipation in inductively coupled plasma reactors in fact represents stochastic heating of electrons, and this possibility is exploited by discussing physical similarities between stochastic heating and energy dissipation due to the stress tensor.

  19. Knots "Choke Off" Polymers upon Stretching.

    PubMed

    Stauch, Tim; Dreuw, Andreas

    2016-01-11

    Long polymer chains inevitably get tangled into knots. Like macroscopic ropes, polymer chains are substantially weakened by knots and the rupture point is always located at the "entry" or "exit" of the knot. However, these phenomena are only poorly understood at a molecular level. Here we show that when a knotted polyethylene chain is tightened, most of the stress energy is stored in torsions around the curved part of the chain. The torsions act as "work funnels" that effectively localize mechanical stress in the immediate vicinity of the knot. As a result, the knot "chokes" the chain at its entry or exit, thus leading to bond rupture at much lower forces than those needed to break a linear, unknotted chain. Our work not only explains the weakening of the polymer chain and the position of the rupture point, but more generally demonstrates that chemical bonds do not have to be extensively stretched to be broken. PMID:26629964

  20. Vortex knots in tangled quantum eigenfunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Alexander J.; Dennis, Mark R.

    2016-07-01

    Tangles of string typically become knotted, from macroscopic twine down to long-chain macromolecules such as DNA. Here, we demonstrate that knotting also occurs in quantum wavefunctions, where the tangled filaments are vortices (nodal lines/phase singularities). The probability that a vortex loop is knotted is found to increase with its length, and a wide gamut of knots from standard tabulations occur. The results follow from computer simulations of random superpositions of degenerate eigenstates of three simple quantum systems: a cube with periodic boundaries, the isotropic three-dimensional harmonic oscillator and the 3-sphere. In the latter two cases, vortex knots occur frequently, even in random eigenfunctions at relatively low energy, and are constrained by the spatial symmetries of the modes. The results suggest that knotted vortex structures are generic in complex three-dimensional wave systems, establishing a topological commonality between wave chaos, polymers and turbulent Bose-Einstein condensates.

  1. Vortex knots in tangled quantum eigenfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexander J.; Dennis, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Tangles of string typically become knotted, from macroscopic twine down to long-chain macromolecules such as DNA. Here, we demonstrate that knotting also occurs in quantum wavefunctions, where the tangled filaments are vortices (nodal lines/phase singularities). The probability that a vortex loop is knotted is found to increase with its length, and a wide gamut of knots from standard tabulations occur. The results follow from computer simulations of random superpositions of degenerate eigenstates of three simple quantum systems: a cube with periodic boundaries, the isotropic three-dimensional harmonic oscillator and the 3-sphere. In the latter two cases, vortex knots occur frequently, even in random eigenfunctions at relatively low energy, and are constrained by the spatial symmetries of the modes. The results suggest that knotted vortex structures are generic in complex three-dimensional wave systems, establishing a topological commonality between wave chaos, polymers and turbulent Bose–Einstein condensates. PMID:27468801

  2. Vortex knots in tangled quantum eigenfunctions.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alexander J; Dennis, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Tangles of string typically become knotted, from macroscopic twine down to long-chain macromolecules such as DNA. Here, we demonstrate that knotting also occurs in quantum wavefunctions, where the tangled filaments are vortices (nodal lines/phase singularities). The probability that a vortex loop is knotted is found to increase with its length, and a wide gamut of knots from standard tabulations occur. The results follow from computer simulations of random superpositions of degenerate eigenstates of three simple quantum systems: a cube with periodic boundaries, the isotropic three-dimensional harmonic oscillator and the 3-sphere. In the latter two cases, vortex knots occur frequently, even in random eigenfunctions at relatively low energy, and are constrained by the spatial symmetries of the modes. The results suggest that knotted vortex structures are generic in complex three-dimensional wave systems, establishing a topological commonality between wave chaos, polymers and turbulent Bose-Einstein condensates. PMID:27468801

  3. Thermal Hydraulic Analyses for Coupling High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor to Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Oh; R. Barner; C. B. Davis; S. Sherman; P. Pickard

    2006-08-01

    The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were

  4. Knots and nonorientable surfaces in chiral nematics

    PubMed Central

    Machon, Thomas; Alexander, Gareth P.

    2013-01-01

    Knots and knotted fields enrich physical phenomena ranging from DNA and molecular chemistry to the vortices of fluid flows and textures of ordered media. Liquid crystals provide an ideal setting for exploring such topological phenomena through control of their characteristic defects. The use of colloids in generating defects and knotted configurations in liquid crystals has been demonstrated for spherical and toroidal particles and shows promise for the development of novel photonic devices. Extending this existing work, we describe the full topological implications of colloids representing nonorientable surfaces and use it to construct torus knots and links of type (p,2) around multiply twisted Möbius strips. PMID:23940365

  5. European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR) SAR ATWS Accident Analyses by using 3D Code Internal Coupling Method

    SciTech Connect

    Gagner, Renata; Lafitte, Helene; Dormeau, Pascal; Stoudt, Roger H.

    2004-07-01

    Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) accident analyses make part of the Safety Analysis Report of the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR), covering Risk Reduction Category A (Core Melt Prevention) events. This paper deals with three of the most penalizing RRC-A sequences of ATWS caused by mechanical blockage of the control/shutdown rods, regarding their consequences on the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) and core integrity. A new 3D code internal coupling calculation method has been introduced. (authors)

  6. Development of Mechanistic Modeling Capabilities for Local Neutronically-Coupled Flow-Induced Instabilities in Advanced Water-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Podowski

    2009-11-30

    The major research objectives of this project included the formulation of flow and heat transfer modeling framework for the analysis of flow-induced instabilities in advanced light water nuclear reactors such as boiling water reactors. General multifield model of two-phase flow, including the necessary closure laws. Development of neurton kinetics models compatible with the proposed models of heated channel dynamics. Formulation and encoding of complete coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models for the analysis of spatially-dependent local core instabilities. Computer simulations aimed at testing and validating the new models of reactor dynamics.

  7. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Coupled with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Chang H.; Davis, Cliff; Kim, Eung S.; Sherman, Steven; Barner, Robert; Vilim, R.

    2007-07-01

    The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) to produce electricity and hydrogen. Although the hydrogen production processes using the nuclear energy are in an early stage of development, coupling hydrogen plant to HTGR requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear plant. In anticipation of the design, development and procurement of an advanced power conversion system for HTGR, this study was initiated to identify the major design and technology options and their tradeoffs in the evaluation of power conversion unit (PCU) coupled to the hydrogen plant. In this study, we investigated a number of design configurations and performed thermal hydraulic analyses using various working fluids and various conditions. Also using the high temperature steam electrolysis process (HTSE), we calculated the energy requirement for the operation of the HTSE. The balance of the plant of the HTSE was developed and the HTGR was modeled to be coupled with the HTSE. This paper presents a portion of results obtained from this study. (authors)

  8. A sectional coupling approach for the simulation of multi-phase reacting flow in a bent reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.; Petrick, M.

    1996-04-01

    Multi-phase reacting flows of a bent fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) reactor have been simulated using the ICRKFLO code. A new sectional coupling approach has been developed to handle the complex geometry, which divides the bent reactor into two sections and computations are performed for the two sections successively. The computational results show that the ICRKFLO incorporated with the new sectional coupling approach can predict product yields very well compared with experimental data and can be used to identify critical processes and parameters which may be modified to improve the quality and quantity of the FCC products.

  9. Interface requirements for coupling a containment code to a reactor system thermal hydraulic codes

    SciTech Connect

    Baratta, A.J.

    1997-07-01

    To perform a complete analysis of a reactor transient, not only the primary system response but the containment response must also be accounted for. Such transients and accidents as a loss of coolant accident in both pressurized water and boiling water reactors and inadvertent operation of safety relief valves all challenge the containment and may influence flows because of containment feedback. More recently, the advanced reactor designs put forth by General Electric and Westinghouse in the US and by Framatome and Seimens in Europe rely on the containment to act as the ultimate heat sink. Techniques used by analysts and engineers to analyze the interaction of the containment and the primary system were usually iterative in nature. Codes such as RELAP or RETRAN were used to analyze the primary system response and CONTAIN or CONTEMPT the containment response. The analysis was performed by first running the system code and representing the containment as a fixed pressure boundary condition. The flows were usually from the primary system to the containment initially and generally under choked conditions. Once the mass flows and timing are determined from the system codes, these conditions were input into the containment code. The resulting pressures and temperatures were then calculated and the containment performance analyzed. The disadvantage of this approach becomes evident when one performs an analysis of a rapid depressurization or a long term accident sequence in which feedback from the containment can occur. For example, in a BWR main steam line break transient, the containment heats up and becomes a source of energy for the primary system. Recent advances in programming and computer technology are available to provide an alternative approach. The author and other researchers have developed linkage codes capable of transferring data between codes at each time step allowing discrete codes to be coupled together.

  10. Investigation of Asymmetries in Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching Reactors Using a 3-Dimensional Hybrid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark J.; Grapperhaus, Michael J.

    1996-10-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) reactors have the potential for scaling to large area substrates while maintaining azimuthal symmetry or side-to-side uniformity across the wafer. Asymmetric etch properties in these devices have been attributed to transmission line properties of the coil, internal structures (such as wafer clamps) and non-uniform gas injection or pumping. To investigate the origins of asymmetric etch properties, a 3-dimensional hybrid model has been developed. The hybrid model contains electromagnetic, electric circuit, electron energy equation, and fluid modules. Continuity and momentum equations are solved in the fluid module along with Poisson's equation. We will discuss results for ion and radical flux uniformity to the substrate while varying the transmission line characteristics of the coil, symmetry of gas inlets/pumping, and internal structures. Comparisons will be made to expermental measurements of etch rates. ^*Work supported by SRC, NSF, ARPA/AFOSR and LAM Research.

  11. Gas Core Reactor Numerical Simulation Using a Coupled MHD-MCNP Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazeminezhad, F.; Anghaie, S.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis is provided in this report of using two head-on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks to achieve supercritical nuclear fission in an axially elongated cylinder filled with UF4 gas as an energy source for deep space missions. The motivation for each aspect of the design is explained and supported by theory and numerical simulations. A subsequent report will provide detail on relevant experimental work to validate the concept. Here the focus is on the theory of and simulations for the proposed gas core reactor conceptual design from the onset of shock generations to the supercritical state achieved when the shocks collide. The MHD model is coupled to a standard nuclear code (MCNP) to observe the neutron flux and fission power attributed to the supercritical state brought about by the shock collisions. Throughout the modeling, realistic parameters are used for the initial ambient gaseous state and currents to ensure a resulting supercritical state upon shock collisions.

  12. Lunar electric power systems utilizing the SP-100 reactor coupled to dynamic conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harty, Richard B.; Durand, Richard E.

    1993-01-01

    An integration study was performed by Rocketdyne under contract to NASA-LeRC. The study was concerned with coupling an SP-0100 reactor to either a Brayton or Stirling power conversion system. The application was for a surface power system to supply power requirements to a lunar base. A power level of 550 kWe was selected based on the NASA Space Exploration Initiative 90-day study. Reliability studies were initially performed to determine optimum power conversion redundancy. This study resulted in selecting three operating engines and one stand-by unit. Integration design studies indicated that either the Brayton or Stirling power conversion systems could be integrated with the PS-100 reactor. The Stirling system had an integration advantage because of smaller piping size and fewer components. The Stirling engine, however, is more complex and heavier than the Brayton rotating unit, which tends to off-set the Stirling integration advantage. From a performance consideration, the Brayton had a 9 percent mass advantage, and the Stirling had a 50 percent radiator advantage.

  13. High accuracy modeling for advanced nuclear reactor core designs using Monte Carlo based coupled calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espel, Federico Puente

    The main objective of this PhD research is to develop a high accuracy modeling tool using a Monte Carlo based coupled system. The presented research comprises the development of models to include the thermal-hydraulic feedback to the Monte Carlo method and speed-up mechanisms to accelerate the Monte Carlo criticality calculation. Presently, deterministic codes based on the diffusion approximation of the Boltzmann transport equation, coupled with channel-based (or sub-channel based) thermal-hydraulic codes, carry out the three-dimensional (3-D) reactor core calculations of the Light Water Reactors (LWRs). These deterministic codes utilize nuclear homogenized data (normally over large spatial zones, consisting of fuel assembly or parts of fuel assembly, and in the best case, over small spatial zones, consisting of pin cell), which is functionalized in terms of thermal-hydraulic feedback parameters (in the form of off-line pre-generated cross-section libraries). High accuracy modeling is required for advanced nuclear reactor core designs that present increased geometry complexity and material heterogeneity. Such high-fidelity methods take advantage of the recent progress in computation technology and coupled neutron transport solutions with thermal-hydraulic feedback models on pin or even on sub-pin level (in terms of spatial scale). The continuous energy Monte Carlo method is well suited for solving such core environments with the detailed representation of the complicated 3-D problem. The major advantages of the Monte Carlo method over the deterministic methods are the continuous energy treatment and the exact 3-D geometry modeling. However, the Monte Carlo method involves vast computational time. The interest in Monte Carlo methods has increased thanks to the improvements of the capabilities of high performance computers. Coupled Monte-Carlo calculations can serve as reference solutions for verifying high-fidelity coupled deterministic neutron transport methods

  14. Knots, BPS States, and Algebraic Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garoufalidis, Stavros; Kucharski, Piotr; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    We analyze relations between BPS degeneracies related to Labastida-Mariño-Ooguri-Vafa (LMOV) invariants and algebraic curves associated to knots. We introduce a new class of such curves, which we call extremal A-polynomials, discuss their special properties, and determine exact and asymptotic formulas for the corresponding (extremal) BPS degeneracies. These formulas lead to nontrivial integrality statements in number theory, as well as to an improved integrality conjecture, which is stronger than the known M-theory integrality predictions. Furthermore, we determine the BPS degeneracies encoded in augmentation polynomials and show their consistency with known colored HOMFLY polynomials. Finally, we consider refined BPS degeneracies for knots, determine them from the knowledge of super-A-polynomials, and verify their integrality. We illustrate our results with twist knots, torus knots, and various other knots with up to 10 crossings.

  15. A pseudo-haptic knot diagram interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Weng, Jianguang; Hanson, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    To make progress in understanding knot theory, we will need to interact with the projected representations of mathematical knots which are of course continuous in 3D but significantly interrupted in the projective images. One way to achieve such a goal would be to design an interactive system that allows us to sketch 2D knot diagrams by taking advantage of a collision-sensing controller and explore their underlying smooth structures through a continuous motion. Recent advances of interaction techniques have been made that allow progress to be made in this direction. Pseudo-haptics that simulates haptic effects using pure visual feedback can be used to develop such an interactive system. This paper outlines one such pseudo-haptic knot diagram interface. Our interface derives from the familiar pencil-and-paper process of drawing 2D knot diagrams and provides haptic-like sensations to facilitate the creation and exploration of knot diagrams. A centerpiece of the interaction model simulates a "physically" reactive mouse cursor, which is exploited to resolve the apparent conflict between the continuous structure of the actual smooth knot and the visual discontinuities in the knot diagram representation. Another value in exploiting pseudo-haptics is that an acceleration (or deceleration) of the mouse cursor (or surface locator) can be used to indicate the slope of the curve (or surface) of whom the projective image is being explored. By exploiting these additional visual cues, we proceed to a full-featured extension to a pseudo-haptic 4D visualization system that simulates the continuous navigation on 4D objects and allows us to sense the bumps and holes in the fourth dimension. Preliminary tests of the software show that main features of the interface overcome some expected perceptual limitations in our interaction with 2D knot diagrams of 3D knots and 3D projective images of 4D mathematical objects.

  16. An eddy-current-based sensor for preventing knots in metallic wire drawing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, Bernat; Riba, Jordi-Roger; Baquero, Grau; Ferrater, Cèsar

    2011-06-01

    During metallic wire drawing processes, the presence of knots and the failure to detect them can lead to long production interruptions, significant economic losses and a lower quality of final product. Consequently, there is a pressing need to develop methods for real-time detection and prevention of this fault. In this paper, a sensor to prevent the formation of knots during the metallic wire drawing process is presented and evaluated by means of experimental data. This fast, inexpensive, non-contact sensor is based on electromagnetic principles such as eddy current induction, magnetic reluctance variations and magnetic coupling. The proposed sensor without direct contact can detect knots in a target metallic wire by measuring the impedance variations of a calibrated sensing coil caused by either a knot or an unwound loop rising from a wire rod. The incorporation of this type of sensor into a wire-drawing machine can avoid the tightening of the knot, thereby reducing downtime and increasing the security and reliability of the process. Experiments were conducted using a scale model of the above proposed system. This allowed highlighting the sensor's potential by carrying out an automatic, real-time knot detection during steel wire drawing.

  17. Fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor for nanoparticles coating via atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Chen-Long; Liu, Xiao; Shan, Bin; Chen, Rong

    2015-07-01

    A fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor has been designed for coating on nanoparticles (NPs) via atomic layer deposition. It consists of five major parts: reaction chamber, dosing and fluidizing section, pumping section, rotary manipulator components, as well as a double-layer cartridge for the storage of particles. In the deposition procedure, continuous fluidization of particles enlarges and homogenizes the void fraction in the particle bed, while rotation enhances the gas-solid interactions to stabilize fluidization. The particle cartridge presented here enables both the fluidization and rotation acting on the particle bed, demonstrated by the analysis of pressure drop. Moreover, enlarged interstitials and intense gas-solid contact under sufficient fluidizing velocity and proper rotation speed facilitate the precursor delivery throughout the particle bed and consequently provide a fast coating process. The cartridge can ensure precursors flowing through the particle bed exclusively to achieve high utilization without static exposure operation. By optimizing superficial gas velocities and rotation speeds, minimum pulse time for complete coating has been shortened in experiment, and in situ mass spectrometry showed the precursor usage can reach 90%. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy results suggested a saturated growth of nanoscale Al2O3 films on spherical SiO2 NPs. Finally, the uniformity and composition of the shells were characterized by high angle annular dark field-transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  18. Fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor for nanoparticles coating via atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Duan, Chen-Long; Liu, Xiao; Shan, Bin; Chen, Rong

    2015-07-01

    A fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor has been designed for coating on nanoparticles (NPs) via atomic layer deposition. It consists of five major parts: reaction chamber, dosing and fluidizing section, pumping section, rotary manipulator components, as well as a double-layer cartridge for the storage of particles. In the deposition procedure, continuous fluidization of particles enlarges and homogenizes the void fraction in the particle bed, while rotation enhances the gas-solid interactions to stabilize fluidization. The particle cartridge presented here enables both the fluidization and rotation acting on the particle bed, demonstrated by the analysis of pressure drop. Moreover, enlarged interstitials and intense gas-solid contact under sufficient fluidizing velocity and proper rotation speed facilitate the precursor delivery throughout the particle bed and consequently provide a fast coating process. The cartridge can ensure precursors flowing through the particle bed exclusively to achieve high utilization without static exposure operation. By optimizing superficial gas velocities and rotation speeds, minimum pulse time for complete coating has been shortened in experiment, and in situ mass spectrometry showed the precursor usage can reach 90%. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy results suggested a saturated growth of nanoscale Al2O3 films on spherical SiO2 NPs. Finally, the uniformity and composition of the shells were characterized by high angle annular dark field-transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. PMID:26233411

  19. Fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor for nanoparticles coating via atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Chen-Long; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Rong E-mail: bshan@mail.hust.edu.cn; Shan, Bin E-mail: bshan@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2015-07-15

    A fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor has been designed for coating on nanoparticles (NPs) via atomic layer deposition. It consists of five major parts: reaction chamber, dosing and fluidizing section, pumping section, rotary manipulator components, as well as a double-layer cartridge for the storage of particles. In the deposition procedure, continuous fluidization of particles enlarges and homogenizes the void fraction in the particle bed, while rotation enhances the gas-solid interactions to stabilize fluidization. The particle cartridge presented here enables both the fluidization and rotation acting on the particle bed, demonstrated by the analysis of pressure drop. Moreover, enlarged interstitials and intense gas–solid contact under sufficient fluidizing velocity and proper rotation speed facilitate the precursor delivery throughout the particle bed and consequently provide a fast coating process. The cartridge can ensure precursors flowing through the particle bed exclusively to achieve high utilization without static exposure operation. By optimizing superficial gas velocities and rotation speeds, minimum pulse time for complete coating has been shortened in experiment, and in situ mass spectrometry showed the precursor usage can reach 90%. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy results suggested a saturated growth of nanoscale Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on spherical SiO{sub 2} NPs. Finally, the uniformity and composition of the shells were characterized by high angle annular dark field-transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  20. Ion-exchange-membrane-based enzyme micro-reactor coupled online with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhigui; Yang, Youyou; Zhang, Jialing; Zhang, Zhengxiang; Bai, Yu; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2012-04-01

    In this article, we developed a membrane-based enzyme micro-reactor by directly using commercial polystyrene-divinylbenzene cation-exchange membrane as the support for trypsin immobilization via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions and successfully applied it for protein digestion. The construction of the reactor can be simply achieved by continuously pumping trypsin solution through the reactor for only 2 min, which was much faster than the other enzyme immobilization methods. In addition, the membrane reactor could be rapidly regenerated within 35 min, resulting in a "new" reactor for the digestion of every protein sample, completely eliminating the cross-interference of different protein samples. The amount and the activity of immobilized trypsin were measured, and the repeatability of the reactor was tested, with an RSD of 3.2% for the sequence coverage of cytochrome c in ten digestion replicates. An integrated platform for protein analysis, including online protein digestion and peptide separation and detection, was established by coupling the membrane enzyme reactor with liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The performance of the platform was evaluated using cytochrome c, myoglobin, and bovine serum albumin, showing that even in the short digestion time of several seconds the obtained sequence coverages was comparable to or higher than that with in-solution digestion. The system was also successfully used for the analysis of proteins from yeast cell lysate.

  1. Wastewater treatment from biodiesel production via a coupled photo-Fenton-aerobic sequential batch reactor (SBR) system.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Ximena María Vargas; Mejía, Gina Maria Hincapié; López, Kelly Viviana Patiño; Vásquez, Gloria Restrepo; Sepúlveda, Juan Miguel Marín

    2012-01-01

    A coupled system of the photo-Fenton advanced oxidation technique and an aerobic sequential batch reactor (SBR) was used to treat wastewater from biodiesel production using either palm or castor oil. The photo-Fenton reaction and biological process were evaluated individually and were effective at treating the wastewater; nevertheless, each process required longer degradation times for the wastewater pollutants compared with the coupled system. The proposed coupled photo-Fenton/aerobic SBR system obtained a 90% reduction of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) in half of the time required for the biological system individually. PMID:22766873

  2. Scaling analysis of the coupled heat transfer process in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, J.C.

    1986-08-01

    The differential equations representing the coupled heat transfer from the solid nuclear core components to the helium in the coolant channels are scaled in terms of representative quantities. This scaling process identifies the relative importance of the various terms of the coupled differential equations. The relative importance of these terms is then used to simplify the numerical solution of the coupled heat transfer for two bounding cases of full-power operation and depressurization from full-system operating pressure for the Fort St. Vrain High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. This analysis rigorously justifies the simplified system of equations used in the nuclear safety analysis effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  3. 3D neutronic codes coupled with thermal-hydraulic system codes for PWR, and BWR and VVER reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Langenbuch, S.; Velkov, K.; Lizorkin, M.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the objectives of code development for coupling 3D neutronics codes with thermal-hydraulic system codes. The present status of coupling ATHLET with three 3D neutronics codes for VVER- and LWR-reactors is presented. After describing the basic features of the 3D neutronic codes BIPR-8 from Kurchatov-Institute, DYN3D from Research Center Rossendorf and QUABOX/CUBBOX from GRS, first applications of coupled codes for different transient and accident scenarios are presented. The need of further investigations is discussed.

  4. Accuracy and convergence of coupled finite-volume/Monte Carlo codes for plasma edge simulations of nuclear fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoos, K.; Dekeyser, W.; Samaey, G.; Börner, P.; Baelmans, M.

    2016-10-01

    The plasma and neutral transport in the plasma edge of a nuclear fusion reactor is usually simulated using coupled finite volume (FV)/Monte Carlo (MC) codes. However, under conditions of future reactors like ITER and DEMO, convergence issues become apparent. This paper examines the convergence behaviour and the numerical error contributions with a simplified FV/MC model for three coupling techniques: Correlated Sampling, Random Noise and Robbins Monro. Also, practical procedures to estimate the errors in complex codes are proposed. Moreover, first results with more complex models show that an order of magnitude speedup can be achieved without any loss in accuracy by making use of averaging in the Random Noise coupling technique.

  5. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1961-07-25

    A means is described for co-relating the essential physical requirements of a fission chain reaction in order that practical, compact, and easily controllable reactors can be built. These objects are obtained by employing a composition of fissionsble isotope and moderator in fluid form in which the amount of fissionsble isotcpe present governs the reaction. The size of the reactor is no longer a critical factor, the new criterion being the concentration of the fissionable isotope.

  6. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1963-09-10

    A breeder reactor is described, including a mass of fissionable material that is less than critical with respect to unmoderated neutrons and greater than critical with respect to neutrons of average energies substantially greater than thermal, a coolant selected from sodium or sodium--potassium alloys, a control liquid selected from lead or lead--bismuth alloys, and means for varying the quantity of control liquid in the reactor. (AEC)

  7. Molecular knots in biology and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Nicole C. H.; Jackson, Sophie E.

    2015-09-01

    Knots and entanglements are ubiquitous. Beyond their aesthetic appeal, these fascinating topological entities can be either useful or cumbersome. In recent decades, the importance and prevalence of molecular knots have been increasingly recognised by scientists from different disciplines. In this review, we provide an overview on the various molecular knots found in naturally occurring biological systems (DNA, RNA and proteins), and those created by synthetic chemists. We discuss the current knowledge in these fields, including recent developments in experimental and, in some cases, computational studies which are beginning to shed light into the complex interplay between the structure, formation and properties of these topologically intricate molecules.

  8. Spontaneous knotting of self-trapped waves

    PubMed Central

    Desyatnikov, Anton S.; Buccoliero, Daniel; Dennis, Mark R.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2012-01-01

    We describe theory and simulations of a spinning optical soliton whose propagation spontaneously excites knotted and linked optical vortices. The nonlinear phase of the self-trapped light beam breaks the wave front into a sequence of optical vortex loops around the soliton, which, through the soliton's orbital angular momentum and spatial twist, tangle on propagation to form links and knots. We anticipate similar spontaneous knot topology to be a universal feature of waves whose phase front is twisted and nonlinearly modulated, including superfluids and trapped matter waves. PMID:23105969

  9. Self-powered denitration of landfill leachate through ammonia/nitrate coupled redox fuel cell reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Xu, Wei; Feng, Daolun; Liu, Zhanmeng; Wu, Zucheng

    2016-03-01

    In order to explore the feasibility of energy-free denitrifying N-rich wastewater, a self-powered device was uniquely assembled, in which ammonia/nitrate coupled redox fuel cell (CRFC) reactor was served as removing nitrogen and harvesting electric energy simultaneously. Ammonia is oxidized at anodic compartment and nitrate is reduced at cathodic compartment spontaneously by electrocatalysis. In 7.14 mM ammonia+0.2M KOH anolyte and 4.29 mM KNO3+0.1M H2SO4 catholyte, the nitrate removal efficiency was 46.9% after 18 h. Meanwhile, a maximum power density of 170 mW m(-2) was achieved when applying Pd/C cathode. When NH4Cl/nitrate and ammonia/nitrite CRFCs were tested, 26.2% N-NH4Cl and 91.4% N-NO2(-) were removed respectively. Nitrogen removal efficiency for real leachate at the same initial NH3-N concentration is 22.9% and nitrification of ammonia in leachate can be used as nitrate source. This work demonstrated a new way for N-rich wastewater remediation with electricity generation. PMID:26720140

  10. Self-powered denitration of landfill leachate through ammonia/nitrate coupled redox fuel cell reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Xu, Wei; Feng, Daolun; Liu, Zhanmeng; Wu, Zucheng

    2016-03-01

    In order to explore the feasibility of energy-free denitrifying N-rich wastewater, a self-powered device was uniquely assembled, in which ammonia/nitrate coupled redox fuel cell (CRFC) reactor was served as removing nitrogen and harvesting electric energy simultaneously. Ammonia is oxidized at anodic compartment and nitrate is reduced at cathodic compartment spontaneously by electrocatalysis. In 7.14 mM ammonia+0.2M KOH anolyte and 4.29 mM KNO3+0.1M H2SO4 catholyte, the nitrate removal efficiency was 46.9% after 18 h. Meanwhile, a maximum power density of 170 mW m(-2) was achieved when applying Pd/C cathode. When NH4Cl/nitrate and ammonia/nitrite CRFCs were tested, 26.2% N-NH4Cl and 91.4% N-NO2(-) were removed respectively. Nitrogen removal efficiency for real leachate at the same initial NH3-N concentration is 22.9% and nitrification of ammonia in leachate can be used as nitrate source. This work demonstrated a new way for N-rich wastewater remediation with electricity generation.

  11. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Roman, W.G.

    1961-06-27

    A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

  12. Dynamic Modeling and Control of Nuclear Reactors Coupled to Closed-Loop Brayton Cycle Systems using SIMULINK™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.; Sanchez, Travis

    2005-02-01

    The operation of space reactors for both in-space and planetary operations will require unprecedented levels of autonomy and control. Development of these autonomous control systems will require dynamic system models, effective control methodologies, and autonomous control logic. This paper briefly describes the results of reactor, power-conversion, and control models that are implemented in SIMULINK™ (Simulink, 2004). SIMULINK™ is a development environment packaged with MatLab™ (MatLab, 2004) that allows the creation of dynamic state flow models. Simulation modules for liquid metal, gas cooled reactors, and electrically heated systems have been developed, as have modules for dynamic power-conversion components such as, ducting, heat exchangers, turbines, compressors, permanent magnet alternators, and load resistors. Various control modules for the reactor and the power-conversion shaft speed have also been developed and simulated. The modules are compiled into libraries and can be easily connected in different ways to explore the operational space of a number of potential reactor, power-conversion system configurations, and control approaches. The modularity and variability of these SIMULINK™ models provides a way to simulate a variety of complete power generation systems. To date, both Liquid Metal Reactors (LMR), Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR), and electric heaters that are coupled to gas-dynamics systems and thermoelectric systems have been simulated and are used to understand the behavior of these systems. Current efforts are focused on improving the fidelity of the existing SIMULINK™ modules, extending them to include isotopic heaters, heat pipes, Stirling engines, and on developing state flow logic to provide intelligent autonomy. The simulation code is called RPC-SIM (Reactor Power and Control-Simulator).

  13. Vortex knot cascade in polynomial skein relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricca, Renzo L.

    2016-06-01

    The process of vortex cascade through continuous reduction of topological complexity by stepwise unlinking, that has been observed experimentally in the production of vortex knots (Kleckner & Irvine, 2013), is shown to be reproduced in the branching of the skein relations of knot polynomials (Liu & Ricca, 2015) used to identify topological complexity of vortex systems. This observation can be usefully exploited for predictions of energy-complexity estimates for fluid flows.

  14. Absence of knots in known RNA structures

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, Cristian; Di Stefano, Marco; Orland, Henri

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing effort to detect and characterize physical entanglement in biopolymers has so far established that knots are present in many globular proteins and also, abound in viral DNA packaged inside bacteriophages. RNA molecules, however, have not yet been systematically screened for the occurrence of physical knots. We have accordingly undertaken the systematic profiling of the several thousand RNA structures present in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The search identified no more than three deeply knotted RNA molecules. These entries are rRNAs of about 3,000 nt solved by cryo-EM. Their genuine knotted state is, however, doubtful based on the detailed structural comparison with homologs of higher resolution, which are all unknotted. Compared with the case of proteins and viral DNA, the observed incidence of knots in available RNA structures is, therefore, practically negligible. This fact suggests that either evolutionary selection or thermodynamic and kinetic folding mechanisms act toward minimizing the entanglement of RNA to an extent that is unparalleled by other types of biomolecules. A possible general strategy for designing synthetic RNA sequences capable of self-tying in a twist-knot fold is finally proposed. PMID:25646433

  15. Azo dye treatment with simultaneous electricity production in an anaerobic-aerobic sequential reactor and microbial fuel cell coupled system.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongjian; Zhang, Xingwang; Lin, Jun; Han, Song; Lei, Lecheng

    2010-06-01

    A microbial fuel cell and anaerobic-aerobic sequential reactor coupled system was used for azo dye degradation with simultaneous electricity production. Electricity was produced during the co-metabolism process of glucose and azo dye. A microorganism cultured graphite-granular cathode effectively decreased the charge transfer resistance of the cathode and yielded higher power density. Operation parameters including glucose concentration and hydraulic retention time were optimized. The results indicated that recovering electricity during a sequential aerobic-anaerobic azo dye treatment process enhanced chemical oxygen demand removal and did not decrease azo dye removal. Moreover, UV-vis spectra and GC-MS illustrated that the azo bond was cleaved biologically in the anaerobic chamber and abiotically in the aerobic chamber. The toxic intermediates, aromatic amines, were removed by aerobic treatment. Our work demonstrated that the microbial fuel cell and sequential anode-cathode reactor coupled system could be applied to achieve electricity production with simultaneous azo dye degradation. PMID:20188540

  16. Statistics of knots, geometry of conformations, and evolution of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lua, Rhonald C; Grosberg, Alexander Y

    2006-05-01

    Like shoelaces, the backbones of proteins may get entangled and form knots. However, only a few knots in native proteins have been identified so far. To more quantitatively assess the rarity of knots in proteins, we make an explicit comparison between the knotting probabilities in native proteins and in random compact loops. We identify knots in proteins statistically, applying the mathematics of knot invariants to the loops obtained by complementing the protein backbone with an ensemble of random closures, and assigning a certain knot type to a given protein if and only if this knot dominates the closure statistics (which tells us that the knot is determined by the protein and not by a particular method of closure). We also examine the local fractal or geometrical properties of proteins via computational measurements of the end-to-end distance and the degree of interpenetration of its subchains. Although we did identify some rather complex knots, we show that native conformations of proteins have statistically fewer knots than random compact loops, and that the local geometrical properties, such as the crumpled character of the conformations at a certain range of scales, are consistent with the rarity of knots. From these, we may conclude that the known "protein universe" (set of native conformations) avoids knots. However, the precise reason for this is unknown--for instance, if knots were removed by evolution due to their unfavorable effect on protein folding or function or due to some other unidentified property of protein evolution.

  17. Statistics of knots, geometry of conformations, and evolution of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lua, Rhonald C; Grosberg, Alexander Y

    2006-05-01

    Like shoelaces, the backbones of proteins may get entangled and form knots. However, only a few knots in native proteins have been identified so far. To more quantitatively assess the rarity of knots in proteins, we make an explicit comparison between the knotting probabilities in native proteins and in random compact loops. We identify knots in proteins statistically, applying the mathematics of knot invariants to the loops obtained by complementing the protein backbone with an ensemble of random closures, and assigning a certain knot type to a given protein if and only if this knot dominates the closure statistics (which tells us that the knot is determined by the protein and not by a particular method of closure). We also examine the local fractal or geometrical properties of proteins via computational measurements of the end-to-end distance and the degree of interpenetration of its subchains. Although we did identify some rather complex knots, we show that native conformations of proteins have statistically fewer knots than random compact loops, and that the local geometrical properties, such as the crumpled character of the conformations at a certain range of scales, are consistent with the rarity of knots. From these, we may conclude that the known "protein universe" (set of native conformations) avoids knots. However, the precise reason for this is unknown--for instance, if knots were removed by evolution due to their unfavorable effect on protein folding or function or due to some other unidentified property of protein evolution. PMID:16710448

  18. Test Results from a Direct Drive Gas Reactor Simulator Coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervol, David S.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Owen, Albert K.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Component level testing of power conversion units proposed for use in fission surface power systems has typically been done using relatively simple electric heaters for thermal input. These heaters do not adequately represent the geometry or response of proposed reactors. As testing of fission surface power systems transitions from the component level to the system level it becomes necessary to more accurately replicate these reactors using reactor simulators. The Direct Drive Gas-Brayton Power Conversion Unit test activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center integrates a reactor simulator with an existing Brayton test rig. The response of the reactor simulator to a change in Brayton shaft speed is shown as well as the response of the Brayton to an insertion of reactivity, corresponding to a drum reconfiguration. The lessons learned from these tests can be used to improve the design of future reactor simulators which can be used in system level fission surface power tests.

  19. Origin of metastable knots in single flexible chains.

    PubMed

    Dai, Liang; Renner, C Benjamin; Doyle, Patrick S

    2015-01-23

    Recent theoretical progress has explained the physics of knotting of semiflexible polymers, yet knotting of flexible polymers is relatively unexplored. We herein develop a new theory for the size distribution of knots on a flexible polymer and the existence of metastable knots. We show the free energy of a flexible molecule in a tube can be mapped to quantitatively reproduce the free energy distribution of a knot on a flexible chain. The size distribution of knots on flexible chains is expected to be universal and might be observed at a macroscopic scale, such as a string of hard balls. PMID:25659023

  20. Comparing models of Red Knot population dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGowan, Conor

    2015-01-01

    Predictive population modeling contributes to our basic scientific understanding of population dynamics, but can also inform management decisions by evaluating alternative actions in virtual environments. Quantitative models mathematically reflect scientific hypotheses about how a system functions. In Delaware Bay, mid-Atlantic Coast, USA, to more effectively manage horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) harvests and protect Red Knot (Calidris canutus rufa) populations, models are used to compare harvest actions and predict the impacts on crab and knot populations. Management has been chiefly driven by the core hypothesis that horseshoe crab egg abundance governs the survival and reproduction of migrating Red Knots that stopover in the Bay during spring migration. However, recently, hypotheses proposing that knot dynamics are governed by cyclical lemming dynamics garnered some support in data analyses. In this paper, I present alternative models of Red Knot population dynamics to reflect alternative hypotheses. Using 2 models with different lemming population cycle lengths and 2 models with different horseshoe crab effects, I project the knot population into the future under environmental stochasticity and parametric uncertainty with each model. I then compare each model's predictions to 10 yr of population monitoring from Delaware Bay. Using Bayes' theorem and model weight updating, models can accrue weight or support for one or another hypothesis of population dynamics. With 4 models of Red Knot population dynamics and only 10 yr of data, no hypothesis clearly predicted population count data better than another. The collapsed lemming cycle model performed best, accruing ~35% of the model weight, followed closely by the horseshoe crab egg abundance model, which accrued ~30% of the weight. The models that predicted no decline or stable populations (i.e. the 4-yr lemming cycle model and the weak horseshoe crab effect model) were the most weakly supported.

  1. Use of RELAP5-3D for Dynamic Analysis of a Closed-Loop Brayton Cycle Coupled To a Nuclear Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Larry D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes results of a dynamic system model for a pair of closed Brayton-cycle (CBC) loops running in parallel that are connected to a nuclear gas reactor. The model assumes direct coupling between the reactor and the Brayton-cycle loops. The RELAP5-3D (version 2.4.1) computer program was used to perform the analysis. Few reactors have ever been coupled to closed Brayton-cycle systems. As such their behavior under dynamically varying loads, startup and shut down conditions, and requirements for safe and autonomous operation are largely unknown. The model described in this paper represents the reactor, turbine, compressor, recuperator, heat rejection system and alternator. The initial results of the model indicate stable operation of the reactor-driven Brayton-cycle system. However, for analysts with mostly pressurized water reactor experience, the Brayton cycle loops coupled to a gas-cooled reactor also indicate some counter-intuitive behavior for the complete coupled system. This model has provided crucial information in evaluating the reactor design and would have been further developed for use in developing procedures for safe start up, shut down, safe-standby, and other autonomous operating modes had the plant development cycle been completed.

  2. Use of RELAP5-3D for Dynamic Analysis of a Closed-Loop Brayton Cycle Coupled To a Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, Larry D.

    2007-01-30

    This paper describes results of a dynamic system model for a pair of closed Brayton-cycle (CBC) loops running in parallel that are connected to a nuclear gas reactor. The model assumes direct coupling between the reactor and the Brayton-cycle loops. The RELAP5-3D (version 2.4.1) computer program was used to perform the analysis. Few reactors have ever been coupled to closed Brayton-cycle systems. As such their behavior under dynamically varying loads, startup and shut down conditions, and requirements for safe and autonomous operation are largely unknown. The model described in this paper represents the reactor, turbine, compressor, recuperator, heat rejection system and alternator. The initial results of the model indicate stable operation of the reactor-driven Brayton-cycle system. However, for analysts with mostly pressurized water reactor experience, the Brayton cycle loops coupled to a gas-cooled reactor also indicate some counter-intuitive behavior for the complete coupled system. This model has provided crucial information in evaluating the reactor design and would have been further developed for use in developing procedures for safe start up, shut down, safe-standby, and other autonomous operating modes had the plant development cycle been completed.

  3. On the universality of knot probability ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janse van Rensburg, E. J.; Rechnitzer, A.

    2011-04-01

    Let pn denote the number of self-avoiding polygons of length n on a regular three-dimensional lattice, and let pn(K) be the number which have knot type K. The probability that a random polygon of length n has knot type K is pn(K)/pn and is known to decay exponentially with length (Sumners and Whittington 1988 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 21 1689-94, Pippenger 1989 Discrete Appl. Math. 25 273-8). Little is known rigorously about the asymptotics of pn(K), but there is substantial numerical evidence (Orlandini et al 1988 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 31 5953-67, Marcone et al 2007 Phys. Rev. E 75 41105, Rawdon et al 2008 Macromolecules 41 4444-51, Janse van Rensburg and Rechnitzer 2008 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 41 105002) that pn(K) grows as p_n(K) \\simeq C_K \\mu _\\emptyset ^n n^{\\alpha -3+N_K}, \\qquad as\\quad n \\rightarrow \\infty, where NK is the number of prime components of the knot type K. It is believed that the entropic exponent, α, is universal, while the exponential growth rate, μ∅, is independent of the knot type but varies with the lattice. The amplitude, CK, depends on both the lattice and the knot type. The above asymptotic form implies that the relative probability of a random polygon of length n having prime knot type K over prime knot type L is \\frac{p_n(K)/p_n}{p_n(L)/p_n} = \\frac{p_n(K)}{p_n(L)} \\simeq \\left[ \\frac{C_K}{C_L} \\right].\\\\[-8pt] In the thermodynamic limit this probability ratio becomes an amplitude ratio; it should be universal and depend only on the knot types K and L. In this communication we examine the universality of these probability ratios for polygons in the simple cubic, face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic lattices. Our results support the hypothesis that these are universal quantities. For example, we estimate that a long random polygon is approximately 28 times more likely to be a trefoil than be a figure-eight, independent of the underlying lattice, giving an estimate of the intrinsic entropy associated with knot

  4. Symmetries in proteins: A knot theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi-Jie; Dill, Ken A.

    1996-04-01

    Whereas the symmetries of small molecules are described by the methods of group theory, there is no corresponding way to describe the complex symmetries in proteins. We develop a quantitative method to define and classify symmetries in compact polymers, based on the mathematical theory of graphs and knots. We represent different chain folds by their ``polymer graphs,'' equivalent to contact maps. We transform those graphs into mathematical knots to give a parsing of different possible chain folds into conformational taxonomies. We use Alexander-Conway knot polynomials to characterize the knots. We find that different protein structures with the same tertiary fold, e.g., a βαβ motif with different lengths of α helix and β sheet, can be described in terms of the different powers of the propagation matrices of the knot polynomial. This identifies a fundamental type of topological length invariance in proteins, ``elongatable'' symmetries. For example, ``helix,'' ``sheet,'' ``helix-turn-helix,'' and other secondary, supersecondary, and tertiary structures define structures of any chain length. Possibly the nine superfolds identified by Thornton et al. have elongatable symmetries.

  5. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, C.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2013-02-07

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  6. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, C.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  7. Coupled thermohydraulic-neutronic instabilities in boiling water nuclear reactors: A review of the state of the art

    SciTech Connect

    March-Leuba, J. ); Rey, J.M. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the current state of the art on the topic of coupled neutronic-thermohydraulic instabilities in boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRs). The topic of BWR instabilities is of great current relevance since it affects the operation of a large number of commercial nuclear reactors. The recent trends towards introduction of high efficiency fuels that permit reactor operation at higher power densities with increased void reactivity feedback and decreased response times, has resulted in a decrease of the stability margin in the low-flow, high-power region of the operating map. This trend has resulted in a number of unexpected'' instability events. For instance, United States plants have experienced two instability events recently, one of them resulted in an automatic reactor scram; in Spain, two BWR plants have experienced unstable limit cycle oscillations that required operator action to suppress. Similar events have been experienced in other European countries. In recent years, BWR instabilities have been one of the more exciting topics of work in the area of transient thermohydraulics. As a result, significant advances in understanding the physics behind these events have occurred, and a new and improved'' state of the art has emerged recently.

  8. Coupled thermohydraulic-neutronic instabilities in boiling water nuclear reactors: A review of the state of the art

    SciTech Connect

    March-Leuba, J.; Rey, J.M.

    1992-05-01

    This paper provides a review of the current state of the art on the topic of coupled neutronic-thermohydraulic instabilities in boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRs). The topic of BWR instabilities is of great current relevance since it affects the operation of a large number of commercial nuclear reactors. The recent trends towards introduction of high efficiency fuels that permit reactor operation at higher power densities with increased void reactivity feedback and decreased response times, has resulted in a decrease of the stability margin in the low-flow, high-power region of the operating map. This trend has resulted in a number of ``unexpected`` instability events. For instance, United States plants have experienced two instability events recently, one of them resulted in an automatic reactor scram; in Spain, two BWR plants have experienced unstable limit cycle oscillations that required operator action to suppress. Similar events have been experienced in other European countries. In recent years, BWR instabilities have been one of the more exciting topics of work in the area of transient thermohydraulics. As a result, significant advances in understanding the physics behind these events have occurred, and a ``new and improved`` state of the art has emerged recently.

  9. Nonlinear electrodynamics is skilled with knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulart, E.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this letter is threefold: First is to show that nonlinear generalizations of electrodynamics support various types of knotted solutions in vacuum. The solutions are universal in the sense that they do not depend on the specific Lagrangian density, at least if the latter gives rise to a well-posed theory. Second, is to describe the interaction between probe waves and knotted background configurations. We show that the qualitative behaviour of this interaction may be described in terms of Robinson congruences, which appear explicitly in the causal structure of the theory. Finally, we argue that optical arrangements endowed with intense background fields could be the natural place to look for the knots experimentally.

