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Sample records for korean gestational diabetes

  1. A genome-wide association study of gestational diabetes mellitus in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Soo Heon; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Cho, Young Min; Go, Min Jin; Cho, Yoon Shin; Choi, Sung Hee; Moon, Min Kyong; Jung, Hye Seung; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Kang, Hyun Min; Cho, Nam H; Lee, In Kyu; Kim, Seong Yeon; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jang, Hak C; Park, Kyong Soo

    2012-02-01

    Knowledge regarding the genetic risk loci for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is still limited. In this study, we performed a two-stage genome-wide association analysis in Korean women. In the stage 1 genome scan, 468 women with GDM and 1,242 nondiabetic control women were compared using 2.19 million genotyped or imputed markers. We selected 11 loci for further genotyping in stage 2 samples of 931 case and 783 control subjects. The joint effect of stage 1 plus stage 2 studies was analyzed by meta-analysis. We also investigated the effect of known type 2 diabetes variants in GDM. Two loci known to be associated with type 2 diabetes had a genome-wide significant association with GDM in the joint analysis. rs7754840, a variant in CDKAL1, had the strongest association with GDM (odds ratio 1.518; P=6.65×10(-16)). A variant near MTNR1B, rs10830962, was also significantly associated with the risk of GDM (1.454; P=2.49×10(-13)). We found that there is an excess of association between known type 2 diabetes variants and GDM above what is expected under the null hypothesis. In conclusion, we have confirmed that genetic variants in CDKAL1 and near MTNR1B are strongly associated with GDM in Korean women. There seems to be a shared genetic basis between GDM and type 2 diabetes.

  2. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Korean Women

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Soo Heon; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Cho, Young Min; Go, Min Jin; Cho, Yoon Shin; Choi, Sung Hee; Moon, Min Kyong; Jung, Hye Seung; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Kang, Hyun Min; Cho, Nam H.; Lee, In Kyu; Kim, Seong Yeon; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jang, Hak C.; Park, Kyong Soo

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge regarding the genetic risk loci for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is still limited. In this study, we performed a two-stage genome-wide association analysis in Korean women. In the stage 1 genome scan, 468 women with GDM and 1,242 nondiabetic control women were compared using 2.19 million genotyped or imputed markers. We selected 11 loci for further genotyping in stage 2 samples of 931 case and 783 control subjects. The joint effect of stage 1 plus stage 2 studies was analyzed by meta-analysis. We also investigated the effect of known type 2 diabetes variants in GDM. Two loci known to be associated with type 2 diabetes had a genome-wide significant association with GDM in the joint analysis. rs7754840, a variant in CDKAL1, had the strongest association with GDM (odds ratio 1.518; P = 6.65 × 10−16). A variant near MTNR1B, rs10830962, was also significantly associated with the risk of GDM (1.454; P = 2.49 × 10−13). We found that there is an excess of association between known type 2 diabetes variants and GDM above what is expected under the null hypothesis. In conclusion, we have confirmed that genetic variants in CDKAL1 and near MTNR1B are strongly associated with GDM in Korean women. There seems to be a shared genetic basis between GDM and type 2 diabetes. PMID:22233651

  3. A Korean multicenter study of prenatal risk factors for overt diabetes during the postpartum period after gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shin, Na-Ri; Yoon, So-Yeon; Cho, Geum Joon; Choi, Suk-Joo; Kwon, Han-Sung; Hong, Soon Cheol; Kwon, Ja-Young; Oh, Soo-Young

    2016-03-01

    To identify prenatal risk factors for postpartum diabetes among pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). In a retrospective study, baseline characteristics and data from a postpartum 75-g glucose tolerance test (GTT) were reviewed for patients with GDM who had delivered in four Korean tertiary institutions from 2006 to 2012. Clinical characteristics were compared between women with and those without postpartum diabetes. Cutoffs to predict postpartum diabetes and diagnostic values were calculated from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Of 1637 patients with GDM, 498 (30.4%) underwent a postpartum 75-g GTT. Postpartum diabetes was diagnosed in 40 (8.0%) patients and impaired glucose intolerance in 157 (31.5%). Women with postpartum diabetes had higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels at GDM diagnosis (P=0.008) and higher 100-g GTT values (P<0.05 for all). In ROC curve analysis, optimal cutoffs for predicting postpartum diabetes were 0.058 for HbA1c level and 5.3 mmol/L (fasting), 10.9 mmol/L (1h), 10.2 mmol/L (2h), and 8.6 mmol/L (3h) for 100-g GTT. The highest sensitivity was observed for 3-h 100-g GTT (76.9%) and the highest positive predictive value was for HbA1c at diagnosis (15.2%). HbA1c level at GDM diagnosis and 100-g GTT values could be used to identify patients at high risk of postpartum diabetes who should undergo postpartum screening. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arrives Trouble Getting Pregnant Avoiding Pregnancy Articles Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... diabetes must also take insulin. Problems of Gestational Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well ...

  5. Gestational diabetes - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy - gestational diabetes; Prenatal care - gestational diabetes ... Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar (glucose) that happens during pregnancy. There are no symptoms in most cases. But ...

  6. Recurrence of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Coelingh Bennink, H J

    1977-01-01

    The recurrence rate of gestational diabetes in 58 patients who had had the foregoing pregnancy complicated by diabetes was estimated to be 30% if our former criteria for abnormal glucose tolerance were strictly applied and 25% if our new, more stringent criteria were used. The recurrence rate is not influenced by prophylactic administration of pyridoxine. The perinatal morbidity complicating the 'second' pregnancy of former gestational diabetics was not increased in those patients who were not treated again, as compared with those who were. Recurrent gestational diabetes is associated with a degree of overdiagnosis in an attempt to detect all gestational diabetics. It is suggested that recurrent gestational diabetes occurs mainly in prediabetic patients.

  7. How to Treat Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Listen En Español How to Treat Gestational Diabetes Be sure to see the latest Diabetes Forecast ... and a healthy start for your baby. Gestational Diabetes – Looking Ahead Gestational diabetes usually goes away after ...

  8. Type 2 diabetes-associated genetic variants discovered in the recent genome-wide association studies are related to gestational diabetes mellitus in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y M; Kim, T H; Lim, S; Choi, S H; Shin, H D; Lee, H K; Park, K S; Jang, H C

    2009-02-01

    New genetic variants associated with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus have been discovered in recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between these diabetogenic variants and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The study included 869 Korean women with GDM and 345 female and 287 male Korean non-diabetic controls. We genotyped the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs7756992 and rs7754840 in CDKAL1; rs564398, rs1333040, rs10757278 and rs10811661 in the CDKN2A-CDKN2B region; rs8050136 in FTO; rs1111875, rs5015480 and rs7923837 in HHEX; rs4402960 in IGF2BP2; and rs13266634 in SLC30A8. In addition, rs7903146 and rs12255372 in TCF7L2; rs5215 and rs5219 in KCNJ11; and rs3856806 and rs1801282 in PPARG were genotyped. The genotype frequencies in the GDM patients were compared with those in the non-diabetic controls. Compared with controls (men and women combined), GDM was associated with rs7756992 and rs7754840 (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.34-1.79, p = 4.17 x 10(-9)) in CDKAL1; rs10811661 (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.29-1.72, p = 1.05 x 10(-7)) in the CDKN2A-CDKN2B region; rs1111875 (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.09-1.49, p = 0.003), rs5015480, and rs7923837 in HHEX; rs4402960 (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01-1.38, p = 0.03) in IGF2BP2; rs13266634 (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.07-1.43, p = 0.005) in SLC30A8; and rs7903146 (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.03-2.43, p = 0.038) in TCF7L2. The risk alleles of the SNPs rs7756992 and rs7754840 in CDKAL1; rs10811661 in the CDKN2A-CDKN2B region; and rs1111875, rs5015480 and rs7923837 in HHEX were associated with significant decreases in the insulin AUC during a 100 g OGTT performed at the time of diagnosis of GDM. Some of the type 2 diabetes-associated genetic variants that were discovered in the recent GWA studies are also associated with GDM in Koreans.

  9. [Gestational diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Senat, M-V; Deruelle, P

    2016-04-01

    While the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was estimated between 5 and 10% in 2010, the application of new thresholds recommended by IADPSG and adopted in 2010 by CNGOF seems to significantly increase the number of patients affected by this pathology. A prospective single-center French study estimated in 2014 the prevalence of gestational diabetes at 14% with these criteria, making it one of the most frequent complications during pregnancy. However, to date, there is no published study using these criteria to show a benefit to the health of women and children. If a diagnosis of GDM or type 2 diabetes during pregnancy is definitively an important risk factor for maternal as well as newborn and child complications, it is probably not the case for moderate hyperglycemia discovered during pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Diagnosing gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The newly proposed criteria for diagnosing gestational diabetes will result in a gestational diabetes prevalence of 17.8%, doubling the numbers of pregnant women currently diagnosed. These new diagnostic criteria are based primarily on the levels of glucose associated with a 1.75-fold increased risk of giving birth to large-for-gestational age infants (LGA) in the Hyperglycemia Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study; they use a single OGTT. Thus, of 23,316 pregnancies, gestational diabetes would be diagnosed in 4,150 women rather than in 2,448 women if a twofold increased risk of LGA were used. It should be recognised that the majority of women with LGA have normal glucose levels during pregnancy by these proposed criteria and that maternal obesity is a stronger predictor of LGA. The expected benefit of a diagnosis of gestational diabetes in these 1,702 additional women would be the prevention of 140 cases of LGA, 21 cases of shoulder dystocia and 16 cases of birth injury. The reproducibility of an OGTT for diagnosing mild hyperglycaemia is poor. Given that (1) glucose is a weak predictor of LGA, (2) treating these extra numbers has a modest outcome benefit and (3) the diagnosis may be based on a single raised OGTT value, further debate should occur before resources are allocated to implementing this change. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00125-010-2005-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorised users. PMID:21203743

  11. [Gestational Diabetes Mellitus].

    PubMed

    Krejčí, Hana

    2016-01-01

    The present generation of women of childbearing age more frequently suffer from overweight, obesity, initial as well as fully established metabolic syndrome, which together with postponing motherhood until the third decade in life plays an important role in the increasing incidence of gestational diabetes (GDM) that currently affects about 1/5 of pregnant women. However the causal link between diabetes during pregnancy and metabolic diseases in the whole population is mutual. By way of epigenetic changes, maternal diabetes unfavourably programmes metabolism of the offspring, who tend to transfer the disorder to the next generations. Gestational diabetes is therefore an important link fitting into the accumulation curve of the incidence of overweight, obesity, metabolic syndrome and consequently also T2DM among the whole population. Genetic as well as epigenetic factors play a great role in the GDM pathogenesis, which is shown by the fact that this complication also affects women with normal BMI. When it comes to diagnosing GDM, we will need to manage also in future with establishing fasting glycemia and glycemia following glucose challenge (OGTT) that may include a considerable degree of measurement inaccuracy. It is therefore necessary to observe pre-analytical and analytical conditions of measurements in order to obtain a reliable result. It is a positive sign that the Czech professional associations have adopted new international criteria for diagnosing GDM which, as opposed to those valid earlier, better reflect the risk of pregnancy-related and perinatal complications.The care for gestational patients with diabetes at a low risk (due to satisfactory glycemic control through a diet or small pharmacotherapeutic doses, with an eutrophic fetus and without associated complications) is provided by an outpatient gynecologist and a diabetes specialist, they can give birth in standard maternity hospitals. The care for gestational patients with diabetes at a higher risk

  12. [Gestational diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Bancher-Todesca, Dagmar; Pollak, Arnold; Repa, Andreas; Lechleitner, Monika; Weitgasser, Raimund

    2012-12-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset during pregnancy and is associated with increased feto-maternal morbidity as well as long-term complications in mothers and offspring. Women detected to have diabetes early in pregnancy receive the diagnosis of overt, non-gestational, diabetes. GDM is diagnosed by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) or fasting glucose concentrations (> 92 mg/dl). Screening for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes at the first prenatal visit (Evidence level B) is recommended in women at increased risk using standard diagnostic criteria (high risk: history of GDM or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance); malformation, stillbirth, successive abortions or birthweight > 4,500 g in previous pregnancies; obesity, metabolic syndrome, age > 45 years, vascular disease; clinical symptoms of diabetes (e.g. glucosuria). Performance of the OGTT (120 min; 75 g glucose) may already be indicated in the first trimester in some women but is mandatory between 24 and 28 gestational weeks in all pregnant women with previous non-pathological glucose metabolism (Evidence level B). Based on the results of the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study GDM is defined, if fasting venous plasma glucose exceeds 92 mg/dl or 1 h 180 mg/dl or 2 h 153 mg/dl after glucose loading (OGTT; international consensus criteria). In case of one pathological value a strict metabolic control is mandatory. All women should receive nutritional counseling and be instructed in blood glucose self-monitoring. If blood glucose levels cannot be maintained in the normal range (fasting < 95 mg/dl and 1 h after meals < 140 mg/dl) insulin therapy should be initiated. Maternal and fetal monitoring is required in order to minimize maternal and fetal/neonatal morbidity and perinatal mortality. After delivery all women with GDM have to be reevaluated as to their glucose tolerance by a 75 g OGTT (WHO criteria) 6

  13. Dietary Patterns and Their Associations with the Diet Quality Index-International (DQI-I) in Korean Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Moon-Kyung; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine dietary pattern, nutritional intake, and diet quality of Korean pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Between October 2008 and May 2012, 166 pregnant women diagnosed with GDM completed a questionnaire and dietary intake was assessed using a 3-day food record. Blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) concentrations were measured and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. Two major dietary patterns ("carbohydrate and vegetable" and "western" patterns) were identified through factor analysis. Dietary pattern scores for each dietary pattern were categorized into tertiles. The dietary quality index-international (DQI-I) was used to measure overall diet quality. Subjects with higher carbohydrate and vegetable pattern scores reported less physical activity (p < 0.05) and have higher diastolic blood pressure levels (p = 0.05). After adjusting for age and energy intake, higher carbohydrate and vegetable pattern scores were associated with higher sodium intakes (p = 0.02), but lower intakes of fat (p = 0.002) and other micronutrients. On the other hand, higher western pattern scores were associated with higher fat intake (p = 0.0001), but lower intakes of sodium (p = 0.01) and other micronutrients. Higher scores for both dietary patterns were associated with lower scores in the moderation category of the DQI-I (p < 0.0001). HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose levels were significantly lower among participants with high DQI-I than those with low DQI-I (p < 0.05). The study findings suggest that many Korean women with GDM do not consume nutritionally adequate or balanced diets, regardless of dietary pattern. PMID:26566516

  14. [Gestational diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Harreiter, Jürgen; Bancher-Todesca, Dagmar; Berger, Angelika; Repa, Andreas; Lechleitner, Monika; Weitgasser, Raimund

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset during pregnancy and is associated with increased feto-maternal morbidity as well as long-term complications in mothers and offspring. Women detected to have diabetes early in pregnancy receive the diagnosis of overt, non-gestational, diabetes (glucose: fasting > 126 mg/dl, spontaneous > 200 mg/dl or HbA1c > 6.5 % before 20 weeks of gestation). GDM is diagnosed by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) or fasting glucose concentrations (> 92 mg/dl). Screening for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes at the first prenatal visit (Evidence level B) is recommended in women at increased risk using standard diagnostic criteria (high risk: history of GDM or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance); malformation, stillbirth, successive abortions or birth weight > 4,500 g in previous pregnancies; obesity, metabolic syndrome, age > 45 years, vascular disease; clinical symptoms of diabetes (e. g. glucosuria)). Performance of the OGTT (120 min; 75 g glucose) may already be indicated in the first trimester in some women but is mandatory between 24 and 28 gestational weeks in all pregnant women with previous non-pathological glucose metabolism (Evidence level B). Based on the results of the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study GDM is defined, if fasting venous plasma glucose exceeds 92 mg/dl or 1 h 180 mg/dl or 2 h 153 mg/dl after glucose loading (OGTT; international consensus criteria). In case of one pathological value a strict metabolic control is mandatory. This diagnostic approach was recently also recommended by the WHO. All women should receive nutritional counseling and be instructed in blood glucose self-monitoring and to increase physical activity to moderate intensity levels- if not contraindicated. If blood glucose levels cannot be maintained in the normal range (fasting < 95 mg/dl and 1 h after meals < 140 mg/dl) insulin

  15. [Gestational diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Bancher-Todesca, Dagmar; Birnbacher, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy and is associated with increased feto-maternal morbidity as well as long-term complications in mothers and offspring. GDM is diagnosed by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) or fasting glucose concentrations in the diabetic range. In case of a high risk for GDM/type 2 diabetes (history of GDM or prediabetes [impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance]; malformation, stillbirth, successive abortions or birth-weight > 4500 g in previous pregnancies) performance of the OGTT (120 min; 75 g glucose) is recommended already in the first trimester and--if normal--the OGTT should be repeated in the second/third trimester. In case of clinical symptoms of diabetes (glucosuria, macrosomia) the test has to be performed immediately. All other women should undergo a diagnostic test between 24 and 28 gestational weeks. If fasting plasma glucose exceeds 95 mg/dl, 1 h 180 mg/dl and 2 hrs 155 mg/dl after glucose loading (OGTT) the woman is classified as GDM (one pathological value is sufficient). In this case a strict metabolic control is mandatory. All women should receive nutritional counseling and be instructed in blood glucose self-monitoring. If blood glucose levels cannot be maintained in the normal range (fasting < 95 mg/dl and 1 h after meals < 130 mg/dl) insulin therapy should be initiated. Maternal and fetal monitoring is required in order to minimize maternal and fetal/neonatal morbidity and perinatal mortality. After delivery all women with GDM have to be reevaluated as to their glucose tolerance by a 75 g OGTT (WHO criteria).

  16. Gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Landon, Mark B; Gabbe, Steven G

    2011-12-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) represents a heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders, which result in varying degrees of maternal hyperglycemia and pregnancy-associated risk. The frequency of GDM is rising globally and may also increase further as less-stringent criteria for the diagnosis are potentially adopted. The additional burden placed on the health care system by increasing cases of GDM requires consideration of diagnostic approaches and currently used treatment strategies. Debate continues to surround both the diagnosis and treatment of GDM despite several recent large-scale studies addressing these controversial issues. As many now have come to reassess their approach to the management of GDM, we provide information in this review to help guide this process. The goal for each health care practitioner should continue to be to provide optimum care for women discovered to have carbohydrate intolerance during pregnancy.

