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Sample records for kong river estuary

  1. Hong Kong at the Pearl River Estuary: A hotspot of microplastic pollution.

    PubMed

    Fok, Lincoln; Cheung, P K

    2015-10-15

    Large plastic (>5mm) and microplastic (0.315-5mm) debris were collected from 25 beaches along the Hong Kong coastline. More than 90% consisted of microplastics. Among the three groups of microplastic debris, expanded polystyrene (EPS) represented 92%, fragments represented 5%, and pellets represented 3%. The mean microplastic abundance for Hong Kong was 5595items/m(2). This number is higher than international averages, indicating that Hong Kong is a hotspot of marine plastic pollution. Microplastic abundance was significantly higher on the west coast than on the east coast, indicating that the Pearl River, which is west of Hong Kong, may be a potential source of plastic debris. The amounts of large plastic and microplastic debris of the same types (EPS and fragments) were positively correlated, suggesting that the fragmentation of large plastic material may increase the quantity of beach microplastic debris. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Integration of multi-source data for water quality classification in the Pearl River estuary and its adjacent coastal waters of Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoling; Li, Yok Shueng; Liu, Zhigang; Yin, Kedong; Li, Zhilin; Wai, Onyx WH.; King, Bruce

    2004-10-01

    The spatial patterns of water quality were studied by integrating a Landsat TM image, 58 in situ water quality datasets and 30 samples from two concentration maps of water quality parameters derived from SeaWiFS and NOAA/AVHRR images in the Pearl River estuary and the adjacent coastal waters of Hong Kong. The reflectance of TM bands 1-4 was derived by using the COST method. The normalized difference water index (NDWI) was extracted from the raw image and the threshold segmentation was used to retrieve the water pixels of spectral reflectance. In order to study the spectral reflectance categories related to water quality, a dataset comprising 88 sampling points from four spectral bands of a Landsat TM image was used. The samples were positioned according to the availability of water quality parameters in the study area, and five reflectance classes could be finally distinguished by using the cluster analysis. Three supervised classifiers, maximum likelihood (MLH), neural network (NN) and support vector machine (SVM), were employed to recognize the spatial patterns of ocean color. All the 88 samples were divided into two data sets: 65 in the training data set and 23 in the testing data set. The classification results using the three methods showed similar spatial patterns of spectral reflectance, although the classification accuracies were different. In order to verify our assumption that the spatial patterns of water quality in the coastal waters could be indirectly detected by ocean color classification using the Landsat TM image, five optically active water quality parameters: turbidity (TURB), suspended sediments (SS), total volatile solid (TVS), chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and phaeo-pigment (PHAE), were selected to implement the analysis of variance (ANOVA). The analysis showed that a statistically significant difference in water quality clearly existed among the five classes of spectral reflectance. It was concluded that the five classes classified by reflectance

  3. Influence of the Pearl River estuary and vertical mixing in Victoria Harbor on water quality in relation to eutrophication impacts in Hong Kong waters.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kedong; Harrison, Paul J

    2007-06-01

    This study presents water quality parameters such as nutrients, phytoplankton biomass and dissolved oxygen based on 11 years of water quality data in Victoria Harbor and examined how the Pearl River estuary discharge in summer and year round sewage discharge influenced these parameters. Nutrients in Victoria Harbor were strongly influenced by both the Pearl River and sewage effluent, as indicated by the high NO(3) inputs from the Pearl River in summer and higher NH(4) and PO(4) in Victoria Harbor than both its sides. N:P ratios were low in the dry season, but increased to >16:1 in the wet season, suggesting that P is potentially the most limiting nutrient in this area during the critical period in the summer. Although there were generally high nutrients, the phytoplankton biomass was not as high as one would expect in Victoria Harbor. In fact, there were high concentrations of chl near the bottom well below the photic zone. Salinity near the bottom was lower in Victoria Harbor than at the two entrances to Victoria Harbor, suggesting strong vertical mixing within Victoria Harbor. Therefore, strong vertical mixing and horizontal advection appear to play an important role in significantly reducing eutrophication impacts in Victoria Harbor. Consequently, dissolved oxygen near the bottom was low in summer, but only occasionally dipped to 2 mgL(-1) despite the high organic loading from sewage effluent.

  4. Spectral Analysis of Columbia River Estuary Currents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    D-A1i6i 689 SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF COLUMBIA RIVER ESTUARY CURRENTS 1/2 (U) ARMY E GINEER VATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKCSBURG MS HYDRAULICS LAB B...26 PART IV: ANALYSIS PROCEDURES. .................... 29 *PART V: RESULTS AND DISCUSSION .. ................. 32 Astoria Winds...45 eStation T11B..........................46 Station T12. .......................... 46 Summary of Results

  5. Historical changes in the Columbia River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Christopher R.; Jay, David A.; Bradford Harvey, R.; Hamilton, Peter; Simenstad, Charles A.

    Historical changes in the hydrology, sedimentology, and physical oceanography of the Columbia River Estuary have been evaluated with a combination of statistical, cartographic, and numerical-modelling techniques. Comparison of data digitized from US Coast and Geodetic Survey bathymetric surveys conducted in the periods 1867-1875, 1926-1937, and 1949-1958 reveals that large changes in the morphology of the estuary have been caused by navigational improvements (jetties, dredged channels, and pile dikes) and by the diking and filling of much of the wetland area. Lesser changes are attributable to natural shoaling and erosion. There has been roughly a 15% decrease in tidal prism and a net accumulation of about 68 × 10 6m 3 of sediment in the estuary. Large volumes of sediment have been eroded from the entrance region and deposited on the continental shelf and in the balance of the estuary, contributing to formation of new land. The bathymetric data indicate that, ignoring erosion at the entrance, 370 to 485 × 10 6m 3 of sediment has been deposited in the estuary since 1868 at an average rate of about 0.5 cm y -1, roughly 5 times the rate at which sea level has fallen locally since the turn of the century. Riverflow data indicate that the seasonal flow cycle of the Columbia River has been significantly altered by regulation and diversion of water for irrigation. The greatest changes have occurred in the last thirty years. Flow variability over periods greater than a month has been significantly damped and the net discharge has been slightly reduced. These changes in riverflow are too recent to be reflected in the available in the available bathymetric data. Results from a laterally averaged, multiple-channel, two-dimensional numerical flow model (described in HAMILTON, 1990) suggest that the changes in morphology and riverflow have reduced mixing, increased stratification, altered the response to fortnightly (neap-spring) changes in tidal forcing, and decreased the

  6. Temporal and spatial distribution of dissolved oxygen in the Pearl River Estuary and adjacent coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kedong; Lin, Zhifeng; Ke, Zhiyuan

    2004-10-01

    The Pearl River is one of the large rivers in the world and it discharges to the northern part of the South China Sea. There has been a concern about the deterioration of dissolved oxygen conditions in the Pearl River estuary and adjacent coastal waters. In this study, historical data on dissolved oxygen (DO) from 1980s, recent data from a summer cruise in 1999, and a 10-year time series in DO for 1990-2000 were used to examine spatial and temporal distribution of DO in the Pearl River estuary and adjacent coastal waters near Hong Kong. In the adjacent coastal waters, low oxygen waters <4 mg l-1 occurred in large areas during the summer of 1981, but DO rarely dropped to <3 mg l-1. In the Pearl River estuary, DO was 3.5-4 mg l-1 in the eastern part, but was >4 mg l-1 in the western part in August 1984. In July 1999, DO was<4 mg l-1 in a near bottom 2 m layer in a large area of the estuary and was <2.5 mg l-1 in the eastern section, just inside the entrance of the estuary. In the coastal waters adjacent to Hong Kong, DO was>4 mg l-1. The 9-year time series showed that DO decreased periodically in summer, but rarely dropped to <3 mg l-1. There was no apparent trend of decreasing DO between 1990 and 2000. Compared to August 1984, DO decreased significantly during the summer of 1999 in the Pearl River estuary, but large scale hypoxia (<2 mg l-1) was not observed. The spatial distribution of low oxygen waters may be controlled by estuarine circulation because DO was significantly correlated with salinity in the summers of 1981 and 1984. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of DO in the bottom layer was parallel to the topography of the bottom, indicating the importance of benthic consumption of DO in the sediment and the subsequent flux of low DO waters from the sediment-water interface resuspended by physical mixing. Relative to the high loading of nitrogen from the Pearl River, the present PO4 concentration is still low. It is possible that the lack of large areas of

  7. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification Ecosystem Complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Charles M.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Burke, Jennifer L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Marcoe, Keith Marcoe

    2012-01-01

    Estuarine ecosystems are controlled by a variety of processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the hierarchical nature of these processes will aid in prioritization of restoration efforts. This hierarchical Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification (henceforth "Classification") of the Columbia River estuary is a spatial database of the tidally-influenced reaches of the lower Columbia River, the tidally affected parts of its tributaries, and the landforms that make up their floodplains for the 230 kilometers between the Pacific Ocean and Bonneville Dam. This work is a collaborative effort between University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (henceforth "UW"), U.S. Geological Survey (henceforth "USGS"), and the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership (henceforth "EP"). Consideration of geomorphologic processes will improve the understanding of controlling physical factors that drive ecosystem evolution along the tidal Columbia River. The Classification is organized around six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. For Levels 4 and 5, we mapped landforms within the Holocene floodplain primarily by visual interpretation of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) topography supplemented with aerial photographs, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soils data, and historical maps. Mapped landforms are classified as to their current geomorphic function, the inferred process regime that formed them, and anthropogenic modification. Channels were classified primarily by a set of depth-based rules and geometric relationships. Classification Level 5 floodplain landforms ("geomorphic catenae") were further classified based on multivariate analysis of land-cover within the mapped landform area and attributed as "sub

  8. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification Geomorphic Catena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Charles M.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Burke, Jennifer L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Marcoe, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Estuarine ecosystems are controlled by a variety of processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the hierarchical nature of these processes will aid in prioritization of restoration efforts. This hierarchical Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification (henceforth "Classification") of the Columbia River estuary is a spatial database of the tidally-influenced reaches of the lower Columbia River, the tidally affected parts of its tributaries, and the landforms that make up their floodplains for the 230 kilometers between the Pacific Ocean and Bonneville Dam. This work is a collaborative effort between University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (henceforth "UW"), U.S. Geological Survey (henceforth "USGS"), and the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership (henceforth "EP"). Consideration of geomorphologic processes will improve the understanding of controlling physical factors that drive ecosystem evolution along the tidal Columbia River. The Classification is organized around six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. For Levels 4 and 5, we mapped landforms within the Holocene floodplain primarily by visual interpretation of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) topography supplemented with aerial photographs, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soils data, and historical maps. Mapped landforms are classified as to their current geomorphic function, the inferred process regime that formed them, and anthropogenic modification. Channels were classified primarily by a set of depth-based rules and geometric relationships. Classification Level 5 floodplain landforms ("geomorphic catenae") were further classified based on multivariate analysis of land-cover within the mapped landform area and attributed as "sub

  9. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification Hydrogeomorphic Reach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Charles M.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Burke, Jennifer L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Marcoe, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Estuarine ecosystems are controlled by a variety of processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the hierarchical nature of these processes will aid in prioritization of restoration efforts. This hierarchical Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification (henceforth "Classification") of the Columbia River estuary is a spatial database of the tidally-influenced reaches of the lower Columbia River, the tidally affected parts of its tributaries, and the landforms that make up their floodplains for the 230 kilometers between the Pacific Ocean and Bonneville Dam. This work is a collaborative effort between University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (henceforth "UW"), U.S. Geological Survey (henceforth "USGS"), and the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership (henceforth "EP"). Consideration of geomorphologic processes will improve the understanding of controlling physical factors that drive ecosystem evolution along the tidal Columbia River. The Classification is organized around six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. For Levels 4 and 5, we mapped landforms within the Holocene floodplain primarily by visual interpretation of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) topography supplemented with aerial photographs, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soils data, and historical maps. Mapped landforms are classified as to their current geomorphic function, the inferred process regime that formed them, and anthropogenic modification. Channels were classified primarily by a set of depth-based rules and geometric relationships. Classification Level 5 floodplain landforms ("geomorphic catenae") were further classified based on multivariate analysis of land-cover within the mapped landform area and attributed as "sub

  10. Methane in surface waters of Oregon estuaries and rivers

    SciTech Connect

    de Angelis, M.A.; Lilley, M.D. )

    1987-05-01

    Methane concentrations in surface waters of Oregon rivers and estuaries were measured over a four-year period. Geographic variations in riverine CH{sub 4} were observed. Results from undisturbed forest streams indicate that rivers can contain high natural levels of CH{sub 4} not attributable to pollution. Lateral diffusion and runoff from saturated forest and fertilized agricultural soils may be important in determining methane levels in rivers. Methane concentrations in well-flushed estuaries appear to be controlled mainly by mixing between high CH{sub 4}-containing river water and low CH{sub 4}-containing seawater endmembers. Rivers and estuaries were found to be sources of methane to the atmosphere. Calculated daily fluxes to the atmosphere ranged from 1.2 to 71 mg CH{sub 4} sq m for rivers and from 0.04 to 21 mg CH{sub 4} sq m for estuarine samples. 24 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Rhenium and Molybdenum in Rivers and Estuaries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, B. D.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.

    2004-12-01

    Due to their redox-sensitive nature, the geochemical cycles of Re and Mo are linked to the global organic carbon cycle. Reducing sediments constitute a globally important sink and weathering of organic-rich sediments is responsible for a large portion of the Re and - to a lesser extent - Mo flux to the oceans (Colodner et al., 1993; Jaffe et al., 2002). Riverine concentrations of Re and Mo are a function of the river basin lithology, but are also likely to be affected by anthropogenic contributions (Colodner et al., 1995). Current estimates of global natural riverine Re flux are restricted to single analyses of four major rivers, which characterize only 23%\\ of the global freshwater flux (Colodner et al., 1993). Annual variability of Re and Mo concentrations in rivers has not been studied. A single study of Re concentrations along the salinity gradient of the Amazon shelf is suggestive of conservative mixing, but scatter in the data do not allow to exclude the possibility of Re addition in the low-salinity end of the profile (Colodner et al., 1993). Careful evaluation of samples from the Hudson River estuary using a variety of extraction techniques indicates that spike-sample equilibration was not fully achieved using commonly used methods. We have therefore developed a simple, clean and efficient method of extracting Re from filtered water samples. Our method utilizes syringe filtration, prolonged heating to achieve spike-sample equilibration, batch equilibration with TEVA resin, and extraction of Re and Mo using syringe filtration. Rhenium concentrations in the Hudson, Housatonic and Connecticut rivers are 38 pM, 6.6 pM and 14 pM, respectively, much higher than the estimated global average of 2.1 pM (Colodner et al., 1993). Molybdenum concentrations are 4.6 nM, 5.5 nM, 7.8 nM, respectively. These rivers drain basins of Precambrian basement as well as predominantly Paleozoic sediments and have been substantially urbanized. Data for a salinity profile along the

  12. Upwelling off Yangtze River estuary in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Xingang; Qiao, Fangli; Xia, Changshui; Zhu, Jianrong; Yuan, Yeli

    2006-11-01

    The mechanisms of upwelling off the Yangtze River estuary (YRE) and in the adjacent waters in boreal summer are studied using numerical modeling. First, the persistent feature of this phenomenon is confirmed using cruise observations, satellite sea surface temperature (SST), and SST climatologic data. Then, the MASNUM (Marine Science and Numerical Modeling) wave-tide-circulation coupled numerical model is employed to simulate the upwelling patterns. On the basis of the simulation, a set of numerical experiments are designed to explore the main mechanisms inducing the upwelling. The results suggest that tidal mixing plays a predominant role in inducing the upwelling. In offshore waters, strong tidal mixing results in considerable horizontal density gradient across tidal fronts. Upwelling is induced as a branch of the secondary circulation, which is stimulated by the cross-frontal density gradient. Topography also exerts profound influences on upwelling by steering bottom currents to ascend upward and regulating tidal fronts in both location and intensity. Besides the tides and topography, other dynamical factors also alter the strength of upwelling locally. The Yangtze River discharge (YRD) and Taiwan Warm Current (TWC) account partly for the upwelling off the YRE and near Zhoushan Islands, respectively. The influence of wind on upwelling is small. In the coastal waters near Zhoushan Islands, the wind forcing exerts negative influences on upwelling by weakening the encroachment of TWC onto the continental shelf, which may exceed the positive effects of Ekman pumping.

  13. Juvenile salmon usage of the Skeena River estuary.

    PubMed

    Carr-Harris, Charmaine; Gottesfeld, Allen S; Moore, Jonathan W

    2015-01-01

    Migratory salmon transit estuary habitats on their way out to the ocean but this phase of their life cycle is more poorly understood than other phases. The estuaries of large river systems in particular may support many populations and several species of salmon that originate from throughout the upstream river. The Skeena River of British Columbia, Canada, is a large river system with high salmon population- and species-level diversity. The estuary of the Skeena River is under pressure from industrial development, with two gas liquefaction terminals and a potash loading facility in various stages of environmental review processes, providing motivation for understanding the usage of the estuary by juvenile salmon. We conducted a juvenile salmonid sampling program throughout the Skeena River estuary in 2007 and 2013 to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of different species and populations of salmon. We captured six species of juvenile anadromous salmonids throughout the estuary in both years, and found that areas proposed for development support some of the highest abundances of some species of salmon. Specifically, the highest abundances of sockeye (both years), Chinook in 2007, and coho salmon in 2013 were captured in areas proposed for development. For example, juvenile sockeye salmon were 2-8 times more abundant in the proposed development areas. Genetic stock assignment demonstrated that the Chinook salmon and most of the sockeye salmon that were captured originated from throughout the Skeena watershed, while some sockeye salmon came from the Nass, Stikine, Southeast Alaska, and coastal systems on the northern and central coasts of British Columbia. These fish support extensive commercial, recreational, and First Nations fisheries throughout the Skeena River and beyond. Our results demonstrate that estuary habitats integrate species and population diversity of salmon, and that if proposed development negatively affects the salmon populations that

  14. Juvenile Salmon Usage of the Skeena River Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Carr-Harris, Charmaine; Gottesfeld, Allen S.; Moore, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    Migratory salmon transit estuary habitats on their way out to the ocean but this phase of their life cycle is more poorly understood than other phases. The estuaries of large river systems in particular may support many populations and several species of salmon that originate from throughout the upstream river. The Skeena River of British Columbia, Canada, is a large river system with high salmon population- and species-level diversity. The estuary of the Skeena River is under pressure from industrial development, with two gas liquefaction terminals and a potash loading facility in various stages of environmental review processes, providing motivation for understanding the usage of the estuary by juvenile salmon. We conducted a juvenile salmonid sampling program throughout the Skeena River estuary in 2007 and 2013 to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of different species and populations of salmon. We captured six species of juvenile anadromous salmonids throughout the estuary in both years, and found that areas proposed for development support some of the highest abundances of some species of salmon. Specifically, the highest abundances of sockeye (both years), Chinook in 2007, and coho salmon in 2013 were captured in areas proposed for development. For example, juvenile sockeye salmon were 2–8 times more abundant in the proposed development areas. Genetic stock assignment demonstrated that the Chinook salmon and most of the sockeye salmon that were captured originated from throughout the Skeena watershed, while some sockeye salmon came from the Nass, Stikine, Southeast Alaska, and coastal systems on the northern and central coasts of British Columbia. These fish support extensive commercial, recreational, and First Nations fisheries throughout the Skeena River and beyond. Our results demonstrate that estuary habitats integrate species and population diversity of salmon, and that if proposed development negatively affects the salmon populations

  15. A trophic model for the Danshuei River Estuary, a hypoxic estuary in northern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsing-Juh; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Jan, Rong-Quen; Hsieh, Hwey-Lian; Chen, Chang-Po; Hsieh, Li-Yung; Hsiao, Yi-Ting

    2007-11-01

    The estuary of the Danshuei River, a hypoxic subtropical estuary, receives a high rate of untreated sewage effluent. The Ecopath with Ecosim software system was used to construct a mass-balanced trophic model for the estuary, and network analysis was used to characterize the structure and matter flow in the food web. The estuary model was comprised of 16 compartments, and the trophic levels varied from 1.0 for primary producers and detritus to 3.0 for carnivorous and piscivorous fishes. The large organic nutrient loading from the upper reaches has resulted in detritivory being more important than herbivory in the food web. The food-chain length of the estuary was relatively short when compared with other tropical/subtropical coastal systems. The shortness of food-chain length in the estuary could be attributed to the low biomass of the top predators. Consequently, the trophic efficiencies declined sharply for higher trophic levels due to low fractions of flows to the top predators and then high fractions to detritus. The low biomass of the top predators in the estuary was likely subject to over-exploitation and/or hypoxic water. Summation of individual rate measurements for primary production and respiration yielded an estimate of -1791 g WW m(-2) year(-1), or -95 g C m(-2) year(-1), suggesting a heterotrophic ecosystem, which implies that more organic matter was consumed than was produced in the estuary.

  16. Estuary Entrance, Umpqua River, Oregon: Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Umpqua River estuary model was of the fixed-bed type, constructed to scales of 1:30 horizontally and 1:100 vertically, and reproduced the lower...28 miles of the Umpqua River and an adjoining portion of the Pacific Ocean. The model was equipped with the necessary appurtenances for accurate

  17. Trace elements and radionuclides in the Connecticut River and Amazon River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    The Connecticut River, its estuary, and the Amazon River estuary were studied to elucidate some of the processes which control river water chemistry and the flux of elements to the sea. The approach taken was to identify inputs to the Connecticut River and to investigate geochemical processes which modify the dissolved load. The form and quantity of nuclides which are in turn supplied to the estuary are altered by processes unique to that transition zone to the ocean. The Connecticut River estuary was sampled on a seasonal basis to investigate the role of the estuary in controlling the flux of elements to the sea. The knowledge gained from the Connecticut River study was applied to the quantitatively more significant Amazon River estuary. There a variety of samples were analyzed to understand the processes controlling the single greatest flux of elements to the Atlantic Ocean. The results indicate that estimates of the total flux of nuclides to the oceans can best be calculated based on groundwater inputs. Unless significant repositories for nuclides exist in the river-estuarine system, the groundwater flux of dissolved nuclides is that which will eventually be delivered to the ocean despite the reactions which were shown to occur in both rivers and estuaries. 153 references, 63 figures, 28 tables.

  18. Sediment Transport Processes In River Dominated Sub-Tropical Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DAquino, Carla; Schettini, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study is to present a comparative assessment of the largest three river dominated estuaries in the southern coast of the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil (Tubarão, Araranguá and Mampituba estuaries). The study was focused on mechanisms of transport of suspended sediments influenced by its morphologic and hydrodynamics characteristics. As shown in D'Aquino et al (2011), these estuaries share common attributes (climate and tides) and follow the basic conceptual model of fine sediment transport (presented by Toldo & Schettini (2006). However, each one has its own particularities regarding the geographical setting, land use, hypsometry, outfall, etc. The methodology used to the field measurements was the same for all estuaries, aiming at measuring the currents, water level, salinity, temperature and turbidity near the outfall for at least two complete tidal cycles (~25 hours). All the campaigns were carried on under syzygya tide conditions. During the sample collecting period, a longitudinal profile was conducted in each estuary, through acquisitions of salinity and temperature of the water column in every kilometer. In the Tubarão and Araranguá rivers estuaries, the concentration of suspended particulate matter (SPM) is mostly influenced by the periods of incoming tide, flood currents. In the Mampituba river estuary, the flocculation process was observed during the encounter of fresh and salt water in every tide entrance. It was possible to observe that the Araranguá river estuary, in what concerns the bottom SPM, responds to the variation of salinity and currents along the bottom. The Tubarão estuary presents a relation between the salinity and the bottom currents. In the Mampituba estuary no relevant correlation was found between the SPM, the salinity, and the bottom currents. Those aspects demonstrate that even sharing some characteristics there are significant differences among these estuaries. In addition, as a result of the comparative

  19. Conservation of Thane Creek and Ulhas River Estuary, India.

    PubMed

    Nikam, Vinay S; Kumar, Arun; Lalla, Kamal; Gupta, Kapil

    2009-07-01

    There has been a steady decrease in the area occupied by wetlands in creeks and estuaries adjacent urban areas due to unprecedented urban growth in coastal cities, for example, Thane Creek and Ulhas River Estuary near Mumbai, India. Urban cities serve as centres of employment and attract a large number of migrants from other places. In case of coastal cities, due to inadequate infrastructure, wastewater and solid waste are disposed of into wetlands and estuary. Discharge of sediments and solid waste into the creeks from drains and construction activities has resulted in decreased flow depth in the coastal waters of Thane Creek and Ulhas River Estuary. Various researchers have studied individual elements of Thane Creek and Ulhas River Estuary at micro level. However, a holistic approach for restoration and conservation of the creek and estuary is required. This paper presents the details of an integrated approach incorporating different conservation measures such as sewerage and sewage treatment, urban drainage management, solid waste management, mangrove plantation and dredging.

  20. 76 FR 8345 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plan Module for Columbia River Estuary Salmon and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... Plan Module for Columbia River Estuary Salmon and Steelhead AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service...; recovery plan module for Columbia River estuary salmon and steelhead. SUMMARY: NMFS announces the adoption of the Columbia River Estuary Endangered Species Act (ESA) Recovery Plan Module for Salmon...

  1. Continuous resistivity profiling data from the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, V.A.; Bratton, J.F.; Worley, C.R.; Crusius, J.; Kroeger, K.D.

    2011-01-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine its importance in nutrient delivery to the Chesapeake Bay. The Corsica River Estuary represents a coastal lowland setting typical of much of the eastern bay. An interdisciplinary U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science team conducted field operations in the lower estuary in April and May 2007. Resource managers are concerned about nutrients that are entering the estuary via SGD that may be contributing to eutrophication, harmful algal blooms, and fish kills. Techniques employed in the study included continuous resistivity profiling (CRP), piezometer sampling of submarine groundwater, and collection of a time series of radon tracer activity in surface water. A CRP system measures electrical resistivity of saturated subestuarine sediments to distinguish those bearing fresh water (high resistivity) from those with saline or brackish pore water (low resistivity). This report describes the collection and processing of CRP data and summarizes the results. Based on a grid of 67.6 kilometers of CRP data, low-salinity (high-resistivity) groundwater extended approximately 50-400 meters offshore from estuary shorelines at depths of 5 to >12 meters below the sediment surface, likely beneath a confining unit. A band of low-resistivity sediment detected along the axis of the estuary indicated the presence of a filled paleochannel containing brackish groundwater. The meandering paleochannel likely incised through the confining unit during periods of lower sea level, allowing the low-salinity groundwater plumes originating from land to mix with brackish subestuarine groundwater along the channel margins and to discharge. A better understanding of the spatial variability and geological controls of submarine groundwater flow beneath the Corsica River Estuary could lead to improved models and mitigation strategies for nutrient over-enrichment in the

  2. Anthropogenic tritium in the Loire River estuary, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péron, O.; Gégout, C.; Reeves, B.; Rousseau, G.; Montavon, G.; Landesman, C.

    2016-12-01

    This work is carried out in the frame of a radioecological monitoring of anthropogenic tritium from upstream and downstream of several nuclear power plants along the Loire River to its estuary. This paper studies the variation of anthropogenic tritium species in the Loire River system from upstream to the mouth of the estuary. Tritiated water (HTO and HTO in sediment pore water) and organically bound tritium (OBT) forms were analysed after dedicated pre-treatments. The collected environmental samples consist in (i) surface-sediment and core samples from the river floor, (ii) surface and water column samples. A maximum 3H activity concentration of 26 ± 3 Bq·L- 1 in the Loire River estuary is obtained whereas an environmental background level around 1 Bq·L- 1 is determined for a non influenced continental area by anthropogenic activities. The European follow-up indicator used as a screening value is 100 Bq·L- 1. The conservative tritium behaviour was used in order to characterize the tidal regime and river flow influences in the mixing zone of the Loire River estuary. Furthermore, OBT levels and total organically carbon (TOC) content are explored. Finally, ratios of OBT relative to HTO in sediment pore water in surface-sediment and core samples are also discussed.

  3. Potential intertidal habitat restoration sites in the Duwamish River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, C.D.

    1991-12-01

    Restoration of wetland habitats in highly urbanized areas is generally constrained by scarcity of opportunity, adverse impacts of surrounding land use, and cost. Although areal wetland losses approach 98% in Seattle's Duwamish River estuary, the system continues to support important salmonid runs, as well as a variety of bird and mammal species. Estuarine-dependent organisms are likely limited by quality and quantity of intertidal habitat in the system. Because the long-range, estuary-wide benefit of site-specific mitigation and restoration projects is limited, it is imperative to develop estuary-wide restoration plans. Towards this end, an inventory and analysis of potential intertidal habitat restoration sites has been completed for the Duwamish River estuary. Twenty-four sites, ranging in size from 0.8 to 25 acres were identified and comparative functional potential assessed. The majority of these sites (18) occur in the upper estuary. Two sites are located in Elliott Bay, and four are located near the historic mouth of the river in the vicinity of Harbor Island. Spatial data have been developed in geographic information system (GIS) format. Other site-specific data relative to habitat restoration has also been assembled.

  4. Invasion by stages in the St Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The St. Louis River estuary is recognized as an invasive species “hotspot” - the harbor ranks among the top locations in the Great Lakes reporting the first occurrence of new, aquatic non-native species. To date, 18 non-native benthic invertebrate, 4 non-native crusta...

  5. Phenology of larval fish in the St. Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little work has been done on the phenology of fish larvae in Great Lakes coastal wetlands. As part of an aquatic invasive species early detection study, we conducted larval fish surveys in the St. Louis River estuary (SLRE) in 2012 and 2013. Using multiple gears in a spatially ba...

  6. Larval fish distribution in the St. Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective was to determine what study design, environmental, and habitat variables contribute to the distribution and abundance of larval fish in the St. Louis River estuary. Larval fish habitat associations are poorly understood in Great Lakes coastal wetlands, yet critical ...

  7. Phenology of larval fish in the St. Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little work has been done on the phenology of fish larvae in Great Lakes coastal wetlands. As part of an aquatic invasive species early detection study, we conducted larval fish surveys in the St. Louis River estuary (SLRE) in 2012 and 2013. Using multiple gears in a spatially ba...

  8. Invasion by stages in the St Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The St. Louis River estuary is recognized as an invasive species “hotspot” - the harbor ranks among the top locations in the Great Lakes reporting the first occurrence of new, aquatic non-native species. To date, 18 non-native benthic invertebrate, 4 non-native crusta...

  9. Larval fish distribution in the St. Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective was to determine what study design, environmental, and habitat variables contribute to the distribution and abundance of larval fish in the St. Louis River estuary. Larval fish habitat associations are poorly understood in Great Lakes coastal wetlands, yet critical ...

  10. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification — Concept and application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simenstad, Charles A.; Burke, Jennifer L.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Cannon, Charles; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Waite, Ian R.; Counihan, Timothy D.; Jones, Krista L.

    2011-01-01

    This document describes the concept, organization, and application of a hierarchical ecosystem classification that integrates saline and tidal freshwater reaches of estuaries in order to characterize the ecosystems of large flood plain rivers that are strongly influenced by riverine and estuarine hydrology. We illustrate the classification by applying it to the Columbia River estuary (Oregon-Washington, USA), a system that extends about 233 river kilometers (rkm) inland from the Pacific Ocean. More than three-quarters of this length is tidal freshwater. The Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification ("Classification") is based on six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. We define and map Levels 1-3 for the entire Columbia River estuary with existing geospatial datasets, and provide examples of Levels 4-6 for one hydrogeomorphic reach. In particular, three levels of the Classification capture the scales and categories of ecosystem structure and processes that are most tractable to estuarine research, monitoring, and management. These three levels are the (1) eight hydrogeomorphic reaches that embody the formative geologic and tectonic processes that created the existing estuarine landscape and encompass the influence of the resulting physiography on interactions between fluvial and tidal hydrology and geomorphology across 230 kilometers (km) of estuary, (2) more than 15 ecosystem complexes composed of broad landforms created predominantly by geologic processes during the Holocene, and (3) more than 25 geomorphic catenae embedded within ecosystem complexes that represent distinct geomorphic landforms, structures, ecosystems, and habitats, and components of the estuarine landscape most likely to change over short time periods.

  11. Energetics and sedimentary processes in the Columbia River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jay, David A.; Giese, Benjamin S.; Sherwood, Christopher R.

    The Columbia River Estuary is an energetic, sand-bedded system. Mixed tides with a spring tidal range of about 3.6m and a large freshwater discharge produce bottom shear stresses capable of transporting nearly all the sizes of sediment present in the estuary. As a result, the morphology of the estuary is closely related to the fluxes of tidal and fluvial energy. To investigate the relationship between energetics and sedimentary processes, an energy budget based on a one-dimensional harmonic tidal model was developed for the estuary-tidal river system and has been compared with the results of geological studies of the bedforms, large-scale morphology, sediment distribution, and suspended sediment field. The pattern of energy fluxes predicted by the model suggests the division of the system into three regimes: a tidally dominated lower estuary, a mid-estuary energy flux divergence (EFD) minimum region, and a fluvially controlled, tidal-fluvial reach. Model results also show that non-linear interactions between the tidal and fluvial flows are responsible for the suppression of the tides in the tidal-fluvial reach during periods of high flow. Finally, changes in tidal amplitude at the mouth result in a less than proportionate response in tidal elevations at points inside the estuary, because the cubic dependence of dissipation on tidal amplitude damps system responses to such changes. Many features of the observed sediment transport patterns and sedimentary environments can be related to the energy budget. Most of the medium to coarse sands entering the system from the river are permanently retained within the EFD minimum. Much of this deposition takes place upstream of the limits of salinity intrusion and is not, therefore, related to baroclinic circulatory effects. Most of the fine sands and the silts and clays entering the system are not permanently retained. Some of the silts and clays are, however, temporarily retained in a turbidity maximum, whose mean position

  12. Radiocaesium distribution in the sediment of a Fukushima river estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Hiroki; Konishi, Hiromi; Nakanishi, Takahiro; Harada, Hisaya; Tsuruta, Tadahiko

    2016-04-01

    On fluvial discharge, paticulate fractions are the main carrier of radiocaesium from land to aquatic bodies such as rivers, lakes and the sea [1]. However, within river estuaries, where there is a drastic increase in salinity, fine particles generally flocculate (in the size order of several tens μm) before settling out and being deposited on the river bed [2]. In this study, we investigated the sediment records and the distribution of radiocaesium within the estuary of the Odaka river in January 2014, located approximately 17 km north of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. Based on distribution of salinity, the environment of the Odaka river is divided into three areas; the freshwater area, the estuarine marine area that was filled with saline water from surface to bottom and the brackish area between these two. Radiocaesium deposition ranged from 45 to 1070 kBq m-2 with the inventory of radiocaesium in the estuary being significantly greater in the brackish area relative to both the freshwater and estuarine marine areas. Particle size dependency of radiocaesium concentration in the sediments showed that the distribution with relatively higher concentration was expected in the brackish area. The possibility of flocculation in the brackish area will be discussed. References [1] Nagao, S., Kanamori, M., Ochiai, S., Tomihara, S., Fukushi, K., and Yamamoto, M., 2013, Biogeosciences, v. 10, no. 10, p. 6215-6223. [2] Droppo, I. G., and Ongley, E. D., 1994, Water Research, v. 28, no. 8, p. 1799-1809.

  13. Assessment of trophic status in Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baodong

    2007-07-01

    The integrated methodology for the assessment of estuarine trophic status (ASSETS), which was extended and refined from the United States National Estuarine Eutrophication Assessment (NEEA), is a multi-parameter assessment system and has been widely used in eutrophication assessment in estuarine and coastal waters. The ASSETS was applied to evaluate the trophic status of the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary, one of the largest estuaries in the world. The following main results were obtained: (i) The estuarine export potential is “moderate susceptibility” due to the “moderate” dilution potential and “moderate” flushing potential; (ii) The overall human influence (OHI) index classified the impact of nutrients in the system as “high” due to the high level of nutrient discharge by the river which channels anthropogenic impacts in the catchments to the estuarine system; (iii) The overall eutrophic condition (OEC) in the estuary was classified into the “high” category due to frequent occurrence of nuisance and toxic algal blooms in the mixing and seawater zones; (iv) Since the nutrient loadings (e.g., DIN) in the river is expected to continue to increase in the near future following the population increase and rapid economic growth throughout the drainage basin, the nutrient-related symptoms in the estuary are likely to substantially worsen, which leads to the “worsen high” category for the definition of future outlook (DFO). The combinations of the three components (i.e., OHI, OEC, and DFO) lead to an overall grade as “bad” for the trophic status in the Changjiang River estuary.

  14. Hierarchical Mapping of Landforms along the Columbia River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mapping and hierarchical classification of landforms along the Columbia River estuary provides insight into formative geologic, hydrologic, and biologic processes and their associated ecosystems, thereby aiding assessment of future trajectories and restoration approaches. The Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification includes an inventory of landforms along 230 km of riverine estuary between the Pacific Ocean and Bonneville Dam in Oregon and Washington, USA. Landforms were mapped by interpretation of lidar topography supplemented with high-resolution bathymetry, aerial photographs, soil maps, and historical maps. Groupings of landforms were assigned to formative process regimes. These landform groupings relate ecosystems to geophysical processes. Assessment of historical changes to the processes that form and maintain landforms thus has implications for the types of ecosystems that can form and persist along the estuary. The estuary was historically a complex system of channels with a floodplain dominated by extensive tidal wetlands in the lower reaches and backswamp lakes and wetlands in upper reaches. Natural levees flank most channels in the upper reaches, locally including areas of ridge and swale topography and crevasse splays that intrude into backswamps. Other Holocene process regimes affecting floodplain morphology have included volcanogenic deltas, tributary fans, eolian dunes, and landslides. Pre-Holocene landforms are locally prominent and include ancient fluvial deposits and bedrock. Historical changes to streamflow regimes, floodplain isolation, and direct anthropogenic disturbance have resulted in channel narrowing and limited the amount of floodplain that can be shaped by flowing water. Floodplain isolation has caused relative subsidence of tidal floodplains along much of the lower estuary. Most extant landforms are on trajectories strongly influenced by humans and new landforms are mostly created by humans.

  15. Large wood in the Snowy River estuary, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinwood, Jon B.; McLean, Errol J.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we report on 8 years of data collection and interpretation of large wood in the Snowy River estuary in southeastern Australia, providing quantitative data on the amount, sources, transport, decay, and geomorphic actions. No prior census data for an estuary is known to the authors despite their environmental and economic importance and the significant differences between a fluvial channel and an estuarine channel. Southeastern Australian estuaries contain a significant quantity of large wood that is derived from many sources, including river flood flows, local bank erosion, and anthropogenic sources. Wind and tide are shown to be as important as river flow in transporting and stranding large wood. Tidal action facilitates trapping of large wood on intertidal bars and shoals; but channels are wider and generally deeper, so log jams are less likely than in rivers. Estuarine large wood contributes to localised scour and accretion and hence to the modification of estuarine habitat, but in the study area it did not have large-scale impacts on the hydraulic gradients nor the geomorphology.

  16. Benthic phosphorus regeneration in the Potomac River Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callender, E.

    1982-01-01

    The flux of dissolved reactive phosphate from Potomac riverine and estuarine sediments is controlled by processes occurring at the water-sediment interface and within surficial sediment. In situ benthic fluxes (0.1 to 2.0 mmoles m-2 day-1) are generally five to ten times higher than calculated diffusive fluxes (0.020 to 0.30 mmoles m-2 day-1). The discrepancy between the two flux estimates is greatest in the transition zone (river mile 50 to 70) and is attributd to macrofaunal irrigation. Both in situ and diffusive fluxes of dissolved reactive phosphate from Potomac tidal river sediments are low while those from anoxic lower estuarine sediments are high. The net accumulation rate of phosphorus in benthic sediment exhibits an inverse pattern. Thus a large fraction of phosphorus is retained by Potomac tidal river sediments, which contain a surficial oxidized layer and oligochaete worms tolerant of low oxygen conditions, and a large fraction of phosphorus is released from anoxic lower estuary sediments. Tidal river sediment pore waters are in equilibrium with amorphous Fe (OH)3 while lower estuary pore waters are significantly undersaturated with respect to this phase. Benthic regeneration of dissolved reactive phosphorus is sufficient to supply all the phosphorus requirements for net primary production in the lower tidal river and transition-zone waters of the Potomac River Estuary. Benthic regeneration supplies approximately 25% as much phosphorus as inputs from sewage treatment plants and 10% of all phosphorus inputs to the tidal Potomac River. When all available point source phosphorus data are put into a steady-state conservation of mass model and reasonable coefficients for uptake of dissolved phosphorus, remineralization of particulate phosphorus, and sedimentation of particulate phosphorus are used in the model, a reasonably accurate simulation of dissolved and particulate phosphorus in the water column is obtained for the summer of 1980. ?? 1982 Dr W. Junk

  17. Environmental contaminants in bald eagles in the Columbia River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, R.G.; Garrett, M.G. ); Schuler, C.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Eggs, blood, and carcasses of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and fish were collected and breeding success of eagles was monitored in the Columbia River estuary, 1980-87, to determine if contaminants were having an effect on productivity. High levels of dichloro diphenyl dichloroethylene (DDE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) were found in eggs, blood from adults, and 2 eagle carcasses. Detectable levels of DDE and PCB's were found in blood of nestlings indicating they were exposed to these contaminants early in life. Increasing concentrations of DDE and PCB's with age also indicated accumulation of these contaminants. Adult eagles also had higher levels of mercury (Hg) in blood than subadults or young indicating accumulation with age. The high levels of DDE and PCB's were associated with eggshell thinning ([bar x] = 10%) and with productivity ([bar x] = 0.56 young/occupied site) that was lower than that of healthy populations (i.e., [ge]1.00 young/occupied site). DDE and PCB's had a deleterious effect on reproduction of bald eagles in the estuary. The role dioxins play in eagle reproduction remains unclear, but concentrations in eagle eggs were similar to those in laboratory studies on other species where dioxins adversely affected hatchability of eggs. Probable source of these contaminants include dredged river sediments and hydroelectric dams, and the proper management of each may reduce the amount of contaminants released into the Columbia River estuary. 46 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. Nitrogen and phosphorus budgets of the Changjiang River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang'an; Yu, Zhiming; Song, Xiuxian; Cao, Xihua; Yuan, Yongquan

    2011-07-01

    Eutrophication has emerged as a key environmental problem in Chinese coastal waters, especially in the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary. In this area, large nutrient inputs result in frequent harmful algal blooms and serious hypoxia in bottom waters. Four cruises were made in the estuary in 2006 to assess the concentration and distribution of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and phosphorus (DIP). The concentration of DIN decreased gradually in a linear relationship with salinity from the river mouth to outer waters, while DIP was relatively more dispersed. A modified box budget method was used to estimate nutrient fluxes in the estuary and its adjacent waters. Water and nutrient budgets as well as primary production and denitrification rates were estimated from the box budget model. Estimated water residence time in the estuary was about 11 d. The turbid mixing zone released 33% of DIN and 49% of DIP, while in the adjacent outer sea 17.9 mmol DIN/m2·d and 0.36 mmol DIP/m2·d were fixed. Dissolved inorganic phosphorus was imported from the deep open sea waters, supporting primary production and population growth in this zone. Net ecosystem production (NEP) was calculated at 38.2 mmol/m2·d in the outer estuary and the estimated rate (N-fixation minus denitrification) was negative (1.92 mmol/m2·d), implying that a large amount of input nitrogen was taken up by algae and recycled through denitrification in bottom water and sediment.

  19. Salinity and turbidity distributions in the Brisbane River estuary, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingying; Zhang, Hong; Lemckert, Charles

    2014-11-01

    The Brisbane River estuary (BRE) in Australia not only plays a vital role in ecosystem health, but is also of importance for people who live nearby. Comprehensive investigations, both in the short- and long-term, into the salinity and turbidity distributions in the BRE were conducted. Firstly, the analysis of numerical results revealed that the longitudinal salinity varied at approximately 0.45 and 0.61 psu/h during neap and spring tides, respectively. The turbidity stayed at a higher level and was less impacted by tide in the upper estuary, however, the water cleared up while the tide changed from flood to ebb in the mid and lower estuary. The second investigation into the seasonal variations of salinity and turbidity in the BRE was conducted, using ten-year field measurement data. A fourth-order polynomial equation was proposed, describing the longitudinal variation in salinity dilution changes as the upstream distance in the BRE during the wet and dry seasons. From the observation, the mid and upper estuaries were vertically well-mixed during both seasons, but the lower BRE was stratified, particularly during the wet season. The estuary turbidity maximum (ETM) zone was about 10 km longer during the wet season than the dry season. Particular emphasis was given to the third investigation into the use of satellite remote sensing techniques for estimation of the turbidity level in the BRE. A linear relationship between satellite observed water reflectance and surface turbidity level in the BRE was validated with an R2 of 0.75. The application of satellite-observed water reflectance therefore provided a practical solution for estimating surface turbidity levels of estuarine rivers not only under normal weather conditions, but also during flood events. The results acquired from this study are valuable for further hydrological research in the BRE and particularly prominent for immediate assessment of flood impacts.

  20. Trace elements and radionuclides in the Connecticut River and Amazon River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    The Connecticut River, its estuary and the Amazon River plume were studied to elucidate processes which control the flux of nuclides to the sea. Major ions (Ca, Mg, Na, Cl, Bicarbonate) and selected trace elements (Ra, Ba, Cu, Si) are introduced to the Connecticut River in proportion to the total dissolved load of various groundwaters. Si, Ra, and Ba are subject to removal from solution by seasonal diatom productivity; whereas the other groundwater-derived elements are found in proportion to TDS both time and space. These nuclides are released in the estuary when a portion of the Ra, Ba, and Si in riverine biogenic detritus is trapped in salt marshes and coves bordering the estuary where it redissolves and is exported to the main river channel at ebb tide. In the Amazon River estuary, the Ra and Ba are released in mid-salinity waters. Ra and Ba together with Si are subsequently removed by diatom productivity as reflected in increased Ra and Ba in the suspended particles and depleted dissolved nuclide concentrations in samples from the high productivity zone. In both the Connecticut River system and the Amazon River plume, Cu behaves conservatively; whereas the fates of Fe and Al are linked to soil-derived humic acids. Trace elements in Amazon plume sediments are found simply in proportion to the percentage of fine-grained size materials, despite low Th-228/Ra-228 mean residence times in the plume and the presence of Cs-137 in the sediment column. Estimates of the total flux of nuclides to the oceans can best be calculated on a mass balance basis using groundwater inputs. Unless significant repositories for nuclides exist in the river-estuarine system, the groundwater flux of dissolved nuclides is net flux to the ocean despite the reactions which occur in both rivers and estuaries.

  1. Trace metals in the Góta river estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielsson, Lars-Göran; Magnusson, Bertil; Westerlund, Stig; Zhang, Kerong

    1983-07-01

    The concentrations of the trace metals Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn in the Göta River estuary have been investigated. The following metal fractions have been determined: acid-leachable, dissolved, labile and particulate. The estuary represents a salt wedge type estuary and is situated in a densely populated region of Sweden. The metal concentrations found for the dissolved fraction is in the range of what can be considered as background levels for freshwater. It is difficult to evaluate any estuarine processes other than conservative mixing for Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn. The dissolved levels in the freshwater end member are Cd, 9-25 ngl -1; Cu, 1·1-1·4 μgl -1; Fe, 20-75 μg l -1: Ni, 0·7-0·9 μg l -1: Pb 0·09-0·2 μg l -1; and Zn, 6-7 μg l -1: The results from the acid-leachable fraction show that at high suspended load the particles sediment in the river mouth. The trace metal levels in this fraction are subject to large variations.

  2. The Mattole River Estuary: Restoration Efforts in a Dynamic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, D.; Liquori, M.

    2010-12-01

    Despite extensive scientific advancement integrating our understanding of hydrology, geomorphology, and ecology in recent decades, the application of restoration in the field has been slow to evolve. This presentation will highlight 20 years of restoration practices in the Mattole River Estuary and how these practices have informed our understanding of this complex system. The Mattole River Watershed is a 304 square-mile basin located near the Mendocino Triple Junction in a remote region of California known as the “The Lost Coast” for its rugged mountains and undeveloped coastline. In addition to numerous species of fish, mammals, and over 250 bird species, the Mattole Watershed is home to three Federally-listed Threatened salmonids: California Coastal Chinook salmon, Southern Oregon/Northern California Coasts coho salmon, and Northern California steelhead trout. The 64 mile-long river meets the Pacific Ocean at the northern end of the 64,000 acre King Range National Conservation Area (KRNCA), managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The watershed is dynamic, with some of the nation’s highest annual rainfall (mean = 158 cm/yr), naturally occurring steep slopes, erosive sedimentary geology, and frequent earthquakes. All of these factors have amplified the negative effects of extensive logging and associated road building between 1945 and 1970, which left a legacy of increased sediment loads and high water temperatures that have yet to recover to pre-disturbance levels, severely impairing riparian and aquatic habitats. Prior to major land disturbances, the Mattole estuary/lagoon was notable for its deep, thermally-stratified pools and numerous functioning north and south bank slough channels that flushed sediments from the river and received marine water. As flows decline in late spring, a sandbar closes off surface flow from the river to the Pacific Ocean, forming a lagoon, which persists until flows increase in the fall. Today, the estuary is poor

  3. Metals in the sediments along the Hudson River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, R.J. )

    1994-01-01

    The distribution of metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in bottom and suspended sediments from the ocean up the Hudson River estuary for 70 km were analyzed. The bottom sediments has a metal concentration maximum in the harbor. Everywhere studied, the metal concentrations in suspension are much higher than in the bottom sediments by 30 times for Cd, 20 times for Cu, and 10 to 15 times for Co, Cr, Ni, Pb, and Zn. The composition of metals in the suspended material varied along the estuary with a large metal maximum in the harbor and again in Haverstraw Bay. By standardizing toxic metal concentrations to Fe, a maximum level of pollution in New York Harbor is indicated, along with a lesser maximum in Haverstraw Bay.

  4. Sedimentary framework of the Potomac River estuary, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, Harley J.; Martin, E. Ann; Glenn, J.L.; Needell, Sally W.

    1981-01-01

    Analyses of seismic-reflection profiles, sediment cores, grab samples, and side-scan sonar records, along with previously collected borehole data, reveal the characteristics, distribution, and geologic history of the shallow strata beneath the Potomac River estuary. The lowermost strata are sediments of the Chesapeake Group (lower Miocene to lower Pleistocene) that crop out on land near the shore but are buried as much as 40 m below the floor of the estuary. The top of these sediments is an erosional unconformity that outlines the Wisconsinan valley of the Potomac River. This valley has a sinuous trend, a flat bottom, a relief of 15 to 34 m, and axial depths of 34 to 54 m below present sea level. During the Holocene transgression of sea level, the ancestral valley was filled with as much as 40 m of sandy and silty, fluvial-to-shallow estuarine sediments. The fill became the substrate for oyster bars in the upper reach and now forms most marginal slopes of the estuary. Since sea level approached its present position (2,000 to 3,000 yr ago), the main channel has become the locus of deposition for watery, gray to black clay or silty clay, and waves and currents have eroded the heterogeneous Quaternary sediments along the margins, leaving winnowed brown sand on shallow shoreline flats. Pb-210 analyses indicate that modern mud is accumulating at rates ranging from 0.16 to 1.80 cm/yr, being lowest near the mouth and increasing toward the head of the estuary. This trend reflects an increased accumulation of fine-grained fluvial sediments near the turbidity maximum, similar to that found in nearby Chesapeake Bay. The present annual accumulation of mud is about 1.54 million metric tons; the cumulative mass is 406 million metric tons.

  5. Modelling tidal energetics of the Columbia River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, B. S.; Jay, D. A.

    1989-12-01

    The Columbia River Estuary is shallow and has a mixed diurnal and semidiurnal tide, strong riverflow, broad tidal flats and variable channel cross-section. It is weakly non-linear with respect to tidal forcing, as measured by a ratio of tidal amplitude to depth. These features, common to many shallow estuaries, were incorporated into a one-dimensional harmonic transport model. The harmonic method utilizes the fact that nearly all of the energy in the system is in a few fundamental tidal frequencies, the first overtides thereof and the mean flow. This allows the representation of the flow as a series of harmonic components whose spatial variability is determined by the model. The model provides a qualitative explantation for and accurate quantitative predictions of along-channel variations in tidal properties in terms of the momentum balance. Near the mouth of the estuary, the boundary shear stress, the pressure gradient and the acceleration terms are all important in the force balance, and the tide behaves like a damped oscillator. Far upriver the pressure gradient is primarily balanced by friction at the bed and tidal wave propagation can be described as a diffusion process. Changes in the channel width in mid-estuary cause partial reflection of the tidal wave and a maximum in tidal range. This partial reflection decreases the tidal energy flux in the upstream direction. The distribution of the time averaged energy fluxes was also determined from the model. The analysis shows that there are two regions of high energy dissipation. Energy is supplied near the mouth of the estuary by the divergence of the landward flux of tidal potential energy and far upriver by the divergence of the seaward flux of fluvial potential energy. These two regions of high dissipation are separated by a region of low dissipation, the energy flux divergence minimum. This spatial division of the estuary is mirrored in the system biology and geology. It is likely that the energy flux

  6. Transport of fallout and reactor radionuclides in the drainage basin of the Hudson River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, H.J.; Linsalata, P.; Olsen, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    The transport and fate of Strontium 90, Cesium 137 and Plutonium 239, 240 in the Hudson River Estuary is discussed. Rates of radionuclide deposition and accumulation over time and space are calculated for the Hudson River watershed, estuary, and continental shelf offshore. 37 references, 7 figures, 15 tables. (ACR)

  7. Trace metals geochemistry of Bengkulu river and estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdaus, M. Lutfi; Darti, Puspa; Alwi, Wiwit; Swistoro, Eko; Sundaryono, Agus; Ruyani, Aceng

    2015-09-01

    Unique feature of Indonesian archipelago in addition to its location that settled between the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean has made Indonesian seas as important parts of the world ocean system. In contrast, research on Indonesian seas including its marine geochemistry is scarce. Research findings have proven that Indonesian seas and its characteristics, such as Indonesian throughflow, are important in the seawater thermohaline circulation that affect world's global climate. The transports of mass and heat from the Pacific into the Indian Ocean are crucial for the oceanic circulation and sea surface temperatures. It is only until recently known that water masses movement could be traced using chemical elements such as Zr and Hf. In modern ocean, sources of these chemicals are mostly from continents. Chemicals had been brought to the oceans through river, estuary, coastal and eventually open seawater. We have analyzed selected important trace metals of Bengkulu river and estuary starting from upper stream of Bengkulu River to coastal seawater of the Indian Ocean. Concentrations of trace metals in the sample were determined by inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Dissolved and labile particulate concentrations of Al, Fe, Mn, V, Sr and Zn are reported in this study.

  8. Quantifying nitrogen inputs to the Choptank River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mccarty, G.; Hapeman, C. J.; Sadeghi, A. M.; Hively, W. D.; Denver, J. M.; Lang, M. W.; Downey, P. M.; Rice, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the US, and over 50% of its streams have been rated as poor or very poor, based on the biological integrity yearly index. The Choptank River, a Bay tributary on the Delmarva Peninsula, is dominated by intensive corn and soybean farming associated with poultry and some dairy production. The Choptank River is under Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) total maximum daily load restrictions. However, reducing nonpoint source pollution contributions from agriculture requires that source predictions be improved and that mitigation and conservation measures be properly targeted. Therefore, new measurement strategies have been implemented. In-situ sensors have been deployed adjacent to US Geological Survey gauging stations in the Tuckahoe and Greensboro sub-basins of the Choptank River watershed. These sensors measure stream water concentrations of nitrate along and water quality parameters every 30 min. Initial results indicate that ~40% less nitrate is exported from the Greensboro sub-basin, even though the total amount of agricultural land use is similar to that in the Tuckahoe sub-basin. This is most likely due to more efficient nitrate processing in the Greensboro sub-basin where the amount of cropland on poorly-drained soils is much larger. Another potential nitrogen source to the Choptank River estuary is atmospheric deposition of ammonia. Over 550 million broilers are produced yearly on the Delmarva Peninsula potentially leading to the release of 20,000 Mtons of ammonia. USEPA recently estimated that as much as 22% of nitrogen in the Bay is due to ammonia deposition. We have initiated a collaborative effort within the LTAR network to increase coverage of ammonia sampling and to explore the spatial and temporal variability of ammonia, particularly in the Choptank River watershed. All these measurements will be useful in improving the handling of nitrogen sources and its fate and transport in the Chesapeake Bay model.

  9. Occurrence and distribution of dissolved tellurium in Changjiang River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaodan; Song, Jinming; Li, Xuegang

    2014-03-01

    With the implementation of the GEOTRACES program, the biogeochemical cycle and distribution of tellurium (Te) in marine environments are becoming increasing environmental concerns. In this study, the concentration of dissolved Te in the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary and nearby waters was determined in May 2009 by hydride-generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry to elucidate the abundance, dominant species, distribution, and relationship with environmental factors. Results show that: (1) dissolved Te was low owing to its low abundance in the Earth's crust, high insolubility in water, and strong affinity to particulate matter; (2) Te(IV) and Te(VI) predominated in surface water. Te(VI) was the dominant species in bottom water, and Te(IV) was the minor species; (3) Horizontally, resulting from low phytoplankton metabolism and the weak reduction from Te(VI) to Te(IV) in the shore, Te(IV) was concentrated in the central zone instead of the coastal region. However, Te(VI) was abundant near the mouth of the Changjiang River where the Changjiang water is diluted and in the area to the south where the Taiwan Warm Current invaded. In the adsorption-desorption process, Te(IV) was negatively related to suspended particulate matter (SPM), indicating that it was adsorbed by particulate matter. While for Te(VI), the positive correlation with SPM suggested that it was desorbed from the solid phase. In the estuary, dissolved Te had a negative correlation to salinity. However, it deviated from the dilution line in high-salinity regions due to the invasion of the Taiwan Warm Current and the mineralization of organic matter. The relationship between Te(IV) and SPM nutrients indicated that it was more bioavailable and more related to phosphorus than to nitrogen. Progress in the field is slow and more research is needed to quantify the input of Te to the estuary and evaluate the biochemical role of organisms.

  10. Geochemical phases of metals in Hudson River estuary sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Stamoulis, S.; Gibbs, R.J.; Menon, M.G.

    1996-08-01

    Bottom sediment samples were collected from six location along a section of the Hudson River Estuary, 5.3 to 82.7 km from the ocean. These samples were analyzed for particle and, due to the bimodal distribution of the sediment, were seperated into two size fractions, fine (<7.8 um) and coarse (7.8-62 um). These fractions were subject to a sequential chemical phase extraction procedure to differenciate the ion exchangeable, carbonate, metallic oxide coating, and organic phases. The extracted phases were analyzed with an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometer for Cd, Co, Cc, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn. Metals were found to be associated largely with fine particle-size fraction. The concentration of fine particles (especially the <2 um size mode within the fine fraction) is a crucial in influencing overall metal content. This is evidenced by strong correlations between the <2 {mu}m or clay mode and concentrations in the metallic-oxide coating phase. Various metal/metal relationships exist among the phases and fractions studied and are highlighted by strong correlations, such as Ni and Zn, and Cu and Cd. The trends associated among the metal and mud concentrations are significant in terms of assessing the bioavailability of heavy metals within the river and estuary system, and as a result, provide valuable insight into the ultimate fate of pollutants which are introduced to this unique environment. 24 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Amino acids in the Pearl River Estuary and adjacent waters: origins, transformation and degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianfang; Li, Yan; Yin, Kedong; Jin, Haiyan

    2004-10-01

    Two cruises were conducted in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) and adjacent coastal waters during July 1999 and 2000 to investigate spatial variation, transformation and degradation of amino acids (AAs). Salinity, suspended sediments (SS), chl a, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, particulate organic carbon, AAs, and hexosamines were measured and analyzed. Concentrations of particulate hydrolysable AAs (PHAAs), dissolved combined AAs and dissolved free AAs ranged from 0.41 to 12.6 μmol L-1, 1.1 to 4.0 μmol L-1 and 0.15 to 1.10 μmol L-1, respectively. AAs concentrations were low in waters of salinity <10, increased to the maximum in the estuarine and coastal plumes (salinity =10-25) and decreased beyond the coastal plume. There was a region where PHAAs were maximum, which coincided with the region of the chl a maximum and depletion of dissolved inorganic phosphorus in the coastal plume south of Hong Kong. This indicates that most of the AAs in estuarine and coastal waters were produced through phytoplankton production and AAs might be a temporary sink for inorganic nitrogen. The ratios of AAs/HAs and glucosamine/galactosamine (Glc-NH2/Gal-NH2) were on average, 26.0 and 3.8, respectively, in biogenic particulate matter (chl a >5 μg L-1 and SS<10 mg L-1), decreased in turbid particles (SS>20 mg L-1) and reached the lowest values of 5.8 and 1.4 in sediments. In particular, the ratios of AAs/HAs, Glc-NH2/Gal-NH2 were low in the upper or northwest side of the estuary where turbidity was high. This indicated that these AAs were "old", likely due to resuspension of refractory organic matter from sediments or zooplankton grazing modification and bacterial reworking as the salt wedge advanced upstream near the bottom. Apparently, the dynamics of AAs in the PRE appeared to be governed by biological production processes and estuarine circulation in the estuary. As the chl a maximum developed downstream in the estuarine and coastal plume and the salt wedge moved upstream at

  12. Subtidal sea level variability in a shallow Mississippi River deltaic estuary, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snedden, G.A.; Cable, J.E.; Wiseman, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    The relative roles of river, atmospheric, and tidal forcings on estuarine sea level variability are examined in Breton Sound, a shallow (0.7 m) deltaic estuary situated in an interdistributary basin on the Mississippi River deltaic plain. The deltaic landscape contains vegetated marshes, tidal flats, circuitous channels, and other features that frictionally dissipate waves propagating through the system. Direct forcing by local wind stress over the surface of the estuary is minimal, owing to the lack of significant fetch due to landscape features of the estuary. Atmospheric forcing occurs almost entirely through remote forcing, where alongshore winds facilitate estuary-shelf exchange through coastal Ekman convergence. The highly frictional nature of the deltaic landscape causes the estuary to act as a low-pass filter to remote atmospheric forcing, where high-frequency, coastally-induced fluctuations are significantly damped, and the damping increases with distance from the estuary mouth. During spring, when substantial quantities of controlled Mississippi River inputs (q?? = 62 m3 s-1) are discharged into the estuary, upper estuary subtidal sea levels are forced by a combination of river and remote atmospheric forcings, while river effects are less clear downestuary. During autumn (q?? = 7 m3 s-1) sea level variability throughout the estuary is governed entirely by coastal variations at the marine boundary. A frequency-dependent analytical model, previously used to describe sea level dynamics forced by local wind stress and coastal forcing in deeper, less frictional systems, is applied in the shallow Breton Sound estuary. In contrast to deeper systems where coastally-induced fluctuations exhibit little or no frictional attenuation inside the estuary, these fluctuations in the shallow Breton Sound estuary show strong frequency-dependent amplitude reductions that extend well into the subtidal frequency spectrum. ?? 2007 Estuarine Research Federation.

  13. Decadal to Millennial Sedimentation Patterns of the Hudson River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M.; McHugh, C. M.; Burckle, L.; Pekar, S.; Pereira, G.; Ryan, W. B.; Bell, R.; Carbotte, S.

    2002-12-01

    The Hudson River Estuary (HRE) is adjacent to large metropolitan areas including New York City. Understanding the variable energy conditions for transporting sediments is key to deal with environmental pollution such as the controversial burial and dredging of PCB's in the HRE. We studied sediment transport in the HRE by examining more than 150 cores and grab samples interpreted within the framework of acoustic images. The HRE sedimentary environments were defined based on quantitative estimates of grain size, sedimentary structures, bioturbation, and sedimentation rates and were divided into: channel, channel banks, subtidal flats, tributaries, and islands. Diatom assemblages were used to determine the extent of salt-water intrusion and sediment reworking in the estuary. Along a longitudinal profile, the estuary can be subdivided into: (1) sandy inner fluvial (furthest upstream), (2) muddy central portions, and (3) sandy outer marine. We classified sedimentary facies for the central and fluvial parts of the system (1 and 2). The HRE basin is nearly filled with sediment and tidal energy is focused within the channel and its banks. In the central basin where the estuary is wide (up to 4 km), flood currents are more energetic along the eastern channel bank and the ebb currents lead to minor sediment deposition on the western bank, but only where the system is out of equilibrium with its sediment load. The energy of the tides is accentuated along narrow segments of the estuary that are locally constrained by gorges of the Hudson Valley Highlands leading to erosion and the trapping of sediments. Beyond the banks of the channel, the subtidal flats that were filled with sediment by 0.5 to 3ka, are tranquil environments where the sediment is homogenized by bioturbation and reworked by waves as the estuary shallowed. Occasional high-energy events, (possibly flood-related) eroded the subtidal flats sediment as shown by rare rip-up clasts found in the cores. The inner

  14. Biogeochemistry of nutrients in an estuary affected by human activities: The Wanquan River estuary, eastern Hainan Island, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruihuan; Liu, Sumei; Zhang, Guiling; Ren, Jingling; Zhang, Jing

    2013-04-01

    Nutrient dynamics were studied in the estuary of the Wanquan River, a tropical mountainous river system of Hainan Island, China, during 2006-2009. The nutrients measured included NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, PO43-, Si(OH)4, total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), total dissolved phosphorus (TDP), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP). The Wanquan River showed great variation in nutrient levels, was enriched in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and dissolved silicate, and depleted in PO43-. The levels of dissolved silicate were higher than average for tropical systems. As a consequence the DIN:PO43- and Si(OH)4:DIN ratios were higher than the Redfield ratio. DON accounted for 18% of TDN in the Wanquan River, and DOP represented approximately 61% of TDP. Nutrients in the Wanquan River estuary behave either conservatively or nonconservatively. Nutrient biogeochemistry in the estuary is affected by human activities in adjacent areas and heavy rainfall associated with typhoons. Phosphorus may be the potential limiting nutrient for phytoplankton growth. A simple steady-state box model showed that riverine input was the major source of nutrients to the estuary, which acted as a source of all nutrients except dissolved silicate, TDP, and DOP. The results indicate that substantial quantities of nitrogen and PO43- are transported to the coastal system, and suggest that dissolved silicate accumulates in the sediment or is transformed into other forms.