  10. IUE observations of NGC 1068 - The extremely luminous starburst knots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhweiler, F. C.; Truong, K. Q.; Altner, B.

    1991-01-01

    A complete investigation of the UV characteristics of the starburst knots in the inner 3 kpc region of NGC 1068 mapped by the IUE is presented. It is noted that these knots probably represent the most luminous H II regions yet studied at optical and UV wavelengths. Comparisons suggest that the brightest knot, knot 1, is 30 times brighter than NGC 604 in M33 and has a total luminosity of not less than 10 to the 43rd ergs/s.

  11. Coupled high fidelity thermal hydraulics and neutronics for reactor safety simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent A. Mousseau; Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

    2008-09-01

    This work is a continuation of previous work on the importance of accuracy in the simulation of nuclear reactor safety transients. This work is qualitative in nature and future work will be more quantitative. The focus of this work will be on a simplified single phase nuclear reactor primary. The transient of interest investigates the importance of accuracy related to passive (inherent) safety systems. The transient run here will be an Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) transient. Here the coolant pump is turned off and the un’SCRAM’ed reactor transitions from forced to free convection (Natural circulation). Results will be presented that show the difference that the first order in time truncation physics makes on the transient. The purpose of this document is to illuminate a possible problem in traditional reactor simulation approaches. Detailed studies need to be done on each simulation code for each transient analyzed to determine if the first order truncation physics plays an important role.

  12. Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  13. Are there p-adic knot invariants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    We suggest using the Hall-Littlewood version of the Rosso-Jones formula to define the germs of p-adic HOMFLY-PT polynomials for torus knots [ m, n] as coefficients of superpolynomials in a q-expansion. In this form, they have at least the [ m, n] ↔ [ n, m] topological invariance. This opens a new possibility to interpret superpolynomials as p-adic deformations of HOMFLY polynomials and poses a question of generalizing to other knot families, which is a substantial problem for several branches of modern theory.

  14. A deeply knotted protein structure and how it might fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, William R.

    2000-08-01

    The search for knots in protein has uncovered little that would cause Alexander the Great to reach for his sword. Excluding knots formed by post-translational crosslinking, the few proteins considered to be knotted form simple trefoil knots with one end of the chain extending through a loop by only a few residues, ten in the `best' example. A knot in an open chain (as distinct from a closed circle) is not rigorously defined and many weak protein knots disappear if the structure is viewed from a different angle. Here I describe a computer algorithm to detect knots in open chains that is not sensitive to viewpoint and that can define the region of the chain giving rise to the knot. It characterizes knots in proteins by the number of residues that must be removed from each end to abolish the knot. I applied this algorithm to the protein structure database and discovered a deep, figure-of-eight knot in the plant protein acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase. I propose a protein folding pathway that may explain how such a knot is formed.

  15. A deeply knotted protein structure and how it might fold.

    PubMed

    Taylor, W R

    2000-08-24

    The search for knots in protein has uncovered little that would cause Alexander the Great to reach for his sword. Excluding knots formed by post-translational crosslinking, the few proteins considered to be knotted form simple trefoil knots with one end of the chain extending through a loop by only a few residues, ten in the 'best' example. A knot in an open chain (as distinct from a closed circle) is not rigorously defined and many weak protein knots disappear if the structure is viewed from a different angle. Here I describe a computer algorithm to detect knots in open chains that is not sensitive to viewpoint and that can define the region of the chain giving rise to the knot. It characterizes knots in proteins by the number of residues that must be removed from each end to abolish the knot. I applied this algorithm to the protein structure database and discovered a deep, figure-of-eight knot in the plant protein acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase. I propose a protein folding pathway that may explain how such a knot is formed.

  16. The effect of dielectric top lids on materials processing in a low frequency inductively coupled plasma (LF-ICP) reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J. W. M.; Chan, C. S.; Xu, L.; Xu, S.

    2014-08-01

    The advent of the plasma revolution began in the 1970's with the exploitation of plasma sources for anisotropic etching and processing of materials. In recent years, plasma processing has gained popularity, with research institutions adopting projects in the field and industries implementing dry processing in their production lines. The advantages of utilizing plasma sources would be uniform processing over a large exposed surface area, and the reduction of toxic emissions. This leads to reduced costs borne by manufacturers which could be passed down as consumer savings, and a reduction in negative environmental impacts. Yet, one constraint that plagues the industry would be the control of contaminants in a plasma reactor which becomes evident when reactions are conducted in a clean vacuum environment. In this work, amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films were grown on glass substrates in a low frequency inductively coupled plasma (LF-ICP) reactor with a top lid made of quartz. Even though the chamber was kept at high vacuum ( 10-4 Pa), it was evident through secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and Fourier-transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) that oxygen contaminants were present. With the aid of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) the contaminant species were identified. The design of the LF-ICP reactor was then modified to incorporate an Alumina (Al2O3) lid. Results indicate that there were reduced amounts of contaminants present in the reactor, and that an added benefit of increased power transfer to the plasma, improving deposition rate of thin films was realized. The results of this study is conclusive in showing that Al2O3 is a good alternative as a top-lid of an LF-ICP reactor, and offers industries a solution in improving quality and rate of growth of thin films.

  17. Catalytic Chan–Lam coupling using a ‘tube-in-tube’ reactor to deliver molecular oxygen as an oxidant

    PubMed Central

    Mallia, Carl J; Burton, Paul M; Smith, Alexander M R; Walter, Gary C

    2016-01-01

    Summary A flow system to perform Chan–Lam coupling reactions of various amines and arylboronic acids has been realised employing molecular oxygen as an oxidant for the re-oxidation of the copper catalyst enabling a catalytic process. A tube-in-tube gas reactor has been used to simplify the delivery of the oxygen accelerating the optimisation phase and allowing easy access to elevated pressures. A small exemplification library of heteroaromatic products has been prepared and the process has been shown to be robust over extended reaction times. PMID:27559412

  18. Catalytic Chan-Lam coupling using a 'tube-in-tube' reactor to deliver molecular oxygen as an oxidant.

    PubMed

    Mallia, Carl J; Burton, Paul M; Smith, Alexander M R; Walter, Gary C; Baxendale, Ian R

    2016-01-01

    A flow system to perform Chan-Lam coupling reactions of various amines and arylboronic acids has been realised employing molecular oxygen as an oxidant for the re-oxidation of the copper catalyst enabling a catalytic process. A tube-in-tube gas reactor has been used to simplify the delivery of the oxygen accelerating the optimisation phase and allowing easy access to elevated pressures. A small exemplification library of heteroaromatic products has been prepared and the process has been shown to be robust over extended reaction times. PMID:27559412

  19. Knotted proteins: A tangled tale of Structural Biology

    PubMed Central

    Faísca, Patrícia F.N.

    2015-01-01

    Knotted proteins have their native structures arranged in the form of an open knot. In the last ten years researchers have been making significant efforts to reveal their folding mechanism and understand which functional advantage(s) knots convey to their carriers. Molecular simulations have been playing a fundamental role in this endeavor, and early computational predictions about the knotting mechanism have just been confirmed in wet lab experiments. Here we review a collection of simulation results that allow outlining the current status of the field of knotted proteins, and discuss directions for future research. PMID:26380658

  20. The constrictor knot is the best ligature

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction An ideal ligature should tighten readily and remain tight. Ligature failure can be a critical complication of invasive procedures in human and veterinary surgical practice. Previous studies have tested various knots but not the constrictor knot. Methods A new test bench was employed to compare six ligatures using four suture materials. As tension in a ligature is not readily measured, the study employed a surrogate measurement: the force required to slide a ligature along a rod. Benchmark values tested each suture material wrapped around the rod to establish the ratio between this force and the ligature tension for each material. Each ligature was tested first during tightening and then again afterwards. The benchmark ratios were employed to calculate the tensions to evaluate which ligature and which suture material retained tension best. Results The model provided consistent linear relationships between the tension in the suture and the force required to pull the ligature along the rod. The constrictor knot retained tension in the ligature best (55–107% better than the next best ligature). Among the suture materials, polydioxanone had the greatest ability to retain the tension in a ligature and polyglactin the least. Conclusions The constrictor knot showed superior characteristics for use as a ligature, and should be introduced into teaching and clinical practice for human and veterinary surgery. The new test bench is recommended for future testing of ligatures as well as objective comparison of suture materials. PMID:24780665

  1. Spontaneous Intravesical Knotting of Urethral Catheter

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Infant feeding tubes (IFT) have been universally used as urethral catheters in neonates and children for several decades. Though generally a safe procedure, it may cause significant morbidity if the catheter spontaneously knots inside the bladder. We report this complication in three children including a neonate. PMID:22953288

  2. 2D fluid model analysis for the effect of 3D gas flow on a capacitively coupled plasma deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2016-06-01

    The wide applicability of capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) deposition has increased the interest in developing comprehensive numerical models, but CCP imposes a tremendous computational cost when conducting a transient analysis in a three-dimensional (3D) model which reflects the real geometry of reactors. In particular, the detailed flow features of reactive gases induced by 3D geometric effects need to be considered for the precise calculation of radical distribution of reactive species. Thus, an alternative inclusive method for the numerical simulation of CCP deposition is proposed to simulate a two-dimensional (2D) CCP model based on the 3D gas flow results by simulating flow, temperature, and species fields in a 3D space at first without calculating the plasma chemistry. A numerical study of a cylindrical showerhead-electrode CCP reactor was conducted for particular cases of SiH4/NH3/N2/He gas mixture to deposit a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN x H y ) film. The proposed methodology produces numerical results for a 300 mm wafer deposition reactor which agree very well with the deposition rate profile measured experimentally along the wafer radius.

  3. Application of Gamma code coupled with turbomachinery models for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh

    2008-02-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of a toxic gas, CO, and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. GAMMA code is being developed to implement turbomachinery models in the power conversion unit (PCU) and ultimately models associated with the hydrogen plant. Some preliminary results will be described in this paper.

  4. Coupling of a bioelectrochemical system for p-nitrophenol removal in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jinyou; Xu, Xiaopeng; Jiang, Xinbai; Hua, Congxin; Zhang, Libin; Sun, Xiuyun; Li, Jiansheng; Mu, Yang; Wang, Lianjun

    2014-12-15

    Coupling of a bioelectrochemical system (BES) into the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) was developed for enhanced p-nitrophenol (PNP) removal in this study. Compared to the control UASB reactor, both PNP removal and the formation of its final reductive product p-aminophenol (PAP) were notably improved in the UASB-BES system. With the increase of current density from 0 to 4.71 A m(-3), the rates of PNP removal and PAP formation increased from 6.16 ± 0.11 and 4.21 ± 0.29 to 6.77 ± 0.00 and 6.11 ± 0.28 mol m(-3) d(-1), respectively. More importantly, the required dosage of organic cosubstrate was significantly reduced in the UASB-BES system than that in the UASB reactor. Organic carbon flux analysis suggested that biogas production from organic cosubstrate was seriously suppressed while direct anaerobic reduction of PNP was not remarkably affected by current input in the UASB-BES system. This study demonstrated that the UASB-BES coupling system had a promising potential for the removal of nitrophenol-containing wastewaters especially without adequate organic cosubstrates inside.

  5. Endoscopic Suturing and Knot Tying: Theory Into Practice

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    Objective To advance modern surgical techniques of endoscopic knot tying, encompassing a new appreciation of knot-tying theory and the application of second-generation, purpose-designed instruments. Summary Background Data During open surgery, surgeons automatically create the surgical half-hitch by using either instrument or hand/finger knot-tying methods (figure 4). Each of these methods, which are mirror images of each other, forms the same result, the half-hitch. Two opposing half-hitches are needed to form a square knot. There are many ways for new-generation instruments to create a secure square knot during endoscopic surgery. An overview of the current endoscopic knot-tying methods is presented. Methods The author presents a theoretical analysis of square knot-tying techniques as applied during instrument and hand/finger movements. The application of a mirror-image concept was considered in the analysis of these two contrasting methods. Results There are 12 ways to create a square knot, some of which have previously not been described or needed in open surgery. Some of these methods have particular application in endoscopic surgery. Conclusions A new understanding of knot-tying theory has been developed, with innovative methods being defined for tissue approximation during endoscopic surgery. These ergonomic, efficient, and contrasting methods of knot tying are described using second-generation endoscopic instruments. The new techniques have direct and broad application in many fields of minimally invasive surgery. PMID:11685022

  6. Towards effective topological field theory for knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, A.; Morozov, A.

    2015-10-01

    Construction of (colored) knot polynomials for double-fat graphs is further generalized to the case when "fingers" and "propagators" are substituting R-matrices in arbitrary closed braids with m-strands. Original version of [25] corresponds to the case m = 2, and our generalization sheds additional light on the structure of those mysterious formulas. Explicit expressions are now combined from Racah matrices of the type R ⊗ R ⊗ R bar ⟶ R bar and mixing matrices in the sectors R⊗3 ⟶ Q. Further extension is provided by composition rules, allowing to glue two blocks, connected by an m-strand braid (they generalize the product formula for ordinary composite knots with m = 1).

  7. Parity and cobordism of free knots

    SciTech Connect

    Manturov, Vassily O

    2012-02-28

    A simple invariant is constructed which obstructs a free knot to be truncated. In particular, this invariant provides an obstruction to the truncatedness of curves immersed in two-dimensional surfaces. A curve on an oriented two-dimensional surface S{sub g} is referred to as truncated (null-cobordant) if there exists a three-dimensional manifold M with boundary S{sub g} and a smooth proper map of a two-disc to M such that the image of the boundary of the disc coincides with the curve. The problem of truncatedness for free knots is solved in this paper using the notion of parity recently introduced by the author. Bibliography: 12 titles.

  8. Cometary Knots Around A Dying Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    These gigantic, tadpole-shaped objects are probably the result of a dying star's last gasps. Dubbed 'cometary knots' because their glowing heads and gossamer tails resemble comets, the gaseous objects probably were formed during a star's final stages of life. Hubble astronomer C. Robert O'Dell and graduate student Kerry P. Handron of Rice University in Houston, Texas discovered thousands of these knots with the Hubble Space Telescope while exploring the Helix nebula, the closest planetary nebula to Earth at 450 light-years away in the constellation Aquarius. Although ground-based telescopes have revealed such objects, astronomers have never seen so many of them. The most visible knots all lie along the inner edge of the doomed star's ring, trillions of miles away from the star's nucleus. Although these gaseous knots appear small, they're actually huge. Each gaseous head is at least twice the size of our solar system; each tail stretches for 100 billion miles, about 1,000 times the distance between the Earth and the Sun. Astronomers theorize that the doomed star spews hot, lower-density gas from its surface, which collides with cooler, higher-density gas that had been ejected 10,000 years before. The crash fragments the smooth cloud surrounding the star into smaller, denser finger-like droplets, like dripping paint. This image was taken in August, 1994 with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The red light depicts nitrogen emission ([NII] 6584A); green, hydrogen (H-alpha, 6563A); and blue, oxygen (5007A).

  9. Coupled full core neutron transport/CFD simulations of pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kochunas, B.; Stimpson, S.; Collins, B.; Downar, T.; Brewster, R.; Baglietto, E.; Yan, J.

    2012-07-01

    Recently as part of the CASL project, a capability to perform 3D whole-core coupled neutron transport and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations was demonstrated. This work uses the 2D/1D transport code DeCART and the commercial CFD code STAR-CCM+. It builds on previous CASL work demonstrating coupling for smaller spatial domains. The coupling methodology is described along with the problem simulated and results are presented for fresh hot full power conditions. An additional comparison is made to an equivalent model that uses lower order T/H feedback to assess the importance and cost of high fidelity feedback to the neutronics problem. A simulation of a quarter core Combustion Engineering (CE) PWR core was performed with the coupled codes using a Fixed Point Gauss-Seidel iteration technique. The total approximate calculation requirements are nearly 10,000 CPU hours and 1 TB of memory. The problem took 6 coupled iterations to converge. The CFD coupled model and low order T/H feedback model compared well for global solution parameters, with a difference in the critical boron concentration and average outlet temperature of 14 ppm B and 0.94 deg. C, respectively. Differences in the power distribution were more significant with maximum relative differences in the core-wide pin peaking factor (Fq) of 5.37% and average relative differences in flat flux region power of 11.54%. Future work will focus on analyzing problems more relevant to CASL using models with less approximations. (authors)

  10. Stretching Response of Knotted and Unknotted Polymer Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraglio, Michele; Micheletti, Cristian; Orlandini, Enzo

    2015-10-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental advances have clarified the major effects of knotting on the properties of stretched chains. Yet, how knotted chains respond to weak mechanical stretching and how this behavior differs from the unknotted case are still open questions and we address them here by profiling the complete stretching response of chains of hundreds of monomers and different topology. We find that the ratio of the knotted and unknotted chain extensions varies nonmonotonically with the applied force. This surprising feature is shown to be a signature of the crossover between the well-known high-force stretching regime and the previously uncharacterized low-force one. The observed differences of knotted and unknotted chain response increases with knot complexity and are sufficiently marked that they could be harnessed in single-molecule contexts to infer the presence and complexity of physical knots in micron-long biomolecules.

  11. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  12. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  13. Continuous ethanol production by immobilized yeast reactor coupled with membrane pervaporation unit.

    PubMed

    Shabtai, Y; Chaimovitz, S; Freeman, A; Katchalski-Katzir, E; Linder, C; Nemas, M; Perry, M; Kedem, O

    1991-10-20

    A system comprised of an immobilized yeast reactor producing ethanol, with a membrane pervaporation module for continuously removing and concentrating the produced ethanol, was developed. The combined system consisted of two integrated circulation loops: In one the sugar-containing medium is circulated through the membrane pervaporation module. The two loops were interconnected in a way allowing for separate parameter optimization (e.g., flow rate, temperature, pH) for each loop.The fermentation unit was 2.0 L bioreactor with five equal segments, packed with 5-mm beads of immobilized yeasts. The bead matrix was a crosslinked polyacrylamide hydrazide gel coated with calcium alginate. The fast circulation loop of the bioreactor allowed for efficient liberation of CO(2) at the top of the immobilized yeast reactor. Continuous operation of the uncoupled reactor for over 50 days with inflowing defined medium or dilute molasses at a residence time of 1.25 h yielded ethanol at a rate of about 10 g/L h.The pervaporation unit was constructed from four 60-cm-long tubular membranes of silicone composite on a polysulfone support. The output from the fermentor was circulated through the inside of the tubes of a unit with a total surface area of 800 cm(2), having an average flux of 150 mL/h, and selectivities to ethanol vs. water up to 7. A vacuum of 30 mb was applied to the outside of the tubes, removing 20-30 g of ethanol per hour, which was collected in condensors. The continuous removal of ethanol, avoiding inhibition of the fermentation process, resulted in an improved productivity and allowed the use of high sugar concentrations (40% wt/vol) offering the potential of a compact system with reduced stillage.The combined system of ethanol production and removal enabled an operative steady state at which the liquid volume of the system, and the concentrations of ethanol within the reactor ( 4% wt/vol), as well as within the flux crossing the pervaporation membrane (17%-20% wt

  14. Experimental investigation on plasma parameter profiles on a wafer level with reactor gap lengths in an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ju-Ho; Chung, Chin-Wook; Kim, Young-Cheol

    2015-07-15

    The gap length effect on plasma parameters is investigated in a planar type inductively coupled plasma at various conditions. The spatial profiles of ion densities and the electron temperatures on the wafer level are measured with a 2D probe array based on the floating harmonic method. At low pressures, the spatial profiles of the plasma parameters rarely changed by various gap lengths, which indicates that nonlocal kinetics are dominant at low pressures. However, at relatively high pressures, the spatial profiles of the plasma parameter changed dramatically. These plasma distribution profile characteristics should be considered for plasma reactor design and processing setup, and can be explained by the diffusion of charged particles and the local kinetics.

  15. Coupled radiation transport/thermal analysis of the radiation shield for a space nuclear reactor. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Barattino, W.J.

    1985-07-01

    A coupled radiation transport-heat transfer-stress analysis of the radiation shield for an SP-100 reactor was performed using a numerical code developed at the University of New Mexico and Sandia National Laboratory. For a fast reactor operating at 1.66 MW/sub th/, the energy deposited and resulting temperature distribution was determined for a shield consisting of tungsten and lithium hydride pressed into a stainless steel honeycomb matrix. While temperature feedback was shown to have a minor effect on energy deposition, the shielding configuration was found to have a major influence in meeting thermal requirements of the lithium hydride. It was shown that a shield optimized for radiation protection will fail because of melting. However, with minor modifications in the shield layering and material selection, the thermal integrity of the shield can be preserved. A shield design of graphite, depleted lithium hydride, tungsten, and natural lithium hydride was shown to satisfy neutron and gamma fluence requirements, maximum temperature limits, and minimize cracking in the LiH portion of the shield.

  16. Single and Coupled Electrochemical Processes and Reactors for the Abatement of Organic Water Pollutants: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Huitle, Carlos A; Rodrigo, Manuel A; Sirés, Ignasi; Scialdone, Onofrio

    2015-12-23

    Traditional physicochemical and biological techniques, as well as advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), are often inadequate, ineffective, or expensive for industrial water reclamation. Within this context, the electrochemical technologies have found a niche where they can become dominant in the near future, especially for the abatement of biorefractory substances. In this critical review, some of the most promising electrochemical tools for the treatment of wastewater contaminated by organic pollutants are discussed in detail with the following goals: (1) to present the fundamental aspects of the selected processes; (2) to discuss the effect of both the main operating parameters and the reactor design on their performance; (3) to critically evaluate their advantages and disadvantages; and (4) to forecast the prospect of their utilization on an applicable scale by identifying the key points to be further investigated. The review is focused on the direct electrochemical oxidation, the indirect electrochemical oxidation mediated by electrogenerated active chlorine, and the coupling between anodic and cathodic processes. The last part of the review is devoted to the critical assessment of the reactors that can be used to put these technologies into practice. PMID:26654466

  17. High-order Spatio-temporal Schemes for Coupled, Multi-physics Reactor Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mr. Vijay S. Mahadevan; Dr. Jean C. Ragusa

    2008-09-01

    This report summarizes the work done in the summer of 08 by the Ph.D. student Vijay Mahadevan. The main focus of the work was to coupled 3-D neutron difusion to 3-D heat conduction in parallel with accuracy greater than or equal to 2nd order in space and time. Results show that the goal was attained.

  18. Escape of a knot from a DNA molecule in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Benjamin; Doyle, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Macroscale knots are an everyday occurrence when trying to unravel an unorganized flexible string (e.g. an iPhone cord taken out of your pocket). In nature, knots are found in proteins and viral capsid DNA, and the properties imbued by their topologies are thought to have biological significance. Unlike their macroscale counterparts, thermal fluctuations greatly influence the dynamics of polymer knots. Here, we use Brownian Dynamics simulations to study knot diffusion along a linear polymer chain. The model is parameterized to dsDNA, a model polymer used in previous simulation and experimental studies of knot dynamics. We have used this model to study the process of knot escape and transport along a dsDNA strand extended by an elongational flow. For a range of knot topologies and flow strengths, we show scalings that result in collapse of the data onto a master curve. We show a topologically mediated mode of transport coincides with observed differences in rates of knot transport, and we provide a simple mechanistic explanation for its effect. We anticipate these results will build on the growing body of fundamental studies of knotted polymers and inform future experimental study. This work is supported by the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) and National Science Foundation (NSF) grant CBET-0852235.

  19. A comparison of ultrasonic suture welding and traditional knot tying.

    PubMed

    Richmond, J C

    2001-01-01

    The slippage of knots and the technical challenge of tying them securely are potential impediments to certain arthroscopic procedures. Ultrasonic energy delivered at 70 kHz can be used to weld No. 2 polypropylene suture. This method was compared with a traditional knot (surgeon's knot with four alternating half hitches) tied with an open technique to determine whether welding of sutures is comparable, in mechanical properties, to hand-tied knots. Both loops were fashioned around a 0.25-inch mandrel and then tested. The load to reach 3-mm elongation (point of likely biologic failure of a repair) was significantly greater for welded sutures than for knots. The elongation at ultimate failure was significantly less for welded sutures than for knots. The number of cycles to failure and the creep after initial displacement were similar for both welded and knotted suture loops. The ultimate load to failure was significantly greater for the knotted than for the welded suture. The welding of suture for the repair of musculoskeletal soft tissue presents an attractive alternative to traditional knot tying, particularly for arthroscopic applications.

  20. Test Results From a Direct Drive Gas Reactor Simulator Coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervol, David S.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Owen, Albert K.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2009-01-01

    The Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) located at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH is a closed cycle system incorporating a turboaltemator, recuperator, and gas cooler connected by gas ducts to an external gas heater. For this series of tests, the BPCU was modified by replacing the gas heater with the Direct Drive Gas heater or DOG. The DOG uses electric resistance heaters to simulate a fast spectrum nuclear reactor similar to those proposed for space power applications. The combined system thermal transient behavior was the focus of these tests. The BPCU was operated at various steady state points. At each point it was subjected to transient changes involving shaft rotational speed or DOG electrical input. This paper outlines the changes made to the test unit and describes the testing that took place along with the test results.

  1. Determining the microwave coupling and operational efficiencies of a microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor under high pressure diamond synthesis operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Nad, Shreya; Gu, Yajun; Asmussen, Jes

    2015-07-01

    The microwave coupling efficiency of the 2.45 GHz, microwave plasma assisted diamond synthesis process is investigated by experimentally measuring the performance of a specific single mode excited, internally tuned microwave plasma reactor. Plasma reactor coupling efficiencies (η) > 90% are achieved over the entire 100-260 Torr pressure range and 1.5-2.4 kW input power diamond synthesis regime. When operating at a specific experimental operating condition, small additional internal tuning adjustments can be made to achieve η > 98%. When the plasma reactor has low empty cavity losses, i.e., the empty cavity quality factor is >1500, then overall microwave discharge coupling efficiencies (η(coup)) of >94% can be achieved. A large, safe, and efficient experimental operating regime is identified. Both substrate hot spots and the formation of microwave plasmoids are eliminated when operating within this regime. This investigation suggests that both the reactor design and the reactor process operation must be considered when attempting to lower diamond synthesis electrical energy costs while still enabling a very versatile and flexible operation performance. PMID:26233399

  2. Determining the microwave coupling and operational efficiencies of a microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor under high pressure diamond synthesis operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nad, Shreya; Gu, Yajun; Asmussen, Jes

    2015-07-15

    The microwave coupling efficiency of the 2.45 GHz, microwave plasma assisted diamond synthesis process is investigated by experimentally measuring the performance of a specific single mode excited, internally tuned microwave plasma reactor. Plasma reactor coupling efficiencies (η) > 90% are achieved over the entire 100–260 Torr pressure range and 1.5–2.4 kW input power diamond synthesis regime. When operating at a specific experimental operating condition, small additional internal tuning adjustments can be made to achieve η > 98%. When the plasma reactor has low empty cavity losses, i.e., the empty cavity quality factor is >1500, then overall microwave discharge coupling efficiencies (η{sub coup}) of >94% can be achieved. A large, safe, and efficient experimental operating regime is identified. Both substrate hot spots and the formation of microwave plasmoids are eliminated when operating within this regime. This investigation suggests that both the reactor design and the reactor process operation must be considered when attempting to lower diamond synthesis electrical energy costs while still enabling a very versatile and flexible operation performance.

  3. Determining the microwave coupling and operational efficiencies of a microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor under high pressure diamond synthesis operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Nad, Shreya; Gu, Yajun; Asmussen, Jes

    2015-07-01

    The microwave coupling efficiency of the 2.45 GHz, microwave plasma assisted diamond synthesis process is investigated by experimentally measuring the performance of a specific single mode excited, internally tuned microwave plasma reactor. Plasma reactor coupling efficiencies (η) > 90% are achieved over the entire 100-260 Torr pressure range and 1.5-2.4 kW input power diamond synthesis regime. When operating at a specific experimental operating condition, small additional internal tuning adjustments can be made to achieve η > 98%. When the plasma reactor has low empty cavity losses, i.e., the empty cavity quality factor is >1500, then overall microwave discharge coupling efficiencies (η(coup)) of >94% can be achieved. A large, safe, and efficient experimental operating regime is identified. Both substrate hot spots and the formation of microwave plasmoids are eliminated when operating within this regime. This investigation suggests that both the reactor design and the reactor process operation must be considered when attempting to lower diamond synthesis electrical energy costs while still enabling a very versatile and flexible operation performance.

  4. Determining the microwave coupling and operational efficiencies of a microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor under high pressure diamond synthesis operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nad, Shreya; Gu, Yajun; Asmussen, Jes

    2015-07-01

    The microwave coupling efficiency of the 2.45 GHz, microwave plasma assisted diamond synthesis process is investigated by experimentally measuring the performance of a specific single mode excited, internally tuned microwave plasma reactor. Plasma reactor coupling efficiencies (η) > 90% are achieved over the entire 100-260 Torr pressure range and 1.5-2.4 kW input power diamond synthesis regime. When operating at a specific experimental operating condition, small additional internal tuning adjustments can be made to achieve η > 98%. When the plasma reactor has low empty cavity losses, i.e., the empty cavity quality factor is >1500, then overall microwave discharge coupling efficiencies (ηcoup) of >94% can be achieved. A large, safe, and efficient experimental operating regime is identified. Both substrate hot spots and the formation of microwave plasmoids are eliminated when operating within this regime. This investigation suggests that both the reactor design and the reactor process operation must be considered when attempting to lower diamond synthesis electrical energy costs while still enabling a very versatile and flexible operation performance.

  5. Optical knots and contact geometry II. From Ranada dyons to transverse and cosmetic knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodenko, Arkady L.

    2016-08-01

    Some time ago Ranada (1989) obtained new nontrivial solutions of the Maxwellian gauge fields without sources. These were reinterpreted in Kholodenko (2015) [10] (part I) as particle-like (monopoles, dyons, etc.). They were obtained by the method of Abelian reduction of the non-Abelian Yang-Mills functional. The developed method uses instanton-type calculations normally employed for the non-Abelian gauge fields. By invoking the electric-magnetic duality it then becomes possible to replace all known charges/masses by the particle-like solutions of the source-free Abelian gauge fields. To employ these results in high energy physics, it is essential to extend Ranada's results by carefully analyzing and classifying all dynamically generated knotted/linked structures in gauge fields, including those discovered by Ranada. This task is completed in this work. The study is facilitated by the recent progress made in solving the Moffatt conjecture. Its essence is stated as follows: in steady incompressible Euler-type fluids the streamlines could have knots/links of all types. By employing the correspondence between the ideal hydrodynamics and electrodynamics discussed in part I and by superimposing it with the already mentioned method of Abelian reduction, it is demonstrated that in the absence of boundaries only the iterated torus knots and links could be dynamically generated. Obtained results allow to develop further particle-knot/link correspondence studied in Kholodenko (2015) [13].

  6. Anaerobic baffled reactor coupled with chemical precipitation for treatment and toxicity reduction of industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Laohaprapanona, Sawanya; Marquesa, Marcia; Hogland, William

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the reduction of soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODs) and the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), formaldehyde (FA) and nitrogen from highly polluted wastewater generated during cleaning procedures in wood floor manufacturing using a laboratory-scale biological anaerobic baffled reactor followed by chemical precipitation using MgCI2 .6H20 + Na2HPO4. By increasing the hydraulic retention time from 2.5 to 3.7 and 5 days, the reduction rates of FA, DOC and CODs of nearly 100%, 90% and 83%, respectively, were achieved. When the Mg:N:P molar ratio in the chemical treatment was changed from 1:1:1 to 1.3:1:1.3 at pH 8, the NH4+ removal rate increased from 80% to 98%. Biologically and chemically treated wastewater had no toxic effects on Vibrio fischeri and Artemia salina whereas chemically treated wastewater inhibited germination of Lactuca sativa owing to a high salt content. Regardless of the high conductivity of the treated wastewater, combined biological and chemical treatment was found to be effective for the removal of the organic load and nitrogen, and to be simple to operate and to maintain. A combined process such as that investigated could be useful for on-site treatment of low volumes of highly polluted wastewater generated by the wood floor and wood furniture industries, for which there is no suitable on-site treatment option available today.

  7. The Geometry and Physics of Knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atiyah, Michael

    1990-10-01

    Deals with an area of research that lies at the crossroads of mathematics and physics. The material presented here rests primarily on the pioneering work of Vaughan Jones and Edward Witten relating polynomial invariants of knots to a topological quantum field theory in 2+1 dimensions. Professor Atiyah presents an introduction to Witten's ideas from the mathematical point of view. The book will be essential reading for all geometers and gauge theorists as an exposition of new and interesting ideas in a rapidly developing area.

  8. Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Peritoneal Catheter Knot Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Haq, Anwar; Al-Otaibi, Faisal; Alshanafey, Saud; Sabbagh, Mohamed Diya; Al Shail, Essam

    2013-01-01

    The ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is a common procedure in pediatric neurosurgery that carries a risk of complications at cranial and abdominal sites. We report on the case of a child with shunt infection and malfunction. The peritoneal catheter was tethered within the abdominal cavity, precluding its removal. Subsequently, laparoscopic exploration identified a knot at the distal end of the peritoneal catheter around the omentum. A new VP shunt was inserted after the infection was healed. This type of complication occurs rarely, so there are a limited number of case reports in the literature. This report is complemented by a literature review. PMID:24109528

  9. Structural recognition and nomenclature standardization in forensic knot analysis.

    PubMed

    Chisnall, Robert Charles

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of knots during civil and criminal investigations is characterized by two fundamental challenges: the precise recognition of all structural nuances and the application of accurate, universally recognized terms. These challenges are exacerbated by inconsistencies, contradictions and regional terminology, which occur in common practice and in mainstream books as well as within forensic science. Some knots bear multiple or value-laden names, even misnomers, and some terms have manifold applications. This can lead to ambiguity and confusion. Additionally, many topological concepts and terms are applicable to practical knot-tying, despite the differences between real-world and theoretical knots, but the esoterica of topology are inaccessible to anyone unfamiliar with that branch of mathematics. To highlight these challenges some examples of knots encountered in case work are presented. Significantly, an overview of a few previously ignored issues is examined and several new concepts are introduced. An emphasis is placed on identifying structural variations, standardized nomenclature is outlined, and recommended terminology is derived from fields such as forensic science, chemistry, archaeology, topology and the textile industry. Greater precision in knot identifications, characterizations and descriptions can assist investigators in linking specific tying practises to potential suspects, analysing the manner in which knotted evidence was tied, and understanding how knots and ligatures perform in given scenarios.

  10. Analysis and physics of laparoscopic intracorporeal square-knot tying.

    PubMed

    Medina, Marelyn

    2005-01-01

    Square knots are often used in open surgery to approximate tissue borders or tie off tubular structures like vessels or ducts. Three common methods are used for surgical square-knot tying: one-hand tying, two-hand tying, and the instrument-tying technique. Two types of suture placements are studied in both the open and laparoscopic surgical fields. The first called equal length has suture segment ends placed at equal distances from the tying site. The second called unequal length has one suture end further away from the tying site than the other. Laparoscopic intracorporeal square-knot tying maneuvers are analyzed herein. Mechanical analysis of square-knot tying movements reveals that regardless of location or method used in construction, all square knots consist of 2 half-knots. For study purposes, these sets of movements are identified in laparoscopy as maneuver A and maneuver B. Further breakout of these maneuvers reveals that they consist of 5 motions. This study reveals that 16 different ways exist to place a square knot by means of the laparoscopic intracorporeal technique. It is likely that difficulty mastering this essential skill is not just the result of poor instrumentation, improper port placement, or the limitations of a 2-dimensional video image. It may also be attributed to mixing up the different square-knot tying techniques during random practice exercises. This is possible if the surgeon is ignorant of the technical variations present in what most people consider a simple task.

  11. The Verbal Facilitation Effect in Learning to Tie Nautical Knots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff, Markus; Schwan, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Motor skills are often demonstrated with a combination of verbal information and video demonstration. In this study, participants learned to tie nautical knots with a video clip demonstrating the motor task preceded by a descriptive or a metaphorical, picture-like verbalization. In a control condition participants learned the knots with a video…

  12. Structural recognition and nomenclature standardization in forensic knot analysis.

    PubMed

    Chisnall, Robert Charles

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of knots during civil and criminal investigations is characterized by two fundamental challenges: the precise recognition of all structural nuances and the application of accurate, universally recognized terms. These challenges are exacerbated by inconsistencies, contradictions and regional terminology, which occur in common practice and in mainstream books as well as within forensic science. Some knots bear multiple or value-laden names, even misnomers, and some terms have manifold applications. This can lead to ambiguity and confusion. Additionally, many topological concepts and terms are applicable to practical knot-tying, despite the differences between real-world and theoretical knots, but the esoterica of topology are inaccessible to anyone unfamiliar with that branch of mathematics. To highlight these challenges some examples of knots encountered in case work are presented. Significantly, an overview of a few previously ignored issues is examined and several new concepts are introduced. An emphasis is placed on identifying structural variations, standardized nomenclature is outlined, and recommended terminology is derived from fields such as forensic science, chemistry, archaeology, topology and the textile industry. Greater precision in knot identifications, characterizations and descriptions can assist investigators in linking specific tying practises to potential suspects, analysing the manner in which knotted evidence was tied, and understanding how knots and ligatures perform in given scenarios. PMID:27320402

  13. Factorization of differential expansion for antiparallel double-braid knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.

    2016-09-01

    Continuing the quest for exclusive Racah matrices, which are needed for evaluation of colored arborescent-knot polynomials in Chern-Simons theory, we suggest to extract them from a new kind of a double-evolution — that of the antiparallel double-braids, which is a simple two-parametric family of two-bridge knots, generalizing the one-parametric family of twist knots. In the case of rectangular representations R = [ r s ] we found an evidence that the corresponding differential expansion miraculously factorizes and can be obtained from that for the twist knots. This reduces the problem of rectangular exclusive Racah to constructing the answers for just a few twist knots. We develop a recent conjecture on the structure of differential expansion for the simplest members of this family (the trefoil and the figure-eight knot) and provide the exhaustive answer for the first unknown case of R = [33]. The answer includes HOMFLY of arbitrary twist and double-braid knots and Racah matrices overline{S} and S — what allows to calculate [33]-colored polynomials for arbitrary arborescent (double-fat) knots. For generic rectangular representations fully described are only the contributions of the single-floor pyramids. One step still remains to be done.

  14. Code Development in Coupled PARCS/RELAP5 for Supercritical Water Reactor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Po; Wilson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The new capability is added to the existing coupled code package PARCS/RELAP5, in order to analyze SCWR design under supercritical pressure with the separated water coolant and moderator channels. This expansion is carried out on both codes. In PARCS, modification is focused on extending the water property tables to supercritical pressure, modifying the variable mapping input file and related code module for processing thermal-hydraulic information from separated coolant/moderator channels, and modifying neutronics feedback module to deal with the separated coolant/moderator channels. In RELAP5, modification is focused on incorporating more accurate water properties near SCWR operation/transient pressure and temperature in themore » code. Confirming tests of the modifications is presented and the major analyzing results from the extended codes package are summarized.« less

  15. Knot Solitons in Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David; Ray, Michael; Tiurev, Konstantin; Ruokokoski, Emmi; Gheorghe, Andrei Horia; Möttönen, Mikko

    2016-05-01

    Knots are familiar entities that appear at a captivating nexus of art, technology, mathematics and science. Following a lengthy period of theoretical investigation and development, they have recently attracted great experimental interest in classical contexts ranging from knotted DNA and nanostructures to vortex knots in fluids. We demonstrate here the controlled creation and detection of knot solitons in the quantum-mechanical order parameter of a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. Images of the superfluid reveal the circular shape of the soliton core and its associated linked rings. Our observations of the knot soliton establish an experimental foundation for future studies of their stability, dynamics and applications within quantum systems. Supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-1205822.

  16. Design principles for rapid folding of knotted DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kočar, Vid; Schreck, John S; Čeru, Slavko; Gradišar, Helena; Bašić, Nino; Pisanski, Tomaž; Doye, Jonathan P K; Jerala, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Knots are some of the most remarkable topological features in nature. Self-assembly of knotted polymers without breaking or forming covalent bonds is challenging, as the chain needs to be threaded through previously formed loops in an exactly defined order. Here we describe principles to guide the folding of highly knotted single-chain DNA nanostructures as demonstrated on a nano-sized square pyramid. Folding of knots is encoded by the arrangement of modules of different stability based on derived topological and kinetic rules. Among DNA designs composed of the same modules and encoding the same topology, only the one with the folding pathway designed according to the 'free-end' rule folds efficiently into the target structure. Besides high folding yield on slow annealing, this design also folds rapidly on temperature quenching and dilution from chemical denaturant. This strategy could be used to design folding of other knotted programmable polymers such as RNA or proteins.

  17. UNEXPECTED IONIZATION STRUCTURE IN ETA CARINAE'S ''WEIGELT KNOTS''

    SciTech Connect

    Remmen, Grant N.; Davidson, Kris; Mehner, Andrea

    2013-08-10

    The Weigelt knots, dense slow-moving ejecta near {eta} Carinae, are mysterious in structure as well as in origin. Using spatially dithered spectrograms obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS), we have partially resolved the ionization zones of one knot. Contrary to simple models, higher ionization levels occur on the outer side, i.e., farther from the star. They cannot represent a bow shock, and no satisfying explanation is yet available-though we sketch one qualitative possibility. STIS spectrograms provide far more reliable spatial measurements of the Weigelt knots than HST images do, and this technique can also be applied to the knots' proper motion problem. Our spatial measurement accuracy is about 10 mas, corresponding to a projected linear scale of the order of 30 AU, which is appreciably smaller than the size of each Weigelt knot.

  18. Design principles for rapid folding of knotted DNA nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Kočar, Vid; Schreck, John S.; Čeru, Slavko; Gradišar, Helena; Bašić, Nino; Pisanski, Tomaž; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Jerala, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Knots are some of the most remarkable topological features in nature. Self-assembly of knotted polymers without breaking or forming covalent bonds is challenging, as the chain needs to be threaded through previously formed loops in an exactly defined order. Here we describe principles to guide the folding of highly knotted single-chain DNA nanostructures as demonstrated on a nano-sized square pyramid. Folding of knots is encoded by the arrangement of modules of different stability based on derived topological and kinetic rules. Among DNA designs composed of the same modules and encoding the same topology, only the one with the folding pathway designed according to the ‘free-end' rule folds efficiently into the target structure. Besides high folding yield on slow annealing, this design also folds rapidly on temperature quenching and dilution from chemical denaturant. This strategy could be used to design folding of other knotted programmable polymers such as RNA or proteins. PMID:26887681

  19. The genomes of root-knot nematodes.

    PubMed

    Bird, David McK; Williamson, Valerie M; Abad, Pierre; McCarter, James; Danchin, Etienne G J; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe; Opperman, Charles H

    2009-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are the most destructive group of plant pathogens worldwide and are extremely challenging to control. The recent completion of two root-knot nematode genomes opens the way for a comparative genomics approach to elucidate the success of these parasites. Sequencing revealed that Meloidogyne hapla, a diploid that reproduces by facultative, meiotic parthenogenesis, encodes approximately 14,200 genes in a compact, 54 Mpb genome. Indeed, this is the smallest metazoan genome completed to date. By contrast, the 86 Mbp Meloidogyne incognita genome encodes approximately 19,200 genes. This species reproduces by obligate mitotic parthenogenesis and exhibits a complex pattern of aneuploidy. The genome includes triplicated regions and contains allelic pairs with exceptionally high degrees of sequence divergence, presumably reflecting adaptations to the strictly asexual reproductive mode. Both root-knot nematode genomes have compacted gene families compared with the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and both encode large suites of enzymes that uniquely target the host plant. Acquisition of these genes, apparently via horizontal gene transfer, and their subsequent expansion and diversification point to the evolutionary history of these parasites. It also suggests new routes to their control. PMID:19400640

  20. Fabrication of an on-line enzyme micro-reactor coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the digestion of recombinant human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Foo, Hsiao Ching; Smith, Norman W; Stanley, Shawn M R

    2015-04-01

    Our aim was to develop a fast and efficient on-line method using micro-reactors for the digestion and deglycosylation of recombinant human erythropoietin extracted from equine plasma. The trypsin digestion micro reactors were fabricated using fused silica capillaries with either a dextran-modified coating or a porous monolith that was able to immobilise the enzyme. These were both found to be reasonably robust and durable, with the trypsin immobilised on dextran-modified fused silica capillaries offering better reproducibility than the micro-reactor based upon covalent attachment of this enzyme to the polymer. It is also evident that the enzyme attached micro reactors produced some tryptic peptides in a greater yield than in-solution digestion. A peptide-N-glycosidase F reactor was also fabricated and, when coupled with the trypsin reactor, the deaminated peptides T5 DAM and T9 DAM from recombinant human erythropoietin could also be detected by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. These results were better than those achieved using off-line digestion plus deglycosylation reactions and the analysis required far less time and effort to complete. The use of this on-line approach improved the sensitivity, efficiency and speed of our confirmation methodology that is based upon detecting the unique peptide segments of recombinant human erythropoietin that has been affinity extracted from positive equine plasma samples.

