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Sample records for kontrolya oborudovaniya aehs

  1. Use widefield Lenses for Space Surveillance System (Ispolzovaniye shirokopol'nykh linzovykh ob'ektivov dla kontrolya kosmicheskogo prostranstva, on Russian)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, P. P.; Volkov, S. K.; Karpenko, G. F.

    On the basis of our observation results, it is shown that widefield optics can be used for the monitoring of high-orbital artificial Earth's satellite (GSS, HEO) with the aim of their orbital determination. With the widefield lens optics "Tair-19" 500/3, at a limited magnitude of 15.5m in an accumulation time of per 10 sec, the ASE (average square error) for the coordinate measurements in the case of GSS does not exceed 2 arcsec. For about 90 % measurements, the ASE is less than 1 arcsec. All of active 46 catalogued GSS with declinations less than 2.5° were detected during the survey from 10°E to 37°W (the zone width was 5° and area was 500 square deg. The possibility to use wide-field optics for the monitoring of LEO with altitudes up to 2 000 km is shown. Among the 39 objects observed during 1 hour in the "beam-park" mode with a FOV=30°×30° the 35 objects were identified in the NORAD catalog.

  2. About using wide lens field optics for observations artificial satellites and space surveillance (O primenenii shirokopol'nykh linzovykh ob"yektivov dlya zadach kontrolya kosmicheskogo prostranstva, on Russian)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, P. P.; Volkov, S. K.; Karpenko, G. F.; Gubin, E. G.; Titenko, V. V.; Yamnitsky, V. A.; Tkachenko, A. A.

    On base results of the observations in Odessa astronomical observatory (Ukraine), is shown. The possibility of the using domestic wide field lens optics for monitoring high orbital objects. With wide field lens optics "Tair-19 5003", limited mag = 15m.5 per 10 seconds of the accumulation, average square-error (ASE) of the measurements of the coordinates slowly moving GSS not more than 2 arcsec. About 90% measurements has ASE less 1 arcsec. At surveillance of the area of the equator by width 5° areas 500 square deg. are discovered 46 active GSS, 12 passive GSS and 2 high elliptical orbital satellites (HEO). Is shown perspective possibility of the use WFO for monitoring LEO height before of 2 000 km. 90% of 39 objects LEO fixed in mode "beam-park" in current 1 hour, surely are identified using catalog NORAD.

  3. Risk Factors for Acute and Early HIV Infection Among Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM) in San Diego, 2008 to 2014: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hoenigl, Martin; Green, Nella; Mehta, Sanjay R; Little, Susan J

    2015-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify risk factors associated with acute and early HIV infection (AEH) among men who have sex with men (MSM) undergoing community HIV testing and to compare demographics in those diagnosed with AEH with those diagnosed at chronic stage of HIV infection.In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed risk factors associated with AEH among 8925 unique MSM (including 200 with AEH [2.2%] and 219 [2.5%] with newly diagnosed chronic HIV infection) undergoing community-based, confidential AEH screening in San Diego, California.The combination of condomless receptive anal intercourse (CRAI) plus ≥5 male partners, CRAI with an HIV-positive male, CRAI with a person who injects drugs, and prior syphilis diagnosis were significant predictors of AEH in the multivariable Cox regression model. Individuals reporting ≥1 of these 4 risk factors had a hazard ratio of 4.6 for AEH. MSM diagnosed with AEH differed in race (P = 0.005; more reported white race [P = 0.001], less black race [P = 0.030], trend toward less Native American race [P = 0.061]), when compared to those diagnosed with chronic HIV infection, while there was no difference observed regarding age.We established a multivariate model for the predicting risk of AEH infection in a cohort of MSM undergoing community HIV screening, which could be potentially used to discern those in need of further HIV nucleic acid amplification testing for community screening programs that do not test routinely for AEH. In addition, we found that race differed between those diagnosed with AEH and those diagnosed at chronic stage of HIV infection underlining the need for interventions that reduce stigma and promote the uptake of HIV testing for black MSM.

  4. Real-world impact of neurocognitive deficits in acute and early HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Katie L; Morgan, Erin E; Morris, Sheldon; Smith, Davey M; Little, Susan; Iudicello, Jennifer E; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Moore, David J; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L; Woods, Steven Paul

    2013-12-01

    The acute and early period of HIV-1 infection (AEH) is characterized by neuroinflammatory and immunopathogenic processes that can alter the integrity of neural systems and neurocognitive functions. However, the extent to which central nervous system changes in AEH confer increased risk of real-world functioning (RWF) problems is not known. In the present study, 34 individuals with AEH and 39 seronegative comparison participants completed standardized neuromedical, psychiatric, and neurocognitive research evaluations, alongside a comprehensive assessment of RWF that included cognitive symptoms in daily life, basic and instrumental activities of daily living, clinician-rated global functioning, and employment. Results showed that AEH was associated with a significantly increased risk of dependence in RWF, which was particularly elevated among AEH persons with global neurocognitive impairment (NCI). Among those with AEH, NCI (i.e., deficits in learning and information processing speed), mood disorders (i.e., Bipolar Disorder), and substance dependence (e.g., methamphetamine dependence) were all independently predictive of RWF dependence. Findings suggest that neurocognitively impaired individuals with AEH are at notably elevated risk of clinically significant challenges in normal daily functioning. Screening for neurocognitive, mood, and substance use disorders in AEH may facilitate identification of individuals at high risk of functional dependence who may benefit from psychological and medical strategies to manage their neuropsychiatric conditions.

  5. Adult Education for the Homeless: A Program in Jeopardy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education and Literacy.

    During its 8-year history, the federal Adult Education for the Homeless Program (AEH) pioneered new methods of service to adults in need and benefited over 320,000 homeless adults and families. Despite an evaluation that documented program success, funding was rescinded from the 1995 federal budget and never reinstated. AEH programs developed the…

  6. Real-World Impact of Neurocognitive Deficits in Acute and Early HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Katie L.; Morgan, Erin E.; Morris, Sheldon; Smith, Davey M.; Little, Susan; Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Moore, David J.; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.; Woods, Steven Paul

    2013-01-01

    The acute and early period of HIV-1 infection (AEH) is characterized by neuroinflammatory and immunopathogenic processes that can alter the integrity of neural systems and neurocognitive functions. However, the extent to which central nervous system changes in AEH confer increased risk of real-world functioning (RWF) problems is not known. In the present study, 34 individuals with AEH and 39 seronegative comparison participants completed standardized neuromedical, psychiatric, and neurocognitive research evaluations, alongside a comprehensive assessment of RWF that included cognitive symptoms in daily life, basic and instrumental activities of daily living, clinician-rated global functioning, and employment. Results showed that AEH was associated with a significantly increased risk of dependence in RWF, which was particularly elevated among AEH persons with global neurocognitive impairment (NCI). Among those with AEH, NCI (i.e., deficits in learning and information processing speed), mood disorders (i.e., Bipolar Disorder), and substance dependence (e.g., methamphetamine dependence) were all independently predictive of RWF dependence. Findings suggest that neurocognitively impaired individuals with AEH are at notably elevated risk of clinically significant challenges in normal daily functioning. Screening for neurocognitive, mood, and substance use disorders in AEH may facilitate identification of individuals at high risk of functional dependence who may benefit from psychological and medical strategies to manage their neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:24277439

  7. Adaptive Learning Resources Sequencing in Educational Hypermedia Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karampiperis, Pythagoras; Sampson, Demetrios

    2005-01-01

    Adaptive learning resources selection and sequencing is recognized as among the most interesting research questions in adaptive educational hypermedia systems (AEHS). In order to adaptively select and sequence learning resources in AEHS, the definition of adaptation rules contained in the Adaptation Model, is required. Although, some efforts have…

  8. Contributed Review: Recent developments in acoustic energy harvesting for autonomous wireless sensor nodes applications.