  15. REE in the Great Whale River estuary, northwest Quebec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Steven J.; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    1988-01-01

    A report on REE concentrations within the estuary of the Great Whale River in northwest Quebec and in Hudson Bay is given, showing concentrations which are less than those predicted by conservative mixing of seawater and river water, indicating removal of REE from solution. REE removal is rapid, occurring primarily at salinities less than 2 percent and ranges from about 70 percent for light REE to no more than 40 percent for heavy REE. At low salinity, Fe removal is essentially complete. The shape of Fe and REE vs. salinity profiles is not consistent with a simple model of destabilization and coagulation of Fe and REE-bearing colloidal material. A linear relationship between the activity of free ion REE(3+) and pH is consistent with a simple ion-exchange model for REE removal. Surface and subsurface samples of Hudson Bay seawater show high REE and La/Yb concentrations relative to average seawater, with the subsurface sample having a Nd concentration of 100 pmol/kg and an epsilon(Nd) of -29.3; characteristics consistent with river inputs of Hudson Bay. This indicates that rivers draining the Canadian Shield are a major source of nonradiogenic Nd and REE to the Atlantic Ocean.

  16. Plutonium AMS measurements in Yangtze River estuary sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tims, S. G.; Pan, S. M.; Zhang, R.; Fifield, L. K.; Wang, Y. P.; Gao, J. H.

    2010-04-01

    The Yangtze River is the largest single source of sediment to the continental shelf of the East China Sea. The quantity of material exported by the river is expected to decrease substantially as a consequence of an extensive continuing program of dam construction within the river catchment. We report here AMS measurements of plutonium isotope concentrations and ratios for selected depth increments from a sediment core, collected from the sub-aqueous delta of the Yangtze River estuary. The Pu derives from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 1960s, and is potentially a useful tracer of sediment deposition times in the marine environment. The results show considerable structure in the depth-concentration profile, and offer an excellent opportunity to compare Pu with the more commonly used 137Cs isotopic tracer. The AMS data show superior sensitivity and indicate that the 240Pu/ 239Pu ratio can provide a check on the deposition dates. The changes in the 240Pu and 239Pu concentrations and the 240Pu/ 239Pu ratios with sediment depth all indicate the possibility of using Pu as a geochronological tool for coastal sediment studies.

  17. REE in the Great Whale River estuary, northwest Quebec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Steven J.; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    1988-01-01

    A report on REE concentrations within the estuary of the Great Whale River in northwest Quebec and in Hudson Bay is given, showing concentrations which are less than those predicted by conservative mixing of seawater and river water, indicating removal of REE from solution. REE removal is rapid, occurring primarily at salinities less than 2 percent and ranges from about 70 percent for light REE to no more than 40 percent for heavy REE. At low salinity, Fe removal is essentially complete. The shape of Fe and REE vs. salinity profiles is not consistent with a simple model of destabilization and coagulation of Fe and REE-bearing colloidal material. A linear relationship between the activity of free ion REE(3+) and pH is consistent with a simple ion-exchange model for REE removal. Surface and subsurface samples of Hudson Bay seawater show high REE and La/Yb concentrations relative to average seawater, with the subsurface sample having a Nd concentration of 100 pmol/kg and an epsilon(Nd) of -29.3; characteristics consistent with river inputs of Hudson Bay. This indicates that rivers draining the Canadian Shield are a major source of nonradiogenic Nd and REE to the Atlantic Ocean.

  18. Physical, hydrological, and biological characteristics of the Loxahatchee River estuary, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Benjamin F.; Sabanskas, Maryann; Long, William Atwood

    1982-01-01

    The Loxahatchee River estuary in southeast Florida has periodically closed and opened to the sea as a result of natural causes. In the last 30 years, the estuary has remained open only by dredging. Activities of man in the estuary and basin affect freshwater and tidal flow which in turn affect bathymetry, bottom sediment, and biota. Under present conditions, tidal flow is much larger than freshwater inflow. (USGS)

  19. Hydrobiological characteristics of Shark River estuary, Everglades National Park, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, B.F.

    1970-01-01

    Water quality in the Shark River estuary was strongly influenced by seasonal patterns of rainfall, water level and temperature. During the rainy season (summer and early fall) the salinity in the 20-mile long estuary ranged from that of fresh water to half that of sea water while concentrations of dissolved oxygen were low, 2-5 milligrams per liter (mg/l) presumably because, among other factors, microbial activity and respiration were accelerated by high temperatures (30-33 degrees C). During the dry season (late fall through spring) the salinity ranged from 18 grams per liter (g/l) in the headwaters to 36 g/l at the Gulf during a dry year such as 1967 and from 1 to 25 g/l during a wet year such as 1969. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen increased from 2-3 mg/l in the summer of 1967 to 4-7 mg/l in the winter of 1968, and temperature decreased from an average of about 30 degrees C in summer to 20 degrees C in winter. Water level declined 5 to 10 decimeters in the headwaters during the dry season, and salinity and tidal action increased. Large amounts of submerged vegetation died in some headwater creeks at the end of the dry season, presumably killed by salinities above 3 g/l. The decaying organic matter and the decrease in photosynthesis resulted in low dissolved oxygen (1-2 mg/l). Fish died at this time probably as a result of the low dissolved oxygen. Trace elements, heavy metals and insecticides occurred in the waters of the estuary in concentrations below those indicated as harmful for aquatic life by current standards established by the Federal Water Pollution Control Administration (1968). The insecticides detected were concentrated in sediment and in various organisms. The patterns of distribution of planktonic and small nektonic animals in the estuary were related to salinity. Copepods (Arcatia tonsa, Labidocera aestiva, Pseudodiaptomus coronatus), cumaceans (Cyclaspis sp.), chaetognaths (Sagitta hispida), bay anchovies (Anchoa mitchilli), and scaled

  20. Statistical modeling and trend detection of extreme sea level records in the Pearl River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiwen; Zhou, Wen

    2017-03-01

    Sea level rise has become an important issue in global climate change studies. This study investigates trends in sea level records, particularly extreme records, in the Pearl River Estuary, using measurements from two tide gauge stations in Macau and Hong Kong. Extremes in the original sea level records (daily higher high water heights) and in tidal residuals with and without the 18.6-year nodal modulation are investigated separately. Thresholds for defining extreme sea levels are calibrated based on extreme value theory. Extreme events are then modeled by peaks-over-threshold models. The model applied to extremes in original sea level records does not include modeling of their durations, while a geometric distribution is added to model the duration of extremes in tidal residuals. Realistic modeling results are recommended in all stationary models. Parametric trends of extreme sea level records are then introduced to nonstationary models through a generalized linear model framework. The result shows that, in recent decades, since the 1960s, no significant trends can be found in any type of extreme at any station, which may be related to a reduction in the influence of tropical cyclones in the region. For the longer-term record since the 1920s at Macau, a regime shift of tidal amplitudes around the 1970s may partially explain the diverse trend of extremes in original sea level records and tidal residuals.

  1. Modelling salinity and circulation for the Columbia River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Peter

    Simulations of the time and depth-dependent salinity and current fields of the Columbia River Estuary have been performed using a multi-channel, laterally averaged estuary model. The study simulated two periods. The first, in October 1980, with low riverflow of about 4,000m 3s -1, which showed marked changes in the salinity intrusion processes between neap and spring tides; and second, in spring 1981, with high riverflow varying between 7,000 and 15,000m 3s -1, which showed the rapid response of the salinity intrusion to changes in riverflow and that vertical mixing did not change character with increasing tidal energy because of the maintenance of stratification by freshwater flow. An extreme low flow simulation (riverflow of 2,000m 3s -1) showed a more partially mixed character of the estuary channels with tidal dispersion of salt across the Taylor Sands from the North Channel to the upper reaches of the Navigation Channel. Asymmetries in the non-linear tidal mean flows, in the flood and ebb circulations, and salinity intrusion characteristics between the two major channels were observed at all riverflows. The model confirms JAY and SMITH's (1990) analysis of the circulation processes in that tidal advection of salt by the vertically sheared tidal currents is the dominant mechanism by which the salinity intrusion is maintained against large freshwater flows. An accurate finite-difference method, which minimized numerical dispersion, was used for the advection terms and was an important component in reasonably simulating the October neap-spring differences in the salinity intrusion. The simulations compare favorably with elevation, current and salinity time series observations taken during October 1980 and spring 1981.

  2. Decadal changes in nutrient fluxes and environmental effects in the Jiulong River Estuary.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gaojie; Cao, Wenzhi; Huang, Zheng; Kao, Chih-Ming; Chang, Chang-Tang; Chiang, Pen-Chi; Wang, Feifei

    2017-02-04

    Estuaries are areas of both freshwater and seawater that are partially enclosed with contact to the open sea and a flow of fresh water. Although the Jiulong River Estuary has a relatively small catchment, this area was found to exhibit high nutrient fluxes. The nutrient fluxes showed obvious fluctuations for different years. The Jiulong River Estuary was predominantly P-limited, and was slowly moving towards higher DIN:DIP and DSi:DIP ratios as the nitrate concentrations increased. The high nutrient fluxes into the estuary may affect estuarine ecosystems by the alteration of DO concentrations in bottom waters, causing harm to benthic fauna due to a lack of oxygen, triggering algal blooms. Additionally, the Jiulong River Estuary was slowly moving towards lower DSi:DIN and DSi:DIP ratios along with the change of time scales, which caused nutrient limitation of phytoplankton growth as P and Si levels decreased and became more limiting.

  3. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Tortorici, Cathy; Yerxa, Tracey; Leary, J.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-02-05

    The purpose ofthis document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision-making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows. 1. Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. 2. Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. 3. Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. 4. Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. 5. Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. In conclusion, the estuary RME effort is designed to meet the research and monitoring needs of the estuary Program using an adaptive management process. Estuary RME's success and usefulness will depend on the actual conduct of adaptive management, as embodied in the objectives, implrementation, data, reporting, and synthesis, evaluation, and decision-making described herein.

  4. Hydrodynamic and Salinity Intrusion Model in Selangor River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haron, N. F.; Tahir, W.

    2016-07-01

    A multi-dimensional hydrodynamic and transport model has been used to develop the hydrodynamic and salinity intrusion model for Selangor River Estuary. Delft3D-FLOW was applied to the study area using a curvilinear, boundary fitted grid. External boundary forces included ocean water level, salinity, and stream flow. The hydrodynamic and salinity transport used for the simulation was calibrated and confirmed using data on November 2005 and from May to June 2014. A 13-day period for November 2005 data and a 6-day period of May to June 2014 data were chosen as the calibration and confirmation period because of the availability of data from the field-monitoring program conducted. From the calibration results, it shows that the model was well suited to predict the hydrodynamic and salinity intrusion characteristics of the study area.

  5. Identifying nearshore groundwater and river hydrochemical variables influencing water quality of Kaoping River Estuary using dynamic factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yi-Ming; Jang, Cheng-Shin; Yu, Hwa-Lung; Chen, Su-Chin; Chu, Hone-Jay

    2013-04-01

    SummaryThe Kaoping River Estuary receives a large amount of nonpoint source pollution and sedimentary discharge from the Kaoping and Tungkang Rivers each year. The Kaoping River Estuary is an integral part of the Kaoping River, shelf, and submarine canyon, which makes prediction of water quality variation difficult. This study attempts to determine the main factors regulating temporal and spatial variations in the water quality in the Kaoping River Estuary over a 9-year period (2003-2011), using dynamic factor analysis (DFA) and min/max autocorrelation factor analysis (MAFA). The result from the MAFA shows that Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) has the highest canonical correlation coefficient with the min/max autocorrelation factor (MAF) axis of water quality. Therefore, Chl-a can be used as an indicator of water quality in the Kaoping River Estuary. The water quality and environmental variables measured downstream of the Kaoping and Tungkang Rivers, as well as submarine groundwater, influence temporal variations of Chl-a in the estuary. The optimal DFA model successfully described Chl-a variations (coefficient of efficiency = 0.969) in the Kaoping River Estuary. DFA results indicate that dissolved oxygen (DO), total suspended sediment (TSS), dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), chemical oxygen demand (COD), as well as the biological oxygen demand (BOD) of river discharge, and the ammonium-nitrogen (NH4-N) concentration of groundwater discharge significantly influenced Chl-a dynamics. Submarine groundwater discharge, which is a significant source of nutrients for the coastal ocean, appears to impact the level of Chl-a concentration substantially. Understanding the relationship between environmental variables and the variability of Chl-a concentration provides a useful approach for setting water quality criteria and pollution prevention plans for the Kaoping River Estuary.

  6. Comparison of common persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in flounder (Platichthys flesus) from the Vistula (Poland) and Douro (Portugal) River estuaries.

    PubMed

    Waszak, Ilona; Dabrowska, Henryka; Komar-Szymczak, Katarzyna

    2014-04-15

    Groups of flounder (Platichthys flesus) females were collected in 2011 from the Vistula River and the Duoro River estuaries and corresponding reference sites in the southern Baltic Sea and Portuguese coast of the Atlantic Ocean to measure and compare the levels and profiles of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The estuaries' sediments were also investigated. Several differences were found in the POPs between the estuaries and between the two marine regions, which were highlighted by PCA. The Vistula River estuary POPs, significantly higher than in the Douro River estuary, were dominated by DDTs followed by PCBs. PBDEs levels, indifferent between the estuaries, were relatively low. The POP levels in flounder and sediment evaluated against environmental assessment criteria (EACs) indicated that none of the measured contaminants for which EAC had been established exceeded the criterion, except for CB-118 in flounder from the Vistula River estuary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nutrient dynamics in mangrove areas of the Red River Estuary in Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wösten, J. H. M.; de Willigen, P.; Tri, N. H.; Lien, T. V.; Smith, S. V.

    2003-05-01

    Nutrient dynamics of mangrove in the 107 km 2 large estuary of the Red River Delta in Vietnam are studied using the existing LOICZ-CABARET budget model. The methodology and assumptions underlying this model are described. Input data for evaporation, rainfall, river discharge, and concentrations of salt, phosphorus and nitrogen are obtained during measurement campaigns in Vietnam. The calculated P-balance of the estuary together with measured data on the C/P ratio of mangroves yield a calculated mangrove biomass growth rate of 80 kg dry matter ha -1 d -1. Direct measurements of mangrove growth show a rate of 31 kg dry matter ha -1 d -1. Considering the uncertainties involved in this study where nutrient exchange with mineral particles is ignored, the nutrient budget model established for the Red River Estuary proves to give acceptable results. The model demonstrates that the mangroves in the estuary act as clear sinks of nutrients and sequester some 26 000 kg N d -1 and some 3100 kg P d -1 for their biomass production. Next the model is used in an explorative way to investigate effects of realistic future scenarios. Increasing river discharge in combination with constant or proportionally increasing river nutrient concentration results in increasing nutrient concentrations in the estuary. Increasing river discharge in combination with decreasing river nutrient concentration results in decreasing nutrient concentrations in the estuary. Constant river discharge in combination with increasing river nutrient concentration results in increasing nutrient concentrations in the estuary. The scenario analysis helps to understand the different interactions in the nutrient dynamics of the Red River mangrove area.

  8. Circulation and physical processes within the San Gabriel River Estuary during summer 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Xu, Jingping; Stein, Eric D.; Noble, Marlene A.; Gartner, Anne L.

    2007-01-01

    The Southern California Coastal Water Research Project (SCCWRP) is developing a hydrodynamic model of the SGR estuary, which is part of the comprehensive water-quality model of the SGR estuary and watershed investigated by SCCWRP and other local agencies. The hydrodynamic model will help understanding of 1) the exchange processes between the estuary and coastal ocean; 2) the circulation patterns in the estuary; 3) upstream natural runoff and the cooling discharge from PGS. Like all models, the SGR hydrodynamic model is only useful after it is fully calibrated and validated. In May 2005, SCCWRP requested the assistance of the U.S. geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology team (CMG) in collecting data on the hydrodynamic conditions in the estuary during the summer dry season. The summer was chosen for field data collection as this was assumed to be the season with the greatest potential for chronic degraded water quality due to low river flow and high thermal stratification within the estuary (due to both higher average air temperature and PGS output). Water quality can be degraded in winter as well, when higher river discharge events bring large volumes of water from the Los Angeles basin into the estuary. The objectives of this project were to 1) collect hydrodynamic data along the SGR estuary; 2) study exchange processes within the estuary through analysis of the hydrodynamic data; and 3) provide field data for model calibration and validation. As the data only exist for the summer season, the results herein only apply to summer conditions.

  9. Concentrations, loads, and sources of polychlorinated biphenyls, Neponset River and Neponset River Estuary, eastern Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breault, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are known to contaminate the Neponset River, which flows through parts of Boston, Massachusetts, and empties into the Neponset River Estuary, an important fish-spawning area. The river is dammed and impassable to fish. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Fish and Game, Division of Ecological Restoration, Riverways Program, collected, analyzed, and interpreted PCB data from bottom-sediment, water, and (or) fish-tissue samples in 2002, 2004-2006. Samples from the Neponset River and Neponset River Estuary were analyzed for 209 PCB congeners, PCB homologs, and Aroclors. In order to better assess the overall health quality of river-bottom sediments, sediment samples were also tested for concentrations of 31 elements. PCB concentrations measured in the top layers of bottom sediment ranged from 28 nanograms per gram (ng/g) just upstream of the Mother Brook confluence to 24,900 ng/g measured in Mother Brook. Concentrations of elements in bottom sediment were generally higher than background concentrations and higher than levels considered toxic to benthic organisms according to freshwater sediment-quality guidelines defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Concentrations of dissolved PCBs in water samples collected from the Neponset River (May 13, 2005 to April 28, 2006) averaged about 9.2 nanograms per liter (ng/L) (annual average of monthly values); however, during the months of August (about 16.5 ng/L) and September (about 15.6 ng/L), dissolved PCB concentrations were greater than 14 ng/L, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's freshwater continuous chronic criterion for aquatic organisms. Concentrations of PCBs in white sucker (fillets and whole fish) were all greater than 2,000 ng/g wet wt, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's guideline for safe consumption of fish: PCB concentrations measured in fish-tissue samples collected from the Tileston and Hollingsworth and

  10. Historical changes in the Columbia River estuary based on sediment cores: feasibility studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, J.H.; Reisenbichler, R.; Gelfenbaum, G.R.; Peterson, C.; Baker, D.; Leavitt, P.R.; Simenstad, C.A.; Prahl, F.G.

    2003-01-01

    The importance of the Columbia River estuary to salmon, other fishes, migratory birds, and other species is fairly well established. Relatively little is known, however, about long-term, historic variations in biological processes and conditions within the estuary. For example, have conditions varied greatly with climatic regime shifts and how has dam construction on the Columbia River influenced biological communities over time? We conducted a feasibility study to see if sediment cores from the estuary could be aged and whether biological or contaminant indicators could be identified. Such information could be useful in understanding long-term environmental variation and in restoration studies.

  11. Heavy metal anomalies in the Tinto and Odiel river and estuary system, Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.H.; Lamothe, P.J. )

    1993-12-01

    The Tinto and Odiel river drain 100 km from the Rio Tinto sulphide mining district and join at a 20-km estuary entering the Atlantic Ocean. A reconnaissance study of heavy metal anomalies in channel sand and overbank mud of the river and estuary shows the following upstream to downstream ranges in ppm ([mu]g g[sup [minus]1]): As 3,000 to <200, Cd 30 to <0.1, Cu 1,500 to 10, Pb 2,000 to <10, Sb 300 to <150, and Zn 3,000 to <200. Organic-rich sandy-silty overbank clay has been analyzed to represent suspended load materials. The high content of heavy metals in the overbank clay throughout the river and estuary systems indicates the importance of suspended sediment transport for dispersing heavy metals from natural erosion and anthropogenic mining activities of the sulfide deposit. The organic-poor river bed sand has been analyzed to represent bedload transport of naturally-occurring sulfide minerals. The sand has high concentrations of metals upstream, decreasing by an order of magnitude in the lower estuary. Although heavy metal contamination of estuary mouth beach sand has been diluted to background levels, estuary mud exhibits increased contamination apparently related to finer grain size, higher organic carbon content, precipitation of river-borne dissolved solids, and input of anthropogenic heavy metals from industrial sources. The contaminated estuary mud disperses to the inner shelf mud belt and offshore suspended sediment, which exhibit metal anomalies from natural erosion and mining of upstream Rio Tinto sulphide lode sources (Pb, Cu, Zn) and industrial activities within the estuary (Fe, Cr, Ti). Because heavy metal contamination of Tinto-Odiel river sediment reaches or exceeds the highest levels encountered in other river sediments of Spain and Europe, a detailed analysis of metals in water and suspended sediment throughout the system, and epidemiological analysis of heavy metal effects in humans is appropriate. 36 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Methylmercury bioaccumulation in an urban estuary: Delaware River USA.

    PubMed

    Buckman, Kate; Taylor, Vivien; Broadley, Hannah; Hocking, Daniel; Balcom, Prentiss; Mason, Rob; Nislow, Keith; Chen, Celia

    2017-09-01

    Spatial variation in mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) bioaccumulation in urban coastal watersheds reflects complex interactions between Hg sources, land use, and environmental gradients. We examined MeHg concentrations in fauna from the Delaware River estuary, and related these measurements to environmental parameters and human impacts on the waterway. The sampling sites followed a north to south gradient of increasing salinity, decreasing urban influence, and increasing marsh cover. Although mean total Hg in surface sediments (top 4cm) peaked in the urban estuarine turbidity maximum and generally decreased downstream, surface sediment MeHg concentrations showed no spatial patterns consistent with the examined environmental gradients, indicating urban influence on Hg loading to the sediment but not subsequent methylation. Surface water particulate MeHg concentration showed a positive correlation with marsh cover whereas dissolved MeHg concentrations were slightly elevated in the estuarine turbidity maximum region. Spatial patterns of MeHg bioaccumulation in resident fauna varied across taxa. Small fish showed increased MeHg concentrations in the more urban/industrial sites upstream, with concentrations generally decreasing farther downstream. Invertebrates either showed no clear spatial patterns in MeHg concentrations (blue crabs, fiddler crabs) or increasing concentrations further downstream (grass shrimp). Best-supported linear mixed models relating tissue concentration to environmental variables reflected these complex patterns, with species specific model results dominated by random site effects with a combination of particulate MeHg and landscape variables influencing bioaccumulation in some species. The data strengthen accumulating evidence that bioaccumulation in estuaries can be decoupled from sediment MeHg concentration, and that drivers of MeHg production and fate may vary within a small region.

  13. 76 FR 70480 - Otay River Estuary Restoration Project, South San Diego Bay Unit of the San Diego Bay National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... by the State Lands Commission. In order to restore estuarine habitat in the Otay River floodplain, we... Fish and Wildlife Service Otay River Estuary Restoration Project, South San Diego Bay Unit of the San... River Estuary Restoration Project. The proposed project involves the restoration of 66.4 acres...

  14. Climate change drives warming in the Hudson River Estuary, New York (USA).

    PubMed

    Seekell, David A; Pace, Michael L

    2011-08-01

    Estuaries may be subject to warming due to global climate change but few studies have considered the drivers or seasonality of warming empirically. We analyzed temperature trends and rates of temperature change over time for the Hudson River estuary using long-term data, mainly from daily measures taken at the Poughkeepsie Water Treatment Facility. This temperature record is among the longest in the world for a river or estuary. The Hudson River has warmed 0.945 °C since 1946. Many of the warmest years in the record occurred in the last 16 years. A seasonal analysis of trends indicated significant warming for the months of April through August. The warming of the Hudson is primarily related to increasing air temperature. Increasing freshwater discharge into the estuary has not mitigated the warming trend.

  15. Freshwater runoff and salinity distribution in the Loxahatchee River estuary, southeastern Florida, 1980-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.M.; McPherson, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    During a recent study, freshwater mixed with seawater over a distance of 5 to 10 river miles in the Loxahatchee River estuary. Large freshwater inflows vertically stratified the estuary and shifted the mixing zone seaward. In the northwest fork of the estuary, the saltwater-freshwater interface moved daily about 0.5 to 1.5 river miles as a result of tides and annually about 3 to 5 miles as a result of seasonal changes in freshwater inflow. In the southwest fork, saltwater movement upstream was blocked by a gate and dam structure in Canal-18, 4.7 miles upstream from the Atlantic Ocean. Although Canal-18 discharged about one-third of the total freshwater tributary inflow to the estuary, the effects of canal discharge on salinity were limited to relatively brief periods. Much of the time, no freshwater was discharged. 15 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Horizontal distribution and population dynamics of the dominant mysid Hyperacanthomysis longirostris along a temperate macrotidal estuary (Chikugo River estuary, Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Keita W.; Nakayama, Kouji; Tanaka, Masaru

    2009-08-01

    The estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM) that develops in the lower salinity areas of macrotidal estuaries has been considered as an important nursery for many fish species. Mysids are one of the dominant organisms in the ETM, serving as a key food source for juvenile fish. To investigate the horizontal distribution and population dynamics of dominant mysids in relation to the fluctuation of physical conditions (temperature, salinity, turbidity, and freshwater discharge), we conducted monthly sampling (hauls of a ring net in the surface water) along the macrotidal Chikugo River estuary in Japan from May 2005 to December 2006. Hyperacanthomysis longirostris was the dominant mysid in the estuary, usually showing peaks of density and biomass in or close to the ETM (salinity 1-10). In addition, intra-specific differences (life-cycle stage, sex, and size) in horizontal distribution were found along the estuary. Larger males and females, particularly gravid females, were distributed upstream from the center of distribution where juveniles were overwhelmingly dominant. Juveniles increased in size toward the sea in marked contrast with males and females. The findings suggest a possible system of population maintenance within the estuary; gravid females release juveniles in the upper estuary, juveniles grow during downstream transport, young males and females mature during the upstream migration. Density and biomass were primarily controlled by seasonal changes of temperature, being high at intermediate temperatures (ca. 15-25 °C in late spring and fall) and being low at the extreme temperatures (ca. 10 °C in midwinter and 30 °C in midsummer). High density (up to 666 ind. m -3) and biomass (up to 168 mg dry weight m -3) of H. longirostris were considered to be comparable with those of copepods in the estuary.

  17. Rapid water quality change in the Elwha River estuary complex during dam removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Melissa M.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Beirne, Matthew M.; Paradis, Rebecca; Ritchie, Andrew; Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Dam removal in the United States is increasing as a result of structural concerns, sedimentation of reservoirs, and declining riverine ecosystem conditions. The removal of the 32 m Elwha and 64 m Glines Canyon dams from the Elwha River in Washington, U.S.A., was the largest dam removal project in North American history. During the 3 yr of dam removal—from September 2011 to August 2014—more than ten million cubic meters of sediment was eroded from the former reservoirs, transported downstream, and deposited throughout the lower river, river delta, and nearshore waters of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Water quality data collected in the estuary complex at the mouth of the Elwha River document how conditions in the estuary changed as a result of sediment deposition over the 3 yr the dams were removed. Rapid and large-scale changes in estuary conditions—including salinity, depth, and turbidity—occurred 1 yr into the dam removal process. Tidal propagation into the estuary ceased following a large sediment deposition event that began in October 2013, resulting in decreased salinity, and increased depth and turbidity in the estuary complex. These changes have persisted in the system through dam removal, significantly altering the structure and functioning of the Elwha River estuary ecosystem.

  18. Impact of the Clean Water Act on the levels of toxic metals in urban estuaries: The Hudson River estuary revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S.A.; Gill, G.A.

    1999-10-15

    To establish the impact of the Clean Water Act on the water quality of urban estuaries, dissolved trace metals and phosphate concentrations were determined in surface waters collected along the Hudson River estuary between 1995 and 1997 and compared with samples collected in the mid-1970s by Klinkhammer and Bender. The median concentrations along the estuary have apparently declined 36--56% for Cu, 55--89% for Cd, 53--85% for Ni, and 53--90% for Zn over a period of 23 years. These reductions appear to reflect improvements in controlling discharges from municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants since the Clean Water Act was enacted in 1972. In contrast, levels of dissolved nutrients (PO{sub 4}) have remained relatively constant during the same period of time, suggesting that wastewater treatment plant improvements in the New York/New Jersey Metropolitan area have not been as effective at reducing nutrient levels within the estuary. While more advanced wastewater treatment could potentially reduce the levels of Ag and PO{sub 4} along the estuary, these improvements would have a more limited effect on the levels of other trace metals.

  19. Seasonal Distribution and Movements of Atlantic and Shortnose Sturgeon in the Penobscot River Estuary, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zydlewski, Joseph; Fernandes, Stephen J.; Zydlewski, Gayle B.; Wippelhauser, Gail S.; Kinnison, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the distribution and seasonal movement patterns of shortnose sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum and Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus occupying rivers in the northern part of their range. During 2006 and 2007, 40 shortnose sturgeon (66–113.4 cm fork length [FL]) and 8 Atlantic sturgeon (76.2–166.2 cm FL) were captured in the Penobscot River, Maine, implanted with acoustic transmitters, and monitored using an array of acoustic receivers in the Penobscot River estuary and Penobscot Bay. Shortnose sturgeon were present year round in the estuary and overwintered from fall (mid-October) to spring (mid-April) in the upper estuary. In early spring, all individuals moved downstream to the middle estuary. Over the course of the summer, many individuals moved upstream to approximately 2 km of the downstream-most dam (46 river kilometers [rkm] from the Penobscot River mouth [rkm 0]) by August. Most aggregated into an overwintering site (rkm 36.5) in mid- to late fall. As many as 50% of the tagged shortnose sturgeon moved into and out of the Penobscot River system during 2007, and 83% were subsequently detected by an acoustic array in the Kennebec River, located 150 km from the Penobscot River estuary. Atlantic sturgeon moved into the estuary from the ocean in the summer and concentrated into a 1.5-km reach. All Atlantic sturgeon moved to the ocean by fall, and two of these were detected in the Kennebec River. Although these behaviors are common for Atlantic sturgeon, regular coastal migrations of shortnose sturgeon have not been documented previously in this region. These results have important implications for future dam removals as well as for rangewide and river-specific shortnose sturgeon management.

  20. Hydrology, sediment circulation and long-term morphological changes in highly urbanized Shenzhen River estuary, China: A combined field experimental and modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiyan; Mao, Xian-zhong

    2015-10-01

    The Shenzhen River estuary is a small estuary in highly urbanized regions between Shenzhen and Hong Kong, China. An increasing amount of sediment has been observed to accumulate in the estuary, imposing a severe impact on the ecological environment. In this study we utilized a series of hydrographic and bathymetry surveys to study the hydrology, sediment transport and morphological processes in the estuary. Flow and sediment circulation patterns in different seasons were inferred using current velocity, salinity and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) time series collected in the hydrographic surveys in conjunction with fathometer profiles in bathymetry surveys. Historical time series at two stations were also analyzed by Mann-Kendall test for possible trends of the driving forces for estuarine morphological processes. The two-dimensional depth-averaged DELFT numerical model was employed to simulate the flow, salinity and SSC fields during the synchronous surveys and to predict the long-term morphological processes in the estuary. A bimodal SSC distribution was observed with two high-SSC zones separated by a low-SSC zone near the central bay, which cannot be explained by the conventional nongravitational transport theory of Postma (1967). It is hypothesized that sediment circulation in the estuary can be separated into two different systems: the "tidal zone" is under the influence of marine sediment from the Pearl River estuary, whereas the "fluvial zone" is mainly affected by terrestrial sediment from the river. Sediment mass exchange between the two systems is limited due to the presence of the low-SSC zone, the location of which could vary with the relative strengths of river flow and tides. The trend analysis of historical time series shows that the river discharge and the mean sea level are increasing and the flood tide range and the ebb tide range are decreasing. These trends are closely related to the intense human activities in the urbanization of

  1. Pu and 137Cs in the Yangtze River estuary sediments: distribution and source identification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyong; Zheng, Jian; Pan, Shaoming; Dong, Wei; Yamada, Masatoshi; Aono, Tatsuo; Guo, Qiuju

    2011-03-01

    Pu isotopes and (137)Cs were analyzed using sector field ICP-MS and γ spectrometry, respectively, in surface sediment and core sediment samples from the Yangtze River estuary. (239+240)Pu activity and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios (>0.18) shows a generally increasing trend from land to sea and from north to south in the estuary. This spatial distribution pattern indicates that the Pacific Proving Grounds (PPG) source Pu transported by ocean currents was intensively scavenged into the suspended sediment under favorable conditions, and mixed with riverine sediment as the water circulated in the estuary. This process is the main control for the distribution of Pu in the estuary. Moreover, Pu is also an important indicator for monitoring the changes of environmental radioactivity in the estuary as the river basin is currently the site of extensive human activities and the sea level is rising because of global climate changes. For core sediment samples the maximum peak of (239+240)Pu activity was observed at a depth of 172 cm. The sedimentation rate was estimated on the basis of the Pu maximum deposition peak in 1963-1964 to be 4.1 cm/a. The contributions of the PPG close-in fallout Pu (44%) and the riverine Pu (45%) in Yangtze River estuary sediments are equally important for the total Pu deposition in the estuary, which challenges the current hypothesis that the riverine Pu input was the major source of Pu budget in this area.

  2. AN ECOSYSTEM MODEL OF A RIVER-DOMINATED PACIFIC NORTHWEST ESTUARY: ROLES OF SALT MARSH-, RIVER- AND OCEAN-DERIVED MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Salmon River estuary on the central Oregon coast is river-dominated, with hydraulic residence times ranging from <1 day during winter high flows to a week during low flows. The estuary receives organic matter and nutrients from the river, the coastal ocean, and a bordering s...

  3. AN ECOSYSTEM MODEL OF A RIVER-DOMINATED PACIFIC NORTHWEST ESTUARY: ROLES OF SALT MARSH-, RIVER- AND OCEAN-DERIVED MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Salmon River estuary on the central Oregon coast is river-dominated, with hydraulic residence times ranging from <1 day during winter high flows to a week during low flows. The estuary receives organic matter and nutrients from the river, the coastal ocean, and a bordering s...

  4. Using a Multi-Component Indicator Toward Reducing Phytoplankton Bloom Occurrences in the Swan River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiana, Ria; Antenucci, Jason P.; Imberger, Jorg

    2012-08-01

    The Swan River estuary is an icon of the city of Perth, Western Australia, running through the city centre and dividing the northern from the southern part of the city. However, frequent phytoplankton blooms have been observed in the estuary as a result of eutrophication. The Index of Sustainable Functionality (ISF), a composite index able to indicate for sustainable health of the estuary, was applied, taking into account the hydrology and highly seasonal nature of the estuary to inform the management of the estuary, towards the aim of reducing bloom occurrences. The study period was from the beginning of intensive monitoring in 1995 to mid-2009. The results emphasize the importance of physical controls on the ecology of the estuary. No significant trend in the estuary's low functionality was found, indicating that despite extensive restoration efforts, the frequency of algal bloom occurrences has remained relatively stationary and other mitigating factors have maintained an annual average ISF value at around 70 % functionality. We identified that the low flow season consistently performs the worst, with (high) temperature found as the most dominant variable for phytoplankton growth and bloom. Thus in managing the estuary, vigilance is required during periods of high temperature and low flow. Focusing on the risk of phytoplankton bloom, a nutrient reduction program that is in place is a long term solution due to high concentrations in the estuary. Other management measures need to be considered and adopted to effectively reduce the occurrences of future phytoplankton blooms.

  5. A comparison of CO2 dynamics and air-water fluxes in a river-dominated estuary and a mangrove-dominated marine estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhand, Anirban; Chanda, Abhra; Manna, Sudip; Das, Sourav; Hazra, Sugata; Roy, Rajdeep; Choudhury, S. B.; Rao, K. H.; Dadhwal, V. K.; Chakraborty, Kunal; Mostofa, K. M. G.; Tokoro, T.; Kuwae, Tomohiro; Wanninkhof, Rik

    2016-11-01

    The fugacity of CO2 (fCO2 (water)) and air-water CO2 flux were compared between a river-dominated anthropogenically disturbed open estuary, the Hugli, and a comparatively pristine mangrove-dominated semiclosed marine estuary, the Matla, on the east coast of India. Annual mean salinity of the Hugli Estuary (≈7.1) was much less compared to the Matla Estuary (≈20.0). All the stations of the Hugli Estuary were highly supersaturated with CO2 (annual mean 2200 µatm), whereas the Matla was marginally oversaturated (annual mean 530 µatm). During the postmonsoon season, the outer station of the Matla Estuary was under saturated with respect to CO2 and acted as a sink. The annual mean CO2 emission from the Hugli Estuary (32.4 mol C m-2 yr-1) was 14 times higher than the Matla Estuary (2.3 mol C m-2 yr-1). CO2 efflux rate from the Hugli Estuary has increased drastically in the last decade, which is attributed to increased runoff from the river-dominated estuary.

  6. Embryotoxicity and genotoxicity evaluation of sediments from Yangtze River estuary using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Chen, Ling; Liu, Li; Wu, Lingling

    2016-03-01

    Sediments function both as a sink and a source of pollutants in aquatic ecosystems and may impose serious effects on benthic organisms and human health. As one of the largest estuaries in the world, the Yangtze River estuary suffers from abundant wastewater from the coastal cities. In this study, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were employed in the fish embryo test and a comet assay to evaluate the embryotoxicity and genotoxicity of the sediments from the Yangtze River estuary, respectively. Results showed that the sediments from the Yangtze River estuary significantly increased mortality, induced development abnormalities, and reduced hatching rate and heart rate of zebrafish embryos after 96 h of exposure. Significant genotoxicity was observed in the samples relative to the controls. Relatively low-level embryotoxicity and genotoxicity of sediments were found in the Yangtze River compared with other river systems. Toxic responses were also discussed in relation to the analyzed organic contaminants in sediments. More attention should be paid to non-priority pollutant monitoring in the Yangtze River estuary.

  7. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2008-02-20

    The purpose of this document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program, hereafter called 'the Estuary Program'. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows: (1) Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. (2) Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. (3) Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. (4) Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. (5) Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. The goal leads to three primary management questions pertaining to the main focus of the Estuary Program: estuary habitat conservation and restoration. (1) Are the estuary habitat actions achieving the expected biological and environmental performance targets? (2) Are the offsite habitat actions in the estuary improving juvenile salmonid performance and which actions are most effective at addressing the limiting factors preventing achievement of habitat, fish, or wildlife performance objectives? (3) What are the limiting factors or threats in the estuary/ocean preventing the achievement of desired habitat or fish performance objectives? Performance measures for the

  8. From headwaters to coast: Influence of human activities on water quality of the Potomac River Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Suzanne B.; Rice, Karen C.; Bricker, Owen P.

    2014-01-01

    The natural aging process of Chesapeake Bay and its tributary estuaries has been accelerated by human activities around the shoreline and within the watershed, increasing sediment and nutrient loads delivered to the bay. Riverine nutrients cause algal growth in the bay leading to reductions in light penetration with consequent declines in sea grass growth, smothering of bottom-dwelling organisms, and decreases in bottom-water dissolved oxygen as algal blooms decay. Historically, bay waters were filtered by oysters, but declines in oyster populations from overfishing and disease have led to higher concentrations of fine-sediment particles and phytoplankton in the water column. Assessments of water and biological resource quality in Chesapeake Bay and tributaries, such as the Potomac River, show a continual degraded state. In this paper, we pay tribute to Owen Bricker’s comprehensive, holistic scientific perspective using an approach that examines the connection between watershed and estuary. We evaluated nitrogen inputs from Potomac River headwaters, nutrient-related conditions within the estuary, and considered the use of shellfish aquaculture as an in-the-water nutrient management measure. Data from headwaters, nontidal, and estuarine portions of the Potomac River watershed and estuary were analyzed to examine the contribution from different parts of the watershed to total nitrogen loads to the estuary. An eutrophication model was applied to these data to evaluate eutrophication status and changes since the early 1990s and for comparison to regional and national conditions. A farm-scale aquaculture model was applied and results scaled to the estuary to determine the potential for shellfish (oyster) aquaculture to mediate eutrophication impacts. Results showed that (1) the contribution to nitrogen loads from headwater streams is small (about 2 %) of total inputs to the Potomac River Estuary; (2) eutrophic conditions in the Potomac River Estuary have improved in

  9. Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration.

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Bonneville Power Administration

    2008-08-01

    The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C.

  10. Trace metal distributions in the Hudson River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkhammer, G. P.; Bender, M. L.

    1981-06-01

    Concentations of reactive PO 4, particulate Al and dissolved and particulate Cd, Fe, Zn, Ni, Cu and Mn were measured in the Hudson River estuary. Soluble trace metal concentrations ranged from 1 to 7 parts 10 -9 Cu; 1 to 60 parts 10 -9 Mn; 0·8 to 11 parts 10 -9 Ni; 3 to 33 parts 10 -9 Zn; 0·1 to 0·5 parts 10 -9 Cd and 5 to 96 parts 10 -9 Fe. The particulate levels were 0·2 to 6 parts 10 -9 Cu; 0·2 to 40 parts 10 -9 Mn; 0·1 to 8 parts 10 -9 Ni; 0·04 to 14 parts 10 -9 Zn; 0·005 to 0·3 parts 10 -9 Cd and 7 to 2200 parts 10 -9 Fe. With the exception of iron, the discharge of these metals with Manhattan/New Jersey sewage was comparable to the riverine flux. Anthropogenic Zn, Ni and Mn inputs were reflected in dissolved concentration maxima in New York Harbor. Mass-balance calculations demonstrate that the anthropogenic fraction of these metals left the Harbor in the dissolved form. Anthropogenic Cd, Fe and Cu were associated with solids and these metals were deposited in Harbor sediments.

  11. Spatial dynamics of biogeochemical processes in the St. Louis River freshwater estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Great Lakes, river-lake transition zones within freshwater estuaries are hydrologically and biogeochemically dynamic areas that regulate nutrient and energy fluxes between rivers and Great Lakes. The goal of our study was to characterize the biogeochemical properties of th...

  12. Ecological parameters in the Elwha River estuary before and during dam removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Melissa M.; Shafroth, Patrick B.; Beirne, Matthew M.; Paradis, Rebecca; Ritchie, Andrew C.

    2017-01-01

    The Elwha and Glines Canyon dams were removed from the Elwha River in Washington State from 2011 to 2014. We collected data for a variety of metrics in the estuary and on the river delta before (2006-2011) and during (2012-2014) dam removal to assess how increased sediment transport and deposition affected habitats, vegetation, invertebrates, and fish.

  13. Spatial dynamics of biogeochemical processes in the St. Louis River freshwater estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Great Lakes, river-lake transition zones within freshwater estuaries are hydrologically and biogeochemically dynamic areas that regulate nutrient and energy fluxes between rivers and Great Lakes. The goal of our study was to characterize the biogeochemical properties of th...

  14. Sediment transport due to extreme events: The Hudson River estuary after tropical storms Irene and Lee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ralston, David K.; Warner, John C.; Geyer, W. Rockwell; Wall, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    Tropical Storms Irene and Lee in 2011 produced intense precipitation and flooding in the U.S. Northeast, including the Hudson River watershed. Sediment input to the Hudson River was approximately 2.7 megaton, about 5 times the long-term annual average. Rather than the common assumption that sediment is predominantly trapped in the estuary, observations and model results indicate that approximately two thirds of the new sediment remained trapped in the tidal freshwater river more than 1 month after the storms and only about one fifth of the new sediment reached the saline estuary. High sediment concentrations were observed in the estuary, but the model results suggest that this was predominantly due to remobilization of bed sediment. Spatially localized deposits of new and remobilized sediment were consistent with longer term depositional records. The results indicate that tidal rivers can intercept (at least temporarily) delivery of terrigenous sediment to the marine environment during major flow events.

  15. Cruise observation and numerical modeling of turbulent mixing in the Pearl River estuary in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jiayi; Gu, Yanzhen

    2016-06-01

    The turbulent mixing in the Pearl River estuary and plume area is analyzed by using cruise data and simulation results of the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS). The cruise observations reveal that strong mixing appeared in the bottom layer on larger ebb in the estuary. Modeling simulations are consistent with the observation results, and suggest that inside the estuary and in the near-shore water, the mixing is stronger on ebb than on flood. The mixing generation mechanism analysis based on modeling data reveals that bottom stress is responsible for the generation of turbulence in the estuary, for the re-circulating plume area, internal shear instability plays an important role in the mixing, and wind may induce the surface mixing in the plume far-field. The estuary mixing is controlled by the tidal strength, and in the re-circulating plume bulge, the wind stirring may reinforce the internal shear instability mixing.

  16. [Effect of water conservancy schistosomiasis control projects in rivers and estuaries connecting with the Yangtze River on Oncomelania snail control].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zi-Xin; Zhu, Zhao-Feng; Hang, De-Rong; Li, Wei; Chen, Shi-Jun; Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Zheng-Qiu; Li, Shui-Mingt; Peng, Xun

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of the water conservancy schistosomiasis control projects in rivers and estuaries connecting with the Yangtze River on Oncomelania snail control. Three water conservancy schistosomiasis control projects of Laobianmin River, Panjia River and Bianmin River were chosen for the objects of the study. The concrete slope protection and the overflow dam, the concrete slope protection and the check sluice, and the simple concrete slope protection were built respectively in above mentioned three rivers. The changes of the area with snails and density of snails were investigated before and after the interventions, and the results were compared among the three projects. In the condition of the routine snail control with the molluscicide, the snails were eliminated in the main riverway of the Laobianmin River, but the snails still existed in the target protected area (tributaries of the river and irrigation areas); the snails were eliminated in the Panjia River and its irrigation areas; in the Bianmin River, the areas with snails dropped by 89.22% in the main river and still remained in the tributaries and irrigation areas after the project implementation. The sluice and overflow dam more contribute to control and eliminate snails in the project areas and the target protected areas in the rivers and estuaries connecting with the Yangtze River. The priority of consideration should be given to the water level control and prevention of snail spreading in the water level instability rivers connecting with the Yangtze River.

  17. Physical, Hydrological, and Biological Characteristics of the Loxahatchee River Estuary, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Benjamin F.; Sabanskas, Maryann; Long, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The Loxahatchee River estuary empties into the Atlantic Ocean at Jupiter Inlet in southeastern Florida. Although relatively small, the estuary is important for its esthetic value and for its sport fishing, boating, recreation, tourism, and prime residential development. In recent years, the condition of the estuary has become of concern to many citizens and agencies of the State. In response to this concern, the U.S. Geological Survey planned and carried out an in-depth environmental investigation. The events that led to the investigation and the objectives of the investigation are outlined in a recent U.S. Geological Survey report by McPherson and Sabanskas (WRI 80-1109).

  18. Modeling the impact of river discharge and wind on the hypoxia off Yangtze Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jingjing; Gao, Shan; Liu, Guimei; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Xueming

    2016-12-01

    The phenomenon of low dissolved oxygen (known as hypoxia) in a coastal ocean system is closely related to a combination of anthropogenic and natural factors. Marine hypoxia occurs in the Yangtze Estuary, China, with high frequency and long persistence. It is related primarily to organic and nutrient enrichment influenced by river discharges and physical factors, such as water mixing. In this paper, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was coupled to a biological model to simulate and analyze the ecological system of the East China Sea. By comparing with the observation data, the model results can reasonably capture the physical and biochemical dynamics of the Yangtze Estuary. In addition, the sensitive experiments were also used to examine the role of physical forcing (river discharge, wind speed, wind direction) in controlling hypoxia in waters adjacent to the Yangtze Estuary. The results showed that the wind field and river discharge have significant impact on the hypoxia off the Yangtze Estuary. The seasonal cycle of hypoxia was relatively insensitive to synoptic variability in the river discharge, but integrated hypoxic areas were sensitive to the whole magnitude of river discharge. Increasing the river discharge was shown to increase hypoxic areas, while decreasing the river discharge tended to decrease hypoxic areas. The variations of wind speed and direction had a great impact on the integrated hypoxic areas.

  19. Comprehensive analysis of an ecological risk assessment of the Daliao River estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ge; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Xueqing; Li, Zhengyan

    2013-08-01

    At present, most estuarine ecological risk studies are based on terrestrial ecosystem models, which ignore spatial heterogeneity. The Daliao River estuary has representative characteristics of many estuaries in China, and we used this estuary as the study area to formulate an estuarine ecological risk evaluation model. Targeting the estuary's special hydrodynamic condition, this model incorporated variables that were under the influence of human activities and used them as the major factors for partitioning sections of the river according to risk values. It also explored the spatial and temporal distribution laws of estuarine ecological risk. The results showed that, on the whole, the ecological risk of the Daliao River estuary area was relatively high. At a temporal level, runoff was the main factor resulting in differences in ecological risk, while at the spatial level, the ecological risk index was affected by pollutants carried by runoff from upstream, as well as downstream pollution emissions and dilution by seawater at the mouth of the sea. The characteristics of this model make it possible to simulate the spatial and temporal risk distribution in different regions and under different rainfall regimes. This model can thus be applied in other estuarine areas and provides some technical support for analysis and control of ecological destruction in estuary areas.

  20. Particulate organic matter predicts bacterial productivity in a river dominated estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    Estuaries act as coastal filters for organic and inorganic fluvial materials in which microbial, biogeochemical, and ecological processes combine to transform organic matter and nutrients prior to export to the coastal ocean. The function of this estuarine 'bioreactor' is linked to the residence times of those materials and to rates of microbial heterotrophic activity. Our ability to forecast the impact of global change on estuarine bioreactor function requires an understanding of the basic controls on microbial community activity and diversity. In the Columbia River estuary, the microbial community undergoes a dramatic seasonal shift in species composition during which a spring bacterioplankton community, dominated by Flavobacteriaceae and Oceanospirillales, is replaced by a summer community, dominated by Rhodobacteraceae and several common marine taxa. This annual shift occurs in July, following the spring freshet, when river flow and river chlorophyll concentration decrease and when estuarine water residence time increases. Analysis of a large dataset from 17 research cruises (1990-2014) showed that the composition of particulate organic matter in the estuary changes after the freshet with decreasing organic carbon and nitrogen content, and increasing contribution of marine and autochthonous estuarine organic matter (based on PO13C and pigment ratios). Bacterial production rates (measured as leucine or thymidine incorporation rates) in the estuary respond to this change, and correlate strongly with labile particulate nitrogen concentration and temperature during individual sampling campaigns, and with the concentration of chlorophyll in the Columbia River across all seasons. Regression models suggest that the concentration of labile particulate nitrogen and the rate of bacterial production can be predicted from sensor measurements of turbidity, salinity, and temperature in the estuary and chlorophyll in the river. These results suggest that the quality of

  1. Influence of wind and river discharge on the vertical exchange process in the Pearl River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, B.; Peng, S.

    2016-02-01

    Vertical exchange process is controlled by the buoyancy input from river discharge and the momentum input by wind forcing. This study investigates the vertical exchange process in the Pearl River Estuary by using a 3-D numerical model. The vertical exchange time (VET) is used to quantify the magnitude of vertical exchange process in response to changing local wind and river discharge. During the dry season, it only takes about 2 days for the surface layer water mass being transported to the bottom layer. During the wet season, such transport will take more than 20 days in a large portion of the main channel. The water in the slope area can be well ventilated. Linear regression of VET indicates that water column stratification can be used to estimate the VET and up to 71% of the variance can be accounted. The estimation by using river runoff can only account for about 49% of the variance. The effects of wind speed and direction are investigated separately. Neither river runoff nor the stratification can properly predict the VET during the typical wet season. Further investigations are needed to reveal the dynamics of vertical exchange process and find out other factors that influence the VET during the wet season.

  2. Decadal morphological evolution of the Yangtze Estuary in response to river input changes and estuarine engineering projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Hua Long; Ding, Ping Xing; Wang, Zheng Bing; Ge, Jian Zhong; Yang, Shi Lun

    2016-07-01

    The Yangtze Estuary in China has been intensively influenced by human activities including altered river and sediment discharges in its catchment and local engineering projects in the estuary over the past half century. River sediment discharge has significantly decreased since the 1980s because of upstream dam construction and water-soil conservation. We analyzed bathymetric data from the Yangtze Estuary between 1958 and 2010 and divided the entire estuary into two sections: inner estuary and mouth bar area. The deposition and erosion pattern exhibited strong temporal and spatial variations. The inner estuary and mouth bar area underwent different changes. The inner estuary was altered from sedimentation to erosion primarily at an intermediate depth (5-15 m) along with river sediment decline. In contrast, the mouth bar area showed continued accretion throughout the study period. The frequent river floods during the 1990s and simultaneously decreasing river sediment probably induced the peak erosion of the inner estuary in 1986-1997. We conclude that both sediment discharge and river flood events played important roles in the decadal morphological evolution of the Yangtze Estuary. Regarding the dredged sediment, the highest net accretion rate occurred in the North Passage where jetties and groins were constructed to regulate the navigation channel in 1997-2010. In this period, the jetties induced enhanced deposition at the East Hengsha Mudflat and the high accretion rate within the mouth bar area was maintained. The impacts of estuarine engineering projects on morphological change extended beyond their sites.

  3. Distribution and flux of /sup 226/Ra and /sup 228/Ra in the Amazon River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Key, R.M.; Sarmiento, J.L.; Stallard, R.F.; Moore, W.S.

    1985-07-20

    Measurements of /sup 226/Ra and /sup 228/Ra in the Amazon River estuary show that desorption from riverborne suspended particulate matter in the estuary increases the riverine flux of both isotopes to the ocean by a factor of approximately 5 over the flux attributable to radium dissolved in the river water alone. The total Amazon flux supplies approximately 0.20% of the /sup 226/Ra and approximately 2.6% of the /sup 228/Ra standing crops in the near-surface Atlantic (0-200 m). Diffusive flux from estuarine and shelf sediments and desorption from resuspended sediments in the region of the estuary approximately double the estuarine /sup 226/Ra concentration and quadruple the estuarine /sup 228/Ra concentration above that caused by the dissolved and desorbed river components alone.

  4. Sedimentary Records of Hyperpycnal Flows and the Influence of River Damming on Sediment Dynamics of Estuaries: Examples from the Nelson, Churchill, Moisie and Sainte-Marguerite Rivers (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Onge, G.; Duboc, Q.; Boyer-Villemaire, U.; Lajeunesse, P.; Bernatchez, P.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment cores were sampled in the estuary of the Nelson and Churchill Rivers in western Hudson Bay, as well as in the estuary of the Moisie and Sainte-Marguerite Rivers in Gulf of St. Lawrence in order to evaluate the impact of hydroelectric dams on the sedimentary regime of these estuaries. The gravity cores at the mouth of the Nelson River recorded several cm-thick rapidly deposited layers with a reverse to normal grading sequence, indicating the occurrence of hyperpycnal flows generated by major floods during the last few centuries. These hyperpycnal flows were probably caused by ice-jam formation, which can increase both the flow and the sediment concentration following the breaching of such natural dams. Following the construction of hydroelectric dams since the 1960s, the regulation of river discharge prevented the formation of hyperpycnal flows, and hence the deposition of hyperpycnites in the upper part of the cores. In the core sampled in the estuary of the Churchill River, only one hyperpycnite was recorded. This lower frequency may be due to the enclosed estuary of the Churchill River, its weaker discharge and the more distal location of the coring site.In the Gulf of St. Lawrence, grain size measurements allowed the identification of a major flood around AD 1844±4 years in box cores from both the Sainte-Marguerite and Moisie Rivers, whereas a drastic decrease in variations in the median grain size occurred around AD ~1900 in the estuary of the Sainte-Marguerite River, highlighting the offshore impact of the SM1 dam construction in the early 1900s. Furthermore, sedimentological variations in the box cores from both estuaries have been investigated by wavelet analysis and the sharp disappearance of high frequencies around AD 1900 in the estuary of the dammed river (Sainte-Marguerite River), but not in the estuary of the natural river (Moisie River), also provides evidence of the influence of dams on the sedimentary regime of estuaries.

  5. River discharge contribution to sea-level rise in the Yangtze River Estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Cuiping; Chen, Wei; Gu, Jie; Su, Tsung-Chow; Song, Hongling; Ma, Yue; Dong, Zhichao

    2017-02-01

    Sea level changes in the Yangtze River Estuary (YRE) as a result of river discharge are investigated based on the monthly averaged river discharge from 1950 to 2011 at the Datong station. Quantification of the sea level contribution is made by model computed results and the sea level rates reported by the China Sea Level Bulletin (CSLB). The coastal modeling tool, MIKE21, is used to establish a depth-averaged hydrodynamic model covering the YRE and Hangzhou Bay. The model is validated with the measured data. Multi-year monthly river discharges are statistically calculated based on the monthly river discharges at Datong station from 1950 to 2011. The four characteristic discharges (frequency of 75%, 50% and 25%, and multi-year monthly) and month-averaged river discharge from 1950 to 2011 are used to study the seasonal and long-term changes of sea level. The computed sea level at the Dajishan and Lvsi stations are used to study the multi-time scale structure of periodic variation in different time scale of river discharge series. The results reveal that (1) the sea level rises as the river discharge increases, and its amplification decreases from upstream to the offshore. (2) The sea level amplification on the south coast is greater than that on the north coast. When river discharge increases by 20,000 m3/s, the sea level will increase by 0.005-0.010 m in most of Hangzhou Bay. (3) The sea level at the Dajishan station, influenced by river discharge, increased 0.178 mm/y from 1980 to 2011. Correspondingly, the sea level rose at a rate of 2.6-3.0 mm/y during the same period. These values were provided by the CSLB. The increase in sea level (1980-2011) at the Dajishan station caused by river discharge is 6.8-8.9% of the total increase in sea level. (4) The 19-20 year dominant nodal cycle of sea level at the Dajishan and Lvsi stations is in accord with 18.6 year nodal cycle of main tidal constituents on Chinese coasts. It implies that the sea-level change period on the

  6. Nutrient input from the Loxahatchee River Environmental Control District sewage-treatment plant to the Loxahatchee River Estuary, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonntag, W.H.; McPherson, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    Two test discharges of treated-sewage effluent were made to the Loxahatchee River in February and September 1981 from the ENCON sewage-treatment plant to document nutrient loading and downstream transport of the effluent to the estuary under maximum daily discharge allowable by law (4 million gallons per day). Concentrations of total nitrogen in the effluent exceeded background concentrations by as much as 7 times during the February test, while concentrations of total phosphorus exceeded background concentrations by as much as 112 times during the September test. The effluent was transported downstream to the estuary in less than 24 hours. Discharge of treated sewage effluent to the river-estuary system in the 1981 water year accounted for less than 0.5 percent of the total nitrogen and 8 percent of the total phosphorus discharged from the major tributaries to the estuary. If maximum discharges of effluent (4 million gallons per day) were sustained throughout the year, annual nitrogen loading from the effluent would account for 5 to 18 percent of the total nitrogen input by the major tributaries to the estuary. With maximum discharges of effluent, annual phosphorus loading would exceed the amount of phosphorus input by the major tributaries to the estuary by 54 to 167 percent. (USGS)

  7. Concentrations of suspended particulate organic carbon in the tidal Yorkshire Ouse River and Humber Estuary.

    PubMed

    Uncles, R J; Frickers, P E; Easton, A E; Griffiths, M L; Harris, C; Howland, R J; King, R S; Morris, A W; Plummer, D H; Tappin, A D

    2000-05-05

    Data are presented for particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate nitrogen (PN) concentrations in the Humber Estuary and tidal River Ouse Estuary. The POC data were derived from approximately monthly surveys and are consistent with data reported for suspended particulate matter (SPM) in the non-tidal River Ouse (the freshwater river) and with SPM, or bed sediments, in estuarine ecosystems such as the Mississippi, Delaware, San Francisco Bay, Tolo Harbour, the Vellar Estuary and Cochin Backwater, as well as the Loire, Gironde, Ems and Tamar Estuaries. Relative to the dry weight of SPM, the Humber-averaged organic carbon and nitrogen percentages during the year February 1995-March 1996 were 2.6 +/- 0.6% (mean and S.D.) and 0.21 +/- 0.04%, respectively. The ratio of Humber-averaged POC to Humber-averaged PN was 13 +/- 3. Higher POC levels were observed near the Humber's mouth and in the adjacent coastal zone during 'bloom' conditions, and in the upper estuarine reaches during large, winter and springtime freshwater inflows. At these times of high runoff, the POC content of SPM increased progressively up-estuary from the coastal zone to the tidal River Ouse. When inflows became very low, during late spring to early autumn of 1995, both the freshwater-saltwater interface (FSI) and the strengthening turbidity maximum (TM) moved further up-estuary and the POC content of SPM in the upper reaches of the Ouse became lower compared with that immediately down-estuary. This led to a poorly defined POC maximum near the confluence of the Humber, Ouse and Trent, before POC eventually decreased again towards the coastal zone. The lower POC contents in the upper estuarine reaches of the tidal Ouse may have been partly due to POC respiration by heterotrophic bacteria attached to SPM within the TM, consistent with the severe oxygen depletion observed there during high turbidity, summertime spring tides.

  8. DOWNSTREAM MIGRATION OF SALMONID SMOLTS IN OREGON RIVERS AND ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migratory fish passage is an important designated use for many Oregon estuaries. Acoustic transmitters were implanted in coho smolts in 2004 and 2006 to evaluate how estuarine habitat, and habitat loss, might affect population health. Acoustic receivers that identified individu...

  9. DOWNSTREAM MIGRATION OF SALMONID SMOLTS IN OREGON RIVERS AND ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migratory fish passage is an important designated use for many Oregon estuaries. Acoustic transmitters were implanted in coho smolts in 2004 and 2006 to evaluate how estuarine habitat, and habitat loss, might affect population health. Acoustic receivers that identified individu...

  10. Breast milk dioxins in Hong Kong and Pearl River Delta.

    PubMed

    Hedley, Anthony J; Wong, Tze Wai; Hui, Lai Ling; Malisch, Rainer; Nelson, Edmund A S

    2006-02-01

    There are no previous reports from South China on chemically determined polychlorinated dibenzo-para-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in human breast milk expressed as World Health Organization (WHO) toxic equivalents (TEQs). In a 2002-2003 WHO exposure study, 13 pools of breast milk comprising samples from 316 primiparous women in Hong Kong in 2002 were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for 29 PCDD/F and dioxin-like PCB congeners. Total WHO-TEQs ranged from 8.97 to 16.7 pg/g fat (weighted mean, 12.9 pg; weighted median, 13.4 pg). Variations in TEQs included positive associations with age (R2 = 0.73, p < 0.0005), higher consumption of dairy products and seafood, and lower TEQs in overseas mothers and ever-smokers. Congener profiles indicated geographic specificity of exposure in Hong Kong, mainland China, and overseas Asian countries, including higher proportions of PCB-TEQs (overseas) and PCDF-TEQs (mainland China). The median TEQs of PCDD/Fs (8.69 pg/g fat) and PCBs (4.73 pg/g fat) in Hong Kong were highest among the five Asian Pacific countries but lower than the levels for at least half of the European countries that participated in the WHO study. However, future international studies should incorporate mother's age in the design of the pooling strategy to allow standardization by other exposure factors and valid comparisons among different countries. The findings allow support for the WHO breast-feeding advisory. Trends in human dioxin levels in the region cannot yet be determined, and rigorous controls are needed to reduce emissions of dioxins and human exposure in mainland China.

  11. Modeling Morphological Changes in the Danshui River Estuary during Typhoon Season in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Yeh, K. C.; Hsieh, T. C.

    2016-02-01

    Spatiotemporal variation of morphology in the Danshui River estuary in Taiwan and its adjacent coasts is highly dynamic during typhoon seasons and therefore complex. Primary reason of the morphological variations is due to interactions of multiscale hydrodynamic and morphodynamic processes under extreme hydrological conditions driven by tides, waves, and river floods. Sediment releases from reservoirs at upstream also contribute to the morphological changes in the estuary. To better understand sedimentation processes in the estuary driven by the multiscale hydrodynamic forcing, an integrated coastal process model is used to simulate flows and seasonal morphological changes due to multiple typhoons in 2008. The high-resolution computational grid was generated by using bed elevations and Lidar data measured before the typhoon season. For the study, three typhoons (i.e. Fong Wong, Sinlako, and Jangmi), which made landfalls close to the study site, were simulated. The hydrodynamic model was validated by comparing the computed hydrodynamic variables (e.g. tidal levels, flow velocities, and waves) at gage stations with observation data. The simulated morphological changes in the estuary including its adjacent coasts and tidal river reaches were also compared with survey data. The computed morphodynamic processes reveal complex bed change patterns in the estuary induced by riverine and coastal processes and influenced by harbors, fishing ports, and sea walls. The simulated results and the computational model is able to facilitate systematic planning and design of the estuary and coasts by assessing impacts of both hydrological forcing (waves, tides, and river floods) and sediment transport in rivers and coasts in a typhoon/hurricane season.

  12. Decadal changes in bathymetry of the Yangtze River Estuary: Human impacts and potential saltwater intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuaihu; Cheng, Heqin; Xu, Y. Jun; Li, Jiufa; Zheng, Shuwei

    2016-12-01

    This study analyzed bathymetric changes of the 77-km Yangtze River Estuary in China over the past ten years in order to understand the impacts of recent human activities on the estuary of a large alluvial river. Morphological changes were assessed by analyzing digitized bathymetric data of the estuarine channels from 2002 to 2013. Additionally, multi-beam bathymetric measurements made in 2012, 2014 and 2015 were utilized to investigate microtophographic bedforms of the lower reach of the estuary. Our results showed that the middle and upper reaches of the Yangtze River Estuary experienced substantial channel bed erosion in the past 10 years, and that the recent human activities have contributed to the change. These included the construction of a 70 km2 reservoir along the Yangtze River Estuary, the Qingcaosha Reservoir, for drinking water supply for the City of Shanghai, which has caused progressive bed erosion in the North Channel. The net volume of channel erosion in the Hengsha Passage from 2002 to 2013 was 0.86 × 108 m3. A large amount of the eroded sediment was trapped downstream, causing overall accretion in the upper reach of the North Passage. The middle and upper reaches of the South Passage also experienced intense erosion (0.45 × 108 m3) in the past ten years, while high accretion occurred in the lower reach because of the Deepening Waterway Project. The channel dredging left a large range of dredging marks and hollows in the North Passage. The increasing saltwater intrusion found in the Yangtze River Estuary may have been a consequence of either dredging or erosion, or both combined.