  1. Pd-Ag Membrane Coupled to a Two-Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor (TZFBR) for Propane Dehydrogenation on a Pt-Sn/MgAl2O4 Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, José-Antonio; Julián, Ignacio; Herguido, Javier; Menéndez, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Several reactor configurations have been tested for catalytic propane dehydrogenation employing Pt-Sn/MgAl2O4 as a catalyst. Pd-Ag alloy membranes coupled to the multifunctional Two-Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor (TZFBR) provide an improvement in propane conversion by hydrogen removal from the reaction bed through the inorganic membrane in addition to in situ catalyst regeneration. Twofold process intensification is thereby achieved when compared to the use of traditional fluidized bed reactors (FBR), where coke formation and thermodynamic equilibrium represent important process limitations. Experiments were carried out at 500–575 °C and with catalyst mass to molar flow of fed propane ratios between 15.1 and 35.2 g min mmol−1, employing three different reactor configurations: FBR, TZFBR and TZFBR + Membrane (TZFBR + MB). The results in the FBR showed catalyst deactivation, which was faster at high temperatures. In contrast, by employing the TZFBR with the optimum regenerative agent flow (diluted oxygen), the process activity was sustained throughout the time on stream. The TZFBR + MB showed promising results in catalytic propane dehydrogenation, displacing the reaction towards higher propylene production and giving the best results among the different reactor configurations studied. Furthermore, the results obtained in this study were better than those reported on conventional reactors. PMID:24958620

  2. Pd-Ag Membrane Coupled to a Two-Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor (TZFBR) for Propane Dehydrogenation on a Pt-Sn/MgAl2O4 Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Medrano, José-Antonio; Julián, Ignacio; Herguido, Javier; Menéndez, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Several reactor configurations have been tested for catalytic propane dehydrogenation employing Pt-Sn/MgAl2O4 as a catalyst. Pd-Ag alloy membranes coupled to the multifunctional Two-Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor (TZFBR) provide an improvement in propane conversion by hydrogen removal from the reaction bed through the inorganic membrane in addition to in situ catalyst regeneration. Twofold process intensification is thereby achieved when compared to the use of traditional fluidized bed reactors (FBR), where coke formation and thermodynamic equilibrium represent important process limitations. Experiments were carried out at 500-575 °C and with catalyst mass to molar flow of fed propane ratios between 15.1 and 35.2 g min mmol-1, employing three different reactor configurations: FBR, TZFBR and TZFBR + Membrane (TZFBR + MB). The results in the FBR showed catalyst deactivation, which was faster at high temperatures. In contrast, by employing the TZFBR with the optimum regenerative agent flow (diluted oxygen), the process activity was sustained throughout the time on stream. The TZFBR + MB showed promising results in catalytic propane dehydrogenation, displacing the reaction towards higher propylene production and giving the best results among the different reactor configurations studied. Furthermore, the results obtained in this study were better than those reported on conventional reactors. PMID:24958620

  3. ICECO-CEL: a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian code for analyzing primary system response in fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1981-02-01

    This report describes a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian code, ICECO-CEL, for analyzing the response of the primary system during hypothetical core disruptive accidents. The implicit Eulerian method is used to calculate the fluid motion so that large fluid distortion, two-dimensional sliding interface, flow around corners, flow through coolant passageways, and out-flow boundary conditions can be treated. The explicit Lagrangian formulation is employed to compute the response of the containment vessel and other elastic-plastic solids inside the reactor containment. Large displacements, as well as geometrical and material nonlinearities are considered in the analysis. Marker particles are utilized to define the free surface or the material interface and to visualize the fluid motion. The basic equations and numerical techniques used in the Eulerian hydrodynamics and Lagrangian structural dynamics are described. Treatment of the above-core hydrodynamics, sodium spillage, fluid cavitation, free-surface boundary conditions and heat transfer are also presented. Examples are given to illustrate the capabilities of the computer code. Comparisons of the code predictions with available experimental data are also made.

  4. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from S-I thermochemical process coupled to a high temperature gas reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldi, M. R.; Francois, J. L.; Castro-Uriegas, D.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated to the hydrogen produced by the sulfur-iodine thermochemical process, coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor, and to compare the results with other life cycle analysis (LCA) studies on hydrogen production technologies, both conventional and emerging. The LCA tool was used to quantify the impacts associated with climate change. The product system was defined by the following steps: (i) extraction and manufacturing of raw materials (upstream flows), (U) external energy supplied to the system, (iii) nuclear power plant, and (iv) hydrogen production plant. Particular attention was focused to those processes where there was limited information from literature about inventory data, as the TRISO fuel manufacture, and the production of iodine. The results show that the electric power, supplied to the hydrogen plant, is a sensitive parameter for GHG emissions. When the nuclear power plant supplied the electrical power, low GHG emissions were obtained. These results improve those reported by conventional hydrogen production methods, such as steam reforming. (authors)

  5. A UASB reactor coupled to a hybrid aerobic MBR as innovative plant configuration to enhance the removal of organic micropollutants.

    PubMed

    Alvarino, T; Suárez, S; Garrido, M; Lema, J M; Omil, F

    2016-02-01

    An innovative plant configuration based in an UASB reactor coupled to a hybrid aerobic membrane bioreactor designed for sustainable treatment of municipal wastewater at ambient temperatures and low hydraulic retention time was studied in terms of organic micropollutants (OMPs) removal. OMPs removal mechanisms, as well as the potential influence of biomass activity and physical conformation were assessed. Throughout all periods of operation (150 days) high organic matter removals were maintained (>95%) and, regarding OMPs removal, this innovative system has shown to be more efficient than conventional technologies for those OMPs which are prone to be biotransformed under anaerobic conditions. For instance, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim have both shown to be biodegradable under anaerobic conditions with similar efficiencies (removal efficiencies above 84%). OMPs main removal mechanism was found to be biotransformation, except in the case of musk fragrances which showed medium sorption onto sludge. OMPs removal was strongly dependent on the efficiency of the primary metabolism (organic matter degradation and nitrification) and the type of biomass. PMID:26386770

  6. Investigation of ion energy and angular distributions at the wafer edge in rf capacitively coupled reactors using CFD-ACE+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhoj, Ananth; Roy, Abhra; Jain, Kunal; Xiong, Zhongmin

    2015-09-01

    Dual frequency capacitively coupled reactors are now commonly used in microelectronics fabrication. The extent of possible independent control of ion fluxes and ion energy and angular distribution (IEADs) by varying HF and LF signals is currently a topic of great interest. In this study, we report on investigations of IEADs in single and dual frequency CCPs, including the wafer edge refinement using CFD-ACE+. The current algorithms in CFD-ACE+ allow the determination of total power at the electrode or in the discharge. To account for the presence of two or more rf sources connected to a powered electrode, the existing numerical algorithms for power targeting were enhanced to track current at the electrode as a function of time, vary voltage and determine power as a function of frequency. The Monte Carlo transport module for heavy species in CFD-ACE+ was recently enhanced to compute IEADs in rf discharges. Results for the effect of varying power and pressure on IEADs were compared to semi-analytical models and data reported in Gahan et al.. The validated model was applied to investigate the effect of details of HF and LF signals on IEADs in Argon discharges.

  7. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  8. Performance of down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor coupled with up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor for treatment of onion dehydration wastewater.

    PubMed

    El-Kamah, Hala; Mahmoud, Mohamed; Tawfik, Ahmed

    2011-07-01

    In this study, a promising system consisting of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor followed by down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor was investigated for onion dehydration wastewater treatment. Laboratory experiments were conducted at two different phases, i.e., phase (1) at overall hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 11h (UASB reactor: 6h and DHS reactor: 5h) and phase (2) at overall HRT of 9.4h (UASB reactor: 5.2h and DHS reactor: 4.2h). Long-term operation results of the proposed system showed that its overall TCOD, TBOD, TSS, TKN and NH(4)-N removal efficiencies were 92 ± 5, 95 ± 2, 95 ± 2, 72 ± 6 and 99 ± 1.3%, respectively (phase 1). Corresponding values for the 2nd phase were 85.4 ± 5, 86 ± 3, 87 ± 6, 65 ± 8 and 95 ± 2.8%. Based on the available results, the proposed system could be more viable option for treatment of wastewater generated from onion dehydration industry in regions with tropical or sub-tropical climates and with stringent discharge standards.

  9. Knot Invariants from Topological Recursion on Augmentation Varieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jie; Jockers, Hans; Klemm, Albrecht; Soroush, Masoud

    2015-06-01

    Using the duality between Wilson loop expectation values of SU( N) Chern-Simons theory on S 3 and topological open-string amplitudes on the local mirror of the resolved conifold, we study knots on S 3 and their invariants encoded in colored HOMFLY polynomials by means of topological recursion. In the context of the local mirror Calabi-Yau threefold of the resolved conifold, we generalize the topological recursion of the remodelled B-model in order to study branes beyond the class of toric Harvey-Lawson special Lagrangians—as required for analyzing non-trivial knots on S 3. The basic ingredients for the proposed recursion are the spectral curve, given by the augmentation variety of the knot, and the calibrated annulus kernel, encoding the topological annulus amplitudes associated to the knot. We present an explicit construction of the calibrated annulus kernel for torus knots and demonstrate the validity of the topological recursion. We further argue that—if an explicit form of the calibrated annulus kernel is provided for any other knot—the proposed topological recursion should still be applicable. We study the implications of our proposal for knot theory, which exhibit interesting consequences for colored HOMFLY polynomials of mutant knots.

  10. Controlling the Motion of Knotted Polymers through Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narsimhan, Vivek; Renner, C. Benjamin; Doyle, Patrick

    Nanopore sequencing is a technique where DNA moves through a pore and base-pair information is read along the chain as an electric signal. One hurdle facing this technique is that DNA passes too quickly through the pore, rendering the signal to be too noisy. In this talk, we discuss one strategy to control the speed by which polymers move through pores. By tying a knot on a polymer chain, we find that we can jam the polymer at the pore's entrance and halt translocation completely. This idea by itself may not seem useful, but by cycling the field on and off at the relaxation time scale of the knot, we can control the swelling dynamics of the knot at the pore's entrance, and hence ratchet the polymer through the pore. This talk focuses on two parts. First, we will discuss the dynamics of a knot jamming at the pore entrance and determine what sets the critical tension to halt translocation. We will determine how knot topology affects these results and discuss what regimes lead to large fluctuations in the translocation speed. We will then discuss the dynamics of a knot under a time-dependent, periodic force. Lastly, we develop a model to describe the knot's swelling dynamics during relaxation, and use this to explain some of the trends observed in our simulations. Now at Liquiglide.

  11. EJECTA KNOT FLICKERING, MASS ABLATION, AND FRAGMENTATION IN CASSIOPEIA A

    SciTech Connect

    Fesen, Robert A.; Zastrow, Jordan A.; Hammell, Molly C.; Shull, J. Michael; Silvia, Devin W.

    2011-08-01

    Ejecta knot flickering, ablation tails, and fragmentation are expected signatures associated with the gradual dissolution of high-velocity supernova (SN) ejecta caused by their passage through an inhomogeneous circumstellar medium or interstellar medium (ISM). Such phenomena mark the initial stages of the gradual merger of SN ejecta with and the enrichment of the surrounding ISM. Here we report on an investigation of this process through changes in the optical flux and morphology of several high-velocity ejecta knots located in the outskirts of the young core-collapse SN remnant Cassiopeia A using Hubble Space Telescope images. Examination of WFPC2 F675W and combined ACS F625W + F775W images taken between 1999 June and 2004 December of several dozen debris fragments in the remnant's northeast ejecta stream and along the remnant's eastern limb reveal substantial emission variations ('flickering') over timescales as short as nine months. Such widespread and rapid variability indicates knot scale lengths {approx_equal} 10{sup 15} cm and a highly inhomogeneous surrounding medium. We also identify a small percentage of ejecta knots located all around the remnant's outer periphery which show trailing emissions typically 0.''2-0.''7 in length aligned along the knot's direction of motion suggestive of knot ablation tails. We discuss the nature of these trailing emissions as they pertain to ablation cooling, knot disruption, and fragmentation, and draw comparisons to the emission 'strings' seen in {eta} Car. Finally, we identify several tight clusters of small ejecta knots which resemble models of shock-induced fragmentation of larger SN ejecta knots caused by a high-velocity interaction with a lower density ambient medium.

  12. New knotted solutions of Maxwell's equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, Carlos; Sircar, Nilanjan; Sonnenschein, Jacob

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we have further developed the study of topologically non-trivial solutions of vacuum electrodynamics. We have discovered a novel method of generating such solutions by applying conformal transformations with complex parameters on known solutions expressed in terms of Bateman's variables. This has enabled us to obtain a wide class of solutions from the basic configuration, such as constant electromagnetic fields and plane-waves. We have introduced a covariant formulation of Bateman's construction and discussed the conserved charges associated with the conformal group as well as a set of four types of conserved helicities. We have also given a formulation in terms of quaternions. This led to a simple map between the electromagnetic knotted and linked solutions into flat connections of SU(2) gauge theory. We have computed the corresponding Chern-Simons charge in a class of solutions and the charge takes integer values.

  13. Ejecta Knot Evolution in Cas A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, John; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Dewey, D.; Trowbridge, S.; Bastien, F.; Sato, K.

    2011-01-01

    Supernova remnants are remarkable laboratories for studying, among other phenomena, explosive nucleosynthesis and plasma dynamics. Time-dependent signatures of such processes can further inform our understanding, and may be found in widely spaced epochs of observation from high spatial and spectral resolution instruments. We investigated the spectral evolution in the X-ray band of the bright ejecta knots in Cassiopeia A over the last decade. Both dispersed and non-dispersed spectra from the Chandra HETG and ACIS instruments were used for this study, helping to better constrain signs of evolution. We present our findings of how such physical properties as the temperature, elemental abundances, velocity, and non-equilibrium ionization age changed over ten years of the several hundred year old remnant's lifetime, along with a careful analysis of the confounding background contamination and model parameter correlations.

  14. Knotted Strings and Leptonic Flavor Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kephart, T. W.; Leser, P.; Päs, H.

    2012-12-01

    We propose a third idea for the explanation of the leptonic flavor structure in addition to the prominent approaches based on flavor symmetry and anarchy. Typical flavor patterns can be modeled by using mass spectra obtained from the discrete lengths spectrum of tight knots and links. We assume that a string theory model exists in which this idea can be incorporated via the Majorana mass structure of a type I seesaw model. It is shown by a scan over the parameter space that such a model is able to provide an excellent fit to current neutrino data and that it predicts a normal neutrino mass hierarchy as well as a small mixing angle θ13. Startlingly, such scenarios could be related to the dimensionality of spacetime via an anthropic argument.

  15. Intraoperative wide bore nasogastric tube knotting: A rare incidence.

    PubMed

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Sethi, Surendra K; Khare, Arvind; Saini, Sudheendra

    2016-01-01

    Nasogastric tubes are commonly used in anesthetic practice for gastric decompression in surgical patients intraoperatively. The indications for its use are associated with a number of potential complications. Knotting of small-bore nasogastric tubes is usually common both during insertion and removal as compared to wide bore nasogastric tubes. Knotting of wide bore nasogastric tube is a rare complication and if occurs usually seen in long standing cases. We hereby report a case of incidental knotting of wide bore nasogastric tube that occurred intraoperatively.

  16. Knots cascade detected by a monotonically decreasing sequence of values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Ricca, Renzo L.

    2016-04-01

    Due to reconnection or recombination of neighboring strands superfluid vortex knots and DNA plasmid torus knots and links are found to undergo an almost identical cascade process, that tend to reduce topological complexity by stepwise unlinking. Here, by using the HOMFLYPT polynomial recently introduced for fluid knots, we prove that under the assumption that topological complexity decreases by stepwise unlinking this cascade process follows a path detected by a unique, monotonically decreasing sequence of numerical values. This result holds true for any sequence of standardly embedded torus knots T(2, 2n + 1) and torus links T(2, 2n). By this result we demonstrate that the computation of this adapted HOMFLYPT polynomial provides a powerful tool to measure topological complexity of various physical systems.

  17. Knots cascade detected by a monotonically decreasing sequence of values

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Ricca, Renzo L.

    2016-01-01

    Due to reconnection or recombination of neighboring strands superfluid vortex knots and DNA plasmid torus knots and links are found to undergo an almost identical cascade process, that tend to reduce topological complexity by stepwise unlinking. Here, by using the HOMFLYPT polynomial recently introduced for fluid knots, we prove that under the assumption that topological complexity decreases by stepwise unlinking this cascade process follows a path detected by a unique, monotonically decreasing sequence of numerical values. This result holds true for any sequence of standardly embedded torus knots T(2, 2n + 1) and torus links T(2, 2n). By this result we demonstrate that the computation of this adapted HOMFLYPT polynomial provides a powerful tool to measure topological complexity of various physical systems. PMID:27052386

  18. The beauty of knots at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Sauvage, Jean-Pierre; Amabilino, David B

    2012-01-01

    What makes a given object look beautiful to the observer, be it in the macroscopic world or at the molecular level? This very general question will be briefly addressed at the beginning of this essay, in relation to contemporary molecular chemistry and biology, leading to the general statement that, most of the time, beauty is tightly connected to function as well as to the cultural background of the observer. The main topic of the present article will be that of topologically non-trivial molecules or molecular ensembles and the fascination that such species have exerted on molecular or solid state chemists. Molecules with a graph identical to Kuratowski's K₅ or K₃,₃ graphs are indeed highly attractive from an aesthetical viewpoint, but perhaps even more fascinating and beautiful are molecular knots. A general discussion will be devoted to these compounds, which are still considered as exotic species because of the very limited number of efficient synthetic strategies leading to their preparation. Particularly efficient are templated approaches based either on transition metals such as copper(I) or on organic groups able to form hydrogen bonds or acceptor-donor stacks. A particularly noteworthy property of knots, and in particular of the trefoil knot, is their topological chirality. The isolation of both enantiomers of the trefoil knot (3₁) could be achieved and showed that such species have fascinating chiroptical properties. Finally, various routes to more complex and beautiful knots than the trefoil knot, which is the simplest non-trivial knot, will be discussed in line with the remarkable ability of transition metals to gather and orient in a very precise fashion several organic components in their coordination spheres, thus leading to synthetic precursors displaying geometries which are perfectly well adapted to the preparation of the desired knots or links.

  19. Influence of the reactor wall composition on radicals' densities and total pressure in Cl{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas: I. Without silicon etching

    SciTech Connect

    Cunge, G.; Sadeghi, N.; Ramos, R.

    2007-11-01

    Laser absorption at 355 nm is used to monitor the time variations of the Cl{sub 2} density in high-density industrial inductively coupled plasma. This technique is combined with the measurement of the gas temperature from the Doppler width of the 811.5 nm line of argon, added as a trace gas and with the measurement of the total gas pressure with a Baratron gauge. These measurements permit to estimate the mole fractions of Cl{sub 2} and Cl species in Cl{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas in a waferless reactor. The impact of the chemical nature of the reactor wall coatings on the Cl and Cl{sub 2} mole fractions is studied systematically. We show that under otherwise identical plasma conditions, the Cl mole fraction is completely different when the plasma is operated in SiOCl, AlF, CCl, or TiOCl coated reactors, because the homogeneous recombination probability of Cl atoms is strongly surface dependant. The Cl atom mole fraction reached at 100 W radiofrequency power in SiOCl coated reactor (80%) is much higher than that obtained at 900 W in a ''clean'' AlF reactor (40%). A simple zero-dimensional model permits to provide the recombination coefficient of Cl atoms, {gamma}{sub rec}: 0.005 on SiOCl film and about 0.3 on the other three coatings. It is proposed to get benefit of this very high sensitivity of Cl{sub 2} dissociation rate to the wall coating for the control of the chamber wall status from the Cl{sub 2} density measurements in standard conditions.

  20. Influence of the reactor wall composition on radicals' densities and total pressure in Cl2 inductively coupled plasmas: I. Without silicon etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunge, G.; Sadeghi, N.; Ramos, R.

    2007-11-01

    Laser absorption at 355nm is used to monitor the time variations of the Cl2 density in high-density industrial inductively coupled plasma. This technique is combined with the measurement of the gas temperature from the Doppler width of the 811.5nm line of argon, added as a trace gas and with the measurement of the total gas pressure with a Baratron gauge. These measurements permit to estimate the mole fractions of Cl2 and Cl species in Cl2 inductively coupled plasmas in a waferless reactor. The impact of the chemical nature of the reactor wall coatings on the Cl and Cl2 mole fractions is studied systematically. We show that under otherwise identical plasma conditions, the Cl mole fraction is completely different when the plasma is operated in SiOCl, AlF, CCl, or TiOCl coated reactors, because the homogeneous recombination probability of Cl atoms is strongly surface dependant. The Cl atom mole fraction reached at 100W radiofrequency power in SiOCl coated reactor (80%) is much higher than that obtained at 900W in a "clean" AlF reactor (40%). A simple zero-dimensional model permits to provide the recombination coefficient of Cl atoms, γrec: 0.005 on SiOCl film and about 0.3 on the other three coatings. It is proposed to get benefit of this very high sensitivity of Cl2 dissociation rate to the wall coating for the control of the chamber wall status from the Cl2 density measurements in standard conditions.

  1. Shunt insufficiency due to knot formation in the peritoneal catheter.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Gábor; Nagy, Andrea; Pataki, István; Bognar, László; Novák, László

    2013-07-30

    The authors report a rare case of the peripheral obstruction of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Premature baby was operated on hydrocephalus due to germinal matrix bleeding. After two months of implantation of venticuloperitoneal shunt peripheral insufficiency of the system was emerged. During the shunt revision extensive knot formation became visible. We simply cut the catheter above the knot and the working shunt was replaced into the abdominal cavity. The postoperative course was uneventful and the baby was free of complaints for more than one year. The pathomechanism of knot formation is not clear thus the discovery of the problem during the operation is an unexpected event. In our opinion tight knot cannot be spontaneously formed intraabdominally. Loose knots can be developed and can reduce the capacity of liquor flow. We think that the knot tightens during pulling out. Longer peritoneal catheters can precipitate multiple looping and/or axial torquations and increase the peripheral resistance of the shunt. In such cases when the pulling out is challenged conversion to laparotomy is suggested.

  2. Probe knots and Hopf insulators with ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Dong-Ling; Wang, Sheng-Tao; Sun, Kai; Duan, Lu-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Knots and links are fascinating and intricate topological objects that have played a prominent role in physical and life sciences. Their influence spans from DNA and molecular chemistry to vortices in superfluid helium, defects in liquid crystals and cosmic strings in the early universe. Here, we show that knotted structures also exist in a peculiar class of three dimensional topological insulators--the Hopf insulators. In particular, we demonstrate that the spin textures of Hopf insulators in momentum space are twisted in a nontrivial way, which implies various knot and link structures. We further illustrate that the knots and nontrivial spin textures can be probed via standard time-of-flight images in cold atoms as preimage contours of spin orientations in stereographic coordinates. The extracted Hopf invariants, knots, and links are validated to be robust to typical experimental imperfections. Our work establishes the existence of knotted structures in cold atoms and may have potential applications in spintronics and quantum information processings. We thank X.-J. Liu and G. Ortiz for helpful discussions. S.T.W., D.L.D., and L.M.D. are supported by the NBRPC 2011CBA00300, the IARPA MUSIQC program, the ARO and the AFOSR MURI program. K.S. acknowledges support from NSF under Grant No. PHY1402971.

  3. Validation of the U.S. NRC coupled code system TRITON/TRACE/PARCS with the special power excursion reactor test III (SPERT III)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, R. C.; Xu, Y.; Downar, T.; Hudson, N.

    2012-07-01

    The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III) was a series of reactivity insertion experiments conducted in the 1950's. This paper describes the validation of the U.S. NRC Coupled Code system TRITON/PARCS/TRACE to simulate reactivity insertion accidents (RIA) by using several of the SPERT III tests. The work here used the SPERT III E-core configuration tests in which the RIA was initiated by ejecting a control rod. The resulting super-prompt reactivity excursion and negative reactivity feedback produced the familiar bell shaped power increase and decrease. The energy deposition during such a power peak has important safety consequences and provides validation basis for core coupled multi-physics codes. The transients of five separate tests are used to benchmark the PARCS/TRACE coupled code. The models were thoroughly validated using the original experiment documentation. (authors)

  4. [A new correction method for radionuclide formation in neutron activation analysis using a reactor power meter coupled with a microcomputer].

    PubMed

    Hirai, S; Yoshino, Y; Suzuki, S; Horiuchi, N

    1982-05-01

    Neutron flux and irradiation time should be accurately known in neutron activation analysis using very short lived nuclides in which conventional monitoring methods i.e., a comparator method, flux monitor method and so on cannot be used satisfactorily. Especially, fluctuation of neutron flux has not been corrected. We noted a change of reactor power at a pneumatic operation, and found out a new correction method for its correction in activation analysis. In our small nuclear reactor, TRIGA-II, the reactor power increased rapidly a few % when a pneumatic-operated capsule arrived at a core of the reactor, and decreased when the capsule left from the core. If the duration between these two changes of the reactor power is equal to the irradiation time, and that the reactor power is proportional to the neutron flux, we can regard an activity formation as a time integration of the reactor power. Then, the correction system was made of a reactor power meter, a V-F converter (voltage to frequency converter), a clock time, a counter, a microcomputer, electric circuits and so on. The signal of the reactor power during the irradiation was counted through the V-F converter, and was accumulated in a memory of the microcomputer. The neutron fluence was calculated in this microcomputer. This method was examined by means of activation of copper and selenium standard samples by 9-11 sec irradiations. The observed activity involved +/- 10% error. However, the error in the corrected activity was decreased to a few % using this correction method. As a result, we found that this method can be used to obtain accurate value for radionuclide formation.

  5. Innovative and Advanced Coupled Neutron Transport and Thermal Hydraulic Method (Tool) for the Design, Analysis and Optimization of VHTR/NGNP Prismatic Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rahnema, Farzad; Garimeela, Srinivas; Ougouag, Abderrafi; Zhang, Dingkang

    2013-11-29

    This project will develop a 3D, advanced coarse mesh transport method (COMET-Hex) for steady- state and transient analyses in advanced very high-temperature reactors (VHTRs). The project will lead to a coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulic (T/H) core simulation tool with fuel depletion capability. The computational tool will be developed in hexagonal geometry, based solely on transport theory without (spatial) homogenization in complicated 3D geometries. In addition to the hexagonal geometry extension, collaborators will concurrently develop three additional capabilities to increase the code’s versatility as an advanced and robust core simulator for VHTRs. First, the project team will develop and implement a depletion method within the core simulator. Second, the team will develop an elementary (proof-of-concept) 1D time-dependent transport method for efficient transient analyses. The third capability will be a thermal hydraulic method coupled to the neutronics transport module for VHTRs. Current advancements in reactor core design are pushing VHTRs toward greater core and fuel heterogeneity to pursue higher burn-ups, efficiently transmute used fuel, maximize energy production, and improve plant economics and safety. As a result, an accurate and efficient neutron transport, with capabilities to treat heterogeneous burnable poison effects, is highly desirable for predicting VHTR neutronics performance. This research project’s primary objective is to advance the state of the art for reactor analysis.

  6. Impact of hydraulic retention time on organic and nutrient removal in a membrane coupled sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shengnan; Wu, Donglei; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2014-05-15

    Although solids retention time (SRT) is the key parameter in wastewater treatment design and operation, this study determined the effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on biological nutrient removal in a membrane coupled sequencing batch reactor (MSBR) at the fixed SRT of 10 days. During more than 200 days of operation, the HRT of the MSBR were decreased from 24 to 12 and to 6 h while the volumetric exchange ratio in each operating cycle was fixed at 50%. The decrease of HRT led to a proportional increase in biomass concentration at the fixed SRT. The system demonstrated excellent removal of organic matter with the highest COD removal efficiency (97%) achieved at the shortest HRT of 6 h. As HRT was reduced from 24 to 12 h, the total nitrogen removal efficiency improved from 68 ± 5% to 80 ± 4%, but there was no further improvement when HRT decreased to 6 h. Coincidently, similar and higher abundance of nitrifying bacteria was observed in the MSBR operated at the HRTs of 6 and 12 h than that at the HRT of 24 h. The total phosphorus removal efficiencies were 62 ± 15%, 77 ± 4% and 85 ± 3% at the HRTs of 24, 12 and 6 h, respectively. The maximum P release rates for activated sludge at the HRTs of 24, 12 and 6 h were 3.7 ± 0.5, 6.4 ± 0.2 and 8.7 ± 0.1 mg P/h, respectively, while the maximum P uptake rates were 3.2 ± 0.1, 8.6 ± 0.2 and 15.2 ± 0.2 mg P/h, respectively. Contradictory to the theory that effluent water quality is solely SRT dependent, the results suggest that it is also affected by HRT and resultant biomass concentration possibly due to factors such as change in hydrolysis of particulate organic matter, the unique microenvironment and transition between anaerobic and aerobic metabolism at high biomass concentrations in MSBR operation.

  7. Flow injection spectrophotometry coupled with a crushed barium sulfate reactor column for the determination of sulfate ion in water samples.

    PubMed

    Burakham, Rodjana; Higuchi, Keiro; Oshima, Mitsuko; Grudpan, Kate; Motomizu, Shoji

    2004-12-15

    A new type of a reactor column, a crushed BaSO(4) reactor column used for the flow injection spectrophotometric determination of sulfate ion using the exchange reaction of sulfate ion and barium-dimethylsulfonazo III is proposed. The column is very simple and economical. It can be continuously used for 8h before washing with water for repeated usage of at least 1 month. The procedure is sensitive. Application to various water samples was demonstrated.

  8. Comparative study on membrane fouling between membrane-coupled moving bed biofilm reactor and conventional membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Syed, W; Zhou, H

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the performance between membrane-coupled moving bed biofilm reactor (M-MBBR) and a conventional membrane bioreactor (MBR) in parallel. Extensive tests were conducted in three pilot-scale experimental units over 6 months. Emphasis was placed on the factors that would affect the performance of membrane filtration. The results showed that the concentrations of soluble microbial product (SMP), colloidal total organic carbon and transparent exopolymer particles in the M-MBBR systems were not significantly different from those in the control MBR system. However, the fouling rates were much higher in the M-MBBR systems as compared to the conventional MBR systems. This indicates membrane fouling potential was related not only to the concentration of SMP, but also to their sources and characteristics. The addition of polyaluminum chloride could reduce the fouling rate of the moving bed biofilm reactor unit by 56.4-84.5% at various membrane fluxes.

  9. Knots and Gamma Classes in Open Topological String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahowald, Matthew

    This thesis explores some mathematical applications of string dualities in open topological string theory and presents some new techniques for studying and computing open Gromov-Witten invariants. First, we prove a mild generalization of the gamma class formula of [BCR13], and show that it applies in two novel examples: the quintic threefold Q with Lagrangian given by the real quintic QR Q, and for Lagrangians LK ? X = O P1 (--1, --1) obtained from the conormal bundles of (r, s) torus knots K ? S3 via the conifold transition. Disk enumeration on (Q, Q R ) was first considered in [PSW08], and disk enumeration for (X, LK) was studied in winding-1 in [DSV13]. The gamma class formula agrees with the results of [DSV13] and [PSW08], and we generalize the formula of [DSV13] to arbitrary winding. Next we study a relationship between mirror symmetry and knot contact homology described in [AENV14, AV12]. For knots K ? S 3 , large-N duality relates open Gromov-Witten theory on (X, L_K ) to SU (N) Chern-Simons theory on (S3, K). We use the conjecture of [AV12] to compute open Gromov-Witten invariants of (X, L K) through mirror symmetry in many examples, including several non-toric knots. We also find further evidence for this conjecture: for ( r, s) torus knots, we find a formula for the genus-0, 1-boundary-component, degree-d, winding-w open Gromov-Witten invariants of (X, LK ) using localization. This formula agrees with the results of the mirror symmetry calculation. Moreover, using this formula, we describe a method for obtaining the augmentation polynomial of a knot K from the open Gromov-Witten invariants of ( X, LK ). This method is shown to correctly recover the augmentation polynomial for the unknot and (3, 2) torus knot.

  10. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

    1962-04-24

    A control system employed with a high pressure gas cooled reactor in which a control rod is positioned for upward and downward movement into the neutron field from a position beneath the reactor is described. The control rod is positioned by a coupled piston cylinder releasably coupled to a power drive means and the pressurized coolant is directed against the lower side of the piston. The coolant pressure is offset by a higher fiuid pressure applied to the upper surface of the piston and means are provided for releasing the higher pressure on the upper side of the piston so that the pressure of the coolant drives the piston upwardly, forcing the coupled control rod into the ncutron field of the reactor. (AEC)

  11. To Knot or Not-That is the Question: A Nanofluidic Knot Factory based on Compression of Single DNA Molecules against Slit Barriers in Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Susan; Khorshid, Ahmed; Zeng, Lili; Zimny, Philip; Reisner, Walter

    Knots can form during DNA packaging in chromosome and obstruct mapping of DNA in nanochannels. Studies have focused on theoretical and numerical studies of knots, but an efficient and fully controlled means of knotting has not yet been explored. Here, we introduce a knot factory on chip based on pneumatic compression of single T4 DNA against a slit barrier in a nanochannel. The DNA are compressed to a well-defined fraction of their initial equilibrium extension. The pressure is then released and the DNA molecules relax back to their equilibrium extension; knots are present along the relaxed DNA, visualized as sharply localized regions of high intensity. Via repeated compression and relaxation, we can measure the probabilities of forming single and multiple knot states and the distribution of knot sizes as a function of fractional compression and waiting time in the compressed state. We show that the total probability of knot formation increases with greater compression and waiting time.These findings are well described via a knot formation free energy derived from scaling arguments, suggesting that the enhanced knotting probability at high compression arises from avoiding the free energy cost due to self-exclusion interactions that would arise from contour stored in the knot.

  12. In situ response of bay productivity to nutrient loading from a small tributary: The Delaware Bay-Murderkill Estuary tidally-coupled biogeochemical reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voynova, Yoana G.; Lebaron, Karine C.; Barnes, Rebecca T.; Ullman, William J.

    2015-07-01

    A small, turbid and nutrient-rich tributary, the Murderkill Estuary, and a large estuarine ecosystem, the Delaware Bay, are tightly linked and form an efficient, tidally-coupled biogeochemical reactor during the summer. Nitrate loading from the Murderkill Estuary generates an instantaneous increase in biological oxygen production in the adjacent Delaware Bay. We are able to capture this primary production response with continuous hourly measurements of dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, and nitrate. The nitrate influxes from the Murderkill support primary production rates in the Delaware Bay margins that are twice as high as the average production rates measured in the central Bay regions. This elevates chlorophyll in the Bay margins in the summer and fuels metabolism. Tidal transport of the newly produced autochthonous chlorophyll particles from the Bay into the Estuary could also provide a source of labile material to the marshes surrounding the Murderkill, thus perhaps fueling marsh respiration. As a consequence of the tidal coupling between Delaware Bay and the Murderkill Estuary, ecosystem productivity and metabolism in the Bay and Estuary are linked, generating an ecosystem feedback mechanism. Storms modulate this tidally-coupled biogeochemical reactor, by generating significant nitrate and salinity changes. Depending on their magnitude and duration, storms induce large phytoplankton blooms in the Delaware Bay. Such large phytoplankton blooms may occur more often with climate change, since century-long discharge records document an increase in storm frequency.

  13. Azo dye removal in a membrane-free up-flow biocatalyzed electrolysis reactor coupled with an aerobic bio-contact oxidation reactor.

    PubMed

    Cui, Dan; Guo, Yu-Qi; Cheng, Hao-Yi; Liang, Bin; Kong, Fan-Ying; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Wang, Ai-Jie

    2012-11-15

    Azo dyes that consist of a large quantity of dye wastewater are toxic and persistent to biodegradation, while they should be removed before being discharged to water body. In this study, Alizarin Yellow R (AYR) as a model azo dye was decolorized in a combined bio-system of membrane-free, continuous up-flow bio-catalyzed electrolysis reactor (UBER) and subsequent aerobic bio-contact oxidation reactor (ABOR). With the supply of external power source 0.5 V in the UBER, AYR decolorization efficiency increased up to 94.8±1.5%. Products formation efficiencies of p-phenylenediamine (PPD) and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) were above 90% and 60%, respectively. Electron recovery efficiency based on AYR removal in cathode zone was nearly 100% at HRTs longer than 6 h. Relatively high concentration of AYR accumulated at higher AYR loading rates (>780 gm(-3) d(-1)) likely inhibited acetate oxidation of anode-respiring bacteria on the anode, which decreased current density in the UBER; optimal AYR loading rate for the UBER was 680 gm(-3) d(-1) (HRT 2.5 h). The subsequent ABOR further improved effluent quality. Overall the Chroma decreased from 320 times to 80 times in the combined bio-system to meet the textile wastewater discharge standard II in China. PMID:23009797

  14. Developing Fully Coupled Dynamical Reactor Core Isolation System Models in RELAP-7 for Extended Station Black-Out Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; David Andrs; Richard Martineau

    2014-04-01

    The reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides makeup water to the reactor vessel for core cooling when the main steam lines are isolated and the normal supply of water to the reactor vessel is lost. It was one of the very few safety systems still available during the Fukushima Daiichi accidents after the tsunamis hit the plants and the system successfully delayed the core meltdown for a few days for unit 2 & 3. Therefore, detailed models for RCIC system components are indispensable to understand extended station black-out accidents (SBO) for BWRs. As part of the effort to develop the new generation reactor system safety analysis code RELAP-7, major components to simulate the RCIC system have been developed. This paper describes the models for those components such as turbine, pump, and wet well. Selected individual component test simulations and a simplified SBO simulation up to but before core damage is presented. The successful implementation of the simplified RCIC and wet well models paves the way to further improve the models for safety analysis by including more detailed physical processes in the near future.

  15. YAP overexpression affects tooth morphogenesis and enamel knot patterning.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Zhao, S; Wang, X P

    2014-05-01

    Teeth develop through distinct morphological stages. At the cap stage, a compactly clustered and concentrically arranged cell mass, the enamel knot, appears at the tip of the enamel organ. Cells in this knot express sets of key molecules, and as such have been proposed to act as a signaling center directing tooth morphogenesis and tooth cusp formation. YAP is a transcriptional co-activator of the Hippo signaling pathway that is essential for the proper regulation of organ growth. In this study, we analyzed the tooth phenotype in transgenic mice that overexpressed a constitutively active form of YAP in the dental epithelium. We found that overexpression of YAP resulted in deformed tooth morphogenesis with widened dental lamina. In addition, the enamel knot was mislocated to the upper portion of the enamel organ, where it remained devoid of proliferating cells and contained apoptotic cells with intense Edar transcripts and reduced E-cadherin expression. Interestingly, some signaling molecules, such as Shh, Fgf4, and Wnt10a, were not expressed in this mislocated enamel knot, but remained at the tip of the enamel organ. Analysis of these data suggests that the signaling center is induced by reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, and its induction may be independent of the enamel knot.

  16. Equations on knot polynomials and 3d/5d duality

    SciTech Connect

    Mironov, A.; Morozov, A.

    2012-09-24

    We briefly review the current situation with various relations between knot/braid polynomials (Chern-Simons correlation functions), ordinary and extended, considered as functions of the representation and of the knot topology. These include linear skein relations, quadratic Plucker relations, as well as 'differential' and (quantum) A-polynomial structures. We pay a special attention to identity between the A-polynomial equations for knots and Baxter equations for quantum relativistic integrable systems, related through Seiberg-Witten theory to 5d super-Yang-Mills models and through the AGT relation to the q-Virasoro algebra. This identity is an important ingredient of emerging a 3d- 5d generalization of the AGT relation. The shape of the Baxter equation (including the values of coefficients) depend on the choice of the knot/braid. Thus, like the case of KP integrability, where (some, so far torus) knots parameterize particular points of the Universal Grassmannian, in this relation they parameterize particular points in the moduli space of many-body integrable systems of relativistic type.

  17. Characteristics of oscillations in magnetic knots of solar faculae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelpanov, A. A.; Kobanov, N. I.; Kolobov, D. Yu.

    2015-10-01

    The characteristics of oscillations of the intensity, magnetic field, andDoppler velocity in facular magnetic knots are compared with those at the facula periphery, where the magnetic field has a moderate intensity. The analysis is based on images in the FeI 6173 Å, 1700 Å, and He II 304 Å lines obtained with the Solar Dynamics Observatory, which are formed in the lower photosphere, upper photosphere, and transition zone, respectively. The spectra of the oscillations of the longitudinal magnetic field in magnetic knots show peaks at a frequency of about 5 mHz, which are not observed at the faculae peripheries. The spectra of the photospheric oscillations of the intensity and Doppler velocity in magnetic knots and in areas of moderate magnetic field are similar, but the oscillation power is a factor of two to four lower in the knots. The maximum spectral peaks in the HeII 304 Å line are mainly distributed in the range 3-6 mHz above magnetic knots and in the range 1.5-3 mHz above periphery regions. It is proposed that this distribution of the oscillations is due to the magnetic-field topologies in faculae: the m

  18. Electrophoretic mobility of supercoiled, catenated and knotted DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Cebrián, Jorge; Kadomatsu-Hermosa, Maridian J.; Castán, Alicia; Martínez, Víctor; Parra, Cristina; Fernández-Nestosa, María José; Schaerer, Christian; Martínez-Robles, María-Luisa; Hernández, Pablo; Krimer, Dora B.; Stasiak, Andrzej; Schvartzman, Jorge B.

    2015-01-01

    We systematically varied conditions of two-dimensional (2D) agarose gel electrophoresis to optimize separation of DNA topoisomers that differ either by the extent of knotting, the extent of catenation or the extent of supercoiling. To this aim we compared electrophoretic behavior of three different families of DNA topoisomers: (i) supercoiled DNA molecules, where supercoiling covered the range extending from covalently closed relaxed up to naturally supercoiled DNA molecules; (ii) postreplicative catenanes with catenation number increasing from 1 to ∼15, where both catenated rings were nicked; (iii) knotted but nicked DNA molecules with a naturally arising spectrum of knots. For better comparison, we studied topoisomer families where each member had the same total molecular mass. For knotted and supercoiled molecules, we analyzed dimeric plasmids whereas catenanes were composed of monomeric forms of the same plasmid. We observed that catenated, knotted and supercoiled families of topoisomers showed different reactions to changes of agarose concentration and voltage during electrophoresis. These differences permitted us to optimize conditions for their separation and shed light on physical characteristics of these different types of DNA topoisomers during electrophoresis. PMID:25414338

  19. The northwestern ejecta knot in SN 1006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broersen, S.; Vink, J.; Miceli, M.; Bocchino, F.; Maurin, G.; Decourchelle, A.

    2013-04-01

    Aims: We want to probe the physics of fast collision-less shocks in supernova remnants. We are interested in the non-equilibration of temperatures and particle acceleration. Specifically, we aim to measure the oxygen temperature with regards to the electron temperature. In addition, we search for synchrotron emission in the northwestern thermal rim. Methods: This study is part of a dedicated deep observational project of SN 1006 using XMM-Newton, which provides us with the currently best resolution spectra of the bright northwestern oxygen knot. We aim to use the reflection grating spectrometer to measure the thermal broadening of the O vii line triplet by convolving the emission profile of the remnant with the response matrix. Results: The line broadening was measured as σe = 2.4 ± 0.3 eV, corresponding to an oxygen temperature of 275-63+72 keV. From the EPIC spectra we obtain an electron temperature of 1.35 ± 0.10 keV. The difference in temperature between the species provides further evidence of non-equilibration of temperatures in a shock. In addition, we find evidence of a bow shock that emits X-ray synchrotron radiation, which is at odds with the general idea that because of the magnetic field orientation only in the NE and SW region, X-ray synchrotron radiation should be emitted. We find an unusual Hα and X-ray synchrotron geometry, in that the Hα emission peaks downstream of the synchrotron emission. This may be an indication of a peculiar Hα shock in which the density is lower and the neutral fraction is higher than in other supernova remnants, resulting in a peak in Hα emission further downstream of the shock.

  20. Influence of the reactor wall composition on radicals' densities and total pressure in Cl{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas: II. During silicon etching

    SciTech Connect

    Cunge, G.; Sadeghi, N.; Ramos, R.

    2007-11-01

    In an industrial inductively coupled plasma reactor dedicated to silicon etching in chlorine-based chemistry, the density of Cl{sub 2} molecules and the gas temperature are measured by means of laser absorption techniques, the density of SiCl{sub x} (x{<=}2) radicals by broadband absorption spectroscopy, the density of SiCl{sub 4} and ions by mass spectrometry, and the total gas pressure with a capacitance gauge. These measurements permit us to estimate the mole fractions of Cl, SiCl{sub 4}, and etch product radicals when etching a 200 mm diameter silicon wafer. The pure Cl{sub 2} plasma is operated in well prepared chamber wall coating with a thin film of SiOCl, AlF, CCl, or TiOCl. The impact of the chemical nature of the reactor wall's coatings on these mole fractions is studied systematically. We show that the reactor wall coatings have a huge influence on the radicals densities, but this is not only from the difference on Cl-Cl recombination coefficient on different surfaces. During silicon etching, SiCl{sub x} radicals sticking on the reactor walls are etched by Cl atoms and recycled into the plasma by forming volatile SiCl{sub 4}. Hence, the loss of Cl atoms in etching the wall deposited silicon is at least as important as their wall recombination in controlling the Cl atoms density. Furthermore, because SiCl{sub 4} is produced at high rate by both the wafer and reactor walls, it is the predominant etching product in the gas phase. However, the percentage of redeposited silicon that can be recycled into the plasma depends on the amount of oxygen present in the plasma: O atoms produced by etching the quartz roof window fix Si on the reactor walls by forming a SiOCl deposit. Hence, the higher the O density is, the lower the SiCl{sub 4} density will be, because silicon is pumped by the reactor walls and the SiOCl layer formed is not isotropically etched by chlorine. As a result, in the same pure Cl{sub 2} plasma at 20 mTorr, the SiCl{sub x} mole fraction can

  1. Influence of the reactor wall composition on radicals' densities and total pressure in Cl2 inductively coupled plasmas: II. During silicon etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunge, G.; Sadeghi, N.; Ramos, R.

    2007-11-01

    In an industrial inductively coupled plasma reactor dedicated to silicon etching in chlorine-based chemistry, the density of Cl2 molecules and the gas temperature are measured by means of laser absorption techniques, the density of SiClx (x ⩽2) radicals by broadband absorption spectroscopy, the density of SiCl4 and ions by mass spectrometry, and the total gas pressure with a capacitance gauge. These measurements permit us to estimate the mole fractions of Cl, SiCl4, and etch product radicals when etching a 200mm diameter silicon wafer. The pure Cl2 plasma is operated in well prepared chamber wall coating with a thin film of SiOCl, AlF, CCl, or TiOCl. The impact of the chemical nature of the reactor wall's coatings on these mole fractions is studied systematically. We show that the reactor wall coatings have a huge influence on the radicals densities, but this is not only from the difference on Cl-Cl recombination coefficient on different surfaces. During silicon etching, SiClx radicals sticking on the reactor walls are etched by Cl atoms and recycled into the plasma by forming volatile SiCl4. Hence, the loss of Cl atoms in etching the wall deposited silicon is at least as important as their wall recombination in controlling the Cl atoms density. Furthermore, because SiCl4 is produced at high rate by both the wafer and reactor walls, it is the predominant etching product in the gas phase. However, the percentage of redeposited silicon that can be recycled into the plasma depends on the amount of oxygen present in the plasma: O atoms produced by etching the quartz roof window fix Si on the reactor walls by forming a SiOCl deposit. Hence, the higher the O density is, the lower the SiCl4 density will be, because silicon is pumped by the reactor walls and the SiOCl layer formed is not isotropically etched by chlorine. As a result, in the same pure Cl2 plasma at 20mTorr, the SiClx mole fraction can vary from 18% in a SiOCl-coated reactor, where the O density is the

  2. Fabrication and characterization of high order filter based on resonance in hybrid multi-knots microfiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nodehi, S.; Mohammed, W. S.; Ahmad, H.; Harun, S. W.