  17. Gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Alfadhli, Eman M.

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is the most common medical complication of pregnancy. It is associated with maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes. Maintaining adequate blood glucose levels in GDM reduces morbidity for both mother and baby. There is a lack of uniform strategies for screening and diagnosing GDM globally. This review covers the latest update in the diagnosis and management of GDM. The initial treatment of GDM consists of diet and exercise. If these measures fail to achieve glycemic goals, insulin should be initiated. Insulin analogs are more physiological than human insulin, and are associated with less risk of hypoglycemia, and may provide better glycemic control. Insulin lispro, aspart, and detemir are approved to be used in pregnancy. Insulin glargine is not approved in pregnancy, but the existing studies did not show any contraindications. The use of oral hypoglycemic agents; glyburide and metformin seems to be safe and effective in pregnancy. PMID:25828275

  18. Gestational diabetes affects fetal autophagy.

    PubMed

    Avagliano, Laura; Massa, Valentina; Terraneo, Laura; Samaja, Michele; Doi, Patrizia; Bulfamante, Gaetano Pietro; Marconi, Anna Maria

    2017-07-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involved in the preservation of energy homeostasis and its dysregulation has been implicated in the development of metabolic disorders, including diabetes mellitus. Gestational diabetes mellitus represents a risk for fetal morbidity and mortality. The present study focuses on the autophagy process in human diabetic placenta and fetal pancreas, compared with controls. Analysis of the autophagy markers LC3, Beclin-1 and p62 suggests an impairment of the autophagy process in diabetic placentas. Results indicate an association between gestational diabetes and autophagy, emphasizing the importance of unravelling the mechanisms regulating this relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Gestational diabetes: A clinical update

    PubMed Central

    Kampmann, Ulla; Madsen, Lene Ring; Skajaa, Gitte Oeskov; Iversen, Ditte Smed; Moeller, Niels; Ovesen, Per

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing in prevalence in tandem with the dramatic increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity in women of childbearing age. Much controversy surrounds the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes, emphasizing the importance and relevance of clarity and consensus. If newly proposed criteria are adopted universally a significantly growing number of women will be diagnosed as having GDM, implying new therapeutic challenges to avoid foetal and maternal complications related to the hyperglycemia of gestational diabetes. This review provides an overview of clinical issues related to GDM, including the challenges of screening and diagnosis, the pathophysiology behind GDM, the treatment and prevention of GDM and the long and short term consequences of gestational diabetes for both mother and offspring. PMID:26240703

  20. Assessing the risk of gestational diabetes in twin gestation.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, C. E.; Scarpelli, S.; LaRosa, D.; Divon, M. Y.

    1995-01-01

    This study examines the hypothesis that twin gestation is a risk factor for gestational diabetes. In a retrospective analysis, the incidence of gestational diabetes in twin and singleton pregnancies was determined in groups matched for maternal age, weight, and parity. One-hour oral glucose challenge tests (50 g) were used to screen 9185 pregnant women. Gestational diabetes was diagnosed when abnormal screens (> or = 130 mg/dL) were followed by two or more abnormal values on a 3-hour (100 g) glucose tolerance test using National Diabetes Data Group (NDDG) criteria. A twin gestation was identified in 1.5% (138/9185) of the pregnancies. Gestational diabetes was diagnosed in 5.8% (8/138) and 5.4% (439/9047) of the twin and singleton pregnancies, respectively. The incidence of gestational diabetes is similar for singleton and twin gestations. PMID:7473851

  1. Trying to understand gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Women with normal glucose tolerance pre-gravid and developing gestational diabetes in late gestation have subclinical metabolic dysfunction prior to conception compared with women with normal glucose tolerance. Because of the 60 % decrease in insulin sensitivity with normal pregnancy, these women develop clinical hyperglycaemia/gestational diabetes in late gestation. The metabolic dysfunction includes impaired insulin response, decreased hepatic suppression of glucose production during insulin infusion and decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, i.e. peripheral insulin resistance. The insulin resistance in normal glucose tolerance pregnancy is related to a decrease in the post-receptor insulin signalling cascade, specifically decreased insulin receptor substrate 1 tyrosine phosphorylation. In women with normal glucose tolerance this is reversed post-partum. In contrast, in gestational diabetes, in addition to the decrease in insulin receptor substrate 1 tyrosine phosphorylation, there is an additional decrease in tyrosine phosphorylation of the intracellular portion of the insulin receptor that is not related to the insulin receptor protein content. Post-partum women with gestational diabetes, who had retention of gestational weight gain, had no significant improvement in insulin sensitivity and increased inflammation expressed as increased plasma and skeletal muscle tumour necrosis factor alpha. The increased inflammation or meta-inflammation is a hallmark of obesity and during pregnancy develops in both white adipose tissue and placenta. Last gene array studies of placenta were associated with alterations in gene expression relating primarily to lipid in contrast to glucose metabolic pathways in gestational diabetes compared with Type 1 diabetes. Future studies are directed at decreasing inflammation prior to and during pregnancy using various lifestyle and nutritional interventions. PMID:24341419

  2. Gestational diabetes insipidus. Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ejmocka-Ambroziak, Anna; Grzechocińska, Barbara; Jastrzebska, Helena; Kochman, Magdalena; Cyganek, Anna; Wielgoś, Mirosław; Zgliczyński, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus is a very rare complication. However, undiagnosed and untreated may lead to serious complications in both mother and fetus. In this study, a case of 34-year-old female patient with diabetes insipidus associated with pregnancy was reported. We discussed process of diagnosis and treatment with particular emphasis on the monitoring of water-electrolyte imbalance during labor.

  3. Detecting and managing gestational diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, M. M.; Noc, A. M.

    1993-01-01

    Gestational diabetes is an asymptomatic metabolic disorder of pregnancy associated with increased morbidity in mother and fetus. Early detection and intervention improve pregnancy outcome. This article reviews the current approach to diagnosis and management. Specific guidelines for nutritional management and insulin use are included. PMID:8495138

  4. Exercise: An Alternative Therapy for Gestational Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artal, Raul

    1996-01-01

    Exercise is encouraged in the management of pregnant women with gestational diabetes or women with Type II diabetes who become pregnant. Although non-weight-bearing exercises may be best for sedentary women, moderate workouts appear to be safe for most women with gestational diabetes. The role of exercise, risk factors, warning signs, and examples…

  5. Exercise: An Alternative Therapy for Gestational Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artal, Raul

    1996-01-01

    Exercise is encouraged in the management of pregnant women with gestational diabetes or women with Type II diabetes who become pregnant. Although non-weight-bearing exercises may be best for sedentary women, moderate workouts appear to be safe for most women with gestational diabetes. The role of exercise, risk factors, warning signs, and examples…

  6. Maternal genotype and gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stuebe, Alison M; Wise, Alison; Nguyen, Thutrang; Herring, Amy; North, Kari E; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether genetic variants associated with glucose homeostasis are associated with gestational diabetes (GDM). We genotyped 899 self-identified Caucasian women and 386 self-identified African-American women in the Pregnancy, Infection and Nutrition (PIN) Studies cohorts for 38 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with type II diabetes (T2DM) and/or glucose homeostasis in European populations. GDM was diagnosed in 56 of 899 (6.2%) Caucasian and 24 of 386 (6.2%) African-American women. Among Caucasian women, GDM was associated with carriage of TCF7L2 rs7901695, MTNR1B rs10830963 and GCKR rs780094 alleles that are associated with T2DM and fasting glucose in nonpregnant populations. Among African-American participants, we found an increased risk among TSPAN8 rs7961581 C allele homozygotes and reduced risk among carriers of the JAZF1 rs864745 T allele. We found several SNPs that are associated with GDM risk in the PIN cohorts. Maternal genotyping may identify women at risk for impaired gestational glucose tolerance. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Gestational diabetes mellitus screening and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Aktün, Hale Lebriz; Uyan, Derya; Yorgunlar, Betül; Acet, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    To verify the usefulness of the World Health Organization criteria for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnant women and its effectiveness in the prevention of maternal and neonatal adverse results in women younger than 35 years without apparent risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. This is a retrospective study based on population involving 1360 pregnant women who delivered and who were followed-up in a university hospital in Istanbul. All women underwent the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test screening, usually in between the 24(th)-28(th) weeks of pregnancy. In all cases, the identification of gestational diabetes mellitus was determined in accordance with the World Health Organization criteria. Approximately 28% of the pregnant women aged younger than 35 years with no risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus were diagnosed with the oral glucose tolerance test in this study. In the gestational diabetes mellitus group, the primary cesarean section rate was importantly higher than that in the non-gestational diabetes mellitus group. Preterm delivery was also associated with gestational diabetes mellitus. The diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus was strongly associated with admittance to the neonatal intensive care unit. Neonatal respiratory problems didn't showed any significant deviation between the groups. There was a moderate association between gestational diabetes mellitus and metabolic complications. Pregnant women with no obvious risk factors were diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus using the World Health Organization criteria. The treatment of these women potentially reduced their risk of adverse maternal and neonatal hyperglycemia-related events, such as cesarean section, polyhydramnios, preterm delivery, admission to neonatal intensive care unit, large for gestational age, and higher neonatal weight.

  8. [Gestational diabetes insipidus during a twin pregnancy].

    PubMed

    De Mesmay, M; Rigouzzo, A; Bui, T; Louvet, N; Constant, I

    2013-02-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus is an uncommon clinical disease whose prevalence is approximately two to three pregnancies per 100,000. It may be isolated or associated with preeclampsia. We report a case of gestational diabetes insipidus in a twin pregnancy, originally isolated during two months, and secondarily complicated by HELLP-syndrome. We recall the specific pathophysiology of polyuric-polydipsic syndrome during pregnancy and summarize its various causes. Finally, we discuss the indications, in case of isolated gestational diabetes insipidus, of treatment by dDAVP.

  9. Placenta changes in pregnancy with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Edu, Antoine; Teodorescu, Cristina; Dobjanschi, Carmen Gabriela; Socol, ZiŢa Zsuzsana; Teodorescu, Valeriu; Matei, Alexandru; Albu, Dinu Florin; Radulian, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Placental damage may be responsible for the fetal complications in pregnancies complicated by diabetes. We have analyzed the prevalence of gestational diabetes (GD) in a population of 109 pregnant women, the risk factors and the placental changes associated with gestational diabetes. Tests carried out were oral glucose tolerance test at 24-28 weeks of gestation, using the IADPSG (International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups) criteria for gestational diabetes, glycated hemoglobin, fasting insulin, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, triglycerides, two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound and, also, there were analyzed macro and microscopic placental fragments from pregnant women with÷without GD. It has been recorded the weight of placenta at birth and there were analyzed the possible pathological changes. The prevalence of GD was 11.9%. We have applied the direct logistic regression to determine the impact of some factors over the probability of association with gestational diabetes. The most powerful predictor was the placental maturity grade, the patients with decreased maturity grade having chances 52.6 times higher than those with an increased placental maturity grade to associate gestational diabetes. Sizes of placentas in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus were significantly increased than in patients without this diagnosis (p=0.012) from week 24-28. Pathological changes were discovered in six of the 13 placentas of women with gestational diabetes mellitus, independent of the level of glycated hemoglobin (p=0.72). The level of hyperglycemia is only partially associated with the presence of placental changes, which may be caused by other maternal factors.

  10. Understanding Gestational Diabetes: A Practical Guide to a Healthy Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This brochure addresses the problem of gestational diabetes and answers the most frequently asked questions about the disease. It begins by defining gestational diabetes and discussing its cause, then addresses such topics as: (1) how gestational diabetes differs from other types of diabetes; (2) who is at risk for developing gestational diabetes…

  11. Fetal programming and gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Lara J; Norman, Jane E; Rice, Gregory E; Illanes, Sebastián E

    2016-12-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is defined by new-onset glucose intolerance during pregnancy. About 2-5% of all pregnant women develop gestational diabetes during their pregnancies and the prevalence has increased considerably during the last decade. This metabolic condition is manifested when pancreatic β-cells lose their ability to compensate for increased insulin resistance during pregnancy, however, the pathogenesis of the disease remains largely unknown. Gestational diabetes is strongly associated with adverse pregnancy outcome as well as with long-term adverse effects on the offspring which likely occurs due to epigenetic modifications of the fetal genome. In the current review we address gestational diabetes and the short and long term complications for both mothers and offspring focusing on the importance of fetal programming in conferring risk of developing diseases in adulthood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Periodontal pathogens and gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dasanayake, A P; Chhun, N; Tanner, A C R; Craig, R G; Lee, M J; Moore, A F; Norman, R G

    2008-04-01

    In previous cross-sectional or case-control studies, clinical periodontal disease has been associated with gestational diabetes mellitus. To test the hypothesis that, in comparison with women who do not develop gestational diabetes mellitus, those who do develop it will have had a greater exposure to clinical and other periodontal parameters, we measured clinical, bacteriological (in plaque and cervico-vaginal samples), immunological, and inflammatory mediator parameters 7 weeks before the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus in 265 predominantly Hispanic (83%) women in New York. Twenty-two cases of gestational diabetes mellitus emerged from the cohort (8.3%). When the cases were compared with healthy control individuals, higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (p=0.004), vaginal levels of Tannerella forsythia (p=0.01), serum C-reactive protein (p=0.01), and prior gestational diabetes mellitus (p=0.006) emerged as risk factors, even though the clinical periodontal disease failed to reach statistical significance (50% in those with gestational diabetes mellitus vs. 37.3% in the healthy group; p=0.38).

  13. The importance of gestational diabetes beyond pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Torres, María Aurora

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the main health problem affecting Mexico's population. The mechanisms by which susceptibility to it is acquired and diabetes develops are topics of ongoing research. In order to prevent type 2 diabetes, one of the challenges is to fully understand gestational diabetes and the hormonal changes and altered carbohydrate metabolism that are associated with it during fetal development. A recent study by the Instituto Nacional de Perinatología found a 12.9% prevalence of gestational diabetes; if the current criteria suggested by the American Diabetes Association were applied, this figure would rise to almost 30%. Identifying mothers and children at high risk of developing diabetes mellitus and its comorbid conditions will help facilitate the timely implementation of preventive measures. This will be a rational use of economic resources in Mexico that will vitally benefit public health.

  14. [Gestational diabetes management: a multidisciplinary treatment algorithm].

    PubMed

    Weinert, Letícia Schwerz; Silveiro, Sandra Pinho; Oppermann, Maria Lúcia; Salazar, Cristiano Caetano; Simionato, Bárbara Marina; Siebeneichler, Aline; Reichelt, Angela Jacob

    2011-10-01

    Effective treatment of gestational diabetes is important as an attempt to avoid unfavorable maternal and fetal outcomes. The objective of this paper is to describe the available therapies to optimize gestational diabetes treatment and to suggest a multidisciplinary approach algorithm. Nutrition therapy is the first option for the majority of these pregnancies; light to moderate physical activity is recommended in the absence of obstetrical contraindications. Medical treatment is recommended if glycemic control is not achieved or if excessive fetal growth is detected by ultrasound. Insulin is the standard treatment although oral antidiabetic drugs have recently been considered an effective and safe option. The monitoring of gestational diabetes treatment includes capillary glucose measurements and evaluation of fetal abdominal circumference by ultrasound performed around the 28th gestational week.

  15. Am I at Risk for Gestational Diabetes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... level is: High 1 Average 0 Low Your health care provider: Will test you as soon as you know you are ... their lifetime. If you had gestational diabetes, your health care provider will test you for diabetes 6 weeks after you give ...

  16. [Fifteen practical questions concerning gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Clay, J-C; Deruelle, P; Fischer, C; Couvreux-Dif, D; Vambergue, A; Cazaubiel, M; Fontaine, P; Subtil, D

    2007-09-01

    With a review of the current literature, a clarification on screening and management of gestational diabetes is hereby set out, within the frame of a Clinical Expert Series. According to the ethnic group, the prevalence varies from 1 to 14%. The treatment is based on dietary advice, insulin. The ACHOIS study demonstrates that the treatment of gestational diabetes significantly decreases perinatal complications (4 to 1%). The place of the oral treatment (glyburide) remains to be defined. In most countries, diagnosis rests on oral glucose test tolerance: Sullivan 50 g glucose test (1 hour) and 100 g test of glucose if positive (3 hours); WHO 75 g test (2 hours). The screening can be systematic or only on risk factors (wide variations between studies). Screening of gestational diabetes is required because its management improves pregnancy outcomes. Despite this, there is no consensus on the strategy of screening and diagnosis.

  17. Gestational Diabetes a Risk Factor for Postpartum Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163195.html Gestational Diabetes a Risk Factor for Postpartum Depression: Study It ... 23, 2017 MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Gestational diabetes and a previous bout of depression can increase ...

  18. Iron, Oxidative Stress and Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Taifeng; Han, Huijun; Yang, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Both iron deficiency and hyperglycemia are highly prevalent globally for pregnant women. Iron supplementation is recommended during pregnancy to control iron deficiency. The purposes of the review are to assess the oxidative effects of iron supplementation and the potential relationship between iron nutrition and gestational diabetes. High doses of iron (~relative to 60 mg or more daily for adult humans) can induce lipid peroxidation in vitro and in animal studies. Pharmaceutical doses of iron supplements (e.g., 10× RDA or more for oral supplements or direct iron supplementation via injection or addition to the cell culture medium) for a short or long duration will induce DNA damage. Higher heme-iron intake or iron status measured by various biomarkers, especially serum ferritin, might contribute to greater risk of gestational diabetes, which may be mediated by iron oxidative stress though lipid oxidation and/or DNA damage. However, information is lacking about the effect of low dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily) on lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and gestational diabetes. Randomized trials of low-dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily) for pregnant women are warranted to test the relationship between iron oxidative stress and insulin resistance/gestational diabetes, especially for iron-replete women. PMID:25255832

  19. Metabolic programming, epigenetics, and gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Pinney, Sara E; Simmons, Rebecca A

    2012-02-01

    The link between an adverse intrauterine environment and the development of disease later in life has been observed in offspring of pregnancies complicated by obesity and diabetes, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unknown. In this review, we highlight recent publications exploring the role of gestational diabetes mellitus in the programming of disease in the offspring. We also review recent publications aiming to identify mechanisms responsible for the "programming effect" that results from exposure to diabetes in utero. Finally, we highlight research on the role of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in an animal model of uteroplacental insufficiency where the offspring develop diabetes as a model by which an exposure to the mother can alter epigenetic modifications that affect expression of key genes and ultimately lead to the development of diabetes in the offspring.

  20. Gestational diabetes mellitus: an updated overview.

    PubMed

    Chiefari, E; Arcidiacono, B; Foti, D; Brunetti, A

    2017-03-10

    The clinical and public health relevance of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is widely debated due to its increasing incidence, the resulting negative economic impact, and the potential for severe GDM-related pregnancy complications. Also, effective prevention strategies in this area are still lacking, and controversies exist regarding diagnosis and management of this form of diabetes. Different diagnostic criteria are currently adopted worldwide, while recommendations for diet, physical activity, healthy weight, and use of oral hypoglycemic drugs are not always uniform. In the present review, we provide an update of current insights on clinical aspects of GDM, by discussing the more controversial issues.