  13. Salt Plug Formation Caused by Decreased River Discharge in a Multi-channel Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Shaha, Dinesh Chandra; Cho, Yang-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater input to estuaries may be greatly altered by the river barrages required to meet human needs for drinking water and irrigation and prevent salt water intrusion. Prior studies have examined the salt plugs associated with evaporation and salt outwelling from tidal salt flats in single-channel estuaries. In this work, we discovered a new type of salt plug formation in the multi-channel Pasur River Estuary (PRE) caused by decreasing river discharges resulting from an upstream barrage. The formation of a salt plug in response to changes in river discharge was investigated using a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) recorder during spring and neap tides in the dry and wet seasons in 2014. An exportation of saline water from the Shibsa River Estuary (SRE) to the PRE through the Chunkhuri Channel occurred during the dry season, and a salt plug was created and persisted from December to June near Chalna in the PRE. A discharge-induced, relatively high water level in the PRE during the wet season exerted hydrostatic pressure towards the SRE from the PRE and thereby prevented the intrusion of salt water from the SRE to the PRE. PMID:27255892

  14. Salt Plug Formation Caused by Decreased River Discharge in a Multi-channel Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaha, Dinesh Chandra; Cho, Yang-Ki

    2016-06-01

    Freshwater input to estuaries may be greatly altered by the river barrages required to meet human needs for drinking water and irrigation and prevent salt water intrusion. Prior studies have examined the salt plugs associated with evaporation and salt outwelling from tidal salt flats in single-channel estuaries. In this work, we discovered a new type of salt plug formation in the multi-channel Pasur River Estuary (PRE) caused by decreasing river discharges resulting from an upstream barrage. The formation of a salt plug in response to changes in river discharge was investigated using a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) recorder during spring and neap tides in the dry and wet seasons in 2014. An exportation of saline water from the Shibsa River Estuary (SRE) to the PRE through the Chunkhuri Channel occurred during the dry season, and a salt plug was created and persisted from December to June near Chalna in the PRE. A discharge-induced, relatively high water level in the PRE during the wet season exerted hydrostatic pressure towards the SRE from the PRE and thereby prevented the intrusion of salt water from the SRE to the PRE.

  15. Eutrophication Links between the Watershed and Estuary in the Neuse River Basin, NC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showers, W. J.; Paerl, H. W.

    2005-05-01

    The Neuse River drains into the Neuse River Estuary and Pamlico Sound, which is part of the second largest estuarine ecosystem in the United States and a key nursery for Mid and Southeast Atlantic fisheries. RiverNet, ModMon, and now FerryMon have monitored nutrient fluxes in the watershed and ecosystem responses in the estuary. Poor water quality in the 1980's led to a phosphorus ban in the basin that decreased P inputs to the watershed and improved water quality in the freshwater portions of the basin. High temporal resolution nutrient monitoring in the river indicates that significant flux variations are associated with point sources, and that N fluxes have been underestimated by previous monitoring efforts. N loss in the watershed is associated with hydric soils that are primarily located in the lower coastal plain. The 17O composition of nitrate suggests that Amospherically Deposited Nitrogen (A.D.N.) is event driven and is controlled by land use in the sub-basin. New regulations imposed by the State of NC are decreasing N fluxes in the watershed, but these fluxes are highly variable and controlled to some extent by extreme rainfall events that result from direct hurricane strikes and droughts. The greater decrease in P flux to the estuary compared to N flux (which has decreased slightly or remained the same) has reduced P-limited primary production in the freshwater upper portion of the estuary. This limits the N assimilation in this region, and allows more efficient N transport to N-sensitive coastal waters in the lower portion of the estuary. Chl a and phytoplankton pigment monitoring in the estuary indicate that site of the maximum primary productivity has moved form the upper estuary in the 1970's and 1980's to the lower estuary today. This displacement of the eutrophication gradient may explain the reduction of Cyanobacteria algae blooms in the upper estuary, and the increase in harmful algae blooms, hypoxia, and declines in fisheries habitats in the

  16. Heavy metal anomalies in the Tinto and Odiel River and estuary system, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C.H.; Lamothe, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Tinto and Odiel rivers drain 100 km from the Rio Tinto sulphide mining district, and join at a 20-km long estuary entering the Atlantic Ocean. A reconnaissance study of heavy metal anomalies in channel sand and overbank mud of the river and estuary by semi-quantitative emission dc-arc spectrographic analysis shows the following upstream to downstream ranges in ppm (??g g-1): As 3,000 to <200, Cd 30 to <0.1, Cu 1,500 to 10, Pb 2,000 to <10, Sb 3000 to <150, and Zn 3,000 to <200. Organic-rich (1.3-2.6% total organic carbon, TOC), sandysilty overbank clay has been analyzed to represent suspended load materials. The high content of heavy metals in the overbank clay throughout the river and estuary systems indicates the importance of suspended sediment transport for dispersing heavy metals from natural erosion and anthropogenic mining activities of the sulfide deposit. The organic-poor (0.21-0.37% TOC) river bed sand has been analyzed to represent bedload transport of naturally-occurring sulfide minerals. The sand has high concentrations of metals upstream but these decrease an order of magnitude in the lower estuary. Although heavy metal contamination of estuary mouth beach sand has been diluted to background levels estuary mud exhibits increased contamination apparently related to finer grain size, higher organic carbon content, precipitation of river-borne dissolved solids, and input of anthropogenic heavy metals from industrial sources. The contaminated estuary mud disperses to the inner shelf mud belt and offshore suspended sediment, which exhibit metal anomalies from natural erosion and mining of upstream Rio Tinto sulphide lode sources (Pb, Cu, Zn) and industrial activities within the estuary (Fe, Cr, Ti). Because heavy metal contamination of Tinto-Odiel river sediment reaches or exceeds the highest levels encountered in other river sediments of Spain and Europe, a detailed analysis of metals in water and suspended sediment throughout the system, and

  17. River discharge controls phytoplankton dynamics in the northern San Francisco Bay estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.; Alpine, A.E.; Cole, B.E.; Wong, R.L.J.; Arthur, J.F.; Ball, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    Phytoplankton dynamics in the upper reach of the northern San Francisco Bay estuary are usually characterized by low biomass dominated by microflagellates or freshwater diatoms in winter, and high biomass dominated by neritic diatoms in summer. During two successive years of very low river discharge (the drought of 1976-77), the summer diatom bloom was absent. This is consistent with the hypothesis that formation of the diatom population maximum is a consequence of the same physical mechanisms that create local maxima of suspended sediments in partially-mixed estuaries: density-selective retention of particles within an estuarine circulation cell. Because the estuary is turbid, calculated phytoplankton growth rates are small in the central deep channel but are relatively large in lateral shallow embayments where light limination is less severe. When river discharge falls within a critical range (100-350 m3 s-1) that positions the suspended particulate maximum adjacent to the productive shallow bays, the population of neritic diatoms increases. However, during periods of high discharge (winter) or during periods of very low discharge (drought), the suspended particulate maximum is less well-defined and is uncoupled (positioned downstream or upstream) from the shallow bays of the upper estuary, and the population of neritic diatoms declines. Hence, the biomass and community composition of phytoplankton in this estuary are controlled by river discharge. ?? 1983.

  18. Oxygen deficit determinations for a major river in eastern Hong Kong, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, G H; Leong, I M; Liu, J; Huang, J C; Lo, I M; Yen, B C

    2000-07-01

    Determination of oxygen deficit in the Hong Kong Shing-Mun River was based on the oxygen uptake by water, algal respiration and river sediment and the oxygen supplied to the river by surface reaeration and algal photosynthesis. A systematic study was conducted to examine the effect of water temperature, flow velocity and water depth on both the oxygen demands and the oxygen supplies. The oxygen budget of a water column in a selected section of the river was modeled. The results of the oxygen budget analysis showed that when water temperature was around 10 degrees C (the lowest temperature in the river), no deficit was observed. When water temperature was 10 degrees C to 20 degrees C, a small oxygen deficit appeared, especially in the deeper water. At the highest water temperature (30 degrees C), the oxygen deficit was maximal, -6.84 g O2/m2/day, in the night-time during the Spring tide period.

  19. Pollutant fate and spatio-temporal variability in the choptank river estuary: Factors influencing water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitall, D.; Hively, W.D.; Leight, A.K.; Hapeman, C.J.; McConnell, L.L.; Fisher, T.; Rice, C.P.; Codling, E.; McCarty, G.W.; Sadeghi, A.M.; Gustafson, A.; Bialek, K.

    2010-01-01

    Restoration of the Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States, is a national priority. Documentation of progress of this restoration effort is needed. A study was conducted to examine water quality in the Choptank River estuary, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay that since 1998 has been classified as impaired waters under the Federal Clean Water Act. Multiple water quality parameters (salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll a) and analyte concentrations (nutrients, herbicide and herbicide degradation products, arsenic, and copper) were measured at seven sampling stations in the Choptank River estuary. Samples were collected under base flow conditions in the basin on thirteen dates between March 2005 and April 2008. As commonly observed, results indicate that agriculture is a primary source of nitrate in the estuary and that both agriculture and wastewater treatment plants are important sources of phosphorus. Concentrations of copper in the lower estuary consistently exceeded both chronic and acute water quality criteria, possibly due to use of copper in antifouling boat paint. Concentrations of copper in the upstream watersheds were low, indicating that agriculture is not a significant source of copper loading to the estuary. Concentrations of herbicides (atrazine, simazine, and metolachlor) peaked during early-summer, indicating a rapid surface-transport delivery pathway from agricultural areas, while their degradation products (CIAT, CEAT, MESA, and MOA) appeared to be delivered via groundwater transport. Some in-river processing of CEAT occurred, whereas MESA was conservative. Observed concentrations of herbicide residues did not approach established levels of concern for aquatic organisms. Results of this study highlight the importance of continued implementation of best management practices to improve water quality in the estuary. This work provides a baseline against which to compare future changes in water quality and may be used

  20. Pollutant fate and spatio-temporal variability in the choptank river estuary: factors influencing water quality.

    PubMed

    Whitall, David; Hively, W Dean; Leight, Andrew K; Hapeman, Cathleen J; McConnell, Laura L; Fisher, Thomas; Rice, Clifford P; Codling, Eton; McCarty, Gregory W; Sadeghi, Ali M; Gustafson, Anne; Bialek, Krystyna

    2010-04-01

    Restoration of the Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States, is a national priority. Documentation of progress of this restoration effort is needed. A study was conducted to examine water quality in the Choptank River estuary, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay that since 1998 has been classified as impaired waters under the Federal Clean Water Act. Multiple water quality parameters (salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll a) and analyte concentrations (nutrients, herbicide and herbicide degradation products, arsenic, and copper) were measured at seven sampling stations in the Choptank River estuary. Samples were collected under base flow conditions in the basin on thirteen dates between March 2005 and April 2008. As commonly observed, results indicate that agriculture is a primary source of nitrate in the estuary and that both agriculture and wastewater treatment plants are important sources of phosphorus. Concentrations of copper in the lower estuary consistently exceeded both chronic and acute water quality criteria, possibly due to use of copper in antifouling boat paint. Concentrations of copper in the upstream watersheds were low, indicating that agriculture is not a significant source of copper loading to the estuary. Concentrations of herbicides (atrazine, simazine, and metolachlor) peaked during early-summer, indicating a rapid surface-transport delivery pathway from agricultural areas, while their degradation products (CIAT, CEAT, MESA, and MOA) appeared to be delivered via groundwater transport. Some in-river processing of CEAT occurred, whereas MESA was conservative. Observed concentrations of herbicide residues did not approach established levels of concern for aquatic organisms. Results of this study highlight the importance of continued implementation of best management practices to improve water quality in the estuary. This work provides a baseline against which to compare future changes in water quality and may be used

  1. Leachable particulate iron in the Columbia River, estuary, and near-field plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippiatt, Sherry M.; Brown, Matthew T.; Lohan, Maeve C.; Berger, Carolyn J. M.; Bruland, Kenneth W.

    2010-03-01

    This study examines the distribution of leachable particulate iron (Fe) in the Columbia River, estuary, and near-field plume. Surface samples were collected during late spring and summer of 2004-2006 as part of four River Influence on Shelf Ecosystems (RISE) cruises. Tidal amplitude and river flow are the primary factors influencing the estuary leachable particulate Fe concentrations, with greater values during high flow and/or spring tides. Near the mouth of the estuary, leachable particulate Fe [defined as the particulate Fe solubilized with a 25% acetic acid (pH 2) leach containing a weak reducing agent to reduce Fe oxyhydroxides and a short heating step to access intracellular Fe] averaged 770 nM during either spring tide or high flow, compared to 320 nM during neap tide, low flow conditions. In the near-field Columbia River plume, elevated leachable particulate Fe concentrations occur during spring tides and/or higher river flow, with resuspended shelf sediment as an additional source to the plume during periods of coastal upwelling and spring tides. Near-field plume concentrations of leachable particulate Fe (at a salinity of 20) averaged 660 nM during either spring tide or high flow, compared to 300 nM during neap tide, low flow conditions. Regardless of tidal amplitude and river flow, leachable particulate Fe concentrations in both the river/estuary and near-field plume are consistently one to two orders of magnitude greater than dissolved Fe concentrations. The Columbia River is an important source of reactive Fe to the productive coastal waters off Oregon and Washington, and leachable particulate Fe is available for solubilization following biological drawdown of the dissolved phase. Elevated leachable Fe concentrations allow coastal waters influenced by the Columbia River plume to remain Fe-replete and support phytoplankton production during the spring and summer seasons.

  2. Factors Contributing to Hypoxia in the Minjiang River Estuary, Southeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Pang, Yong; Pan, Hongche; Shi, Chengchun; Huang, Yawen; Wang, Jianjian

    2015-08-11

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is not only a fundamental parameter of coastal water quality, but also an indication of organics decomposed in water and their degree of eutrophication. There has been a concern about the deterioration of dissolved oxygen conditions in the Minjiang River Estuary, the longest river in Fujian Province, Southeast China. In this study, the syntheses effects on DO was analyzed by using a four year time series of DO concentration and ancillary parameters (river discharge, water level, and temperature) from the Fuzhou Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, at three automated stations along the Minjiang River Estuary. Hypoxia occurred exclusively in the fluvial sections of the estuary during the high temperature and low river discharge period and was remarkably more serious in the river reach near the large urban area of Fuzhou. Enhancement of respiration by temperature and discharge of domestic sewage and industrial wastewater, versus regeneration of waters and dilution of pollutant concentration with increased river discharge, which regarded as the dominant antagonist processes that controlled the appearance of seasonal hypoxia. During the high temperature and the drought period, minimal mainstream flow above 700 m(3)Ÿs(-1), reduction of pollutants and forbidding sediment dredging in the South Channel should be guaranteed for strong supports on water quality management and drinking water source protection.

  3. Factors Contributing to Hypoxia in the Minjiang River Estuary, Southeast China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Pang, Yong; Pan, Hongche; Shi, Chengchun; Huang, Yawen; Wang, Jianjian

    2015-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is not only a fundamental parameter of coastal water quality, but also an indication of organics decomposed in water and their degree of eutrophication. There has been a concern about the deterioration of dissolved oxygen conditions in the Minjiang River Estuary, the longest river in Fujian Province, Southeast China. In this study, the syntheses effects on DO was analyzed by using a four year time series of DO concentration and ancillary parameters (river discharge, water level, and temperature) from the Fuzhou Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, at three automated stations along the Minjiang River Estuary. Hypoxia occurred exclusively in the fluvial sections of the estuary during the high temperature and low river discharge period and was remarkably more serious in the river reach near the large urban area of Fuzhou. Enhancement of respiration by temperature and discharge of domestic sewage and industrial wastewater, versus regeneration of waters and dilution of pollutant concentration with increased river discharge, which regarded as the dominant antagonist processes that controlled the appearance of seasonal hypoxia. During the high temperature and the drought period, minimal mainstream flow above 700 m3·s−1, reduction of pollutants and forbidding sediment dredging in the South Channel should be guaranteed for strong supports on water quality management and drinking water source protection. PMID:26270670

  4. Ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus in the Pearl River and effects on the estuarine coastal waters: Nutrient management strategy in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kedong; Harrison, Paul J.; Broom, Malcolm; Chung, C. H.

    The Pearl River is the second largest river in China, and has a 454,000 km 2 drainage basin. Excess nutrients can result in algal blooms, or even harmful algal blooms and subsequent dissolved oxygen (DO) consumption can lead to hypoxia. However, not all nutrients are equal; only one nutrient relative to other nutrients is the most limiting for algal biomass production and the other nutrients that are in excess cannot be used to produce a further increase in an algal bloom. Therefore, the strategy of nutrient pollution control is to remove the most limiting nutrient from the sewage effluent to minimize eutrophication impacts on the receiving waters. This, in turn, determines the type and level of sewage treatment. In the Pearl River, nitrogen (N) is very high and phosphorus (P) is relatively low, leading to a very high N:P ratio. The Pearl River flows into coastal waters in the South China Sea and heavily influences Hong Kong waters located to the east of the Pearl River estuary. When the Hong Kong government planned to upgrade the domestic sewage facility to biological treatment, this triggered the scientific question of which nutrient, N or P is the most limiting nutrient and the answer to this question became critical in making the management decision on the treatment facilities for removal of N or P, which bears a huge financial implication. In the past, because N is high in southern waters, it was thought that any addition of N would exceed the environmental assimilation capacity and result in algal blooms. Therefore, N has been typically considered for removal from sewage effluent. However, evidence revealed that P was the most limiting nutrient in the southern waters of Hong Kong and it actually limits phytoplankton biomass accumulation and potentially limits bacterial DO consumption. Hence, the removal of P has been suggested to receive priority over N removal, if there is a need for the future elevation of treatment levels. However, as this conclusion is

  5. Trace metals in estuaries in the Russian Far East and China: case studies from the Amur River and the Changjiang.

    PubMed

    Shulkin, Vladimir; Zhang, Jing

    2014-11-15

    This paper compares the distributions of dissolved and particulate forms of Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb in the estuaries of the largest rivers in East Asia: the Amur River and the Changjiang (Yangtze River). High suspended solid concentrations, elevated pH, and relatively low dissolved trace metal concentrations are characteristics of the Changjiang. Elevated dissolved Fe and Mn concentrations, neutral pH, and relatively low suspended solid concentrations are characteristics of the Amur River. The transfer of dissolved Fe to suspended forms is typical in the Amur River estuary, though Cd and Mn tend to mobilize to solution, and Cu and Ni are diluted in the estuarine system. Metal concentrations in suspended matter in the Amur River estuary are controlled by the ratio of terrigenous riverine material, enriched in Al and Fe, and marine biogenic particles, enriched in Cu, Mn, Cd, and in some cases Ni. The increase in dissolved forms of Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Pb compared with river end-member is unique to the Changjiang estuary. Particle-solution interactions are not reflected in bulk suspended-solid metal concentrations in the Changjiang estuary due to the dominance of particulate forms of these metals. Cd is an exception in the Changjiang estuary, where the increase in dissolved Cd is of comparable magnitude to the decrease in particulate Cd. Despite runoff in the Amur River being lower than that in the Changjiang, the fluxes of dissolved Mn, Zn and Fe in the Amur River exceed those in the Changjiang. Dissolved Ni, and Cd fluxes are near equal in both estuaries, but dissolved Cu is lower in the Amur River estuary. The hydrological and physico-chemical river characteristics are dominated at the assessment of river influence on the adjoining coastal sea areas despite differences in estuarine processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.

    2006-12-20

    This report is the second annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration projects in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration projects throughout the estuary. This project is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.

  7. The faucet snail (Bithynia tentaculata) invades the St. Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The European-origin faucet snail (Bithynia tentaculata) now numbers among the aquatic invasive species present in the St. Louis River Estuary. This snail has been in the lower Great Lakes since the early 20th century but is new to the Lake Superior basin. We found faucet snails...

  8. The Partitioning of Triclosan between Aqueous and Particulate Phases in the Hudson River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distribution of Triclosan within the Hudson River Estuary can be explained by a balance among the overall effluent inputs from municipal sewage treatment facilities, dilution of Triclosan concentrations in the water column with freshwater and seawater inputs, removal of Tricl...

  9. The Partitioning of Triclosan between Aqueous and Particulate Phases in the Hudson River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distribution of Triclosan within the Hudson River Estuary can be explained by a balance among the overall effluent inputs from municipal sewage treatment facilities, dilution of Triclosan concentrations in the water column with freshwater and seawater inputs, removal of Tricl...

  10. Habitat use and trophic position effects on contaminant bioaccumulation in St. Louis River Estuary fishes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of our study was to determine the relationship between fish tissue stable isotope composition and total mercury or polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in the St. Louis River estuary food web. We sampled two resident fishes, Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) ...

  11. Distribution of submerged aquatic vegetation in the St. Louis River estuary: Maps and models

    EPA Science Inventory

    In late summer of 2011 and 2012 we used echo-sounding gear to map the distribution of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in the St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE). From these data we produced maps of SAV distribution and we created logistic models to predict the probability of occurr...

  12. Time Series Analysis of Water Level and Temperature in the St Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pressure and temperature loggers were deployed at 9 sites in the St Louis River estuary between 6/23 10/31 2011. A reference sensor was place on the shore to correct pressure data. Sensors were paced at <1 m depth in Allouez Bay, Superior Bay, near Hearding Island, WLSSD Bay, th...

  13. Nutrient Budgets and Management Actions in the Patuxent River Estuary, Maryland

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-year nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) budgets were developed for the Patuxent River estuary, a seasonally stratified and moderately eutrophic tributary of Chesapeake Bay. Major inputs (point, diffuse, septic and direct atmospheric) were measured for 13 years during which la...

  14. MEASURED CONCENTRATIONS OF HERBICIDES AND MODEL PREDICTIONS OF ATRAZINE FATE IN THE PATUXENT RIVER ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    McConnell, Laura L., Jennifer A. Harman-Fetcho and James D. Hagy, III. 2004. Measured Concentrations of Herbicides and Model Predictions of Atrazine Fate in the Patuxent River Estuary. J. Environ. Qual. 33(2):594-604. (ERL,GB X1051).

    The environmental fate of herbicides i...

  15. Habitat use and trophic position effects on contaminant bioaccumulation in St. Louis River Estuary fishes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of our study was to determine the relationship between fish tissue stable isotope composition and total mercury or polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in the St. Louis River estuary food web. We sampled two resident fishes, Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) ...

  16. Time Series Analysis of Water Level and Temperature in the St Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pressure and temperature loggers were deployed at 9 sites in the St Louis River estuary between 6/23 10/31 2011. A reference sensor was place on the shore to correct pressure data. Sensors were paced at <1 m depth in Allouez Bay, Superior Bay, near Hearding Island, WLSSD Bay, th...

  17. PARASITIC AND SYMBIONIC FAUNA IN OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) COLLECTED FROM THE CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER AND ESTUARY, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory



    Studies of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, collected from ten sites in the Caloosahatchee River and Estuary, Florida, revealed a varied parasite and symbiotic fauna that have never been reported from this area. Organisms observed included ovacystis virus infecting gametes...

  18. A Community Runs Through It: 30 Years of Collaboration in the St. Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    When participants in the 2016 St Louis River Summit identified their roles and described their interactions with the estuary on the 50-year timeline, they were illustrating the community that built and is now implementing the Remedial Action Plan. From its inception, the Great La...

  19. Protocols for Monitoring Habitat Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Roegner, G. Curtis; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2008-04-25

    Protocols for monitoring salmon habitat restoration projects are essential for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' environmental efforts in the Columbia River estuary. This manual provides state-of-the science data collection and analysis methods for landscape features, water quality, and fish species composition, among others.

  20. 78 FR 14985 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Russian River Estuary Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... Watch Public Education Program in 1985 to educate beach visitors and monitor seal populations. State... surf at the mouth of the river or swimming inside the estuary. Most recently, a solitary male sea lion... precocious, swimming and diving immediately after birth and throughout the lactation period, unlike most...

  1. Distribution of submerged aquatic vegetation in the St. Louis River estuary: Maps and models

    EPA Science Inventory

    In late summer of 2011 and 2012 we used echo-sounding gear to map the distribution of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in the St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE). From these data we produced maps of SAV distribution and we created logistic models to predict the probability of occurr...

  2. A Community Runs Through It: 30 Years of Collaboration in the St. Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    When participants in the 2016 St Louis River Summit identified their roles and described their interactions with the estuary on the 50-year timeline, they were illustrating the community that built and is now implementing the Remedial Action Plan. From its inception, the Great La...

  3. Investigating phenology of larval fishes in St. Louis River estuary shallow water habitats

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the development of an early detection monitoring strategy for non-native fishes, larval fish surveys have been conducted since 2012 in the St. Louis River estuary. Survey data demonstrates there is considerable variability in fish abundance and species assemblages acro...

  4. Nutrient Budgets and Management Actions in the Patuxent River Estuary, Maryland

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-year nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) budgets were developed for the Patuxent River estuary, a seasonally stratified and moderately eutrophic tributary of Chesapeake Bay. Major inputs (point, diffuse, septic and direct atmospheric) were measured for 13 years during which la...

  5. The faucet snail (Bithynia tentaculata) invades the St. Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The European-origin faucet snail (Bithynia tentaculata) now numbers among the aquatic invasive species present in the St. Louis River Estuary. This snail has been in the lower Great Lakes since the early 20th century but is new to the Lake Superior basin. We found faucet snails...

  6. Investigating phenology of larval fishes in St. Louis River estuary shallow water habitats

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the development of an early detection monitoring strategy for non-native fishes, larval fish surveys have been conducted since 2012 in the St. Louis River estuary. Survey data demonstrates there is considerable variability in fish abundance and species assemblages acro...

  7. A predictive model for floating leaf vegetation in the St. Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    In July 2014, USEPA staff was asked by MPCA to develop a predictive model for floating leaf vegetation (FLV) in the St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE). The existing model (Host et al. 2012) greatly overpredicts FLV in St. Louis Bay probably because it was based on a limited number of...

  8. A predictive model for floating leaf vegetation in the St. Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    In July 2014, USEPA staff was asked by MPCA to develop a predictive model for floating leaf vegetation (FLV) in the St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE). The existing model (Host et al. 2012) greatly overpredicts FLV in St. Louis Bay probably because it was based on a limited number of...

  9. PARASITIC AND SYMBIONIC FAUNA IN OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) COLLECTED FROM THE CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER AND ESTUARY, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory



    Studies of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, collected from ten sites in the Caloosahatchee River and Estuary, Florida, revealed a varied parasite and symbiotic fauna that have never been reported from this area. Organisms observed included ovacystis virus infecting gametes...

  10. MEASURED CONCENTRATIONS OF HERBICIDES AND MODEL PREDICTIONS OF ATRAZINE FATE IN THE PATUXENT RIVER ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    McConnell, Laura L., Jennifer A. Harman-Fetcho and James D. Hagy, III. 2004. Measured Concentrations of Herbicides and Model Predictions of Atrazine Fate in the Patuxent River Estuary. J. Environ. Qual. 33(2):594-604. (ERL,GB X1051).

    The environmental fate of herbicides i...

  11. Chemical speciation of inorganic pollutants in river-estuary-sea water systems.

    PubMed

    Tepavitcharova, Stefka; Todorov, Tihomir; Rabadjieva, Diana; Dassenakis, Manos; Paraskevopoulou, Vasiliki

    2009-02-01

    Monitoring studies and thermodynamic modeling were used to reveal the changes of inorganic chemical species of some water pollutants (nutrients and trace metals such as Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb) inthe river-estuary-sea water system. The case studies were two rivers, Kamchiya and Ropotamo, representing part of the Bulgarian Black Sea water catchment area, and having different flow characteristics. There were no major differences in inorganic chemical species of the two river systems. NO3(-) and NO2(-) chemical species showed no changes along the river-estuary-sea water system. Concerning phosphates six different species were calculated and differences between the three parts of the systems were established. The HPO4(2-) and H2PO4(-) species were found to be dominant in river waters. The H2PO4(-) species quickly decreased at the expense of HPO4(2-) and Ca, Mg and Na phosphate complexes in estuary and seawater. Trace metals showed a great variety of chemical species. Fe(OH)2(+) species prevailed in river waters, and Fe(OH)3(0) species--in sea waters. Me2+ and MeCO3(0) (Me = Cu, Pb) and PbHCO3(+) were dominant in river waters, while Cu(CO3)2(2-) and PbCl(-) species appear also in sea waters. Cd2+ species prevailed in river and estuary waters, and CdCln(2-n) (n = 1-3) species, in seawater. Free Zn2+ species predominated in all systems but downstream their percentage decreased at the expense of Zn phosphates, carbonates,sulfates and chlorides complexes. Only free Mn2+ species were dominant along the systems.

  12. Use of glacier river-fed estuary channels by juvenile coho salmon: transitional or rearing habitats?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoem Neher, Tammy D.; Rosenberger, Amanda E.; Zimmerman, Christian E.; Walker, Coowe M.; Baird, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Estuaries are among the most productive ecosystems in the world and provide important rearing environments for a variety of fish species. Though generally considered important transitional habitats for smolting salmon, little is known about the role that estuaries serve for rearing and the environmental conditions important for salmon. We illustrate how juvenile coho salmonOncorhynchus kisutch use a glacial river-fed estuary based on examination of spatial and seasonal variability in patterns of abundance, fish size, age structure, condition, and local habitat use. Fish abundance was greater in deeper channels with cooler and less variable temperatures, and these habitats were consistently occupied throughout the season. Variability in channel depth and water temperature was negatively associated with fish abundance. Fish size was negatively related to site distance from the upper extent of the tidal influence, while fish condition did not relate to channel location within the estuary ecotone. Our work demonstrates the potential this glacially-fed estuary serves as both transitional and rearing habitat for juvenile coho salmon during smolt emigration to the ocean, and patterns of fish distribution within the estuary correspond to environmental conditions.

  13. Complex movement patterns of greenback flounder (Rhombosolea tapirina) in the Murray River estuary and Coorong, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earl, Jason; Fowler, Anthony J.; Ye, Qifeng; Dittmann, Sabine

    2017-04-01

    The greenback flounder Rhombosolea tapirina is a commercially-important flatfish species in southern Australia and New Zealand, whose population dynamics are poorly understood. Acoustic telemetry was used to assess movement patterns and area use for R. tapirina in the Murray River estuary and Coorong, South Australia. Twenty fish (221-313 mm total length) equipped with acoustic transmitters were monitored for up to seven months during a period of high freshwater inflow. Fish were detected over a large part of the system, but showed a strong preference for brackish and near-marine conditions in the inner estuary. Tagged fish exhibited complex movement patterns that differed among individuals, including: (1) within estuary movements; (2) dispersal from the estuary to the sea; and (3) return migrations between the estuary and the sea. A diurnal shift in fine-scale area use was observed in the part of the estuary where residency was highest, with individuals occupying deeper habitats during the day and shallower areas during the night. The results demonstrate the individualistic and often highly transient behaviour of this species and its ability to undertake regular movements over the spatial scale of 10s of km. Understanding such movement patterns can improve effective management of estuarine flatfish populations and ecosystems.

  14. Chiral source apportionment of polychlorinated biphenyls to the Hudson River estuary atmosphere and food web.

    PubMed

    Asher, Brian J; Wong, Charles S; Rodenburg, Lisa A

    2007-09-01

    The New York/New Jersey Harbor Estuary is subject to significant contamination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from numerous sources, including the historically contaminated Upper Hudson River, stormwater runoff and sewer overflows, and atmospheric deposition from PCBs originating from the surrounding urban area. However, the relative importance of these sources to the estuary's food web is not fully understood. Sources of PCBs to the estuary were apportioned using chiral signatures of PCBs in air, water, total suspended matter, phytoplankton, and sediment. PCBs 91, 95, 136, and 149 were racemic in the atmosphere of the estuary. However, the other phases contained nonracemic PCB 95 and to a lesser extent PCB 149. Thus, the predominant atmospheric source of these congeners is likely unweathered local pollution and not volatilization from the estuary. The similarity in chiral signatures in the other phases is consistent with dynamic contaminant exchange among them. Chiral signatures in the dissolved phase and total suspended matter were correlated with Upper Hudson discharge, suggesting thatthe delivery of nonracemic contaminated sediment from the Upper Hudson, not the atmosphere, controls phytoplankton uptake of some PCBs. Thus, measures to control PCB contamination in the Upper Hudson should be effective in reducing loadings to the estuary's aquatic ecosystem.

  15. Spatiotemporal Trends of Heavy Metals in Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphins (Sousa chinensis) from the Western Pearl River Estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Gui, Duan; Yu, Ri-Qing; Karczmarski, Leszek; Ding, Yulong; Zhang, Haifei; Sun, Yong; Zhang, Mei; Wu, Yuping

    2017-02-07

    We assessed the spatiotemporal trends of the concentrations of 11 heavy metals (HMs) in the liver and kidney of Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins (Sousa chinensis) from western Pearl River Estuary (PRE) during 2004-2015. The hepatic levels of Cr, As, and Cu in these dolphins were among the highest reported for cetaceans globally, and the levels of Zn, Cu, and Hg were sufficiently high to cause toxicological effects in some of the animals. Between same age-sex groups, dolphins from Lingdingyang were significantly more contaminated with Hg, Se, and V than those from the West-four region, while the opposite was true for Cd. Generalized additive mixed models showed that most metals had significant but dissimilar temporal trends over a 10-year period. The concentrations of Cu and Zn increased significantly in recent years, corresponding to the high input of these metals in the region. Body-length-adjusted Cd levels peaked in 2012, accompanied by the highest annual number of dolphin stranding events. In contrast to the significant decrease in HM levels in the dolphins in Hong Kong waters (the eastern reaches of the PRE), the elevated metal exposure in the western PRE raises serious concerns.

  16. Columbia River Estuary Hybrid Model Studies. Report 1. Verification of Hybrid Modeling of the Columbia River Mouth.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    330 PPT STATION 2-F PLATE 62 SURFACE 40 30 I \\/ \\ 20 / 10- 0 2 4 6 8 )0 )2 14 16 18 20 22 24 0 MIDDE PTH 40 0 4 0 0 -o v /" 4 0 0 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14...River Estuary, Report 2, Entrance Studies, Section 2, Fixed-Bed Studies of North Jetty Rehabilitation ," Technical Report 2-735, No. 2-2, U.S.A.E...Estuary, Report 2, Entrance Studies, Section 1, Fixed-Bed Studies of South Jetty Rehabilitation ," Technical Report 2-735, No. 2-1, U.S.A.E. Waterways

  17. Beluga whale summer habitat associations in the Nelson River estuary, western Hudson Bay, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexander J.; Higdon, Jeff W.; Richard, Pierre; Orr, Jack; Bernhardt, Warren

    2017-01-01

    To understand beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) estuarine use in the Nelson River estuary, southwest Hudson Bay, we recorded and examined beluga movements and habitat associations for the July through August period in 2002–2005. We compared locations of belugas fitted with satellite transmitters (“tags”) (2002–2005) and aerial-surveyed (2003 and 2005) belugas for years of differing freshwater flow from the Nelson River which is influenced by hydroelectric activity. Using the beluga telemetry location data, we estimated an early August behavioral shift in beluga distribution patterns from local estuarine use to a progressively more migratory behavior away from the estuary. The timing of this shift in behavior was also apparent in results of beluga aerial surveys from the 1940s–1960s, despite environmental changes including later freeze-up and warming ocean temperatures. Overall, during the higher than average discharge (“wet”) year of 2005, the three tagged belugas ranged farther from the Nelson River but not farther from the nearest shore along southwestern Hudson Bay, compared to the 10 tagged belugas tracked during the “dry” years of 2002–2004 with below average discharges. Aerial survey data for 2003 and 2005 display a similar dry vs. wet year shift in spatial patterns, with no significant change in overall density of belugas within the study area. In the Nelson estuary, proximity to the fresh-salt water mixing area may be more important than the shallow waters of the upper estuary. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) were observed in the Churchill area (200 km northwest) during each year of study, 2002–05, and belugas may benefit from the proximity to shallow estuary waters that provide protection from the larger-bodied predator. Study results contribute to an understanding of the influence of environmental variation on how and why belugas use estuaries although considerable uncertainties exist and additional research is required. PMID

  18. Estimating sediment budgets at the interface between rivers and estuaries with application to the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Scott A.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2005-09-01

    Where rivers encounter estuaries, a transition zone develops where riverine and tidal processes both affect sediment transport processes. One such transition zone is the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, a large, complex system where several rivers meet to form an estuary (San Francisco Bay). Herein we present the results of a detailed sediment budget for this river/estuary transitional system. The primary regional goal of the study was to measure sediment transport rates and pathways in the delta in support of ecosystem restoration efforts. In addition to achieving this regional goal, the study has produced general methods to collect, edit, and analyze (including error analysis) sediment transport data at the interface of rivers and estuaries. Estimating sediment budgets for these systems is difficult because of the mixed nature of riverine versus tidal transport processes, the different timescales of transport in fluvial and tidal environments, and the sheer complexity and size of systems such as the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Sediment budgets also require error estimates in order to assess whether differences in inflows and outflows, which could be small compared to overall fluxes, are indeed distinguishable from zero. Over the 4 year period of this study, water years 1999-2002, 6.6 ± 0.9 Mt of sediment entered the delta and 2.2 ± 0.7 Mt exited, resulting in 4.4 ± 1.1 Mt (67 ± 17%) of deposition. The estimated deposition rate corresponding to this mass of sediment compares favorably with measured inorganic sediment accumulation on vegetated wetlands in the delta.

  19. Estimating sediment budgets at the interface between rivers and estuaries with application to the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Scott A.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2005-09-01

    Where rivers encounter estuaries, a transition zone develops where riverine and tidal processes both affect sediment transport processes. One such transition zone is the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, a large, complex system where several rivers meet to form an estuary (San Francisco Bay). Herein we present the results of a detailed sediment budget for this river/estuary transitional system. The primary regional goal of the study was to measure sediment transport rates and pathways in the delta in support of ecosystem restoration efforts. In addition to achieving this regional goal, the study has produced general methods to collect, edit, and analyze (including error analysis) sediment transport data at the interface of rivers and estuaries. Estimating sediment budgets for these systems is difficult because of the mixed nature of riverine versus tidal transport processes, the different timescales of transport in fluvial and tidal environments, and the sheer complexity and size of systems such as the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Sediment budgets also require error estimates in order to assess whether differences in inflows and outflows, which could be small compared to overall fluxes, are indeed distinguishable from zero. Over the 4 year period of this study, water years 1999-2002, 6.6 +/- 0.9 Mt of sediment entered the delta and 2.2 +/- 0.7 Mt exited, resulting in 4.4 +/- 1.1 Mt (67 +/- 17%) of deposition. The estimated deposition rate corresponding to this mass of sediment compares favorably with measured inorganic sediment accumulation on vegetated wetlands in the delta.

  20. Estimating sediment budgets at the interface between rivers and estuaries with application to the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, S.A.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Where rivers encounter estuaries, a transition zone develops where riverine and tidal processes both affect sediment transport processes. One such transition zone is the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, a large, complex system where several rivers meet to form an estuary (San Francisco Bay). Herein we present the results of a detailed sediment budget for this river/estuary transitional system. The primary regional goal of the study was to measure sediment transport rates and pathways in the delta in support of ecosystem restoration efforts. In addition to achieving this regional goal, the study has produced general methods to collect, edit, and analyze (including error analysis) sediment transport data at the interface of rivers and estuaries. Estimating sediment budgets for these systems is difficult because of the mixed nature of riverine versus tidal transport processes, the different timescales of transport in fluvial and tidal environments, and the sheer complexity and size of systems such as the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Sediment budgets also require error estimates in order to assess whether differences in inflows and outflows, which could be small compared to overall fluxes, are indeed distinguishable from zero. Over the 4 year period of this study, water years 1999-2002, 6.6 ?? 0.9 Mt of sediment entered the delta and 2.2 ?? 0.7 Mt exited, resulting in 4.4 ?? 1.1 Mt (67 ?? 17%) of deposition. The estimated deposition rate corresponding to this mass of sediment compares favorably with measured inorganic sediment accumulation on vegetated wetlands in the delta.

  1. [Labidocera euchaeta: its distribution in Yangtze River Estuary and responses to global warming].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhao-Li; Gao, Qian

    2009-05-01

    Based on the investigation data from eight oceanographic censuses in Yangtze River Estuary (28 degrees 00'-32 degrees 00' N, 122 degrees 00'-123 degrees 30' E) in four seasons of 1959 and 2002, the seasonal distribution pattern of Labidocera euchaeta in the Estuary and the responses of this zooplankton to global warming were analyzed. In the study area, L. euchaeta had a higher average abundance in winter and spring than in summer and autumn, with the highest occurrence frequency in winter and an obvious aggregation in spring and summer. Water salinity was the key factor determining the horizontal distribution of L. euchaeta. The optimal water temperature and salinity for L. euchaeta were 16 degrees C and 12-20, respectively, indicating that this zooplankton belonged to a warm temperate brackish water species. Comparing with that in 1959, the abundance of L. euchaeta in 2002 decreased obviously, which could be related to global warming and suggested that L. euchaeta could be used as an important indictor species of ocean warming in Yangtze River Estuary. The high abundance of L. euchaeta in spring appeared in the most turbid zone of Yangtze River Estuary, being of significance in maintaining the functions of fishing grounds in the waters.

  2. Cadmium and manganese distributions in the Hudson River estuary: interannual and seasonal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A.

    1998-08-01

    Surface waters collected along the salinity gradient of the Hudson River estuary in four cruises between 1995 and 1997 were size-fractionated into particulate (>0.45 μm), `dissolved' (<0.45 μm), colloidal (10 kDa, 0.45 μm) and low molecular weight (<10 kDa) phases. Dissolved Cd concentrations (range: 0.11-1.19 nM) in surface waters of the estuary appear to have decreased fourfold (from an average of 2.36 to 0.61 nM) over a 23-year period, since the initial analysis of samples collected in the 1970s by Klinkhammer and Bender [Estuar. Coastal Shelf Sci. 12 (1981) 629-643]. This interannual decline reflects improvement in sewage treatment and the elimination of industrial Cd sources to the Hudson River estuary. In contrast, dissolved Mn levels (range: 0.033-1.46 μM) have remained relatively constant over the same period of time, suggesting that anthropogenic sources have very limited impact on Mn concentrations in the estuary. The concentrations of both Cd and Mn appeared to strongly depend on the season and/or river discharge. The highest concentrations were detected under low freshwater discharge, implying that limited hydraulic flushing allows a build-up of metals in the water column. Although the decline in Cd levels within the estuary reflects a reduction in the magnitude of anthropogenic inputs, mass balance estimates indicated that current sources of Cd to the estuary include sewage discharges (in the lower estuary around Manhattan) and diagenetic remobilization from industrial Cd deposited in sediments nearly 2 decades ago (in the upper estuary near Foundry Cove). Moreover, under low river discharge, the sources considered in our model (sewage, riverine input, atmospheric deposition, and benthic fluxes) could account for no more than 60% of the Cd exported from the lower estuary to the ocean. This suggests that undefined sources such as ground water and inputs from other watersheds (e.g., Long Island Sound and Newark Bay) may potentially influence the

  3. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Sedimentary Environments in the Hudson River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagle, A. L.; Carbotte, S. M.; Nitsche, F. O.; Ryan, W. B.; Bell, R.

    2004-05-01

    Sitting at the interface between marine and terrestrial systems, estuaries are sensitive to natural climatic, sea-level and tectonic changes as well as to anthropogenic impacts. Research on estuarine systems has led to improved understanding of estuarine processes, but relation of those processes to the long-term evolution of estuaries is still uncertain. A geophysical survey funded by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation resolves details of spatial and temporal variability of sedimentary processes in the Hudson River Estuary. Here we present interpreted sedimentary environments and evidence of past environments for a 30-km stretch of the Lower Hudson River Estuary, between Piermont and Haverstraw Bay. Integration of high-resolution seismic surveys, side-scan sonar imagery and multibeam bathymetry with sediment samples allows differentiation of three distinct sedimentary environments in the estuary: depositional, erosional and dynamic. Modern deposition occurs mainly in Haverstraw Bay on shallow marginal flats bounding the river channel as well as the channel floor. South of Haverstraw Bay, deposition is limited to a local region in a sharp channel bend, and to areas of anthropogenic disturbance. Erosion in the Lower Estuary dominates the broad, shallow western marginal flats in Tappan Zee and Piermont. Man-made and natural obstructions to river flow, such as a relic oyster bed that outcrops on the river bottom in Haverstraw Bay, create local erosional areas. Dynamic environments, incorporating both erosion and deposition, occur where sediment is actively moving through the estuary. Flow-perpendicular sediment waves dominate the channel floor and walls of the Lower Estuary. Dynamic sediment drifts and scouring are associated with man-made constructions, such as the Tappan Zee Bridge and a pipeline crossing the river south of Piermont Pier. Information from sub-bottom seismics and sediment coring provide evidence that sedimentary environments

  4. Occurrence and risk assessment of antibiotics in river water in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenjing; Li, Na; Zheng, Hailong; Lin, Huiying

    2016-03-01

    The occurrence and distribution of six typical antibiotics in the main rivers of Hong Kong were investigated using high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ES-MS/MS). The results revealed that the antibiotics were widely distributed in the area studied. Of the target antibiotics, ofloxacin was the most frequently detected in the rivers, with a detection rate of 69.6% and a median concentration of 0.7ng/L. Sulfadimidine (n.d-580.4ng/L) and doxycycline (n.d-82.2ng/L), with detection frequencies of 65.2% and 30.4%, respectively, were found at the same level as in rivers in North America, Spain, France, Australia, and in the Yangtze and Pearl Rivers of China, while the other target antibiotics were found at lower levels. According to the ratios of the measured environmental concentration to the predicted no-effect concentration, ofloxacin and doxycycline could present a medium to low ecological risk to algae, while sulfonamides posed no obvious ecological risk to the relevant aquatic organisms (algae, Daphnia magna, and fish). A high detection rate of antibiotics occurred in densely populated areas, revealing that population activities might be greatly contributing to the increasing levels of antibiotics in the area. Thus, the residues of antibiotics present in the waters of Hong Kong need to be closely monitored.

  5. A water-quality study of the tidal Potomac River and Estuary; an overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callender, Edward; Carter, Virginia; Hahl, D.C.; Hitt, Kerie; Schultz, Barbara I.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey began a 5-year interdisciplinary study of the tidal Potomac River and Estuary in October of 1977. The objectives of the study are: (1) to provide a basic understanding of physical, chemical, and biological processes; (2) to develop flow and transport models to predict the movement and fate of nutrients and algaes and (3) to develop efficient techniques for the study of tidal rivers and estuaries. The ultimate goal is to aid water-quality decision-making for the tidal Potomac River and Estuary. The study is being conducted by scientists from many disciplines involved in 14 interrelated studies. These scientists are addressing five major problem areas: nutrient enrichment, algal blooms, dissolved oxygen, sedimentation, and effects of water quality on living resources. Preliminary results show that treatment of sewage has reduced the concentration load of organic carbon and phosphorus below that of the 1960's and 1970's, and changed the form of dissolved nitrogen in the tidal river. Concentrations of chlorophyll a during the study period were lower than those experienced during the massive algal blooms of the 1960's. Dissolved oxygen concentrations fluctuate in response to changes in algal populations, but remain above the Environmental Protection Agency limits during the summer low-flow period. Sedimentation rates have accelerated during the past 50-70 years due to urbanization and farming. Asian clams have recently invaded the tidal river; submersed aquatic vegetation has declined since the early 1900's, but conditions may now favor its return.

  6. BED VARIATION ANALYSIS IN THE CHIKUGO RIVER ESTUARY BY THE FLOOD FLOWS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenta; Shimamoto, Hisanori; Kubo, Seiki; Fukuoka, Shoji

    A series of fisherie issues in the Ariake sea has been believed to be caused by a lack of sand supply from the Chikugo river on the basis of few investigations of characteristics and amount of sediment transport in the the Chikugo river estuary. The core sampling and super-sonic echo sounder indicates that the vertical structure of mid stream of the Chikugo river estuary is consists of complex alternate layer and the rate of water content is much different to each layer. To make the rate of sand transport in the Chikugo river estuary clear, the authors applied unsteady quasi-three dimensional flood flow and river bed variation analysis using observed temporal changes in water surface profiles of flood. In the analysis, the bed layer which the rate of water content upper than 70% is calculated 2009by the experimental equation of erosion speed of the cohesive material. The results of analysis indicates that the rate of sand supply is strongly affected by the tidal level change of the Ariake sea.

  7. Sediment discharge into a subsiding Louisiana deltaic estuary through a Mississippi River diversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snedden, G.A.; Cable, J.E.; Swarzenski, C.; Swenson, E.

    2007-01-01

    Wetlands of the Mississippi River deltaic plain in southeast Louisiana have been hydrologically isolated from the Mississippi River by containment levees for nearly a century. The ensuing lack of fluvial sediment inputs, combined with natural submergence processes, has contributed to high coastal land loss rates. Controlled river diversions have since been constructed to reconnect the marshes of the deltaic plain with the river. This study examines the impact of a pulsed diversion management plan on sediment discharge into the Breton Sound estuary, in which duplicate 185 m3 s-1-diversions lasting two weeks each were conducted in the spring of 2002 and 2003. Sediment delivery during each pulse was highly variable (11,300-43,800 metric tons), and was greatest during rising limbs of Mississippi River flood events. Overland flow, a necessary transport mechanism for river sediments to reach the subsiding backmarsh regions, was induced only when diversion discharge exceeded 100 m3 s-1. These results indicate that timing and magnitude of diversion events are both important factors governing marsh sediment deposition in the receiving basins of river diversions. Though the diversion serves as the primary source of river sediments to the estuary, the inputs observed here were several orders of magnitude less than historical sediment discharge through crevasses and uncontrolled diversions in the region, and are insufficient to offset present rates of relative sea level rise. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sediment discharge into a subsiding Louisiana deltaic estuary through a Mississippi River diversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Gregg A.; Cable, Jaye E.; Swarzenski, Christopher; Swenson, Erick

    2007-01-01

    Wetlands of the Mississippi River deltaic plain in southeast Louisiana have been hydrologically isolated from the Mississippi River by containment levees for nearly a century. The ensuing lack of fluvial sediment inputs, combined with natural submergence processes, has contributed to high coastal land loss rates. Controlled river diversions have since been constructed to reconnect the marshes of the deltaic plain with the river. This study examines the impact of a pulsed diversion management plan on sediment discharge into the Breton Sound estuary, in which duplicate 185 m 3 s -1-diversions lasting two weeks each were conducted in the spring of 2002 and 2003. Sediment delivery during each pulse was highly variable (11,300-43,800 metric tons), and was greatest during rising limbs of Mississippi River flood events. Overland flow, a necessary transport mechanism for river sediments to reach the subsiding backmarsh regions, was induced only when diversion discharge exceeded 100 m 3 s -1. These results indicate that timing and magnitude of diversion events are both important factors governing marsh sediment deposition in the receiving basins of river diversions. Though the diversion serves as the primary source of river sediments to the estuary, the inputs observed here were several orders of magnitude less than historical sediment discharge through crevasses and uncontrolled diversions in the region, and are insufficient to offset present rates of relative sea level rise.

  9. Spatial distribution of dissolved cadmium in the Jiulong river-estuary system: Relevance of anthropogenic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Deli; Yang, Xiqian; Zhai, Weidong; Li, Yan; Hong, Huasheng

    2015-12-01

    This study first examined the spatial distribution of dissolved cadmium (Cd) along with other hydrochemical parameters in a large subtropical river estuary system (the Jiulong River-Estuary, China) between 2008 and 2010, aiming to evaluate the impacts of the recently increasing anthropogenic perturbation in natural waters. The results showed that dissolved Cd was variable in the watershed with sporadically high concentrations (>0.6 nmol L-1). The significantly positive correlation of dissolved Cd with phosphate in the watershed (May 2008: dissolved Cd=0.22*P+0.0062, r=0.64, p<0.05) indicated that dissolved Cd levels have been elevated along with P by the increasing agricultural discharges and/or sewage effluents. The estuary was characterized with decreased levels of dissolved Cd in the highly turbid upper part (salinity: <5; dissolved Cd: <0.1 nmol L-1; Total Suspended Matter: 100-300 mg/L), and a mid-salinity maximum of dissolved Cd in the middle part, which were higher in Summer high river discharge period (0.40-0.54 nmol L-1) than in Fall low river discharge period (0.25-0.35 nmol L-1). Dissolved Cd generally decreased outwards in the lower estuary and nearby coastal waters as mixed with the low Cd-content seawater offshore (dissolved Cd= -0.025*Salinity+0.96, r=0.60, p<0.05). In particular, an enhancement of dissolved Cd (by ~0.2 nmol L-1) was observed in the lower estuary and estuarine plume zone as a result of sewage discharges nearby and/or Cd-enriched submarine groundwater discharges. Summarily, our exemplary study provides clear evidence that China's natural waters are currently subject to local perturbation due to the recently increasing anthropogenic activities.

  10. Hydrodynamic response of the Breton Sound estuary to pulsed Mississippi River inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haosheng; Justic, Dubravko; Lane, Robert R.; Day, John W.; Cable, Jaye E.

    2011-11-01

    Pulsed re-introduction of Mississippi River water into the deltaic plain has been proposed as a wetland restoration strategy for coastal Louisiana. In this study, the hydrodynamic response of the Breton Sound estuary to a two-week pulse of Mississippi River water via the Caernarvon river diversion structure was investigated using a barotropic, three-dimensional, Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM). The numerical model was driven by tidal and subtidal forcing at the open Gulf boundary, freshwater discharge from the Caernarvon river diversion structure, as well as wind stress at the water surface. After successfully validating the model with field observations, three numerical experiments were run to assess the response of current, water level, and marsh flooding to different diversion discharge scenarios. The three scenarios considered were: a pulsed scenario of ˜200 m 3 s -1 corresponding to the actual diversion discharge in March 2001, a constant discharge scenario of 40 m 3 s -1 corresponding to the annually averaged discharge of 2001, and a scenario with no discharge. Numerical simulation results indicated that constant 40 m 3 s -1 discharge caused little change in wetland inundation comparing to the no discharge case and, thus, inter-exchange between deep channels and the wetlands was not improved by this rate of diversion discharge. In contrast, the two-week ˜200 m 3 s -1 discharge caused enhanced water exchange between wetlands and adjacent water bodies, substantially increasing water velocity in the bayous and channels of the upper estuary. These effects occurred in the estuary to about 20-25 km from the diversion structure, and caused a noticeable increase in down-estuary residual current with a significant reduction of local estuarine residence times for the whole estuary. Beyond 30 km from the diversion structure, the impact of high water discharge was small and the hydrodynamics was mostly controlled by tides and wind.

  11. Biogeochemical transport in the Loxahatchee River estuary, Florida: The role of submarine groundwater discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, P.W.; Orem, W.H.; McPherson, B.F.; Baskaran, M.; Wan, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The distributions of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Ba, U, and a suite of naturally occurring radionuclides in the U/Th decay series (222Rn, 223,224,226,228Ra) were studied during high- and low-discharge conditions in the Loxahatchee River estuary, Florida to examine the role of submarine groundwater discharge in estuarine transport. The fresh water endmember of this still relatively pristine estuary may reflect not only river-borne constituents, but also those advected during active groundwater/surface water (hyporheic) exchange. During both discharge conditions, Ba concentrations indicated slight non-conservative mixing. Such Ba excesses could be attributed either to submarine groundwater discharge or particle desorption processes. Estuarine dissolved organic carbon concentrations were highest at salinities closest to zero. Uranium distributions were lowest in the fresh water sites and mixed mostly conservatively with an increase in salinity. Suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations were generally lowest ( 28??dpm L- 1) at the freshwater endmember of the estuary and appear to identify regions of the river most influenced by the discharge of fresh groundwater. Activities of four naturally occurring isotopes of Ra (223,224,226,228Ra) in this estuary and select adjacent shallow groundwater wells yield mean estuarine water-mass transit times of less than 1 day; these values are in close agreement to those calculated by tidal prism and tidal frequency. Submarine groundwater discharge rates to the Loxahatchee River estuary were calculated using a tidal prism approach, an excess 226Ra mass balance, and an electromagnetic seepage meter. Average SGD rates ranged from 1.0 to 3.8 ?? 105??m3 d- 1 (20-74??L m- 2 d- 1), depending on river-discharge stage. Such calculated SGD estimates, which must include both a recirculated as well as fresh water component, are in close agreement with results obtained from a first-order watershed mass balance. Average submarine

  12. Suwannee river basin and estuary integrated science workshop: September 22-24, 2004 Cedar Key, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, Brian; Raabe, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    In response to the growing number of environmental concerns in the mostly pristine Suwannee River Basin and the Suwannee River Estuary system, the States of Florida and Georgia, the Federal government, and other local organizations have identified the Suwannee River as an ecosystem in need of protection because of its unique biota and important water resources. Organizations with vested interests in the region formed a coalition, the Suwannee Basin Interagency Alliance (SBIA), whose goals are to promote coordination in the identification, management, and scientific knowledge of the natural resources in the basin and estuary. To date, an integrated assessment of the physical, biological, and water resources has not been completed. A holistic, multi-disciplinary approach is being pursued to address the research needs in the basin and estuary and to provide supportive data for meeting management objectives of the entire ecosystem. The USGS is well situated to focus on the larger concerns of the basin and estuary by addressing specific research questions linking water supply and quality to ecosystem function and health across county and state boundaries. A strategic plan is being prepared in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies to identify and implement studies to address the most compelling research issues and management questions, and to conduct fundamental environmental monitoring studies. The USGS, Suwannee River Water Management District and the Florida Marine Research Institute are co-sponsoring this scientific workshop on the Suwannee River Basin and Estuary to: Discuss current and past research findings, Identify information gaps and research priorities, and Develop an action plan for coordinated and relevant research activities in the future. This workshop builds on the highly successful basin-wide conference sponsored by the Suwannee Basin Interagency Alliance that was held three years ago in Live Oak, Florida. This years workshop will focus on

  13. Using Landsat 8 data to estimate suspended particulate matter in the Yellow River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhongfeng; Xiao, Cong; Perrie, William; Sun, Deyong; Wang, Shengqiang; Shen, Hui; Yang, Dezhou; He, Yijun

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of suspended particulate matter (SPM) and its variations in estuary regions are key to promoting carbon, oxygen, and nutrient cycling in coastal regions and nearby seas. This study presents SPM estimations for the Yellow River estuary from Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (L8/OLI) data from 2013 to 2016. L8/OLI-measured remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) was cross-validated with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements, and SPM concentrations calculated from the tuned retrieval model were validated with in situ observations. The validation shows that L8/OLI can provide reasonably Rrs, which can be used to quantify SPM distributions and variations in the Yellow River estuary. Three year averaged SPM maps show that highly turbid waters are mostly found in an ovate area surrounding the mouth of the Yellow River. The corresponding area proportion is less than 30%, with SPM concentrations greater than 100 g m-3. High variations of SPM distributions are consistent with high SPM concentrations, and vice versa. Significant difference is observed between dry and wet seasons. Higher SPM in the dry season is observed both in range and intensity compared to those of the wet season. Furthermore, multiyear averaged SPM distributions with high concentrations are mainly attributable to currents. Significant seasonal variations are mainly controlled by sediment resuspension processes driven by wind-wave forces. Due to human interventions, seasonal variability in river runoff and sediment discharge from the Yellow River has decreased in recent years. Accordingly, seasonal variability in SPM distributions in the Yellow River estuary due to sediment discharge has decreased.

  14. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions from a subtropical estuary (the Brisbane River estuary, Australia).

    PubMed

    Musenze, Ronald S; Werner, Ursula; Grinham, Alistair; Udy, James; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-02-15

    Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are two key greenhouse gases. Their global atmospheric budgeting is, however, flout with challenges partly due to lack of adequate field studies determining the source strengths. Knowledge and data limitations exist for subtropical and tropical regions especially in the southern latitudes. Surface water methane and nitrous oxide concentrations were measured in a subtropical estuarine system in the southern latitudes in an extensive field study from 2010 to 2012 and water-air fluxes estimated using models considering the effects of both wind and flow induced turbulence. The estuary was found to be a strong net source of both CH4 and N2O all-year-round. Dissolved N2O concentrations ranged between 9.1 ± 0.4 to 45.3 ± 1.3 nM or 135 to 435% of atmospheric saturation level, while CH4 concentrations varied between 31.1 ± 3.7 to 578.4 ± 58.8 nM or 1210 to 26,430% of atmospheric saturation level. These results compare well with measurements from tropical estuarine systems. There was strong spatial variability with both CH4 and N2O concentrations increasing upstream the estuary. Strong temporal variability was also observed but there were no clear seasonal patterns. The degree of N2O saturation significantly increased with NOx concentrations (r(2)=0.55). The estimated water-air fluxes varied between 0.1 and 3.4 mg N2O m(-2)d(-1) and 0.3 to 27.9 mg CH4 m(-2)d(-1). Total emissions (CO2-e) were N2O (64%) dominated, highlighting the need for reduced nitrogen inputs into the estuary. Choice of the model(s) for estimation of the gas transfer velocity had a big bearing on the estimated total emissions.

  15. Sediment dynamics in the lower Mekong River: Transition from tidal river to estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowacki, Daniel J.; Ogston, Andrea S.; Nittrouer, Charles A.; Fricke, Aaron T.; Van, Pham Dang Tri

    2015-09-01

    A better understanding of flow and sediment dynamics in the lowermost portions of large-tropical rivers is essential to constraining estimates of worldwide sediment delivery to the ocean. Flow velocity, salinity, and suspended-sediment concentration were measured for 25 h at three cross sections in the tidal Song Hau distributary of the Mekong River, Vietnam. Two campaigns took place during comparatively high-seasonal and low-seasonal discharge, and estuarine conditions varied dramatically between them. The system transitioned from a tidal river with ephemeral presence of a salt wedge during high flow to a partially mixed estuary during low flow. The changing freshwater input, sediment sources, and estuarine characteristics resulted in seaward sediment export during high flow and landward import during low flow. The Dinh An channel of the Song Hau distributary exported sediment to the coast at a rate of about 1 t s-1 during high flow and imported sediment in a spatially varying manner at approximately 0.3 t s-1 during low flow. Scaling these values results in a yearly Mekong sediment discharge estimate about 65% smaller than a generally accepted estimate of 110 Mt yr-1, although the limited temporal and spatial nature of this study implies a relatively high degree of uncertainty for the new estimate. Fluvial advection of sediment was primarily responsible for the high-flow sediment export. Exchange-flow and tidal processes, including local resuspension, were principally responsible for the low-flow import. The resulting bed-sediment grain size was coarser and more variable during high flow and finer during low, and the residual flow patterns support the maintenance of mid-channel islands. This article was corrected on 7 OCT 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  16. Water-quality data from continuously monitored sites in the Pamlico and Neuse River estuaries, North Carolina, 1989-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrett, Ronald G.; Bales, Jerad

    1991-01-01

    Beginning in April 1989, water quality measurements were made at six sites in or near Pamlico River estuary and at five sites in or near the Neuse River estuary. Measurements taken at 15-minute intervals included near-surface and near-bottom specific conductance; near-surface water temperature; and near-surface, mid-depth, and near-bottom dissolved-oxygen concentrations. Water-quality data obtained from continuously-monitored sites in the Pamlico River estuary and the Neuse River estuary are presented for the period April 1989 through September 1990. Instantaneous values for selected periods are summarized in a series of box plots. Instantaneous maximum and minimum values are also tabulated. Daily mean values of salinity, water temperature, and dissolved-oxygen concentrations for the entire period are presented in tables and graphs.

  17. Runoff and flocculation modify underwater light environment of the Hudson River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stross, R. G.; Sokol, R. C.

    1989-10-01

    Spectral quality of underwater irradiance was measured in the Hudson River Estuary at ten stations, which ranged from Albany to Battery Park, Manhattan. Incoming light is attenuated by a large, fluctuating load of terrigenous sediments and by phytoplankton. Photic depth ranged from only 0·6 m in late winter to 4·3 m in summer. All but the yellow and red wavelengths are eliminated near the surface. Much of the suspended material flocculates and settles within a day or more of standing in the laboratory. Floc patterns were also observed in the estuary from the air. Light transmission improves during the summer interval in direct proportion to the size of the algal crop, as measured by chlorophyll concentration. Circumstantial evidence indicates a self-clearing system which is based on co-flocculation of algae with clays and fine silts. The study suggests that a clearer estuary is possible when inputs of algal nutrients and suspended solids are managed.

  18. 78 FR 1246 - Otay River Estuary Restoration Project; South San Diego Bay Unit and Sweetwater Marsh Unit of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... of the strategies identified to meet this goal is to restore native habitats in the Otay River... Marina. In order to restore estuarine habitat in the Otay River floodplain, we have initially estimated... Fish and Wildlife Service Otay River Estuary Restoration Project; South San Diego Bay Unit...

  19. Effects of Nitrogen Availability and Form on Phytoplankton Growth in a Eutrophied Estuary (Neuse River Estuary, NC, USA).

    PubMed

    Cira, Emily K; Paerl, Hans W; Wetz, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability and form are important controls on estuarine phytoplankton growth. This study experimentally determined the influence of urea and nitrate additions on phytoplankton growth throughout the growing season (March 2012, June 2011, August 2011) in a temperate, eutrophied estuary (Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, USA). Photopigments (chlorophyll a and diagnostic photopigments: peridinin, fucoxanthin, alloxanthin, zeaxanthin, chlorophyll b) and microscopy-based cell counts were used as indicators of phytoplankton growth. In March, the phytoplankton community was dominated by Gyrodinium instriatum and only fucoxanthin-based growth rates were stimulated by nitrogen addition. The limited response to nitrogen suggests other factors may control phytoplankton growth and community composition in early spring. In June, inorganic nitrogen concentrations were low and stimulatory effects of both nitrogen forms were observed for chlorophyll a- and diagnostic photopigment-based growth rates. In contrast, cell counts showed that only cryptophyte and dinoflagellate (Heterocapsa rotundata) growth were stimulated. Responses of other photopigments may have been due to an increase in pigment per cell or growth of plankton too small to be counted with the microscopic methods used. Despite high nitrate concentrations in August, growth rates were elevated in response to urea and/or nitrate addition for all photopigments except peridinin. However, this response was not observed in cell counts, again suggesting that pigment-based growth responses may not always be indicative of a true community and/or taxa-specific growth response. This highlights the need to employ targeted microscopy-based cell enumeration concurrent with pigment-based technology to facilitate a more complete understanding of phytoplankton dynamics in estuarine systems. These results are consistent with previous studies showing the seasonal importance of nitrogen availability in estuaries, and also

  20. Assessing the effects of nutrient management in an estuary experiencing climatic change: the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Valdes, Lexia M; Piehler, Michael F; Stow, Craig A

    2006-03-01

    Eutrophication is a serious water quality problem in estuaries receiving increasing anthropogenic nutrient loads. Managers undertaking nutrient-reduction strategies aimed at controlling estuarine eutrophication are faced with the challenge that upstream freshwater segments often are phosphorus (P)-limited, whereas more saline downstream segments are nitrogen (N)-limited. Management also must consider climatic (hydrologic) variability, which affects nutrient delivery and processing. The interactive effects of selective nutrient input reductions and climatic perturbations were examined in the Neuse River Estuary (NRE), North Carolina, a shallow estuary with more than a 30-year history of accelerated nutrient loading and water quality decline. The NRE also has experienced a recent increase in Atlantic hurricanes and record flooding, which has affected hydrology and nutrient loadings. The authors examined the water quality consequences of selective nutrient (P but not N) reductions in the 1980s, followed by N reductions in the 1990s and an increase in hurricane frequency since the mid-1990s. Selective P reductions decreased upstream phytoplankton blooms, but increased downstream phytoplankton biomass. Storms modified these trends. In particular, upstream annual N and P concentrations have decreased during the elevated hurricane period. Increased flushing and scouring from storms and flooding appear to have enhanced nutrient retention capabilities of the NRE watershed. From a management perspective, one cannot rely on largely unpredictable changes in storm frequency and intensity to negate anthropogenic nutrient enrichment and eutrophication. To control eutrophication along the hydrologically variable freshwater-marine continuum, N and P reductions should be applied adaptively to reflect point-source-dominated drought and non-point-source-dominated flood conditions.

