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  1. Recreational Industry in the North of European Russia: Case Assessment, Komi Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovleva, M. P.; Kuchkina, E.; Iyevlev, N.; Lyaskovsky, S.

    2012-12-01

    At the past AGU Annual Meeting in 2011, we presented information about development of the recreation industry in European Russia within the "Silver Ring" Project (http://neespi.org/web-content/meetings/AGU_2011/Yakovleva-poster.pdf). This Project can be considered as a system of actions directed to a comprehensive socio-economic development of the Northwest of the Russian Federation that includes 11 provinces ("oblast", "republic", "okrug") of the country. Among the provinces included in the Project, The Komi Republic is one of the most interesting regions. The Komi Republic is located in the North of European Russia within the gridbox restricted by 59N - 69N latitudes and 45E - 66E longitudes. The region is populated by indigenous northern nations: Komi, Russians, Karels, Ved', Permyaks, and others. It is characterized as an ecologically clean territory, has a small population density, is rich with natural reserves, and has abundant forest and water resources. Flora and fauna of the Republic are unique and attractive. Rich biodiversity and abundance of fish and game allow hunting and sport fishing. As of January 1, 2010, The Komi Republic has 240 territories of special environmental protection ("zakazniki") with restricted human activity. This allows a diversity of field trips devoted to in-depth studies of regional ecosystems as well as tourist visits aiming to enjoy unique nature and ethnic-cultures of the North.

  2. Dissolved organic carbon dynamics in a near-pristine boreal mire-forest-river landscape during spring snowmelt, Komi Republic, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avagyan, A.; Runkle, B.; Kutzbach, L.

    2011-12-01

    It is well known that peatlands represent an important soil carbon reserve. Therefore, they are considered as hot-spots with respect to climate change. However, lack of information concerning the transport of dissolved organic matter within peatlands and its release into fluvial systems represents a major gap in our understanding of both local and global carbon cycles. In particular, the spring snowmelt period, as a major hydrological event in the annual water cycle of boreal regions, strongly influences the fluxes of carbon between terrestrial and fluvial systems. The aim of this study is to provide thorough quantitative analyses of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and fluxes in a boreal mire-forest-river landscape during the snowmelt period. Water samples were collected in the Komi Republic, Russia, in spring 2011 along transects across the near-pristine Ust-Pojeg mire complex and the nearby river Pojeg into which it drains (61°56'N, 50°13'E). This peatland is in a transitional state from fen to bog and consists of minerogeous, ombrogenous, and transitional forest-mire (lagg) zones. Microtopographic features include hummocks, hollows, and lawns. High frequency absorption measurements were conducted directly at the study site with a portable UV-Vis spectrometer over a wavelength range of 200-742.5 nm at 2.5 nm intervals. These results were calibrated against values obtained from the catalytically-aided platinum 680°C combustion technique. The results showed that in the beginning of the snowmelt period only surface carbon is flushed away by melted snow water while deeper layers remain frozen. During this time, DOC concentrations fluctuated within the range of 10-14 mg L-1 across the whole mire complex. During the later stages of snowmelt, concentrations of DOC were different between lagg, fen and bog zones, which separated them into distinct hydrological and biogeochemical units within the mire complex. The highest concentration was observed at the

  3. Spatial structure of periodicity in the conifer tree radial increment in the Republic of Komi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raspopov, O. M.; Lopatin, E. V.; Kolström, T.; Dergachev, V. A.; Dmitriev, P. B.; Kahle, H.-P.; Spiecker, H.

    2013-12-01

    Spectral analysis of tree ring data sets of Siberian spruce ( Picea obovata) and Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris L.) was carried out to study the effects of climatic factors on the conifer tree radial growth in the territory of the Komi Republic. Analyses were performed for different natural subzones in the Komi Republic: the forest-tundra transition zone and the northern, middle, and southern taiga. The results show that several groups of periodicities can be found in the tree radial growth. One from groups of periodicities is related to internal processes in the atmosphere-ocean system; the other is related to the fluctuations in solar activity.

  4. Artificial and natural radionuclides in soils of the southern and middle taiga zones of Komi Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznosikov, V. A.; Lodygin, E. D.; Shuktomova, I. I.

    2017-07-01

    Specific activities of artificial (137Cs, 90Sr) and natural (40K, 232Th, 226Ra) radionuclides in background soils of southern and middle taiga of Komi Republic have been estimated with consideration for the landscape-geochemical features of the territory. It has been shown that their accumulation and migration in soils are determined by the following factors: position in relief, texture, and organic matter content. No anomalous zones with increased contents of radionuclides in soils have been revealed.

  5. Innovative type of Reproduction of Agriculture of the Komi Republic - the Basis of its Sustainable Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomareva, Anna

    2013-04-01

    The necessity of transition of agriculture to sustainability is complicated by the necessity to increase production of local environmentally safe food, unemployment indigenous growth of living standards of the peasant community, stable and balanced nature management. Due to the difficult economic conditions of natural and agricultural development for the Komi Republic principle of food self-sufficiency is unacceptable, but the production of basic food products, for which favorable there are conditions, is objective necessity in the short term. Priority directions of development of the agricultural and fisheries sectors: the production of socially significant food products - potatoes, vegetables of the local range, milk, fresh meat, eggs, dietary, preservation and development of traditional industries, and collecting wild mushrooms and berries and its processing. Off forecast in the northern agricultural areas three scenarios selected: a base (slow), optimistic and pessimistic. For all versions of the forecast to be considered systemic crisis of the agricultural sector of the North is ongoing. Functioning of on sector under a particular scenario will depend on the factors and conditions that affect the stability of the agricultural enterprises and farms. At the base, especially under unfavorable conditions, negative external factors and conditions will prevail. The baseline scenario of recent years assumes the maintenance of the rate of change indicators of agriculture, of the levels of state industry conditions of interbranch exchange in agriculture, of access to economic entities in the financial markets, of the pricing and taxation policies, of relatively low investment opportunities to upgrade production capacity. In this embodiment the growth of agricultural production and its reduction will occur in suburban (peripheral areas). The optimistic scenario will be characterized by protectionist policies of the state, increase investment to improve soil fertility

  6. Paludified forests of Komi Republic (Northeastern Europe) do not act as hotspots of the CH4 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Julia; Lukasheva, Maria; Gudyrev, Vasiliy; Miglovets, Mikhail

    2017-04-01

    In the Komi Republic, which is situated in Northeastern Europe and is subject of Russian Federation, 306,000km2 or about 73 % of the total area are covered by forest. The predominant part of these forests lies within the boreal zone. Within the boreal forests the vegetation patterns are a result of the moisture characteristics and air temperature. Based on the moisture conditions forest communities can be grouped into wet, mesic and dry sites. In conditions of high soil moisture content forest peatlands can develop. In boreal forest landscapes it is not a rare phenomenon and can reach coverage of up to one third of the total area. In addition to the high water content of the soils forested peatlands are characterised by low soil temperatures, high organic matter accumulation and low organic matter decomposition. The thick moss-organic layer on the forest floor and waterlogged soils favours methanogenesis. Such process of accumulation of poorly decomposed organic matter mostly originating from Sphagnum which involves the formation of waterlogged conditions is defined as paludification. Highly favourable to forest paludification are sites characterised by fine-textured soils which highly hamper percolation. Paludified forests also occur at peatland margins as a result of peatland expansion. During the last years peatland margins were considered as potential biogeochemical hotspots within the peatlands and due to their high nutrient and dissolved organic matter content they may also be a major methane emitter. Paludification can also occur at forests sites after clear cutting, which is a very intensive logging type and usually leads to water table elevations. In this study measurements were conducted at peatland margins and at a clear cut sites during three climatically different years. The summer of the year 2013 was considerably warmer and drier, and the summer of the year 2014 was considerably colder and wetter than the long term mean. The investigation period in

  7. Paludified forests of Komi Republic (Northeastern Europe) do not act as hotspots of the CH4 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Julia; Lukasheva, Maria; Gudyrev, Vasiliy; Mikhaylov, Oleg; Miglovets, Mikhail

    2015-04-01

    In the Komi Republic, which is situated in Northeastern Europe and is subject of Russian Federation, 306,000km2 or about 73 % of the total area are covered by forest. The predominant part of these forests lies within the boreal zone. Within the boreal forests the vegetation patterns are a result of the moisture characteristics and air temperature. Based on the moisture conditions forest communities can be grouped into wet, mesic and dry sites. In conditions of high soil moisture content forest peatlands can develop. In boreal forest landscapes it is not a rare phenomenon and can reach coverage of up to one third of the total area. In addition to the high water content of the soils forested peatlands are characterised by low soil temperatures, high organic matter accumulation and low organic matter decomposition. The thick moss-organic layer on the forest floor and waterlogged soils favours methanogenesis. Such process of accumulation of poorly decomposed organic matter mostly originating from Sphagnum which involves the formation of waterlogged conditions is defined as paludification. Highly favourable to forest paludification are sites characterised by fine-textured soils which highly hamper percolation. Paludified forests also occur at peatland margins as a result of peatland expansion. During the last years peatland margins were considered as potential biogeochemical hotspots within the peatlands and due to their high nutrient and dissolved organic matter content they may also be a major methane emitter. Paludification can also occur at forests sites after clear cutting, which is a very intensive logging type and usually leads to water table elevations. In this study measurements were conducted at peatland margins and at a clear cut site during two climatically different years. The summer of the year 2013 was considerably warmer and drier, and the summer of the year 2014 was considerably colder and wetter than the long term mean. In this study we show, that

  8. [Evaluation of the partial contribution of naturally occurring radionuclides and nonradioactive chemically toxic elements in formation of biological effects within the Vicia cracca population inhabiting the area contaminated with uranium-radium production wastes in the Komi Republic].

    PubMed

    Evseeva, T I; Geras'kin, S A; Vakhrusheva, O M

    2014-01-01

    The site contaminated with uranium-radium production wastes in the Komi Republic was studied. The activity concentration of naturally occurring radionuclides (226Ra, 228Th, 238U, 230Th, 232Th, 210Po, and 210Pb), as well as concentrations of nonradioactive chemically toxic elements (Pb, Zn, Cu, As, V, Mo, Sr, Y, and Ba) in the soil samples from the experimental site is 10-183 times higher than reference levels. A chronic exposure to alpha-emitters and nonradioactive chemically toxic elements causes adverse effects in tufted vetch (Vacia cracca L.) both at the cellular (aberration of chromosomes) and population (decrease in the reproductive ability) levels. Radionuclides are the main contributors to the decrease in the reproductive capacity and an increase in the level of the cytogenetic damage in root tip cells of tufted vetch seedlings. As and Pb significantly influence the reproductive capacity of plants. Sr, Zn, Y and P modify the biological effects caused by exposure to radionuclides. Moreover, P and Zn reduce the adverse effects of radionuclides; however, Sr and Y enhance these effects.

  9. Regional differences in the genetic variability of Finno-Ugric speaking Komi populations.

    PubMed

    Khrunin, Andrey; Verbenko, Dmitry; Nikitina, Kseniya; Limborska, Svetlana

    2007-01-01

    The Komi (Komi-Zyryan) people are one of the most numerous ethnic groups belonging to the Finno-Ugric linguistic community. They occupy an extensive territory in north Russia to the west of the Ural Mountains, in the northeast of the East European Plain. This is an area of long-term interactions between Europeans and North Asians. Genetic variability was evaluated in two geographically distinct populations, the Izhemski and Priluzski Komi. We searched for polymorphisms of the TP53 gene (a 16-bp duplication in intron 3 and three RFLPs: for Bsh1236I at codon 72, for MspI in intron 6, and for BamHI in the 3' flanking region) and for variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphisms of locus D1S80 and of the 3' untranslated region of the gene for apolipoprotein B (ApoB). Some data from our previous studies of TP53, 3'ApoB, and D1S80 variability were involved in the comparison of Komi with other Eastern European populations. Multidimensional scaling analysis of genetic distances was used for the evaluation of genetic relationships between populations. The results revealed some affinity between Priluzski Komi and Eastern Slavonic populations, and significant segregation of Izhemski Komi from other ethnic groups studied. The unique genetic features of Izhemski Komi may have been determined by their ethnogenesis or the pressure of environmental factors, such as special nutrition and adaptation to extreme climatic conditions.

  10. Deterring Russia’s Revanchist Ambitions in the Baltic Republics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-16

    approval-rating-at- record-levels 22 Robert M. Gates, Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2014), 272. 23 TASS (Russian News...breedlove-explains-implications-of- information-in-hybrid-warfare- 48 Katya Adler , “Baltics states shiver as Russia flexes its muscles”, BBC article...Unconventional Warfare, Ukraine 2013-2014”, (Fort Bragg, NC), 39. Articles Adler , Katya. “Baltics states shiver as Russia flexes its muscles”, BBC article, 06

  11. [Sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in the Shira and Shunet meromictic lakes (Khakass Republic, Russia)].

    PubMed

    Kallistova, A Iu; Kevbrina, M V; Pimenov, N V; Rusanov, I I; Rogozin, D Iu; Wehrli, B; Nozhevnikova, A N

    2006-01-01

    The biogeochemical and molecular biological study of the chemocline and sediments of saline meromictic lakes Shira and Shunet (Khakass Republic, Russia) was performed. A marked increase in the rates of sulfate reduction and methanogenesis was revealed at the medium depths of the chemocline. The rates of these processes in the bottom sediments decreased with depth. The numbers of Bacteria, Archaea, and of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization with rRNA specific oligonucleotide probes labeled with horseradish peroxidase and subsequent tyramide signal amplification. In the chemocline, both the total microbial numbers and those of Bacteria were shown to increase with depth. The archaea and SRB were present in almost equal numbers. In the lake sediments, a drastic decrease in microbial numbers with depth was revealed. SRB were found to prevail in the upper sediment layer and archaea in the lower one. This finding correlates with the measured rates of sulfate reduction and methanogenesis.

  12. The taiga tick Ixodes persulcatus (Acari: Ixodidae) in the Sakha Republic (Yakutia) of Russia: distributional and reproductive ranges.

    PubMed

    Uspensky, Igor; Garruto, Ralph M; Goldfarb, Lev

    2003-01-01

    The finding of an unfed adult female of the taiga tick Ixodes persulcatus Schulze is reported from the northern part of Eastern Siberia (the central part of the Sakha Republic [former Yakutia]) of Russia. This finding supplements other reported single findings of the taiga tick in different sites of the central part of the Sakha Republic, thus increasing its distributional range. The reproductive range of the taiga tick is limited to two separate areas in the southern parts of the Republic. The most probable mode of tick introduction northwards from the border of the reproductive range is by spring bird migrations from their wintering areas to breeding sites. The possibility of the establishment of stable tick populations in the areas of introduction is also considered.

  13. Genetic differentiation and karyotype variation in Hedysarum chaiyrakanicum, an endemic species of Tuva Republic, Russia.

    PubMed

    Zvyagina, Natalia S; Dorogina, Olga V; Krasnikov, Alexander A

    2016-05-01

    Overgrazing and mining affect vegetation, particularly in mountains. At times, it goes to such an extent that the plant species become vulnerable and slowly extinct from its habitat. Such endemic species need to be protected. One such endemic species Hedysarum chaiyrakanicum Kurbatsky, a vulnerable steppe vegetation of Tuva Republic, Russia was evaluated for its genetic diversity and taxonomic definition using molecular technique and chromosome number adjustment. The genetic differentiation among H. chaiyrakanicum, H. setigerum Turcz. and H. gmelinii Ledeb. genotypes was determined using five inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers and then examined with Nei's genetic distance coefficient (D) and Shannon's information index (H). A total of 134 reproducible bands were detected with polymorphism percentage of 98%. The genetic diversity of H. chaiyrakanicum was found to be 0.343 while the Shannon index H(sp) was determined as 8 06. The chromosome number 2n = 16 is newly observed within the H. chaiyrakanicum. The genetic relationship based on ISSR data supported the taxonomic distinction of H. chaiyrakanicum from H. setigerum and H. gmelinii. We recommend both in situ and ex situ conservation strategies, specially germplasm sampling, to save this endemic species.

  14. Striking the balance: Challenges and perspectives for the protected areas network in northeastern European Russia.

    PubMed

    Degteva, Svetlana V; Ponomarev, Vasily I; Eisenman, Sasha W; Dushenkov, Vyacheslav

    2015-10-01

    Increasing anthropogenic pressure on the largest remaining tracts of old-growth boreal forest in Europe necessitates additional conservation of ecosystems and biodiversity in northeastern European Russia. In a regional network comprising 8 % of the Nenets Autonomous District and 13.5 % of the Komi Republic, 248 areas have varying protected statuses as state nature reserves (zapovedniks), national parks, reserves/sanctuaries (zakazniks), or natural monuments. Due to increased natural resource extraction in this relatively pristine area, designation of additional protected areas is critical for the protection of key ecological sites. The history of ecological preservation in these regions is herein described, and recent recommendations for incorporating additional ecologically representative areas into the regional network are presented. If the protected area network can be expanded, the overall environmental stability in these globally significant ecosystems may remain intact, and can help Russia meet the 2020 Aichi conservation targets, as set forth by the Convention of Biological Diversity.

  15. Suppressive composts from organic wastes as agents of biological control of fusariosis in Tatartan Republic (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumerova, Raushaniya; Galitskaya, Polina; Beru, Franchesca; Selivanovskaya, Svetlana

    2015-04-01

    Plant diseases are one of the seriously limiting factors of agriculture efficiency around the world. Diseases caused by fungi are the major threat to plants. Crop protection in modern agriculture heavily depends on chemical fungicides. Disadvantages of chemical pesticides soon became apparent as damage to the environment and a hazard to human health. In this regard use of biopesticides becomes an attractive alternative method of plant protection. For biological control of fungal plant diseases, separate bacterial or fungal strains as well as their communities can be used. Biopreparations must consist of microbes that are typical for local climate and soil conditions and therefore are able to survive in environments for a long time. Another option of plant pests' biological control is implementation of suppressive composts made of agricultural or other organic wastes. These composts can not only prevent the development of plant diseases, but also improve the soil fertility. The objective of this work was estimation of potential of composts and strains isolated from these composts as means for biological control of fusariosis that is one of the most widespread plant soil born disease. The composts were made up of the commonly produced agricultural wastes produced in Tatarstan Republic (Russia). Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici was used as a model phytopathogen. Ten types of organic waste (Goat manure (GM), Chicken dung (CD), Chicken dung with straw addition (CS), Rabbit dung (RD), Cow manure (CM), Rerotting pork manure (RPM), Fresh pork manure (FPM), Pork manure with sawdust and straw (PMS), the remains of plants and leaves (PL), the vegetable waste (VW) were sampled in the big farms situated in Tatarstan Republic which is one of the main agricultural regions of Russia. The initial wastes were composted for 150 days. Further, the following characteristics of the composts were assessed: pH, electro conductivity, TOC, DOC, Ntot. On petri dishes with meat

  16. Ecological and Geochemical Assessment of Woody Vegetation in Tungsten-Molybdenum Mining Area (Buryat Republic, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasimov, N. S.; Kosheleva, N. E.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    Biogeochemical studies performed in the impact zone of the Dzhida tungsten- molybdenum mining and processing enterprise in Zakamensk (Buryat Republic, Russia) in 2013 showed that the needles and bark of Lárix sibírica Ledeb. and the leaves and bark of Bétula platyphýlla Sukacs are characterized by certain changes in their trace element (TE) composition. The total index of the biogeochemical transformation Z v which sums all the positive and negative deviations of TE contents from the background values for larch and birch in the city averaged 95 and 46 for their assimilating organs and 30 and 25 for their perennial organs, respectively. This was caused by the increased uptake of W, Mo, V, Pb, Bi, Cd, and Co in the city. The close correlation between TE concentrations in soils and plants was observed for the elements of the strong and moderate biological capturing, including cationic Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, and Ba and anions of the ore elements W and Mo and the associated Bi. The most intensive TE accumulation was found in the larch needles due to the wax layer which firmly fixes the dust enriched with TEs. Indication of the ecological state of urban woody plants revealed that their organs contain the increased concentrations of Pb and Fe and suffer from the Mn deficiency, which attests to disturbance of photosynthetic processes, most pronounced in the residential area. Birch leaves are characterized by a very low Cu/Zn ratio which detects the imbalance of these elements participating in the synthesis of enzymes.

  17. Syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, molecular epidemiological strain typing and determination of macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum in 2013-2014 in Tuva Republic, Russia.

    PubMed

    Khairullin, Rafil; Vorobyev, Denis; Obukhov, Andrey; Kuular, Ural-Herel; Kubanova, Anna; Kubanov, Alexey; Unemo, Magnus

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of syphilis in the Tuva Republic (geographical centre of Asia), Russia has been exceedingly high historically. No detailed examinations and no molecular investigations of Treponema pallidum strains transmitted in the Tuva Republic, or in general, in Russia, were published internationally. We examined the syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, and the molecular epidemiology and macrolide resistance in T. pallidum strains in 2013-2014 in the Tuva Republic. Among 95 mainly primary or secondary syphilis patients, the arp, tpr, tp0548 and 23S rRNA genes in 85 polA gene-positive genital ulcer specimens were characterized. The syphilis incidence in Tuva Republic peaked in 1998 (1562), however declined to 177 in 2013. Among the 70 (82%) completely genotyped specimens, six molecular strain types were found. Strain type 14d/f accounted for 91%, but also 14c/f, 14d/g, 14b/f, 14i/f, 9d/f, and 4d/f were identified. Two (2.4%) specimens contained the 23S rRNA A2058G macrolide resistance mutation. This is the first internationally published typing study regarding T. pallidum in Russia, performed in the Tuva Republic with the highest syphilis incidence in Russia. The two molecular strain types 4d/f and 9d/f have previously been described only in Eastern and Northern China and for the first time, macrolide-resistant syphilis was described in Russia. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Teaching Staff Advanced Training in Russia, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the USA and Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalchuk, Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    In the article the peculiarities in organization of postgraduate teacher training in foreign countries have been highlighted; the basic problems and prospects for advanced training which stipulate for reforming the relevant national systems have been revealed; common and distinctive trends in their development have been justified. In Russia there…

  19. Teaching Staff Advanced Training in Russia, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the USA and Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalchuk, Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    In the article the peculiarities in organization of postgraduate teacher training in foreign countries have been highlighted; the basic problems and prospects for advanced training which stipulate for reforming the relevant national systems have been revealed; common and distinctive trends in their development have been justified. In Russia there…

  20. First data on the composition of atmospheric dust responsible for yellow snow in Northern European Russia in March 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V. P.; Korobov, V. B.; Lisitzin, A. P.; Aleshinskaya, A. S.; Bogdanova, O. Yu.; Goryunova, N. V.; Grishchenko, I. V.; Dara, O. M.; Zavernina, N. N.; Kurteeva, E. I.; Novichkova, E. A.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Sapozhnikov, F. V.

    2010-04-01

    The descent of a large quantity of dust responsible for bright colors of atmospheric precipitation in the temperate, subpolar, and polar zones of the northern hemisphere is rarely observed [1-5]. In the twentieth century and in the beginning of the twenty-first century in the northern part of European Russia, such events had not been registered right up to March 25-26, 2008. At that time in some parts of the Arkhangelsk region, Komi Republic, and Nenets Autonomous Area, atmospheric precipitation as moist snow and rain responsible for sand and saffron colors of ice crust formation on the snow surface was observed. Thus, due to detailed mineralogical, geochemical, pollen, diatom, and meteorological investigations, it was established that the main source of the yellow dust is the semidesert and steppe regions of the Northwest Kazakhstan, and the Volgograd and Astrakhan regions, Kalmykia.

  1. Changes in smoking among adolescents in the Republic of Karelia, Russia and Eastern Finland from 1995 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Aura, Annamari; Laatikainen, Tiina; Isoaho, Hannu; Bykachev, Kirsi; Lazutkina, Galina; Tossavainen, Kerttu

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of smoking, smoking experimentation and future intention to smoke in the Pitkäranta district, the Republic of Karelia, Russia and Eastern Finland in the years 1995 and 2013. Cross-sectional studies were carried out among 15-year-old ninth grade adolescents in all schools in the Pitkäranta region (1995: n=385, response rate 95%; 2013: 182, response rate 98%) and a sample of schools in Eastern Finland (1995: n=2098, response rate 91%; 2013: 635 response rate 95%). The daily smoking prevalence among adolescents did not change either in Eastern Finland or in the Pitkäranta district from 1995 to 2013. However, smoking among Finnish adolescents was more common than among Russians (p<0.001) and boys, in general, smoke more commonly than girls (p<0.001). In Finland, early smoking experimentations declined by half among both genders but in Pitkäranta the girls' smoking experimentations tripled (relative risk 3.03, 95% confidence interval 1.76-5.20) from 1995 to 2013. The combined effect of country and gender was significant (p<0.001) for future intention to smoke. In Finland future intentions to smoke were very similar in boys and girls compared with obvious gender differences in Russia. These results suggest that more attention should be paid for programmes that consider better gender and culture-specific issues in preventing initiation of smoking and promoting an anti-smoking climate in societies. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  2. Seismotectonics of the Chersky Seismic Belt, eastern Sakha Republic (Yakutia) and Magadan District, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Koz'min, B. M.; Mackey, K. G.; Riegel, S. A.; McLean, M. S.; Imaev, V. S.

    2009-09-01

    The Chersky seismic belt represents a zone of deformation between the North American and Eurasian plates in northeast Russia. The belt extends from the Laptev Sea into the Chersky Range where it splits into two branches. One branch extends to Kamchatka and the Aleutian-Kurile Junction, while the other branch extends south towards Sakhalin Island. Focal mechanisms indicate a change from extension to transpression in the northern Verkhoyansk Range and generally left-lateral transpression in the Chersky Range extending to northern Kamchatka. The few focal mechanisms on the second branch suggest right-lateral transpression. A large number of faults, sub-parallel to the seismicity and presumed to be strike-slip, are visible in satellite imagery and topographic maps and are also associated with seismically generated landslides. These data support a model in which the Sea of Okhotsk forms the core of a separate Okhotsk microplate surrounded by diffuse boundaries on the north and west. Microseismicity in continental northeast Russia is most heavily concentrated within and between the fault systems along the northern boundary of the proposed Okhotsk plate and indicates a high level of deformation. The sense of slip on the faults (both from focal mechanisms and geology) are also generally consistent with the extrusion of the Okhotsk plate to the southeast as it is compressed between its larger neighbors. The northernmost part of the Okhotsk plate may be decoupled to some degree from the more stable central Sea of Okhotsk.

  3. Long-term monitoring of gully erosion in Udmurt Republic, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rysin, Ivan; Grigoriev, Ivan; Zaytseva, Mariya; Golosov, Valentin; Sharifullin, Aidar

    2017-03-01

    This article presents results from the long term-monitoring of gully headcut retreat rates (GHRR) between 1959 and 2015 in different parts of the Udmurt Republic and is based on the use of historical aerial photographs and field observations (measuring the distance from the gully head to a fixed reference point) (Vanmaercke et al., 2016). It was determined that GHRR decreased from 2.4 to 0.3 m yr-1 during the 1959-1997 observation period and the 1998-2015 period, respectively. Measurements of GHRR were made once per year for most of the monitoring sites, and twice per year (after snow-melt in May, and after the rainy season, October-November) for gullies located in the eastern part of the study area that contain high proportions of arable land. 80 % of GHRR occurred during the snowmelt period (1978-1997), and decreased to 53 % since 1997. Spatial patterns of GHRR resulting from changing hydro-climatic factors for different regions of the Udmurt Republic, as a whole, were determined based on the analysis of long-term observations at 6 meteorological stations and 4 gauging stations. The main reason for decreasing GHRR appears to be due to reductions in winter frozen soil depth. The influence of stormwater runoff more clearly occurred within the east and north parts of the Vyatka-Kama interfluve, whereas higher correlations between GHRR and frozen soil depth were found for the western parts of the Republic. The most significant increases in GHRR appear to have occurred during the warm part of the year (June-July), after > 40 mm rainstorms.

  4. Desertification in Russia: Problems and solutions (an example in the Republic of Kalmykia-Khalmg Tangch).

    PubMed

    Zonn, I S

    1995-01-01

    During the second half of the 20th century Kalmykia has undergone severe desertification. Under Soviet rule, rangelands were increasingly devoted to animal production, and pastures were converted to cropland in a campaign to increase crops. Pastures were grazed two to three times their sustainable production, saiga populations and habitat greatly decreased, more than 17 million ha were subjected to wind erosion, 380,000 ha were transformed into moving sands, and 106,000 ha were ruined by secondary salinization and waterlogging. By the 1990s almost 80% of the Republic had undergone desertification, and 13% had been transformed into a true desert. In 1986 the General Scheme of Desertification Control was formulated. The scheme called for rotating pastures, reclaiming blown sand using silviculture, tilling overgrazed pastures and sowing fodder plants, and developing water supplies for pastures. In its early years the scheme has been successful. But the management of restored pastures usually reverts to the same farms responsible for the poor conditions, and there is great apprehension that degradation could reoccur. This case study concludes that the general cattle and agriculture development in Kalmykia is unviable for ecological and economic reasons, that Kalmykia should implement an adaptive policy oriented toward conservation and accommodating the interrelation and variability of land resources, that the desertification problem can be solved only by changing agrarian policy as a whole, and that a desertification control program must become an integral part of economic and social development of the Republic.

  5. [Sociological analysis of healthcare delivery in Russia regions with inclement natural conditions (in case of the Republic of Altai)].

    PubMed

    Kozhevnikov, A A

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes the results of a sociological study of delivery of healthcare in the Republic of Altai to search for ways to improve its quality and to provide access to the local population. Analysis was made with regard to an interdisciplinary, comprehensive approach to considering the range of problems associated with not only the health of local residents and identifying risk factors leading to diseases, but also by determining the possibilities that could promote the minimization of causes that have a considerable impact on the occurrence of diseases and also hamper healthcare delivery in the human settlements of Gornyi Altai, which are difficult of access. The investigation has used sociological and statistical methods. It has been ascertained that the available healthcare forces and means should be today employed at the regional level, by applying the principles of necessary sufficiency in conjunction with the local population's social motivation to be involved in the activity associated with the rendering of medical services. In addition, it is necessary to systemically use mobile medical units as a significant factor for the optimization of medical care to the population living in Russia's regions which are difficult of access.

  6. Organohalogen compounds in human breast milk from Republic of Buryatia, Russia.

    PubMed

    Tsydenova, Oyuna V; Sudaryanto, Agus; Kajiwara, Natsuko; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Batoev, Valeriy B; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2007-03-01

    Human breast milk samples collected during 2003/04 in Buryatia, a Russian autonomous republic, were analyzed in order to assess human exposure to organohalogen compounds including organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). When compared with available worldwide data, levels of HCB (23-880 ng/g lipid wt.), PCBs (69-680 ng/g lipid wt.), and HCHs (100-3700 ng/g lipid wt.) were relatively high, indicating elevated human exposure to these organochlorines (OCs) in Buryatia. In contrast to OCs, PBDE concentrations were low (0.46-1.7 ng/g lipid wt.). Out of 14 BDE congeners analyzed, BDE-28, BDE-47, BDE-100, BDE-153, BDE-197, and BDE-207 were detected. Estimated daily intakes (EDIs) of HCHs, HCB, CHLs, and PCBs by infants solely from human milk for 100%, 43%, 34%, and 17% of the samples, respectively, exceeded guideline thresholds. Although high EDIs raise concern for possible toxic effects of OCs, women in Buryatia are recommended to breastfeed due to numerous advantages of breastfeeding for mother and child.

  7. Hypolactasia in the indigenous populations of northern Russia.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, A I

    1998-01-01

    The distribution of hypolactasia (PH) in the indigenous populations of the polar and related territories of the Russian Federation was investigated by an oral lactose tolerance. The frequency of hypolactasia in Kildin Saami population is 48%, Komi-Izhem-63%, Northern Mansi-71%, Northern Khanty-72%, West Siberia Nenets-78%. Generally hypolactasia frequencies in indigenous groups of Arctic and Sub-Arctic territories of Russia are higher than in the "reference" samples of Slav (Russian, 40-49%) and Permian Finn (Komi-Permiak and Udmurtian, 50-59%) groups.

  8. Thermal properties and phase composition of water for frozen rocks of Por-Bajin island (Republic of Tuva, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksyutina, Daria; Motenko, Rimma; Buldovich, Sergey; Koshurnikov, Andrey; Prosuncov, Kirill

    2010-05-01

    We investigated current permafrost state, thermal properties and phase composition of water for frozen rocks of Por-Bajin Island (Tere-Hol Lake, south-east part of Tuva republic, Russia). Rocks of the island are represented by dispersing grounds in permafrost state. The architectural monument Por-Bajin fortress (the middle of the VIII century) located at the island can be destructed due to thawing of frozen rocks resulted by water level rising in the surrounding Por-Bajin lake. Seasonally thawed layer on the island varies from 1.1 to 1.8 meters based on drilling observations from 13 drill holes the. Measured in the field the thermal conductivity indicates the low values in seasonally thawed layer (from 0.14 to 0.19 Wm-1K-1). Twenty most typical for the studied area frozen handsamples were collected from several holes in the depth interval from 1.5 to 10.15 meters. The humidity of sampled specimens varies from 13 to 270 percents and density varies from 1.21 to 2.17 g/cm3. Investigations of grain-size composition, thermal properties and liquid phase composition were undertaken using laboratory methods. The grain-size composition of Por-Bajin grounds varies from clays to gritstones and gravelites with clay-silt matrix. Phase composition of water in the frozen grounds was studied by contact and cryoscopic methods. Thermal properties were investigated by the I-st type regular mode method (a-calorimeter). Based on obtained data computer model allowed to forecast the evolution of permafrost at the island and predict the destiny of Por-Bajin monument. This work was supported by grant from President of the Russian Federation NSh - 4078.2008.5

  9. A genome-wide analysis of populations from European Russia reveals a new pole of genetic diversity in northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Khrunin, Andrey V; Khokhrin, Denis V; Filippova, Irina N; Esko, Tõnu; Nelis, Mari; Bebyakova, Natalia A; Bolotova, Natalia L; Klovins, Janis; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Rehnström, Karola; Ripatti, Samuli; Schreiber, Stefan; Franke, Andre; Macek, Milan; Krulišová, Veronika; Lubinski, Jan; Metspalu, Andres; Limborska, Svetlana A

    2013-01-01

    Several studies examined the fine-scale structure of human genetic variation in Europe. However, the European sets analyzed represent mainly northern, western, central, and southern Europe. Here, we report an analysis of approximately 166,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in populations from eastern (northeastern) Europe: four Russian populations from European Russia, and three populations from the northernmost Finno-Ugric ethnicities (Veps and two contrast groups of Komi people). These were compared with several reference European samples, including Finns, Estonians, Latvians, Poles, Czechs, Germans, and Italians. The results obtained demonstrated genetic heterogeneity of populations living in the region studied. Russians from the central part of European Russia (Tver, Murom, and Kursk) exhibited similarities with populations from central-eastern Europe, and were distant from Russian sample from the northern Russia (Mezen district, Archangelsk region). Komi samples, especially Izhemski Komi, were significantly different from all other populations studied. These can be considered as a second pole of genetic diversity in northern Europe (in addition to the pole, occupied by Finns), as they had a distinct ancestry component. Russians from Mezen and the Finnic-speaking Veps were positioned between the two poles, but differed from each other in the proportions of Komi and Finnic ancestries. In general, our data provides a more complete genetic map of Europe accounting for the diversity in its most eastern (northeastern) populations.

  10. A Genome-Wide Analysis of Populations from European Russia Reveals a New Pole of Genetic Diversity in Northern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Khrunin, Andrey V.; Khokhrin, Denis V.; Filippova, Irina N.; Esko, Tõnu; Nelis, Mari; Bebyakova, Natalia A.; Bolotova, Natalia L.; Klovins, Janis; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Rehnström, Karola; Ripatti, Samuli; Schreiber, Stefan; Franke, Andre; Macek, Milan; Krulišová, Veronika; Lubinski, Jan; Metspalu, Andres; Limborska, Svetlana A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies examined the fine-scale structure of human genetic variation in Europe. However, the European sets analyzed represent mainly northern, western, central, and southern Europe. Here, we report an analysis of approximately 166,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in populations from eastern (northeastern) Europe: four Russian populations from European Russia, and three populations from the northernmost Finno-Ugric ethnicities (Veps and two contrast groups of Komi people). These were compared with several reference European samples, including Finns, Estonians, Latvians, Poles, Czechs, Germans, and Italians. The results obtained demonstrated genetic heterogeneity of populations living in the region studied. Russians from the central part of European Russia (Tver, Murom, and Kursk) exhibited similarities with populations from central–eastern Europe, and were distant from Russian sample from the northern Russia (Mezen district, Archangelsk region). Komi samples, especially Izhemski Komi, were significantly different from all other populations studied. These can be considered as a second pole of genetic diversity in northern Europe (in addition to the pole, occupied by Finns), as they had a distinct ancestry component. Russians from Mezen and the Finnic-speaking Veps were positioned between the two poles, but differed from each other in the proportions of Komi and Finnic ancestries. In general, our data provides a more complete genetic map of Europe accounting for the diversity in its most eastern (northeastern) populations. PMID:23505534

  11. Child and adolescent mental health problems in Tyva Republic, Russia, as possible risk factors for a high suicide rate.

    PubMed

    Slobodskaya, Helena R; Semenova, Nadezhda B

    2016-04-01

    High rates of child mental health problems in the Russian Federation have recently been documented; the rates of youth suicide are among the highest in the world. Across the Russian regions, Republic of Tyva has one of the highest rates of child and adolescent suicide and the lowest life expectancy at birth. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and associations of mental health problems in Native Tyvinian children and adolescents using internationally recognised measures and diagnoses. A two-stage, two-phase design involved selection of schools in five rural settlements in Western Tyva and two schools in the capital city followed by selection of Native Tyvinian children in grades 3-4 (ages 9-10) and 6-7 (ages 14-15). In the first phase, a screening measure of psychopathology, the Rutter Teacher Questionnaire, was obtained on 1048 children with a 97% participation rate. In the second phase, more detailed psychiatric assessments were carried out for subgroups of screen-positive and screen-negative children. The prevalence of mental health problems was about 25%, ranging from 40% in adolescent boys from rural areas to 9% in adolescent girls from the city. The patterning of disorders and risk factors were similar to those in other countries, rural areas were associated with an increased risk of psychopathology. The findings indicate that there is an urgent need for interventions to reduce risk in this population and provide effective help for Tyvinian children and adolescents with mental health problems.

  12. Analysis of allelic variation of the apolipoprotein B hypervariable locus in the Bashkir and Komi populations

    SciTech Connect

    Khusnutdinova, E.K.; Khidiatova, I.M.; Rafikov, H.S.

    1995-07-01

    Allelic variation of the hypervariable apolipoprotein B gene locus (APOB) in three groups of the Bashkir population and in the Komi population was analyzed. Among 219 individuals studied, 13 allelic variants were identified with a number of repeats ranging from 28 to 52. The frequency of alleles varied from 0.01 to 0.51 with the mean heterozygosity index being 0.66 in the Bashkir population and 0.74 in the Komi one. Considerable difference in the frequency distribution of the APOB loci genotypes between the Bashkir and Komi populations was observed, and the distribution patterns for Bashkirs from Abzelilovskii and Ilishevskii raions deviated from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The genetic distance between the Bashkir and Komi populations calculated on the basis of allele frequencies at the hypervariable APOB gene locus corresponded to the expected degree similarity of the population studied. Thus, this locus can be recommended as an informative marker for studying the gene pool and genetic processes in the populations because of the high level of its polymorphism and the heterozygosity in the populations. 19 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. [Composition and Density of Soil Fauna in the Region with Enhanced Radioactivity Level (Komi Republic, Vodnyi)].

    PubMed

    Kolesnikova, A A; Kudrin, A A; Konakova, T N; Taskaeva, A A

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the influence of high levels of radiation on soil fauna were carried out in 2012 in the territory formed as a result of the activity of the enterprise for extraction and production of radium from reservoir water and waste of uranium ore from 1931 to 1956. At present the local radioactive pollution in this area is caused by the presence of heavy natural radionuclides 226Ra, 238U and products of their disintegration in soils. The oppression of soil invertebrate.fauna in pine forests and meadows with high levels of radionuclides and heavy metals is revealed. Also shown is the decrease in the number and density of different taxonomic groups of invertebrates, reduction of the diversity and spectrum of trophic groups and vital forms in the area with a high content of radionuclides in soil. Our results are in agreement with the results obtained by the similar studies showing negative influence of high-level ionizing radiation on soil fauna.

  14. Pyrogenic changes in iron-illuvial podzols in the middle taiga of the Komi Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymov, A. A.; Dubrovsky, Yu. A.; Gabov, D. N.

    2014-02-01

    The changes in the morphological, physicochemical, and chemical properties of iron-illuvial podzols under middle-taiga dwarf shrub-green moss pine forests in the first months after fires are examined. It is shown that forest fires are accompanied by changes in the morphology of the litter horizons, their compaction, and by changes in the chemical properties of the soils. The data on the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) indicate a significant increase in the contents of chrysene, fluorene, naphthalene, pyrene, and anthracene in the Opyr(L) horizon in comparison with the litters in the background pine forest. The total PAH content in the O(F)pyr horizon increases mainly at the expense of di- and tri-nuclear PAHs (naphthalene and fluorene). The mineral soil horizons in the burnt area become enriched in the most mobile amphiphilic fractions of the organic matter, which is seen from the increase in the absolute and relative contents of the hydrophilic fractions, which might be represented by the products of combustion of fresh plant remains and litter.

  15. Additive partitioning of testate amoeba species diversity across habitat hierarchy within the pristine southern taiga landscape (Pechora-Ilych Biosphere Reserve, Russia).

    PubMed

    Tsyganov, Andrey N; Komarov, Alexander A; Mitchell, Edward A D; Shimano, Satoshi; Smirnova, Olga V; Aleynikov, Alexey A; Mazei, Yuri A

    2015-02-01

    In order to better understand the distribution patterns of terrestrial eukaryotic microbes and the factors governing them, we studied the diversity partitioning of soil testate amoebae across levels of spatially nested habitat hierarchy in the largest European old-growth dark coniferous forest (Pechora-Ilych Biosphere Reserve; Komi Republic, Russia). The variation in testate amoeba species richness and assemblage structure was analysed in 87 samples from six biotopes in six vegetation types using an additive partitioning procedure and principal component analyses. The 80 taxa recorded represent the highest value of species richness for soil testate amoebae reported for taiga soils so far. Our results indicate that testate amoeba assemblages were highly aggregated at all levels and were mostly controlled by environmental factors rather than dispersal processes. The variation in species diversity of testate amoebae increased from the lowest to the highest hierarchical level. We conclude that, similarly to macroscopic organisms, testate amoeba species richness and community structure are primarily controlled by environmental conditions within the landscape and suggest that metacommunity dynamics of free-living microorganisms are driven by species sorting and/or mass effect processes.

  16. Vitamin D status of northern indigenous people of Russia leading traditional and "modernized" way of life.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Andrew; Khabarova, Yulia; Vershubsky, Galina; Ateeva, Yulia; Ryzhaenkov, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D status in groups of northern indigenous people of Russia leading close to traditional (seminomadic reindeer herding), post-traditional (in settlements) or "modernized" (in towns) way of life was analysed. The survey study groups consisted of 178 Nenets and Komi aged 18-60 living in the Arctic (66-67°N). Urban Komi, Udmurts and Komi-Permiaks (n=150) living in a non-Arctic area (57-61°N) formed a control group. The concentration of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), as a transport form of vitamin D, was assessed by enzyme immunoassay analysis. The group average 25OHD levels in both rural and urban Arctic residents are within the range of values seen in the non-Arctic urban subjects adjusted for season: 39.7-47.7 nmol/l. Abandoning traditional lifestyle associates with lower vitamin D levels in indigenous Arctic people. Mean±standard deviation 25OHD values among Nenets were lower in those living in the administrative centre (a big settlement) with a population of 1,460 (32.2±12.90 nmol/l) than in the residents of small settlements (39.6±14.08 nmol/l), and in reindeer herders (42.4±13.45 nmol/l; p<0.05 in both cases). Komi townspeople had lower 25OHD concentrations (47.7±12.00 nmol/l) than Komi reindeer herders (68.7±25.20; p<0.01). The transition from seminomadic to post-traditional and "modernized" way of life has led to a decrease in the consumption of traditional foods among the indigenous people of the Russian Arctic. Our data support the notion that the traditional northern diet promotes healthy vitamin D levels, while adherence to the "western" type of diet correlates with a lower 25OHD concentration.

  17. Educational Developments in Russia Since 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikandrov, Nicolai D.

    1997-01-01

    Educational reforms in Russia since 1990 have positive as well as negative aspects. Economic decline that followed the severing of ties among the former republics and regions of Russia itself place severe limitations on the pace and content of reform. The most important developments are the possibility of choice in education and independence of…

  18. The Experience of a Distance Learning Organization in a Private Higher Educational Institution in the Republic of Tatarastan (Russia): From Idea to Realization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akhmetova, Daniya; Vorontsova, Liliya; Morozova, Ilona Gennadyevna

    2013-01-01

    The article is devoted to the unique experience of distance learning development in the conditions of Russian reality. The model of distance learning in the Institute of Economics, Management and Law (Kazan city, Russia) is created on the basis of educational sphere diagnosis taking into account foreign and Russian experience. The specificity of…

  19. NATO Expansion: Poland, Hungary, and the Czech Republic’s Quest for Membership, and the Perceived Threat to Russia’s National Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-04-01

    impossible.”11 In the years immediately after the Russo -Japanese War and the 1905 revolution, the Russian High Command chose a strategy of the strategic...Crimean War, and Russo -Austrian competition in the Balkans—in conjunction with the challenge posed by Slavic minorities to the integrity of Austria...Montgomery (Alabama) Advertiser, November 4, 1996. Stanley, Alessandra , “Russia Seeks Links to NATO But Nationalists Are Bitter,” The New York Times, March 18

  20. From economic survival to recreation: contemporary uses of wild food and medicine in rural Sweden, Ukraine and NW Russia.

    PubMed

    Stryamets, Nataliya; Elbakidze, Marine; Ceuterick, Melissa; Angelstam, Per; Axelsson, Robert

    2015-06-16

    There are many ethnobotanical studies on the use of wild plants and mushrooms for food and medicinal treatment in Europe. However, there is a lack of comparative ethnobotanical research on the role of non-wood forest products (NWFPs) as wild food and medicine in local livelihoods in countries with different socio-economic conditions. The aim of this study was to compare the present use of wild food and medicine in three places representing different stages of socio-economic development in Europe. Specifically we explore which plant and fungi species people use for food and medicine in three selected rural regions of Sweden, Ukraine and the Russian Federation. We studied the current use of NWFPs for food and medicine in three rural areas that represent a gradient in economic development (as indicated by the World Bank), i.e., Småland high plain (south Sweden), Roztochya (western Ukraine), and Kortkeros (Komi Republic in North West Russia). All areas were characterised by (a) predominating rural residency, (b) high forest coverage, and (c) free access to NWFPs. A total of 205 in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with local residents in the three study areas. The collected NWFPs data included (1) the species that are used; (2) the amount harvested, (3) uses and practices (4) changes over time, (5) sources of knowledge regarding the use of NWFPs as wild food and medicine and (6) traditional recipes. In Sweden 11 species of wild plant and fungi species were used as food, and no plant species were used for medicinal purposes. In Ukraine the present use of NWFPs included 26 wild foods and 60 medicinal species, while in Russia 36 food and 44 medicinal species were reported. In the economically less developed rural areas of Ukraine and Russia, the use of NWFPs continues to be an important part of livelihoods, both as a source of income and for domestic use as food and medicine. In Sweden the collection of wild food has become mainly a recreational activity

  1. Determination of Judo Endurance Performance Using the Uchi - Komi Technique and an Adapted Lactate Minimum Test

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Paulo H.S.M.; Drigo, Alexandre J.; Carvalho, Mauro C.G.A.; Oliveira, João C.; Nunes, João E.D.; Baldissera, Vilmar; Perez, Sérgio E.A.