  1. Potential Mechanisms of Exercise in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Golbidi, Saeid; Laher, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance first diagnosed during pregnancy. This condition shares same array of underlying abnormalities as occurs in diabetes outside of pregnancy, for example, genetic and environmental causes. However, the role of a sedentary lifestyle and/or excess energy intake is more prominent in GDM. Physically active women are less likely to develop GDM and other pregnancy-related diseases. Weight gain in pregnancy causes increased release of adipokines from adipose tissue; many adipokines increase oxidative stress and insulin resistance. Increased intramyocellular lipids also increase cellular oxidative stress with subsequent generation of reactive oxygen species. A well-planned program of exercise is an important component of a healthy lifestyle and, in spite of old myths, is also recommended during pregnancy. This paper briefly reviews the role of adipokines in gestational diabetes and attempts to shed some light on the mechanisms by which exercise can be beneficial as an adjuvant therapy in GDM. In this regard, we discuss the mechanisms by which exercise increases insulin sensitivity, changes adipokine profile levels, and boosts antioxidant mechanisms. PMID:23691290

  2. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Where are we now?

    PubMed

    Ashwal, Eran; Hod, Moshe

    2015-12-07

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as any carbohydrate intolerance first diagnosed during pregnancy. The prevalence of GDM is about 2-5% of normal pregnancies and depends of the prevalence of same population to type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is associated with adverse outcome for the mother, the fetus, neonate, child and adult offspring of the diabetic mother. Detection of GDM lies on screening, followed as necessary by diagnostic measures. Screening can either be selective, based upon risk stratification or universal. Timely testing enables the obstetrician to assess glucose tolerance in the presence of the insulin-resistant state of pregnancy and permits treatment to begin before excessive fetal growth has occurred. Once a diagnosis of GDM was made close perinatal surveillance is warranted. The goal of treatment is reducing fetal-maternal morbidity and mortality related with GDM. The exact glucose values needed are still not absolutely proved. The decision whether and when to induce delivery depends on gestational age, estimated fetal weight, maternal glycemic control and bishop score. Future research is needed regarding prevention of GDM, treatment goals and effectiveness of interventions, guidelines for pregnancy care and prevention of long term metabolic sequel for both the infant and the mother.

  3. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Non-insulin management

    PubMed Central

    Magon, Navneet; Seshiah, V.

    2011-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) complicates a substantial number of pregnancies. There is consensus that in patients of GDM, excellent blood glucose control, with diet and, when necessary, oral hypoglycemics and insulin results in improved perinatal outcomes, and appreciably reduces the probability of serious neonatal morbidity compared with routine prenatal care. Goals of metabolic management of a pregnancy complicated with GDM have to balance the needs of a healthy pregnancy with the requirements to control glucose level. Medical nutrition therapy is the cornerstone of therapy for women with GDM. Surveillance with daily self-monitoring of blood glucose has been found to help guide management in a much better way than blood glucose checking in labs and clinics, which tends to be less frequent. Historically, insulin has been the therapeutic agent of choice for controlling hyperglycemia in pregnant women. However, difficulty in medication administration with multiple daily injections, potential for hypoglycemia, and increase in appetite and weight make this therapeutic option cumbersome for many pregnant patients. Use of oral hypogycemic agents (OHAs) in pregnancy has opened new vistas for GDM management. At present, there is a growing acceptance of glyburide (glibenclamide) use as the primary therapy for GDM. Glyburide and metformin have been found to be safe, effective and economical for the treatment of gestational diabetes. Insulin, however, still has an important role to play in GDM. GDM is a window of opportunity, which needs to be seized, for prevention of diabetes in future life. Goal of our educational programs should be not only to improve pregnancy outcomes but also to promote healthy lifestyle changes for the mother that will last long after delivery. Team effort on part of obstetricians and endocrinologists is required to make “the diabetes capital of the world” into “the diabetes care capital of the world”. PMID:22028999

  4. [Recent concepts in gestational diabetes' etiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Hernández Valencia, Marcelino; Zárate, Arturo

    2005-07-01

    Changes in insulin action cause maternal adaptation to fetal nutrient demand. Insulin resistance generates a greater production of insulin to compensate this resistance; however, there could be failure of pancreatic beta-cells to compensate by adequate insulin secretion. Factors linked to the development of gestational diabetes are: increased concentrations of placental growth hormone; peptides produced by adipose tissue, which show predictive value for the development of insulin resistance; adverse effects of intrauterine food restriction; autoimmunity induced by the consumption of some nutrients in early neonatal life; viral infections in children, which could damage pancreatic islets and become incapable of responding to metabolic overload such as pregnancy.

  5. Perceived psychosocial stress and gestational weight gain among women with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Ai; Ferrara, Assiamira; Brown, Susan D; Ehrlich, Samantha F; Tsai, Ai-Lin; Quesenberry, Charles P; Crites, Yvonne; Hedderson, Monique M

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence links perceived stress-a potentially modifiable psychosocial risk factor-with health behaviors and obesity. Yet little is known about the relationship between stress during pregnancy and gestational weight gain, particularly among women with pregnancy complications. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis to examine associations between psychosocial stress during pregnancy and gestational weight gain among women with gestational diabetes. We used baseline data from the Gestational Diabetes's Effects on Moms (GEM) study: 1,353 women with gestational diabetes who delivered a term singleton within Kaiser Permanente Northern California were included. Perceived stress near the time of gestational diabetes diagnosis was measured using the validated Perceived Stress Scale (PSS10). Gestational weight gain was categorized according to the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations. Binomial regression analyses adjusted for gestational age and maternal age at the time of gestational diabetes diagnosis, and race/ethnicity and estimated rate ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence interval (CI). Among women with a normal pregravid Body Mass Index (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2), there was a significant association between high (Q4) PSS score and risk of both exceeding and gaining below the Institute of Medicine recommendations compared to those with lower stress (Q1) [adjusted RR = 2.16 95% CI 1.45-3.21; RR = 1.39 95% CI 1.01-1.91, respectively.] Among women with pregravid overweight/obesity (BMI≥25 kg/m2), there was no association. Although the temporal relationship could not be established from this study, there may be a complex interplay between psychosocial stress and gestational weight gain among women with gestational diabetes. Further studies examining stress earlier in pregnancy, risk of developing gestational diabetes and excess/inadequate gestational weight gain are warranted to clarify these complex relationships.

  6. Postpartum healthcare after gestational diabetes and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ehrenthal, Deborah B; Maiden, Kristin; Rogers, Stephanie; Ball, Amy

    2014-09-01

    Gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy identify women with an elevated lifetime risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Prospective cohort of women recruited from the postpartum service of a large community-based academic obstetrical hospital after delivery of a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes (GDM) or a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (HDP). Interviews were conducted, and validated surveys completed, before hospital discharge and again 3 months postpartum. The study sample included 249 women: 111 with GDM, 127 with HDP, and 11 with both. Most, 230 (92.4%) had a PCP prior to pregnancy and 97 (39.0%) reported an office visit with their PCP during the prenatal period. Of the 176 (70.7%) participants who attended the 3-month study visit, 169 (96.0%) women with either diagnosis reported they had attended their 6-week postpartum visit. By the 3-month study visit, 51 (57.9%) women with GDM had completed follow-up glucose testing; 93 (97.9%) with HDP had follow-up blood pressure testing; and 101 (57.4%) with either diagnosis recalled ever having completed lipid screening. Women least likely to complete screening tests were those who had no college education, less than a high school level of health literacy, and who were not privately insured. There are important opportunities to improve postpartum testing for diabetes and CVD risk factor assessment. Most women were connected to primary care suggesting a "hand-off" to a primary care physician after pregnancy is feasible. More robust strategies may be needed to improve follow-up care for women with less education, lower health literacy, and those without private health insurance.

  7. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Future Cardiovascular Risk: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Burlina, S.; Dalfrà, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus is increasing in parallel with the rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes and obesity around the world. Current evidence strongly suggests that women who have had gestational diabetes mellitus are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. Given the growing prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus, it is important to identify appropriate reliable markers of cardiovascular disease and specific treatment strategies capable of containing obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome in order to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in the women affected. PMID:27956897

  8. Perceived psychosocial stress and gestational weight gain among women with gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Ai; Ferrara, Assiamira; Brown, Susan D.; Ehrlich, Samantha F.; Tsai, Ai-Lin; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Crites, Yvonne; Hedderson, Monique M.

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence links perceived stress—a potentially modifiable psychosocial risk factor—with health behaviors and obesity. Yet little is known about the relationship between stress during pregnancy and gestational weight gain, particularly among women with pregnancy complications. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis to examine associations between psychosocial stress during pregnancy and gestational weight gain among women with gestational diabetes. We used baseline data from the Gestational Diabetes’s Effects on Moms (GEM) study: 1,353 women with gestational diabetes who delivered a term singleton within Kaiser Permanente Northern California were included. Perceived stress near the time of gestational diabetes diagnosis was measured using the validated Perceived Stress Scale (PSS10). Gestational weight gain was categorized according to the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations. Binomial regression analyses adjusted for gestational age and maternal age at the time of gestational diabetes diagnosis, and race/ethnicity and estimated rate ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence interval (CI). Among women with a normal pregravid Body Mass Index (BMI 18.5–24.9 kg/m2), there was a significant association between high (Q4) PSS score and risk of both exceeding and gaining below the Institute of Medicine recommendations compared to those with lower stress (Q1) [adjusted RR = 2.16 95% CI 1.45–3.21; RR = 1.39 95% CI 1.01–1.91, respectively.] Among women with pregravid overweight/obesity (BMI≥25 kg/m2), there was no association. Although the temporal relationship could not be established from this study, there may be a complex interplay between psychosocial stress and gestational weight gain among women with gestational diabetes. Further studies examining stress earlier in pregnancy, risk of developing gestational diabetes and excess/inadequate gestational weight gain are warranted to clarify these complex relationships. PMID:28350836

  9. Gestational diabetes and childhood obesity: what is the link?

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin Y; Sharma, Andrea J; Callaghan, William M

    2012-12-01

    To review recently published studies examining the role of prepregnancy obesity in the relationship between gestational diabetes mellitus and childhood obesity. Seven epidemiologic studies published from January 2011 to February 2012 differentiate between preexisting diabetes mellitus and gestational diabetes mellitus, and six of them examine the role of maternal obesity. In studies that account for maternal obesity as a covariate, the association between gestational diabetes mellitus and childhood obesity is attenuated significantly after adjustment for prepregnancy BMI. In the one study that does not adjust for maternal obesity, maternal glucose level during pregnancy is associated with greater offspring adiposity, independent of the child's diet and lifestyle. This review shows a positive association between maternal gestational diabetes mellitus and offspring overweight and obesity that is attenuated significantly after adjustment for prepregnancy BMI. The relationship between maternal gestational diabetes mellitus and offspring overweight and obesity could reflect fetal programming, shared genes and/or shared environments, such as postnatal diet and physical activity. Maternal gestational hyperglycemia and subsequent fetal hyperinsulinemia may predispose offspring to increased adiposity, impaired glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Because maternal obesity is a more prevalent condition than gestational diabetes mellitus and strongly associated with offspring obesity, effective interventions addressing prepregnancy obesity need to be further explored as they may have a greater public health impact on childhood overweight and obesity than those targeting women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

  10. [Gestational diabetes in the light of current literature].

    PubMed

    Hawryluk, Jarosław; Grafka, Agnieszka; Gęca, Tomasz; Łopucki, Maciej

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents current data on the pathophysiology of gestational diabetes mellitus, classification and new diagnostic methods. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is defined as carbohydrate intolerance first detected during pregnancy. It is the most common metabolic disorder of pregnant women. The frequency of its occurrence depends on inter alia body weight, belonging to a particular ethnic group and diagnostic methods. GDM reveals usually between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. The development of diabetes in pregnancy poses a threat to both the mother and the fetus. It is associated with an increased incidence of birth defects in newborns, impaired intrauterine fetal growth, higher incidence of premature births and greater percentage of the intrauterine fetus death. Amongst women complicated by gestational diabetes arterial hypertension more often unfolds. In the development of gestational diabetes mellitus important role apart from maternal and fetal hyperinsulinemia play: antagonistic to insulin placental hormones, TNFα, placental pro-inflammatory cytokines, resistin, leptin ghrelin.

  11. [Predisposition and phenotypes of gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Kleinwechter, H; Demandt, N; Schäfer-Graf, U

    2014-05-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance first diagnosed with a 75 gram oral glucose tolerance test based on IADPSG criteria which had been recently adopted by WHO. In industrial countries GDM is one of the most frequent pregnancy complications. In 2012, in Germany GDM had been diagnosed in 4,3 % of all births, overall 27,700 cases. GDM has to be considered as a preliminary stage of type 2 diabetes with insulin resistance and inadequate β-cell-compensation. Additionally, adverse metabolic profile, associations with inflammatory parameters, with D vitamin metabolism, and insufficient decline of renal threshold for glucose had been identified in women with GDM. Within 10 years after GDM roughly 50 % of the women convert to overt diabetes, mostly type 2. GDM and type 2 diabetes share potential candidate genes. In about 1 % of GDM in Caucasian women a mutation in glucokinase gene had been found (GCK-MODY). Predisposition to GDM is predominantly characterized by family history of diabetes, previous GDM in pregnancies, factors of metabolic syndrome, and unfavorable life style. The probability for GDM rises with increasing mother's age and preconceptional BMI. Via fetal programming GDM dispones to offspring obesity as early as school entry. Prevention of GDM focus on regular physical exercise, normalizing body weight before conception, reducing excess intake of animal protein and soft drinks, planning of pregnancy in younger ages, and avoiding pollutant exposition as well as smoking cessation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Metformin in gestational diabetes: An emerging contender

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance occurring first time during pregnancy. Its prevalence is simultaneously increasing with the global rise of diabesity. GDM commonly develops, when maternal glucose metabolism is unable to compensate for the progressive development of insulin resistance, arising primarily from the consistently rising diabetogenic placental hormones. It classically develops during the second or third trimester. Theoretically, insulin sensitizers should have been the ideal agent in its treatment, given the insulin resistance, the major culprit in its pathogenesis. Fortunately, majority of women can be treated satisfactorily with lifestyle modification, and approximately 20% requires more intensive treatment. For several decades, insulin has been the most reliable treatment strategy and the gold standard in GDM. Metformin is effective insulin sensitizing agent and an established first line drug in type 2 diabetes currently. As it crosses the placenta, a safety issue remains an obstacle and, therefore, metformin is currently not recommended in the treatment of GDM. Nevertheless, given the emerging clinically equivalent safety and efficacy data of metformin compared to insulin, it appears that it may perhaps open a rather new door in managing GDM. The aim of this review is to critically analyze, the safety and efficacy data of metformin regarding its use in GDM and pregnant mothers with polycystic ovarian disease, which has emerged in past decades. PMID:25729685

  13. Gestational diabetes: risks, management, and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is commonly defined as glucose intolerance first recognized during pregnancy. Diagnostic criteria for GDM have changed over the decades, and several definitions are currently used; recent recommendations may increase the prevalence of GDM to as high as one of five pregnancies. Perinatal complications associated with GDM include hypertensive disorders, preterm delivery, shoulder dystocia, stillbirths, clinical neonatal hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and cesarean deliveries. Postpartum complications include obesity and impaired glucose tolerance in the offspring and diabetes and cardiovascular disease in the mothers. Management strategies increasingly emphasize optimal management of fetal growth and weight. Monitoring of glucose, fetal stress, and fetal weight through ultrasound combined with maternal weight management, medical nutritional therapy, physical activity, and pharmacotherapy can decrease comorbidities associated with GDM. Consensus is lacking on ideal glucose targets, degree of caloric restriction and content, algorithms for pharmacotherapy, and in particular, the use of oral medications and insulin analogs in lieu of human insulin. Postpartum glucose screening and initiation of healthy lifestyle behaviors, including exercise, adequate fruit and vegetable intake, breastfeeding, and contraception, are encouraged to decrease rates of future glucose intolerance in mothers and offspring. PMID:21151681

  14. Preconceptional Iron Intake and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Anne Marie; Mitchell, Allen A.; Werler, Martha M.

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the impact of preconceptional heme and non-heme iron on gestational diabetes mellitius (GDM) in the Boston University Slone Epidemiology Birth Defects Study (BDS). This retrospective cohort analysis included 7229 participants enrolled in the BDS between 1998 and 2008 who gave birth to non-malformed infants and were free of pre-existing diabetes. All data were collected through structured interviews conducted within 6 months of delivery. Calorie-adjusted and multivariable odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression models. Preconceptional dietary heme iron was modestly associated with an elevated risk of GDM among those (multivariable OR comparing the fifth quintile to the first: 1.55; 95% CI 0.98, 2.46). Conversely, preconceptional dietary non-heme iron was associated with a decreased risk of GDM among those in the fifth quintile of intake compared to the first (multivariable OR: 0.48; 95% CI 0.28, 0.81). Women who consumed supplemental iron during preconception also had a decreased risk of GDM (multivariable OR: 0.78; 95% CI 0.60, 1.02). In conclusion, our data support a positive association between preconceptional heme iron intake and GDM and an inverse association between preconceptional non-heme iron intake from foods and preconceptional intake from supplements. PMID:27231921

  15. Gestational Diabetes Insipidus Associated with HELLP Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gambito, Renela; Chan, Michael; Sheta, Mohamed; Ramirez-Arao, Precious; Gurm, Harmeet; Tunkel, Allan; Nivera, Noel

    2012-01-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus is a rare, but well recognized, complication of pregnancy. It is related to excess vasopressinase enzyme activity which is metabolized in the liver. A high index of suspicion of gestational diabetes insipidus is required in a correct clinical setting especially in the presence of other risk factors such as preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and twin pregnancies. We are presenting a case of gestational diabetes insipidus in a patient with HELLP syndrome. The newborn in this case also had hypernatremia thereby raising possibilities of vasopressinase crossing the placenta.

  16. The Infant Born to a Woman with Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Povinelli, Theresa; Lim, Caitlin; Raines, Deborah A

    2017-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance with onset during pregnancy. During pregnancy, women with GDM develop insulin resistance, which results in altered glucose tolerance. As a result, there are frequent episodes of hyperglycemia and high levels of circulating amino acids, increasing the transfer of nutrients to the fetus. This article discusses the role of the mother-baby nursing in the care of neonates born to women with gestational diabetes.

  17. Gestational diabetes mellitus: metabolic control during labour.

    PubMed

    Balsells, M; Corcoy, R; Adelantado, J M; García-Patterson, A; Altirriba, O; de Leiva, A

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM): 1) metabolic control during labour using a standardised protocol; 2) the influence of therapy during pregnancy in intrapartum metabolic control and insulin requirements; and 3) the impact of maternal glycaemia during labour on neonatal hypoglycaemia. An observational study of 85 women with GDM (54 insulin-treated) was performed. Intrapartum metabolic management included i.v. glucose and insulin infusions, urinary ketone measurement and hourly capillary blood glucose (CBG) monitoring. Mean CBG from arrival to delivery was 4.7 +/- 1.1 mmol/l with 83% of mean CBG values within the target range (2.8-6.9 mmol/l). Mean CBG and insulin requirements were unrelated to therapy during pregnancy, but hypoglycaemia (CBG<2.8 mmol/l) was more frequent in women receiving insulin during pregnancy (40.7 vs 19.4 %, p<0.01). In several logistic regression models, CBG during labour was predictive of neonatal hypoglycaemia. We conclude that in women with GDM, the use of a standardised intrapartum management protocol is associated to fair metabolic control, that insulin requirements during labour are unrelated to therapy during pregnancy and that high CBG during labour increases the risk of neonatal hypoglycaemia.