  1. Effects of Nitrogen Availability and Form on Phytoplankton Growth in a Eutrophied Estuary (Neuse River Estuary, NC, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Paerl, Hans W.; Wetz, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability and form are important controls on estuarine phytoplankton growth. This study experimentally determined the influence of urea and nitrate additions on phytoplankton growth throughout the growing season (March 2012, June 2011, August 2011) in a temperate, eutrophied estuary (Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, USA). Photopigments (chlorophyll a and diagnostic photopigments: peridinin, fucoxanthin, alloxanthin, zeaxanthin, chlorophyll b) and microscopy-based cell counts were used as indicators of phytoplankton growth. In March, the phytoplankton community was dominated by Gyrodinium instriatum and only fucoxanthin-based growth rates were stimulated by nitrogen addition. The limited response to nitrogen suggests other factors may control phytoplankton growth and community composition in early spring. In June, inorganic nitrogen concentrations were low and stimulatory effects of both nitrogen forms were observed for chlorophyll a- and diagnostic photopigment-based growth rates. In contrast, cell counts showed that only cryptophyte and dinoflagellate (Heterocapsa rotundata) growth were stimulated. Responses of other photopigments may have been due to an increase in pigment per cell or growth of plankton too small to be counted with the microscopic methods used. Despite high nitrate concentrations in August, growth rates were elevated in response to urea and/or nitrate addition for all photopigments except peridinin. However, this response was not observed in cell counts, again suggesting that pigment-based growth responses may not always be indicative of a true community and/or taxa-specific growth response. This highlights the need to employ targeted microscopy-based cell enumeration concurrent with pigment-based technology to facilitate a more complete understanding of phytoplankton dynamics in estuarine systems. These results are consistent with previous studies showing the seasonal importance of nitrogen availability in estuaries, and also

  2. Connectivity Among Three Restored Crassostrea Virginica Bars in the Severn River Estuary: Implications for Oyster Recovery Efforts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-30

    planted in 2002) through time. The larger size classes represented by CC 10-07 may indicate that the part of the reef containing oysters grown in...Connectivity among three restored Crassostrea virginica bars in the Severn River Estuary; Implications for oyster recovery efforts...restored Crassostrea virginica bars in the Severn River Estuary: Implications for oyster recovery efforts 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  3. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Whiting, Allan H.

    2007-12-06

    This report is the third annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration action in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE). The project is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce. Measurement of the cumulative effects of ecological restoration projects in the Columbia River estuary is a formidable task because of the size and complexity of the estuarine landscape and the meta-populations of salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Despite the challenges presented by this system, developing and implementing appropriate indicators and methods to measure cumulative effects is the best way to enable estuary managers to track the overall effectiveness of investments in estuarine restoration projects. This project is developing methods to quantify the cumulative effects of multiple restoration activities in the CRE. The overall objectives of the 2006 study were to continue to develop techniques to assess cumulative effects, refine the standard monitoring protocols, and initiate development of an adaptive management system for Corps of Engineers’ habitat restoration monitoring efforts in the CRE. (The adaptive management effort will be reported at a later date.) Field studies during 2006 were conducted in tidal freshwater at Kandoll Farm on the lower Grays River and tidal brackish water at Vera Slough on Youngs Bay. Within each of area, we sampled one natural reference site and one restoration site. We addressed the overall objectives with field work in 2006 that, coupled with previous field data, had specific objectives and resulted in some important findings that are summarized here by chapter in this report. Each chapter of the report contains data on particular monitored variables for pre- and post

  4. Detection of Changes in Sediment Distribution in the Hudson River Estuary with Repeated Subbottom Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, F. O.; Kenna, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    During the last decade, several major storms have impacted the US Atlantic coast, including tropical storm Sandy in 2013 and tropical storms Irene and Lee in 2012. These storms, in particular, had major impacts on the watershed of the Hudson River Estuary, resulting in changes in the delivery and distribution of sediments. While Sandy generated a large storm surge that mostly effected the lower estuary, Irene and Lee caused significant flooding in the upper estuary that delivered ~2.7 million tons of sediment to the Hudson River Estuary, which according to USGS estimates is an amount equal to three times the annual load of ~700,000-800,000 metric? tons (Wall et al. 2008; Ralston et al., 2013). Here we report results from high-resolution Chirp subbottom surveys conducted in selected areas of the Hudson River in 2014. Areas were selected with the goal of investigating changes in the sediment deposition and storage in the Hudson River as a result of these events. The new survey lines were acquired following the tracks of earlier subbottom profiles that were collected as part of the Hudson River Benthic Mapping Project in the early 2000s, i.e. before the storms of 2012 and 2013, in a dense grid of subbottom profiles. We then compared these co-located profiles to determine changes between the profiles and to map out the spatial distribution of increased deposition in the selected areas. In several places, the data show clear increases of the thickness of depositional layers of over 0.25 m while in other areas these changes are less clear. Changes based on sub-bottom data will be compared to results obtained on sediment cores taken from the same areas. Preliminary analysis of the sediment cores indicates clear layers of recent sediments in some areas that correspond to the results of the subbottom analysis.

  5. Coastal upwelling supplies oxygen-depleted water to the Columbia River estuary.

    PubMed

    Roegner, G Curtis; Needoba, Joseph A; Baptista, António M

    2011-04-20

    Low dissolved oxygen (DO) is a common feature of many estuarine and shallow-water environments, and is often attributed to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment from terrestrial-fluvial pathways. However, recent events in the U.S. Pacific Northwest have highlighted that wind-forced upwelling can cause naturally occurring low DO water to move onto the continental shelf, leading to mortalities of benthic fish and invertebrates. Coastal estuaries in the Pacific Northwest are strongly linked to ocean forcings, and here we report observations on the spatial and temporal patterns of oxygen concentration in the Columbia River estuary. Hydrographic measurements were made from transect (spatial survey) or anchor station (temporal survey) deployments over a variety of wind stresses and tidal states during the upwelling seasons of 2006 through 2008. During this period, biologically stressful levels of dissolved oxygen were observed to enter the Columbia River estuary from oceanic sources, with minimum values close to the hypoxic threshold of 2.0 mg L(-1). Riverine water was consistently normoxic. Upwelling wind stress controlled the timing and magnitude of low DO events, while tidal-modulated estuarine circulation patterns influenced the spatial extent and duration of exposure to low DO water. Strong upwelling during neap tides produced the largest impact on the estuary. The observed oxygen concentrations likely had deleterious behavioral and physiological consequences for migrating juvenile salmon and benthic crabs. Based on a wind-forced supply mechanism, low DO events are probably common to the Columbia River and other regional estuaries and if conditions on the shelf deteriorate further, as observations and models predict, Pacific Northwest estuarine habitats could experience a decrease in environmental quality.

  6. Coastal Upwelling Supplies Oxygen-Depleted Water to the Columbia River Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Roegner, G. Curtis; Needoba, Joseph A.; Baptista, António M.

    2011-01-01

    Low dissolved oxygen (DO) is a common feature of many estuarine and shallow-water environments, and is often attributed to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment from terrestrial-fluvial pathways. However, recent events in the U.S. Pacific Northwest have highlighted that wind-forced upwelling can cause naturally occurring low DO water to move onto the continental shelf, leading to mortalities of benthic fish and invertebrates. Coastal estuaries in the Pacific Northwest are strongly linked to ocean forcings, and here we report observations on the spatial and temporal patterns of oxygen concentration in the Columbia River estuary. Hydrographic measurements were made from transect (spatial survey) or anchor station (temporal survey) deployments over a variety of wind stresses and tidal states during the upwelling seasons of 2006 through 2008. During this period, biologically stressful levels of dissolved oxygen were observed to enter the Columbia River estuary from oceanic sources, with minimum values close to the hypoxic threshold of 2.0 mg L−1. Riverine water was consistently normoxic. Upwelling wind stress controlled the timing and magnitude of low DO events, while tidal-modulated estuarine circulation patterns influenced the spatial extent and duration of exposure to low DO water. Strong upwelling during neap tides produced the largest impact on the estuary. The observed oxygen concentrations likely had deleterious behavioral and physiological consequences for migrating juvenile salmon and benthic crabs. Based on a wind-forced supply mechanism, low DO events are probably common to the Columbia River and other regional estuaries and if conditions on the shelf deteriorate further, as observations and models predict, Pacific Northwest estuarine habitats could experience a decrease in environmental quality. PMID:21533083

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediment of typical estuaries and the spatial distribution in Haihe river basin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing L; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Lu L

    2014-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with carcinogenic and mutagenic characteristics have been detected in many estuaries and bays around the world. To detect the contaminated level in typical estuaries in Haihe river basin, China, a comprehensive survey of 16 PAHs in surface sediment has been conducted and an ecological risk assessment has been taken. It showed that Haihe river estuary had the highest concentration, ranging from 92.91 to 15886.00 ng g(-1). And Luan river estuary has the lowest polluted level, ranging from 39.55 to 328.10 ng g(-1). PAHs in sediment were dominated by low and mid molecular weight PAHs in all the sampling sites. Most of the sampling sites in all sampling seasons indicated a rarely happened ecological risk of ΣPAHs, while the S6 in Haihe river estuary was in an occasionally anticipated risk. To illustrate the spatial distribution pattern of PAHs in surface sediment in Haihe river basin, the results were compared with previous research of the research team. Based on data of the comparison, it had been revealed that Haihe river had the most serious PAHs pollution, with an average concentration of 5884.86 ng g(-1), and showed the highest contamination level in all four ecological units. The ΣPAHs concentration showed in a rank of reservoir > estuary > rural area > city.

  8. Simulation of tidal flow and circulation patterns in the Loxahatchee River Estuary, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, G.M.; Goodwin, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a two-dimensional, vertically averaged, computer simulation model of the Loxahatchee River estuary show that under typical low freshwater inflow and vertically well mixed conditions, water circulation is dominated by freshwater inflow rather than by tidal influence. The model can simulate tidal flow and circulation in the Loxahatchee River estuary under typical low freshwater inflow and vertically well mixed conditions, but is limited, however, to low-flow and well mixed conditions. Computed patterns of residual water transport show a consistent seaward flow from the northwest fork through the central embayment and out Jupiter Inlet to the Atlantic Ocean. A large residual seaward flow was computed from the North Intracoastal Waterway to the inlet channel. Although the tide produces large flood and ebb flows in the estuary, tide-induced residual transport rates are low in comparison with freshwater-induced residual transport. Model investigations of partly mixed or stratified conditions in the estuary need to await development of systems capable of simulating three-dimensional flow patterns. (Author 's abstract)

  9. Inventories and sorption-desorption trends of radiocesium and radiocobalt in James River estuary sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Zucker, C.L.; Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Cutshall, N.H.

    1984-01-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclides (Cs TX, Cs TU, CoW) have been introduced to the James River estuary as a result of low-level releases from the Surry Reactor site since 1973 and worldwide atmospheric fallout from nuclear weapons tests since the early 1950s. The total radionuclide burden in the estuary sediments has been estimated by integrating radionuclide activities in 29 box cores and extrapolating these integrated values over surface areas subdivided on the basis of sediment type, rate of accumulation, and proximity to the reactor release site. The results indicate that 30% of the CoW, but only 15% of the Cs TU released from the reactor site, has been retained in the estuary sediments, and about 40% of the Cs TU and CoW sediment inventory is in areas that represent less than 5% of the total estuarine surface area. Depletion of the Cs TU in downstream sediments forms a noticeable trend in the James River estuary, and it is postulated that seawater cation competition and exchange is primarily responsible. 26 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  10. Tidal current shear in a broad, shallow, river-dominated estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, H.F.; Noble, M.A.; Williams, E.A.; Schroeder, W.W.; Pennock, J.R.; Gelfenbaum, G.

    1997-01-01

    Approximately one year of current, temperature, salinity and pressure data were collected at a site near the mouth of the Mobile Bay estuary in Alabama. This estuary is broad, shallow (3 m) and relatively flat. Diurnal tides account for 85%, of the current variance in the lower estuary. Tidal currents have significant vertical shear in both amplitude and direction. The principal diurnal constituents in the lower bay, O1 and K1, have amplitudes that range from 12 to 25 cm/s in the near-surface layer, 9 to 12 cm/s near the bed. The principal axis of the near-surface diurnal ellipse is rotated 30??clockwise relative to the near-bottom ellipse. This strong tidal current shear can exist because the estuary has a strong, persistent, haline stratification maintained by a continuous river input. The cause and strength of the tidal shear depends on a combination of factors, including differential topographic forcing through separate entrances into the bay and spatial and temporal variations in water column stability caused by changes in the magnitude of river flow and wind stress.

  11. Zooplankton Distribution in the Guaraú River Estuary (South-eastern Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Rubens M.

    1994-09-01

    The structure and seasonal variability of zooplanktonic associations were analysed over a 1-year period in the Guaraú River Estuary (south-east Brazil). The spatial segregation of the zooplankton was mainly conditioned by the longitudinal salinity gradient, as revealed by multivariate analysis. The upper estuary was dominated by a large indigenous population of the estuarine copepod Pseudodiaptomus richardi. The estuarine marine copepods Acartia lilljeborgi and Oithona hebes, together with meroplanktonic organisms, co-occurred with P. richardi in the middle estuary. The maintenance of high standing-stocks of marine euryhaline species such as Paracalanus crassirostris and Pseudodiaptomus acutus in the outer estuary, largely depended on recruitment from the coastal water. Temperature fluctuations influenced the seasonal occurrence of the zooplankton, with higher densities occurring in the warmer months. Increased river inflow caused by summer rainfalls had an evident but comparatively smaller effect on the zooplankton abundance. Predation on rotifers and grazing on nanoplankton are probably important factors regulating the local zooplankton dynamics.

  12. Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2012-05-01

    This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (2004–2010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  13. Sedimentology and ichnology of the fluvial reach to inner estuary of the Ogeechee River estuary, Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchepetkina, Alina; Gingras, Murray K.; Pemberton, S. George

    2016-08-01

    Through the integration of sedimentological and ichnological observations, this paper explores the character of sediments deposited across the fluvio-tidal transition zone of the upper microtidal, mixed-energy, sand-dominated Ogeechee River estuary, Georgia, USA. A transect of tidally influenced to fluvial channel-bars and their facies variability is reported. Field and laboratory methods were employed, including observation of physical and biogenic sedimentary structures on the point-bar surfaces and in trenches, collection of grab samples, suction and box coring, grain size and total organic carbon analyses, optical microscopy, core logging, and daylight photography. The data presented in the paper can help in predicting facies changes across the fluvio-tidal transition of sand-dominated fluvio-tidal deposits in the rock record. The lower inner estuary is characterized by medium-fine and fine-medium sand with planar and trough cross-bedding, small-scale ripple lamination, tidal sedimentary structures (flaser and wavy bedding, herringbone cross-stratification), abundant organic debris, and mud rip-up clasts. Bioturbation of the intertidal point bars is low, but cryptobioturbation is locally observed. Upper inner estuary deposits comprise coarse-medium- and medium-coarse-grained sand, and are characterized by faint high-angle planar and trough cross-bedding. Organic debris, mud rip-up clasts, herringbone and current-ripple lamination are rarely observed. Bioturbation is absent to sparse. The fluvio-tidal transition is represented by very-coarse- to coarse-grained sand and granules. Physical sedimentary structures constitute massive, graded planar and trough cross-bedding with abundant plant detritus. Except for rare Siphonichnus- and Lockeia-like traces, bioturbation is absent. The fluvial setting is characterized by coarse-medium sand with unidirectional cross-bedding, current-ripple lamination, and rare organic-rich mud clasts. Bioturbation is absent. Inner

  14. A model study of the effects of river discharges and winds on hypoxia in summer in the Pearl River Estuary.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xing; Zhan, Haigang; Ni, Peitong; Cai, Shuqun

    2016-12-15

    The deterioration of dissolved oxygen conditions in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) in summer has recently attracted considerable-scientific and political-attention. This paper documents the development, calibration, and verification of a coupled three-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model for the PRE. A comparison of the model's performance against field observations indicated that the model is capable of reproducing key hydrodynamic and water quality characteristics of the estuary within an acceptable range of accuracy. Furthermore, a scenario analysis showed that the extent of the hypoxic zone responds differently to changes in the river discharge at different inlets. Moreover, the hypoxic zone also changes in response to variations in the southwest wind in summer; specifically, a larger hypoxic zone develops as southwest winds blow in a more southward direction. However, the hypoxic conditions are much more sensitive to changes in the wind speed than changes in the wind direction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Epifauna and thermal additions in the upper Patuxent River estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cory, R.L.; Nauman, J.W.

    1969-01-01

    In the upper Patuxent Estuary environmental changes in temperature, salinity, and turbidity over a 5-year period are linked to changes in epifaunal production and species distribution. During 1967 a series of monthly panels showed dry weight production averaged 2.8 times greater in a steam electric station heated effluent than in the intake. A downriver shift in epifanual production in 1967 and changes in species abundance was noted and attributed to natural changes in salinity and turbidity and man-induced changes in temperature. ?? 1969 Estuarine Research Federation.

  16. Effects of river discharge and tidal asymmetry on residual sediment transport and long-term morphodynamics in the river estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Van der Wegen, M.; Roelvink, J.; He, Q.

    2013-12-01

    The morphodynamics are of ubiquitous importance to the estuarine function with respect to navigation and ecology. This study examines the hydrodynamics, residual sediment transport processes and long-term morphodynamics in the river estuary forced by river discharge and marine tides. We systematically investigated the generation of tidal asymmetry and its modulation by varying river discharges, the interactions between the river discharge and the tides, and the induced residual sediment transport and associated morphodynamic adjustment and then the feedback mechanisms by deploying the Delft3D model in 1D mode. The model shows that the internally generated tidal asymmetry behaves nonlinearly with increasing river discharge. The internal tidal asymmetry is flood dominated in the absence of river discharge and tidal flat. Introduction of a river discharge promotes the overtide generation which reinforces the tidal asymmetry. An increasing river discharge dissipates the tidal energy and damps the tides that the overtide generation is confined in the downstream. A river discharge threshed can be figured out at which the energy transformation from the principle tide (M2) to the overtide (M4) reaches maximum. The tidal averaged residual sediment transport is decomposed into components according to a bed load transport mode. The tidal asymmetry induces a residual sediment transport whose direction is determined by the nature of the tidal asymmetry. The river discharge induces a net seaward residual transport due to enhanced seaward residual current. Moreover, the interaction between the river discharge and tides generates a river-induced asymmetry. The river-induced asymmetry enhances the seaward residual sediment transport to a large degree that it plays a significant role in flushing sediment seaward. The estuarine morphodynamics reach a (quasi-) equilibrium in a time scale of millennia. The morphodynamic equilibrium is characterized by a reducing longitudinal residual

  17. Radionuclide tracers for the fate of metals in the Savannah estuary: River-ocean exchange processes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.R.; Thein, M.; Larsen, I.L.; Byrd, J.T.; Windom, H.L.

    1989-01-01

    Plutonium-238 from the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant labels riverborne particles, providing a unique opportunity for examining the fate of metals in estuaries and for tracing river-ocean exchange processes. Results indicate that plutonium and lead-210 are enriched on estuarine particles and that inputs of plutonium from oceanic sources greatly exceed inputs from riverborne or drainage-basin sources as far upstream as the landward limit of seawater penetration. We suggest that these radionuclides (and other chemically reactive metals) are being scavenged from oceanic water by sorption onto particles in turbid estuarine and coastal areas. Since estuaries, bays, mangroves, and intertidal areas serve as effective traps for fine particles and associated trace substances, these results have important implications concerning the disposal of chemically reactive substances in oceanic waters. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. [Temporal and spatial distribution of red tide in Yangtze River Estuary and adjacent waters].

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu-San; Li, Zi-Cheng; Zhou, Juan; Zheng, Bing-Hui; Tang, Jing-Liang

    2011-09-01

    The events of red tide were collected in Yangtze River Estuary and adjacent waters from 1972 to 2009. Based on geographic information system (GIS) analysis on the temporal and spatial distribution of red tide, the distribution map was generated accordingly. The results show: (1) There are three red tide-prone areas, which are outside the Yangtze River estuary and the eastern of Sheshan, Huaniaoshan-Shengshan-Gouqi, Zhoushan and the eastern of Zhujiajian. The red tide occurred 174 times in total, in which there were 25 times covered the area was larger than 1 000 km2. After 2000, the frequency of red tide were significantly increasing; (2) The frequent occurrence of red tide was in May (51% of total occurrence) and June (20% of total occurrence); (3) In all of the red tide plankton, the dominant species were Prorocentrum danghaiense, Skeletonema costatum, Prorocentrum dantatum, Nactiluca scientillans. The red tides caused by these species were 38, 35, 15, 10 times separately.

  19. The geochemistry of rare earth elements in the Amazon River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Shokovitz, E.R. )

    1993-05-01

    The estuarine geochemistry of rare earth elements (REEs) was studied using samples collected in the Amazon River estuary from the AmasSeds (Amazon Shelf SEDiment Study) cruise of August 1989. Extensive removal of dissolved (0.22 [mu]m filtered) trivalent REEs from river water occurs in the low (0--6) salinity region. Removal by the salt-induced coagulation of river colloids leads to fractionation among the REE(III) series; the order of removal is light REEs > middle REEs > heavy REEs. There also is the enhanced removal of Ce (relative to trivalent La and Nd) in the low salinity (0--6) zone and in the zone of high biological activity. This is the first field observation of strong Ce removal associated with coagulation of river colloids and biological productivity. The argument is made that the decrease in the Ce anomaly across a biological front is caused by biologically mediated oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV). Coagulation of river colloids and biologically mediated oxidation of Ce(III) lead to fractionation of REE(III) and redox modification of Ce. These processes result in the REE composition becoming fractionated relative to the Amazon River water and crust and more evolved toward the REE composition of the oceans. This study implies that reactions in estuaries play significant, yet poorly understood roles in controlling the REE composition and Ce anomaly of the oceans. 46 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Spatial distribution of copepods along the salinity gradient of Perai river estuary, Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Johan, I; Maznah, W O Wan; Mashhor, M; Abu Hena, M K; Amin, S M N

    2012-07-01

    Investigation on copepod communities in Perai river estuary was conducted from November 2005 to May 2006. Five stations were established for monthly sampling and were located from the river mouth to the upper reaches of the river. Copepod samples were collected from vertical tows using a standard zooplankton net. The Perai river estuary was slightly stratified and salinity decreases significantly from the mouth of the river towards the upper reaches of the river. A total of 28 species of copepods were recorded and comprised of 14 families, Paracalanidae, Oithonidae, Corycaeidae, Acartiidae, Calanidae, Centropagidae, Eucalanidae, Pontellidae, Pseudodiaptomidae, Tortanidae, Ectinosomatidae, Euterpinidae, Clausidiidae and Cyclopidae. A total of 10 species showed high positive affiliation towards salinity (R > 0.60), Acartia spinicauda, Euterpina acutifrons, Microsetella norvegica, Oithona nana, Oithona simplex, Paracalanus crassirostris, Paracalanus elegans, Paracalanus parvus, Pseudodiaptomus sp. and Hemicyclops sp. The copepod species Pseudodiaptomus dauglishi were negatively affiliated towards salinity (R = -0.71). The copepod assemblages classified into two distinct groups according to salinity regimes, euryhaline-polyhaline group (25 marine affiliated species) and oligohaline-mesohaline group (3 freshwater affiliated species).

  1. Mid-Holocene variability of the East Asian monsoon based on bulk organic δ13C and C/N records from the Pearl River estuary, southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, F.; Zong, Y.; Lloyd, J. M.; Leng, M. J.; Switzer, A. D.; Yim, W. W.; Huang, G.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the mid-Holocene dynamics of the East Asian monsoon (EAM) is integral to modelling the Holocene development of the global climate system (Webster et al., 1998). Thus the mid-Holocene EAM history was reconstructed using bulk organic carbon isotopes (δ13C), total carbon to total nitrogen (C/N) ratios and total organic carbon (TOC) from a sediment core (UV1), at a mean resolution of 7-10 years, from the Pearl River estuary, southern China. Sedimentary δ13C, C/N and TOC from the Pearl River estuary is a good indicator of changes in monsoonal precipitation strength (Zong et al., 2006; Yang et al., 2010; Yu et al., 2010), eg sediments buried during a period of high precipitation exhibit a high proportion of terrigenous sediments, and have low δ13C and high C/N, and vice versa (Yu et al., 2010). Results suggest a general decreasing trend in monsoonal precipitation from 6650 to 2215 cal yr BP because of the weakening Northern Hemisphere insolation most likely related to the current precession circle (An, 2000). Superimposed on this trend are apparent dry-wet oscillations at centennial to millennial timescales most likely in response to solar activity. Mismatch between δ13C and results from the Dongge Cave in southern China at millennial-timescale oscillations (Wang et al., 2005), may indicate that the δ13C from the Pearl River estuary reveals changes in precipitation in a broader area than the δ18O from Dongge Cave does. Reference An Z (2000) The history and variability of the East Asian paleomonsoon climate. Quaternary Science Reviews 19: 171-187. Wang Y, Cheng H, Edwards RL, He Y, Kong X, An Z, Wu J, Kelly MJ, Dykoski CA and Li X (2005) The Holocene Asian Monsoon: Links to Solar Changes and North Atlantic Climate. Science 308: 854-857. Webster PJ, Magaña VO, Palmer TN, Shukla J and Tomas RA (1998) Monsoons: Processes, predictability, and the prospects for prediction. Journal of Geophysical Research 103(C7): 14451-14510. Yang S, Tang M, Yim WWS, Zong

  2. Mid-Holocene variability of the East Asian monsoon based on bulk organic δ13C and C/N records from the Pearl River estuary, southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, F.; Lloyd, J. M.; Zong, Y.; Leng, M. J.; Switzer, A. D.; Yim, W. W.; Huang, G.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the mid-Holocene dynamics of the East Asian monsoon (EAM) is integral to modelling the Holocene development of the global climate system (Webster et al., 1998). Thus the mid-Holocene EAM history was reconstructed using bulk organic carbon isotopes (δ13C), total carbon to total nitrogen (C/N) ratios and total organic carbon (TOC) from a sediment core (UV1), at a mean resolution of 10 years, from the Pearl River estuary, southern China. Sedimentary δ13C, C/N and TOC from the Pearl River estuary is a good indicator of changes in monsoonal precipitation strength (Zong et al., 2006; Yang et al., 2010), eg sediments buried during a period of high precipitation exhibit a high proportion of terrigenous sediments, and have low δ13C and high C/N, and vice versa (Yu et al., 2010). Results suggest a general decreasing trend in monsoonal precipitation from 6650-2215 cal yr BP due to the weakening insolation over northern hemisphere most likely related to the current precession circle (An, 2000). Superimposed on this trend are apparent dry-wet oscillations at centennial to millennial timescales most likely in response to solar activity. Mismatch between δ13C and results from the Dongge Cave in southern China at millennial-timescale oscillations (Wang et al., 2005), may indicate that the δ13C from the Pearl River estuary reveals changes in precipitation in a broader area than the δ18O from Dongge Cave does. Reference An Z (2000) The history and variability of the East Asian paleomonsoon climate. Quaternary Science Reviews 19: 171-187. Wang Y, Cheng H, Edwards RL, He Y, Kong X, An Z, Wu J, Kelly MJ, Dykoski CA and Li X (2005) The Holocene Asian Monsoon: Links to Solar Changes and North Atlantic Climate. Science 308: 854-857. Webster PJ, Magaña VO, Palmer TN, Shukla J and Tomas RA (1998) Monsoons: Processes, predictability, and the prospects for prediction. Journal of Geophysical Research 103(C7): 14451-14510. Yang S, Tang M, Yim WWS, Zong Y, Huang G, Switzer

  3. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Jeff; Skalski, J. R.; Teel, D. J.; Brewer, Taylor; Bryson, Amanda J.; Dawley, Earl M.; Kuligowski, D. R.; Whitesel, T.; Mallette, Christine

    2013-11-30

    The study reported herein was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), University of Washington (UW), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The goal of the study was to evaluate the ecological benefits of restoration actions for juvenile salmon in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; rkm 0–234).

  4. Investigating Typhoon Induced River-Surge Interactions in the Tamsui Estuary, Taiwan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskell; J. H.; Grieser, J.; Rodney, J.; Howe, N. J.

    2016-02-01

    It is increasingly important to understand the combined influence of the main drivers of coastal risk due to sea level rise and the potential increase in extreme weather events. An Asian Basin stochastic typhoon set was used to force a storm surge model of Taiwan to investigate the interaction between storm surge and high river discharges (50, 100 and 200 year return period discharges) in the Tamsui River. Taiwan is a mountainous country leading to the combined risk of surge and high river discharge occurring simultaneously in estuary regions. The typhoon tracks were selected using a Hurricane Surge Index (Kantha, 2006) and cross the northern tip of Taiwan with maximum sustained winds (Vmax) between 51 m/s and 75 m/s (Cat 3-5). Peak surge elevations in the Tamsui River range from 5.7 m to 10.3 m. The surge interacts with the river flow to induce changes in the water elevation between -8 m and 4 m depending on the surge elevation and river discharge and increases the inundated area in the range 37 km to 204 km. Significant positive interactions occur in the Tamsui Estuary (Fig. 1a) but do not have implications for increased inundation and occur at the start of the flood phase and the end of the ebb phase as previously shown in idealized test cases (Maskell et al., 2013). Current vectors in the estuary show that at the time leading up to high water the river outflow starts to become dominant in the mid-channel reducing maximum water levels by up to 10% in the combined surge and river solution. However, surge inhibits downstream propagation of the flood wave in the upper river channels increasing water levels by up to 2 m. The maximum inundated area (1330 km2) is caused by the combination of defence overflow due to the maximum surge (10.27 m) and increased river levels (RP100) in the upper channels leading to significant inundation either side of the Keelung River (Fig. 1b). The Erchung floodway is effective in diverting some of the flow (up to 10,443 m3/s) reducing

  5. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Habitat Monitoring Study, 2011 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Borde, Amy B.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Thom, Ronald M.; Wright, Cynthia L.

    2012-03-01

    The Ecosystem Monitoring Program is a collaborative effort between the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP), University of Washington, Wetland Ecosystem Team (UW), US Geological Survey, Water Science Center (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA-Fisheries, hereafter NOAA), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Sciences Laboratory (PNNL). The goal of the program is to conduct emergent wetland monitoring aimed at characterizing salmonid habitats in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) from the mouth of the estuary to Bonneville Dam (Figure 1). This is an ecosystem based monitoring program focused on evaluating status and trends in habitat and reducing uncertainties regarding these ecosystems to ultimately improve the survival of juvenile salmonids through the LCRE. This project comprehensively assesses habitat, fish, food web, and abiotic conditions in the lower river, focusing on shallow water and vegetated habitats used by juvenile salmonids for feeding, rearing and refugia. The information is intended to be used to guide management actions associated with species recovery, particularly that of threatened and endangered salmonids. PNNL’s role in this multi-year study is to monitor the habitat structure (e.g., vegetation, topography, channel morphology, and sediment type) as well as hydrologic patterns.

  6. Distribution and abundance of American eels in the White Oak River estuary, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hightower, J.E.; Nesnow, C.

    2006-01-01

    Apparent widespread declines in abundance of Anguilla rostrata (American eel) have reinforced the need for information regarding its life history and status. We used commercial eel pots and crab (peeler) pots to examine the distribution, condition, and abundance of American eels within the White Oak River estuary, NC, during summers of 2002-2003. Catch of American eels per overnight set was 0.35 (SE = 0.045) in 2002 and 0.49 (SE = 0.044) in 2003. There was not a significant linear relationship between catch per set and depth in 2002 (P = 0.31, depth range 0.9-3.4 m) or 2003 (P = 0.18, depth range 0.6-3.4 m). American eels from the White Oak River were in good condition, based on the slope of a length-weight relationship (3.41) compared to the median slope (3.15) from other systems. Estimates of population density from grid sampling in 2003 (300 mm and larger: 4.0-13.8 per ha) were similar to estimates for the Hudson River estuary, but substantially less than estimates from other (smaller) systems including tidal creeks within estuaries. Density estimates from coastal waters can be used with harvest records to examine whether overfishing has contributed to the recent apparent declines in American eel abundance.

  7. Terrestrial humic substances in Daliao River and its estuary: optical signatures and photoreactivity to UVA light.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Lei, Kun; Wang, Xuechun

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) components were identified by Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC) in surface water of Daliao River and its estuary with a focus on terrestrial humic substance-(HS)-like FDOM identified under two contrasting hydrological conditions. The hydrological conditions did not have noticeable effect on the spectral features of the terrestrial HS-like FDOM, but did affect the components' intensities and photoreactivity: (1) the intensities of terrestrial HS-like components were higher in the normal flow period than in the high flow period, and (2) a spectrally similar terrestrial HS-like FDOM identified under the two contrasting hydrological conditions showed distinct photoreactivity to the same dose of UVA illumination. The findings indicated that terrestrial HS was generated at lower intensities at the terrestrial sources during the high flow period than during the normal flow period and that the transport of terrestrial HS material through the river-estuary system was affected dominantly by seawater dilution along the salinity gradient while fine-tuned by solar UVA illumination. This study exemplifies the effect of hydrological conditions on optical signatures of terrestrial HS-like FDOM and their photoreactivity towards UVA illumination, improving our understanding of the dynamics of terrestrial HS material in river-estuary systems in the framework of the currently proposed new conceptual model for terrestrial organic matter.

  8. Analysis of change of red tide species in Yodo River estuary by the numerical ecosystem model.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mitsuru; Yanagi, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    Occurrence number of red tides in Osaka Bay in Japan is more than 20 cases every year. Diatom red tide was dominant in Osaka Bay, but the non-diatom red tide was dominant in early 1990s. Therefore, the material cycling in Yodo River estuary in Osaka Bay during August from 1991 to 2000 was analyzed by using the numerical ecosystem model and field observation data to clarify the reasons of change in red tide species. Year-to-year variation in calculated concentration ratio of diatom to non-diatom corresponds to the variation in observed ratio of red tide days of diatom to non-diatom. Limiting nutrient of primary production is phosphate over the period. Diatom dominated from 1991 to 1993, but it was difficult for non-diatom to grow due to the limitation by physical condition. Non-diatom was able to grow because of good physical and nutrient conditions from 1994 to 1996. And diatom dominated again under the good physical condition, and phosphorus supply was not enough for non-diatom to grow from 1998 to 2000. Phosphate concentration in the lower layer of Yodo River estuary was important to the variation in red tide species in the upper layer of Yodo River estuary.

  9. Trace metals in the Ob and Yenisei Rivers' Estuaries (the Kara Sea).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demina, L. L.

    2014-12-01

    Behavior of some trace metals (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Pb) in water column (soluble <0.45 µm and particulate fractions) and bottom sediments (surface and cores) along the two transects from the Ob River and Yenisei River Estuaries to the Kara Sea was studied. The length of both transects was about 700 km. Water depth was 12-63 m, O2 dissolved :5.36-9.55 ml l-1. Along the transects salinity increased from 0.07 to 34.2 psu, while the SPM' concentration decreased from 10.31 to 0.31 mg/l. Total suspended particulate matter load is more than one order of magnitude higher in the Ob River Estuary comparing to that of the Yenisei River. It has led to a significant difference between the suspended trace metals' concentrations (µg/l) in water of the two estuaries. With salinity increase along transects Fe susp., Mn susp. and Zn susp. decreased by a factor of 100-500, that has led to a growth of a relative portion of dissolved trace metals followed by their bioaccumulation (Demina et al., 2010). A strong direct correlation between suspended Cu, Fe and SPM mass concentration was found. For the first time along the Yenisei River' Estuary -the Kara Sea transect a direct positive correlation between Cu suspended and volume concentration of SPM (mg/ml3) was found, that was attributed to contribution of phytoplankton aggregates in the SPM composition. A trend of relationship between content of suspended As and pelitic fraction (2-10 µm) of SPM was firstly found in theses basins also. Study of trace metal speciation in the bottom sediments (adsorbed, associated with Fe-Mn (oxyhydr)oxides, organic matter and fixed in the mineral lattice or refractory) has revealed the refractory fraction to be prevailing (70-95% total content) for Fe, Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Cr, Cd and Pb. That means that toxic heavy metals were not available for bottom fauna. Mn was predominantly found in the adsorbed and (oxyhydr)oxides geochemically labile forms, reflecting the redox condition change

  10. Dissolved silica in the tidal Potomac River and Estuary, 1979-81 water years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Stephen F.

    1988-01-01

    The Potomac River at Chain Bridge is the major riverine source of dissolved silica (DSi) to the tidal Potomac River and Estuary. DSi concentrations at Chain Bridge are positively correlated with river discharge; river discharge is an important factor controlling rates of supply, dilution, and residence time. When river flow is high, the longitudinal DSi distribution is conservative. When river flow is low, other processes, such as phytoplankton uptake, benthic flux, resuspension, ground-water discharge, and water-column dissolution of diatoms, tend to be more influential than the river. Elevated concentrations of DSi in sewage-treatment-plant effluent in the Washington, D.C., area raise the DSi concentration of receiving Potomac River water. The tidal river zone serves as a net sink for DSi as a result of phytoplankton uptake. Ultimately, the biogenic silica from the tidal river is transported to the transition zone, where it is mineralized. As a result, the DSi concentration in the transition zone increases during summer. The DSi concentrations in the estuarine zone are largely controlled by dilution by Chesapeake Bay water and by phytoplankton uptake.

  11. Artificial water sediment regulation scheme influences morphology, hydrodynamics and nutrient behavior in the Yellow River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bochao; Yang, Disong; Burnett, William C.; Ran, Xiangbin; Yu, Zhigang; Gao, Maosheng; Diao, Shaobo; Jiang, Xueyan

    2016-08-01

    Anthropogenic controls on water and sediment may play important roles in river system transformations and morphological evolution, which could further affect coastal hydrodynamics and nutrient behavior. We used geochemical tracers to evaluate the influence of an intentional large release of water and sediment during the so-called "Water Sediment Regulation Scheme" (WSRS) on estuarine morphology, hydrodynamics and nutrients in the Yellow River estuary, China. We discovered that there was a newly formed small delta in the river mouth after the 2013 WSRS. This new morphologic feature altered terrestrial material distribution patterns from a single plume to a two-plume pattern within the estuary. Our results show that the WSRS significantly influenced the study area in the following ways: (1) Radium and nutrient concentrations were significantly elevated (two to four times), especially along the two river outlets. (2) Estuarine mixing was about two times stronger during WSRS than before. Average aerial mixing rates before and during WSRS were 50 ± 26 km2 d-1 and 89 ± 51 km2 d-1, respectively. (3) Our data is consistent with P limitation and suggest that stoichiometrically based P limitation was even more severe during WSRS. (4) All river-derived nutrients were thoroughly consumed within one to two weeks after entry to near-shore waters. (5) The extent of the area influenced by terrestrial nutrients was two to three times greater during WSRS. Human influence, such as triggered by WSRS regulations, should thus be considered when studying biogeochemical processes and nutrient budgets in situations like the Yellow River estuary.

  12. Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary in 2009

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Bellgraph, Brian J.; Carter, Jessica A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Titzler, P. Scott; Hughes, Michael S.

    2010-08-01

    The study reported herein was funded as part of the Anadromous Fish Evaluation Program, which is managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The Anadromous Fish Evaluation Program study code is EST P 02 01: A Study of Salmonid Survival and Behavior through the Columbia River Estuary Using Acoustic Tags. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries for the USACE Portland District. Estimated survival of acoustic-tagged juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead through the lower Columbia River and estuary in 2009 was lowest in the final 50 km of the estuary. Probability of survival was relatively high (>0.90) for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon from the Bonneville Dam forebay (rkm 236) to Three-tree Point (rkm 49.6). Survival of juvenile Chinook salmon declined sharply through the lower 50 km of the estuary. Acoustic-tagged steelhead smolts did not survive as well as juvenile Chinook salmon between Bonneville Dam and the mouth of the Columbia River. Steelhead survival began to decline farther upstream (at rkm 86) relative to that of the Chinook salmon stocks. Subyearling Chinook salmon survival decreased markedly as the season progressed. It remains to be determined whether later migrating subyearling Chinook salmon are suffering increasing mortality as the season progresses or whether some portion of the apparent loss is due to fish extending their freshwater residence. This study provided the first glimpse into what promises to be a very informative way to learn more about how juvenile salmonid passage experiences through the FCRPS may influence their subsequent survival after passing Bonneville Dam. New information regarding the influence of migration pathway through the lower 50 km of the Columbia River estuary on probability of survival of juvenile salmonids, combined with increased understanding regarding the foraging distances and time periods of

  13. A dynamic water-quality modeling framework for the Neuse River estuary, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, Jerad D.; Robbins, Jeanne C.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of fish kills in the Neuse River estuary in 1995, nutrient reduction strategies were developed for point and nonpoint sources in the basin. However, because of the interannual variability in the natural system and the resulting complex hydrologic-nutrient inter- actions, it is difficult to detect through a short-term observational program the effects of management activities on Neuse River estuary water quality and aquatic health. A properly constructed water-quality model can be used to evaluate some of the potential effects of manage- ment actions on estuarine water quality. Such a model can be used to predict estuarine response to present and proposed nutrient strategies under the same set of meteorological and hydrologic conditions, thus removing the vagaries of weather and streamflow from the analysis. A two-dimensional, laterally averaged hydrodynamic and water-quality modeling framework was developed for the Neuse River estuary by using previously collected data. Development of the modeling framework consisted of (1) computational grid development, (2) assembly of data for model boundary conditions and model testing, (3) selection of initial values of model parameters, and (4) limited model testing. The model domain extends from Streets Ferry to Oriental, N.C., includes seven lateral embayments that have continual exchange with the main- stem of the estuary, three point-source discharges, and three tributary streams. Thirty-five computational segments represent the mainstem of the estuary, and the entire framework contains a total of 60 computa- tional segments. Each computational cell is 0.5 meter thick; segment lengths range from 500 meters to 7,125 meters. Data that were used to develop the modeling framework were collected during March through October 1991 and represent the most comprehensive data set available prior to 1997. Most of the data were collected by the North Carolina Division of Water Quality, the University of North Carolina

  14. Estimation of groundwater and nutrient fluxes to the Neuse River estuary, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spruill, T.B.; Bratton, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted between April 2004 and September 2005 to estimate groundwater and nutrient discharge to the Neuse River estuary in North Carolina. The largest groundwater fluxes were observed to occur generally within 20 m of the shoreline. Groundwater flux estimates based on seepage meter measurements ranged from 2.86??108 to 4.33??108 m3 annually and are comparable to estimates made using radon, a simple water-budget method, and estimates derived by using Darcy's Law and previously published general aquifer characteristics of the area. The lower groundwater flux estimate (equal to about 9 m3 s-1), which assumed the narrowest groundwater discharge zone (20 m) of three zone widths selected for an area west of New Bern, North Carolina, most closely agrees with groundwater flux estimates made using radon (3-9 m3 s-1) and Darcy's Law (about 9 m3 s-1). A groundwater flux of 9 m 3 s-1 is about 40% of the surface-water flow to the Neuse River estuary between Streets Ferry and the mouth of the estuary and about 7% of the surface-water inflow from areas upstream. Estimates of annual nitrogen (333 tonnes) and phosphorus (66 tonnes) fluxes from groundwater to the estuary, based on this analysis, are less than 6% of the nitrogen and phosphorus inputs derived from all sources (excluding oceanic inputs), and approximately 8% of the nitrogen and 17% of the phosphorus annual inputs from surface-water inflow to the Neuse River estuary assuming a mean annual precipitation of 1.27 m. We provide quantitative evidence, derived from three methods, that the contribution of water and nutrients from groundwater discharge to the Neuse River estuary is relatively minor, particularly compared with upstream sources of water and nutrients and with bottom sediment sources of nutrients. Locally high groundwater discharges do occur, however, and could help explain the occurrence of localized phytoplankton blooms, submerged aquatic vegetation, or fish kills. ?? 2008 Coastal and Estuarine

  15. Suspended sediment transport in the freshwater reach of the Hudson river estuary in eastern New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wall, G.R.; Nystrom, E.A.; Litten, S.

    2008-01-01

    Deposition of Hudson River sediment into New York Harbor interferes with navigation lanes and requires continuous dredging. Sediment dynamics at the Hudson estuary turbidity maximum (ETM) have received considerable study, but delivery of sediment to the ETM through the freshwater reach of the estuary has received relatively little attention and few direct measurements. An acoustic Doppler current profiler was positioned at the approximate limit of continuous freshwater to develop a 4-year time series of water velocity, discharge, suspended sediment concentration, and suspended sediment discharge. This data set was compared with suspended sediment discharge data collected during the same period at two sites just above the Hudson head-of-tide (the Federal Dam at Troy) that together represent the single largest source of sediment entering the estuary. The mean annual suspended sediment-discharge from the freshwater reach of the estuary was 737,000 metric tons. Unexpectedly, the total suspended sediment discharge at the study site in November and December slightly exceeded that observed during March and April, the months during which rain and snowmelt typically result in the largest sediment discharge to the estuary. Suspended sediment discharge at the study site exceeded that from the Federal Dam, even though the intervening reach appears to store significant amounts of sediment, suggesting that 30-40% of sediment discharge observed at the study site is derived from tributaries to the estuary between the Federal Dam and study site. A simple model of sediment entering and passing through the freshwater reach on a timescale of weeks appears reasonable during normal hydrologic conditions in adjoining watersheds; however, this simple model may dramatically overestimate sediment delivery during extreme tributary high flows, especially those at the end of, or after, the "flushing season" (October through April). Previous estimates of annual or seasonal sediment delivery

  16. Restoration of Hydrodynamic and Hydrologic Processes in the Chinook River Estuary, Washington – Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Kristanovich, Felix C.

    2006-08-03

    A hydrodynamic and hydrologic modeling analysis was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of restoring natural estuarine functions and tidal marine wetlands habitat in the Chinook River estuary, located near the mouth of the Columbia River in Washington. The reduction in salmonid populations is attributable primarily to the construction of a Highway 101 overpass across the mouth of the Chinook River in the early 1920s with a tide gate under the overpass. This construction, which was designed to eliminate tidal action in the estuary, has impeded the upstream passage of salmonids. The goal of the Chinook River Restoration Project is to restore tidal functions through the estuary, by removing the tide gate at the mouth of the river, filling drainage ditches, restoring tidal swales, and reforesting riparian areas. The hydrologic model (HEC-HMS) was used to compute Chinook River and tributary inflows for use as input to the hydrodynamic model at the project area boundary. The hydrodynamic model (RMA-10) was used to generate information on water levels, velocities, salinity, and inundation during both normal tides and 100-year storm conditions under existing conditions and under the restoration alternatives. The RMA-10 model was extended well upstream of the normal tidal flats into the watershed domain to correctly simulate flooding and drainage with tidal effects included, using the wetting and drying schemes. The major conclusion of the hydrologic and hydrodynamic modeling study was that restoration of the tidal functions in the Chinook River estuary would be feasible through opening or removal of the tide gate. Implementation of the preferred alternative (removal of the tide gate, restoration of the channel under Hwy 101 to a 200-foot width, and construction of an internal levee inside the project area) would provide the required restorations benefits (inundation, habitat, velocities, and salinity penetration, etc.) and meet flood protection requirements. The

  17. Restoration of Hydrodynamic and Hydrologic Processes in the Chinook River Estuary, Washington – Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Kristanovich, Felix C.

    2006-01-01

    A hydrodynamic and hydrologic modeling analysis was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of restoring natural estuarine functions and tidal marine wetlands habitat in the Chinook River estuary, located near the mouth of the Columbia River in Washington. The reduction in salmonid populations is attributable primarily to the construction of a Highway 101 overpass across the mouth of the Chinook River in the early 1920s with a tide gate under the overpass. This construction, which was designed to eliminate tidal action in the estuary, has impeded the upstream passage of salmonids. The goal of the Chinook River Restoration Project is to restore tidal functions through the estuary, by removing the tide gate at the mouth of the river, filling drainage ditches, restoring tidal swales, and reforesting riparian areas. The hydrologic model (HEC-HMS) was used to compute Chinook River and tributary inflows for use as input to the hydrodynamic model at the project area boundary. The hydrodynamic model (RMA-10) was used to generate information on water levels, velocities, salinity, and inundation during both normal tides and 100-year storm conditions under existing conditions and under the restoration alternatives. The RMA-10 model was extended well upstream of the normal tidal flats into the watershed domain to correctly simulate flooding anddrainage with tidal effects included, using the wetting and drying schemes. The major conclusion of the hydrologic and hydrodynamic modeling study was that restoration of the tidal functions in the Chinook River estuary would be feasible through opening or removal of the tide gate. Implementation of the preferred alternative (removal of the tide gate, restoration of the channel under Hwy 101 to a 200-foot width, and construction of an internal levee inside the project area) would provide the required restorations benefits (inundation, habitat, velocities, and salinity penetration, etc.) and meet flood protection requirements. The

  18. Integrated modelling of faecal contamination in a densely populated river-sea continuum (Scheldt River and Estuary).

    PubMed

    de Brauwere, Anouk; Gourgue, Olivier; de Brye, Benjamin; Servais, Pierre; Ouattara, Nouho Koffi; Deleersnijder, Eric

    2014-01-15

    In order to simulate the long-term (months-years) median Escherichia coli distributions and variations in the tidal Scheldt River and Estuary, a dedicated module was developed for the Second-generation Louvain-la-Neuve Ice-ocean Model (SLIM, www.climate.be/slim). The resulting model (SLIM-EC2) presents two specific and new features compared to the older SLIM-EC model version. The first is that the E. coli concentrations in the river are split in three fractions: the free E. coli in the water column, the ones attached to suspended solids and those present in the bottom sediments, each with their own transport, decay and settling-resuspension dynamics. The bacteria attached to particles can settle and survive on the bottom, where they can be brought back in the water column during resuspension events. The second new feature of the model is that it is coupled to the catchment model SENEQUE-EC, which thus provides upstream boundary conditions to SLIM-EC2. The result is an integrated and multi-scale model of the whole Scheldt drainage network from its source down to the Belgian/Dutch coastal zone. This new model reproduces the long-term median E. coli concentration along the Scheldt River and Estuary. An extensive sensitivity study is performed demonstrating the relative robustness of the model with respect to the chosen parameterisations. In addition to reproducing the observed E. coli concentrations in 2007-2008 at various stations, two extreme wastewater management scenarios were considered. Overall, there is no doubt that the Scheldt Estuary acts as a cleaning filter of faecal contamination originating from large Belgian cities. As a result, at the mouth of the Scheldt Estuary E. coli concentration is negligible in all investigated conditions. © 2013.

  19. Multivariate analysis of heavy metals concentrations in river estuary.

    PubMed

    Alkarkhi, Abbas F M; Ahmad, Anees; Ismail, Norli; Easa, Azhar Mat

    2008-08-01

    Multivariate statistical techniques such as multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and discriminant analysis (DA) were applied for analyzing the data obtained from two rivers in the Penang State of Malaysia for the concentration of heavy metal ions (As, Cr, Cd, Zn, Cu, Pb, and Hg) using a flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F-AAS) for Cr, Cd, Zn, Cu, Pb, As and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) for Hg. The two locations of interest with 20 sampling points of each location were Kuala Juru (Juru River) and Bukit Tambun (Jejawi River). MANOVA showed a strong significant difference between the two rivers in terms of heavy metal concentrations in water samples. DA gave the best result to identify the relative contribution for all parameters in discriminating (distinguishing) the two rivers. It provided an important data reduction as it used four parameters (Zn, Pb, Cd and Cr) affording 100% correct assignations. Results indicated that the two rivers were different in terms of heavy metals concentrations in water, and the major difference was due to the contribution of Zn. A negative correlation was found between discriminate functions (DF) and Cr and As, whereas positive correlation was exhibited with other heavy metals. Therefore, DA allowed a reduction in the dimensionality of the data set, delineating a few indicator parameters responsible for large variations in heavy metal concentrations. Correlation matrix between the parameters exhibited a strong evidence of mutual dependence of these metals.

  20. Hydrodynamics in the Yellow River Estuary via radium isotopes: Ecological perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bochao; Burnett, William; Dimova, Natasha; Diao, Shaobo; Mi, Tiezhu; Jiang, Xueyan; Yu, Zhigang

    2013-09-01

    We used radium isotopes as tracers to characterize coastal hydrodynamics and submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) in the Yellow River Estuary in order to assess the ecological effects in one of the most turbid estuaries in the world. Based on apparent water ages calculated by 224Ra/223Ra activity ratios, we found that the river plume flowed mainly southeast at a flow rate of 5-7 km d-1, while a small portion of the river plume was diverted northeast to the central Bohai Sea at a flow rate of less than 2 km d-1. We estimate that with this flow regime, nutrients would be consumed within about two weeks mostly by microplankton and nanoplankton near shore, and picoplankton further offshore to support an average primary production of 0.14 g C m-2 d-1. We then used a 226Ra mass balance model to quantify the SGD flux in the study area. The estimated SGD flux was 1.3×109 m3 d-1 with a range of 2.8×108-3.0×109 m3 d-1. Even the minimum SGD value was about 3 times higher than the Yellow River discharge at that time. The SGD input of dissolved nutrients was shown to be very important to the estuarine nutrient budget, at least 5 times higher than river input. Sediment regeneration of nutrients proved to be very small relative to the SGD flux in this region.

  1. Temporal and Spatial Variations in Nutrient Stoichiometry and Regulation of Phytoplankton Biomass in Hong Kong waters: Influence of the Pearl River Outflow and Sewage Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Ho, Alvin Y. T.; Yin, Kedong; Yuan, Xiangcheng; Anderson, Donald M.; Lee, Joseph H.W.; Harrison, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    In 2001, the Hong Kong government implemented the Harbor Area Treatment Scheme (HATS) under which 70% of the sewage that had been formerly discharged into Victoria Harbor is now collected and sent to Stonecutters Island Sewage Works where it receives chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT), and is then discharged into waters west of the Harbor. The relocation of the sewage discharge will possibly change the nutrient dynamics and phytoplankton biomass in this area. Therefore, there is a need to examine the factors that regulate phytoplankton growth in Hong Kong waters in order to understand future impacts. Based on a historic nutrient data set (1986–2001), a comparison of ambient nutrient ratios with the Redfield ratio (N:P:Si=16:1:16) showed clear spatial variations in the factors that regulate phytoplankton biomass along a west (estuary) to east (coastal/oceanic) transect through Hong Kong waters. Algal biomass was constrained by a combination of low light conditions, a rapid change in salinity, and strong turbulent mixing in western waters throughout the year. Potential stoichiometric Si limitation (up to 94% of the cases in winter) occurred in Victoria Harbor due to the contribution of sewage effluent with high N and P enrichment all year, except for summer when the frequency of stoichiometric Si limitation (48%) was the same as P, owing to the influence of the high Si in the Pearl River discharge. In the eastern waters, potential N limitation and N and P co-limitation occurred in autumn and winter respectively, because of the dominance of coastal/oceanic water with low nutrients and low N:P ratios. In contrast, potential Si limitation occurred in spring and a switch to potential N, P and Si limitation occurred in eastern waters in summer. In southern waters, there was a shift from P limitation (80%) in summer due to the influence of the N-rich Pearl River discharge, to N limitation (68%) in autumn, and to N and P co-limitation in winter due to the

  2. Temporal and spatial variations in nutrient stoichiometry and regulation of phytoplankton biomass in Hong Kong waters: influence of the Pearl River outflow and sewage inputs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Ho, Alvin Y T; Yin, Kedong; Yuan, Xiangcheng; Anderson, Donald M; Lee, Joseph H W; Harrison, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    In 2001, the Hong Kong government implemented the Harbor Area Treatment Scheme (HATS) under which 70% of the sewage that had been formerly discharged into Victoria Harbor is now collected and sent to Stonecutters Island Sewage Works where it receives chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT), and is then discharged into waters west of the Harbor. The relocation of the sewage discharge will possibly change the nutrient dynamics and phytoplankton biomass in this area. Therefore, there is a need to examine the factors that regulate phytoplankton growth in Hong Kong waters in order to understand future impacts. Based on a historic nutrient data set (1986-2001), a comparison of ambient nutrient ratios with the Redfield ratio (N:P:Si=16:1:16) showed clear spatial variations in the factors that regulate phytoplankton biomass along a west (estuary) to east (coastal/oceanic) transect through Hong Kong waters. Algal biomass was constrained by a combination of low light conditions, a rapid change in salinity, and strong turbulent mixing in western waters throughout the year. Potential stoichiometric Si limitation (up to 94% of the cases in winter) occurred in Victoria Harbor due to the contribution of sewage effluent with high N and P enrichment all year, except for summer when the frequency of stoichiometric Si limitation (48%) was the same as P, owing to the influence of the high Si in the Pearl River discharge. In the eastern waters, potential N limitation and N and P co-limitation occurred in autumn and winter respectively, because of the dominance of coastal/oceanic water with low nutrients and low N:P ratios. In contrast, potential Si limitation occurred in spring and a switch to potential N, P and Si limitation occurred in eastern waters in summer. In southern waters, there was a shift from P limitation (80%) in summer due to the influence of the N-rich Pearl River discharge, to N limitation (68%) in autumn, and to N and P co-limitation in winter due to the

  3. Salinity and flow relations and effects of reduced flow in the Chassahowitzka River and Homosassa River estuaries, southwest Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yobbi, D.K.; Knochenmus, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Chassahowitzka and Homosassa Rivers Florida, are spring-fed streams flowing into the Gulf of Mexico that may be affected by future development of groundwaters. Reduction of streamflow may cause an upstream movement of saltwater in the rivers. Data on flow, tide, and salinity define the physical characteristics of both estuaries. Vertical and longitudinal salinity profiles indicate that the estuaries are reasonably well mixed for the streamflow and high-tide conditions observed during the study. Estimates of the daily maximum upstream locations of the vertically averaged 3-ppt and 5-ppt salinities in the Chassahowitzka River and the vertically averaged 2-ppt and 5-ppt salinities in the Homosassa River are described by multiple linear regression analysis using daily mean streamflow of each river and high-tide stage of the gulf. For the vertically averaged 3-ppt and 2-ppt salinities, the square of the correlation coefficient for the predictive equations ranged from 0.77 to 0.85. For the vertically averaged 5-ppt salinities, the square of the correlation coefficient for the predictive equations ranged from 0.73 to 0.88. Upstream movement of salt-water due to pumping 40 million gal/day from a well field near the headwater springs of the Chassahowitzka and Homosassa Rivers was determined. Pumping at this rate from the Chassahowitzka River would cause a 15% reduction of average spring flow, resulting in an upstream movement of both the vertically averaged 3-ppt and 5-ppt of about 0.3 mile. In the Homosassa River, pumping would cause a 13% reduction of average spring flow, resulting in an upstream movement of both the vertically averaged 2-ppt and 5-ppt salinities of about 0.1 mile. (USGS)

  4. Nitrification and Nitrifying Bacteria in the Lower Seine River and Estuary (France)

    PubMed Central

    Cébron, Aurélie; Berthe, Thierry; Garnier, Josette

    2003-01-01

    The Achères wastewater treatment plant, located just downstream of Paris, discharges its effluents into the lower Seine River. The effluents contain large numbers of heterotrophic bacteria, organic matter, and ammonium and are a source of nitrifying bacteria. As a result, degradation of organic matter by heterotrophic bacteria and subsequent oxygen depletion occur immediately downstream of the effluent outlet, whereas nitrifying bacteria apparently need to build up a significant biomass before ammonium oxidation significantly depletes the oxygen. We quantified the potential total nitrifying activity and the potential activities of the ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing communities along the Seine River. In the summer, the maximum nitrifying activity occurs in the upper freshwater estuary, ∼200 km downstream of Achères. The quantities of nitrifying bacteria, based on amoA gene copy numbers, and of Nitrobacter organisms, based on 16S rRNA gene copy numbers, were correlated with the potential nitrifying activities. The species composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria was investigated at two sites: the Triel station just downstream from Achères (km 84) and the Seine freshwater estuary at the Duclair station (km 278). By means of PCR primers targeting the amoA gene, a gene library was created. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the majority of the analyzed clones at both sites were affiliated with the genus Nitrosomonas. The Nitrosomonas oligotropha- and Nitrosomonas urea-related clones represented nearly 81% of the community of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria at Triel and 60% at Duclair. Two other ammonia-oxidizing clusters of the β subclass of the Proteobacteria, i.e., Nitrosomonas europaea- and Nitrosospira-like bacteria, were found in smaller numbers. The major change in the ammonia-oxidizing community between the two stations along the Seine River-upper estuary continuum was the replacement of the N. oligotropha- and N. urea-related bacteria by the Nitrosospira

  5. Consumption processes and food web structure in the Columbia River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simenstad, Charles A.; Small, Lawrence F.; David McIntire, C.

    Consumption processes at several trophic levels tend to coverage in the central (estuarine-mixing) region of the Columbia River estuary, where living and dentrital food resources are entrained within the energy null of the turbidity maximum zone. Primary consumers in this region are generalist and omnivorous feeders, capable of exploiting both autotrophic and heterotrophic food web pathways. In the presence of higher standing stocks of their prey resources, feeding by secondary and tertiary consumers is also concentrated, or more effective, in the estuarine mixing region of the estuary. During the 1980-1981 studies of the estuary, total consumer (metazoan) production averaged 5.5g C m -2 within the estuary. Of the estimated 15 x 10 3mt Cyy -1 attributed to primary consumption in the water column, 83% was the result of suspension-feeding pelagic zooplankton. In comparison to grazing on phytoplankton, it was estimated that approximately 84% of primary consumption in the water column was based on suspended detritus and, presumably, associated microbiota. Endemic primary,consumers, principally epibenthic crustaceans such as the calanoid copepod Eurytemora affinis, the harpacticoid copepod Scottolana canadensis, and the crangonid shrimp Crangon franciscorum, accounted for a high proportion of the consumption of suspended particles. Wertland herbivores inhabiting the estuary's extensive marshes, on the other hand, were estimated to account for only 2 to 17% of total estuarine primary consumption. Trophic linkages to secondary and tertiary consumers were more evenly apportioned among pelagic fishes, motile macroinvertebrates, and benthic infauna. High, comparatively unknown fluxes of migratory or wide-ranging tertiary consumers, such as piscivorous birds, seals and sea lions, made estimation of their annual consumption rates in the estuary highly tenuous. The physical processes of mixing and stratification, sediments accretion and erosion, and salinity intrusion appear to

  6. Sedimentary fabrics of the macrotidal, mud-dominated, inner estuary to fluvio-tidal transition zone, Petitcodiac River estuary, New Brunswick, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchepetkina, Alina; Gingras, Murray K.; Zonneveld, John-Paul; Pemberton, S. George

    2016-03-01

    The study provides a detailed description of mud-dominated sedimentary fabrics and their application for the rock record within the inner estuary to the fluvial zone of the Petitcodiac River estuary, New Brunswick, Canada. Sedimentological characteristics and facies distributions of the clay- and silt-rich deposits are reported. The inner estuary is characterized by thick accumulations of interbedded silt and silty clay on intertidal banks that flank the tidally influenced channel. The most common sedimentary structures observed are parallel and wavy lamination, small-scale soft-sediment deformation with microfaults, and clay and silt current ripples. The tidal channel contains sandy silt and clayey silt with planar lamination, massive and convolute bedding. The fluvio-tidal transition zone is represented by interbedded trough cross-stratified sand and gravel beds with planar laminated to massive silty mud. The riverine, non-tidal reach of the estuary is characterized by massive, planar tabular and trough cross-stratified gravel-bed deposits. The absence of bioturbation within the inner estuary to the fluvio-tidal transition zone can be explained by the following factors: low water salinities (0-5 ppt), amplified tide and current speeds, and high concentrations of flocculated material in the water body. Notably, downstream in the middle and outer estuary, bioturbation is seasonally pervasive: in those locales the sedimentary conditions are similar, but salinity is higher. In this study, the sedimentological (i.e., grain size, bedding characters, sedimentary structures) differences between the tidal estuary and the fluvial setting are substantial, and those changes occur over only a few hundred meters. This suggests that the widely used concept of an extensive fluvio-tidal transition zone and its depositional character may not be a geographically significant component of fluvial or estuary deposits, which can go unnoticed in the study of the ancient rocks.

  7. Foraging patterns of Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants in the Columbia River estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, Donald E.; Roby, D.D.; Collis, K.