    2016-04-01

    This work proposes a novel design of a hybrid microfiber resonator which can be used as a band-pass and band-stop filter in various applications such as fiber lasers. The structure comprises of two microfiber knot resonators with different sizes which are surrounded by a semi-loop structure with one input and two output ports. Utilization of the Vernier effect in the proposed structure showed an enhancement of the free spectral range (FSR). The finesse has increased by a factor of three compared to a single knot providing a sharper roll-off. The filter bandwidth is adjustable as a result of the manipulation of the coupling length and rings' radii. The performance of the device is explained theoretically using transfer matrix analysis.

  3. Novel application of an established technique for removing a knotted ureteric stent.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Heidi; Turney, Ben; Kumar, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a case whereby a ureteric stent became knotted during removal and lodged within the upper ureter. The authors describe a novel minimally invasive technique to remove the knotted ureteric stent using the holmium laser. PMID:22701009

  4. Topological zoo of free-standing knots in confined chiral nematic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seč, David; Čopar, Simon; Žumer, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Knotted fields are an emerging research topic relevant to different areas of physics where topology plays a crucial role. Recent realization of knotted nematic disclinations stabilized by colloidal particles raised a challenge of free-standing knots. Here we demonstrate the creation of free-standing knotted and linked disclination loops in the cholesteric ordering fields, which are confined to spherical droplets with homeotropic surface anchoring. Our approach, using free energy minimization and topological theory, leads to the stabilization of knots via the interplay of the geometric frustration and intrinsic chirality. Selected configurations of the lowest complexity are characterized by knot or link types, disclination lengths and self-linking numbers. When cholesteric pitch becomes short on the confinement scale, the knotted structures change to practically unperturbed cholesteric structures with disclinations expelled close to the surface. The drops with knots could be controlled by optical beams and may be used for photonic elements.

  5. Coupling of acrylic dyeing wastewater treatment by heterogeneous Fenton oxidation in a continuous stirred tank reactor with biological degradation in a sequential batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Bruno M; Rodrigues, Carmen S D; Boaventura, Rui A R; Maldonado-Hódar, F J; Madeira, Luís M

    2016-01-15

    This work deals with the treatment of a recalcitrant effluent, from the dyeing stage of acrylic fibres, by combination of the heterogeneous Fenton's process in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with biological degradation in a sequential batch reactor (SBR). Three different catalysts (a commercial Fe/ZSM-5 zeolite and two distinct Fe-containing activated carbons - ACs - prepared by wet impregnation of iron acetate and iron nitrate) were employed on the Fenton's process, and afterwards a parametric study was carried out to determine the effect of the main operating conditions, namely the hydrogen peroxide feed concentration, temperature and contact time. Under the best operating conditions found, using the activated carbon impregnated with iron nitrate, 62.7% of discolouration and 39.9% of total organic carbon (TOC) reduction were achieved, at steady-state. Furthermore, a considerable increase in the effluent's biodegradability was attained (BOD5:COD ratio increased from <0.001 to 0.27 and SOUR - specific oxygen uptake rate - from <0.2 to 11.1 mg O2/(gVSS·h)), alongside a major decrease in its toxicity (from 92.1 to 94.0% of Vibrio fischeri inhibition down to 6.9-9.9%). This allowed the application of the subsequent biological degradation stage. The combination of the two processes provided a treated effluent that clearly complies with the legislated discharge limits. It was also found that the iron leaching from the three catalysts tested was very small in all runs, a crucial factor for the stability and long-term use of such materials. PMID:26513317

  6. Coupling of acrylic dyeing wastewater treatment by heterogeneous Fenton oxidation in a continuous stirred tank reactor with biological degradation in a sequential batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Bruno M; Rodrigues, Carmen S D; Boaventura, Rui A R; Maldonado-Hódar, F J; Madeira, Luís M

    2016-01-15

    This work deals with the treatment of a recalcitrant effluent, from the dyeing stage of acrylic fibres, by combination of the heterogeneous Fenton's process in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with biological degradation in a sequential batch reactor (SBR). Three different catalysts (a commercial Fe/ZSM-5 zeolite and two distinct Fe-containing activated carbons - ACs - prepared by wet impregnation of iron acetate and iron nitrate) were employed on the Fenton's process, and afterwards a parametric study was carried out to determine the effect of the main operating conditions, namely the hydrogen peroxide feed concentration, temperature and contact time. Under the best operating conditions found, using the activated carbon impregnated with iron nitrate, 62.7% of discolouration and 39.9% of total organic carbon (TOC) reduction were achieved, at steady-state. Furthermore, a considerable increase in the effluent's biodegradability was attained (BOD5:COD ratio increased from <0.001 to 0.27 and SOUR - specific oxygen uptake rate - from <0.2 to 11.1 mg O2/(gVSS·h)), alongside a major decrease in its toxicity (from 92.1 to 94.0% of Vibrio fischeri inhibition down to 6.9-9.9%). This allowed the application of the subsequent biological degradation stage. The combination of the two processes provided a treated effluent that clearly complies with the legislated discharge limits. It was also found that the iron leaching from the three catalysts tested was very small in all runs, a crucial factor for the stability and long-term use of such materials.

  7. Untangling Knots Via Reaction-Diffusion Dynamics of Vortex Strings.

    PubMed

    Maucher, Fabian; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2016-04-29

    We introduce and illustrate a new approach to the unknotting problem via the dynamics of vortex strings in a nonlinear partial differential equation of reaction-diffusion type. To untangle a given knot, a Biot-Savart construction is used to initialize the knot as a vortex string in the FitzHugh-Nagumo equation. Remarkably, we find that the subsequent evolution preserves the topology of the knot and can untangle an unknot into a circle. Illustrative test case examples are presented, including the untangling of a hard unknot known as the culprit. Our approach to the unknotting problem has two novel features, in that it applies field theory rather than particle mechanics and uses reaction-diffusion dynamics in place of energy minimization. PMID:27176541

  8. Untangling Knots Via Reaction-Diffusion Dynamics of Vortex Strings.

    PubMed

    Maucher, Fabian; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2016-04-29

    We introduce and illustrate a new approach to the unknotting problem via the dynamics of vortex strings in a nonlinear partial differential equation of reaction-diffusion type. To untangle a given knot, a Biot-Savart construction is used to initialize the knot as a vortex string in the FitzHugh-Nagumo equation. Remarkably, we find that the subsequent evolution preserves the topology of the knot and can untangle an unknot into a circle. Illustrative test case examples are presented, including the untangling of a hard unknot known as the culprit. Our approach to the unknotting problem has two novel features, in that it applies field theory rather than particle mechanics and uses reaction-diffusion dynamics in place of energy minimization.

  9. Untangling Knots Via Reaction-Diffusion Dynamics of Vortex Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maucher, Fabian; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We introduce and illustrate a new approach to the unknotting problem via the dynamics of vortex strings in a nonlinear partial differential equation of reaction-diffusion type. To untangle a given knot, a Biot-Savart construction is used to initialize the knot as a vortex string in the FitzHugh-Nagumo equation. Remarkably, we find that the subsequent evolution preserves the topology of the knot and can untangle an unknot into a circle. Illustrative test case examples are presented, including the untangling of a hard unknot known as the culprit. Our approach to the unknotting problem has two novel features, in that it applies field theory rather than particle mechanics and uses reaction-diffusion dynamics in place of energy minimization.

  10. Classification of knotted tori in 2-metastable dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Cencelj, Matija; Repovs, Dusan; Skopenkov, Mihail B

    2012-11-30

    This paper is devoted to the classical Knotting Problem: for a given manifold N and number m describe the set of isotopy classes of embeddings N{yields}S{sup m}. We study the specific case of knotted tori, that is, the embeddings S{sup p} Multiplication-Sign S{sup q}{yields}S{sup m}. The classification of knotted tori up to isotopy in the metastable dimension range m {>=} p + 3/2q + 2, p{<=}q, was given by Haefliger, Zeeman and A. Skopenkov. We consider the dimensions below the metastable range and give an explicit criterion for the finiteness of this set of isotopy classes in the 2-metastable dimension. Bibliography: 35 titles.

  11. Differential expansion and rectangular HOMFLY for the figure eight knot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.

    2016-10-01

    Differential expansion (DE) for a Wilson loop average in representation R is built to respect degenerations of representations for small groups. At the same time it behaves nicely under some changes of the loop, e.g. of some knots in the case of 3d Chern-Simons theory. Especially simple is the relation between the DE for the trefoil 31 and for the figure eight knot 41. Since arbitrary colored HOMFLY for the trefoil are known from the Rosso-Jones formula, it is therefore enough to find their DE in order to make a conjecture for the figure eight. We fulfill this program for all rectangular representation R = [rs ], i.e. make a plausible conjecture for the rectangularly colored HOMFLY of the figure eight knot, which generalizes the old result for totally symmetric and antisymmetric representations.

  12. KNOTS AND RANDOM WALKS IN VIBRATED GRANULAR CHAINS

    SciTech Connect

    E. BEN-NAIM; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    The authors study experimentally statistical properties of the opening times of knots in vertically vibrated granular chains. Our measurements are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with a theoretical model involving three random walks interacting via hard core exclusion in one spatial dimension. In particular, the knot survival probability follows a universal scaling function which is independent of the chain length, with a corresponding diffusive characteristic time scale. Both the large-exit-time and the small-exit-time tails of the distribution are suppressed exponentially, and the corresponding decay coefficients are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values.

  13. Knots and physics: Old wine in new bottles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfeld, Allen C.

    1998-12-01

    The history of the interplay between physics and mathematics in the theory of knots is briefly reviewed. In particular, Gauss' original definition of the linking number in the context of electromagnetism is presented, along with analytical, algebraical, and geometrical derivations. In a modern context, the linking number appears in the first-order term in the perturbation expansion of a Wilson loop in Chern-Simons quantum field theory. New knot invariants, the Vassiliev numbers, arise in higher-order terms of the expansion, and can be written in a form which shows them to be generalizations of the linking number.

  14. Excitation of knotted vortex lines in matter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maucher, F.; Gardiner, S. A.; Hughes, I. G.

    2016-06-01

    We study the creation of knotted ultracold matter waves in Bose–Einstein condensates via coherent two-photon Raman transitions with a Λ level configuration. The Raman transition allows an indirect transfer of atoms from the internal state | a> to the target state | b> via an excited state | e> , that would be otherwise dipole-forbidden. This setup enables us to imprint three-dimensional knotted vortex lines embedded in the probe field to the density in the target state. We elaborate on experimental feasibility as well as on subsequent dynamics of the matter wave.

  15. The treatment of PPCP-containing sewage in an anoxic/aerobic reactor coupled with a novel design of solid plain graphite-plates microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Tang; Yang, Chu-Wen; Chang, Yu-Jie; Chang, Ting-Chieh; Wei, Da-Jiun

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic sewage containing high concentrations of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs, mg/L level) was treated using an anoxic/aerobic (A/O) reactor coupled with a microbial fuel cell (MFC) at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 8 h. A novel design of solid plain graphite plates (SPGRPs) was used for the high surface area biodegradation of the PPCP-containing sewage and for the generation of electricity. The average CODCr and total nitrogen removal efficiencies achieved were 97.20% and 83.75%, respectively. High removal efficiencies of pharmaceuticals, including acetaminophen, ibuprofen, and sulfamethoxazole, were also obtained and ranged from 98.21% to 99.89%. A maximum power density of 532.61 mW/cm(2) and a maximum coulombic efficiency of 25.20% were measured for the SPGRP MFC at the anode. Distinct differences in the bacterial community were presented at various locations including the mixed liquor suspended solids and biofilms. The bacterial groups involved in PPCP biodegradation were identified as Dechloromonas spp., Sphingomonas sp., and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This design, which couples an A/O reactor with a novel design of SPGRP MFC, allows the simultaneous removal of PPCPs and successful electricity production. PMID:25197659

  16. The treatment of PPCP-containing sewage in an anoxic/aerobic reactor coupled with a novel design of solid plain graphite-plates microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Tang; Yang, Chu-Wen; Chang, Yu-Jie; Chang, Ting-Chieh; Wei, Da-Jiun

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic sewage containing high concentrations of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs, mg/L level) was treated using an anoxic/aerobic (A/O) reactor coupled with a microbial fuel cell (MFC) at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 8 h. A novel design of solid plain graphite plates (SPGRPs) was used for the high surface area biodegradation of the PPCP-containing sewage and for the generation of electricity. The average CODCr and total nitrogen removal efficiencies achieved were 97.20% and 83.75%, respectively. High removal efficiencies of pharmaceuticals, including acetaminophen, ibuprofen, and sulfamethoxazole, were also obtained and ranged from 98.21% to 99.89%. A maximum power density of 532.61 mW/cm(2) and a maximum coulombic efficiency of 25.20% were measured for the SPGRP MFC at the anode. Distinct differences in the bacterial community were presented at various locations including the mixed liquor suspended solids and biofilms. The bacterial groups involved in PPCP biodegradation were identified as Dechloromonas spp., Sphingomonas sp., and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This design, which couples an A/O reactor with a novel design of SPGRP MFC, allows the simultaneous removal of PPCPs and successful electricity production.

  17. The Treatment of PPCP-Containing Sewage in an Anoxic/Aerobic Reactor Coupled with a Novel Design of Solid Plain Graphite-Plates Microbial Fuel Cell

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi-Tang; Yang, Chu-Wen; Chang, Yu-Jie; Chang, Ting-Chieh; Wei, Da-Jiun

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic sewage containing high concentrations of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs, mg/L level) was treated using an anoxic/aerobic (A/O) reactor coupled with a microbial fuel cell (MFC) at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 8 h. A novel design of solid plain graphite plates (SPGRPs) was used for the high surface area biodegradation of the PPCP-containing sewage and for the generation of electricity. The average CODCr and total nitrogen removal efficiencies achieved were 97.20% and 83.75%, respectively. High removal efficiencies of pharmaceuticals, including acetaminophen, ibuprofen, and sulfamethoxazole, were also obtained and ranged from 98.21% to 99.89%. A maximum power density of 532.61 mW/cm2 and a maximum coulombic efficiency of 25.20% were measured for the SPGRP MFC at the anode. Distinct differences in the bacterial community were presented at various locations including the mixed liquor suspended solids and biofilms. The bacterial groups involved in PPCP biodegradation were identified as Dechloromonas spp., Sphingomonas sp., and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This design, which couples an A/O reactor with a novel design of SPGRP MFC, allows the simultaneous removal of PPCPs and successful electricity production. PMID:25197659

  18. Coenzyme Q(10) production by immobilized Sphingomonas sp. ZUTE03 via a conversion-extraction coupled process in a three-phase fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lequan; Ding, Hanbing; Wang, Weijian; Kong, Zhuoyi; Li, Xuanzhen; Shi, Yuping; Zhong, Weihong

    2012-02-10

    A three-phase fluidized bed reactor (TPFBR) was designed to evaluate the potential of CoQ(10) production by gel-entrapped Sphingomonas sp. ZUTE03 via a conversion-extract coupled process. In the reactor, the CoQ(10) yield reached 46.99 mg/L after 8 h of conversion; a high-level yield of about 45 mg/L was maintained even after 15 repetitions (8 h/batch). To fully utilize the residual precursor (para-hydroxybenzoic acid, PHB) in the aqueous phase, the organic phase was replaced with new solution containing 70 mg/L solanesol for each 8 h batch. The CoQ(10) yield of each batch was maintained at a level of about 43 mg/L until the PHB ran out. When solid solanesol was fed to the organic phase for every 8 h batch, CoQ(10) could accumulate and reach a yield of 171.52 mg/L. When solid solanesol and PHB were fed to the conversion system after every 8 h batch, the CoQ(10) yield reached 441.65 mg/L in the organic phase after 20 repetitions, suggesting that the conversion-extract coupled process could enhance CoQ(10) production in the TPFBR.

  19. The Mental Manipulation of 2-D Representations of Knots as Deformable Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeay, Heather; Piggins, David

    1996-01-01

    Spatial tests involving the comparison of diagrams of interlaced ropes or knots at varying orientations were given to (n=21) subjects, mostly English college undergraduates, to determine an ordering in terms of complexity of tasks involving the mental manipulation of the knots. Certain knot shapes were processed faster than others and greater…

  20. Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of Heat Transfer Fluid Requirements and Characteristics for Coupling A Hydrogen Production Plant to a High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    C. B. Davis; C. H. Oh; R. B. Barner; D. F. Wilson

    2005-06-01

    The Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the hightemperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant, may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. Seven possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermalhydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermalhydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The

  1. Coupling digestion in a pilot-scale UASB reactor and electrochemical oxidation over BDD anode to treat diluted cheese whey.

    PubMed

    Katsoni, Alphathanasia; Mantzavinos, Dionissios; Diamadopoulos, Evan

    2014-11-01

    The efficiency of the anaerobic treatment of cheese whey (CW) at mesophilic conditions was investigated. In addition, the applicability of electrochemical oxidation as an advanced post-treatment for the complete removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) from the anaerobically treated cheese whey was evaluated. The diluted cheese whey, having a pH of 6.5 and a total COD of 6 g/L, was first treated in a 600-L, pilot-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The UASB process, which was operated for 87 days at mesophilic conditions (32 ± 2 °C) at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3 days, led to a COD removal efficiency between 66 and 97 %, while the particulate matter of the wastewater was effectively removed by entrapment in the sludge blanket of the reactor. When the anaerobic reactor effluent was post-treated over a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode at 9 and 18 A and in the presence of NaCl as the supporting electrolyte, complete removal of COD was attained after 3-4 h of reaction. During electrochemical experiments, three groups of organochlorinated compounds, namely trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetonitriles (HANs), and haloketons (HKs), as well as 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) and chloropicrin were identified as by-products of the process; these, alongside free chlorine, are thought to increase the matrix ecotoxicity to Artemia salina. PMID:24793070

  2. Coaxial rings and H2 knots in Hubble 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsia, Chih-Hao; Kwok, Sun; Chau, Wayne; Zhang, Yong

    2016-07-01

    Hubble 12 (Hb 12) is a young planetary nebula (PN) exhibiting nested shells. We present new near-infrared narrow-band imaging observations of Hb 12 using the Canada-France- Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). A number of co-axial rings aligned with the bipolar lobes and two pairs of separate H2 knots with different orientations are detected.

  3. Spontaneous knot; a rare cause of ventriculoperitoneal shunt blockage.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Wail; Wiig, Ulrikke; Caird, John

    2011-02-01

    A 14-year old X linked congenital hydrocephalus presented with unexplained headaches and vomiting. He had external ventricular drain and intracranial pressure monitoring (ICP). Subsequently, he underwent exploration and removal of previously inserted ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts. On retrieval of peritoneal catheters a double knot was noted between his two distal catheters. This case illustrates a rare cause of ventriculoperitoneal shunt malfunction.

  4. Wall-crossing invariants: from quantum mechanics to knots

    SciTech Connect

    Galakhov, D. E-mail: galakhov@physics.rutgers.edu; Mironov, A. Morozov, A.

    2015-03-15

    We offer a pedestrian-level review of the wall-crossing invariants. The story begins from the scattering theory in quantum mechanics where the spectrum reshuffling can be related to permutations of S-matrices. In nontrivial situations, starting from spin chains and matrix models, the S-matrices are operatorvalued and their algebra is described in terms of R- and mixing (Racah) U-matrices. Then the Kontsevich-Soibelman (KS) invariants are nothing but the standard knot invariants made out of these data within the Reshetikhin-Turaev-Witten approach. The R and Racah matrices acquire a relatively universal form in the semiclassical limit, where the basic reshufflings with the change of moduli are those of the Stokes line. Natural from this standpoint are matrices provided by the modular transformations of conformal blocks (with the usual identification R = T and U = S), and in the simplest case of the first degenerate field (2, 1), when the conformal blocks satisfy a second-order Shrödinger-like equation, the invariants coincide with the Jones (N = 2) invariants of the associated knots. Another possibility to construct knot invariants is to realize the cluster coordinates associated with reshufflings of the Stokes lines immediately in terms of check-operators acting on solutions of the Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equations. Then the R-matrices are realized as products of successive mutations in the cluster algebra and are manifestly described in terms of quantum dilogarithms, ultimately leading to the Hikami construction of knot invariants.

  5. Velocity, energy, and helicity of vortex knots and unknots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggioni, F.; Alamri, S.; Barenghi, C. F.; Ricca, R. L.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we determine the velocity, the energy, and estimate writhe and twist helicity contributions of vortex filaments in the shape of torus knots and unknots (as toroidal and poloidal coils) in a perfect fluid. Calculations are performed by numerical integration of the Biot-Savart law. Vortex complexity is parametrized by the winding number w given by the ratio of the number of meridian wraps to that of longitudinal wraps. We find that for w<1 vortex knots and toroidal coils move faster and carry more energy than a reference vortex ring of same size and circulation, whereas for w>1 knots and poloidal coils have approximately same speed and energy of the reference vortex ring. Helicity is dominated by writhe contributions. Finally, we confirm the stabilizing effect of the Biot-Savart law for all knots and unknots tested, found to be structurally stable over a distance of several diameters. Our results also apply to quantized vortices in superfluid H4e .

  6. Velocity, energy, and helicity of vortex knots and unknots.

    PubMed

    Maggioni, F; Alamri, S; Barenghi, C F; Ricca, R L

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we determine the velocity, the energy, and estimate writhe and twist helicity contributions of vortex filaments in the shape of torus knots and unknots (as toroidal and poloidal coils) in a perfect fluid. Calculations are performed by numerical integration of the Biot-Savart law. Vortex complexity is parametrized by the winding number w given by the ratio of the number of meridian wraps to that of longitudinal wraps. We find that for w<1 vortex knots and toroidal coils move faster and carry more energy than a reference vortex ring of same size and circulation, whereas for w>1 knots and poloidal coils have approximately same speed and energy of the reference vortex ring. Helicity is dominated by writhe contributions. Finally, we confirm the stabilizing effect of the Biot-Savart law for all knots and unknots tested, found to be structurally stable over a distance of several diameters. Our results also apply to quantized vortices in superfluid 4He . PMID:20866907

  7. Homochiral and meso figure eight knots and a Solomon link.

    PubMed

    Ponnuswamy, Nandhini; Cougnon, Fabien B L; Pantoş, G Dan; Sanders, Jeremy K M

    2014-06-11

    A homochiral naphthalenediimide-based building block forms in water a disulfide library of macrocycles containing topological isomers. We attempted to identify each of these isomers, and explored the mechanisms leading to their formation. The two most abundant species of the library were assigned as a topologically chiral Solomon link (60% of the library, as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)) and a topologically achiral figure eight knot (18% by HPLC), competing products with formally different geometries but remarkably similar 4-fold symmetries. In contrast, a racemic mixture of building blocks gives the near-quantitative formation of another new and more stable structure, assigned as a meso figure eight knot. Taken together, these results seem to uncover a correlation between the point chirality of the building block used and the topological chirality of the major structure formed. These and the earlier discovery of a trefoil knot also suggest that the number of rigid components in the building block may translate into corresponding knot symmetry and could set the basis of a new strategy for constructing complex topologies. PMID:24831779

  8. Numerical Simulation of Gel Electrophoresis of DNA Knots in Weak and Strong Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Weber, C.; Stasiak, A.; De Los Rios, P.; Dietler, G.

    2006-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis allows one to separate knotted DNA (nicked circular) of equal length according to the knot type. At low electric fields, complex knots, being more compact, drift faster than simpler knots. Recent experiments have shown that the drift velocity dependence on the knot type is inverted when changing from low to high electric fields. We present a computer simulation on a lattice of a closed, knotted, charged DNA chain drifting in an external electric field in a topologically restricted medium. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm, the dependence of the electrophoretic migration of the DNA molecules on the knot type and on the electric field intensity is investigated. The results are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with electrophoretic experiments done under conditions of low and high electric fields. PMID:16473912

  9. A Monte Carlo Study of Knots in Long Double-Stranded DNA Chains

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Florian C.; Virnau, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We determine knotting probabilities and typical sizes of knots in double-stranded DNA for chains of up to half a million base pairs with computer simulations of a coarse-grained bead-stick model: Single trefoil knots and composite knots which include at least one trefoil as a prime factor are shown to be common in DNA chains exceeding 250,000 base pairs, assuming physiologically relevant salt conditions. The analysis is motivated by the emergence of DNA nanopore sequencing technology, as knots are a potential cause of erroneous nucleotide reads in nanopore sequencing devices and may severely limit read lengths in the foreseeable future. Even though our coarse-grained model is only based on experimental knotting probabilities of short DNA strands, it reproduces the correct persistence length of DNA. This indicates that knots are not only a fine gauge for structural properties, but a promising tool for the design of polymer models. PMID:27631891

  10. A Monte Carlo Study of Knots in Long Double-Stranded DNA Chains.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Florian C; Virnau, Peter

    2016-09-01

    We determine knotting probabilities and typical sizes of knots in double-stranded DNA for chains of up to half a million base pairs with computer simulations of a coarse-grained bead-stick model: Single trefoil knots and composite knots which include at least one trefoil as a prime factor are shown to be common in DNA chains exceeding 250,000 base pairs, assuming physiologically relevant salt conditions. The analysis is motivated by the emergence of DNA nanopore sequencing technology, as knots are a potential cause of erroneous nucleotide reads in nanopore sequencing devices and may severely limit read lengths in the foreseeable future. Even though our coarse-grained model is only based on experimental knotting probabilities of short DNA strands, it reproduces the correct persistence length of DNA. This indicates that knots are not only a fine gauge for structural properties, but a promising tool for the design of polymer models. PMID:27631891

  11. Reductive Transformation of p-chloronitrobenzene in the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor coupled with microbial electrolysis cell: performance and microbial community.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangyang; Shao, Junjie; Li, Mengyan; Gao, Kaituo; Jin, Jie; Zhu, Liang

    2016-10-01

    A microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) combined with an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was operated to degrade p-chloronitrobenzenes (p-ClNB) effectively. The results indicated that p-ClNB was transformed to p-chloroaniline (p-ClAn) and then reduced via dechlorination pathways. In the MEC-UASB coupled system, p-ClNB, p-ClAn removal efficiency and dechlorination efficiency reached 99.63±0.37%, 40.39±9.26% and 32.16±8.12%, respectively, which was significantly improved in comparison with the control UASB system. In addition, the coupled system could maintain appropriate pH and promote anaerobic sludge granulation to exert a positive effect on reductive transformation of p-ClNB. PCR-DGGE experiment and 454 pyrophosphate sequencing analysis indicated that applied voltage would significantly influence the succession of microbial community and promote oriented enrichment of the functional bacteria, which could be the underlying reasons for the improved performance. This study demonstrated that MEC-UASB coupled system had a promising application prospect to remove the recalcitrant pollutants effectively. PMID:27455127

  12. Reductive Transformation of p-chloronitrobenzene in the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor coupled with microbial electrolysis cell: performance and microbial community.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangyang; Shao, Junjie; Li, Mengyan; Gao, Kaituo; Jin, Jie; Zhu, Liang

    2016-10-01

    A microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) combined with an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was operated to degrade p-chloronitrobenzenes (p-ClNB) effectively. The results indicated that p-ClNB was transformed to p-chloroaniline (p-ClAn) and then reduced via dechlorination pathways. In the MEC-UASB coupled system, p-ClNB, p-ClAn removal efficiency and dechlorination efficiency reached 99.63±0.37%, 40.39±9.26% and 32.16±8.12%, respectively, which was significantly improved in comparison with the control UASB system. In addition, the coupled system could maintain appropriate pH and promote anaerobic sludge granulation to exert a positive effect on reductive transformation of p-ClNB. PCR-DGGE experiment and 454 pyrophosphate sequencing analysis indicated that applied voltage would significantly influence the succession of microbial community and promote oriented enrichment of the functional bacteria, which could be the underlying reasons for the improved performance. This study demonstrated that MEC-UASB coupled system had a promising application prospect to remove the recalcitrant pollutants effectively.

  13. Conversion of activated-sludge reactors to microbial fuel cells for wastewater treatment coupled to electricity generation.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Tomoya; Miyahara, Morio; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2014-11-01

    Wastewater can be treated in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with the aid of microbes that oxidize organic compounds using anodes as electron acceptors. Previous studies have suggested the utility of cassette-electrode (CE) MFCs for wastewater treatment, in which rice paddy-field soil was used as the inoculum. The present study attempted to convert an activated-sludge (AS) reactor to CE-MFC and use aerobic sludge in the tank as the source of microbes. We used laboratory-scale (1 L in capacity) reactors that were initially operated in an AS mode to treat synthetic wastewater, containing starch, yeast extract, peptone, plant oil, and detergents. After the organics removal became stable, the aeration was terminated, and CEs were inserted to initiate an MFC-mode operation. It was demonstrated that the MFC-mode operation treated the wastewater at similar efficiencies to those observed in the AS-mode operation with COD-removal efficiencies of 75-80%, maximum power densities of 150-200 mW m(-2) and Coulombic efficiencies of 20-30%. These values were similar to those of CE-MFC inoculated with the soil. Anode microbial communities were analyzed by pyrotag sequencing of 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicons. Comparative analyses revealed that anode communities enriched from the aerobic sludge were largely different from those from the soil, suggesting that similar reactor performances can be supported by different community structures. The study demonstrates that it is possible to construct wastewater-treatment MFCs by inserting CEs into water-treatment tanks.

  14. Metabolic Toxicity Screening Using Electrochemiluminescence Arrays Coupled with Enzyme-DNA Biocolloid Reactors and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hvastkovs, Eli, G.; Schenkman, John B.; Rusling, James, F.

    2012-07-01

    New chemicals or drugs must be guaranteed safe before they can be marketed. Despite widespread use of bioassay panels for toxicity prediction, products that are toxic to a subset of the population often are not identified until clinical trials. This article reviews new array methodologies based on enzyme/DNA films that form and identify DNA-reactive metabolites that are indicators of potentially genotoxic species. This molecularly based methodology is designed in a rapid screening array that utilizes electrochemiluminescence (ECL) to detect metabolite-DNA reactions, as well as biocolloid reactors that provide the DNA adducts and metabolites for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. ECL arrays provide rapid toxicity screening, and the biocolloid reactor LC-MS approach provides a valuable follow-up on structure, identification, and formation rates of DNA adducts for toxicity hits from the ECL array screening. Specific examples using this strategy are discussed. Integration of high-throughput versions of these toxicity-screening methods with existing drug toxicity bioassays should allow for better human toxicity prediction as well as more informed decision making regarding new chemical and drug candidates.

  15. Metabolic Toxicity Screening Using Electrochemiluminescence Arrays Coupled with Enzyme-DNA Biocolloid Reactors and Liquid Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hvastkovs, Eli G.; Schenkman, John B.; Rusling, James F.

    2012-01-01

    New chemicals or drugs must be guaranteed safe before they can be marketed. Despite widespread use of bioassay panels for toxicity prediction, products that are toxic to a subset of the population often are not identified until clinical trials. This article reviews new array methodologies based on enzyme/DNA films that form and identify DNA-reactive metabolites that are indicators of potentially genotoxic species. This molecularly based methodology is designed in a rapid screening array that utilizes electrochemiluminescence (ECL) to detect metabolite-DNA reactions, as well as biocolloid reactors that provide the DNA adducts and metabolites for liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. ECL arrays provide rapid toxicity screening, and the biocolloid reactor LC-MS approach provides a valuable follow-up on structure, identification, and formation rates of DNA adducts for toxicity hits from the ECL array screening. Specific examples using this strategy are discussed. Integration of high-throughput versions of these toxicity-screening methods with existing drug toxicity bioassays should allow for better human toxicity prediction as well as more informed decision making regarding new chemical and drug candidates. PMID:22482786

  16. The effects of neutral gas heating on H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz planar coil inductively coupled plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K.; Chin, Oi-Hoong

    2012-09-15

    The H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz laboratory 6 turn planar coil inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor are simulated for low pressure argon discharge range of 0.02-0.3 mbar with neutral gas heating and at ambient temperature. An experimentally fitted 3D power evolution plot for 0.02 mbar argon pressure is also shown to visualize the effects of hysteresis in the system. Comparisons between simulation and experimental measurements show good agreement in the pressure range of 0.02-0.3 mbar for transition currents and 0.02-0.1 mbar for maintenance currents only when neutral gas heating is considered. This suggests that neutral gas heating plays a non-negligible role in determining the mode transition points of a rf ICP system.

  17. Development of Tritium Permeation Analysis Code and Tritium Transport in a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Coupled with Hydrogen Production System

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Mike Patterson

    2010-06-01

    Abstract – A tritium permeation analyses code (TPAC) was developed by Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of analyzing tritium distributions in very high temperature reactor (VHTR) systems, including integrated hydrogen production systems. A MATLAB SIMULINK software package was used in developing the code. The TPAC is based on the mass balance equations of tritium-containing species and various forms of hydrogen coupled with a variety of tritium sources, sinks, and permeation models. In the TPAC, ternary fission and neutron reactions with 6Li, 7Li 10B, and 3He were taken into considerations as tritium sources. Purification and leakage models were implemented as main tritium sinks. Permeation of tritium and H2 through pipes, vessels, and heat exchangers were considered as main tritium transport paths. In addition, electroyzer and isotope exchange models were developed for analyzing hydrogen production systems, including high temperature electrolysis and sulfur-iodine processes.

  18. The effects of neutral gas heating on H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz planar coil inductively coupled plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K.; Chin, Oi-Hoong

    2012-09-01

    The H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz laboratory 6 turn planar coil inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor are simulated for low pressure argon discharge range of 0.02-0.3 mbar with neutral gas heating and at ambient temperature. An experimentally fitted 3D power evolution plot for 0.02 mbar argon pressure is also shown to visualize the effects of hysteresis in the system. Comparisons between simulation and experimental measurements show good agreement in the pressure range of 0.02-0.3 mbar for transition currents and 0.02-0.1 mbar for maintenance currents only when neutral gas heating is considered. This suggests that neutral gas heating plays a non-negligible role in determining the mode transition points of a rf ICP system.

  19. A special reactor coupled with a high-temperature mass spectrometer for the investigation of the vaporization and cracking of organometallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Violet, Perrine; Nuta, Ioana; Artaud, Laurent; Collas, Hervé; Blanquet, Elisabeth; Chatillon, Christian

    2009-03-01

    A special reactor coupled to a high-temperature mass spectrometer was specifically designed for the study of vaporization and thermal cracking of organometallic precursors. This reactor has two kinds of settings. One is a single Knudsen effusion cell which enables the analysis of the composition of saturated vapors and the determination of the partial pressure of each gaseous molecule in equilibrium with its condensed phase. This cell is an evaporation/sublimation cell (operating from 243 to 473 K), which can be tightly closed--like a vacuum chamber--in order to protect organometallic compounds against moisture and atmospheric components. This cell can be independently weighed usefully to evaluate the equilibrium vapor pressures of the sample using the mass-loss method. During experiments, the effusion aperture is externally opened for direct mass spectrometric measurements. The other setting dedicated to the study of thermal decomposition of gaseous molecules consists of a set of tandem cells: the previously described Knudsen cell and a cracking cell (operating from 293 to 973 K).

  20. Biological oxidation of Mn(II) coupled with nitrification for removal and recovery of minor metals by downflow hanging sponge reactor.

    PubMed

    Cao, Linh Thi Thuy; Kodera, Hiroya; Abe, Kenichi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Aoi, Yoshiteru; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Ozaki, Tomonori; Ohashi, Akiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides (bio-MnO₂) have been shown to absorb minor metals. Bioreactor cultivation of heterotrophic manganese oxidizing bacteria (MnOB), which produce bio-MnO₂ via oxidation of Mn (II), can be expected to be involved in a promising system for removal and recovery of minor metals from wastewater. However, MnOB enrichment in wastewater treatment is difficult. This study investigated whether MnOB can be cultivated when coupled with nitrification in a system in which soluble microbial products (SMP) from nitrifiers are provided to MnOB as a substrate. A downflow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor was applied for MnOB cultivation with ammonium (NH₄⁺) and Mn (II) continuously supplied. During long-term operation, Mn (II) oxidation was successfully established at a rate of 48 g Mn m⁻³ d⁻¹ and bio-MnO₂ that formed on the sponges were recovered from the bottom of the reactor. The results also revealed that Ni and Co added to the influent were simultaneously removed. Microbial 16S rRNA gene clone analysis identified nitrifiers supporting MnOB growth and showed that only one clone of Bacillus subtilis, which was affiliated with a known MnOB cluster, was present, suggesting the existence of other novel bacteria with the ability to oxidize Mn (II).

  1. Acetylcholinesterase immobilized capillary reactors coupled to protein coated magnetic beads: A new tool for plant extract ligand screening

    PubMed Central

    Vanzolini, Kenia Lourenço; Jiang, Zhengjin; Zhang, Xiaoqi; Vieira, Lucas Campos Curcino; Corrêa, Arlene Gonçalvez; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Cass, Quezia Bezerra; Moaddel, Ruin

    2013-01-01

    The use of immobilized capillary enzyme reactors (ICERs) and enzymes coated to magnetic beads ((NT or CT)-MB) for ligand screening has been adopted as a new technique of high throughput screening (HTS). In this work the selected target was the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which acts on the central nervous system and is a validated target for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, as well as for new insecticides. A new approach for the screening of plant extracts was developed based on the ligand fishing experiments and zonal chromatography. For that, the magnetic beads were used for the ligand fishing experiments and capillary bioreactors for the activity assays. The latter was employed also under non-linear conditions to determine the affinity constants of known ligands, for the first time, as well as for the active fished ligand. PMID:24148457

  2. An emerging reactor technology for chemical synthesis: surface acoustic wave-assisted closed-vessel Suzuki coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ketav; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie; Perlmutter, Patrick

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of an energy-efficient surface acoustic wave (SAW) device for driving closed-vessel SAW-assisted (CVSAW), ligand-free Suzuki couplings in aqueous media. The reactions were carried out on a mmolar scale with low to ultra-low catalyst loadings. The reactions were driven by heating resulting from the penetration of acoustic energy derived from RF Raleigh waves generated by a piezoelectric chip via a renewable fluid coupling layer. The yields were uniformly high and the reactions could be executed without added ligand and in water. In terms of energy density this new technology was determined to be roughly as efficient as microwaves and superior to ultrasound.

  3. Elastic knots of Space-Time may improve QED, QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriske, Richard

    2016-03-01

    This author had previously suggested that the time dimension of Electric fields and Magnetic fields are different. This matter was apparently settled with the Special Theory, in which each Observer, has his own Dimension of Time, that is ``elastic'' with one Dimension of Space. The independence of E and M, when they are not varying with time, leads one wonder if they are the same time. For a moving Observer, the two fields are joined through Faraday and Ampere's law. Particle Physics has made the simple Special Relativity interpretation murky. A photon does not simply become either an Electric field or a Magnetic field when viewed in its ''rest frame''. Because of this all kinds of extra sub theories are used, such as the Photon is quantized, and is massless in its rest frame, and always moves at the velocity of light. As for the Photon of the magnetic, or just the electric field, it is ``off the mass shell''. Perhaps a better theory is that the elasticity of time and the fact the ``Two'' observers show up in the theory, is that there has to be two dimensions of time, tied in a knot, in order for a field to become a Particle. The knot tying in EM is simple, when the E field varies it produces M, and vice-versa. For massive particles the knots are more complicated, more dimensions.

  4. Folding analysis of the most complex Stevedore's protein knot.

    PubMed

    Wang, Iren; Chen, Szu-Yu; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2016-01-01

    DehI is a homodimeric haloacid dehalogenase from Pseudomonas putida that contains the most complex 61 Stevedore's protein knot within its folding topology. To examine how DehI attains such an intricate knotted topology we combined far-UV circular dichroism (CD), intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate its folding mechanism. Equilibrium unfolding of DehI by chemical denaturation indicated the presence of two highly populated folding intermediates, I and I'. While the two intermediates vary in secondary structure contents and tertiary packing according to CD and intrinsic fluorescence, respectively, their overall dimension and compactness are similar according to SAXS. Three single-tryptophan variants (W34, W53, and W196) were generated to probe non-cooperative unfolding events localized around the three fluorophores. Kinetic fluorescence measurements indicated that the transition from the intermediate I' to the unfolded state is rate limiting. Our multiparametric folding analyses suggest that DehI unfolds through a linear folding pathway with two distinct folding intermediates by initial hydrophobic collapse followed by nucleation condensation, and that knotting precedes the formation of secondary structures. PMID:27527519

  5. Endopathogenic lifestyle of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi in olive knots

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez‐Moreno, Luis; Jiménez, Antonio J.; Ramos, Cayo

    2009-01-01

    Summary The endophytic phase of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi in olive stems and the structural and ultrastructural histogenesis of olive knots have been studied. Construction of a stable plasmid vector expressing the green fluorescent protein, in combination with the use of in vitro olive plants, allowed real‐time monitoring of P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi infection. The infection process was also examined by bright field and epifluorescence microscopy as well as by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Hypertrophy of the stem tissue was concomitant with the formation of bacterial aggregates, microcolonies and multilayer biofilms, over the cell surfaces and the interior of plasmolysed cells facing the air‐tissue interface of internal opened fissures, and was followed by invasion of the outer layers of the hypertrophied tissue. Pathogenic invasion of the internal lumen of newly formed xylem vessels, which were connected with the stem vascular system, was also observed in late stages of infection. Ultrastructural analysis of knot sections showed the release of outer membrane vesicles from the pathogen surface, a phenomenon not described before for bacterial phytopathogens during host infection. This is the first real‐time monitoring of P. savastanoi disease development and the first illustrated description of the ultrastructure of P. savastanoi‐induced knots. PMID:21255279

  6. Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Phillpot, Simon; Tulenko, James

    2011-09-08

    The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

  7. Half-bow sliding knot: modified suture technique for scleral fixation using the corneoscleral pocket.

    PubMed

    Chee, Soon-Phaik

    2011-09-01

    A modified suture technique for precise knot placement in the Hoffman corneoscleral pocket technique of scleral fixation is described. Both loops of the polypropylene suture passing from the intraocular device through the sclera and conjunctiva are retrieved from the pocket. A loop of suture is pulled through 3 suture throws made using the second suture loop, forming a half bow. Centration of the intraocular lens (IOL)-capsular bag is checked. If the suture tension is too tight, the surgeon can easily undo the knot of the half-bow knot by pulling it free and can then retie the sliding knot. When the IOL-capsular bag is centered, the suture loop is cut and the free end removed. The second suture end is retrieved from the pocket, and knot tying is completed without further adjustment to the tension. Posterior pressure on the intraocular device centers it and settles the knot within the sclera at the fixation point.

  8. T7 RNA polymerase cannot transcribe through a highly knotted DNA template.

    PubMed Central

    Portugal, J; Rodríguez-Campos, A

    1996-01-01

    The ability of T7 RNA polymerase to transcribe a plasmid DNA in vitro in its linear, supercoiled, relaxed and knotted forms was analysed. Similar levels of transcription were found on each template with the exception of plasmids showing varying degrees of knotting (obtained using stoichiometric amounts of yeast topoisomerase II). A purified fraction of knotted DNA with a high number of nodes (crosses) was found to be refractory to transcription. The unknotting of the knotted plasmids, using catalytic amounts of topoisomerase II, restored their capacity as templates for transcription to levels similar to those obtained for the other topological forms. These results demonstrate that highly knotted DNA is the only topological form of DNA that is not a template for transcription. We suggest that the regulation of transcription, which depends on the topological state of the template, might be related to the presence of knotted DNA with different number of nodes. PMID:9016657

  9. Fully Coupled Modeling of Burnup-Dependent (U1- y , Pu y )O2- x Mixed Oxide Fast Reactor Fuel Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Zhou, Wenzhong; Zhou, Wei

    2016-03-01

    During the fast reactor nuclear fuel fission reaction, fission gases accumulate and form pores with the increase of fuel burnup, which decreases the fuel thermal conductivity, leading to overheating of the fuel element. The diffusion of plutonium and oxygen with high temperature gradient is also one of the important fuel performance concerns as it will affect the fuel material properties, power distribution, and overall performance of the fuel pin. In order to investigate these important issues, the (U1- y Pu y )O2- x fuel pellet is studied by fully coupling thermal transport, deformation, oxygen diffusion, fission gas release and swelling, and plutonium redistribution to evaluate the effects on each other with burnup-dependent models, accounting for the evolution of fuel porosity. The approach was developed using self-defined multiphysics models based on the framework of COMSOL Multiphysics to manage the nonlinearities associated with fast reactor mixed oxide fuel performance analysis. The modeling results showed a consistent fuel performance comparable with the previous results. Burnup degrades the fuel thermal conductivity, resulting in a significant fuel temperature increase. The fission gas release increased rapidly first and then steadily with the burnup increase. The fuel porosity increased dramatically at the beginning of the burnup and then kept constant as the fission gas released to the fuel free volume, causing the fuel temperature to increase. Another important finding is that the deviation from stoichiometry of oxygen affects greatly not only the fuel properties, for example, thermal conductivity, but also the fuel performance, for example, temperature distribution, porosity evolution, grain size growth, fission gas release, deformation, and plutonium redistribution. Special attention needs to be paid to the deviation from stoichiometry of oxygen in fuel fabrication. Plutonium content will also affect the fuel material properties and performance

  10. Effect on plasma and etch-rate uniformity of controlled phase shift between rf voltages applied to powered electrodes in a triode capacitively coupled plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Dougyong; Jeong, Sangmin; Park, Youngmin; Volynets, Vladimir N.; Ushakov, Andrey G.; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2009-01-15

    The influence of the phase shift between rf voltages applied to the powered electrodes on plasma parameters and etch characteristics was studied in a very high-frequency (VHF) capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) triode reactor. rf voltages at 100 MHz were simultaneously applied to the top and bottom electrodes having a controlled phase shift between them, which could be varied between 0 deg. and 360 deg. Several plasma and process characteristics were measured as a function of the phase shift: (i) radial profiles of plasma-emission intensity, (ii) line-of-sight averaged plasma-emission intensity, and (iii) radial profiles of blanket SiO{sub 2} etching rate over a 300 mm wafer. Radial profiles of plasma emission were obtained using the scanning optical probe. It has been shown that all the measured characteristics strongly depend on the phase shift: (i) plasma-emission intensity is minimal at phase shift equal to 0 deg. and maximal at 180 deg. for all radial positions, while the emission radial profile changes from bell-shaped distribution with considerable nonuniformity at 0 deg. to a much more flattened distribution at 180 deg.; (ii) line-of-sight averaged plasma-emission intensity shows a similar dependence on the phase shift with minimum and maximum at 0 deg. and 180 deg., respectively; and (iii) the etch-rate radial profile at 180 deg. shows a much better uniformity as compared to that at 0 deg. Some of these results can be qualitatively explained by the redistribution of plasma currents that flow between the electrodes and also from the electrodes to the grounded wall with the phase shift. We suggest that the phase-shift effect can be used to improve the plasma and etch-rate spatial uniformity in VHF-CCP triode reactors.