  18. Gestational diabetes mellitus, programing and epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jie; Yang, Huixia

    2014-08-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common medical complication in pregnancy. Offspring exposed to maternal hyperglycemia have a higher birth weight and are prone to develop metabolic disease in adult life. The intrauterine environmental or nutritional status seems to be involved in the fetal programing. The concept of "Developmental Origins of Health and Disease" (DOHaD) has been widely accepted and it brings new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of human diseases. The underlying mechanism is still under discussion and epigenetic mechanisms may provide an explanation for the phenomenon. The aim of this review is to illustrate the role of epigenetic modifications in the development of insulin resistance in metabolic diseases induced by adverse intrauterine exposures. Changes in epigenetic mechanism may be an early event in pathogenesis and progression of the metabolic disease in humans. Studies on epigenetic modifications contribute to our understanding of long-term effects of in utero exposure and shed light on the disease prevention and treatment by modulating epigenetic changes.

  19. Gestational Diabetes Testing, Narrative, and Medical Distrust.

    PubMed

    Edwell, Jennifer; Jack, Jordynn

    2017-03-01

    In this article, we investigate the role of scientific and patient narratives on perceptions of the medical debate around gestational diabetes (GDM) testing. Among medical scientists, we show that the narrative surrounding GDM testing affirms that future research and data will lead to medical consensus. We call this narrative trajectory the "deferred quest." For patients, however, diagnosis and their subsequent discovery that biomedicine does not speak in one voice ruptures their trust in medical authority. This new distrust creates space for patients to develop a Frankian quest narrative where they become the protagonist in their story. Additionally, across these different narratives, we observe how character is constructed and employed to negotiate trust. We conclude that healthcare providers should assess the narrative trajectory adopted by patients after diagnosis. Also, we suggest that providers acknowledge the lack of medical consensus to their patients. This veracity would foster women's sense of trust in their provider as well as allow women to be active interlocutors in a debate that ultimately plays out in their deliberation about their body, pregnancy, and risk.

  20. Exercise guidelines for gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Padayachee, Cliantha; Coombes, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide. This disease has many detrimental consequences for the woman, the unborn foetus and child. The management of GDM aims to mediate the effects of hyperglycaemia by controlling blood glucose levels. Along with pharmacology and dietary interventions, exercise has a powerful potential to assist with blood glucose control. Due to the uncertainty of risks and benefits of exercise during pregnancy, women tend to avoid exercise. However, under adequate supervision exercise is both safe and beneficial in the treatment of GDM. Therefore it is vital that exercise is incorporated into the continuum of care for women with GDM. Medical doctors should be able to refer to competently informed exercise professionals to aid in GDM treatment. It is important that exercise treatment is informed by research. Hence, the development of evidence-based guidelines is important to inform practice. Currently there are no guidelines for exercise in GDM. This review aims to assess the efficacy of exercise for the management of GDM in order to establish an exercise prescription guideline specific to the condition. It is recommended that women with GDM should do both aerobic and resistance exercise at a moderate intensity, a minimum of three times a week for 30-60 min each time. PMID:26240700

  1. Pharmacological Management of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bergel, Riki; Hadar, Eran; Toledano, Yoel; Hod, Moshe

    2016-11-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the most common morbidities complicating pregnancy, with short- and long-term consequences to the mothers, fetuses, and newborns. Management and treatment are aimed to achieve best possible glycemic control, while avoiding hypoglycemia and ensuring maternal and fetal safety. It involves behavioral modifications, nutrition and medications, if needed; concurrent with maternal and fetal surveillance for possible adverse outcomes. This review aims to elaborate on the pharmacological options for GDM therapy. We performed an extensive literature review of different available studies, published during the last 50 years, concerning pharmacological therapy for GDM, dealing with safety and efficacy, for both fetal and maternal morbidity consequences; as well as failure and success in establishing appropriate metabolic and glucose control. Oral medication therapy is a safe and effective treatment modality for GDM and in some circumstances may serve as first-line therapy when nutritional modifications fail. When oral agents fail to establish glucose control then insulin injections should be added. Determining the best oral therapy in inconclusive, although it seems that metformin is slightly superior to glyburide, in some aspects. As for parenteral therapy, all insulins listed in this article are considered both safe and effective for treatment of hyperglycemia during pregnancy. Importantly, a better safety profile, with similar efficacy is documented for most analogues. As GDM prevalence rises, there is a need for successful monitoring and treatment for patients. Caregivers should know the possible and available therapeutic options.

  2. Diagnosing gestational diabetes mellitus in the Danish National Birth Cohort.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Sjurdur F; Houshmand-Oeregaard, Azedeh; Granström, Charlotta; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Damm, Peter; Bech, Bodil H; Vaag, Allan A; Zhang, Cuilin

    2017-05-01

    The Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) contains comprehensive information on diet, lifestyle, constitutional and other major characteristics of women during pregnancy. It provides a unique source for studies on health consequences of gestational diabetes mellitus. Our aim was to identify and validate the gestational diabetes mellitus cases in the cohort. We extracted clinical information from hospital records for 1609 pregnancies included in the Danish National Birth Cohort with a diagnosis of diabetes during or before pregnancy registered in the Danish National Patient Register and/or from a Danish National Birth Cohort interview during pregnancy. We further validated the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus in 2126 randomly selected pregnancies from the entire Danish National Birth Cohort. From the individual hospital records, an expert panel evaluated gestational diabetes mellitus status based on results from oral glucose tolerance tests, fasting blood glucose and Hb1c values, as well as diagnoses made by local obstetricians. The audit categorized 783 pregnancies as gestational diabetes mellitus, corresponding to 0.89% of the 87 792 pregnancies for which a pregnancy interview for self-reported diabetes in pregnancy was available. From the randomly selected group the combined information from register and interviews could correctly identify 96% (95% CI 80-99.9%) of all cases in the entire Danish National Birth Cohort population. Positive predictive value, however, was only 59% (56-61%). The combined use of data from register and interview provided a high sensitivity for gestational diabetes mellitus diagnosis. The low positive predictive value, however, suggests that systematic validation by hospital record review is essential not to underestimate the health consequences of gestational diabetes mellitus in future studies. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  3. Platelet profile in patients with gestational diabetes: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Sak, Muhammet Erdal; Soydinç, Hatice Ender; Özler, Ali; Evsen, Mehmet Sıddık; Turgut, Abdülkadir; Sak, Sibel; Gül, Talip

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare alterations in the morphology and function of platelets occurring in gestational diabetes and healthy pregnancies. Material and Methods: A retrospective study was performed of 77 pregnant women: 42 cases with gestational diabetes and 35 healthy controls. The two groups were compared in terms of demographics and platelet parameters derived from complete blood counts. Results: The mean platelet volume (p=0.001) and HbA1c (p<0.001) were significantly increased in the patients with gestational diabetes. The mean platelet volume was well correlated with the platelet distribution width (rs=0.404, p<0.001) and the platelet count (rs=0.355, p=0.002) Conclusion: The mean platelet volume and other platelet parameters may significantly aid the identification of diabetic pregnants at risk for vascular complications. The role and possible clinical relevance of these changes during diabetic pregnancy need to be investigated in further studies. PMID:24592046

  4. Polymorphism of the renalase gene in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Syeda Sadia; Jamil, Zehra; Alam, Faiza; Malik, Hajira Zafar; Madhani, Sarosh Irfan; Ahmad, Muhammad Saad; Shabbir, Tayyab; Rehmani, Muhammed Noman; Rabbani, Amna

    2017-01-01

    Renalase is considered as a novel candidate gene for type 2 diabetes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship of serum renalase and two single nucleotide polymorphisms with gestational diabetes mellitus. One hundred and ninety-eight normotensive pregnant females (n = 99 gestational diabetes mellitus; n = 99 euglycemic pregnant controls) were classified according to the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study criteria. Fasting and 2-h post glucose load blood levels and anthropometric assessment was performed. Serum renalase was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas DNA samples were genotyped for renalase single nucleotide polymorphisms rs2576178 and rs10887800 using Polymerase chain reaction-Restriction fragment length polymorphism method. In an age-matched case control study, no difference was observed in the serum levels of renalase (p > 0.05). The variant rs10887800 showed an association with gestational diabetes mellitus and remained significant after multiple adjustments (p < 0.05), whereas rs2576178 showed weak association (p = 0.030) that was lost after multiple adjustments (p = 0.09). We inferred a modest association of the rs10887800 polymorphism with gestational diabetes. Although gestational diabetes mellitus is self-reversible, yet presence of this minor G allele might predispose to metabolic syndrome phenotypes in near the future.

  5. Healthy Pre-Pregnancy Diet and Exercise May Reduce Risk of Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy Diet and Exercise May Reduce Risk of Gestational Diabetes Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... they become pregnant are less likely to develop gestational diabetes mellitus, a type of diabetes that occurs only ...

  6. The effects of polycystic ovary syndrome on gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Aktun, Hale Lebriz; Yorgunlar, Betul; Acet, Mustafa; Aygun, Banu Kumbak; Karaca, Nilay

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the inter-relationship between polycystic ovary syndrome and gestational diabetes mellitus, and demonstrate maternal and fetal outcomes. This was a case-control study in 1360 pregnant women who received a diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus between 24 and 28 weeks of gestational age. Among all diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus, 150 pregnant women had received a polycystic ovary syndrome, and 160 women who did not have polycystic ovary syndrome were designated as controls. The incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension was 26.3% and 12% in the case and control groups, respectively. Preeclampsia was seen at an incidence of 12% and 6% in case and in control groups, respectively. The difference in neonatal hypoglycemia between the two groups was statistically significant, with an incidence of 17% and 5% in the case and in control groups, respectively. This study demonstrated that the presence of polycystic ovary syndrome along with gestational diabetes mellitus increases the risk of pregnancy induced hypertension by 2.4 fold, preeclampsia by 2 fold and neonatal hypoglycemia by 3.2 fold, compared to gestational diabetes mellitus alone.

  7. Italian risk factor-based screening for gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Corrado, F; Pintaudi, B; Di Vieste, G; Interdonato, M L; Magliarditi, M; Santamaria, A; D'Anna, R; Di Benedetto, A

    2014-09-01

    There is a debate about whether universal or risk factors-based screening is most appropriate for gestational diabetes diagnosis. The aim of our retrospective study was to compare in our population the universal screening test recommended by the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) panel and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) versus the selective screening proposed by the United Kingdom National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines (NICE) but modified by the Italian National Institute of Health. From May 2010 to October 2011 all consecutive pregnant women were screened for gestational diabetes according to the IADPSG's panel criteria, while all the risk factors for each patient were registered. Of the 1015 pregnant women included in the study, 113 (11%) were diagnosed with gestational diabetes and 26 (23%) of them would not have been identified by the selective screening proposed by the Italian National Institute of Health. However, all the risk factors considered by the selective screening revealed a good predictive role except for maternal age ≥ 35 years (OR: 0.98). In the group without the risk factors considered, it was reported the predictive role for gestational diabetes of prepregnancy BMI and nulliparity. The selective risk factors-based screening proposed by the Italian National Institute of Health has detected 77% of gestational diabetes cases in our population, sparing the oral glucose tolerance test for more than 40% of pregnant women at the same time. More information on the clinical impact of this choice could be obtained by a strict analysis of treatment, perinatal outcome and follow-up of an adequate sample size of "missed" gestational diabetes.

  8. Histopathological placental lesions in mild gestational hyperglycemic and diabetic women

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate and compare the incidence of histopathological placental lesions in mild gestational hyperglycemia, gestational diabetes and overt diabetes at term and preterm gestation. Research design and methods One-hundred-and-thirty-one placental samples were collected from Diabetes mellitus (DM) positive screened patients. Two diagnostic tests, glycemic profile and 100 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in parallel identified 4 groups normoglycemic, mild gestational hyperglycemia (MGH), gestational DM (GDM) or overt DM (DM). Placental tissue specimens and sections from 4 groups were obtained by uniform random sampling and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Results Placentas from MGH group presented 17 types of histopathological change and higher rates of syncytial nodes and endarteritis. GDM placentas presented only nine types of histopathological change, high rates of dysmaturity, low rates of calcification and no syncytial nodes. Overt DM placentas showed 22 types of histopathological change, 21 of which were present in the preterm period. There were histopathological similarities between MGH and DM placentas, but the former exhibited a higher incidence of endarteritis, which has been described as a "post-mortem" phenomenon. Conclusion Our results confirmed that the distinct placental changes associated with DM and MGH depend on gestational period during which the diabetic insult occurs. It may reasonably be inferred that subclinical maternal hyperglycemia during pregnancy, as showed in MGH group, is responsible for increased placental endarteritis, a postmortem lesion in the live fetus. PMID:21831283

  9. Optimizing postpartum care for the patient with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Noelle G; Niznik, Charlotte M; Yee, Lynn M

    2017-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus poses well-established risks to both the mother and infant. As >50% of women with gestational diabetes mellitus will develop type 2 diabetes mellitus in their lifetime, performing postpartum oral glucose tolerance testing is paramount to initiation of appropriate lifestyle interventions and pharmacologic therapy. Nonetheless, test completion among women with gestational diabetes mellitus is estimated to be <50%, with particularly low rates in Latina patients, as well as patients with public insurance, low education levels, and low health literacy. Data suggest our current health services infrastructure loses patients in the postpartum gap between pregnancy-focused care and primary care. Previous studies have suggested strategies to promote oral glucose tolerance testing completion to identify type 2 diabetes mellitus. Based on existing evidence, we propose best practices for the postpartum care of women with gestational diabetes mellitus: (1) enhanced patient support for identifying long-term health care providers, (2) patient-centered medical home utilization when possible, (3) patient and provider test reminders, and (4) formalized obstetrician-primary care provider hand offs using the Situation Background Assessment Recommendation (SBAR) mnemonic. These strategies deserve future investigation to solidify a multilevel approach for identifying and preventing the continuum of diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neighbourhood food environment and gestational diabetes in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Janevic, Teresa; Borrell, Luisa N.; Savitz, David A.; Herring, Amy H.; Rundle, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Summary The association between neighbourhood characteristics and gestational diabetes has not been examined previously. We investigated the relationship between the number of healthy food outlets (supermarkets; fruit/vegetable and natural food stores), and unhealthy food outlets (fast food; pizza; bodegas; bakeries; convenience, candy/nut and meat stores) in census tract of residence, and gestational diabetes in New York City. Gestational diabetes, census tract and individual-level covariates were ascertained from linked birth-hospital data for 210 926 singleton births from 2001 to 2002 and linked to commercial data on retail food outlets. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) were estimated using a multilevel logistic model. No association between food environment measures and gestational diabetes was found, with aORs ranging from 0.95 to 1.04. However, an increased odds of pre-pregnancy weight >200 lbs for women living in a given neighbourhood with no healthy food outlets [aOR = 1.14, 95% CI 1.07, 1.21] or only one healthy food place [aOR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.04, 1.18] relative to two or more healthy food outlets was found. Due to probable misclassification of neighbourhood food environment and pre-pregnancy obesity results are likely to be biased towards the null. Future research, including validity studies, on the neighbourhood food environment, obesity during pregnancy and gestational diabetes is warranted. PMID:20415754

  11. Neighbourhood food environment and gestational diabetes in New York City.

    PubMed

    Janevic, Teresa; Borrell, Luisa N; Savitz, David A; Herring, Amy H; Rundle, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    The association between neighbourhood characteristics and gestational diabetes has not been examined previously. We investigated the relationship between the number of healthy food outlets (supermarkets; fruit/vegetable and natural food stores), and unhealthy food outlets (fast food; pizza; bodegas; bakeries; convenience, candy/nut and meat stores) in census tract of residence, and gestational diabetes in New York City. Gestational diabetes, census tract and individual-level covariates were ascertained from linked birth-hospital data for 210 926 singleton births from 2001 to 2002 and linked to commercial data on retail food outlets. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) were estimated using a multilevel logistic model. No association between food environment measures and gestational diabetes was found, with aORs ranging from 0.95 to 1.04. However, an increased odds of pre-pregnancy weight >200 lbs for women living in a given neighbourhood with no healthy food outlets [aOR = 1.14, 95% CI 1.07, 1.21] or only one healthy food place [aOR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.04, 1.18] relative to two or more healthy food outlets was found. Due to probable misclassification of neighbourhood food environment and pre-pregnancy obesity results are likely to be biased towards the null. Future research, including validity studies, on the neighbourhood food environment, obesity during pregnancy and gestational diabetes is warranted.