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the viability to use Uchi-komi (UK) in the evaluation of the judo endurance performance and using lactate threshold the analysis of the blood lactate ([Lac]) and heart rate (HR) determined through a lactate minimum test. The subjects were a group of 6 male, volunteer judokas, from 25.17 ± 5.76 years old, weight 84.50 ± 23.78 kg and height 1.78 ± 0.10 m, competitors of different levels of performance (from regional to international competitions) and match experience of (11 ± 6) years old. Three tests were performed: a) 3000 m dash in track, b) the adapted test of lactate minimum for running and c) for UK, with execution of the blow ippon-seoi-nague. No significant difference was evident for the track tests and UK in relation to blood lactate and heart rate (p > 0.05) (3.87 ± 0.38 vs 4.17 ± 0.54 mmol·L-1 and 167 ± 2 vs 152 ± 7 b·min-1, respectively). In conclusion it is stressed that: 1) The specific test for lactate minimum in judo sport is a promising possibility of aerobic capacity evaluation and a instrument of intensity training control; 2) The metabolic profile in Vlm and UKlm is similar, because there are not differences in the [Lac] and in the HR at this intensity; 3) It is possible to estimate the training intensity through the determination of the lactate minimum intensity in running (Vlm) and the Heart Rate associated (HR) from the execution of ippon-seoi- nague (uchi-komi) in judo training; 4) The Vlm for judo athletes is approximately 88% of the V3000. Key points The specific test for lactate minimum in judo sport is a promising possibility of aerobic capacity evaluation; This is a instrument for intensity training control for judo players; The metabolic profile is similar between running and uki-komi (ippon-seoi-nague techniques) at lactate minimum intensity. PMID:24198697

  2. Permafrost and indigenous land use in the northern Urals: Komi and Nenets reindeer husbandry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, Kirill V.; Habeck, Joachim Otto

    2016-09-01

    Permafrost is an integral part of the environmental conditions that frame indigenous peoples' livelihoods in many parts of the circumpolar region. On the basis of their long-term ethnographic field researches, the authors describe the various ways in which permafrost dynamics influence the lives and economic activities of two groups of reindeer-herding nomads in North-Eastern Europe and Western Siberia: Komi and Nenets. Permafrost affects the herders directly, for the herders have to take into account the probability of thermokarst while choosing the campsite and performing certain herding procedures. It also affects the herders indirectly, through its influence on landscape and vegetation and thus on reindeer behavior. More rapid permafrost degradation will have a range of adverse effects on reindeer herding.

  3. 78 FR 65283 - Grain-Oriented Electrical Steel From the People's Republic of China, the Czech Republic, Germany...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ...-3874 (the Czech Republic, Germany, Poland, and the Russian Federation (Russia)); or Steve Bezirganian... Russia (the Petitions) filed in proper form on behalf of AK Steel Corporation, Allegheny Ludlum, LLC, and... to the Poland Petition, dated September 26, 2013, and Supplement to the Russia Petition, dated...

  4. Vladivostok, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-28

    This image, acquired by NASA Terra spacecraft, is of Vladivostok, the administrative center of Primorsky Krai, Russia, and home port of the Russian Pacific Fleet, situated at the head of the Golden Horn Bay, Vladivostok.

  5. Arkhangelsk, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-26

    NASA Terra spacecraft captured this image of the city of Arkhangelsk or Archangel in English and administrative capital of Archangelsk Oblast, Russia. It is situated on both banks of the Dvina River near where it flows into the White Sea.

  6. Socioeconomic inequalities in all-cause mortality in the Czech Republic, Russia, Poland and Lithuania in the 2000s: findings from the HAPIEE Study

    PubMed Central

    Vandenheede, Hadewijch; Vikhireva, Olga; Pikhart, Hynek; Kubinova, Ruzena; Malyutina, Sofia; Pajak, Andrzej; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Peasey, Anne; Simonova, Galina; Topor-Madry, Roman; Marmot, Michael; Bobak, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Relatively large socioeconomic inequalities in health and mortality have been observed in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and the former Soviet Union (FSU). Yet comparative data are sparse and virtually all studies include only education. The aim of this study is to quantify and compare socioeconomic inequalities in all-cause mortality during the 2000s in urban population samples from four CEE/FSU countries, by three different measures of socioeconomic position (SEP) (education, difficulty buying food and household amenities), reflecting different aspects of SEP. Methods Data from the prospective population-based HAPIEE (Health, Alcohol, and Psychosocial factors in Eastern Europe) study were used. The baseline survey (2002–2005) included 16 812 men and 19 180 women aged 45–69 years in Novosibirsk (Russia), Krakow (Poland), Kaunas (Lithuania) and seven Czech towns. Deaths in the cohorts were identified through mortality registers. Data were analysed by direct standardisation and Cox regression, quantifying absolute and relative SEP differences. Results Mortality inequalities by the three SEP indicators were observed in all samples. The magnitude of inequalities varied according to gender, country and SEP measure. As expected, given the high mortality rates in Russian men, largest absolute inequalities were found among Russian men (educational slope index of inequality was 19.4 per 1000 person-years). Largest relative inequalities were observed in Czech men and Lithuanian subjects. Disadvantage by all three SEP measures remained strongly associated with increased mortality after adjusting for the other SEP indicators. Conclusions The results emphasise the importance of all SEP measures for understanding mortality inequalities in CEE/FSU. PMID:24227051

  7. Spectrum and Frequency of the GJB2 Gene Pathogenic Variants in a Large Cohort of Patients with Hearing Impairment Living in a Subarctic Region of Russia (the Sakha Republic)

    PubMed Central

    Posukh, Olga L.; Teryutin, Fedor M.; Solovyev, Aisen V.; Klarov, Leonid A.; Romanov, Georgii P.; Gotovtsev, Nyurgun N.; Kozhevnikov, Andrey A.; Kirillina, Elena V.; Sidorova, Oksana G.; Vasilyevа, Lena M.; Fedotova, Elvira E.; Morozov, Igor V.; Bondar, Alexander A.; Solovyevа, Natalya A.; Kononova, Sardana K.; Rafailov, Adyum M.; Sazonov, Nikolay N.; Alekseev, Anatoliy N.; Tomsky, Mikhail I.; Dzhemileva, Lilya U.; Khusnutdinova, Elza K.; Fedorova, Sardana A.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic variants in the GJB2 gene, encoding connexin 26, are known to be a major cause of hearing impairment (HI). More than 300 allelic variants have been identified in the GJB2 gene. Spectrum and allelic frequencies of the GJB2 gene vary significantly among different ethnic groups worldwide. Until now, the spectrum and frequency of the pathogenic variants in exon 1, exon 2 and the flanking intronic regions of the GJB2 gene have not been described thoroughly in the Sakha Republic (Yakutia), which is located in a subarctic region in Russia. The complete sequencing of the non-coding and coding regions of the GJB2 gene was performed in 393 patients with HI (Yakuts—296, Russians—51, mixed and other ethnicities—46) and in 187 normal hearing individuals of Yakut (n = 107) and Russian (n = 80) populations. In the total sample (n = 580), we revealed 12 allelic variants of the GJB2 gene, 8 of which were recessive pathogenic variants. Ten genotypes with biallelic recessive pathogenic variants in the GJB2 gene (in a homozygous or a compound heterozygous state) were found in 192 out of 393 patients (48.85%). We found that the most frequent GJB2 pathogenic variant in the Yakut patients was c.-23+1G>A (51.82%) and that the second most frequent was c.109G>A (2.37%), followed by c.35delG (1.64%). Pathogenic variants с.35delG (22.34%), c.-23+1G>A (5.31%), and c.313_326del14 (2.12%) were found to be the most frequent among the Russian patients. The carrier frequencies of the c.-23+1G>A and с.109G>A pathogenic variants in the Yakut control group were 10.20% and 2.80%, respectively. The carrier frequencies of с.35delG and c.101T>C were identical (2.5%) in the Russian control group. We found that the contribution of the GJB2 gene pathogenic variants in HI in the population of the Sakha Republic (48.85%) was the highest among all of the previously studied regions of Asia. We suggest that extensive accumulation of the c.-23+1G>A pathogenic variant in the indigenous Yakut

  8. Spectrum and Frequency of the GJB2 Gene Pathogenic Variants in a Large Cohort of Patients with Hearing Impairment Living in a Subarctic Region of Russia (the Sakha Republic).

    PubMed

    Barashkov, Nikolay A; Pshennikova, Vera G; Posukh, Olga L; Teryutin, Fedor M; Solovyev, Aisen V; Klarov, Leonid A; Romanov, Georgii P; Gotovtsev, Nyurgun N; Kozhevnikov, Andrey A; Kirillina, Elena V; Sidorova, Oksana G; Vasilyevа, Lena M; Fedotova, Elvira E; Morozov, Igor V; Bondar, Alexander A; Solovyevа, Natalya A; Kononova, Sardana K; Rafailov, Adyum M; Sazonov, Nikolay N; Alekseev, Anatoliy N; Tomsky, Mikhail I; Dzhemileva, Lilya U; Khusnutdinova, Elza K; Fedorova, Sardana A

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic variants in the GJB2 gene, encoding connexin 26, are known to be a major cause of hearing impairment (HI). More than 300 allelic variants have been identified in the GJB2 gene. Spectrum and allelic frequencies of the GJB2 gene vary significantly among different ethnic groups worldwide. Until now, the spectrum and frequency of the pathogenic variants in exon 1, exon 2 and the flanking intronic regions of the GJB2 gene have not been described thoroughly in the Sakha Republic (Yakutia), which is located in a subarctic region in Russia. The complete sequencing of the non-coding and coding regions of the GJB2 gene was performed in 393 patients with HI (Yakuts-296, Russians-51, mixed and other ethnicities-46) and in 187 normal hearing individuals of Yakut (n = 107) and Russian (n = 80) populations. In the total sample (n = 580), we revealed 12 allelic variants of the GJB2 gene, 8 of which were recessive pathogenic variants. Ten genotypes with biallelic recessive pathogenic variants in the GJB2 gene (in a homozygous or a compound heterozygous state) were found in 192 out of 393 patients (48.85%). We found that the most frequent GJB2 pathogenic variant in the Yakut patients was c.-23+1G>A (51.82%) and that the second most frequent was c.109G>A (2.37%), followed by c.35delG (1.64%). Pathogenic variants с.35delG (22.34%), c.-23+1G>A (5.31%), and c.313_326del14 (2.12%) were found to be the most frequent among the Russian patients. The carrier frequencies of the c.-23+1G>A and с.109G>A pathogenic variants in the Yakut control group were 10.20% and 2.80%, respectively. The carrier frequencies of с.35delG and c.101T>C were identical (2.5%) in the Russian control group. We found that the contribution of the GJB2 gene pathogenic variants in HI in the population of the Sakha Republic (48.85%) was the highest among all of the previously studied regions of Asia. We suggest that extensive accumulation of the c.-23+1G>A pathogenic variant in the indigenous Yakut

  9. 78 FR 70574 - Grain-Oriented Electrical Steel From China, Czech Republic, Germany, Japan, Korea, Poland, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ...-1237 (Preliminary)] Grain-Oriented Electrical Steel From China, Czech Republic, Germany, Japan, Korea... China, Czech Republic, Germany, Japan, Korea, Poland, and Russia of grain-oriented electrical steel... from Czech Republic, Germany, Japan, Korea, Poland, and Russia. Accordingly, effective September 18...

  10. Russia report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Along with cementing the joint Shuttle-Mir Program in late June with a $400 million contract, the U.S. and Russia signed a deal to team up on global environmental issues. Under the agreement, U.S. and Russian scientists will establish modern facilities for petroleum research, including advanced geographic systems technology, petroleum geochemistry, and seismic processing to help Russia transition to a “market” economy, Interior Secreary Bruce Babbitt reports. The program, to be funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, will produce maps, technical reports, and other data for investment decisions.

  11. Moscow, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-05-21

    This image from NASA Terra spacecraft shows Moscow, the capital city of Russia, the northernmost megacity in the world, the most populous in Europe, and with a population of over 11,000,000, the 6th largest city proper in the world.

  12. [The problem of immigration in Russia].

    PubMed

    Slater, W

    1994-01-01

    "The article examines the threefold immigration problem currently facing Russia: the influx of refugees from the developing world who hope eventually to reach the West, and the large numbers of non-Russians and ethnic Russians entering the country from the other former Soviet republics. The institutions established recently to tackle immigration are insufficiently funded and often find themselves in conflict with other agencies, both Russian and international. Legislation on the status of immigrants is also confused. The most pressing issue, however, is that of Russian immigration into Russia. This has implications for domestic policies: the immigrants are regarded as a potential solution to the problem of rural depopulation and are prevented from entering densely populated regions. The exodus of ethnic Russians from the other former Soviet republic may also affect Russia's relations with these countries, which it has accused of discriminating against their Russian populations." (SUMMARY IN ENG) excerpt

  13. Carbon emission from the soil surface in a mature blueberry pine forest of the middle taiga (Republic of Komi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, A. F.

    2016-08-01

    Data on the input of plant falloff and organic matter decomposition on the surface of the peaty podzolic-gleyic humus-illuvial (Gleyic Podzol) soil under a mature blueberry pine forest in the middle taiga are presented. The fractional composition of the falloff was determined, and constants of decomposition for its components were calculated. The carbon flux to the atmosphere due to the mineralization of plant residues is estimated at 251 g/m2. A close positive correlation ( r = 0.71; P < 0.05) was found between the carbon dioxide emission measured using a gas analyzer and the soil temperature at the depth of 10 cm. The CO2 emission for a growing period calculated from the data on its dependence on soil temperature in different years varied from 243 to 313 g C/m2 and was related to weather conditions.

  14. Moscow, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-30

    STS068-236-027 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- The STS-68 crewmembers used a 70mm camera to photograph this early morning nadir view of wheel-shaped Moscow. Star City, Russia facility, north of the city, is among the detail seen in the view, photographed from 115 nautical miles above Earth. Six NASA astronauts spent a week and a half aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in support of the Space Radar Laboratory 2 (SRL-2) mission.

  15. Genetic diversity of Echinococcus spp. in Russia.

    PubMed

    Konyaev, Sergey V; Yanagida, Tetsuya; Nakao, Minoru; Ingovatova, Galina M; Shoykhet, Yakov N; Bondarev, Alexandr Y; Odnokurtsev, Valeriy A; Loskutova, Kyunnyay S; Lukmanova, Gulnur I; Dokuchaev, Nikolai E; Spiridonov, Sergey; Alshinecky, Mikhail V; Sivkova, Tatyana N; Andreyanov, Oleg N; Abramov, Sergey A; Krivopalov, Anton V; Karpenko, Sergey V; Lopatina, Natalia V; Dupal, Tamara A; Sako, Yasuhito; Ito, Akira

    2013-11-01

    In Russia, both alveolar and cystic echinococcoses are endemic. This study aimed to identify the aetiological agents of the diseases and to investigate the distribution of each Echinococcus species in Russia. A total of 75 Echinococcus specimens were collected from 14 host species from 2010 to 2012. Based on the mitochondrial DNA sequences, they were identified as Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.), E. canadensis and E. multilocularis. E. granulosus s.s. was confirmed in the European Russia and the Altai region. Three genotypes, G6, G8 and G10 of E. canadensis were detected in Yakutia. G6 was also found in the Altai region. Four genotypes of E. multilocularis were confirmed; the Asian genotype in the western Siberia and the European Russia, the Mongolian genotype in an island of Baikal Lake and the Altai Republic, the European genotype from a captive monkey in Moscow Zoo and the North American genotype in Yakutia. The present distributional record will become a basis of public health to control echinococcoses in Russia. The rich genetic diversity demonstrates the importance of Russia in investigating the evolutionary history of the genus Echinococcus.

  16. The changing nature of murder in Russia.

    PubMed

    Chervyakov, Valeriy V; Shkolnikov, Vladimir M; Pridemore, William Alex; McKee, Martin

    2002-11-01

    The death rate from homicide in Russia increased rapidly during the 1990 s. It is now about 20 times higher than in western Europe and is among the highest recorded anywhere in the world. However, this issue has received little attention so far from public health researchers or policymakers. This paper describes the changing nature of homicide during the 1990 s in Russia as a whole and, in more detail, in the Udmurt Republic. The study uses data from three sources: routine mortality data for Russia from 1970 to 1999; statistics on criminal investigations and convictions in Russia between 1990 and 1997; and an in-depth study of homicide trial records in the Udmurt Republic in 1989-1991 and 1998.Deaths from homicide increased between 1970 and 1985, falling slightly during the 1985 anti-alcohol campaign and then resuming their increase until 1994. Another fall in the late 1990 s was arrested in 1998, with an increase in 1999. By 1999 the age standardised homicide death rate in Russia was 81% higher than in 1990, an increase almost twice that of all causes of death combined. Throughout the 1990 s about 10% of those convicted of homicide were female. Of those homicides leading to convictions in the Udmurt Republic, 71% of those killed by males were male, as were 76% of those killed by females. Killings of women by men often involved sexual assaults. In Russia as a whole, about 80% of those convicted of homicide were reported to be under the influence of alcohol at the time. In the Udmurt Republic, where data on both offender and victim were available, victims were also commonly intoxicated. The nature of homicide in Russia has changed considerably in less than a decade, with many more now involving aggravating circumstances, such as murder to conceal another crime, in association with robbery or rape, or by a group of people. Although still a small proportion of the total convicted, the number of murders by hired killers is also on the rise. The characteristics of those

  17. ABH secretion polymorphism in Icelanders, Aland Islanders, Finns, Finnish Lapps, Komi and Greenland Eskimos: a review and new data.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, A W; Partanen, K; Frants, R R; Pronk, J C; Kostense, P J

    1986-01-01

    The secretion of the ABH antigens in saliva was tested in indigenous individuals of several populations: Icelanders in Reykjavik and Husavik (northeastern Iceland), Aland Islanders, Finno-Ugrians (Finns, Finnish Lapps, Komi) and Eskimos (Augpilagtok, northwestern Greenland). The frequencies of ABH non-secretors among the Icelanders (28-36%) were among the highest ever noted in Europeans. Among Alanders and Swedes on the Finnish mainland the frequency (around 20%) was comparable to Swedish values but considerably higher than among Finns (13-14%). The values among northeastern Finns and Komi (about 9%) were intermediate between values among Lapps (below 5%) and Scandinavians (15-26%), excluding Icelanders (28-41%). The average frequency of non-secretors among Lapps in Finland (2.2 +/- 0.5%) was the lowest observed among white populations. Like many other arctic populations of the Mongolian race, the Greenland Eskimos had a very low frequency of non-secretors. It is probable that the non-secretor allele ABH*se was absent from the ancient Lapps and Greenland Eskimos but introduced by invading populations. It is concluded that the ABH*se allele frequencies vary much more among northern European populations than hitherto appreciated. Recent studies indicate that the non-secretor status of the ABH blood group substances in mucous body fluids is associated with pathological conditions of the mucous membranes of the embryologically related digestive and respiratory systems, particularly with duodenal ulcer and gastric (pre)malignancies but probably also with pulmonary dysfunction. In view of these disadvantages of the ABH non-secretor status the high frequency of ABH*se in Icelanders is a paradoxical phenomenon. The frequency of ABH non-secretors among the founders (Vikings) of Iceland may have been considerably higher than among the present populations in northwestern Europe. The increase in northwestern direction of the ABH*se allele frequencies supports this hypothesis

  18. Lichens as biomonitor of atmospheric aerosol composition in the Northwest European Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Vladimir P.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Zamber, Natalia S.; Konov, Konstantin G.; Starodymova, Dina P.

    2010-05-01

    Numerous studies have shown that aerosols are of importance for atmospheric chemistry and climate of the Arctic. At the coasts of Arctic seas and in their catchment areas delivery of chemical elements and compounds are registered in natural archives, for example in lichens. Lichens absorb substances, including trace elements, through dry and wet deposition, and have been widely used as biomonitors. We studied multi-element composition of terricolous (mostly of genera Cladonia and Cetraria) and fruticose epiphytic (mostly of genera Alectoria, Usnea and Bryoria) lichens collected in 2004-2009 in Kola Peninsula, Karelia, Arkhangelsk Region and Komi Republic of NW Russia, mostly in the frame of International Polar Year activity. About 110 samples were analyzed. The unwashed lichen samples were air dried and homogenised to a fine powder in an agate crusher. Samples were treated in a four-step chemical digestion procedure (full dissolution via acid attack) and element concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Parts of dry samples were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). An enrichment factor (EF) was calculated for each element (X) relative to the composition of earth's crust: EF = ((X/Al) in lichen) / ((X/Al) in the earth's crust). Al was used as a crustal indicator. In most samples contents of Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, rare earth elements (REEs), Th, U are at the background level and their EFs are less than 10. These low EF values indicated that, relative to average values for crustal rocks, there was no enrichment of these elements in the lichen concerned. For some elements (Se, Cd, Zn, Sb, Pb, As, Ni, Cu) consistently higher EF values were obtained. These higher values were interpreted in terms of sources of both anthropogenic and natural sources other than crustal rock and (or) soil. These elements could be derived by long-range atmospheric transport. Highest concentrations of Cu, Ni, Pb in lichens

  19. Moscow, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Moscow, the political and economic heart of Russia, sits on the far eastern end of Europe, roughly 1300 kilometers (815 miles) west of the Ural Mountains and the Asian continent. The city boasts a population of nine million and encompasses an area of 1035 square kilometers (405 square miles). The Moscow River runs through the center of the city, and the Kremlin, the seat of the Russian government, lies in the direct center. Moscow is thought to have been founded in the 12th Century by Yury Dolgoruky, Prince of Suzdal, who hosted a big feast on the site. The city was shortly after established as a trading route along the Moscow River. Ivan III, who is largely credited with uniting all of Russia, built the Kremlin's cathedrals and declared Moscow the capital of his new kingdom in the 15th century. In the 17th century, Ivan the Great moved the capital to St. Petersburg, where it remained until the Bolsheviks brought the seat of government back to Moscow in 1918. Over the years the city has been sacked and burnt to the ground by the Tartars, the Poles, and the French. Thanks to the resilient spirit of the Russian people, the city remains as vital as ever. Now it is as capitalist in nature as London or New York, and everything from Big Macs to BMWs can be found on its streets. The blue-gray pixels in this false-color image are urban areas. The light green areas surrounding the city are farms and the brown regions are more sparsely vegetated areas. This image of Moscow was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+), flying aboard the Landsat 7 satellite. July 23, 2002, marks the 30th anniversary of the Landsat program. (Click to read the press release-Celebrating 30 Years of Imaging the Earth.) The Landsat program has been particularly instrumental in tracking land use and land cover changes-such as increased urban growth-over the last three decades. Image courtesy Ron Beck, USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  20. Moscow, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Moscow, the political and economic heart of Russia, sits on the far eastern end of Europe, roughly 1300 kilometers (815 miles) west of the Ural Mountains and the Asian continent. The city boasts a population of nine million and encompasses an area of 1035 square kilometers (405 square miles). The Moscow River runs through the center of the city, and the Kremlin, the seat of the Russian government, lies in the direct center. Moscow is thought to have been founded in the 12th Century by Yury Dolgoruky, Prince of Suzdal, who hosted a big feast on the site. The city was shortly after established as a trading route along the Moscow River. Ivan III, who is largely credited with uniting all of Russia, built the Kremlin's cathedrals and declared Moscow the capital of his new kingdom in the 15th century. In the 17th century, Ivan the Great moved the capital to St. Petersburg, where it remained until the Bolsheviks brought the seat of government back to Moscow in 1918. Over the years the city has been sacked and burnt to the ground by the Tartars, the Poles, and the French. Thanks to the resilient spirit of the Russian people, the city remains as vital as ever. Now it is as capitalist in nature as London or New York, and everything from Big Macs to BMWs can be found on its streets. The blue-gray pixels in this false-color image are urban areas. The light green areas surrounding the city are farms and the brown regions are more sparsely vegetated areas. This image of Moscow was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+), flying aboard the Landsat 7 satellite. July 23, 2002, marks the 30th anniversary of the Landsat program. (Click to read the press release-Celebrating 30 Years of Imaging the Earth.) The Landsat program has been particularly instrumental in tracking land use and land cover changes-such as increased urban growth-over the last three decades. Image courtesy Ron Beck, USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  1. Russia Country Analysis Brief

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Russia is a major producer and exporter of oil and natural gas. Russia's economic growth is driven by energy exports, given its high oil and natural gas production. Oil and natural gas revenues accounted for 43% of Russia's federal budget revenues in 2015.

  2. Distance Education in Russia: Between the Past and the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moiseeva, Marina

    2005-01-01

    The history of distance education in Russia and in the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) is a history of dramatic change in ideology, conceptual framework, and approach. It can be divided into two main stages: initial formation and development into the world's largest system of correspondence learning, from the mid 1920s to the…

  3. Chemical compound of a snow cover in taiga zone territory of the European northeast of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariya, Vasilevich

    2013-04-01

    Receipt of substances from atmosphere plays an important role in geochemical balance of ecosystems. Atmosphere participates participate in an exchange and substance redistribution for the Earth, and its chemical compound gives the objective information on quality of the air environment. The snow cover acts as the effective store of substances which remain in it in an invariable condition within winter. Chemical compound of snow reflects the valid size of dry both damp losses and quantitative parametres of pollution of ecosystems. Sensitivity of a snow cover to change of industrial conditions in region allows to estimate a state of environment objectively. Distinction of areas on natural receipt macro- and microcomponents from atmosphere causes of an estimation of their background receipt on spreading surface. The purpose of the present work is studying of a chemical compound of a snow cover and spatial distribution of macrocomponents to a taiga zone territories of the European northeast (Republic Komi). It is established that average value of a mineralization of thawed snow, has made 2.8 mg/dm3 and tends to reduction with width increase. Our results have shown that thawed snow water in a taiga zone is characterised by subacidic reaction. Average value ?? has made 4.7 ± 0.1. The oxidation of snow cover is observed from the north on the south. Formation of acidity of a snow cover estimated through the relation of the sum of concentration anions (A = [SO42-] + [N?3-] + [?l-]) to the sum of cations concentration (K = [NH4+] + [Ca2+] + [Mg2+] + [Na+] + [K+]). The received data follows that thawed snow of a taiga zone is characterised by values ?/? <1 at increase in the given relation from the south on the north from 0.42 till (average value equally 0.58). Thus, the acid-base properties of a taiga zone snow cover are defined by deficiency of neutralised connections and prevalence in thawed snow of ions of hydrogen that corresponds to the general situation in the

  4. Russia: Background and Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    commercial sector, income inequality remained high and economic growth all but disappeared.29 It is easy to point to oil to explain Russia’s problems...Russia is unlikely to shift to an economy that produces technology-intensive goods, leaving it in a middle income trap.11 Many thought after the... income trap has hit Russia, and it is doubtful Russia will switch to technological goods that drive growth in high- income countries. These factors

  5. Assessment of contemporary erosion/sedimentation rates trend within a small well-cultivated catchments using caesium-137 as a chronomarker (on the example of the Republic of Tatarstan, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifullin, Aidar; Gusarov, Artem; Gafurov, Artur; Golosov, Valentin

    2017-04-01

    An analysis of sedimentation at a first order valley bottoms allows us to receive a sufficiently reliable quantitative evaluation of soil losses from the catchment area for two time intervals: 1963-1986 and 1987-2015 and its temporal variability. The studied catchment "Temeva River" with total area 1.13 km2 is located in the northwestern part of the Republic of Tatarstan (the Myósha river basin). Combination methods and approaches were used for evaluation of sediment redistribution for the both time intervals, including detail geodetic survey of the main morphological units of the valley, large scale geomorphological mapping, cesium-137 technique for the sediment dating in the typical locations of the valley bottom, calculation of soil losses using modified version of USLE and State Hydrological Institute models. In addition available information was collected from the local meteorological stations about some climate characteristics dynamics for the period 1950-2015. Landsat images were applied for evaluation of possible changes of land use. Crop management coefficients were calculated separately for the rainfall season and snow-melt using available data about crop-rotation dynamics for the last 55 years. In the results it was found the significant decrease of average annual soil losses from the cultivated part of the "Temeva River" catchment for the period 1987-2015 if it is compare with period 1963-1986. Such conclusion is mainly based on the different sedimentation rates in the valley bottom: for the period of 1963-1986 the average sedimentation rates were 0.92-1.81 cm per year, while the period of 1987-2015 the rates were 0.17-0.50 cm per year. The main reason for this significant decrease sediment redistribution within the catchment is the reduction of surface runoff caused by climate warming in the region. It is led to the reduction of soils freezing depth and water reserves in a snow cover before the snow-melt, and to the sharp decline in the frequency of

  6. Population change in the former Soviet Republics.

    PubMed

    Haub, C

    1994-12-01

    Demographic trends in the former Soviet Republics and Russia are summarized and discussed in this publication. The former Soviet Republics in Europe as well as Georgia and Armenia had completed or almost completed their demographic transition before October 1991. Other Central Asian republics experienced reduced mortality, but, despite rapid declines, fertility is still above replacement level (at 3-4 children per woman). The economic and social dislocation of the breakup of the republics has hastened fertility decline. The annual population growth rate of the USSR in the mid-1980s was 0.9%; this rate declined to 0.4% in 1991, and the decline has continued. The 1991 population of the USSR was 289.1 million. Between 1989 and 1991, the crude birth rate was 18/1000 population, and the crude death rate was 10/1000. The net migration rate of -4/1000 helped to reduce growth. Total fertility in the USSR was 2.3 children in 1990. In Russia, fertility declined from 1.9 in 1990 to 1.4 in 1993. The preferred family size in Russia was 1.9 in 1990 and 1.5 in 1993. This decline occurred due to lack of confidence in the economy and insufficient income. Only 19% of women used contraception in 1990. Marriages declined after 1990. Age pyramids were similar in the republics in that there was a narrowing in the proportion aged 45-49 years, and the male population aged over 65 years was diminished, due to the effect of World War II. The cohort of those aged 20-24 years in 1992 was very small due to the small parental birth cohort. The differences in the republics was characterized as broad-based in the younger ages because of high fertility. The number of childbearing women will remain large. Life expectancy has been 70 years since the 1950s and has declined in some republics due to substandard health care, lack of job safety measures, and alcoholism. Some republics experienced increased life expectancy, but, after 1991, mortality increased. Tajikistan had the highest infant mortality

  7. Fireball Streaking over Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-16

    This photograph of the meteor streaking through the sky above Chelyabinsk, Russia, on Feb. 15, 2013, was taken by a local, M. Ahmetvaleev. The small asteroid was about 56 to 66 feet 17 to 20 meters wide.

  8. Fireball Flash over Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-16

    This image shows the flash above Chelyabinsk, Russia, from the fireball streaking through the sky on Feb. 15, 2013. The small asteroid was approximately 56 to 66 feet in diameter. The picture was taken by a local, M. Ahmetvaleev.

  9. Franz Josef Land, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-12

    This image from NASA Terra spacecraft is of Franz Josef Land, an archipelago in the far north of Russia. It consists of 191 islands covering an area of about 200 by 325 km, and has no native inhabitants.

  10. Changes in the organic matter of taiga soils during the natural reafforestation after cutting in the middle taiga of the Komi Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymov, A. A.; Milanovskii, E. Yu.

    2013-12-01

    It has been shown that the distribution features of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic fractions of humic substances (HSs) in the upper genetic horizons of undisturbed podzolic soils and litho-barrier podzols are similar. The concentrations of the separate HS fractions in the mineral horizons are largely determined by the soil mineralogy. In forest litters of secondary phytocenoses developed after the cutting of spruce forests, an increase in the content of hydrophilic compounds has been observed on loamy deposits at a decrease in the portion of lignin-like organic compounds. An increase in the portion of Al-Fe-humus compounds has been revealed in the mineral soil horizons of secondary phytocenoses. It has been proposed to use the degree of hydrophilicity ( D H ) for characterizing the features of the organic matter in taiga soils. An increase in the content of the fractions of occluded organic matter and that bound to minerals (density of 1.6-2.2 g/cm3) has been observed in the eluvial horizons of a young cutover area.

  11. Radioactive Elements in Soils of Siberia (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranovskaya, N. V.; Rikhvanov, L. P.; Matveenko, I. N.; Strakhovenko, V. D.; Malikova, I. N.; Shcherbakov, B. L.; Sukhorukov, F. V.; Aturova, V. P.

    2012-04-01

    The Center of State Sanitary and Epidemiological Surveillance Department in Krasnoyarsk Territory, Krasnoyarsk In the course of long-term research a great deal of information on the content of natural and artificial radionuclides in soils of the Siberian regions has been obtained and summarized (Altai and Krasnoyarsk Territories, Altai Republic, Buryatia, Yakutia, Khakassia, Irkutsk, Novosibirsk, Tomsk Oblasts and a number of other Siberian regions). The content level of U(Ra), Th and K in soil of studied areas is within the range of values obtained for soil of other areas of Russia and the world and defined, first of all, by radioactivity of parent rocks. The authors have studied the total level of specific activity for 137Cs most completely in soils of different Siberian regions. The maximum density of such sites with global fallouts (nuclear air explosions in Novaya Zemlya, Lop Nor, Semipalatinsk etc.) is typical for the areas of Altai Territory and Buryatia Republic. Elevated level of radiocesium (to 1000 and more than Bq/kg) is characteristic for the sites adjacent to the area of NFP (Seversk, Zheleznogorsk). Our data obtained in determination of plutonium in soils of different Siberian regions excess remarkably its background accepted for Siberia. Particularly high accumulation levels of Pu in soil were observed in the zones of NFP operation (Seversk, Tomsk Oblast; Zheleznogorsk, Krasnoyarsk Territory, in the sites of accidents fallouts at underground nuclear explosions in Sakha Republic (Yakutia). Abnormally high ratio of 238Pu/239,240Pu in soils of Sakha republic, Aginsk Buryatia Autonomous District, Krasnoyarsk Territory has engaged our attention.

  12. Kondyor Massif, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-19

    The Kondyor Massif is located in Eastern Siberia, Russia, north of the city of Khabarovsk. It is a rare form of igneous intrusion called alkaline-ultrabasic massif and it is full of rare minerals. This image is from NASA Terra satellite.

  13. Russia: St. Petersburg

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... 1703. This marshy, low-lying area possesses many rivers and islands, and about 300 bridges, of which more than twenty are drawbridges. The ... of the 20th century, Russia's westernmost border served as a barrier to international interaction, and the forests in this region were ...

  14. Dating Violence in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysova, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    The phenomenon of violence in interpersonal relationships has been little studied in Russia, and the phenomenon of violence between dating partners has not been the object of scientific interest at all. The study on which the present article is based was designed to obtain information about the violence in dating among students enrolled in…

  15. Dating Violence in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysova, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    The phenomenon of violence in interpersonal relationships has been little studied in Russia, and the phenomenon of violence between dating partners has not been the object of scientific interest at all. The study on which the present article is based was designed to obtain information about the violence in dating among students enrolled in…

  16. White Sea - Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At bottom center of this true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from April 13, 2001, the White Sea in western Russia is becoming free of ice in its southern extent. Meanwhile, the blue-green waters along the coast of the peninsula jutting out into the Barents Sea to the northeast could be due to a phytoplankton bloom.

  17. Home Education in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staroverova, T. I.

    2011-01-01

    From the eighteenth through the early twentieth centuries, home education (home schooling) by tutors and governesses in Russia was a customary form of schooling for an overwhelming majority of members of the nobility. Social and political transformations of the twentieth century led to substantial changes as the state got actively involved with…

  18. White Sea - Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At bottom center of this true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from April 13, 2001, the White Sea in western Russia is becoming free of ice in its southern extent. Meanwhile, the blue-green waters along the coast of the peninsula jutting out into the Barents Sea to the northeast could be due to a phytoplankton bloom.

  19. Home Education in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staroverova, T. I.

    2011-01-01

    From the eighteenth through the early twentieth centuries, home education (home schooling) by tutors and governesses in Russia was a customary form of schooling for an overwhelming majority of members of the nobility. Social and political transformations of the twentieth century led to substantial changes as the state got actively involved with…

  20. Rehabilitation in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Erin

    2005-01-01

    For several decades, the disability community in Russia has battled for its rights. In 1995, a disability rights law was passed that covered multiple areas, such as environmental access, education, and work. This article focuses on Russian rehabilitation philosophy and practice. It is written from a mixture of perspectives?personal experience,…

  1. Russia: Forest policy during transition

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    Russia is a recognized leader in forest conservation, research, and development. This book analyzes the country`s forest sector and the severe management problems that threaten its socioeconomic stability and environmental integrity. It outlines the significance of Russia`s forest resources, review the sector`s performance, identifies the key challenges, proposal and agenda for forest sector reform, and assesses the need for assistance from the international community. The book`s main focus is on Siberia and the Far East. Tables, boxes, and figures show various factors that contribute to and are affected by Russia`s environmental problems and the expected reforms in the forest sector.

  2. CITY OF SANTA FE V. KOMIS REVISITED: AN ANALYSIS OF THE ACTUAL IMPACTS OF CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF THE SANTA FE BYPASS ON THE VALUE OF NEARBY REAL ESTATE

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Dr. E. J., Jr.,; Bentz, C. B.; O'Hora, T. D.; Baepler, Dr. D.

    2003-02-27

    The Santa Fe Bypass for transport of transuranic waste (TRU) to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico has been constructed and is operational (as of 2000). This paper presents a review of actual empirical data from the sales of real estate in the Santa Fe City/County area since the filing of the City of Santa Fe v. Komis lawsuit in 1988. The data analyzed covers the time period from 1989 through the last quarter of 2001.

  3. Russia`s atomic tsar: Viktor N. Mikhailov

    SciTech Connect

    Reams, C.A.

    1996-12-01

    Minatom (Ministry of Atomic Energy) was created to manage Russia`s nuclear weapons program in the age of disarmament. The ministry is responsible for the development, production, and maintenance of nuclear weapons, warhead dismantlement, the production of nuclear materials for weapons, the disposition of nuclear materials disassembled from warheads, the administration of Russia`s vast nuclear weapons complex, the development of policy for the future role of Russia`s nuclear complex and payment of employees entrusted with such tasks. Thus, Minatom is instrumental in the implementation of arms control, disarmament and nonproliferation agreements. The director of Minatom, Viktor N. Mikhailov, wields a great deal of power and influence over Russia`s nuclear infrastructure. He is an important player amidst efforts to reduce the threats posed by Russia`s decaying nuclear complex. There are certainly other personalities in the Russian government who influence Minatom; however, few affect the ministry as profoundly as Mikhailov. His ability to influence Russia`s nuclear complex has been clearly demonstrated by his policies in relation to the US purchase of Russian highly enriched uranium, the planned fissile material storage facility at Mayak, materials protection, control and accountability programs, and his unwavering determination to sell Iran commercial nuclear technology. Mikhailov has also been a key negotiator when dealing with the US on issues of transparency of weapons dismantlement and fissile material disposition, as well as the use of US threat reduction funds. His policies and concerns in these areas will affect the prospects for the successful negotiation and implementation of future nuclear threat reduction programs and agreements with Russia.

  4. Reassuring Russia On BMD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-16

    he was responsible for the operational test planning, execution, analysis, and reporting of all Navy Ballistic Missile Defense Baselines, AEGIS... Ballistic Missile Defense comprehensive strategy states that the United States homeland missile defense capabilities are not focused on Russia, are...Reflecting Russia’s concerns over the U.S. ballistic missile defense strategy, Russia’s President announced his State Armament Program 2020 which increases

  5. Confronting Russia, Again

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    countercartel” composed of the EU, the United States, China, Japan, India, and South Korea under the supervison of the International Energy Agency (IEA...Russias rhetoric and campaign to expand its strategic influence are indicative of a perception by Moscow that its resurgence is a zero sum game vis-à-vis...the United States. Russian influence and power are the result of its asymmetric energy relationship with Europe and its position in international

  6. [Imported viral hepatitis in the Czech Republic].

    PubMed

    Dlhý, J; Benes, C

    2007-04-01

    Through the analysis of notified viral hepatitis, trends in the occurrence of imported cases in the Czech Republic have been specified, the aim of which was to draw attention to the epidemiologically important aspects of travelling abroad. In the software environment of Epi Info version 6.04d, nationwide databases of communicable diseases over the period of 1993-2005 were analysed. The period was defined with respect to the availability of necessary data in the Epidat information system for communicable disease reporting in the Czech Republic. During the years 1993-2005, 12,091 cases of communicable diseases were imported into the Czech Republic of which viral hepatitis accounted for 5.7 % (685). The rates by diagnosis were as follows: viral hepatitis A 61 %, acute viral hepatitis B 15 %, chronic viral hepatitis C 11 %, viral hepatitis E 5 %, acute viral hepatitis C 3 %, chronic viral hepatitis B 3 % and other cases of viral hepatitis 2 %. The rates by the "imported by" variable: Czech tourists 47.2 %, foreigners 32.8 %, Czech business travellers 20.0 %. The diseases were most commonly imported from the following countries: Ukraine 13 %, Slovakia 8 %, Southern Europe 6 %, Egypt 6 % and Russia 5 %. In the Czech Republic, communicable diseases are reported using the Epidat system. The Epidat database analysis focused on reported cases of imported viral hepatitis represents an important starting point for assessing health risks associated with travelling abroad.

  7. [AIDS in Russia. It is still possible to stop the epidemic. Interview with Dr. A.P. Koslov].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, P

    1996-01-01

    According to A.P. Koslov, president of the Fourth International Conference on AIDS, Cancer, and Associated Diseases held in Russia in 1996, the conference represents the first high level discussion of AIDS risk management in Russia. Russia has a strong potential for development of a vaccine, having been a key player in the smallpox eradication program in the late 1950s. Conditions are difficult at present, but it is possible that Russia will be able to develop a practical vaccine for distribution in the Third World. Efforts to develop an HIV vaccine underway in different countries have been examined, and a list has been compiled of Russian institutions able to participate in HIV vaccine development. International assistance for vaccine development in Russia would help both the medical establishment in Russia, which has suffered because of the economic and social crisis, and the international community. A meeting is planned for December 1996 in St. Petersburg to organize an AIDS control organization for all of Russia. Mobilization of support for AIDS prevention activities is necessary but very difficult. If nothing is done, the epidemic in Ukraine will soon spread to Russia. But Russia and China are among the few countries where an HIV epidemic could still be prevented or stopped. The association in St. Petersburg cooperates with other former Soviet republics in AIDS control activities, although attendance at international meetings and conferences is frequently curtailed for financial reasons.

  8. STS-112 crew with President of Ajara in Georgia (Russia)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Aslan Abashidze, President of the Autonomous Republic of Ajara in Georgia (Russia) shakes hands with STS-112 Mission Specialist Fyodor N. Yurchikhin, Ph.D., (right) a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency. Yurchikhin is at Kennedy Space Center awaiting his launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-112 to the International Space Station. The launch has been postponed to no earlier than Monday, Oct. 7, so that the Mission Control Center, located at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, can be secured and protected from potential storm impacts from Hurricane Lili.

  9. STS-112 crew with President of Ajara in Georgia (Russia)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Aslan Abashidze, President of the Autonomous Republic of Ajara in Georgia (Russia) shakes hands with STS-112 Mission Specialist Fyodor N. Yurchikhin, Ph.D., (right) a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency. Yurchikhin is at Kennedy Space Center awaiting his launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-112 to the International Space Station. The launch has been postponed to no earlier than Monday, Oct. 7, so that the Mission Control Center, located at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, can be secured and protected from potential storm impacts from Hurricane Lili.

  10. Biosensor development in Russia.

    PubMed

    Reshetilov, Anatoly N

    2007-07-01

    The review summarizes the current Russian research in the field of biological sensors for detection of carbohydrates, alcohols, medicines, enzyme inhibitors, toxicants, heavy metal ions, as well as viruses and microbial cells. Some of the presented works describe the analytical parameters of biosensors; other publications provide a basis for their development. The review covers mainly publications that have appeared over the past 10 years. As a whole, the collected material gives an idea of the main tendencies of biosensor development in Russia. The review is not meant to be comprehensive but highlights the major trends in this field in the last decade.

  11. Academic medicine in Russia.

    PubMed

    Burger, Edward J; Ziganshina, Lilia; Ziganshin, Airat U

    2004-12-01

    Academic medicine, along with professionalism of the medical community in Russia underwent a remarkable evolution from the Revolution through the decline of the Soviet Union. The Soviet period brought about an enormous expansion of numbers of admissions to medical schools and a corresponding increase in the number of new physicians. Academic medical institutions were separated from institutions of higher learning in general and medical science was separated from the mainstream of science. Many of these features have been reversed in the past 14 years and re-professionalization of medicine has resumed.

  12. Russia’s Naval Future.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-24

    31 vii Viii ULS OF URn PAGE Figure I .......................................... 42 ix RUSSIA’S NAVAL FUTURE CHATER I...convinced Peter that Russia must become a naval power. To accomplish this goal, he set out in 1697 to visit European cities -especially English and

  13. Syphilis soars in Russia.

    PubMed

    Ingram, M

    1995-07-08

    The number of adults with syphilis in Russia has increased 15-fold since the collapse of the Soviet Union. The rate in children is 20 times higher than it was 4 years ago. 126,500 cases were registered with the health ministry over the past year, while 7900 were in 1990. The number of cases in children increased from 38 in 1991 to 761 this year; most of these cases were acquired via sexual transmission. Lilia Tikhonova, the health ministry's chief specialist on sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), blamed the increases on "the complete perversion of our society's morals," the rapid growth of child prostitution, the influx of homeless people and refugees into the cities, and miracle cures that are used in place of seeing a specialist. In communist Russia, patients were required to register passport details and previous sexual contacts, and future sexual contact was forbidden for a period; anyone breaking these rules faced 5 years in jail. Current law only punishes those who knowingly infect their sexual partners. Health officials in the Ukraine, where a similar increase in the number of STDs has been noted, blame black market condoms. Over the past 5 years, cheap foreign condoms have flooded the market.

  14. Flooding in Southern Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Over the past two weeks, heavy rains have inundated southern Russia, giving rise to floods that killed up to 83 people and drove thousands from their homes. This false-color image acquired on June 23, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra satellite shows some of the worst flooding. The Black Sea is the dark patch in the lower left-hand corner. The city of Krasnodor, Russia, which was one of the cities hardest hit, sits on the western edge of the larger lake on the left side of the image, and Stavropol, which lost more lives than any other city, sits just east of the small cluster of lakes on the right-hand side of the image. Normally, the rivers and smaller lakes in this image cannot even be seen clearly on MODIS imagery. In this false-color image, the ground is green and blue and water is black or dark brown. Clouds come across as pink and white. Credit: Image courtesy Jesse Allen, NASA GSFC, based on data provided by the MODIS Rapid Response System.