    PubMed

    Khan, Farid Ullah; Khattak, Muhammad Umair

    2016-02-01

    Rapid developments in micro electronics, micro fabrication, ultra-large scale of integration, ultra-low power sensors, and wireless technology have greatly reduced the power consumption requirements of wireless sensor nodes (WSNs) and make it possible to operate these devices with energy harvesters. Likewise, other energy harvesters, acoustic energy harvesters (AEHs), have been developed and are gaining swift interest in last few years. This paper presents a review of AEHs reported in the literature for the applications of WSNs. Based on transduction mechanism, there are two types of AEHs: piezoelectric acoustic energy harvesters (PEAEHs) and electromagnetic acoustic energy harvesters (EMAEHs). The reported AEHs are mostly characterized under the sound pressure level (SPL) that ranges from 45 to 161 dB. The range for resonant frequency of the produced AEHs is from 146 Hz to 24 kHz and these produced 0.68 × 10(-6) μW to 30 mW power. The maximum power (30 mW) is produced by a PEAEH, when the harvester is subjected to a SPL of 161 dB and 2.64 kHz frequency. However, for EMAEHs, the maximum power reported is about 1.96 mW (at 125 dB and 143 Hz). Under the comparable SPLs, the power production by the reported EMAEHs is relatively better than that of PEAEHs, moreover, due to lower resonant frequency, the EMAEHs are more feasible for the low frequency band acoustical environment. PMID:26931827

  9. In vitro synergistic effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa aqueous extract in combination with standard antibiotics against Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sherif T S; Berchová, Kateřina; Majerová, Michaela; Pokorná, Marie; Švajdlenka, Emil

    2016-09-01

    Context The increasing problem of drug-resistant strains has led to the failure of current treatment regimens of Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection. Recently, a new treatment strategy has been developed to overcome the problem by using natural products in combination with antibiotics to enhance the treatment efficacy. Objective The antimicrobial combinatory effect of the aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae) (AEHS) with antibiotics (clarithromycin, CLA; amoxicillin, AMX; metronidazole, MTZ) has been evaluated in vitro against HP strains. Materials and methods Hibiscus calyces (35 g) were brewed in 250 mL of boiled water for 30 min, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by agar dilution method. The checkerboard assay was used to evaluate the antimicrobial combinatory effect according to the sum of fractional inhibitory concentration (∑FIC) indices. Results In this study, AEHS exerted remarkable bacteriostatic effect against all HP strains tested with MICs values ranging from 9.18 to 16.68 μg/mL. Synergy effect of AEHS with CLA or MTZ was obtained against four of seven HP strains tested with ∑FIC ranging from 0.21 to 0.39. The additive effect of AEHS with AMX was obtained against five of seven HP strains tested with ∑FIC ranging from 0.61 to 0.91. Conclusion This study presents AEHS as a potent therapeutic candidate alone, or in combination with antibiotics for the treatment of HP infection. PMID:26731378

  10. Expression and characterization of hyperthermostable exo-polygalacturonase TtGH28 from Thermotoga thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene TtGH28 encoding a putative GH28 polygalacturonase from Pseudothermotoga thermarum DSM 5069 (Theth_0397, NCBI# AEH50492.1) was synthesized, expressed in E. coli, and characterized. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of gene product TtGH28 with other GH28 proteins whose structures and detai...

  11. Patterns in Authoring of Adaptive Educational Hypermedia: A Taxonomy of Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Elizabeth; Cristea, Alexandra; Stewart, Craig; Brailsford, Tim

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the use of adaptation patterns in the task of formulating standards for adaptive educational hypermedia (AEH) systems that is currently under investigation by the EU ADAPT project. Within this project, design dimensions for high granularity patterns have been established. In this paper we focus on detailing lower granularity…

  12. Learning To Hope: A Study of the Adult Education for the Homeless Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, Darrel; Koloski, Judy

    A comprehensive study of the Adult Education for the Homeless Program (AEH) was conducted using data from the following sources: program files; focus groups conducted with state project administrators; site visits to 9 local programs in 3 states; surveys of 32 state projects, 230 local programs, 588 service delivery sites, and 2,943 program…

  13. 76 FR 4692 - Notice of Receipt of Requests To Voluntarily Cancel Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... salt; 2,4-D, dimethylamine salt. 000270-00319 AEH Super Concentrate Glufosinate. Weed, Grass and Brush...- Ferrous sulfate 2-4. monohydrate. 008660-00248 Lawn Food 10-4-6 Plus Ferrous sulfate Moss Killer... Facility's normal hours of operation (8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal...

  14. Non-traumatic spontaneous acute epidural hematoma in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Serarslan, Yurdal; Aras, Mustafa; Altaş, Murat; Kaya, Hasan; Urfalı, Boran

    2014-01-01

    A 19-year-old female with sickle cell anemia (SCD) was referred to our hospital after two days of hospitalization at another hospital for a headache crisis. This headache crisis was due to a raised intracranial pressure; these symptoms were noted and included in her comprehensive list of symptoms. There was an acute drop in the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. The cranial CT scan demonstrated a left fronto-parietal acute epidural hematoma (AEH) and a calvarial bone expansion, which was suggestive of medullary hematopoiesis. The patient underwent emergent craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma. There were no abnormal findings intra-operatively apart from the AEH, except skull thickening and active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries. Repeated CT scan showed a complete evacuation of the hematoma. The possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms were discussed. In addition to the factors mentioned in the relevant literature, any active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries on the separated surface of the dura from the skull could have contributed to the expanding of the AEH in our patient. Neurosurgeons and other health care providers should be aware of spontaneous AEH in patients with SCD.