  12. Abuse in Childhood or Adolescence and Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Susan M.; Tobias, Deirdre K.; Clark, Cari J.; Zhang, Cuilin; Hu, Frank B.; Rich-Edwards, Janet W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Early life abuse has been linked to later Type 2 diabetes, but its association with gestational diabetes has not been examined. The aim of this study was to examine the association between childhood and adolescent abuse victimization and risk of gestational diabetes in the Nurses’ Health Study II. Methods Participants were asked about experiences of physical and sexual abuse in childhood or adolescence in 2001 and about history of pregnancy complications in 2009. Mothers of singleton live births who provided information on their abuse history comprised the study sample. Modified Poisson regression was used to estimate risk ratios and 95% CIs for gestational diabetes as a function of physical and sexual abuse victimization. Analyses were conducted in 2014–2015. Results Of 45,550 women in the analysis, 8% reported severe physical abuse and 11% reported forced sexual activity in childhood or adolescence. Approximately 3% (n=3,181) of pregnancies were complicated by gestational diabetes. In adjusted models, severe physical abuse was associated with a 42% greater gestational diabetes risk (risk ratio=1.42, 95% CI=1.21, 1.66) relative to no physical abuse and forced sexual activity was associated with a 30% greater risk (95% CI=1.14, 1.49). Women with histories of both physical and sexual abuse were at higher risk than women exposed to a single type of abuse. These associations were not explained by overweight status in early adulthood or prior to pregnancy. Conclusions Childhood and adolescent victimization is associated with increased risk of gestational diabetes in adult women. PMID:26547539

  13. Neonatal outcomes according to different therapies for gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Silva, Amanda L da; Amaral, Augusto R do; Oliveira, Daniela S de; Martins, Lisiane; Silva, Mariana R E; Silva, Jean Carl

    To compare different neonatal outcomes according to the different types of treatments used in the management of gestational diabetes mellitus. This was a retrospective cohort study. The study population comprised pregnant women with gestational diabetes treated at a public maternity hospital from July 2010 to August 2014. The study included women aged at least 18 years, with a singleton pregnancy, who met the criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus. Blood glucose levels, fetal abdominal circumference, body mass index and gestational age were considered for treatment decision-making. The evaluated neonatal outcomes were: type of delivery, prematurity, weight in relation to gestational age, Apgar at 1 and 5min, and need for intensive care unit admission. The sample consisted of 705 pregnant women. The neonatal outcomes were analyzed based on the treatment received. Women treated with metformin were less likely to have children who were small for gestational age (95% CI: 0.09-0.66) and more likely to have a newborn adequate for gestational age (95% CI: 1.12-3.94). Those women treated with insulin had a lower chance of having a preterm child (95% CI: 0.02-0.78). The combined treatment with insulin and metformin resulted in higher chance for a neonate to be born large for gestational age (95% CI: 1.14-11.15) and lower chance to be born preterm (95% CI: 0.01-0.71). The type of treatment did not affect the mode of delivery, Apgar score, and intensive care unit admission. The pediatrician in the delivery room can expect different outcomes for diabetic mothers based on the treatment received. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Perceived needs in women with gestational diabetes: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Khooshehchin, Taraneh Emamgoli; Keshavarz, Zohre; Afrakhteh, Maryam; Shakibazadeh, Elham; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes is the most common medical complication of pregnancy. It can be associated with many complications for mother and fetus. Gestational diabetes is also one of the main health issues in Iran. Therefore, the present study is aimed at a deeper understanding of women’s experiences of gestational diabetes and their perceived needs to inform future lifestyle interventions. Methods This qualitative content analysis study was carried out in 2015. Participants were pregnant women diagnosed with gestational diabetes in the 24th to 36th week of pregnancy, who were referred to the clinics affiliated with Shahid Beheshti Medical Science University in Tehran, Iran. In-depth interviews were conducted with participants, using semi-structured questions. Interviews were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Conventional content analysis was carried out for data analysis. Interviews continued until data saturation was obtained. Data were coded in MAXQDA software (version 11). Results Content analysis highlighted two themes; educational needs and need to support. The former was featured with five main categories: information sources, education process, unknown and known, weaknesses of public information system, and eagerness to learn. The latter was featured with two main categories: family support and social support. Conclusion Clarifying the needs of the mothers with gestational diabetes, leads to better and proper education planning and a program toward the improvement of health, self-care, and prevention of diabetes. PMID:28163857

  15. Gestational diabetes insipidus: a review of an underdiagnosed condition.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Nikolay; Audibert, François; Bedard, Marie-Josée; Mahone, Michèle; Goffinet, François; Kadoch, Isaac-Jacques

    2010-03-01

    To review the etiology, diagnosis, and management of diabetes insipidus during pregnancy. A search of the literature was performed in PubMed using key word searching and citation snowballing to identify articles published in English between January 1, 1980, and December 31, 2008, on the subject of diabetes insipidus during pregnancy. Once the articles were identified, a thorough review of all results was conducted. Results and conclusions were compiled and summarized. We reviewed 50 studies selected using the following key words: diabetes insipidus, pregnancy, arginine vasopressin, vasopressinase. Gestational diabetes insipidus is underdiagnosed because polyuria is often considered normal during pregnancy. Clinicians caring for pregnant women should consider screening for gestational diabetes insipidus, because it could be associated with serious underlying pathology.

  16. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Post-partum Risk and Follow up.

    PubMed

    Poola-Kella, Silpa; Steinman, Rachel A; Mesmar, Bayan; Malek, Rana

    2017-09-11

    Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at an increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we will discuss postpartum cardiovascular and diabetes risk in women with a history of GDM and different ways to improve postpartum screening. This review involves a comprehensive literature review on gestational diabetes and post-partum risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus as well as post-partum screening methods. Cardiovascular risk post-partum is potentiated by increased inflammatory markers leading to worsening atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events downstream. Decreased insulin sensitivity and β cell compensation, recurrent GDM, maternal factors such as pre and post-partum weight gain and lactation may contribute to T2DM risk. Postpartum glucose testing is essential in screening women as hyperglycemia in pregnancy has long term effects on both cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk on the mother. Long and short term improvement to post-partum glucose testing is essential to decreasing cardiometabolic and diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Predictors for antenatal insulin requirement in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Subarna; Nayak, Prasanta Kumar; Sahoo, Jayaprakash; Mathew, Agnes; Padma, Alaganandam; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar; Agrawal, Sarita

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify pre-gestational and gestational factors predicting subsequent insulin requirement in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Maternal parameters were compared between mothers achieving glycemic control with or without the addition of antenatal insulin therapy (AIT). Insulin was required only in 8/83 (10%) patients for glycemic control. Those who needed insulin had a stronger family history of diabetes and higher first hour plasma glucose along with multiple (>1) abnormal values during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in univariate analysis (p < 0.05). The first hour plasma glucose value of ≥ 9.72 mmol/l predicted requirement of AIT in GDM mothers with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 73%. However, only positive family history of diabetes mellitus among first degree relatives and multiple abnormal values in OGTT were independent predictors for antenatal insulin requirement in regression analysis.

  18. [Screening for gestational diabetes: Still many unsolved issues].

    PubMed

    Bartolo, S; Vambergue, A; Deruelle, P

    2016-02-01

    For many years, there is a debate on gestational diabetes screening, including what screening test and thresholds to use. The purpose of this literature review is to determine whether gestational diabetes screening in France meets the 10 definition criteria of the WHO. The DG is a public health problem, with a natural history partially known and detectable at an early stage. Currently, there is no data showing that there is a benefit to treat patient screens by the new criteria. The one-step approach-screening test can only detect fetal complications and not maternal complications. It seems to be acceptable for the population of pregnant women. The diagnostic test and treatment also seem to be acceptable to us. To this day, its reproducibility is uncertain. Screening leads to an increase in obstetric interventions. Several studies found that screening for gestational diabetes is cost-effective but in a different context of care than in France.

  19. Fasting glycaemia to simplify screening for gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ryser Rüetschi, J; Jornayvaz, F R; Rivest, R; Huhn, E A; Irion, O; Boulvain, M

    2016-12-01

    Recommendations in Switzerland on screening for gestational diabetes endorse the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group consensus. As universal testing is time consuming and glucose loading is unpleasant, the recommendations include a simplification, not performing the glucose loading in women with fasting glycaemia <4.4 mmol/l. Our objective was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of this simplified strategy, compared with the complete test, in our population with a low prevalence of gestational diabetes. We collected 2298 complete 75-g glucose tolerance tests. We simulated stopping the test, so avoiding the glucose loading and further glycaemia, if fasting glycaemia was <4.4 or ≥5.1 mmol/l. Unselected pregnant women from Geneva and Basel, at 24-28 weeks of gestation. We calculated the sensitivity, and the percentage of women who would avoid the complete test with the strategy based on fasting glycaemia. The prevalence of gestational diabetes was 10.9% in our population. Among 251 women with gestational diabetes, fasting glycaemia was ≥5.1 mmol/l in 119 women (47.4%), between 4.4 and <5.1 mmol/l in 78 women (31.1%) and <4.4 mmol/l in 54 women (21.5%). Proceeding with the complete test only in women with fasting glycaemia between 4.4 and <5.1 mmol/l will result in a sensitivity of 78.5%. This strategy would avoid glucose loading in 63.8% of women. Screening with fasting glycaemia is an attractive alternative to universal screening with the complete 75-g glucose tolerance test. This strategy is, however, slightly less sensitive than previously reported in higher-risk populations. Fasting glycaemia can be considered as an alternative to the complete test for gestational diabetes screening. © 2016 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  20. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus. A perspective in 1998.

    PubMed

    Carr, S R

    1998-08-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was originally defined using statistics. It is appropriate to examine the current state of screening for gestational diabetes using a similar approach. This article reviews data supporting current recommendations for universal screening of pregnant women for GDM at 24-28 weeks using the 50-g 1-h oral glucose challenge. The advantages and disadvantages of several thresholds for abnormality are discussed, as are possible alternatives to the 50-g 1-h oral glucose challenge. Finally, recent improvements in the precision of portable blood glucose meters are reviewed, and recommendations for their use are advanced.

  1. Maternal outcomes and follow-up after gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, C.

    2014-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus reflects impaired maternal insulin secretion relative to demand prior to pregnancy, as well as temporary metabolic stressors imposed by the placenta and fetus. Thus, after delivery, women with gestational diabetes have increased risk of diabetes and recurrent gestational diabetes because of their underlying impairment, which may be further exacerbated by fat accretion during pregnancy and post-partum deterioration in lifestyle behaviours. This hypothetical model is discussed in greater detail, particularly the uncertainty regarding pregnancy as an accelerator of β-cell decline and the role of gestational weight gain. This report also presents risk estimates for future glucose intolerance and diabetes and reviews modifiable risk factors, particularly body mass and lifestyle alterations, including weight loss and breastfeeding. Non-modifiable risk factors such as race/ethnicity and insulin use during pregnancy are also discussed. The review concludes with current literature on lifestyle modification, recommendations for post-partum glucose screening, and future directions for research to prevent maternal disease. PMID:24341443

  2. Maternal rhabdomyolysis and twin fetal death associated with gestational diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Price, Joan T; Schwartz, Nadav

    2013-08-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus is a rare, transient complication of pregnancy typically characterized by polyuria and polydipsia that may lead to mild electrolyte abnormalities. More severe sequelae of gestational diabetes insipidus are uncommon. We present a case of a 25-year-old woman at 23 weeks of gestation in a dichorionic-diamniotic twin pregnancy who developed severe symptomatic gestational diabetes insipidus complicated by rhabdomyolysis and death of both fetuses. Maternal rhabdomyolysis caused by gestational diabetes insipidus is extremely rare. Early recognition and treatment of gestational diabetes insipidus is necessary to prevent maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality.

  3. Resistin role in development of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Khalid; George, Teena P

    2017-07-01

    Diabetes is estimated to be one of the major causes of deaths in most countries due to its high prevalence rate, which was 8.8% in 2015. Hyperglycemia detected during pregnancy is known as gestational diabetes mellitus and it increases the potential risk of development of Type 2 diabetes in mothers with its varying prevalence rate of 1-14% in different populations. It also leads to the higher risk of developing abnormal glucose tolerance and obesity in their child at an early age. Recent studies show that potential mediators of insulin resistance such as adipokines - adiponectin, leptin and resistin are important for glucose and lipid metabolism. Adipokines are directly involved in the regulation of insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in the liver, muscle and adipose tissue. It is also involved in inflammation, adipose tissue accumulation, adverse fat distribution and subsequently affects glucose metabolism. This review highlights the role of resistin (an adipokine) in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus.

  4. Prepregnancy body mass index is an independent risk factor for gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, preterm labor, and small- and large-for-gestational-age infants.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dayeon; Song, Won O

    2015-01-01

    We examined if prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) is a risk factor for gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, preterm labor, and small-for-gestational-age (SGA) and large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants with consideration of gestational weight gain, to document the importance of preconception versus prenatal stage. We used the data of 219 868 women from 2004 to 2011 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the effect of prepregnancy BMI for gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, preterm labor, and SGA and LGA infants with consideration of gestational weight gain. Regardless of gestational weight gain, women with obese prepregnancy BMI (≥30 kg/m(2)) had increased odds of gestational hypertension (adjusted odds ratios (AOR) = 2.91; 95% CI = 2.76-3.07), gestational diabetes (2.78; 2.60-2.96), and LGA (1.87; 1.76-1.99) compared to women with normal prepregnancy BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)). Women with underweight prepregnancy BMI (<18.5 kg/m(2)) had increased odds of preterm labor (1.25; 1.16-1.36) and SGA infants (1.36; 1.25-1.49), but decreased odds of LGA infants (0.72; 0.61-0.85) in reference to women with normal prepregnancy BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)). Regardless of adequacy of gestational weight gain, the risk of gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, and LGA infants increases with obese prepregnancy BMI, whereas that of preterm labor and SGA infants increases with underweight prepregnancy BMI. Preconception care of reproductive aged women is as important as prenatal care to lower the risk of gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, preterm labor, and SGA and LGA infants.

  5. Gestational diabetes: Linking epidemiology, excessive gestational weight gain, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and future metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Durnwald, Celeste

    2015-06-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) affects up to 200,000 deliveries in the United States each year. With the growing obesity epidemic, delayed childbearing, and multiple gestations, the diagnosis of GDM is expected to continue to rise. GDM unmasks a beta-cell defect that persists after pregnancy and typically worsens over time imparting the increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus after the index pregnancy. In addition, coexisting obesity and progressive weight gain are additive factors for progression to type 2 DM. Obstetricians play an integral role in informing GDM women about their lifelong risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and can help bridge the care to primary care physicians, as it relates to recommended screening and long-term follow-up.

  6. Diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and a history of polycystic ovary syndrome: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bond, R; Pace, R; Rahme, E; Dasgupta, K

    2017-08-07

    To investigate whether polycystic ovary syndrome further increases postpartum diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and to explore relationships between polycystic ovary syndrome and incident diabetes in women who do not develop gestational diabetes. This retrospective cohort study (Quebec Physician Services Claims; Hospitalization Discharge Databases; Birth and Death registries) included 34 686 women with gestational diabetes during pregnancy (live birth), matched 1:1 to women without gestational diabetes by age group, year of delivery and health region. Diagnostic codes were used to define polycystic ovary syndrome and incident diabetes. Cox regression models were used to examine associations between polycystic ovary syndrome and incident diabetes. Polycystic ovary syndrome was present in 1.5% of women with gestational diabetes and 1.2% of women without gestational diabetes. There were more younger mothers and mothers who were not of white European ancestry among those with polycystic ovary syndrome. Those with polycystic ovary syndrome more often had a comorbidity and a lower proportion had a previous pregnancy. Polycystic ovary syndrome was associated with incident diabetes (hazard ratio 1.52; 95% CI 1.27, 1.82) among women with gestational diabetes. No conclusive associations between polycystic ovary syndrome and diabetes were identified (hazard ratio 0.94; 95% CI 0.39, 2.27) in women without gestational diabetes. In women with gestational diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome confers additional risk for incident diabetes postpartum. In women without gestational diabetes, an association between PCOS and incident diabetes was not observed. Given the already elevated risk of diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes, a history of both polycystic ovary syndrome and gestational diabetes signal a critical need for diabetes surveillance and prevention. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  7. [Diabetes in Pregnancy - Type 1/Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kleinwechter, Helmut; Demandt, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    In Germany in 5.5% of all births diabetes is registered. In patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes planning pregnancy, preconception counseling, diabetologic care with optimized periconceptional metabolic control and folic acid supplementation are essential for good pregnancy outcome. Gestational diabetes (GDM) should be diagnosed timely and managed according to existing guidelines. GDM is treated with insulin in approximately 20%. In 1-2% of GDM cases a glucokinase gene mutation is present (MODY 2). Pregnancies after bariatric-metabolic surgery are increasing and show high risks. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Visual Evoked Potential to Assess Retinopathy in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hari Kumar, K V S; Ahmad, F M H; Sood, Sandeep; Mansingh, Sudhir

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated for early retinopathy using the visual evoked potential (VEP) in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus during pregnancy. All patients with GDM and type 2 diabetes seen between June and October of 2014 were included in this cross-sectional, observational study. Patients with secondary diabetes, ocular or major illness were excluded from the study. VEP was recorded in both eyes to derive prominent positive peak latency (P100), amplitude and initial negative deflection (N75) latency. The data were compared with 10 gestational age-matched controls with normal glucose tolerance. Appropriate statistical methods were used for comparison among the 3 groups. The study participants (40 with GDM, 10 with type 2 diabetes, 10 with normal glucose tolerance) had a median (25th to 75th interquartile range) age of 26 (24.3, 30) years, a gestational age of 24.5 (21, 27) weeks and weights of 66.8 (63.4, 71.5) kg. The P100 latencies were comparable among the 3 groups (p=0.0577). However, patients with any diabetes (GDM and type 2 diabetes) had prolonged P100 latencies (p=0.0139) and low P100 amplitudes (p=0.0391) in comparison to controls. P100 latency showed a direct correlation with hyperglycemia (p=0.0118). Our data showed that VEP abnormalities are detectable even in the short-term hyperglycemia of GDM and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Association of GSTs polymorphisms with risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Shaoru; Zhai, Qianqian; Hai, Jie; Wang, Di; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qinggui

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to investigate the association between GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphisms and development of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. A total of 320 patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and 358 pregnancy subjects were consecutively collected between January 2013 and December 2014. Genotyping for detection of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val was conducted by using PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms) method. By Fisher's exact test, we found that the genotype distributions of GSTP1 IIe105Val were in line with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in control subjects (P=0.57). By Chi-square test, we found significant differences in the genotype distributions of GSTM1 (χ(2)=11.49, P=0.001) and GSTT1 (χ(2)=18.50, P<0.001). Using unconditional logistic analysis, individuals carrying the null genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1 were associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus when compared with the present genotype, and the adjusted Ors (95% CI) were 1.71 (1.24-2.36) and 2.00 (1.44-2.79), respectively. However, the GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphism was not associated with an elevated risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, we suggest that the GSTM1 null genotype and GSTT1 null genotype are correlated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population.

  10. Association of GSTs polymorphisms with risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Shaoru; Zhai, Qianqian; Hai, Jie; Wang, Di; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qinggui

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to investigate the association between GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphisms and development of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. A total of 320 patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and 358 pregnancy subjects were consecutively collected between January 2013 and December 2014. Genotyping for detection of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val was conducted by using PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms) method. By Fisher’s exact test, we found that the genotype distributions of GSTP1 IIe105Val were in line with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in control subjects (P=0.57). By Chi-square test, we found significant differences in the genotype distributions of GSTM1 (χ2=11.49, P=0.001) and GSTT1 (χ2=18.50, P<0.001). Using unconditional logistic analysis, individuals carrying the null genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1 were associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus when compared with the present genotype, and the adjusted Ors (95% CI) were 1.71 (1.24-2.36) and 2.00 (1.44-2.79), respectively. However, the GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphism was not associated with an elevated risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, we suggest that the GSTM1 null genotype and GSTT1 null genotype are correlated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. PMID:26823865

  11. Gestational diabetes insipidus: a morphological study of the placenta.

    PubMed

    Castiglione, F; Buccoliero, A M; Garbini, F; Gheri, C F; Moncini, D; Poggi, G; Saladino, V; Rossi Degl'Innocenti, D; Gheri, R G; Taddei, G L

    2009-12-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus (GDI) refers to the state of excessive water intake and hypotonic polyuria. Those cases manifesting in pregnancy and referred to as GDI may persist thereafter or may be a transient latent form that resolves after delivery. Microscopic examination of affected subjects has not been previously reported. In the literature, there are various case reports and case series on diabetes insipidus in pregnancy. In this study, we present a case that had transient diabetes insipidus during pregnancy in which the placenta was examined.