  15. Flooding in Southern Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Over the past two weeks, heavy rains have inundated southern Russia, giving rise to floods that killed up to 83 people and drove thousands from their homes. This false-color image acquired on June 23, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra satellite shows some of the worst flooding. The Black Sea is the dark patch in the lower left-hand corner. The city of Krasnodor, Russia, which was one of the cities hardest hit, sits on the western edge of the larger lake on the left side of the image, and Stavropol, which lost more lives than any other city, sits just east of the small cluster of lakes on the right-hand side of the image. Normally, the rivers and smaller lakes in this image cannot even be seen clearly on MODIS imagery. In this false-color image, the ground is green and blue and water is black or dark brown. Clouds come across as pink and white. Credit: Image courtesy Jesse Allen, NASA GSFC, based on data provided by the MODIS Rapid Response System.

  16. Russia’s Nuclear Weapons Dilemma: A Cooperative Approach to International Security in the 1990s

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Vladislav Zubok , "Tyranny of the Weak: Russia’s New Foreign Policy," World Policy Journal 9, no. 2 (1992): 203-205. 57 support for economic reform. They...8217 Views of the Soviet Army." Problems of Communism 37, no. 3-4 (May-August 1988): 110-116. Zubok , Vladislav . "Tyranny of the Weak: Russia’s New Foreign Policy." World Policy Journal 9, no. 2 (1992): i91-217. ...republics. 15 Kurt M . Campbell et al., Soviet Nuclear Fission: Control of the Nuclear Arsenal in a Disintegrating Soviet Union

  17. Green Youth of Russia, Kazakhstan and Ukraine: After-School Naturalist Programs in Post-Soviet Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinnikov, Mikhail S.; Lindsey, Jason Royce

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the status of young naturalist after-school programs in three post-Soviet republics: Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan. In the past, the region's environmental teachers, leaders and activists have emerged from such youth programs. Thus, the health of these programs is a leading indicator for the long-term viability of broader…

  18. Green Youth of Russia, Kazakhstan and Ukraine: After-School Naturalist Programs in Post-Soviet Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinnikov, Mikhail S.; Lindsey, Jason Royce

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the status of young naturalist after-school programs in three post-Soviet republics: Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan. In the past, the region's environmental teachers, leaders and activists have emerged from such youth programs. Thus, the health of these programs is a leading indicator for the long-term viability of broader…

  19. Ural Mountains, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-06

    This image from NASA Terra spacecraft shows the Ural Mountains, which run 2500 km north-south through western Russia, and form the boundary between Europe and Asia. Since the 17th century, the mountains were exploited for their deposits of iron, copper, gold, coal, oil, mica and gemstones. The Urals are among the world's oldest existing mountain ranges, having been formed about 275 million years ago due to the collision of the Laurussia supercontinent with the continent of Kazakhstania. The image was acquired July 13, 2011, covers an area of 39 by 62 km, and is located near 65.5 degrees north, 59.9 degrees east. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19795

  20. 75 FR 73045 - Magnesium Metal From the People's Republic of China: Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Orders: Pure Magnesium From the People's Republic of China, the Russian Federation and Ukraine; Notice of... Ukraine; Notice of Amended Final Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value: Antidumping Duty... mixtures in the 2000-2001 investigations of magnesium from China, Israel, and Russia. See Final...

  1. Japan-Russia Pediatric Society.

    PubMed

    Nihei, K; Thunemathu, Y; Kobayashi, N

    1993-12-01

    In March 1990, medical interchange between Japan and the Soviet Union began with a letter from the local health bureau of Khabarovsk. We visited Khabarovsk three times and Kamchatka once, and saw many hospitals and patients. Russian doctors of pediatrics visited Japan. Medical information was exchanged and discussed. The Japan-Russia Pediatric Society was established to perform interchange of medical information, technology and staff such as doctors, nurses and technicians between Japan and Russia, especially the Far East district of Russia. The Society meeting has been held three times: Tokyo (1991), Khabarovsk (1992) and Niigata (1993). It is necessary to continue the interchange between the two countries.

  2. Nursing and health in Russia.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    There are over one million nurses in Russia, and they work in a crippled healthcare system facing a dramatic increase in infectious diseases. But nurses are valiantly coping with the country's health crisis and becoming a recognized profession.

  3. Summer Harvest in Saratov, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-07-31

    These images from NASA Terra satellite were captured on May 31 and July 18, 2002 and show Russia Saratov Oblast province, located in the southeastern portion of the East-European plain, in the Lower Volga River Valley.

  4. The comparative analysis of payments for negative environmental impact in Russia and Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsibulnikova, M. R.; Ospanov, A. T.; Salata, D. V.; Strelnikova, A. B.

    2015-11-01

    The article represents the calculation of the payment for negative environmental impact caused by the development of the uranium ores deposits in the Republic of Kazakhstan. To compare the deposits in Kazakhstan and the Russian Federation, the event is simulated as if the object were located in the territory of the Russian Federation. The comparison of the results serves as an evidence to substantiate the experts’ claim that the financial mechanism of land management in Russia should be reformed.

  5. Antiviral activity of polyporoid mushrooms (higher Basidiomycetes) from Altai Mountains (Russia).

    PubMed

    Teplyakova, Tamara V; Psurtseva, Nadezhda V; Kosogova, Tatiana A; Mazurkova, Natalia A; Khanin, Viacheslav A; Vlasenko, Viacheslav A

    2012-01-01

    Antiviral activity against type A influenza virus of birds A/chicken/Kurgan/05/2005 (H5N1) and humans A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2) was investigated for aqueous extracts from mycelium of 11 basidial fungi species collected in the Altai Mountains (Altai Republic, Russia). The most perspective strains for producing antiviral medicines are studied strains Daedaleopsis confragosa, Datronia mollis, Ischnoderma benzoinum, Trametes gibbosa, T. versicolor, Laricifomes officinalis, and Lenzites betulina.

  6. [The importance of works of the G.Ye. Rhein commission for public health in Russia].

    PubMed

    Egorysheva, I V

    2013-01-01

    The article analyses the history of development, functioning and historical importance of works of imperially established interdepartmental commission for revision of medical sanitary legislation (the G.Ye. Rhein commissions 1912-1916). The commission developed several progressive legislation projects which were not accepted by medical community of Russia. On the contrary, these proposals were implemented by Narkomzdrav of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic.

  7. Political chaos reins progress on new joint ventures in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-16

    This paper reports that frustration is mounting among foreign petroleum companies chasing business opportunities in Russia. Political uncertainty continues to block large oil and gas exploration and production deals there. Most foreign officials believe Russia's transformation from a centrally planned economy to a market economy is irreversible. But enough political, social, and economic uncertainty persists that Russian leaders are hesitant to approve deals with foreign companies. The lack of certainty among leaders of the former Soviet republic about who controls Russia's natural resources, who can approve contracts, and who determines winners of bid tenders is causing confusion among foreign companies trying to negotiate major E and P deals. With no clearly successful path apparent for completing large deals, various secondary negotiating strategies are prevailing. Russian industry specialists say those secondary strategies work best for small deals involving relatively small players in less prospective regions. Meantime, countervailing political forces within the country, the world's top producer of oil and gas, continue to buffet petroleum companies that are negotiating deals or getting projects off the ground.

  8. Modern Nanoparticle Research in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrievski, R. A.

    2003-12-01

    Nanoparticle and nanomaterial research has become one of the most active frontier areas. In Russia and countries of the former Soviet Union work devoted to the thorough study of ultrafine media (low-dimensional subjects) started early. In the present paper a short historical review is given and the problems of nanoparticle research in Russia and some related fields (such as nanomaterials, nanochemistry, and nanophysics) are discussed.

  9. Downslope windstorms in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakova, Anna; Toropov, Pavel; Moiseenko, Konstantin

    2017-04-01

    Downslope windstorms occur on the leeward slopes of mountain ranges in many mountain areas of the world when the optimal combination of synoptic and orographic conditions appears. Such phenomenon is characterized by gusty wind with maximum velocity up to 60 m/s and rapid changes in temperature.At the present time, the most studied downslope winds are Adriatic bora, winds of the Rocky Mountains in the United States (including chinook), the Alpine foёhn. In Russia, such winds are observed on Novaya Zemlya archipelago, on Lake Baikal (Sarma), in the Urals (Kizelovskaya bora), in the Crimea, in Pevek, at the Black Sea coast of the Caucasus (Novorossiysk bora). The aim of this work is to study the role of different physical mechanisms in the formation of the strongest and most illuminated by observational data downslope windstorms in Russia, which is Novorossiysk bora, Novaya Zemlya bora and windstorm in Pevek. These winds are located in different climatic zones and orographic conditions, however, they may have similar mechanisms and physical characteristics. Analysis of three-dimensional structure of these phenomena, including the structure of upstream flow, disturbances on the leeward side of the range, flow behavior above the ridges, was performed on the basis of observational data, MERRA reanalysis data and the results of mesoscale modeling using WRF-ARW model. The analysis identified characteristics common to all of the studied winds that allow us to classify them as a single phenomenon. Also the applicability of hydraulic and internal gravity wave theory, that are commonly used for downslope windstorms, was evaluated for studied winds. The hydraulic theory predicts the occurrence of hydraulic jump and the flow regime transition from subcritical to supercritical over the leeward slope, which leads to increased wind speed. On the other hand, the wave theory for some cases successfully explains these phenomena. It was shown that mesoscale pressure perturbations

  10. Kondyor Massif, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is neither an impact crater nor a volcano. It is a perfect circular intrusion, about 10 km in diameter with a topographic ridge up to 600 m high. The Kondyor Massif is located in Eastern Siberia, Russia, north of the city of Khabarovsk. It is a rare form of igneous intrusion called alkaline-ultrabasic massif and it is full of rare minerals. The river flowing out of it forms placer mineral deposits. Last year 4 tons of platinum were mined there. A remarkable and very unusual mineralogical feature of the deposit is the presence of coarse crystals of Pt-Fe alloy, coated with gold. This 3-D perspective view was created by draping a simulated natural color ASTER composite over an ASTER-derived digital elevation model.

    The image was acquired on June 10, 2006, and is located at 57.6 degrees north latitude, 134.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  11. Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Temperate and green in the summer, the Kamchatka Peninsula in northeastern Russia freezes over completely in the winter. This true-color image of the Kamchatka Peninsula was acquired on December 12, 2001, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The peninsula is surrounded by the Sea of Okhotsk to the west and by the Bering Sea to the east. The ice and snow highlight the stunning valleys and tall peaks of the Sredinnyy Khrebet, which is the volcanic mountain range running down the center of the peninsula. The mountains along the range reach heights of over 3500 meters (11,484 feet). Many of the volcanoes are still active, and ash and volcanic rock has turned the snow a dark gray on the eastern side of the range. The light blue latticework of ridges, valleys, and alluvial fans extending from the center of the range were likely carved out by past and present glaciers and by run-off from spring snowmelt. The small island that extends off of the tip of the peninsula is Ostrov Paramushir (Paramushir Island). Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  12. Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Temperate and green in the summer, the Kamchatka Peninsula in northeastern Russia freezes over completely in the winter. This true-color image of the Kamchatka Peninsula was acquired on December 12, 2001, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The peninsula is surrounded by the Sea of Okhotsk to the west and by the Bering Sea to the east. The ice and snow highlight the stunning valleys and tall peaks of the Sredinnyy Khrebet, which is the volcanic mountain range running down the center of the peninsula. The mountains along the range reach heights of over 3500 meters (11,484 feet). Many of the volcanoes are still active, and ash and volcanic rock has turned the snow a dark gray on the eastern side of the range. The light blue latticework of ridges, valleys, and alluvial fans extending from the center of the range were likely carved out by past and present glaciers and by run-off from spring snowmelt. The small island that extends off of the tip of the peninsula is Ostrov Paramushir (Paramushir Island). Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  13. Kondyor Massif, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is neither an impact crater nor a volcano. It is a perfect circular intrusion, about 10 km in diameter with a topographic ridge up to 600 m high. The Kondyor Massif is located in Eastern Siberia, Russia, north of the city of Khabarovsk. It is a rare form of igneous intrusion called alkaline-ultrabasic massif and it is full of rare minerals. The river flowing out of it forms placer mineral deposits. Last year 4 tons of platinum were mined there. A remarkable and very unusual mineralogical feature of the deposit is the presence of coarse crystals of Pt-Fe alloy, coated with gold. This 3-D perspective view was created by draping a simulated natural color ASTER composite over an ASTER-derived digital elevation model.

    The image was acquired on June 10, 2006, and is located at 57.6 degrees north latitude, 134.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  14. Russia`s Great Game in a nuclear South Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, J.F.; Taylor, T.T.

    1998-12-31

    Lost in the noise of Pakistan`s nuclear weapon tests in the western Baluchistan desert on 28 and 30 May was a surprising diplomatic move by Russia. On 23 May, Russia became the first state to express its willingness to recognize India as a nuclear-weapon state, provided that India commits itself to the international nonproliferation regime. Russia`s Ambassador to India, Albert Chernyshev, stated in the days after the Indian but before the Pakistani nuclear tests that ``India proclaimed itself a nuclear weapons power. One now hopes that India will behave as a nuclear weapons power by acting responsibly. Every nuclear weapons state has some rights. But for getting recognition it must have some obligations. Once it is ready to show these obligations by joining the nonproliferation regime, its recognition as a nuclear weapons power will follow.`` Russia`s Great Game in South Asia in pursuit of short-term economic and other interests appears to be a serious obstacle on the path to dealing effectively with the South Asian nuclear crisis. Grave damage to security, stability and nonproliferation has already resulted from India`s and Pakistan`s actions, but the situation does not have to spiral out of control. It is imperative that the international community respond appropriately to this challenge. The international community is at a crossroads and Russia`s actions will be critical. Will it be willing to go beyond the narrow economic and political calculations reflected in its diplomatic posturing, and take actions that will serve its long-term interests by bridging differences with other great powers in order to demonstrate to India that it has not chosen the right path. If Russia decides it can gain from India`s current, perilous path and blocks or otherwise frustrates appropriate responses, the nuclear danger on the subcontinent will escalate and the global regimes to promote nonproliferation and to ban testing will be seriously, perhaps fatally, weakened with

  15. Changes in Russia's Military and Nuclear Doctrine

    SciTech Connect

    Wolkov, Benjamin M.; Balatsky, Galya I.

    2012-07-26

    In 1993, the Russian Federation set out a new military doctrine that would determine the direction of its armed forces until President Putin set out the next doctrine in 2000. The Russian Federation creating the doctrine was new; the USSR had recently collapsed, Gorbachev - the creator of the predecessor to this doctrine in 1987 - was out of office, and the new Russian military had only been formed in May, 1992.1 The analysis of the 1993 doctrine is as follows: a definition of how doctrine is defined; a short history of Russian military doctrine leading up to the 1993 doctrine (officially the Basic Provisions of the Military Doctrine of the Russian Federation); and finally, what the doctrine established. An overview of the 1993 doctrine is: (1) Russia's 1993 doctrine was a return to older, more aggressive doctrine as a result of stability concerns surrounding the recent collapse of the USSR; (2) Russia turned from Gorbachev's 'defensive defense' in the 1987 doctrine to aggressive defense with the option of preempting or striking back against an aggressor; (3) Russia was deeply concerned about how nationalism would affect the former Soviet Republics, particularly in respect to the ethnic Russians still living abroad; and (4) Nuclear doctrine pledged to not be the first to use nuclear weapons but provided for the potential for escalation from a conventional to a nuclear war. The 2000 doctrine (officially the Russian Federation Military Doctrine) was created in a more stable world than the 1993 doctrine was. The Russian Federation had survived independence and the 'threat of direct military aggression against the Russian Federation and its allies' had diminished. It had secured all of the nuclear weapons from its neighbors Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan, and had elected a new president, Vladimir Putin, to replace Boris Yeltsin. Yet, even as the doctrine took more defensive tones than the 1993 doctrine, it expanded its nuclear options. Below are a new definition of

  16. Sochi, Russia 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Sochi, Russia Winter Olympic Sites (Coastal Cluster) The Black Sea resort of Sochi, Russia, is the warmest city ever to host the Winter Olympic Games, which open on Feb. 7, 2014, and run through Feb. 23. This north-looking image, acquired on Jan. 4, 2014, by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft, shows the Sochi Olympic Park Coastal Cluster -- the circular area on the shoreline in the bottom center of the image -- which was built for Olympic indoor sports. Even curling has its own arena alongside multiple arenas for hockey and skating. The Olympic alpine events will take place at the Mountain Cluster, located in a snow-capped valley at the top right of the image. Sochi itself, a city of about 400,000, is not visible in the picture. It's farther west (left) along the coast, past the airport at bottom left. In the image, red indicates vegetation, white is snow, buildings are gray and the ocean is dark blue. The area imaged is about 15 miles (24 kilometers) from west to east (left to right) at the coastline and 25 miles (41 kilometers) from front to back. Height is exaggerated 1.5 times. The image was created from the ASTER visible and near-infrared bands, draped over ASTER-derived digital elevation data. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched Dec. 18, 1999, on Terra. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring of dynamic conditions

  17. Sochi, Russia 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Sochi, Russia Winter Olympic Sites (Mountain Cluster) The 2014 Winter Olympic ski runs may be rated double black diamond, but they're not quite as steep as they appear in this image of the skiing and snowboarding sites for the Sochi Winter Olympic Games, acquired on Jan. 4, 2014, by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft. Rosa Khutar ski resort near Sochi, Russia, is in the valley at center, and the runs are visible on the shadowed slopes on the left-hand side of the valley. Height has been exaggerated 1.5 times to bring out topographic details. The games, which begin on Feb. 7 and continue for 17 days, feature six new skiing and boarding events plus the return of the legendary Jamaican bobsled team to the winter games for the first time since 2002. In this southwest-looking image, red indicates vegetation, white is snow, and the resort site appears in gray. The area imaged is about 11 miles (18 kilometers) across in the foreground and 20 miles (32 kilometers) from front to back. The image was created from the ASTER visible and near-infrared bands, draped over ASTER-derived digital elevation data. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched Dec. 18, 1999, on Terra. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring

  18. The White Sea, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Editor's Note: The caption below, published on May 10, 2001, is incorrect. According to Masha Vorontsova, director of the International Fund for Animal Welfare in Moscow, the situation with the seal pups in the White Sea is normal. There is no disaster and there never was. For more details, refer to the article entitled 'No Danger' on the New Scientist home page. The Earth Observatory regrets the earlier errant report. Original Caption According to the Russian Polar Research Institute for Fisheries and Oceanography, between 250,000 and 300,000 Greenland seal pups face death by starvation over the next two months due to a cruel trick by mother nature. The seals, most of them less than two months old, are trapped on ice sheets that remain locked in the White Sea, located near Archangel in Northern Russia. Typically, during the spring thaw the ice sheets break up and flow with the currents northward into the Barents Sea, the seals' spring feeding grounds. The seal pups hitch a ride on the ice floes, living on their own individual stores of fat until they arrive in the Barents Sea. Their mothers departed for the Barents Sea weeks ago. In a normal year, the seal pups' trip from the White Sea out to the Barents takes about six weeks and the seals have adapted to rely upon this mechanism of mother nature. During their yearly migration, the mother seals usually stay with their pups and feed them until their pelts turn from white to grey--a sign that the pups are mature enough to swim and feed themselves. Unfortunately, this year unusually strong northerly winds created a bottleneck of ice near the mouth of the white sea, thus blocking the flow of ice and trapping the pups. These true-color images of the White Sea were acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. This image, taken May 2, 2000 that there is usually much less ice in the White Sea this time of year as most of it is typically en route to the

  19. The White Sea, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Editor's Note: The caption below, published on May 10, 2001, is incorrect. According to Masha Vorontsova, director of the International Fund for Animal Welfare in Moscow, the situation with the seal pups in the White Sea is normal. There is no disaster and there never was. For more details, refer to the article entitled 'No Danger' on the New Scientist home page. The Earth Observatory regrets the earlier errant report. Original Caption According to the Russian Polar Research Institute for Fisheries and Oceanography, between 250,000 and 300,000 Greenland seal pups face death by starvation over the next two months due to a cruel trick by mother nature. The seals, most of them less than two months old, are trapped on ice sheets that remain locked in the White Sea, located near Archangel in Northern Russia. Typically, during the spring thaw the ice sheets break up and flow with the currents northward into the Barents Sea, the seals' spring feeding grounds. The seal pups hitch a ride on the ice floes, living on their own individual stores of fat until they arrive in the Barents Sea. Their mothers departed for the Barents Sea weeks ago. In a normal year, the seal pups' trip from the White Sea out to the Barents takes about six weeks and the seals have adapted to rely upon this mechanism of mother nature. During their yearly migration, the mother seals usually stay with their pups and feed them until their pelts turn from white to grey--a sign that the pups are mature enough to swim and feed themselves. Unfortunately, this year unusually strong northerly winds created a bottleneck of ice near the mouth of the white sea, thus blocking the flow of ice and trapping the pups. These true-color images of the White Sea were acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. This image, taken May 2, 2000 that there is usually much less ice in the White Sea this time of year as most of it is typically en route to the

  20. [History and current status of acupuncture-moxibustion in Russia and former Soviet Union].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Yang; Zhang, Wen-Peng; Zhu, Jian-Ping; Lei, Yan

    2012-10-01

    A brief history and new developments of acupuncture moxibustion in the former Soviet Union is provided in this paper, as well as in Russia. Science of acupuncture-moxibustion was introduced into Russia after the 10th Century. After the foundation of People's Republic of China, acupuncture-moxibustion therapy has drawn widespread attention in the former Soviet Union and Russia since the 1950s. Notably, acupuncture moxibustion therapy was legalized and popularized in mid 1950s in the Soviet Union, which was gradually accepted as a part of the country's medical system. In the latest 20 years, Federal health departments have paid attention to acupuncture-moxibustion therapy and issued laws and regulations on acupuncture reflexotherapy. The number of books and journals about acupuncture-moxibustion has been increasing; clinical application of acupuncture-moxibustion has been spreading and is welcomed by people. Academic exchanges between China and Russia are more frequent, which promoted the development of science of acupuncture-moxibustion in Russia.

  1. 76 FR 11273 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the suspended investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia... investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  2. 77 FR 12880 - Uranium From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... COMMISSION Uranium From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject five... investigation on uranium from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to... Publication 4307 (February 2012), entitled Uranium from Russia: Investigation No. 731-TA-539-C (Third Review...

  3. Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-03

    This image, acquired by NASA Terra spacecraft, shows Santo Domingo, the capital of the Dominican Republic, founded in 1496 Christopher Columbus, it is the oldest continuously inhabited European settlement in the Americas.

  4. Gender Asymmetries in Today's Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimashevskaia, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    There can be no doubt that gender attitudes and the gender stereotypes formed on their basis have a deep-rooted social character. This stems unequivocally from the parallels of development of social processes and gender models. The ideology of gender began to flourish in Russia along with perestroika, an ideology that in the past quarter-century…

  5. Artemia cyst production in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Liudmila I.; Litvinenko, Aleksandr I.; Boiko, Elena G.; Kutsanov, Kirill

    2015-11-01

    In Western Siberia (Russia) there are about 100 Artemia lakes with total area over 1 600 km2. Geographically these lakes are located between 51°-56°N and 61°-82°E. In general these lakes are shallow (depth less than 1.5 m), small or medium size (0.1 to 10 km2); they are chloride; their total salinity is from 40 to 250 g/L. The harvesting of cysts per year is only in 20-40 lakes. In Russia 550 tons of dry Artemia cysts (14%-18% of the world production) were harvested annually. This includes about 350 tons in the Altai region and 200 tons in other regions. During our regular 20-year study period the cyst harvest was: 95 tons in Kurgan; 65 tons in Omsk, 20 tons in Novosibirsk, 20 tons in Tyumen. Ways of increasing cyst harvest in Russia are considered in this article. During the last 30 years the harvest of cysts in Russia has increased from 7-20 to 500-600 tons. A significant influence of dryness of the year was found on productivity in selected lakes, but taken for all the lakes together, the relationship was not significant. The optimal salinity for productivity of cysts in the lakes was determined. Analysis of productivity of the lakes and the harvesting results showed that the stocks of cysts are underutilized by approximately 1.7 times.

  6. Experiential Perestroika: The Russia Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proudman, Bill; Pavlova, Alona

    1994-01-01

    In 1993, an educational exchange program sponsored by the Association for Experiential Education (AEE) sent six educators from North America to Russia to conduct workshops for students and teachers on concepts of experiential learning. As a result of this cooperative exchange, Altai Regional Educational Center (Siberia) was created to coordinate…

  7. Scholars at Risk in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, Yuri

    2006-04-01

    I will share my general thoughts on safe haven for scholars at risk, based on my own experience, and will discuss scholars at risk in Russia. At the present time, these are mostly scientists falsely accused of espionage. I will highlight the special issues this fact raises for providing support or safe haven for such scientists.

  8. Shannon Lucid Trains in Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut Shannon Lucid is seen egressing from a training version of a soyez spacecraft, during a water survival training session in Russia. In March of 1996, Lucid accompanied the STS-76 crew to the Russian space station, Mir, where she stayed for a little over four months before returning to Earth with the STS-79 crew.

  9. Smoke and Clouds over Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-23

    Several mountain ranges and a portion of the Amur River are visible in this set of stereo images of Russia far east Khabarovsk region taken by the MISR instrument aboard NASA Terra spacecraft. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

  10. Expedition 25 portraits in Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-31

    JSC2010-E-124006 (August 2010) --- Attired in Russian Sokol launch and entry suits, NASA astronaut Scott Kelly (left), Expedition 25 flight engineer and Expedition 26 commander; along with Russian cosmonauts Alexander Kaleri (center) and Oleg Skripochka, both Expedition 25/26 flight engineers, take a break from training in Star City, Russia to pose for a portrait. Photo credit: Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center

  11. Shannon Lucid Trains in Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut Shannon Lucid is seen egressing from a training version of a soyez spacecraft, during a water survival training session in Russia. In March of 1996, Lucid accompanied the STS-76 crew to the Russian space station, Mir, where she stayed for a little over four months before returning to Earth with the STS-79 crew.

  12. Forest health status in Russia

    Treesearch

    Vladislav A. Alexeyev

    1998-01-01

    About 886.5 Mha in Russia is occupied by forests, including 763.5 Mha of tree stands and 123 Mha of nonstocked lands. The Russian forests comprise about 22 percent of the earth's forest area or 43 percent of the earth's temperate and boreal forests. Main forest-forming species are Larix sp. (32 percent of the growing stock), Pinus...

  13. Gender inequality in Russia: the perspective of participatory gender budgeting.

    PubMed

    Zakirova, Venera

    2014-11-01

    Gender-based discrimination is found in all economies in the world. Women's unpaid work accounts for about half of the world GDP, yet women remain under-valued and under-represented in national policies worldwide. The question of gender budgeting and citizens' participation in budgeting and governance processes has gained attention in recent years, but Russia is far from implementing these. Instead, blindness to gender issues dominates in national strategies and budgets. This paper explores these issues and looks in-depth at them in the decentralisation process in Bashkortostan, a central Russian republic. Civil society institutions whose role is to strengthen the links between government, civil society and the community in Bashkortostan, such as Public Chambers and Municipalities, lack the capacity to introduce participatory gender budgeting. As a result, no systematic participatory planning, let alone planning that is gender-sensitive, has taken place there.

  14. STS-112 crew with President of Ajara in Georgia (Russia)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building, Aslan Abashidze (right), President of the Autonomous Republic of Ajara in Georgia (Russia), visits with the STS-112 crew. From left, they are Mission Specialist Piers J. Sellers; Pilot Pamela Ann Melroy; Mission Specialist Fyodor N. Yurchikhin, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency; Mission Specialist Sandra H. Magnus; and CommanderJeffrey S. Ashby. Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, not pictured, is also a member of the crew. The crew is awaiting launch on mission STS-112 to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. The launch has been postponed to no earlier than Monday, Oct. 7, so that the Mission Control Center, located at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, can be secured and protected from potential storm impacts from Hurricane Lili.

  15. STS-112 crew with President of Ajara in Georgia (Russia)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building, Aslan Abashidze (left), President of the Autonomous Republic of Ajara in Georgia (Russia), STS-112 Mission Specialist Fyodor N. Yurchikhin, Ph.D., a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency; and Georgi Abashidze, Mayor of Batumi (Yurchikhin's hometown), pose for a portrait. Yurchikhin and the other members of the STS-112 crew are awaiting launch to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. The launch has been postponed to no earlier than Monday, Oct. 7, so that the Mission Control Center, located at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, can be secured and protected from potential storm impacts from Hurricane Lili.

  16. STS-112 crew with President of Ajara in Georgia (Russia)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building, Aslan Abashidze (left), President of the Autonomous Republic of Ajara in Georgia (Russia), STS-112 Mission Specialist Fyodor N. Yurchikhin, Ph.D., a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency; and Georgi Abashidze, Mayor of Batumi (Yurchikhin's hometown), pose for a portrait. Yurchikhin and the other members of the STS-112 crew are awaiting launch to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. The launch has been postponed to no earlier than Monday, Oct. 7, so that the Mission Control Center, located at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, can be secured and protected from potential storm impacts from Hurricane Lili.

  17. STS-112 crew with President of Ajara in Georgia (Russia)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building, Aslan Abashidze (right), President of the Autonomous Republic of Ajara in Georgia (Russia), visits with the STS-112 crew. From left, they are Mission Specialist Piers J. Sellers; Pilot Pamela Ann Melroy; Mission Specialist Fyodor N. Yurchikhin, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency; Mission Specialist Sandra H. Magnus; and CommanderJeffrey S. Ashby. Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, not pictured, is also a member of the crew. The crew is awaiting launch on mission STS-112 to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. The launch has been postponed to no earlier than Monday, Oct. 7, so that the Mission Control Center, located at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, can be secured and protected from potential storm impacts from Hurricane Lili.

  18. Patterns of smoking in Russia

    PubMed Central

    McKee, M.; Bobak, M.; Rose, R.; Shkolnikov, V.; Chenet, L.; Leon, D.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Tobacco is a leading cause of avoidable death in Russia but there is, as yet, relatively little information in the public domain on who is smoking and how this is changing. This information is important for those seeking to develop effective policies to tackle this issue.
OBJECTIVE—To determine the prevalence of smoking in Russia and its association with sociodemographic factors.
DESIGN—Cross-sectional survey on patterns of tobacco consumption.
SETTING—Data were collected using the New Russia Barometer, a multi-stage stratified-sample survey of the population of the Russian Federation undertaken in the summer of 1996.
PARTICIPANTS—Data were available on 1587 individuals (response rate 65.7%). Respondents differed little from the overall Russian population in terms of age, sex, education, and voting intention.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Prevalence of current and past smoking.
RESULTS—Smoking is common among males of all ages and in all areas. Of those aged 18-24 years, 65% smoke, rising to 73% in those aged 25-34 and then falling steadily to reach 41% in those aged 65 and older. Among women, smoking is much more common among the young (27% in those aged 18-34) than among the middle-aged and elderly (5% in those aged 55 and older), and more common among those living in urban areas than in rural areas. Smoking is also more common among men and women suffering material deprivation but there is no independent association with education. Among men, but not women, church attendance is inversely associated with smoking. In both sexes, but especially women, heavy drinking and smoking are associated.
CONCLUSIONS—Tobacco poses a major threat to the health of future generations in Russia, especially among women. A robust policy response is required.


Keywords: prevalence; Russia; smoking PMID:9706750

  19. Russia’s Proliferation Pathways

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    uranium enrichment plant in the Siberian city of Angarsk). Without initiatives from outside, Russia would hardly initiate or readily endorse more... cities , concluded that Russian crime is increasingly transnational, having many and easy links with foreign crime groups, many of whom are themselves...the Caucasus. Drug use has grown considerably making workers in these cities , many of whom are former criminals or connected to criminals who are

  20. Emergent Russia: The Geostrategic Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    industrial waste could guide Russia through this process, which would expand business opportunities, generate local contacts, and demonstrate American...produced a coup, and resulted in the collapse of the Soviet Union. Ivan IV’s harsh treatment of subjects and slaves, associated with his further...WWII) and again during the dismantling of the Soviet Union. Looking West Russia’s fight for access to southern farmlands and a warm- water port

  1. A Strategic Appraisal of Russia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-06

    Soviet Union, 1992, 64. 13. Current Geographic Issues, Geographic Notes, Volume 2, # 2, Summer 1992, 15. 14. Nikolai Petrov and Andrei Treivish, "Praise...34 The Rise of Nations in the Soviet Union, 1992. Petrov , Nikolai and Treivish Andrei , "Praise for Isolationism," Russian Weekly News magazine "New Times...Muslim world. Russia, probably, has lost all influence in this strategically important area. Only the leader of Kazakhstan, N . Nazarbaev, and the leader

  2. Republication of: Relativistic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, H. P.

    2012-08-01

    This is a reprinting of the paper by Howard Percy Robertson, first published in 1933 in Rev. Mod. Phys., that is a very authoritative summary of relativistic cosmology at the stage at which it was up to 1933. The paper has been selected by the Editors of General Relativity and Gravitation for re-publication in the Golden Oldies series of the journal. This republication is accompanied by an editorial note written by George Ellis, and by Robertson's biography, compiled by Andrzej Krasinski from printed sources.

  3. Divergent paths for adult mortality in Russia and Central Asia: evidence from Kyrgyzstan.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Michel; Gavrilova, Natalia; Torgasheva, Liudmila; Denisenko, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    Adult mortality has been lower in Kyrgyzstan vs. Russia among males since at least 1981 and among females since 1999. Also, Kyrgyzstan's mortality fluctuations have had smaller amplitude. This has occurred in spite of worse macro-economic outcomes in Kyrgyzstan. To understand these surprising patterns, we analyzed cause-specific mortality in Kyrgyzstan vs. Russia for the period 1981-2010, using unpublished official data. We find that, as in Russia, fluctuations in Kyrgyzstan have been primarily due to changes in external causes and circulatory causes, and alcohol appears to play an important role. However, in contrast with Russia, mortality from these causes in Kyrgyzstan has been lower and has increased by a smaller amount. As a result, the mortality gap between the two countries is overwhelmingly attributable to external and cardio-vascular causes, and more generally, to causes that have been shown to be strongly related to alcohol consumption. These cause-specific results, together with the existence of large ethnic differentials in mortality in Kyrgyzstan, highlight the importance of cultural and religious differences, and their impact on patterns of alcohol consumption, in explaining the mortality gap between the two countries. These findings show that explanatory frameworks relying solely on macro-economic factors are not sufficient for understanding differences in mortality levels and trends among former Soviet republics.

  4. Divergent Paths for Adult Mortality in Russia and Central Asia: Evidence from Kyrgyzstan

    PubMed Central

    Guillot, Michel; Gavrilova, Natalia; Torgasheva, Liudmila; Denisenko, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    Adult mortality has been lower in Kyrgyzstan vs. Russia among males since at least 1981 and among females since 1999. Also, Kyrgyzstan’s mortality fluctuations have had smaller amplitude. This has occurred in spite of worse macro-economic outcomes in Kyrgyzstan. To understand these surprising patterns, we analyzed cause-specific mortality in Kyrgyzstan vs. Russia for the period 1981-2010, using unpublished official data. We find that, as in Russia, fluctuations in Kyrgyzstan have been primarily due to changes in external causes and circulatory causes, and alcohol appears to play an important role. However, in contrast with Russia, mortality from these causes in Kyrgyzstan has been lower and has increased by a smaller amount. As a result, the mortality gap between the two countries is overwhelmingly attributable to external and cardio-vascular causes, and more generally, to causes that have been shown to be strongly related to alcohol consumption. These cause-specific results, together with the existence of large ethnic differentials in mortality in Kyrgyzstan, highlight the importance of cultural and religious differences, and their impact on patterns of alcohol consumption, in explaining the mortality gap between the two countries. These findings show that explanatory frameworks relying solely on macro-economic factors are not sufficient for understanding differences in mortality levels and trends among former Soviet republics. PMID:24116034

  5. Aerospace Medical Support in Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleberry, Tara; Chamberlin, Blake; Cole, Richard; Dowell, Gene; Savage, Scott

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the role of the flight surgeon in support of aerospace medical support operations at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), also known as Star City, in Russia. The flight surgeon in this role is the medical advocate for non-russian astronauts, and also provides medical care for illness and injury for astronauts, family members, and guests as well as civil servants and contractors. The flight surgeon also provides support for hazardous training. There are various photos of the area, and the office, and some of the equipment that is used.

  6. Russia's Policy and Standing in Nanotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terekhov, Alexander I.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I consider the historical stages of development of nanotechnology in Russia as well as the political framework for this. It is shown that early federal nanotechnology programs in Russia date back to the 1990s and that since the mid-2000s, nanotechnology has attracted the increasing attention of government. I characterize the…

  7. Biogerontology in Russia: from past to future.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, Vladimir N; Khavinson, Vladimir Kh; Mikhailova, Olga N

    2011-02-01

    The paper presents major steps of gerontology development in Russia. The issues of training in gerontology and geriatrics, institutional infrastructure within the Gerontological Society of the Russian Academy of Sciences and its activities have been considered therein. Some results of Russian researchers obtained during 2005-2010 have been summarized as well. Special attention is given to the prospects of gerontology in Russia.

  8. 76 FR 47238 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4249 (August 2011), entitled Ammonium Nitrate from...

  9. Russia's Policy and Standing in Nanotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terekhov, Alexander I.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I consider the historical stages of development of nanotechnology in Russia as well as the political framework for this. It is shown that early federal nanotechnology programs in Russia date back to the 1990s and that since the mid-2000s, nanotechnology has attracted the increasing attention of government. I characterize the…

  10. Russia [Teachers Guide and Student Readings].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Schools, Pittsburgh, PA. Intercultural Understanding Project.

    This teaching unit, one of a series of curriculum guides on different world areas for use at the secondary level, treats the culture and history of Russia, oftentimes comparing it with that of the United States. Major teaching objectives are to have students compare and contrast basic geographic, cultural, and historical information on Russia and…

  11. The carbon balance of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolman, Han; Shvidenko, Anatoly; Recapp Russia Synthesis Team

    2013-04-01

    We determine the net land to atmosphere flux of carbon in Russia, including Ukraine, Belarus and Kazakhstan using inventory based, eddy covariance, and inversion methods. Our high boundary estimate is -342 Tg C yr-1 from the eddy covariance method, and this is close to the upper bounds of the inventory based Land Ecosystem Assessment and inverse models estimate. A lower boundary estimate is provided at -1350 Tg C yr-1 from from the inversion models. The average of the three methods is -613.5 Tg C yr-1. The methane emission is estimated separately at 41.4 TgC yr-1. These three methods agree well within their respective error bounds. There is thus good consistency between bottom up and top down methods. The forests of Russia primarily cause the net atmosphere to land flux ( -692 Tg C yr-1 from the LEA) with remarkable little interannual variability. It remains however remarkable that the three methods provide such close estimates (-615, -662, -554 TgCyr-1) for NBP, given the inherent uncertainties in all of the approaches. The lack of recent forest inventories, the few eddy covariance sites and associated uncertainty with upscaling and under sampling of concentrations for the inversions are among the prime causes of the uncertainty. The DGVMs suggest a much lower uptake at -91Tg C yr-1 and we argue that this is caused by a high estimate of heterotrophic respiration compared to other methods.

  12. Flooding on Russia's Lena River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nearly every year in the late spring, ice blocks the flow of water at the mouth of the Lena River in northeastern Russia and gives rise to floods across the Siberian plains. This year's floods can be seen in this image taken on June 2, 2002, by the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard the Terra satellite. The river runs down the left side of the image, and its delta is shrouded in ice (red) at the top of the image. Normally, the river would resemble a thin black line in MODIS imagery. The river, which is Russia's longest, flows 2,641 miles (4,250 kilometers) south to north through Siberia and into the Laptev Sea. In the winter, the river becomes nearly frozen. In the spring, however, water upstream thaws earlier than water at the mouth of the river. As the southern end of the river begins to melt, blocks of ice travel downstream to the still frozen delta, pile up, and often obstruct the flow of water. Flooding doesn't always occur on the same parts of the river. The floods hit further south last year. If the flooding grows severe enough, explosive charges are typically used to break up the ice jams. In these false-color images land areas are a dull, light green or tan, and water is black. Clouds appear pink, and ice comes across as bright red. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  13. Flooding on Russia's Lena River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nearly every year in the late spring, ice blocks the flow of water at the mouth of the Lena River in northeastern Russia and gives rise to floods across the Siberian plains. This year's floods can be seen in this image taken on June 2, 2002, by the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard the Terra satellite. The river runs down the left side of the image, and its delta is shrouded in ice (red) at the top of the image. Normally, the river would resemble a thin black line in MODIS imagery. The river, which is Russia's longest, flows 2,641 miles (4,250 kilometers) south to north through Siberia and into the Laptev Sea. In the winter, the river becomes nearly frozen. In the spring, however, water upstream thaws earlier than water at the mouth of the river. As the southern end of the river begins to melt, blocks of ice travel downstream to the still frozen delta, pile up, and often obstruct the flow of water. Flooding doesn't always occur on the same parts of the river. The floods hit further south last year. If the flooding grows severe enough, explosive charges are typically used to break up the ice jams. In these false-color images land areas are a dull, light green or tan, and water is black. Clouds appear pink, and ice comes across as bright red. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  14. Russia

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... viewing. Each image covers an area about 345 kilometers x 278 kilometers. The Amur River, in the upper right, and Lake Bolon, at ... view due to sunglint (mirror-like reflection of the Sun's rays by the water). The Amur River valley is a primary breeding ground for ...

  15. Nuclear weapons and NATO-Russia relations

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwell, G.C.

    1998-12-01

    Despite the development of positive institutional arrangements such as Russian participation in the NATO-led peacekeeping force in Bosnia and the NATO- Russia Permanent Joint Council, the strategic culture of Russia has not changed in any fundamental sense. Russian strategic culture has not evolved in ways that would make Russian policies compatible with those of NATO countries in the necessary economic, social, technological, and military spheres. On the domestic side, Russia has yet to establish a stable democracy and the necessary legal, judicial, and regulatory institutions for a free-market economy. Russia evidently lacks the necessary cultural traditions, including concepts of accountability and transparency, to make these adaptations in the short-term. Owing in part to its institutional shortcomings, severe socioeconomic setbacks have afflicted Russia. Russian conventional military strength has been weakened, and a concomitant reliance by the Russians on nuclear weapons as their ultimate line of defense has increased. The breakdown in the infrastructure that supports Russian early warning and surveillance systems and nuclear weapons stewardship defense, coupled with a tendency towards has exacerbated Russian anxiety and distrust toward NATO. Russia`s reliance on nuclear weapons as the ultimate line of defense, coupled with a tendency toward suspicion and distrust toward NATO, could lead to dangerous strategic miscalculation and nuclear catastrophe.

  16. Fires in Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Numerous thermal anomalies were detected on the Kamchatka Peninsula in northeastern Russia in late June and early July by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Some of the anomalies (red dots) were fires, but at least one was the result of ongoing volcanic activity at one of the Peninsula's numerous active volcanoes. The erupting volcano, called Sheveluch, can be seen most clearly in the image from July 8, 2002. It is located in the upper right quadrant of the image, and appears as a grayish circular patch amid the surrounding green vegetation. In its center is a red dot indicating that MODIS detected a thermal signature coming from the restless volcano. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  17. Fires in Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Numerous thermal anomalies were detected on the Kamchatka Peninsula in northeastern Russia in late June and early July by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Some of the anomalies (red dots) were fires, but at least one was the result of ongoing volcanic activity at one of the Peninsula's numerous active volcanoes. The erupting volcano, called Sheveluch, can be seen most clearly in the image from July 8, 2002. It is located in the upper right quadrant of the image, and appears as a grayish circular patch amid the surrounding green vegetation. In its center is a red dot indicating that MODIS detected a thermal signature coming from the restless volcano. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  18. Quo Vadis?: Russia's health challenges.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Patricio V

    2011-01-01

    The roots of the health crisis in the Russian Federation are not entirely, or even primarily, in the state of the health care system. High levels of mortality and morbidity, particularly among working-age males, reflect many other factors that transcend the health system as they are related to the aging of the population, growing urbanization, lifestyles and risky behaviours. Spending more money on healthcare, while necessary, will not be sufficient to improve Russia's health outcomes on a sustainable basis. A multisectoral strategy is required, coupled with increased health expenditures and structural reforms to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare organization, financing and service delivery. However, it should be clear that improving health outcomes is a complex, medium- to long-term undertaking that should be addressed forcefully by the government at the federal and regional levels as a priority social objective.

  19. Review: mass spectrometry in Russia.

    PubMed

    Zaikin, Vladimir G; Sysoev, Alexander A

    2013-01-01

    The present review covers the main research in the area of mass spectrometry from the 1990s which was about the same time as the Russian Federation emerged from the collapse of the Soviet Union (USSR). It consists of two main parts-application of mass spectrometry to chemistry and related fields and creation and development of mass spectrometric technique. Both traditional and comparatively new mass spectrometric methods were used to solve various problems in organic chemistry (reactivity of gas-phase ions, structure elucidation and problems of identification, quantitative and trace analysis, differentiation of stereoisomers, derivatization approaches etc.), biochemistry (proteomics and peptidomics, lipidomics), medical chemistry (mainly the search of biomarkers, pharmacology, doping control), environmental, petrochemistry, polymer chemistry, inorganic and physical chemistry, determination of natural isotope ratio etc. Although a lot of talented mass spectrometrists left Russia and moved abroad after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the vitality of the mass spectral community proved to be rather high, which allowed the continuation of new developments in the field of mass spectrometric instrumentation. They are devoted to improvements in traditional magnetic sector mass spectrometers and the development of new ion source types, to analysis and modification of quadrupole, time-of-flight (ToF) and ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) analyzers. The most important achievements are due to the creation of multi-reflecting ToF mass analyzers. Special attention was paid to the construction of compact mass spectrometers, particularly for space exploration, of combined instruments, such as ion mobility spectrometer/mass spectrometer and accelerating mass spectrometers. The comparatively young Russian Mass Spectrometry Society is working hard to consolidate the mass spectrometrists from Russia and foreign countries, to train young professionals on new appliances and regularly

  20. Russia's energy policy: A framing comment

    SciTech Connect

    Aslund, A.

    2006-05-15

    A prominent specialist on the Russian economy provides a framing comment on two preceding papers entitled 'Russia's Energy Policy' (by Vladimir Milov, Leonard Coburn, and Igor Danchenko) and 'Russia's Energy Policy: A Divergent View' (by Matthew J. Sagers). The author argues that Russia's current energy policy should be viewed as an outcome of competition between three overlapping programs. In this context, he identifies three policy models - the old Soviet, the liberal or oligarchic, and the most recent state capitalist. The latter is currently supported by President Putin, who prioritizes diversification of the country's economy at the expense of diminished investments in the oil and gas sector.

  1. Antibiotic resistance of microorganisms in agricultural soils in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilova, Natasha; Galitskaya, Polina; Selivanovskaya, Svetlana

    2017-04-01

    Antibiotics are medicines widely used to treat and prevent bacterial infections not only in human medicine but also in veterinary. Besides, in animal husbandry antibiotics are often used in for stimulation of animal's growth. Many antibiotics used for veterinary purposes are weakly absorbed in the animal's gut. So up to 90% of the administered antibiotics are excreted with manure and urine. Therefore use of manure as an organic fertilizer leads to formation and spreading of antibiotic resistance among soil microbes. Another reason of such spreading is the horizontal transfer of genes encoding antibiotic resistance from manure to soil microflora. The level of antibiotic resistance genes pollution of soils has not been properly studied yet. The aim of this study was to estimate the contamination of agricultural soils by antibiotic resistant genes. 30 samples of agricultural soils were selected around of Kazan city (Tatarstan Republic) with 1.3 Mio citizens. Since tetracycline is reported to be the most wide spread veterinary antibiotic in Russia, we estimated the level of soil contamination by tet(X) gene encoding tetracycline decomposition in microbial cell. Real time PCR method with specific primers was used as a method of investigation. Particle size type distribution of 31% of soil samples was estimated to be sandy clay, and 69% of soil samples - to silty clay. Content of dissoluble organic carbon ranged from 0,02 mg g -1 (sample 20) to 0,46 mg g -1 (sample 16). Respiration activity and microbial biomass of soils were estimated to be 0,80-5,28 CO2 C mg g -1 h-1 and 263,51-935,77 µg kg - 1 respectively. The values presented are typical for soils of Tatarstan Republic. In terms of the antibiotic resistant gene content, 27 of 30 samples investigated contained tet(X) gene, while 52% of the samples were highly contaminated, 34% of samples were middle contaminated and 14% of samples - weakly contaminated.