  15. Non-traumatic spontaneous acute epidural hematoma in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Serarslan, Yurdal; Aras, Mustafa; Altaş, Murat; Kaya, Hasan; Urfalı, Boran

    2014-01-01

    A 19-year-old female with sickle cell anemia (SCD) was referred to our hospital after two days of hospitalization at another hospital for a headache crisis. This headache crisis was due to a raised intracranial pressure; these symptoms were noted and included in her comprehensive list of symptoms. There was an acute drop in the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. The cranial CT scan demonstrated a left fronto-parietal acute epidural hematoma (AEH) and a calvarial bone expansion, which was suggestive of medullary hematopoiesis. The patient underwent emergent craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma. There were no abnormal findings intra-operatively apart from the AEH, except skull thickening and active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries. Repeated CT scan showed a complete evacuation of the hematoma. The possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms were discussed. In addition to the factors mentioned in the relevant literature, any active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries on the separated surface of the dura from the skull could have contributed to the expanding of the AEH in our patient. Neurosurgeons and other health care providers should be aware of spontaneous AEH in patients with SCD. PMID:24447643

  16. Mechanisms Involved in Toxicity of Liver Caused by Piroxicam in Mice and Protective Effects of Leaf Extract of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L.

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Piroxicam is one of the important therapeutic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory class of drugs used mainly to suppress pain and inflammation in arthritis and other musculoskeletal disorders. Besides being anti-inflammatory, these drugs are analgesic and antipyretic often used for the relief of nonspecific fever condition. Recently, piroxicam has also gained attention as an effective therapy for tumors, colorectal, and invasive bladder cancers. The objective of the current study is to evaluate the protective effects of the alcoholic leaf extract of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis (AEH), Malvaceae, against piroxicam-induced toxicity in mice. Sixty adult Swiss albino mice (Mus musculus) were divided into four groups (n = 10), which included a control group, a group treated orally with AEH (30 mg kg−1 b.w.) for 15 days, a group treated orally with piroxicam (6.6 mg kg−1 b.w.) for 15 days, and another group treated orally with piroxicam and AEH for 15 days. The results indicated that treatment with piroxicam alone resulted in a significant increase in the activities of serum marker enzymes, namely, aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase with profound hepatic lipid peroxidation as evidenced by a marked increment in the level of thoibarbituric acid reactive substances along with a distinct diminution in reduced glutathoine content and various antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in the liver. However, treatment with AEH during piroxicam treatment retrieved or partially antagonized the effects induced by piroxicam toward the normal values of controls. Histopathological observations also corroborate with the above findings. It can be concluded that AEH exhibited a protective action against piroxicam toxicity and effective in combating oxidative stress-induced hepatic damage. PMID:26819562

  17. Mechanisms Involved in Toxicity of Liver Caused by Piroxicam in Mice and Protective Effects of Leaf Extract of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L.

    PubMed

    Sahu, C R

    2016-01-01

    Piroxicam is one of the important therapeutic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory class of drugs used mainly to suppress pain and inflammation in arthritis and other musculoskeletal disorders. Besides being anti-inflammatory, these drugs are analgesic and antipyretic often used for the relief of nonspecific fever condition. Recently, piroxicam has also gained attention as an effective therapy for tumors, colorectal, and invasive bladder cancers. The objective of the current study is to evaluate the protective effects of the alcoholic leaf extract of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis (AEH), Malvaceae, against piroxicam-induced toxicity in mice. Sixty adult Swiss albino mice (Mus musculus) were divided into four groups (n = 10), which included a control group, a group treated orally with AEH (30 mg kg(-1) b.w.) for 15 days, a group treated orally with piroxicam (6.6 mg kg(-1) b.w.) for 15 days, and another group treated orally with piroxicam and AEH for 15 days. The results indicated that treatment with piroxicam alone resulted in a significant increase in the activities of serum marker enzymes, namely, aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase with profound hepatic lipid peroxidation as evidenced by a marked increment in the level of thoibarbituric acid reactive substances along with a distinct diminution in reduced glutathoine content and various antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in the liver. However, treatment with AEH during piroxicam treatment retrieved or partially antagonized the effects induced by piroxicam toward the normal values of controls. Histopathological observations also corroborate with the above findings. It can be concluded that AEH exhibited a protective action against piroxicam toxicity and effective in combating oxidative stress-induced hepatic damage. PMID:26819562

  18. Asymptotic Expansion Homogenization for Multiscale Nuclear Fuel Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J. D.; Tonks, M. R.; Chockalingam, K.; Perez, D. M.; Novascone, S. R.; Spencer, B. W.; Williamson, R. L.

    2015-03-01

    Engineering scale nuclear fuel performance simulations can benefit by utilizing high-fidelity models running at a lower length scale. Lower length-scale models provide a detailed view of the material behavior that is used to determine the average material response at the macroscale. These lower length-scale calculations may provide insight into material behavior where experimental data is sparse or nonexistent. This multiscale approach is especially useful in the nuclear field, since irradiation experiments are difficult and expensive to conduct. The lower length-scale models complement the experiments by influencing the types of experiments required and by reducing the total number of experiments needed. This multiscale modeling approach is a central motivation in the development of the BISON-MARMOT fuel performance codes at Idaho National Laboratory. These codes seek to provide more accurate and predictive solutions for nuclear fuel behavior. One critical aspect of multiscale modeling is the ability to extract the relevant information from the lower length-scale sim- ulations. One approach, the asymptotic expansion homogenization (AEH) technique, has proven to be an effective method for determining homogenized material parameters. The AEH technique prescribes a system of equations to solve at the microscale that are used to compute homogenized material constants for use at the engineering scale. In this work, we employ AEH to explore the effect of evolving microstructural thermal conductivity and elastic constants on nuclear fuel performance. We show that the AEH approach fits cleanly into the BISON and MARMOT codes and provides a natural, multidimensional homogenization capability.

  19. An Experimental Study on Elastic Wave Propagation in a Filament-Wound Composite Motor Case for Acoustic Emission during Hydroproof Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sung-Jin; Choe, Ji-Ung; Bae, Dong-Ho

    Recently, acoustic emission during hydroproof (AE/H) testing has been adopted for the quality assurance of filament-wound composite rocket motor (FCRM) cases. For the proper performance of this testing, it is crucial to understand the characteristics of elastic wave propagation in the FCRM case, since AE signals captured in this testing can very significantly according to various factors including its geometry and material properties. Furthermore, the optimization of the AE/H testing parameters is strongly desired based on this understanding for the suitable interpretation of the test results. To address such a need, we have conducted an experimental study on the analysis of the elastic wave propagation in the FCRM case. In the experiments, broadband ultrasonic waves radiated at a fixed point were received at many different locations after propagating through the FCRM case with different distances and/or directions. From the received signals, the characteristics of elastic wave propagation such as frequency components, the maximum propagation distances and velocity curves were investigated in two separate conditions: one with the case empty and the other with the case hydraulically pressurized. Based on this systematic investigation, the optimal frequency component of the elastic wave to be monitored in the AE/H testing of the FCRM case was determined successfully.