  11. The Minailo knot: a time-saving and cost-saving technique.

    PubMed

    Brown, John V; Tinnerman-Minailo, Erin J; Rettenmaier, Mark A; Micha, John P; Goldstein, Bram H

    2010-01-01

    Endoscopic knot tying during minimally invasive surgery can be complicated, time consuming, and associated with a protracted learning curve. The Minailo knot seems to be a reasonable option because the technique does not require any specialized instrumentation or skill to perform. In particular, vaginal closure is obtained with the placement of a single intra-corporeal knot. Our initial and successful experience with this knot-tying technique during robotic hysterectomy for treatment of gynecologic disease suggests that the method is safe and feasible. PMID:27628633

  12. Extension of the supercritical carbon dioxide brayton cycle to low reactor power operation: investigations using the coupled anl plant dynamics code-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 liquid metal reactor code system.

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.

    2012-05-10

    Significant progress has been made on the development of a control strategy for the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle enabling removal of power from an autonomous load following Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) down to decay heat levels such that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be used to cool the reactor until decay heat can be removed by the normal shutdown heat removal system or a passive decay heat removal system such as Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) loops with DRACS in-vessel heat exchangers. This capability of the new control strategy eliminates the need for use of a separate shutdown heat removal system which might also use supercritical CO{sub 2}. It has been found that this capability can be achieved by introducing a new control mechanism involving shaft speed control for the common shaft joining the turbine and two compressors following reduction of the load demand from the electrical grid to zero. Following disconnection of the generator from the electrical grid, heat is removed from the intermediate sodium circuit through the sodium-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger, the turbine solely drives the two compressors, and heat is rejected from the cycle through the CO{sub 2}-to-water cooler. To investigate the effectiveness of shaft speed control, calculations are carried out using the coupled Plant Dynamics Code-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code for a linear load reduction transient for a 1000 MWt metallic-fueled SFR with autonomous load following. No deliberate motion of control rods or adjustment of sodium pump speeds is assumed to take place. It is assumed that the S-CO{sub 2} turbomachinery shaft speed linearly decreases from 100 to 20% nominal following reduction of grid load to zero. The reactor power is calculated to autonomously decrease down to 3% nominal providing a lengthy window in time for the switchover to the normal shutdown heat removal system or for a passive decay heat removal system to become effective. However, the

  13. TRITIUM PERMEATION AND TRANSPORT IN THE GASOLINE PRODUCTION SYSTEM COUPLED WITH HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS (HTGRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Mike Patterson

    2011-05-01

    This paper describes scoping analyses on tritium behaviors in the HTGR-integrated gasoline production system, which is based on a methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) plant. In this system, the HTGR transfers heat and electricity to the MTG system. This system was analyzed using the TPAC code, which was recently developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The global sensitivity analyses were performed to understand and characterize tritium behaviors in the coupled HTGR/MTG system. This Monte Carlo based random sampling method was used to evaluate maximum 17,408 numbers of samples with different input values. According to the analyses, the average tritium concentration in the product gasoline is about 3.05×10-3 Bq/cm3, and 62 % cases are within the tritium effluent limit (= 3.7x10-3 Bq/cm3[STP]). About 0.19% of released tritium is finally transported from the core to the gasoline product through permeations. This study also identified that the following four parameters are important concerning tritium behaviors in the HTGR/MTG system: (1) tritium source, (2) wall thickness of process heat exchanger, (3) operating temperature, and (4) tritium permeation coefficient of process heat exchanger. These four parameters contribute about 95 % of the total output uncertainties. This study strongly recommends focusing our future research on these four parameters to improve modeling accuracy and to mitigate tritium permeation into the gasol ine product. If the permeation barrier is included in the future study, the tritium concentration will be significantly reduced.

  14. A "Firework" of H2 Knots in the Planetary Nebula NGC 7293 (The Helix Nebula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, M.; Speck, A. K.; McHunu, B. M.; Tanaka, I.; Wright, N. J.; Smith, M. D.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Viti, S.; Wesson, R.

    2009-08-01

    We present a deep and wide field-of-view (4' × 7') image of the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 7293 (the Helix Nebula) in the 2.12 μm H2 v = 1 → 0 S(1) line. The excellent seeing (0farcs4) at the Subaru Telescope, allows the details of cometary knots to be examined. The knots are found at distances of 2farcm2-6farcm4 from the central star (CS). At the inner edge and in the inner ring (up to 4farcm5 from the CS), the knot often show a "tadpole" shape, an elliptical head with a bright crescent inside and a long tail opposite to the CS. In detail, there are variations in the tadpole shapes, such as narrowing tails, widening tails, meandering tails, or multipeaks within a tail. In the outer ring (4farcm5-6farcm4 from the CS), the shapes are more fractured, and the tails do not collimate into a single direction. The transition in knot morphology from the inner edge to the outer ring is clearly seen. The number density of knots governs the H2 surface brightness in the inner ring: H2 exists only within the knots. Possible mechanisms which contribute to the shaping of the knots are discussed, including photoionization and streaming motions. A plausible interpretation of our images is that inner knots are being overrun by a faster wind, but that this has not (yet) reached the outer knots. Based on H2 formation and destruction rates, H2 gas can survive in knots from formation during the late asymptotic giant branch phase throughout the PN phase. These observations provide new constraints on the formation and evolution of knots, and on the physics of molecular gas embedded within ionized gas. Based on data taken with the Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (proposal ID S07B-054).

  15. Simulation of decay heat removal by natural convection in a pool type fast reactor model-ramona-with coupled 1D/2D thermal hydraulic code system

    SciTech Connect

    Kasinathan, N.; Rajakumar, A.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Chetal, S.C.

    1995-09-01

    Post shutdown decay heat removal is an important safety requirement in any nuclear system. In order to improve the reliability of this function, Liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) are equipped with redundant hot pool dipped immersion coolers connected to natural draught air cooled heat exchangers through intermediate sodium circuits. During decay heat removal, flow through the core, immersion cooler primary side and in the intermediate sodium circuits are also through natural convection. In order to establish the viability and validate computer codes used in making predictions, a 1:20 scale experimental model called RAMONA with water as coolant has been built and experimental simulation of decay heat removal situation has been performed at KfK Karlsruhe. Results of two such experiments have been compiled and published as benchmarks. This paper brings out the results of the numerical simulation of one of the benchmark case through a 1D/2D coupled code system, DHDYN-1D/THYC-2D and the salient features of the comparisons. Brief description of the formulations of the codes are also included.

  16. The Nature of Cometary Knots in the Helix Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.; O'dell, C. R.

    1996-12-01

    Recent HST observations have revealed heretofore unseen fine scale structure in the Helix Nebula. Thousands of well resolved neutral dark cores have been detected in extinction against the background emission of the nebula. These Cometary Knots (CK) have a remarkably uniform appearance with photoionized cusps and tails trailing away from the cusps on almost radial lines. The total mass of the CK is similar to the total mass of the ionized diffuse gas in the ring which means that they represent an important component of the nebula. We discuss the origin and future of the CK in the Helix. It has been suggested that the CK result from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities arising at the ionization front of the nebula (Capriotti 1973, 1996). Our hydrodynamical simulations indicate that indeed Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities could lead to filamentary structures within planetary nebulae. The substructure of these fingers differs, however, from the observations in important ways. The observed CK therefore must have a different origin. The knots might represent local density fluctuations which remained behind and were compressed as the main ionization front advanced into the neutral material. Another formation scenario is a thin shell instability which results from the interaction of the nebula with a fast stellar wind. Although no stellar wind features have been detected so far, the brightness distribution of the ionized cusps of the knots indicates that this gas is in pressure equilibrium with a high-temperature surrounding gas which could be generated by a shocked stellar wind. If such a wind would have high velocities and low densities it could fall beneath the threshold for spectroscopic detection although it could be important for understanding the formation and structure of the CK. Detailed high-resolution numerical simulations which take into account a fast wind phase as well as the time variation of the Central Star's UV photon flux are presented.

  17. Ball lightning as a force-free magnetic knot

    PubMed

    Ranada; Soler; Trueba

    2000-11-01

    The stability of fireballs in a recent model of ball lightning is studied. It is shown that the balls shine while relaxing in an almost quiescent expansion, and that three effects contribute to their stability: (i) the formation in each one during a process of Taylor relaxation of a force-free magnetic field, a concept introduced in 1954 in order to explain the existence of large magnetic fields and currents in stable configurations of astrophysical plasmas; (ii) the so called Alfven conditions in magnetohydrodynamics; and (iii) the approximate conservation of the helicity integral. The force-free fields that appear are termed "knots" because their magnetic lines are closed and linked.

  18. Racah matrices and hidden integrability in evolution of knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, A.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, An.; Sleptsov, A.

    2016-09-01

    We construct a general procedure to extract the exclusive Racah matrices S and S bar from the inclusive 3-strand mixing matrices by the evolution method and apply it to the first simple representations R = [ 1 ], [2], [3] and [ 2 , 2 ]. The matrices S and S bar relate respectively the maps (R ⊗ R) ⊗ R bar ⟶ R with R ⊗ (R ⊗ R bar) ⟶ R and (R ⊗ R bar) ⊗ R ⟶ R with R ⊗ (R bar ⊗ R) ⟶ R. They are building blocks for the colored HOMFLY polynomials of arbitrary arborescent (double fat) knots. Remarkably, the calculation realizes an unexpected integrability property underlying the evolution matrices.

  19. Long-term safety of polypropylene knots under scleral flaps for transsclerally sutured posterior chamber lenses.

    PubMed Central

    Van Meter, W S

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the safety of polypropylene knots used in TS-SPCL combined with PK and AV over time. METHOD: A retrospective review of 26 consecutive cases of TS-SPCL by one surgeon (WSVM) with at least 12 months follow-up (mean 26, range 12-62). All patients had a double strand polypropylene knot buried under partial thickness scleral flaps at 2 and 8 o'clock. Knots were rotated into the globe (R) in 10 cases, and could not be buried (N) in 13 cases, and in 3 cases 1 knot was buried. RESULTS: No cases of suture erosion occurred in R or N. One or more polypropylene sutures were visible in 17 patients (8 R, 9 T) at last exam. Twenty-three of 52 knots were rotated into the globe, and 70% of rotated knots were not even visible at the slit lamp at final visit. There was no evidence of conjunctival erosion in any patient. There was no lens dislocation and no endophthalmitis. CONCLUSION: The combination of partial thickness scleral flaps with double strand polypropylene knots reduces the incidence of suture erosion through the conjunctive if knots cannot be rotated into the globe. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:9440177

  20. Percutaneous Retrieval of a Pulmonary Artery Catheter Knot in Pacing Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela-Garcia, Luis Felipe Almendro-Delia, Manuel; Gonzalez-Valdayo, Miguel; Munoz-Campos, Juan; Dorado-Garcia, Jose C.; Gomez-Rosa, Francisco; Vazquez-Garcia, Rafael; Calderon-Leal, Jose M.

    2007-09-15

    To illustrate a successful approach to resolving a pulmonary artery catheter knot in the pacing leads of a cardiac resynchronization device. When planning invasive monitoring for patients having right chamber electrodes, fluoroscopic-guided catheter insertion and extraction is advisable. In the event of coiling or knotting, an interventional radiologist should be contacted as soon as possible to avoid serious complications.

  1. Translocation dynamics of knotted polymers under a constant or periodic external field.

    PubMed

    Narsimhan, Vivek; Renner, C Benjamin; Doyle, Patrick S

    2016-06-14

    We perform Brownian dynamics simulations to examine how knots alter the dynamics of polymers moving through nanopores under an external field. In the first part of this paper, we study the situation when the field is constant. Here, knots halt translocation above a critical force with jamming occurring at smaller forces for twist topologies compared to non-twist topologies. Slightly below the jamming transition, the polymer's transit times exhibit large fluctuations. This phenomenon is an example of the knot's molecular individualism since the conformation of the knot plays a large role in the chain's subsequent dynamics. In the second part of the paper, we study the motion of the chain when one cycles the field on and off. If the off time is comparable to the knot's relaxation time, one can adjust the swelling of the knot at the pore and hence design strategies to ratchet the polymer in a controllable fashion. We examine how the off time affects the ratcheting dynamics. We also examine how this strategy alters the fluctuations in the polymer's transit time. We find that cycling the force field can reduce fluctuations near the knot's jamming transition, but can enhance the fluctuations at very high forces since knots get trapped in metastable states during the relaxation process. The latter effect appears to be more prominent for non-torus topologies than torus ones. We conclude by discussing the feasibility of this approach to control polymer motion in biotechnology applications such as sequencing. PMID:27181288

  2. Ethnomathematics in Arfak (West Papua-Indonesia): Hidden Mathematics on Knot of Rumah Kaki Seribu

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haryanto; Nusantara, Toto; Subanji; Abadyo

    2016-01-01

    This ethnomathematics article focused on the models of knot which is used in the frame of "Rumah Kaki Seribu." The knot model itself was studied mathematically. The results of this study revealed the way Arfak tribal communities think mathematically. This article uses exploration, documentation, interview, experiments and literature…

  3. Introduction of "Papazian Pusher: " A Modified-Design Knot Pusher for Surgical Repair of Cleft Palates.

    PubMed

    Papazian, Nazareth J; Chahine, Fadl; Atiyeh, Bishara; Deeba, Samer; Zgheib, Elias; Abu-Sittah, Ghassan

    2015-09-01

    Tying sutures is an integral aspect of any surgery and reliable instruments are essential for hassle-free procedures including craniofacial surgeries. Knot pushers have been widely known for their application in various laparoscopic, arthroscopic, and anal surgeries. The literature reveals numerous articles pertaining to knot pushers, as well as improvements on existing designs. Nevertheless, no application of knot pushers in the surgical repair of cleft palates has been described. We describe a new knot pusher "Papazian Pusher" (PP) finely designed for application in oral surgeries in general and repair of cleft palates in particular. The instrument was used satisfactorily in repair of cleft palate surgeries and no complications were encountered. The PP was found, overall, to be easy to use, and helps in performing faster, stronger, smooth, and secure knots. PMID:26355980

  4. High Proteolytic Resistance of Spider-Derived Inhibitor Cystine Knots

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kyoko; Sugiura, Mika; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Proteolytic stability in gastrointestinal tract and blood plasma is the major obstacle for oral peptide drug development. Inhibitor cystine knots (ICKs) are linear cystine knot peptides which have multifunctional properties and could become promising drug scaffolds. ProTx-I, ProTx-II, GTx1-15, and GsMTx-4 were spider-derived ICKs and incubated with pepsin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase in physiological conditions to find that all tested peptides were resistant to pepsin, and ProTx-II, GsMTx-4, and GTx1-15 showed resistance to all tested proteases. Also, no ProTx-II degradation was observed in rat blood plasma for 24 hours in vitro and ProTx-II concentration in circulation decreased to half in 40 min, indicating absolute stability in plasma and fast clearance from the system. So far, linear peptides are generally thought to be unsuitable in vivo, but all tested ICKs were not degraded by pepsin and stomach could be selected for the alternative site of drug absorption for fast onset of the drug action. Since spider ICKs are selective inhibitors of various ion channels which are related to the pathology of many diseases, engineered ICKs will make a novel class of peptide medicines which can treat variety of bothering symptoms. PMID:26843868

  5. Effusive molecular beam-sampled Knudsen flow reactor coupled to vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry using an external free radical source

    SciTech Connect

    Leplat, N.; Rossi, M. J.

    2013-11-15

    A new apparatus using vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry (VUV SPIMS) of an effusive molecular beam emanating from a Knudsen flow reactor is described. It was designed to study free radical-molecule kinetics over a significant temperature range (300–630 K). Its salient features are: (1) external free radical source, (2) counterpropagating molecular beam and diffuse VUV photon beam meeting in a crossed-beam ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer with perpendicular ion extraction, (3) analog detection of the photocurrent of the free radical molecular cation, and (4) possibility of detecting both free radicals and closed shell species in the same apparatus and under identical reaction conditions owing to the presence of photoelectrons generated by the photoelectric effect of the used VUV-photons. The measured thermal molecular beam-to-background ratio was 6.35 ± 0.39 for Ar and 10.86 ± 1.59 for i-C{sub 4}H{sub 10} at 300 K, a factor of 2.52 and 1.50 smaller, respectively, than predicted from basic gas-dynamic considerations. Operating parameters as well as the performance of key elements of the instrument are presented and discussed. Coupled to an external free radical source a steady-state specific exit flow of 1.6 × 10{sup 11} and 5.0 × 10{sup 11} molecule s{sup −1} cm{sup −3} of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}{sup •} (ethyl) and t-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}{sup •} (t-butyl) free radicals have been detected using VUV SPIMS at their molecular ion m/z 29 and 57, respectively, at 300 K.

  6. Effusive molecular beam-sampled Knudsen flow reactor coupled to vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry using an external free radical source.

    PubMed

    Leplat, N; Rossi, M J

    2013-11-01

    A new apparatus using vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry (VUV SPIMS) of an effusive molecular beam emanating from a Knudsen flow reactor is described. It was designed to study free radical-molecule kinetics over a significant temperature range (300-630 K). Its salient features are: (1) external free radical source, (2) counterpropagating molecular beam and diffuse VUV photon beam meeting in a crossed-beam ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer with perpendicular ion extraction, (3) analog detection of the photocurrent of the free radical molecular cation, and (4) possibility of detecting both free radicals and closed shell species in the same apparatus and under identical reaction conditions owing to the presence of photoelectrons generated by the photoelectric effect of the used VUV-photons. The measured thermal molecular beam-to-background ratio was 6.35 ± 0.39 for Ar and 10.86 ± 1.59 for i-C4H10 at 300 K, a factor of 2.52 and 1.50 smaller, respectively, than predicted from basic gas-dynamic considerations. Operating parameters as well as the performance of key elements of the instrument are presented and discussed. Coupled to an external free radical source a steady-state specific exit flow of 1.6 × 10(11) and 5.0 × 10(11) molecule s(-1) cm(-3) of C2H5(●) (ethyl) and t-C4H9(●) (t-butyl) free radicals have been detected using VUV SPIMS at their molecular ion m/z 29 and 57, respectively, at 300 K.

  7. An experimental study on the oxidative coupling of methane in a direct current corona discharge reactor over Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Marafee, A.; Liu, C.; Xu, G.; Mallinson, R.; Lobban, L.

    1997-03-01

    The homogeneous and catalytic oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) for converting methane directly into higher hydrocarbons has been the subject of a large body of research. The present study on conversion of methane in dc corona discharge packed bed reactors may significantly improve the process economics. Experimental investigations have been conducted in which all the reactive gases pass through a catalyst bed which is situated within the corona-induced plasma zone. In this study, a typical OCM catalyst, Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, was used to investigate experimentally the corona discharge OCM reactions. Experiments were conducted over a wide range of temperatures (823--1,023 K) and input powers (0--6 W) with both positive and negative corona processes. Compared to the catalytic process in the absence of corona discharge, the corona discharge results in higher methane conversion and larger yield of C{sub 2} products even at temperatures at which there is no C{sub 2} activity for the catalyst alone. The methane conversion and C{sub 2} yield increase with O{sub 2} partial pressure during the corona-enhanced catalytic reactions, while the selectivity decreases slightly with increasing O{sub 2} partial pressure. Compared to results obtained in the absence of corona discharges, methane conversion in the presence of the dc corona was nearly five times larger and the selectivity for C{sub 2} over eight times higher at 853 K. A great enhancement in catalytic activity has also been achieved at a temperature at which the catalyst alone shows no C{sub 2} activity. The conversion at higher temperature (more than 953 K) is limited by the poor corona performance and the availability of active oxygen species.

  8. Two-dimensional model of a capacitively coupled rf discharge and comparisons with experiments in the Gaseous Electronics Conference reference reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeuf, J. P.; Pitchford, L. C.

    1995-02-01

    We present results from a two-dimensional (2D) numerical fluid model of rf discharges in conditions close to recently published measurements of the spatial distribution of plasma density in the Gaseous Electronic Conference reference cell. The discharge is in pure argon at pressures in the 100 mtorr range, frequency 13.56 MHz, and rf voltage amplitudes on the order of 100 V. The model is based on solutions of the continuity, momentum (drift-diffusion), and energy equations for the electrons, continuity, and drift-diffusion equation for positive ions, coupled with the Poisson equation. The results of the model are qualitatively and quantitatively in good agreement with the experiments. The model predicts a maximum of plasma density off axis, as in the experiment. The ion current density on the electrode is also nonuniform, and increases radially in the conditions of the experiments. The effects of the rf voltage, pressure, and reactor geometry (electrode dimensions, gap length, guard rings, etc.) on the plasma properties and on the uniformity of the ion current on the powered electrode are also discussed. It is shown that the existence of a maximum of plasma density in the radial direction, in the conditions of the experiment, is due to the small value of the electrode spacing. The results show that the harmonic content of the discharge current is also geometry dependent. The comparisons show that 2D, three-moment fluid models can accurately describe the discharge and the effects of the chamber geometry on the plasma properties for pressure above the limit where collisionless electron heating does not play a significant role.

  9. An Indwelling Urethral Catheter Knotted Around a Double-J Ureteral Stent: An Unusual Complication after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Warmerdam, E. G.; Toorop, R. J.; Abrahams, A. C.; Berger, P.

    2011-01-01

    Urethral catheterization is a common procedure with a relatively low complication rate. Knotting of an indwelling urethral catheter is a very rare complication, and there are only a few case reports on knotted catheters, most of them concerning children. We report an especially rare case where a urethral catheter formed a knot around a double-J ureteral stent after a kidney transplantation. We will discuss the various risk factors for knotting of a catheter and the methods to untangle a knot. PMID:24533194

  10. Effects of horseshoe crab harvest in delaware bay on red knots: Are harvest restrictions working?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niles, L.J.; Bart, J.; Sitters, H.P.; Dey, A.D.; Clark, K.E.; Atkinson, P.W.; Baker, A.J.; Bennett, K.A.; Kalasz, K.S.; Clark, N.A.; Clark, J.; Gillings, S.; Gates, A.S.; Gonzalez, P.M.; Hernandez, D.E.; Minton, C.D.T.; Morrison, R.I.G.; Porter, R.R.; Ross, R.K.; Veitch, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Each May, red knots (Calidris canutus rufa) congregate in Delaware Bay during their northward migration to feed on horseshoe crab eggs (Limulus polyphemus) and refuel for breeding in the Arctic. During the 1990s, the Delaware Bay harvest of horseshoe crabs for bait increased 10-fold, leading to a more than 90% decline in the availability of their eggs for knots. The proportion of knots achieving weights of more than 180 grams by 26-28 May, their main departure period, dropped from 0.6-0.8 to 0.14-0.4 over 1997-2007. During the same period, the red knot population stopping in Delaware Bay declined by more than 75%, in part because the annual survival rate of adult knots wintering in Tierra del Fuego declined. Despite restrictions, the 2007 horseshoe crab harvest was still greater than the 1990 harvest, and no recovery of knots was detectable. We propose an adaptive management strategy with recovery goals and annual monitoring that, if adopted, will both allow red knot and horseshoe crab populations to recover and permit a sustainable harvest of horseshoe crabs.

  11. Ball lightning as a force-free magnetic knot

    PubMed

    Ranada; Soler; Trueba

    2000-11-01

    The stability of fireballs in a recent model of ball lightning is studied. It is shown that the balls shine while relaxing in an almost quiescent expansion, and that three effects contribute to their stability: (i) the formation in each one during a process of Taylor relaxation of a force-free magnetic field, a concept introduced in 1954 in order to explain the existence of large magnetic fields and currents in stable configurations of astrophysical plasmas; (ii) the so called Alfven conditions in magnetohydrodynamics; and (iii) the approximate conservation of the helicity integral. The force-free fields that appear are termed "knots" because their magnetic lines are closed and linked. PMID:11102074

  12. Discretized knot motion on a tensioned fiber induced by transverse waves.

    PubMed

    Potestio, Raffaello; Tubiana, Luca

    2016-01-21

    Topological entanglement is a ubiquitous feature of many biological as well as artificial polymers and fibers. While the equilibrium properties of entangled chains have been the subject of several studies, little is known about their out-of-equilibrium behavior. Here, we address the problem of a stretched knotted fiber driven by a periodic force applied to one of its termini. We show that the onset of standing waves kinetically traps the knot in spatially localized states where the amplitude of the oscillations is maximal, while the knot normal diffusive dynamics is replaced by a discrete jump dynamics. PMID:26510521

  13. Discretized knot motion on a tensioned fiber induced by transverse waves.

    PubMed

    Potestio, Raffaello; Tubiana, Luca

    2016-01-21

    Topological entanglement is a ubiquitous feature of many biological as well as artificial polymers and fibers. While the equilibrium properties of entangled chains have been the subject of several studies, little is known about their out-of-equilibrium behavior. Here, we address the problem of a stretched knotted fiber driven by a periodic force applied to one of its termini. We show that the onset of standing waves kinetically traps the knot in spatially localized states where the amplitude of the oscillations is maximal, while the knot normal diffusive dynamics is replaced by a discrete jump dynamics.

  14. Development of a plant dynamics computer code for analysis of a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle energy converter coupled to a natural circulation lead-cooled fast reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.

    2007-03-08

    STAR-LM is a lead-cooled pool-type fast reactor concept operating under natural circulation of the coolant. The reactor core power is 400 MWt. The open-lattice core consists of fuel pins attached to the core support plate, (the does not consist of removable fuel assemblies). The coolant flows outside of the fuel pins. The fuel is transuranic nitride, fabricated from reprocessed LWR spent fuel. The cladding material is HT-9 stainless steel; the steady-state peak cladding temperature is 650 C. The coolant is single-phase liquid lead under atmospheric pressure; the core inlet and outlet temperatures are 438 C and 578 C, respectively. (The Pb coolant freezing and boiling temperatures are 327 C and 1749 C, respectively). The coolant is contained inside of a reactor vessel. The vessel material is Type 316 stainless steel. The reactor is autonomous meaning that the reactor power is self-regulated based on inherent reactivity feedbacks and no external power control (through control rods) is utilized. The shutdown (scram) control rods are used for startup and shutdown and to stop the fission reaction in case of an emergency. The heat from the reactor is transferred to the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle in in-reactor heat exchangers (IRHX) located inside the reactor vessel. The IRHXs are shell-and-tube type heat exchangers with lead flowing downwards on the shell side and CO{sub 2} flowing upwards on the tube side. No intermediate circuit is utilized. The guard vessel surrounds the reactor vessel to contain the coolant, in the very unlikely event of reactor vessel failure. The Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) implementing the natural circulation of air flowing upwards over the guard vessel is used to cool the reactor, in the case of loss of normal heat removal through the IRHXs. The RVACS is always in operation. The gap between the vessels is filled with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) to enhance the heat removal by air by significantly reducing the thermal

  15. Tightening slip knots in raw and degummed silk to increase toughness without losing strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantano, Maria F.; Berardo, Alice; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-02-01

    Knots are fascinating topological elements, which can be found in both natural and artificial systems. While in most of the cases, knots cannot be loosened without breaking the strand where they are tightened, herein, attention is focused on slip or running knots, which on the contrary can be unfastened without compromising the structural integrity of their hosting material. Two different topologies are considered, involving opposite unfastening mechanisms, and their influence on the mechanical properties of natural fibers, as silkworm silk raw and degummed single fibers, is investigated and quantified. Slip knots with optimized shape and size result in a significant enhancement of fibers energy dissipation capability, up to 300-400%, without affecting their load bearing capacity.

  16. Tightening slip knots in raw and degummed silk to increase toughness without losing strength.

    PubMed

    Pantano, Maria F; Berardo, Alice; Pugno, Nicola M

    2016-01-01

    Knots are fascinating topological elements, which can be found in both natural and artificial systems. While in most of the cases, knots cannot be loosened without breaking the strand where they are tightened, herein, attention is focused on slip or running knots, which on the contrary can be unfastened without compromising the structural integrity of their hosting material. Two different topologies are considered, involving opposite unfastening mechanisms, and their influence on the mechanical properties of natural fibers, as silkworm silk raw and degummed single fibers, is investigated and quantified. Slip knots with optimized shape and size result in a significant enhancement of fibers energy dissipation capability, up to 300-400%, without affecting their load bearing capacity. PMID:26868855

  17. Folding of small knotted proteins: Insights from a mean field coarse-grained model

    SciTech Connect

    Najafi, Saeed; Potestio, Raffaello

    2015-12-28

    A small but relevant number of proteins whose native structure is known features nontrivial topology, i.e., they are knotted. Understanding the process of folding from a swollen unknotted state to the biologically relevant native conformation is, for these proteins, particularly difficult, due to their rate-limiting topological entanglement. To shed some light into this conundrum, we introduced a structure-based coarse-grained model of the protein, where the information about the folded conformation is encoded in bonded angular interactions only, which do not favor the formation of native contacts. A stochastic search scheme in parameter space is employed to identify a set of interactions that maximizes the probability to attain the knotted state. The optimal knotting pathways of the two smallest knotted proteins, obtained through this approach, are consistent with the results derived by means of coarse-grained as well as full atomistic simulations.

  18. Tightening slip knots in raw and degummed silk to increase toughness without losing strength

    PubMed Central

    Pantano, Maria F.; Berardo, Alice; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    Knots are fascinating topological elements, which can be found in both natural and artificial systems. While in most of the cases, knots cannot be loosened without breaking the strand where they are tightened, herein, attention is focused on slip or running knots, which on the contrary can be unfastened without compromising the structural integrity of their hosting material. Two different topologies are considered, involving opposite unfastening mechanisms, and their influence on the mechanical properties of natural fibers, as silkworm silk raw and degummed single fibers, is investigated and quantified. Slip knots with optimized shape and size result in a significant enhancement of fibers energy dissipation capability, up to 300–400%, without affecting their load bearing capacity. PMID:26868855

  19. Management of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) in bottle gourd using different botanicals in pots.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tulika; Patel, B A

    2015-09-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the efficacy of different botanicals in varying doses for management of root-knot nematode, M. incognita in bottle gourd. The results exhibited that madar (Calotropis procera) and neem (Azadirachta indica) leaves application proved to be more effective in improving plant growth characters and reducing root-knot index and final nematode population. Among the doses tested, higher dose of 1.5 % (w/w) was more effective than lower ones. PMID:26345048

  20. AN ASYMMETRICAL SYNCHROTRON MODEL FOR KNOTS IN THE 3C 273 JET

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wen-Po; Chen, Y. J.; Wang, Chun-Cheng

    2015-06-20

    To interpret the emission of knots in the 3C 273 jet from radio to X-rays, we propose a synchrotron model in which, owing to the shock compression effect, the injection spectra from a shock into the upstream and downstream emission regions are asymmetric. Our model could well explain the spectral energy distributions of knots in the 3C 273 jet, and predictions regarding the knots’ spectra could be tested by future observations.

  1. Knotted Vortices: Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Method for Simulation of Vortex dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesch, Fabian; Chikatamarla, Shyam; Karlin, Ilya

    2013-11-01

    Knotted and interlinked vortex structures in real fluids are conjectured to play a major role in hydrodynamic flow dissipation. Much interest lies in determining their temporal stability and the mechanism through which knots dissolve. Kleckner and Irvine recently have shown the existence of such knotted vortices experimentally by accelerating hydrofoils in water. In the present work we employ the entropic lattice Boltzmann method (ELBM) to perform DNS simulations of the creation and dynamics of knotted vortex rings inspired by the experimental setup in. ELBM renders LBM scheme unconditionally stable by restoring the second law of thermodynamics (the Boltzmann H-theorem), and thus enables simulations of large domains and high Reynolds numbers with DNS quality. The results presented in this talk provide an in-depth study of the dynamics of knotted vortices and vortex reconnection events and confirm the existence of trefoil knots in silicio for the first time. This work was supported by a grant from the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre (CSCS) under project ID s347.

  2. Folding Pathways of a Knotted Protein with a Realistic Atomistic Force Field

    PubMed Central

    a Beccara, Silvio; Škrbić, Tatjana; Covino, Roberto; Micheletti, Cristian; Faccioli, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    We report on atomistic simulation of the folding of a natively-knotted protein, MJ0366, based on a realistic force field. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported effort where a realistic force field is used to investigate the folding pathways of a protein with complex native topology. By using the dominant-reaction pathway scheme we collected about 30 successful folding trajectories for the 82-amino acid long trefoil-knotted protein. Despite the dissimilarity of their initial unfolded configuration, these trajectories reach the natively-knotted state through a remarkably similar succession of steps. In particular it is found that knotting occurs essentially through a threading mechanism, involving the passage of the C-terminal through an open region created by the formation of the native -sheet at an earlier stage. The dominance of the knotting by threading mechanism is not observed in MJ0366 folding simulations using simplified, native-centric models. This points to a previously underappreciated role of concerted amino acid interactions, including non-native ones, in aiding the appropriate order of contact formation to achieve knotting. PMID:23555232

  3. A DECADE-BASELINE STUDY OF THE PLASMA STATES OF EJECTA KNOTS IN CASSIOPEIA A

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, John; Dewey, Daniel; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Heine, Sarah N. T.; Canizares, C. R.; Bastien, Fabienne A.; Sato, Kosuke E-mail: jmrv@mit.edu

    2013-05-20

    We present the analysis of 21 bright X-ray knots in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant from observations spanning 10 yr. We performed a comprehensive set of measurements to reveal the kinematic and thermal state of the plasma in each knot, using a combined analysis of two high energy resolution High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) and four medium energy resolution Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) sets of spectra. The ACIS electron temperature estimates agree with the HETG-derived values for approximately half of the knots studied, yielding one of the first comparisons between high resolution temperature estimates and ACIS-derived temperatures. We did not observe the expected spectral evolution-predicted from the ionization age and density estimates for each knot-in all but three of the knots studied. The incompatibility of these measurements with our assumptions has led us to propose a dissociated ejecta model, with the metals unmixed inside the knots, which could place strong constraints on supernova mixing models.

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.

    1958-10-14

    Methods of controlling reactors are presented. Specifically, a plurality of neutron absorber members are adjustably disposed in the reactor core at different distances from the center thereof. The absorber members extend into the core from opposite faces thereof and are operated by motive means coupled in a manner to simultaneously withdraw at least one of the absorber members while inserting one of the other absorber members. This feature effects fine control of the neutron reproduction ratio by varying the total volume of the reactor effective in developing the neutronic reaction.

  5. Evaluation of the effect of 4 types of knots on the mechanical properties of 4 types of suture material used in small animal practice.

    PubMed

    Avoine, Xytilis; Lussier, Bertrand; Brailovski, Vladimir; Inaekyan, Karine; Beauchamp, Guy

    2016-04-01

    The influence of the type of material used, knot configuration, and use of an additional throw on the tensile force at failure, the elongation, and the mode of failure of different configurations of linear sutures and knotted suture loops was evaluated in this in-vitro mechanical study. We hypothesized that all types of knots would significantly influence the initial force and elongation of suture materials and would influence the force and elongation at which the knotted loops break, but not their mode of failure. A total of 432 samples of 4 types of size 3-0 suture material (polydioxanone, polyglecaprone 25, polyglactin 910, and nylon), representing 9 configurations, were tested in a tensiometer. The configurations were 1 linear suture without a knot and the following loops: square (SQ) knot; surgeon's (SU) knot; granny (GR) knot; and sliding half-hitch (SHH) knot using either 4 and 5 or 3 and 4 throws, depending on the material. For polydioxanone, SQ and SU knots did not decrease the initial force at failure of the suture. Granny (GR) and SHH knots decreased the tensile force at failure and elongation by premature failure of the loop. For polyglecaprone 25, all knots decreased the initial force at failure of the suture, with SHH being weaker than the other knots. For coated polyglactin 910, all knots decreased the initial force at failure of the suture and slippage increased significantly compared with the other 3 sutures. The use of SQ knots with 3 throws did not result in a safe knot. For nylon, knots did not alter the original mechanics of the suture. In conclusion, all knots and types of suture material do not necessarily have the same effect on the initial tensile force at failure of suture materials. PMID:27127344

  6. Optical vortex knots – one photon at a time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempone-Wiltshire, Sebastien J.; Johnstone, Shaun P.; Helmerson, Kristian

    2016-04-01

    Feynman described the double slit experiment as “a phenomenon which is impossible, absolutely impossible, to explain in any classical way and which has in it the heart of quantum mechanics”. The double-slit experiment, performed one photon at a time, dramatically demonstrates the particle-wave duality of quantum objects by generating a fringe pattern corresponding to the interference of light (a wave phenomenon) from two slits, even when there is only one photon (a particle) at a time passing through the apparatus. The particle-wave duality of light should also apply to complex three dimensional optical fields formed by multi-path interference, however, this has not been demonstrated. Here we observe particle-wave duality of a three dimensional field by generating a trefoil optical vortex knot – one photon at a time. This result demonstrates a fundamental physical principle, that particle-wave duality implies interference in both space (between spatially distinct modes) and time (through the complex evolution of the superposition of modes), and has implications for topologically entangled single photon states, orbital angular momentum multiplexing and topological quantum computing.

  7. Temperature Sensing in Seawater Based on Microfiber Knot Resonator

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongjuan; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Xin; Liao, Yipeng; Wang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Ocean internal-wave phenomena occur with the variation in seawater vertical temperature, and most internal-wave detections are dependent on the measurement of seawater vertical temperature. A seawater temperature sensor based on a microfiber knot resonator (MKR) is designed theoretically and demonstrated experimentally in this paper. Especially, the dependences of sensing sensitivity on fiber diameter and probing wavelength are studied. Calculated results show that sensing sensitivity increases with the increasing microfiber diameter with the range of 2.30–3.91 μm and increases with the increasing probing wavelength, which reach good agreement with results obtained by experiments. By choosing the appropriate parameters, the maximum sensitivity measured can reach to be 22.81 pm/°C. The seawater temperature sensor demonstrated here shows advantages of small size, high sensitivity, easy fabrication, and easy integration with fiber systems, which may offer a new optical method to detect temperature of seawater or ocean internal-wave phenomenon and offer valuable reference for assembling micro sensors used for other parameters related to seawater, such as salinity, refractive index, concentration of NO3− and so on. PMID:25299951

  8. Optical vortex knots – one photon at a time

    PubMed Central

    Tempone-Wiltshire, Sebastien J.; Johnstone, Shaun P.; Helmerson, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Feynman described the double slit experiment as “a phenomenon which is impossible, absolutely impossible, to explain in any classical way and which has in it the heart of quantum mechanics”. The double-slit experiment, performed one photon at a time, dramatically demonstrates the particle-wave duality of quantum objects by generating a fringe pattern corresponding to the interference of light (a wave phenomenon) from two slits, even when there is only one photon (a particle) at a time passing through the apparatus. The particle-wave duality of light should also apply to complex three dimensional optical fields formed by multi-path interference, however, this has not been demonstrated. Here we observe particle-wave duality of a three dimensional field by generating a trefoil optical vortex knot – one photon at a time. This result demonstrates a fundamental physical principle, that particle-wave duality implies interference in both space (between spatially distinct modes) and time (through the complex evolution of the superposition of modes), and has implications for topologically entangled single photon states, orbital angular momentum multiplexing and topological quantum computing. PMID:27087642

  9. The magnetic resonance appearance of surfers' knots: a case report.

    PubMed

    McManus, Luke J; Thomson, Andrew; Whan, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Athletes are at increased risk of developing soft-tissue lesions of the lower limbs. Although the majority of these will be benign, the differential diagnosis is broad and increasingly, doctors are turning to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a first-line investigation when presented with these sorts of lesions, both to narrow the differential diagnosis and exclude malignancy. We report the case of a 28-year-old Caucasian man who presented with 2 soft-tissue lesions of the right foot. History and examination of the nodules fitted with a diagnosis of surfers' knots, an unusual form of acquired, benign, connective tissue nodule that may appear over the tibial tuberosities, dorsum of the feet, and occasionally on the chest of surfers in association with repetitive microtrauma during surfing. MRI findings were consistent with this diagnosis with both lesions exhibiting T1 hypointensity and speckled T2 hypointensity with no significant blooming artifact on gradient echo imaging. When imaged with gadolinium, they demonstrated only mild contrast enhancement. MRI is a valuable tool when investigating athletes with soft-tissue lesions over the lower limbs where the possibility of malignancy must be addressed. In selected cases, MRI may be sufficient to permit a conservative approach to the management of these patients. PMID:27594950

  10. Novel Inhibitor Cystine Knot Peptides from Momordica charantia

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Richard J.; Tang, Jun; Zeng, Guang-Zhi; Franco, Octavio L.; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Craik, David J.; Daly, Norelle L.; Tan, Ning-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Two new peptides, MCh-1 and MCh-2, along with three known trypsin inhibitors (MCTI-I, MCTI-II and MCTI-III), were isolated from the seeds of the tropical vine Momordica charantia. The sequences of the peptides were determined using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Using a strategy involving partial reduction and stepwise alkylation of the peptides, followed by enzymatic digestion and tandem mass spectrometry sequencing, the disulfide connectivity of MCh-1 was elucidated to be CysI-CysIV, CysII-CysV and CysIII-CysVI. The three-dimensional structures of MCh-1 and MCh-2 were determined using NMR spectroscopy and found to contain the inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) motif. The sequences of the novel peptides differ significantly from peptides previously isolated from this plant. Therefore, this study expands the known peptide diversity in M. charantia and the range of sequences that can be accommodated by the ICK motif. Furthermore, we show that a stable two-disulfide intermediate is involved in the oxidative folding of MCh-1. This disulfide intermediate is structurally homologous to the proposed ancestral fold of ICK peptides, and provides a possible pathway for the evolution of this structural motif, which is highly prevalent in nature. PMID:24116036

  11. Feedback in clinical education: untying the Gordian knot.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Debra F

    2015-05-01

    Feedback is essential to clinical education, especially in the era of competencies, milestones, and entrustable professional activities. It is, however, an area where medical educators often fall short. Although educational leaders and faculty supervisors provide feedback in a variety of clinical settings, surveys show important gaps in medical student and resident satisfaction with the feedback received, suggesting lost opportunities to identify performance problems as well as to help each learner reach his or her greatest potential.In this issue of Academic Medicine, Telio and colleagues extend the empirically validated concept of a "therapeutic alliance" to propose the "educational alliance" as a framework for enhancing feedback in medical education. They highlight the importance of source credibility, which depends on the teacher-learner relationship and alignment of values, the teacher's understanding of the learner's role and goals, the teacher's direct observation of the learner, and the learner's perception of the teacher's good intentions. The author of this Commentary suggests that the educational alliance framework should prompt medical educators to reconsider feedback and explore opportunities for optimizing it. Most medical schools and graduate medical education programs are not designed in a way that supports the education alliance model, but the Commentary author offers suggestions for cultivating educational alliances, including rethinking supervisor selection criteria. Such interventions should be combined with ongoing faculty development and efforts to improve coaching and mentoring for students, residents, and fellows. Untying the Gordian knot of effective feedback will require innovative approaches, exchange of successful strategies, and continued research.

  12. Optical vortex knots - one photon at a time.

    PubMed

    Tempone-Wiltshire, Sebastien J; Johnstone, Shaun P; Helmerson, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Feynman described the double slit experiment as "a phenomenon which is impossible, absolutely impossible, to explain in any classical way and which has in it the heart of quantum mechanics". The double-slit experiment, performed one photon at a time, dramatically demonstrates the particle-wave duality of quantum objects by generating a fringe pattern corresponding to the interference of light (a wave phenomenon) from two slits, even when there is only one photon (a particle) at a time passing through the apparatus. The particle-wave duality of light should also apply to complex three dimensional optical fields formed by multi-path interference, however, this has not been demonstrated. Here we observe particle-wave duality of a three dimensional field by generating a trefoil optical vortex knot - one photon at a time. This result demonstrates a fundamental physical principle, that particle-wave duality implies interference in both space (between spatially distinct modes) and time (through the complex evolution of the superposition of modes), and has implications for topologically entangled single photon states, orbital angular momentum multiplexing and topological quantum computing. PMID:27087642

  13. Optical vortex knots - one photon at a time.

    PubMed

    Tempone-Wiltshire, Sebastien J; Johnstone, Shaun P; Helmerson, Kristian

    2016-04-18

    Feynman described the double slit experiment as "a phenomenon which is impossible, absolutely impossible, to explain in any classical way and which has in it the heart of quantum mechanics". The double-slit experiment, performed one photon at a time, dramatically demonstrates the particle-wave duality of quantum objects by generating a fringe pattern corresponding to the interference of light (a wave phenomenon) from two slits, even when there is only one photon (a particle) at a time passing through the apparatus. The particle-wave duality of light should also apply to complex three dimensional optical fields formed by multi-path interference, however, this has not been demonstrated. Here we observe particle-wave duality of a three dimensional field by generating a trefoil optical vortex knot - one photon at a time. This result demonstrates a fundamental physical principle, that particle-wave duality implies interference in both space (between spatially distinct modes) and time (through the complex evolution of the superposition of modes), and has implications for topologically entangled single photon states, orbital angular momentum multiplexing and topological quantum computing.

  14. Optical vortex knots - one photon at a time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempone-Wiltshire, Sebastien J.; Johnstone, Shaun P.; Helmerson, Kristian

    2016-04-01

    Feynman described the double slit experiment as “a phenomenon which is impossible, absolutely impossible, to explain in any classical way and which has in it the heart of quantum mechanics”. The double-slit experiment, performed one photon at a time, dramatically demonstrates the particle-wave duality of quantum objects by generating a fringe pattern corresponding to the interference of light (a wave phenomenon) from two slits, even when there is only one photon (a particle) at a time passing through the apparatus. The particle-wave duality of light should also apply to complex three dimensional optical fields formed by multi-path interference, however, this has not been demonstrated. Here we observe particle-wave duality of a three dimensional field by generating a trefoil optical vortex knot - one photon at a time. This result demonstrates a fundamental physical principle, that particle-wave duality implies interference in both space (between spatially distinct modes) and time (through the complex evolution of the superposition of modes), and has implications for topologically entangled single photon states, orbital angular momentum multiplexing and topological quantum computing.