    2007-01-01

    We examined spatial and temporal foraging patterns of Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants nesting in the Columbia River estuary, to potentially identify circumstances where juvenile salmonids listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act might be more vulnerable to predation by these avian piscivores. Data were collected during the 1998 and 1999 breeding seasons, using point count surveys of foraging birds at 40 sites along the river's banks, and using aerial strip transect counts throughout the estuary for terns. In 1998, terns selected tidal flats and sites with roosting beaches nearby for foraging, making greater use of the marine/mixing zone of the estuary later in the season, particularly areas near the ocean jetties. In 1999, cormorants selected foraging sites in freshwater along the main channel with pile dikes present, particularly early in the season. Foraging trends in the other year for each species were generally similar to the above but usually not significant. During aerial surveys we observed 50% of foraging and commuting terns within 8 km of the Rice Island colony, and ??? 5% of activity occurred ??? 27 km from this colony in both years. Disproportionately greater cormorant foraging activity at pile dikes may indicate greater vulnerability of salmonids to predation at those features. Colony relocations to sites at sufficient distance from areas of relatively high salmonid abundance may be a straightforward means of reducing impacts of avian predation on salmonids than habitat alterations within the Columbia River estuary, at least for terns. ?? 2007 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  8. Continuous resistivity profiling data from the upper Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, 2004-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, VeeAnn A.; Bratton, John F.; Bergeron, Emile M.; Meunier, Jeff K.; Crusius, John; Koopmans, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    The Neuse River Estuary in North Carolina has suffered impacts of eutrophication in recent years. As part of a larger project to better constrain nutrient budgets in the estuary, field investigations were performed to study occurrence and discharge of fresh and brackish ground water and nutrients beneath the estuary itself (fig. 1). A Continuous Resistivity Profiling (CRP) system (Manheim and others, 2004) was used to map the depth of the freshwater-saltwater interface (FSI) in sub-estuarine groundwater. This study area serves as a typological representation of a submarine groundwater environment characteristic of a shallow estuary in a wide coastal plain that has not experienced glaciation. Similar settings extend from New Jersey to Georgia, and along the Gulf of Mexico in the U.S. This report archives 29 lines of data collected during 2004 and 2005 surveys representing almost 210 km of survey lines. These data are further explained in the Data Processing section of the report and previews available of the processed data are available.

  9. Data-collection program for Pamlico River Estuary model calibration and validation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, Jerad D.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation is being conducted to collect and interpret continuous records relating to the flow characteristics of the Pamlico River Estuary, North Carolina, and to calibrate and validate a numerical model of estuarine hydrodynamics. The study reach is 50 kilometers long and ranges in width from 330 meters at the upstream boundary to 6.4 kilometers at the downstream end. Water levels are recorded at 6 locations along the estuary; daily water-level range is typically greater at the head of the estuary than at the mouth, most likely due to upstream narrowing of the channel. Water-quality data are recorded at 14 locations. These data indicate that saline waters with low dissolved oxygen concentrations move upstream along the bottom of the estuary. Point velocities were monitored for 3 weeks at 7 locations; vertical profiles of horizontal velocity were made at the boundaries of the study reach for about 32 hours. Local tributary inflows and wind speed and direction are also being determined.

  10. Bathymetric controls on sediment transport in the Hudson River estuary: Lateral asymmetry and frontal trapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ralston, David K.; Geyer, W. Rockwell; Warner, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of field observations and numerical model results have identified that sediment transport in the Hudson River estuary is laterally segregated between channel and shoals, features frontal trapping at multiple locations along the estuary, and varies significantly over the spring-neap tidal cycle. Lateral gradients in depth, and therefore baroclinic pressure gradient and stratification, control the lateral distribution of sediment transport. Within the saline estuary, sediment fluxes are strongly landward in the channel and seaward on the shoals. At multiple locations, bottom salinity fronts form at bathymetric transitions in width or depth. Sediment convergences near the fronts create local maxima in suspended-sediment concentration and deposition, providing a general mechanism for creation of secondary estuarine turbidity maxima at bathymetric transitions. The lateral bathymetry also affects the spring-neap cycle of sediment suspension and deposition. In regions with broad, shallow shoals, the shoals are erosional and the channel is depositional during neap tides, with the opposite pattern during spring tides. Narrower, deeper shoals are depositional during neaps and erosional during springs. In each case, the lateral transfer is from regions of higher to lower bed stress, and depends on the elevation of the pycnocline relative to the bed. Collectively, the results indicate that lateral and along-channel gradients in bathymetry and thus stratification, bed stress, and sediment flux lead to an unsteady, heterogeneous distribution of sediment transport and trapping along the estuary rather than trapping solely at a turbidity maximum at the limit of the salinity intrusion.

  11. Turning the tide: effects of river inflow and tidal amplitude on sandy estuaries in laboratory landscape experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinhans, Maarten; Braat, Lisanne; Leuven, Jasper; Baar, Anne; van der Vegt, Maarten; van Maarseveen, Marcel; Markies, Henk; Roosendaal, Chris; van Eijk, Arjan

    2016-04-01

    Many estuaries formed over the Holocene through a combination of fluvial and coastal influxes, but how estuary planform shape and size depend on tides, wave climate and river influxes remains unclear. Here we use a novel tidal flume setup of 20 m length by 3 m width, the Metronome (http://www.uu.nl/metronome), to create estuaries and explore a parameter space for the simple initial condition of a straight river in sandy substrate. Tidal currents capable of transporting sediment in both the ebb and flood phase because they are caused by periodic tilting of the flume rather than the classic method of water level fluctuation. Particle imaging velocimetry and a 1D shallow flow model demonstrate that this principle leads to similar sediment mobility as in nature. Ten landscape experiments recorded by timelapse overhead imaging and AGIsoft DEMs of the final bed elevation show that absence of river inflow leads to short tidal basins whereas even a minor discharge leads to long convergent estuaries. Estuary width and length as well as morphological time scale over thousands of tidal cycles strongly depend on tidal current amplitude. Paddle-generated waves subdue the ebb delta causing stronger tidal currents in the basin. Bar length-width ratios in estuaries are slightly larger to those in braided rivers in experiments and nature. Mutually evasive ebb- and flood-dominated channels are ubiquitous and appear to be formed by an instability mechanism with growing bar and bifurcation asymmetry. Future experiments will include mud flats and live vegetation.

  12. Influence of multiple dam passage on survival of juvenile Chinook salmon in the Columbia River estuary and coastal ocean.

    PubMed

    Rechisky, Erin L; Welch, David W; Porter, Aswea D; Jacobs-Scott, Melinda C; Winchell, Paul M

    2013-04-23

    Multiple dam passage during seaward migration is thought to reduce the subsequent survival of Snake River Chinook salmon. This hypothesis developed because juvenile Chinook salmon from the Snake River, the Columbia River's largest tributary, migrate >700 km through eight hydropower dams and have lower adult return rates than downstream populations that migrate through only 3 or 4 dams. Using a large-scale telemetry array, we tested whether survival of hatchery-reared juvenile Snake River spring Chinook salmon is reduced in the estuary and coastal ocean relative to a downstream, hatchery-reared population from the Yakima River. During the initial 750-km, 1-mo-long migration through the estuary and coastal ocean, we found no evidence of differential survival; therefore, poorer adult returns of Snake River Chinook may develop far from the Columbia River. Thus, hydrosystem mitigation efforts may be ineffective if differential mortality rates develop in the North Pacific Ocean for reasons unrelated to dam passage.

  13. Sediment transport and morphodynamic changes in Ziarat Estuary and Mond River Delta, the Persian Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi Arab, Azadeh; Haghshenas, S. Abbas; Samsami, Farzin

    2014-05-01

    The Mond River, which is considered as one of the Major Iranian rivers discharging in to the Persian Gulf, is bounded within the region from 51°10' to 54°28' E and 27°20' to 29°51' N, flowing in two provinces of Fars and Boushehr. The latest part of the river is completely meandered and the river mouth has been migrating twice during the past 50 years. Total sediment discharge of the river is estimated as 12 million cubic meter per year. Analysis of meandering river phenomenon and river mouth migration as well as evolution of the down-stream sand spits has long been one of the challenges in hydrodynamic discussions. This natural process usually takes place in rivers to provide energy equilibrium and its integration with human desires has posed as a management issue. The sediment discharging to the Persian Gulf plays an essential role in formation of Mond River Delta as well as a set of sand spits formed in downstream of the river mouth. The morpho-dynamic of entire environment of the Mond River - Mond Delta highly affects marine environment in the surrounding area. The present study offers the results of a numerical and field investigation of various features of river-delta interaction on Ziarat Estuary and the Mond Delta area. A numerical model has been utilized to investigate cases of flow and sediment transport behaviour in the coastal Mond area and future migration patterns of the River Mouth is estimated. Sediment sources and relevant contributions in morphodynamic changes of the sand spits are widely investigated through sediment constituent analysis. The results of the numerical model are compared with field observations and comprehensive GIS based analysis of historic shoreline changes from aerial photos and satellite imagery. It is concluded that the model achievements are capable to predict the observed phenomena. Management guidelines and suggestions are deducted and drawn from the calibration and verification of the results with field observations

  14. River-sea transitions of sediment dynamics: A case study of the tide-impacted Yangtze River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H. F.; Yang, S. L.; Xu, K. H.

    2017-09-01

    Hydrodynamics and sediment dynamics vary greatly in tide-dominated estuaries worldwide, but there is a paucity of data of large tide-dominated estuary systems due to difficulties of observation in a large spatial scale. In this study, we investigate sediment dynamic transitions in a 660-km long section between the tidal limit and mouth of the Yangtze River. We found that tidal effects are almost undetectable in the uppermost 100-km section, but the mean tidal range gradually increases downstream to nearly 3 m at the river mouth. Flow is generally unidirectional in the uppermost 400-km section, although its velocity changes in response to flood/ebb tidal dynamics; in the lowest 250-km section, flow is bidirectional, and ebb flow durations decrease towards the sea. In the lowermost 100 km, the ebb flow durations decreases to below 60%, and the flow is dominated by tidal currents. Salinity is only detectable in the lowest 100-km section due to the dominance of Yangtze River water discharge. Bed sediments mainly include sand in the uppermost 500-km section, whereas mud dominates in the remaining areas. In contrast, the median grain size of the suspended sediments was found to be greater in the lowest 100-km section (8-13 μm) than in the upper sections (5-6 μm) due to strong exchanges between suspended and near bed sediments. The suspended sediment concentration (SSC) was found to be low (<0.1 g/L) and homogenous in the uppermost 100-km section, downstream of which the SSC increased rapidly to >1 g/L and both surface-bottom and intratidal variabilities occurred. The rates of sediment parameter changes were rapid in the river-sea transitional zone, and this zone may shift upstream and downstream in response to the relative contributions of the river, tides and waves. A conceptual model of the river-sea transition of sediment dynamics for the Yangtze estuary was established, and this model shed light on quantitative studies of sediment dynamics in other large tide

  15. Fouling community of the Loxahatchee River estuary, Florida, 1980-81

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, B.F.; Sonntag, W.H.; Sabanskas, M.

    1984-01-01

    Monthly growth of the fouling community at eight test panel sites in the Loxahatchee River Estuary was related to salinity and temperature. Growth was lowest in January 1981 (averaging 23 g per m2, dry weight), and increased during spring and early summer with increasing water temperature. Maximum growth occurred during early or midsummer at upstream locations, before river or canal discharge substantially reduced salinity, and in late summer at downstream locations. Growth was greatest at salinities slightly less than that of seawater and decreased at salinities less than about 10???. Growth was suppressed throughout the estuary in August 1981, probably because of the sudden decrease in temperature and salinity, and perhaps the increase in physical scouring, caused by runoff from Tropical Storm Dennis. Large loads of nutrients transported to the estuary from storm runoff, however, may have subsequently stimulated growth, which increased in September 1981 to the maximum for the year (averaging 683 g per m2, dry weight). ?? 1984 Estuarine Research Federation.

  16. Occurrence of Cymbasoma longispinosum Bourne, 1890 in the Curuçá River estuary.

    PubMed

    Leite, Natália R; Pereira, Luci C C; Abrunhosa, Fernando; Pires, Marcus A B; Costa, Rauquírio M da

    2010-09-01

    The present work was carried out to verify the occurrence and distribution of Cymbasoma longispinosum Bourne, 1890 in a tropical Amazon estuary from North Brazil. Samplings were performed bimonthly from July/2003 to July/2004 at two different transects (Muriá and Curuçá rivers) situated along the Curuçá estuary (Pará, North Brazil). Samples were collected during neap tides via gentle (1 to 1.5 knots) 200 μm-mesh net tows from a small boat. Additional subsurface water samples were collected for the determination of environmental parameters. Males and females of Cymbasoma longispinosum were only observed during September and November/2003. The highest number of organisms was found in September/2003 at the Muriá River transect. The presence of C. longispinosum in samples obtained during September and November/2003 could probably be related to the reproductive period of this species in the studied estuary, which is directly related to the dry period in the region. The highest salinity values and the highest number of individuals observed in September/2003 corroborate with the previous assumption, since no C. longispinosum was found during the months comprising the rainy period (January to June).

  17. Occurrence of Natural Contaminants of Emerging Concern in the Douro River Estuary, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Rita; Maia, Alexandra; Santos, Mariana; Tiritan, Maria Elizabeth; Ribeiro, Cláudia Maria Rosa

    2016-02-01

    Many studies demonstrated the presence of diverse environmental contaminants in the Douro River estuary, such as natural and synthetic estrogens, pharmaceuticals, industrial compounds and pesticides. This estuary is located between two densely populated cities and is highly impacted due to anthropogenic activities, such as industry and agriculture. Although the presence of mycotoxins and phytoestrogens, such as lignans and coumestrans, in the aquatic environment is reported by some authors, their occurrence in Portuguese waters was not investigated yet. To evaluate the presence of phytoestrogens, phytosterols and mycotoxins in Douro River estuary, water samples were collected seasonally at nine sampling points, preconcentrated by solid phase extraction and analysed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Local flora was collected on the riverside, in the same sampling points, for identification and evaluation of the possible relation to the presence of phytoestrogens and/or phytosterols in the estuarine water. Results showed the ubiquitous presence of mycotoxins, namely deoxynivalenol up to 373.5 ng L(-1). Both phytoestrogens and phytosterols showed a possible seasonal fluctuation, which is in accordance to the life cycle of the local flora and agricultural practices. Physicochemical parameters were also determined for water quality evaluation. This study revealed for the first time the presence of mycotoxins and lignans in estuarine waters from Portugal, and highlights the need to consider natural contaminants in future monitoring programs.

  18. Effects of Spartina alterniflora Invasion on Soil Respiration in the Yangtze River Estuary, China

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Naishun; Qu, Junfeng; Li, Zhaolei; Li, Gang; Zhao, Hua; Zhao, Bin; Li, Bo; Chen, Jiakuan; Fang, Changming

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have found that plant invasion can enhance soil organic carbon (SOC) pools, by increasing net primary production (NPP) and/or decreased soil respiration. While most studies have focused on C input, little attention has been paid to plant invasion effects on soil respiration, especially in wetland ecosystems. Our study examined the effects of Spartina alterniflora invasion on soil respiration and C dynamics in the Yangtze River estuary. The estuary was originally occupied by two native plant species: Phragmites australis in the high tide zone and Scirpus mariqueter in the low tide zone. Mean soil respiration rates were 185.8 and 142.3 mg CO2 m−2 h−1 in S. alterniflora and P. australis stands in the high tide zone, and 159.7 and 112.0 mg CO2 m−2 h−1 in S. alterniflora and S. mariqueter stands in the low tide zone, respectively. Aboveground NPP (ANPP), SOC, and microbial biomass were also significantly higher in the S. alterniflora stands than in the two native plant stands. S. alterniflora invasion did not significantly change soil inorganic carbon or pH. Our results indicated that enhanced ANPP by S. alterniflora exceeded invasion-induced C loss through soil respiration. This suggests that S. alterniflora invasion into the Yangtze River estuary could strengthen the net C sink of wetlands in the context of global climate change. PMID:25799512

  19. Variation of phytoplankton community structure from the Pearl River estuary to South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhao-Yu; Wang, You-Shao; Cheng, Hao; Sun, Cui-Ci; Wu, Mei-Lin

    2015-10-01

    The Pearl River is located in the northern part of South China Sea. The environment of the Pearl River estuary (PRE) is significantly impacted by nutrients from anthropogenic activities. Along the anthropogenic pollution gradient from the PRE to South China Sea, the phylogenetic diversity and biomass of phytoplankton was examined in relation to physic-chemical variables. The richness of rbcL gene was higher in the open sea than the estuary, while the concentration of chlorophyll a (Chl a) was higher in the estuary than in the open sea. The cluster analysis of the sequences data resulted in seven phytoplankton community types and the dominant species of phytoplankton changed from Cryptophytes and Diatoms to Prymnesiophytes and Diatoms along the gradient. The community structure of phytoplankton was shaped by nutrients and salinity. The phytoplankton biomass was significantly positively affected by phosphorus, nitrite and ammonium (P < 0.01) but negatively by salinity (P < 0.05); the phytoplankton diversity was highly positively affected by salinity (P < 0.05) but negatively by silicate and nitrate (P < 0.01; P < 0.05, respectively). Anthropogenic activities played a critical role in the phytoplankton distribution and biomass of the study area. Further research is necessary to reveal the influence mechanism of environmental factors on the phytoplankton.

  20. Effects of Spartina alterniflora invasion on soil respiration in the Yangtze River estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Bu, Naishun; Qu, Junfeng; Li, Zhaolei; Li, Gang; Zhao, Hua; Zhao, Bin; Li, Bo; Chen, Jiakuan; Fang, Changming

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have found that plant invasion can enhance soil organic carbon (SOC) pools, by increasing net primary production (NPP) and/or decreased soil respiration. While most studies have focused on C input, little attention has been paid to plant invasion effects on soil respiration, especially in wetland ecosystems. Our study examined the effects of Spartina alterniflora invasion on soil respiration and C dynamics in the Yangtze River estuary. The estuary was originally occupied by two native plant species: Phragmites australis in the high tide zone and Scirpus mariqueter in the low tide zone. Mean soil respiration rates were 185.8 and 142.3 mg CO2 m(-2) h(-1) in S. alterniflora and P. australis stands in the high tide zone, and 159.7 and 112.0 mg CO2 m(-2) h(-1) in S. alterniflora and S. mariqueter stands in the low tide zone, respectively. Aboveground NPP (ANPP), SOC, and microbial biomass were also significantly higher in the S. alterniflora stands than in the two native plant stands. S. alterniflora invasion did not significantly change soil inorganic carbon or pH. Our results indicated that enhanced ANPP by S. alterniflora exceeded invasion-induced C loss through soil respiration. This suggests that S. alterniflora invasion into the Yangtze River estuary could strengthen the net C sink of wetlands in the context of global climate change.

  1. Fluorescence tracking of dissolved and particulate organic matter quality in a river-dominated estuary.

    PubMed

    Osburn, Christopher L; Handsel, Lauren T; Mikan, Molly P; Paerl, Hans W; Montgomery, Michael T

    2012-08-21

    Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence was combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) to model base-extracted particulate (POM) and dissolved (DOM) organic matter quality in the Neuse River Estuary (NRE), North Carolina, before and after passage of Hurricane Irene in August 2011. Principle components analysis was used to determine that four of the PARAFAC components (C1-C3 and C6) were terrestrial sources to the NRE. One component (C4), prevalent in DOM of nutrient-impacted streams and estuaries and produced in phytoplankton cultures, was enriched in the POM and in surface sediment pore water DOM. One component (C5) was related to recent autochthonous production. Photoexposure of unfiltered Neuse River water caused an increase in slope ratio values (S(R)) which corresponded to an increase in the ratio C2:C3 for DOM, and the production of C4 fluorescence in both POM and DOM. Changes to the relative abundance of C4 in POM and DOM indicated that advection of pore water DOM from surface sediments into overlying waters could increase the autochthonous quality of DOM in shallow microtidal estuaries. Modeling POM and DOM simultaneously with PARAFAC is an informative technique that is applicable to assessments of estuarine water quality.

  2. Spatial assessment of water quality using chemometrics in the Pearl River Estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meilin; Wang, Youshao; Dong, Junde; Sun, Fulin; Wang, Yutu; Hong, Yiguo

    2017-03-01

    A cruise was commissioned in the summer of 2009 to evaluate water quality in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE). Chemometrics such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Cluster analysis (CA) and Self-Organizing Map (SOM) were employed to identify anthropogenic and natural influences on estuary water quality. The scores of stations in the surface layer in the first principal component (PC1) were related to NH4-N, PO4-P, NO2-N, NO3-N, TP, and Chlorophyll a while salinity, turbidity, and SiO3-Si in the second principal component (PC2). Similarly, the scores of stations in the bottom layers in PC1 were related to PO4-P, NO2-N, NO3-N, and TP, while salinity, Chlorophyll a, NH4-N, and SiO3-Si in PC2. Results of the PCA identified the spatial distribution of the surface and bottom water quality, namely the Guangzhou urban reach, Middle reach, and Lower reach of the estuary. Both cluster analysis and PCA produced the similar results. Self-organizing map delineated the Guangzhou urban reach of the Pearl River that was mainly influenced by human activities. The middle and lower reaches of the PRE were mainly influenced by the waters in the South China Sea. The information extracted by PCA, CA, and SOM would be very useful to regional agencies in developing a strategy to carry out scientific plans for resource use based on marine system functions.

  3. Interactions of river discharge and tidal modulation in a tropical estuary, NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Miranda, Luiz Bruner; Bérgamo, Alessandro Luvizon; de Castro, Belmiro Mendes

    2005-12-01

    Observations of thermohaline properties and currents were undertaken in the Curimataú River estuary (6°18'S), Rio Grande do Norte state (RN), Brazil, during consecutive neap-spring tidal cycles in the austral autumn rainy season. Highly asymmetric neap tide along channel velocities (-0.4 to 0.9 m s-1) and highly stratified conditions were generated by an increase of the buoyancy energy from the freshwater input ( R iE≈5.6). During the spring-tidal cycle the river discharge decreased and the longitudinal velocity components were higher, less asymmetrical (-0.8 to 1.1 m s-1) and semidiurnal, associated with moderately stratified conditions ( R iE≈0.1) due to the increase of the kinetic tidal energy forcing mechanism. The overall salinity variation from surface to bottom during two tidal cycles was from 20.5 to 36.3 and 29 to 36.7 in the neap and spring tide experiments, respectively; in the last experiment, the tropical water (TW) mass intrusion was enhanced. The net salt transport reversed from down to up estuary during the neap and spring tide experiments, respectively, varied from 6.0 to -2.0 kg m-1 s-1, an indication of changes in the main forcing of the estuary dynamics. Evaluation of a classical steady analytical model, in comparison with nearly steady experimental vertical profiles of velocity, shows an agreement classifiable as reasonably fair.

  4. Mapping ecosystem services in the St. Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainable management of ecosystems for the perpetual flow of services beneficial to human communities requires reliable data about from where in the ecosystem services flow. Our objective is to map ecosystem services in the St. Louis River with the overarching U.S. EPA goal of ...

  5. Mapping ecosystem services in the St. Louis River estuary (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of ecosystems for sustainable provision of services beneficial to human communities requires reliable data about from where in the ecosystem services flow. Our objective is to map ecosystem services in the St. Louis River with the overarching EPA goal of community sust...

  6. Mapping ecosystem services in the St. Louis River estuary (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of ecosystems for sustainable provision of services beneficial to human communities requires reliable data about from where in the ecosystem services flow. Our objective is to map ecosystem services in the St. Louis River with the overarching EPA goal of community sust...

  7. Mapping ecosystem services in the St. Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainable management of ecosystems for the perpetual flow of services beneficial to human communities requires reliable data about from where in the ecosystem services flow. Our objective is to map ecosystem services in the St. Louis River with the overarching U.S. EPA goal of ...

  8. Radioactive cesium dynamics derived from hydrographic observations in the Abukuma River Estuary, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kakehi, Shigeho; Kaeriyama, Hideki; Ambe, Daisuke; Ono, Tsuneo; Ito, Shin-ichi; Shimizu, Yugo; Watanabe, Tomowo

    2016-03-01

    Large quantities of radioactive materials were released into the air and the ocean as a result of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, caused by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and the subsequent major tsunami off the Pacific coast. There is much concern about radioactive contamination in both the watershed of the Abukuma River, which flows through Fukushima Prefecture, and its estuary, where it discharges into the sea in Miyagi Prefecture. We investigated radioactive cesium dynamics using mixing diagrams obtained from hydrographic observations of the Abukuma River Estuary. Particulate radioactive cesium dominates the cesium load in the river, whereas the dissolved form dominates in the sea. As the salinity increased from <0.1 to 0.1-2.3, the mixing diagram showed that dissolved radioactive cesium concentrations increased, because of desorption. Desorption from suspended particles explained 36% of dissolved radioactive cesium in estuarine water. However, the dissolved and particulate radioactive cesium concentrations in the sea decreased sharply because of dilution. It is thought that more than 80% of the discharged particulate radioactive cesium was deposited off the river mouth, where the radioactive cesium concentrations in sediment were relatively high (217-2440 Bq kg(-1)). Radioactive cesium that was discharged to the sea was transported southward by currents driven by the density distribution.

  9. Energy-related use conflicts for the Columbia River Estuary. Volume I. Text

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.; Loehr, L.; Richter, K.; Ahlborn, G.; Westerlund, F.; Pratt, J.

    1983-06-01

    High, medium, and low probabilities of energy related development are projected for the Columbia River Estuary to river mile 93. Projections for five, fifteen, and twenty-five year planning horizons are aggregated, mapped, and described. The direct and indirect effects of projected energy-related development upon fish and wildlife in estuarine and riverine systems are summarized. Habitats affected by construction are identified, and operations of energy facility components causing impacts are characterized. Ecosystem models are developed for riverine, estuarine, channel, sandflat, mudflat, emergent vegetation, and riparian habitats to determine biological significance and pathways of projected impacts. Species accounts are furnished for 13 species and species groups that are of special concern. Cumulative impacts are integrated and described on a site-specific basis. Policy-making, planning, and regulatory processes relevant to the control of energy-related impacts in the Columbia River Estuary and lower river are outlined. Management and mitigation measures are discussed both for species of concern and for the types of energy facilities expected to be developed. This report has two volumes. Volume 1 provides a narrative description of projected energy development and describes the biological characteristics of fish and wildlife and their habitats, and gives a critique of potential environmental impacts, and measures of protection and mitigation.

  10. Influence of Environmental Variables on the Distribution of Macrobenthos in the Han River Estuary, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ok Hwan; Lee, Hyung-Gon; Lee, Jae-Hac

    2012-12-01

    We compared environmental effects on the macrobenthic community of the Han River Estuary in summer, when freshwater input from the Han River increased, and in spring, when freshwater input decreased. Field samples were taken from the upper region of the Shingok reservoir to the southern area of Ganghwado at 18 sampling sites after rainy (August 2006) and dry (March 2007) seasons. Macrobenthic fauna were collected using a Van Veen Grab (0.025 m2 and 0.1 m2) and environmental factors were measured simultaneously. Dominant species of macrobenthic fauna and the macrobenthic community were divided into two areas, the area of the Han River with no salinity (< 0.1 psu) and the southern part of Ganghwado with salinity (> 20 psu). The dominant species Byblis japonicus appeared at Junruri in the dry season. The distributions of two polychaetes, Hediste japonica and Nephtys caeca, were divided into the lower and upper areas of the Singok submerged weir. BIO-ENV (the matching of biotic to environmental patterns) analysis revealed that salinity was the most important factor affecting macrobenthic communities in the Han River Estuary, with other factors such as sediment grain size, bottom dissolved oxygen, and total organic carbon of sediment being secondary.

  11. Last century seabed morphodynamics of the Magra River estuary (Western Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratellesi, Marta; Ivaldi, Roberta; Ciavola, Paolo; Sinapi, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    The estimation of morphological and volumetric changes of the delta system at the mouth of the Magra River is presented in this paper using bathymetric and sedimentological data. The data series were collected during several hydro-oceanographic surveys carried out from 1882 to 2014, processed following the hydrographic international standards and stored in the Italian Navy Hydrographic Institute database. In particular, bathymetric data characterized by the same standard and accuracy were collected using different devices such as sounding lines, single-beam and multi-beam acoustic system. This research compares Digital Terrain Models (DTMs), derived from highly accurate bathymetric data and covering different time scales (secular, half-century and decade) in order to assess and quantify the seabed morphodynamics in relation with the river sedimentary budget. The methodology and data exploitation consist mainly in the production of DTMs to study the elevation change, two-dimensional and three dimensional maps, cross-sections of the seabed, difference surfaces and computation of net volumes as well as an historical sedimentological map. These products are also an useful contribution to the aim of EU RISC-KIT Project. The results of the analysis highlight changes in the geometry of the Magra River mouth, of the coastal profile and bottom features primarily due to variations of the sedimentary budget and secondarily to wave dynamics. This behaviour is characterized by evident river mouth and coastal retreat, beach erosion and sediment bars decay and net accretion under periods of high river sediment discharge and elongate bar formation during relatively fair conditions. In the last century the main change is constituted by the disappearance of the typical constructive seabed delta morphology and the transformation into the current small estuary, with microtidal condition. This small estuary has an upper sector where river processes, sediments and bedforms dominate, a

  12. Science-policy interplay: Air quality management in the Pearl River Delta region and Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Liuju; Louie, Peter K. K.; Zheng, Junyu; Yuan, Zibing; Yue, Dingli; Ho, Josephine W. K.; Lau, Alexis K. H.

    2013-09-01

    The information provided by the scientific studies and control measures implemented in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of China reveals that tremendous progress has been made in the understanding of regional air pollution issues and the deployment of mitigation measures for alleviating these problems. Given the unparalleled rapid economic growth in the PRD over the past two decades, such progress was only made possible by strong, science-based support and the partnerships between government and research institutions in the region and overseas. Researchers from these partnership programs and related studies have deployed cutting-edge expertise and experience in various crucial mainland China and mainland China/Hong Kong-level projects. China recognizes the importance of protecting the environment and cleaning up the air in the pursuit of sustainable growth and economic development. To avoid falling into a cycle of event-driven clean-up efforts, China has recently taken a major step and updated the national ambient air quality standards. Clearly, China is implementing an increasing number of evidence-based policies to address air pollution problems. Thus, to bring a fresh impetus at a national level, the PRD must maintain and augment the Hong Kong-mainland collaborative momentum, inducing a "whole-China" effort to clean up air pollution. To strengthen the science-based support system and ensure continuous and concerted effort in implementing the regional multi-pollutant control strategy, there must be an overarching and integral Hong Kong-Guangdong science consortium framework supporting the formulation of regional policy and control measures built on common goals under the "one country, two systems" principle. The "PRD Approach" of the air quality management regime reflected regional cooperative efforts in synchronous air pollutant control, catalyzed the crucial role of information disclosure and subtly transformed the air quality management approach to overcome

  13. Nutrient dynamics from the Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary to the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Su Mei; Qi, Xiao Hong; Li, Xiaona; Ye, Hao Ran; Wu, Ying; Ren, Jing Ling; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wei Yi

    2016-02-01

    Water and sediment samples were collected from the Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary and the adjacent East China Sea during impoundment of the river at the Three Gorges Dam. The concentrations of dissolved inorganic and organic nutrients, and particulate inorganic phosphorus and particulate organic phosphorus in the water column (PIP and POP, respectively) and sediments (SIP and SOP, respectively) were analyzed. The nutrient dynamics in salt marshes associated with the Changjiang estuary were also considered. In addition, river water samples were collected bimonthly in the lower reaches of the Changjiang. The concentrations of dissolved inorganic nutrients, PIP and POP showed temporal and spatial variations, which decreased from the coast to offshore areas. The dissolved organic nitrogen and phosphorus (P) concentrations showed patchy distributions, but were consistent with the distribution of phytoplankton biomass. Phosphorus is the major limiting element for phytoplankton growth. Among the various P forms, particulate P represented 38-52% of total P. The PIP and POP concentrations showed clear seasonal variations corresponding to the occurrence of the levels of suspended particulate matter. The P accumulation rates showed a decreasing trend from the coast to offshore areas, and high P burial efficiencies were found; the latter were related to a low benthic PO43 - flux and high sediment accumulation rates. The potential bioavailable P was estimated to be 65-70% of total P, of which more than two-thirds was regenerated in the water column. The salt marsh in the Changjiang estuary plays an important ecological role in nutrient transport from the river to offshore areas, and increased P limitation.

  14. Modeling the Influence of River Flow and Salt Water Intrusion in the Terengganu Estuary, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. L.; Tangang, F.; Hamid, M. R.; Benson, Y.; Razali, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    Salinity intrusion is a major concern when the freshwater extraction station is located in the estuary. This paper attempt to predict the salt intrusion length in the upper stretch of estuary, by applying different magnitudes of freshwater discharge at the river regime. The integrated two dimensional hydrodynamics model associated with advection dispersion model was performed to investigate the salinity intrusion. The model was well calibrated and verified by the measured data undertaken during dry season. The maximum salt intrusion length to the threshold of salinity density is 1.00 ppt on the existing condition was predicted at 9.97 km from the river mouth. Moreover, with the magnitude of 100.00 m3s-1 and 30.00 m3s-1 freshwater discharges at the upstream boundary (Kpg Tanggol), it was predicted the maximum salt intrusion length was 11.84 km and 21.41 km, respectively, from the river mouth. Therefore, it was determined the minimum freshwater discharge of approximately 100.00 m3s-1 is required at the Kpg Tanggol river gauging station, in order to maintain the acceptable salinity levels at the Pulau Musang freshwater pump house. However, the actual water discharge at the Kpg Tanggol boundary station should be higher, since the minimum discharge does not take into consideration the amount of water extraction by the Pulau Musang and SATU pump stations. Further analysis is required to execute the consequences of water extraction toward the salinity intrusion in the Terengganu estuary that coupled with projected sea level rise.

  15. Factors affecting chick provisioning by Caspian Terns nesting in the Columbia River estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Scott K.; Roby, D.D.; Lyons, Donald E.; Collis, K.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting chick provisioning by radio-tagged Caspian Terns (Sterna caspia) nesting in a large colony on East Sand Island in the Columbia River estuary during 2001. Caspian Tern predation on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) in the estuary prompted resource managers to relocate ca. 9,000 pairs of terns nesting on Rice Island (river km 34) to East Sand Island (river km 8), where terns were expected to consume fewer salmonids in favor of marine forage fishes. This study investigated factors influencing foraging success, diet composition, and overall reproductive success at the managed Caspian Tern colony. Our results indicated that daytime colony attendance by nesting terns averaged 64% and decreased throughout the chick-rearing period, while duration of foraging trips averaged 47 min and increased during the same period; these seasonal changes were more strongly related to date than chick age. Average meal delivery rates to 2-chick broods (0.88 meals h-1) were 2.6 times greater than to 1-chick broods (0.33 meals h-1). Parents delivered more juvenile salmonids to chicks during ebb tides than flood tides, but meal delivery rates to the nest remained constant, suggesting diet composition tracks relative availability of prey species. Foraging trips resulting in delivery of juvenile salmonids averaged 68% longer than foraging trips for schooling marine forage fishes, indicating higher availability of marine prey near the colony. High availability of marine forage fish in the Columbia River estuary during 2001 was apparently responsible for high colony attendance, short foraging trips, high chick meal delivery rates, and high nesting success of Caspian Terns on East Sand Island.

  16. Water-quality data from continuously monitored sites in the Pamlico and Neuse River estuaries, North Carolina, 1991-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrett, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    Water-quality measurements were made at six sites in or near North Carolina?s Pamlico River estuary and at five sites in or near the Neuse River estuary. Measurements taken at 15-minute intervals included near-surface and near-bottom specific conductance; near-surface water temperature; and near-surface, mid-depth, and near-bottom dissolved-oxygen concentrations. In the Pamlico River estuary, salinities generally ranged from less than 0.1 to 20 parts per thousand during the period October 1991 through September 1992. Recorded water temperatures in the Pamlico River were between 3.5 and 33 degrees Celsius during the measurement period. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations ranged from less than 1 to 23 milligrams per liter. In the Neuse River estuary, salinities ranged from 0.3 to 27 parts per thousand between October 1991 and September 1992. During the same period, recorded water temperatures in this estuary were between 4 and 34 degrees Celsius. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations ranged from less than 1 to greater than 22 milligrams per liter. Daily mean values of salinity; water temperature; dissolved-oxygen concentrations; and dissolved oxygen, percent saturation, are presented in tables and graphs. Five-day mean values of water temperature and dissolved-oxygen concentrations for day and night conditions also are presented in tables. Data are presented illustrating the vertical distribution of selected constituents at each site for selected dates.

  17. Heavy metals in soils and plants of the don river estuary and the Taganrog Bay coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkina, T. M.; Fedorov, Yu. A.; Nevidomskaya, D. G.; Pol'shina, T. N.; Mandzhieva, S. S.; Chaplygin, V. A.

    2017-09-01

    Natural and anthropogenic factors determining the distribution and accumulation features of Pb, Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni, Cd, Mn, and As in the soil-plant system of the Don River estuary and the northern and southern Russian coasts of Taganrog Bay estuary have been studied. High mobility of Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd has been revealed in alluvial soils. This is confirmed by the significant bioavailability of Cu, Zn, and, to a lesser degree, Cd and the technophily of Pb, which are accumulated in tissues of macrophytic plants. Statistically significant positive correlations have been found between the mobile forms of Cu, Zn, Cd, and Mn in the soil and the accumulation of metals in plants. Impact zones with increased metal contents in aquatic ecosystems can be revealed by bioindication from the morphofunctional parameters of macrophytic plants (with Typha L. as an example).

  18. Potential for eutrophication and nuisance algal blooms in the lower Neuse river estuary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Paerl, H.W.; Mallin, M.; Rudek, J.; Bates, P.W.

    1990-12-01

    Phytoplankton primary production and its environmental regulation were examined at 3 stations representative of the lower Neuse River Estuary near the Pamlico Sound interface. This study covered a 3-year period (November 1987-October 1990). The authors also examined the roles of the major phytoplankton nutrients nitrogen and phosphorus in controlling growth and bloom formation. The overall potential for nuisance blooms and associated episodes of bottom water hypoxia and anoxia was investigated in field studies. Algal biomass and production varied seasonally, with high values in summer and low values in winter. In situ nutrient addition bioassays indicated the estuary experienced a general state of N limitation with especially profound limitation during summer periods. The authors recommendations for a management strategy include reductions in Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP), and suspended sediment loads in order to maintain the system in a nuisance bloom-free condition.

  19. An assessment of natural radionuclides in water of Langat River estuary, Selangor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzah, Zaini; Rosli, Tengku Nurliana Tuan Mohd; Saat, Ahmad; Wood, Ab. Khalik

    2014-02-01

    An estuary is an area that has a free connection with the open sea and it is a dynamic semi-enclosed coastal bodies. Ex-mining, aquaculture and industrial areas in Selangor are the sources of pollutants discharged into the estuary water. Radionuclides are considered as pollutants to the estuary water. Gamma radiations emitted by natural radionuclides through their decaying process may give impact to human. The radiological effect of natural radionuclides which are 226Ra, 228Ra, 40K, 238U and 232Th, were explored by determining the respective activity concentrations in filtered water along the Langat estuary, Selangor. Meanwhile, in- situ water quality parameters such as temperature, dissolve oxygen (DO), salinity, total suspended solid (TSS), pH and turbidity were measured by using YSI portable multi probes meter. The activity concentration of 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K were determined by using gamma-ray spectrometry with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The activity concentrations of 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K in samples are in the range of 0.17 - 0.67 Bq/L, 0.16 - 0.97 Bq/L and 1.22 - 5.57 Bq/L respectively. On the other hand, the concentrations of uranium-238 and thorium-232 were determined by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRF). The thorium concentrations are between 0.17 ppm to 0.28 ppm and uranium concentrations were 0.25 ppm to 0.31 ppm. The results show activity concentrations of radionuclides are slightly high near the river estuary. The Radium Equivalent, Absorbed Dose Rate, External Hazard Index, and Annual Effective Dose of 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K are also studied.

  20. An assessment of natural radionuclides in water of Langat River estuary, Selangor

    SciTech Connect

    Hamzah, Zaini Rosli, Tengku Nurliana Tuan Mohd Saat, Ahmad Wood, Ab. Khalik

    2014-02-12

    An estuary is an area that has a free connection with the open sea and it is a dynamic semi-enclosed coastal bodies. Ex-mining, aquaculture and industrial areas in Selangor are the sources of pollutants discharged into the estuary water. Radionuclides are considered as pollutants to the estuary water. Gamma radiations emitted by natural radionuclides through their decaying process may give impact to human. The radiological effect of natural radionuclides which are {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, were explored by determining the respective activity concentrations in filtered water along the Langat estuary, Selangor. Meanwhile, in- situ water quality parameters such as temperature, dissolve oxygen (DO), salinity, total suspended solid (TSS), pH and turbidity were measured by using YSI portable multi probes meter. The activity concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K were determined by using gamma-ray spectrometry with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K in samples are in the range of 0.17 - 0.67 Bq/L, 0.16 - 0.97 Bq/L and 1.22 - 5.57 Bq/L respectively. On the other hand, the concentrations of uranium-238 and thorium-232 were determined by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRF). The thorium concentrations are between 0.17 ppm to 0.28 ppm and uranium concentrations were 0.25 ppm to 0.31 ppm. The results show activity concentrations of radionuclides are slightly high near the river estuary. The Radium Equivalent, Absorbed Dose Rate, External Hazard Index, and Annual Effective Dose of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K are also studied.

  1. The physical and geochemical interaction between a tidally-dominated estuary system (Wassaw Sound, GA) and a river-dominated estuary (Savannah River, GA) through salinity and inorganic carbon

    Treesearch

    Mike Scaboo; Christopher Hintz

    2016-01-01

    The Wilmington, Bull, and Savannah Rivers are interconnected waterways that flow through adjacent Savannah and Wassaw Sound Estuaries. These systems are linked by the upper reaches of the Wilmington River maintained as part of the Intracoastal Waterway. Significant changes to the Savannah River began in December 2014 with the initiation of the Savannah Harbor Expansion...

  2. Rapid, Human-Induced Siltation of the Macro-Tidal Ord River Estuary, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolanski, E.; Moore, K.; Spagnol, S.; D'Adamo, N.; Pattiaratchi, C.

    2001-11-01

    Field studies on the sediment dynamics of the two arms of Cambridge Gulf, tropical Western Australia, were undertaken. The system is macro-tidal with 8 m tides. The West Arm is the estuary of the Durack and Pentecost rivers, which are largely untouched by human activities. The East Arm is the estuary of the Ord River affected by land clearing which started 100 years ago, and by two river dams constructed 30 years ago. Prior to damming of the Ord River, the natural flow in all rivers was highly seasonal, characterized by small, at times negligible, flow during the dry season, which lasts eight months, and occasional river floods during the wet season, which lasts four months. The river flow has been regulated in the East Arm as a result of damming; this resulted in suppressing large river floods. The salinity intrusion length has decreased by about 50% in the East Arm following river damming. The East Arm has silted measurably over the last 30 years, with the stream cross-sectional area decreasing by about 50%. Field and numerical studies suggest that this is due to the dam-induced suppression of large river floods, which has in turn allowed a greater amount of tidal pumping of sediment into the East Arm from Cambridge Gulf. Since tidal pumping is increasing as the system is silting, the East Arm appears to now be geomorphologically unstable as a result of human activities. Numerical studies suggest it may take as little as 100 years for the Ord River to reach a new equilibrium. Modelling suggests that this equilibrium may be characterized by a salinity intrusion length half that before damming, a channel width and depth reduced by 70%, and a much stronger tidal asymmetry characterized by an increasing size of the tidal bore. The West Arm appears to be at equilibrium since there has been no net loss or gain of sediment for the last 111 years. Tidal dynamics and river floods appear responsible for self-scouring this channel.

  3. Assessment of heavy metal pollution in surficial sediments from a tropical river-estuary-shelf system: A case study of Kelantan River, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ai-Jun; Bong, Chui Wei; Xu, Yong-Hang; Hassan, Meor Hakif Amir; Ye, Xiang; Bakar, Ahmad Farid Abu; Li, Yun-Hai; Lai, Zhi-Kun; Xu, Jiang; Loh, Kar Hoe

    2017-08-11

    To understand the source-to-sink of pollutants in the Kelantan River estuary and the adjacent shelf area in Malaysia, a total of 42 surface sediment samples were collected in the Kelantan River-estuary-shelf system to analyze for grain size, total organic carbon (TOC) content, Al and heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb). The surficial sediments were mainly composed of clayey silt and the TOC content in sediments decreased from the river to the shelf. The surficial sediments experienced Pb pollution; Cr only showed a certain level of pollution in the coastal area of the estuary but not in other areas, and Ni, Cu, Zn, and Cd showed no pollution. The heavy metals mainly originated from natural weathering and erosion of rocks and soils in the catchment and enriched near the river mouth. Total organic carbon can promote the enrichment of heavy metals in sediments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Baseline sediment trace metals investigation: Steinhatchee River estuary, Florida, Northeast Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trimble, C.A.; Hoenstine, R.W.; Highley, A.B.; Donoghue, J.F.; Ragland, P.C.

    1999-01-01

    This Florida Geological Survey/U.S. Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service Cooperative Study provides baseline data for major and trace metal concentrations in the sediments of the Steinhatchee River estuary. These data are intended to provide a benchmark for comparison with future metal concentration data measurements. The Steinhatchee River estuary is a relatively pristine bay located within the Big Bend Wildlife Management Area on the North Central Florida Gulf of Mexico coastline. The river flows 55 km through woodlands and planted pines before emptying into the Gulf at Deadman Harbor. Water quality in the estuary is excellent at present. There is minimal development within the watershed. The estuary is part of an extensive system of marshes that formed along the Florida Gulf coast during the Holocene marine transgression. Sediment accretion rate measurements range from 1.4 to 4.1 mm/yr on the basis of lead-210 measurements. Seventy-nine short cores were collected from 66 sample locations, representing four lithofacies: clay- and organic-rich sands, organic-rich sands, clean quartz sands, and oyster bioherms. Samples were analyzed for texture, total organic matter, total carbon, total nitrogen, clay mineralogy, and major and trace-metal content. Following these analyses, metal concentrations were normalized against geochemical reference elements (aluminum and iron) and against total weight percent organic matter. Metals were also normalized granulometrically against total weight percent fines (<0.062 mm). Concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for all metals except mercury. Mercury concentrations were determined by cold-flameless atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Granulometric measurements were made by sieve and pipette analyses. Organic matter was determined by two methods: weight loss upon ignition and elemental analysis (by Carlo-Erba Furnace) of carbon and nitrogen. X

  5. Importance of budgets for estimating the input of groundwater-derived nutrients to an eutrophic tidal river and estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makings, Uriah; Santos, Isaac R.; Maher, Damien T.; Golsby-Smith, Lindsay; Eyre, Bradley D.

    2014-04-01

    Groundwater is often overlooked as a source of nutrients to estuaries and most previous groundwater-surface water exchange studies did not consider the input of dissolved organic nutrients. Here, we hypothesize that groundwater is contributing to high dissolved inorganic and organic nutrient concentrations in an eutrophic subtropical tidal river and estuary (Caboolture River, Queensland, Australia). Several spatial radon (222Rn, a natural groundwater tracer) surveys indicated that the majority of groundwater discharge occurred in the tidal river just upstream of the estuary, and that the radon hotspot did not necessarily coincide with the nutrient hotspot. A radon mass balance revealed that groundwater discharge into the tidal river was equivalent to about 50% of the gauged river flow in February 2012. Groundwater discharge apparently contributed 85% of ammonium and 35% of phosphate entering the estuary. In spite of significant correlations between radon and nitrate and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) during spatial surveys, groundwater could account for only 7% of nitrate and 9% of DON inputs due to low groundwater concentrations and other sources (i.e., apparently a sewage treatment plant for nitrate and floodplain tributaries for DON). Because total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) was dominated by DON (69%) and nitrate (23%), the groundwater ammonium inputs were a minor source to the TDN pool within the tidal river and estuary. This study demonstrated that correlations between a groundwater tracer and nutrient concentrations do not necessarily illustrate causation. To assess how groundwater drives nutrient dynamics in estuaries, it may be important to include the tidal river (not only the estuarine salinity gradient) in field investigations, consider DON (not only ammonium and nitrate), and perform detailed budgets that include minor tributaries.

  6. Characteristics of CDOM Optical Properties in Two Mississippi River Influenced Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Sa, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Absorption and fluorescence properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are investigated in two estuarine systems, the Barataria Basin and the Breton Sound, Louisiana, USA. These two estuarine systems located directly west and east of the Mississippi River delta have experienced significant wetland loss and have man-made freshwater diversion structures used to divert water and associated constituents from the Mississippi River into the two estuaries. In the Barataria Basin, water samples were obtained along an axial transect from the marine end member to the upper basin while in the Breton Sound, sampling was conducted along two major routes dominated by wetlands through which diverted water travels. An assessment of CDOM absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEMs) fluorescence properties along with parallel factor analysis of the EEMs data acquired under different river discharge conditions will be presented.

  7. Qualitative and numerical analyses of the effects of river inflow variations on mixing diagrams in estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cifuentes, L.A.; Schemel, L.E.; Sharp, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of river inflow variations on alkalinity/salinity distributions in San Francisco Bay and nitrate/salinity distributions in Delaware Bay are described. One-dimensional, advective-dispersion equations for salinity and the dissolved constituents are solved numerically and are used to simulate mixing in the estuaries. These simulations account for time-varying river inflow, variations in estuarine cross-sectional area, and longitudinally varying dispersion coefficients. The model simulates field observations better than models that use constant hydrodynamic coefficients and uniform estuarine geometry. Furthermore, field observations and model simulations are consistent with theoretical 'predictions' that the curvature of propery-salinity distributions depends on the relation between the estuarine residence time and the period of river concentration variation. ?? 1990.

  8. Frequency of hepatocellular fibrillar inclusions in European flounder (Platichthys flesus) from the Douro River estuary, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Carrola, João; Fontaínhas-Fernandes, António; Pires, Maria João; Rocha, Eduardo

    2014-02-01

    Liver lesions in wild fish have been associated with xenobiotic exposure. Facing reports of pollution in the Douro River estuary (north of Portugal), we have been making field surveys using fishes and targeting histopathological biomarkers of exposure and effect. Herein, we intended to better characterize and report the rate of one poorly understood lesion-hepatocellular fibrillar inclusions (HFI)-found in European flounder (Platichthys flesus). With this report, we aimed to establish sound baseline data that could be viewed as a starting point for future biomonitoring, while offering the world's second only pool of field data on such a liver toxicopathic lesion, which could be compared with data available from the UK estuaries. Sampling was done in the Douro River estuary over 1 year. A total of 72 animals were fished with nets, in spring-summer (SS) and autumn-winter (AW) campaigns. Livers were processed for histopathology and both routine and special staining procedures (alcian blue, periodic acid Schiff (PAS), tetrazonium coupling reaction). Immunohistochemistry targeted AE1/AE3 (pan cytokeratins). The severity of the HFI extent was graded using a system with four levels, varying from 0 (absence of HFI) to 3 (high relative density of cells with HFI). Cells (isolated/groups) with HFI appeared in 35 % or more of the fish, in the total samples of each season, and over 40 % in more homogeneous sub-samples. There were no significant differences when comparing samples versus sub-samples or SS versus AW. When merging the data sets from the two seasons, the frequency of fish with HFI was ≈36 % for the total sample and ≈49 % for the sub-sample. The extreme group (biggest and smallest fish) revealed a HFI frequency of only 16 %, which differed significantly from the total and sub-sampled groups. Immunostaining and PAS were negative for the HFI, and alcian blue could, at times, faintly stain the inclusions. These were positive with the tetrazonium reaction. We showed

  9. Nutrient Inputs to Estuaries from Nine Scottish East Coast Rivers; Influence of Estuarine Processes on Inputs to the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balls, Philip W.

    1994-10-01

    Nutrient distributions (nitrate, ammonia, phosphate and silicate) have been determined in the surface waters of nine North Sea estuaries: Tweed, Forth, Tay, Dee, Don, Ythan, Beauly/Inverness Firth, Cromarty Firth and Dornoch Firth. Seasonal variability has been examined by conducting surveys in April, July and September 1991 and February 1992. On each occasion, surveys of all nine estuaries were normally completed in 3-5 days of each other, around high water on spring tides. This intensive and strictly controlled sampling regime ensures a realistic comparison between nutrient concentrations in individual estuaries. Nutrient concentrations in individual rivers and estuaries are demonstrated to be related to land use. River catchments with intensive agriculture and low freshwater input, such as the Don and Ythan, have enhanced nitrate (up to 600 μM) and phosphate (up to 5 μM) concentrations in their estuaries. By contrast, Highland river catchments with mineral-poor soils, low populations and low agricultural intensity (Inverness, Cromarty and Dornoch Firths) generally lead to nutrient concentrations being lower in river water than in coastal seawater. Conservative mixing of dissolved nutrients is demonstrated to be a function of estuarine flushing time which controls the extent to which internal processes (biological and abiological) can modify nutrient inputs. Nutrients tend to behave conservatively in short rapidly flushed estuaries such as the Tweed, Don and Ythan. In contrast, internal processes are shown to be important when estimating riverine nutrient fluxes to the coastal zone from large slowly flushed estuaries such as the Forth, Tay and Dornoch Firth. For these systems, estimates of riverine inputs to the estuary do not provide a good estimate of the load entering the coastal zone. This is primarily due to the cycling of nutrient elements between dissolved and particulate (including sediment) phases. On a regional basis, gross nutrient inputs are

  10. Salt Marsh Formation in the Lower Hudson River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merley, M. M.; Peteet, D. M.; Peteet, D. M.

    2001-05-01

    Salt marshes are constant depositional environments and as a result contain accurate indicators of past relative sea level rise and salinity. The Hudson River marshes are at least twice as deep when compared to coastal marshes on either side of the mouth of the Hudson. The reason for this difference in sedimentation is unclear. This study uses macrofossil data as well as sediment stratigraphy in order to understand the formation and evolution of these marshes. The composition of seeds, roots, shoots and foraminifera, are used to indicate past sea levels. The four sites involved in this study are, from south to north, the Arthur Kill Marsh in Staten Island ( 40 36 N, 74 77W), Piermont marsh (N 41 00; 73 55W) Croton Point ( 41 14 N; 73 50W) and Iona Island( 41 18N, 73 58W). These are all tidally influenced but with increasing distances from the New York Bight, which gives a good spectrum of tidal influence. AMS-C14 dates on basal macrofossils will document the time of each marsh formation. Basal material from Arthur Kill (8m) includes freshwater seeds such as Viola, Potomageton and Alnus along with Salix buds. Basal material from Croton Point (10m) includes fibrous woody material, foraminifera and Zanichellia seeds and other brackish vegetational components. The basal material from Piermont (13.77m) is lacking any identifyable macrofossils between 150 and 500 microns. The basal material from Iona Island (10m) has vegetation such as Scirpus and Cyperus seeds, probably implying a brackish environment. The freshwater origin of the Arthur Kill marsh in Staten Island is significant because it predates either sea level rise or the western channel incision. Additional implications for this study include evidence for changes in river channel geomorphology. Reasons for the relatively deeper river marshes include possible basal clay compaction, high production due to river and marine nutrients as well as tectonic activity. This study provides the groundwork for more high

  11. Salt Marsh Formation in the Lower Hudson River Estuary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merley, Michael; Peteet, Dorothy; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Salt marshes are constant depositional environments and as a result contain accurate indicators of past relative sea level rise and salinity. The Hudson River marshes are at least twice as deep when compared to coastal marshes on either side of the mouth of the Hudson. The reason for this difference in sedimentation is unclear. This study uses macrofossil data as well as sediment stratigraphy in order to understand the formation and evolution of these marshes. The composition of seeds, roots, shoots and foraminifera, are used to indicate past sea levels. The four sites involved in this study are, from south to north, the Arthur Kill Marsh in Staten Island (40 36 N, 74 77W), Piermont marsh (N 4100; 73 55W) Croton Point (41 14 N; 73 50W) and Iona Island (41 18N, 73 58W). These are all tidally influenced but with increasing distances from the New York Bight, which gives a good spectrum of tidal influence. AMS-C14 dates on basal macrofossils will document the time of each marsh formation. Basal material from Arthur Kill (8 m) includes freshwater seeds such as Viola, Potomageton and Alnus along with Salix buds. Basal material from Croton Point (10 m) includes fibrous woody material, foraminifera and Zanichellia seeds and other brackish vegetational components. The basal material from Piermont (13.77 m) is lacking any identifiable macrofossils between 150 and 500 microns. The basal material from Iona Island (10 m) has vegetation such as Scirpus and Cyperus seeds, probably implying a brackish environment. The freshwater origin of the Arthur Kill marsh in Staten Island is significant because it predates either sea level rise or the western channel incision. Additional implications for this study include evidence for changes in river channel geomorphology. Reasons for the relatively deeper river marshes include possible basal clay compaction, high production due to river and marine nutrients as well as tectonic activity. This study provides the groundwork for more high

  12. Salt Marsh Formation in the Lower Hudson River Estuary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merley, Michael; Peteet, Dorothy; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Salt marshes are constant depositional environments and as a result contain accurate indicators of past relative sea level rise and salinity. The Hudson River marshes are at least twice as deep when compared to coastal marshes on either side of the mouth of the Hudson. The reason for this difference in sedimentation is unclear. This study uses macrofossil data as well as sediment stratigraphy in order to understand the formation and evolution of these marshes. The composition of seeds, roots, shoots and foraminifera, are used to indicate past sea levels. The four sites involved in this study are, from south to north, the Arthur Kill Marsh in Staten Island (40 36 N, 74 77W), Piermont marsh (N 4100; 73 55W) Croton Point (41 14 N; 73 50W) and Iona Island (41 18N, 73 58W). These are all tidally influenced but with increasing distances from the New York Bight, which gives a good spectrum of tidal influence. AMS-C14 dates on basal macrofossils will document the time of each marsh formation. Basal material from Arthur Kill (8 m) includes freshwater seeds such as Viola, Potomageton and Alnus along with Salix buds. Basal material from Croton Point (10 m) includes fibrous woody material, foraminifera and Zanichellia seeds and other brackish vegetational components. The basal material from Piermont (13.77 m) is lacking any identifiable macrofossils between 150 and 500 microns. The basal material from Iona Island (10 m) has vegetation such as Scirpus and Cyperus seeds, probably implying a brackish environment. The freshwater origin of the Arthur Kill marsh in Staten Island is significant because it predates either sea level rise or the western channel incision. Additional implications for this study include evidence for changes in river channel geomorphology. Reasons for the relatively deeper river marshes include possible basal clay compaction, high production due to river and marine nutrients as well as tectonic activity. This study provides the groundwork for more high

  13. Latest Holocene evolution and human disturbance of a channel segment in the Hudson River Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klingbeil, A.D.; Sommerfield, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    The latest Holocene sedimentary record of a cohesive channel and subtidal shoal in the lower Hudson River Estuary was examined to elucidate natural (sea-level rise, sediment transport) and anthropogenic (bulkheading, dredging) influences on the recent morphodynamic evolution of the system. To characterize the seafloor and shallow subbottom, ??? 100 km of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles (chirp) were collected within a 20-km reach of the estuary and correlated with sediment lithologies provided by eight vibracores recovered along seismic lines. Sediment geochronology with 137Cs and 14C was used to estimate intermediate and long-term sedimentation rates, respectively, and historical bathymetric data were analyzed to identify regional patterns of accretion and erosion, and to quantify changes in channel geometry and sediment volume. The shoal lithosome originated around 4 ka presumably with decelerating eustatic sea level rise during the latest Holocene. Long-term sedimentation rates on the shoal (2.3-2.6 mm/yr) are higher than in the channel (2 mm/yr) owing to hydrodynamic conditions that preferentially sequester suspended sediment on the western side of the estuary. As a result, the shoal accretes oblique to the principal axis of tidal transport, and more rapidly than the channel to produce an asymmetric cross-section. Shoal deposits consist of tidally bedded muds and are stratified by minor erosion surfaces that seismic profiles reveal to extend for 10s of meters to kilometers. The frequency and continuity of these surfaces suggest that the surficial shoal is catastrophically stripped on decadal-centennial time scales by elevated tidal flows; tidal erosion maintains the shoal at a uniform depth below sea level and prevents it from transitioning to an intertidal environment. Consequently, the long-term sedimentation rate approximates the rate of sea-level rise in the lower estuary (1-3 mm/yr). After the mid 1800s, the natural geometry of the lower Hudson

  14. The influence of estuarine conditions on the dynamics of a coastal phytoplankton community in a micro-tidal estuary: Yura River Estuary, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Fukuzaki, K.; Akiyama, S.; Ichimi, K.; Kasai, A.; Fukushima, K.; Ueno, M.; Yoshioka, T.; Yamashita, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The western side of Wakasa Bay, Tango Sea, Japan receives most of its allochthonous nutrient input from the Yura River. The Yura Estuary is classified as micro-tidal with a spring tidal range of less than 0.5 m. In summer, generally, the river discharge is low and the sea level is high, so the salt wedge extends 20 km upstream. Then, phytoplankton blooms occur due to an influx of riverine nutrients in the estuary. In contrast, during spring, river discharge is high and the salt wedge is not formed. These seasonal differences in estuarine physical and biological conditions may affect the coastal zone. The objective of this study is to examine the influence of estuarine conditions on the dynamics of the coastal phytoplankton community in this micro-tidal estuary. For this objective, field surveys were conducted both in the coastal zone and the river side of this estuary. Four sampling stations with depths of 5, 10, 20 and 30 m were set in the coastal zone, and weekly surveys were conducted from December 2009 to June 2011. Six sampling stations were set between the mouth of the Yura River and 16 km upstream, and monthly surveys were conducted in summer (from June 2010 to August 2010) and spring (from February 2011 to April 2011). Vertical profiles of salinity, water temperature and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured with a CTD profiler at each station. With water samples taken from the surface, middle, and bottom layers at each station, concentrations of chlorophyll a, pheophytin, and nutrients were analyzed. The nutrients flux from the upstream to the estuary correlated strongly with river discharge, not with nutrient concentrations. In summer, when estuarine water were stratified, marine phytoplankton (mainly diatoms) developed in the middle layer of the estuary while freshwater phytoplankton (mainly green algae) increased in the surface layer of the river mouth. Nitrate concentration in riverine water was estimated to decline 15% while the water flowed from the

  15. Sediment quality in Rivers and their estuaries of an olive oil production area, Messinia, Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasopoulou, Evaggelia; Pavlidou, Alexandra; Skoulikidis, Nikos; Dassenakis, Manos; Hatzianestis, Ioannis

    2014-05-01

    Sediment analysis at four major rivers (Pamisos, Aris, Velikas and Nedon) and their estuaries towards heavy metals took place in the Prefecture of Messinia, Greece, during two sampling campaigns in 2008 and 2011. The main industrial activity in the region is the operation of 250 olive oil industries and the main problem concerning pollution derives from the vast quantities of olive mill waste waters that are being generated annually most of which is currently discharged in nearby streams. Chemical parameters such as phenols, total organic carbon and certain heavy metals were found to be strongly correlated with the wastes from the olive oil industries. Major and minor elements (heavy metals) were measured in riverine and estuarine sediments. In parallel heavy metals were determined in the olive waste from a local industry, using atomic absorption spectrometry, in order to correlate the results with the sediment analysis. Major and Minor elements were recorded based upon the total percentage of the sediment samples and in order to eliminate the grain size effect, the concentrations were normalized towards Al. A pollution indice, the sediment enrichment factor, was also calculated, the high values of which towards Cr are of particular interest. Additionally organic carbon and total phenolic compounds were determined in rivers and their estuaries. High concentrations of Chromium were recorded in River Aris sediment, which seems to be the most polluted. Relatively high concentrations of zinc were encountered at rivers Aris and Pamisos while the chromium load seems to be higher near the estuaries of the rivers. The olive mill waste water analysis confirmed the existence of chromium in the waste and extremely elevated values were also found at a nearby station where these wastes tend to accumulate for decades. In contrast the results from the Nedon River indicated that it is not affected, since the low values found remained constant from the source of the river until its

  16. Estuarine research; an annotated bibliography of selected literature, with emphasis on the Hudson River estuary, New York and New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Embree, William N.; Wiltshire, Denise A.

    1978-01-01

    Abstracts of 177 selected publications on water movement in estuaries, particularly the Hudson River estuary, are compiled for reference in Hudson River studies. Subjects represented are the hydraulic, chemical, and physical characteristics of estuarine waters, estuarine modeling techniques, and methods of water-data collection and analysis. Summaries are presented in five categories: Hudson River estuary studies; hydrodynamic-model studies; water-quality-model studies; reports on data-collection equipment and methods; and bibliographies, literature reviews, conference proceedings, and textbooks. An author index is included. Omitted are most works published before 1965, environmental-impact statements, theses and dissertations, policy or planning reports, regional or economic reports, ocean studies, studies based on physical models, and foreign studies. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Dynamic genetic features of eukaryotic plankton diversity in the Nakdong River estuary of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jee Eun; Chung, Ik Kyo; Lee, Sang-Rae

    2016-08-01

    Estuaries are environments where freshwater and seawater mix and they display various salinity profiles. The construction of river barrages and dams has rapidly changed these environments and has had a wide range of impacts on plankton communities. To understand the dynamics of such communities, researchers need accurate and rapid techniques for detecting plankton species. We evaluated the diversity of eukaryotic plankton over a salinity gradient by applying a metagenomics tool at the Nakdong River estuary in Korea. Environmental samples were collected on three dates during summer and autumn of 2011 at the Eulsukdo Bridge at the mouth of that river. Amplifying the 18S rDNA allowed us to analyze 456 clones and 122 phylotypes. Metagenomic sequences revealed various taxonomic groups and cryptic genetic variations at the intra- and inter-specific levels. By analyzing the same station at each sampling date, we observed that the phylotypes presented a salinity-related pattern of diversity in assemblages. The variety of species within freshwater samples reflected the rapid environmental changes caused by freshwater inputs. Dinophyceae phylotypes accounted for the highest proportion of overall diversity in the seawater samples. Euryhaline diatoms and dinoflagellates were observed in the freshwater, brackish and seawater samples. The biological data for species composition demonstrate the transitional state between freshwater and seawater. Therefore, this metagenomics information can serve as a biological indicator for tracking changes in aquatic environments.