  20. Risk Behavior and Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Transgender Women and Men Undergoing Community-Based Screening for Acute and Early HIV Infection in San Diego.

    PubMed

    Green, Nella; Hoenigl, Martin; Morris, Sheldon; Little, Susan J

    2015-10-01

    The transgender community represents an understudied population in the literature. The objective of this study was to compare risk behavior, and HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) rates between transgender women and transgender men undergoing community-based HIV testing.With this retrospective analysis of a cohort study, we characterize HIV infection rates as well as reported risk behaviors and reported STI in 151 individual transgender women and 30 individual transgender men undergoing community based, voluntary screening for acute and early HIV infection (AEH) in San Diego, California between April 2008 and July 2014.HIV positivity rate was low for both, transgender women and transgender men undergoing AEH screening (2% and 3%, respectively), and the self-reported STI rate for the prior 12 months was 13% for both. Although transgender women appeared to engage in higher rates of risk behavior overall, with 69% engaged in condomless receptive anal intercourse (CRAI) and 11% engaged in sex work, it is important to note that 91% of transgender women reported recent sexual intercourse, 73% had more than 1 sexual partner, 63% reported intercourse with males, 37% intercourse with males and females, and 30% had CRAI.Our results indicate that in some settings rates of HIV infection, as well as rates of reported STIs and sexual risk behavior in transgender men may resemble those found in transgender women. Our findings support the need for comprehensive HIV prevention in both, transgender women and men.

  1. Risk Behavior and Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Transgender Women and Men Undergoing Community-Based Screening for Acute and Early HIV Infection in San Diego

    PubMed Central

    Green, Nella; Hoenigl, Martin; Morris, Sheldon; Little, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The transgender community represents an understudied population in the literature. The objective of this study was to compare risk behavior, and HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) rates between transgender women and transgender men undergoing community-based HIV testing. With this retrospective analysis of a cohort study, we characterize HIV infection rates as well as reported risk behaviors and reported STI in 151 individual transgender women and 30 individual transgender men undergoing community based, voluntary screening for acute and early HIV infection (AEH) in San Diego, California between April 2008 and July 2014. HIV positivity rate was low for both, transgender women and transgender men undergoing AEH screening (2% and 3%, respectively), and the self-reported STI rate for the prior 12 months was 13% for both. Although transgender women appeared to engage in higher rates of risk behavior overall, with 69% engaged in condomless receptive anal intercourse (CRAI) and 11% engaged in sex work, it is important to note that 91% of transgender women reported recent sexual intercourse, 73% had more than 1 sexual partner, 63% reported intercourse with males, 37% intercourse with males and females, and 30% had CRAI. Our results indicate that in some settings rates of HIV infection, as well as rates of reported STIs and sexual risk behavior in transgender men may resemble those found in transgender women. Our findings support the need for comprehensive HIV prevention in both, transgender women and men. PMID:26469928

  2. New Approaches to Nondestructive Evaluation of a Filament-Wound Composite Motor Case Using Circumferential Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sung-Jin; Choe, Ji-Ung; Bae, Dong-Ho

    For reliable quality assurance of filament-wound composite rocket motor (FCRM) cases by use of acoustic emission during hydroproof (AE/H) testing, it is necessary both to detect defects introduced in fabrication process and to monitor damage done due to hydraulic pressurization. The circumferential wave, which has strong directivity and weak anisotropy in wave propagation in the particular FCRM case under present investigation, has high potential to address such a need. To explore these outstanding capabilities of the circumferential wave, two kinds of experiments were conducted. The pitch-catch measurements of the circumferential wave that propagated through the artificial slits demonstrated its high potential for detection of flaws. The experiments for AE source location using a particular, triangular layout of AE sensors declared its capability for monitoring of damages. Inspired from the experiments, new approaches to nondestructive evaluation of the given FCRM case were proposed using the circumferential wave: 1) an ultrasonic pitch-catch scanning and 2) an AE/H testing with a suitable triangular layout of AE sensors.

  3. Phenotypic and molecular characteristics of an Aeromonas hydrophila strain isolated from the River Nile.

    PubMed

    Furmanek-Blaszk, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila, an inhabitant of aquatic ecosystems found in most parts of the world, has considerable virulence potential. The polymerase chain reaction technique was used to assay for the presence of five virulence factor genes: haemolytic toxins aerA and ahh1, elastase ahyB, the enterotoxin act, and the polar flagella flaA/flaB in the A. hydrophila strain isolated from the River Nile. Drug screening showed high levels of resistance to β-lactam antibiotics and tetracycline. Slime production was determined by the Congo red agar plate test. The isolate produced two restriction enzymes named AehI and AehII which are isoschizomers of XhoI and StuI respectively. The complete nucleotide sequence of the cryptic plasmid pAhy2.5 (2524 bp) from this strain was determined. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of two open reading frames (ORFs) encoding putative proteins. The protein coded by ORF1 is homologous with Rep proteins of plasmids belonging to the pC194 family, which are known to replicate by the rolling-circle mechanism. The putative double-strand origin of replication and a region with palindromic sequences that could function as a single-strand origin were detected in pAhy2.5.

  4. Human Research Program: Space Human Factors and Habitability Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, Dane M.

    2007-01-01

    The three project areas of the Space Human Factors and Habitability Element work together to achieve a working and living environment that will keep crews healthy, safe, and productive throughout all missions -- from Earth orbit to Mars expeditions. The Advanced Environmental Health (AEH) Project develops and evaluates advanced habitability systems and establishes requirements and health standards for exploration missions. The Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE) Project s goal is to ensure a safe and productive environment for humans in space. With missions using new technologies at an ever-increasing rate, it is imperative that these advances enhance crew performance without increasing stress or risk. The ultimate goal of Advanced Food Technology (AFT) Project is to develop and deliver technologies for human centered spacecraft that will support crews on missions to the moon, Mars, and beyond.