  2. Republic P-47C Thunderbolt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    Republic P-47C Thunderbolt: Republic's P-47 was one example of a perfect marriage of airframe and power plant. The engine of this P-47C was still under study, as can ascertained by the survey rake for measuring propeller thrust. This rake protrudes from the fuselage just behind the cowling ahead and in front of the wing.

  3. Republic P-47C Thunderbolt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    Republic P-47C Thunderbolt: Republic's P-47 was one example of a perfect marriage of airframe and power plant. The engine of this P-47C was still under study, as can be ascertained by the survey rake for measuring propeller thrust. This rake protrudes from the fuselage just behind the cowling ahead and in front of the wing.

  4. Republic P-47B Thunderbolt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1942-01-01

    Republic P-47B Thunderbolt: The Republic P-47B Thunderbolt was one of the great fighters used by the U. S. Army Air Force in World War II, and crews praised its ability to absorb punishment. This P-47B was used by NACA engineers to study the horizontal tail loads experienced by a fighter during abrupt maneuvers.

  5. Vocational-Technical Education in Russia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolansky, William D.; Bax, Rashid M.

    1994-01-01

    The problems facing vocational-technical education in Russia are similar to those in the United States. Entrepreneurshp and better shcool-to-work transition can help solve some of those probelms. (JOW)

  6. The Social Position of Schoolteachers in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Il'in, V. A.; Shabunova, A. A.; Leonidova, G. V.

    2013-01-01

    Research on the teaching profession in Russia shows that teachers are characterized by low pay and low prestige. There is an urgent need to change this situation if the modernization and innovative development of Russian society are to be achieved.

  7. Russia ends pact to curb uranium use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The Russian government has terminated an agreement between the country's nuclear body, Rosatom, and the US Department of Energy (DOE) into the feasibility of converting research reactors in Russia to low-enriched uranium (LEU).

  8. The Social Position of Schoolteachers in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Il'in, V. A.; Shabunova, A. A.; Leonidova, G. V.

    2013-01-01

    Research on the teaching profession in Russia shows that teachers are characterized by low pay and low prestige. There is an urgent need to change this situation if the modernization and innovative development of Russian society are to be achieved.

  9. Shaded Relief Color Wrapped, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-16

    This shaded relief topographic acquired by NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission SRTM image from data collected on February 12, 2000 shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia.

  10. STS-71 astronauts training in Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Norman E. Thagard in a cosmonaut space suit in the Training Simulator Facility at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (Star City), near Moscow, Russia. In March 1995, astronaut Thagard is scheduled to be launched in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft

  11. 3-D Perspective View, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-23

    This perspective view shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. The image was generated using the first data collected during NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission SRTM.

  12. SRTM Anaglyph: Sredinnyy Khrebet, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-07-05

    This anaglyph, from NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, shows the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. Sredinnyy Khrebet, the mountain range that makes up the spine of the peninsula. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

  13. Anaglyph with Landsat Overlay, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-16

    This 3-D anaglyph shows an area on the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia as seen by the instrument onboard NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

  14. Space Radar Image of Samara, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-15

    This three-frequency space radar image shows the city of Samara, Russia in pink and light green right of center. Samara is at the junction of the Volga and Samara Rivers approximately 800 kilometers 500 miles southeast of Moscow.

  15. Three new species and one new subspecies of Deserticossus Yakovlev, 2006 (Lepidoptera: Cossidae) from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Russia, with world catalogue of the genus.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, Roman V; Witt, Thomas J

    2017-05-23

    Three new species and one new subspecies of the genus Deserticossus Yakovlev, 2006 are described: Deserticossus doroshkini Yakovlev & Witt sp. nov. from eastern Kazakhstan (Tarbagatai Mts.), D. selevini Yakovlev & Witt sp. nov. from southeastern Kazakhstan (Malye Boguty Mts.), D. kamelini Yakovlev & Witt sp. nov. from Kyrgyzstan (Fergana Valley), and D. tsingtauana didenkoi Yakovlev & Witt subsp. nov. from Russia (Southern Siberia, Buryatia Republic). The described species and subspecies of Deserticossus are listed, with notes on the type material, synonymies, and distribution for each taxon.

  16. Weekend effects on binge drinking and homicide: the social connection between alcohol and violence in Russia.

    PubMed

    Pridemore, William Alex

    2004-08-01

    This study employs unique newly available Russian mortality data to examine the social connection between binge drinking and homicide in the country. SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND MEASUREMENTS: All death certificates of those aged 20-64 years in the Udmurt Republic, Russia, were analyzed according to day and cause of death for the years 1994-98. Deaths due to alcohol poisoning were used as a proxy for binge drinking. There was a high bivariate correlation (r = 0.75) between the daily distribution of deaths due to alcohol and homicide. The number of alcohol deaths was significantly higher on Saturdays and Sundays (presumably as a result of drinking on Friday and Saturday nights) and the number of homicide deaths was significantly higher on Fridays and Saturdays. The levels of alcohol consumption and homicide in Russia are among the highest in the world, and there is mounting evidence that the two are related. Binge drinking, preference for distilled spirits and a high social tolerance for heavy drinking may act as social and cultural contextual factors that might increase the risk of violent outcomes. The high correspondence between the daily distribution of alcohol and homicide deaths provides indirect evidence for the social connection between them. While these findings do not represent a causal connection, when placed in the context of the growing literature on this topic they provide further support of an association between alcohol consumption and homicide rates in Russia and preliminary evidence for the intermediate role in this relationship played by social context.

  17. Republic of Maldives

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-09

    The Republic of Maldives is a country located in the Indian Ocean, southwest of India. It comprises twenty-six atolls, and 1192 coral islands, with an average ground elevation of 1.5 m. Tourism and fishing account for more than half of the country's GDP. Kulhudhuffushi, seen in the upper right corner, is the capital of Haa Dhaalu Atoll administrative division in the north of the Maldives. The image was acquired April 3, 2013, covers an area of 30.3 by 45.2 km, and is located at 6.5 degrees north, 73 degrees east. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21166

  18. Improvements in progress for Russia`s new PSA law

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliaresi, L.; Hensel, A.C.

    1996-03-25

    Russian legislation making production sharing agreements (PSAs) fully legal under Russian law passed the upper house of the Russian Parliament (Federal Council) on December 19, 1995, was signed into law by President Boris Yeltsin on December 31, 1995, and took effect on January 11, 1996. While PSA legislation remains the central legal basis for large scale investment in the Russian petroleum sector, company views towards investment in this sector are tied to much more than the extent of legal guarantees. Investor attitudes are also shaped by expectations regarding political stability, behavior of Russian regulatory authorities, and prospects for the Russian economy. Furthermore, Western investors in the petroleum sector have some experience in dealing with the Russian government and existing frameworks for investment, particularly the joint venture (JV) deals with Russian entities and the often changing regulatory and tax treatment of these ventures. It is the view of the authors that attitudes among some Western companies in Russia on the political and economic environment may be too pessimistic and shaped more by press reports than actual conditions. News reports on violence, political instability, and a disastrous economy are not entirely borne out by the facts. Russian, of course, faces serious political and economic problems which must be carefully evaluated, but the overall outlook is much more complex, and some positive developments are underway. This paper reviews the economic, oil production and industry outlook as a result of the PSA law.

  19. Enterprise systems in Russia: 1992-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataev, Michael Yu; Bulysheva, Larisa A.; Emelyanenko, Alexander A.; Emelyanenko, Vladimir A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper introduces the enterprise systems (ES) development and implementation in Russia in the past three decades. Historic analysis shows that, in terms of time frame, the development of ACS (Automated Control Systems) in the former Soviet Union and the ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) in the West was almost parallel. In this paper, the current status and the major trend of ES in Russia is discussed.

  20. NATO Needs a Comprehensive Strategy for Russia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    February 11, 2015: http://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurope/?fa=59003 13 Dempsey, 2015. 14 See Vladimir Putin , “Meeting of the Valdai International...Crimea, presents an unequivocal challenge to European security. Russia’s actions are not just a stark rejection of Euro-Atlantic integration; Russia ...economic sanctions on Russia and NATO conventional military measures geared toward demonstrating readi- ness and new capabilities. NATO leaders clearly

  1. US DOE International energy policy on Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, B.G.

    1996-04-01

    This report describes the importance of the United States Department of Energy`s (US DOE) International Energy Policy to Russia. Key objectives identified include the support of the transition to democracy and a market based economy. The U.S.interests at stake, importance of energy to Russia, key institutional mechanism, energy-policy committee, joint energy activities, and the key to the success of other U.S. policy are discussed.

  2. Trends and educational differences in non-communicable disease risk factors in Pitkäranta, Russia, from 1992 to 2007.

    PubMed

    Vlasoff, Tiina; Laatikainen, Tiina; Korpelainen, Vesa; Uhanov, Mihail; Pokusajeva, Svetlana; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Vartiainen, Erkki; Puska, Pekka

    2015-02-01

    Mortality and morbidity from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is a major public health problem in Russia. The aim of the study was to examine trends and educational differences from 1992 to 2007 in NCD risk factors in Pitkäranta in the Republic of Karelia, Russia. Four cross-sectional population health surveys were carried out in the Pitkäranta region, Republic of Karelia, Russia, in 1992, 1997, 2002, and 2007. An independent random sample of 1000 persons from the general population aged 25-64 years was studied in each survey round. The total number of respondents in the four surveys was 2672. The surveys included a questionnaire, physical measurements, and blood sampling, and they were carried out following standard protocols. The NCD risk factor trends generally increased in Pitkäranta during the study period with the exception of systolic blood pressure and smoking among men. Especially significant increases were observed in alcohol consumption among both sexes and in smoking among women. Educational differences and differences in trends were relatively small with the exception of a significant increase in smoking in the lowest female educational category. Trends showing an increase in some major NCD risk factors and signs of emerging socio-economic differences call for stronger attention to effective health promotion and preventive policies in Russia. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  3. Attenuation Tomography in Eastern Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, C. A.; Phillips, W. S.; Hartse, H. E.; Steck, L. K.; Begnaud, M. L.; Mackey, K. G.; Fujita, K.

    2006-12-01

    We are using catalog amplitude parameters to derive a 2D function that maps laterally-varying attenuation features for eastern Siberia and the Russian Far East. Our information is from the Michigan State University (MSU) Siberia database, compiled through cooperative efforts of MSU, Russian network operators and Los Alamos researchers. The database also includes information from teleseismic bulletins, such as those provided by the International Seismological Centre, U.S. Geological Survey and Alaska Earthquake Information Center. For Siberia we have ~242,000 S and Sg amplitude readings and ~140,000 P and Pg amplitude readings for source-to-receiver distances in the local to regional range (0 to 15 degrees). In Kamchatka, ~155,000 S amplitude measurements and 85,000 P amplitudes are reported. We derive the 2D attenuation mapping using tomographic methods. The results of our inversion will be compared with known tectonic features in northeastern Russia and with velocity perturbation features derived for the region in previous work.

  4. Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-01-03

    On the night of June 4, 2001, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 2,447 meters (8,028 feet). The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25-kilometer (15-mile) ash plume, seen as a cold "cloud" streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred here during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964. Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and Asia, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The area is part of the "Ring of Fire," a string of volcanoes that encircles the Pacific Ocean. The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color-coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas. The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03514

  5. Why Russia is not a state

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, J.E.

    1993-08-16

    This article makes two principal points. First the author argues that the Russian federation has never been a state and is not sustainable as a state. Four centrifugal indicators are presented to support this claim: ethnic divisiveness; uncertainty about the legitimacy of Russia`s current borders; competing claims for legitimacy on the part of federal and regional leaders; and army units` unpredictable allegiances. Second, she argues that Soviet policies intended to facilitate central control of the periphery had the perverse effect of creating ethnic identity and demands for national autonomy where, in many cases, they did not exist prior to the Communist regime. Following the introduction, part one briefly reviews the concepts of state, nation, and nationalism and the roles they play in Russia. Criteria for state-hood are discussed. Part two lists the main ethnic groups in Russia and considers the roots of ethnic nationalism in the Russian Federation. Part three discusses confusion over the legitimacy of the physical, economic, and political boundaries of the Russian Federation. Part four discusses political disarray in the center and the regions and the lack of unity among order-enforcing entities. The Volga-Ural region -- where there is a large concentration of nuclear weapons and facilities, and which is especially volatile politically -- is discussed in somewhat more detail. Part five argues that these factors taken together call into question Russia`s identity as a state. The author concludes that Russia remains a multi-ethnic empire in which the rule of law is still not supreme.

  6. Calendars in the Moldavian Soviet Republic and Republic of Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex; Dragan, Dorin

    2007-10-01

    A critical overview of the National Calendars (former Calendars), published in the Moldavian S.S.R. - Republic of Moldova is given, in which one accent on biographies of scientists and not on science itself.

  7. Avalanche risk assessment in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, Anton; Seliverstov, Yury; Sokratov, Sergey; Glazovskaya, Tatiana; Turchaniniva, Alla

    2017-04-01

    The avalanche prone area covers about 3 million square kilometers or 18% of total area of Russia and pose a significant problem in most mountain regions of the country. The constant growth of economic activity, especially in the North Caucasus region and therefore the increased avalanche hazard lead to the demand of the large-scale avalanche risk assessment methods development. Such methods are needed for the determination of appropriate avalanche protection measures as well as for economic assessments during all stages of spatial planning of the territory. The requirement of natural hazard risk assessments is determined by the Federal Law of Russian Federation. However, Russian Guidelines (SP 11-103-97; SP 47.13330.2012) are not clearly presented concerning avalanche risk assessment calculations. A great size of Russia territory, vast diversity of natural conditions and large variations in type and level of economic development of different regions cause significant variations in avalanche risk values. At the first stage of research the small scale avalanche risk assessment was performed in order to identify the most common patterns of risk situations and to calculate full social risk and individual risk. The full social avalanche risk for the territory of country was estimated at 91 victims. The area of territory with individual risk values lesser then 1×10(-6) covers more than 92 % of mountain areas of the country. Within these territories the safety of population can be achieved mainly by organizational activities. Approximately 7% of mountain areas have 1×10(-6) - 1×10(-4) individual risk values and require specific mitigation measures to protect people and infrastructure. Territories with individual risk values 1×10(-4) and above covers about 0,1 % of the territory and include the most severe and hazardous mountain areas. The whole specter of mitigation measures is required in order to minimize risk. The future development of such areas is not recommended

  8. Summer Harvest in Saratov, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Russia's Saratov Oblast (province) is located in the southeastern portion of the East-European plain, in the Lower Volga River Valley. Southern Russia produces roughly 40 percent of the country's total agricultural output, and Saratov Oblast is the largest producer of grain in the Volga region. Vegetation changes in the province's agricultural lands between spring and summer are apparent in these images acquired on May 31 and July 18, 2002 (upper and lower image panels, respectively) by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR).

    The left-hand panels are natural color views acquired by MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. Less vegetation and more earth tones (indicative of bare soils) are apparent in the summer image (lower left). Farmers in the region utilize staggered sowing to help stabilize yields, and a number of different stages of crop maturity can be observed. The main crop is spring wheat, cultivated under non-irrigated conditions. A short growing season and relatively low and variable rainfall are the major limitations to production. Saratov city is apparent as the light gray pixels on the left (west) bank of the Volga River. Riparian vegetation along the Volga exhibits dark green hues, with some new growth appearing in summer.

    The right-hand panels are multi-angle composites created with red band data from MISR's 60-degree backward, nadir and 60-degree forward-viewing cameras displayed as red, green and blue respectively. In these images, color variations serve as a proxy for changes in angular reflectance, and the spring and summer views were processed identically to preserve relative variations in brightness between the two dates. Urban areas and vegetation along the Volga banks look similar in the two seasonal multi-angle composites. The agricultural areas, on the other hand, look strikingly different. This can be attributed to differences in brightness and texture between bare soil and vegetated land. The chestnut-colored soils in

  9. Summer Harvest in Saratov, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Russia's Saratov Oblast (province) is located in the southeastern portion of the East-European plain, in the Lower Volga River Valley. Southern Russia produces roughly 40 percent of the country's total agricultural output, and Saratov Oblast is the largest producer of grain in the Volga region. Vegetation changes in the province's agricultural lands between spring and summer are apparent in these images acquired on May 31 and July 18, 2002 (upper and lower image panels, respectively) by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR).

    The left-hand panels are natural color views acquired by MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. Less vegetation and more earth tones (indicative of bare soils) are apparent in the summer image (lower left). Farmers in the region utilize staggered sowing to help stabilize yields, and a number of different stages of crop maturity can be observed. The main crop is spring wheat, cultivated under non-irrigated conditions. A short growing season and relatively low and variable rainfall are the major limitations to production. Saratov city is apparent as the light gray pixels on the left (west) bank of the Volga River. Riparian vegetation along the Volga exhibits dark green hues, with some new growth appearing in summer.

    The right-hand panels are multi-angle composites created with red band data from MISR's 60-degree backward, nadir and 60-degree forward-viewing cameras displayed as red, green and blue respectively. In these images, color variations serve as a proxy for changes in angular reflectance, and the spring and summer views were processed identically to preserve relative variations in brightness between the two dates. Urban areas and vegetation along the Volga banks look similar in the two seasonal multi-angle composites. The agricultural areas, on the other hand, look strikingly different. This can be attributed to differences in brightness and texture between bare soil and vegetated land. The chestnut-colored soils in

  10. Lake Enriquillo, Dominican Republic

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-15

    Lake Enriquillo is a hypersaline lake in the Dominican Republic. In 2004, the lake covered an area of 164 square kilometers; by 2011, it had doubled in size and grown to 350 km2, inundating farmland and homes. Various reasons for the flooding include increases in rainfall; increase of sediments going into the lake, raising the lakebed; and milder temperatures, reducing surface evaporation. The lake is home to the largest population of American crocodiles in the Caribbean. The images were acquired October 26, 2003 and June 10, 2017, cover an area of 22.7 by 45.4 km, and are located at 18.5 degrees north, 71.6 degrees west. An image of Lake Enriquillo taken in 2003 is available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21815

  11. Struggling to survive in Russia.

    PubMed

    Gadasina, A

    1997-01-01

    Abortion has long been the traditional method of family planning (FP) in Russia. Today, abortions are free, but contraception is not. The birth rate has decreased between 1989 and 1995, and the death rate has increased. The present economic situation has had a marked adverse effect on women who are expected to juggle jobs, household duties, and child care responsibilities. In order to survive, women sometimes must engage in work that compromises their health. Many women have resorted in prostitution, and this has caused an unprecedented explosion in the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases, especially syphilis. The number of people newly registered as HIV-positive in the first half of 1997 exceeded the total for 1996. While sex education is still restricted, erotica and pornography is widely available. Cases of syphilis are increasing among the young, and, in 1996, about 2500 girls under age 15 gave birth and an equal number had abortions. Only 12% of all pregnant women and 25% of newborn infants can be considered healthy. In 1994, the government launched a FP program that is being carried out by a few public and private organizations. One of these, the Russian FP Association, has created more than 50 branches in different regions, opened youth centers, and provided sex education and reproductive health counseling. The overall effort has led to a 27% reduction in abortions, and a 25% reduction in abortion mortality. These efforts, however, have been opposed by "pro-life" forces and by the Communist wing of the government that reduced the budget. The FP Association is fighting back by lobbying and explaining the need for its work.

  12. Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On the night of June 4, 2001, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 2,447 meters (8,028 feet). The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25-kilometer (15-mile) ash plume, seen as a cold 'cloud' streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred here during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964.

    Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and Asia, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The area is part of the 'Ring of Fire,' a string of volcanoes that encircles the Pacific Ocean.

    The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color-coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas.

    The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched Dec. 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

  13. Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On the night of June 4, 2001, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 2,447 meters (8,028 feet). The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25-kilometer (15-mile) ash plume, seen as a cold 'cloud' streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred here during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964.

    Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and Asia, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The area is part of the 'Ring of Fire,' a string of volcanoes that encircles the Pacific Ocean.

    The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color-coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas.

    The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched Dec. 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

  14. Space Biology in Russia Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, Anatoly; Sychev, Vladimir; Ilyin, Eugene

    At present space biology research in Russia is making significant progress in several areas of high priority. Gravitational biology. In April-May 2013, a successful 30-day flight of the biological satellite (biosatellite) Bion-M1 was conducted, which carried rodents (mice and gerbils), geckos, fish, mollusks, crustaceans, microorganisms, insects, lower and higher plants, seeds, etc. The investigations were performed by Russian scientists as well as by researchers from NASA, CNES, DLR and South Korea. Foton-M4 carrying various biological specimens is scheduled to launch in 2014. Work has begun to develop science research programs to be implemented onboard Bion-M2 and Bion-M3 as well as on high apogee recoverable spacecraft. Study of the effects of microgravity on the growth and development of higher plants cultivated over several generations on the International Space Station (ISS) has been recently completed. Space radiobiology. Regular experiments aimed at investigating the effects of high-energy galactic cosmic rays on the animal central nervous system and behavior are being carried out using the Particle Accelerator in the town of Dubna. Biological (environmental) life support systems. In recent years, experiments have been performed on the ISS to upgrade technologies of plant cultivation in microgravity. Advanced greenhouse mockups have been built and are currentlyundergoing bioengineering tests. Technologies of waste utilization in space are being developed. Astrobiology experiments in orbital missions. In 2010, the Biorisk experiment on bacterial and fungal spores, seeds and dormant forms of organisms was completed. The payload containing the specimens was installed on the exterior wall of the ISS and was exposed to outer space for 31 months. In addition, Bion-M1 also carried seeds, bacterial spores and microbes that were exposed to outer space effects. The survival rate of bacterial spores incorporated into man-made meteorites, that were attached to the

  15. [Palivizumab: four seasons in Russia].

    PubMed

    Baranov, A A; Ivanov, D O; Aliamovskaia, G A; Amirova, V R; Antoniuk, I V; Asmolova, G A; Beliaeva, I A; Bokeria, E L; Briukhanova, O A; Vinogradova, I V; Vlasova, E V; Galustian, A N; Gafarova, G V; Gorev, V V; Davydova, I V; Degtiarev, D N; Degtiareva, E A; Dolgikh, V V; Donits, I M; Zakharova, N I; Zernova, L Iu; Zimina, E P; Zuev, V V; Keshishian, E S; Kovalev, I A; Koltunov, I E; Korsunskiĭ, A A; Krivoshchekov, E V; Krsheminskaia, I V; Kuznetsova, S N; Liubimenko, V A; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Nesterenko, É V; Nikolaev, S V; Ovsiannikov, D Iu; Pavlova, T I; Potapova, M V; Rychkova, L V; Safarov, A A; Safina, A I; Skachkova, M A; Soldatova, I G; Turti, T V; Filatova, N A; Shakirova, R M; Ianulevich, O S

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the Russian Federation (RF) registered palivizumab--innovative drug, based on monoclonal antibodies for passive immunization of seasonal respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in children of disease severe progress risk group, which include primarily premature infants, children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease. Currently, palivizumab is included in the list of recommended medicines and medical care standards of different countries, including Russia. In the review the results of Russian research on the progress of RSV infection, its epidemiology and immunization experience gained over the 2010-2014 period are summarized in relation to the foreign data. During the four epidemic seasons palivizumab immunization covered more than 3,200 children of severe RSV infection risk group with a progressive annual increase in the number of patients who received the drug. Geography of palivizumab immunization is also greatly expanded in our country during this time. If during the first two seasons measures of immunization were taken mainly in Moscow and St. Petersburg, at the present time, thirty one territorial entities of the Russian Federation have the experience in the drug application. Analysis of the results of RSV infection immunization (made in several regions) confirms the high clinical efficacy and palivizumab safety already demonstrated in international studies. In addition, the analysis presents the potential to improve the efficiency of the integrated RSV infection immunization programs, realizing in the establishment of high-risk child group register, adequate counseling for parents, as well as the development of the routing of patients and coordination of interaction between different health institutions during the immunization.

  16. Helminth infections in domestic dogs from Russia

    PubMed Central

    Moskvina, T. V.; Ermolenko, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are the hosts for a wide helminth spectrum including tapeworms, flatworms, and nematodes. These parasites affect the dog health and cause morbidity and mortality, especially in young and old animals. Some species, as Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma caninum, Dipylidium caninum, and Echinococcus spp. are well-known zoonotic parasites worldwide, resulting in high public health risks. Poor data about canine helminth species and prevalence are available in Russia, mainly due to the absence of official guidelines for the control of dog parasites. Moreover, the consequent low quality of veterinary monitoring and use of preventive measures, the high rate of environmental contamination by dog feces and the increase of stray dog populations, make the control of the environmental contamination by dog helminths very difficult in this country. This paper reviews the knowledge on canine helminth fauna and prevalence in Russia. Practical aspects related to diagnosis, treatment, and control of parasitic diseases of dogs in Russia are discussed. PMID:27956777

  17. Snowstorm Along the China-Mongolia-Russia Borders

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-31

    Heavy snowfall on March 12, 2004, across north China Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, Mongolia and Russia, caused train and highway traffic to stop for several days along the Russia-China border shown here by NASA Terra spacecraft.

  18. Perspective View, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. The data are from the first C-band mapping swath of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). In the foreground is the broad, flat floodplain of the Amanina River, shown in blue. In background of the image is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the 3spine2 of the peninsula. The cluster of hills in the upper right is a field of small dormant volcanoes. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and understand the hazards posed by future eruptions.

    This shaded relief perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest elevations. This image contains about 2300 meters (7500 feet) of total relief. To emphasize subtle differences in topography, the relief is exaggerated by a factor of 5.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the

  19. Sredinnyy Khrebet, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia is shown in this scene created from a preliminary elevation model derived from the first data collected during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) on February 12, 2000. Sredinnyy Khrebet, the mountain range that makes up the spine of the peninsula, is a chain of active volcanic peaks. Pleistocene and recent glaciers have carved the broad valleys and jagged ridges that are common here. The relative youth of the volcanism is revealed by the topography as infilling and smoothing of the otherwise rugged terrain by lava, ash, and pyroclastic flows, particularly surrounding the high peaks in the south central part of the image. Elevations here range from near sea level up to 2,618 meters (8,590 feet). Two visualization methods were combined to produce this image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the north-south direction. Northern slopes appear bright and southern slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow, red, and magenta, to white at the highest elevations. Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space

  20. Sredinnyy Khrebet, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia is shown in this scene created from a preliminary elevation model derived from the first data collected during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) on February 12, 2000. Sredinnyy Khrebet, the mountain range that makes up the spine of the peninsula, is a chain of active volcanic peaks. Pleistocene and recent glaciers have carved the broad valleys and jagged ridges that are common here. The relative youth of the volcanism is revealed by the topography as infilling and smoothing of the otherwise rugged terrain by lava, ash, and pyroclastic flows, particularly surrounding the high peaks in the south central part of the image. Elevations here range from near sea level up to 2,618 meters (8,590 feet). Two visualization methods were combined to produce this image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the north-south direction. Northern slopes appear bright and southern slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow, red, and magenta, to white at the highest elevations. Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space

  1. Perspective View, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. The data are from the first C-band mapping swath of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). In the foreground is the broad, flat floodplain of the Amanina River, shown in blue. In background of the image is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the 3spine2 of the peninsula. The cluster of hills in the upper right is a field of small dormant volcanoes. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and understand the hazards posed by future eruptions.

    This shaded relief perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest elevations. This image contains about 2300 meters (7500 feet) of total relief. To emphasize subtle differences in topography, the relief is exaggerated by a factor of 5.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the

  2. Shaded Relief, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This topographic image shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. The data are from the first C-band mapping swath of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). On the left side are four rivers, which flow northwest to the Sea of Okhotsk. These rivers are, from the south to north, Tigil, Amanina, Voyampolka, and Zhilovaya. The broad, flat floodplains of the rivers are shown in blue. These rivers are important spawning grounds for salmon. In the right side of the image is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the 3spine2 of the peninsula. The cluster of hills to the lower right is a field of small dormant volcanoes. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and understand the hazards posed by future eruptions.

    This shaded relief image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest elevations. This image contains about 2300 meters (7500 feet) of total relief. Shaded relief maps are commonly used in applications such as geologic mapping and land use planning.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and

  3. Polymorphisms of Cytochrome P450 Genes in Three Ethnic Groups from Russia

    PubMed Central

    Korytina, Gülnaz; Kochetova, Olga; Akhmadishina, Leysan; Viktorova, Elena; Victorova, Tatyana

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of the most common allelic variants of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2C9, CYP2E1, CYP2F1, CYP2J2 and CYP2S1 in a representative sample of the three ethnic groups (Russians, Tatars and Bashkirs) from Republic of Bashkortostan (Russia), and compare the results with existing data published for other populations. Material and Methods: CYPs genotypes were determined in 742 DNA samples of healthy unrelated individuals representative of three ethnic groups. The CYPs gene polymorphisms were examined using the PCR-RLFP method. Results: Analysis of the CYP1A1 (rs1048943, rs4646903), CYP1A2 (rs762551), CYP2E1 (rs2031920) allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies revealed significant differences among healthy residents of the Republic of Bashkortostan of different ethnicities. Distribution of allele and genotype frequencies of CYP1A2 (rs35694136), CYP1B1 (rs1056836), CYP2C9 (rs1799853, rs1057910), CYP2F1 (rs11399890), CYP2J2 (rs890293), CYP2S1 (rs34971233, rs338583) genes were similar in Russians, Tatars, and Bashkirs. Analysis of the CYPs genes allele frequency distribution patterns among the ethnic groups from the Republic of Bashkortostan in comparison with the different populations worldwide was conducted. Conclusion: The peculiarities of the allele frequency distribution of CYPs genes in the ethnic groups of the Republic of Bashkortostan should be taken into consideration in association and pharmacogenetic studies. The results of the present investigation will be of great help in elucidating the genetic background of drug response, susceptibility to cancer and complex diseases, as well as in determining the toxic potentials of environmental pollutants in our region. PMID:25207010

  4. United States/Russia Space Cooperation Documentary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This video documents the initiative to develop a multinational, permanent space research laboratory. Historical background on the U.S. and Soviet manned space flight program as well as joint efforts such as the Apollo-Soyuz link up is shown. The current initiative will begin with collaborative missions involving NASA's space shuttle and Russia's Mir space station, and culminate in a permanently manned space station involving the U.S., Russia, Japan, Canada, and ESA. Shown are computer simulations of the proposed space station. Commentary is provided by the NASA administrator, former astronauts, cosmonauts, and Russian and American space experts.

  5. Cowpox in a human, Russia, 2015.

    PubMed

    Popova, A Y; Maksyutov, R A; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Zaikovskaya, A V; Sergeev, A A; Vlashchenko, I V; Bodnev, S A; Ternovoi, V A; Alexandrova, N S; Tarasov, A L; Konovalova, N V; Koroleva, A A; Bulychev, L E; Pyankov, O V; Demina, Y V; Agafonov, A P; Shchelkunov, S N; Miheev, V N

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the first laboratory-confirmed human case of cowpox virus infection in Russia since 1991. Phylogenetic studies of haemagglutinin, TNF-α receptor-like protein and thymidine kinase regions showed significant differences with known orthopoxviruses, including unique amino-acid substitutions and deletions. The described cowpox virus strain, taking into account differences, is genetically closely related to strains isolated years ago in the same geographical region (European part of Russia and Finland), which suggests circulation of viral strains with common origin in wild rodents without spread over long distances and appearance in other parts of the world.

  6. United States/Russia Space Cooperation Documentary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This video documents the initiative to develop a multinational, permanent space research laboratory. Historical background on the U.S. and Soviet manned space flight program as well as joint efforts such as the Apollo-Soyuz link up is shown. The current initiative will begin with collaborative missions involving NASA's space shuttle and Russia's Mir space station, and culminate in a permanently manned space station involving the U.S., Russia, Japan, Canada, and ESA. Shown are computer simulations of the proposed space station. Commentary is provided by the NASA administrator, former astronauts, cosmonauts, and Russian and American space experts.

  7. Type specimens of centipedes (Myriapoda, Chilopoda) in the National Museum, Prague (Czech Republic)

    PubMed Central

    Dolejš, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The centipede collection in the National Museum in Prague contains type material of 16 taxa (14 species and two subspecies), of which 15 were described by Luděk J. Dobroruka and one by Karl W. Verhoeff: Allothereua wilsonae Dobroruka, 1979; Chinobius alenae Dobroruka, 1980; Lithobius corrigendus Dobroruka, 1988; Lithobius creticus Dobroruka, 1977; Lithobius erythrocephalus mohelensis Dobroruka, 1959; Lithobius evae Dobroruka, 1958; Lithobius magurensis Dobroruka, 1971; Lithobius purkynei Dobroruka, 1957; Lithobius tatricus Dobroruka, 1958; Lithobius tatricus monounguis Dobroruka, 1958; Monotarsobius homolaci Dobroruka, 1971; Monotarsobius krali Dobroruka, 1979; Pachymerium dilottiae Dobroruka, 1976; Pachymerium hanzaki Dobroruka, 1976; Scolopendra aztecorum Verhoeff, 1934 and Strigamia olympica Dobroruka, 1977. Of these 16 taxa, five were described from the Czech Republic, three from Slovakia and eight from other countries (Greece, Iraq, Kyrgyzstan, Mexico, Nepal, Russia and Uzbekistan). The eight taxa described from the Czech and Slovak Republics are now considered as junior synonyms but the eight taxa described from the other countries are still valid. PMID:26257531

  8. Chinese Students in the Higher Educational Institutions of Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aref'ev, A. L.

    2012-01-01

    There has been an increase in the number of students from China studying in Russia, but still less than 2 percent of Chinese who study abroad do so in Russia. A third of these students would not encourage others to do so, on the grounds that educational conditions are not good and that they feel unwelcome in Russia. Most of these students…

  9. 77 FR 51825 - Ferrovanadium and Nitrided Vanadium From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... COMMISSION Ferrovanadium and Nitrided Vanadium From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1... antidumping duty order on ferrovanadium and nitrided vanadium from Russia would not be likely to lead to... contained in USITC Publication 4345 (August 2012), entitled Ferrovanadium and Nitrided Vanadium from Russia...

  10. 75 FR 35086 - Magnesium From China and Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... COMMISSION Magnesium From China and Russia AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... orders on magnesium from China and Russia. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it will...)) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on magnesium from China and Russia...

  11. 75 FR 74746 - Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... COMMISSION Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of five-year reviews concerning the antidumping duty orders on solid urea from Russia and Ukraine... antidumping duty orders on solid urea from Russia and Ukraine would be likely to lead to continuation or...

  12. 76 FR 15339 - Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... COMMISSION Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... orders on solid urea from Russia and Ukraine. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it will...)) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on solid urea from Russia and Ukraine...

  13. 76 FR 77015 - Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... COMMISSION Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty orders on solid urea from Russia and Ukraine would be likely to lead to continuation or... 2011), entitled Solid Urea from Russia and Ukraine: Investigation Nos. 731-TA- 340-E and 340-H (Third...

  14. Chinese Students in the Higher Educational Institutions of Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aref'ev, A. L.

    2012-01-01

    There has been an increase in the number of students from China studying in Russia, but still less than 2 percent of Chinese who study abroad do so in Russia. A third of these students would not encourage others to do so, on the grounds that educational conditions are not good and that they feel unwelcome in Russia. Most of these students…

  15. Federal Republic of Germany.

    PubMed

    1987-05-01

    The population of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) was an estimated 61 million (including West Berlin) in 1986 and is in the process of declining gradually as a result of low birth rates. The infant mortality rate is 11/1000, while life expectancy is 73.4 years for women and 67.2 years for men. Of the work force of 27.6 million, 5.4% are engaged in agriculture, 41.6% work in industry and commerce, 10% are employed by the government, and 42.7% are in the service sector. The gross national product was US$898.8 billion in 1986, with an annual growth rate of 2.6% and a per capita income of $10,680. The government is parliamentary and based on a democratic constitution emphasizing protection of individual liberty and divided power in a federal structure. Political life since the establishment of the FRG in 1949 has been characterized by remarkable stability and orderly succession. The FRG ranks among the most important economic powers in the world. The economy is largely export oriented, with 25-30% of the gross national product shipped abroad each year. Competition and free enterprise are fostered, but the state participates in the ownership and management of major sections of the economy, including public services. A major concern at present is the country's ability to adapt to new markets and to develop sophisticated technologies.

  16. Smoke and Clouds over Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Several mountain ranges and a portion of the Amur River are visible in this set of MISR images of Russia's far east Khabarovsk region. The images were acquired on May 13, 2001 during Terra orbit 7452. The view from MISR's 70-degree forward-looking camera is at the top left; the 26-degree forward-looking view is at the top right. The larger image at the bottom is a stereo 'anaglyph' created using the cameras at two intermediate angles. To view the stereo image in 3-D you need red/blue glasses with the red filter placed over your left eye. All of the images are oriented with north to the left to facilitate stereo viewing. Each image covers an area about 345 kilometers x 278 kilometers.

    The Amur River, in the upper right, and Lake Bolon, at the top center, are most prominent in the 26-degree view due to sunglint (mirror-like reflection of the Sun's rays by the water). The Amur River valley is a primary breeding ground for storks and cranes and a stopover for large numbers of migratory birds. About 20% of the Amur wetlands are protected by official conservation measures, but human development has converted large portions to agricultural uses. Other notable features in these images are several mountain chains, including the Badzhal'skiy to the left of center and the Bureiskiy in the lower left.

    Smoke plumes from several forest fires can be seen. They are especially apparent in the 70-degree view where the smoke's visibility is accentuated, in part, by the long slant path through the atmosphere. The largest plumes are in the lower left and upper right, with some smaller plumes above and to the right of the image centers. In the upper images the hazy region in the vicinity of these smaller plumes has the appearance of low-altitude smoke, but depth perception provided by the stereo anaglyph shows that it is actually a distinct layer of high-altitude cirrus clouds. Whether the cirrus is related to the fires is uncertain. It is possible, however, for the fires have

  17. Patterns of Student Employment in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roshchin, Sergey; Rudakov, Victor

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyses the factors of combining study and work and the factors explaining intensity of work during study in Russia, based on cross-sectional survey data. The issue of how Russian students combine work and study is analysed through the set of financial, academic, social and demographic predictors, quality of university and quality of…

  18. The "Ride for Russia" Tree Lichen Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of nine indicator lichens found on trees in Northern Europe and Western Russia was used for monitoring air quality. The 4200 mile route of the survey went through eight countries. Surveys were carried out in cities, towns, countryside and forests, and along motorways. The author has conducted tree lichen surveys with pupils from…

  19. Novel Lyssaviruses Isolated from Bats in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Botvinkin, Alexandr D.; Poleschuk, Elena M.; Borisova, Tatyana I.; Gazaryan, Suren V.; Yager, Pamela; Rupprecht, Charles E.

    2003-01-01

    Two new rabies-related viruses were discovered in Russia during 2002. Viruses were isolated from bats in Eastern Siberia near Baikal Lake and in the western Caucasus Mountains. After preliminary antigenic and genetic characterization, we found that both viruses should be considered as new putative lyssavirus genotypes. PMID:14720408

  20. Child Care in Russia: In Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ispa, Jean

    With the advent of "perestroika" and "glasnost," Russian childcare and education underwent a transitional period in practice and theory. Contrasting impressions from an earlier visit under the Communist regime, this book describes the experiences of Jean Ispa in her travels to Russia, observing children in six child care…

  1. Novel variant of tickborne encephalitis virus, Russia.

    PubMed

    Ternovoi, Vladimir A; Protopopova, Elena V; Chausov, Eugene V; Novikov, Dmitry V; Leonova, Galina N; Netesov, Sergey V; Loktev, Valery B

    2007-10-01

    We isolated a novel strain of tickborne encephalitis virus (TBEV), Glubinnoe/2004, from a patient with a fatal case in Russia. We sequenced the strain, whose landmark features included 57 amino acid substitutions and 5 modified cleavage sites. Phylogenetically, Glubinnoe/2004 is a novel variant that belongs to the Eastern type of TBEV.

  2. Environmental Education for Sustainable Development in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasimov, N. S.; Malkhazova, S. M.; Romanova, E. P.

    2005-01-01

    The conceptual underpinning and the organizational structure of the existing system of higher environmental education in Russia are analysed. The system, embracing 129 universities, has been created in the last 10 years. At present there is a shift from general environmental education to education for sustainable development. The new system is…

  3. Life-Threatening Sochi Virus Infections, Russia.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Detlev H; Tkachenko, Evgeniy A; Morozov, Vyacheslav G; Yunicheva, Yulia V; Pilikova, Olga M; Malkin, Gennadiy; Ishmukhametov, Aydar A; Heinemann, Patrick; Witkowski, Peter T; Klempa, Boris; Dzagurova, Tamara K

    2015-12-01

    Sochi virus was recently identified as a new hantavirus genotype carried by the Black Sea field mouse, Apodemus ponticus. We evaluated 62 patients in Russia with Sochi virus infection. Most clinical cases were severe, and the case-fatality rate was as high as 14.5%.

  4. STS-71 astronauts training in Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronauts Norman E. Thagard and Bonnie J. Dunbar by the Mir Space Station simulator at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (Star City), near Moscow, Russia. In March 1995, astronaut Thagard is scheduled to be launched in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft with

  5. STS-71 astronauts training in Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Bonnie J. Dunbar in a cosmonaut space suit in the Training Simulator Facility at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (Star City), near Moscow, Russia. In March 1995, astronaut Norman E. Thagard is scheduled to be launched in a Russian Soyuz sp

  6. Expedition 25 portraits in Russia - Scott Kelly

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-31

    JSC2010-E-124007 (August 2010) --- NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, Expedition 25 flight engineer and Expedition 26 commander, attired in a Russian Sokol launch and entry suit, takes a break from training in Star City, Russia to pose for a portrait. Photo credit: Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center

  7. STS-71 astronauts training in Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronauts Norman E. Thagard and Bonnie J. Dunbar in cosmonaut space suits in the Training Simulator Facility at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (Star City), near Moscow, Russia. In March 1995, astronaut Thagard is scheduled to be launched in a Russ

  8. Expedition 25 portraits in Russia - Oleg Skripochka

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-31

    JSC2010-E-124005 (August 2010) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, Expedition 25/26 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Sokol launch and entry suit, takes a break from training in Star City, Russia to pose for a portrait. Photo credit: Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center

  9. Expedition 25 portraits in Russia - Alexander Kaleri

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-31

    JSC2010-E-124004 (August 2010) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Kaleri, Expedition 25/26 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Sokol launch and entry suit, takes a break from training in Star City, Russia to pose for a portrait. Photo credit: Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center

  10. STS-71 astronauts training in Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronauts Norman E. Thagard and Bonnie J. Dunbar in cosmonaut space suits by the Soyuz TM simulator at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (Star City), near Moscow, Russia. In March 1995, astronaut Thagard is scheduled to be launched in a Russian Soyuz

  11. Novel lyssaviruses isolated from bats in Russia.

    PubMed

    Botvinkin, Alexandr D; Poleschuk, Elena M; Kuzmin, Ivan V; Borisova, Tatyana I; Gazaryan, Suren V; Yager, Pamela; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2003-12-01

    Two new rabies-related viruses were discovered in Russia during 2002. Viruses were isolated from bats in Eastern Siberia near Baikal Lake and in the western Caucasus Mountains. After preliminary antigenic and genetic characterization, we found that both viruses should be considered as new putative lyssavirus genotypes.

  12. The "Ride for Russia" Tree Lichen Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of nine indicator lichens found on trees in Northern Europe and Western Russia was used for monitoring air quality. The 4200 mile route of the survey went through eight countries. Surveys were carried out in cities, towns, countryside and forests, and along motorways. The author has conducted tree lichen surveys with pupils from…

  13. Libraries at "the End of Russia."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronayne, Betty

    2000-01-01

    Describes the library at Far Eastern State Technical University in Vladivostok (Russia) based on a visit that was part of a collaborative project with California State University, Sacramento. Highlights include staffing; problems with funding, space, and technology; library collections in the Department of World Politics and Law; and the nearby…

  14. Expedition 43 Crew Final Exams in Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-13

    NASA Video File of ISS Expedition 43 final exams in Russia on March 5, 2015 with crewmembers Scott Kelly, Gennady Padalka, and Mikhail Kornienko; and backup crew Jeff Williams, Sergei Volkov and Alexei Ovchinin. Includes footage of final qualification training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC); interview with Emily Nelson, ISS Expedition 46 Lead Flight Director; and scenes from the qualification training.

  15. Life-Threatening Sochi Virus Infections, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Tkachenko, Evgeniy A.; Morozov, Vyacheslav G.; Yunicheva, Yulia V.; Pilikova, Olga M.; Malkin, Gennadiy; Ishmukhametov, Aydar A.; Heinemann, Patrick; Witkowski, Peter T.; Klempa, Boris; Dzagurova, Tamara K.

    2015-01-01

    Sochi virus was recently identified as a new hantavirus genotype carried by the Black Sea field mouse, Apodemus ponticus. We evaluated 62 patients in Russia with Sochi virus infection. Most clinical cases were severe, and the case-fatality rate was as high as 14.5%. PMID:26584463

  16. Education and Society in the New Russia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anthony, Ed.

    This collection of essays examines the changes that have occurred in Russia since the dissolution of the USSR in 1991. A historical perspective is used to show that many of the changes were underway during perestroika and that post-Soviet developments are an extension of those changes. The book is divided into four sections. Section 1, "The…

  17. Mapping Russia: Geographic and Cultural Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khachikian, Arthur

    For people living in the 20th century, Russia has been associated with images of communism, the Bolshevik Revolution, totalitarian regimes and leaders, and the fears and stereotypes of the Cold War era. The dissolution of the Soviet Union, the end of the Cold War, and the liberal revolutions of the 1980s-1990s have provided an opportunity to…

  18. Education in the Fate of Today's Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borisenkov, V.P.; Kraevskii, V.V.; Valeev, G.Kh.; Avtonomova, N.S.; Evdokimov, A.K.; Shchedrina, T.G.; Belomestnova, N.V.; Beliaeva, M.A.; Shimina, A.N.; Karmanchikov, A.J.; Korol, A.D.; Varnavskaia, N.Ia.; Berezhnova, E.V.; Daniliuk, A.Ia.; Anua, R.G.; Sidorina, T.Iu.; Tarba, I.D.; Arlamov, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Education in the fate of today's Russia was the topic of a scientific seminar titled "Philosophy, Education, and Society," held in the summer of 2007 in the city of Gagra by the editors of the journals "Voprosy filosofii" and "Pedagogika," the Moscow N.E. Bauman State Technical University, and the Russian Academy of…

  19. [Collective immunity against poliomyelitis among the population of several regions of Russia].