  18. Seasonal variations of Aulacoseira granulata population abundance in the Pearl River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Li, Xinhui; Lai, Zini; Tan, Xichang; Pang, Shixun; Yang, Wanling

    2009-12-01

    Seasonal variations of the abundance of Aulacoseira granulata populations were studied in the Pearl River Estuary from August 2007 to May 2009. The average abundance of A. granulata reached 134.14 × 10 3 cells dm - 3 (10.66 × 10 3 filaments dm - 3), contributing 9.1% to the total phytoplankton. Compared with freshwater areas, A. granulata abundance in the Pearl River Estuary was one or more orders lower. Among the four variant forms of A. granulata, the dominance sequence was A. granulata var. granulata > var. angustissima > var. curvata > var. angustissima f. spiralis. The dominance of A. granulata var. granulata and A.g. var. angustissima benefited from their linear shape. A. granulata abundance was higher in the warm seasons and lower in the cold seasons. The fluctuations of Si concentrations could also influence contrasting results as in May 2008 and May 2009. The spatial distribution of A. granulata was mainly influenced by the water runoff of the Pearl River at different outflow channel. We found that the relative abundance of var. angustissima to A. granulata var. granulata was much higher in winter than in other seasons, which maybe because high cell surface/volume area (A/V) benefited var. angustissima by ensuring more effective uptake of nutrients and CO 2 and a slower sinking velocity than var. granulata.

  19. Dynamic genetic features of eukaryotic plankton diversity in the Nakdong River estuary of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jee Eun; Chung, Ik Kyo; Lee, Sang-Rae

    2017-07-01

    Estuaries are environments where freshwater and seawater mix and they display various salinity profiles. The construction of river barrages and dams has rapidly changed these environments and has had a wide range of impacts on plankton communities. To understand the dynamics of such communities, researchers need accurate and rapid techniques for detecting plankton species. We evaluated the diversity of eukaryotic plankton over a salinity gradient by applying a metagenomics tool at the Nakdong River estuary in Korea. Environmental samples were collected on three dates during summer and autumn of 2011 at the Eulsukdo Bridge at the mouth of that river. Amplifying the 18S rDNA allowed us to analyze 456 clones and 122 phylotypes. Metagenomic sequences revealed various taxonomic groups and cryptic genetic variations at the intra- and inter-specific levels. By analyzing the same station at each sampling date, we observed that the phylotypes presented a salinity-related pattern of diversity in assemblages. The variety of species within freshwater samples reflected the rapid environmental changes caused by freshwater inputs. Dinophyceae phylotypes accounted for the highest proportion of overall diversity in the seawater samples. Euryhaline diatoms and dinoflagellates were observed in the freshwater, brackish and seawater samples. The biological data for species composition demonstrate the transitional state between freshwater and seawater. Therefore, this metagenomics information can serve as a biological indicator for tracking changes in aquatic environments.

  20. 18O and 226Ra in the Minjiang River estuary, China and their hydrological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huatai; Guo, Zhanrong; Gao, Aiguo; Yuan, Xiaojie; Zhang, Bin

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the 2H, 18O and 226Ra values in groundwater and surface water in the Minjiang River estuary were investigated in the dry and wet seasons. The δ18O values in the dry season were always higher than those in the wet season in both groundwater and surface water because of the presence of evaporation in the water cycle process. During the dry season, the δ18O values in groundwater on the southern bank of the Minjiang River are much higher than those on the northern bank because evaporation is more intense in the farmland of the southern bank than in the urbanized northern bank. The δ18O values in the estuarine water exhibit a good positive correlation with salinity, with a coefficient of 0.96 (p = 0.05) in both seasons. The 226Ra activities in the estuarine water increase with increasing salinity because of desorption from riverine suspended particles. The 226Ra activity reaches a peak value at a salinity of 20.5. Based on a three-endmember model, the average proportions of the estuarine water are calculated to be 0.02 for groundwater, 0.39 for river water and 0.59 for seawater. From this mixing ratio, the groundwater discharge into the estuary is estimated to be 9.31 × 106 m3 d-1 in the wet season.

  1. 210Pb chronology and trace metal geochemistry in the intertidal sediment of Qinjiang River estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Peng; Meng, Xianwei; Feng, Aiping; Yin, Ping; Wang, Xiangqin; Zhang, Jun

    2012-06-01

    Historical records of metal inputs were studied by using a sediment core collected from a sand-rich mudflat in the Qinjiang River estuary, China. 210Pb chronology was used to reconstruct the fluxes of Hg, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr and As to the core site during the last 86 years. Based on the constant initial concentration model, the sedimentation rates are 1.18 cm year-1 in the top 30 cm sandy layer and 0.92 cm year-1 in the muddy bottom layer. To compensate for grain-size and mineralogy effects on metal concentrations, aluminum was used as the normalizing element. The enrichment factors ( EF) indicate that the natural inputs had prevailed up to the early 1980s. After this period, the intensity of human activities has resulted in continual increasing trend of metals towards the surface. Recent sediment samples from the Qinjiang River estuary are found moderately enriched by Cd ( EF>1.5) and slightly enriched by other metals ( EF<1.5). Considering that the drainage area of the Qinjiang River is mostly agricultural land, the increased Cd may be due to the usage of fertilizers and pesticides in agricultural activities and the combustion of fossil fuels.

  2. Deforestation monitoring in the Amazon River estuary by multi-temporal Envisat ScanSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Ishwaran, N.; Brito Pezzuti, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we have capitalized on the all-weather, all-day operational capability of spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems and used multi-temporal (from 2002 to 2006), multi-track (track 174, 360 and 447) Envisat ScanSAR amplitude images for deforestation mapping and change detection in the Amazon River estuary. A synergistic approach to deforestation mapping was adopted using SAR backscattering anomalies, the neighbouring forest constraint and DEM-derived slopes based on the three following characteristics: (1) backscattering is reduced in regions suspected to have undergone deforestation; (2) open regions without neighbouring forests were identified for removal; and (3) false-alarms linked to water bodies are mitigated using the shape threshold of flat-slope objects. Our results show that deforestation in the Amazon River estuary continues to be a serious problem, particularly along the rivers, streams or roads, which are more susceptible to anthropogenic activities than other areas. Up to 2006, the deforested portion accounts for 4.6 per cent (3,096,000 pixels) of the entire study site of approximately 458,000 square kilometers (67,320,000 pixels). However, this figure, validated by Landsat ETM images, may have overestimated deforestation to some extent. Nevertheless, multi-temporal analysis using SAR systems, as done in this study, have a clear potential for surveillance of deforestation in the Amazon, particularly in light of the frequent cloud cover typical of the area and the limitations of deforestation monitoring by means of optical satellite imagery.

  3. Evaluation of distribution and sources of sewage molecular marker (LABs) in selected rivers and estuaries of Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Magam, Sami M; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Halimoon, Normala; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Kannan, Narayanan; Masood, Najat; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Alkhadher, Sadeq; Keshavarzifard, Mehrzad; Vaezzadeh, Vahab; Sani, Muhamad S A; Latif, Mohd Talib

    2016-03-01

    This is the first extensive report on linear alkylbenzenes (LABs) as sewage molecular markers in surface sediments collected from the Perlis, Kedah, Merbok, Prai, and Perak Rivers and Estuaries in the west of Peninsular Malaysia. Sediment samples were extracted, fractionated, and analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The concentrations of total LABs ranged from 68 to 154 (Perlis River), 103 to 314 (Kedah River), 242 to 1062 (Merbok River), 1985 to 2910 (Prai River), and 217 to 329 ng g(-1) (Perak River) dry weight (dw). The highest levels of LABs were found at PI3 (Prai Estuary) due to the rapid industrialization and population growth in this region, while the lowest concentrations of LABs were found at PS1 (upstream of Perlis River). The LABs ratio of internal to external isomers (I/E) in this study ranged from 0.56 at KH1 (upstream of Kedah River) to 1.35 at MK3 (Merbok Estuary) indicating that the rivers receive raw sewage and primary treatment effluents in the study area. In general, the results of this paper highlighted the necessity of continuation of water treatment system improvement in Malaysia.

  4. Air-water CO2 fluxes in the microtidal Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosswell, Joseph R.; Wetz, Michael S.; Hales, Burke; Paerl, Hans W.

    2012-08-01

    From June 2009 to July 2010, we conducted 27 continuous-flow surveys of surface water CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) along the longitudinal axis of the Neuse River Estuary (NRE), North Carolina ranging from the tidal freshwater region to the polyhaline border with the Pamlico Sound. Lateral transects were also conducted at the borders of each of three hydrologically distinct sections. The pCO2 displayed considerable spatial-temporal variability. Likewise, net air-water CO2 fluxes showed high spatial and temporal variability, with a maximum [release] of 271 mmol C m-2 d-1 during high river flow conditions in fall and minimum [uptake] of -38 mmol C m-2 d-1 during wind-driven, high primary productivity conditions in late spring. During high-flow conditions, pCO2 generally decreased from the river mouth to the Pamlico Sound, similar to patterns seen in well-mixed systems. During warm, low-flow conditions, surface water pCO2 distributions were spatially variable and dissimilar to those patterns seen in most macrotidal, well-mixed estuaries. The annual air-water CO2 efflux from the study area was 4.7 mol C m-2 yr-1, an order of magnitude less than previously estimated for temperate estuaries. The CO2 fluxes observed in the NRE highlight the contrasts between macrotidal and microtidal systems and suggest that global estuarine CO2 emissions are likely overestimated by the current classification approaches. Scaling this lower efflux by the relative surface area of macrotidal and microtidal systems would reduce the global estuarine flux by 42%.

  5. [Preliminary results concerning summer-time denitrification in the Jiulong River Estuary].

    PubMed

    Chen, Neng-Wang; Wu, Jie-Zhong; Hong, Hua-Sheng

    2011-11-01

    Denitrification is an important process mitigating nitrogen (N) pollution in aquatic systems. Water samples in 13 sites throughout the Jiulong River Estuary were collected in July, 2010 in a preliminary investigation of the denitrification rate in this area. As end-products of denitrification, dissolved N2 was measured by determining N2 : Ar ratios using MIMS (HPR-40), while the concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) dissolved in water was determined by Purge and Trap-Gas Chromatography. The results showed significant spatial variance of net increase of dissolved N2 (ranging between - 9.9 and 66.8 micromol x L(-1)) and N2O (ranging between 4.3 and 31.5 nmol x L(-1)) in the Jiulong River Estuary. The net increase of dissolved N2 and N2O declined gradually from river sites to sea sites. Dissolved N2O was supersaturated by 170%-562%. The air-water fluxes of N2 ranged between -2.9 and 53.2 mmol x (m2 x d) (-1), and N2O between 5.2 and 23.9 micromol x (m2 x d)(-1). The N2O yield shared only 0.03% - 1.2% (average 0.25%) of total N air-water flux. The results suggested that water temperature and nutrient (N and P) were the key factors influencing denitrification. The denitrification rate is controlled by nitrate level at fresh-water sites with salinity < 0.5%. However, in salty waters, net increase in N2 and N2O mainly originated from denitrification occurring upstream of the estuary, and was dominated by the salinity gradient due to tidal mixing.

  6. Foraging ecology of Caspian Terns in the Columbia River Estuary, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, Donald E.; Roby, D.D.; Collis, K.

    2005-01-01

    Comparisons were made of the foraging ecology of Caspian Terns (Sterna caspia) nesting on two islands in the Columbia River estuary using radio telemetry and observations of prey fed to chicks and mates at each colony. Early in the chick-rearing period, radio-tagged terns nesting at Rice Island (river km 34) foraged mostly in the freshwater zone of the estuary close to the colony, while terns nesting on East Sand Island (river km 8) foraged in the marine or estuarine mixing zones close to that colony. Late in the chick-rearing period, Rice Island terns moved more of their foraging to the two zones lower in the estuary, while East Sand Island terns continued to forage in these areas. Tern diets at each colony corresponded to the primary foraging zone (freshwater vs. marine/ mixing) of radio-tagged individuals: Early in chick-rearing, Rice Island terns relied heavily on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp., 71% of identified prey), but this declined late in chick-rearing (46%). East Sand Island terns relied less on salmonids (42% and 16%, early and late in chick-rearing), and instead utilized marine fishes such as Anchovy (Engraulis mordax) and Herring (Clupea pallasi). Throughout chick-rearing, Rice Island terns foraged farther from their colony (median distance: 12.3 km during early chick-rearing and 16.9 km during late chick-rearing) than did East Sand Island terns (9.6 and 7.7 km, respectively). The study leads to the conclusion that Caspian Terns are generalist foragers and make use of the most proximate available forage fish resources when raising young.

  7. Trace metal pollution and carbon and nitrogen isotope tracing through the Yongdingxin River estuary in Bohai Bay, Northern China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Conghui; Wei, Qi; Ma, Lixia; Li, Li; Wu, Guanghong; Pan, Ling

    2017-02-15

    A tide gate was built in 2010 to prevent seawater from moving upstream into the Yongdingxin River estuary in Bohai Bay, Northern China. We analysed the concentrations of Hg, Cd, Pb, TOC, TN, δ(13)C and δ(15)N and studied their variations in the surface layer and vertical profiles of sediment cores collected from the Yongdingxin River estuary. Contamination factors and geo-accumulation indices were calculated for each metal, which revealed high levels of contamination for Hg and Cd in the sediments, likely from anthropogenic sources. δ(13)C and δ(15)N were used as natural tracers to determine the sources of TOC and TN. The results revealed that sewage was the main source of TOC, while TN may have more than one source in the Yongdingxin River estuary. Sewage dominated trace metal pollution in the Yongdingxin River estuary. Our results provide a baseline for trace metal contamination in an estuary facing a large water project. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Roberts Bank: Ecological crucible of the Fraser River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Terri F.; Elner, Robert W.; O'Neill, Jennifer D.

    2013-08-01

    Roberts Bank, part of the Fraser River delta system on Canada's Pacific coast, is a dynamic estuarine environment supporting important fisheries as well as internationally significant populations of migratory shorebirds. The 8000 ha bank environment comprises a complex of riparian boundaries, intertidal marshes, mud and sand flats, eelgrass meadows, macroalgae and biofilms. Anthropogenic developments (a ferry causeway in 1961 and a port causeway in 1969) have been responsible for changes in tidal flow patterns, tidal elevation, sediment transport and the net expansion of eelgrass beds. The goals of the present study were to (1) directly compare geotechnical properties spanning each side of the coalport causeway, and (2) enhance our understanding of the intercauseway ecosystem under a high-resolution sampling design. Sediment properties (grain size, porosity, organic content, and chlorophyll) and biological communities (eelgrass, macrofauna (0.5-1.0 mm) and meiofauna (0.063-0.5 mm)) were surveyed in 1997 at three stations outside the intercauseway area and three lateral transects spanning the intercauseway tidal flat at tidal heights representing three different habitats: biofilm, Zostera japonica, and Zostera marina. A fine-silt organic-rich porous deposit was observed on the shoreward north side of the coalport causeway relative to the south counterpart, suggesting that consolidation and erosion processes could likely not keep pace with the deposition of Fraser River silt. High chlorophyll levels were found in the protected shoreward northern border of the ferry causeway where fine sands dominate and higher water transparency exists, owing to the redirection of the silt-laden river plume by the coalport causeway. Principle Components Analysis revealed a positive relationship between these porous, organic-rich sediments and cumacean abundance in all regions where eelgrass was absent, including the north side of the coalport causeway. Further, a positive

  9. Impact of river basin management on coastal water quality and ecosystem services: A southern Baltic estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schernewski, Gerald; Hürdler, Jens; Neumann, Thomas; Stybel, Nardine; Venohr, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Eutrophication management is still a major challenge in the Baltic Sea region. Estuaries or coastal waters linked to large rivers cannot be managed independently. Nutrient loads into these coastal ecosystems depend on processes, utilisation, structure and management in the river basin. In practise this means that we need a large scale approach and integrated models and tools to analyse, assess and evaluate the effects of nutrient loads on coastal water quality as well as the efficiency of river basin management measures on surface waters and especially lagoons and estuaries. The Odra river basin, the Szczecin Lagoon and its coastal waters cover an area of about 150,000 km² and are an eutrophication hot-spot in the Baltic region. To be able to carry out large scale, spatially integrative analyses, we linked the river basin nutrient flux model MONERIS to the coastal 3D-hydrodynamic and ecosystem model ERGOM. Objectives were a) to analyse the eutrophication history in the river basin and the resulting functional changes in the coastal waters between early 1960's and today and b) to analyse the effects of an optimal nitrogen and phosphorus management scenario in the Oder/Odra river basin on coastal water quality. The models show that an optimal river basin management with reduced nutrient loads (e.g. N-load reduction of 35 %) would have positive effects on coastal water quality and algae biomass. The availability of nutrients, N/P ratios and processes like denitrification and nitrogen-fixation would show spatial and temporal changes. It would have positive consequences for ecosystems functions, like the nutrient retention capacity, as well. However, this optimal scenario is by far not sufficient to ensure a good coastal water quality according to the European Water Framework Directive. A "good" water quality in the river will not be sufficient to ensure a "good" water quality in the coastal waters. Further, nitrogen load reductions bear the risk of increased

  10. Detection of estuarine and tidal river hydromorphology using hyper-spectral and LiDAR data: Forth estuary, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilvear, David; Tyler, Andrew; Davids, Corine

    2004-11-01

    High spatial resolution hyper-spectral imagery (CASI) and light detection and ranging (LiDAR) imagery acquired for the tidal River Carron and Forth estuary, Scotland, were used in conjunction with field surveys to assess the feasibility of monitoring hydromorphology and human alterations with satellite and airborne remote sensing data. The study was undertaken in the context of the European Union Water Framework Directive (WFD) that requires member states to monitor hydromorphological elements as a component of the ecological status of rivers, estuaries and shorelines. Visual assessment and automated classifications of the imagery were compared with field survey data for an estuarine reach comprising saline waters, mudflats, a tidal reach of a tributary river and an urban/industrialised shoreline. The morphology of the estuary and inflowing tidal waters together with most artificial features of interest could be clearly seen in the CASI imagery at 1 m spatial resolution. Supervised classification of the imagery produced an overall accuracy value of 72%. Downgrading the imagery to simulate the spatial resolution of 4 m IKONOS satellite data surprisingly improved the accuracy to 74%. Simulation of 10 m SPOT imagery resulted in an image where many artificial features of interest such as roads, pipelines and jetties were rendered invisible. Adding LiDAR data as an additional data set aided manual and automated identification of features and visualisation of the hydromorphology of the rivers and estuaries in the study area. Shadows cast from tall objects were a feature of the winter imagery and reduced automated classification accuracy. Overall, the study demonstrates that high spatial resolution remotely sensed digital imagery has the potential to be a useful tool for panoptic mapping of the geomorphology and human impact on tidal rivers and estuaries. In the context of the WFD, remote sensing provides a potential way forward for monitoring the physical status of

  11. Field monitoring of toxic organic pollution in the sediments of Pearl River estuary and its tributaries.

    PubMed

    Fu, J; Wang, Z; Mai, B; Kang, Y

    2001-01-01

    Field monitoring of the toxic organic compounds (PCBs, PAHs, organochlorine pesticides) in the top sediments of Pearl River Estuary and its up-streams were made. It was found that the highest concentrations of these toxic organic compounds occurred in the sediment sampled at Macau inner harbor (ZB013), which is a sink of suspended fine particles transported from the upstream waterways. Because of the affinity of the hydrophobic organic compounds (PAHs, PCBs) for the solid phase, these fine particle depositions led to accumulation of these compounds in the sediment of Macau. The atmospheric dry deposition may be another source of the toxic organic pollution in the sediment.

  12. Lanzavecchia mangrovi sp. n. (Nematoda, Dorylaimida) from mangroves of Red River Estuary, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Gagarin, Vladimir G

    2014-02-12

    A new nematode species found in the Red River Estuary of Vietnam is described. Lanzavecchia mangrovi sp. n. is morphologically close to L. coomansi Nicholas, Stewart, 1984, but differs in its longer body (L = 2.71-3.76 µm versus L = 2.2-2.9 µm), shorter spicules (63-65 mm versus 72-88), longer prerectum (500-675 mm versus 262-310 µm) and shorter distal portion of tail in relation to the proximal portion (0.6-0.8 versus 0.9-2.3).

  13. Determination of acoustic attenuation in the Hudson River Estuary by means of ship noise observations.

    PubMed

    Roh, Heui-Seol; Sutin, Alexander; Bunin, Barry

    2008-06-01

    Analysis of sound propagation in a complex urban estuary has application to underwater threat detection systems, underwater communication, and acoustic tomography. One of the most important acoustic parameters, sound attenuation, was analyzed in the Hudson River near Manhattan using measurements of acoustic noise generated by passing ships and recorded by a fixed hydrophone. Analysis of the ship noise level for varying distances allowed estimation of the sound attenuation in the frequency band of 10-80 kHz. The effective attenuation coefficient representing the attenuation loss above cylindrical spreading loss had only slight frequency dependence and can be estimated by the frequency independent value of 0.058 dBm.

  14. Chemical and microbiological qualities of The East River (Dongjiang) water, with particular reference to drinking water supply in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Ho, K C; Chow, Y L; Yau, J T S

    2003-09-01

    Currently, about 80% of drinking water in Hong Kong is abstracted from The East River (Dongjiang) that is located in the mainland side of China. Literature records and monitoring results of 2000-2001 confirmed that the lower section of the Dongjiang had been contaminated by organic and inorganic pollutants. Statistical analyses showed that the increases of total cadmium, copper and zinc in the surface layer of sediment of Hong Kong reservoirs from 1994 to 2001 were positively correlated (significant at p<0.05) with those in the surface layer of sediments of the lower Dongjiang. Recent microbiological survey revealed that pathogens such as Salmonella spp., Vibro spp., Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum appeared occasionally in water samples of the Dongjiang and Hong Kong reservoirs. While analytical results found that currently most of the heavy metals, trace organics and microbes were removed by the drinking water treatment plants in Hong Kong, the long-term health risk of drinking water contamination should not be overlooked. The Water Supplies Department of Hong Kong is recommended to intensify its water quality monitoring program to cover pathogenic bacteria and parasites in watercourses and reservoirs.

  15. Activity of methane oxidizing bacteria along the River Elbe downstream to its estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoušu, A.; Šimek, K.; Bussmann, I.

    2012-04-01

    Contribution of rivers and estuarine systems to the global methane (CH4) budget is still not clear yet and for improving the estimations on the CH4 emission it is essential to cover the whole natural system in large-scale studies. In this context we quantified the activity of methane oxidizing bacteria (as a microbial "biofilter") over almost two seasons along a large European river system, the river Elbe, from its source in the Czech Republic towards to its estuary in the North Sea. Determination of methane oxidation rate was measured using a tritiated CH4 radiotracer technique. Methane concentrations in the water column were analyzed by the headspace method. The range of CH4concentrations and related microbial oxidation activities displayed a strong increase from the upper river parts, which includes mainly natural river, to the polluted downstream canalized parts of the river with high CH4concentrations and microbial activities, where anaerobic sediments occur. In the water column of the estuarine zone a sharp decrease of the CH4 concentration- and CH4 oxidation rates is mainly influenced by the increasing salinity. Additional parameters (temperature, dissolved oxygen, amount of suspended particular matter and nutrient content) are possible factors influencing the methanotrophic activity. Further investigations will compare the population structure of MOB at the different sites along the whole transect.

  16. Sediment concentrations and loads in the Loxahatchee River estuary, Florida, 1980-82

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonntag, Wayne H.; McPherson, Benjamin F.

    1984-01-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the magnitude of sediment loads and the general spatial and temporal patterns of sediment transport in the Loxahatchee River estuary, Florida. Mean concentrations of suspended sediment generally were higher in the Jupiter Inlet area than in the remainder of the embayment area. Concentrations of suspended sediment varied with season and weather conditions. Concentrations in selected tributaries following Tropical Storm Dennis in August 1981 immediately increased as much as 16 times over concentrations before the storm. Suspended-sediment loads from the tributaries were also highly seasonal and storm related. During a 61-day period of above-average rainfall that included Tropical Storm Dennis, 5 major tributaries discharged 926 tons (short) of suspended sediment to the estuary, accounting for 74 percent of the input for the 1981 water year and 49 percent of the input for the 20-month study period. Suspended-sediment loads at Jupiter Inlet and at the mouth of the estuary embayment on both incoming and outgoing tides far exceeded tributary loads, but the direction of long-term, net tidal transport was not determined. (USGS)

  17. Biogeographical distribution of diverse anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria in Cape Fear River Estuary.

    PubMed

    Dale, Olivia R; Tobias, Craig R; Song, Bongkeun

    2009-05-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) specific PCR method was developed to examine diversity and distribution of anammox bacteria in sediments collected from three different sites at Cape Fear River Estuary, North Carolina, where environmental parameters vary greatly over the year. Abundance and activities of anammox bacteria in these sediments were measured using the quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) method and (15)N isotope tracer incubations. Different anammox bacterial communities composed with Brocadia, Kuenenia, Jettenia or Scalindua were found among sites along the estuarine gradient. Seasonal variations of anammox community structures were observed along the estuary based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes. Correlation analysis suggested that salinity variation influenced the diversity and distribution of different anammox bacteria in the estuary. Q-PCR assays of anammox bacteria showed temporal and spatial variations of their abundances, which were highly correlated to salinity variation. (15)N isotope tracer incubations measured different anammox rates and its per cent contribution to total N(2) production among sites. The highest anammox rate was found at the site where Scalindua organisms dominated with the highest anammox bacterial abundance. Thus, we demonstrated a biogeographical distribution of diverse anammox bacteria influenced by salinity, and provide evidence to link anammox abundance and activities in estuarine sediments.

  18. PPCPs in Jiulong River estuary (China): Spatiotemporal distributions, fate, and their use as chemical markers of wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Li, Yan; Li, Mingyue; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Lv, Min; Wang, Hongjie; Hu, Anyi; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-05-01

    The occurrence and fate of 50 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) were investigated in the surface water of Jiulong River estuary in the southeast of China in spring, wet season, summer, autumn and winter. Results demonstrated a wide distribution of PPCPs in Jiulong River estuary, where 34 PPCPs were detected at least once and 5 PPCPs were detected in all the samples, including caffeine, diclofenac, metoprolol, methyl paraben, and propyl paraben. Spatial and seasonal variations were observed. Special emphasis was placed on the PPCP fate in the estuary. Most PPCPs showed a non-conservative behavior in the estuary, while the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and bisphenol A showed a pseudo-conservative behavior. The non-conservative and pseudo-conservative behavior was attributed to the combination of the seawater dilution, the introduction of PPCPs via the sewage water, and the physical, chemical, or biological removal processes. Furthermore, PPCP concentrations showed drastic variations in the turbidity maximum zones. To our best knowledge, this is the first work to indicate the pseudo-conservative behavior of PPCPs in the estuary, and to show the drastic variations of PPCPs in the turbidity maximum zone. In addition, the ratio of labile to conservative PPCPs was calculated to track the source of untreated sewage contamination. Results showed a significantly higher ratio compared to the average value in WWTP effluents, indicating the ubiquitous discharge of untreated domestic wastewater in Jiulong River estuary. In addition, the high ratio of bisphenol A to conservative PPCPs implied the potential input of untreated industrial wastewater in Jiulong River estuary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characteristics of depositional environments in the Nakdong River Estuary, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Han Jun; Lee, Jun-Ho; Kang, Jeongwon; Choi, Jae Ung

    2017-04-01

    Most of the major Korean estuaries, under high pressure from development, have dams with environmental problems, including restricted water circulation, low water quality, decreased biodiversity and wetland destruction. The Nakdong estuary on the southeastern coast of Korean Peninsula is an enclosed type with two large estuarine dams that were constructed in 1934 and between 1983 and 1987. The construction of dams has led to geomorphologic evolution of the barrier islands within Nakdong estuary. The estuary has been characterized as barrier-lagoon system with various subenvironments and microtidal with a 1.5 m tidal range. The sedimentary analyses and monitoring short-term sedimentation rates were investigated to understand characteristics of depositional environments in barrier-lagoon system of the Nakdong River Estuary. The surface sediments in the system were classified into three sedimentary facies in summer 2015. Generally, sand sediment was dominated in the seaward side of barrier islands and muddy sand sediment was dominated on the lagoon. Sandy mud and mud sediments were distributed in the tidal flat near Noksan industrial district and channels near dams. Fourteen a priori subenvironments were distinguished based on differences in landscape characterization (sediment texture, salinity, total organic carbon, pH and C/N ratios). The dendrogram resulting from cluster analysis of environmental variables from 14 a priori subenvironments could be clustered into 4 groups that were characterized by different sediment texture and hydrodynamic energy. The short-term sedimentation rates were obtained seasonally from three lines by burying a plate at sub-bottom depth from May 2015 to May 2016. The deposition was dominated on the tidal flat between mainland and Jinudo (JW- Line) and Sinjado (SJ-Line) with the net deposition rate of 10.09 mm/year and 12.38 mm/year, respectively. The erosion was dominated on the tidal flats at Eulsukdo (ES-Line) on the east side of the

  20. Comparison of biogenic methane emissions from unmanaged estuaries, lakes, oceans, rivers and wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Llorente, M. J.; Alvarez-Cobelas, M.

    2012-11-01

    A literature review of quantitative data was carried out to conduct a cross-system study on methane emissions relating peak emissions (PE) and annual emissions (AE) in five types of non-managed ecosystems: estuaries, lakes, oceans, streams and wetlands. PE spanned eight orders of magnitude (0.015 μg CH4 m-2 h-1-300 mg CH4 m-2 h-1) while AE spanned seven (0.078-19044 g CH4 m-2 yr-1). PE and AE were strongly related worldwide (r2 = 0.93). There was no relationship between AE and latitude, with highly variable PE across latitudes and climates. The coefficient of variation (CV) was greatest for emissions in oceans and estuaries, while the highest emission rate was recorded in wetlands and lakes. Efflux from coastal areas and estuaries was higher than that from upwelling areas and deep seas. Concerning wetland types, marshes showed the highest PE with the highest wetland emissions occurring in sites dominated by big helophytes. Non-stratifying- and eutrophic lakes displayed more emissions than other lake types, but there was no environmental variable that might predict methane emissions from lakes on a worldwide basis. Generally, most ecosystem types followed a seasonal pattern of emissions, with a maximum in summer, except in estuaries which did not show any distinct pattern. Regarding the importance of hot spots within most ecosystems, more spatial variability of CH4 emissions was observed in lakes than in wetlands and oceans; however, no relationship between emissions and spatial variability was found. A positive relationship, albeit weak, was found between methane flux and either temperature or irradiance in wetlands; a narrow range of both negative and positive values of the water table promoted CH4 emissions. Previously, little was known about the factors controlling efflux from river and marine environments. Our study suggests that local conditions are important in controlling CH4 emissions, because the variability explained by the more commonly studied abiotic

  1. Hydrochemical and isotopic characteristics of estuarial seawater and river water of Bailanghe in Laizhou Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiaofeng; Xu, Suning; Wang, Ruijiu; Li, Wenpeng; Wang, Zhiyi; Mei, Junjun; Ding, Zhilei; Yang, Peijie; Yu, Liangju; Lv, Tieying; Bai, Gang; Kang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    In the study of seawater intrusion, seawater is usually taken as an end-member that mixes with other source(s). However, compared to standard seawater, the coastal seawater particularly that near the estuary, can be strongly influenced by the rivers into the sea and by coastal human activities. Their composition can be thus continuously changed and redistributed with space and time. Therefore, before investigating seawater intrusion in a certain area, it is essentially important to determine the features of the estuarine seawater (e.g. the mixture percentage between standard seawater and river water). In this study, we aimed to gain a clear situation of the seawater intrusion in Laizhou Bay, Southern Bohai, China. The issue aforementioned was investigated by comparing the stable isotopic and hydrochemical composition of the marine and river water collected in this area. Samples investigated include 5 surface water samples collected at the downstream of the Bailanghe and 7 seawater samples near the estuary of Laizhou Bay. Inert tracers (δD, δ18O, Cl, Br) and reaction tracers (Na, Mg, SO4, HCO3, Ca, NO3) are particularly analyzed. The major results are as follows: 1) All the river water samples fall below the Global Meteoric Water Line in the δD - δ18O diagram, reflecting evaporation of the upstream reservoir water. The seawater samples fall on the mixing line of standard seawater and the river water in the stable isotopic diagram. 2) The Cl-δ18O diagram indicates widespread dissolution of evaporate into the river, while high concentration of Ca and HCO3-, as well as the SO42- - Cl relation of the river water samples reflect the dissolution of CO2 , carbonate and sulfate in the atmosphere and on the ground. 3) The Br/Cl ratios of seawater samples are closed to the marine ratios. This together with the plots of major ions vs. Cl suggest that the seawater samples are originated from the mixture of standard seawater and river water. Therefore, when referring to the

  2. [Spatial distribution and ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in the estuaries surface sediments from the Haihe River Basin].

    PubMed

    Lü, Shu-Cong; Zhang, Hong; Shan, Bao-Qing; Li, Li-Qing

    2013-11-01

    It is well known that the rivers in the Haihe River Basin have been seriously polluted. However, what is the present condition of the estuary pollution and how the polluted inland rivers affect the estuary areas are not clear. 10 main estuaries of the Haihe River Basin were selected to measure the contents of typical heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd, Cr and Ni) in the surface sediments and to analyze the spatial distribution of these heavy metals. The potential ecological risk index was used to assess the ecological risk of the six heavy metals in the estuaries. The results showed that the contents of Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd, Cr and Ni in the surface sediments of the 10 estuaries were all higher than their background values in the main local soil types and the contents of Cu, Ni and Pb were 2.3-2.6 times as high as their background values, which indicated that the estuaries were contaminated by the six heavy metals. The results also indicated that the contents of the six heavy metals in surface sediment varied from one estuary to another. The four heavy metals of Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn had bigger spatial differences than Pb and Cd in the contents in sediment from different estuaries. The contents of Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn in sediment were higher in the estuaries of the Yongdingxin River, Ziyaxin River and Beipai River than those in the other estuaries, and there were significant correlations between each other (R(Cu-Zn) = 0.891, R(Cu-Cr) = 0.927, R(Cu-Ni) = 0.964, R(Zn-Cr) = 0.842, R(Zn-Ni) = 0.939, and R(Cr-Ni) = 0.879, P < 0.01), which indicated that they possibly came from the same sources. Moreover, the contents of Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn in sediment also had significant correlations with the populations of sub-river basins with correlation coefficients of 0.855, 0.806, 0.867 and 0.855 (P < 0.01), respectively. The contents of Cd and Pb had smaller spatial differences in sediment from different estuaries than the other heavy metals, with the values ranged 23.3-95.8 mg x kg(-1) and 0

  3. Simulation of hydrodynamics and solute transport in the Pamlico River estuary, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, Jerad; Robbins, Jeanne C.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to characterize flow, circulation, and solute transport in the Pamlico River estuary, North Carolina. The study included a detailed field-measurement program and the calibration, validation, and application of a physically realistic numerical model of hydro- dynamics and transport. Water level, salinity, water temperature, wind speed and direction, and current data were collected during March 1988 through September 1992, and were used to characterize physical conditions in the estuary. Data from pre- existing streamflow gaging stations and meteoro- logical stations were also used. A two-dimensional vertically averaged hydrodynamic and solute transport model was applied to the 48-kilometer study reach. The model domain was discretized into 5,620 separate 200- by 200-meter computational cells. Model calibration was achieved through adjustment of parameters for June 14-30, 1991. Data from selected periods in 1989 and 1991 were used for model validation. Water levels used for model calibration and validation ranged from -0.052 to 0.698 meter; salinities ranged from 0.1 to 13.1 parts per thousand; and wind speeds ranged from calm to 22 meters per second. The model was tested for stratified and unstratified conditions. Simulated and observed data were used to evaluate model performance. The calibrated model was applied for selected periods in 1989 and 1991. Instantaneous flows were simulated at each boundary and at mid- estuary. Circulation patterns were characterized using vector plots, particle tracking, and solute transport. Particle tracks showed that materials released at mid-estuary may remain in the system for 25 days or longer.

  4. A sampler for coring sediments in rivers and estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prych, Edmund A.; Hubbell, D.W.

    1966-01-01

    A portable sampler developed to core submerged unconsolidated sediments collects cores that are 180 cm long and 4.75cm in diameter. The sampler is used from a 12-m boat in water depths up to 20 m and in flow velocities up to 1.5m per second to sample river and estuarine deposits ranging from silty clay to medium sand. Even in sand that cannot be penetrated with conventional corers, the sampler achieves easy penetration through the combined application of vibration, suction, and axial force. A piston in the core barrel creates suction, and the suspension system is arranged so that tension on the support cable produces both a downward force on the core barrel and a lateral support against overturning. Samples are usually retained because of slight compaction in the driving head; as a precaution, however, the bottom of the core barrel is covered by a plate that closes after the barrel is withdrawn from the bed. Tests show that sample-retainers placed within the driving head restrict penetration and limit core lengths. Stratification within cores is disrupted little as a result of the sampling process.

  5. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River estuary. Volume I. Entrainment-impact estimates for six fish populations inhabiting the Hudson River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Boreman, J.; Barnthouse, L.W.; Vaughn, D.S.; Goodyear, C.P.; Christensen, S.W.; Kumar, K.D.; Kirk, B.L.; Van Winkle, W.

    1982-01-01

    This volume is concerned with the estimation of the direct (or annual) entrainment impact of power plants on populations of striped bass, white perch, Alosa spp. (blueback herring and alewife), American shad, Atlantic tomcod, and bay anchovy in the Hudson River estuary. Entrainment impact results from the killing of fish eggs, larvae, and young juveniles that are contained in the cooling water cycled through a power plant. An Empirical Transport Model (ETM) is presented as the means of estimating a conditional entrainment mortality rate (defined as the fraction of a year class which would be killed due to entrainment in the absence of any other source of mortality). Most of this volume is concerned with the estimation of several parameters required by the ETM: physical input parameters (e.g., power-plant withdrawal flow rates); the longitudinal distribution of ichthyoplankton in time and space; the duration of susceptibility of the vulnerable organisms; the W-factors, which express the ratios of densities of organisms in power plant intakes to densities of organisms in the river; and the entrainment mortality factors (f-factors), which express the probability that an organism will be killed if it is entrained. Once these values are obtained, the ETM is used to estimate entrainment impact for both historical and projected conditions.

  6. Maixi River estuary to the Baihua Reservoir in the Maotiao River catchment: phytoplankton community and environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiuhua; Chen, Lili; Chen, Fengfeng; Gao, Tingjin; Li, Xiaofeng; Liu, Songping; Li, Cunxiong

    2013-03-01

    Phytoplankton and environmental variables were measured monthly from July 2009 to August 2011 in the Maixi River from the estuary to Baihua Reservoir in the Maotiao River catchment, southwestern China, to understand phytoplankton community structure and environmental factors. The relationship between phytoplankton community structure and environmental factors including hydrological, meteorological, physical, and chemical variables were explored using multivariate analysis. A total of 81 taxa of phytoplankton were identified, which were mainly composed of chlorophyta, bacillariophyta, and cyanobacteria. The phytoplankton community was dominated by Pseudanabaena limnetica during summer and fall and by Cyclotella meneghiniana during winter and spring. The abundance of phytoplankton ranged from 0.24×104 cells/L to 33.45×106 cells/L, with the minimum occurring during February 2010 and the maximum during July 2009. The phytoplankton community was dominated mainly by cyanobacteria from April to September, and by bacillariophyta and pyrrophyta from October to March. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that temperature, pH values, and orthophosphate were the most important driving factors regulating the composition and dynamics of the phytoplankton community in the estuary. Cyanobacteria and euglenophyta abundance and biomass were affected mainly by temperature and pH values, while most chlorophyta and bacillariophyta were influenced by the concentrations of nutrients.

  7. An Ecosystem-Based Restoration Plan with Emphasis on Salmonid Habitats in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Sutherland, George B.; Berquam, Taunja J.; Ebberts, Blaine; Ricci, Nicole M.; Southard, John A.; Wilcox, Jessica D.

    2003-10-14

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), in coordination with the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) and NOAA Fisheries, originated this project (BPA Project No. 2002-076; Contract No. DE-AC06-76RL01830, Release No. 652-24). Their intent was to develop a useful habitat restoration plan for the lower Columbia River and estuary to help guide restoration efforts and fulfill Reasonable and Prudent Alternative Action 159 of the 2000 National Marine Fisheries Service Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. This document focuses on salmon habitat, although its ecosystem-based approach necessarily affects other species as well. Salmon habitat restoration is best undertaken within the context of other biota and physical processes using an ecosystem perspective. The anticipated audience for the plan includes entities responsible for, interested in, or affected by habitat restoration in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Timeframes to apply this plan extend from the immediate (2003-2004) to the near-term (2005-2006) to the long-term (2007 and beyond). We anticipate and encourage that the plan be revised as new knowledge and experience are attained. A team comprised of the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (Estuary Partnership), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) wrote this document. The BPA and the COE, as the responsible Action Agencies, provided technical oversight. The Estuary Partnership's Science Work Group, NOAA Fisheries Habitat Conservation Division, Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) staff, and state and tribal fisheries management agencies reviewed drafts. The Independent Scientific Advisory Board of the NPPC reviewed and commented on the 90% draft. Revisions were incorporated into the final draft document subsequently released for public review. Extensive efforts were made to ensure a sound technical and policy basis and to solicit input from all

  8. Historical eutrophication in a river-estuary complex in mid-coast Maine.

    PubMed

    Köster, Dörte; Lichter, John; Lea, Peter D; Nurse, Andrea

    2007-04-01

    European settlement of New England brought about a novel disturbance regime that impacted rivers and estuaries through overfishing, deforestation, dams, and water pollution. The negative consequences of these activities intensified with industrialization in the 19th and 20th centuries, often resulting in ecosystem degradation. Since environmental legislation was implemented in the 1970s, improvement in water quality has been tangible and widespread; however, ecological recovery can require substantial amounts of time and may never be complete. To document the natural baseline conditions and investigate the recovery of a severely degraded river-estuary complex in mid-coast Maine, we examined diatoms, pollen, total organic carbon, total nitrogen, stable isotopes, total phosphorus, biogenic silica, and trace metals in intertidal sediments and established a chronology with 14C, 210Pb, and indicator pollen horizons. Both climate variability and human effects were evident in the sedimentary record of Merrymeeting Bay, the freshwater tidal portion of the Kennebec estuary. Natural climate variability was apparent in an episode of high sedimentation and altered diatom abundance during the 12th and 13th centuries and in changing pollen abundances between the 16th and 19th centuries, indicative of regional cooling. During the 18th century, colonial land clearance began an era of high sedimentation and eutrophication that strongly intensified with industrialization during the late 19th and 20th centuries. Improvements in water quality over the past 30 years in response to environmental regulation had little effect on ecosystem recovery as represented by the sedimentary record. Diatom composition and productivity and high fluxes of organic C, total P, and biogenic Si in recent sediments indicate that rates of nutrient loading remain high. These environmental proxies imply that aquatic productivity in Merrymeeting Bay was originally nutrient limited and water clarity high

  9. River flow control on intertidal mudflat sedimentation in the mouth of a macrotidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuvilliez, Antoine; Lafite, Robert; Deloffre, Julien; Lemoine, Maxence; Langlois, Estelle; Sakho, Issa

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the impact of hydrological variability influenced by climatic phenomena upon the sedimentary exchange between the turbidity maximum (TM) and a river mouth intertidal mudflat. This study, carried out over a period of 10 years (1997-2006) in the Seine Estuary (France), is specifically focused on two extreme periods: a wet one from 2001 to 2002 and a drier one from 2005 to 2006. This study is based on an original approach combining data gathered via low-altitude remote sensing with altimeter readings and ground-level measurements. During this 10 year period, we observed a link between climate change and the sedimentary processes on the mudflat surface. The modifications of sedimentary processes are mainly connected to the multiannual variability of hydrological flow rates that control the positioning of the turbidity maximum, the source of the sedimentary material deposited in this intertidal zone. The TM at the mouth of the Seine estuary is well developed; its maximum mass is estimated to be between 300,000 tons and 500,000 tons (Avoine et al., 1981) with maximum concentrations in the surface waters ranging from 1 to 2 g • l- 1 (Le Hir et al., 2001). Most of the fine particles stored within the TM have been found to originate from within the catchment area (Dupont et al., 1994). In the Seine estuary, the dynamics of the estuarine TM, in response to hydrodynamic forcings, have been previously described (Avoine et al., 1981) and modeled (e.g. Brenon and Le Hir, 1999; Le Hir et al., 2001). The TM is upstream of the northern mudflat when the river flow is low (< 450 m • s- 1) and nearby the study area when the river flow is higher. Thus during wet periods, the sedimentation rates increase by + 17 cm • y- 1, while during the drier one (when the turbidity maximum is located upstream of the estuary) we observed an erosion rate of 7.6 cm • y- 1. Sedimentation events in the mudflat resulting from spring tides are less frequent

  10. Circulation, density distribution and neap-spring transitions in the Columbia River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jay, David A.; Dungan Smith, J.

    This paper has two purposes. The first is to use tidal-monthly variations in the density and velocity fields and the salt and water transports as key to understanding the circulation of the Columbia River Estuary and other river estuaries. The Columbia River Estuary is a good natural laboratory in this regard, because the flushing time of the system (a few days) is short relative to the tidal month during all seasons. This allows the occurrence of distinct transitions from a strongly to a weakly stratified water column (and back) during the tidal month. Furthermore, because atmospheric processes are secondary to riverflow and tidal influence in determining the circulation, most of the energy in circulatory phenomena is confined to distinct tidal, tidal-monthly and seasonal frequency bands. Observations of salt transport and neap-spring transitions reported herein should provide important constraints on future theoretical studies of estuarine circulation. The second purpose is to describe the circulation and density field of the Columbia River Estuary as background for understanding the geologic and biological investigations discussed in other papers in this volume. Previous investigations have focused on seasonal variations in riverflow as governing the turbidity maximum and biological productivity. Studies reported in this volume show that tidal monthly variations in circulatory processes are of comparable importance. With regard to the velocity field, the influence of stratification causes the tidal flow to show the largest vertical variations in phase and amplitude in the lower estuary. The vertical distribution of the mean current is controlled by the ebb-flood asymmetry in the time-dependent flow, vertical mixing processes, the baroclinic pressure gradient, and interaction of the flow with topography. Net upstream bottom flow is weak or absent during periods of weak stratification; it is substantially only when the system is highly stratified. Net upstream

  11. Three-dimensional simulation of flow, salinity, sediment, and radionuclide movements in the Hudson River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Trent, D.S.

    1985-04-01

    The three-dimensional, finite difference model, FLESCOT simulates time-varying movements of flow, turbulent kinetic energy, salinity, water temperature, sediment, and contaminants in estuarine, coastal, and ocean waters. The model was applied to a 106-km (66-mi) reach of the Hudson River estuary in New York between Chelsea and the mouth of the river. It predicted the time-varying, three-dimensional distributions of tidal flow, salinity, three separate groups of sediments (i.e., sand, silt, and clay), and a radionuclide (/sup 137/Cs) in both dissolved and particulate (those sorbed by sediments) forms for over 40 days. The model also calculated riverbed elevation changes caused by sediment deposition and bed erosion, bed sediment size distribution and armoring, and distributions of the particulate /sup 137/Cs sorbed by sand, silt, and clay in the bed.

  12. Energy related use conflicts for the Columbia River Estuary. Volume 1. Text. Volume 2. Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.; Loehr, L.; Richter, K.; Ahlborn, G.; Westerlund, F.

    1983-06-01

    High, medium, and low probabilities of energy related development are projected for the Columbia River Estuary to river mile 93. Projections for five, fifteen, and twenty-five year planning horizons are aggregated, mapped, and described. The direct and indirect effects of projected energy-related development upon fish and wildlife in estuarine and riverine systems are summarized. Habitats affected by construction are identified, and operations of energy facility components causing impacts are characterized. Ecosystem models are developed for riverine, estuarine, channel, sandflat, mudflat, emergent vegetation, and riparian habitats to determine biological significance and pathways of projected impacts. Species accounts are furnished for 13 species and species groups that are of special concern. Cumulative impacts are integrated and described on a site-specific basis.

  13. A numerical experiment on tidal river simplification in simulation of tide dominated estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, X.; Jia, L.; Zhu, L.

    2017-04-01

    In numerical simulation of tide dominated estuaries, introduction of simplified tidal channels into the model for real rivers is one of the strategies to deal with the lack of topographic data. To understand the effects of simplification and their sensitivity to the simplifying parameters, a numerical experiment was conducted to test the parameters such as channel length L, surface width B, bed slope S, bottom elevation ▽0, bed roughness n and run-off Qr. The results indicated the values of those parameters which were liable to less tidal prism and greater flood resistance would result in larger simulation errors. For a better simplification the values of parameters for the channel geometry, resistance and upstream inflow needed to be consistent with the average of the natural river as much as possible. The simplification method made the computation stable, fast and saved the storage space and it was adoptable for different time periods and seasons.

  14. Continuous resistivity profiling and seismic-reflection data collected in 2006 from the Potomac River Estuary, Virginia and Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, V.A.; Foster, D.S.; Bratton, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    In 2006 the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a geophysical survey on the Chesapeake Bay and the Potomac River Estuary in order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay. Resource managers are concerned about nutrients that are entering the estuary via submarine groundwater discharge and are contributing to eutrophication. The research carried out as part of this study was designed to help refine nutrient budgets for Chesapeake Bay by characterizing submarine groundwater flow and groundwater discharge beneath part of the bay?s mainstem and a major tributary, the Potomac River Estuary. The data collected indicate that plumes of reduced-salinity groundwater are commonly present along the shorelines of Chesapeake Bay and the Potomac River Estuary. Data also show that buried paleochannels generally do not serve as conduits for flow of groundwater from land to underneath the bay and estuary but rather may focus discharge of reduced-salinity water along their flanks, and provide routes for migration of saltwater into the sediments.

  15. A simple optical model to estimate suspended particulate matter in Yellow River Estuary.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongfeng

    2013-11-18

    Distribution of the suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentration is a key issue for analyzing the deposition and erosion variety of the estuary and evaluating the material fluxes from river to sea. Satellite remote sensing is a useful tool to investigate the spatial variation of SPM concentration in estuarial zones. However, algorithm developments and validations of the SPM concentrations in Yellow River Estuary (YRE) have been seldom performed before and therefore our knowledge on the quality of retrieval of SPM concentration is poor. In this study, we developed a new simple optical model to estimate SPM concentration in YRE by specifying the optimal wavelength ratios (600-710 nm)/ (530-590 nm) based on observations of 5 cruises during 2004 and 2011. The simple optical model was attentively calibrated and the optimal band ratios were selected for application to multiple sensors, 678/551 for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), 705/560 for the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and 680/555 for the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI). With the simple optical model, the relative percentage difference and the mean absolute error were 35.4% and 15.6 gm(-3) respectively for MODIS, 42.2% and 16.3 gm(-3) for MERIS, and 34.2% and 14.7 gm(-3) for GOCI, based on an independent validation data set. Our results showed a good precision of estimation for SPM concentration using the new simple optical model, contrasting with the poor estimations derived from existing empirical models. Providing an available atmospheric correction scheme for satellite imagery, our simple model could be used for quantitative monitoring of SPM concentrations in YRE.

  16. Relationship of Caspian tern foraging ecology to nesting success in the Columbia River estuary, Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Scott K.; Roby, D.D.; Lyons, Donald E.; Collis, K.

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) and marine forage fishes in the diet of Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia) nesting in the Columbia River estuary has been established, but the relationship between diet composition, foraging distribution, and productivity of these birds has received little attention. We used radio-telemetry and on-colony observations to relate changes in off-colony distribution to patterns of colony attendance, diet composition, and productivity of adult terns nesting on East Sand Island during two years of different river and prey conditions. Average distance from the East Sand Island colony (located in the marine zone of the estuary) was 38% (6.6 km) greater in 2000 compared to 2001, associated with lower availability of marine forage fish near East Sand Island and lower prevalence of marine prey in tern diets. Colony attendance was much lower (37.0% vs. 62.5% of daylight hours), average trip duration was 40% longer (38.9 min), and nesting success was much lower (0.57 young fledged pair-1 vs. 1.40 young fledged pair-1) in 2000 compared to 2001. Higher proportions of juvenile salmonids in the diet were associated with relatively high use of the freshwater zone of the estuary by radio-tagged terns, which occurred prior to chick-rearing and when out-migrating salmonid smolts were relatively abundant. Lower availability of marine prey in 2000 apparently limited Caspian tern nesting success by markedly reducing colony attendance and lengthening foraging trips by nesting terns, thereby increasing chick mortality rates from predation, exposure, and starvation. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Spatial distribution and quantification of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in Sado River estuary, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Cláudia; Pardal, Miguel Angelo; Tiritan, Maria Elizabeth; Rocha, Eduardo; Margalho, Rui Miguel; Rocha, Maria João

    2009-12-01

    The important Portuguese Sado River estuary has never been investigated for the presence of potentially endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), such as natural estrogens (estradiol, estrone), pharmaceutical estrogens (17alpha-ethynylestradiol), phytoestrogens (daidzein, genistein and biochanin A), or industrial chemicals (4-octylphenol, 4-nonylphenol, and bisphenol A). Thus, the main objective of this study was to evaluate their presence at 13 sampling points distributed between both the industrial and the natural reserve areas of the estuary, zones 1 and 2, respectively. For that, water samples collected in summer and winter were processed by solid phase extraction and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Results showed that estrone, ethynylestradiol, all the aforementioned phytoestrogens as well as bisphenol A and 4-octylphenol were found in zone 1. In zone 2, neither estrogens nor 4-OP were found. However, in the same zone, daidzein (500 ng/L) and genistein (320 ng/L) attained their highest levels in summer, whereas biochanin A peaked in winter (170 ng/L). Furthermore, bisphenol A was also found in some areas of zone 2, but showed similar concentrations in both surveys (about 220 ng/L). This study demonstrated that the Sado River estuary had low EDCs levels, suggesting that the Sado's high hydrodynamic activity may be involved in the dilution of local pollution. It was suggested that at the current levels of concentrations, all assayed EDCs are unlikely to individually cause endocrine disruption in local animals. However, under a continuous exposure scenario, an additive and/or synergistic action of the estrogenic chemicals load can not be excluded, and so, continuous monitoring is advisable.

  18. Spatial and Temporal Comparison of DNRA Communities in New River Estuary, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B.; Lisa, J.; Tobias, C. R.

    2016-02-01

    Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) is an important nitrate respiring pathway, competing with denitrification, in various ecosystems. Studies examining the diversity and composition of DNRA communities are limited and their link to DNRA activity is unknown. We conducted a multidisciplinary investigation of sediment communities in the upper reaches of a eutrophic estuary to examine spatial and temporal variation of DNRA community structures and determine their linkage to activities. Sediment samples were collected seasonally from two study sites (AA2 and JAX) in the New River Estuary, North Carolina, USA. 15N-nitrate tracer experiments were conducted to measure potential DNRA rates while abundance of DNRA communities was measured using quantitative PCR of cytochrome C nitrite reductase genes (nrfA). Composition and diversity of DNRA communities were also examined based on next generation sequencing (NGS) of nrfA genes using an Ion Torrent PGM. Bioinformatic analysis was conducted using the FunGene pipeline and Mothur program. Higher DNRA activities were measured at JAX and associated with higher abundance of nrfA genes. Seasonal variation in DNRA rates and nrfA gene abundance was more evident at JAX than AA2. Nitrate concentration and dissolved oxygen in bottom water were significantly and positively correlated with activities and abundance of DNRA communities. The nrfA NGS analysis revealed that spatial variation of DNRA communities was much greater than temporal variation with salinity, dissolved organic carbon, and nitrate as the most important environmental variables affecting these communities. Diversity of DNRA communities was negative correlated with the DNRA rates and nrfA gene abundance, which suggests that dominant members of the DNRA community are responsible for higher rates. Thus, our multidisciplinary study clearly demonstrates the linkage between structure and activities of DNRA communities in the upper reaches of New River Estuary.

  19. Radium isotopes assess water mixing processes and its application in the Zhujiang River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoyi; Xu, Bochao; Yu, Zhigang; Li, Xiuqin; Nan, Haiming; Jian, Huimin; Jiang, Xueyan; Diao, Shaobo; Gao, Maosheng

    2016-10-01

    Radium (Ra) isotopes are useful for tracing water mass transport and examining estuarine hydrological dynamics. In this study, several hydrological parameters, nutrients, chlorophyll-a (chl-a), suspended particulate matter (SPM) and Ra isotopes (223Ra, 224Ra and 226Ra) of surface waters of the Zhujiang (Pearl) River estuary (ZRE) were measured. This was done for both winter (December) and summer (July) seasons, to quantitatively understand the seasonal characteristics of river plume flow rate and trajectories, as well as the ecological response. The results show that Ra concentrations in summer were higher than in winter, especially 224Ra (about 2-5 times higher). The spatial distribution of three Ra isotopes and relative Ra water ages indicated that river water mainly flushed out of ZRE through the western side in winter, where the water transport was about 5 days faster than in the eastern zone. In summer, diluted river water expended to the east side, resulting in fairly similar water ages for both sides of the river mouth. Although nutrients were higher during the summer season, lower chl-a concentrations indicated that reduced primary production might be caused by high SPM (low light penetration). The results obtained from this study will provide knowledge needed for effectively developing and managing the ZRE.

  20. Radium isotopes assess water mixing processes and its application in the Zhujiang River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoyi; Xu, Bochao; Yu, Zhigang; Li, Xiuqin; Nan, Haiming; Jian, Huimin; Jiang, Xueyan; Diao, Shaobo; Gao, Maosheng

    2017-09-01

    Radium (Ra) isotopes are useful for tracing water mass transport and examining estuarine hydrological dynamics. In this study, several hydrological parameters, nutrients, chlorophyll- a (chl- a), suspended particulate matter (SPM) and Ra isotopes (223Ra, 224Ra and 226Ra) of surface waters of the Zhujiang (Pearl) River estuary (ZRE) were measured. This was done for both winter (December) and summer (July) seasons, to quantitatively understand the seasonal characteristics of river plume flow rate and trajectories, as well as the ecological response. The results show that Ra concentrations in summer were higher than in winter, especially 224Ra (about 2-5 times higher). The spatial distribution of three Ra isotopes and relative Ra water ages indicated that river water mainly flushed out of ZRE through the western side in winter, where the water transport was about 5 days faster than in the eastern zone. In summer, diluted river water expended to the east side, resulting in fairly similar water ages for both sides of the river mouth. Although nutrients were higher during the summer season, lower chl- a concentrations indicated that reduced primary production might be caused by high SPM (low light penetration). The results obtained from this study will provide knowledge needed for effectively developing and managing the ZRE.

  1. Autonomous Acoustic Receiver Deployment and Mooring Techniques for Use in Large Rivers and Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Titzler, P. Scott; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Carter, Jessica A.

    2010-08-01

    Autonomous acoustic receivers are often deployed across a range of aquatic habitats to study aquatic species. The Juvenile Salmon Telemetry System autonomous acoustic receiver packages we deployed in the Columbia River and its estuary were comprised of an acoustic receiver, acoustic release, and mooring line sections and were deployed directly on the river bottom. Detection ranges and reception data from past optimization deployments helped determine acoustic receiver spacing in order to achieve acceptable detection probabilities for juvenile salmon survival estimation. Methods used in 2005, which resulted in a high equipment loss rate, were modified and used between 2006 and 2008 to increase crew safety and optimize receiver deployment and recovery operations in a large river system. By eliminating surface buoys and taglines (for anchor recovery), we experienced a recovery success rate greater than previous acoustic receiver deployment techniques used in the Columbia River and elsewhere. This autonomous acoustic receiver system has optimized deployment, recovery, and servicing efficiency to successfully detect acoustic-tagged salmonids in a variety of river environments.

  2. Spatiotemporal variability of wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Whitall, D R; Paerl, H W

    2001-01-01

    Excessive nitrogen (N) loading to N-sensitive waters such as the Neuse River estuary (North Carolina) has been shown to promote changes in microbial and algal community composition and function (harmful algal blooms), hypoxia and anoxia, and fish kills. Previous studies have estimated that wet atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (WAD-N), as deposition of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN: NO3-, NH3/NH4+) and dissolved organic nitrogen, may contribute at least 15% of the total externally supplied or "new" N flux to the coastal waters of North Carolina. In a 3-yr study from June 1996 to June 1999, we calculated the weekly wet deposition of inorganic and organic N at eleven sites on a northwest-southeast transect in the watershed. The annual mean total (wet DIN + wet organics) WAD-N flux for the Neuse River watershed was calculated to be 956 mg N/m2/yr (15026 Mg N/yr). Seasonally, the spring (March-May) and summer (June-August) months contain the highest total weekly N deposition; this pattern appears to be driven by N concentration in precipitation. There is also spatial variability in WAD-N deposition; in general, the upper portion of the watershed receives the lowest annual deposition and the middle portion of the watershed receives the highest deposition. Based on a range of watershed N retention and in-stream riverine processing values, we estimate that this flux contributes approximately 24% of the total "new" N flux to the estuary.

  3. Phase association of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Minjiang River Estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z L; Hong, H S; Zhou, J L; Yu, G

    2004-05-05

    Persistent organic pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of great concern due to their persistence, bioaccumulation and toxic effects. In this work the levels of 16 priority PAHs were determined in water, pore water, sediment, soil and vegetable samples from Minjiang River Estuary, China. Total PAH concentrations varied from 9.9 to 474 microg/l in water, 82.1 to 239 microg/l in pore water, 112 to 877 ng/g dry wt. in surficial sediments, 128 to 465 ng/g dry wt. in soil and 8600 to 111,000 ng/g dry wt. in Chinese vegetables. Overall, the mean concentrations of PAHs were present in higher levels in pore water than that in surface water, due possibly to higher concentrations of dissolved organic carbon or colloids with which the hydrophobic pollutants were strongly associated. Such a concentration gradient implies a potential flux of pollutants from sediment pore water to overlying water. Contamination was dominated by high molecular mass PAH compounds in all samples, indicating combustion-derived sources (for example, pyrolysis at high temperature). The levels of PAHs in water and vegetable were relatively high in comparison to other studies, although PAHs in sediment and soil were comparable to those found in many other similar environments. The ratios of selected PAHs indicated again that PAHs in Minjiang River Estuary were mainly derived from incomplete combustion of fossil fuel.

  4. Ecosystem Health Assessment in the Pearl River Estuary of China by Considering Ecosystem Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Gao, Huiwang; Yao, Xiaohong; Chen, Zhenhua; Fang, Hongda; Ye, Shufeng

    2013-01-01

    Marine ecosystem is a complex nonlinear system. However, ecosystem health assessment conventionally builds on a linear superposition of changes in ecosystem components and probably fails to evaluate nonlinear interactions among various components. To better reflect the intrinsic interactions and their impacts on ecosystem health, an ecosystem coordination index, defined as the matching level of ecosystem structure/services, is proposed and incorporated into the ecosystem health index for a systematic diagnosis in the Pearl River Estuary, China. The analysis results show that the ecosystem health index over the last three decades decreased from 0.91 to 0.50, indicating deteriorating from healthy to unhealthy status. The health index is 3–16% lower than that calculated using the common method without considering ecosystem coordination. Ecosystem health degradation in the Pearl River Estuary manifested as significant decreases in structure/services and somewhat mismatching among them. Overall, the introduction of coordination in ecosystem health assessment could improve the understanding of the mechanism of marine ecosystem change and facilitate effective restoration of ecosystem health. PMID:23894670

  5. Toxicological relevance of endocrine disruptors in the Tagus River estuary (Lisbon, Portugal).

    PubMed

    Rocha, Maria João; Cruzeiro, Catarina; Reis, Mário; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo; Rocha, Eduardo

    2015-08-01

    The Tagus is the longest Iberian river, notwithstanding, the levels of natural and xenoestrogenic endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) were never measured in its estuary. Suspecting for their presence, we made a major survey of 17 EDCs that include: (i) natural (17β-oestradiol and estrone) and pharmaceutical oestrogens (17α-ethynylestradiol); (ii) industrial and household pollutants (octylphenols, nonylphenols and their mono and diethoxylates, and bisphenol A); (iii) phytoestrogens (biochanin A, daidzein, formononetin, genistein); and (iv) the phytosterol (sitosterol). Water samples from the Tagus estuary were taken from nine locations every 2 months over a 1-year period and analysed by gas chromatography. Oestrogens, industrial/household pollutants were consistently higher at two sites-at Tagus River mouth and close to the Trancão tributary, both at Lisbon region. The overall oestrogenic load, in ethynylestradiol equivalents, was 13 ng/L for oestrogens, 2.3 ng/L for industrial/household pollutants and 43 ng/L for phytoestrogens; well in the range of toxicological significance. Water physicochemical parameters also indicated anthropogenic pollution, mainly at the two above-referred sampling sites.

  6. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2010-10-26

    This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

  7. Sediment accumulation in the Siletz River estuary in response to changes in hydroclimate and land use.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakenham, A.; Wheatcroft, R.

    2008-12-01

    The transfer of sediment from source to sink involves a complex set of processes that vary over multiple time and space scales. In the Pacific Northwest, there is anecdotal evidence that many estuaries are filling rapidly with sediment due to changes in hydroclimatology coupled with land-use changes. Because both factors may co-exist, the relative contribution of each, the mechanisms of sediment delivery (event vs. steady), and the role of larger scale processes, such as sea level rise, are important issues to disentangle. To address these issues we are studying the Siletz River, a small (<1000 km2), mountainous river system in the Oregon Coast Range. Precipitation and stream flow patterns in this region are forced by the PDO-ENSO, with a cool, wet period from 1945 to 1975. In addition, the Siletz watershed was extensively logged following WWII, thereby exacerbating sediment erosion from the watershed. A variety of evidence (e.g., x-radiographs, grain size, C-14, Pb-210 and Cs-137 geochronology) collected within the estuary indicates, however, that there has not been a clear acceleration of sediment accumulation during the latter half of the 20-th century, and suggests extrabasinal effects (e.g., sea level rise, neotectonics) may control accumulation.

  8. Seasonal changes in the demersal nekton community off the Changjiang River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yazhou; Ling, Jianzhong; Li, Jiansheng; Yang, Linlin; Li, Shengfa

    2014-03-01

    The diversity, community structure and seasonal variation in demersal nekton off the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary was evaluated using monthly trawl survey data, collected between December 2008 and November 2009. A total of 95 species (56 teleosts, 11 cephalopods, and 28 decapod crustaceans) from 69 genera, 49 families and 15 orders were collected. These species could be classified into six groups on the basis of temporal distribution patterns. The resident crab Ovalipes punctatus dominated the community, both in number and biomass. A clear seasonal succession was observed in the species composition. Cluster analysis revealed three primary seasonal groups corresponding to the samples collected in winter-spring, late spring-summer and late summer-autumn. The highest biomass and lowest diversity were observed in summer, while the lowest biomass and highest diversity in winter. The abundance-biomass comparison curves and community composition suggested that the investigated community was moderately disturbed. The results suggest that reduction in fishing pressure and in the degree of seasonal hypoxia are essential for sustainable resource management off the Changjiang River estuary.