  5. Measuring the biological effect of presurgical metformin treatment in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sivalingam, V N; Kitson, S; McVey, R; Roberts, C; Pemberton, P; Gilmour, K; Ali, S; Renehan, A G; Kitchener, H C; Crosbie, E J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preclinical studies in endometrial cancer (EC) show that metformin reduces cellular proliferation by PI3K-AKT-mTOR inhibition. We tested the hypothesis that short-term presurgical metformin reduces cellular proliferation in atypical endometrial hyperplasia (AEH) and endometrioid EC, and assessed the feasibility of using phosphorylated PI3K-AKT-mTOR proteins as tissue end points. Methods: Women with AEH or EC received metformin 850 mg twice a day or no drug in the presurgical window between diagnosis and hysterectomy. Before and after the window, tissue samples were obtained; serum markers of insulin resistance (e.g. homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance index) were determined; and anthropometrics measured (e.g. BMI). Cell proliferation (Ki-67) and PI3K-AKT-mTOR phosphostatus were assessed by immunohistochemistry and scored blinded to treatment. Results: Twenty-eight metformin-treated and 12 untreated patients, well matched for age and BMI, completed the study. Metformin treatment (median 20 days, range 7–34) was associated with a 17.2% reduction in tumour Ki-67 (95% CI −27.4, −7.0, P=0.002), in a dose-dependent manner. Tumour PI3K-AKT-mTOR protein phosphostatus varied but the effects were not significant after adjusting for changes in controls. Conclusions: Short-term metformin was associated with reduced Ki-67 expression in EC. Changes in tumour PI3K-AKT-mTOR protein phosphostatus were seen in both groups. Future studies should address the variability attributed to different sampling techniques including devascularisation of the uterus at hysterectomy. PMID:26794276

  6. Weaving Together Space Biology and the Human Research Program: Selecting Crops and Manipulating Plant Physiology to Produce High Quality Food for ISS Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Gioia; Hummerick, Mary; Douglas, Grace; Wheeler, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Researchers from the Human Research Program (HRP) have teamed up with plant biologists at KSC to explore the potential for plant growth and food production on the international space station (ISS) and future exploration missions. KSC Space Biology (SB) brings a history of plant and plant-microbial interaction research for station and for future bioregenerative life support systems. JSC HRP brings expertise in Advanced Food Technology (AFT), Advanced Environmental Health (AEH), and Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP). The Veggie plant growth hardware on the ISS is the platform that first drove these interactions. As we prepared for the VEG-01 validation test of Veggie, we engaged with BHP to explore questions that could be asked of the crew that would contribute both to plant and to behavioral health research. AFT, AEH and BHP stakeholders were engaged immediately after the return of the Veggie flight samples of space-grown lettuce, and this team worked with the JSC human medical offices to gain approvals for crew consumption of the lettuce on ISS. As we progressed with Veggie testing we began performing crop selection studies for Veggie that were initiated through AFT. These studies consisted of testing and down selecting leafy greens, dwarf tomatoes, and dwarf pepper crops based on characteristics of plant growth and nutritional levels evaluated at KSC, and organoleptic quality evaluated at JSCs Sensory Analysis lab. This work has led to a successful collaborative proposal to the International Life Sciences Research Announcement for a jointly funded HRP-SB investigation of the impacts of light quality and fertilizer on salad crop productivity, nutrition, and flavor in Veggie on the ISS. With this work, and potentially with other pending joint projects, we will continue the synergistic research that will advance the space biology knowledge base, help close gaps in the human research roadmap, and enable humans to venture out to Mars and beyond.

  7. Trait differences between naturalized and invasive plant species independent of residence time and phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, R V; Randall, R P; Leishman, M R

    2015-01-01

    inclusion of quantitative traits, in particular SLA, into the WRA schemes. Diferencia de Características entre Especies de Plantas Naturalizadas e Invasoras Independientes del Tiempo de Residencia y de la Filogenia Resumen La habilidad para predecir cuáles plantas exóticas harán la transición de naturalizadas a invasoras antes de su introducción a regiones nuevas es un objetivo clave para la conservación y tiene el potencial de incrementar la eficiencia de la evaluación de riesgo de hierbas (ERH). Sin embargo, múltiples factores contribuyen al éxito invasor de las plantas (p. ej.: características funcionales, características de cobertura, tiempo de residencia, filogenia) y todos deben considerarse simultáneamente para poder identificar correlaciones significativas del éxito invasor. Recopilamos en Australia 146 parejas de especies de plantas invasoras y naturalizadas emparejadas filogenéticamente (congéneres) y con tiempos de residencia mínima similares (es decir, el tiempo transcurrido desde su introducción en años). Estas parejas se usaron para probar diferencias en cinco características funcionales (duración de la floración, tamaño de la hoja, altura máxima, área específica de la hoja [AEH], masa de la semilla) y en tres características de cobertura nativa de las especies (ocupación de bioma, temperatura media anual y amplitud de pluviosidad) entre especies invasoras y naturalizadas. Las especies invasoras, en promedio, tuvieron una mayor AEH, periodos de floración más largos y fueron más altas que sus parientes congéneres naturalizadas. Las invasoras también exhibieron una mayor tolerancia a diferentes condiciones ambientales en su cobertura nativa, donde ocuparon más biomas y una mayor amplitud de pluviosidad y condiciones de temperatura que sus congéneres naturalizadas. Sin embargo, ni la masa de la semilla ni el tamaño de hoja difirieron entre las parejas de especies naturalizadas e invasoras. Un hallazgo relevante fue el papel de

  8. Human Factors and Habitability Challenges for Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban

    2015-01-01

    As NASA is planning to send humans deeper into space than ever before, adequate crew health and performance will be critical for mission success. Within the NASA Human Research Program (HRP), the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) team is responsible for characterizing the risks associated with human capabilities and limitations with respect to long-duration spaceflight, and for providing mitigations (e.g., guidelines, technologies, and tools) to promote safe, reliable and productive missions. SHFH research includes three domains: Advanced Environmental Health (AEH), Advanced Food Technology (AFT), and Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE). The AEH portfolio focuses on understanding the risk of microbial contamination of the spacecraft and on the development of standards for exposure to potential toxins such as chemicals, bacteria, fungus, and lunar/Martian dust. The two risks that the environmental health project focuses on are adverse health effects due to changes in host-microbe interactions, and risks associated with exposure to dust in planetary surface habitats. This portfolio also proposes countermeasures to these risks by making recommendations that relate to requirements for environmental quality, foods, and crew health on spacecraft and space missions. The AFT portfolio focuses on reducing the mass, volume, and waste of the entire integrated food system to be used in exploration missions, and investigating processing methods to extend the shelf life of food items up to five years, while assuring that exploration crews will have nutritious and palatable foods. The portfolio also delivers improvements in both the food itself and the technologies for storing and preparing it. SHFE sponsors research to establish human factors and habitability standards and guidelines in five risk areas, and provides improved design concepts for advanced crew interfaces and habitability systems. These risk areas include: Incompatible vehicle/habitat design

  9. Fast computation of close-coupling exchange integrals using polynomials in a tree representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallerberger, Markus; Igenbergs, Katharina; Schweinzer, Josef; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2011-03-01