  15. BRIGHT KNOT APPEARS IN SUPERNOVA 1987A RING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [RIGHT] - This NASA Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image shows the glowing gas ring around supernova 1987A, as it appeared in 1994. The gas, excited by light from the explosion, has been fading for a decade. [LEFT] - Recent Hubble telescope observations show a brightening knot on the upper right side of the ring. This is the site of a powerful collision between an outward moving blast wave and the innermost parts of the circumstellar ring. The collision heats the gas and has caused it to brighten in recent months. This is likely to be the first sign of a dramatic and violent collision that will take place over the next few years, rejuvenating SN1987A as a powerful source of X-ray and radio emissions. The white sickle-shaped material in the center is the visible part of the shredded star, rushing outward at 3,000 kilometers per second, which is heated by radioactive elements created in the supernova explosion. The bright dot in the lower left is a star, which is the same direction as SN1987A, but is not physically part of the system. Both images were made from separate images taken in blue light, visual light and the narrow emission from glowing hydrogen. Computer image processing techniques were used to enhance details in the ring. Credit: Peter Garnavich (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), and NASA

  16. Helicity, topology, and Kelvin waves in reconnecting quantum knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark di Leoni, P.; Mininni, P. D.; Brachet, M. E.

    2016-10-01

    Helicity is a topological invariant that measures the linkage and knottedness of lines, tubes, and ribbons. As such, it has found myriads of applications in astrophysics, fluid dynamics, atmospheric sciences, and biology. In quantum flows, where topology-changing reconnection events are a staple, helicity appears as a key quantity to study. However, the usual definition of helicity is not well posed in quantum vortices, and its computation based on counting links and crossings of centerline vorticity can be downright impossible to apply in complex and turbulent scenarios. We present a definition of helicity which overcomes these problems and which gives the expected result in the large-scale limit. With it, we show that certain reconnection events can excite Kelvin waves and other complex motions of the centerline vorticity, which slowly deplete helicity as they interact nonlinearly, thus linking the theory of vortex knots with observations of quantum fluids. This process also results in the depletion of helicity in a fully turbulent quantum flow, in a way reminiscent of the decay of helicity in classical fluids.

  17. Characterization of the Inner Knot of the Crab: The Site of the Gamma-Ray Flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudy, Alexander; Horns, Dieter; DeLuca, Andrea; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery; Tennant, Allyn; Yuan, Yajie; Buehler, Rolf; Arons, Jonathon; Blandford, Roger; Caraveo, Patrizia; Costa, Enrico; Funk, Stephan; Hays, Elizabeth; Lobanov, Andrei; Max, Claire; Mayer, Michael; Mignani, Roberto; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Romani, Roger; Tavani, Marco; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2015-09-01

    A particularly intriguing recent result from γ-ray astronomy missions is the detection of powerful flares from the Crab Nebula, which challenges the current understanding of pulsar wind nebulae and acceleration mechanisms. To search for the production site(s) of these flares, we conducted a multi-wavelength observing campaign using Keck, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. As the short timescales of the γ-ray flares (≲ 1 day) suggest a small emitting region, the Crab’s inner knot (about 0.6 arcsec from the pulsar) is a candidate site for such flaring. This paper describes observations of the inner knot, seeking to understand its nature and possible relationship with γ-ray flares. Using singular-value decomposition, analysis of the HST images yielded results consistent with traditional methods while substantially reducing some uncertainties. These analyses show that the knot’s intrinsic properties (especially size and brightness) are correlated with its (projected) separation from the pulsar. This characterization of the inner knot helps in constraining standard shock model parameters, under the assumption that the knot lies near the shocked surface. While the standard shock model gives good agreement in several respects, two puzzles persist: (a) the observed angular size of the knot relative to the pulsar-knot separation is much smaller than expected; and (b) the variable high degree of polarization (reported by others) is difficult to reconcile with a highly relativistic downstream flow. However, the IR-optical flux of the inner knot is marginally consistent with the shock accelerating most of the Nebula’s optical-emitting particles.

  18. Bounds for the minimum step number of knots confined to slabs in the simple cubic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, K.; Scharein, R.; Diao, Y.; Arsuaga, J.; Vazquez, M.; Shimokawa, K.

    2012-02-01

    Volume confinement is a key determinant of the topology and geometry of a polymer. However, the direct relationship between the two is not fully understood. For instance, recent experimental studies have constructed P4 cosmids, i.e. P4 bacteriophages whose genome sequence and length have been artificially engineered and have shown that upon extraction their DNA knot distribution differs from that of wild-type bacteriophage P4. In particular, it was observed that the complexity of the knots decreases sharply with the length of the packed genome. This problem is the motivation of this paper. Here, a polymer is modeled as a self-avoiding polygon on the simple cubic lattice and the confining condition is such that the polygon is bounded between two parallel planes (i.e. bounded within a slab). We estimate the minimum length required for such a polygon to realize a knot type. Our numerical simulations show that in order to realize a prime knot (with up to ten crossings) in a 1-slab (i.e. a slab of height 1), one needs a polygon of length strictly longer than the minimum length needed to realize the same knot when there is no confining condition. In the case of the trefoil knot, we can in fact establish this result analytically by proving that the minimum length required to tie a trefoil in the 1-slab is 26, which is greater than 24, the known minimum length required to tie a trefoil without a confinement condition. Additionally, we find that in the 1-slab not all geometrical realizations of a given knot type are equivalent under BFACF moves. This suggests that in certain confined volumes, knowing the topology of a polymer is not enough to describe all its states.

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  20. Knots in rings. The circular knotted protein Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II folds via a stable two-disulfide intermediate.

    PubMed

    Cemazar, Masa; Daly, Norelle L; Häggblad, Sara; Lo, Kai Pong; Yulyaningsih, Ernie; Craik, David J

    2006-03-24

    The aim of this work was to elucidate the oxidative folding mechanism of the macrocyclic cystine knot protein MCoTI-II. We aimed to investigate how the six-cysteine residues distributed on the circular backbone of the reduced unfolded peptide recognize their correct partner and join up to form a complex cystine-knotted topology. To answer this question, we studied the oxidative folding of the naturally occurring peptide using a range of spectroscopic methods. For both oxidative folding and reductive unfolding, the same disulfide intermediate species was prevalent and was characterized to be a native-like two-disulfide intermediate in which the Cys1-Cys18 disulfide bond was absent. Overall, the folding pathway of this head-to-tail cyclized protein was found to be similar to that of linear cystine knot proteins from the squash family of trypsin inhibitors. However, the pathway differs in an important way from that of the cyclotide kalata B1, in that the equivalent two-disulfide intermediate in that case is not a direct precursor of the native protein. The size of the embedded ring within the cystine knot motif appears to play a crucial role in the folding pathway. Larger rings contribute to the independence of disulfides and favor an on-pathway native-like intermediate that has a smaller energy barrier to cross to form the native fold. The fact that macrocyclic proteins are readily able to fold to a complex knotted structure in vitro in the absence of chaperones makes them suitable as protein engineering scaffolds that have remarkable stability. PMID:16547012

  1. Knots in rings. The circular knotted protein Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II folds via a stable two-disulfide intermediate.

    PubMed

    Cemazar, Masa; Daly, Norelle L; Häggblad, Sara; Lo, Kai Pong; Yulyaningsih, Ernie; Craik, David J

    2006-03-24

    The aim of this work was to elucidate the oxidative folding mechanism of the macrocyclic cystine knot protein MCoTI-II. We aimed to investigate how the six-cysteine residues distributed on the circular backbone of the reduced unfolded peptide recognize their correct partner and join up to form a complex cystine-knotted topology. To answer this question, we studied the oxidative folding of the naturally occurring peptide using a range of spectroscopic methods. For both oxidative folding and reductive unfolding, the same disulfide intermediate species was prevalent and was characterized to be a native-like two-disulfide intermediate in which the Cys1-Cys18 disulfide bond was absent. Overall, the folding pathway of this head-to-tail cyclized protein was found to be similar to that of linear cystine knot proteins from the squash family of trypsin inhibitors. However, the pathway differs in an important way from that of the cyclotide kalata B1, in that the equivalent two-disulfide intermediate in that case is not a direct precursor of the native protein. The size of the embedded ring within the cystine knot motif appears to play a crucial role in the folding pathway. Larger rings contribute to the independence of disulfides and favor an on-pathway native-like intermediate that has a smaller energy barrier to cross to form the native fold. The fact that macrocyclic proteins are readily able to fold to a complex knotted structure in vitro in the absence of chaperones makes them suitable as protein engineering scaffolds that have remarkable stability.

  2. Long-slit spectrophotometry of the multiple knots of the polar ring galaxy IIZw71

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Montero, E.; García-Benito, R.; Díaz, A. I.; Pérez, E.; Kehrig, C.

    2009-04-01

    Aims: The blue compact dwarf galaxy IIZw71 is catalogued as a probable polar-ring galaxy, and along its long axis it has several very luminous knots showing recent episodes of star formation. Our main aim is to study the physical properties, the stellar content, and the kinematics in the brightest knots of the polar ring. Methods: We carried out long-slit spectroscopic observations of the polar ring in the spectral range 3500-10 000 Å taken with the William Herschel Telescope (WHT). The spectroscopic observations complemented by the available photometry of the galaxy in narrow Hα filters. Results: We measured the rotation curve of the ring, from which we infer a ratio M/LB ≈ 3.9 inside the star-forming ring. We measured the auroral [Oiii] line in the two brightest knots, allowing us to measure oxygen, sulphur, nitrogen, argon, and neon chemical abundances following the direct method. Different empirical calibrators were used to estimate the oxygen abundance in the two faintest knots where the temperature sensitive lines could not be measured. The metallicities obtained are very similar for all the knots, but lower than previously reported in the literature from integrated spectra. The N/O abundance, as derived from the N2O2 parameter (the ratio of the [Nii] and [Oii] intensities), is remarkably constant over the ring, indicating that local polution processes are not conspicuous. Using synthetic stellar populations (SSPs) calculated with the code STARLIGHT, we studied the age distribution of the stellar populations in each knot, finding that in all of them there is a combination of a very young population with less than 10 Myr, responsible for the ionisation of the gas, with other populations older than 100 Myr, probably responsible for the chemical evolution of the knots. The small differences in metallicity and the age distributions among the different knots are indicative of a common chemical evolution, probably related to the process of interaction with the

  3. DNA knots reveal a chiral organization of DNA in phage capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsuaga, Javier; Vazquez, Mariel; McGuirk, Paul; Trigueros, Sonia; Sumners, De Witt; Roca, Joaquim

    2005-06-01

    Icosahedral bacteriophages pack their double-stranded DNA genomes to near-crystalline density and achieve one of the highest levels of DNA condensation found in nature. Despite numerous studies, some essential properties of the packaging geometry of the DNA inside the phage capsid are still unknown. We present a different approach to the problems of randomness and chirality of the packed DNA. We recently showed that most DNA molecules extracted from bacteriophage P4 are highly knotted because of the cyclization of the linear DNA molecule confined in the phage capsid. Here, we show that these knots provide information about the global arrangement of the DNA inside the capsid. First, we analyze the distribution of the viral DNA knots by high-resolution gel electrophoresis. Next, we perform Monte Carlo computer simulations of random knotting for freely jointed polygons confined to spherical volumes. Comparison of the knot distributions obtained by both techniques produces a topological proof of nonrandom packaging of the viral DNA. Moreover, our simulations show that the scarcity of the achiral knot 41 and the predominance of the torus knot 51 over the twist knot 52 observed in the viral distribution of DNA knots cannot be obtained by confinement alone but must include writhe bias in the conformation sampling. These results indicate that the packaging geometry of the DNA inside the viral capsid is writhe-directed. Author contributions: D.W.S. and J.R. designed research; J.A. and J.R. performed research; J.A., M.V., P.M., S.T., and J.R. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; J.A., M.V., P.M., and J.R. analyzed data; and D.W.S. and J.R. wrote the paper.This paper was submitted directly (Track II) to the PNAS office.‡Present address: Department of Mathematics and Center for Computation in the Life Sciences, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132.

  4. Where the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondrion tie the knot: the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM).

    PubMed

    Raturi, Arun; Simmen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    More than a billion years ago, bacterial precursors of mitochondria became endosymbionts in what we call eukaryotic cells today. The true significance of the word "endosymbiont" has only become clear to cell biologists with the discovery that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) superorganelle dedicates a special domain for the metabolic interaction with mitochondria. This domain, identified in all eukaryotic cell systems from yeast to man and called the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM), has a distinct proteome, specific tethers on the cytosolic face and regulatory proteins in the ER lumen of the ER. The MAM has distinct biochemical properties and appears as ER tubules closely apposed to mitochondria on electron micrographs. The functions of the MAM range from lipid metabolism and calcium signaling to inflammasome formation. Consistent with these functions, the MAM is enriched in lipid metabolism enzymes and calcium handling proteins. During cellular stress situations, like an altered cellular redox state, the MAM alters its set of regulatory proteins and thus alters MAM functions. Notably, this set prominently comprises ER chaperones and oxidoreductases that connect protein synthesis and folding inside the ER to mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, ER membranes associated with mitochondria also accommodate parts of the machinery that determines mitochondrial membrane dynamics and connect mitochondria to the cytoskeleton. Together, these exciting findings demonstrate that the physiological interactions between the ER and mitochondria are so bilateral that we are tempted to compare their relationship to the one of a married couple: distinct, but inseparable and certainly dependent on each other. In this paradigm, the MAM stands for the intracellular location where the two organelles tie the knot. Resembling "real life", the happy marriage between the two organelles prevents the onset of diseases that are characterized by disrupted metabolism and decreased lifespan

  5. Particle on a torus knot: Constrained dynamics and semi-classical quantization in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Praloy; Pramanik, Souvik; Ghosh, Subir

    2016-11-01

    Kinematics and dynamics of a particle moving on a torus knot poses an interesting problem as a constrained system. In the first part of the paper we have derived the modified symplectic structure or Dirac brackets of the above model in Dirac's Hamiltonian framework, both in toroidal and Cartesian coordinate systems. This algebra has been used to study the dynamics, in particular small fluctuations in motion around a specific torus. The spatial symmetries of the system have also been studied. In the second part of the paper we have considered the quantum theory of a charge moving in a torus knot in the presence of a uniform magnetic field along the axis of the torus in a semiclassical quantization framework. We exploit the Einstein-Brillouin-Keller (EBK) scheme of quantization that is appropriate for multidimensional systems. Embedding of the knot on a specific torus is inherently two dimensional that gives rise to two quantization conditions. This shows that although the system, after imposing the knot condition reduces to a one dimensional system, even then it has manifested non-planar features which shows up again in the study of fractional angular momentum. Finally we compare the results obtained from EBK (multi-dimensional) and Bohr-Sommerfeld (single dimensional) schemes. The energy levels and fractional spin depend on the torus knot parameters that specifies its non-planar features. Interestingly, we show that there can be non-planar corrections to the planar anyon-like fractional spin.

  6. Hippo pathway/Yap regulates primary enamel knot and dental cusp patterning in tooth morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuk-Jae Edward; Li, Liwen; Jung, Han-Sung

    2015-11-01

    The shape of an individual tooth crown is primarily determined by the number and arrangement of its cusps, i.e., cusp patterning. Enamel knots that appear in the enamel organ during tooth morphogenesis have been suggested to play important roles in cusp patterning. Animal model studies have shown that the Hippo pathway effector Yap has a critical function in tooth morphogenesis. However, the role of the Hippo pathway/Yap in cusp patterning has not been well documented and its specific roles in tooth morphogenesis remain unclear. Here, we provide evidence that Yap is a key mediator in tooth cusp patterning. We demonstrate a correlation between Yap localization and cell proliferation in developing tooth germs. We also show that, between the cap stage and bell stage, Yap is crucial for the suppression of the primary enamel knot and for the patterning of secondary enamel knots, which are the future cusp regions. When Yap expression is stage-specifically knocked down during the cap stage, the activity of the primary enamel knot persists into the bell-stage tooth germ, leading to ectopic cusp formation. Our data reveal the importance of the Hippo pathway/Yap in enamel knots and in the proper patterning of tooth cusps.

  7. Ileosigmoid knotting in patients under 25 years of age: A report of two cases☆

    PubMed Central

    Igwe, Patrick Okechukwu; Jebbin, Nze Jephet; Dodiyi-Manuel, Amabra; Adotey, Jacob Molai

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Ileosigmoid knotting is a rare cause of acute abdomen with high morbidity and mortality. Its diagnosis is infrequently made before surgery because of its varying ways of presentation and rarity. PRESENTATION OF CASE The first was a 21-year-old male who presented with a history of sudden generalized abdominal pain and progressive abdominal distension. He was pale and severely dehydrated. His extremities were cold and clammy. His pulse rate was 110 per minute and blood pressure was 90/50 mmHg. The second case was 20-year-old male who presented with similar symptoms as above. He was not pale but mildly dehydrated. His pulse rate was 92 per minute and blood pressure 110/70 mmHg. Both patients were resuscitated and had exploratory laparotomy a few hours after presentation. The first patient was found to have ileosigmoid knotting with gangrenous sigmoid colon and terminal ileum. He had Hartmann's procedure and right hemicolectomy with ileo-transverse anastomosis. The second patient was found to have ileosigmoid knotting with viable loops of bowel. He had careful detorsion, sigmoidectomy with primary anastomosis. Both patients’ have good outcome. DISCUSSION This is to report two cases of ileosigmoid knotting in two male patients aged 21 and 20 years, respectively, with the hope of increasing awareness. CONCLUSION Ileosigmoid knotting though more common in fourth or fifth decade of life, can also occur in the 2nd decade. Early diagnosis, careful resuscitation and skilful surgical intervention will improve outcome. PMID:25462043

  8. Multispecies modeling for adaptive management of horseshoe crabs and red knots in the delaware bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGowan, C.P.; Smith, D.R.; Sweka, J.A.; Martin, J.; Nichols, J.D.; Wong, R.; Lyons, J.E.; Niles, L.J.; Kalasz, K.; Brust, J.; Klopfer, M.; Spear, B.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive management requires that predictive models be explicit and transparent to improve decisions by comparing management actions, directing further research and monitoring, and facilitating learning. The rufa subspecies of red knots (Calidris canutus rufa), which has recently exhibited steep population declines, relies on horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) eggs as their primary food source during stopover in Delaware Bay during spring migration. We present a model with two different parameterizations for use in the adaptive management of horseshoe crab harvests in the Delaware Bay that links red knot mass gain, annual survival, and fecundity to horseshoe crab dynamics. The models reflect prevailing hypotheses regarding ecological links between these two species. When reported crab harvest from 1998 to 2008 was applied, projections corresponded to the observed red knot population abundances depending on strengths of the demographic relationship between these species. We compared different simulated horseshoe crab harvest strategies to evaluate whether, given this model, horseshoe crab harvest management can affect red knot conservation and found that restricting harvest can benefit red knot populations. Our model is the first to explicitly and quantitatively link these two species and will be used within an adaptive management framework to manage the Delaware Bay system and learn more about the specific nature of the linkage between the two species. ?? 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Multispecies modeling for adaptive management of horseshoe crabs and red knots in the Delaware Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGowan, Conor P.; Smith, David; Sweka, John A.; Martin, Julien; Nichols, James D.; Wong, Richard; Lyons, James E.; Niles, Lawrence J.; Kalasz, Kevin; Brust, Jeffrey; Klopfer, Michelle; Spear, Braddock

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive management requires that predictive models be explicit and transparent to improve decisions by comparing management actions, directing further research and monitoring, and facilitating learning. The rufa subspecies of red knots (Calidris canutus rufa), which has recently exhibited steep population declines, relies on horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) eggs as their primary food source during stopover in Delaware Bay during spring migration. We present a model with two different parameterizations for use in the adaptive management of horseshoe crab harvests in the Delaware Bay that links red knot mass gain, annual survival, and fecundity to horseshoe crab dynamics. The models reflect prevailing hypotheses regarding ecological links between these two species. When reported crab harvest from 1998 to 2008 was applied, projections corresponded to the observed red knot population abundances depending on strengths of the demographic relationship between these species. We compared different simulated horseshoe crab harvest strategies to evaluate whether, given this model, horseshoe crab harvest management can affect red knot conservation and found that restricting harvest can benefit red knot populations. Our model is the first to explicitly and quantitatively link these two species and will be used within an adaptive management framework to manage the Delaware Bay system and learn more about the specific nature of the linkage between the two species.

  10. A 'FIREWORK' OF H{sub 2} KNOTS IN THE PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 7293 (THE HELIX NEBULA)

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, M.; Speck, A. K.; McHunu, B. M.; Tanaka, I.; Wright, N. J.; Viti, S.; Wesson, R.; Smith, M. D.; Zijlstra, A. A. E-mail: mikako@star.ucl.ac.uk

    2009-08-01

    We present a deep and wide field-of-view (4' x 7') image of the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 7293 (the Helix Nebula) in the 2.12 {mu}m H{sub 2} v = 1 {yields} 0 S(1) line. The excellent seeing (0.''4) at the Subaru Telescope, allows the details of cometary knots to be examined. The knots are found at distances of 2.'2-6.'4 from the central star (CS). At the inner edge and in the inner ring (up to 4.'5 from the CS), the knot often show a 'tadpole' shape, an elliptical head with a bright crescent inside and a long tail opposite to the CS. In detail, there are variations in the tadpole shapes, such as narrowing tails, widening tails, meandering tails, or multipeaks within a tail. In the outer ring (4.'5-6.'4 from the CS), the shapes are more fractured, and the tails do not collimate into a single direction. The transition in knot morphology from the inner edge to the outer ring is clearly seen. The number density of knots governs the H{sub 2} surface brightness in the inner ring: H{sub 2} exists only within the knots. Possible mechanisms which contribute to the shaping of the knots are discussed, including photoionization and streaming motions. A plausible interpretation of our images is that inner knots are being overrun by a faster wind, but that this has not (yet) reached the outer knots. Based on H{sub 2} formation and destruction rates, H{sub 2} gas can survive in knots from formation during the late asymptotic giant branch phase throughout the PN phase. These observations provide new constraints on the formation and evolution of knots, and on the physics of molecular gas embedded within ionized gas.

  11. Supercoiling, knotting and replication fork reversal in partially replicated plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Olavarrieta, L.; Martínez-Robles, M. L.; Sogo, J. M.; Stasiak, A.; Hernández, P.; Krimer, D. B.; Schvartzman, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    To study the structure of partially replicated plasmids, we cloned the Escherichia coli polar replication terminator TerE in its active orientation at different locations in the ColE1 vector pBR18. The resulting plasmids, pBR18-TerE@StyI and pBR18-TerE@EcoRI, were analyzed by neutral/neutral two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. Replication forks stop at the Ter–TUS complex, leading to the accumulation of specific replication intermediates with a mass 1.26 times the mass of non-replicating plasmids for pBR18-TerE@StyI and 1.57 times for pBR18-TerE@EcoRI. The number of knotted bubbles detected after digestion with ScaI and the number and electrophoretic mobility of undigested partially replicated topoisomers reflect the changes in plasmid topology that occur in DNA molecules replicated to different extents. Exposure to increasing concentrations of chloroquine or ethidium bromide revealed that partially replicated topoisomers (CCCRIs) do not sustain positive supercoiling as efficiently as their non-replicating counterparts. It was suggested that this occurs because in partially replicated plasmids a positive ΔLk is absorbed by regression of the replication fork. Indeed, we showed by electron microscopy that, at least in the presence of chloroquine, some of the CCCRIs of pBR18-Ter@StyI formed Holliday-like junction structures characteristic of reversed forks. However, not all the positive supercoiling was absorbed by fork reversal in the presence of high concentrations of ethidium bromide. PMID:11809877

  12. Aggregates of a hetero-oligophenylene derivative as reactors for the generation of palladium nanoparticles: a potential catalyst in the Sonogashira coupling reaction under aerial conditions.

    PubMed

    Walia, Preet Kamal; Pramanik, Subhamay; Bhalla, Vandana; Kumar, Manoj

    2015-12-18

    The utilization of Pd nanoparticles stabilized by aggregates of hetero-oligophenylene derivative 3 as an excellent catalyst in a copper/amine free Sonogashira coupling reaction under aerial conditions at room temperature has been demonstrated. PMID:26460180

  13. Complete Mapping of a Cystine Knot and Nested Disulfides of Recombinant Human Arylsulfatase A by Multi-Enzyme Digestion and LC-MS Analysis Using CID and ETD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Wenqin; Lin, Melanie; Salinas, Paul; Savickas, Philip; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Karger, Barry L.

    2013-01-01

    Cystine knots or nested disulfides are structurally difficult to characterize, despite current technological advances in peptide mapping with high-resolution liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In the case of recombinant human arylsulfatase A (rhASA), there is one cystine knot at the C-terminal, a pair of nested disulfides at the middle, and two out of three unpaired cysteines in the N-terminal region. The statuses of these cysteines are critical structure attributes for rhASA function and stability that requires precise examination. We used a unique approach to determine the status and linkage of each cysteine in rhASA, which was comprised of multi-enzyme digestion strategies (from Lys-C, trypsin, Asp-N, pepsin, and PNGase F) and multi-fragmentation methods in mass spectrometry using electron transfer dissociation (ETD), collision induced dissociation (CID), and CID with MS3 (after ETD). In addition to generating desired lengths of enzymatic peptides for effective fragmentation, the digestion pH was optimized to minimize the disulfide scrambling. The disulfide linkages, including the cystine knot and a pair of nested cysteines, unpaired cysteines, and the post-translational modification of a cysteine to formylglycine, were all determined. In the assignment, the disulfide linkages were Cys138-Cys154, Cys143-Cys150, Cys282-Cys396, Cys470-Cys482, Cys471-Cys484, and Cys475-Cys481. For the unpaired cysteines, Cys20 and Cys276 were free cysteines, and Cys51 was largely converted to formylglycine (>70 %). A successful methodology has been developed, which can be routinely used to determine these difficult-to-resolve disulfide linkages, ensuring drug function and stability.

  14. Avian influenza virus antibodies in Pacific Coast Red Knots (Calidris canutus rufa)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James A.; DeCicco, Lucas H.; Ruthrauff, Daniel R.; Krauss, Scott; Hall, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Prevalence of avian influenza virus (AIV) antibodies in the western Atlantic subspecies of Red Knot (Calidris canutus rufa) is among the highest for any shorebird. To assess whether the frequency of detection of AIV antibodies is high for the species in general or restricted only to C. c. rufa, we sampled the northeastern Pacific Coast subspecies of Red Knot (Calidris canutus roselaari) breeding in northwestern Alaska. Antibodies were detected in 90% of adults and none of the chicks sampled. Viral shedding was not detected in adults or chicks. These results suggest a predisposition of Red Knots to AIV infection. High antibody titers to subtypes H3 and H4 were detected, whereas low to intermediate antibody levels were found for subtypes H10 and H11. These four subtypes have previously been detected in shorebirds at Delaware Bay (at the border of New Jersey and Delaware) and in waterfowl along the Pacific Coast of North America.

  15. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt disconnection associated with spontaneous knot formation in the peritoneal catheter.

    PubMed

    Lo, William B; Ramirez, Roberto; Rodrigues, Desiderio; Solanki, Guirish A

    2013-01-01

    A 10-year-old girl underwent distal ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt revision 3 weeks earlier and developed further shunt malfunction. During the current shunt revision, a disconnection at the straight connector site in the cervical subcutaneous tissue was confirmed and a knot was identified in the peritoneal catheter. Postoperatively, the patient made a rapid neurological recovery and was discharged 48 h later. This is the first case of VP shunt disconnection associated with a spontaneous distal knot formation. The likely mechanism was that the spontaneously formed knot acted as an anchor at the peritoneal wall, preventing free relative movement of the distal catheter. The resultant tension led to failure at the weakest point of the system, resulting in a disconnection at the proximal straight connector site.

  16. Slip knots and unfastening topologies enhance toughness without reducing strength of silk fibroin fibres.

    PubMed

    Berardo, Alice; Pantano, Maria F; Pugno, Nicola M

    2016-02-01

    The combination of high strength and high toughness is a desirable feature that structural materials should display. However, while in the past, engineers had to compromise on either strength or toughness depending on the requested application, nowadays, new toughening strategies are available to provide strong materials with high toughness. In this paper, we focus on one of such strategy, which requires no chemical treatment, but the implementation of slip knots with optimized shape and size in the involved material, which is silkworm silk in this case. In particular, a variety of slip knot topologies with different unfastening mechanisms are investigated, including even complex knots usually used in the textile industry, and their efficiency in enhancing toughness of silk fibres is discussed. PMID:26855750

  17. Slip knots and unfastening topologies enhance toughness without reducing strength of silk fibroin fibres.

    PubMed

    Berardo, Alice; Pantano, Maria F; Pugno, Nicola M

    2016-02-01

    The combination of high strength and high toughness is a desirable feature that structural materials should display. However, while in the past, engineers had to compromise on either strength or toughness depending on the requested application, nowadays, new toughening strategies are available to provide strong materials with high toughness. In this paper, we focus on one of such strategy, which requires no chemical treatment, but the implementation of slip knots with optimized shape and size in the involved material, which is silkworm silk in this case. In particular, a variety of slip knot topologies with different unfastening mechanisms are investigated, including even complex knots usually used in the textile industry, and their efficiency in enhancing toughness of silk fibres is discussed.

  18. A cactus-derived toxin-like cystine knot Peptide with selective antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Aboye, Teshome L; Strömstedt, Adam A; Gunasekera, Sunithi; Bruhn, Jan G; El-Seedi, Hesham; Rosengren, K Johan; Göransson, Ulf

    2015-05-01

    Naturally occurring cystine knot peptides show a wide range of biological activity, and as they have inherent stability they represent potential scaffolds for peptide-based drug design and biomolecular engineering. Here we report the discovery, sequencing, chemical synthesis, three-dimensional solution structure determination and bioactivity of the first cystine knot peptide from Cactaceae (cactus) family: Ep-AMP1 from Echinopsis pachanoi. The structure of Ep-AMP1 (35 amino acids) conforms to that of the inhibitor cystine knot (or knottin) family but represents a novel diverse sequence; its activity was more than 500 times higher against bacterial than against eukaryotic cells. Rapid bactericidal action and liposome leakage implicate membrane permeabilisation as the mechanism of action. Sequence homology places Ec-AMP1 in the plant C6-type of antimicrobial peptides, but the three dimensional structure is highly similar to that of a spider neurotoxin.

  19. Avian influenza virus antibodies in Pacific Coast Red Knots (Calidris canutus roselaari).

    PubMed

    Johnson, James A; DeCicco, Lucas H; Ruthrauff, Daniel R; Krauss, Scott; Hall, Jeffrey S

    2014-07-01

    Prevalence of avian influenza virus (AIV) antibodies in the western Atlantic subspecies of Red Knot (Calidris canutus rufa) is among the highest for any shorebird. To assess whether the frequency of detection of AIV antibodies is high for the species in general or restricted only to C. c. rufa, we sampled the northeastern Pacific Coast subspecies of Red Knot (Calidris canutus roselaari) breeding in northwestern Alaska. Antibodies were detected in 90% of adults and none of the chicks sampled. Viral shedding was not detected in adults or chicks. These results suggest a predisposition of Red Knots to AIV infection. High antibody titers to subtypes H3 and H4 were detected, whereas low to intermediate antibody levels were found for subtypes H10 and H11. These four subtypes have previously been detected in shorebirds at Delaware Bay (at the border of New Jersey and Delaware) and in waterfowl along the Pacific Coast of North America.

  20. First results from the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph - Ultraviolet spectra of a starburst knot in NGC 1068

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchings, J.B.; Bruhweiler, F.; Truong, K.Q.; Boggess, A.; Heap, S.R.; Ebbets, D.; Beaver, E.; Rosenblatt, E.; Perez, M. Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD Ball Aerospace Systems Group, Boulder, CO California Univ., La Jolla NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center Computer Sciences Corp., Greenbelt, MD )

    1991-08-01

    This paper presents UV spectroscopy of a circumnuclear starburst knot in the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068, a close-by active galaxy which has some of the most luminous known starburst knots. The spectrum shows the presence of several thousand O and B stars which appear to have formed about 3 million years ago. 19 refs.

  1. First results from the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph - Ultraviolet spectra of a starburst knot in NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Bruhweiler, F.; Truong, K. Q.; Boggess, A.; Heap, S. R.; Ebbets, D.; Beaver, E.; Rosenblatt, E.; Perez, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents UV spectroscopy of a circumnuclear starburst knot in the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068, a close-by active galaxy which has some of the most luminous known starburst knots. The spectrum shows the presence of several thousand O and B stars which appear to have formed about 3 million years ago.

  2. Characterization of the Inner Knot of the Crab: The Site of the Gamma-ray Flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Chandra/HST/Keck gamma-ray flare Team

    2015-01-01

    One of the most intriguing recent discoveries has been the detection of powerful γ-ray flares from the Crab Nebula. Such events, with a recurrence time of about once per year, can be so dramatic to make the system the brightest source in the gamma-ray sky as occurred, e.g. in April 2011. These flares challenge our understanding of how pulsar wind nebulae work and defy current astrophysical models for particle acceleration. We present here our study of the inner knot located within a fraction of an arcsecond from the pulsar with the aim of characterizing the feature and asking if this might be the site of the origin of the γ-ray flares. We took data using Keck, HST, and Chandra obtained as part of our multi-wavelength campaign to identify the source of the enigmatic flares. We set an upper limit as to the x-ray flux from the knot. We also find that the dimensions, surface brightness, flux, etc. of the optical and infrared knot are all correlated with distance of from the pulsar. This distance, in turn, varies with time. In addition to this most thorough characterization of the inner knot's properties, we examine the hypothesis that the knot may be the site of the flares by examining the knot separation versus the Fermi/LAT γ-ray flux. Finally, as part of this research, we make use of a new approach employing singular value decomposition (SVD) for analyzing time series of images and compare the approach to more traditional methods. Our conclusions are only refined but not impacted by using the new approach.

  3. Unfolding knots by proteasome-like systems: simulations of the behaviour of folded and neurotoxic proteins.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Michał; Gómez-Sicilia, Àngel; Carrión-Vázquez, Mariano; Cieplak, Marek

    2016-08-16

    Knots in proteins have been proposed to resist proteasomal degradation. Ample evidence associates proteasomal degradation with neurodegeneration. One interesting possibility is that indeed knotted conformers stall this machinery leading to toxicity. However, although the proteasome is known to unfold mechanically its substrates, at present there are no experimental methods to emulate this particular traction geometry. Here, we consider several dynamical models of the proteasome in which the complex is represented by an effective potential with an added pulling force. This force is meant to induce the translocation of a protein or a polypeptide into the catalytic chamber. The force is either constant or applied periodically. The translocated proteins are modelled in a coarse-grained fashion. We do comparative analysis of several knotted globular proteins and the transiently knotted polyglutamine tracts of length 60 alone and fused in exon 1 of the huntingtin protein. Huntingtin is associated with Huntington's disease, a well-known genetically determined neurodegenerative disease. We show that the presence of a knot hinders and sometimes even jams translocation. We demonstrate that the probability to do so depends on the protein, the model of the proteasome, the magnitude of the pulling force, and the choice of the pulled terminus. In any case, the net effect would be a hindrance in the proteasomal degradation process in the cell. This would then yield toxicity via two different mechanisms: one through toxic monomers compromising degradation and another by the formation of toxic oligomers. Our work paves the way for the mechanistic investigation of the mechanical unfolding of knotted structures by the proteasome and its relation to toxicity and disease. PMID:27425826

  4. Demographic consequences of migratory stopover: linking red knot survival to horseshoe crab spawning abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGowan, Conor P.; Hines, James E.; Nichols, James D.; Lyons, James E.; Smith, David; Kalasz, Kevin S.; Niles, Lawrence J.; Dey, Amanda D.; Clark, Nigel A.; Atkinson, Philip W.; Minton, Clive D.T.; Kendall, William

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how events during one period of the annual cycle carry over to affect survival and other fitness components in other periods is essential to understanding migratory bird demography and conservation needs. Previous research has suggested that western Atlantic red knot (Calidris canutus rufa) populations are greatly affected by horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) egg availability at Delaware Bay stopover sites during their spring northward migration. We present a mass-based multistate, capturerecapture/resighting model linking (1) red knot stopover mass gain to horseshoe crab spawning abundance and (2) subsequent apparent annual survival to mass state at the time of departure from the Delaware Bay stopover area. The model and analysis use capture-recapture/resighting data with over 16,000 individual captures and 13,000 resightings collected in Delaware Bay over a 12 year period from 1997–2008, and the results are used to evaluate the central management hypothesis that red knot populations can be influenced by horseshoe crab harvest regulations as part of a larger adaptive management effort. Model selection statistics showed support for a positive relationship between horseshoe crab spawning abundance during the stopover and the probability of red knots gaining mass (parameter coefficient from the top model b = 1.71, SE = 0.46). Our analyses also supported the link between red knot mass and apparent annual survival, although average estimates for the two mass classes differed only slightly. The addition of arctic snow depth as a covariate influencing apparent survival improved the fit of the data to the models (parameter coefficient from the top model b = 0.50, SE = 0.08). Our results indicate that managing horseshoe crab resources in the Delaware Bay has the potential to improve red knot population status.

  5. Characterization of the Inner Knot of the Crab: the Site of the Gamma-ray Flares?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most intriguing recent discoveries has been the detection of powerful gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula. Such events, with a recurrence time of about once per year, can be so dramatic to make the system the brightest source in the gamma-ray sky as occurred, e.g. in April 2011. These flares challenge our understanding of how pulsar wind nebulae work and defy current astrophysical models for particle acceleration. We present here our study of the inner knot located within a fraction of an arcsecond from the pulsar with the aim of characterizing the feature and asking if this might be the site of the origin of the gamma-ray flares. We took data using Keck, HST, and Chandra obtained as part of our multi-wavelength campaign to identify the source of the enigmatic flares. We set an upper limit as to the gamma-ray flux from the knot. We also find that the dimensions, surface brightness, flux, etc. of the optical and infrared knot are all correlated with distance from the pulsar. This distance, in turn, varies with time. In addition to this most thorough characterization of the inner knot's properties, we examine the hypothesis that the knot may be the site of the flares by examining the knot separation versus the Fermi/LAT gamma-ray flux. Finally, as part of this research, we make use of a new approach employing singular value decomposition (SVD) for analyzing time series of images and compare the approach to more traditional methods. Our conclusions are only refined but not impacted by using the new approach.

  6. Knot Stent”: An Unusual Cause of Acute Renal Failure in Solitary Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Moufid, Kamal; Touiti, Driss; Mohamed, Lezrek

    2012-01-01

    The insertion of indwelling ureteric stents is a routine procedure in urology practice. Complications secondary to the insertion of these stents have also increased, such as stent encrustation, stent fragmentation, stone formation, and recurrent urinary tract infections. Knot formation within the renal pelvis or in the coiled portion of the ureteral stent is an extremely rare condition, with less than 15 cases reported in literature. The authors report a rare case of knotted stent, complicated by an obstructive acute renal failure and urosepsis, in a patient with a solitary functioning kidney. PMID:22919550

  7. Design considerations for attaining 250-knot test velocities at the aircraft landing dynamics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. E., Jr.; Snyder, R. E.; Taylor, J. T.; Cires, A.; Fitzgerald, A. L.; Armistead, M. F.

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary design studies are presented which consider the important parameters in providing 250 knot test velocities at the Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility. Four major components of this facility are: the hydraulic jet catapult, the test carriage structure, the reaction turning bucket, and the wheels. Using the hydraulic-jet catapult characteristics, a target design point was selected and a carriage structure was sized to meet the required strength requirements. The preliminary design results indicate that to attain 250 knot test velocities for a given hydraulic jet catapult system, a carriage mass of 25,424 kg (56,000 lbm.) cannot be exceeded.

  8. Particulate behavior in a controlled-profile pulverized coal-fired reactor: A study of coupled turbulent particle dispersion and thermal radiation transport. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Queiroz, M.; Webb, B.W.

    1996-06-01

    To aid in the evaluation and development of advanced coal-combustion models, comprehensive experimental data sets are needed containing information on both the condensed and gas phases. To address this need a series of test were initiated on a 300 kW laboratory-scale, coal-fired reactor at a single test condition using several types of instrumentation. Data collected on the reactor during the course of the test includes: gas, particle, and wall temperature profiles; radiant, total, and convective heat fluxes to the walls; particle size and velocity profiles; transmission measurements; and gas species concentrations. Solid sampling was also performed to determine carbon and total burnout. Along with the extensive experimental measurements, the particle dispersion and radiation submodels in the ACERC comprehensive 2D code were studied in detail and compared to past experimental measurements taken in the CPR. In addition to the presentation and discussion of the experimental data set, a detailed description of the measurement techniques used in collecting the data, including a discussion of the error associated with each type of measurement, is given.

  9. Ion-exchange reactions on clay minerals coupled with advection/dispersion processes. Application to Na+/Ca2+ exchange on vermiculite: Reactive-transport modeling, batch and stirred flow-through reactor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tertre, E.; Hubert, F.; Bruzac, S.; Pacreau, M.; Ferrage, E.; Prêt, D.

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims at testing the validity of using an Na+/Ca2+ ion-exchange model, derived from batch data to interpret experimental Ca2+-for-Na+ exchange breakthrough curves obtained on vermiculite (a common swelling clay mineral in surface environments). The ion-exchange model was constructed considering the multi-site nature of the vermiculite surface as well as the exchange of all aqueous species (Mg2+ derived from the dissolution of the solid and H+). The proposed ion-exchange model was then coupled with a transport model, and the predicted breakthrough curves were compared with the experimental ones obtained using a well stirred flow-through reactor. For a given solute residence time in the reactor (typically 50 min), our thermodynamic model based on instantaneous equilibrium was found to accurately reproduce several of the experimental breakthrough curves, depending on the Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations of the influents pumped through the reactor. However the model failed to reproduce experimental breakthrough curves obtained at high flow rates and low chemical gradient between the exchanger phase and the solution. An alternative model based on a hybrid equilibrium/kinetic approach was thus used and allowed predicting experimental data. Based on these results, we show that a simple parameter can be used to differentiate between thermodynamic and kinetic control of the exchange reaction with water flow. The results of this study are relevant for natural systems where two aquatic environments having contrasted chemistries interact. Indeed, the question regarding the attainment of a full equilibrium in such a system during the contact time of the aqueous phase with the particle/colloid remains most often open. In this context, we show that when a river (a flow of fresh water) encounters marine colloids, a systematic full equilibrium can be assumed (i.e., the absence of kinetic effects) when the residence time of the solute in 1 m3 of the system is ⩾6200 h.

  10. Scanning tunneling microscope assembly, reactor, and system

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Feng; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-11-18

    An embodiment of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) reactor includes a pressure vessel, an STM assembly, and three spring coupling objects. The pressure vessel includes a sealable port, an interior, and an exterior. An embodiment of an STM system includes a vacuum chamber, an STM reactor, and three springs. The three springs couple the STM reactor to the vacuum chamber and are operable to suspend the scanning tunneling microscope reactor within the interior of the vacuum chamber during operation of the STM reactor. An embodiment of an STM assembly includes a coarse displacement arrangement, a piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement, and a receiver. The piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube is coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement. The receiver is coupled to the piezoelectric scanning tube and is operable to receive a tip holder, and the tip holder is operable to receive a tip.

  11. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1961-09-01

    A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, F.

    1959-10-27

    A reactor in which at least a portion of the moderator is in the form of movable refractory balls is described. In addition to their moderating capacity, these balls may serve as carriers for fissionable material or fertile material, or may serve in a coolant capacity to remove heat from the reactor. A pneumatic system is used to circulate the balls through the reactor.

  13. EBT reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Santoro, R. T.; Spong, D. A.; Uckan, T.; Owen, L. W.; Barnes, J. M.; McBride, J. B.

    1983-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of a recent ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) reactor study that includes ring and core plasma properties with consistent treatment of coupled ring-core stability criteria and power balance requirements. The principal finding is that constraints imposed by these coupling and other physics and technology considerations permit a broad operating window for reactor design optimization. Within this operating window, physics and engineering systems analysis and cost sensitivity studies indicate that reactors with <..beta../sub core/> approx. 6 to 10%, P approx. 1200 to 1700 MW(e), wall loading approx. 1.0 to 2.5 MW/m/sup 2/, and recirculating power fraction (including ring-sustaining power and all other reactors auxiliaries) approx. 10 to 15% are possible. A number of concept improvements are also proposed that are found to offer the potential for further improvement of the reactor size and parameters. These include, but are not limited to, the use of: (1) supplementary coils or noncircular mirror coils to improve magnetic geometry and reduce size, (2) energetic ion rings to improve ring power requirements, (3) positive potential to enhance confinement and reduce size, and (4) profile control to improve stability and overall fusion power density.

  14. Research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.; Fox, G.J.

    1996-04-01

    There are currently 284 research reactors in operation, and 12 under construction around the world. Of the operating reactors, nearly two-thirds are used exclusively for research, and the rest for a variety of purposes, including training, testing, and critical assembly. For more than 50 years, research reactor programs have contributed greatly to the scientific and educational communities. Today, six of the world`s research reactors are being shut down, three of which are in the USA. With government budget constraints and the growing proliferation concerns surrounding the use of highly enriched uranium in some of these reactors, the future of nuclear research could be impacted.

  15. CONVECTION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  16. Plug Flow Reactor Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Richard S.

    1996-07-30

    PLUG is a computer program that solves the coupled steady state continuity, momentum, energy, and species balance equations for a plug flow reactor. Both homogeneous (gas-phase) and heterogenous (surface) reactions can be accommodated. The reactor may be either isothermal or adiabatic or may have a specified axial temperature or heat flux profile; alternatively, an ambient temperature and an overall heat-transfer coefficient can be specified. The crosssectional area and surface area may vary with axial position, and viscous drag is included. Ideal gas behavior and surface site conservation are assumed.