    PubMed

    Seybil, V B; Malyshkina, L P; Ageeva, O T; Kosolapova, E I; Mnozhina, E G; Groshenkova, E V; Krivtsov, N V; Gurianova, N I; Daltsaeva, M K; Fomina, N S

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work was to estimate the collective immunity against poliomyelitis among the population of 8 regions and republics of Russia. The rates of the collective immunity against poliomyelitis allow the polio vaccination quality to be estimated and the population protection rate to be simultaneously demonstrated. A total of 8 regions (2138 people) were tested. The antibodies to the polioviruses of 1-3 types were determined against the vaccine Sabin strains in the neutralization test in the RD cell line. As a result, we found that vaccination against poliomyelitis in all observed regions was maintained at the required high level. Thus, the number of people with antibodies to the polio in most regions and age groups approximates or reaches 100%, while GMT is also high. This work demonstrated the necessity of the continuation of vaccination against poliomyelitis and control over collective immunity.

  20. Situation Reports--Afghanistan, Cyprus, Iran, Kenya, Lebanese Republic, Malagasy Republic, Malaysia (West), People's Democratic Republic of Yemen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in eight foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Afghanistan, Cyprus, Iran, Kenya, Lebanese Republic, Malagasy Republic (Madagascar), Malaysia (West), and People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. Information is provided under two topics, general background and…

  1. Promoting sustainable energy strategies in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.K.

    1995-12-31

    Enormous structural changes are taking place in the economy of Russia. It is important that vital sectors of the economy undergo a smooth transition from a centrally-planned paradigm to a more market-oriented structure. Introducing market-oriented-institutional structures and energy planning approaches to Russian utilities can facilitate the transition to the market and allow them to become vehicles for change rather than mere witnesses. As real electricity prices increase relative to other prices, a significant industrial restructuring can be expected, with an accompanying reduction of energy consumption. By developing programs to help industry become more energy-efficiency, the electricity sector can play a central role in Russia`s economic recovery. A robust energy sector will be in a much better position to lead other sectors of the economy toward market-oriented solutions to the present economic crisis. Because of the magnitude of the task of recreating an economy for one of the world`s superpowers, institutional restructuring should take place incrementally. The transition of US utilities from a {open_quotes}build-and-grow{close_quotes} paradigm to one of Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) and subsequently to a hybrid of competition and IRP began and is continuing on the state and regional level. Local success stories on the West Coast and New England persuaded other states to adopt these methods. This strategy could also prove to be very effective in regions of Russia that are served by integrated electricity grids, such as the South Russia Power pool (Yuzhenergo) that serves the North Caucasus region. As the Russian energy system currently undergoes change, simultaneously privatizing and restructuring, these issues will be largely decided within the next two years. One of the greatest challenges involves implementing an environmentally sustainable strategy which ensures that energy efficiency and renewable energy are incorporated into the new structure.

  2. Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    1989-11-01

    The Central African Republic contains 242,000 square miles, which rolling terrain almost 2000 feet above sea level. The climate is tropical, and it has a population of 2.8 million people with a 2.5% growth rate. There are more than 80 ethnic groups including Baya 34%, Banda 28%, Sara 10%, Mandja 9%, Mboum 9%, and M'Baka 7%. The religions are traditional African 35%, protestant 25%, Roman Catholic 25%, and Muslim 15%, and the languages are French and Sangho. The infant mortality rate is 143/1000, with expectancy at 49 years and a 40% literacy rate. The work force of 1 million is 70% agricultural, industry 6% and commerce and service 6% and government 3%. The government consists of a president assisted by cabinet ministers and a single party. Natural resources include diamonds, uranium, timber, gold, and oil, and major industries are beverages, textiles, and soap. Agricultural products feature coffee, cotton, peanuts, tobacco, food crops and livestock. Most of the population live in rural areas and most of the 80 ethnic groups have their own language. This is one of the world's least developed countries, with a per capita income of $375/year. The main problems with development are the poor transportation infrastructure, and the weak internal and international marketing systems. The US and various international organizations have aided in agriculture development, health programs, and family planning. US investment is mainly in diamond and gold mining, and although oil drilling has been successful it is not economically feasible at current prices.

  3. [Epidemiological Surveillance of Cholera in Russia During the Period of the Seventh Pandemic].

    PubMed

    Onishhenko, G G; Moskvitina, E A; Kruglikov, V D; Titova, S V; Adamenko, O L; Vodop'ianov, A S; Vodop'ianov, S O

    2015-01-01

    In this work basic stages of formation of the epidemiological surveillance of cholera in Russia are described. In 1990-s for the first time zoning by epidemic manifestations of cholera was carried out at the level of subjects forming parts of Russia and other Republics of the Soviet Union with the introduction of differential tactics of epidemiological surveillance. Improvement of epidemiological surveillance of cholera was aimed at harmonization with the IHR (2005), integration of epidemiological surveillance of cholera and social-hygienic monitoring of water objects of I and II categories. Characterization of isolated Vibrio cholerae strains (1990-2014) on the genomic basis determined the emergence of new VNTR-genotypes of V. cholerae O1 ctxAB+ tcpA+, responsible for outbreaks, simultaneously with isolation of V. cholerae 01 ctxAB-tcpA-strains during monitoring of environmental objectsfor cholera. A viewpoint is considered of the beginning of the eighth cholera pandemic in the context of emergence of V. cholerae El Tor strains with CTXφ prophage carrying ctxB gene of cholera toxin of classical biovar. Main directions offurther enhancement ofepidemiological surveillance include the study of basic data structures used in the epidemiological surveillance system, the use of zoning of municipal units offederal subjects with corresponding surveillance tactics and expected economic effect.

  4. Conclusions from Ufa, Russia, drinking water dioxin cleanup experiments involving different treatment technologies.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, A D; Schecter, A; Papke, O; Beljak, A A

    1996-02-01

    The city of Ufa, in the Bashkortostan Republic of Russia, is believed to have dioxin contamination of its water supply from 30 years of gas ejections, sewage and buried sludge from the Chimprom industrial factory, and possibly other sources. A project was developed to provide technology at relatively low cost for treating dioxin contaminated water in routine and also in emergency situations. This paper describes the results of the 15-year research project to remove dioxins from drinking water. Three different methods were experimentally tested for efficiency at removing dioxins from tap water. The methods used were: (1) ozonization plus filtration through powder sorbents, (2) filtration through sand, and (3) filtration through granulated sorbents. It was found that the method of filtration through granulated sorbents was most effective at removing dioxins from water: 90-95% of all PCDD and PCDF isomers were removed from water samples. This research also shows that the most toxic congener, 2,3,7,8-TCDD, can be removed effectively and efficiently. In addition, there are no significant differences between the extractability of PCDDs and PCDFs. Reductions in exposure to humans from contaminated drinking water can be accomplished via sorptive water treatments for relatively reasonable cost, making this a practical approach. This method of decreasing toxic chemicals is being implemented in Ufa, Russia.

  5. Shared Knowledge for Addressing Impacts of Land Use Transitions on Reindeer Husbandry in Northern Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, N.; Yurchak, B.; Sleptsov, Y.; Turi, J. M.

    2004-12-01

    Reindeer husbandry in Northern Russia is an economic activity with a special cultural dimension of utmost importance to the indigenous peoples. Climate changes with warmer temperatures are creating significant problems now in the Arctic for the reindeer herds. These climate factors, industrial development, and the recent transition of Russia to a market economy have resulted in a nearly complete disruption of any system of supply of goods and services and health care to indigenous peoples. In turn, this has caused rapidly deteriorating health and living conditions in the indigenous reindeer herder communities. To try to address some of these issues, a NASA-reindeer herder partnership, called Reindeer Mapper, has been initiated which is establishing a system to bring indigenous traditional and local knowledge together with scientific and engineering knowledge, remote sensing and information technologies to create a more powerful information base for addressing these environmental, climate, industrial, political, and business problems. Preliminary results from the Reindeer Mapper pilot project will be presented including a special information-sharing communications system for the Reindeer Mapper project (a private intranet system), several NASA data sets useful to the herders including SAR and Landsat imagery, local knowledge of herd distributions, ground-based data, and weather observations. Results will also be presented from the first NASA-reindeer herder science and indigenous knowledge summer camp for children of reindeer herders from the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia).

  6. Environmental situation and development of mineral raw material base in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larikova, O. I.

    2003-04-01

    The necessity of the further development of mineral raw material base and exploration for new deposits in Russia, connected with the loss of traditional sources of mineral and raw material resources in the former USSR republics, let us to study several ecological problems of top priority: 1. To determine all natural factors that affect the development of mineral raw material base; to determine the availability of the Russian territory ranged according to the favorable conditions for the development of its mineral raw material base. 2. To determine all natural factors in order to find regions where natural environment is not capable of self-restoration and where additional burden resulted from deposits' development could cause irreversible environmental changes and ecological catastrophes. 3. To evaluate the main negative results arisen from deposits' development and to set up the complex of nature protection measures in order to reduce negative influence on the environment. To solve the first task, scientists from VIEMS and VNIIgeosystem have compiled the Atlas of electronic geo-ecological maps of Russia consisting of more than 20 digital geoecological maps grouped into 4 blocks: - natural factors, including continuous and discontinuous permafrost, seismological danger, avalanche and mudflow hazards, manifestation of exogenous geological processes; - unique natural resources and objects, including current and designed reservation parks, unique lake systems, areas used mainly by small-in-numbers peoples of the North; - hydro geological factors - rate of underground water resources in operation and provision of population with fresh underground water; - social and economic factors, including density and natural increase of population disease and mortality rates, the number of unemployed, etc. On the final map, the whole territory of Russia has been divided into 4 categories: - territories, where the law prohibits the exploration, - territories, those are adverse for

  7. Weekend effects on binge drinking and homicide: the social connection between alcohol and violence in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Pridemore, William Alex

    2006-01-01

    Aims and design This study employs unique newly available Russian mortality data to examine the social connection between binge drinking and homicide in the country. Setting, participants and measurements All death certificates of those aged 20–64 years in the Udmurt Republic, Russia, were analyzed according to day and cause of death for the years 1994–98. Deaths due to alcohol poisoning were used as a proxy for binge drinking. Findings There was a high bivariate correlation (r = 0.75) between the daily distribution of deaths due to alcohol and homicide. The number of alcohol deaths was significantly higher on Saturdays and Sundays (presumably as a result of drinking on Friday and Saturday nights) and the number of homicide deaths was significantly higher on Fridays and Saturdays. Conclusions The levels of alcohol consumption and homicide in Russia are among the highest in the world, and there is mounting evidence that the two are related. Binge drinking, preference for distilled spirits and a high social tolerance for heavy drinking may act as social and cultural contextual factors that might increase the risk of violent outcomes. The high correspondence between the daily distribution of alcohol and homicide deaths provides indirect evidence for the social connection between them. While these findings do not represent a causal connection, when placed in the context of the growing literature on this topic they provide further support of an association between alcohol consumption and homicide rates in Russia and preliminary evidence for the intermediate role in this relationship played by social context. PMID:15265100

  8. LGBT Rights Activism and Homophobia in Russia.

    PubMed

    Buyantueva, Radzhana

    2017-04-14

    This article explores how lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender/transsexual (LGBT) people's perception of increasing conservative trends and negative public attitudes affected the development of LGBT rights activism in Russia. It includes following sections: (1) the analysis of the development of LGBT community and activism in Russia; (2) the investigation of public perception of same-sex relations and how LGBT people's views of it affected their readiness to join activism; and (3) the examination of the state's policy toward LGBT people in a wake of conservative discourse and its impact on LGBT activism and LGBT people's willingness to get involved in it. The article concludes by considering implications that LGBT rights activism face nowadays in order to survive and continue its existence.

  9. Clinical trials in Russia: achieving excellence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, Robert S.; Ichim, Thomas E.; Petrov, Vladimir; Reznik, Boris N.

    2005-06-01

    The Russian population offers a unique opportunity for conducting clinical trials in general, and specifically in the area of Medical Devices. Although the regulatory framework for approval of clinical trials and eventual marketing registration is based on an American-style format, details of operating in the Russian framework are very different. Understanding and leveraging the unique characteristics of the Russian system on the patient side, the investigator side, and the regulatory side is important in extracting optimum value out of clinical trials in Russia. Having performed Medical Device research and clinical trials in Russia, the authors overview the present system and describe various strategies for working in this growing but still under-utilized clinical trials arena.

  10. Update: Federal Republic of Germany.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewenthal, Nessa P.

    The Federal Republic of Germany is widely respected for its highly developed economy, rich cultural life, and significant contributions to science, mathematics, and the arts. Designed for families or individuals planning to move to or live in Germany for extended periods of time, this book provides guidance in such practical matters as entry…

  11. STS-71 astronauts training in Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-20

    Astronaut Norman E. Thagard in a cosmonaut space suit in the Training Simulator Facility at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (Star City), near Moscow, Russia. In March 1995, astronaut Thagard is scheduled to be launched in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft with two cosmonauts to begin a three-month tour of duty on the Russian Mir Space Station. Thagard, along with his back-up, astronaut Bonnie J. Dunbar, has been training in Russian since February 1994.

  12. STS-71 astronauts training in Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-20

    Astronaut Bonnie J. Dunbar in a cosmonaut space suit in the Training Simulator Facility at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (Star City), near Moscow, Russia. In March 1995, astronaut Norman E. Thagard is scheduled to be launched in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft with two cosmonauts to begin a three-month tour of duty on the Russian Mir Space Station. Thagard, along with his back-up, astronaut Bonnie J. Dunbar, has been training in Russian since February 1994.

  13. STS-71 astronauts training in Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-20

    Astronauts Norman E. Thagard and Bonnie J. Dunbar in cosmonaut space suits in the Training Simulator Facility at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (Star City), near Moscow, Russia. In March 1995, astronaut Thagard is scheduled to be launched in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft with two cosmonauts to begin a three-month tour of duty on the Russian Mir Space Station. Thagard, along with his back-up, astronaut Bonnie J. Dunbar, has been training in Russian since February 1994.

  14. Politics and Economics in Putins Russia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    skilled critical thinkers and complex problem solvers. Concurrently, it is our duty to the U.S. Army to also act as a “think factory ” for commanders and... factor in reinforcing the fetters that bind Russia and hold the country back. As Judy Holiday memora- bly stated in the movie, Born Yesterday, “This...withdrawal from Afghanistan.44 There are further complicating factors in these peripheries, too. First, due to geopolitical and geo- economic shifts

  15. Land Change in Russia since 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Beurs, K.; Ioffe, G.; Nefedova, T.

    2010-12-01

    Agricultural reform has been an important anthropogenic change process shaping landscapes in European Russia since the formal collapse of the Soviet Union at the end of 1991. Widespread land abandonment is perhaps the most evident side effect of the reform, even visible in synoptic imagery. While land abandonment as a result of the collapse of the Soviet Union is relatively well documented, few studies have investigated the unfolding process of abandonment that results from rural population declines. Russia’s population is projected to shrink by a staggering 29% by 2050 and population dynamics are predicted to play a significant role structuring rural landscapes across European Russia. While often treated as a unified whole with respect to agricultural reform, significant regional diversity exists in Russia. Official statistics at the rayon (county) level are typically skewed toward large-scale farming and farm data from important household productions are summarized into regional averages. In addition, data at sub-district level can often only be obtained by visiting rural administrators in person. Large scale official data thus need to be interpreted with caution. Here we present data collected during the summer of 2010 from representative settlements and enterprises in selected counties within the oblasts (states) of Kostroma and Samara. These field data will provide an initial overview of the economic and social state in modern rural western Russia. We will combine the field data with established socio-demographic observations as well as satellite observations at multiple scales to understand the effect of global change and to project future developments.

  16. Urbanization data of Samara city, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Boori, Mukesh Singh; Choudhary, Komal; Kupriyanov, Alexander; Kovelskiy, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    A method has been developed for urbanization by using satellite data and socio-economic data. These datasets consists three decade Landsat images and population data. A detailed description using flow chart is given to show how to use this data to produce land use/cove maps. The land use/cove maps were used to know the urban growth in Samara City, Russia. PMID:26937466

  17. Urbanization data of Samara city, Russia.

    PubMed

    Boori, Mukesh Singh; Choudhary, Komal; Kupriyanov, Alexander; Kovelskiy, Viktor

    2016-03-01

    A method has been developed for urbanization by using satellite data and socio-economic data. These datasets consists three decade Landsat images and population data. A detailed description using flow chart is given to show how to use this data to produce land use/cove maps. The land use/cove maps were used to know the urban growth in Samara City, Russia.

  18. When did "scientific psychology" begin in Russia?

    PubMed

    Sirotkina, Irina

    2006-01-01

    The pattern of the institutionalisation of psychology in Russia was as complex as in other countries. The institutionalisation was more than a single event or even a series of events: it was a manifold process that involved various actors, groups, and political parties, and took at least several decades. Psychology was taught within the subject of philosophy, but as a separate course, at high schools, from the early nineteenth century. When, in mid-century, philosophy was banned from universities for political reasons, logic and psychology still remained in the curriculum. Psychology became a contested area in the 1860s, with the rise of the radical movement that accompanied the abolition of serfdom and other reforms. The young radicals, or nihilists, favoured positive science and gave clear preference to physiology; at medical schools, psychology gradually became part of physiology and psychiatry teaching. Psychiatric clinics provided a venue for the first psychological experiments; the first courses in experimental psychology were also taught to psychiatry students. At the turn of the century, humanities departments joined in by opening laboratories and adding courses in experimental psychology to the philosophical psychology traditionally taught. Yet by 1917, the year when the monarchy ended in Russia, only two universities, in Moscow and Odessa, had succeeded in founding laboratories. The institutionalisation of psychology on a mass scale followed the Bolshevik revolution in Russia. The new communist regime facilitated the country's modernisation, and psychology became one of its instruments.

  19. Food legislation and its harmonization in Russia.

    PubMed

    Shamtsyan, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Bringing Russian legislation into compliance with international norms and standards is necessary after its accession to the World Trade Organization. Harmonization of food legislation and of sanitary and phytosanitary measures are among the problems that had to be solved first. Many Russian food and trade regulations had been changed or are still in the process of being reformed, largely owing to a policy of integration pursued by the Customs Union of Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan. However, as a member of the Eurasian Economic Community, Russia is also engaged not only in harmonization throughout the Customs Union but also Kirgizstan and Tajikistan, and Armenia, Moldova and Ukraine as observer countries. Russia also continues to coordinate policy reforms closely with the European Union, its primary trade partner, ultimately bringing Russian food and sanitary norms closer to international standards (e.g. Codex). Today, all participants in the Russian food production chain, processing and sale of foods have to deal with growing numbers of security standards. Many organizations are certified under several schemes, which leads to unnecessary costs. Harmonization of standards has helped promote solutions in the domestic market as well as import-export of foods and raw materials for production. Priorities have included food safety for human health, consumer protection, removal of hazardous and/or adulterated products and increased competition within the domestic food market as well as mutual recognition of certification in bilateral and multilateral (inter)national agreements. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Spatial assessment of gully density in the zone of intensive agriculture of the European part of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Regina; Golosov, Valentin; Yermolaev, Oleg

    2017-04-01

    Gully erosion is one of the most active geomorphic processes and one of the major cause of land degradation worldwide. Gullies within the European part of Russian are observed mostly within the arable lands. Latest assessment and mapping of the gully density for the European Russia was undertaken during 1970th. Spatial assessment of the contemporary gully density was undertaken for five key river basins of the European part of Russia: Mesha (55o53' N, 50o14' E), Ulema (55o05' N, 48o40' E), Samara (52o11' N, 53o49' E), Medveditsa (52o10' N, 45o21' E), Veduga (51o34' N, 38o39' E), using high resolution space images for identification of active gully length and gully head density. The studied river basins are located in the four natural zones: a) zone of mixed and broadleaf forests (Republic of Tatarstan); b) forest-steppe zone (Voronezh region); c) steppe zone (Saratov and Orenburg regions). It is plain with absolute altitudes in the range 140-266 m. Annual precipitation is 550-600 mm with more precipitation falls during the warm period of year in the Eastern river basins (Republic of Tatarstan, Orenburg region) - 250-360 mm. Gullies were recognized in the satellite images and delineated. The information about gullies was extracted by using visual image interpretation. The autumn and spring satellite images are the most informative for the mapping of the active gully pattern within the study area, because it is easier to identify active gully headcuts and walls. Field verification of the data in the key areas of the Republic of Tatarstan, Orenburg and Voronezh regions was performed for the correction of gully maps produced by interpretation of satellite images. The result of the study are maps of gully density for each of the key basin. The highest average density of gullies (0,09 km/km2 and 0,04 km/km2) are observed for the Republic of Tatarstan river basins, and the lowest - in the studied basin of Saratov region (0,01 km/km2). The maximum total length of the gully

  1. Russia’s Next Revolution: Reclaiming Lost Freedom

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-30

    narrative. The Russian government today is in a weaker position than many realize due to social challenges, geopolitical ambitions, and severe...Sanctions in response to Russian military aggression combined with falling oil prices created major economic setbacks in Russia.9 Russians cannot ignore...decade.13 Russia continues to support oligarchs, corruption, and criminal behavior. Russia is presumed responsible for cyber-attacks against several

  2. Haplotype Diversity and Reconstruction of Ancestral Haplotype Associated with the c.35delG Mutation in the GJB2 (Cx26) Gene among the Volgo-Ural Populations of Russia.

    PubMed

    Dzhemileva, L U; Posukh, O L; Barashkov, N A; Fedorova, S A; Teryutin, F M; Akhmetova, V L; Khidiyatova, I M; Khusainova, R I; Lobov, S L; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2011-07-01

    The mutations in theGJB2(Сх26) gene make the biggest contribution to hereditary hearing loss. The spectrum and prevalence of theGJB2gene mutations are specific to populations of different ethnic origins. For severalGJB2 mutations, their origin from appropriate ancestral founder chromosome was shown, approximate estimations of "age" obtained, and presumable regions of their origin outlined. This work presents the results of the carrier frequencies' analysis of the major (for European countries) mutation c.35delG (GJB2gene) among 2,308 healthy individuals from 18 Eurasian populations of different ethnic origins: Bashkirs, Tatars, Chuvashs, Udmurts, Komi-Permyaks, Mordvins, and Russians (the Volga-Ural region of Russia); Byelorussians, Ukrainians (Eastern Europe); Abkhazians, Avars, Cherkessians, and Ingushes (Caucasus); Kazakhs, Uzbeks, Uighurs (Central Asia); and Yakuts, and Altaians (Siberia). The prevalence of the c.35delG mutation in the studied ethnic groups may act as additional evidence for a prospective role of the founder effect in the origin and distribution of this mutation in various populations worldwide. The haplotype analysis of chromosomes with the c.35delG mutation in patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (N=112) and in population samples (N =358) permitted the reconstruction of an ancestral haplotype with this mutation, established the common origin of the majority of the studied mutant chromosomes, and provided the estimated time of the c.35delG mutation carriers expansion (11,800 years) on the territory of the Volga-Ural region.

  3. Development of computerized materials, protection, control and accountability systems in the former Soviet republics: a joint effort

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteson, R.; Ryan, R.H.; Seitz, S.; Landry, R.P.

    1996-07-01

    The laboratory-to-laboratory programs of cooperation between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Institutes of the Russian Federation and the government-to-government programs between the US and Russia have the goal of reducing the danger of nuclear weapons proliferation by strengthening systems of nuclear materials protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A). As part of these programs, DOE is making available to sites in the former Soviet Republics a new-generation nuclear materials accountability system similar to one developed for DOE sites. This new system, the Core Materials Accountability System (COREMAS), is designed for international use. It is a core system to which facility-specific extensions are expected to be made. This paper describes the joint efforts of US personnel and software development teams at sites in Russia, Kazakhstan, and the Ukraine to develop sophisticated computerized MPC&A systems that are customized for the site-specific needs of each facility.

  4. Review of the millipede genus Sibiriulus Gulička, 1972, with descriptions of three new species from Altai, Siberia, Russia (Diplopoda, Julida, Julidae).

    PubMed

    Mikhaljova, Elena V; Nefediev, Pavel S; Nefedieva, Julia S; Sakhnevich, Miroslava B; Dyachkov, Yuri V

    2014-09-22

    The genus Sibiriulus Gulička, 1963, which has hitherto been known to comprise only four species, is rediagnosed and shown to include seven species from Siberia, Russia. Three species are described here as new to science: S. latisupremus sp. nov., S. baigazanensis sp. nov., S. aktashensis sp. nov. The species Sibiriulus profugus (Stuxberg, 1876) is recorded in the fauna of the Altai Province and the Republic of Altai for the first time. All currently known species of Sibiriulus are keyed and mapped, including the new species.

  5. Aging in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Andel, Ross

    2014-12-01

    The goal was to provide an overview of main issues relevant to aging in the Czech Republic. The Czech Republic is a former Eastern Bloc nation of about 10.5 million. Older adults are overrepresented relative to those under age 15. Life expectancy currently hovers around 78 years (75 for men/81 for women), a number slightly higher than most of Eastern Europe but lower than most of Western Europe. Cardiovascular diseases account for about 50% of all mortality, which is one of the highest rates in Europe and therefore of particular concern. Lifestyle habits, especially high alcohol consumption, a high rate of smokers, and high-fat diet relative to most other European countries and the United States, combined with relatively low expenditures for health promotion, appear important in the context of high cardiovascular mortality. Long-term care is funded mostly by state and local governments. The country has tried to address issues associated with insufficient capacity and low quality in long-term care, a particularly prominent problem in the Czech Republic compared with other European countries. The recently established International Clinical Research Center brings new possibilities for collaborative research in the Czech Republic, including research specific to aging. Improving long-term care and establishing methodologically sound longitudinal data sets are among the most pressing issues, although sustaining the pension system strained by increasing life expectancy, low retirement age, and extensive government-sponsored benefits has also recently emerged as a critical issue. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Russia in the World Water Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibikova, Tatiana; Koronkevich, Nikolay; Barabanova, Elena; Zaytseva, Irina

    2014-05-01

    The comparison of Russia and the countries of the former USSR with other countries of the world on various natural and anthropogenic characteristics, including those for water sector, has become more popular in recent years. At the same time, after the break-up of the Soviet Union there were significant changes in political, social and economic spheres on the territory of new formed countries, that influenced their water resources state. Such changes as well as other environmental changes may become even more significant in the future that predetermines the necessity of the profound study of the question, as all the conditions and changes still have not been fully explored. First of all, it concerns the economic crisis including water sector in the early 90's which has not been fully overcome until present time despite economic recovery in the last years of the twentieth century. Together with the changes in climatic conditions it caused perceptible changes in the river runoff on the territory of Russia, Ukraine and Belarus, countries which have much in common. As the result, peculiar conditions for the formation and usage of water resources on the territory of the former Soviet Union have been formed. The laboratory of hydrology of the Institute of Geography of Russian Academy of Sciences analysed the situation with water resources in the countries of the former Soviet Union, and the position of Russia in the global water industry. The comparison of changes in various water consumption characteristics of the states was made; the evaluation of influence of changing economic activity on the river flow and quality of waters was analysed; comparison by the availability of water resources, anthropogenic influence, efficiency of water use, with world characteristics was made. There were 19 countries selected, including the Post-Soviet states, which occupy 54% of land and form 56% of the world population. Among the compared parameters there were: availability of water

  7. News of Education in Russia: [2010--The Year of the Schoolteacher in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents statements by President Dmitry A. Medvedev at the meeting of the Council on the Implementation of Priority National Projects and Demographic Policy on the development of education, health care, and demography, and at the ceremony on the occasion of the launching of the Year of the Schoolteacher in Russia, held at the Russian…

  8. "Russia and Europe"--The Fundamental Problem of Courses in the History of Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vul'fson, B. L.

    2009-01-01

    Russia is witnessing an unprecedented explosion of interest in its history. This is entirely understandable. In the Russians' desire to understand the profound changes going on in different areas of their lives they are attempting to look at the past with new eyes, because the past has merged with the present and to a large extent determines its…

  9. News of Education in Russia: [2010--The Year of the Schoolteacher in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents statements by President Dmitry A. Medvedev at the meeting of the Council on the Implementation of Priority National Projects and Demographic Policy on the development of education, health care, and demography, and at the ceremony on the occasion of the launching of the Year of the Schoolteacher in Russia, held at the Russian…

  10. "Russia and Europe"--The Fundamental Problem of Courses in the History of Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vul'fson, B. L.

    2009-01-01

    Russia is witnessing an unprecedented explosion of interest in its history. This is entirely understandable. In the Russians' desire to understand the profound changes going on in different areas of their lives they are attempting to look at the past with new eyes, because the past has merged with the present and to a large extent determines its…

  11. Gambling in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Szczyrba, Zdeněk; Mravčík, Viktor; Fiedor, David; Černý, Jakub; Smolová, Irena

    2015-07-01

    To provide an overview of gambling and associated problems in the Czech Republic, including an overview of the historical context, legislation, prevalence, treatment and research base and agenda. A review of literature and relevant sources. The trajectory of gambling patterns in the territory of the Czech Republic in the 20th century reflected broad socio-political changes. Those included significant expansion between the wars, strict state control and bans on some gambling activities during the communist regime and finally dynamic development characterized by a boom in electronic gaming machines (EGMs) and increasing accessibility of gambling facilities after 1989, which aggravated gambling-related problems. Many municipalities have banned EGMs, which has created conflict in regulation at state and municipal levels. The draft gambling law prepared in 2014 aims to clarify the regulatory framework. Before 2012 there was only sporadic research interest in gambling, but in 2012 the first complex research on gaming and problem gambling in the Czech population took place. The estimated prevalence of problem gambling is currently 2% in the population aged 15-64 years. Preventive measures, counselling and treatment services for problem gamblers are limited. Weak and ineffective regulation of the gambling market in the Czech Republic during the past 20 years, despite the large growth in gambling, has led to inadequate prevention and response to problem gambling which has become a considerable public health, social and political issue. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. Explaining Counterfeit Alcohol Purchases in Russia.

    PubMed

    Kotelnikova, Zoya

    2017-04-01

    Alcohol is a common target of counterfeiting in Russia. Counterfeit alcohol is defined here as the manufacture, distribution, unauthorized placement (forgery) of protected commodity trademarks, and infringement of the exclusive rights of the registered trademark holders of alcoholic beverages. It is often argued that the expansion of the counterfeit product market is due to the steady demand of economically disadvantaged people for low-priced goods. The situation becomes more complicated once deceptive and nondeceptive forms of counterfeiting are taken into account. This study aimed to identify markers of risky behavior associated with the purchase of counterfeit alcohol in Russia. The analysis relied on consumer self-reports of alcohol use and purchase collected nationwide by the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS-HSE) in 2012 to 2014. I used a generalized linear mixed-model logistic regression to identify predictors of risky behavior by consumers who purchased counterfeit alcohol, either knowingly or unknowingly, during the 30 days preceding the survey. Purchases of counterfeit alcohol declined slightly from 2012 to 2014, mainly due to a decrease in consumers mistakenly purchasing counterfeit products. Predictors of counterfeit alcohol purchases differed between consumers who knowingly and unknowingly purchased counterfeit products. Nondeceptive purchase of counterfeit alcohol was related primarily to an indifference to alcohol brands. Consumers with social networks that include drinkers of nonbeverage alcohol and producers of homemade alcohol were highly likely to consume counterfeit alcohol deliberately. Problem drinking was significantly associated with a higher risk of both deceptive and nondeceptive purchases of counterfeit alcohol. Poverty largely contributed to nondeceptive counterfeiting. The literature has overestimated the impact of low prices on counterfeit alcohol consumption. Problem drinking and membership in social networks of consumers

  13. Hantavirus Infection in the Republic of Georgia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    SUBTITLE Hantavirus Infection In The Republic Of Georgia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR (S) 5d. PROJECT... Hantavirus Infection in the Republic of Georgia Tinatin Kuchuloria, Danielle V. Clark, Matthew J. Hepburn, Tengiz Tsertsvadze, Guillermo...Pimentel, and Paata Imnadze We describe a laboratory-confirmed case of hantavirus infection in the Republic of Georgia. Limited information is available

  14. Heavy Metals Phytoextraction from the Polluted Soils of Zakamensk (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubugunov, V.; Dorzhonova, V.; Ubugunov, L.

    2012-04-01

    Mining and ore-dressing are one of the most serious causes of environment pollution. Last century in days of active industrialization in Russia a considerable quantity of mineral deposits has been developed. It was not given sufficient attention for ecological safety at that time. After an economic crisis connected with disorder of the USSR and a planned economy, a number of the enterprises became bankrupts and have stopped the activity. As a result the broken landscapes have not been recultivated everywhere, there were numerous wastes. The negative consequences were especially strongly manifested in areas with severe climatic conditions where environmental self-renewal occurred is slowed rather down. The degree of a waste toxicity also acted as the important factor. One of such situations has arisen in Zakamensk - an administrative center of Zakamensky area of Buryat Republic (Russia). Environmental problems of the town have arisen in connection with activity of town-forming enterprise - Dzhidinsky tungsten-molybdenum industrial complex. The enterprise has been organized in 1934 and functioned within 63 years till 1997. During enterprise operating time 3 deposits have been exploited and is created 2 large (more than 40 million tons) tails depository of technogenic sands (TS), located in immediate proximity (less than 1-2 km) from a town residential zone.Sand of tails are rather toxic, the average maintenance of heavy metals in them is (mg/kg): Cd - 42, Pb - 7500, Zn - 3160, Cu - 620, Ni - 34, Co - 44, Mn - 121, Cr - 70, Hg - 0,01, As - 13, Mo - 90. Due to the lack of knowledges on the toxicity of TS in the past century, they were actively used in the road and house construction, during the erection of dams. After scientific studies they were recommended for using as fertilizers. Besides anthropogenic sands movement, there was intensive dispersion of sand by means of water and wind erosion. As a result of natural migration sands got to the subordinated elements of

  15. Expedition 28 prelaunch views from Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-16

    Expedition 28 Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov lays flowers at the Kremlin Wall at Red Square in Moscow May 16, 2011 as part of the traditional activities leading to the launch of him and his crewmates, Flight Engineer Mike Fossum of NASA and Satoshi Furukawa of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency to the International Space Station June 8 in their Soyuz TMA-02M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Looking on are backup crewmembers Don Pettit of NASA, Oleg Kononenko of Russia and Andre Kuipers of the European Space Agency.

  16. Immobilization of excess weapons plutonium in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, G B; Jardine, L J; Mansourov, O A

    1999-01-25

    In this paper, we examine the logic and framework for the development of a capability to immobilize excess Russian weapons plutonium by the year 2004. The initial activities underway in Russia, summarized here, include engineering feasibility studies of the immobilization of plutonium-containing materials at the Krasnoyarsk and Mayak industrial sites. In addition, research and development (R&D) studies are underway at Russian institutes to develop glass and ceramic forms suitable for the immobilization of plutonium-containing materials, residues, and wastes and for their geologic disposal.

  17. Seabirds of the Chukotka Peninsula, Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konyukhov, N.B.; Bogoslovskaya, L.S.; Zvonov, B.M.; van Pelt, Thomas I.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted seabird surveys along the entire coast of the Chukotka Peninsula (northwestern Siberia, Russia) from 1983 to 1991. We present the first comprehensive descriptions of the distribution and size of Chukotkan seabird colonies. Thirteen species of seabirds were recorded breeding on the peninsula, with an additional 13 migrant or vagrant species. Our estimate that at least 3 300 000 seabirds breed on the Chukotka Peninsula demonstrates the importance of this region to arctic seabird populations. Colony size and species composition may be determined by availability of adequate breeding sites, access to foraging areas, and variable ice conditions.

  18. Space Radar Image of Baikal Lake, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-01

    This is an X-band black-and-white image of the forests east of the Baikal Forest in the Jablonowy Mountains of Russia. The image is centered at 52.5 degrees north latitude and 116 degrees east longitude near the mining town of Bukatschatscha. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 4, 1994, during the second flight of the spaceborne radar. This area is part of an international research project known as the Taiga Aerospace Investigation using Geographic Information System Applications. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA01754

  19. Natural factors of technological disasters in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Elena

    2010-05-01

    More than 90 percent of disasters occurring in the Russian Federation are technological accidents and catastrophes, which account for nearly 80 percent of all the fatalities and affected people. A total of 1966 technological disasters and 152 natural ones occurred in Russia in 2008. In addition to technical, social, and economic causes of technological disasters, natural factors also play an essential role in triggering or magnifying them. A data base of technological disasters happened in Russia since 1992 has been created. More than 11,000 events are listed in the data base. New information is constantly being added to it. Occurrence time and location, a type of disaster, a number of people killed and affected, economic and ecological losses as well as a probable cause of every disaster are registered; its short description is also included. Using collected data a contribution of various natural hazards and phenomena to occurrence of technological disasters in Russia was assessed. Almost 5 percent of all technological disasters listed in the data base were triggered by natural processes. Natural factors caused the most part of accidents at power supply systems (72 percent), 11 percent of accidents at heat- and 9 percent at water supply systems; more than 10 percent of sudden collapses of buildings and mines as well as water accidents; 4.5 percent of pipeline ruptures, and 2 to 3 percent of air crashes, automobile and railway accidents. The majority of these technological disasters and accidents caused by natural factors were produced by windstorms and hurricanes (37 percent), snowfalls and snowstorms (27 percent), rainfalls (16 percent), hard frost and icy conditions of roads (12 percent), and thunderstorms (nearly 4 percent). Climate changes expected until the end of the century will have important consequences for frequency increasing and change in spatial distribution of technological disasters triggered by hydrometeorological phenomena. Increasing of

  20. ISS Expedition 43 Crew Departure from Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-16

    NASA video file of ISS Expedition 43 crew departure from Russia on March 16, 2015 with crewmembers Scott Kelly, Gennady Padalka, and Mikhail Kornienko; and backupcrew Jeff Williams, Sergei Volkov and Alexie Ovchinin. Includes footage of crew and backup crew as the meet outside the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC); ISS Expedition 42 crewmembers Elena Serova and Alexander Samokutyaev as they exits the GCTC; crew and backup crew with family, friends and officials as they walk to park, pose for photographs and offers short remarks; and finally the crew as they are leaving by bus.

  1. Russia's energy policy, 1992-2005

    SciTech Connect

    Milov, V.; Coburn, L.L.; Danchenko, I.

    2006-05-15

    A team comprising a former Russian policymaker and American analysts of the current Russian energy policy examines the course of that policy and its limitations during the post-Soviet period. In the process, they critically analyze key problems in Russia's oil, gas, coal, and electricity sectors that represent a potential drag on growth of the entire Russian economy and at the very least call into question the sustainability of further increases in exports to the West. The authors explore in considerable depth and detail both the factors underlying the recent increase in government intervention in the energy sector and the likely consequences for domestic production, consumption, resource security, and critical exports.

  2. Space Radar Image of Baikal Lake, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an X-band black-and-white image of the forests east of the Baikal Forest in the Jablonowy Mountains of Russia. The image is centered at 52.5 degrees north latitude and 116 degrees east longitude near the mining town of Bukatschatscha. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 4, 1994, during the second flight of the spaceborne radar. This area is part of an international research project known as the Taiga Aerospace Investigation using Geographic Information System Applications.

  3. Continuous measurements of aerosol particles in Arctic Russia and Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, Eija; Kondratyev, Vladimir; Brus, David; Lihavainen, Heikki; Laurila, Tuomas; Aurela, Mika; Hatakka, Juha; Viisanen, Yrjö; Reshetnikov, Alexander; Ivakhov, Victor; Uttal, Taneil; Makshtas, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    The Arctic and northern boreal regions of Eurasia are experiencing rapid environmental changes due to pressures by human activities. The largest anthropogenic climate forcings are due to aerosol particles and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The Arctic environment is highly sensitive to changes in aerosol concentrations or composition, largely due to the high surface reflectance for the most part of the year. Concentrations of aerosols in winter and spring Arctic are affected by 'Arctic Haze', a phenomenon suggested to arise from the transport of pollutants from lower latitudes and further strengthened by the strong stratification of the Arctic wintertime atmosphere. Sources and transport patterns of aerosols into the Arctic are, however, not fully understood. In order to monitor the changes within the Arctic region, as well as to understand the sources and feedback mechanisms, direct measurements of aerosols within the Arctic are needed. So far, direct year-round observations have been inadequate especially within the Russian side of the Arctic. This is the reason why a new climate observatory was founded in Tiksi, Russia. Tiksi meteorological observatory in northern Siberia (71o 36' N; 128o 53' E) on the shore of the Laptev Sea has been operating since 1930s. Recently, it was upgraded and joint in the network of the IASOA, in the framework of the International Polar Year Activity project. The project is run in collaboration between National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) with the support of the National Science Foundation (NSF), Roshydromet (AARI and MGO units), government of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) and the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI). The research activities of FMI in Tiksi include e.g. continuous long-term measurements of aerosol physical properties, which have been successfully continued since summer 2010. These, together with the FMI measurements in Pallas station in northern Finland since 1999, provide important information on the

  4. 78 FR 55096 - Ferrosilicon from Russia and Venezuela

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... COMMISSION Ferrosilicon from Russia and Venezuela Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... Russia and Venezuela of ferrosilicon, provided for in subheadings 7202.21.10, 7202.21.50, 7202.21.75... Venezuela. Accordingly, effective July 19, 2013, the Commission instituted antidumping duty...

  5. Carbon storage in forests and peatlands of Russia

    Treesearch

    V.A. Alexeyev; R.A. Birdsey; [Editors

    1998-01-01

    Contains information about carbon storage in the vegetation, soils, and peatlands of Russia. Estimates of carbon storage in forests are derived from statistical data from the 1988 national forest inventory of Russia and from other sources. Methods are presented for converting data on timber stock into phytomass of tree stands, and for estimating carbon storage in...

  6. The Reality and Prospects of the Academic Degree in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laptev, V. V.; Pisareva, S. A.; Triapitsyna, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    With the move toward mass higher education in Russia, academic degrees have lost much of their prestige. It is now necessary to look more closely at the reasons for this devaluation, to explore ways to optimize the training of researchers in graduate school programs, and to integrate Russia's system of science training into the European system.…

  7. Higher Education Reform in Russia: Democratization or Bureaucratization?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panfilova, T. V.

    2011-01-01

    Recent reforms have increased the level of administrative oversight, and also of interference of the structure and content of university education in Russia. This is leading to a weakening of Russian higher education. In this article, the author talks about the reform of the system of higher education in Russia and the bureaucratization of higher…

  8. Adolescent Drunkenness: Perception of the Problem in Russia and Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybakova, L. N.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol abuse in Russia among children is increasing, but programs to address this problem have not been adequately developed. The experience of other countries in equipping children to handle alcohol in a mature and safe way can be used as a basis for creating new programs in Russia.

  9. Engineering and Technical Education in Russia, in Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aref'ev, A. L.; Aref'ev, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of the main tendencies in the development of engineering and technical education in Russia during the last 100 years shows that earlier strengths have been lost, and that currently technical education in Russia is far behind modern world standards.

  10. Adolescent Drunkenness: Perception of the Problem in Russia and Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybakova, L. N.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol abuse in Russia among children is increasing, but programs to address this problem have not been adequately developed. The experience of other countries in equipping children to handle alcohol in a mature and safe way can be used as a basis for creating new programs in Russia.

  11. Higher Education Reform in Russia: Democratization or Bureaucratization?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panfilova, T. V.

    2011-01-01

    Recent reforms have increased the level of administrative oversight, and also of interference of the structure and content of university education in Russia. This is leading to a weakening of Russian higher education. In this article, the author talks about the reform of the system of higher education in Russia and the bureaucratization of higher…

  12. The Universities of Russia: Areas and Prospects of Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berdashkevich, A. P.

    2011-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a significant increase in university students in Russia, the growth of private and state-financed higher education, and the beginnings of a move to a national network of research institutions. The recent economic recession, however, poses a challenge to the continuance of current fee-based higher education in Russia.…

  13. 76 FR 11813 - Magnesium From China and Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... COMMISSION Magnesium From China and Russia Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on magnesium from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of... revocation of the antidumping duty order on magnesium from Russia would not be likely to lead to continuation...

  14. Problems of the Reproduction of Russia's Science Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voronin, Iu. M.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past ten years there have been signs in Russia of a dangerous widespread tendency to underrate the creation of a whole set of conditions necessary for expanded reproduction of the country's science potential. Russia has fallen farther and farther behind technologically, its ability to compete in the world markets of science-intensive…

  15. Engineering and Technical Education in Russia, in Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aref'ev, A. L.; Aref'ev, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of the main tendencies in the development of engineering and technical education in Russia during the last 100 years shows that earlier strengths have been lost, and that currently technical education in Russia is far behind modern world standards.

  16. An Academic Degree in Russia: Reality and Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laptev, V. V.; Pisareva, S. A.; Tryapitsyna, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses the history of the formation of the system of awarding degrees in Russia. It analyzes the reasons for the devaluation of academic degrees in contemporary Russia, and it reveals the ways to improve researcher training in graduate school. Possible models for integrating the Russian system of researcher training into an open…

  17. The Universities of Russia: Areas and Prospects of Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berdashkevich, A. P.

    2011-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a significant increase in university students in Russia, the growth of private and state-financed higher education, and the beginnings of a move to a national network of research institutions. The recent economic recession, however, poses a challenge to the continuance of current fee-based higher education in Russia.…

  18. Initial Teacher Education in Russia: Connecting Theory, Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valeeva, Roza A.; Gafurov, Ilshat R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores initial teacher education (ITE) in Russia, its organisation and content in the light of international literature. Changes in the political, socio-economic and cultural life of Russia in recent decades have defined a completely different model of teacher education. This model has evolved through key policy documents including…

  19. The resurgence of tuberculosis in Russia.

    PubMed

    Shilova, M V; Dye, C

    2001-07-29

    This paper documents and attempts to explain the epidemic spread of tuberculosis (TB) in Russia during the 1990s. After several decades of decline, the notification rate of all new TB cases among permanent residents increased by 7.5% per year from 1991-1999 and the death rate by 11% per year. Growth was quickest from 1993-1995 but increased again after the economic crisis of August 1998. Approximately 120 000 new cases and 30 000 deaths were reported in 1999. Case detection and cure rates have fallen in Russia since the mid-1980s; the fall has been accompanied by a higher frequency of severe disease among cases, and higher death and case fatality rates. With a mathematical model describing the deterioration in case finding and cure rates we could replicate the average rate of increase in incidence 1991-1999 but not the precise timing of the observed changes. Other factors that probably helped to shape the observed rise in caseload include enhanced transmission due to the mixing of prison and civilian populations, an increase in susceptibility to disease, and changes in the proportion of cases detected by surveillance. Although our explanation for the resurgence of TB is incomplete, we have identified a set of measures that can be implemented now to cut transmission, incidence and deaths.

  20. The resurgence of tuberculosis in Russia.

    PubMed Central

    Shilova, M V; Dye, C

    2001-01-01

    This paper documents and attempts to explain the epidemic spread of tuberculosis (TB) in Russia during the 1990s. After several decades of decline, the notification rate of all new TB cases among permanent residents increased by 7.5% per year from 1991-1999 and the death rate by 11% per year. Growth was quickest from 1993-1995 but increased again after the economic crisis of August 1998. Approximately 120 000 new cases and 30 000 deaths were reported in 1999. Case detection and cure rates have fallen in Russia since the mid-1980s; the fall has been accompanied by a higher frequency of severe disease among cases, and higher death and case fatality rates. With a mathematical model describing the deterioration in case finding and cure rates we could replicate the average rate of increase in incidence 1991-1999 but not the precise timing of the observed changes. Other factors that probably helped to shape the observed rise in caseload include enhanced transmission due to the mixing of prison and civilian populations, an increase in susceptibility to disease, and changes in the proportion of cases detected by surveillance. Although our explanation for the resurgence of TB is incomplete, we have identified a set of measures that can be implemented now to cut transmission, incidence and deaths. PMID:11516384

  1. Water resources management in Rostov region (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, O.

    2009-04-01

    Proper management of water resources leads to the development of the region. Nowadays there is an urgent problem - water shortage. Many European countries face this problem, Russia is not the excluding. In addition, there is a problem not only of water quantity, but quality as well. Although Rostov region is well provided with fresh water, the water resources are unevenly disturbed within region. Rostov region is heavily populated and receive moderate rainfall. Groundwater has a limited capacity for renewal. At the same time, Rostov region is industrial and agricultural one that is why pressures from agriculture, industry and domestic users affect the quantity of water resources. Both water quality and availability must be integrated in long-term planning and policy implications concerning water management. In Russia there are high standards for water quality. Effectively managed water-supply and resource protection systems generate the indispensable basis for agricultural and industrial production. Throughout the Region, urban and rural development has thrived where water sources have been effectively managed. Rostov region can be divided into three parts: northern districts, central part of the region and southern ones. Main cities in the region have not enough available drinking water. In the region ground water is used for curing and water supplying purpose.