    The semi-classical atomic-orbital close-coupling method is a well-known approach for the calculation of cross sections in ion-atom collisions. It strongly relies on the fast and stable computation of exchange integrals. We present an upgrade to earlier implementations of the Fourier-transform method. For this purpose, we implement an extensive library for symbolic storage of polynomials, relying on sophisticated tree structures to allow fast manipulation and numerically stable evaluation. Using this library, we considerably speed up creation and computation of exchange integrals. This enables us to compute cross sections for more complex collision systems. Program summaryProgram title: TXINT Catalogue identifier: AEHS_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHS_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12 332 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 157 086 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 95 Computer: All with a Fortran 95 compiler Operating system: All with a Fortran 95 compiler RAM: Depends heavily on input, usually less than 100 MiB Classification: 16.10 Nature of problem: Analytical calculation of one- and two-center exchange matrix elements for the close-coupling method in the impact parameter model. Solution method: Similar to the code of Hansen and Dubois [1], we use the Fourier-transform method suggested by Shakeshaft [2] to compute the integrals. However, we heavily speed up the calculation using a library for symbolic manipulation of polynomials. Restrictions: We restrict ourselves to a defined collision system in the impact parameter model. Unusual features: A library for symbolic manipulation of polynomials, where polynomials are stored in a space-saving left-child right

  10. LC-MS/MS Identification of a Bromelain Peptide Biomarker from Ananas comosus Merr.

    PubMed

    Secor, Eric R; Szczepanek, Steven M; Singh, Anurag; Guernsey, Linda; Natarajan, Prabitha; Rezaul, Karim; Han, David K; Thrall, Roger S; Silbart, Lawrence K

    2012-01-01

    Bromelain (Br) is a cysteine peptidase (GenBank AEH26024.1) from pineapple, with over 40 years of clinical use. The constituents mediating its anti-inflammatory activity are not thoroughly characterized and no peptide biomarker exists. Our objective is to characterize Br raw material and identify peptides in the plasma of Br treated mice. After SDS-PAGE in-gel digestion, Br (VN#3507; Middletown, CT, USA) peptides were analyzed via LC/MS/MS using 95% protein probability, 95% peptide probability, and a minimum peptide number = 5. Br spiked mouse plasma (1 ug/ul) and plasma from i.p. treated mice (12 mg/kg) were assessed using SRM. In Br raw material, we identified seven proteins: four proteases, one jacalin-like lectin, and two protease inhibitors. In Br spiked mouse plasma, six proteins (ananain, bromelain inhibitor, cysteine proteinase AN11, FB1035 precursor, FBSB precursor, and jacalin-like lectin) were identified. Using LC/MS/MS, we identified the unique peptide, DYGAVNEVK, derived from FB1035, in the plasma of i.p. Br treated mice. The spectral count of this peptide peaked at 6 hrs and was undetectable by 24 hrs. In this study, a novel Br peptide was identified in the plasma of treated mice for the first time. This Br peptide could serve as a biomarker to standardize the therapeutic dose and maximize clinical utility.

  11. Forensic applications of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes in tracing nitrate sources in urban environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silva, S.R.; Ging, P.B.; Lee, R.W.; Ebbert, J.C.; Tesoriero, A.J.; Inkpen, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ground and surface waters in urban areas are susceptible to nitrate contamination from septic systems, leaking sewer lines, and fertilizer applications. Source identification is a primary step toward a successful remediation plan in affected areas. In this respect, nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of nitrate, in conjunction with hydrologic data and water chemistry, have proven valuable in urban studies from Austin, Texas, and Tacoma, Washington. In Austin, stream water was sampled during stremflow and baseflow conditions to assess surface and subsurface sources of nitrate, respectively. In Tacoma, well waters were sampled in adjacent sewered and un-sewered areas to determine if locally high nitrate concentrations were caused by septic systems in the un-sewered areas. In both studies, sewage was identified as a nitrate source and mixing between sewage and other sources of nitrate was apparent. In addition to source identification, combined nitrogen and oxygen isotopes were important in determining the significance of denitrification, which can complicate source assessment by reducing nitrate concentrations and increasing ??15N values. The two studies illustrate the value of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate for forensic applications in urban areas. ?? Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. on behalf of AEHS.

  12. 2013 Advanced Environmental Health/Advanced Food Technology Standing Review Panel Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Advanced Environmental Health/Advanced Food Technology (AEH/AFT) Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) participated in a WebEx/teleconference with members of the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) Element, representatives from the Human Research Program (HRP), and NASA Headquarters on November 22, 2013 (list of participants is in Section IX of this report). The SRP reviewed the updated research plans for the Risk of Adverse Health Effects Due to Alterations in Host-Microorganism Interactions (Host Microbe Risk) and the Risk of Performance Decrement and Crew Illness Due to an Inadequate Food System (Food Risk). The SRP also received a status update on the Risk of Adverse Health Effects of Exposure to Dust and Volatiles during Exploration of Celestial Bodies (Dust Risk). Overall, the SRP was impressed with the strong research plans presented by the scientists and staff associated with the SHFH Element. The SRP also thought that the updated research plans were thorough, well organized, and presented in a comprehensive manner. The SRP agrees with the changes made to the Host Microbe Risk and Food Risk portfolios and thinks that the targets for Gap closure are appropriate.

  13. Expression and Characterization of Hyperthermostable Exo-polygalacturonase TtGH28 from Thermotoga thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Wagschal, Kurt; Rose Stoller, J; Chan, Victor J; Lee, Charles C; Grigorescu, Arabela A; Jordan, Douglas B

    2016-07-01

    D-galacturonic acid is a potential platform chemical comprising the principal component of pectin in the citrus processing waste stream. Several enzyme activities are required for the enzymatic production of galacturonic acid from pectin, including exo- and endo-polygalacturonases. The gene TtGH28 encoding a putative GH28 polygalacturonase from Pseudothermotoga thermarum DSM 5069 (Theth_0397, NCBI# AEH50492.1) was synthesized, expressed in Escherichia coli, and characterized. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of gene product TtGH28 with other GH28 proteins whose structures and details of their catalytic mechanism have been elucidated shows that three catalytic Asp residues and several other key active site residues are strictly conserved. Purified TtGH28 was dimeric and hyperthermostable, with K t (0.5)  = 86.3 °C. Kinetic parameters for activity on digalacturonic acid, trigalacturonic acid, and polygalacturonic acid were obtained. No substrate inhibition was observed for polygalacturonate, while the K si values for the oligogalacturonides were in the low mM range, and K i for product galacturonic acid was in the low μM range. Kinetic modeling of the progress of reaction showed that the enzyme is both fully exo- and fully non-processional. PMID:27209035

  14. 2015 Advanced Environmental Health/Advanced Food Technology Standing Review Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 Advanced Environmental Health/Advanced Food Technology (AEH/AFT) Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) met for a site visit in Houston, TX on December 14 - 15, 2015. The SRP met with representatives from the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) Element and members of the Human Research Program (HRP) to review the updated research plans for the Risk of Adverse Health Effects Due to Host-Microorganism Interactions (MicroHost Risk) and the Risk of Performance Decrement and Crew Illness due to an Inadequate Food System (Food Risk). During the meeting, the SRP also met with the vehicle engineers to discuss possible food storage options. The SRP would like to commend Dr. Oubre and Dr. Douglas for their detailed presentations, as well the frank, refreshing, and comprehensive engineering presentation. This gave much needed perspective to the food storage issues and reassured the committee about NASA's approach to the problem. In terms of critiques, the SRP remains unconvinced about the rationale for probiotic use other than for specific applications supported by the literature. It is not clear what gap or problem is being addressed by the use of probiotics, and the rationale for their use needs to be clearly rooted in the available literature. The SRP thinks that if low-Earth orbit is associated with immune system impairment, then there may additional risks linked with the use of probiotics. It is not clear to the SRP how NASA will determine if probiotics are having their intended beneficial effect. A similar concern is raised as to what gaps or problems are being addressed by "functional foods". Mixed infections, rather than single species infections, which can augment severity of disease, also represent a significant concern. Overall, the SRP considers this to be a strong program that is well-organized, well-coordinated and generates valuable data.