  17. Plug Flow Reactor Simulator

    1996-07-30

    PLUG is a computer program that solves the coupled steady state continuity, momentum, energy, and species balance equations for a plug flow reactor. Both homogeneous (gas-phase) and heterogenous (surface) reactions can be accommodated. The reactor may be either isothermal or adiabatic or may have a specified axial temperature or heat flux profile; alternatively, an ambient temperature and an overall heat-transfer coefficient can be specified. The crosssectional area and surface area may vary with axial position,more » and viscous drag is included. Ideal gas behavior and surface site conservation are assumed.« less

  18. On the implications of recent observations of the inner knot in the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yajie; Blandford, Roger D.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations of the Crab nebula (Rudy et al.) have maintained its reputation for high-energy astrophysical enlightenment and its use as a test-bed for theories of the behaviour of magnetized, relativistic plasma. In particular, new observations of the inner knot located 0.65 arcsec SE from the pulsar confirm that it is compact, elongated transversely to the symmetry axis and curved concave towards the pulsar. 60 per cent polarization has been measured along the symmetry axis (Moran et al.). The knot does not appear to be involved in the gamma-ray flares. The new observations both reinforce the interpretation of the knot as dissipation of the pulsar wind at a strong shock and challenge the details of existing models of this process. In particular, it is argued that the compactness, high polarization, and curvature are difficult to reconcile with simple relativistic shock models. Alternative possibilities include deflection of the outflow ahead of the shock and spatial variation in which the knot is interpreted as a caustic. Some future observations are proposed and new theoretical investigations are suggested.

  19. Managing Root-knot on Tobacco in the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Charles S.

    1989-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes suppress yields of flue-cured tobacco an estimated 0.1 to 4.8% annually in the southeastern United States, even though nematode management practices have been widely adopted. Although Meloidogyne incognita races 1 and 3 have predominated, M. arenaria, M. javanica, and M. incognita races 2 and 4 are increasingly important. Seventy-five percent of the flue-cured tobacco hectarage in North Carolina and Virginia is rotated on 2-year or 3-year intervals. Over half of the hectarage in the southeastern United States was planted with tobacco cultivars resistant to M. incognita races 1 and 3 in 1986. Resistance to other species or races of root-knot nematodes is not available in commercially available flue-cured tobacco cultivars. Most producers plow and (or) disc-out flue-cured tobacco roots and stalks after harvest. Nematicide use ranges from virtually 100% in Florida and Georgia to 60% in Virginia. Continued research is needed to develop management strategies for mixed populations of root-knot nematodes and to incorporate resistance to more root-knot nematode species and races into tobacco cultivars. Nematode advisory programs that allow producers to optimize nematicide use from an economical and ecological point of view are also needed. PMID:19287655

  20. Black knot [Apiosporina morbosa (Schw.)] resistance in imported and domestic Prunus domestica L. germplasm and cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black knot (BK) Apisporina morbosa (Schw.) is an important fungal disease of Prunus domestica and other Prunus species in North America. BK causes economic losses in the plum growing regions of northern and eastern U.S. and eastern Canada. Relatively few P. domestica commercial cultivars are resis...

  1. Resistant Citrullus lanatus var. citroides Rootstocks for Managing Root-knot Nematodes in Grafted Watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southern root-knot nematode (RKN), Meloidogyne incognita, is an important re-emerging pest of watermelon. Several factors have contributed to re-emergence of RKN including: 1) ban of methyl bromide for soil fumigation; 2) reduced land area for crop rotation; and 3) continuous cropping of cucurbits u...

  2. Tomato susceptibility to root-knot nematodes requires an intact jasmonic Acid signaling pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Response of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to root-knot nematode (RKN; Meloidogyne spp.) infection was monitored using TOM1 cDNA microarray with resistant (‘Motelle’; Mi-1) and susceptible (‘Moneymaker’; mi) tomato at 24 h after RKN infection. The array analysis identified 1497 genes and 750 genes d...

  3. Transcriptome analysis of resistant and susceptible alfalfa cultivars infected with root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes are one of the major limiting factors in alfalfa production. Root knot nematodes (RKN, Meloidogyne spp.) are widely distributed and economically important sedentary endoparasites of agricultural crops (Castagnone-Sereno et al. 2013) and they may inflict significant damage to alfalfa fields...

  4. Field level risk assessment for root-knot nematodes in lima beans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southern Root-Knot Nematode (RKN), Meloidogyne incognita, is a major yield limiting pest in lima beans (Phaseolus lunatus). RKN are not evenly distributed through fields and population dynamics are fluid making whole field management challenging. The objectives of this research were to characterize ...

  5. Is Grafting Useful for Managing Root-Knot Nematodes in Watermelon?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five Citrullus lanatus var. citroides germplasm lines, four Lagenaria siceraria cultivars, one Cucurbita moschata x C. maxima hybrid, and one commercial wild watermelon (Citrullus lanatus spp.) cultivar were evaluated as rootstocks for watermelon in a field infested with the southern root-knot nemat...

  6. Wormholes in chemical space connecting torus knot and torus link pi-electron density topologies.

    PubMed

    Rzepa, Henry S

    2009-03-01

    Möbius aromaticities can be considered as deriving from cyclic delocalized pi-electron densities rho(r)(pi) which have the topological form of either a two-component torus link or a single-component torus knot. These two topological forms are distinguished by their (non-zero) linking number L(k), which describes how many times the two components of a torus link cross each other or the single component of a torus knot crosses with itself. The special case of Hückel or benzenoid aromaticity is associated with a pi-electron density that takes the form of a two-component torus link for which the linking number is zero. A class of molecule has been identified which here is termed a Janus aromatic, and which bears the characteristics of both a two-component torus link and a single-component torus knot in the topology of the pi-electron density. This is achieved by the formation of one (or more) wormholes or throats in the pi-electron density connecting the two torus forms, which can impart a Janus-like dual personality to the aromaticity of the system. The impact of such wormholes on the overall pi-delocalized aromaticity of such molecules is approximately estimated using a NICS(rcp) index, and subdivides into two types; those where the forms of aromaticity associated with a torus link and a torus knot cooperate and those where they oppose.

  7. Mustard seed meal for management of root-knot nematode and weeds in tomato production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mustard seed meals of indian mustard [InM (Brassica juncea)] and yellow mustard [YeM (Sinapis alba)], alone and combined, were tested for effects on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants and for suppression of southern root-knot nematode [RKN (Meloidogyne incognita)] and weed populations. In the gree...

  8. A knotted1-like homeobox protein regulates abscission in tomato by modulating the auxin pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    KD1, a gene encoding a KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX transcription factor is known to be involved, in tomato, in ontogeny of the compound leaf. KD1 is also highly expressed in both leaf and flower abscission zones. Reducing abundance of transcripts of this gene in tomato, using both virus induced gene sile...

  9. Comparison of ultrasonic suture welding and traditional knot tying in a rabbit rotator cuff repair model.

    PubMed

    Nho, Shane J; Cole, Brian J; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Williams, James M; Romeo, Anthony A; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Bach, Bernard R; Hallab, Nadim J

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate ultrasonic suture welding of monofilament suture in an animal model of rotator cuff repair with biomechanical and histologic analyses. We randomly assigned 46 shoulders in 23 rabbits to 1 of 3 treatment groups: sham-operated (n = 15), knotted (n = 15), and welded (n = 16). Supraspinatus defects were surgically created and acutely repaired with suture anchors loaded with either No. 2-0 Ethibond for knotted group or No. 2-0 nylon for welded shoulders. Eighteen weeks postoperatively, all animals were killed, and the shoulders underwent either biomechanical testing or histologic analysis. The maximum stress of the sham-operated group (20.6 N/mm2) was significantly greater than that of both the knotted (10.2 N/mm2) and welded (8.3 N/mm2) groups (P < .05), but no differences were observed between the knotted and welded groups. Although some histologic changes were noted, none was considered to be significant to distinguish either group.

  10. Phytotoxicity of Clove Oil to Vegetable Crop Seedlings and Nematotoxicity to Root-knot Nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clove oil derived from the plant Syzygium aromaticum is active against various soilborne plant pathogens, and therefore has potential for use as a biobased pesticide. A clove oil formulation previously found to be toxic to the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita in laboratory assays was invest...

  11. Evidence for a disease complex between Pythium aphanidermatum and root-knot nematodes in cucumber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field trial in 2012 indicated a possible disease complex between Pythium aphanidermatum and the root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne incognita in cucumber. Two growth chamber trials were conducted to investigate this potential disease complex. Treatments included inoculating nine-day-old cucumbe...

  12. Southern root-knot nematode affects common cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium) interference with cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southern root-knot nematode and common cocklebur will both interfere with cotton growth and yield. A greater understanding of the interaction of these pests on cotton growth and yield is needed for effective IPM (integrated pest management). An additive design was used in outdoor micro-plots with fi...

  13. Splitting, linking, knotting, and solitonic escape of topological defects in nematic drops with handles.

    PubMed

    Tasinkevych, Mykola; Campbell, Michael G; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2014-11-18

    Topologically nontrivial field excitations, including solitonic, linked, and knotted structures, play important roles in physical systems ranging from classical fluids and liquid crystals, to electromagnetism, classic, and quantum field theories. These excitations can appear spontaneously during symmetry-breaking phase transitions. For example, in cosmological theories, cosmic strings may have formed knotted configurations influencing the Early Universe development, whereas in liquid crystals transient tangled defect lines were observed during isotropic-nematic transitions, eventually relaxing to defect-free states. Knotted and solitonic fields and defects were also obtained using optical manipulation, complex-shaped colloids, and frustrated cholesterics. Here we use confinement of nematic liquid crystal by closed surfaces with varied genus and perpendicular boundary conditions for a robust control of appearance and stability of such field excitations. Theoretical modeling and experiments reveal structure of defect lines as a function of the surface topology and material and geometric parameters, establishing a robust means of controlling solitonic, knotted, linked, and other field excitations. PMID:25369931

  14. Splitting, linking, knotting, and solitonic escape of topological defects in nematic drops with handles

    PubMed Central

    Tasinkevych, Mykola; Campbell, Michael G.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2014-01-01

    Topologically nontrivial field excitations, including solitonic, linked, and knotted structures, play important roles in physical systems ranging from classical fluids and liquid crystals, to electromagnetism, classic, and quantum field theories. These excitations can appear spontaneously during symmetry-breaking phase transitions. For example, in cosmological theories, cosmic strings may have formed knotted configurations influencing the Early Universe development, whereas in liquid crystals transient tangled defect lines were observed during isotropic–nematic transitions, eventually relaxing to defect-free states. Knotted and solitonic fields and defects were also obtained using optical manipulation, complex-shaped colloids, and frustrated cholesterics. Here we use confinement of nematic liquid crystal by closed surfaces with varied genus and perpendicular boundary conditions for a robust control of appearance and stability of such field excitations. Theoretical modeling and experiments reveal structure of defect lines as a function of the surface topology and material and geometric parameters, establishing a robust means of controlling solitonic, knotted, linked, and other field excitations. PMID:25369931

  15. Percutaneous Untying of a Knot in a Retained Swan-Ganz Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatti, Waqar A.; Sinha, Sankar; Rowlands, Peter

    2000-03-15

    A patient was referred to us with a tightly knotted Swan-Ganz catheter. The catheter could not be removed by conventional simple methods. We describe a minimally invasive means of removal of the catheter using an Amplatz gooseneck snare and an angioplasty balloon. This allowed the catheter to be removed without trauma.

  16. Pierced Lasso Bundles Are a New Class of Knot-like Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Haglund, Ellinor; Sulkowska, Joanna I.; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Lammert, Heiko; Onuchic, José N.; Jennings, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    A four-helix bundle is a well-characterized motif often used as a target for designed pharmaceutical therapeutics and nutritional supplements. Recently, we discovered a new structural complexity within this motif created by a disulphide bridge in the long-chain helical bundle cytokine leptin. When oxidized, leptin contains a disulphide bridge creating a covalent-loop through which part of the polypeptide chain is threaded (as seen in knotted proteins). We explored whether other proteins contain a similar intriguing knot-like structure as in leptin and discovered 11 structurally homologous proteins in the PDB. We call this new helical family class the Pierced Lasso Bundle (PLB) and the knot-like threaded structural motif a Pierced Lasso (PL). In the current study, we use structure-based simulation to investigate the threading/folding mechanisms for all the PLBs along with three unthreaded homologs as the covalent loop (or lasso) in leptin is important in folding dynamics and activity. We find that the presence of a small covalent loop leads to a mechanism where structural elements slipknot to thread through the covalent loop. Larger loops use a piercing mechanism where the free terminal plugs through the covalent loop. Remarkably, the position of the loop as well as its size influences the native state dynamics, which can impact receptor binding and biological activity. This previously unrecognized complexity of knot-like proteins within the helical bundle family comprises a completely new class within the knot family, and the hidden complexity we unraveled in the PLBs is expected to be found in other protein structures outside the four-helix bundles. The insights gained here provide critical new elements for future investigation of this emerging class of proteins, where function and the energetic landscape can be controlled by hidden topology, and should be take into account in ab initio predictions of newly identified protein targets. PMID:24945798

  17. The characteristics and evolution of dense knots in the Supernova Remnant, Cas A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielens, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Supernovae are key drivers of the evolution of the interstellar medium of galaxies as they are main sources of freshly synthesized elements, dust and kinetic energy. Dense Fast Moving Knots (FMKs) are an important component of supernova remnants as they may be prime sites for dust formation and their high densities protect this dust against the destructive action of the reverse shock. Herschel, Spitzer, Akari, and ground-based IR studies of dense clumps in the Cas A supernova remnant have revealed large column densities (4E19 per square cm) of warm (500-1000K) dense (1E5 to 1E6 particles per cc) CO gas. This dense environment is very conducive to dust formation and protection. However, the relationship of the molecular and ionic gas is unclear and the derived large column densities are much larger than shock models predict, indicating the importance of energy conduction by electrons from the surrounding hot plasma into the knot. Conduction is a key process in the evolution of knots and drives the overall morphology of supernova remnants and their interaction with the interstellar medium. We propose to observe three CO-rich knots in the [OIII] 52&88 and [OI] 63 fine-structure lines with FIFI-LS/SOFIA. We will compare the distribution of these atomic lines with that of CO and derive the physical conditions and column densities. A pilot program in Cycle 2 has demonstrated the feasibility of this project. The proposed observations will address the key questions: "Can FMKs protect dust ?", "Are the observed variations in the mid-IR CO emission related to variations in the pre-shock density, column density, or the presence of additional heating sources for the gas?", and "What is the importance of electron energy conduction for the heating of the gas and how do these knots dissolve and merge with the SNR/ISM?"

  18. Determination of Noncovalent Binding Using a Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor as a Flow Injection Device Coupled to Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Santos, Inês C; Waybright, Veronica B; Fan, Hui; Ramirez, Sabra; Mesquita, Raquel B R; Rangel, António O S S; Fryčák, Petr; Schug, Kevin A

    2015-07-01

    Described is a new method based on the concept of controlled band dispersion, achieved by hyphenating flow injection analysis with ESI-MS for noncovalent binding determinations. A continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was used as a FIA device for exponential dilution of an equimolar host-guest solution over time. The data obtained was treated for the noncovalent binding determination using an equimolar binding model. Dissociation constants between vancomycin and Ac-Lys(Ac)-Ala-Ala-OH peptide stereoisomers were determined using both the positive and negative ionization modes. The results obtained for Ac-L-Lys(Ac)-D-Ala-D-Ala (a model for a Gram-positive bacterial cell wall) binding were in reasonable agreement with literature values made by other mass spectrometry binding determination techniques. Also, the developed method allowed the determination of dissociation constants for vancomycin with Ac-L-Lys(Ac)-D-Ala-L-Ala, Ac-L-Lys(Ac)-L-Ala-D-Ala, and Ac-L-Lys(Ac)-L-Ala-L-Ala. Although some differences in measured binding affinities were noted using different ionization modes, the results of each determination were generally consistent. Differences are likely attributable to the influence of a pseudo-physiological ammonium acetate buffer solution on the formation of positively- and negatively-charged ionic complexes.

  19. Determination of Noncovalent Binding Using a Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor as a Flow Injection Device Coupled to Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Inês C.; Waybright, Veronica B.; Fan, Hui; Ramirez, Sabra; Mesquita, Raquel B. R.; Rangel, António O. S. S.; Fryčák, Petr; Schug, Kevin A.

    2015-07-01

    Described is a new method based on the concept of controlled band dispersion, achieved by hyphenating flow injection analysis with ESI-MS for noncovalent binding determinations. A continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was used as a FIA device for exponential dilution of an equimolar host-guest solution over time. The data obtained was treated for the noncovalent binding determination using an equimolar binding model. Dissociation constants between vancomycin and Ac-Lys(Ac)-Ala-Ala-OH peptide stereoisomers were determined using both the positive and negative ionization modes. The results obtained for Ac- L-Lys(Ac)- D-Ala- D-Ala (a model for a Gram-positive bacterial cell wall) binding were in reasonable agreement with literature values made by other mass spectrometry binding determination techniques. Also, the developed method allowed the determination of dissociation constants for vancomycin with Ac- L-Lys(Ac)- D-Ala- L-Ala, Ac- L-Lys(Ac)- L-Ala- D-Ala, and Ac- L-Lys(Ac)- L-Ala- L-Ala. Although some differences in measured binding affinities were noted using different ionization modes, the results of each determination were generally consistent. Differences are likely attributable to the influence of a pseudo-physiological ammonium acetate buffer solution on the formation of positively- and negatively-charged ionic complexes.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  1. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  2. BioReactor

    2003-04-18

    BioReactor is a simulation tool kit for modeling networks of coupled chemical processes (or similar productions rules). The tool kit is implemented in C++ and has the following functionality: 1. Monte Carlo discrete event simulator 2. Solvers for ordinary differential equations 3. Genetic algorithm optimization routines for reverse engineering of models using either Monte Carlo or ODE representation )i.e., 1 or 2)

  3. Aperiodicity resulting from two-cycle coupling in the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction. III. Analysis of a model of the effect of spatial inhomogeneities at the input ports of a continuous-flow, stirred tank reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Györgyi, László; Field, Richard J.

    1989-11-01

    Deterministic chaos is a well-established phenomenon in continuous-flow, stirred tank reactor (CSTR) experiments with the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinskii (BZ) reaction. However, it has not yet been possible to reproduce the experimentally observed, robust chaos in simulations using realistic models of the homogeneous chemical kinetics of the BZ reaction. That it may be necessary to consider spatial inhomogeneities in modeling the BZ chaos is suggested by the existence of strong stirring effects on the aperiodic behavior and by the difficulty of reproducing chaos under the same conditions in reactors of different physical configuration. Such inhomogeneity might result from a lack of perfect mixing in the CSTR, especially near the inlets, or from diffusion of species at low flow rates from the CSTR reaction mixture into the tips of the inlets. The presence of spatial inhomogeneities allows coupling between essentially independent oscillators, a well-known source of chaos. Such a model using a realistic representation of the BZ kinetics leads to an eight-variable set of ordinary differential equations. Numerical analysis of these equations by continuation methods and by numerical integration shows the existence of broad regions of chaos and various hysteresis effects involving limit cycles, a steady state and/or a strange attractor. Tristability was found in calculations in a narrow flow rate range. The computed behavior appears for parameter values closely related to the values used experimentally to obtain similar phenomena, and the visual similarity of the computed and experimental strange attractors is striking. The experimental routes to chaos, period doubling, intermittency, and secondary Hopf bifurcations are all reproduced in the simulations. The computed and experimental structures of periodic windows observed within chaotic regions also are very similar.

  4. X-Wing RSRA - 80 Knot Taxi Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Rotor Systems Research Aircraft/X-Wing, a vehicle that was used to demonstrate an advanced rotor/fixed wing concept called X-Wing, is shown here during high-speed taxi tests at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, on 4 November 1987. During these tests, the vehicle made three taxi tests at speeds of up to 138 knots. On the third run, the RSRA/X-Wing lifted off the runway to a 25-foot height for about 16 seconds. This liftoff maneuver was pre-planned as an aid to evaluations for first flight. At the controls were NASA pilot G. Warren Hall and Sikorsky pilot W. Faull. The unusual aircraft that resulted from the Ames Research Center/Army X-Wing Project was flown at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, beginning in the spring of 1984, with a follow-on program beginning in 1986. The program, was conceived to provide an efficient combination of the vertical lift characteristic of conventional helicopters and the high cruise speed of fixed-wing aircraft. It consisted of a hybrid vehicle called the NASA/Army Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA), which was equipped with advanced X-wing rotor systems. The program began in the early 1970s to investigate ways to increase the speed of rotor aircraft, as well as their performance, reliability, and safety . It also sought to reduce the noise, vibration, and maintenance costs of helicopters. Sikorsky Aircraft Division of United Technologies Laboratories built two RSRA aircraft. NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, did some initial testing and transferred the program to Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California, for an extensive flight research program conducted by Ames and the Army. The purpose of the 1984 tests was to demonstrate the fixed-wing capability of the helicopter/airplane hybrid research vehicle and explore its flight envelope and flying qualities. These

  5. Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code (Version I)

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.L.; Finn, P.A.; Gohar, M.Y.; Barrett, R.J.; Gorker, G.E.; Spampinaton, P.T.; Bulmer, R.H.; Dorn, D.W.; Perkins, L.J.; Ghose, S.

    1985-09-01

    A computer code was developed to model a Tandem Mirror Reactor. Ths is the first Tandem Mirror Reactor model to couple, in detail, the highly linked physics, magnetics, and neutronic analysis into a single code. This report describes the code architecture, provides a summary description of the modules comprising the code, and includes an example execution of the Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code. Results from this code for two sensitivity studies are also included. These studies are: (1) to determine the impact of center cell plasma radius, length, and ion temperature on reactor cost and performance at constant fusion power; and (2) to determine the impact of reactor power level on cost.

  6. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1958-04-22

    A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.; Johnson, H.W.

    1961-04-01

    BS>A nuclear reactor incorporating fuel rods passing through a moderator and including tubes of a material of higher Thermal conductivity than the fuel in contact with the fuel is described. The tubes extend beyond the active portion of the reactor into contant with a fiuld coolant.

  8. Reactor building

    SciTech Connect

    Hista, J. C.

    1984-09-18

    Reactor building comprising a vessel shaft anchored in a slab which is peripherally locked. This reactor building comprises a confinement enclosure within which are positioned internal structures constituted by an internal structure floor, a vessel shaft, a slab being positioned between the general floor and the internal structure floor, the vesse

  9. Thermal-hydraulic interfacing code modules for CANDU reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.S.; Gold, M.; Sills, H.

    1997-07-01

    The approach for CANDU reactor safety analysis in Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is presented. Reflecting the unique characteristics of CANDU reactors, the procedure of coupling the thermal-hydraulics, reactor physics and fuel channel/element codes in the safety analysis is described. The experience generated in the Canadian nuclear industry may be useful to other types of reactors in the areas of reactor safety analysis.

  10. 78 FR 60023 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Threatened Status for the Rufa Red Knot...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... review published in the Federal Register on July 1, 1994 (59 FR 34270), we have sought the expert... knots make one of the longest distance migrations known in the animal kingdom, traveling up to...

  11. Accomplishments of a 10-year initiative to develop host plant resistance to root-knot and reniform nematodes in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2003 Cotton Incorporated initiated a Beltwide research program to develop host plant resistance against root-knot (Meloidogyne incognita) and reniform (Rotylenchulus reniformis) nematodes. Objectives formulated at a coordinating meeting in 2003 that included participants from public institutions...

  12. The olive knot disease as a model to study the role of interspecies bacterial communities in plant disease

    PubMed Central

    Buonaurio, Roberto; Moretti, Chiaraluce; da Silva, Daniel Passos; Cortese, Chiara; Ramos, Cayo; Venturi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in studying interspecies bacterial interactions in diseases of animals and plants as it is believed that the great majority of bacteria found in nature live in complex communities. Plant pathologists have thus far mainly focused on studies involving single species or on their interactions with antagonistic competitors. A bacterial disease used as model to study multispecies interactions is the olive knot disease, caused by Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi (Psv). Knots caused by Psv in branches and other aerial parts of the olive trees are an ideal niche not only for the pathogen but also for many other plant-associated bacterial species, mainly belonging to the genera Pantoea, Pectobacterium, Erwinia, and Curtobacterium. The non-pathogenic bacterial species Erwinia toletana, Pantoea agglomerans, and Erwinia oleae, which are frequently isolated inside the olive knots, cooperate with Psv in modulating the disease severity. Co-inoculations of these species with Psv result in bigger knots and better bacterial colonization when compared to single inoculations. Moreover, harmless bacteria co-localize with the pathogen inside the knots, indicating the formation of stable bacterial consortia that may facilitate the exchange of quorum sensing signals and metabolites. Here we discuss the possible role of bacterial communities in the establishment and development of olive knot disease, which we believe could be taking place in many other bacterial plant diseases. PMID:26113855

  13. The olive knot disease as a model to study the role of interspecies bacterial communities in plant disease.

    PubMed

    Buonaurio, Roberto; Moretti, Chiaraluce; da Silva, Daniel Passos; Cortese, Chiara; Ramos, Cayo; Venturi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in studying interspecies bacterial interactions in diseases of animals and plants as it is believed that the great majority of bacteria found in nature live in complex communities. Plant pathologists have thus far mainly focused on studies involving single species or on their interactions with antagonistic competitors. A bacterial disease used as model to study multispecies interactions is the olive knot disease, caused by Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi (Psv). Knots caused by Psv in branches and other aerial parts of the olive trees are an ideal niche not only for the pathogen but also for many other plant-associated bacterial species, mainly belonging to the genera Pantoea, Pectobacterium, Erwinia, and Curtobacterium. The non-pathogenic bacterial species Erwinia toletana, Pantoea agglomerans, and Erwinia oleae, which are frequently isolated inside the olive knots, cooperate with Psv in modulating the disease severity. Co-inoculations of these species with Psv result in bigger knots and better bacterial colonization when compared to single inoculations. Moreover, harmless bacteria co-localize with the pathogen inside the knots, indicating the formation of stable bacterial consortia that may facilitate the exchange of quorum sensing signals and metabolites. Here we discuss the possible role of bacterial communities in the establishment and development of olive knot disease, which we believe could be taking place in many other bacterial plant diseases. PMID:26113855

  14. A knot in the catheter--an unusual cause of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt blockage.

    PubMed

    Chopra, I; Gnanalingham, K; Pal, D; Peterson, D

    2004-09-01

    A 25-year-old woman, who was 25 weeks pregnant, underwent insertion of a VP shunt for hydrocephalus, secondary to a bithalamic glioma. Two months later, she represented with symptoms of raised intracranial pressure and MR scan revealed increased ventricular size. On exploration of the shunt, manometry with saline confirmed blockage of the catheter distal to the valve. On re-opening the abdominal wound, the peritoneal catheter was found to be knotted, 2 cm from the end. This segment of the catheter was replaced, with resolution of symptoms, post-operatively. The present case illustrates that a knot in the peritoneal catheter is an extremely rare cause of shunt malfunction. Possible mechanisms underlying it are discussed.

  15. An easy technique for removal of knotted catheter in the bladder: percutaneous suprapubic cystoscopic intervention.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Aybars; Okur, Mesut; Kaya, Murat; Büyükkaya, Ramazan; Katranci, Ali Osman; Kucuk, Adem

    2013-01-01

    Uncontaminated urine samples are indispensable to precisely diagnose urinary tract infections in new-borns or infants. Among many clinical interventions for urine collection are described, the most common noninvasive practice is using sterile bags, associated with significant contamination of samples. In children, however, invasive methods i.e. catheterization, are generally needed for reliable urine specimens. Almost always all the inserted catheters are easily drawn back, nevertheless, might not work as expected, and lead to considerable problems that cannot be overcome. Herein, a case of a female newborn treated with a successful percutaneous suprapubic cystoscopic procedure for extracting knotted urinary catheter in the bladder is presented. The least invasive and easiest technic is suggested to be used when catheter is knotted in the bladder, as elaborately stated.

  16. Engineered cystine knot miniproteins as potent inhibitors of human mast cell tryptase beta.

    PubMed

    Sommerhoff, Christian P; Avrutina, Olga; Schmoldt, Hans-Ulrich; Gabrijelcic-Geiger, Dusica; Diederichsen, Ulf; Kolmar, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the design, chemical and recombinant synthesis, and functional properties of a series of novel inhibitors of human mast cell tryptase beta, a protease of considerable interest as a therapeutic target for the treatment of allergic asthma and inflammatory disorders. These inhibitors are derived from a linear variant of the cyclic cystine knot miniprotein MCoTI-II, originally isolated from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis. A synthetic cyclic miniprotein that bears additional positive charge in the loop connecting the N- and C-termini inhibits all monomers of the tryptase beta tetramer with an overall equilibrium dissociation constant K(i) of 1 nM and thus is one of the most potent proteinaceous inhibitors of tryptase beta described to date. These cystine knot miniproteins may therefore become valuable scaffolds for the design of a new generation of tryptase inhibitors. PMID:19852971

  17. Optical knots and contact geometry I. From Arnol'd inequality to Ranada's dyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodenko, Arkady L.

    2016-06-01

    Recently there had been a great deal of activity associated with various schemes of designing both analytic and experimental methods describing knotted structures in electrodynamics and in hydrodynamics. The majority of works in electrodynamics were inspired by the influential paper by Ranada (Lett Math Phys 18:97-106, 1989) and its subsequent refinements. In this work and in its companion we analyze Ranada's results using methods of contact geometry and topology. Not only our analysis allows us to reproduce his major results but in addition, it provides opportunities for considerably extending the catalog of the known/obtained knot types. In addition, it allows to reinterpret both the electric and magnetic charges purely geometrically thus opening the possibility of treatment of masses and charges in Yang-Mills and gravitational fields purely geometrically.

  18. Engineered cystine knot miniproteins as potent inhibitors of human mast cell tryptase beta.

    PubMed

    Sommerhoff, Christian P; Avrutina, Olga; Schmoldt, Hans-Ulrich; Gabrijelcic-Geiger, Dusica; Diederichsen, Ulf; Kolmar, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the design, chemical and recombinant synthesis, and functional properties of a series of novel inhibitors of human mast cell tryptase beta, a protease of considerable interest as a therapeutic target for the treatment of allergic asthma and inflammatory disorders. These inhibitors are derived from a linear variant of the cyclic cystine knot miniprotein MCoTI-II, originally isolated from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis. A synthetic cyclic miniprotein that bears additional positive charge in the loop connecting the N- and C-termini inhibits all monomers of the tryptase beta tetramer with an overall equilibrium dissociation constant K(i) of 1 nM and thus is one of the most potent proteinaceous inhibitors of tryptase beta described to date. These cystine knot miniproteins may therefore become valuable scaffolds for the design of a new generation of tryptase inhibitors.

  19. SU(2)/ SL(2) knot invariants and Kontsevich-Soibelman monodromies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galakhov, D. M.; Mironov, A. D.; Morozov, A. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    We review the Reshetikhin-Turaev approach for constructing noncompact knot invariants involving Rmatrices associated with infinite-dimensional representations, primarily those constructed from the Faddeev quantum dilogarithm. The corresponding formulas can be obtained from modular transformations of conformal blocks as their Kontsevich-Soibelman monodromies and are presented in the form of transcendental integrals, where the main issue is working with the integration contours. We discuss possibilities for extracting more explicit and convenient expressions that can be compared with the ordinary (compact) knot polynomials coming from finite-dimensional representations of simple Lie algebras, with their limits and properties. In particular, the quantum A-polynomials and difference equations for colored Jones polynomials are the same as in the compact case, but the equations in the noncompact case are homogeneous and have a nontrivial right-hand side for ordinary Jones polynomials.

  20. Oxidative folding of peptides with cystine-knot architectures: kinetic studies and optimization of folding conditions.

    PubMed

    Reinwarth, Michael; Glotzbach, Bernhard; Tomaszowski, Michael; Fabritz, Sebastian; Avrutina, Olga; Kolmar, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive peptides often contain several disulfide bonds that provide the main contribution to conformational rigidity and structural, thermal, or biological stability. Among them, cystine-knot peptides-commonly named "knottins"-make up a subclass with several thousand natural members. Hence, they are considered promising frameworks for peptide-based pharmaceuticals. Although cystine-knot peptides are available through chemical and recombinant synthetic routes, oxidative folding to afford the bioactive isomers still remains a crucial step. We therefore investigated the oxidative folding of ten protease-inhibiting peptides from two knottin families, as well as that of an HIV entry inhibitor and of aprotinin, under two conventional sets of folding conditions and by a newly developed procedure. Kinetic studies identified folding conditions that resulted in correctly folded miniproteins with high rates of conversion even for highly hydrophobic and aggregation-prone peptides in concentrated solutions. PMID:23229141

  1. An easy technique for removal of knotted catheter in the bladder: percutaneous suprapubic cystoscopic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, Aybars; Okur, Mesut; Kaya, Murat; Büyükkaya, Ramazan; Katranci, Ali Osman; Kucuk, Adem

    2013-01-01

    Uncontaminated urine samples are indispensable to precisely diagnose urinary tract infections in new-borns or infants. Among many clinical interventions for urine collection are described, the most common noninvasive practice is using sterile bags, associated with significant contamination of samples. In children, however, invasive methods i.e. catheterization, are generally needed for reliable urine specimens. Almost always all the inserted catheters are easily drawn back, nevertheless, might not work as expected, and lead to considerable problems that cannot be overcome. Herein, a case of a female newborn treated with a successful percutaneous suprapubic cystoscopic procedure for extracting knotted urinary catheter in the bladder is presented. The least invasive and easiest technic is suggested to be used when catheter is knotted in the bladder, as elaborately stated. PMID:23936602

  2. Spontaneous knotting of a pigtail ureteric stent in the ureter requiring percutaneous removal.

    PubMed

    Braslis, K G; Joyce, G

    1992-10-01

    Insertion of a ureteric stent is a common procedure in urologic practice. Ureteric stenting may be performed for: ureteric obstruction, benign or malignant: to prevent ureteric obstruction from stone fragments after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL); or to prevent leakage from the upper urinary tract. A case of spontaneous knotting of a ureteric stent in situ is reported. Although this complication has been reported previously it is rare.

  3. Comparative pathogenicity of reniform nematode on root-knot resistant and susceptible bidi tobacco.

    PubMed

    Bairwa, Aarti; Patel, H R

    2016-09-01

    Comparative pathogenicity of reniform nematode on root-knot resistant ABT 10 and susceptible bidi tobacco A119 revealed that ABT 10 was found significantly superior to A119 with respect to plant growth characters and as good as A119 with respect to multiplication of reniform nematode. Initial inoculum of 1,000 J4 of the nematode found damaging to both ABT 10 and A119 varieties of bidi tobacco. PMID:27605772

  4. Os2 -Os4 Switch Controls DNA Knotting and Anticancer Activity.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Romero, María J; Salassa, Luca; Cheng, Xi; Habtemariam, Abraha; Clarkson, Guy J; Prokes, Ivan; Rodger, Alison; Costantini, Giovanni; Sadler, Peter J

    2016-07-25

    Dinuclear trihydroxido-bridged osmium-arene complexes are inert and biologically inactive, but we show here that linking dihydroxido-bridged Os(II) -arene fragments by a bridging di-imine to form a metallacycle framework results in strong antiproliferative activity towards cancer cells and distinctive knotting of DNA. The shortened spacer length reduces biological activity and stability in solution towards decomposition to biologically inactive dimers. Significant differences in behavior toward plasmid DNA condensation are correlated with biological activity. PMID:27240103

  5. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  6. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

    1958-12-01

    A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

  7. Stability of small-amplitude torus knot solutions of the localized induction approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calini, Annalisa; Ivey, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    We study the linear stability of small-amplitude torus knot solutions of the localized induction approximation equation for the motion of a thin vortex filament in an ideal fluid. Such solutions can be constructed analytically through the connection with the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation using the method of isoperiodic deformations. We show that these (p, q) torus knots are generically linearly unstable for p < q, while we provide examples of neutrally stable (p, q) torus knots with p > q, in contrast with an earlier linear stability study by Ricca (1993 Chaos 3 83-95 1995 Chaos 5 346; 1995 Small-scale Structures in Three-dimensional Hydro and Magneto-dynamics Turbulence (Lecture Notes in Physics vol 462) (Berlin: Springer)). We also provide an interpretation of the original perturbative calculation in Ricca (1995), and an explanation of the numerical experiments performed by Ricca et al (1999 J. Fluid Mech. 391 29-44), in light of our results.

  8. Folding analysis of the most complex Stevedore’s protein knot

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Iren; Chen, Szu-Yu; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2016-01-01

    DehI is a homodimeric haloacid dehalogenase from Pseudomonas putida that contains the most complex 61 Stevedore’s protein knot within its folding topology. To examine how DehI attains such an intricate knotted topology we combined far-UV circular dichroism (CD), intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate its folding mechanism. Equilibrium unfolding of DehI by chemical denaturation indicated the presence of two highly populated folding intermediates, I and I’. While the two intermediates vary in secondary structure contents and tertiary packing according to CD and intrinsic fluorescence, respectively, their overall dimension and compactness are similar according to SAXS. Three single-tryptophan variants (W34, W53, and W196) were generated to probe non-cooperative unfolding events localized around the three fluorophores. Kinetic fluorescence measurements indicated that the transition from the intermediate I’ to the unfolded state is rate limiting. Our multiparametric folding analyses suggest that DehI unfolds through a linear folding pathway with two distinct folding intermediates by initial hydrophobic collapse followed by nucleation condensation, and that knotting precedes the formation of secondary structures. PMID:27527519

  9. Combinatorial optimization of cystine-knot peptides towards high-affinity inhibitors of human matriptase-1.

    PubMed

    Glotzbach, Bernhard; Reinwarth, Michael; Weber, Niklas; Fabritz, Sebastian; Tomaszowski, Michael; Fittler, Heiko; Christmann, Andreas; Avrutina, Olga; Kolmar, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Cystine-knot miniproteins define a class of bioactive molecules with several thousand natural members. Their eponymous motif comprises a rigid structured core formed by six disulfide-connected cysteine residues, which accounts for its exceptional stability towards thermic or proteolytic degradation. Since they display a remarkable sequence tolerance within their disulfide-connected loops, these molecules are considered promising frameworks for peptide-based pharmaceuticals. Natural open-chain cystine-knot trypsin inhibitors of the MCoTI (Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor) and SOTI (Spinacia oleracea trypsin inhibitor) families served as starting points for the generation of inhibitors of matriptase-1, a type II transmembrane serine protease with possible clinical relevance in cancer and arthritic therapy. Yeast surface-displayed libraries of miniproteins were used to select unique and potent matriptase-1 inhibitors. To this end, a knowledge-based library design was applied that makes use of detailed information on binding and folding behavior of cystine-knot peptides. Five inhibitor variants, four of the MCoTI family and one of the SOTI family, were identified, chemically synthesized and oxidatively folded towards the bioactive conformation. Enzyme assays revealed inhibition constants in the low nanomolar range for all candidates. One subnanomolar binder (Ki = 0.83 nM) with an inverted selectivity towards trypsin and matriptase-1 was identified. PMID:24146945

  10. Physical experience leads to enhanced object perception in parietal cortex: insights from knot tying.

    PubMed

    Cross, Emily S; Cohen, Nichola Rice; Hamilton, Antonia F de C; Ramsey, Richard; Wolford, George; Grafton, Scott T

    2012-12-01

    What does it mean to "know" what an object is? Viewing objects from different categories (e.g., tools vs. animals) engages distinct brain regions, but it is unclear whether these differences reflect object categories themselves or the tendency to interact differently with objects from different categories (grasping tools, not animals). Here we test how the brain constructs representations of objects that one learns to name or physically manipulate. Participants learned to name or tie different knots and brain activity was measured whilst performing a perceptual discrimination task with these knots before and after training. Activation in anterior intraparietal sulcus, a region involved in object manipulation, was specifically engaged when participants viewed knots they learned to tie. This suggests that object knowledge is linked to sensorimotor experience and its associated neural systems for object manipulation. Findings are consistent with a theory of embodiment in which there can be clear overlap in brain systems that support conceptual knowledge and control of object manipulation. PMID:23022108

  11. Characterization of a Root-Knot Nematode Population of Meloidogyne arenaria from Tupungato (Mendoza, Argentina)

    PubMed Central

    Evangelina García, Laura; Sánchez-Puerta, María Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are polyphagous plant parasites of global importance. Successful host infection depends on the particular interaction between a specific nematode species and race and a specific plant species and cultivar. Accurate diagnosis of nematode species is relevant to effective agricultural management; and benefits further from understanding the variability within a single nematode species. Here, we described a population of M. arenaria race 2 from Mendoza (Argentina). This study represents the first morphometric, morphological, biochemical, reproductive, molecular, and host range characterization of a root-knot nematode species from Argentina. Even after gathering morphological and morphometric data of this population and partially sequencing its rRNA, an unequivocal taxonomic assignment could not be achieved. The most decisive data was provided by esterase phenotyping and molecular methods using SCARs. These results highlight the importance of taking a multidimensional approach for Meloidogyne spp. diagnosis. This study contributes to the understanding of the variability of morphological, reproductive and molecular traits of M. arenaria, and provides data on the identification of root-knot nematodes on tomato cultivars from Argentina. PMID:23481918

  12. [Controlling effect of antagonist bioorganic fertilizer on tomato root-knot nematode].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen; Chen, Fang; Xiao, Tong-jian; Wang, Xiao-hui; Ran, Wei; Yang, Xing-ming; Shen, Qi-rong

    2011-04-01

    Indoor in vitro culture experiment and greenhouse pot experiment were conducted to evaluate the capabilities of three bacterial strains XZ-173 (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens), SL-25 (B. gibsonii), and KS-62 (Paenibacillus polymyxa) that can hydrolyze collagen protein in controlling tomato root-knot nematode. In the in vitro culture experiment, suspensions of XZ-173, SL-25, and KS-62 induced a mortality rate of 75.9%, 66.7%, and 50.0% to the second-stage junior nematode within 24 h, and decreased the egg hatching rate to 17.8%, 28.9% and 37.6% after 7-day incubation, respectively, in contrast to the 17.4% mortality rate and 53.6% egg hatching rate in the control (sterilized water). In the greenhouse pot experiment, the bioorganic fertilizer mixed with equal parts of fermented XZ-173, SL-25, and KS-62 gained the best result, with the root-knot nematode population in rhizosphere soil decreased by 84.0% as compared with the control. The bioorganic fertilizer also decreased the numbers of galls and eggs on tomato roots significantly, and increased the underground and aboveground biomass of tomato. Therefore, antagonist bioorganic fertilizer has promising potential in controlling root-knot nematode. PMID:21774329

  13. The chemical abundances of the Cassiopeia A fast-moving knots - Explosive nucleosynthesis on a minicomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, M. D.; Joss, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    A simplified nuclear reaction network for explosive nucleosynthesis calculations is described in which only the most abundant nuclear species and the most important reactions linking these species are considered. This scheme permits the exploration of many cases without excessive computational effort. Good agreement with previous calculations employing more complex reaction networks is obtained. This scheme is applied to the observed chemical abundances of the fast-moving knots in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A and it is found that a wide range of initial conditions could yield the observed abundances. The abundances of four of the knots with significant and different amounts of elements heavier than oxygen are consistent with an origin in material of the same initial composition but processed at different peak temperatures and densities. Despite the observed high oxygen abundances and low abundances of light elements in the knots, they did not necessarily undergo incomplete oxygen burning; in fact, it is not even necessary that oxygen have been present in the initial composition. The agreement between the calculated and observed chemical abundances in Cas A and similar supernova remnants depends primarily upon the relevant nuclear physics and does not provide strong evidence in favor of any particular model of the supernova event.

  14. DotKnot: pseudoknot prediction using the probability dot plot under a refined energy model

    PubMed Central

    Sperschneider, Jana; Datta, Amitava

    2010-01-01

    RNA pseudoknots are functional structure elements with key roles in viral and cellular processes. Prediction of a pseudoknotted minimum free energy structure is an NP-complete problem. Practical algorithms for RNA structure prediction including restricted classes of pseudoknots suffer from high runtime and poor accuracy for longer sequences. A heuristic approach is to search for promising pseudoknot candidates in a sequence and verify those. Afterwards, the detected pseudoknots can be further analysed using bioinformatics or laboratory techniques. We present a novel pseudoknot detection method called DotKnot that extracts stem regions from the secondary structure probability dot plot and assembles pseudoknot candidates in a constructive fashion. We evaluate pseudoknot free energies using novel parameters, which have recently become available. We show that the conventional probability dot plot makes a wide class of pseudoknots including those with bulged stems manageable in an explicit fashion. The energy parameters now become the limiting factor in pseudoknot prediction. DotKnot is an efficient method for long sequences, which finds pseudoknots with higher accuracy compared to other known prediction algorithms. DotKnot is accessible as a web server at http://dotknot.csse.uwa.edu.au. PMID:20123730

  15. Combinatorial Optimization of Cystine-Knot Peptides towards High-Affinity Inhibitors of Human Matriptase-1

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Niklas; Fabritz, Sebastian; Tomaszowski, Michael; Fittler, Heiko; Christmann, Andreas; Avrutina, Olga; Kolmar, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Cystine-knot miniproteins define a class of bioactive molecules with several thousand natural members. Their eponymous motif comprises a rigid structured core formed by six disulfide-connected cysteine residues, which accounts for its exceptional stability towards thermic or proteolytic degradation. Since they display a remarkable sequence tolerance within their disulfide-connected loops, these molecules are considered promising frameworks for peptide-based pharmaceuticals. Natural open-chain cystine-knot trypsin inhibitors of the MCoTI (Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor) and SOTI (Spinacia oleracea trypsin inhibitor) families served as starting points for the generation of inhibitors of matriptase-1, a type II transmembrane serine protease with possible clinical relevance in cancer and arthritic therapy. Yeast surface-displayed libraries of miniproteins were used to select unique and potent matriptase-1 inhibitors. To this end, a knowledge-based library design was applied that makes use of detailed information on binding and folding behavior of cystine-knot peptides. Five inhibitor variants, four of the MCoTI family and one of the SOTI family, were identified, chemically synthesized and oxidatively folded towards the bioactive conformation. Enzyme assays revealed inhibition constants in the low nanomolar range for all candidates. One subnanomolar binder (Ki = 0.83 nM) with an inverted selectivity towards trypsin and matriptase-1 was identified. PMID:24146945

  16. Combinatorial optimization of cystine-knot peptides towards high-affinity inhibitors of human matriptase-1.

    PubMed

    Glotzbach, Bernhard; Reinwarth, Michael; Weber, Niklas; Fabritz, Sebastian; Tomaszowski, Michael; Fittler, Heiko; Christmann, Andreas; Avrutina, Olga; Kolmar, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Cystine-knot miniproteins define a class of bioactive molecules with several thousand natural members. Their eponymous motif comprises a rigid structured core formed by six disulfide-connected cysteine residues, which accounts for its exceptional stability towards thermic or proteolytic degradation. Since they display a remarkable sequence tolerance within their disulfide-connected loops, these molecules are considered promising frameworks for peptide-based pharmaceuticals. Natural open-chain cystine-knot trypsin inhibitors of the MCoTI (Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor) and SOTI (Spinacia oleracea trypsin inhibitor) families served as starting points for the generation of inhibitors of matriptase-1, a type II transmembrane serine protease with possible clinical relevance in cancer and arthritic therapy. Yeast surface-displayed libraries of miniproteins were used to select unique and potent matriptase-1 inhibitors. To this end, a knowledge-based library design was applied that makes use of detailed information on binding and folding behavior of cystine-knot peptides. Five inhibitor variants, four of the MCoTI family and one of the SOTI family, were identified, chemically synthesized and oxidatively folded towards the bioactive conformation. Enzyme assays revealed inhibition constants in the low nanomolar range for all candidates. One subnanomolar binder (Ki = 0.83 nM) with an inverted selectivity towards trypsin and matriptase-1 was identified.