  2. Extensive Burn Scars in Russia's Amur Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Vast areas of southeastern Russia have been scorched by fires over the last few weeks. All across Siberia fires have been raging, and this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 15, 2002, shows extensive, dark burn scars along with actively burning fires (red dots) on the north side of the Amur River, which separates Russia (north) and China (south). The southern Amur region is largely devoted to farming and other agriculture, and these fires may have been set intentionally to prepare the land for the growing season. Fire is often used to clear land of unwanted vegetation, and to return the nutrients stored in vegetation back to the soil. However, fires that are too frequent or severe can devastate the soil, eventually making it unsuitable for farming or grazing. Fires can also escape control and spread into protected areas. In this image, fires are mostly concentrated in a lowland area within the drainage basin of the Zeya River, which drains from the frozen lake at the top of the image. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  3. STS-71 astronauts training in Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-20

    S94-45643 (20 Sept 1994) --- Astronaut Norman E. Thagard in a cosmonaut space suit in the Training Simulator Facility at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (Star City), near Moscow, Russia. In March 1995, astronaut Thagard is scheduled to be launched in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft with two cosmonauts to begin a three-month tour of duty on the Russian Mir Space Station. Thagard, along with his back-up, astronaut Bonnie J. Dunbar, has been training in Russia since February 1994. During his stay on Mir, he will conduct a variety of life sciences experiments that will provide U.S. investigators with the first long-duration exposure data since Skylab in the late 1970's. Thagard's mission will end in July when the Space Shuttle Atlantis, carrying the newly installed docking mechanism, docks with Mir Space Station for the first United States - Russian docking operation since Apollo-Soyuz in 1975. The Orbiter will remain attached to Mir for five days of joint scientific operations before returning home with Thagard and his Russian crew mates and leaving behind two cosmonauts on Mir.

  4. STS-71 astronauts training in Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-20

    S94-45647 (20 Sept 1994) --- Astronaut's Norman E. Thagard and Bonnie J. Dunbar by the Mir Space Station simulator at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (Star City), near Moscow, Russia. In March 1995, astronaut Thagard is scheduled to be launched in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft with two cosmonauts to begin a three-month tour of duty on the Russian Mir Space Station. Thagard, along with his back-up, astronaut Dunbar, has been training in Russia since February 1994. During his stay on Mir, he will conduct a variety of life sciences experiments that will provide U.S. investigators with the first long-duration exposure data since Skylab in the late 1970's. Thagard's mission will end in late May or early June when the Space Shuttle Atlantis, carrying the newly installed docking mechanism, docks with Mir Space Station for the first United States - Russian docking operation since Apollo-Soyuz in 1975. The Orbiter will remain attached to Mir for five days of joint scientific operations before returning home with Thagard and his Russian crew mates and leaving behind two cosmonauts on Mir.

  5. New archeomagnetic intensity data from Western Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salnaya, Natasha; Gallet, Yves; Akimova, Stanislava; Antipov, Ilya; Glazunova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    We recently started a new archeomagnetism research program for Western Russia. The main objective of this project is to recover the geomagnetic field intensity variations in Western Russia over the past two millennia, in order to compare these variations with those already known from Western and Eastern Europe. We sampled several ensembles of baked brick fragments precisely dated by historical constraints between the XIIth and XIVth centuries AD from the archeological site of Novgorod, south of St Petersburg, and between the XVIIth and XVIIIth centuries AD from the Monastery of New Jerusalem located close to Moscow. Most fragments, with a magnetic mineralogy dominated by magnetite, are suitable for archeointensity experiments. For some fragments from Novgorod, the magnetization is carried by a mixture of magnetite and another mineral of high coercivity and low unblocking temperature. The unblocking temperatures are close to 200°C. This mineral, most probably a form of hematite with Al substitutions, is therefore similar to that previously reported from archeological fired-clay artifacts originating from Europe and South America. Archeointensity experiments were conducted using the experimental protocol developed for the Triaxe magnetometer. We will present our first archeointensity results and a preliminary comparison with available European results, mostly from France and Bulgaria.

  6. Extensive Burn Scars in Russia's Amur Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Vast areas of southeastern Russia have been scorched by fires over the last few weeks. All across Siberia fires have been raging, and this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 15, 2002, shows extensive, dark burn scars along with actively burning fires (red dots) on the north side of the Amur River, which separates Russia (north) and China (south). The southern Amur region is largely devoted to farming and other agriculture, and these fires may have been set intentionally to prepare the land for the growing season. Fire is often used to clear land of unwanted vegetation, and to return the nutrients stored in vegetation back to the soil. However, fires that are too frequent or severe can devastate the soil, eventually making it unsuitable for farming or grazing. Fires can also escape control and spread into protected areas. In this image, fires are mostly concentrated in a lowland area within the drainage basin of the Zeya River, which drains from the frozen lake at the top of the image. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  7. Space Surveillance: United States, Russia, and China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidelmann, P. K.

    2012-06-01

    With the launch of Sputnik, the United States and Russia began the process of tracking artificial satellites. This led to developments for observations, orbit determination, and catalog maintenance. The two countries followed somewhat different approaches to the same problem based on the available hardware and theoretical developments. As more sophisticated hardware and theories have been developed, progress has been made. However, new problems have developed because of debris, collision possibilities, and reentering objects. In addition, the range of spacecraft has increased to include geosynchronous orbits. In more recent times the European Space Agency (ESA) and China have become involved in various aspects of Space Surveillance. In 1994, the first meeting between United States and Russian experts in the field of space surveillance was held. Since then, seven more US Russia Space Surveillance Workshops have been held, with the addition of participants from ESA. Terry Alfriend has been the US Technical Chairman for many of these workshops. In 2009 a US China Space Surveillance Technical Interchange was held in Shanghai, China, and Terry was the US Technical Chairman.

  8. Family and family therapy in Russia.

    PubMed

    Bebtschuk, Marina; Smirnova, Daria; Khayretdinov, Oleg

    2012-04-01

    This article represents the information about family and family therapy in the context of culture, traditions and contemporary changes of social situations in Russia. The legislation of family rights are mentioned within items about marriage and family in the Constitution, Civil Code and Family Code of the Russian Federation which has changed during recent years. The definition of family and description of family structure are given through the prism of the current demographic situation, dynamics of statistics of marriage and divorce rates, mental disorders, disabilities and such phenomena as social abandonment. The actual curriculum, teaching of family therapy and its disadvantages, system of continuous education, supervision and initiatives of the Institute of Integrative Family Therapy in improvement of preparing of specialists who can provide qualified psychosocial assistance for the family according to the actual needs of society are noted. The directions of state and private practice of family counselling and therapy both for psychiatric patients and medical patients, for adults and children in a family systemic approach are highlighted with an indication of the spectrum of techniques and methods used by Russian professionals. The main obstacles and perspectives of development of family therapy in Russia are summarized.

  9. Zoning of cold stress associated with climatic change in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradova, V.V.

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of my work is to learn the connection of geographical zonality with the distribution of stress in Russia. The map {open_quotes}Geographical distribution of climate life condition ranged on the degree of discomfort in Russia{close_quotes}, made in Institute of Geography of Russian Academy of Sciences, reflects the zoning of cold stress in Russia. This zoning was used for the estimation of cold stress in Russia at various screenplays of climate change. The base of zoning was mating of boundaries of nature-climatic zonality with characteristics of cold presented by indices of cold stress (enthalpy, dry cooling, wet cooling, wind chill etc.). The paper covers geographical distribution of factors provoking cold stress: low temperatures, wind speed and air humidity. Zoning of cold stress on the territory of Russia for long standing average conditions and for the periods of cooling and warming of global climate in the XX century was performed.

  10. First molecular screening of deafness in the Altai Republic population

    PubMed Central

    Posukh, Olga; Pallares-Ruiz, Nathalie; Tadinova, Vera; Osipova, Ludmila; Claustres, Mireille; Roux, Anne-Françoise

    2005-01-01

    Background We studied the molecular basis of NSHL in Republic of Altai (South Siberia, Russia). The Altaians are the indigenous Asian population of the Altai Mountain region considered as a melting-pot and a dispersion center for world-wide human expansions in the past. Methods A total of 76 patients of Altaian, Russian or mixed ethnicity and 130 Altaian controls were analyzed by PCR-DHPLC and sequencing in the GJB2 gene. The GJB6 deletion and the common non-syndromic deafness-causing mitochondrial mutations were also tested when appropriate. Results 8.3% of the Altaian chromosomes were carrying GJB2 mutations versus 46.9% of the Russian chromosomes. The 235delC mutation was predominant among Altaians, whereas the 35delG mutation was most prevalent among Russian patients. Conclusion We found an Asian-specific GJB2 diversity among Altaians, and different GJB2 contribution for deafness in the Altaian and Russian patients. The high carrier frequency of 235delC in Altaians (4.6%) is probably defined by gene drift/founder effect in a particular group. The question whether the Altai region could be one of founder sources for the 235delC mutation widespread in Asia is open. PMID:15790391

  11. Adult Education and Indigenous Peoples in Russia. International Survey on Adult Education for Indigenous Peoples. Country Study: Russia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meschtyb, Nina

    Adult education for indigenous peoples in Russia was examined. First, information on government institutions, indigenous organizations, international agencies, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) engaged in adult education for Russia's indigenous peoples was compiled. Next, questionnaires and survey techniques were used to research the policy…

  12. Assessment in the Republic of Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The island of Ireland is the most westerly point of the European Union, and is divided into the 26 counties of the Republic of Ireland and the 6 counties of Northern Ireland, the latter under the governance of the United Kingdom. This article presents a brief history and a brief description of the economic profile of the Republic of Ireland. This…

  13. Star of the Republic Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    The Star of the Republic Museum (Washington, Texas), the Historical Museum of the Texas Republic, has created lesson plans to enhance student understanding of Texas state history. Regardless of the opportunity to visit the museum, the lessons can enrich the classroom experience by making objects from the museum accessible to students. The…

  14. Boletes from Belize and the Dominican Republic

    Treesearch

    Beatriz Ortiz-Santana; D. Jean Lodge; Timothy J. Baroni; Ernst E. Both

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents results of surveys of stipitate-pileate Boletales in Belize and the Dominican Republic. A key to the Boletales from Belize and the Dominican Republic is provided, followed by descriptions, drawings of the micro-structures and photographs of each identified species. Approximately 456 collections from Belize and...

  15. Excess Weapons Plutonium Immobilization in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, L.; Borisov, G.B.

    2000-04-15

    The joint goal of the Russian work is to establish a full-scale plutonium immobilization facility at a Russian industrial site by 2005. To achieve this requires that the necessary engineering and technical basis be developed in these Russian projects and the needed Russian approvals be obtained to conduct industrial-scale immobilization of plutonium-containing materials at a Russian industrial site by the 2005 date. This meeting and future work will provide the basis for joint decisions. Supporting R&D projects are being carried out at Russian Institutes that directly support the technical needs of Russian industrial sites to immobilize plutonium-containing materials. Special R&D on plutonium materials is also being carried out to support excess weapons disposition in Russia and the US, including nonproliferation studies of plutonium recovery from immobilization forms and accelerated radiation damage studies of the US-specified plutonium ceramic for immobilizing plutonium. This intriguing and extraordinary cooperation on certain aspects of the weapons plutonium problem is now progressing well and much work with plutonium has been completed in the past two years. Because much excellent and unique scientific and engineering technical work has now been completed in Russia in many aspects of plutonium immobilization, this meeting in St. Petersburg was both timely and necessary to summarize, review, and discuss these efforts among those who performed the actual work. The results of this meeting will help the US and Russia jointly define the future direction of the Russian plutonium immobilization program, and make it an even stronger and more integrated Russian program. The two objectives for the meeting were to: (1) Bring together the Russian organizations, experts, and managers performing the work into one place for four days to review and discuss their work with each other; and (2) Publish a meeting summary and a proceedings to compile reports of all the excellent

  16. A long-bodied centriscoid fish from the basal Eocene of Kabardino-Balkaria, northern Caucasus, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannikov, Alexandre F.; Carnevale, Giorgio

    2012-05-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene transition is of crucial interest for interpreting the Cenozoic evolutionary radiation of vertebrates. A substantial increase of the number of vertebrate families occurred between the Late Paleocene and Early Eocene, with the appearance of most of the representatives of extant lineages. Basal Eocene marine fish diversity is currently poorly known, exclusively restricted to two assemblages from Denmark and Turkmenistan, respectively. Exceptionally well-preserved articulated skeletal remains of fishes have recently been discovered from a basal Eocene sapropelitic layer exposed along the Kheu River in the Republic of Kabardino-Balkaria, northern Caucasus, Russia. Here, we report on Gerpegezhus paviai gen. et sp. nov., a new peculiar syngnathoid fish from this new Ciscaucasian locality. The morphological structure of the single available specimen suggests that it is the first long-bodied member of the superfamily Centriscoidea, representing the sole member of the new family Gerpegezhidae, which forms a sister pair with the extant family Centriscidae.

  17. Estimation of individual age and season of death in woolly rhinoceros, Coelodonta antiquitatis (Blumenbach, 1799), from Sakha-Yakutia, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillova, Irina V.; Shidlovskiy, Fedor K.

    2010-11-01

    A unique find of a woolly rhinoceros skull bearing both nasal and frontal horns is described from a thermokarst lake of the Bol'shaya Chukoch'ya River basin in north-eastern Republic of Sakha (Yakutia), Russia. Based on counts of cementum layers of the maxillary first molar and dark and transverse bands of the nasal and frontal horns a correlation of individual age records within these structures is established. Both estimations of individual age are agreed as well as three other age estimation criteria followed from cranial characteristics, general aspects of dentition and tooth wear pattern. Thus, the number of horn bands, which is equal to 30 or 31, does express the individual age at the moment when the woolly rhinoceros died. The tooth cementum and both horns are proved to be recording structures of woolly rhinoceroses which can be used as precise individual age estimation criteria. The season in which death occurred is also discussed.

  18. Fatal attraction: Explaining Russia's sensitive nuclear transfers to Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchinsky, Leah R.

    This paper explores Russia's sensitive nuclear assistance to Iran in an effort to determine why a supplier state might proliferate against its own apparent security interests. The goal is to help readers understand the supply-side dynamics of nuclear proliferation. Through careful reconstruction of the historical narrative, using open source data, this study tests the plausibility of a "fatalistic calculus" explanation, identified by Stephen Sestanovich as a possible driver for Russia's behavior. According to the hypothesis, Russia has cooperated with Iran as a way both to stay in the good graces of a neighbor that is suspected of developing nuclear weapons and to win short-term influence and profits. The paper also examines the role of other factors advanced in the existing supply-side literature, such as economic motives identified by physicist and nonproliferation scholar David Albright. The findings show that bureaucratic, economic and fatalistic factors have each played a role in motivating Russia's cooperation with Iran, with their relative importance shifting over time. Fatalism begets a strategy of Russian "minimaxing," in the lexicon of Russia scholar Robert Freedman, wherein Russia attempts to minimize damage to its relationship with the U.S. while maximizing influence in Iran via nuclear cooperation. Fatalism, as actualized by minimaxing, best explains Russia's behavior after former Russian president Vladmir Putin came to power, when the bureaucratic and economic arguments become less cogent.

  19. Bios-3 project in Krasnoyarsk, Russia

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R M

    1994-01-01

    The article in this issue by Gitelson and Okladnikov provides a valuable summary of some of the work conducted at the Bios-3 project in Krasnoyarsk, Russia. As the title suggests, the focus is on humans and their role in a CELSS biosphere. I am aware of several translated reports and some recent articles by Dr. Gitelson and colleagues in which the Bios project is described, but this paper provides some information that I have not seen previously in an english article. Although the discussion is focused on bioregeneration, the authors state that complementary physicochemical technologies and some stowage may be needed in a CELSS. For example, animal protein foods were taken into the Bios-3 chamber, since, as the authors state, "products of animal origin would make the system considerably more complicated and energy inefficient."

  20. Nuclear plant emergency preparedness in Russia.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Randolph L

    2009-11-01

    An international team of experts conducted a detailed operational review at the Volgodonsk nuclear power plant. The review was the first mission by an International Atomic Energy Agency Operational Safety Review Team to Russia in over a decade. The author reviewed the emergency preparedness program in detail. Emergency preparedness professionals in the West are largely unfamiliar with Russian nuclear plant emergency preparedness programs, and the legacy of Chernobyl may leave some doubt as to their efficacy. This article describes the program in some detail and compares some elements to programs in the United States. The author was favorably impressed with the state of nuclear plant emergency preparedness in the Russian Federation and identified program elements that should be considered for implementation elsewhere.

  1. Training of clinical laboratory professionals in Russia.

    PubMed

    Morozova, V T; Dolgov, V V; Malakhov, V N

    1994-12-31

    In Russia, specialized education of clinical laboratory physicians who work in the positions of medical technologists, head of laboratory or one of its divisions is conducted in various forms of postgraduate training, namely internship, primary specialization courses, advanced study courses, graduate clinical studies and postgraduate fellowship. Such education is offered at 14 Departments for Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics, which are located within the Institutes for Advanced Medical Studies or at Faculties for Advanced Medical Studies in Medical Institutes. Until the present, the primary specialization courses and the advanced study courses have been the most prevalent forms of training clinical laboratory professionals. These two types of courses offer formal lectures, seminars as well as practical classes, and the course contents are regulated by a uniform curriculum promulgated by the Ministry of Health. Training in these courses is the necessary prerequisite to obtain degree of advanced qualification as an expert in clinical laboratory diagnostics, which in turn provides access to better remunerated positions.

  2. Superconductivity in Russia: Update and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozhogin, V.

    1995-01-01

    The research projects and new technological developments that have occured in Russia are highlighted in this document. Some of the research discussed includes: x-ray structure analysis of YBCO superconducting single crystals and accompanying phase transformations; the role of electron-electron interaction in High Temperature Superconductors (HTSC); the formation of Cooper pairs in crystals; the synthesis and research on a new family of superconductors based on complex copper and mercury oxides (HgBa2CuO4 + alpha and HgBa2CaCu2O6 + alpha); methods for the extraction of higher (up to C200) fullerenes and metalfullerenides has been developed; and process of production of Josephson junctions and development of SQUID's.

  3. Stationary plasma thruster evaluation in Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    A team of electric propulsion specialists from U.S. government laboratories experimentally evaluated the performance of a 1.35-kW Stationary Plasma Thruster (SPT) at the Scientific Research Institute of Thermal Processes in Moscow and at 'Fakel' Enterprise in Kaliningrad, Russia. The evaluation was performed using a combination of U.S. and Russian instrumentation and indicated that the actual performance of the thruster appears to be close to the claimed performance. The claimed performance was a specific impulse of 16,000 m/s, an overall efficiency of 50 percent, and an input power of 1.35 kW, and is superior to the performance of western electric thrusters at this specific impulse. The unique performance capabilities of the stationary plasma thruster, along with claims that more than fifty of the 660-W thrusters have been flown in space on Russian spacecraft, attracted the interest of western spacecraft propulsion specialists. A two-phase program was initiated to evaluate the stationary plasma thruster performance and technology. The first phase of this program, to experimentally evaluate the performance of the thruster with U.S. instrumentation in Russia, is described in this report. The second phase objective is to determine the suitability of the stationary plasma thruster technology for use on western spacecraft. This will be accomplished by bringing stationary plasma thrusters to the U.S. for quantification of thruster erosion rates, measurements of the performance variation as a function of long-duration operation, quantification of the exhaust beam divergence angle, and determination of the non-propellant efflux from the thruster. These issues require quantification in order to maximize the probability for user application of the SPT technology and significantly increase the propulsion capabilities of U.S. spacecraft.

  4. New System of Food Control in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, Irina V.

    Food safety is quite important for human health in all countries. Humanity has the uniform space and must take care about all parts of it. Pollution of one region leads to the same state of others regions through water, land, air, living organisms. The poor-quality or poisoned food products can pollute the territory and influence negatively on the environment. The food security is important, especially, in connection with the possibility of terrorist attacks. The Federal Service of control in sphere of protection of the rights of consumers was formed in Russia in 2004. This Service carries out the activity directly and through the territorial organizations in interaction with administrative structures in food control and inspection, namely in sanitary-epidemiological service, veterinary service, grain service, inspection of trade connections and standardization and certification. The control is carried out on the basis of laws. The law № 29-FZ concerns the quality and safety of foodstuff and how to control it. The law 134-FZ attracted the protection of the rights of legal persons and individual businessmen. The modification of the law №234-FZ about protection of the rights of consumers is connected with new food - GMOs. Great attention is paid to the safety of new food. Private companies also perform analysis of heavy metals, mycotoxins, radiation and the presence of bacteria, virus or genetically modified organisms. We would like to thank the group Pilot Study "Food chain security" for very important work concerning food safety in different countries. They help us to understand internal problems in Russia and to create the cooperation with other countries. All these steps are very important for the protection population from toxic food.

  5. Family business in Russia: the path to middle class?

    PubMed

    Barkhatova, N; McMylor, P; Mellor, R

    2001-06-01

    The paper seeks to explore via a series of interview-based case studies aspects of the emergence of an entrepreneurial middle-class in Russia. The paper notes the origins of those studied in the professional or highly skilled workers in the former Soviet Union. The paper reveals the complexity and fragility of the circumstances of these entrepreneurs and suggests that commentary in both Russia and the West that pins its hopes for social stability on the emergence of a new property owning middle class in Russia are, at best, premature.

  6. Air Pollution Studies in the Republic of Udmurtia, Russian Federation, using Moss Biomonitoring and INAA

    SciTech Connect

    Pankratova, Yu. S.; Frontasyeva, M. V.; Pavlov, S. S.; Berdnikov, A. A.

    2007-11-26

    The concentrations of 36 elements were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis in 79 moss samples, collected in the southern part of the Republic of Udmurtia, Russian Federation, in the period 2005-2006. A factor analysis was applied to determine possible pollution sources over the territory. The seven resulting factors represent a natural and anthropogenic origin of the elemental deposition in Udmurt moss. Some of the factors are interpreted as being associated with the industry factor (W, Mo, Cr, Zn); chemical weapon destruction (As is the component of lewisite; Na is used for detoxication of lewisite). The results are compared to the data of atmospheric deposition of some regions of Russia and European countries.

  7. Occurrence and genetic variability of Kemerovo virus in Ixodes ticks from different regions of Western Siberia, Russia and Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Tkachev, Sergey E; Tikunov, Artem Yu; Babkin, Igor V; Livanova, Natalia N; Livanov, Stanislav G; Panov, Victor V; Yakimenko, Valeriy V; Tantsev, Alexey K; Taranenko, Dmitrii E; Tikunova, Nina V

    2017-01-01

    Kemerovo virus (KEMV), a member of the Reoviridae family, Orbivirus genus, is transmitted by Ixodes ticks and can cause aseptic meningitis and meningoencephalitis. Recently, this virus was observed in certain provinces of European part of Russia, Ural, and Western and Eastern Siberia. However, the occurrence and genetic diversity of KEMV in Western Siberia remain poorly studied. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the prevalence and genetic variability of KEMV in Ixodes ticks from Western Siberia. A total of 1958 Ixodes persulcatus, I. pavlovskyi ticks and their hybrids from Novosibirsk and Omsk provinces, Altai Republic (Russia) and East Kazakhstan province (Kazakhstan) were analyzed for the presence of KEMV and tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) RNA. It was observed that the KEMV distribution area in Western Siberia was wider than originally thought and included Northern and Northeastern Altai in addition to the Omsk and Novosibirsk provinces. For the first time, this virus was found in Kazakhstan. The occurrence of KEMV was statistically lower than TBEV in most locations in Western Siberia. KEMV was found both in I. persulcatus and I. pavlovskyi ticks and in their hybrids. Notably, KEMV variants observed in the 2010s were genetically different from those isolated in the 1960s, which indicated the ongoing process of evolution of the Kemerovo virus group. Moreover, the possibility of reassortment for KEMV was demonstrated for the first time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. 78 FR 65268 - Certain Oil Country Tubular Goods From India, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... Republic of the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Thailand, the Republic of Turkey, Ukraine, and the... Nair at (202) 482- 3813 (Thailand); Catherine Cartsos at (202) 482-1757 (Turkey); David Lindgren at... Republic of the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Thailand, the Republic of Turkey, Ukraine, and the...

  9. ScienceCast 93: What Happened Over Russia?

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-25

    Two weeks after an asteroid exploded over Russia's Ural mountains, scientists are making progress understanding the origin and make-up of the unexpected space rock. This week's ScienceCast presents their latest results.

  10. The Regional Institution of Higher Learning in Today's Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karamurzov, B. S.

    2014-01-01

    The regional universities in Russia are an important resource for the development of Russian society, but more needs to be done to increase their effectiveness, including tackling corruption and leveraging local competitive advantages.

  11. Evaluating the performance of Russia in the research in nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, A. I.

    2012-11-01

    The article analyzes the development of nano research in Russia during the years 1990-2010. To identify the contribution of Russia in nanoscience and to compare it with the contribution of other countries, we used the international multidisciplinary database Science Citation Index Expanded. Scientific performance is measured based on the growth rate of nano publications by countries and in the world, authorship patterns, indexes of international collaboration, etc. The indicators used are the national publication output, the total citations and the average citation per nano publication, the number and subject profile of highly cited nano publications; contribution and impact of Russian institutions. The article describes the current state and trends of nano research in Russia, their key players and the existing "centers of excellence." It also discusses some inconsistencies of Russia's science policy in the field of nanotechnology in light of the performed bibliometric study.

  12. The Regional Institution of Higher Learning in Today's Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karamurzov, B. S.

    2014-01-01

    The regional universities in Russia are an important resource for the development of Russian society, but more needs to be done to increase their effectiveness, including tackling corruption and leveraging local competitive advantages.

  13. Research Note: Patterns of Alcohol-Related Mortality in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Pridemore, William Alex; Kim, Sang-Weon

    2006-01-01

    The level of alcohol consumption in Russia is among the highest in the world and is often associated with a variety of problems in the country. Until recently, however, it was impossible to examine the health and social burdens associated with consumption in Russia due to Soviet secrecy surrounding vital statistics and health data related to alcohol and other topics. This study employed newly available mortality data to describe the demographic, temporal, and spatial patterns of mortality resulting directly from chronic and acute alcohol consumption in the country. The data reveal that in spite of high overall rates of alcohol-related mortality in Russia, levels of mortality vary considerably along these dimensions. Although descriptive in nature, the patterns of alcohol-related mortality in Russia presented here should provide initial observations with which to generate and test hypotheses concerning the causes and consequences of these patterns. PMID:16900263

  14. Germany, Russia, and Conditions for Stability in Central Europe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-04

    but it certainly will not be the first time that an empire has refused to learn from its mistakes. Military ties between Russia and East-Central...conventional and nuclear forces, Russia should not perceive a military threat from Germany; and, second , for the time being at least, and even with...changes in the politico- military and economic map of Europe, there are also powerful negative forces which threaten stability from the Atlantic to the

  15. Ukraine’s Relations with Russia: Competition or Cooperation?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    Because the Druzhba pipeline traverses Ukraine from Russia westward to Slovakia and Hungary, more Russian oil flows through Ukraine to Europe and...possible extensions into Poland while feeding off the Druzhba line. With the pipeline , Ukraine seeks to entice Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan oil exporters to...abroad.”3 In the fall of 2000, after receiving pressure from Russia, Ukrainian President Kuchma dismissed the “Western-oriented” Borys Tarasiuk as

  16. The NATO-Russia Council: Origins and Prospects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    to developing cooperation with Russia, whose involvement is critical for any comprehensive post-Cold War system of European security. Russia was...of the Defense Ministry’s 12th Chief Administration will be testing security systems for nuclear munitions in conjunction with American experts...The systems judged to be the most suitable will be purchased with funds from the U.S. government and installed at Russia’s nuclear weapons facilities

  17. Clinical pharmacology in Russia-historical development and current state.

    PubMed

    Zagorodnikova Goryachkina, Ksenia; Burbello, Aleksandra; Sychev, Dmitry; Frolov, Maxim; Kukes, Vladimir; Petrov, Vladimir

    2015-02-01

    Clinical pharmacology in Russia has long history and is currently active, but rather unrecognized internationally. It is governmentally approved as a teaching/scientific specialty since 1983 and as a medical specialty since 1997. Courses of clinical pharmacology are included in the undergraduate curricula in the 5th and/or 6th year of education at all medical schools in the Russian Federation. Postgraduate education includes initial specialization in internal medicine with further residency in clinical pharmacology. Governmental legislation recommends that every healthcare institution has either a department or a single position of clinical pharmacologist. Major routine duties include information about and monitoring of medication use, consultations in difficult clinical situations, pharmacogenetic counseling, therapeutic drug monitoring, pharmacovigilance, and participation in drug and therapeutics (formulary) committees. There are official experts in clinical pharmacology in Russia responsible for coordinating relevant legislative issues. The chief expert clinical pharmacologist represents the discipline directly at the Ministry of Health. Research in clinical pharmacology in Russia is extensive and variable, but only some of it is published internationally. Russia is a participant of international societies of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics and collaboration is actively ongoing. There are still certain problems related to the development of the discipline in Russia-some healthcare institutions do not see the need for clinical pharmacology. However, the number of clinical pharmacologists in Russia is increasing as well as their role in physicians' education, national healthcare, and research.

  18. Lithospheric delamination underneath Far East Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntaflos, Theodoros; Koutsovitis, Petros; Aschchepkov, Igor; Hauzenberger, Christoph; Prikhodko, Vladimir; Asseva, Anna

    2013-04-01

    In the back-arc environment of Far East Russia, mantle xenoliths from Sikhoti-Alin( Komku area, KO) and Primorie (Sviyaginsky area, SV), Far East Russia are fertile spinel lherzolites with traces of amphibole, phlogopite and hyalophane in some of the studied samples. Though samples from both localities are fertile there is a systematic difference in their fertility. The KO samples have mg# varying from 0.891 to 0.899 and are slightly more fertile than the SV samples that have mg# ranging from 0.898 to 0.904. LA-ICP-MS analyses on clinopyroxenes confirm this trend as the (La/Yb)N in KO samples range from 0.1to 1.0 and in SV samples from 0.15 to 1.73. The estimated equilibration temperatures for the KO suite range from 940 °C to 1035 °C and for the SV suite from 770 to 945. The differences in the estimated equilibrium temperatures between the KO and SV suites suggest that the less fertile SV suite originated in shallower depths than the more fertile KO suite. Pargasitic amphibole, kaersutite, and extremely Ti-rich phlogopite, up to 14 wt% TiO2, are associated with intergranular glass indicating clearly metasomatism of undersaturated hydrous alkaline melts. Incompatible element abundances, besides Ba, Sr and Ti that are slightly enriched in the amphibole, are similar in both phases suggesting minor metasomatism due to percolation of small amounts of water-rich fluids. The Sr and Nd cpx isotopic ratios range from 0.702599 to 0.703567 and 0.512915 to 513153, repectively and the model Nd isotope age range from 1.5 to 2.2 Ga indicating an old (Proterozoic?) partial melt event. The lithospheric mantle beneath the studied area represents the residue after partial melting of up to 2 % of a primitive mantle and is comparable to that of Mongolia. Despite the fact that the studied area experienced several subducting episodes, the lithospheric mantle appears to be unaffected from the upwelling fluids/melts of the subducted slab(s). Since there is no indication for plume

  19. Cryolithozone of Western Arctic shelf of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmyanskii, Mikhail; Vladimirov, Maksim; Snopova, Ekaterina; Kartashev, Aleksandr

    2017-04-01

    We propose a new original version of the structure of the cryolithozone of west Arctic seas of Russia. In contrast to variants of construction of sections and maps based on thermodynamic modeling, the authors have used electrometric, seismic, and thermal data including their own profile measurements by near-field transient electromagnetic technique and seismic profile observations by reflection method. As a result, we defined the spatial characteristics of cryolithozone and managed to differentiate it to several layers, different both in structure and formation time. We confirmed once again that the spatial boundary of cryolithozone, type and thickness of permafrost, chilled rocks and thawed ground are primarily determined by tectonic and oceanographic regimes of the Arctic Ocean and adjacent land in different geological epochs. Permafrost formed on the land in times of cold weather, turn to submarine during flooding and overlap, in the case of the sea transgression, by marine sediments accumulating in the period of warming. We have been able to establish a clear link between the permafrost thickness and the geomorphological structure of the area. This can be explained by the distribution of thermodynamic flows that change the temperature state of previously formed permafrost rocks. Formation in the outer parts of the shelf which took place at ancient conversion stage can be characterized by the structure: • permafrost table - consists of rocks, where the sea water with a temperature below 0 °C has replaced the melted ice; • middle horizon - composed of undisturbed rocks, and the rocks chilled through the lower sieving underlay; As a result of the interpretation and analysis of all the available data, the authors created a map of types of cryolithozone of the Western Arctic shelf of Russia. The following distribution areas are marked on the map: • single-layer cryolithozone (composed of sediments upper Pleistocene and Holocene); • monosyllabic relict

  20. Stratigraphic scale the Lower Precambrian of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimova, Svetlana; Bogdanov, Yuri

    2017-04-01

    The quality of state geological maps depends on the quality of the combined serial legends, which are based on the adopted stratigraphic scheme of the General stratigraphic scale, regional and local stratigraphic schemes. The main task of the General stratigraphic scale is the temporal correlation of stratigraphic units of regional schemes and the age of their boundaries. For the Precambrian age determination is based on paleontological and geochronological methods. Currently, work is being carried out to update the stratigraphic framework of the formations of the upper Proterozoic (Riphean and Vendian). Relatively less studied is the stratigraphy of the lower Precambrian. To the bottom are Precambrian structurally-material complexes of Archean and lower Proterozoic rocks, crystalline basement of ancient platforms and also included in the fold belts. The solution to the problems of stratigraphy of the lower Precambrian is possible only by creating and improving regional stratigraphic schemes. Such work should be based on the study of stratotype sections and references of boundaries in the model regions of the lower Precambrian. The current General stratigraphic scale of the lower Precambrian of Russia (RGSS) consists of the Lower Archean (Sami) and the Upper Archean (Lopi) and lower Proterozoic (Karelian) Eonotam. Archaea is divided into two Eonotam in Russian General stratigraphic scale, in the International Chronostratigraphic Chart (ICC) - three units, designated as Eon. The age of the boundary between Eonotam and Eon the same (3200 million years). The same and the age of the boundary between the Archean and the Proterozoic. The RGSS of the Precambrian, based on the comprehensive study of typical sections and analysis of isotopic Dating of different methods. Stratotype reference sections of the districts of Karelia and the Kola Peninsula represent different types of sections, the time (geochronological) correlation which was the basis for the regional scheme

  1. Medical Education in Peoples's Republic of China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, John A. D.; Yingang, Lin

    1987-01-01

    The three types of physicians trained in the People's Republic of China (practitioners in Chinese medicine, traditional Mongolian medicine, and western-style medicine) and the design of the medical schools and programs are discussed. (MSE)

  2. Ergonomic evaluation and comparison of wood harvesting systems in Northwest Russia.

    PubMed

    Gerasimov, Yuri; Sokolov, Anton

    2014-03-01

    A comparison of 14 currently applicable wood harvesting systems was assessed with respect to ergonomic point of view. For this purpose, the research method, based on the Hodges-Lehmann rule and the integrated work-severity rate of single machinery, was developed for ergonomic evaluation of cut-to-length, tree-length and full-tree harvesting systems. Altogether, about 130 different parameters of 36 units of equipment that impact on the ergonomics and work conditions were measured and estimated in interviews undertaken directly at forestry harvesting workplaces in 15 logging companies in the Republic of Karelia, Northwest Russia. Then the results were compared to the effective norms, and the degree of compliance with the stipulated values was determined. The estimates obtained for the degree of compliance were combined. This permits a direct comparison of the workload on forestry harvesting workers such as operators, lumberjacks and choker setters. In many respects, the current ergonomic standard is standard, except for the operators of cable skidders, chainsaws and choker settings. Visibility and work postures were considered to be the most critical features influencing the operator's performance. Problems still exist, despite the extensive development of cabs. The best working conditions in terms of harvesting systems were provided by "harvester + forwarder" in cut-to-length harvesting, and "feller-buncher + grapple skidder" in full-tree harvesting. The motor-manual tree-length harvesting performed with cable skidders showed the worst results in terms of ergonomics.

  3. Special education in Russia: historical aspects.

    PubMed

    Malofeev, N N

    1998-01-01

    Tracing the history of special education services in Russia from its beginnings in the early nineteenth century through the rapid expansion of both private and government-supported programs and institutions until the restrictive Soviet period provides both understanding and appreciation of current Russian special education services and institutions. Theoretical principles guiding special education formulated by L. Vygotsky, and sources outside the USSR, were officially suppressed, as were testing and statistical data on handicapped individuals. Official mandates to bring students with handicaps up to state-approved standards resulted in the development of creative, effective approaches. The framework of special education changed little until the breakdown of the USSR. The new Russian Federation ratified UN resolutions protecting the rights of children. Categorical language is a recent development, and terms such as defective, retarded and pedologist are gradually being replaced. The final decade of this century is witnessing rapid change at the initiation of the Ministry of Education that is beginning to produce needed reform. One of the major initiatives is to provide LD specialists in all schools so that students will not need to be a great distance from home to receive needed services.

  4. Eruption of Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-07-21

    On the night of June 4, 2001 ASTER captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 8028'. The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25 km ash plume, seen as a cold "cloud" streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964. Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and the Far East, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas. The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02674

  5. Tickborne Pathogen Detection, Western Siberia, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Rar, Vera A.; Fomenko, Natalia V.; Dobrotvorsky, Andrey K.; Livanova, Natalya N.; Rudakova, Svetlana A.; Fedorov, Evgeniy G.; Astanin, Vadim B.

    2005-01-01

    Ixodes persulcatus (n = 125) and Dermacentor reticulatus (n = 84) ticks from Western Siberia, Russia, were tested for infection with Borrelia, Anaplasma/Ehrlichia, Bartonella, and Babesia spp. by using nested polymerase chain reaction assays with subsequent sequencing. I. persulcatus ticks were infected with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (37.6% ± 4.3% [standard deviation]), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (2.4% ± 1.4%), Ehrlichia muris (8.8% ± 2.5%), and Bartonella spp. (37.6% ± 4.3%). D. reticulatus ticks contained DNA of B. burgdorferi sensu lato (3.6% ± 2.0%), Bartonella spp. (21.4% ± 4.5%), and Babesia canis canis (3.6% ± 2.0%). Borrelia garinii, Borrelia afzelii, and their mixed infections were observed among I. persulcatus, whereas B. garinii NT29 DNA was seen in samples from D. reticulatus. Among the I. persulcatus ticks studied, no Babesia spp. were observed, whereas B. canis canis was the single subspecies found in D. reticulatus. PMID:16318722

  6. Situation Report--Barbados, Finland, German Democratic Republic, Italy, Lesotho, Luxembourg, Malagasy Republic (Madagascar), Malaysia (West), Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Sweden, Syrian Arab Republic, and Yugoslavia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in 15 foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Barbados, Finland, German Democratic Republic, Italy, Lesotho, Luxembourg, Malagasy Republic, Malaysia (West), Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Sweden, Syrian Arab Republic, and Yogoslavia. Information…

  7. Republic of Kazakhstan: Capacity Building through the Increasing of Space Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omarova, G.

    Currently, a new space policy of the Republic of Kazakhstan is being formulated. Basic directions are: Adherence to principal agreements of the International Space Law. Optimal utilization and modernization of the Baikonur spaceport launch infrastructure. Creation of the national satellite communication system In accordance with the above listed goals and objectives, the following priority actions should be taken in national level: Increasing of the National activities in COPUOS Developing of the National space activities Program and Space activities Act; Funding of a new and upgraded facilities at the Baikonur spaceport; Creating of the educational and training system for national space industry In 2004 Kazakhstan-Russia cooperation in space activities has entered to a new perspectives. Both countries proceeded to develop joint projects in the field of space activities connected to modernization of existing space infrastructure of the Baikonur spaceport for launchers that meet requirements of ecological security. Three relevant bilateral agreements were signed. All signed documents ensure more wide participation of the Republic of Kazakhstan in realization of space programs and projects implemented at the Baikonur spaceport through shared financing and realization jointly with Russia of projects on building of the space missile complex ``Baiterek'' and launching of geostationary communication satellite. It opens great opportunities for Kazakhstan in terms of capacity building. Implementation of the mentioned two projects will allow to use the available scientific, technical and intellectual potential of the Republic of Kazakhstan in the field of space activities, and to utilize effectively the infrastructure of Baikonur complex, to get affordable access to space technologies, to create conditions for development, test and operation of space facilities, new science --capacity technologies that will lead to close integration with Russian space industry and with

  8. THE 1971 ARTYK EARTHQUAKE SEQUENCE, NORTHEAST RUSSIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, M. S.; Fujita, K.; Mackey, K. G.; Koz'min, B. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Mw 6.4 Artyk earthquake is the largest earthquake to have occurred in continental northeast Russia in the instrumental era. It was accompanied by 1200 aftershocks of which 286 were relocated using regional and local data. The mainshock is located at the southern end of the aftershocks and was accompanied by landslides and other surficial deformation which was concentrated in topographically lower, soil covered slopes. The aftershocks relocate along the Kobdi fault as mapped by Shilo (1961), and appears to left-laterally offset a diorite by about 8 km suggesting a slip rate of <0.2 cm/yr. The southern end of both the aftershock region and the Kobdi fault appears to curve towards the east and may be creating a small pull-apart in the valley of the Melyankir River. The further southeast continuation of the Kobdi fault is uncertain, but the aftershock distribution does not support a linkage between the Kobdi and Arkagala faults as proposed by some Russian authors to form a single Chai-Yureya fault; a restraining (south to southwestward) bend would be required to for such a connection. Examination of satellite imagery and seismicity suggest that the Kobdi fault continues linearly to the northwest and may not link to the Nera fault across a Upper Nera pull-apart. Based on the aftershock distribution, focal mechanisms, and regional faults mapped on the ground or from satellite images, the Artyk earthquake sequence represents an intraplate event along a fault within the deforming part of the Okhotsk plate. Though the aftershocks do not necessarily support the connection of the Kobdi and Arkagala faults, the sequence may link the Kobdi with other faults to the northwest and/or southeast.

  9. Space Radar Image of Moscow, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-01

    This is a vertically polarized L-band image of the southern half of Moscow, an area which has been inhabited for 2,000 years. The image covers a diameter of approximately 50 kilometers (31 miles) and was taken on September 30, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. The city of Moscow was founded about 750 years ago and today is home to about 8 million residents. The southern half of the circular highway (a road that looks like a ring) can easily be identified as well as the roads and railways radiating out from the center of the city. The city was named after the Moskwa River and replaced Russia's former capital, St. Petersburg, after the Russian Revolution in 1917. The river winding through Moscow shows up in various gray shades. The circular structure of many city roads can easily be identified, although subway connections covering several hundred kilometers are not visible in this image. The white areas within the ring road and outside of it are buildings of the city itself and it suburban towns. Two of many airports are located in the west and southeast of Moscow, near the corners of the image. The Kremlin is located north just outside of the imaged city center. It was actually built in the 16th century, when Ivan III was czar, and is famous for its various churches. In the surrounding area, light gray indicates forests, while the dark patches are agricultural areas. The various shades from middle gray to dark gray indicate different stages of harvesting, ploughing and grassland. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA01752

  10. Space Radar Image of Kliuchevskoi Volcano, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-01

    This is an image of the Kliuchevskoi volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, which began to erupt on September 30, 1994. Kliuchevskoi is the bright white peak surrounded by red slopes in the lower left portion of the image. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 25th orbit on October 1, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 30 kilometers by 60 kilometers (18.5 miles by 37 miles) that is centered at 56.18 degrees north latitude and 160.78 degrees east longitude. North is toward the top of the image. The Kamchatka volcanoes are among the most active volcanoes in the world. The volcanic zone sits above a tectonic plate boundary, where the Pacific plate is sinking beneath the northeast edge of the Eurasian plate. The Endeavour crew obtained dramatic video and photographic images of this region during the eruption, which will assist scientists in analyzing the dynamics of the current activity. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). The Kamchatka River runs from left to right across the image. An older, dormant volcanic region appears in green on the north side of the river. The current eruption included massive ejections of gas, vapor and ash, which reached altitudes of 20,000 meters (65,000 feet). New lava flows are visible on the flanks of Kliuchevskoi, appearing yellow/green in the image, superimposed on the red surfaces in the lower center. Melting snow triggered mudflows on the north flank of the volcano, which may threaten agricultural zones and other settlements in the valley to the north. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA01731

  11. Space Radar Image of Samara, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This three-frequency space radar image shows the city of Samara, Russia in pink and light green right of center. Samara is at the junction of the Volga and Samara Rivers approximately 800 kilometers (500 miles) southeast of Moscow. The wide river in the center of the image is the Volga. Samara, formerly Kuybyshev, is a busy industrial city known for its chemical, mechanical and petroleum industries. Northwest of the Volga (upper left corner of the image) are deciduous forests of the Samarskaya Luka National Park. Complex patterns in the floodplain of the Volga are caused by 'cut-off' lakes and channels from former courses of the meandering river. The three radar frequencies allow scientists to distinguish different types of agricultural fields in the lower right side of the image. For example, fields which appear light blue are short grass or cleared fields. Purple and green fields contain taller plants or rough plowed soil. Scientists hope to use radar data such as these to understand the environmental consequences of industrial, agricultural and natural preserve areas coexisting in close proximity. This image is 50 kilometers by 26 kilometers (31 by 16 miles) and is centered at 53.2 degrees north latitude, 50.1 degrees east longitude. North is toward the top of the image. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is C-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue is X-band, vertically transmitted and received. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on October 1, 1994 onboard the space shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  12. Space Radar Image of Samara, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This three-frequency space radar image shows the city of Samara, Russia in pink and light green right of center. Samara is at the junction of the Volga and Samara Rivers approximately 800 kilometers (500 miles) southeast of Moscow. The wide river in the center of the image is the Volga. Samara, formerly Kuybyshev, is a busy industrial city known for its chemical, mechanical and petroleum industries. Northwest of the Volga (upper left corner of the image) are deciduous forests of the Samarskaya Luka National Park. Complex patterns in the floodplain of the Volga are caused by 'cut-off' lakes and channels from former courses of the meandering river. The three radar frequencies allow scientists to distinguish different types of agricultural fields in the lower right side of the image. For example, fields which appear light blue are short grass or cleared fields. Purple and green fields contain taller plants or rough plowed soil. Scientists hope to use radar data such as these to understand the environmental consequences of industrial, agricultural and natural preserve areas coexisting in close proximity. This image is 50 kilometers by 26 kilometers (31 by 16 miles) and is centered at 53.2 degrees north latitude, 50.1 degrees east longitude. North is toward the top of the image. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is C-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue is X-band, vertically transmitted and received. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on October 1, 1994 onboard the space shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  13. [Parasites of the Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) in northwestern Russia].