  15. Low-maturity Kulthieth Formation coal: A possible source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in benthic sediment of the northern Gulf of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Kooten, G. K.; Short, J.W.; Kolak, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The successful application of forensic geology to contamination studies involving natural systems requires identification of appropriate endmembers and an understanding of the geologic setting and processes affecting the systems. Studies attempting to delineate the background, or natural, source for hydrocarbon contamination in Gulf of Alaska (GOA) benthic sediments have invoked a number of potential sources, including seep oils, source rocks, and coal. Oil seeps have subsequently been questioned as significant sources of hydrocarbons present in benthic sediments of the GOA in part because the pattern of relative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance characteristic of benthic GOA sediments is inconsistent with patterns typical of weathered seep oils. Likewise, native coal has been dismissed in part because ratios of labile hydrocarbons to total organic carbon (e.g. PAH:TOC) for Bering River coal field (BRCF) sources are too low - i.e. the coals are over mature - to be consistent with GOA sediments. We present evidence here that native coal may have been prematurely dismissed, because BRCF coals do not adequately represent the geochemical signatures of coals elsewhere in the Kulthieth Formation. Contrary to previous thought, Kulthieth Formation coals east of the BRCF have much higher PAH: TOC ratios, and the patterns of labile hydrocarbons in these low thermal maturity coals suggest a possible genetic relationship between Kulthieth Formation coals and nearby oil seeps on the Sullivan anticline. Analyses of low-maturity Kulthieth Formation coal indicate the low maturity coal is a significant source of PAH. Source apportionment models that neglect this source will underestimate the contribution of native coals to the regional background hydrocarbon signature. ?? Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. on behalf of AEHS.

  16. Seismic anisotropy in the lower crust: The link between rock composition, microstructure, texture and seismic properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaplinska, Daria; Piazolo, Sandra; Almqvist, Bjarne

    2015-04-01

    techniques, including Voigt, Reuss, Hill, geometric mean and self-consistent and Asymptotic Expansion Homogenization (AEH) methods. To test the advantages and disadvantages of the method, results are compared to measured geophysical properties of equivalent rocks. Such comparison, allows refinement of seismic data interpretation for mid to lower crustal rocks. References: Cook, A., Vel., S., Johnson, S.E., Gerbi, C., Song, W.J., 2013. Elastic and Seismic Properties (ESP) Toolbox (beta version); http://umaine.edu/mecheng/faculty-and-staff/senthil-vel/software/ESP_Toolbox/

  17. Predictors of early continence following robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lavigueur-Blouin, Hugo; Noriega, Alina Camacho; Valdivieso, Roger; Hueber, Pierre-Alain; Bienz, Marc; Alhathal, Naif; Latour, Mathieu; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; El-Hakim, Assaad; Zorn, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Functional outcomes after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) greatly influence patient quality of life. Data regarding predictors of early continence, especially 1 month following RARP, are limited. Previous reports mainly address immediate or 3-month postoperative continence rates. We examine preoperative predictors of pad-free continence recovery at the first follow-up visit 1 month after RARP. Methods: Between January 2007 and January 2013, preoperative and follow-up data were prospectively collected for 327 RARP patients operated on by 2 fellowship-trained surgeons (AEH and KCZ). Patient and operative characteristics included age, body mass index (BMI), staging, preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA), prostate weight, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) score and type of nerve-sparing performed. Continence was defined by 0-pad usage at 1 month follow-up. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess for predictors of early continence. Results: Overall, 44% of patients were pad-free 1 month post-RARP. In multivariate regression analysis, age (odds ratio [OR] 0.946, confidence interval [CI] 95%: 0.91, 0.98) and IPSS (OR: 0.953, CI 95%: 0.92, 0.99) were independent predictors of urinary continence 1 month following RARP. Other variables (BMI, staging, preoperative PSA, SHIM score, prostate weight and type of nerve-sparing) were not statistically significant predictors of early continence. Limitations of this study include missing data for comorbidities, patient use of pelvic floor exercises and patient maximal activity. Moreover, patient-reported continence using a 0-pad usage definition represents a semiquantitative and subjective measurement. Conclusion: In a broad population of patients who underwent RARP at our institution, 44% of patients were pad-free at 1 month. Age and IPSS were independent predictors of early continence after surgery. Men of advanced

  18. Trait differences between naturalized and invasive plant species independent of residence time and phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, R V; Randall, R P; Leishman, M R

    2015-01-01

    inclusion of quantitative traits, in particular SLA, into the WRA schemes. Diferencia de Características entre Especies de Plantas Naturalizadas e Invasoras Independientes del Tiempo de Residencia y de la Filogenia Resumen La habilidad para predecir cuáles plantas exóticas harán la transición de naturalizadas a invasoras antes de su introducción a regiones nuevas es un objetivo clave para la conservación y tiene el potencial de incrementar la eficiencia de la evaluación de riesgo de hierbas (ERH). Sin embargo, múltiples factores contribuyen al éxito invasor de las plantas (p. ej.: características funcionales, características de cobertura, tiempo de residencia, filogenia) y todos deben considerarse simultáneamente para poder identificar correlaciones significativas del éxito invasor. Recopilamos en Australia 146 parejas de especies de plantas invasoras y naturalizadas emparejadas filogenéticamente (congéneres) y con tiempos de residencia mínima similares (es decir, el tiempo transcurrido desde su introducción en años). Estas parejas se usaron para probar diferencias en cinco características funcionales (duración de la floración, tamaño de la hoja, altura máxima, área específica de la hoja [AEH], masa de la semilla) y en tres características de cobertura nativa de las especies (ocupación de bioma, temperatura media anual y amplitud de pluviosidad) entre especies invasoras y naturalizadas. Las especies invasoras, en promedio, tuvieron una mayor AEH, periodos de floración más largos y fueron más altas que sus parientes congéneres naturalizadas. Las invasoras también exhibieron una mayor tolerancia a diferentes condiciones ambientales en su cobertura nativa, donde ocuparon más biomas y una mayor amplitud de pluviosidad y condiciones de temperatura que sus congéneres naturalizadas. Sin embargo, ni la masa de la semilla ni el tamaño de hoja difirieron entre las parejas de especies naturalizadas

  19. The role of length scales in bridging the gap between rock CPO and seismic signals of crustal anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaya, D.; Johnson, S. E.; Vel, S. S.; Song, W. J.; Christensen, N. I.