  12. [Translational research in gestational diabetes mellitus and mild gestational hyperglycemia: current knowledge and our experience].

    PubMed

    Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; Piculo, Fernanda; Marini, Gabriela; Damasceno, Débora Cristina; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos; Barbosa, Angélica Pascon

    2013-10-01

    Maternal diabetes constitutes an unfavorable environment for fetal-placental and embryonic development. It is has important repercussion in modern obstetrics, since it is associated to an increased risk of neonatal and maternal morbidity, and it still is a significant medical challenge. The increased occurrence of diabetes worldwide, the increase in diabetes type 2 in women at reproductive age and the crossed generation of intrauterine programming for diabetes type 2 are the bases for the growing interest in utilization of diabetic experimental samples, with the aim to acquire knowledge about the mechanisms that induce development alterations in gestational diabetes. Several studies have shown the benefits of diabetes prevention, with interventions in lifestyle, metabolic improvement and control of cardiovascular risk factors to substantially prevent the complications of this devastating disease. Despite these findings, the recent revolution in the scientific knowledge, and the infinite number of new therapies for diabetes, there is still a large gap between what was learned through research and what is really done in public, clinical and community health. The negative economic impact of this complacency in people, families, and national economies is alarming. It is expected that translational research in the binomial diabetes and pregnancy are implemented in centers of excellence, in both basic and applied research, and complemented by multicenter clinical studies, conducted in a pragmatic way to increase the level of scientific evidence with more reliable diagnostic and propaedeutic resources.

  13. Diabetes nurse educators' experiences of providing care for women, with gestational diabetes mellitus, from disadvantaged backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Carolan, Mary

    2014-05-01

    To explore diabetes nurse educators' experiences of providing care for women, with gestational diabetes mellitus, from disadvantaged backgrounds and to gather information which would assist with the development of an educational programme that would support both women and diabetes educators. Rates of gestational diabetes mellitus have increased dramatically in recent years. This is concerning as gestational diabetes mellitus is linked to poorer pregnancy outcomes including hypertension, stillbirth, and nursery admission. Poorest outcomes occur among disadvantaged women. gestational diabetes mellitus is also associated with maternal type 2 diabetes and with child obesity and type 2 diabetes among offspring. Effective self-management of gestational diabetes mellitus reduces these risks. Diabetes nurse educators provide most education and support for gestational diabetes mellitus self-management. An interpretative phenomenological analysis approach, as espoused by Smith and Osborn (Qualitative Psychology: A Practical Guide to Research Methods, 2008, Sage, London, 51), provided the framework for this study. The views of six diabetes educators were explored through in-depth interviewing. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed according to steps outlined by Smith and Osborn (Qualitative Psychology: A Practical Guide to Research Methods, 2008, Sage, London, 51). Three themes emerged from the data: (1) working in a suboptimal environment, (2) working to address the difficulties and (3) looking to the future. Throughout, the diabetes nurse educators sought opportunities to connect with women in their care and to make the educational content understandable and meaningful. Low literacy among disadvantaged women has a significant impact on their understanding of gestational diabetes mellitus information. In turn, catering for women with low literacy contributes to increased workloads for diabetes nurse educators, making them vulnerable to burnout. There is a need

  14. Prevention of gestational diabetes in pregnant women with risk factors for gestational diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Govinden, Gemma; Bustani, R; Song, S; Farrell, TA

    2015-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus can be defined as ‘glucose intolerance or hyperglycaemia with onset or first recognition during pregnancy.’ Objective The objective of our systematic review was to see if there was any intervention that could be used for primary prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. Search strategy Major databases were searched from 1966 to Aug 2012 without language restriction. Selection criteria Randomised trials comparing intervention with standard care in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes were included. Meta-analysis was performed in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis statement. The primary outcome assessed was the incidence of gestational diabetes. Data collection and analysis Data from included trials were extracted independently by two authors and analysed using Rev-Man 5. Main results A total of 2422 women from 14 randomised trials were included; which compared diet (four randomised trials), exercise (three randomised trials), lifestyle changes (five randomised trials) and metformin (two randomised trials) with standard care in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. Dietary intervention was associated with a statistically significantly lower incidence of gestational diabetes (Odds ratio 0.33, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.76) and gestational hypertension (Odds ratio 0.28, 95% CI 0.09, 0.86) compared to standard care. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus or in the secondary outcomes with exercise, lifestyle changes or metformin use compared to standard care. Conclusions The use of dietary intervention has shown a statistically significantly lower incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus and gestational hypertension compared to standard care in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. PMID:27512459

  15. Selective rather than universal screening for gestational diabetes mellitus?

    PubMed

    Miailhe, Grégoire; Kayem, Gilles; Girard, Guillaume; Legardeur, Hélène; Mandelbrot, Laurent

    2015-08-01

    To estimate the proportion of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who would be missed by selective versus universal screening and to describe their pregnancy outcomes. An observational cohort study in a single center performing universal screening for GDM with a 75 g oral glucose challenge test (OGTT) at 24-28 weeks gestation. We excluded women with pregestational or first trimester diabetes, those not screened and deliveries <34 weeks. Risk factors were age ≥ 35 years, BMI ≥ 25, family history of diabetes, GDM in a previous pregnancy or macrosomia in a previous pregnancy. Main outcomes were large for gestational age (LGA>90th centile for gestational age, adjusted for gender) and small for gestational age<10th centile. Among 2187 women screened, 309 (14%) had GDM, of whom 256 (83%) had one or more risk factors. The proportion of women who had GDM despite the absence of any risk factor was 2.4%. In multivariate analysis, LGA was significantly associated with GDM only in case of risk factors. Mean fasting blood glucose was lower in GDM without risk factors than in GDM with risk factors (87 ± 1 mg/dl versus 94 ± 14, p<0.001) and fewer required insulin (6% versus 26%, respectively, p<0.001). Selective screening would have missed one-sixth of GDM cases, but these cases seemed milder, with normal fasting blood glucose, and thus less likely to lead to perinatal complications. Whereas an opt-in approach relies heavily on accurate patient screening, we suggest that screening tests could be avoided in low-risk women by an opt-out approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Gestational diabetes mellitus: importance of blood glucose monitoring].

    PubMed

    Flores Le-Roux, Juana A; Benaiges Boix, David; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is common during pregnancy, and is frequently associated with maternal and perinatal complications. Intensive treatment of hyperglycaemia during pregnancy has been shown to reduce perinatal morbidity. In women with pregestational type 1 or 2 diabetes, hyperglycaemia during labour and delivery is an important factor in the development of neonatal hypoglycaemia. There are no generally accepted recommendations for women with GDM. Recent studies evaluating patients with GDM show that peripartum glucose control can be achieved in these women without the need for insulin use in the majority of cases. Hyperglycaemia during labour is not related with treatment established during pregnancy but rather with non-compliance of endocrinological follow-up. Factors such as ethnic origin, neonatal hypoxaemia, and large for gestational age seem to play an important role in the development of neonatal hypoglycaemia.

  17. Methods of screening for and diagnosing of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Coustan, D R

    1993-09-01

    Screening for gestational diabetes should be performed using a 50-g 1-hour glucose challenge. The threshold for further testing may be chosen based on the goal of the screening program, either to maximize sensitivity at the expense of more diagnostic testing by using a 130 mg/dL cutoff or to increase specificity at the sacrifice of some sensitivity by using a 140 mg/dL cutoff. The choice of universal screening or an age cutoff, such as 25 years, with testing reserved in younger women for those with risk factors, is dependent on the characteristics of a given patient population or practice. The diagnostic test for gestational diabetes is the 100-g 3-hour oral glucose tolerance test on venous plasma or serum specimens. Whole blood values may be used, but the use of capillary blood measurements by test strips and reflectance meters is not recommended.

  18. Gestational diabetes mellitus in Italy: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Lapolla, Annunziata; Dalfrà, Maria Grazia; Bonomo, Matteo; Parretti, Elena; Mannino, Domenico; Mello, Giorgio; Di Cianni, Graziano

    2009-08-01

    This prospective study evaluated the impact of gestational diabetes on maternal and fetal outcome in a large cohort of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) followed up using standardized clinical criteria. Between 1999 and 2003, we collected 3465 GDM women from 31 Italian regional obstetric or diabetes centers, recording the time and mode of delivery, gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, congenital malformations, and neonatal mortality, comparing findings with the Italian general pregnant population. The rate of cesarean sections was 34.9% and macrosomia 8.7% (33.2 and 7.4%, respectively, in the general population, p=ns). The stillbirth and neonatal mortality rates were no different in GDM patients and normal pregnancies (0.34% vs. 0.30%, p=0.176 and 0.29% vs. 0.32%, p=0.748), but the former had twice as many newborn with congenital malformations (2.05% vs. 0.89%, p<0.01; CI 1.64-2.62). A prognostic model for the outcome of pregnancy was built and the concurrent occurrence of several conditions was deemed as a positive outcome. Pregnancies which did not meet one or more of the above criteria were classified as "complicated". On multivariate logistic analysis, only the week of gestation when GDM was diagnosed and prepregnancy BMI were independent predictors of a complicated pregnancy. When correctly diagnosed and treated during pregnancy, women with GDM have a pregnancy outcome similar to the general pregnant population, except for a greater likelihood of congenital malformations in the newborn, probably due to unrecognized prior diabetes. Prepregnancy obesity plays an important part in raising the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes in GDM patients.

  19. Capillary blood glucose screening for gestational diabetes: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Landon, M B; Cembrowski, G S; Gabbe, S G

    1986-10-01

    Home glucose monitoring with the use of reflectance meters is an important adjunct in the care of pregnant women with insulin-dependent diabetes. The accuracy of reflectance meters for the assay of capillary glucose specimens has been well documented. The present preliminary study was undertaken to determine the utility of outpatient screening for gestational diabetes mellitus with the use of a reflectance meter (Accu-Chek, Boehringer Mannheim Co.). One hundred twenty-five patients in our high-risk practice had a standard 50 gm glucose load at 26 to 28 weeks' gestation. Capillary glucose values were measured on site with the Accu-Chek. Venous plasma glucose levels were measured by the central laboratory chemistry analyzer. While the laboratory (x) and meter (y) glucose determinations between the two sets of values were highly correlated (R = 0.89, p less than 0.001), there was a significant difference in their average values (x = 111.74, y = 136.35, p less than 0.0001). With the use of a receiver operator characteristic curve, a meter value of 160 mg/dl was determined as the optimal threshold for performing a 3-hour glucose tolerance test. The sensitivity and specificity with the use of a meter value of 160 mg/dl were 93% and 96%, respectively, for detecting an abnormal screening test in venous plasma (greater than or equal to 135 mg/dl). A total of 32 glucose tolerance tests were performed, with four patients included who had venous values less than 135 mg/dl. All eight patients with gestational diabetes mellitus were correctly identified. These data suggest that a glucose reflectance meter can be used for accurate outpatient screening of gestational diabetes mellitus. The potential advantages of capillary blood glucose screening include both cost and efficiency. Patients with abnormal screening values can be promptly identified and scheduled for a follow-up 3-hour glucose tolerance test.

  20. Gestational diabetes mellitus: challenges in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Mpondo, Bonaventura C T; Ernest, Alex; Dee, Hannah E

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a well-characterized disease affecting a significant population of pregnant women worldwide. It has been widely linked to undue weight gain associated with factors such as diet, obesity, family history, and ethnicity. Poorly controlled GDM results in maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Improved outcomes therefore rely on early diagnosis and tight glycaemic control. While straightforward protocols exist for screening and management of diabetes mellitus in the general population, management of GDM remains controversial with conflicting guidelines and treatment protocols. This review highlights the diagnostic and management options for GDM in light of recent advances in care.

  1. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus and its prevalence in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Jesmin, Subrina; Akter, Shamima; Akashi, Hidechika; Al-Mamun, Abdullah; Rahman, Md Arifur; Islam, Md Majedul; Sohael, Farzana; Okazaki, Osamu; Moroi, Masao; Kawano, Satoru; Mizutani, Taro

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has important health complications for both mother and child and is increasing all over the world. Although prevalence estimates for GDM are not new in developed and many developing countries, data are lacking for many low-income countries like Bangladesh. To evaluate the prevalence of GDM in Bangladesh. This cross-sectional study included 3447 women who consecutively visited the antenatal clinics with an average gestation age of 26 weeks. GDM was defined according to WHO criteria (fasting plasma glucose [FPG] ≥7.0 mmol/L or 2-h ≥7.8 mmol/L) and the new ADA criteria (FPG ≥5.3 mmol/L or 2-h ≥8.6 mmol/L OGTT). We also calculated overt diabetes as FPG ≥7.0 mmol/L. Prevalence of GDM was 9.7% according to the WHO criteria and 12.9% according to the ADA criteria in this study population. Prevalence of overt diabetes was 1.8%. Women with GDM were older, higher educated, had higher household income, higher parity, parental history of diabetes, and more hypertensive, compared with non-GDM women. This study demonstrates a high prevalence of GDM in Bangladesh. These estimates for GDM may help to formulate new policies to prevent and manage diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Alteration of maternal serum irisin levels in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ural, Ulku Mete; Sahin, Serap Baydur; Tekin, Yesim Bayoglu; Cüre, Medine Cumhur; Sezgin, Hacer

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to compare serum irisin concentrations in pregnant women with and without ges-tational diabetes mellitus (GDM). This study was performed at the Tertiary Care Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecol-ogy, between January 2014 and April 2014. A total of 45 pregnant women with GDM (diabetes group) and 41 BMI- and age-matched healthy pregnant women (control group) were recruited. Maternal serum irisin levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit at 24-28 weeks of gestation. An association between maternal serum irisin lev-els and metabolic parameters was analyzed. Body mass index, serum levels of glucose, insulin and irisin were tested and analyzed in the study group and controls. Pregnant women with GDM had significantly higher fasting plasma glucose (p = 0.001), first-hour OGTT glucose (p = 0.001), second-hour OGTT glucose (p = 0.001), and fasting insulin (p = 0.045) levels as compared to controls. Serum irisin levels were 1.04 ± 0.3 and 1.3 ± 0.2 in pregnant women with GDM and healthy pregnant controls, respectively (p = 0.001). Correlation analysis between irisin levels and anthropometric and biochemical parameters in patients with gestational diabetes revealed that none of the investigated parameters correlated with serum irisin level. Our results suggest that serum irisin levels might be introduced as a novel marker for GDM, with decreased levels of irisin being indicative of GDM.

  3. Lowering the threshold for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rust, O A; Bofill, J A; Andrew, M E; Kincaid, T A; Stubbs, T M; Miller, E H; Morrison, J C

    1996-10-01

    Our purpose was to determine whether lowering the diagnostic threshold for gestational diabetes mellitus on 3-hour 100 gm oral glucose tolerance testing will select a population at risk for adverse perinatal outcome. In this retrospective study 434 patients with an abnormal 50 gm glucose screen result (> or = 140 mg/dl) underwent a standardized 3-hour oral glucose tolerance test. The results were stratified according to maternal weight and the criteria recommended by Sacks or Carpenter. Birth weight and rate of macrosomia were the primary perinatal outcome variables analyzed. Analysis of the data set stratified according to the Sacks criteria revealed results very similar to the Carpenter criteria data set. Patients who would have been newly diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus only if the lowered criteria were used (group 2) were older and heavier. No other variable comparisons achieved statistical significance. When the same patients were stratified according to prepregnancy weight, overweight patients were older, gained less weight during the third trimester, underwent cesarean section more often, and had higher cumulative maternal morbidity. Regression analysis showed that the degree of hyperglycemia did not predict macrosomia or influence birth weight, but prepregnant maternal body mass index was associated with macrosomia. Fetal macrosomia is influenced by maternal prepregnant body mass index. Lowering the glucose tolerance test threshold would result in overdiagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus without improving perinatal outcome.

  4. [Clinical characteristics of 7 patients with gestational diabetes insipidus].

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Qun; Xiong, Chun-Qiu; Wu, Min; Dong, Ruo-Lin; Chen, Yun-Qin; Gao, Jie; Chen, Ou-Jing; Huang, Yin-Ping

    2008-04-01

    To investigate the clinical feature, treatment and prognosis of both the mother and the fetus with gestational diabetes insipidus. A total of 7 cases of gestational diabetes insipidus collected in the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou Combination of Traditional Chinese Medicine with Western Medicine Hospital, and Zhejiang Taizhou Hospital from June 1993 to June 2006 were analyzed retrospectively. Seven cases symptoms all characterized by excessive thirst polydipsia and polyuria. The average 24 h urinary output was between 11 L to 13 L and manifested of hypobaricuria. After effective treatment (three cases were treated with 1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin, another three patients were managed with hydrochlorothiazide, and the last one was cured with antisterone), seven patients with gestational diabetes insipidus did not have any severe consequences. Their symptoms of excessive thirst, polyuria, and polydypsia disappeared from 7 days to 3 months after parturition. Urinary volume returned to normal standard of 1000-2000 ml during 24 hours. Specific gravity of urine recovered normally between a range 1.015-1.025 and serum sodium recovered between 135-147 mmol/L. The average duration of illness was 52 days. Eight newborn infants survived. Two of them were sent to neonatal intensive care unit for treatment. One was because of premature delivery caused by antepartum eclampsia, and the other case was one of the twins who had hydronephrosis. The baby of the first case left hospital after 3 weeks' treatment. The latter one's symptom disappeared 2 weeks after delivery. No obvious symptom was discovered among all the babies through follow-up telephone calls 42 days after childbirth. Gestational diabetes insipidus is a rare endocrinopathy complicating pregnancy. This disorder is characterized by excessive thirst, polydypsia, polyuria, hypobaric urine and electrolyte disturbances usually manifesting in the third trimester of pregnancy or puerperium

  5. [Suitability of screening for diabetes mellitus in women with a history of gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Silvares, E; Domínguez-Vigo, P; Domínguez-Sánchez, J; González-González, A

    To assess long-term suitability of screening for type 2 diabetes mellitus in women with a previous diagnosis of gestational diabetes in Primary Care. The secondary objectives were to determine if there were clinical factors that modified the usefulness of the screening. An observational cohort type study was performed, which included all patients with the diagnosis of gestational diabetes during the years 2000 to 2009 (n=470) in the University Hospital Complex of Ourense. The electronic medical records were reviewed to assess the existence of gestational diabetes and the year of the last fasting blood glucose. The mean follow-up time was 12.9 years. The screening for evidence of a fasting blood glucose in the last 3 years was considered adequate. The following variables were analysed: adequacy of screening for type 2 diabetes mellitus, age, body mass index, gestational diabetes in more than one gestation, and rural/urban environment. A descriptive analysis of the data was performed, using Chi2 and Student's t-test to determine differences between subgroups. Statistical significance was considered as P<.05 RESULTS: The long-term monitoring of these patients was very irregular. Only 67.08% of the study group underwent diabetes mellitus type 2 screening. The level of follow-up was not associated with age, BMI, the place of residence, or the year of diagnosis. In patients with more than one episode of gestational diabetes, subsequent blood glucose control was achieved in 94.1%. The adequacy of the screening in our area is very irregular and highly improvable. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Gestational diabetes mellitus: risks and management during and after pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Thomas A; Xiang, Anny H; Page, Kathleen A

    2012-11-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) carries a small but potentially important risk of adverse perinatal outcomes and a long-term risk of obesity and glucose intolerance in offspring. Mothers with GDM have an excess of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy and a high risk of developing diabetes mellitus thereafter. Diagnosing and treating GDM can reduce perinatal complications, but only a small fraction of pregnancies benefit. Nutritional management is the cornerstone of treatment; insulin, glyburide and metformin can be used to intensify treatment. Fetal measurements complement maternal glucose monitoring in the identification of pregnancies that require such intensification. Glucose testing shortly after delivery can stratify the short-term diabetes risk in mothers. Thereafter, annual glucose and HbA(1c) testing can detect deteriorating glycaemic control, a harbinger of future diabetes mellitus, usually type 2 diabetes mellitus. Interventions that mitigate obesity or its metabolic effects are most potent in preventing or delaying diabetes mellitus. Lifestyle modification is the primary approach; use of medications for diabetes prevention after GDM remains controversial. Family planning enables optimization of health in subsequent pregnancies. Breastfeeding may reduce obesity in children and is recommended. Families should be encouraged to help children adopt lifestyles that reduce the risk of obesity.