  9. Relationship between nutrients and plankton biomass in the turbidity maximum zone of the Pearl River Estuary.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhen; Xu, Jie; Huang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xia; Jiang, Zhijian; Ye, Feng; Liang, Ximei

    2017-07-01

    Nutrients, dissolved and particulate organic carbon and plankton (bacterio-, phyto- and zoo-) were compared in the turbidity maximum zone (TMZ) and adjacent areas (non-TMZ) in the Pearl River estuary. Our results showed that high levels of suspended substances had marked effect on dynamics of nutrients and plankton in the TMZ. Based on the cluster analysis of total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations, all stations were divided into two groups, TMZ with average TSS of 171mg/L and non-TMZ of 45mg/L. Suspended substances adsorbed PO4(3-) and dissolved organic carbon, resulting in higher particulate phosphorus and organic carbon (POC) and lower PO4(3-) and DOC in the TMZ, compared to the non-TMZ. However, suspended substances had limited effect on nitrogenous nutrients. Phytoplankton growth was light-limited due to high concentrations of suspended substances in the TMZ and a peak of phytoplankton abundance appeared in the non-TMZ. In contrast, the highest bacterial abundance occurred in the TMZ, which was likely partly responsible for low DOC levels. Two peaks of zooplankton abundance observed in the TMZ and non-TMZ in the Pearl River estuary were primarily supported by bacteria and phytoplankton, respectively. Our finding implied that high levels of suspended solids in the TMZ affect the trophic balance. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Occurrence of PPCPs in Pearl River Estuary and South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisch, Kathrin; Waniek, Joanna J.; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E.

    2017-04-01

    The development of a coastal megacity has put the South China Sea under human induced stress. Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are ubiquitous contaminants and can be used as anthropogenic indicators for pollution of the marine environment. They enter the marine environment indirectly via waste water or directly due to recreational activities. PPCPs make up a group of different pharmaceuticals such as antibiotic, anti-inflammatories etc. and personal care products such as UV-filters. A mayor concern is the unknown fate and the effect these pollutants on the marine environment and especially its organisms. In some studies it was proven that some of these PPCPs have an endocrine disrupting and/or a subtle chronic effect on aquatic organisms. They are of concern for the health of the marine environment and may have an effect on human health. With our study we could determine the occurrence of PPCPs in the Pearl River estuary and the South China Sea. Salicylic acid (metabolite of acetylsalicylic acid) and octocrylene (UV-filter) were found in the open Sea in low ng/L concentration. Octocrylene is used in sunscreen and as a light stabilizer in paints and polymer-based products. It is of environmental concern because of its potential to be bioaccumulative. In addition to our findings in the open South China Sea, could we detect PPCPs, especially antibiotics, in higher ng/L-concentrations in the Pearl River Estuary.

  11. Two-dimensional circulation modeling of the Pamlico River estuary, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giese, G.L.; Bales, Jerad

    1992-01-01

    A two dimensional, vertically averaged, unsteady flow model was applied to a 50- kilometer reach of the Pamlico River estuary, North Carolina. The model computational grid, which consists of about 16,000 square cells, each 200 meters on a side, was developed from more than one million depth soundings. Information from a comprehensive data-collection network, including six water-level stations, six temperature and salinity measurement stations, and one wind measurement station, was used to provide data for boundary conditions and for model calibration. Preliminary model results for this ongoing study were sensitive to the presence of a lateral water-level gradient at the downstream boundary. For the simulation period, water-level oscillations at the downstream boundary were much more important in controlling Pamlico River flows than were local winds blowing over the surface of the estuary. Average absolute differences between observed and simulated water levels at two measurement sites were less than 2 centimeters for the 8-day calibration period.

  12. Integrated estuary management for diffused sediment pollution in Dapeng Bay and neighboring rivers (Taiwan).

    PubMed

    Chung, Chung-Yi; Chen, Jen-Jeng; Lee, Chang-Gai; Chiu, Chun-Yen; Lai, Wen-Liang; Liao, Shao-Wei

    2011-02-01

    neighboring rivers. Our results yield useful information concerning estuary recovery and water resources management and may be applicable to other basins with similar characteristics that are experiencing similar coastal environmental issues.

  13. Influence of dissolved organic matter on dissolved vanadium speciation in the Churchill River estuary (Manitoba, Canada).

    PubMed

    Shi, Yong Xiang; Mangal, Vaughn; Guéguen, Céline

    2016-07-01

    Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) devices were used to investigate the temporal and spatial changes in vanadium (V) speciation in the Churchill estuary system (Manitoba). Thirty-six DGT sets and 95 discrete water samples were collected at 8 river and 3 estuary sites during spring freshet and summer base flow. Dissolved V concentration in the Churchill River at summer base flow was approximately 5 times higher than those during the spring high flow (27.3 ± 18.9 nM vs 4.8 ± 3.5 nM). DGT-labile V showed an opposite trend with greater values found during the spring high flow (2.6 ± 1.8 nM vs 1.4 ± 0.3 nM). Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) conducted on 95 excitation-emission matrix spectra validated four humic-like (C1C4) and one protein-like (C5) fluorescent components. Significant positive relationship was found between protein-like DOM and DGT-labile V (r = 0.53, p < 0.05), indicating that protein-like DOM possibly affected the DGT-labile V concentration in Churchill River. Sediment leachates were enriched in DGT-labile V and protein-like DOM, which can be readily released when river sediment began to thaw during spring freshet. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic conditions in the Tagus River Estuary during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Célia; Abrantes, Fátima; Rodrigues, Teresa; Voelker, Antje; Vis, Geert-Jan

    2010-05-01

    Estuaries constitute the frontier between terrestrial, fluvial and marine environments, representing areas of high biological productivity that are particularly sensitive to global, regional and local environmental and climatic changes. The lower Tagus valley experienced a transgression period from 12000 - 7000 calendar (cal) years BP (Vis et al., 2008;QSR). Trying to understand the interaction between land-river and ocean, we are studying paleoenvironmental conditions of the Tagus river estuary, using a 52,76 m long core drilled near Vila Franca de Xira (38°56´24´´N; 8°56´19´´W, 2 meters elevation). The age model of this core is based on 6 AMS 14C dates. Marine/estuarine productivity and river input have been reconstructed for the last 14 000 calendar years BP, using a high resolution, multi-proxy study of diatoms, C37 alkenones, higher plant C23 - C33 n-alkanes and C20 - C30 n-alkan-1-ols, Fe and Ca content derived from XRF analysis and Total Organic Carbon (TOC). Our data shows that major river input events (as revealed by higher concentrations of terrestrial lipid biomarkers and phytoliths) control the primary productivity at this site because increased productivity - maxima in diatoms, C37 alkenones and TOC - are synchronous. Marine and brackish diatom genera and C37 alkenones occur between ca. 11500- 4500 cal years BP indicating a marine to brackish environment, probably in a shallow marine pro-delta. After 4500 cal years sea level had risen so much that the marine influence was reduced (low abundance of marine diatoms) and the environmental was similar to the modern, i.e., a brackish tidal flat. Further work is needed to improve the understanding of this estuarine record.

  15. Sources and fate of bioavailable dissolved organic nitrogen in the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paerl, H. W.; Peierls, B. L.; Hounshell, A.; Osburn, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Eutrophication is a widespread problem affecting the structure and function of estuaries and is often linked to anthropogenic nitrogen (N) enrichment, since N is the primary nutrient limiting algal production. Watershed management actions typically have ignored dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) loading because of its perceived refractory nature and instead focused on inorganic N as targets for loading reductions. A fluorescence-based model indicated that anthropogenic sources of DON near the head of the microtidal Neuse River Estuary (NRE), NC were dominated by septic systems and poultry waste. A series of bioassays were used to determine the bioavailability of river DON and DON-rich sources to primary producers and whether those additions promoted the growth of certain phytoplankton taxa, particularly harmful species. Overall, at time scales up to two to three weeks, estuarine phytoplankton and bacteria only showed limited responses to additions of high molecular weight (HMW, >1 kDa) river DON. When increases in productivity and biomass did occur, they were quite small compared with the response to inorganic N. Low molecular weight (LMW) river DON, waste water treatment plant effluent, and poultry litter extract did have a positive effect on phytoplankton and bacterial production, indicating a bioavailable fraction. High variability of bulk DON concentration suggested that bioavailable compounds added in the experimental treatments were low in concentration and turned over quite rapidly. Some phytoplankton taxa, as measured by diagnostic photopigments, appeared to be selectively enhanced by the HMW and specific source DON additions, although the taxa could not be positively identified as harmful species. Preliminary tests show that labile autochthonous organic matter may act as a primer for the mineralization of the HMW DON. These and other, longer-term bioavailability studies will be needed to adequately address the fate of watershed DON in estuarine ecosystems.

  16. Tideless estuaries in brackish seas as possible freshwater-marine transition zones for bacteria: the case study of the Vistula river estuary.

    PubMed

    Gołębiewski, Marcin; Całkiewicz, Joanna; Creer, Simon; Piwosz, Kasia

    2017-04-01

    Most bacteria are found either in marine or fresh waters and transitions between the two habitats are rare, even though freshwater and marine bacteria co-occur in brackish habitats. Estuaries in brackish, tideless seas could be habitats where the transition of freshwater phylotypes to marine conditions occurs. We tested this hypothesis in the Gulf of Gdańsk (Baltic Sea) by comparing bacterial communities from different zones of the estuary, via pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons. We predicted the existence of a core microbiome (CM, a set of abundant OTUs present in all samples) comprising OTUs consisting of populations specific for particular zones of the estuary. The CMs for the entire studied period consisted of only eight OTUs, and this number was even lower for specific seasons: five in spring, two in summer, and one in autumn and winter. Six of the CM OTUs, and another 21 of the 50 most abundant OTUs consisted of zone-specific populations, plausibly representing micro-evolutionary forces. The presence of up to 15% of freshwater phylotypes from the Vistula River in the brackish Gulf of Gdańsk supported our hypothesis, but high dissimilarity between the bacterial communities suggested that freshwater-marine transitions are rare even in tideless estuaries in brackish seas. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Relocation of the Yellow River estuary in 1855 AD recorded in the sediment core from the northern Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin; Jia, Nan; Cheng, Wenhan; Wang, Yuhong; Sun, Liguang

    2013-12-01

    Relocation of the Yellow River estuary has significant impacts on not only terrestrial environment and human activities, but also sedimentary and ecological environments in coastal seas. The responses of regional geochemical characteristics to the relocation event, however, have not been well studied. In the present study, we performed detailed geochemical elemental analyses of a sediment core from the northern Yellow Sea and studied their geochemical responses to the 1855 AD relocation of the Yellow River estuary. The results show that TOC/TN, Co/Al2O3, Cr/Al2O3, Ni/Al2O3 and Se/Al2O3 ratios all decreased abruptly after 1855 AD, and similar decreases are observed in the sediments of the mud area southwest off the Cheju Island. These abrupt changes are very likely caused by the changes in source materials due to the relocation of the Yellow River estuary from the southern Yellow Sea to the Bohai Sea, which the corresponding decreasing trends caused by the changes in main source materials from those transported by the Liaohe River, the Haihe River and the Luanhe River to those by the Yellow River. Because the events have precise ages recorded in historical archives, these obvious changes in elemental geochemistry of sediments can be used to calibrate age models of related coastal sea sediments.

  18. Humpback Dolphins in Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta: Status, Threats and Conservation Challenges.

    PubMed

    Karczmarski, Leszek; Huang, Shiang-Lin; Or, Carmen K M; Gui, Duan; Chan, Stephen C Y; Lin, Wenzhi; Porter, Lindsay; Wong, Wai-Ho; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Ho, Yuen-Wa; Chui, Scott Y S; Tiongson, Angelico Jose C; Mo, Yaqian; Chang, Wei-Lun; Kwok, John H W; Tang, Ricky W K; Lee, Andy T L; Yiu, Sze-Wing; Keith, Mark; Gailey, Glenn; Wu, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    In coastal waters of the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) is thought to number approximately 2500 individuals. Given these figures, the putative PRD population may appear strong enough to resist demographic stochasticity and environmental pressures. However, living in close proximity to the world's busiest seaport/airport and several densely populated urban centres with major coastal infrastructural developments comes with challenges to the long-term survival of these animals. There are few other small cetacean populations that face the range and intensity of human-induced pressures as those present in the PRD and current protection measures are severely inadequate. Recent mark-recapture analyses of the animals in Hong Kong waters indicate that in the past two decades the population parameters have not been well understood, and spatial analyses show that only a very small proportion of the dolphins' key habitats are given any form of protection. All current marine protected areas within the PRD fail to meet a minimum habitat requirement that could facilitate the population's long-term persistence. Demographic models indicate a continuous decline of 2.5% per annum, a rate at which the population is likely to drop below the demographic threshold within two generations and lose 74% of the current numbers within the lifespan of three generations. In Hong Kong, the case of humpback dolphins represents a particularly explicit example of inadequate management where a complete revision of the fundamental approach to conservation management is urgently needed. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  19. Historic Habitat Opportunities and Food-Web Linkages of Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect

    Bottom, Daniel L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; Campbell, Lance

    2009-05-15

    In 2002 with support from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), an interagency research team began investigating salmon life histories and habitat use in the lower Columbia River estuary to fill significant data gaps about the estuary's potential role in salmon decline and recovery . The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided additional funding in 2004 to reconstruct historical changes in estuarine habitat opportunities and food web linkages of Columbia River salmon (Onchorhynchus spp.). Together these studies constitute the estuary's first comprehensive investigation of shallow-water habitats, including selected emergent, forested, and scrub-shrub wetlands. Among other findings, this research documented the importance of wetlands as nursery areas for juvenile salmon; quantified historical changes in the amounts and distributions of diverse habitat types in the lower estuary; documented estuarine residence times, ranging from weeks to months for many juvenile Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha); and provided new evidence that contemporary salmonid food webs are supported disproportionately by wetland-derived prey resources. The results of these lower-estuary investigations also raised many new questions about habitat functions, historical habitat distributions, and salmon life histories in other areas of the Columbia River estuary that have not been adequately investigated. For example, quantitative estimates of historical habitat changes are available only for the lower 75 km of the estuary, although tidal influence extends 217 km upriver to Bonneville Dam. Because the otolith techniques used to reconstruct salmon life histories rely on detection of a chemical signature (strontium) for salt water, the estuarine residency information we have collected to date applies only to the lower 30 or 35 km of the estuary, where fish first encounter ocean water. We lack information about salmon habitat use, life histories, and growth within the long tidal

  20. Heavy metal spatial variability and historical changes in the Yangtze River estuary and North Jiangsu tidal flat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyong; Pan, Shaoming; Sun, Zhuyou; Ma, Renfeng; Chen, Lanhua; Wang, Yanlong; Wang, Shuao

    2015-09-15

    This research focuses on the spatial and temporal patterns of heavy metals from the Yangtze River estuary and the tidal flat of north Jiangsu. Most heavy metals in the surficial sediments after normalization to Ti decreased seaward at the Yangtze River estuary. The core records showed that the heavy metal variations in the last 50years were primarily linked to natural weathering input of trace elements. However, significant heavy metal pollution (mainly Ni, Pb, Cd, Cu and As) were in the two study areas, with anthropogenic inventories accounting for 23-40% percent of the total pollution. Sequential extraction showed that Pb, Cu and Ni were present largely in the non-residual fraction, which indicated the potential bioavailability in the study areas. The SEM/EDS together with sequential extraction facilitated the easy tracing of the origin/sources of heavy metals in a simple way in the estuary and the tidal flat.

  1. Factors initiating phytoplankton blooms and resulting effects on dissolved oxygen in Duwamish River estuary, Seattle, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Eugene Brummer

    1969-01-01

    Phytoplankton productivity, standing stock, and related environmental factors were studied during 1964-66 in the Duwamish River estuary, at Seattle, Wash., to ascertain the factors that affect phytoplankton growth in the estuary; a knowledge of these factors in turn permits the detection and evaluation of the influence that effluent nutrients have on phytoplankton production. The factors that control the concentration of dissolved oxygen were also evaluated because of the importance of dissolved oxygen to the salmonid populations that migrate through the estuary. Phytoplankton blooms, primarily of diatoms, occurred in the lower estuary during August 1965 and 1966. No bloom occurred during 1964, but the presence of oxygen-supersaturated surface water in August 1963 indicates that a bloom did occur then. Nutrients probably were not the primary factor controlling the timing of phytoplankton blooms. Ammonia ,and phosphate concentrations increased significantly downstream from the Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle's Renton Treatment Plant outfall after the plant began operation in June 1965, and concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus were relatively high before operation of the Renton Treatment Plant and during nonbloom periods. The consistent coincidence of blooms with minimum fresh-water discharge and tidal exchange during August throughout the study period indicates that bloom timing probably was controlled mostly by hydrographic factors that determine retention time and stability of the surface-water layer. This control was demonstrated in part by a highly significant correlation of gross productivity with retention time (as indicated by fresh-water discharge) and vertical stability (as indicated by the difference between mean surface and mean bottom temperatures). The failure of a bloom to develop in 1964 is related to a minimum fresh-water discharge that was much greater than normal during that summer. Hydrographic factors are apparently important because

  2. Sediment Transport at River Lima Estuary: Developing a Sound Methodology to Assess Sediment River Basin Input to an Erosion Prone Coast (NW Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, J.; Costa, N.; Venâncio, S.; Martins, M.; Vieira, J.; Granja, H.

    2016-12-01

    The NW coast of Iberian Peninsula is mainly formed by rocky cliffs northern of the river Minho mouth and by narrow sandy beaches south of this river. These beaches are mainly in a sedimentary deficit status resulting from the north-south longitudinal drift driven by the dominant wave climate that acts from the NW direction. In this scenario understand and quantify river sediment inputs to the coast is crucial in order to follow a sustainable management policy to mitigate erosion impacts both in the natural and social environments. This work will present results from research conducted at rive Lima Estuary, one of the rivers flowing to the NW Iberian coast, based on both numerical modeling and field data acquisition. A hydrological model of the river basin and a detailed morphodynamic model of the estuary were implemented. Instrumentation of the estuary that is being conducted comprises traditional sensor pressures and new ones that are being designed and assembled to be installed at different measurement stations within the estuary. Modelling results for flood events showed that the river is capable of remove all the sediments that are deposited in the narrow estuarine canal located near the river mouth. Some of these sediments are immediately deposited downstream, within the interior of the harbor. Here, there is a strong possibility of silting of the river mouth and the central area of the harbor. Since the river flows during extreme events are controlled by an upstream reservoir, the capacity of the river to transport sediments to the coast was lowered during the last decades, which, moreover, requires dredging works over the years to maintain navigation depth requirements. Dredging sediments should be correctly deposited at the coast in order to properly feed the longitudinal drift, otherwise they will be out of the system, which aggravate the installed erosion tendency.

  3. Identifying the breeding areas of locusts in the Yellow River estuary using Landsat ETM+ imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingsheng; Liu, Gaohuan; Yang, Yuzhen; Liu, Peng; Huang, Jianjie

    2006-03-01

    The Yellow River Estuary became an important plague region of locusts because of its special geographic location. Many years' survey data showed that the environment was the chief factor that influenced locust pest occurring. In the recent years, because the amount of water from the Yellow River and precipitation reduced and distributed asymmetrically, and soil salinization became serious much more, and many farmlands went out of cultivation, which improved the habitats for locusts, the plague of locusts happened frequently under condign climate. The field survey data from 1991 to 2000 showed that the plague of locust became more aggravating year after year. Therefore, it is important to monitor and control the plague of locusts. According to many years' investigation data analysis, got the condign habitat conditions for Locusta Migratoria Manilensis (Meyen) in the Yellow River Estuary. So the breeding areas of locusts monitoring with remote sensing imagery was to identify those regions according to the condign habitat conditions. Landsat ETM+ imagery (2000-05-02) data was chosen to identify the breeding areas of locusts in the Yellow River Estuary. Firstly classified Landsat TM imagery (2000-5-2) and extract reed lands and lawn lands and slightly salinized soils. Secondly made mask images through transforming these three raster classes into vector layers, then calculated a anti-atmospheric visible light vegetation index VARIg = (B2-B3)/(B2+B3-B1). According to field investigation data of vegetation fractional cover in 2000, got the relationship between vegetation fractional cover and VARIg values, 70% to 3.0, 50% to 2.3. As a result, the infrequent areas were where VARIg values were great than 3.0, and the moderate areas were where VARIg values were between 2.3 and 3.0, and frequent areas were where VARIg values were under 2.3. According to statistical analysis, the infrequent areas were percent 10 of the lands that have the condign soil salt content for locust

  4. Emergy and Economic Evaluations of Four Fruit Production Systems on Reclaimed Wetlands Surrounding the Pearl River Estuary, China

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emergy and economic methods were used to evaluate and compare a traditional tropical fruit cultivation system, for bananas, and three newly introduced fruit cultivation systems, for papaya, guava and wampee, on reclaimed wetlands of the Pearl River Estuary, China. The evaluations...

  5. A survey of the St. Louis River estuary with emphasis on non-indigenous species and habitat structure

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a larger study to develop a monitoring network for aquatic non-indigenous species (NIS), a comprehensive multi-gear survey of larval fish and macroinvertebrates in the St. Louis River estuary was conducted during summer 2012. A total of 139 larval fish samples and 118...

  6. A decade of aquatic invasive species (AIS) early detection method development in the St. Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    As an invasion prone location, the St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE) has been a case study for ongoing research to develop the framework for a practical Great Lakes monitoring network for early detection of aquatic invasive species (AIS). Early detection, however, necessitates findi...

  7. Shoreline Classification of the St. Louis River Estuary using Geographic Information Systems and Standard Landuse/Landcover Data Sets

    EPA Science Inventory

    The St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE) shoreline is ~300 km in length and borders MN and WI from the MN highway 23 downstream to Lake Superior. The shoreline is a complex and diverse mixture of many features from industrial docks and slips in the lower SLRE to complex wetlands and na...

  8. Long-term Changes in Water Quality and Productivity in the Patuxent River Estuary: 1985 to 2003

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a quantitative assessment of estuarine ecosystem responses to reduced phosphorus and nitrogen loading from sewage treatment facilities and to variability in freshwater flow and non-point nutrient inputs to the Patuxent River estuary. We analyzed a 19-year data set o...

  9. [Distribution of phytoplankton and water dynamical environmental factors in high red tide occurrence area of Changjiang River estuary].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Genhai; Xu, Weiyi; Zhu, Dedi; Shi, Qingsong; Zhang, Jian

    2003-07-01

    Species composition and cell abundance of phytoplankton, and its relations with environmental factors were investigated in the Changjiang River estuary of east China sea (30 degrees 50'-31 degrees 50'N, 121 degrees 50'-123 degrees 00'E). A total of 110 taxa belonging to 45 genera of phytoplankton in the investigation area were identified. The main species of phytoplankton resulted in red tide were Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum dentatum, etc. Phytoplankton abundance in the day was higher than that at night. The vertical distribution of phytoplankton in different water bodies was not obvious. The ecological groups of phytoplankton were freshwater group, estuarine and brackish water and low salinity group in the coast, high salinity and warm water group in off-sea, and widely ranging group. The abundance of phytoplankton in the Changjiang River estuary was 1.6 x 10(3)-75.2 x 10(3) ind.dm-3. The species composition and cell abundance of phytoplankton were related to the freshwater pouring into the Changjiang River estuary. The three waters in the area affecting the distribution of phytoplankton were the Changjiang River estuary water, freshwater, and warm water from outsea.

  10. [Distribution of Nitrogen and Phosphorus in the Tidal Reach and Estuary of the Daliao River and Analysis of Potential Eutrophication].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Cao, Wei; Ma, Ying-qun; Han, Chao-nan; Qin, Yan-wen; Zhao, Yan-min; Liu, Zhi-chao; Yang, Cheng-cheng

    2016-05-15

    Based on the monitoring data in the tidal reach and estuary of the Daliao river in August and November, 2013, the seasonal and spatial distribution of the nitrogen and phosphorus forms were studied, and the degree of eutrophication was evaluated. The results showed that nitrate nitrogen was the main chemical species and occupied about fifty-five percent of inorganic nitrogen, and the particulate phosphorus was the main chemical species and occupied about fifty percent of total phosphorus in the tidal reach and estuary of the Daliao river in wet and dry seasons, 2013. The concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients decreased in the direction from tidal reach to estuary of the Daliao river. Correlation analysis showed that there was a significant negative correlation between the nitrogen and phosphorus forms and salinity in most of the water body, which illustrated that physical dilution of seawater played a major role in the spatial distribution of nitrogen and phosphorus forms. The concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients in the dry season were higher than those in the wet season, this was mainly related to the seasonal terrestrial input of the tidal reach. The concentration of the dissolved inorganic nitrogen was higher than 0.30 mg · L⁻¹, and the value of N/P was higher than 60, which indicated that PO₄³⁻-P was the nutrient limiting phytoplankton growth in the tidal reach and estuary of the Daliao river in August and November, 2013.

  11. Emergy and Economic Evaluations of Four Fruit Production Systems on Reclaimed Wetlands Surrounding the Pearl River Estuary, China

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emergy and economic methods were used to evaluate and compare a traditional tropical fruit cultivation system, for bananas, and three newly introduced fruit cultivation systems, for papaya, guava and wampee, on reclaimed wetlands of the Pearl River Estuary, China. The evaluations...

  12. A survey of the St. Louis River estuary with emphasis on non-indigenous species and habitat structure

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a larger study to develop a monitoring network for aquatic non-indigenous species (NIS), a comprehensive multi-gear survey of larval fish and macroinvertebrates in the St. Louis River estuary was conducted during summer 2012. A total of 139 larval fish samples and 118...

  13. Long-term Changes in Water Quality and Productivity in the Patuxent River Estuary: 1985 to 2003

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a quantitative assessment of estuarine ecosystem responses to reduced phosphorus and nitrogen loading from sewage treatment facilities and to variability in freshwater flow and non-point nutrient inputs to the Patuxent River estuary. We analyzed a 19-year data set o...

  14. A decade of aquatic invasive species (AIS) early detection method development in the St. Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    As an invasion prone location, the St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE) has been a case study for ongoing research to develop the framework for a practical Great Lakes monitoring network for early detection of aquatic invasive species (AIS). Early detection, however, necessitates findi...

  15. Shoreline Classification of the St. Louis River Estuary using Geographic Information Systems and Standard Landuse/Landcover Data Sets

    EPA Science Inventory

    The St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE) shoreline is ~300 km in length and borders MN and WI from the MN highway 23 downstream to Lake Superior. The shoreline is a complex and diverse mixture of many features from industrial docks and slips in the lower SLRE to complex wetlands and na...

  16. Distribution of heavy metals in sediments of the Pearl River Estuary, southern China: implications for sources and historical changes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Feng; Huang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Dawen; Tian, Lei; Zeng, Yanyi

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of heavy metals (Pb, Zn, Cd and As) in sediments of the Pearl River Estuary was investigated. The spatial distribution of heavy metals displayed a decreasing pattern from the turbidity maxima to both upstream and downstream of the estuary, which suggested that suspended sediments played an important role in the trace metal distribution in the Pearl River Estuary. In addition, metal concentrations were higher in the west part of the estuary which received most of the pollutants from the Pearl River. In the sediment cores, fluxes of heavy metals were consistent with a predominant anthropogenic input in the period 1970-1990. From the mid-1990s to the 2000s, there was a significant decline in heavy metal pollution. The observed decline has shown the result of pollution control in the Pearl River Delta. However, it is noteworthy that the metal concentrations in the most recent sediment still remained considerably high. Taken together, the enrichment of heavy metals in sediments was largely controlled by anthropogenic pollution.

  17. Physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the Duwamish River Estuary, King County, Washington, 1963-67

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Santos, John F.; Stoner, J.D.

    1972-01-01

    This report describes the significant results to 1967 of a comprehensive study that began in 1963 to evaluate what changes take place in an estuary as the loads .of raw and partially treated industrial and municipal wastes are replaced by effluent from a secondary treatment plant. The study area is the Duwamish River estuary, about 18.3 river kilometers long. At mean sea level the estuary has a water-surface area of about 1 square mile and a mean width of 440 feet. At the lowest and highest recorded tides, the volume of the estuary is about 205 and 592 million cubic feet, respectively. The estuary is well stratified (salt-wedge type) at fresh-water inflows greater than 1,000 cfs (cubic feet per second), but when inflow rates are less than 1,000 cfs the lower 5.6 kilometers of the estuary grades into the partly mixed type. The crosschannel salinity distribution is uniform for a given location and depth. Salinity migration is controlled by tides and fresh-water inflow. At fresh-water inflow rates greater than 1,000 cfs, water in the upper 8.4 kilometers of the estuary is always fresh regardless of tide. At inflow rates less than 600 cfs and tide heights greater than 10 feet; some salinity has been detected 16.1 kilometers above the mouth of the estuary. Studies using a fluorescent dye show that virtually no downward mixing into the salt wedge occurs; soluble pollutants introduced at the upper end of the estuary stay in the surface layer (5-15 ft thick). On the basis of dye studies when fresh-water inflow is less than 400 cfs, it is estimated that less than 10 percent of a pollutant will remain in the estuary a minimum of 7 days. Longitudinal dispersion coefficients for the surface layer have been determined to be on the order of 100-400 square feet per second. Four water-quality stations automatically monitor DO (dissolved oxygen), water temperature, pH, and specific conductance; at one station solar radiation also is measured. DO concentration in the surface layer

  18. Alternative and Legacy Perfluoroalkyl Substances: Differences between European and Chinese River/Estuary Systems.

    PubMed

    Heydebreck, Franziska; Tang, Jianhui; Xie, Zhiyong; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2015-07-21

    The production and use of long-chain perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) must comply with national and international regulations. Driven by increasingly stringent regulations, their production has been outsourced to less regulated countries in Asia. In addition, the fluoropolymer industry started to use fluorinated alternatives, such as 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoro-2-(1,1,2,2,3,3,3-heptafluoropropoxy)propanoic acid (HFPO-DA). Between August 2013 and September 2014, we investigated the occurrence and distribution of HFPO-DA and legacy PFASs in surface waters of the following river/estuary systems: the Elbe and Rhine Rivers in Germany, the Rhine-Meuse delta in The Netherlands, and the Xiaoqing River in China. Distinct differences were revealed among the study areas; notably, the Chinese samples were highly polluted by an industrial point source discharging mainly perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). This particular point source resulted in concentrations more than 6000 times higher than an industrial point source observed in the Scheur River, where HFPO-DA was the dominant compound with a concentration of 73.1 ng/L. Moreover, HFPO-DA was detected in all samples along the coastline of the North Sea, indicating that the compound may be transported from the Rhine-Meuse delta into the German Bight via the water current. To the best of our knowledge, the fluorinated alternative, HFPO-DA, was detected for the first time in surface waters of Germany and China.

  19. Circulation and dispersion in a cancellate coast: The rivers, bays and estuaries of central Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David A.

    2009-07-01

    The glacially carved central coast of Maine is incised by river systems with interconnecting channels, offshore-trending submarine ridges, and narrow passages between nearshore islands and headlands. The tidal range exceeds 3 m, leading to complex and vigorous circulation patterns with strong flows in narrow channels, near river mouths, and between islands. The spongiform coastal morphology allows enhanced exchange between offshore waters, estuaries and internecine bays, resulting in rapid dispersal of nutrients, larvae and contaminants throughout the region. A fine-grid numerical circulation model has been used to examine the influences of the tides, river flows and winds on the dispersion of lobster larvae and pollutants in the nearshore and riverine environment. This paper describes the model application, presents a few salient features of the circulation patterns, and examines some implications for the coastal environment. For example, under realistic tides and variable southwest summer winds, about 80% of neutral near-surface particles introduced near the offshore islands (a proxy for stage IV lobster larvae from offshore sources) remain within a few km of the islands over a two-week period. On the other hand, a persistent, periodic sea breeze can remove more than two-thirds of the particles from the domain over the same period. Tidal mixing disperses pollutants entering the upper Kennebec River to the offshore and through internecine passages in about one week.

  20. Development of a preliminary relative risk model for evaluating regional ecological conditions in the Delaware River Estuary, USA.

    PubMed

    Iannuzzi, Timothy J; Durda, Judi L; Preziosi, Damian V; Ludwig, David F; Stahl, Ralph G; DeSantis, Amanda A; Hoke, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    Effective environmental management and restoration of urbanized systems such as the Delaware River Estuary requires a holistic understanding of the relative importance of various stressor-related impacts throughout the watershed, both historical and ongoing. To that end, it is important to involve as many stakeholders as possible in the management process and to develop a system for sharing of scientific data and information, as well as effective technical tools for evaluating and disseminating the data needed to make management decisions. In this study, we describe a preliminary assessment that was undertaken to evaluate the relative risks for the variety of stressors currently operating within the Delaware Estuary using a relative risk model (RRM) framework. This model was constructed using existing data and information on the ecological conditions and stressors in the main-stem Delaware River below the head of tide at Trenton, New Jersey, USA. A large database was developed with pertinent data from a variety of library, scientific, and regulatory sources. Data were compiled, reviewed, and characterized before development of the Estuary-specific RRM. Our primary goals and objectives in developing this preliminary RRM for the Estuary were to 1) determine if the RRM framework can be adapted to a large complex estuarine system such as the Delaware River, 2) identify the issues associated with adapting the model framework to the various management issues and regional areas/habitats of the River, 3) help identify data needs and potential refinements that might be needed to more specifically quantify relative stressor risks in various areas and habitats of the Estuary to better inform future management goals/actions by Stakeholders. The key conclusions of our preliminary assessment are 1) a diverse suite of stressors is likely affecting the ecological conditions of the Delaware Estuary, 2) chemical (toxicants/contaminants) and physical (sedimentation, habitat loss

  1. Spatial variation in organic matter utilization by benthic communities from Yura River-Estuary to offshore of Tango Sea, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Emily S.; Kasai, Akihide; Ueno, Masahiro; Won, Nam-il; Ishihi, Yuka; Yokoyama, Hisashi; Yamashita, Yoh

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of δ 13C and δ 15N of organic matter among benthic communities from the upper estuary of Yura River to offshore of Tango Sea, Japan, to determine spatial variation in utilization of organic matter by benthic communities. The δ 13C values of benthic animals ranged from -27 to -15‰ in the upper estuary, -21 to -15‰ in the lower estuary, -20 to -16‰ in the shallow coast (5-10 m depths), -18 to -16‰ in the deep coast (30-60 m depths) and -19 to -15‰ in offshore (100-150 m depths) stations. Adapting the dual isotope values to mixing models, we estimated the relative contributions of potential food sources to the benthos diet. Phytoplankton and macroalgae that intruded the estuary in summer were utilized as alternative food aside from the terrestrial-origin organic matter assimilated by the estuarine benthic consumers. Resuspended benthic microalgae were important source of energy in the shallow coastal stations, while abundant supply of phytodetritus fueled the deep coastal and offshore benthic food webs. Spatial difference in the diet of benthic communities depends largely on the shifts in the primary carbon source. Thus, benthic communities are important link of autochthonous/allochthonous production and secondary production in the continuous river-estuary-marine system.

  2. Water-quality data from continuously monitored sites in the Pamlico and Neuse River estuaries, North Carolina, 1990-91

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrett, Ronald G.

    1992-01-01

    Water quality measurements were made at six sites in or near North Carolina's Pamlico River estuary and at five sites in or near the Neuse River estuary. Measurements taken at 15-minute intervals included near-surface and near-bottom specific conductance; near-surface water temperature; and near-surface, mid-depth, and near-bottom dissolved-oxygen concentrations. In the Pamlico River estuary, salinities generally ranged from near zero to about 20 parts per thousand during the period April 1989 through September 1991; however, unnaturally high salinities (up to about 51 parts per thousand) were observed at one site on July 11, 1990. Recorded water temperatures in the Pamlico River were between 0 and 33 degrees Celsius during the measurement period. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations ranged from less than 1 to 20 milligrams per liter. In the Neuse River estuary, salinities ranged from less than 0.1 to nearly 33 parts per thousand between May 1989 and September 1991. During the same period, recorded water temperatures in this estuary were between 0 and 33 degrees Celsius. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations ranged from less than 1 to 21 milligrams per liter. Instantaneous values for selected periods are summarized in a series of box plots. Daily mean values of salinity, water temperature, dissolved-oxygen concentrations, and dissolved oxygen, percent saturation, are presented in tables and graphs, as are 5-day mean values for day and night conditions. This is the second in a series of reports summarizing water quality data obtained from these continuously monitored sites.

  3. Geochemistry of the suspended sediment in the estuaries of the Mandovi and Zuari rivers, central west coast of India.

    PubMed

    Kessarkar, Pratima M; Shynu, R; Rao, V Purnachandra; Chong, Feng; Narvekar, Tanuja; Zhang, Jing

    2013-05-01

    The geochemistry of the suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected during the monsoon was determined to identify the sources of SPM and to understand the physicochemical processes in the Mandovi and Zuari river estuaries. The concentrations of SPM decrease seaward in both estuaries, but are relatively high at bay stations. Kaolinite is the most dominant clay mineral in the upstream of both rivers. Smectite increases seaward in both estuaries and is abundant in the bay. Upstream stations of Mandovi, where ore deposits are stored on the shore, exhibit high Fe, Mn, total rare earth elements (∑REE), and middle REE- and heavy REE-enriched patterns. Channel stations of both estuaries exhibit middle REE- and light REE-enriched patterns, which gradually changed seaward to middle REE- and heavy REE-enriched patterns. Canal stations exhibit the highest concentrations of major and trace metals. High metal/Al ratios occur at stations in the upstream of Zuari and at the confluence of canals in the Mandovi estuary. Enrichment factors of metals indicate that Mn is significantly polluted while other metals are moderately polluted. The δ(13)C and δ(15)N of organic matter indicate that the terrigenous organic matter at the upstream is diluted seaward by marine organic matter. Organic matter at bay stations is largely marine and altered-type. The compositions of SPM are controlled by the particulates from ore dust, the geology of the drainage basins, and the physicochemical processes in the estuaries. Particulates resuspended from the bay are dominated by ore dust, which are advected into the channels of both estuaries during the lull periods of the monsoon.

  4. Conservation paleobiology in near time: Isotopic estimates for restoration flows to the estuary of the Colorado River, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flessa, Karl; Dettman, David; Cintra-Buenrostro, Carlos; Rowell, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    In most years since 1960, the Colorado River has not reached the sea. Upstream dams and diversions in the U.S.A. and Mexico have diverted the river's water for agricultural and municipal use. The river's estuary in the upper Gulf of California, in Mexico, once supported very large populations of Mulinia coloradoensis, a trophically important bivalve mollusk, and Totoaba macdonaldi, a now-endangered scianid fish,. Because Colorado River water is isotopically distinct from Gulf of California seawater, we used the δ18O composition of the pre-dam bivalve shells and fish otoliths to estimate past salinities and river flows. We estimate that five to ten percent of the river's annual flow would be needed to restore M. coloradoensis habitat in the river's mouth and to restore the nursery grounds of T. macdonaldi. The dead can speak to the living.

  5. Surface-water hydrology and salinity of the Anclote River estuary, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, Mario

    1990-01-01

    Direct measurements of streamflow, tides, and salinity in the Anclote River Estuary, Florida were made during the period January 1984 through May 1986; historical streamflow was compared to that measured during the study; the influence of well-field pumpage on streamflow was evaluated; and regression relations between salinity, tide, and average daily streamflow were developed. Mean monthly streamflows during the study period generally were lower than the corresponding long-term monthly averages yet representative of flows that typically enter the estuary. The influence of pumpage from individual well fields in or near the basin on streamflow was not statistically significant; the influence of total well-field pumpage, however, was significant at the 5% level. The upstream daily location of 0.44-, 5.0-, 10-, and 18-parts-per-thousand (ppt) salinity was quantified using multiple regression techniques. Streamflow used in the analysis ranged from 2.3 to 263 cu ft/sec, and high tides ranged from 0.25 ft below to 2.76 ft above sea level. Vertical salinity profiles indicated partially to well-mixed conditions throughout the estuary during the study period. Results of the regression analyses show that streamflow has a large effect on the location of the saltwater- freshwater interface (defined as 0.44 ppt salinity) as well as water having a salinity of 5.0 ppt. The location of water having salinities greater than 5.0 ppt is affected increasingly by tide, with a corresponding decrease in effect by streamflow. (USGS)

  6. Avulsion at a drift-dominated mesotidal estuary: The Chubut River outlet, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isla, Federico; Espinosa, Marcela; Rubio, Belén; Escandell, Alejandra; Gerpe, Marcela; Miglioranza, Karina; Rey, Daniel; Vilas, Federico

    2015-10-01

    The Chubut River flows from the Andes to the Atlantic Ocean, and is interrupted by a single dam built at the middle valley. The lower valley is dominated by the aggradation of an alluvial plain induced by a complex of spits that enclosed the inlet in the last 5000 years. The river has reduced its flow because the blocking of the upper basin by terminal moraines during the Upper Pleistocene. At least the last two marine transgressions have flooded this estuary, and contributed to the aggradation during regressions. The area is of particular interest in regard to irrigation channels practiced since the XIX century. Today, the mean monthly flow is less than 10 m3/s although peaks of 95 m3/s have been recorded in Gaiman in July 2001. The dynamics of the estuary is dominated by waves (wave-dominated estuary) as tidal effects attenuate in less than 5 km. Three vibracores were collected within this floodplain: (a) at Gaiman, an area without any effect of the sea (35 km from the coast); (b) at Trelew, at the former avulsion plain of the river (18 km from the coast); and (c) at Playa Magagna, a saltmarsh located 0.4 km from the beach. At the Gaiman core (1.54 m long) fresh-water epiphytic diatoms dominate (Epithemia sorex, Cocconeis placentula, Ulnaria ulna) suggesting the aggradation of an alluvial plain. The Trelew core (2.19 m long) was collected from a deltaic plain. It was composed by fine sand with organic matter at the base that evolved into silty layers to the top. Several unconformities and laminae with heavy minerals were detected by their geochemical composition analysed by micro X-ray fluorescence (Itrax XRF core scanner). Fine-sand laminated layers were perfectly detected by their high content in S and Cl. On the other hand, mud layers presented lower content in Mg and Al with increments in Ca and V. The core from the marsh area (1.67 m long) was analysed in terms of the diatom evolution in order to detect Holocene sea-level and salinity effects. The sand flats

  7. A River Runs through It: A School on the Edge of the Columbia River Estuary Combines Science and Stewardship Right in Its Own Backyard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Lee

    2002-01-01

    The estuary at the mouth of the Columbia River in Wahkiakum County Washington) provides a natural laboratory for experiential learning. Wahkiakum High School students participate in interdisciplinary projects that have included habitat restoration, a salmon hatchery, stream restoration, tree planting, and recreating the final leg of the Lewis and…

  8. A River Runs through It: A School on the Edge of the Columbia River Estuary Combines Science and Stewardship Right in Its Own Backyard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Lee

    2002-01-01

    The estuary at the mouth of the Columbia River in Wahkiakum County Washington) provides a natural laboratory for experiential learning. Wahkiakum High School students participate in interdisciplinary projects that have included habitat restoration, a salmon hatchery, stream restoration, tree planting, and recreating the final leg of the Lewis and…

  9. Importance of atmospherically deposited nitrogen to the annual nitrogen budget of the Neuse River estuary, North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Whitall, David; Hendrickson, Brad; Paerl, Hans

    2003-06-01

    Wet deposition of nitrogen, as NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-), and organic N, contributes up to 50% of the total externally supplied or 'new' N flux to the Neuse River Estuary (North Carolina). Excessive nitrogen (N) loading to N-sensitive waters such as the Neuse River Estuary has been linked to changes in microbial and algal community composition and function (harmful algal blooms), hypoxia/anoxia, and fish kills. In a 4-year study from July 1996 to July 2000, the weekly wet deposition of NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-), and dissolved organic N was calculated, based on concentration and precipitation measurements, at 11 sites on a northwest-southeast transect in the watershed. Data from this period indicate that the annual mean total wet atmospherically deposited (AD)-N flux was 11 kg ha(-1) year(-1). Deposition was fairly evenly distributed between nitrate, ammonium, and organics (32%, 32%, and 36%, respectively). Seasonally, the summer (June-August) months contained the highest weekly wet total N deposition; this trend was not driven by precipitation amount. Estimates of watershed N retention and in-stream riverine processing revealed that the AD-N flux contributed an estimated 20% (range of 15-51%) of the total 'new' N flux to the estuary, with direct deposition of N to the estuary surface accounting for 6% of the total 'new' N flux. This study did not measure the dry depositional flux, which may double the contribution of AD-N to the estuary. The AD-N is an important source of 'new' N to the Neuse River Estuary as well as other estuarine and coastal ecosystems downwind of major emission sources. As such, AD-N should be included in effective nutrient mitigation and management efforts for these N-sensitive waters.

  10. Modeling the transport of freshwater and dissolved organic carbon in the Neuse River Estuary, NC, USA following Hurricane Irene (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Matthew M.; Mulligan, Ryan P.; Miller, Richard L.

    2014-02-01

    Numerical models are useful tools that aid in understanding complex flows and the distribution of suspended material over large geographic areas and during extreme weather events. Here we describe the use of a three-dimensional numerical model (Delft3D) to simulate freshwater and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transport over a 3-week period, following intense precipitation that led to high river discharge into the brackish Neuse River Estuary (NRE), NC, from Hurricane Irene (Aug. 2011). The model was calibrated and validated using field measurements of water level elevations, vertical salinity profiles, and surface DOC concentrations in the estuary. DOC was simulated as a conservative tracer over the study period. Model results indicate differences in the intensity of the freshwater and DOC-laden plumes as they propagated along estuary due to a one week time lag between the maximum discharge of 540 m3 s-1 and maximum DOC concentration of 29.85 mg L-1 entering the NRE from the river. In the upper estuary, the surface DOC concentration increased by 18 mg L-1 above the pre-storm value of 7 mg L-1; the maximum concentration occurred 10 days after the passage of the storm. In the lower estuary, the outer edge of the DOC plume reached Pamlico Sound after 3 weeks with a surface DOC concentration that was 3 mg L-1 above the pre-storm value. Results also indicate cross-channel salinity differences up to 10 ppt and DOC concentration differences up to 15 mg L-1 in the upper NRE to due to wind-driven motion of the estuary. The methods described here could be applied to other coastal plain estuarine systems to simulate and characterize flow rates and DOC transport during and succeeding storm events where field measurements are often limited.

  11. CO2 emissions from a temperate drowned river valley estuary adjacent to an emerging megacity (Sydney Harbour)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, E. L.; Mulhearn, P. J.; Eyre, B. D.

    2017-06-01

    The Sydney Harbour Estuary is a large drowned river valley adjacent to Sydney, a large urban metropolis on track to become a megacity; estimated to reach a population of 10 million by 2100. Monthly underway surveys of surface water pCO2 were undertaken along the main channel and tributaries, from January to December 2013. pCO2 showed substantial spatio-temporal variability in the narrow high residence time upper and mid sections of the estuary, with values reaching a maximum of 5650 μatm in the upper reaches and as low as 173 μatm in the mid estuary section, dominated by respiration and photosynthesis respectively. The large lower estuary displayed less variability in pCO2 with values ranging from 343 to 544 μatm controlled mainly by tidal pumping and temperature. Air-water CO2 emissions reached a maximum of 181 mmol C m-2 d-1 during spring in the eutrophic upper estuary. After a summer high rainfall event nutrient-stimulated biological pumping promoted a large uptake of CO2 transitioning the Sydney Harbour Estuary into a CO2 sink with a maximum uptake of rate of -10.6 mmol C m-2 d-1 in the mid-section of the estuary. Annually the Sydney Harbour Estuary was heterotrophic and a weak source of CO2 with an air-water emission rate of 1.2-5 mmol C m-2 d-1 (0.4-1.8 mol C m-2 y-1) resulting in a total carbon emission of around 930 tonnes per annum. CO2 emissions (weighted m3 s-1 of discharge per km2 of estuary surface area) from Sydney Harbour were an order of magnitude lower than other temperate large tectonic deltas, lagoons and engineered systems of China, India, Taiwan and Europe but were similar to other natural drowned river valley systems in the USA. Discharge per unit area appears to be a good predictor of CO2 emissions from estuaries of a similar climate and geomorphic class.

  12. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the Hudson River Estuary linked to wet weather sewage contamination.

    PubMed

    Young, Suzanne; Juhl, Andrew; O'Mullan, Gregory D

    2013-06-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria resistant to tetracycline and ampicillin were assessed in waterways of the New York City metropolitan area using culture-dependent approaches and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of resultant isolates. Resistant microbes were detected at all 10 sampling sites in monthly research cruises on the lower Hudson River Estuary (HRE), with highest concentrations detected at nearshore sites. Higher frequency sampling was conducted in Flushing Bay, to enumerate resistant microbes under both dry and wet weather conditions. Concentrations of ampicillin- and tetracycline-resistant bacteria, in paired samples, were positively correlated with one another and increased following precipitation. Counts of the fecal indicator, Enterococcus, were positively correlated with levels of resistant bacteria, suggesting a shared sewage-associated source. Analysis of 16S rRNA from isolates identified a phylogenetically diverse group of resistant bacteria, including genera containing opportunistic pathogens. The occurrence of Enterobacteriaceae, a family of enteric bacteria, was found to be significantly higher in resistant isolates compared to total heterotrophic bacteria and increased following precipitation. This study is the first to document the widespread distribution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the HRE and to demonstrate clearly a link between the abundance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and levels of sewage-associated bacteria in an estuary.

  13. Species composition and gear characteristics of the Macrobrachium fishery of the Cross River Estuary, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwosu, Francis M.

    2010-03-01

    The Cross River Estuary, Nigeria, is an important shrimping area for artisanal fishermen of the coastal communities. The multi-species Macrobrachium fishery is exploited with three main gears, namely beach seine, push net and trap. Studies on species composition of this fishery recorded thirteen shrimp species, one swimming crab ( Callinectes amnicola) and two fish species ( Eleotris sp. and Pellonula leonensis). The shrimp species identified included Macrobrachium macrobrachion (83.39% and 55.69% by number and weight, respectively), M. vollenhovenii (9.66% and 37.18%), M. equidens (3.8% and 2.87%), juveniles-sub-adults of Penaeus notialis (1.11% and 1.3%), M. dux, M. felicinum, Palaemonetes africanus, Palaemon maculatus, Palaemon elegans, Desmocaris sp., Leander sp., Nematopalaemon hastatus and Alpheus pontederiae. While the selectivity index for trap was 0.25, beach seine and push net had a lower index of 0.063. The results present the first comprehensive and representative report for the Estuary shrimp fishery and will assist in the management of the biodiversity of this ecosystem.

  14. Assessment of the Mutagenicity of Sediments from Yangtze River Estuary Using Salmonella Typhimurium/Microsome Assay

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Chen, Ling; Floehr, Tilman; Xiao, Hongxia; Bluhm, Kerstin; Hollert, Henner; Wu, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    Sediments in estuaries are of important environmental concern because they may act as pollution sinks and sources to the overlying water body. These sediments can be accumulated by benthic organisms. This study assessed the mutagenic potential of sediment extracts from the Yangtze River estuary by using the Ames fluctuation assay with the Salmonella typhimurium his (−) strain TA98 (frameshift mutagen indicator) and TA100 (baseshift mutagen indicator). Most of the sediment samples were mutagenic to the strain TA98, regardless of the presence or absence of exogenous metabolic activation (S9 induction by β-naphthoflavone/phenobarbital). However, none of the samples were mutagenic to the strain TA100. Thus, the mutagenicity pattern was mainly frameshift mutation, and the responsible toxicants were both direct (without S9 mix) and indirect (with S9 mix) mutagens. The mutagenicity of the sediment extracts increased when S9 was added. Chemical analysis showed a poor correlation between the content of priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and the detected mutagenicity in each sample. The concept of effect-directed analysis was used to analyze possible compounds responsible for the detected mutagenic effects. With regard to the mutagenicity of sediment fractions, non-polar compounds as well as weakly and moderately polar compounds played a main role. Further investigations should be conducted to identify the responsible components. PMID:26606056

  15. Metagenomic Analysis of Virioplankton of the Subtropical Jiulong River Estuary, China

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lanlan; Zhang, Rui; He, Ying; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities in the oceans, and encompass a significant reservoir of genetic diversity. However, little is known about their biodiversity in estuary environments, which represent a highly dynamic and potentially more diverse habitat. Here, we report a metagenomic analysis of the dsDNA viral community from the Jiulong River Estuary (JRE), China, and provide a comparative analysis with other closely related environments. The results showed that the majority of JRE virome did not show any significant similarity to the database. For the major viral group (Caudovirales) detected in the sample, Podoviridae (44.88%) were the most abundant family, followed by Siphoviridae (32.98%) and Myoviridae (17.32%). The two most abundant viruses identified in the virome were phages HTVC010P and HMO-2011, which infect bacteria belonging to marine SAR11 and SAR116 clades, respectively. Two contigs larger than 20 kb, which show similar overall genome architectures to Celeribacter phage P12053L and Thalosomonas phage BA3, respectively, were generated during assembly. Comparative analysis showed that the JRE virome was more similar to marine viromes than to freshwater viromes, and shared a relative coarse-grain genetic overlap (averaging 14.14% ± 1.68%) with other coastal viromes. Our study indicated that the diversity and community structure of the virioplankton found in JRE were mainly affected by marine waters, with less influence from freshwater discharge. PMID:26848678

  16. Nitrogen loading sources and eutrophication of the Neuse River estuary, North Carolina: Direct and indirect roles of atmospheric deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Paerl, H.W.; Mallin, M.A.; Donahue, C.A.; Go, M.; Peierls, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    A multi-year (1990-1993) field survey and in situ bioassay study was undertaken to examine trophic and biogeochemical impacts of nutrient loading events at 3 representative oligohaline and mesohaline locations in the Neuse River Estuary North Carolina. Additional data were evaluated from an earlier study (1987-1990) at a mesohaline location. Previous studies showed the estuary as being nitrogen-limited throughout much of th year. In addition there is evidence and concern that recent increases in nitrogen loading have led to spatial and temporal expansion of phytoplankton blooms, indicating accelerating eutrophication. Accordingly, we examined the roles of significant nitrogen (N) inputs on the eutrophication process.

  17. Trace metals in the Columbia River Estuary following the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, G.F.; Wilson, S.L.; Holton, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    Dissolved and suspended concentrations of cadmium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead, and zinc were measured in the Columbia River Estuary following the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Soluble concentrations of these trace elements were not substantially elevated by the influx of volcanic ash and mud into the estuary during this period, except for somewhat higher than usual concentrations of manganese and copper. A laboratory experiment indicates that manganese leached from volcanic debris in fresh water and in the transition from fresh to slightly saline water probably caused the elevated Mn leaching from the material into fresh water.

  18. Quantitative assessment of benthic food resources for juvenile Gulf sturgeon, Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi in the Suwannee River estuary, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, R.A.; Sulak, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    Gulf sturgeon, Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi, forage extensively in the Suwannee River estuary following emigration out of the Suwannee River, Florida. While in the estuary, juvenile Gulf sturgeon primarily feed on benthic infauna. In June-July 2002 and February-April 2003, random sites within the estuary were sampled for benthic macrofauna (2002 n = 156; 2003 n = 103). A mean abundance of 2,562 ind m-2 (SE ?? 204) was found in the summer, with significantly reduced macrofaunal abundance in the winter (mean density of 1,044 ind m-2, SE ?? 117). Benthic biomass was significantly higher in the summer with an average summer sample dry weight of 5.92 g m-2 (SE ?? 0.82) compared to 3.91 g m-2 (SE ?? 0.67) in the winter. Amphipods and polychaetes were the dominant taxa collected during both sampling periods. Three different estimates of food availability were examined taking into account principal food item information and biomass estimates. All three estimates provided a slightly different view of potential resources but were consistent in indicating that food resource values for juvenile Gulf sturgeon are spatially heterogeneous within the Suwannee River estuary. ?? 2005 Estuarine Research Federation.

  19. Establishment Patterns of Non-native Fishes: Lessons from the Duluth-Superior Harbor and Lower St. Louis River, an Invasion-prone Great Lakes Freshwater Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The St. Louis River freshwater estuary which drains into western Lake Superior and includes the Duluth-Superior (MN-WI) harbor, has a long history of non-native fish introductions. From 1985 to 2002, seven new fishes were identified in the estuary, an unprecedented rate of non-n...

  20. Establishment Patterns of Non-native Fishes: Lessons from the Duluth-Superior Harbor and Lower St. Louis River, an Invasion-prone Great Lakes Freshwater Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The St. Louis River freshwater estuary which drains into western Lake Superior and includes the Duluth-Superior (MN-WI) harbor, has a long history of non-native fish introductions. From 1985 to 2002, seven new fishes were identified in the estuary, an unprecedented rate of non-n...

  1. Effects of the sandbar breaching on hydrobiological parameters and zooplankton communities in the Senegal River Estuary (West Africa).

    PubMed

    Champalbert, Gisèle; Pagano, Marc; Arfi, Robert; Chevalier, Cristèle

    2014-05-15

    This study describes the changes in hydrology, zooplankton communities and abundance in the Senegal River Estuary (SRE) before and after the breaching of the sandbar in October 2003. Samples were taken in 2003 at 3 stations located upstream (DI), in mid estuary (HY) and downstream (RM), and in 2005 at the same stations (RM becoming Old River Mouth: ORM), plus the new river mouth (NRM) resulting from the morphological evolution of the SRE. The study showed marked seasonal variations that affected the structure and distribution of zooplankton as well as major changes caused by the sandbar opening: increased marine influence throughout the whole SRE, changes in the horizontal gradients, arrival of euryhaline species and increase in meroplankton, in particular decapod larvae, transformation of the ORM area into a slackwater area with limited exchanges and the highest zooplankton numbers during high waters.

  2. Dissolved Copper, Nickel and Lead in Tampamachoco Lagoon and Tuxpan River Estuary in the SW Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Garduño Ruiz, E P; Rosales Hoz, L; Carranza Edwards, A

    2016-10-01

    In order to estimate the effects of a thermal power plant, physicochemical parameters and the concentrations of copper, nickel and lead were evaluated in water from both Tampamachoco Lagoon and the estuary of the Tuxpan River. Average salinities were 33.66 ups in the lagoon area, 32.77 ups in the channel that joins the lagoon and the river, and 24.74 ups in the river estuary. Total average metal concentrations were 21.95 for Cu, 29.67 for Ni and 4.31 µ/L for Pb. Sampling point 1 and samples from the bottom water of the lagoon present the highest salinities and concentrations of suspended matter, TOC, Cu, Ni and Pb.These high values may be associated with the infiltration of sea water either from plant operation or from the channel that connects the lagoon with the sea.

  3. Influence of livestock activities on residue antibiotic levels of rivers in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Kwok, Katrina; Chen, Yumei; Cheung, Anna; Leung, Kelvin S Y; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2017-04-01

    Occurrence of 10 antibiotics in the Yuen Long (YLR), Kam Tin (KTR), and Shing Mun (SMR) rivers of Hong Kong and possible influence of livestock activities on the concentrations of antibiotics were investigated. Tetracycline (30-497 ng/L), sulfadiazine (2-80 ng/L), sulfamethoxazole (2-152 ng/L), ofloxacin (5-227 ng/L), and erythromycin (1-315 ng/L) were detected in all the three rivers; chlortetracycline (23-227 ng/L), oxytetracycline (7-104 ng/L), ciprofloxacin (12-68 ng/L), and roxithromycin (1-105 ng/L) were detected in YLR and KTR, whereas norfloxacin (3-34 ng/L) was detected in KTR only. Significant correlation between livestock population and antibiotic contamination was observed in YLR only, indicating the influences of other sources in KTR and SMR. Among the antibiotics, significant correlation was observed between tetracyclines and sulfonamides indicating the major influence of livestock farms, whereas tetracyclines/sulfonamides were negatively correlated with fluoroquinolones/macrolides implying the differential origin of the latter class of antibiotics. Water quality of KTR and YLR were highly influenced by the non-point source pollutions, while of SMR was relatively good. Particularly, Escherichia coli populations of the YLR and KTR were 3-4 logs higher than those of the SMR indicating the involvement of livestock farms and sewerages. Good correlation between tetracyclines (TCs)/sulfonamides (SAs) and number of livestock farms and a negative correlation between TCs/SAs and fluoroquinolones (FQs)/macrolides (MLs) could be used as an indicator to trace the possible source of pollution.

  4. Mechanistic and statistical models of total Vibrio abundance in the Neuse River Estuary.

    PubMed

    Froelich, Brett; Bowen, James; Gonzalez, Raul; Snedeker, Alexandra; Noble, Rachel

    2013-10-01

    Bacteria in the genus Vibrio are ubiquitous to estuarine waters worldwide and are often the dominant genus recovered from these environments. This genus contains several potentially pathogenic species, including Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio alginolyticus. These bacteria have short generation times, as low as 20-30 min, and can thus respond rapidly to changing environmental conditions. A five-parameter mechanistic model was generated based on environmental processes including hydrodynamics, growth, and death rates of Vibrio bacteria to predict total Vibrio abundance in the Neuse River Estuary of eastern North Carolina. Additionally an improved statistical model was developed using the easily monitored parameters of temperature and salinity. This updated model includes data that covers more than eight years of constant bacterial monitoring, and incorporates extreme weather events such as droughts, storms, and floods. These models can be used to identify days in which bacterial abundance might coincide with increased health risks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Russell, Micah; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John

    2008-10-01

    The goal of this multi-year study (2004-2010) is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. Field research in 2005, 2006, and 2007 involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp vs. marsh), trajectory (restoration vs. reference site), and restoration action (tide gate vs. culvert vs. dike breach). The field work established two kinds of monitoring indicators for eventual cumulative effects analysis: core and higher-order indicators. Management implications of limitations and applications of site-specific effectiveness monitoring and cumulative effects analysis were identified.

  6. The hydrokinetic power resource in a macrotidal estuary: the Kennebec River of the central Maine coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Power levels available from the kinetic energy of tidal flows can be significant in coastal or estuarine regions with relatively modest tidal ranges. For example, the central Maine coast, where the mean semidiurnal tidal range is about 3 m, includes several river estuaries with narrow interconnecting passages where tidal currents exceed 2 m s-1. A numerical circulation model applied to this region shows that the vigorous tidal flows lead to available power peaks exceeding 3 Kw per square meter of turbine aperture in several sites during a spring tide. At one promising location, the peak power density is 6.5 Kw/m2 near the surface and the energy capacity in a 500 m2 section under mean tidal conditions is about 2700 Mwh per year, sufficient to meet the average consumption needs of about 150 homes connected to an electrical grid capable of accepting the tidal power pulses and blending them with traditional sources.

  7. Assessment of essential elements and heavy metals content on Mytilus galloprovincialis from river Tagus estuary.

    PubMed

    Santos, I; Diniz, M S; Carvalho, M L; Santos, J P

    2014-06-01

    Trace elemental content was analysed in edible tissues of Mytilus galloprovincialis collected in five different sampling areas near the mouth of river Tagus estuary in Lisbon. The concentrations of essential elements (S, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Br and Sr) were determined by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry, while toxic elements (Cr, Cd, Hg, Se and Pb) were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results show that the essential elements K and S are present at the highest concentrations in all the studied samples reaching 2,920 and 4,520 μg g(-1) (fresh weight), respectively. The highest levels of heavy metals found were in two areas close to the city for Pb and Cd, but below the maximum allowed values.

  8. Yellow River Estuary typical wetlands classification based on hyperspectral derivative transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Jie; Ren, Guangbo; Ma, Yi

    2014-02-01

    The first-order derivative transformation was applied on a PROBA CHRIS hyperspectral remote sensing image of the Yellow River Estuary coastal wetland. Five classic supervised classification methods were employed on the images before and after the derivative transformation, and then those classification results were compared through manual interpretation and quantified analysis. The aim of this research is to evaluate the effects on the classification ability of supervised classification methods made by the derivative transformation. Experimental results show that, the derivative transformation is capable of improving the classification ability of certain supervised classification algorisms in coastal wetlands classification using hyperspectral images. Especially, for the Maximum Likelihood and Support Vector Machine methods, with the best classification accuracy, derivative transformation could effectively help distinguish vegetation and clear water wetlands.

  9. Water quality in the tidal Potomac River and Estuary, hydrologic data report, 1979 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Stephen F.; Hahl, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    This report contains data on the physical and chemical properties measured during the 1979 water year for the tidal Potomac River and estuary. Data were collected routinely at five major stations and periodically at 14 intervening stations. Each major station represents a cross section through which the transport of selected dissolved and suspended materials will be computed. The intervening stations represent locations at which data were collected for special studies such as: salt water migration, dissolved oxygen dynamics, and other synoptic studies. About 960 samples were analyzed for silicate, Kjeldhal nitrogen, nitrite, phosphorus, chlorophyll and suspended sediment, with additional samples analyzed for organic carbon, calcium, magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate, sulfate, potassium, chloride, fluoride, seston and dissolved solids residue. In addition, about 1400 in-situ measurements of dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, temperature, and Secchi disk transparency are reported. (USGS)

  10. Ecological status and sources of anthropogenic contaminants in mangroves of the Wouri River Estuary (Cameroon).

    PubMed

    Fusi, Marco; Beone, Gian Maria; Suciu, Nicoleta Alina; Sacchi, Angela; Trevisan, Marco; Capri, Ettore; Daffonchio, Daniele; Din, Ndongo; Dahdouh-Guebas, Farid; Cannicci, Stefano

    2016-08-30

    Mangroves are critically threatened by human activities, despite the important ecosystem functions and services they provide. Mangroves in Cameroon represent no exception to the worldwide trend of mangrove destruction, especially around Douala, on the Wouri river estuary. In two sites around Douala, we assessed the presence of sterols, PAHs, PCBs, DEHP, DDT and its metabolite p,p'-DDE and potentially toxic metals in sediment samples. As a proxy of ecological quality, we measured the diversity and abundance of macrobenthos assemblages. We detected p,p'-DDE contamination, with concentrations higher than 3μgkg(-1) in 16 out of 26 samples which were attributed to recent widespread use of DDT. The detection of sterols revealed faecal contamination. Significant sensitivity of the macrobenthos to contaminants was revealed, with possible implications on the overall mangrove vulnerability to climate change and on the provision of ecosystem services to local populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comprehensive assessment of heavy metal contamination in sediment of the Pearl River Estuary and adjacent shelf.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongqiang; Chen, Fanrong; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Jinsong; Wu, Shijun; Kang, Mingliang

    2012-09-01

    Total metal concentrations (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb), acid volatile sulfide and simultaneously extracted metals (AVS-SEM), and heavy metal fractionation were used to assess the heavy metals contamination status and ecological risk in the sediments of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) and adjacent shelf. Elevated concentrations at estuarine sites and lower concentrations at adjacent shelf sites are observed, especially for Cu and Zn. Within the PRE, the concentration of heavy metals in the western shore was mostly higher than that in the middle shore. The metals from anthropogenic sources mainly occur in the labile fraction and may be taken up by organisms as the environmental parameters change. A combination of total metal concentrations, metal contamination index and sequential extraction analysis is necessary to get the comprehensive information on the baseline, anthropogenic discharge and bioavailability of heavy metals.