    2012-04-01

    to. We use tensor representation of anisotropic elasticity to formulate a way to separate structural effects from local rock CPO in order to calculate the effective media associated with a structure (see W.J. Song et al., this session). Frontier issues exist to improve the connection between rock CPO and seismic signals. For quantitative analyses of anisotropic elastic tensors: *Improved averaging methods of rock CPO tensors beyond modal or volume averaging, such as asymptotic expansion homogenization (AEH). *Updated series of single-crystal elasticity measurements using modern technologies. For structural geology/tectonics and geodynamics: *Catalogue mapping functions or impulse responses associated with 3D structure. *Identify geometries of anisotropy tensors associated with different tectonic regimes. *Geodynamical modeling of crustal tectonics in order to quantify patterns of metamorphic/deformational fabrics. For seismology: *Two-layer and multi-layer seismic anisotropy methods. *Robust anisotropy tomography methods with improved resolution. *Field experiment methods designed specifically for crustal anisotropy (multi-azimuth, multi-incidence, multi-wavelength using active/passive source types). We discuss the dimensional scales of common seismic waves and earth structures. We illustrate tensor structural operators, effective media, and resulting seismic signals using anisotropic synthetic wave propagation.

  20. Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

    2008-02-18

    between alkaline metal hydrides (AmH), Alkaline earth metal hydrides (AeH2), alane (AlH3), transition metal (Tm) hydrides (TmHz, where z=1-3) and molecular hydrogen (H2). The effort started first with variations of known alanates and subsequently extended the search to unknown compounds. In this stage, the FPM techniques were developed and validated on known alanate materials such as NaAlH4 and Na2LiAlH6. The coupled predictive methodologies were used to survey over 200 proposed phases in six quaternary spaces, formed from various combinations of Na, Li Mg and/or Ti with Al and H. A wide range of alanate compounds was examined using SSP having additions of Ti, Cr, Co, Ni and Fe. A number of compositions and reaction paths were identified having H weight fractions up to 5.6 wt %, but none meeting the 7.5 wt%H reversible goal. Similarly, MSP of alanates produced a number of interesting compounds and general conclusions regarding reaction behavior of mixtures during processing, but no alanate based candidates meeting the 7.5 wt% goal. A novel alanate, LiMg(AlH4)3, was synthesized using SBP that demonstrated a 7.0 wt% capacity with a desorption temperature of 150°C. The deuteride form was synthesized and characterized by the Institute for Energy (IFE) in Norway to determine its crystalline structure for related FPM studies. However, the reaction exhibited exothermicity and therefore was not reversible under acceptable hydrogen gas pressures for on-board recharging. After the extensive studies of alanates, the material class of emphasis was shifted to borohydrides. Through SBP, several ligand-stabilized Mg(BH4)2 complexes were synthesized. The Mg(BH4)2*2NH3 complex was found to change behavior with slightly different synthesis conditions and/or aging. One of the two mechanisms was an amine-borane (NH3BH3) like dissociation reaction which released up to 16 wt %H and more conservatively 9 wt%H when not including H2 released from the NH3. From FPM, the stability of the Mg(BH4

  1. A reward semi-Markov process with memory for wind speed modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroni, F.; D'Amico, G.; Prattico, F.

    2012-04-01

    -order Markov chain with different number of states, and Weibull distribution. All this model use Markov chains to generate synthetic wind speed time series but the search for a better model is still open. Approaching this issue, we applied new models which are generalization of Markov models. More precisely we applied semi-Markov models to generate synthetic wind speed time series. The primary goal of this analysis is the study of the time history of the wind in order to assess its reliability as a source of power and to determine the associated storage levels required. In order to assess this issue we use a probabilistic model based on indexed semi-Markov process [4] to which a reward structure is attached. Our model is used to calculate the expected energy produced by a given turbine and its variability expressed by the variance of the process. Our results can be used to compare different wind farms based on their reward and also on the risk of missed production due to the intrinsic variability of the wind speed process. The model is used to generate synthetic time series for wind speed by means of Monte Carlo simulations and backtesting procedure is used to compare results on first and second oder moments of rewards between real and synthetic data. [1] A. Shamshad, M.A. Bawadi, W.M.W. Wan Hussin, T.A. Majid, S.A.M. Sanusi, First and second order Markov chain models for synthetic gen- eration of wind speed time series, Energy 30 (2005) 693-708. [2] H. Nfaoui, H. Essiarab, A.A.M. Sayigh, A stochastic Markov chain model for simulating wind speed time series at Tangiers, Morocco, Re- newable Energy 29 (2004) 1407-1418. [3] F. Youcef Ettoumi, H. Sauvageot, A.-E.-H. Adane, Statistical bivariate modeling of wind using first-order Markov chain and Weibull distribu- tion, Renewable Energy 28 (2003) 1787-1802. [4]F. Petroni, G. D'Amico, F. Prattico, Indexed semi-Markov process for wind speed modeling. To be submitted.

  2. First and second order semi-Markov chains for wind speed modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prattico, F.; Petroni, F.; D'Amico, G.

    2012-04-01

    -order Markov chain with different number of states, and Weibull distribution. All this model use Markov chains to generate synthetic wind speed time series but the search for a better model is still open. Approaching this issue, we applied new models which are generalization of Markov models. More precisely we applied semi-Markov models to generate synthetic wind speed time series. Semi-Markov processes (SMP) are a wide class of stochastic processes which generalize at the same time both Markov chains and renewal processes. Their main advantage is that of using whatever type of waiting time distribution for modeling the time to have a transition from one state to another one. This major flexibility has a price to pay: availability of data to estimate the parameters of the model which are more numerous. Data availability is not an issue in wind speed studies, therefore, semi-Markov models can be used in a statistical efficient way. In this work we present three different semi-Markov chain models: the first one is a first-order SMP where the transition probabilities from two speed states (at time Tn and Tn-1) depend on the initial state (the state at Tn-1), final state (the state at Tn) and on the waiting time (given by t=Tn-Tn-1), the second model is a second order SMP where we consider the transition probabilities as depending also on the state the wind speed was before the initial state (which is the state at Tn-2) and the last one is still a second order SMP where the transition probabilities depends on the three states at Tn-2,Tn-1 and Tn and on the waiting times t_1=Tn-1-Tn-2 and t_2=Tn-Tn-1. The three models are used to generate synthetic time series for wind speed by means of Monte Carlo simulations and the time lagged autocorrelation is used to compare statistical properties of the proposed models with those of real data and also with a time series generated though a simple Markov chain. [1] F. Youcef Ettoumi, H. Sauvageot, A.-E.-H. Adane, Statistical bivariate modeling