  7. A Simple Screening Score for Diabetes for the Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-ho; Bang, Heejung; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Kim, Hee Man; Park, Seok Won; Kim, Dae Jung

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We developed and validated a self-assessment score for diabetes risk in Korean adults and compared it with other established screening models. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2001 and 2005 data were used to develop a diabetes screening score. After excluding patients with known diabetes, 9,602 participants aged ≥20 years were selected. Undiagnosed diabetes was defined as a fasting plasma glucose ≥126 mg/dL and/or nonfasting plasma glucose ≥200 mg/dL. The SAS Survey Logistic Regression analysis was used to determine predictors of undiagnosed diabetes (n = 341). We validated our model and compared it with other existing methods using the KNHANES 2007–2008 data (n = 8,391). RESULTS Age, family history of diabetes, hypertension, waist circumference, smoking, and alcohol intake were independently associated with undiagnosed diabetes. We calculated a diabetes screening score (range 0–11), and a cut point of ≥5 defined 47% of adults as being at high risk for diabetes and yielded a sensitivity of 81%, specificity of 54%, positive predictive value of 6%, and positive likelihood ratio of 1.8 (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.73). Comparable results were obtained in validation datasets (sensitivity 80%, specificity 53%, and AUC = 0.73), showing better performance than other non-Asian models from the U.S. or European population. CONCLUSIONS This self-assessment score may be useful for identifying Korean adults at high risk for diabetes. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the utility and feasibility of this score in various settings. PMID:22688547

  8. [SLEEP DISTURBANCES AND GESTATIONAL DIABETES PREVALENCE ON LAST TRIMESTER OF PREGNANCY].

    PubMed

    Ruiz González, Isabel; Valenza, Marie Carmen; Molina, Carmen M; Torres Sanchez, Irene; Cabrera Martos, Irene; González-Jiménez, Emilio

    2015-09-01

    recent studies suggest that women with gestational diabetes are more likely to suffer sleep disorders compared to pregnant women without diabetes. The objectives of this study were to analyze the risk factors associated with gestational diabetes and to verify if exist an association between the presence or abscense of gestational diabetes and the quality of the sleep and/or daytime sleepiness. case-controls study with a sample of 130 pregnant women, 46 of them with gestational diabetes and 84 controls. Anthropometric parameters such as weight, stature, body mass index (BMI) and abdominal perimeter were evaluated. Socio-demographic variables, including age and family situation were assessed, and a gynecological study was performed, evaluating the number of simple or multiple births, number of miscarriages and gynecological pathology during the past 3 years. The O'Sullivan test was conducted for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes. The quality of sleep and daytime sleepiness were also measured. 46 women were diagnosed of gestational diabetes. There are significant differences (p < 0.001) in BMI scores among women with gestational diabetes and controls, being the highest values in the diabetic group. There is a significant association (p = 0.002) between the existence of family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and the presence or abscense of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes present a significant worse quality of sleep (p < 0.001), and values of daytime sleepiness higher than the general population. high values of BMI or family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus seems to be factors associated to the risk of suffer gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have a poorer quality of sleep and a higher degree of daytime sleepiness than the general population, reducing the well-being of the mother and the fetus. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  9. Did You Have Gestational Diabetes When You Were Pregnant? What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    Did You Have Gestational Diabetes When You Were Pregnant? What You Need to Know. Some women get diabetes when they are pregnant. Doctors call ... doctor or health care team if: • you had gestational diabetes • you want to get pregnant again Breastfeed your ...

  10. Pregnancy outcome in immigrant women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dalfrà, Maria Grazia; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Masin, Michela; Bonsembiante, Barbara; Cosma, Chiara; Barison, Antonella; Toniato, Rosanna; Fedele, Domenico; Lapolla, Annunziata

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies show adverse outcomes of pregnancy among immigrant women from countries with high diabetes rates. We compared maternal and fetal outcomes in immigrant and Italian women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) followed up at our center. Maternal characteristics considered were age, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), HbA1c, frequency of insulin treatment, timing and mode of delivery, and hypertensive disorders; and, for fetal outcome, infants large or small for gestational age, and fetal complications. Pre-pregnancy BMI and HbA1c were higher in immigrant GDM women than in Italians, and more of them were on insulin. No differences in maternal outcome emerged between the two groups. More large for gestational age (LGA) babies were born to immigrant women than to Italians, but no other differences emerged. Apart from newborn LGA, maternal and fetal outcomes were comparable in our immigrant and Italian GDM women. Immigrant GDM women have favourable outcomes if given access to health care and language and cultural barriers are removed.

  11. The Therapeutic Effect of Zuogui Wan in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Rats

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qianjin; Niu, Xin; Liu, Xinshe; Xu, Kaixia; Yang, Xiangzhu; Wang, Huifeng

    2014-01-01

    In this experiment, we established an animal model of gestational diabetes mellitus rats using streptozotocin. Using the rat model of GDM, the pregnant rats in 1-19d were divided into three groups: (1) Zuogui Wan gestational diabetes mellitus group (group I, n = 12), (2) gestational diabetes mellitus rats as the control group (group II, n = 11), and (3) rats of normal pregnancy group (group III, n = 11). Compared with gestational diabetes mellitus rats as the control group, Zuogui Wan can change the indexes of fasting blood glucose, body weight, total cholesterol, insulin, and metabolism cage index significantly in Zuogui Wan gestational diabetes mellitus group. We can conclude that Zuogui Wan has the therapeutic effect on gestational diabetes mellitus. PMID:25136475

  12. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Risks and Management during and after Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Thomas A.; Xiang, Anny H.; Page, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) represents glucose levels in the high end of the population distribution during pregnancy. GDM carries a small but potentially important risk of adverse perinatal outcomes and a longer-term risk of obesity and glucose intolerance in offspring. Mothers with GDM have an excess of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy and a high risk of diabetes mellitus thereafter. Diagnosing and treating GDM can reduce perinatal complications, but only a small fraction of pregnancies benefit. Nutritional management is the cornerstone of treatment; insulin, glyburide and metformin can be used to intensify treatment. Fetal measurements compliment maternal glucose measurements in identifying pregnancies that need such intensification. Glucose testing shortly after pregnancy can stratify the near-term diabetes risk in mothers, Thereafter, annual glucose and HbA1C testing can detect deteriorating glycaemic control, a harbinger of future diabetes, usually type 2. Interventions that mitigate obesity or its metabolic effects are most potent in preventing or delaying diabetes. Lifestyle modification is the primary approach; use of medications for diabetes prevention after GDM remains controversial. Family planning allows optimization of health in subsequent pregnancies. Breastfeeding may reduce obesity in children and is recommended. Families should be encouraged to help children adopt lifestyles that reduce the risk of obesity. PMID:22751341

  13. [Incidence and clinical risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus in women with previous gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Vigo, P; Álvarez-Silvares, E; Alves-Pérez M T; Domínguez-Sánchez, J; González-González, A

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes is considered a variant of diabetes mellitus as they share a common pathophysiological basis: insulin resistance in target and insufficient secretion of it by pancreatic p-cell bodies. Pregnancy is a unique physiological situation provides an opportunity to identify future risk of diabetes mellitus. To determine the long-term incidence of diabetes mellitus in women who have previously been diagnosed with gestational diabetes and identifying clinical risk factors for developing the same. nested case-control cohort study. 671 patients between 1996 and 2009 were diagnosed with gestational diabetes were selected. The incidence of diabetes mellitus was estimated and 2 subgroups were formed: Group A or cases: women who develop diabetes mellitus after diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Group B or control: random sample of 71 women with a history of gestational diabetes in the follow-up period remained normoglycemic. Both groups were studied up to 18 years postpartum. By studying Kaplan Meier survival of the influence of different gestational variables it was obtained in the later development of diabetes mellitus with time parameter and COX models for categorical variables were applied. Significant variables were studied by multivariate Cox analysis. In all analyzes the Hazard ratio was calculated with confidence intervals at 95%. The incidence of diabetes mellitus was 10.3% in patients with a history of gestational diabetes. They were identified as risk factors in the index pregnancy to later development of diabetes mellitus: greater than 35 and younger than 27 years maternal age, BMI greater than 30 kg/m2, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, insulin therapy, poor metabolic control and more than a complicated pregnancy with gestational diabetes. Clinical factors have been identified in the pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes that determine a higher probability of progression to diabetes mellitus in the medium and long term.

  14. Placental lipases in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

    PubMed

    Barrett, Helen L; Kubala, Marta H; Scholz Romero, Katherin; Denny, Kerina J; Woodruff, Trent M; McIntyre, H David; Callaway, Leonie K; Nitert, Marloes Dekker

    2014-01-01

    Infants of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are more likely to be born large for gestational age with a higher percentage body fat. Elevated maternal lipids may contribute to this. Placental lipases such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL), endothelial lipase (EL) and hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) are involved in transferring lipids from mother to fetus. Previous studies of expression of these lipases in placentae in women with diabetes in pregnancy have reported divergent results. Intracellular lipases such as adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and HSL are central to lipid droplet metabolism. The activities of these lipases are both influenced by Perilipin 1, and ATGL is also activated by a co-factor comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) and inhibited by G0/G1 switch gene 2 (GS02). None of these modifying factors or ATGL have been examined previously in placenta. The purpose of this study was therefore to examine the expression of ATGL, HSL, LPL, EL, as well as Perilipin 1, GS02 and CGI-58 in term pregnancies complicated by GDM. mRNA and protein expression of the lipases were measured in placentae from 17 women with GDM and 17 normoglycaemic pregnancies, matched for maternal BMI and gestational age of delivery. ATGL mRNA expression was increased and HSL mRNA expression reduced in placentae from GDM although there was no differences in protein expression of any of the lipases. All lipases were localised to trophoblasts and endothelial cells. The expression of Perilipin 1 and CGI-58 mRNA was increased and GS02 not altered in GDM. These results suggest that there is no difference in expression in these four lipases between GDM and normoglycaemic placentae, and therefore altered lipid transfer via these lipases does not contribute to large for gestational age in infants of women with GDM.

  15. Baseline HbA1c to Identify High-Risk Gestational Diabetes: Utility in Early vs Standard Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sweeting, Arianne N; Ross, Glynis P; Hyett, Jon; Molyneaux, Lynda; Tan, Kris; Constantino, Maria; Harding, Anna Jane; Wong, Jencia

    2017-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) necessitates risk stratification directing limited antenatal resources to those at greatest risk. Recent evidence demonstrates that an early pregnancy glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c ≥5.9% (41 mmol/mol) predicts adverse pregnancy outcomes. To determine the optimal HbA1c threshold for adverse pregnancy outcomes in GDM in a treated multiethnic cohort and whether this differs in women diagnosed <24 vs ≥24 weeks' gestation (early vs standard GDM). This was a retrospective cohort study undertaken at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Diabetes Antenatal Clinic, Australia, between 1991 and 2011. Pregnant women (N = 3098) underwent an HbA1c (single-laboratory) measurement at the time of GDM diagnosis. Maternal clinical and pregnancy outcome data were collected prospectively. The association between baseline HbA1c and adverse pregnancy outcomes in early vs standard GDM. HbA1c was measured at a median of 17.6 ± 3.3 weeks' gestation in early GDM (n = 844) and 29.4 ± 2.6 weeks' gestation in standard GDM (n = 2254). In standard GDM, HbA1c >5.9% (41 mmol/mol) was associated with the greatest risk of large-for-gestational-age (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 2.7 [1.5-4.9]), macrosomia (3.5 [1.4-8.6]), cesarean section (3.6 [2.1-6.2]), and hypertensive disorders (2.6 [1.1-5.8]). In early GDM, similar HbA1c associations were seen; however, lower HbA1c correlated with the greatest risk of small-for-gestational-age (P trend = 0.004) and prevalence of neonatal hypoglycemia. Baseline HbA1c >5.9% (41 mmol/mol) identifies an increased risk of large-for-gestational-age, macrosomia, cesarean section, and hypertensive disorders in standard GDM. Although similar associations are seen in early GDM, higher HbA1c levels do not adequately capture risk-limiting utility as a triage tool in this cohort.

  16. Comparison of different criteria for diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sagili, Haritha; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar; Sahoo, Jayaprakash; Lakshminarayanan, Subitha; Rani, Reddi; Jayalakshmi, D.; Kumar, K. T. Hari Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has been adopted by most associations across the world including the American Diabetes Association and World Health Organization (WHO). We conducted a study comparing the IADPSG and previous WHO criteria and their effects on neonatal birth weight. Methods: The study was carried out in Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department of a tertiary care institute in South India in collaboration with Endocrinology Department. Thousand two hundred and thirty-one antenatal cases with at least one risk factor for GDM and gestational age of more than 24 weeks were included in the study. Both criteria were compared on the basis of 75 g oral glucose tolerance test results. Results: The prevalence of GDM using IADPSG and previous WHO criteria were 12.6% and 12.4%, respectively. The prevalence of GDM was 9.9% when both criteria had to be satisfied. Both GDM criteria groups did not differ in neonatal birth weight and macrosomia rate. However, there was a significant increase in lower segment cesarean section in IADPSG criteria group. Elevated fasting plasma glucose alone picked up only one GDM in the previous WHO criteria group. Conclusions: A single 2 h plasma glucose is both easy to perform and economical. A revised WHO criterion using a 2 h threshold of ≥140 mg % can be adopted as a one-step screening and diagnostic procedure for GDM in our country. PMID:26693435

  17. Obesity and diabetes genetic variants associated with gestational weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Stuebe, Alison M.; Lyon, Helen; Herring, Amy; Ghosh, Joyee; Wise, Alison; North, Kari E.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether genetic variants associated with diabetes and obesity predict gestational weight gain. Study Design 960 participants in the Pregnancy, Infection and Nutrition cohorts were genotyped for 27 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with diabetes and obesity. Results Among white and black women (n=960), KCNQ1 risk allele carriage was directly associated with weight gain (p < 0.01). In Bayesian hierarchical models among white women (N=628), we found posterior odds ratios > 3 for inclusion of TCF2 and THADA SNPs in our models. Among black women (n=332), we found associations between risk allele carriage and weight gain for the THADA and INSIG2 SNPs. In Bayesian variable selection models, we found an interaction between the TSPAN8 risk allele and pre-gravid obesity, with lower weight gain among obese risk allele carriers. Conclusion We found evidence that diabetes and obesity risk alleles interact with maternal pre-gravid BMI to predict gestational weight gain. PMID:20816152

  18. Gestational diabetes mellitus and macrosomia: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Kc, Kamana; Shakya, Sumisti; Zhang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Fetal macrosomia, defined as a birth weight ≥ 4,000 g, may affect 12% of newborns of normal women and 15-45% of newborns of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The increased risk of macrosomia in GDM is mainly due to the increased insulin resistance of the mother. In GDM, a higher amount of blood glucose passes through the placenta into the fetal circulation. As a result, extra glucose in the fetus is stored as body fat causing macrosomia, which is also called 'large for gestational age'. This paper reviews studies that explored the impact of GDM and fetal macrosomia as well as macrosomia-related complications on birth outcomes and offers an evaluation of maternal and fetal health. Fetal macrosomia is a common adverse infant outcome of GDM if unrecognized and untreated in time. For the infant, macrosomia increases the risk of shoulder dystocia, clavicle fractures and brachial plexus injury and increases the rate of admissions to the neonatal intensive care unit. For the mother, the risks associated with macrosomia are cesarean delivery, postpartum hemorrhage and vaginal lacerations. Infants of women with GDM are at an increased risk of becoming overweight or obese at a young age (during adolescence) and are more likely to develop type II diabetes later in life. Besides, the findings of several studies that epigenetic alterations of different genes of the fetus of a GDM mother in utero could result in the transgenerational transmission of GDM and type II diabetes are of concern.

  19. Noise exposure during the first trimester and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Kyoung-Bok; Min, Jin-Young

    2017-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a form of diabetes that affects pregnant women. GDM tends to resolve after delivery, but has an impact on the health of the mother and her offspring. Considering the potential association between noise and diabetes and the susceptibility of the pregnant state to diabetogenesis, noise pollution may be associated with the risk of GDM; however, there is no evidence of the effect of noise pollution on GDM. In this study, we investigated the association between residential exposure to noise during the first trimester and incidence of GDM using the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort (NHIS-NSC), a representative sample of South Koreans. We analyzed the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort (2002-2013), a population-wide health insurance claim data. Study population was a total of 18 165 pregnant women. GDM was defined as ICD-10 code O244, and noise exposure levels were categorized as daytime (07:00-19:00) and nighttime (23:00-7:00). Other known risk factors for GDM were age, income, residential area, physical activity, smoking, drinking, blood sugar levels, and body mass index before getting pregnant. The study population included 18 165 pregnant women, of which 8.8% developed gestational diabetes. After adjustment, the adjusted OR (95% CI) for GDM associated with 1 dB increase in nighttime noise was 1.07 (95% CI: 1.05-1.10). Compared with the reference group (Quartile 1), the adjusted ORs for GDM in those exposed to the highest quartile of noise exposure (Quartile 4) was 1.61 (95% CI: 1.38-1.87) at nighttime noise. However, no significant association was observed between daytime noise exposure (07:00-19:00) and the incidence of GDM. We observed that the odds of gestational diabetes during the first trimester was 1.6 times higher for pregnant women exposed to elevated nighttime noise compared to similar women exposed to normal baseline noise levels in South Korea. Although this finding

  20. CXC chemokine ligand 16 is increased in gestational diabetes mellitus and preeclampsia and associated with lipoproteins in gestational diabetes mellitus at 5 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Lekva, Tove; Michelsen, Annika E; Aukrust, Pål; Paasche Roland, Marie Cecilie; Henriksen, Tore; Bollerslev, Jens; Ueland, Thor

    2017-08-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus and preeclampsia are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease later in life, but the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between CXC chemokine ligand 16 and indices of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia and systemic inflammation in gestational diabetes mellitus and preeclampsia. This sub-study of the population-based prospective cohort included 310 women. Oral glucose tolerance test was performed during pregnancy and 5 years later along with lipid analysis. CXC chemokine ligand 16 was measured in plasma (protein) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (messenger RNA) during pregnancy and at follow-up. Circulating CXC chemokine ligand 16 was higher in gestational diabetes mellitus women early in pregnancy and at follow-up, while higher in preeclampsia women late in pregnancy compared to control women. Messenger RNA of CXC chemokine ligand 16 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were lower in gestational diabetes mellitus and preeclampsia women compared to control women. Increased circulating CXC chemokine ligand 16 level was associated with a higher apolipoprotein B and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in gestational diabetes mellitus women but not in normal pregnancy at follow-up. Our study shows that women with gestational diabetes mellitus and preeclampsia had a dysregulated CXC chemokine ligand 16 during pregnancy, and in gestational diabetes mellitus, the increase in CXC chemokine ligand 16 early in pregnancy and after 5 years was strongly associated with their lipid profile.