  12. Seeking a Chemical Signature for Flood Deposits, Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benninger, L. K.; Wells, J. T.

    2004-05-01

    Major flooding in eastern North Carolina during September-November 1999 caused substantial sediment redistribution in the Neuse River estuary. Locations showing both net erosion and net deposition have been identified by comparing profiles of excess 210-Pb and fallout 137-Cs in cores collected before and after the flooding. While these radionuclide tracers are well suited to studies of modern flooding, however, their half-lives and input histories limit their utility to the last 50-100 years. Thus we have sought a chemical signature which might identify flood-derived sediments in older deposits. The 1999 floods did not leave coarse sediments in the thalweg of the Neuse estuary. The only texturally distinctive flood deposits were thin (< 1 cm) and spatially discontinuous shell layers. At one site in the lower estuary, however, the top 6 cm of a core was red in color when collected in November 1999. This gives a minimum of 6 cm flood deposition at this site; 137-Cs maxima before and after flooding suggest net flood deposition of 10-16 cm. Sediment samples from this core, and from a pre-flood (1988) core from the same location have been analyzed for a suite a major, minor, and trace elements. Elemental concentrations in both cores were normalized to aluminum to account for lithologic variations. The post-flood core-top has lower Si/Al, Mg/Al, and Ca/Al than the pre-flood core-top, suggesting that the flood deposits contain less quartz and calcium carbonate than pre-flood sediments. Fe/Al is distinctly higher in the post-flood core-top, but in time diagenesis may erase this signal. For many elements M/Al ratios do not differ systematically between pre-flood and post-flood cores (e.g., M = Cr, Ni, Zr, La, Ce, Th). Cu/Al, Zn/Al and Pb/Al vary between pre-flood and post-flood cores, but because of pollution inputs of Cu, Zn, and Pb these signals probably have little utility in pre-colonial sediments. Given present data the most promising candidates as tracers of flood

  13. Aquatic metabolism response to the hydrologic alteration in the Yellow River estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaomei; Sun, Tao; Liu, Fangfang; Xu, Jing; Pang, Aiping

    2015-06-01

    Successful artificial hydrologic regulation and environmental flow assessments for the ecosystem protection require an accurate understanding of the linkages between flow events and biotic responses. To explore an ecosystem's functional responses to hydrologic alterations, we analysed spatial and temporal variations in aquatic metabolism and the main factors influenced by artificial hydrologic alterations based on the data collected from 2009 to 2012 in the Yellow River estuary, China. Gross primary production (GPP) ranged from 0.002 to 8.488 mg O2 L-1 d-1. Ecosystem respiration (ER) ranged from 0.382 to 8.968 mg O2 L-1 d-1. Net ecosystem production (NEP) ranged from -5.792 to 7.293 mg O2 L-1 d-1 and the mean of NEP was -0.506 mg O2 L-1 d-1, which means that the trophic status of entire estuary was near to balance. The results showed that seasonal variations in the aquatic metabolism are influenced by the hydrologic alteration in the estuary. High water temperature and solar radiation in summer are associated with low turbidity and consequently high rates of GPP and ER, making the estuary net autotrophic in summer, and that also occurred after water-sediment regulation in August. Turbidity and water temperature were identified as two particularly important factors that influenced the variation in the metabolic balance. As a result, metabolism rate did not decrease but increased after the regulation. ER increased significantly in summer and autumn and reached a maximum after the water-sediment regulation in September. GPP and NEP reached a maximum value after the water-sediment regulation in August, and then decreased in autumn. Estuarine ecosystem shifted from net heterotrophy in spring to net autotrophy in summer, and then to net heterotrophy in autumn. Our study indicated that estuarine metabolism may recover to a high level faster in summer than that in other seasons after the short-term water-sediment regulation due to higher water temperature and nutrients.

  14. [Kinetics of zooplankton in an aquatic continuum: from the Marne River and reservoir to the Seine estuary].

    PubMed

    Akopian, Maïa; Garnier, Josette; Pourriot, Roger

    2002-07-01

    A study was carried out within a 700-km river sector, including three types of ecosystems (a reservoir, a river and its estuary) to characterise the major features of zooplankton communities in the Seine Basin. In rivers, zooplankton biomass becomes significant only when the growth rate of the organisms is higher than the dilution rate (4-5th orders rivers, according to River Continuum Concept). Upstream, short residence times favour the development of small species (Rotifers) with low individual body weight and biomass. Conversely, larger species (microcrustaceans) develop more downstream, where increased residence time leads to autochthonous production (Riverine Productivity Model). Such a pattern is greatly modified by human impact. Zooplankton input from the Marne reservoir represents one type of disruption in the general upstream-downstream trend (according to the Serial Discontinuity Concept). This reservoir is a source of microcrustaceans; they rapidly disappear mainly through fish predation, and therefore have little impact on the river phytoplankton. Discontinuities, such as confluences, have a relatively small effect on the stock of zooplankton with regard to the water release from the reservoir, but they persist more downstream, because they have the same lotic origin. A few microhabitats with macrophytes play a small role for this canalised river, but they can modify locally the plankton community structure and composition. As a whole, the flux of zooplankton rises exponentially, whereas discharge increases linearly from upstream (4th order) to downstream (8th order). In the canalised sectors, Dreissena larvae build up an important biomass, adding to that of the zooplankton sensu stricto. Especially abundant in the downstream sector of the Marne and Seine Rivers, the larvae show a widespread colonisation of the benthic substrates by the adult Dreissena. One of the largest mussel colonies in the middle estuary can contribute to a rapid decrease of

  15. Large-river delta-front estuaries as natural "recorders" of global environmental change.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Thomas S; Allison, Mead A

    2009-05-19

    Large-river delta-front estuaries (LDE) are important interfaces between continents and the oceans for material fluxes that have a global impact on marine biogeochemistry. In this article, we propose that more emphasis should be placed on LDE in future global climate change research. We will use some of the most anthropogenically altered LDE systems in the world, the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River and the Chinese rivers that enter the Yellow Sea (e.g., Huanghe and Changjiang) as case-studies, to posit that these systems are both "drivers" and "recorders" of natural and anthropogenic environmental change. Specifically, the processes in the LDE can influence ("drive") the flux of particulate and dissolved materials from the continents to the global ocean that can have profound impact on issues such as coastal eutrophication and the development of hypoxic zones. LDE also record in their rapidly accumulating subaerial and subaqueous deltaic sediment deposits environmental changes such as continental-scale trends in climate and land-use in watersheds, frequency and magnitude of cyclonic storms, and sea-level change. The processes that control the transport and transformation of carbon in the active LDE and in the deltaic sediment deposit are also essential to our understanding of carbon sequestration and exchange with the world ocean--an important objective in global change research. U.S. efforts in global change science including the vital role of deltaic systems are emphasized in the North American Carbon Plan (www.carboncyclescience.gov).

  16. The Caloosahatchee River Estuary: a monitoring partnership between Federal, State, and local governments, 2007-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    From 2007 to 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) and the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), operated a flow and salinity monitoring network at tributaries flowing into and at key locations within the tidal Caloosahatchee River. This network was designed to supplement existing long-term monitoring stations, such as W.P. Franklin Lock, also known as S–79, which are operated by the USGS in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Lee County, and the City of Cape Coral. Additionally, a monitoring station was operated on Sanibel Island from 2010 to 2013 as part of the USGS Greater Everglades Priority Ecosystem Science initiative and in partnership with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge). Moving boat water-quality surveys throughout the tidal Caloosahatchee River and downstream estuaries began in 2011 and are ongoing. Information generated by these monitoring networks has proved valuable to the FDEP for developing total maximum daily load criteria, and to the SFWMD for calibrating and verifying a hydrodynamic model. The information also supports the Caloosahatchee River Watershed Protection Plan.

  17. Hydrographic Study of a Highly Stratified River Mouth Estuary. Alvarado Coastal Lagoon, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perales-Valdivia, H.; Sanay, R.

    2014-12-01

    Two 24 hours surveys on high and low river discharge conditions were used to describe the hydrography and the currents at the entrance of Alvarado Coastal Lagoon, México, located at the southwestern coast of the Gulf of México. This study represent the first of this kind in this lagoon. The Alvardo Coastal Lagoon sustains several economical fisheres in the region, including the shrimp fishery. The inlet of the Alvarado Coastal Lagoon is a microtidal rivermouth estuary. In each survey, towed ADCP and hydrographic data were sampled during a diurnal tidal cycle for three across-inlet transects located near the mouth. 12 track repetitions were completed allowing to distinguish the subtidal and tidal signals. In both runoff conditions a salt wedge was present, and showed surface-bottom salinity difference up to 35 psu. During high river discharge condition the salt wedge was present only during flood tide. The thicknesses of the interface, and upper and bottom layers oscillated according the tide. The water surface layer was always toward the ocean. During low river discharge condition the salt wedge was present for the whole tidal cycle. The vertical position of the interface oscillated as the tide did but keeping a constant thickness.

  18. Impact of Mississippi River freshwater reintroduction on enhancing marsh accretionary processes in a Louisiana estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLaune, R. D.; Jugsujinda, A.; Peterson, G. W.; Patrick, W. H.

    2003-11-01

    To counteract extensive wetland loss a series of diversion projects have been implemented to introduce freshwater and sediment from the Mississippi River into Louisiana coastal wetlands. To keep pace with increases in water level due to subsidence Louisiana coastal marshes must vertically accrete through the accumulation of both organic matter and mineral sediment. The impact of Mississippi River freshwater diversion on enhancing vertical marsh accretion (mineral and organic matter accumulation) was examined in Breton Sound estuary, a coastal wetland experiencing marsh deterioration as result of subsidence and salt water intrusion. Using 137Cs dating and artificial marker horizons, increases in the rate of vertical marsh accretion were measured at marsh sites along a spatial gradient which has been receiving diverted water from the Mississippi River (Caernarvon diversion) since 1991. Vertical accretion and accumulation of mineral sediment organic matter and nutrients in the marsh soil profile, increased at marsh sites receiving freshwater and sediment input. Iron and manganese content of the marsh surface sediment were shown to be an excellent signature of riverine sediment deposition. Soil extractable phosphorus was higher and extractable sodium was lower at sites nearest freshwater and sediment input. Results demonstrated that freshwater diversion through sediment input and lowering of salinity will enhance marsh accretion and stability, slowing or reversing the rate of wetland loss.

  19. pCO2 distributions and air-water CO2 fluxes in the Columbia River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Wiley; Hales, Burke; Strutton, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Sources of time and space variability in the distributions of surface water carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) and air-water CO2 flux were quantified in the Columbia River estuary (CRE) during five cruises in spring, summer and autumn 2007/08. The CRE is an upwelling margin river-dominated mesotidal system that is an estuary class not represented in global flux compilations. Data from the CRE show instances of pCO2 under and oversaturation with respect to the atmosphere during every season in association with tidal, wind, biological and storm-driven sources of variability. On average the CRE is a sink for atmospheric CO2 during spring and a source during summer and autumn, with large positive air-water CO2 fluxes during the snowmelt freshet coinciding with the functional transition in the estuary. It is hypothesized here that interannual variability in size of the snowmelt freshet largely influences the extent of springtime CO2 uptake in the CRE, and subsequently the magnitude of net annual CO2 emission from the estuary. Data collected during an autumn storm show that large fluxes can drop quickly, even in the presence of high gas transfer velocities, because of rapid CO2 exchange with the atmosphere in this weakly buffered system. Combining seasonal observations of CO2 exchange with an assumption of winter conditions, we estimate that the net annual emission from the CRE is approximately 1 mol C m-2 yr-1. The air-water CO2 fluxes reported here are the first from an upwelling margin river-dominated mesotidal estuary, and the estimate of net annual exchange is substantially lower than those from other tidal and/or large river systems represented in global flux compilations.

  20. Flow and salinity characteristics of the upper Suwannee River Estuary, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillis, Gina M.

    2000-01-01

    Continuous stage and salinity data were recorded from August 1995 to December 1997 at four gages located in the upper Suwannee River Estuary. Continuous velocity data were recorded at two of the four gages and continuous discharge data were computed for these two gages. Additional salinity data were collected at 15 monitoring sites from November 1992 to October 1997. Wind-speed data collected at Cedar Key, Florida, during the study period were utilized in the regression analysis. Correlations were developed to describe the longitudinal extent of the saltwater/freshwater interface (defined as 0.5 parts per thousand (ppt) salinity) and salinity distribution in the upper Suwannee River Estuary. On East Pass, the median of difference between daily maximum and daily minimum stage ranged from 2.92 feet for a gage at river mile 3.8 to 3.33 feet for a gage at river mile 1.2. Velocities tended to be unidirectional with some instances of bilateral flow. Reversal in flow direction was common and coincided with rising tides. Monthly mean discharges for the Suwannee River near Wilcox, Florida, during the study period typically were lower than the average for the period of record (1931.97). Discharge near Wilcox averaged 4,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) lower than the long-term average from June to September 1996. An El Ni?o event induced precipitation that was responsible for higher than average monthly mean discharge measured near Wilcox during November and December 1997. The maximum observed salinity concentrations for the study period ranged from 28.20 ppt at river mile 3.8 to 31.00 ppt at river mile 1.9. Median daily fluctuations of salinity at river miles 3.8 and 1.2 were 0.12 and 11.31 ppt, respectively. The maximum daily upstream extent of the saltwater/freshwater interface was at or upstream from river mile 4.0 for about 50 percent of the study period. The interface was at or upstream from river mile 3.8 and river mile 2.8 40 and 57 percent of the time. The interface

  1. Modelling of river plume dynamics in Öre estuary (Baltic Sea) with Telemac-3D hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The main property of river plumes is their buoyancy, fresh water discharged by rivers is less dense than the receiving, saline waters. To study the processes of plume formation in case of river discharge into a brackish estuary where salinity is low (3.5 - 5 psu) a three dimensional hydrodynamic model was applied to the Öre estuary in the Baltic Sea. This estuary is a small fjord-like bay in the north part of the Baltic Sea. Size of the bay is about 8 by 8 km with maximum depth of 35 metres. River Öre has a small average freshwater discharge of 35 m3/s. But in spring during snowmelt the discharge can be many times higher. For example, in April 2015 the discharge increased from 8 m3/s to 160 m3/s in 18 days. To study river plume dynamics a finite element based three dimensional baroclinic model TELEMAC - 3D is used. The TELEMAC modelling suite is developed by the National Laboratory of Hydraulics and Environment (LNHE) of Electricité de France (EDF). Modelling domain was approximated by an unstructured mesh with element size varies from 50 to 500 m. In vertical direction a sigma-coordinate with 20 layers was used. Open sea boundary conditions were obtained from the Baltic Sea model HIROMB-BOOS using COPERNICUS marine environment monitoring service. Comparison of modelling results with observations obtained by BONUS COCOA project's field campaign in Öre estuary in 2015 shows that the model plausible simulate river plume dynamics. Modelling of age of freshwater is also discussed. This work resulted from the BONUS COCOA project was supported by BONUS (Art 185), funded jointly by the EU and the Swedish Research Council Formas.

  2. Response of the turbidity maximum zone in the Yangtze River Estuary due to human activities during the dry season.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofeng; Shen, Zhenyao; Yang, Ye

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between a river and the sea results in a turbidity maximum zone (TMZ) within the estuary, which has a great impact on the local ecosystem. In the Yangtze River Estuary, the magnitude and extent of the TMZ vary with water discharge. In this study, the cumulative human activity altered the water discharge regime from the river to the estuary. In the post-Three Gorges Dam (TGD) period, water discharge increased by 35.10 % at Datong in February compared with that in the pre-TGD period. The effects of water discharge variation on the characteristics of the TMZ were analyzed during spring and neap tidal periods using the three-dimensional environmental fluid dynamic code (EFDC) model. The area of the TMZ decreased by 3.11 and 17.39 % during neap and spring tides, respectively. In addition, the upper limit of the TMZ moved 11.68 km seaward during neap tide, whereas the upper limit of the TMZ in the upstream and downstream areas moved seaward 9.65 and 2.34 km, respectively, during spring tide. These findings suggest that the area and location of the TMZ are more sensitive to upstream runoff during spring tide than during neap tide. These changes in the TMZ will impact the biochemical processes in the Yangtze River Estuary. In the foreseeable future, the distribution characteristic of TMZ will inevitably change due to variations in the Yangtze River discharge resulting from new human activities (i.e., new dams), which are being constructed upstream in the Yangtze River system.

  3. Sensitivity of Circulation in the Skagit River Estuary to Sea Level Rise and Future Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Long, Wen; Sackmann, Brandon; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Hamlet, Alan F.

    2016-01-01

    Future climate simulations based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emissions scenario (A1B) have shown that the Skagit River flow will be affected, which may lead to modification of the estuarine hydrodynamics. There is considerable uncertainty, however, about the extent and magnitude of resulting change, given accompanying sea level rise and site-specific complexities with multiple interconnected basins. To help quantify the future hydrodynamic response, we developed a three dimensional model of the Skagit River estuary using the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM). The model was set up with localized high-resolution grids in Skagit and Padilla Bay sub-basins within the intermediate-scale FVCOM based model of the Salish Sea (greater Puget Sound and Georgia Basin). Future changes to salinity and annual transport through the basin were examined. The results confirmed the existence of a residual estuarine flow that enters Skagit Bay from Saratoga Passage to the south and exits through Deception Pass. Freshwater from the Skagit River is transported out in the surface layers primarily through Deception Pass and Saratoga Passage, and only a small fraction (≈4%) is transported to Padilla Bay. The moderate future perturbations of A1B emissions, corresponding river flow, and sea level rise of 0.48 m examined here result only in small incremental changes to salinity structure and inter-basin freshwater distribution and transport. An increase in salinity of ~1 ppt in the near-shore environment and a salinity intrusion of approximately 3 km further upstream is predicted in Skagit River, well downstream of the drinking water intakes.

  4. [Purification function and ecological services value of Crassostrea sp. in Yangtze River estuary].

    PubMed

    Quan, Wei-Min; Zhang, Jin-Ping; Ping, Xian-Yin; Shi, Li-Yan; Li, Pei-Jun; Chen, Ya-Qu

    2007-04-01

    Oyster reef ecosystem is a natural decontamination plant of estuarine environment. This paper analyzed the bioaccumulation of heavy metals by Crassostrea sp. population at the dams of Yangtze River estuary, with its purification capacity and ecological services value assessed. The results indicated that Crassostrea sp. had a high capacity in bio-accumulating Cu, Zn and Cd, with the bio-concentration factor (BCF) and biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) being (14.28 +/- 2.41) x 10(3), (12.75 +/- 2.02) x 10(3) and (14.51 +/- 3.71) x 10(3), and 26.78 +/- 4.53, 23.24 +/- 3.69 and 16.62 +/- 4.25, respectively. The bioaccumulation capacity decreased in the order of Cu > Zn > Cd > As > Pb > Hg. The total weight and fresh meat weight of the oyster at the dams of Yangtze River estuary were about 1.07 x 10(6) t and 1.75 x 10(5) t, respectively, and the total storage of nutrients and heavy metals were 1.462 x 10(6) kg N, 1 x 10(5) kg P, 24 745 kg Cu, 58 257 kg Zn, 609 kg Pb, 254 kg Cd, 0.18 kg Hg and 329 kg As. The total ecological services value of the oyster reef was estimated at about 8.27 x 10(6) RMB x a(-1), including habitat value of about 5.10 x 10(6) RMB x a(-1) and environmental value of about 3.17 x 10(6) RMB x a(-1). Such an environmental value was equivalent to the value of treating about 7.31 x 10(6) t combined sewage each year, and corresponded to a large municipal sewage plant with a treatment capacity about 20 000 t d(-1).

  5. Stratification and salt-wedge in the Seomjin river estuary under the idealized tidal influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jin Hwan; Jang, Dongmin; Kim, Yong Hoon

    2017-09-01

    Advection, straining, and vertical mixing play primary roles in the process of estuarine stratification. Estuaries can be classified as salt-wedge, partially-mixed or well-mixed depending on the vertical density structure determined by the balancing of advection, mixing and straining. In particular, straining plays a major role in the stratification of the estuarine water body along the estuarine channel. Also, the behavior of a salt wedge with a halocline shape in a stratified channel can be controlled by the competition between straining and mixing induced by buoyancy from the riverine source and tidal forcing. The present study uses Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) to show that straining and vertical mixing play major roles in controlling along-channel flow and stratification structures in the Seomjin river estuary (SRE) under idealized conditions. The Potential Energy Anomaly (PEA) dynamic equation quantifies the governing processes thereby enabling the determination of the stratification type. By comparing terms in the equation, we examined how the relative strengths of straining and mixing alter the stratification types in the SRE due to changes in river discharge and the depth resulting from dredging activities. SRE under idealized tidal forcing tends to be partially-mixed based on an analysis of the balance between terms and the vertical structure of salinity, and the morphological and hydrological change in SRE results in the shift of stratification type. While the depth affects the mixing, the freshwater discharge mainly controls the straining, and the balance between mixing and straining determines the final state of the stratification in an estuarine channel. As a result, the development and location of a salt wedge along the channel in a partially mixed and highly stratified condition is also determined by the ratio of straining to mixing. Finally, our findings confirm that the contributions of mixing and straining can be assessed by using the

  6. Continuous river discharge monitoring with bottom-mounted current profilers at narrow tidal estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, E.; D'Alimonte, D.

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study is to verify whether accurate and continuous estimates of freshwater discharge at the mouth of a narrow estuary with a single channel can be obtained from a bottom-mounted current profiler (ADCP). The focus is on moderate- to high-discharge events that significantly affect the water circulation corresponding to low river flow conditions. Observations at the Guadiana Estuary (southern Iberia) indicate lateral subtidal flow variability, constant cross-channel area, and quasi-steady response of the axial velocity to discharge events. Based on the concept of maximum entropy, the mean and maximum channel velocities were related by a constant ratio, Ω, using data from three cross-channel surveys. This relationship was then used to estimate the freshwater discharge at the mouth based on the maximum velocity obtained from the detided ADCP velocity profiles. This approach was possible because the ADCP was deployed near the position of maximum current velocity, that is, over the deepest part of the channel. The results show good correspondence with observations, indicating that the entropy model can complete or substitute the records from upstream gauged stations that do not include the contribution from downstream tributaries. A Multilayer Perceptron neural net (MLP) based on the entropy approach was then implemented with the purpose of estimating the discharge when Ω is unknown. This latter analysis showsthat the relationship between maximum velocity and discharge is quasi-stationary. Consequently, the MLP can successfully estimate freshwater runoff if the training data represent all statistical properties of the river discharge dynamics. The results also indicate that Ω may vary not only with concomitant hydrographic conditions, but also with the recent (i.e., several days prior) discharge magnitude.

  7. [Spatial variations of biogenic elements in coastal wetland sediments of the Jiulong River Estuary].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Qing; Yang, Jun; Liu, Le-Mian; Tian, Yuan; Yu, Zheng; Wang, Chang-Fu

    2012-11-01

    To reveal the spatial distribution of biogenic elements and their influencing factors in the typical subtropical coastal wetland, both surface and core sediment samples were collected from the Jiulong River Estuary, southeast China in summer 2009. The biogenic elements including carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur (C, N, P, S) were determined by Element Analyzer and Flow Injection Analyzer. The concentrations of TC, TN, TP, and TS were (12.64 +/- 2.66) g x kg(-1), (1.57 +/- 0.29) g x kg(-1), (0.48 +/- 0.06) g x kg(-1), and (2.61 +/- 1.37) g x kg(-1), respectively. Further, these biogenic elements showed a distinct spatial pattern which closely related with the vegetation type and tide level. Values of TC, TN, TP in the surface sediment of mangrove vegetation zones were higher than those in the cord-grass and mudflat zones, while TC, TN, TP concentrations in the high tide level regions were higher than those in the middle and low tide level regions. The TS concentration was the highest in cord-grass vegetation and middle tidal level zones. The TC and TN values in sedimentary core decreased gradually with depth, and they were the highest in the mangrove sites, followed by cord-grass and mudflat sites at the same depth. In mudflat sedimentary core, the average content of TP was the lowest, whereas TS was the highest. Redundancy analysis revealed that vegetation type, pH and tide level were the main factors influencing the distribution of biogenic elements in surface sediments of the Jiulong River Estuary, by explaining 24.0%, 19.0% and 11.6% of total variation in the four biogenic elements (C, N, P and S), respectively.

  8. Impacts of sea cucumber farming on biogeochemical characteristics in the Yellow River estuary, Northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jing; Yokoyama, Hisashi; Cui, Baoshan; Zhou, Jin; Yan, Jiaguo; Ma, Xu; Shibata, Shozo

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the potential environmental effects of pond farming for Apostichopus japonicas in Yellow River estuary, we examined discrepancies of distance-based typical pollution indicators (TOC, TN, NO3-, NH4+, NO2- and PO43-) and biochemical tracers (δ13C and δ15N) in water column and sediment, as well as dietary characteristics of dominant macrobenthos between farming and non-farming areas. The results revealed that studied variables in water column showed no uniform spatial differences. Meanwhile, those in sediment displayed similar decrease tendencies from farming pond to the adjacent tidal flat, which was considered to represent the environmental effects of farming. Biochemical tracers (δ13C and δ15N) in both water column and sediment confirmed the origin of organic matters from the aquaculture waste. The detectable dispersion distance of aquaculture waste was restricted to an area within 50 m distance as determined by most variables in sediment (TOC, TN, NO3- and NH4+), particularly by C:N ratio and δ13C with which origins of the wastes were traced. Bayesian mixing models indicated that in the farming area BMA had a larger contribution, while POM(marine) showed a smaller contribution to the diets of Helice tridens and Macrophthalmus abbreviates compared to those in the non-farming area. The overall results showed that pond farming for Apostichopus japonicus in the Yellow River estuary altered the local environment to a certain extent. For methodological consideration, sediment biogeochemical characteristics as a historical recorder much more effectively reflected aquaculture waste accumulation, and stable isotope approaches are efficient in tracing the origin and extent of various allogenous sources.

  9. Nitrogen cycle of a typical Suaeda salsa marsh ecosystem in the Yellow River estuary.

    PubMed

    Mou, Xiaojie; Sun, Zhigao; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Chuanyuan

    2011-01-01

    The nitrogen (N) biological cycle of the Suaeda salsa marsh ecosystem in the Yellow River estuary was studied during 2008 to 2009. Results showed that soil N had significant seasonal fluctuations and vertical distribution. The N/P ratio (15.73 +/- 1.77) of S. salsa was less than 16, indicating that plant growth was limited by both N and P. The N absorption coefficient of S. salsa was very low (0.007), while the N utilization and cycle coefficients were high (0.824 and 0.331, respectively). The N turnover among compartments of S. salsa marsh showed that N uptake from aboveground parts and roots were 2.539 and 0.622 g/m2, respectively. The N translocation from aboveground parts to roots and from roots to soil were 2.042 and 0.076 g/m2, respectively. The N translocation from aboveground living bodies to litter was 0.497 g/m2, the annual N return from litter to soil was far less than 0.368 g/m2, and the net N mineralization in topsoil during the growing season was 0.033 g/m2. N was an important limiting factor in S. salsa marsh, and the ecosystem was classified as unstable and vulnerable. S. salsa was seemingly well adapted to the low-nutrient status and vulnerable habitat, and the nutrient enrichment due to N import from the Yellow River estuary would be a potential threat to the S. salsa marsh. Excessive nutrient loading might favor invasive species and induce severe long-term degradation of the ecosystem if human intervention measures were not taken. The N quantitative relationships determined in our study might provide a scientific basis for the establishment of effective measures.

  10. [Methane fluxes and controlling factors in the intertidal zone of the Yellow River estuary in autumn].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huan-Huan; Sun, Zhi-Gao; Wang, Ling-Ling; Mou, Xiao-Jie; Sun, Wan-Long; Song, Hong-Li; Sun, Wen-Guang

    2012-02-01

    The characteristics of methane (CH4) fluxes from tidal wetlands of the Yellow River estuary were observed in situ with static-chamber and GC methods in September and October 2009, and the key factors affecting CH4 fluxes were discussed. From the aspect of space, the CH4 flux ranges in high tidal wetland, middle tidal wetland, low tidal wetland, bare flat are - 0.206-1.264, -0.197-0.431, -0.125-0.659 and -0.742-1.767 mg x (m2 x h)(-1), the day average fluxes are 0.089, 0.038, 0.197 and 0.169 mg x (m2 x h)(-1), respectively, indicating that the tidal wetlands are the sources of CH4 and the source function of CH4 differed among the four study sites, in the order of low tidal wetland > bare flat > high tidal wetland > middle tidal wetland. From the aspect of time, the ranges of CH4 fluxes from the tidal wetland ecosystems are -0.444-1.767 and - 0.742- 1.264 mg x (m2 x h)(-1), and the day average fluxes are 0.218 and 0.028 mg x (m2 x h)(-1) in September and October, respectively. The CH4 fluxes in each tidal wetland in September are higher than those in October except that the high tidal wetland acts as weak sink in September. Further studies indicate that the changes of environmental factors in the Yellow River estuary are complicated, and the CH4 fluxes are affected by multiple factors. The differences of CH4 fluxes characteristics among different tidal wetlands in autumn are probably related to temperature (especially atmospheric temperature) and vegetation growth status, while the effects of water or salinity condition and tide status on the CH4 flux characteristics might not be ignored.

  11. The influence of late summer typhoons and high river discharge on water quality in Hong Kong waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weihua; Yin, Kedong; Harrison, Paul J.; Lee, Joseph H. W.

    2012-10-01

    A typhoon produces a rapid mixing and flushing event and it can be added to the list of other factors such as shallow water depth, spring tidal mixing, the Pearl River discharge, summer upwelling that make Hong Kong waters relatively resistant to eutrophication impacts. Two typhoons passed over Hong Kong waters and provided an opportunity to document the changes in water quality in late summer 2003. Before the typhoon (Aug 19-20) and during a neap tide, a large algal bloom (>10 μg Chl-a L-1) occurred in the stratified southern waters influenced by the Pearl River estuarine waters with high NO3. However, PO4 and SiO4 were drawn down to near limiting concentrations by the large bloom. After the typhoons, Chl-a decreased to 2 μg L-1 due to vertical mixing and advection. The heavy rainfall and increased river discharge quickly re-set the water column to the usual strong summer stratification in only a few days. As a result, high nutrients in the river discharge stimulated another large algal bloom a few days after the next neap tide when tidal mixing was reduced. In the southern waters, the deeper station showed stronger stratification and lower bottom dissolved oxygen (DO) than the shallower station suggesting that the low DO in the bottom water may have come from offshore transport.

  12. Estimating salinity intrusion effects due to climate change on the Lower Savannah River Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conrads, Paul A.; Roehl, Edwin A.; Daamen, Ruby C.; Cook, John B.; Sexton, Charles T.; Tufford, Daniel L.; Carbone, Gregory J.; Dow, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    The ability of water-resource managers to adapt to future climatic change is especially challenging in coastal regions of the world. The East Coast of the United States falls into this category given the high number of people living along the Atlantic seaboard and the added strain on resources as populations continue to increase, particularly in the Southeast. Increased temperatures, changes in regional precipitation regimes, and potential increased sea level may have a great impact on existing hydrological systems in the region. The Savannah River originates at the confluence of the Seneca and Tugaloo Rivers, near Hartwell, Ga., and forms the state boundary between South Carolina and Georgia. The J. Strom Thurmond Dam and Lake, located 238 miles upstream from the Atlantic Ocean, is responsible for most of the flow regulation that affects the Savannah River from Augusta, Ga., to the coast. The Savannah Harbor experiences semi-diurnal tides of two low and two high tides in a 24.8-hour period with pronounced differences in tidal range between neap and spring tides occurring on a 14-day and 28-day lunar cycle. Salinity intrusion results from the interaction of three principal forces - streamflow, mean tidal water levels, and tidal range. To analyze, model, and simulate hydrodynamic behaviors at critical coastal streamgages in the Lower Savannah River Estuary, data-mining techniques were applied to over 15 years of hourly streamflow, coastal water-quality, and water-level data. Artificial neural network (ANN) models were trained to learn the variable interactions that cause salinity intrusions. Streamflow data from the 9,850 square-mile Savannah River Basin were input into the model as time-delayed variables. Tidal inputs to the models were obtained by decomposing tidal water-level data into a “periodic” signal of tidal range and a “chaotic” signal of mean water levels. The ANN models were able to convincingly reproduce historical behaviors and generate

  13. Flow and transport in the Suwannee River estuary, Florida, 1999-2000: Analysis of data and three-dimensional simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, Jerad D.; Tomlinson, S.A.; Tillis, Gina

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model was developed to assist in the evaluation of the effects of changes in freshwater flow on the salinity regime of the lower Suwannee River, its estuary, and Suwannee Sound. Hydrodynamic and salt-transport modeling were supported by data from a comprehensive data-collection network operated in the lower Suwannee River during 1998-2000. The study area included all of the downstream-most 12 kilometers of the Suwannee River, Suwannee Sound, and part of the Gulf of Mexico. Development, calibration, and application of the hydrodynamic and salt-transport model were completed by using data primarily collected during October 1999-September 2000.

  14. Contribution of the upper river, the estuarine region, and the adjacent sea to the heavy metal pollution in the Yangtze Estuary.

    PubMed

    Yin, Su; Wu, Yuehan; Xu, Wei; Li, Yangyang; Shen, Zhenyao; Feng, Chenghong

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether the discharge control of heavy metals in the Yangtze River basin can significantly change the pollution level in the estuary, this study analyzed the sources (upper river, the estuarine region, and the adjacent sea) of ten heavy metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Zn) in dissolved and particulate phases in the surface water of the estuary during wet, normal, and dry seasons. Metal sources inferred from section fluxes agree with those in statistical analysis methods. Heavy metal pollution in the surface water of Yangtze Estuary primarily depends on the sediment suspension and the wastewater discharge from estuary cities. Upper river only constitutes the main source of dissolved heavy metals during the wet season, while the estuarine region and the adjacent sea (especially the former) dominate the dissolved metal pollution in the normal and dry seasons. Particulate metals are mainly derived from sediment suspension in the estuary and the adjacent sea, and the contribution of the upper river can be neglected. Compared with the hydrologic seasons, flood-ebb tides exert a more obvious effect on the water flow directions in the estuary. Sediment suspension, not the upper river, significantly affects the suspended particulate matter concentration in the estuary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tracing the origin of the oxygen-consuming organic matter in the hypoxic zone in a large eutrophic estuary: the lower reach of the Pearl River Estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jianzhong; Dai, Minhan; He, Biyan; Wang, Lifang; Gan, Jianping; Guo, Xianghui; Zhao, Huade; Yu, Fengling

    2017-09-01

    We assess the relative contributions of different sources of organic matter, marine vs. terrestrial, to oxygen consumption in an emerging hypoxic zone in the lower Pearl River Estuary (PRE), a large eutrophic estuary located in Southern China. Our cruise, conducted in July 2014, consisted of two legs before and after the passing of Typhoon Rammasun, which completely de-stratified the water column. The stratification recovered rapidly, within 1 day after the typhoon. We observed algal blooms in the upper layer of the water column and hypoxia underneath in bottom water during both legs. Repeat sampling at the initial hypoxic station showed severe oxygen depletion down to 30 µmol kg-1 before the typhoon and a clear drawdown of dissolved oxygen after the typhoon. Based on a three endmember mixing model and the mass balance of dissolved inorganic carbon and its isotopic composition, the δ13C of organic carbon remineralized in the hypoxic zone was -23.2 ± 1.1 ‰. We estimated that 65 ± 16 % of the oxygen-consuming organic matter was derived from marine sources, and the rest (35 ± 16 %) was derived from the continent. In contrast to a recently studied hypoxic zone in the East China Sea off the Changjiang Estuary where marine organic matter dominated oxygen consumption, here terrestrial organic matter significantly contributed to the formation and maintenance of hypoxia. How varying amounts of these organic matter sources drive oxygen consumption has important implications for better understanding hypoxia and its mitigation in bottom waters.

  16. Holocene Sedimentation in the Ångermanälven River Estuary, the northern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotilainen, Aarno; Hyttinen, Outi; Obrochta, Stephen; Andrén, Thomas; Ryabchuk, Daria; Snowball, Ian; IODP Expedition 347 Science Party, The

    2015-04-01

    In the IODP Expedition 347 - "Baltic Sea Paleoenvironment" - two sites in the Ångermanälven River estuary were drilled. Sites M0061 and M0062 are located at about 62°47'N, in an area which was deglaciated ca. 10 ka ago. It has long been known that varve deposition is an ongoing process in Ångermanälven estuary, and that it has continued so several thousand years back in time. It has also been shown that a correlation exists between maximum daily discharge and mean varve thickness at least AD 1901-1971 in the Ångermanälven River (Sander et al. 2002). Studying varve thickness and sediment geochemistry potentially yield estimations on past changes in precipitation and sedimentation processes in the estuary. In this presentation, the preliminary results from site M0062 are shown. The core recovery was approximately 36 m and the sediment sequence was divided into two lithological units (Expedition 347 Scientists, 2014). The lowest Unit 2 (17.09-35.9 mbsf) consists of well-sorted sand, deposited by a (glacio)fluvial system. Unit 1 (0-17.09 mbsf) showed transition from glacial lake varves to brackish marine couplets. The uppermost 18 metres were analysed for grain-size and elemental geochemistry every 0.3-0.5 m. From selected intervals, a 1mm-resolution XRF-scanning of the split core surface was done to compare changes in the relative abundance of light elements. Results from Ångermanälven were compared with measurements from glacial varved sediments, retrieved from the eastern Gulf of Finland. This work is also part of "Climate - ice sheet - sea interactions - evolution of the Baltic Sea Basin over the past 60000 years (CISU)" which is a new joint research project with The Academy of Finland and The Russian Foundation for Basic Research. The CISU project is coordinated by Geological Survey of Finland and the other partners are Helsinki University and A.P. Karpinsky Russian Geological Research Institute (VSEGEI), Russia. The project bases on the IODP Expedition

  17. Estimates of bacterioplankton and Synechococcus spp. mortality from nanoflagellate grazing and viral lysis in the subtropical Danshui River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, An-Yi; Gong, Gwo-Ching; Huang, Yu Wen; Chao, Chien Fu

    2015-02-01

    To better understand picoplankton dynamics in the surface waters of upriver the Danshui River and its estuary, we assessed nanoflagellate-induced and virus-induced mortality of bacteria and Synechococcus spp. during different seasons (October, 2012 and January, April and July, 2013) using a modified dilution technique. Bacteria and viruses were significantly higher in abundance upriver than at the estuary. The distribution of Synechococcus spp. did not follow this spatial pattern. Abundance of Synechococcus spp. was relatively low during the whole sampling period in the upriver region. Furthermore, bacterial mortality resulting from nanoflagellate grazing were generally higher than those resulting from viral lysis in the upriver region, while Synechococcus spp. losses appeared to be mainly due to viral lysis upriver and in the estuary. Our dilution experiments suggested that nanoflagellates largely depend on bacteria as an important energy source there.

  18. Circulation and mixing along the North Passage in the Changjiang River estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Xiang; Shi, John Z.; Hu, Guo-Dong; Xiong, Long-Bing

    2015-08-01

    Simultaneous field observations were made of time series of water level, current velocity, salinity and suspended sediment concentration at ten hydrological gauging stations along the North Passage in the Changjiang River estuary on 17 to 24 February (dry season) and 12 to 18 August 2012 (wet season), respectively. Quantitative analyses of those data are attempted to understand circulation and mixing along the Deepwater Navigational Channel in this estuary. Landward subtidal flow only appears during the neap tide. The maximum bottom landward velocity is in the order of 0.05-0.1 m·s- 1 in the dry season and 0.15-0.2 m·s- 1 in the wet season, respectively. In both dry and wet seasons, calculated mixing parameter (M), which is the ratio of the tidal timescale to the vertical mixing timescale, is below the critical value (1.0) on a neap tide but above it on a spring tide within the middle and lower reaches of the Channel. This suggests that tidal variation of mixing may be able to generate the tidal straining circulation during the periodic stratified spring tide. The interaction between significant river shear flow and longitudinal density gradient, a process termed "river effect" in this study, is revealed as the major reason for seasonal variation of stratification. The competition between tidal stirring, gravitational circulation and river effect could produce an increase in tidal mean value of the potential energy anomaly (ϕ) from neap to spring tides. Tidal mean value of the Simpson number (Si) over a neap tide surpasses the critical value (8.4 × 10- 1) within the middle reach of the Channel, suggesting the occurrence of persistent stratification there. Tidal mean Si over a spring tide is in the order of 8.4 × 10- 1-8.8 × 10- 2 within the middle reach, suggesting the occurrence of strain induced periodic stratification (SIPS). Shear prevails within the pycnocline in the middle and lower reaches of the Channel on a neap tide, with the value of squared shear

  19. Upstream Freshwater and Terrestrial Sources Are Differentially Reflected in the Bacterial Community Structure along a Small Arctic River and Its Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Hauptmann, Aviaja L.; Markussen, Thor N.; Stibal, Marek; Olsen, Nikoline S.; Elberling, Bo; Bælum, Jacob; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Jacobsen, Carsten S.

    2016-01-01

    Glacier melting and altered precipitation patterns influence Arctic freshwater and coastal ecosystems. Arctic rivers are central to Arctic water ecosystems by linking glacier meltwaters and precipitation with the ocean through transport of particulate matter and microorganisms. However, the impact of different water sources on the microbial communities in Arctic rivers and estuaries remains unknown. In this study we used 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to assess a small river and its estuary on the Disko Island, West Greenland (69°N). Samples were taken in August when there is maximum precipitation and temperatures are high in the Disko Bay area. We describe the bacterial community through a river into the estuary, including communities originating in a glacier and a proglacial lake. Our results show that water from the glacier and lake transports distinct communities into the river in terms of diversity and community composition. Bacteria of terrestrial origin were among the dominating OTUs in the main river, while the glacier and lake supplied the river with water containing fewer terrestrial organisms. Also, more psychrophilic taxa were found in the community supplied by the lake. At the river mouth, the presence of dominant bacterial taxa from the lake and glacier was unnoticeable, but these taxa increased their abundances again further into the estuary. On average 23% of the estuary community consisted of indicator OTUs from different sites along the river. Environmental variables showed only weak correlations with community composition, suggesting that hydrology largely influences the observed patterns. PMID:27708629

  20. Sources and seasonal variation of PAHs in the sediments of drinking water reservoirs in Hong Kong and the Dongjiang River (China).

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Fung, Pui Ka; Tse, Man Fung; Hong, Hua Chang; Wong, Ming Hung

    2008-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the sources of the drinking water supply of Hong Kong. The main emphasis was on the Dongjiang River in mainland China which is the major source, supplying 80% of the total consumption in Hong Kong (the remaining 20% is obtained from rain water). Sediments were collected from four sites along the Dongjiang River and four reservoirs in Hong Kong during both the dry and wet weather seasons. The concentrations of total PAHs in the sediments ranged between 36 and 539 microg/kg dry wt. The lower levels were detected at the upstream site on the Dongjiang River and at the reservoirs in Hong Kong (44-85 microg/kg dry wt), while the mid- and downstream sites on the Dongjiang River were more polluted (588-658 microg/kg dry wt). Examination of the PAH profiles revealed that the mid- and downstream sections of the Dongjiang River contained high percentages of 4,5,6-ring PAHs, similar to the amounts of atmospheric particulate matter and road dust collected during the dry weather season from the Pearl River Delta region as reported in the literature. Seasonal changes were revealed in the reservoirs of Hong Kong, with higher PAH levels in the wet weather season than in the dry weather season. For those reservoirs in Hong Kong that store water from the Dongjiang River, a distinct seasonal pattern was also observed, namely, that under dry weather season conditions the PAHs found in the sediments were primarily from petrogenic source, while under wet weather season conditions they were from pyrolytic sources. No such pattern was detected in the reservoirs which stored only rain water.

  1. Spatial-temporal variations of phosphorus fractions in surface water and suspended particles in the Daliao River Estuary, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Qin, Yanwen; Han, Chaonan; Cao, Wei; Ma, Yingqun; Shi, Yao; Liu, Zhichao; Yang, Chenchen

    2016-08-01

    The transport and storage of phosphorus in estuary is a complex biogeochemical process as the result of the convergence of fresh and saline water. The objective of the current study is to investigate the spatial-temporal variations of phosphorus fractions in surface water and suspended particles of Daliao River Estuary, China. Samples were collected in August (wet season) and November (dry season), 2013. The results showed that total particulate phosphorus (TPP) in water accounted for more than 50 % of the total phosphorus (TP). Meanwhile, in suspended particles, more than 62 % of particulate phosphorus was in the form of bioavailable phosphorus, including exchangeable phosphorus (Exc-P), extractable organic phosphorus (Exo-P), and iron-bound phosphorus (Fe-P), which meant that the potential impacts of bioavailable phosphorus in suspended particles on estuarine water environment cannot be ignored. There were significantly seasonal variations of phosphorus fractions in the Daliao River Estuary. The concentrations of phosphorus fractions in water in wet season were much lower than that in dry season because of the dilution effect of larger rainfall in wet season. In addition, spatial distribution characteristics of phosphorus fractions were also obvious. Due to terrigenous phosphorus input from the upstream of tidal reach and seawater dilution effect in coastal estuary, total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentrations in water gradually decreased from tidal reach to coastal estuary. However, the concentrations of TPP and TP in water and Exo-P in suspended particles presented spatial fluctuation, and these were greatly attributed to sediment re-suspension in coastal estuary.

  2. Application of Bayesian structural equation modeling for examining phytoplankton dynamics in the Neuse River Estuary (North Carolina, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhonditsis, G. B.; Paerl, H. W.; Valdes-Weaver, L. M.; Stow, C. A.; Steinberg, L. J.; Reckhow, K. H.

    2007-03-01

    We introduce a Bayesian structural equation modeling framework to explore the spatiotemporal phytoplankton community patterns in the Neuse River Estuary (study period 1995-2001). The initial hypothesized model considered the influence of the physical environment (flow, salinity, and light availability), nitrogen (dissolved oxidized inorganic nitrogen, and total dissolved inorganic nitrogen), and temperature on total phytoplankton biomass and phytoplankton community structure. Generally, the model gave plausible results and enabled the identification of the longitudinal role of the abiotic factors on the observed phytoplankton dynamics. River flow fluctuations and the resulting salinity and light availability changes (physical environment) dominate the up-estuary processes and loosen the coupling between nitrogen and phytoplankton. Further insights into the phytoplankton community response were provided by the positive path coefficients between the physical environment and diatoms, chlorophytes, and cryptophytes in the down-estuary sections. The latter finding supports an earlier hypothesis that these three groups dominate the phytoplankton community during high freshwater conditions as a result of their faster nutrient uptake and growth rates and their tolerance on low salinity conditions. The relationship between dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations and phytoplankton community becomes more apparent as we move to the down-estuary sections. A categorization of the phytoplankton community into cyanobacteria, dinoflagellates and an assemblage that consists of diatoms, chlorophytes, and cryptophytes provided the best results in the upper and middle segments of the estuary. Finally, the optimal down-estuary grouping aggregates diatoms and chlorophytes, lumps together dinoflagellates with cryptophytes, while cyanobacteria are treated separately. These structural shifts in the temporal phytoplankton community patterns probably result from combined bottom-up and top

  3. Using circulating reproductive hormones for sex determination of Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus) in the Saco River estuary, Maine.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Carolyn R; Novak, Ashleigh J; Wippelhauser, Gail S; Sulikowski, James A

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus) is a long-lived, anadromous fish species ranging from Labrador, CA to Florida, USA. In the Saco River, located in the Gulf of Maine, this species was not present during a survey study ending in 1982, but was found inhabiting the estuary in 2007. Although the reason for the return of this sturgeon to this river system remains unknown, research on basic life-history information is necessary to facilitate the conservation of this federally protected species. Given the conservation status of the species, the present study used circulating sex steroid hormones to determine the sex of 288 Atlantic sturgeon captured between 2012 and 2014 in the Saco River estuary located in the Gulf of Maine. Overall, the sex was determined for 93% of Atlantic sturgeon sampled. Mean hormone values were similar to other Atlantic sturgeon reproductive studies. The findings indicate the validity of sex steroid hormones as a singular method for sex determination in wild Atlantic sturgeon. Results also indicated a likely 1:1 (male:female) sex ratio in the system, except in 2014 when a 1:3 ratio was observed. It is not believed that the Saco River estuary is used for spawning, as several impassable dams block access to spawning habitat. However, this area might provide crucial foraging for growth and development of juveniles and a habitat for adults forgoing spawning.

  4. Distribution and source identification of trace metals in the sediment of Yellow River Estuary and the adjacent Laizhou Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Ling, Min; Liu, Ru-hai; Yu, Ping; Tang, Ai-kun; Luo, Xian-xiang; Ma, Qimin

    2017-02-01

    Rapid economic development in the Yellow River basin has inevitably resulted in increase of pollution in the estuary, and concern for both the environment and protection against pollutants is increasing. Contents of trace metals (Cu, Pb Zn, Cr, Cd, As, Hg), Fe, Al, total organic carbon (TOC), and their granulometry were determined in surface sediment samples from the Yellow River estuary and its adjacent areas. Metal contents were significantly correlated each other. Clay, TOC and heavy metal contents showed similar distribution characteristics, with concentrations increased from the land to the sea. The distribution of grain size plays an important role in influencing the distribution of trace metals. Heavy metal concentrations showed a significant relationship with Fe and Al content, while most heavy metals were not enriched. These results were also confirmed by the analysis of enrichment factors and principal component analysis of the metals. The metal content of the Yellow River Estuary sediments was similar to the content observed 20 years ago, but the concentrations of most metals in Laizhou Bay decreased. The decrease in the carrying sediment of the Yellow River might be responsible for this pattern.

  5. A comparison of congeneric PCB patterns in American eels and striped bass from the Hudson and Delaware River estuaries.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Jeffrey T F; Horwitz, Richard; Steinbacher, Joseph C; Ruppel, Bruce

    2003-10-01

    The Hudson River estuary has enormous spatial variation in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination due in large part to historical point source discharges above Troy Dam. The Delaware River estuary has accumulated significant levels of PCBs through decades of industrial, municipal, and non-point source inputs. The overall goal of this research was to use existing data sets to compare and contrast the patterns of accumulated PCB congeners in sub-populations of American eels and striped bass inhabiting these two estuaries and surrounding coastal waters. Using principal component analysis and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), inter- and intra-estuarine differences in accumulated congeneric patterns were denoted for both species. Results from our study support the idea that migratory behaviors of striped bass hamper the use of accumulated congener-specific PCB patterns in providing information on localized contamination, although major regional differences were seen between upriver Hudson River fish, downriver Hudson River fish and fish from other areas within this study. This study provides additional evidence for the use of the American eel as a biomonitoring tool, since its limited home range provides finer resolution of regional contamination.

  6. Tracking lead origin in the Yellow River Estuary and nearby Bohai Sea based on its isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ning-jing; Huang, Peng; Liu, Ji-hua; Shi, Xue-fa; Ma, De-yi; Zhu, Ai-mei; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Hui; He, Lian-hua

    2015-09-01

    The Pb concentration and Pb isotopes (204Pb, 206Pb, 207Pb, and 208Pb) in surface sediments from the Yellow River Estuary and nearby Bohai Sea have been determined to investigate the Pb sources in this area. Results showed that Pb in the Yellow River Estuary and northern Laizhou Bay (YRE-NL) sediments was mainly from the Yellow River catchment as a consequence of lithogenic sediments (from rock weathering) accumulation. However, Pb in the coastal area of southern Laizhou Bay (CSLB) sediments was from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Sewage discharged near the Mihe mouth of the CSLB did not extend further to the middle and outer shelves because of the current in Laizhou Bay. The total Pb concentration varied from 14.5 to 30.4 μg/g with an average concentration of 20.1 ± 4.2 μg/g. Thus, significant Pb pollution was not observed in the Yellow River Estuary and nearby Bohai Sea. However, Pb contamination in some sites was indicated by Pb isotope ratios.

  7. Discharge-measurement system using an acoustic Doppler current profiler with applications to large rivers and estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.

    1993-01-01

    Discharge measurement of large rivers and estuaries is difficult, time consuming, and sometimes dangerous. Frequently, discharge measurements cannot be made in tide-affected rivers and estuaries using conventional discharge-measurement techniques because of dynamic discharge conditions. The acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system (ADDMS) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey using a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler coupled with specialized computer software to measure horizontal water velocity at 1-meter vertical intervals in the water column. The system computes discharge from water-and vessel-velocity data supplied by the ADDMS using vector-algebra algorithms included in the discharge-measurement software. With this system, a discharge measurement can be obtained by engaging the computer software and traversing a river or estuary from bank to bank; discharge in parts of the river or estuarine cross sections that cannot be measured because of ADDMS depth limitations are estimated by the system. Comparisons of ADDMS-measured discharges with ultrasonic-velocity-meter-measured discharges, along with error-analysis data, have confirmed that discharges provided by the ADDMS are at least as accurate as those produced using conventional methods. In addition, the advantage of a much shorter measurement time (2 minutes using the ADDMS compared with 1 hour or longer using conventional methods) has enabled use of the ADDMS for several applications where conventional discharge methods could not have been used with the required accuracy because of dynamic discharge conditions.

  8. Using circulating reproductive hormones for sex determination of Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus) in the Saco River estuary, Maine

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Carolyn R.; Novak, Ashleigh J.; Wippelhauser, Gail S.; Sulikowski, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus) is a long-lived, anadromous fish species ranging from Labrador, CA to Florida, USA. In the Saco River, located in the Gulf of Maine, this species was not present during a survey study ending in 1982, but was found inhabiting the estuary in 2007. Although the reason for the return of this sturgeon to this river system remains unknown, research on basic life-history information is necessary to facilitate the conservation of this federally protected species. Given the conservation status of the species, the present study used circulating sex steroid hormones to determine the sex of 288 Atlantic sturgeon captured between 2012 and 2014 in the Saco River estuary located in the Gulf of Maine. Overall, the sex was determined for 93% of Atlantic sturgeon sampled. Mean hormone values were similar to other Atlantic sturgeon reproductive studies. The findings indicate the validity of sex steroid hormones as a singular method for sex determination in wild Atlantic sturgeon. Results also indicated a likely 1:1 (male:female) sex ratio in the system, except in 2014 when a 1:3 ratio was observed. It is not believed that the Saco River estuary is used for spawning, as several impassable dams block access to spawning habitat. However, this area might provide crucial foraging for growth and development of juveniles and a habitat for adults forgoing spawning. PMID:27957335

  9. Picophytoplankton: A major contributor to planktonic biomass and primary production in a eutrophic, river-dominated estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaulke, Alicia K.; Wetz, Michael S.; Paerl, Hans W.

    2010-11-01

    Biomass and primary productivity of picophytoplankton (PP; phytoplankton <3 μm) and larger phytoplankton (>3 μm) were determined during an annual cycle along the salinity gradient in North Carolina's Neuse River Estuary (NRE), a eutrophic, microtidal estuary. The PP were a major component of total phytoplankton biomass and productivity, contributing ˜35-44% of the total chlorophyll a (Chl a) and 42-55% of the total primary productivity. Chl a and productivity of PP decreased from the upper to lower estuary, although the PP contribution relative to larger phytoplankton remained nearly constant. Significant PP growth occurred in the spring, but PP productivity and biomass were maximal in summer. PP productivity and biomass were positively correlated with temperature and dissolved inorganic phosphorus concentrations, which were maximal in summer due to release from sediments. Biomass and productivity of PP and >3 μm phytoplankton were also positively correlated, suggesting that growth conditions favoring the onset of blooms of larger phytoplankton species will similarly affect PP. High PP productivity and biomass in the NRE support the notion that PP play an important role in the production and eutrophication potentials of this estuary. High PP productivity and biomass have been noted in several other temperate estuaries, all sharing a common feature with the NRE—long residence time. These findings challenge the assumption that PP relative importance should be minimal in eutrophic systems.

  10. Soil phosphorus forms and profile distributions in the tidal river network region in the Yellow River Delta estuary.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junbao; Qu, Fanzhu; Wu, Huifeng; Meng, Ling; Du, Siyao; Xie, Baohua

    2014-01-01

    Modified Hedley fraction method was used to study the forms and profile distribution in the tidal river network region subjected to rapid deposition and hydrologic disturbance in the Yellow River Delta (YRD) estuary, eastern China. The results showed that the total P (Pt) ranged from 612.1 to 657.8 mg kg(-1). Dilute HCl extractable inorganic P (Pi) was the predominant form in all profiles, both as absolute values and as a percentage of total extracted Pi. The NaOH extractable organic P (Po) was the predominant form of total extracted Po, while Bicarb-Pi and C.HCl-Po were the lowest fractions of total extracted Pi and Po in all the P forms. The Resin-P concentrations were high in the top soil layer and decreased with depth. The Pearson correlation matrix indicated that Resin-P, Bicarb-Pi, NaOH-Pi, and C.HCl-Pi were strongly positively correlated with salinity, TOC, Ca, Al, and Fe but negatively correlated with pH. The significant correlation of any studied form of organic P (Bicarb-Po, NaOH-Po, and C.HCl-Po) with geochemical properties were not observed in the study. Duncan multiple-range test indicated that the P forms and distribution heterogeneity in the profiles could be attributed to the influences of vegetation cover and hydrologic disturbance.

  11. Soil Phosphorus Forms and Profile Distributions in the Tidal River Network Region in the Yellow River Delta Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Junbao; Qu, Fanzhu; Wu, Huifeng; Meng, Ling; Du, Siyao; Xie, Baohua

    2014-01-01

    Modified Hedley fraction method was used to study the forms and profile distribution in the tidal river network region subjected to rapid deposition and hydrologic disturbance in the Yellow River Delta (YRD) estuary, eastern China. The results showed that the total P (Pt) ranged from 612.1 to 657.8 mg kg−1. Dilute HCl extractable inorganic P (Pi) was the predominant form in all profiles, both as absolute values and as a percentage of total extracted Pi. The NaOH extractable organic P (Po) was the predominant form of total extracted Po, while Bicarb-Pi and C.HCl-Po were the lowest fractions of total extracted Pi and Po in all the P forms. The Resin-P concentrations were high in the top soil layer and decreased with depth. The Pearson correlation matrix indicated that Resin-P, Bicarb-Pi, NaOH-Pi, and C.HCl-Pi were strongly positively correlated with salinity, TOC, Ca, Al, and Fe but negatively correlated with pH. The significant correlation of any studied form of organic P (Bicarb-Po, NaOH-Po, and C.HCl-Po) with geochemical properties were not observed in the study. Duncan multiple-range test indicated that the P forms and distribution heterogeneity in the profiles could be attributed to the influences of vegetation cover and hydrologic disturbance. PMID:24971393

  12. SOURCES AND TRANSFORMATIONS OF NITROGEN, CARBON, AND PHOSPHORUS IN THE POTOMAC RIVER ESTUARY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennino, M. J.; Kaushal, S.

    2009-12-01

    downstream. Ecological stoichiometric ratios along the river indicate increases in C/N ratios downstream, but no corresponding trend with C/P ratios. The N/P ratios increased directly below the treatment plant and then decreased gradually downstream. The C/N/P ratios remained level until the last two sampling stations within 20 miles of the Chesapeake Bay, where there is a large increase. Despite large inputs, there may be large variations in sources and ecological stoichiometry along rivers and estuaries, and knowledge of these transformations will be important in predicting changes in the amounts, forms, and stoichiometry of nutrient loads to coastal waters.

  13. Delineation of the sources and sinks of heterogeneously distributed methane in the Pearl River and its estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Xie, W.; Wei, Y.; Zhang, C.

    2013-12-01

    Methane in low temperature environments is mostly produced by methanogens. Sharp decrease in methane concentration has been observed from freshwater to marine water in coastal regions. The goal of this study was to delineate the sources and sinks of methane from the lower Pearl River (including, North, West, and East segments) and its estuary along a salinity gradient (0.0 % to 3.4%). Methane concentration in lower Pearl River ranged from 50.1 to 10578 nmol L-1 in the winter (average = 565.5 × 1464.9 nmol L-1) and from 38.4 to 974.1 nmol L-1 in the summer (average = 179.6 × 165.7 nmol L-1). In the estuary, however, methane concentration was 5-10 folds lower in winter and 3-8 folds lower in summer. The sea-to-air methane flux was also much higher in the fresh water (3159.6 umol/d.m2) than in the estuary (528.1 umol/d.m2). Abnormally high methane concentrations and methane flux in the East Pearl River appear to be associated with effluents of industrial or municipal wastes. DNA sequencing of the archaeal 16S rRNA gene indicates predominance of methanogens in the freshwater and their disappearance in the estuary. This is supported by the archaeal lipoid analysis, which showed the predominance of archaeol and caldarchaeol that characterize the methanogens. It is unknown, however, how aerobic (bacteria) and anerobic (archaea) methanotrophs may be involved in the oxidation of methane in the estuary environment where methane consumption is apparently occurring.

  14. Application of cluster analysis to the geochemistry zonation of the estuary waters in the Tinto and Odiel rivers (Huelva, Spain).

    PubMed

    Grande, José Antonio; Borrego, José; de la Torre, Maria Luisa; Sáinz, A

    2003-06-01

    The combination of acid water from mines, industrial effluents and sea water plays a determining role in the evolutionary process of the chemical makeup of the water in the estuary of the Tinto and Odiel rivers. This estuary is in the southwest of the Iberian Peninsula and is one of the estuarine systems on the northwest coast of the Gulf of Cádiz. From the statistical treatment of data obtained by analyzing samples of water from this system, which is affected by industrial and mining pollution processes, we can see how the sampling points studied form two large groups depending on whether they receive tidal or fluvial influences. Fluvial input contributes acid water with high concentrations of heavy metal, whereas industrial effluents are responsible for the presence of phosphates, silica and other nutrients. The estuarine system of the Tinto and Odiel Rivers can be divided into three areas--the Tinto estuary, the Odiel estuary and the area of confluence--based on the physical--chemical characteristics of the water.

  15. Great earthquakes and tsunamis of the past 2000 years at the Salmon River estuary, central Oregon coast, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, A.R.; Asquith, A.C.; Grant, W.C.

    2004-01-01

    Four buried tidal marsh soils at a protected inlet near the mouth of the Salmon River yield definitive to equivocal evidence for coseismic subsidence and burial by tsunami-deposited sand during great earthquakes at the Cascadia subduction zone. An extensive, landward-tapering sheet of sand overlies a peaty tidal-marsh soil over much of the lower estuary. Limited pollen and macrofossil data suggest that the soil suddenly subsided 0.3-1.0 m shortly before burial. Regional correlation of similar soils at tens of estuaries to the north and south and precise 14C ages from one Salmon River site imply that the youngest soil subsided during the great earthquake of 26 January A.D. 1700. Evidence for sudden subsidence of three older soils during great earthquakes is more equivocal because older-soil stratigraphy can be explained by local hydrographic changes in the estuary. Regional 14C correlation of two of the three older soils with soils at sites that better meet criteria for a great-earthquake origin is consistent with the older soils recording subsidence and tsunamis during at least two great earthquakes. Pollen evidence of sudden coseismic subsidence from the older soils is inconclusive, probably because the amount of subsidence was small (<0.5 m). The shallow depths of the older soils yield rates of relative sea-level rise substantially less than rates previously calculated for Oregon estuaries.

  16. Shallow Sediment Trace Metal Concentrations and Short-Term Accumulation Rates in the Neponset River Estuary, Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, J. R.; Zhu, J.; Olsen, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    The Neponset River estuary is a small estuary that drains into the Boston Harbor on the east coast of the United States. It is also a highly urbanized estuary and has a long history of urban development over 450 years. In July 2006, six sediment cores were collected in the Neponset River estuary to examine particle dynamics and sediment accumulation via radionuclide (Beryllium-7) dating, and to determine sediment metal concentrations (As, Cu, Pb, and Zn) via ED-XRF measurements. Measured sediment Be-7 profiles indicate various sedimentation environments, where sediment accumulation, resuspension or redeposition is likely to occur. High metal concentrations were often corresponding to high Be-7 inventories in sediment cores. Possible sources of trace metal contaminants in the water column include: storm water run-off, Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), a well-documented industrial pollution event that occurred upstream in the early to mid twentieth century, and the resuspension of sediment. Existing and future data will provide baseline information for quantifying the effects of the proposed and pending environmental restoration project, which includes the removal of the Baker Dam. The combined pre- and post-Dam removal data may then be used in cost-benefit analyses for other similar estuarine restoration projects.

  17. A Numerical Modeling Study of Mesodinium Bloom Formation and Retention in a River-Dominated Mesotidal Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitz, Y. H.; Cervantes, B.

    2016-02-01

    The Columbia River estuary experiences extensive seasonal red-colored blooms caused by a mixotrophic ciliate of the genus Mesodinium. Although the blooms are non-toxic, they have a significant influence on the levels of nutrients, light and oxygen in the estuary. Mesodinium spp. displays very particular physiology that makes it one of few planktonic species able to thrive in a highly flushed system: a high growth rate due to its ability to photosynthesize using the photosynthetic organelles of its preys, and complex vertical migration patterns. Knowledge of the migration pattern is based on limited observations of Mesodinium behavior in culture and recent in-situ measurements collected in the Columbia River estuary. A more comprehensive understanding is needed of the mechanisms allowing Mesodin