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, D I; Iakovleva, G A; Artem'ev, A V

    2013-01-01

    New data on Ospey parasites in Karelian Republic are given. One specimen was investigated. Two parasite species--Nematostrigea serpens and Diplostomum pseudospathaceum were found. Trematoda D. pseudospathaceum was recorded in Osprey parasite fauna for the first time.

  14. Republic of Ireland: abortion controversy.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    The problems associated with illegal abortion dominate public discussion in Ireland. While abortion is illegal in Ireland, the Supreme Court directed in 1992 that Irish women can go to Britain for abortions when their lives are thought to be at risk. Abortion was a constant feature during the Irish Presidential election campaign in October, while a dispute about the future of a 13-year-old girl's pregnancy dominated the headlines in November. The presidential election on October 30 resulted in a victory for one of the two openly anti-choice candidates, Mary McAleese, a lawyer from Northern Ireland. With a voter turnout of 47.6%, McAleese polled 45.2% of the votes cast. Although the president may refuse to sign bills which have been passed by parliament, McAleese has said that she will sign whatever bill is placed before her, even if it liberalizes abortion law in the republic. As for the case of the 13-year-old pregnant girl, she was taken into the care of Irish health authority officials once the case was reported to the police. However, the health board, as a state agency, is prevented by Irish law from helping anyone travel abroad for abortion. The girl was eventually given leave in a judgement by a High Court Judicial Review on November 28 to travel to England for an abortion.

  15. Czech Republic: health system review.

    PubMed

    Alexa, Jan; Recka, Lukas; Votapkova, Jana; van Ginneken, Ewout; Spranger, Anne; Wittenbecher, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of the Czech health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health-care provision, health reforms and health system performance. The Czech health-care system is based on compulsory statutory health insurance providing virtually universal coverage and a broad range of benefits, and doing so at 7.7 % of GDP in 2012 - well below the EU average - of which a comparatively high 85 % was publicly funded. Some important health indicators are better than the EU averages (such as mortality due to respiratory disease) or even among the best in the world (in terms of infant mortality, for example). On the other hand, mortality rates for diseases of the circulatory system and malignant neoplasms are well above the EU average, as are a range of health-care utilization rates, such as outpatient contacts and average length of stay in acute care hospitals. In short, there is substantial potential in the Czech Republic for efficiency gains and to improve health outcomes. Furthermore, the need for reform in order to financially sustain the system became evident again after the global financial crisis, but there is as yet no consensus about how to achieve this.

  16. Water resources change in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus in the post-soviet period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibikova, Tatiana

    2010-05-01

    In recent decades large changes in the state, formation and utilization of water resources have taken place on the territory of the former Soviet Union. There are several reasons for this. Water resources change is caused by different natural and anthropogenic factors. The main reason is climatic, first of all warming during cold seasons and augmentation of rainfall in winter and in summer. During the last 15 years on the territories of Russia and Belarus the rise in river runoff has been observed. Changes in the river runoff in Ukraine were not so certain in the ninetieth but at the very end of the 20th century the raise was also seen. Change of the climatic conditions coincides with the human impact on water resources. After the collapse of the Soviet Union there were great changes in political, social and economic spheres of the new formed states. The economic recession as well as the economic rise since the last years of the 20th century has affected the state of water resources. During the last 15 years water use and therefore water sewage reduction has been well seen. The structure of water consumption and therefore of all water management is defined by climatic conditions. First of all it is seen in irrigated agriculture, but also takes place in other branches of water management. We tried to show the dependence of some water consumption characteristics on the mean annual air temperature and on its correlation with the annual precipitation in the regions of the Russian Federation, Ukraine and Belarus. It was found out that in the regions of Russia with low air temperature water consumption per area unit is less than on the territories with high air temperature. This is typical for the period of economic recession after the collapse of the USSR, as well as for the period of economic growth during the last years. Besides, more severe climate in Russia causes lower water consumption per area unit, at the same time in Russia self-purification is less intensive

  17. Black carbon emissions in Russia: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Meredydd; Kholod, Nazar; Kuklinski, Teresa; Denysenko, Artur; Smith, Steven J.; Staniszewski, Aaron; Hao, Wei Min; Liu, Liang; Bond, Tami C.

    2017-08-01

    This study presents a comprehensive review of estimated black carbon (BC) emissions in Russia from a range of studies. Russia has an important role regarding BC emissions given the extent of its territory above the Arctic Circle, where BC emissions have a particularly pronounced effect on the climate. We assess underlying methodologies and data sources for each major emissions source based on their level of detail, accuracy and extent to which they represent current conditions. We then present reference values for each major emissions source. In the case of flaring, the study presents new estimates drawing on data on Russia's associated petroleum gas and the most recent satellite data on flaring. We also present estimates of organic carbon (OC) for each source, either based on the reference studies or from our own calculations. In addition, the study provides uncertainty estimates for each source. Total BC emissions are estimated at 688 Gg in 2014, with an uncertainty range 401 Gg-1453 Gg, while OC emissions are 9224 Gg with uncertainty ranging between 5596 Gg and 14,736 Gg. Wildfires dominated and contributed about 83% of the total BC emissions: however, the effect on radiative forcing is mitigated in part by OC emissions. We also present an adjusted estimate of Arctic forcing from Russia's BC and OC emissions. In recent years, Russia has pursued policies to reduce flaring and limit particulate emissions from on-road transport, both of which appear to significantly contribute to the lower emissions and forcing values found in this study.

  18. The perils and pitfalls of business in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, R.B.

    1995-09-01

    It is not for the lack of trying that few Western oil companies have profitable operations in Russia. Quite the contrary. Every oil company with a thirst for opportunity has searched that once-forbidden region for deals. This gold rush was triggered by an apparent crying need or Western know-how and capital, but appearances in Russia often widely differ from reality. Hype of early oil ventures set a false tone of promise, but company and company came home poorer and wiser. The gold rush went bust. Now in the fourth year of the West`s involvement in Russia`s oilfields, operators are soberly evaluating their prospects. Even while signals are encouraging the West, like a reduction in export tariffs and some progress on contract law, a remarkable event is occuring that throws out many Western arguments for continuing involvement and investment: On their own, the Russians are arresting their production decline and have increased output. This will have immediate and long term effects on Westerners. First, it lends credibility to Russian voices demanding that Mother Russia not sign away its precious resources to foreigners. Second, it encourages trade barriers to protect domestic industry. Third, it weakens the bargaining position of Westerners. Fourth, it reduces the options available to Western operators. What remains will be E&P opportunities where Western technology and capital really can play a role-complex reservoirs, hostile environments-but poor contract terms.

  19. The Age of Dinosaurs in Russia and Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benton, Michael J.; Shishkin, Mikhail A.; Unwin, David M.; Kurochkin, Evgenii N.

    2003-12-01

    The former Soviet Union covers a vast area of land, and over the last 200 years, many dozens of extraordinary dinosaurs and other fossil amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals have been found in Mesozoic rocks in its territories. The Permo-Triassic of the Ural Mountains of Russia have produced hundreds of superb specimens, and many of the dinosaurs from Mongolia are unique. This is the first compilation in any Western language of this large body of Russian research and the first time so much of this research, previously unexplored by the West, has been introduced in English. The Age of Dinosaurs in Russia and Mongolia is written by a unique mix of Russian and Western palaeontologists, and provides an entrée to a range of fossil faunas, in particular reptiles, that have been little known outside Russia. It will undoubtedly become a major reference work for all vertebrate palaeontologists.

  20. Investigating the efficiency of development of centralized heating in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, E. A.; Makarova, A. S.; Khorshev, A. A.; Urvantseva, L. V.; Shul'Gina, V. S.

    2010-12-01

    The efficiency of centralized heating systems developed on a local level in Russia has been studied. The obtained results allow numerous schemes applied for the heat and electricity supply used in various towns to be generalized and a unified system of technical and economic indices to be formulated that characterize the technology of heat and power generation and transport. Using these indices, calculations of the efficiency of combined and separate schemes of energy supply in various climatic zones of Russia have been performed. Based on the complex comparative analysis of the efficiency of centralized heating systems with allowance for the local and system factors, it is possible to estimate the optimum scale of centralized heating in Russia up to 2030 and recognize the main trends in the development of this industry in various stages of its development.

  1. The burden of serious fungal diseases in Russia.

    PubMed

    Klimko, N; Kozlova, Y; Khostelidi, S; Shadrivova, O; Borzova, Y; Burygina, E; Vasilieva, N; Denning, D W

    2015-10-01

    The incidence and prevalence of fungal infections in Russia is unknown. We estimated the burden of fungal infections in Russia according to the methodology of the LIFE program (www.LIFE-worldwide.org). The total number of patients with serious and chronic mycoses in Russia in 2011 was three million. Most of these patients (2,607,494) had superficial fungal infections (recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis, oral and oesophageal candidiasis with HIV infection and tinea capitis). Invasive and chronic fungal infections (invasive candidiasis, invasive and chronic aspergillosis, cryptococcal meningitis, mucormycosis and Pneumocystis pneumonia) affected 69,331 patients. The total number of adults with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and severe asthma with fungal sensitisation was 406,082.

  2. Price elasticities of alcohol demand: evidence from Russia.

    PubMed

    Goryakin, Yevgeniy; Roberts, Bayard; McKee, Martin

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we estimate price elasticities of demand of several types of alcoholic drinks, using 14 rounds of data from the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey-HSE, collected from 1994 until 2009. We deal with potential confounding problems by taking advantage of a large number of control variables, as well as by estimating community fixed effect models. All in all, although alcohol prices do appear to influence consumption behaviour in Russia, in most cases the size of effect is modest. The finding that two particularly problematic drinks-cheap vodka and fortified wine-are substitute goods also suggests that increasing their prices may not lead to smaller alcohol consumption. Therefore, any alcohol pricing policies in Russia must be supplemented with other measures, such as restrictions on numbers of sales outlets or their opening times.

  3. The experience and opportunities carrying out balloon experiments in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifrin, David; Faucon, Pierre

    2001-08-01

    Beginning with EASOE campaign (1999/1992) that involved participation of Russian specialists in the Arctic region, including the territory of Russia, six international balloon campaigns have been implemented: EASOE (1999/1992), SESAME (1994/1995), ILAS (1997), THESEO (1999), THESEO/2000, ARCHEOPS (2000/2001). All campaigns were launched from Esrange, the facility of the Swedish Space Corporation in Kiruna (68N, 21E) in winter. During these campaigns 19 open-envelope balloon flights as well as 10 long duration flights (of IK-montgolfiers MIR and superpressure balloons) have been conducted on the Russian territory. The given paper features the ten-year experience in implementing balloon campaigns in Russia as well as opportunities for conducting flight in Russia.

  4. Vodka and violence: alcohol consumption and homicide rates in Russia.

    PubMed

    Pridemore, William Alex

    2002-12-01

    In Russia, rates of alcohol consumption and homicide are among the highest in the world, and already-high levels increased dramatically after the breakup of the Soviet Union. Rates of both, however, vary greatly among Russia's 89 regions. We took advantage of newly available vital statistics and socioeconomic data to examine the regional covariation of drinking and lethal violence. Log-log models were employed to estimate the impact of alcohol consumption on regional homicide rates, controlling for structural factors thought to influence the spatial distribution of homicide rates. Results revealed a positive and significant relationship between alcohol consumption and homicide, with a 1% increase in regional consumption of alcohol associated with an approximately 0.25% increase in homicide rates. In Russia, higher regional rates of alcohol consumption are associated with higher rates of homicide.

  5. Oil and gas resources in the West Siberian Basin, Russia

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The primary objective of this study is to assess the oil and gas potential of the West Siberian Basin of Russia. The study does not analyze the costs or technology necessary to achieve the estimates of the ultimate recoverable oil and gas. This study uses reservoir data to estimate recoverable oil and gas quantities which were aggregated to the field level. Field totals were summed to a basin total for discovered fields. An estimate of undiscovered oil and gas, from work of the US Geological Survey (USGS), was added to give a total basin resource volume. Recent production decline points out Russia`s need to continue development of its discovered recoverable oil and gas. Continued exploration is required to discover additional oil and gas that remains undiscovered in the basin.

  6. Ixodes persulcatus, a major vector of Alphaproteobacteria in Russia.

    PubMed

    Shpynov, Stanislav

    2012-12-01

    Ixodes persulcatus Schulze, 1930 (I. persulcatus) is distributed from the western to the eastern borders of Russia where it is found in the taiga and in mixed forests of the European type. This tick is a known vector of viral (tick-borne encephalitis virus), spirochetal (Borrelia spp.), and protozoan (Babesia spp.) agents. In this work, we analyzed the phylogenetic position of I. persulcatus within the Prostriata based on its 18S rRNA gene. Furthermore, we review the relationship of this tick with 9 Alphaproteobacteria from the genera Rickettsia, Ehrlichia, and Anaplasma which are found in I. persulcatus in the territory of Russia. These observations suggest that I. persulcatus may be one of the more important vectors and reservoirs of Alphaproteobacteria and other microorganisms in Russia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Occupational accidents in Russia and the Russian Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Dudarev, Alexey A.; Karnachev, Igor P.; Odland, Jon Øyvind

    2013-01-01

    Background According to official statistics, the rate of occupational accidents (OAs) and fatal injuries in Russia decreased about 5-fold and 2-fold, respectively, from 1975 to 2010, but working conditions during this period had the opposite trend; for example, the number of people who work in unfavourable and hazardous conditions (particularly since 1991) has increased significantly. Methods This review summarises the results of a search of the relevant peer-reviewed literature published in Russia and official statistics on OAs and occupational safety in Russia and the Russian Arctic in 1980–2010. Results The occupational safety system in Russia has severely deteriorated in the last 2 decades, with legislators tending to promote the interests of industry and business, resulting in the neglect of occupational safety and violation of workers’ rights. The majority of workers are employed in conditions that do not meet rules of safety and hygiene. More than 60% of OAs can be attributed to management practices – violation of safety regulations, poor organisation of work, deficiency of certified occupational safety specialists and inadequate personnel training. Research aimed at improving occupational safety and health is underfunded. There is evidence of widespread under-reporting of OAs, including fatal accidents. Three federal agencies are responsible for OAs recording; their data differ from each other as they use different methodologies. The rate of fatal OAs in Russia was 3–6 times higher than in Scandinavian countries and about 2 times higher compared to United States and Canada in 2001. In some Russian Arctic regions OAs levels are much higher. Conclusions Urgent improvement of occupational health and safety across Russia, especially in the Arctic regions, is needed. PMID:23519652

  8. Occupational accidents in Russia and the Russian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Dudarev, Alexey A; Karnachev, Igor P; Odland, Jon Øyvind

    2013-01-01

    According to official statistics, the rate of occupational accidents (OAs) and fatal injuries in Russia decreased about 5-fold and 2-fold, respectively, from 1975 to 2010, but working conditions during this period had the opposite trend; for example, the number of people who work in unfavourable and hazardous conditions (particularly since 1991) has increased significantly. This review summarises the results of a search of the relevant peer-reviewed literature published in Russia and official statistics on OAs and occupational safety in Russia and the Russian Arctic in 1980-2010. The occupational safety system in Russia has severely deteriorated in the last 2 decades, with legislators tending to promote the interests of industry and business, resulting in the neglect of occupational safety and violation of workers' rights. The majority of workers are employed in conditions that do not meet rules of safety and hygiene. More than 60% of OAs can be attributed to management practices--violation of safety regulations, poor organisation of work, deficiency of certified occupational safety specialists and inadequate personnel training. Research aimed at improving occupational safety and health is underfunded. There is evidence of widespread under-reporting of OAs, including fatal accidents. Three federal agencies are responsible for OAs recording; their data differ from each other as they use different methodologies. The rate of fatal OAs in Russia was 3-6 times higher than in Scandinavian countries and about 2 times higher compared to United States and Canada in 2001. In some Russian Arctic regions OAs levels are much higher. Urgent improvement of occupational health and safety across Russia, especially in the Arctic regions, is needed.

  9. Beverage-specific alcohol sales and violent mortality in Russia.

    PubMed

    Razvodovsky, Yury Evgeny

    2010-01-01

    High violent mortality rate in Russia and its profound fluctuation over recent decades have attracted considerable interest. A mounting body of evidence points to the binge drinking pattern as a potentially important contributor to the violent mortality crisis in Russia. In line with this evidence, we assume that higher level of vodka consumption in conjunction with binge drinking pattern results in close aggregate-level association between vodka sales and violent mortality rates in Russia. To test this hypothesis, trends in beverage-specific alcohol sales per capita and mortality rates from external causes in Russia between 1980 and 2005 were analyzed by means of ARIMA time-series analysis. Results of the analysis indicate that violent mortality rates tend to be more responsive to change in vodka sales per capita than to change in total level of alcohol sales. The analysis suggests that a 1-litre increase in vodka sales per capita would result in a 5% increase in violent mortality rate, an 11.3% increase in accidents and injuries mortality rate, a 9.2% increase in suicide rate, a 12.5% increase in homicide rate, and a 21.9% increase in fatal alcohol poisoning rate. The outcomes of this study provide support for the hypothesis that alcohol played a crucial role in the fluctuation in violent mortality rate in Russia in recent decades. Assuming that drinking vodka is usually associated with intoxication episodes, these findings provide additional evidence that the binge drinking pattern is an important determinant of the violent mortality crisis in Russia.

  10. Spread of extensively resistant VIM-2-positive ST235 Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Russia: a longitudinal epidemiological and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Mikhail V; Skleenova, Elena N; Shevchenko, Oksana V; D'souza, Jimson W; Tapalski, Dmitry V; Azizov, Ilya S; Sukhorukova, Marina V; Pavlukov, Roman A; Kozlov, Roman S; Toleman, Mark A; Walsh, Timothy R

    2013-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant and extensively-drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa are increasing therapeutic challenges worldwide. We did a longitudinal epidemiological and clinical study of extensively-drug-resistant P aeruginosa in Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Russia. The study was done in three prospectively defined phases: Jan 1, 2002-Dec 31, 2004; Jan 1, 2006-Dec 31, 2007; and Jan 1, 2008-Dec 31, 2010. The first two phases were in Russia only. All consecutive, non-duplicate, nosocomial isolates and case report forms were sent to the coordinating centre (Institute of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, Smolensk, Russia), where species reidentification, susceptibility testing, and molecular typing of isolates were done. We did susceptibility testing by agar dilution. The presence of metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) genes was established by PCR and sequencing, and class 1 integrons containing MBL gene cassettes were analysed by the PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism approach. Strain relatedness was analysed by multiple loci variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (at six VNTR loci) and multilocus sequence typing. In 2002-04, 628 of 1053 P aeruginosa isolates were insusceptible to carbapenems and 47 (4.5%) possessed MBLs. In 2006-07, 584 of 787 isolates were insusceptible to carbapenems and 160 (20.3%) possessed MBLs. In 2008-10, 1238 of 1643 Russian P aeruginosa isolates were insusceptible to carbapenems and 471 (28.7%) possessed MBLs. Additionally, the 32 P aeruginosa isolates from Belarus and Kazakhstan were all carbapenem insusceptible and all possessed MBLs. More than 96% of MBL-positive P aeruginosa isolates were resistant to all antibiotics except colistin (ie, extensively drug resistant), and, in 2010, 5·9% were resistant to colistin. 685 (96.5%) of 710 MBL-positive P aeruginosa belonged to ST235. bla(VIM-2) genes were detected in 707 (99.6%) of 710 MBL-positive isolates. Extensively-drug-resistant ST235 P aeruginosa has rapidly spread throughout Russia and into

  11. Strategy of Irrigation Branch in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeyliger, A.; Ermolaeva, O.

    2012-04-01

    At this moment, at the starting time of the program on restoration of a large irrigation in Russia till 2020, the scientific and technical community of irrigation branch does not have clear vision on how to promote a development of irrigated agriculture and without repeating of mistakes having a place in the past. In many respects absence of a vision is connected to serious backlog of a scientific and technical and informational and technological level of development of domestic irrigation branch from advanced one. Namely such level of development is necessary for the resolving of new problems in new conditions of managing, and also for adequate answers to new challenges from climate and degradation of ground & water resources, as well as a rigorous requirement from an environment. In such important situation for irrigation branch when it is necessary quickly generate a scientific and technical politics for the current decade for maintenance of translation of irrigated agriculture in the Russian Federation on a new highly effective level of development, in our opinion, it is required to carry out open discussion of needs and requirements as well as a research for a adequate solutions. From political point of view a framework organized in FP6 DESIRE 037046 project is an example of good practice that can serve as methodical approach how to organize and develop such processes. From technical point of view a technology of operational management of irrigation at large scale presents a prospective alternative to the current type of management based on planning. From point of view ICT operational management demands creation of a new platform for the professional environment of activity. This platform should allow to perceive processes in real time, at their partial predictability on signals of a straight line and a feedback, within the framework of variability of decision making scenarious, at high resolution and the big ex-awning of sensor controls and the gauges

  12. Space Radar Image of Star City, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the Star City cosmonaut training center, east of Moscow, Russia. Four American astronauts are training here for future long-duration flights aboard the Russian Mir space station. These joint flights are giving NASA and the Russian Space Agency experience necessary for the construction of the international Alpha space station, beginning in late 1997. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR), on its 62nd orbit on October 3, 1994. This Star City image is centered at 55.55 degrees north latitude and 38.0 degrees east longitude. The area shown is approximately 32 kilometers by 49 kilometers (20 miles by 30 miles). North is to the top in this image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The image was produced using three channels of SIR-C radar data: red indicates L-band (23 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and received); green indicates L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue indicates C-band (6 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In general, dark pink areas are agricultural; pink and light blue areas are urban communities; black areas represent lakes and rivers; dark blue areas are cleared forest; and light green areas are forested. The prominent black runways just right of center are Shchelkovo Airfield, about 4 km long. The textured pale blue-green area east and southeast of Shchelkovo Airfield is forest. Just east of the runways is a thin railroad line running southeast; the Star City compound lies just east of the small bend in the rail line. Star City contains the living quarters and training facilities for Russian cosmonauts and their families. Moscow's inner loop road is visible at the lower left edge of the image. The Kremlin is just off the left edge, on the banks of the meandering Moskva River. The Klyazma River snakes to the southeast from the reservoir in the upper left (shown in bright red

  13. Space Radar Image of Star City, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-15

    This radar image shows the Star City cosmonaut training center, east of Moscow, Russia. Four American astronauts are training here for future long-duration flights aboard the Russian Mir space station. These joint flights are giving NASA and the Russian Space Agency experience necessary for the construction of the international Alpha space station, beginning in late 1997. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR), on its 62nd orbit on October 3, 1994. This Star City image is centered at 55.55 degrees north latitude and 38.0 degrees east longitude. The area shown is approximately 32 kilometers by 49 kilometers (20 miles by 30 miles). North is to the top in this image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The image was produced using three channels of SIR-C radar data: red indicates L-band (23 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and received); green indicates L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue indicates C-band (6 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In general, dark pink areas are agricultural; pink and light blue areas are urban communities; black areas represent lakes and rivers; dark blue areas are cleared forest; and light green areas are forested. The prominent black runways just right of center are Shchelkovo Airfield, about 4 km long. The textured pale blue-green area east and southeast of Shchelkovo Airfield is forest. Just east of the runways is a thin railroad line running southeast; the Star City compound lies just east of the small bend in the rail line. Star City contains the living quarters and training facilities for Russian cosmonauts and their families. Moscow's inner loop road is visible at the lower left edge of the image. The Kremlin is just off the left edge, on the banks of the meandering Moskva River. The Klyazma River snakes to the southeast from the reservoir in the upper left (shown in bright red

  14. Space Radar Image of Kiluchevskoi, Volcano, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-01

    This is an image of the area of Kliuchevskoi volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, which began to erupt on September 30, 1994. Kliuchevskoi is the blue triangular peak in the center of the image, towards the left edge of the bright red area that delineates bare snow cover. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 88th orbit on October 5, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 75 kilometers by 100 kilometers (46 miles by 62 miles) that is centered at 56.07 degrees north latitude and 160.84 degrees east longitude. North is toward the bottom of the image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The Kamchatka volcanoes are among the most active volcanoes in the world. The volcanic zone sits above a tectonic plate boundary, where the Pacific plate is sinking beneath the northeast edge of the Eurasian plate. The Endeavour crew obtained dramatic video and photographic images of this region during the eruption, which will assist scientists in analyzing the dynamics of the recent activity. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In addition to Kliuchevskoi, two other active volcanoes are visible in the image. Bezymianny, the circular crater above and to the right of Kliuchevskoi, contains a slowly growing lava dome. Tolbachik is the large volcano with a dark summit crater near the upper right edge of the red snow covered area. The Kamchatka River runs from right to left across the bottom of the image. The current eruption of Kliuchevskoi included massive ejections of gas, vapor and ash, which reached altitudes of 15,000 meters (50,000 feet). Melting snow mixed with volcanic ash triggered mud flows on the

  15. Anaglyph with Landsat Overlay, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This 3-D anaglyph shows an area on the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. Red-blue glasses are required to see the 3-D effect. The topographic data are from the first C-band mapping swath of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Images from the optical Landsat satellite are overlain on the SRTM topography data. The meandering channel of the Tigil River is seen along the bottom of the image, at the base of steep cliffs. In the middle left of the image, a terrace indicates recent uplift of the terrain and downcutting by the river. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists and hydrologists to study the interplay of tectonic uplift and erosion.

    This anaglyph was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. Each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data, which are overlain on the topography.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA

  16. SRTM Anaglyph: Sredinnyy Khrebet, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia is shown in this scene created from a preliminary elevation model derived from the first data collected during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) on February 12, 2000. Sredinnyy Khrebet, the mountain range that makes up the spine of the peninsula, is a chain of active volcanic peaks. Pleistocene and recent glaciers have carved the broad valleys and jagged ridges that are common here. The relative youth of the volcanism is revealed by the topography as infilling and smoothing of the otherwise rugged terrain by lava, ash, and pyroclastic flows, particularly surrounding the high peaks in the south central part of the image. Elevations here range from near sea level up to 2,618 meters (8,590 feet).

    This anaglyph was produced by first shading a preliminary SRTM elevation model. The stereoscopic effect was then created by generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by

  17. Eruption of Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On the night of June 4, 2001 ASTER captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 8028'. The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25 km ash plume, seen as a cold 'cloud' streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964. Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and the Far East, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas.

    The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in

  18. Eruption of Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On the night of June 4, 2001 ASTER captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 8028'. The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25 km ash plume, seen as a cold 'cloud' streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964. Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and the Far East, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas.

    The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in

  19. SRTM Anaglyph: Sredinnyy Khrebet, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia is shown in this scene created from a preliminary elevation model derived from the first data collected during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) on February 12, 2000. Sredinnyy Khrebet, the mountain range that makes up the spine of the peninsula, is a chain of active volcanic peaks. Pleistocene and recent glaciers have carved the broad valleys and jagged ridges that are common here. The relative youth of the volcanism is revealed by the topography as infilling and smoothing of the otherwise rugged terrain by lava, ash, and pyroclastic flows, particularly surrounding the high peaks in the south central part of the image. Elevations here range from near sea level up to 2,618 meters (8,590 feet).

    This anaglyph was produced by first shading a preliminary SRTM elevation model. The stereoscopic effect was then created by generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by

  20. Anaglyph with Landsat Overlay, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This 3-D anaglyph shows an area on the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. Red-blue glasses are required to see the 3-D effect. The topographic data are from the first C-band mapping swath of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Images from the optical Landsat satellite are overlain on the SRTM topography data. The meandering channel of the Tigil River is seen along the bottom of the image, at the base of steep cliffs. In the middle left of the image, a terrace indicates recent uplift of the terrain and downcutting by the river. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists and hydrologists to study the interplay of tectonic uplift and erosion.

    This anaglyph was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. Each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data, which are overlain on the topography.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA

  1. 3-D Perspective Kamchatka Peninsula Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. The image was generated using the first data collected during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). In the foreground is the Sea of Okhotsk. Inland from the coast, vegetated floodplains and low relief hills rise toward snow capped peaks. The topographic effects on snow and vegetation distribution are very clear in this near-horizontal view. Forming the skyline is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the spine of the peninsula. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and to understand the hazards posed by future eruptions. This image was generated using topographic data from SRTM and an enhanced true-color image from the Landsat 7 satellite. This image contains about 2,400 meters (7,880 feet) of total relief. The topographic expression was enhanced by adding artificial shading as calculated from the SRTM elevation model. The Landsat data was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota. SRTM, launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a 60- meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. SRTM collected three dimensional measurements of nearly 80 percent of the Earth's surface. SRTM is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. Size: 33.3 km (20.6 miles) wide x 136 km (84 miles) coast to skyline. Location: 58.3 deg. North lat., 160 deg. East long. Orientation: Easterly view, 2 degrees

  2. Space Radar Image of Star City, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the Star City cosmonaut training center, east of Moscow, Russia. Four American astronauts are training here for future long-duration flights aboard the Russian Mir space station. These joint flights are giving NASA and the Russian Space Agency experience necessary for the construction of the international Alpha space station, beginning in late 1997. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR), on its 62nd orbit on October 3, 1994. This Star City image is centered at 55.55 degrees north latitude and 38.0 degrees east longitude. The area shown is approximately 32 kilometers by 49 kilometers (20 miles by 30 miles). North is to the top in this image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The image was produced using three channels of SIR-C radar data: red indicates L-band (23 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and received); green indicates L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue indicates C-band (6 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In general, dark pink areas are agricultural; pink and light blue areas are urban communities; black areas represent lakes and rivers; dark blue areas are cleared forest; and light green areas are forested. The prominent black runways just right of center are Shchelkovo Airfield, about 4 km long. The textured pale blue-green area east and southeast of Shchelkovo Airfield is forest. Just east of the runways is a thin railroad line running southeast; the Star City compound lies just east of the small bend in the rail line. Star City contains the living quarters and training facilities for Russian cosmonauts and their families. Moscow's inner loop road is visible at the lower left edge of the image. The Kremlin is just off the left edge, on the banks of the meandering Moskva River. The Klyazma River snakes to the southeast from the reservoir in the upper left (shown in bright red

  3. Shaded Relief Color Wrapped, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This shaded relief topographic image shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. The data are from the first C-band mapping swath of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). On the left side are five rivers, which flow northwest to the Sea of Okhotsk. These rivers are, from the south to north, Tigil, Amanina, Voyampolka, Zhilovaya, and Kakhtana. The broad, flat floodplains of the rivers are shown in yellow. These rivers are important spawning grounds for salmon. In the right side of the image is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the 3spine2 of the peninsula. The cluster of hills to the lower right is a field of small dormant volcanoes. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and understand the hazards posed by future eruptions.

    This image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Each cycle of colors (from red through green back to red) represents an equal amount of elevation difference (400 meters, or 1300 feet)similar to contour lines on a standard topographic map. This image contains about 2300 meters (7500 feet) of total relief. For the shading, a computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. Shaded relief maps are commonly used in applications such as geologic mapping and land use planning.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast

  4. 3-D Perspective View, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. The image was generated using the first data collected during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). In the foreground is the Sea of Okhotsk. Inland from the coast, vegetated floodplains and low relief hills rise toward snow capped peaks. The topographic effects on snow and vegetation distribution are very clear in this near-horizontal view. Forming the skyline is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the spine of the peninsula. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and to understand the hazards posed by future eruptions.

    This image was generated using topographic data from SRTM and an enhanced true-color image from the Landsat 7 satellite. This image contains about 2,400 meters (7,880 feet) of total relief. The topographic expression was enhanced by adding artificial shading as calculated from the SRTM elevation model. The Landsat data was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    SRTM, launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar(SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. SRTM collected three-dimensional measurements of nearly 80 percent of the Earth's surface. SRTM is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, D.C.

    Size: 33.3 km (20.6 miles) wide x

  5. Space Radar Image of Kliuchevskoi, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-01

    This is an X-band seasonal image of the Maly Semlyachik volcano, which is part of the Karymsky volcano group on Kamchatka peninsula, Russia. The image is centered at 54.2 degrees north latitude and 159.6 degrees east longitude. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 9, 1994, during the first flight of the radar system, and on September 30, 1994, during the second flight. The image channels have been assigned the following colors: red corresponds to data acquired on April 9; green corresponds to data acquired on September 30; and blue corresponds to the ratio between data from April 9 and September 30, 1994. Kamchatka is twice as large as England, Scotland and Wales combined and is home to approximately 470,000 residents. The region is characterized by a chain of volcanoes stretching 800 kilometers (500 miles) across the countryside. Many of the volcanoes, including the active Maly Semlyachik volcano in this image, have erupted during this century. But the most active period in creating the three characteristic craters of this volcano goes back 20,000, 12,000 and 2,000 years ago. The highest summit of the oldest crater reaches about 1,560 meters (1,650 feet). The radar images reveal the geological structures of craters and lava flows in order to improve scientists' knowledge of these sometimes vigorously active volcanoes. This seasonal composite also highlights the ecological differences that have occurred between April and October 1994. In April the whole area was snow-covered and, at the coast, an ice sheet extended approximately 5 kilometers (3 miles) into the sea. The area shown surrounding the volcano is covered by low vegetation much like scrub. Kamchatka also has extensive forests, which belong to the northern frontier of Taiga, the boreal forest ecosystem. This region plays an important role in the world's carbon cycle. Trees require 60 years to

  6. A Survey of Biofuel Production potentials in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykova, Natalya; Gustafsson, Jan-Erik

    2010-01-01

    Due to the abundance of fossil fuel resources in Russia, the development of the renewable energy market there was delayed. Recent technological advancement has led to an increasing interest in biofuel production. The aim of research was to evaluate how biofuels are introduced into the current energy scheme of the country. The potential production of biofuels was estimated based on sustainable approaches which provide solution for carbon emission reduction and environmental benefits. Russia still requires biofuel policy to make biofuels compatible with traditional fossil fuels.

  7. Health care in the new Russia: a western perspective.

    PubMed

    Wallen, A J; Cammuso, B S

    1997-01-01

    With the end of the Cold War and establishment of relations with Russia, the opportunity for nurses to meet their Russian colleagues is now available. The authors, with an international group of nurses, visited Russia to learn about their healthcare system and nursing practice. The authors found Russian healthcare system severely lacking in the technology and resources available in other industraialized nations. Within this system, the nurse's role is significantly different from nursing in the American healthcare system. Nurses practice within a system of severe shortages and provide nursing care dependent upon physicians.

  8. [Cancer incidence in the Altai Republic].

    PubMed

    Odintsova, I N; Pisareva, L F; Ananina, O A; Khriapenkov, A V; Cherdyntseva, N V

    2014-01-01

    From all regions of the Siberian Federal District (SFD), the Altai Republic is the least urbanized territory, more than third of its population is Altai. The Altai Republic ranks the 11th for cancer incidence among 12 territories of SFD. Cancer incidence rate is 1.4 times less in females than in males. There is a tendency toward increased cancer incidence in the Republic. The two most common cancer sites in males are digestive and respiratory organs. In females, the most common cancer sites are reproductive and digestive organs. Prostate cancer has the highest incidence rate in males and kidney cancer in females. Increase in the cancer incidence rate was observed among male patients who are younger and older than able-bodied age and in female patients who were younger than able-bodied age. Problems related to the improvement of methods for cancer prevention, early detection and treatment are of great importance.

  9. Astronomy in the Republic of Macedonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijatovic, Mijat

    Astronomy in the territory of today's Republic of Macedonia has a century-long history. This history is presented in the essay, begining with M. Trpković's suggestions to reform the orthodox calendar in 1900s, through the foundation of the first faculty of Macedonian language in Skopje in 1946, until today's situation in astronomy. In second half of the XX century, the development of astronomy in the Republic of Macedonia is divided in two different periods: before and after the big earthquake in Skopje in 1963. The first period is characterized by hope and enthusiasm, and a little observatory was started to be built, but it was destroyed in the earthquake. The last ten years a new upsurge is seen in Astronomy in the Republic of Macedonia, which is founded on Balkan and international collaboration.

  10. The Recent Emergence of Private Christian Colleges and Universities in Russia: Historical Reasons and Contemporary Developments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrenko, Konstantin I.; Glanzer, Perry L.

    2005-01-01

    Although the history of Christianity in Russia dates back to the tenth century, the history of private Christian higher education in Russia is no more than a decade. This paper first explains the historical reasons for this fact and then describes the contemporary development of faith-based private education in Russia over the past decade. When…

  11. History, administration, goals, values, and long-term data of Russia's strictly protected scientific nature reserves

    Treesearch

    Martin A. Spetich; Anna E. Kvashnina; Y.D. Nukhimovskya; Olin E. Jr. Rhodes

    2009-01-01

    One of the most comprehensive attempts at biodiversity conservation in Russia and the former Soviet Union has been the establishment of an extensive network of protected natural areas. Among all types of protected areas in Russia, zapovedniks (strictly protected scientific preserve) have been the most effective in protecting biodiversity at the ecosystem scale. Russia...

  12. 77 FR 21527 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia: Correction to Notice of Opportunity To Request Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... International Trade Administration Ammonium Nitrate From Russia: Correction to Notice of Opportunity To Request... of the antidumping duty orders and inadvertently omitted Ammonium Nitrate from Russia, POR 5/2/2011-3... include the Ammonium Nitrate from Russia administrative review in the referenced notice. Dated: April...

  13. 15 CFR 744.10 - Restrictions on certain entities in Russia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Russia. 744.10 Section 744.10 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.10 Restrictions on certain entities in Russia. (a) General prohibition. Certain entities in Russia are included in Supplement No. 4 to this part 744 (Entity...

  14. 15 CFR 744.10 - Restrictions on certain entities in Russia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Russia. 744.10 Section 744.10 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.10 Restrictions on certain entities in Russia. (a) General prohibition. Certain entities in Russia are included in supplement No. 4 to this part 744 (Entity...

  15. 15 CFR 744.10 - Restrictions on certain entities in Russia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Russia. 744.10 Section 744.10 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.10 Restrictions on certain entities in Russia. (a) General prohibition. Certain entities in Russia are included in Supplement No. 4 to this part 744...

  16. 15 CFR 744.10 - Restrictions on certain entities in Russia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Russia. 744.10 Section 744.10 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.10 Restrictions on certain entities in Russia. (a) General prohibition. Certain entities in Russia are included in Supplement No. 4 to this part 744 (Entity...

  17. 15 CFR 744.10 - Restrictions on certain entities in Russia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Russia. 744.10 Section 744.10 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.10 Restrictions on certain entities in Russia. (a) General prohibition. Certain entities in Russia are included in Supplement No. 4 to this part 744 (Entity...

  18. 78 FR 33064 - Silicon Metal From Russia; Institution of a Five-Year Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... COMMISSION Silicon Metal From Russia; Institution of a Five-Year Review AGENCY: United States International... whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on silicon metal from Russia would be likely to lead to... order on imports of silicon metal from Russia (68 FR 14578). Following the five-year reviews by...

  19. Republication of: New mechanics of material systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathisson, Myron

    2010-04-01

    This is an English translation of the second of two papers by Myron Mathisson, first published in German in 1931 and 1937, in which he presented the correct formulation of equations of motion of spinning bodies in general relativity (today known as the Mathisson-Papapetrou equations). The papers have been selected by the Editors of General Relativity and Gravitation for republication in the Golden Oldies series of the journal. This republication is accompanied by an editorial note and Mathisson’s brief biography, both written by Andrzej Trautman.

  20. Dominican Republic Wind Energy Resource Atlas Development

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.

    1999-09-09

    A wind resource analysis and mapping study was conducted for the Dominican Republic. The purpose of this study was to identify most favorable wind resource areas and quantify the value of that resource within those areas. This was a major study and the first of its kind undertaken for the Dominican Republic. The key to the successful completion of the study was an automated wind resource mapping program recently developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a US Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory.

  1. Two basins explored in Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, G.M.

    1996-04-29

    Exploration companies are exploring two tracts in separate basins of the Dominican Republic. Drilling is under way or planned in the eastern Cibao basin in the northeastern part of the country, where Petrolera Once Once SA holds a 1,001,287 ha concession, and the Azua-Bani basin in the southwester, where Mobil-Murfin holds a 2,266,197 ha concession. About 75 wells have been drilled onshore in Dominican Republic, but commercial production has not been established. This paper summarizes the exploration history and geology of the area.

  2. Trace element concentrations in needles and bark of Larix Sibirica within the Mo-W ore field (Buryat Republic, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, Ivan; Kosheleva, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    The present study aims to assess the changes in the trace element (TE) composition of Larix Sibirica species growing in the impact area of Dzhida Mo-W plant in the Zakamensk city. The objectives of the study were: (1) to reveal the biogeochemical background features and changes in the TE composition of larch needles and bark in the mining region; (2) to determine patterns of spatial distribution of TE content in larch organs; (3) to assess the ecological state of larch plantation in different land-use zones of the city. A landscape-geochemical survey of the territory was carried out in summer of 2013. Total of 21 mixed (taken from 3-5 trees) samples of needles and bark were collected in undisturbed and different land-use areas. The bulk contents of TEs in dry plant samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry with induced coupled plasma. Sixteen priority pollutants were selected for thorough analysis, including elements of hazard classes I (Zn, As, Pb, Cd), II (Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Mo, Sb), III (V, Sr, Ba, W), and some others (Sn, Bi). Concentrations of TEs (C_b) in background trees were compared with the global clarks (C_g) for annual increment of terrestrial vegetation (Dobrovol'skii 2003) via calculating the global enrichment EF_g=C_b/Cg and dispersion factors DF_g=C_g/C_b}. The concentrations of the elements in the urban samples Ci were grouped depending on the type of land use and compared with the background (C_b) via calculating the local enrichment EF_l=C_i/Cb and dispersion factors DF_l=C_b/C_i. The ecological state of the urban plants was diagnosed using three TE ratios. The Fe/Mn ratio represents photosynthetic activity with optimum value 1.5-2.5. The Pb/Mn ratio characterizes balance between technogenic and biophilic elements, its value for unpolluted terrestrial plants is 0.006. The Cu/Zn ratio determines the proportionality in the provision of enzyme synthesis with these metals, its optimum value is 0.27. TE composition of needles of background larch is characterized by increased concentrations of ?? ? Mn (EF_g=2.9) ? Sr (1.5), and reduced ones for Ni, Co, Pb, Mo, Sn, V (DF_l=5.1-22.1), that of Cd, Cu, Zn are close to global clarks. Ba, Pb, Cd (EF_g=3.5-2.3) are accumulated in the bark, Cu, Zn, Co, Cr, Ni, Sn dissipate (DF_g=2.1-3.7), and the content of Mn, Sr, Mo, V, As is close to Cg. In the city larch needles accumulate Cr (EF_l=37.8), W (18.9), V, Pb, Bi (8.6-11.4), Sb, Ni, Cd, Sn (6.6-2.5); Mn (DF_l=3.1) is among scattered. Changes in the TE composition of larch bark is most clearly evident in the industrial area, where high concentrations of W, Sn (EF_l=5.4-6.6), Sb, Pb, As (2.8-3.4), Mo, Cd, V, Bi, Zn (1.5-2.0) and low ones -- of Cr, Ni, Co, Ba (DF_l=4.6-2.1) are observed. As an indicator of long-term pollution, bark displays that vegetation of industrial zone has been subject previously to most intense anthropogenic impact, so, Pb/Mn=0.06 was there the highest. After plant closing residential area experiences the greatest impact according to Fe/Mn=4.7; Pb/Mn=0.04 values in the needles. This is caused by the active transport of aeolian dry material of tailings. 1. Dobrovol'skii VV (2003) Basics of biogeochemistry: the textbook for students of higher educational institutions. Moscow, "Academia" Publ., 400 p.

  3. 75 FR 969 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China and the Republic of Korea...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ... International Trade Administration Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China and... investigations of diamond sawblades and parts thereof (``diamond sawblades'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'') and the Republic of Korea (``Korea''). See Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the...

  4. 77 FR 20788 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the Republic of Korea and the People's Republic of China...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... International Trade Administration Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the Republic of Korea and the People... administrative reviews of the antidumping duty orders on diamond sawblades and parts thereof (diamond sawblades) from the Republic of Korea (Korea) and the People's Republic of China (PRC). See Diamond Sawblades...

  5. 78 FR 74115 - Monosodium Glutamate From the People's Republic of China and the Republic of Indonesia...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... Indonesia: Postponement of Preliminary Determination in the Countervailing Duty Investigations AGENCY... (PRC)); Nicholas Czajkowski at (202) 482- 1395 (the Republic of Indonesia (Indonesia)), AD/CVD... investigations of monosodium glutamate from Indonesia and the PRC.\\1\\ Currently, the preliminary determinations...