  17. Cellular uptake of a cystine-knot peptide and modulation of its intracellular trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xinxin; Stanger, Karen; Kaluarachchi, Harini; Maurer, Till; Ciepla, Paulina; Chalouni, Cecile; Franke, Yvonne; Hannoush, Rami N.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclotides or cyclic cystine-knot peptides have emerged as a promising class of pharmacological ligands that modulate protein function. Interestingly, very few cyclotides have been shown to enter into cells. Yet, it remains unknown whether backbone cyclization is required for their cellular internalization. In this report, we studied the cellular behavior of EETI-II, a model acyclic cystine-knot peptide. Even though synthetic methods have been used to generate EETI-II, recombinant methods that allow efficient large scale biosynthesis of EETI-II have been lagging. Here, we describe a novel protocol for recombinant generation of folded EETI-II in high yields and to near homogeneity. We also uncover that EETI-II is efficiently uptaken via an active endocytic pathway to early endosomes in mammalian cells, eventually accumulating in late endosomes and lysosomes. Notably, co-incubation with a cell-penetrating peptide enhanced the cellular uptake and altered the trafficking of EETI-II, leading to its evasion of lysosomes. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of modulating the subcellular distribution and intracellular targeting of cystine-knot peptides, and hence enable future exploration of their utility in drug discovery and delivery. PMID:27734922

  18. Erwinia oleae sp. nov., isolated from olive knots caused by Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Chiaraluce; Hosni, Taha; Vandemeulebroecke, Katrien; Brady, Carrie; De Vos, Paul; Buonaurio, Roberto; Cleenwerck, Ilse

    2011-11-01

    Three endophytic bacterial isolates were obtained in Italy from olive knots caused by Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi. Phenotypic tests in combination with 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated a phylogenetic position for these isolates in the genera Erwinia or Pantoea, and revealed two other strains with highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences (>99 %), CECT 5262 and CECT 5264, obtained in Spain from olive knots. Rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting of the five strains from olive knots with BOX, ERIC and REP primers revealed three groups of profiles that were highly similar to each other. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) based on concatenated partial atpD, gyrB, infB and rpoB gene sequences indicated that the strains constituted a single novel species in the genus Erwinia. The strains showed general phenotypic characteristics typical of the genus Erwinia and whole genome DNA-DNA hybridization data confirmed that they represented a single novel species of the genus Erwinia. The strains showed DNA G+C contents ranging from 54.7 to 54.9 mol%. They could be discriminated from phylogenetically related species of the genus Erwinia by their ability to utilize potassium gluconate, l-rhamnose and d-arabitol, but not glycerol, inositol or d-sorbitol. The name Erwinia oleae sp. nov. (type strain DAPP-PG 531(T)= LMG 25322(T) = DSM 23398(T)) is proposed for this novel taxon.

  19. Application of lariat lock catch knot suture in the achilles tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baocang; Feng, Xiaona; Yan, Ming; Wang, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to summarize the clinical experience of repairing the Achilles tendon rupture by lariat lock catch knot suture. Between January 2011 and February, 2014, 32 cases of the Achilles tendon rupture were treated by lariat lock catch knot suture. There were 26 males and 6 females, with the average age of 39 years (range 17-53 years), including 13 left knees and 19 right knees. 29 wounds healed by first intention, and 3 cases who were performed local flap transfer due to necrosis of skin were healed by second intention. Thirty-two cases were followed up 10-25 months (13 months on average). No re-rupture of Achilles tendon or deep infection occurred during follow-up period. According to Arner-Lindholm assessment standard, the results were excellent in 19 cases and good in 13 cases, the excellent and good rate was 100%. Lariat lock catch knot suture is a safe and effective method for repairing Achilles tendon. PMID:26770612

  20. The properties of conformal blocks, the AGT hypothesis, and knot polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Various properties of correlators of the two-dimensional conformal field theory are discussed. Specifically, their relation to the partition function of the four-dimensional supersymmetric theory is analyzed. In addition to being of interest in its own right, this relation is of practical importance. For example, it is much easier to calculate the known expressions for the partition function of supersymmetric theory than to calculate directly the expressions for correlators in conformal theory. The examined representation of conformal theory correlators as a matrix model serves the same purpose. The integral form of these correlators allows one to generalize the obtained results for the Virasoro algebra to more complicated cases of the W algebra or the quantum Virasoro algebra. This provides an opportunity to examine more complex configurations in conformal field theory. The three-dimensional Chern-Simons theory is discussed in the second part of the present review. The current interest in this theory stems largely from its relation to the mathematical knot theory (a rather well-developed area of mathematics known since the 17th century). The primary objective of this theory is to develop an algorithm that allows one to distinguish different knots (closed loops in three-dimensional space). The basic way to do this is by constructing the so-called knot invariants.

  1. Probing Unparticle Physics in Reactor Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Bolanos, A.

    2008-11-13

    Unparticle physics is studied by using reactor neutrino data. We obtain limits to the scalar unparticle couplings depending on different values for the parameter d. We found that, as has been already noticed, reactor neutrino data is a good tool to put constraints on unparticle physics. Thanks to a detailed analysis of the experimental characteristics of reactor data we find better constraints than the previously reported.

  2. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.

    1960-04-01

    A nuclear reactor is described consisting of blocks of graphite arranged in layers, natural uranium bodies disposed in holes in alternate layers of graphite blocks, and coolant tubes disposed in the layers of graphite blocks which do not contain uranium.

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, H.L.

    1960-09-20

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising fissionable material dispersed in graphite blocks, helium filling the voids of the blocks and the spaces therebetween, and means other than the helium in thermal conductive contact with the graphite for removing heat.

  4. Chemical Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hurwitz, H. Jr.; Brooks, H.; Mannal, C.; Payne, J.H.; Luebke, E.A.

    1959-03-24

    A reactor of the heterogeneous, liquid cooled type is described. This reactor is comprised of a central region of a plurality of vertically disposed elongated tubes surrounded by a region of moderator material. The central region is comprised of a central core surrounded by a reflector region which is surrounded by a fast neutron absorber region, which in turn is surrounded by a slow neutron absorber region. Liquid sodium is used as the primary coolant and circulates through the core which contains the fuel elements. Control of the reactor is accomplished by varying the ability of the reflector region to reflect neutrons back into the core of the reactor. For this purpose the reflector is comprised of moderator and control elements having varying effects on reactivity, the control elements being arranged and actuated by groups to give regulation, shim, and safety control.

  6. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  7. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  8. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

    1962-10-23

    A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, H.C.

    1959-01-13

    A neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, fluid cooled tvpe is described. The reactor is comprised of a pressure vessel containing the moderator and a plurality of vertically disposed channels extending in spaced relationship through the moderator. Fissionable fuel material is placed within the channels in spaced relationship thereto to permit circulation of the coolant fluid. Separate means are provided for cooling the moderator and for circulating a fluid coolant thru the channel elements to cool the fuel material.

  10. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  11. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Breden, C.R.; Dietrich, J.R.

    1961-06-20

    A water-soluble non-volatile poison may be introduced into a reactor to nullify excess reactivity. The poison is removed by passing a side stream of the water containing the soluble poison to an evaporation chamber. The vapor phase is returned to the reactor to decrease the concentration of soluble poison and the liquid phase is returned to increase the concentration of soluble poison.

  12. High and Low Throughput Screens with Root-knot Nematodes Meloidogyne spp.

    PubMed Central

    Atamian, Hagop S.; Roberts, Philip A.; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2012-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (genus Meloidogyne) are obligate plant parasites. They are extremely polyphagous and considered one of the most economically important plant parasitic nematodes. The microscopic second-stage juvenile (J2), molted once in the egg, is the infective stage. The J2s hatch from the eggs, move freely in the soil within a film of water, and locate root tips of suitable plant species. After penetrating the plant root, they migrate towards the vascular cylinder where they establish a feeding site and initiate feeding using their stylets. The multicellular feeding site is comprised of several enlarged multinuclear cells called 'giant cells' which are formed from cells that underwent karyokinesis (repeated mitosis) without cytokinesis. Neighboring pericycle cells divide and enlarge in size giving rise to a typical gall or root knot, the characteristic symptom of root-knot nematode infection. Once feeding is initiated, J2s become sedentary and undergo three additional molts to become adults. The adult female lays 150-250 eggs in a gelatinous matrix on or below the surface of the root. From the eggs new infective J2s hatch and start a new cycle. The root-knot nematode life cycle is completed in 4-6 weeks at 26-28°C. Here we present the traditional protocol to infect plants, grown in pots, with root-knot nematodes and two methods for high-throughput assays. The first high-throughput method is used for plants with small seeds such as tomato while the second is for plants with large seeds such as cowpea and common bean. Large seeds support extended seedling growth with minimal nutrient supplement. The first high throughput assay utilizes seedlings grown in sand in trays while in the second assay plants are grown in pouches in the absence of soil. The seedling growth pouch is made of a 15.5 x 12.5cm paper wick, folded at the top to form a 2-cm-deep trough in which the seed or seedling is placed. The paper wick is contained inside a transparent plastic pouch

  13. Foraging in a tidally structured environment by Red Knots (Calidris canutus): ideal, but not free.

    PubMed

    van Gils, Jan A; Spaans, Bernard; Dekinga, Anne; Piersma, Theunis

    2006-05-01

    Besides the "normal" challenge of obtaining adequate intake rates in a patchy and dangerous world, shorebirds foraging in intertidal habitats face additional environmental hurdles. The tide forces them to commute between a roosting site and feeding grounds, twice a day. Moreover, because intertidal food patches are not all available at the same time, shorebirds should follow itineraries along the best patches available at a given time. Finally, shorebirds need additional energy stores in order to survive unpredictable periods of bad weather, during which food patches are covered by extreme tides. In order to model such tide-specific decisions, we applied stochastic dynamic programming in a spatially explicit context. Two assumptions were varied, leading to four models. First, birds had either perfect (ideal) or no (non-ideal) information about the intake rate at each site. Second, traveling between sites was either for free or incurred time and energy costs (non-free). Predictions were generated for three aspects of foraging: area use, foraging routines, and energy stores. In general, non-ideal foragers should feed most intensely and should maintain low energy stores. If traveling for such birds is free, they should feed at a random site; otherwise, they should feed close to their roost. Ideal foragers should concentrate their feeding around low tide (especially when free) and should maintain larger energy stores (especially when non-free). If traveling for such birds is free, they should feed at the site offering the highest intake rate; otherwise, they should trade off travel costs and intake rate. Models were parameterized for Red Knots (Calidris canutus) living in the Dutch Wadden Sea in late summer, an area for which detailed, spatially explicit data on prey densities and tidal heights are available. Observations of radio-marked knots (area use) and unmarked knots (foraging routines, energy stores) showed the closest match with the ideal/non-free model. We

  14. Foraging in a tidally structured environment by Red Knots (Calidris canutus): ideal, but not free.

    PubMed

    van Gils, Jan A; Spaans, Bernard; Dekinga, Anne; Piersma, Theunis

    2006-05-01

    Besides the "normal" challenge of obtaining adequate intake rates in a patchy and dangerous world, shorebirds foraging in intertidal habitats face additional environmental hurdles. The tide forces them to commute between a roosting site and feeding grounds, twice a day. Moreover, because intertidal food patches are not all available at the same time, shorebirds should follow itineraries along the best patches available at a given time. Finally, shorebirds need additional energy stores in order to survive unpredictable periods of bad weather, during which food patches are covered by extreme tides. In order to model such tide-specific decisions, we applied stochastic dynamic programming in a spatially explicit context. Two assumptions were varied, leading to four models. First, birds had either perfect (ideal) or no (non-ideal) information about the intake rate at each site. Second, traveling between sites was either for free or incurred time and energy costs (non-free). Predictions were generated for three aspects of foraging: area use, foraging routines, and energy stores. In general, non-ideal foragers should feed most intensely and should maintain low energy stores. If traveling for such birds is free, they should feed at a random site; otherwise, they should feed close to their roost. Ideal foragers should concentrate their feeding around low tide (especially when free) and should maintain larger energy stores (especially when non-free). If traveling for such birds is free, they should feed at the site offering the highest intake rate; otherwise, they should trade off travel costs and intake rate. Models were parameterized for Red Knots (Calidris canutus) living in the Dutch Wadden Sea in late summer, an area for which detailed, spatially explicit data on prey densities and tidal heights are available. Observations of radio-marked knots (area use) and unmarked knots (foraging routines, energy stores) showed the closest match with the ideal/non-free model. We

  15. Slow knot formation by suppressed self-reptation in a collapsed polymer chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Mitsuo; Nakamura, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Naoki; Maki, Yasuyuki

    2012-02-01

    Chain-expansion processes from knotted globules have been measured for poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in the mixed solvent tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) + water (2.5 vol %) by static light scattering. The solution was quenched from the Θ temperature of 41.5 ∘C to 37.0 ∘C, aged there for a time period tp, and then returned rapidly to the Θ temperature. The chain-expansion process was determined as a time evolution of the expansion factor α2 after the temperature increase. The measurement was carried out by changing the aging time tp from 240 to 7200 min, and the molecular weight from Mw = 4.0 × 106 to 1.5 × 107, by taking advantage of the extremely slow chain aggregation in the solution. The chain-expansion process obtained for Mw = 1.22 × 107 became slow with increasing tp, which revealed the knot formation in single globules. The characteristic time of the chain expansion from globules aged for tp = 7200 min was found to depend on the molecular weight as Mw2.7. This exponent, which is close to 3, demonstrated a disentanglement process due to self-reptation. The present data were compared with the previous data of the chain expansion from compact globules aged at 25.0 ∘C. The comparison made at Mw = 1.22 × 107 and at the same values of tp revealed that the chain expansion from the globules aged at 25.0 ∘C was much faster than that from the globules at 37.0 ∘C, indicating a lower knot density in the more compact globules. It was conjectured that the knot formation due to self-reptation would be suppressed in a compact globule because an entire conformational change required by knot formation would become difficult to occur in the confined space of high segment concentration, particularly for a long polymer chain. The chain collapse of PMMA in the mixed solvent has been observed to occur extremely slowly at the later stage. This slow process was explained by the suppressed self-reptation.

  16. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  17. On reactor type comparisons for the next generation of reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Alesso, H.P.; Majumdar, K.C.

    1991-08-22

    In this paper, we present a broad comparison of studies for a selected set of parameters for different nuclear reactor types including the next generation. This serves as an overview of key parameters which provide a semi-quantitative decision basis for selecting nuclear strategies. Out of a number of advanced reactor designs of the LWR type, gas cooled type, and FBR type, currently on the drawing board, the Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR) seem to have some edge over other types of the next generation of reactors for the near-term application. This is based on a number of attributes related to the benefit of the vast operating experience with LWRs coupled with an estimated low risk profile, economics of scale, degree of utilization of passive systems, simplification in the plant design and layout, modular fabrication and manufacturing. 32 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. Research reactors - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Computational Modeling of Multiphase Reactors.

    PubMed

    Joshi, J B; Nandakumar, K

    2015-01-01

    Multiphase reactors are very common in chemical industry, and numerous review articles exist that are focused on types of reactors, such as bubble columns, trickle beds, fluid catalytic beds, etc. Currently, there is a high degree of empiricism in the design process of such reactors owing to the complexity of coupled flow and reaction mechanisms. Hence, we focus on synthesizing recent advances in computational and experimental techniques that will enable future designs of such reactors in a more rational manner by exploring a large design space with high-fidelity models (computational fluid dynamics and computational chemistry models) that are validated with high-fidelity measurements (tomography and other detailed spatial measurements) to provide a high degree of rigor. Understanding the spatial distributions of dispersed phases and their interaction during scale up are key challenges that were traditionally addressed through pilot scale experiments, but now can be addressed through advanced modeling.

  20. Computational Modeling of Multiphase Reactors.

    PubMed

    Joshi, J B; Nandakumar, K

    2015-01-01

    Multiphase reactors are very common in chemical industry, and numerous review articles exist that are focused on types of reactors, such as bubble columns, trickle beds, fluid catalytic beds, etc. Currently, there is a high degree of empiricism in the design process of such reactors owing to the complexity of coupled flow and reaction mechanisms. Hence, we focus on synthesizing recent advances in computational and experimental techniques that will enable future designs of such reactors in a more rational manner by exploring a large design space with high-fidelity models (computational fluid dynamics and computational chemistry models) that are validated with high-fidelity measurements (tomography and other detailed spatial measurements) to provide a high degree of rigor. Understanding the spatial distributions of dispersed phases and their interaction during scale up are key challenges that were traditionally addressed through pilot scale experiments, but now can be addressed through advanced modeling. PMID:26134737

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.; Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to neutronic reactors of the heterogeneous water cooled type, and in particular to a fuel element charging and discharging means therefor. In the embodiment illustrated the reactor contains horizontal, parallel coolant tubes in which the fuel elements are disposed. A loading cart containing a magnzine for holding a plurality of fuel elements operates along the face of the reactor at the inlet ends of the coolant tubes. The loading cart is equipped with a ram device for feeding fuel elements from the magazine through the inlot ends of the coolant tubes. Operating along the face adjacent the discharge ends of the tubes there is provided another cart means adapted to receive irradiated fuel elements as they are forced out of the discharge ends of the coolant tubes by the incoming new fuel elements. This cart is equipped with a tank coataining a coolant, such as water, into which the fuel elements fall, and a hydraulically operated plunger to hold the end of the fuel element being discharged. This inveation provides an apparatus whereby the fuel elements may be loaded into the reactor, irradiated therein, and unloaded from the reactor without stopping the fiow of the coolant and without danger to the operating personnel.

  2. EXPANSION OF HYDROGEN-POOR KNOTS IN THE BORN-AGAIN PLANETARY NEBULAE A30 AND A78

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, X.; Guerrero, M. A.; Marquez-Lugo, R. A.; Toalá, J. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.; Blair, W. P.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L. M.; Todt, H.

    2014-12-20

    We analyze the expansion of hydrogen-poor knots and filaments in the born-again planetary nebulae A30 and A78 based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images obtained almost 20 yr apart. The proper motion of these features generally increases with distance to the central star, but the fractional expansion decreases, i.e., the expansion is not homologous. As a result, there is not a unique expansion age, which is estimated to be 610-950 yr for A30 and 600-1140 yr for A78. The knots and filaments have experienced complex dynamical processes: the current fast stellar wind is mass loaded by the material ablated from the inner knots; the ablated material is then swept up until it shocks the inner edges of the outer, hydrogen-rich nebula. The angular expansion of the outer filaments shows a clear dependence on position angle, indicating that the interaction of the stellar wind with the innermost knots channels the wind along preferred directions. The apparent angular expansion of the innermost knots seems to be dominated by the rocket effect of evaporating gas and by the propagation of the ionization front inside them. Radiation-hydrodynamical simulations show that a single ejection of material followed by a rapid onset of the stellar wind and ionizing flux can reproduce the variety of clumps and filaments at different distances from the central star found in A30 and A78.

  3. POWER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.

    1958-07-01

    A fast nuclear reactor system ls described for producing power and radioactive isotopes. The reactor core is of the heterogeneous, fluid sealed type comprised of vertically arranged elongated tubular fuel elements having vertical coolant passages. The active portion is surrounded by a neutron reflector and a shield. The system includes pumps and heat exchangers for the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The core, primary coolant pump and primary heat exchanger are disposed within an irapenforate tank which is filled with the primary coolant, in this case a liquid metal such as Na or NaK, to completely submerge these elements. The tank is completely surrounded by a thick walled concrete shield. This reactor system utilizes enriched uranium or plutonium as the fissionable material, uranium or thorium as a diluent and thorium or uranium containing less than 0 7% of the U/sup 235/ isotope as a fertile material.

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.

    1957-10-01

    A reactor of the type which preferably uses plutonium as the fuel and a liquid moderator, preferably ordinary water, and which produces steam within the reactor core due to the heat of the chain reaction is described. In the reactor shown the fuel elements are essentially in the form of trays and are ventically stacked in spaced relationship. The water moderator is continuously supplied to the trays to maintain a constant level on the upper surfaces of the fuel element as it is continually evaporated by the heat. The steam passes out through the spaces between the fuel elements and is drawn off at the top of the core. The fuel elements are clad in aluminum to prevent deterioration thereof with consequent contamimation of the water.

  5. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1958-07-15

    A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

  6. Bioconversion reactor

    DOEpatents

    McCarty, Perry L.; Bachmann, Andre

    1992-01-01

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  7. Catalytic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-10-14

    A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

  9. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Young, G.

    1963-01-01

    This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1957-09-24

    Reactors of the type employing plates of natural uranium in a moderator are discussed wherein the plates are um-formly disposed in parallel relationship to each other thereby separating the moderator material into distinct and individual layers. Each plate has an uninterrupted sunface area substantially equal to the cross-sectional area of the active portion of the reactor, the particular size of the plates and the volume ratio of moderator to uranium required to sustain a chain reaction being determinable from the known purity of these materials and other characteristics such as the predictable neutron losses due to the formation of radioactive elements of extremely high neutron capture cross section.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  12. Identification of Sources of Resistance to Four Species of Root-knot Nematodes in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Ng'ambi, Tenson B. S.; Rufty, Rebeca C.; Barker, Kenneth R.; Melton, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    Resistance to the southern root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita races 1 and 3, has been identified, incorporated, and deployed into commercial cultivars of tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum. Cultivars with resistance to other economically important root-knot nematode species attacking tobacco, M. arenaria, M. hapla, M. javanica, and other host-specific races of M. incognita, are not available in the United States. Twenty-eight tobacco genotypes of diverse origin and two standard cultivars, NC 2326 (susceptible) and Speight G 28 (resistant to M. incognita races 1 and 3), were screened for resistance to eight root-knot nematode populations of North Carolina origin. Based on root gall indices at 8 to 12 weeks after inoculation, all genotypes except NC 2326 and Okinawa were resistant to M. arenaria race 1, and races 1 and 3 of M. incognita. Except for slight root galling, genotypes resistant to M. arenaria race 1 responded similarly to races 1 and 3 of M. incognita. All genotypes except NC 2326, Okinawa, and Speight G 28 showed resistance to M. javanica. Okinawa, while supporting lower reproduction of M. javanica than NC 2326, was rated as moderately susceptible. Tobacco breeding lines 81-R-617A, 81-RL- 2K, SA 1213, SA 1214, SA 1223, and SA 1224 were resistant to M. arenaria race 2, and thus may be used as sources of resistance to this pathogen. No resistance to M. hapla and only moderate resistance to races 2 and 4 of M. incognita were found in any of the tobacco genotypes. Under natural field infestations of M. arenaria race 2, nematode development on resistant tobacco breeding lines 81-RL-2K, SA 1214, and SA 1215 was similar to a susceptible cultivar with some nematicide treatments; however, quantity and quality of yield were inferior compared to K 326 plus nematicides. PMID:19270897

  13. Polymer Uncrossing and Knotting in Protein Folding, and Their Role in Minimal Folding Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mohazab, Ali R.; Plotkin, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a method for calculating the extent to which chain non-crossing is important in the most efficient, optimal trajectories or pathways for a protein to fold. This involves recording all unphysical crossing events of a ghost chain, and calculating the minimal uncrossing cost that would have been required to avoid such events. A depth-first tree search algorithm is applied to find minimal transformations to fold , , , and knotted proteins. In all cases, the extra uncrossing/non-crossing distance is a small fraction of the total distance travelled by a ghost chain. Different structural classes may be distinguished by the amount of extra uncrossing distance, and the effectiveness of such discrimination is compared with other order parameters. It was seen that non-crossing distance over chain length provided the best discrimination between structural and kinetic classes. The scaling of non-crossing distance with chain length implies an inevitable crossover to entanglement-dominated folding mechanisms for sufficiently long chains. We further quantify the minimal folding pathways by collecting the sequence of uncrossing moves, which generally involve leg, loop, and elbow-like uncrossing moves, and rendering the collection of these moves over the unfolded ensemble as a multiple-transformation “alignment”. The consensus minimal pathway is constructed and shown schematically for representative cases of an , , and knotted protein. An overlap parameter is defined between pathways; we find that proteins have minimal overlap indicating diverse folding pathways, knotted proteins are highly constrained to follow a dominant pathway, and proteins are somewhere in between. Thus we have shown how topological chain constraints can induce dominant pathway mechanisms in protein folding. PMID:23365638

  14. EBT reactor characteristics consistent with stability and power balance requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.; Santoro, R.T.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a recent EBT reactor study that includes both ring and core plasma properties and consistent treatment of coupled ring-core stability criteria and power balance requirements. The principal finding is that constraints imposed by these coupling and other physics and technology considerations permit a broad operating window for reactor design optimization. A number of concept improvements are also proposed that are found to offer the potential for further improvement of the reactor size and parameters.

  15. True knot of umbilical cord: Case report and review of literat.

    PubMed

    Khan, Momna; Zahiruddin, Sana; Iftikhar, Maria

    2016-08-01

    True knot of umbilical cord (TKUC) is a rare abnormality. When it becomes tight, it may lead to the obstruction of the foetal circulation and intrauterine death (IUD). We present two cases of TKUC managed at The Aga Khan University Hospital with two extreme outcomes. A 22 years old primigravida was diagnosed with unexplained intrauterine foetal demise at 28th week gestation. She delivered vaginally after induction and tight TKUC was identified as a cause of IUD. The second patient delivered an alive healthy male baby vaginally who was found to have a lose TKUC. PMID:27524546

  16. All-fiber magnetic-field sensor based on microfiber knot resonator and magnetic fluid.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianli; Ding, Hui

    2012-12-15

    All-fiber magnetic-field sensor based on a device consisting of a microfiber knot resonator and magnetic fluid is proposed for the first time in this Letter. Sensor principles and package technology are introduced in detail. Experimental results show that the resonance wavelength of the proposed sensor regularly varies with changes to the applied magnetic field. When the magnetic field is increased to 600 Oe, the wavelength shift reaches nearly 100 pm. Moreover, the sensor responding to the 50 Hz alternating magnetic field is also experimentally investigated, and a minimal detectable magnetic-field strength of 10 Oe is successfully achieved.

  17. The classical and quantum mechanics of a particle on a knot

    SciTech Connect

    Sreedhar, V.V.

    2015-08-15

    A free particle is constrained to move on a knot obtained by winding around a putative torus. The classical equations of motion for this system are solved in a closed form. The exact energy eigenspectrum, in the thin torus limit, is obtained by mapping the time-independent Schrödinger equation to the Mathieu equation. In the general case, the eigenvalue problem is described by the Hill equation. Finite-thickness corrections are incorporated perturbatively by truncating the Hill equation. Comparisons and contrasts between this problem and the well-studied problem of a particle on a circle (planar rigid rotor) are performed throughout.

  18. Os2–Os4 Switch Controls DNA Knotting and Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ying; Romero, María J.; Salassa, Luca; Cheng, Xi; Habtemariam, Abraha; Clarkson, Guy J.; Prokes, Ivan; Rodger, Alison; Costantini, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dinuclear trihydroxido‐bridged osmium–arene complexes are inert and biologically inactive, but we show here that linking dihydroxido‐bridged OsII–arene fragments by a bridging di‐imine to form a metallacycle framework results in strong antiproliferative activity towards cancer cells and distinctive knotting of DNA. The shortened spacer length reduces biological activity and stability in solution towards decomposition to biologically inactive dimers. Significant differences in behavior toward plasmid DNA condensation are correlated with biological activity. PMID:27240103

  19. Effect of tea dust residues to control root-knot nematode of tomato.

    PubMed

    Fathi, G H; Eshtiaghi, H; Kheiri, A; Okhovat, M

    2004-01-01

    In this research, control of tomato root- knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) was conducted using tea dust residues at different rates. First, the species and race of nematode were identified by employing diagnostic keys. Then, with 5 replications in complete randomized design. Tea dust residues were used at 9 treatments (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 g/kg of soil). Statistical analysis on mean treatments rates showed that treatment with 25 g/kg soil economically was effective in growth rates and reduction in gall index. PMID:15759440

  20. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  1. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Carleton, John T.

    1977-01-25

    A graphite-moderated nuclear reactor includes channels between blocks of graphite and also includes spacer blocks between adjacent channeled blocks with an axis of extension normal to that of the axis of elongation of the channeled blocks to minimize changes in the physical properties of the graphite as a result of prolonged neutron bombardment.

  2. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Weinberg, A.M.; Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1959-10-27

    BS>A reactor cooled by water, biphenyl, helium, or other fluid with provision made for replacing the fuel rods with the highest plutonium and fission product content without disassembling the entire core and for promptly cooling the rods after their replacement in order to prevent build-up of heat from fission product activity is described.

  3. Sonochemical Reactors.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Parag R; Patil, Pankaj N

    2016-10-01

    Sonochemical reactors are based on the generation of cavitational events using ultrasound and offer immense potential for the intensification of physical and chemical processing applications. The present work presents a critical analysis of the underlying mechanisms for intensification, available reactor configurations and overview of the different applications exploited successfully, though mostly at laboratory scales. Guidelines have also been presented for optimum selection of the important operating parameters (frequency and intensity of irradiation, temperature and liquid physicochemical properties) as well as the geometric parameters (type of reactor configuration and the number/position of the transducers) so as to maximize the process intensification benefits. The key areas for future work so as to transform the successful technique at laboratory/pilot scale into commercial technology have also been discussed. Overall, it has been established that there is immense potential for sonochemical reactors for process intensification leading to greener processing and economic benefits. Combined efforts from a wide range of disciplines such as material science, physics, chemistry and chemical engineers are required to harness the benefits at commercial scale operation.

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1962-12-25

    A reactor is described comprising a plurality of horizontal trays containing a solution of a fissionable material, the trays being sleeved on a vertical tube which contains a vertically-reciprocable control rod, a gas-tight chamber enclosing the trays, and means for conducting vaporized moderator from the chamber and for replacing vaporized moderator in the trays. (AEC)

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, H.L.

    1958-10-01

    The design of control rods for nuclear reactors are described. In this design the control rod consists essentially of an elongated member constructed in part of a neutron absorbing material and having tube means extending therethrough for conducting a liquid to cool the rod when in use.

  6. Sonochemical Reactors.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Parag R; Patil, Pankaj N

    2016-10-01

    Sonochemical reactors are based on the generation of cavitational events using ultrasound and offer immense potential for the intensification of physical and chemical processing applications. The present work presents a critical analysis of the underlying mechanisms for intensification, available reactor configurations and overview of the different applications exploited successfully, though mostly at laboratory scales. Guidelines have also been presented for optimum selection of the important operating parameters (frequency and intensity of irradiation, temperature and liquid physicochemical properties) as well as the geometric parameters (type of reactor configuration and the number/position of the transducers) so as to maximize the process intensification benefits. The key areas for future work so as to transform the successful technique at laboratory/pilot scale into commercial technology have also been discussed. Overall, it has been established that there is immense potential for sonochemical reactors for process intensification leading to greener processing and economic benefits. Combined efforts from a wide range of disciplines such as material science, physics, chemistry and chemical engineers are required to harness the benefits at commercial scale operation. PMID:27573503

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1960-09-27

    A unit assembly is described for a neutronic reactor comprising a tube and plurality of spaced parallel sandwiches in the tube extending lengthwise thereof, each sandwich including a middle plate having a central opening for plutonium and other openings for fertile material at opposite ends of the plate.

  8. Understanding the light curves of the HST-1 knot in M87 with internal relativistic shock waves along its jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronado, Y.; López-Corona, O.; Mendoza, S.

    2016-10-01

    Knots or blobs observed in astrophysical jets are commonly interpreted as shock waves moving along them. Long-time observations of the HST-1 knot inside the jet of the galaxy M87 have produced detailed multiwavelength light curves. In this paper, we model these light curves using the semi-analytical approach developed by Mendoza et al. This model was developed to account for the light curves produced by working surfaces (blobs) moving along relativistic jets. These working surfaces are generated by periodic oscillations of the injected flow velocity and mass ejection rates at the base of the jet. Using genetic algorithms to fit the parameters of the model, we are able to explain the outbursts observed in the light curves of the HST-1 knot with an accuracy greater than a 2σ statistical confidence level.

  9. 14 CFR 61.327 - How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft that has a VH greater than 87 knots...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... light-sport aircraft that has a VH greater than 87 knots CAS? 61.327 Section 61.327 Aeronautics and...: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.327 How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft that has a VH greater than 87 knots CAS? If you hold a sport...

  10. Zirconium Hydride Space Power Reactor design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asquith, J. G.; Mason, D. G.; Stamp, S.

    1972-01-01

    The Zirconium Hydride Space Power Reactor being designed and fabricated at Atomics International is intended for a wide range of potential applications. Throughout the program a series of reactor designs have been evaluated to establish the unique requirements imposed by coupling with various power conversion systems and for specific applications. Current design and development emphasis is upon a 100 kilowatt thermal reactor for application in a 5 kwe thermoelectric space power generating system, which is scheduled to be fabricated and ground tested in the mid 70s. The reactor design considerations reviewed in this paper will be discussed in the context of this 100 kwt reactor and a 300 kwt reactor previously designed for larger power demand applications.

  11. Potential of Leguminous Cover Crops in Management of a Mixed Population of Root-knot Nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Osei, Kingsley; Gowen, Simon R.; Pembroke, Barbara; Brandenburg, Rick L.; Jordan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Root-knot nematode is an important pest in agricultural production worldwide. Crop rotation is the only management strategy in some production systems, especially for resource poor farmers in developing countries. A series of experiments was conducted in the laboratory with several leguminous cover crops to investigate their potential for managing a mixture of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, M. javanica). The root-knot nematode mixture failed to multiply on Mucuna pruriens and Crotalaria spectabilis but on Dolichos lablab the population increased more than 2- fold when inoculated with 500 and 1,000 nematodes per plant. There was no root-galling on M. pruriens and C. spectabilis but the gall rating was noted on D. lablab. Greater mortality of juvenile root-knot nematodes occurred when exposed to eluants of roots and leaves of leguminous crops than those of tomato; 48.7% of juveniles died after 72 h exposure to root eluant of C. spectabilis. The leaf eluant of D. lablab was toxic to nematodes but the root eluant was not. Thus, different parts of a botanical contain different active ingredients or different concentrations of the same active ingredient. The numbers of root-knot nematode eggs that hatched in root exudates of M. pruriens and C. spectabilis were significantly lower (20% and 26%) than in distilled water, tomato and P. vulgaris root exudates (83%, 72% and 89%) respectively. Tomato lacks nematotoxic compounds found in M. pruriens and C. spectabilis. Three months after inoculating plants with 1,000 root-knot nematode juveniles the populations in pots with M. pruriens, C. spectabilis and C. retusa had been reduced by approximately 79%, 85% and 86% respectively; compared with an increase of 262% nematodes in pots with Phaseolus vulgaris. There was significant reduction of 90% nematodes in fallow pots with no growing plant. The results from this study demonstrate that some leguminous species contain compounds that either kill root-knot

  12. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Remnant–Preserving Reconstruction Using a “Lasso-Loop” Knot Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karampalis, Christos; Tzavelas, Anastasios; Vraggalas, Vasileios; Christodoulou, Pavlos; Bisbinas, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture predisposes to altered kinematics and possible knee joint degeneration. Graft fiber maturation and ligamentization may eliminate this risk during ACL reconstruction procedures. ACL remnant–sparing techniques support the theory that the preserved tissue enhances revascularization, preserves the mechanoreceptors, and leads to anatomic remodeling. The purpose of this article is to present a simple and reproducible technique of tensioning the preserved ACL remnant over the femur. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through the ACL remnant with a “lasso-loop” technique using a curved rotator cuff hook. Femoral and tibial tunnel preparation is performed according to a standard surgical technique for the EndoButton device (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA). The free ends of the ACL remnant suture are retrieved through the tibial tunnel and passed through each outside hole of the EndoButton device. The hamstring graft is passed through the tibial and femoral tunnels and fixed to the femoral cortex by flipping the EndoButton and to the tibia by an interference screw. Finally, non-sliding half-stitch locking knots are made to secure the ACL remnant suture on the EndoButton device, by use of a knot pusher. This technique offers simple and secure tensioning of the ACL remnant on the fixation device. PMID:26870656

  13. The enigma of the rise of angiosperms: can we untie the knot?

    PubMed

    Augusto, L; Davies, T J; Delzon, S; De Schrijver, A

    2014-10-01

    Multiple hypotheses have been put forward to explain the rise of angiosperms to ecological dominance following the Cretaceous. A unified scheme incorporating all these theories appears to be an inextricable knot of relationships, processes and plant traits. Here, we revisit these hypotheses, categorising them within frameworks based on plant carbon economy, resistance to climatic stresses, nutrient economy, biotic interactions and diversification. We maintain that the enigma remains unresolved partly because our current state of knowledge is a result of the fragmentary nature of palaeodata. This lack of palaeodata limits our ability to draw firm conclusions. Nonetheless, based on consistent results, some inferences may be drawn. Our results indicate that a complex multidriver hypothesis may be more suitable than any single-driver theory. We contend that plant carbon economy and diversification may have played an important role during the early stages of gymnosperms replacement by angiosperms in fertile tropical sites. Plant tolerance to climatic stresses, plant nutrition, biotic interactions and diversification may have played a role in later stages of angiosperm expansion within temperate and harsh environments. The angiosperm knot remains partly tied, but to unravel it entirely will only be feasible if new discoveries are made by scientific communities.

  14. Effect of Mulch Surface Color on Root-knot of Tomato Grown in Simulated Planting Beds

    PubMed Central

    Fortnum, B. A.; Kasperbauer, M. J.; Decoteau, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of different-colored polyethylene mulches on quantity and spectra of reflected light, plant morphology, and root-knot disease was studied in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) grown in simulated planting beds. Tomato plants were inoculated with Meloidogyne incognita at initial populations (Pi) of 0, 1,000, 10,000, or 50,000 eggs/plant, and grown in a greenhouse for 50 days over white, red, or black mulch. Soil temperature was kept constant among the mulch treatments by placing an insulation barrier between the colored mulch and the soil surface. Soil temperature varied less than 0.5 °C between soil chambers at solar noon. Tomatoes grown over white mulch received more reflected photosynthetic light and had greater shoot weights (27%), root weights (32%), and leaf area (20%) than plants grown over black mulch. Plants grown over red mulch received a higher far-red-to-red ratio in the reflected light. Mulch color altered the plant's response to root-knot nematode infection by changing the distribution of mass in axillary shoots. At high Pi, axillary leaf area and leaf weight were greater in tomato grown over white mulch than when grown over red mulch. The root-gall index was lower for plants grown over white mulch than similar plants grown over red mulch. PMID:19270954

  15. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Remnant-Preserving Reconstruction Using a "Lasso-Loop" Knot Configuration.

    PubMed

    Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karampalis, Christos; Tzavelas, Anastasios; Vraggalas, Vasileios; Christodoulou, Pavlos; Bisbinas, Ilias

    2015-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture predisposes to altered kinematics and possible knee joint degeneration. Graft fiber maturation and ligamentization may eliminate this risk during ACL reconstruction procedures. ACL remnant-sparing techniques support the theory that the preserved tissue enhances revascularization, preserves the mechanoreceptors, and leads to anatomic remodeling. The purpose of this article is to present a simple and reproducible technique of tensioning the preserved ACL remnant over the femur. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through the ACL remnant with a "lasso-loop" technique using a curved rotator cuff hook. Femoral and tibial tunnel preparation is performed according to a standard surgical technique for the EndoButton device (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA). The free ends of the ACL remnant suture are retrieved through the tibial tunnel and passed through each outside hole of the EndoButton device. The hamstring graft is passed through the tibial and femoral tunnels and fixed to the femoral cortex by flipping the EndoButton and to the tibia by an interference screw. Finally, non-sliding half-stitch locking knots are made to secure the ACL remnant suture on the EndoButton device, by use of a knot pusher. This technique offers simple and secure tensioning of the ACL remnant on the fixation device. PMID:26870656

  16. A baseline correction algorithm for Raman spectroscopy by adaptive knots B-spline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Fan, Xian-guang; Xu, Ying-jie; Wang, Xiu-fen; He, Hao; Zuo, Yong

    2015-11-01

    The Raman spectroscopy technique is a powerful and non-invasive technique for molecular fingerprint detection which has been widely used in many areas, such as food safety, drug safety, and environmental testing. But Raman signals can be easily corrupted by a fluorescent background, therefore we presented a baseline correction algorithm to suppress the fluorescent background in this paper. In this algorithm, the background of the Raman signal was suppressed by fitting a curve called a baseline using a cyclic approximation method. Instead of the traditional polynomial fitting, we used the B-spline as the fitting algorithm due to its advantages of low-order and smoothness, which can avoid under-fitting and over-fitting effectively. In addition, we also presented an automatic adaptive knot generation method to replace traditional uniform knots. This algorithm can obtain the desired performance for most Raman spectra with varying baselines without any user input or preprocessing step. In the simulation, three kinds of fluorescent background lines were introduced to test the effectiveness of the proposed method. We showed that two real Raman spectra (parathion-methyl and colza oil) can be detected and their baselines were also corrected by the proposed method.

  17. Initial speed of knots in the plasma tail of C/2013 R1(Lovejoy)

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Masafumi; Furusho, Reiko; Terai, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Jun-Ichi; Koda, Jin; Fujiwara, Hideaki

    2015-03-01

    We report short-time variations in the plasma tail of C/2013 R1(Lovejoy). A series of short (2–3 minutes) exposure images with the 8.2 m Subaru telescope shows faint details of filaments and their motions over a 24 minute observing duration. We identified rapid movements of two knots in the plasma tail near the nucleus (∼3×10{sup 5} km). Their speeds are 20 and 25 km s{sup −1} along the tail and 3.8 and 2.2 km s{sup −1} across it, respectively. These measurements set a constraint on an acceleration model of plasma tail and knots as they set the initial speed just after their formation. We also found a rapid narrowing of the tail. After correcting the motion along the tail, the narrowing speed is estimated to be ∼8 km s{sup −1}. These rapid motions suggest the need for high time-resolution studies of comet plasma tails with a large telescope.

  18. The Knotted Sky I: Planck constraints on the primordial power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, Grigor; Price, Layne C.; Easther, Richard; Abazajian, Kevork N. E-mail: lpri691@aucklanduni.ac.nz E-mail: r.easther@auckland.ac.nz

    2014-08-01

    Using the temperature data from Planck we search for departures from a power-law primordial power spectrum, employing Bayesian model-selection and posterior probabilities. We parametrize the spectrum with n knots located at arbitrary values of logk, with both linear and cubic splines. This formulation recovers both slow modulations and sharp transitions in the primordial spectrum. The power spectrum is well-fit by a featureless, power-law at wavenumbers k>10{sup -3} Mpc{sup -1}. A modulated primordial spectrum yields a better fit relative to ΛCDM at large scales, but there is no strong evidence for a departure from a power-law spectrum. Moreover, using simulated maps we show that a local feature at k ∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc{sup -1} can mimic the suppression of large-scale power. With multi-knot spectra we see only small changes in the posterior distributions for the other free parameters in the standard ΛCDM universe. Lastly, we investigate whether the hemispherical power asymmetry is explained by independent features in the primordial power spectrum in each ecliptic hemisphere, but find no significant differences between them.

  19. Resistance of upland-rice lines to root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Souza, D C T; Botelho, F B S; Rodrigues, C S; Furtini, I V; Smiderle, E C; de Matos, D L; Bruzi, A T

    2015-01-01

    Despite the benefits of crop rotation, occurrence of nematodes is a common problem for almost all crops within the Cerrado biome, especially for rice. The use of resistant cultivars is one of the main methods for control of nematodes. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the reaction of 36 upland-rice lines, with desirable agronomic characteristics, according to their resistance to root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita). The experimental design was entirely randomized with four replications. Each plot of land consisted of two rice plants in a 3-L vase. The plants were inoculated with 1000 eggs and eventual juveniles of the respective nematodes. Fifty-five days after the inoculation, the roots and the aerial part of the plant were weighed and the egg mass (EM) as well as the reproduction factor (Rf) were estimated. It was determined that the isolated use of EM was not beneficial in selecting rice lines resistant to the root-knot nematode. This procedure must, therefore, take into account the egg counting and the Rf, in order to improve the reliability of the selection. In our study, 30 evaluated lines were observed to be resistant. Among the recommended cultivars, only BRS Monarca had its performance susceptible to the studied nematode species. PMID:26782379

  20. Kalata B8, a novel antiviral circular protein, exhibits conformational flexibility in the cystine knot motif.

    PubMed

    Daly, Norelle L; Clark, Richard J; Plan, Manuel R; Craik, David J

    2006-02-01

    The cyclotides are a family of circular proteins with a range of biological activities and potential pharmaceutical and agricultural applications. The biosynthetic mechanism of cyclization is unknown and the discovery of novel sequences may assist in achieving this goal. In the present study, we have isolated a new cyclotide from Oldenlandia affinis, kalata B8, which appears to be a hybrid of the two major subfamilies (Möbius and bracelet) of currently known cyclotides. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of kalata B8 and observed broadening of resonances directly involved in the cystine knot motif, suggesting flexibility in this region despite it being the core structural element of the cyclotides. The cystine knot motif is widespread throughout Nature and inherently stable, making this apparent flexibility a surprising result. Furthermore, there appears to be isomerization of the peptide backbone at an Asp-Gly sequence in the region involved in the cyclization process. Interestingly, such isomerization has been previously characterized in related cyclic knottins from Momordica cochinchinensis that have no sequence similarity to kalata B8 apart from the six conserved cysteine residues and may result from a common mechanism of cyclization. Kalata B8 also provides insight into the structure-activity relationships of cyclotides as it displays anti-HIV activity but lacks haemolytic activity. The 'uncoupling' of these two activities has not previously been observed for the cyclotides and may be related to the unusual hydrophilic nature of the peptide. PMID:16207177