  6. Space Radar Image of Moscow, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a vertically polarized L-band image of the southern half of Moscow, an area which has been inhabited for 2,000 years. The image covers a diameter of approximately 50 kilometers (31 miles) and was taken on September 30, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. The city of Moscow was founded about 750 years ago and today is home to about 8 million residents. The southern half of the circular highway (a road that looks like a ring) can easily be identified as well as the roads and railways radiating out from the center of the city. The city was named after the Moskwa River and replaced Russia's former capital, St. Petersburg, after the Russian Revolution in 1917. The river winding through Moscow shows up in various gray shades. The circular structure of many city roads can easily be identified, although subway connections covering several hundred kilometers are not visible in this image. The white areas within the ring road and outside of it are buildings of the city itself and it suburban towns. Two of many airports are located in the west and southeast of Moscow, near the corners of the image. The Kremlin is located north just outside of the imaged city center. It was actually built in the 16th century, when Ivan III was czar, and is famous for its various churches. In the surrounding area, light gray indicates forests, while the dark patches are agricultural areas. The various shades from middle gray to dark gray indicate different stages of harvesting, ploughing and grassland. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific

  7. Space Radar Image of Kliuchevskoi Volcano, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the Kliuchevskoi volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, which began to erupt on September 30, 1994. Kliuchevskoi is the bright white peak surrounded by red slopes in the lower left portion of the image. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 25th orbit on October 1, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 30 kilometers by 60 kilometers (18.5 miles by 37 miles) that is centered at 56.18 degrees north latitude and 160.78 degrees east longitude. North is toward the top of the image. The Kamchatka volcanoes are among the most active volcanoes in the world. The volcanic zone sits above a tectonic plate boundary, where the Pacific plate is sinking beneath the northeast edge of the Eurasian plate. The Endeavour crew obtained dramatic video and photographic images of this region during the eruption, which will assist scientists in analyzing the dynamics of the current activity. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). The Kamchatka River runs from left to right across the image. An older, dormant volcanic region appears in green on the north side of the river. The current eruption included massive ejections of gas, vapor and ash, which reached altitudes of 20,000 meters (65,000 feet). New lava flows are visible on the flanks of Kliuchevskoi, appearing yellow/green in the image, superimposed on the red surfaces in the lower center. Melting snow triggered mudflows on the north flank of the volcano, which may threaten agricultural zones and other settlements in the valley to the north. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars

  8. Space Radar Image of Kliuchevskoi Volcano, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the Kliuchevskoi volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, which began to erupt on September 30, 1994. Kliuchevskoi is the bright white peak surrounded by red slopes in the lower left portion of the image. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 25th orbit on October 1, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 30 kilometers by 60 kilometers (18.5 miles by 37 miles) that is centered at 56.18 degrees north latitude and 160.78 degrees east longitude. North is toward the top of the image. The Kamchatka volcanoes are among the most active volcanoes in the world. The volcanic zone sits above a tectonic plate boundary, where the Pacific plate is sinking beneath the northeast edge of the Eurasian plate. The Endeavour crew obtained dramatic video and photographic images of this region during the eruption, which will assist scientists in analyzing the dynamics of the current activity. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). The Kamchatka River runs from left to right across the image. An older, dormant volcanic region appears in green on the north side of the river. The current eruption included massive ejections of gas, vapor and ash, which reached altitudes of 20,000 meters (65,000 feet). New lava flows are visible on the flanks of Kliuchevskoi, appearing yellow/green in the image, superimposed on the red surfaces in the lower center. Melting snow triggered mudflows on the north flank of the volcano, which may threaten agricultural zones and other settlements in the valley to the north. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars

  9. Space Radar Image of Kiluchevskoi, Volcano, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the area of Kliuchevskoi volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, which began to erupt on September 30, 1994. Kliuchevskoi is the blue triangular peak in the center of the image, towards the left edge of the bright red area that delineates bare snow cover. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 88th orbit on October 5, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 75 kilometers by 100 kilometers (46 miles by 62 miles) that is centered at 56.07 degrees north latitude and 160.84 degrees east longitude. North is toward the bottom of the image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The Kamchatka volcanoes are among the most active volcanoes in the world. The volcanic zone sits above a tectonic plate boundary, where the Pacific plate is sinking beneath the northeast edge of the Eurasian plate. The Endeavour crew obtained dramatic video and photographic images of this region during the eruption, which will assist scientists in analyzing the dynamics of the recent activity. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In addition to Kliuchevskoi, two other active volcanoes are visible in the image. Bezymianny, the circular crater above and to the right of Kliuchevskoi, contains a slowly growing lava dome. Tolbachik is the large volcano with a dark summit crater near the upper right edge of the red snow covered area. The Kamchatka River runs from right to left across the bottom of the image. The current eruption of Kliuchevskoi included massive ejections of gas, vapor and ash, which reached altitudes of 15,000 meters (50,000 feet). Melting snow mixed with volcanic ash triggered mud flows on the

  10. Space Radar Image of Kiluchevskoi, Volcano, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the area of Kliuchevskoi volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, which began to erupt on September 30, 1994. Kliuchevskoi is the blue triangular peak in the center of the image, towards the left edge of the bright red area that delineates bare snow cover. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 88th orbit on October 5, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 75 kilometers by 100 kilometers (46 miles by 62 miles) that is centered at 56.07 degrees north latitude and 160.84 degrees east longitude. North is toward the bottom of the image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The Kamchatka volcanoes are among the most active volcanoes in the world. The volcanic zone sits above a tectonic plate boundary, where the Pacific plate is sinking beneath the northeast edge of the Eurasian plate. The Endeavour crew obtained dramatic video and photographic images of this region during the eruption, which will assist scientists in analyzing the dynamics of the recent activity. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In addition to Kliuchevskoi, two other active volcanoes are visible in the image. Bezymianny, the circular crater above and to the right of Kliuchevskoi, contains a slowly growing lava dome. Tolbachik is the large volcano with a dark summit crater near the upper right edge of the red snow covered area. The Kamchatka River runs from right to left across the bottom of the image. The current eruption of Kliuchevskoi included massive ejections of gas, vapor and ash, which reached altitudes of 15,000 meters (50,000 feet). Melting snow mixed with volcanic ash triggered mud flows on the

  11. Space Radar Image of Moscow, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a vertically polarized L-band image of the southern half of Moscow, an area which has been inhabited for 2,000 years. The image covers a diameter of approximately 50 kilometers (31 miles) and was taken on September 30, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. The city of Moscow was founded about 750 years ago and today is home to about 8 million residents. The southern half of the circular highway (a road that looks like a ring) can easily be identified as well as the roads and railways radiating out from the center of the city. The city was named after the Moskwa River and replaced Russia's former capital, St. Petersburg, after the Russian Revolution in 1917. The river winding through Moscow shows up in various gray shades. The circular structure of many city roads can easily be identified, although subway connections covering several hundred kilometers are not visible in this image. The white areas within the ring road and outside of it are buildings of the city itself and it suburban towns. Two of many airports are located in the west and southeast of Moscow, near the corners of the image. The Kremlin is located north just outside of the imaged city center. It was actually built in the 16th century, when Ivan III was czar, and is famous for its various churches. In the surrounding area, light gray indicates forests, while the dark patches are agricultural areas. The various shades from middle gray to dark gray indicate different stages of harvesting, ploughing and grassland. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific

  12. Space Radar Image of Kliuchevskoi, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an X-band seasonal image of the Maly Semlyachik volcano, which is part of the Karymsky volcano group on Kamchatka peninsula, Russia. The image is centered at 54.2 degrees north latitude and 159.6 degrees east longitude. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 9, 1994, during the first flight of the radar system, and on September 30, 1994, during the second flight. The image channels have been assigned the following colors: red corresponds to data acquired on April 9; green corresponds to data acquired on September 30; and blue corresponds to the ratio between data from April 9 and September 30, 1994. Kamchatka is twice as large as England, Scotland and Wales combined and is home to approximately 470,000 residents. The region is characterized by a chain of volcanoes stretching 800 kilometers (500 miles) across the countryside. Many of the volcanoes, including the active Maly Semlyachik volcano in this image, have erupted during this century. But the most active period in creating the three characteristic craters of this volcano goes back 20,000, 12,000 and 2,000 years ago. The highest summit of the oldest crater reaches about 1,560 meters (1,650 feet). The radar images reveal the geological structures of craters and lava flows in order to improve scientists' knowledge of these sometimes vigorously active volcanoes. This seasonal composite also highlights the ecological differences that have occurred between April and October 1994. In April the whole area was snow-covered and, at the coast, an ice sheet extended approximately 5 kilometers (3 miles) into the sea. The area shown surrounding the volcano is covered by low vegetation much like scrub. Kamchatka also has extensive forests, which belong to the northern frontier of Taiga, the boreal forest ecosystem. This region plays an important role in the world's carbon cycle. Trees require 60 years to

  13. The Narcotics Situation in Russia as a Social Pedagogical Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popov, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    The increase in the use of narcotics in Russia has been complicated by the spread of new kinds of drugs that are less visible than more traditional kinds. A worsening of the situation must be prevented. This requires studying the accumulation of world experience, searching for up-to-date approaches to prevention, combining the efforts of science…

  14. Pilot Project in International Distance Education in Russia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slusky, Ludwig; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes a joint project in which California State University, Los Angeles delivered an advanced course to students at Tomsk Polytechnic University in Tomsk, Russia using Telnet communications. Discusses the technology, course alterations, the role of local coordinators, delivery, and future opportunities. (AEF)

  15. On Models of the University in Today's Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozov, N. S.

    2008-01-01

    In current discussions of the problems that affect the development of higher education in Russia, two dimensions dominate, in which opinions diverge and positions clash. In the "first" ("the political and economic" dimension) the extreme poles are the "liberal approach" (according to which higher educational…

  16. The Narcotics Situation in Russia as a Social Pedagogical Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popov, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    The increase in the use of narcotics in Russia has been complicated by the spread of new kinds of drugs that are less visible than more traditional kinds. A worsening of the situation must be prevented. This requires studying the accumulation of world experience, searching for up-to-date approaches to prevention, combining the efforts of science…

  17. Reforming Undergraduate Instruction in Russia, Belarus, and Ukraine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovzik, Alexander; Watts, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Deals with the restructuring of undergraduate economics instruction at Russia's Moscow State University (MSU) since 1989. Examines how changes at MSU are reflected at Belarus State University and at Kiev State University. Considers issues such as training of faculty members, and the use of translated Western textbooks. (RLH)

  18. Family Intervention Training Programs in Russia and Eastern European Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatz, Mona Struhsaker; Salz, Michael

    This paper describes the experiences of a psychologist and social worker trainer from 1992-1995 as she traveled throughout Post-Peristroika Russia and Eastern Europe working with families. The author describes how being in another country caused her to adjust her notions of what is "normal," and she discusses how culture contributes to…

  19. Understanding Care for the Poor in Rural Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shubin, Sergei

    2012-01-01

    The issues surrounding care and care-provision have been key themes in social scientific research, yet the intersections between care and poverty, particularly in rural contexts, have not been sufficiently explored. This paper addresses this gap by studying care for the poor in rural Russia. It argues that isolated, disengaged and decontextualised…

  20. Resume Writing in Russia and the Newly Independent States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Betsy; Sapp, David Alan; Sargsyan, Nelly

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the teaching of resume writing at one university in Russia and several institutions in the Newly Independent States (NIS). The authors explore challenges including variable cultural norms for written versus oral communication, severe financial and material hardship in the educational sector, cultural discomfort with the norms…

  1. 77 FR 5770 - Energy Efficiency Trade Mission to Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... these technologies is rising as domestic consumer energy prices rise and people and organizations become... anticipated increases in energy prices. Road Infrastructure: Due to the rapid increase in the number of... International Trade Administration Energy Efficiency Trade Mission to Russia AGENCY: International Trade...

  2. U.S.-RUSSIA TIES: Spy Conviction Strains Science Collaborations.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    2000-12-15

    The conviction last week in Russia of U.S. businessman Edward Pope on charges of espionage may add to already growing tensions in scientific collaborations between the two countries, according to officials on both sides. The recent strains appear to be a reaction to a broad range of national security concerns in each nation.

  3. Engineering Education in Russia in an Era of Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukianenko, M. V.; Polezhaev, O. A.; Churliaeva, N. P.

    2013-01-01

    Engineering education in Russia is undergoing reforms, but the history of this form of higher education does not indicate that it will succeed in bringing it into line with current world standards, or even making it more able to contribute at a high level to Russian economic growth. (Contains 5 notes.)

  4. Indicators of the Education Potential of the Population of Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikhomirov, N. P.; Ushchev, V. I.

    2007-01-01

    The steady tendencies toward the decline in the size of Russia's population in the twenty-first century, owing to the effect of global political, social, and economic factors, are giving rise to a number of fundamental problems that have to do with the erosion of the conditions that are essential not only for the stable development of society, but…

  5. Seven Years of Distance Education in Russia: First Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakushkina, Tatiana

    2004-01-01

    In the year 2002, the federal experiment on creating and developing the system of distance education in Russia came to its end. This fact provokes the author to analyze the first outcomes of the beginning era of computer-based-learning in this country. The paper aims to review the development of distance education in the context of past and…

  6. The Modernization of Russia and Base Centers for Teacher Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riabov, V. V.; Rakitov, A. I.

    2011-01-01

    The modernization of Russia requires people to be trained for a modern economy, for technological development, and for the sphere of state, regional, and corporate management. Accomplishing this complex task has been assigned to the "New School" policy, approved in 2010. The present article examines ways of dealing with problems that…

  7. Diverse phytoplasmas associated with leguminus crops in Russia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A large scale survey of diseased legume plants (mainly clover and alfalfa in the Fabaceae family) was conducted from 2009-2013 in four Economic Regions of Russia - Northern (Arkhangelsk and Vologda oblast), Central (Moscow oblast), Volga (Samara oblast) and West Siberian (Novosibirsk oblast). The m...

  8. Human Resource Development Practices in Russia: A Structured Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plakhotnik, Maria S.

    2005-01-01

    This literature review aimed to investigate the literature on HRD in Russian enterprises, U.S. firms in Russia, or U.S.-Russian joint ventures to determine the role and function of HRD practitioners in creating a successful economic transition. Thirty-three articles were selected through a database search and examined using content analysis. Three…

  9. Nuclear test monitoring system detected meteor explosion over Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-10-01

    Sound waves from the Chelyabinsk meteor, which exploded over Russia on 15 February 2013, were detected by 20 infrasound stations that are part of the international monitoring system operated by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). The fireball was the most energetic event observed since the 1908 Tunguska meteorite impact and is the most energetic event detected by the CTBTO network.

  10. Indigenous Minority Languages of Russia: A Bibliographical Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumura, Kazuto, Ed.

    This publication is a printed version of 54 Web documents as they were at the end of March 2002. It includes selected lists of school textbooks, dictionaries, grammars, grammatical descriptions, and folklore collections in and on 54 indigenous minority languages of Russia, many of which are endangered. The 54 languages are arranged in the…

  11. Indicators of the Education Potential of the Population of Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikhomirov, N. P.; Ushchev, V. I.

    2007-01-01

    The steady tendencies toward the decline in the size of Russia's population in the twenty-first century, owing to the effect of global political, social, and economic factors, are giving rise to a number of fundamental problems that have to do with the erosion of the conditions that are essential not only for the stable development of society, but…

  12. Epidemiology of Primary Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Vladimir Region, Russia.

    PubMed

    Ershova, Julia V; Volchenkov, Grigory V; Kaminski, Dorothy A; Somova, Tatiana R; Kuznetsova, Tatiana A; Kaunetis, Natalia V; Cegielski, J Peter; Kurbatova, Ekaterina V

    2015-11-01

    We studied the epidemiology of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Vladimir Region, Russia, in 2012. Most cases of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) were caused by transmission of drug-resistant strains, and >33% were in patients referred for testing after mass radiographic screening. Early diagnosis of drug resistance is essential for preventing transmission of MDR TB.

  13. International trends in health science librarianship part 20: Russia.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jeannette; Jargin, Serge

    2017-03-01

    This is the last in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the 21st century. The focus of the present issue is Russia. The next feature column will initiate a new series entitled New Directions in Health Science Librarianship. The first contribution will be from Australia. JM. © 2017 Health Libraries Group.

  14. Seroepidemiology and Molecular Epidemiology of Enterovirus 71 in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Akhmadishina, Ludmila V.; Eremeeva, Tatiana P.; Trotsenko, Olga E.; Ivanova, Olga E.; Mikhailov, Mikhail I.; Lukashev, Alexander N.

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is an emerging human pathogen causing massive epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease with severe neurological complications in Asia. EV71 also circulates in Europe, however it does not cause large outbreaks. The reason for distinct epidemiological patterns of EV71 infection in Europe and Asia and the risk of EV71 epidemic in Europe and Russia remain unknown. Seroepidemiology of EV71 and molecular epidemiology of occasional EV71 isolates were studied to explore circulation of EV71 in Russia. In six regions of Russian Federation, seroprevalence of EV71 in sera collected in 2008 ranged from 5% to 20% in children aged 1–2 years and from 19% to 83% in children aged 3–5 years. The seroprevalence among elder children was significantly higher (41–83% vs. 19–27%) in Asian regions of Russia. EV71 strains identified in Russia in 2001–2011 belonged to subtypes C1 and C2, while genotype C4 that was causing epidemics in Asia since 1998 emerged in 2009 and became dominant in 2013. PMID:24819617

  15. Seroepidemiology and molecular epidemiology of enterovirus 71 in Russia.

    PubMed

    Akhmadishina, Ludmila V; Eremeeva, Tatiana P; Trotsenko, Olga E; Ivanova, Olga E; Mikhailov, Mikhail I; Lukashev, Alexander N

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is an emerging human pathogen causing massive epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease with severe neurological complications in Asia. EV71 also circulates in Europe, however it does not cause large outbreaks. The reason for distinct epidemiological patterns of EV71 infection in Europe and Asia and the risk of EV71 epidemic in Europe and Russia remain unknown. Seroepidemiology of EV71 and molecular epidemiology of occasional EV71 isolates were studied to explore circulation of EV71 in Russia. In six regions of Russian Federation, seroprevalence of EV71 in sera collected in 2008 ranged from 5% to 20% in children aged 1-2 years and from 19% to 83% in children aged 3-5 years. The seroprevalence among elder children was significantly higher (41-83% vs. 19-27%) in Asian regions of Russia. EV71 strains identified in Russia in 2001-2011 belonged to subtypes C1 and C2, while genotype C4 that was causing epidemics in Asia since 1998 emerged in 2009 and became dominant in 2013.

  16. Identification of Phytoplasma Species Associated With Potato Diseases in Russia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four out of six known potato diseases attributed to phytoplasma infection were previously reported to occur in Russia based on a combination of biological properties such as symptomatology and/or vector relationships and electron microscopy of infected phloem tissue. In 2007, the first molecular id...

  17. Engineering Education in Russia in an Era of Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukianenko, M. V.; Polezhaev, O. A.; Churliaeva, N. P.

    2013-01-01

    Engineering education in Russia is undergoing reforms, but the history of this form of higher education does not indicate that it will succeed in bringing it into line with current world standards, or even making it more able to contribute at a high level to Russian economic growth. (Contains 5 notes.)

  18. Information Needs Research in Russia and Lithuania, 1965-2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maceviciute, Elena

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The invisibility of research on information needs from the East and Central Europe in the West suggested an exploration of the published research output from Lithuania and Russia from 1965 to 2003. Method: The data were collected from the abstracting journal Informatika-59. The publications were retrieved from Lithuanian and Russian…

  19. International Reports on Literacy Research: Canada, France, Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Jacquelynn A., Comp.; Botzakis, Stergios, Comp.

    2006-01-01

    This article is a compilation of reports on international literacy research. The report includes 3 separate reports on Canada, France and Russia. In the first report, research correspondent Linda M. Phillips, in collaboration with Christian Beaulieu, reports on the Canadian Language and Literacy Research Network (CLLRNet). The vision of CLLRNet is…

  20. Reforming Undergraduate Instruction in Russia, Belarus, and Ukraine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovzik, Alexander; Watts, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Deals with the restructuring of undergraduate economics instruction at Russia's Moscow State University (MSU) since 1989. Examines how changes at MSU are reflected at Belarus State University and at Kiev State University. Considers issues such as training of faculty members, and the use of translated Western textbooks. (RLH)

  1. A Look at TEFL in Russia and Ukraine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Mary Lee

    A survey of 53 teachers of English as a foreign language (EFL) in Russia and Ukraine, conducted in May 1992, investigated current teaching conditions and methods and perceived needs and concerns. The teachers taught at elementary, secondary, and postsecondary levels; a majority taught in teacher training institutions. Over half the respondents…

  2. The Household and the Family in Rural Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patsiorkovskii, V. V.; Patsiorkovskaia, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    There is a great need to improve rural life in Russia, and this must involve the development of the agricultural economy. This will require improving life for rural families, making it easier for them to obtain land to farm, and providing adequate housing and cultural facilities in the Russian village. (Contains 1 table.) [This article was…

  3. Oil and Gas Resources of the West Siberian Basin, Russia

    EIA Publications

    1997-01-01

    Provides an assessment of the oil and gas potential of the West Siberian Basin of Russia. The report was prepared in cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) and is part of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP).

  4. 75 FR 48360 - Magnesium From China and Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ...: Scheduling of full five-year reviews concerning the antidumping duty orders on alloy magnesium from China and pure and alloy magnesium from Russia. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice of the scheduling of...) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on alloy magnesium from China and...

  5. The Modernization of Russia and Base Centers for Teacher Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riabov, V. V.; Rakitov, A. I.

    2011-01-01

    The modernization of Russia requires people to be trained for a modern economy, for technological development, and for the sphere of state, regional, and corporate management. Accomplishing this complex task has been assigned to the "New School" policy, approved in 2010. The present article examines ways of dealing with problems that…

  6. Teaching History in Russia after the Collapse of the USSR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volodina, Tatyana

    2005-01-01

    Dramatic conflicts and ideological changes occurred in Russia during the past decade. They inevitably influenced Russian education, particularly history teaching. A number of problems that have arisen in history education have been identified, including the emergence of new ideological symbols, and inequalities between schools for the rich and…

  7. The Social and Pedagogical Protection of Orphans in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantiukhina, E. N.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the history of the provision of children's care ("prizrenie") in Russia which provides evidence that the desire to help those close to one, especially orphans and the poor, was a traditional trait of the Russian national character. The system of children's welfare as it took shape over many centuries is unique in…

  8. Needs Assessment for Health Care Management Education in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rekhter, Natalia; Togunov, Igor A.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: For more than 70 years, health care management in the Soviet Union reflected a centralized directive style familiar to the Soviet political system. Market-oriented reform in post-Soviet Russia is pushing practicing physicians and physician-executives to acquire new information and skills regarding health care management. To assist…

  9. Social Inequality and Access to Higher Education in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konstantinovskiy, David L.

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses research on social inequality and access to higher education in Russia. It argues that the myth about equality of life chances, as with certain other myths, was an important part of the Soviet ideology. However, children from privileged groups traditionally received the education and professional training which were most…

  10. The Problem of Engineering Creativity in Russia: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukushkin, Sergey; Churlyaeva, Natalya

    2012-01-01

    The problem of technological creativity in Russia is briefly discussed. Special attention is paid to the development of indigenous engineering corpus in unfavourable conditions and some reasons for engineers' low creativity are revealed. The Soviet system of engineering higher education (HE) is criticised as not focused on fostering creative…

  11. Financing Education in Transitional Societies: Lessons from Russia and China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Mark; Borevskaya, Nina

    2001-01-01

    Compares changing patterns in educational finance in Russia and China, drawing on the literature concerning educational change in societies moving from socialism to market economies. Discusses economic and political contexts in the two countries, public and private educational expenditures, decentralization of financial responsibilities, increased…

  12. International Reports on Literacy Research: Canada, France, Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Jacquelynn A., Comp.; Botzakis, Stergios, Comp.

    2006-01-01

    This article is a compilation of reports on international literacy research. The report includes 3 separate reports on Canada, France and Russia. In the first report, research correspondent Linda M. Phillips, in collaboration with Christian Beaulieu, reports on the Canadian Language and Literacy Research Network (CLLRNet). The vision of CLLRNet is…

  13. Traditions and Innovations: English Language Teaching in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ter-Minasova, Svetlana G.

    2005-01-01

    The English language in Russia: a brief survey. It includes a historical perspective, the traditions of the past and the new challenges of the present-day situation. The history is simple: it is based on a deep love of foreign languages in general and English in particular. Love against all odds, for better, for worse, for richer and for poorer.…

  14. America and Russia in International Communications: Stereotypes and Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aksenova, Olga; Beadle, Mary

    1999-01-01

    One barrier to international communication is cultural stereotypes. Based on a literature review and on personal experience and research, this paper explores several prevalent stereotypes about Russia and the United States, noting the influence they may have on business communication. It also discusses the opportunities for and threats to…

  15. In Russia, Corruption Plagues the Higher-Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemtsova, Anna

    2008-01-01

    From the top down, says the writer, Russia's universities are impoverished by bribery and insider deals large and small. A new president's dorm at Nizhniy Novgorod is one example of what anti-corruption watchdogs say is widespread mismanagement, and in some cases outright corruption, throughout the country's higher-education system. Presidents use…

  16. The Social and Pedagogical Protection of Orphans in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantiukhina, E. N.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the history of the provision of children's care ("prizrenie") in Russia which provides evidence that the desire to help those close to one, especially orphans and the poor, was a traditional trait of the Russian national character. The system of children's welfare as it took shape over many centuries is unique in…

  17. Discursive Practices of Private Online Tutoring Websites in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozar, Olga

    2015-01-01

    A recent development in English teaching in Russia is the emergence of private online language-tutoring schools, which offer one-on-one lessons by means of audio/videoconferencing. It remains unclear: (1) how these new providers of educational services are presenting themselves to the potential learners; (2) what ideology they tend to drawn on and…

  18. Resume Writing in Russia and the Newly Independent States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Betsy; Sapp, David Alan; Sargsyan, Nelly

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the teaching of resume writing at one university in Russia and several institutions in the Newly Independent States (NIS). The authors explore challenges including variable cultural norms for written versus oral communication, severe financial and material hardship in the educational sector, cultural discomfort with the norms…

  19. Discursive Practices of Private Online Tutoring Websites in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozar, Olga

    2015-01-01

    A recent development in English teaching in Russia is the emergence of private online language-tutoring schools, which offer one-on-one lessons by means of audio/videoconferencing. It remains unclear: (1) how these new providers of educational services are presenting themselves to the potential learners; (2) what ideology they tend to drawn on and…

  20. Autocrats and Academics. Education, Culture, and Society in Tsarist Russia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, James C.

    A sociointellectual profile is presented of the academic intelligentsia in tsarist Russia, including statistics that demonstrate the uniqueness of the educational structure and provide a basis for comparison with other national systems. The evolution of Russian educational institutions is shown to offer insight into the ways in which institutions…

  1. The Problem of Engineering Creativity in Russia: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukushkin, Sergey; Churlyaeva, Natalya

    2012-01-01

    The problem of technological creativity in Russia is briefly discussed. Special attention is paid to the development of indigenous engineering corpus in unfavourable conditions and some reasons for engineers' low creativity are revealed. The Soviet system of engineering higher education (HE) is criticised as not focused on fostering creative…

  2. The New Universities of Russia: Problems and Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiroi, V. N.

    2011-01-01

    Russian universities do poorly in international rankings, and this will hurt Russia's ability to compete successfully in the global market. One way in which to try to improve this situation is to create new universities by merging institutions and organize them in innovative ways to become more efficient and effective. [This article was translated…

  3. Educational Changes in Russia. Bulletin, 1919, No. 37

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bach, Theresa

    1919-01-01

    In the press reports bearing upon conditions in Russia since the outbreak or the revolution in March, 1917, little mention has been made of the tremendous changes that have shaken the entire educational system in that country. One needs only read "Vyestnik Vremennavo Pravitelstva" ("Messenger of the Provisional Government"),…

  4. Needs Assessment for Health Care Management Education in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rekhter, Natalia; Togunov, Igor A.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: For more than 70 years, health care management in the Soviet Union reflected a centralized directive style familiar to the Soviet political system. Market-oriented reform in post-Soviet Russia is pushing practicing physicians and physician-executives to acquire new information and skills regarding health care management. To assist…

  5. Responses to Agrarian Reforms in Russia: Evidence from Novosibirsk Oblast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davydova, Irina; Franks, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    Interviews with Directors of restructured collective farms, private farmers, Rural Development Officers, and Agricultural specialists in the Administration from Suzun raion, Novosibirsk oblast, central Russia revealed a regional response to recent agrarian reforms. Distinct differences emerged between the objectives of the restructured collective…

  6. In Russia, Corruption Plagues the Higher-Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemtsova, Anna

    2008-01-01

    From the top down, says the writer, Russia's universities are impoverished by bribery and insider deals large and small. A new president's dorm at Nizhniy Novgorod is one example of what anti-corruption watchdogs say is widespread mismanagement, and in some cases outright corruption, throughout the country's higher-education system. Presidents use…

  7. English Language Teaching Profile: Central African Republic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Council, London (England). English-Teaching Information Centre.

    This profile in outline form of the English language teaching situation in the Central African Republic discusses the role of English and English within the educational system. While French is the official language and Sango is the national language, English is taught in all secondary schools, is used as the medium of instruction in the University…

  8. Teacher Training in the Czech Republic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delamere, Patricia

    This paper describes the procedures for developing and delivering a training program designed to enhance the language ability and teacher training skills of lead teachers of English in the Czech Republic. The described program was funded by PHARE, a European Commission funding source dedicated to strengthening and enhancing the skills, knowledge,…

  9. LANDSAT activities in the Republic of Zaire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilunga, S.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of the LANDSAT data utilization program of the Republic of Zaire is presented. The program emphasizes topics of economic significance to the national development program of Zaire: (1) agricultural land use capability analysis, including evaluation of the effects of large-scale burnings; (2) mineral resources evaluation; and (3) production of mapping materials for poorly covered regions.

  10. Private Supplementary Tutoring in the Czech Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Štastný, Vít

    2016-01-01

    The study contributes to the literature on private supplementary tutoring by shedding light on this phenomenon in the Czech Republic. The aim of the paper is to identify the reasons for seeking out private supplementary tutoring and to assess the factors underlying its demand. In the representative sample of 1,265 senior upper-secondary school…

  11. Cryptosporidium from Palawan, Republic of the Philippines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    PALAWAN, REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES Mare A. Laxer* Alberto K. Alcantara* Marivyl Javato-Laxer" Mene D. Cui* Renato A. Leano* Soiedad Bautista* Natividad ...Marivyl Javato-Laxer, Mere D. Cui, Renato A. Leano, Soledad Bautista, Natividad Rami To, ressie L. Gavina 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVFRED 114 DATE OF

  12. Private Supplementary Tutoring in the Czech Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Štastný, Vít

    2016-01-01

    The study contributes to the literature on private supplementary tutoring by shedding light on this phenomenon in the Czech Republic. The aim of the paper is to identify the reasons for seeking out private supplementary tutoring and to assess the factors underlying its demand. In the representative sample of 1,265 senior upper-secondary school…

  13. Gravimetric maps of the Central African Republic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albouy, J.; Godivier, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Gravimetric maps of the Central African Republic are described including a map of Bouguer anomalies at 1/1,000,000 in two sections (eastern sheet, western sheet) and a map, in color, of Bouguer anomalies at 1/2,000,000. Instrumentation, data acquisition, calibration, and data correction procedures are discussed.

  14. OECD Reviews of School Resources: Slovak Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Paulo; Halász, Gábor; Levacic, Rosalind; Shewbridge, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This report for the Slovak Republic forms part of the OECD Review of Policies to Improve the Effectiveness of Resource Use in Schools. The purpose of the Review is to explore how school resources can be governed, distributed, utilised and managed to improve the quality, equity and efficiency of school education. School resources are understood in…

  15. Education in the Republic of China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education, Taipei (Taiwan).

    This document describes in detail the history and structure of the Republic of China's educational system. Section 1 includes charts detailing school density and changes in school population since 1950. Section 2 addresses the aim of education and its legal background. Section 3 presents a synopsis of current school regulations at all levels.…

  16. The People's Republic of China: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Excerpted from The People's Republic of China,'' No. 4 in the Issues in United States Foreign Policy series, the material discusses (1) Profile, (2) Customs, Etiquette, and Rhetoric, (3) Women in the P.R.C., (4) Cuisine, (5) Medicine and Health, (6) Education, (7) Language, and (8) Communes and Agriculture. (JB)

  17. Ritual Kinship in a Dominican Republic Plantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alum, Rolando A., II

    This paper presents an anthropological description of "compadrazgo" (cogodparenthood) as a sociocultural institution in a state owned sugar cane plantation in the southeastern part of the Dominican Republic. The enthnohistory of the compadrazgo cultural complex is outlined and the institution's roots in ancient Europe before its…

  18. English Teaching Profile: Yemen Arab Republic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Council, London (England). English Language and Literature Div.

    A description of the role and status of the English language in the Yemen Arab Republic begins with a general statement concerning the distribution of English speakers and the use of English language materials. Subsequent sections outline: (1) the use and status of English within the educational system at all levels, including teacher education;…

  19. Medical ethics in the German Democratic Republic.

    PubMed

    Luther, E

    1989-06-01

    Medical ethics has been developing in the German Democratic Republic (GDR) since the 1970's on the basis of the traditional ethics of physicians and the socio-economic fundamentals of our socialist state. Medical care provided in the framework of Marxist-Leninist medical ethics is based on rationality and humanity.

  20. English Teaching Profile: Yemen Arab Republic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Council, London (England). English Language and Literature Div.

    A description of the role and status of the English language in the Yemen Arab Republic begins with a general statement concerning the distribution of English speakers and the use of English language materials. Subsequent sections outline: (1) the use and status of English within the educational system at all levels, including teacher education;…

  1. Interpretive Challenges in the Dominican Republic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Clinton L.

    1984-01-01

    Addresses challenges facing many developing countries in establishing and maintaining a comprehensive natural resource management policy when environmental conservation takes a back seat to agricultural production. Examines current environmental education and interpretation efforts in the Dominican Republic and offers suggestions for developing an…

  2. Education in the Republic of China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education, Taipei (Taiwan).

    This document describes in detail the history and structure of the Republic of China's educational system. Section 1 includes charts detailing school density and changes in school population since 1950. Section 2 addresses the aim of education and its legal background. Section 3 presents a synopsis of current school regulations at all levels.…

  3. OECD Reviews of School Resources: Slovak Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Paulo; Halász, Gábor; Levacic, Rosalind; Shewbridge, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This report for the Slovak Republic forms part of the OECD Review of Policies to Improve the Effectiveness of Resource Use in Schools. The purpose of the Review is to explore how school resources can be governed, distributed, utilised and managed to improve the quality, equity and efficiency of school education. School resources are understood in…

  4. Fraction of stroke mortality attributable to alcohol consumption in Russia.

    PubMed

    Y E, Razvodovsky

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is an international health problem with high associated human and economic costs. The mortality rate from stroke in Russia is one of the highest in the world. Risk factors identification is therefore a high priority from the public health perspective. Epidemiological evidence suggests that binge drinking is an important determinant of high stroke mortality rate in Russia. The aim of the present study was to estimate the premature stroke mortality attributable to alcohol abuse in Russia on the basis of aggregate-level data of stroke mortality and alcohol consumption. Age-standardized sex-specific male and female stroke mortality data for the period 1980-2005 and data on overall alcohol consumption were analyzed by means ARIMA time series analysis. The results of the analysis suggest that 26.8% of all male stroke deaths and 18.4% female stroke deaths in Russia could be attributed to alcohol. The estimated alcohol-attributable fraction for men ranged from 16.2% (75+ age group) to 57,5% (30-44 age group) and for women from 21.7% (60-74 age group) and 43.5% (30- 44 age group). The outcomes of this study provide support for the hypothesis that alcohol is an important contributor to the high stroke mortality rate in Russian Federation. Therefore prevention of alcohol-attributable harm should be a major public health priority in Russia. Given the distribution of alcohol-related stroke deaths, interventions should be focused on the young and middle-aged men and women.

  5. Black carbon emissions in Russia: A critical review

    DOE PAGES

    Evans, Meredydd; Kholod, Nazar; Kuklinski, Teresa; ...

    2017-05-18

    Here, this study presents a comprehensive review of estimated black carbon (BC) emissions in Russia from a range of studies. Russia has an important role regarding BC emissions given the extent of its territory above the Arctic Circle, where BC emissions have a particularly pronounced effect on the climate. We assess underlying methodologies and data sources for each major emissions source based on their level of detail, accuracy and extent to which they represent current conditions. We then present reference values for each major emissions source. In the case of flaring, the study presents new estimates drawing on data onmore » Russia's associated petroleum gas and the most recent satellite data on flaring. We also present estimates of organic carbon (OC) for each source, either based on the reference studies or from our own calculations. In addition, the study provides uncertainty estimates for each source. Total BC emissions are estimated at 688 Gg in 2014, with an uncertainty range 401 Gg-1453 Gg, while OC emissions are 9224 Gg with uncertainty ranging between 5596 Gg and 14,736 Gg. Wildfires dominated and contributed about 83% of the total BC emissions: however, the effect on radiative forcing is mitigated in part by OC emissions. We also present an adjusted estimate of Arctic forcing from Russia's BC and OC emissions. In recent years, Russia has pursued policies to reduce flaring and limit particulate emissions from on-road transport, both of which appear to significantly contribute to the lower emissions and forcing values found in this study.« less

  6. Nesting ecology of Spectacled Eiders Somateria fischeri on the Indigirka River Delta, Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, John M.; Esler, Daniel; Degtyarev, Andrei G.

    1998-01-01

    In 1994 and 1995 we investigated breeding biology and nest site habitat of Spectacled Eiders on two study areas within the coastal fringe of the Indigirka River Delta, Russia (71°20' N, 150°20' E). Spectacled Eiders were first observed on 6 June in both years and nesting commenced by mid-June. Average clutch size declined with later nest initiation dates by 0.10 eggs per day; clutches were larger in 1994 than 1995 and were slightly larger on a coastal island study area compared to an interior area. Nesting success varied substantially between years, with estimates of 1.6% in 1994 and 27.6% in 1995. Total egg loss, through avian or mammalian predation, occurred more frequently than partial egg loss. Partial egg loss was detected in 16 nests and appeared unrelated to nest initiation date or clutch size. We found no difference among survival rates of nests visited weekly, biweekly, and those at which the hen was never flushed, suggesting that researcher presence did not adversely affect nesting success. A comparison of nine habitat variables within each study area revealed little difference between nest sites and a comparable number of randomly located sites, leading us to conclude that Spectacled Eiders nest randomly with respect to most small scale habitat features. We propose that large scale landscape features are more important indicators of nesting habitat as they may afford greater protection from land-based predators, such as the Arctic Fox. Demographic data collected during this study, along with recent conservation measures implemented by the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia), lead us to conclude that there are few threats to the Indigirka River Delta Spectacled Eider population. Presently, the Indigirka River Delta contains the largest concentration of nesting Spectacled Eiders and deserves continued monitoring and conservation.

  7. Planning, Preparation, and Transport of the High-Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel from the Czech Republic to the Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Tyacke; I. Bolshinsky; Frantisek Svitak

    2007-10-01

    The United States, Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have been working together on a program called the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program, which is part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative. The purpose of this program is to return Soviet or Russian-supplied high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel, currently stored at Russian-designed research reactors throughout the world, to Russia. In February 2003, the RRRFR Program began discussions with the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) in Rež, Czech Republic, about returning their HEU spent nuclear fuel to the Russian Federation for reprocessing. In March 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy signed a contract with NRI to perform all activities needed for transporting their HEU spent nuclear fuel to Russia. After 2 years of intense planning, preparations, and coordination at NRI and with three other countries, numerous organizations and agencies, and a Russian facility, this shipment is scheduled for completion before the end of 2007. This paper will provide a summary of activities completed for making this international shipment. This paper contains an introduction and background of the RRRFR Program and the NRI shipment project. It summarizes activities completed in preparation for the shipment, including facility preparations at NRI in Rež and FSUE “Mayak” in Ozyorsk, Russia; a new transportation cask system; regulatory approvals; transportation planning and preparation in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Ukraine, and the Russian Federation though completion of the Unified Project and Special Ecological Programs. The paper also describes fuel loading and cask preparations at NRI and final preparations/approvals for transporting the shipment across the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Ukraine, and the Russian Federation to FSUE Mayak where the HEU spent nuclear fuel will be processed, the uranium will be downblended and made into low-enriched uranium fuel for commercial reactor

  8. Kazakhstan Strategic Problems of an Emerging Republic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    thirteenth century, the Turks had estab-lished firm control over most of Central Asia. Large scale conversions of the Turkic peoples to Islam strengthened...uprising in the name of Islam in 1868. However, with their victory in 1868, Russia could at last claim full and firm control over Kazakhstan. The Russian...34 He also declared Kazakh one of the two national languages and announced that he was learning Kazakh himself. Nonetheless, feelings continued to run

  9. Republic of Botswana. Country profile.

    PubMed

    Tarver, J

    1985-08-01

    A summary of Botswana's population characteristics, population distribution, labor force characteristics, health situation, and transportation and communication facilities is provided. 87% of the country's 941,027 inhabitants live in the catchment area of the Limpopo River in the eastern region of the country. Much of the remaining area is covered by the Kalahari Desert. The population is growing at an annual rate of 3.6%, the birth rate is 50 and the total fertility rate is 6.6. The government has no official population policy. Major ethnic groups are the cattle raising Tswanas, which make up 50% of the population, the Herero, and the Basarwa, or Bushmen, of the Kalahri Desert. Urban areas are officially defined as population centers which contain 5000 or more residents and in which at least 75% of the inhabitants are engaged in nonagricultural work. According to this classification, 84% of the population is rural; however, most rural inhabitants live in agrotowns and temporarily move to outlying cattle and land posts during part of the year. Some of the agrotowns have almost 25,000 inhabitants. Major urban centers include 1) Gaborone, the capital and major administrative center, with a popualtion of 59,657; 2) Francistown, a large commercial center, with a population of 31,065; 3) Selebi-Phikwe, a mining center, populated by 29,469; and 4) Lobatse, a livestock marketing and processing center, with 19,034 residents. The urban population increased from 54,416 to 150,021 between 1971-81. The population has a young age structure. A large number of working aged males migrate temporarily to the Republic of South Africa to work in the gold mines. 37% of the economically active population is engaged in government services, 26% in mining, manufacturing, and construction, 21% in trade and finance, 6% in transportation, utilities, and communication, and 4.5% in agriculture. Only 1.3% of the land is cultivatable. The working age population is expected to double by the end of

  10. Republic of Senegal. Country profile.

    PubMed

    Gold, D

    1985-04-01

    The demographic and economic characteristics and some of the cultural traditions of the Republic of Senegal are described. Senegal obtained its independence from France in 1960. Despite the fact that the majority of the population derives its living from agriculture, the country must import additional food staples to feed its population. Conditions contributing to poor crop yields in recent years include 1) the frequent occurrence of droughts, 2) soil depletion caused by overintensive cultivation practices, and 3) land dessication caused by poor forestry management. In 1984 crop yields were only 10% of the normal crop yields. The government under the leadership of the president, Adbou Diouf, is currently developing plans to improve agricultural conditions and to encourage the industrial development of the country. The tourist industry is also growing. In 1976 Senegal conducted it 1st national census. According to the census the total population was 5,068,741 and the population growth rate was 2.6%. The US Census Bureau estimates that the population growth rate is now 3.2% and that 654,000 people were added to the population between 1976 and 1985. 27% of the population is urban, and the majority of the urban population resides in Dakar. In recent years, the rate of rural to urban migration increased rapidly as a result of the deteriorating agricultural conditions. The population is unevenly distributed throughout the country; 82% of the population lives in 39% of the country's territory. In 1977, 18% of the population lived in housing with electricity, and in 1983, 37% of the population lived in housing with running water. Most rural residents live in villages consisting of clusters of clay structures with thatched roofs and dirt floors. Most of the urban poor live in crowded shantytowns, which lack urban services. More than 1/2 of the population is under the age of 18. According to the 1978 World Fertility Survey, 83% of all women of reproductive age are married

  11. Education in the Baltic States, Ukraine, Belarus' and Russia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomiak, Janusz

    1992-01-01

    Reviews recent educational changes and issues in six republics of the former Soviet Union, including controversies over language of instruction, revision of curriculum and textbooks to eliminate Marxism and emphasize national history and culture, reappearance of religious schools and instruction, and criticisms of teacher education and teaching…

  12. Intergroup Conflict in Russia: Testing the Group Position Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minescu, Anca; Poppe, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    The group position model (Blumer 1958; Bobo and Tuan 2006) assumes that attempting to secure a privileged position for the ingroup is a main determinant of perceived intergroup conflict. This assumption is tested with survey data collected in 1999 and 2000 among eight titular groups in autonomous republics of the Russian Federation. The survey…

  13. Education in the Baltic States, Ukraine, Belarus' and Russia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomiak, Janusz

    1992-01-01

    Reviews recent educational changes and issues in six republics of the former Soviet Union, including controversies over language of instruction, revision of curriculum and textbooks to eliminate Marxism and emphasize national history and culture, reappearance of religious schools and instruction, and criticisms of teacher education and teaching…

  14. Assessment of the Potential Operational Consequences of Russia Joining NATO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    guarantee over a vast geographical distance without adding any capacity to transport NATO forces from Western...popular public support, such as Lech Walesa. The transition was also supported by domestic organizations such as the Catholic Church and the...Havel in the Czech Republic or Lech Walesa in Poland, the tension in politics increased after the dissolution of Czechoslovakia. After the Velvet

  15. NATO and Russia: Bridge-Building for the 21st Century. Report of the Working Group on NATO-Russia Relations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    rotating basis. Under the NATO-Russia Council provision for operating "at 20"-or "at N ," where " N " is the number of NATO allies plus Russia-in theory...Advisor to ISKRAN Vice President Gore David Gompert Maj.-Gen. Alexander Piskunov (reserve) President, RAND Europe Deputy Chief, General Accounting Office

  16. Women Physicists in Russia After 20 Years of Reforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, Nelli; Ermolaeva, Elena; Kunitsyna, Ekaterina; Kratasyk, Valentina; Vitman, Renata

    2009-04-01

    The process of globalization and reforms in Russia resulted in great changes in the human resources of Russian science. Feminization and stratification of Russian scientific community has occurred in physics and all sciences. Active women physicists ages 35-50 years are part of a new group of "new Russian scientists," whose expertise is in demand in Russia and abroad. But the social conditions for young mothers are not satisfactory as yet, so young women physicists with small children have great problems in their career building, though there are lots of grants for young scientists (Russian and international). The percentage of female in physics and mathematics on average is about 40%. We show the present situation for women in physics and the activities of organizations of women physicists.

  17. An Outbreak of Sheep Pox in Zabajkalskij kray of Russia.

    PubMed

    Maksyutov, R A; Gavrilova, E V; Agafonov, A P; Taranov, O S; Glotov, A G; Miheev, V N; Shchelkunov, S N; Sergeev, A N

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we investigated recent sheep pox outbreaks that occurred in Ononsky and Borzunsky regions of Zabajkalskij kray of Russia. The outbreaks involved in 2756 animals of which 112 were infected and 3 were slaughtered. Samples of injured skin of infected sheep were analysed by electron microscopy and CaPV-specific P32 gene amplification. Following sequence analysis of entire P32 gene showed that both specimens were identical to the sequence of several sheep poxvirus isolates from China and India. The close location of China to the last decade's Russian outbreaks suggest that possible future outbreaks in Russia could occur along the border regions with countries where sheep and goat pox are not controlled.

  18. CO2 fluxes at wetland ecosystems in European Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbatova, J.; Astafeva, E.; Ivanov, D.; Avilov, V.; Valentini, R.

    2012-12-01

    Peatlands are one of the main element of natural landscapes of Russia (about 10% of territory). Chamber measurements of CO2 fluxes from soil with vegetation were conducted during green seasons 2011, 2012 years in European part of Russia (Central Forest Reserve, Tver region). Two main subjects were selected for field researches: ombrotrophic bog and wet spruce forest. Our previous eddy covariance investigations in the ecosystems have allowed to determine that in common wet forest is source of CO2 for atmosphere but ombrotrophic bog is sink for CO2. Chamber measurements have evaluated net ecosystems exchange, soil respiration, photosynthesis of grass cover and their depending on environmental factors. Photosynthesis of vegetation cover on the bog is significantly more than at the forest. Variation in water level dynamics alone could significantly affect the C balance as at the bog as at the wet forest mainly through altering the decomposition rate of the organic matter accumulated in the soil profile.

  19. Elder abuse and neglect vs. parricide: a letter from Russia.

    PubMed

    Jargin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    In Russia, elder abuse is rarely discussed in the professional literature and the media. However, it is posited that parricide can be considered a form of elder abuse in Russia, as the line between elder abuse and parricide can be vague. Instances of parricide can appear trivial, hardly realized as such by victims and the social environment. Borderline cases can include involving older people in binge drinking, denying them help, and manipulating them to commit suicide. The perpetrators are often nonpsychotic, although sometimes exhibiting abnormal personality traits. Anger toward the victim can be absent on the part of the perpetrator, with their actions often driven by economic desires. A concluding point is that for better prevention of parricide and, therefore, elder abuse, it should not be considered only an unusual horrific crime committed by the mentally ill.

  20. Demonstration of a PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Trocciola; Thomas N. Pompa; Linda S. Boyd

    2004-09-01

    This project involved the installation of a 200kW PC25C{trademark} phosphoric-acid fuel cell power plant at Orgenergogaz, a Gazprom industrial site in Russia. In April 1997, a PC25C{trademark} was sold by ONSI Corporation to Orgenergogaz, a subsidiary of the Russian company ''Gazprom''. Due to instabilities in the Russian financial markets, at that time, the unit was never installed and started by Orgenergogaz. In October of 2001 International Fuel Cells (IFC), now known as UTC Fuel Cells (UTCFC), received a financial assistance award from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) entitled ''Demonstration of PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia''. Three major tasks were part of this award: the inspection of the proposed site and system, start-up assistance, and installation and operation of the powerplant.