  1. A study of bone turnover markers in gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Sheelu Shafiq; Borse, Abhijit Girish; Pervez, Anjum; Anjum, Shaheen

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Gestational diabetes is defined as carbohydrate intolerance resulting in hyperglycemia of variable severity with the first recognition during pregnancy. Established risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are maternal age, obesity, family history of diabetes, etc. Vitamin D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and various other hormones are known for their function in maintaining calcium and phosphorous homeostatic. Furthermore, Vitamin D, PTH serum ionized calcium, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) have been reported to be altered with glucose homeostasis. The present study compares the bone markers in pregnant women with and without gestational diabetes. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at outpatient antenatal check-up clinic and outpatient diabetic clinics at J. N. Medical College and Hospital, Aligarh. One hundred pregnant females, of which fifty with GDM and fifty without GDM, were included in the study from January 2014 to November 2015. Detailed history, physical examination, and anthropometric measurement were done. Bone turnover markers in the form of Vitamin D, parathyroid hormone, serum ionized calcium, and serum ALP were measured in pregnant women who had gestational diabetes which was compared with normal pregnant women. Results: In our study, the mean age of participate of GDM group was 28.2 ± 3 years, while the mean age group in non-GDM group was 25.44 ± 2.78 years. Ionized calcium in GDM was found to be 4.606 ± 0.354 mEq/L, while in non-GDM, it was 4.548 ± 0.384 mEq/L, P = 0.430. Vitamin D came out to be 21.80 ± 9.48 ng/ml, while it was 32.346 ± 8.37 ng/ml in non-GDM group. Serum PTH in GDM group was 71.436 ± 36.189 pg/ml and 37.168 ± 8.128 pg/ml in nondiabetic gestational group. Serum ALP in GDM group was 9.1 ± 4.56 KA U/dl and 6.98 ± 2.2 KA U/dl in nondiabetic gestational group, P - 0.0038. In GDM group, there was a significant negative linear correlation between PTH and 25-hydroxyvitamin D

  2. Increased visfatin concentrations in women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, Katarzyna; Krugluger, Walter; Mittermayer, Friedrich; Rahman, Rupa; Haider, Dominik; Shnawa, Nadja; Schernthaner, Guntram

    2006-05-01

    The recently discovered adipocytokine visfatin has insulin-like properties. It lowers blood glucose and improves insulin sensitivity; however, clinical data on visfatin are limited. To evaluate the role of visfatin in GDM (gestational diabetes mellitus), we determined visfatin levels in women with GDM and in healthy pregnant controls. Furthermore, visfatin concentrations were investigated longitudinally during pregnancy and after delivery in a subgroup of women with GDM. Blood for measurement of visfatin and metabolic parameters was obtained from 64 women with GDM [median week of gestation, 34 (interquartile range, 27-36) weeks] and 30 healthy pregnant controls [median week of gestation, 34 (interquartile range, 28-36) weeks]. In a subgroup of 24 women with GDM, visfatin, leptin and metabolic parameters were investigated twice during pregnancy (28-30 and 38-40 weeks of gestation) and 2 weeks after delivery. In the cross-sectional analysis, median visfatin levels were significantly elevated in women with GDM [64.0 (interquartile range, 50.9-74.8) ng/ml] compared with controls [46.0 (interquartile range, 36.9-54.6) ng/ml; P<0.0001]. In women with GDM, visfatin correlated with week of gestation at the time of blood draw (R=0.35, P=0.005). No association with fasting glucose, insulin, homoeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance or body mass index was observed. According to the longitudinal analysis, visfatin increased during pregnancy (P=0.002) and rose further after delivery (P=0.014), whereas leptin and insulin levels decreased after parturition (both P<0.001). In conclusion, visfatin is elevated in women with GDM and increases during the course of pregnancy as well as after delivery. Furthermore, visfatin shows no association with insulin and leptin in women with GDM.

  3. Relationship Between Myo-Inositol Supplementary and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiangqin; Liu, Zhaozhen; Zhang, Yulong; Lin, Yuan; Song, Jianrong; Zheng, Lianghui; Lin, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To determine whether myo-inositol supplement will increase the action of endogenous insulin, which is mainly measured by markers of insulin resistance such as homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, and web of science were comprehensively searched using “gestational diabetes mellitus” and “myo-inositol” to identify relevant studies. Both subject headings and free texts were adopted. The methodological quality of the included studies were assessed and pooled analyzed by the methods recommended by the Cochrane collaboration. A total of 5 trials containing 513 participants were included. There was a significant reduction in aspects of gestational diabetes incidence (risk ratio [RR], 0.29; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.19–0.44), birth weight (mean difference [MD], −116.98; 95% CI, −208.87 to −25.09), fasting glucose oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) (MD, −0.36; 95% CI, −0.51 to −0.21), 1-h glucose OGTT (MD, −0.63; 95% CI, −1.01 to −0.26), 2-h glucose OGTT (MD, −0.45; 95% CI, −0.75 to −0.16), and related complications (odds ratio [OR], 0.28; 95% CI 0.14–0.58). On the basis of current evidence, myo-inositol supplementation reduces the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), although this conclusion requires further evaluation in large-scale, multicenter, blinded randomized controlled trials. PMID:26496267

  4. Strategies in the Nutritional Management of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Teri L.; Anderson, Molly A.; Chartier-Logan, Catherine; Friedman, Jacob E.; Barbour, Linda A.

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the optimal macronutrient composition for dietary management of gestational diabetes mellitus(GDM) has enormous potential to improve perinatal outcomes. Diet therapy may result in significant cost savings if effective in deterring the need for expensive medical management within this growing population. In only 6 randomized controlled trials(RCTs) in 250 women, data suggest that a diet higher in complex carbohydrate and fiber, low in simple sugar, and lower in saturated fat may be effective in blunting postprandial hyperglycemia, preventing worsened insulin resistance and excess fetal growth. The use of diet in GDM remains an area in grave need for high-quality RCTs. PMID:24047934

  5. Carbohydrate sources for gestational diabetes mellitus screening. A comparison.

    PubMed

    Murphy, N J; Meyer, B A; O'Kell, R T; Hogard, M E

    1994-12-01

    One hundred eight patients were prospectively randomized to receive 50 g of a glucose polymer, d-glucose or a candy bar during a one-hour gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) screening. The polymer had a mean serum glucose similar to that of d-glucose, with significantly fewer side effects, allowing an increased rate of examination completion. The candy bar produced a significantly lower mean serum glucose but had the highest rating for flavor. The polymer was an inexpensive and well-tolerated alternative for GDM screening, while the use of a candy bar needs more study.

  6. Prevention of type 2 diabetes among women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hod, Moshe; Hadar, Eran; Cabero-Roura, Luis

    2015-10-01

    The morbidity and mortality rates related to diabetes are constantly rising, as well as those for other noncommunicable diseases. The epidemic is spreading throughout the world, in both low- and high-resource countries. Prevention is a key aspect in the battle against the disease and obstetricians play a critical role in the fight. Prevention starts in utero-for the diabetic mother, her infant, and future generations. The postpartum period should not be neglected because it provides another window of opportunity to address prevention. Data on the prevention of type 2 diabetes among women diagnosed with gestational diabetes are discussed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Sedentary behavior, gestational diabetes mellitus, and type 2 diabetes risk: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven T; Lynch, Brigid; Vallance, Jeff; Davenport, Margie H; Gardiner, Paul A; Butalia, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    A substantial number of pregnancies are complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and up to 70 % of women with GDM go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Given the extensive body of research suggesting physical activity reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes, facilitating physical activity, and reducing sedentary time may be effective approaches to promote the health of women with a previous GDM diagnosis. Here, we discuss physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behavior, in the context of GDM and the potential for type 2 diabetes risk reduction.

  8. Leukocyte Telomere Length in the Neonatal Offspring of Mothers with Gestational and Pre-Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gilfillan, Christopher; Naidu, Pratyusha; Gunawan, Florence; Hassan, Fadwa; Tian, Pei; Elwood, Ngaire

    2016-01-01

    Aims Telomeres undergo shortening with cell division, accelerated by increased oxidative stress. We aimed to demonstrate shortened telomeres in the offspring of mothers who have diabetes as a consequence of exposure to increased oxidative stress during intrauterine development. Methods We examined the level of glycaemia (glucose, HbA1c, fructosamine), oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation) and the levels of antioxidant enzymes (Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Selenium dependent glutathione peroxidase) and correlate these findings with mean telomere length (TL) in maternal and foetal blood in groups of pregnant women with pre-gestational diabetes (PGD), gestational diabetes (GD) and a euglycaemic control group. Results Foetal and maternal glucose, maternal HbA1c, and foetal insulin and C-peptide were higher in the PGD group with the GD group being intermediate. Markers of oxidative stress did not vary between groups with the exception of foetal SOD activity that was highest in the GD group. There were no detectable differences in maternal or foetal TL between study groups. An exploratory analysis looking at correlations between glycaemic and oxidative stress parameters and TL revealed a negative correlation between maternal and foetal glucose and TL across the whole study population. This relationship held for the short-term marker of glycaemic control, fructosamine. Conclusions We were unable to show significant telomere shortening in the offspring of mothers with PGD or GD. Exploratory analysis revealed a relationship between foetal TL and short-term glycaemia particularly in PGD. It is possible that increased telomerase activity can compensate for long-term increased oxidative stress but not for short-term dysglycaemia. PMID:27736899

  9. HbA1c and Gestational Weight Gain Are Factors that Influence Neonatal Outcome in Mothers with Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Barquiel, Beatriz; Herranz, Lucrecia; Hillman, Natalia; Burgos, Ma Ángeles; Grande, Cristina; Tukia, Keleni M; Bartha, José Luis; Pallardo, Luis Felipe

    2016-06-01

    Maternal glucose and weight gain are related to neonatal outcome in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The aim of this study was to explore the influence of average third-trimester HbA1c and excess gestational weight gain on GDM neonatal complications. This observational study included 2037 Spanish singleton pregnant women with GDM followed in our Diabetes and Pregnancy Unit. The maternal HbA1c level was measured monthly from GDM diagnosis to delivery. Women were compared by average HbA1c level and weight gain categorized into ≤ or > the current Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations for body mass index. The differential effects of these factors on large-for-gestational-age birth weight and a composite of neonatal complications were assessed. Women with an average third-trimester HbA1c ≥5.0% (n = 1319) gave birth to 7.3% versus 3.8% (p = 0.005) of large-for-gestational-age neonates and 22.0% versus 16.0% (p = 0.006) of neonates with complications. Women with excess gestational weight gain (n = 299) delivered 12.5% versus 5.2% (p < 0.001) of large-for-gestational-age neonates and 24.7% versus 19.0% (p = 0.022) of neonates with complications. In an adjusted multiple logistic regression analysis among mothers exposed to the respective risk factors, ∼47% and 52% of large-for-gestational-age neonates and 32% and 37% of neonatal complications were potentially preventable by attaining an average third-trimester HbA1c level <5.0% and optimizing gestational weight gain. Average third-trimester HbA1c level ≥5% and gestational weight gain above the IOM recommendation are relevant risk factors for neonatal complications in mothers with gestational diabetes.

  10. Prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus in urban and rural Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mwanri, Akwilina W; Kinabo, Joyce; Ramaiya, Kaushik; Feskens, Edith J M

    2014-01-01

    To estimate prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and associated determinants in urban and rural Tanzania. A cross-sectional study was conducted from 2011 through 2012 in selected urban and rural communities. Pregnant women (609 urban, 301 rural), who were not previously known to have diabetes, participated during usual ante-natal clinic visits. Capillary blood samples were collected at fasting and 2h after 75 g glucose load and were measured using HemoCue. Diagnosis of GDM was made using 1999 World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Women in rural areas were younger (26.6 years) than in urban areas (27.5 years). Mean gestational age, height, and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) were similar for the two areas. Overall prevalence of GDM averaged 5.9%, with 8.4% in urban area and 1.0% in rural area. Prevalence of GDM was higher for women who had a previous stillbirth (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.5-5.4), family history of type 2 diabetes (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.2), and MUAC above 28 cm (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.3), and lower for women with normal hemoglobin compared with anemia (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.22-0.93). Prevalence of GDM is higher than expected in urban areas in Tanzania, indicating an increasing population who are at risk for delivery complications and type 2 diabetes in Sub-Saharan Africa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Abdominal obesity and gestational diabetes: the interactive role of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Ebrahim; Nargesi, Arash Aghajani; Asbagh, Firoozeh Akbari; Ghazizadeh, Zaniar; Heidari, Behnam; Mirmiranpoor, Hossein; Esteghamati, Alireza; Vigneron, Claude; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium is a cofactor for numerous metabolic enzymatic reactions. It is required for glucose utilization and insulin signaling. We compared plasma magnesium concentrations in pregnant women with and without abdominal obesity, and investigated the interactive roles of magnesium and obesity in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Pregnant women with and without abdominal obesity (n = 40 in each group) were followed during gestation. Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) were performed at 24-28 weeks of pregnancy to diagnose GDM. Plasma glucose, insulin, triglycerides, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured. The obesity-GDM relationship was investigated prospectively, and the magnesium-GDM relationship was analyzed on a cross-sectional basis. Sixteen patients in the obese group and one in the control developed GDM. There were no differences in plasma magnesium levels between obese and control groups (p-value = 0.14), but significant differences between diabetic and non-diabetic patients (p-value = 0.05). Fourteen out of 17 diabetic patients had magnesium concentrations below the median. Increases in insulin, homeostatic model for insulin resistance, triglycerides, hs-CRP, MDA and second-hour blood glucose were more pronounced in those with both abdominal obesity and low-normal magnesium concentrations. In the Poisson regression model, obesity (relative risk = 20.6, p-value = 0.002), low-normal magnesium level (relative risk = 4.2, p-value = 0.009), and their interaction (p-value<0.001) were significant. Abdominally obese patients with lower plasma magnesium are more likely to show abnormal OGTT results. Insulin resistance, inflammatory response and oxidative stress are exaggerated in these patients.

  12. Review of gestational diabetes mellitus effects on vascular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Louise A; Chik, Constance L; Ryan, Edmond A

    2016-05-01

    Vascular dysfunction has been described in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, previous gestational diabetes mellitus increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes mellitus, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Factors contributing to vascular changes remain uncertain. The aim of this review was to summarize vascular structure and function changes found to occur in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus and to identify factors that contribute to vascular dysfunction. A systematic search of electronic databases yielded 15 publications from 1998 to March 2014 that met the inclusion criteria. Our review confirmed that previous gestational diabetes mellitus contributes to vascular dysfunction, and the most consistent risk factor associated with previous gestational diabetes mellitus and vascular dysfunction was elevated body mass index. Heterogeneity existed across studies in determining the relationship of glycaemic levels and insulin resistance to vascular dysfunction. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Maternal and neonatal outcomes of gestational diabetes: A retrospective cohort study from Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Sreelakshmi, P. R.; Nair, Sanjeev; Soman, Biju; Alex, Rani; Vijayakumar, K.; Kutty, V. Raman

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of gestational diabetes is on the rise. Understanding the various outcomes of it is necessary to face this challenge. Objectives: To study the frequency of occurrence of various maternal and fetal outcomes among gestational diabetes patients. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study conducted in rural Kerala, a southern state of India. The study participants were followed up for a period of 4 years, from 2007 to 2011. The participants included 60 women with gestational diabetes and 120 women without gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes was the major exposure variable. The frequencies of various outcomes were computed. Multivariable logistic regression was done to compute the risk for various outcomes in gestational diabetes. Results: The major outcomes included termination of pregnancy by caesarean section, long-term progression to type 2 diabetes, in-born nursery (IBN) admissions and increased neonatal birth weight. The maximum adjusted RR [13.2 (1.5-116.03)] was for the development of type 2 DM later. Conclusion: Gestational diabetes can result in significant feto-maternal outcomes; so better facilities are needed to manage gestational diabetes. PMID:26288780

  14. Gestational diabetes mellitus and subsequent development of overt diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Damm, P

    1998-11-01

    GDM develops in 1-3% of all pregnancies. Women with GDM are characterized by a relatively diminished insulin secretion coupled with a pregnancy-induced insulin resistance primary located in skeletal muscle tissue. The cellular background for this insulin resistance is not known. The binding of insulin to its receptor and the subsequent activation of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase have significant importance for the cellular effect of insulin. Thus, the pathogenesis to the insulin resistance was studied by investigating insulin receptor binding and tyrosine kinase activity in skeletal muscle biopsies from women with GDM and pregnant controls. No major abnormalities were found in GDM wherefore it is likely that the insulin resistance is caused by intracellular defects distal to the activation of the tyrosine kinase. Glucose tolerance returns to normal postpartum in the majority of women with GDM. However, previous studies, in populations quite different from a Danish population, have shown that women with previous GDM have a high risk of developing overt diabetes mellitus later in life. Hence, we aimed to investigate the prognosis of women with previous GDM with respect to subsequent development of diabetes and also to identify predictive factors for the development of overt diabets in these women. A follow-up study of diet treated GDM women diagnosed during 1978 to 1985 at the Rigshospital, Copenhagen was performed. Glucose tolerance was evaluated in 241 women (81% of the GDM population) 2-11 years after pregnancy. Abnormal glucose tolerance was found in 34.4% of the women (3.7% IDDM, 13.7% NIDDM, 17% IGT) in contrast to a control group where none had diabetes and 5.3% had IGT. Logistic regression analysis identified the following independent risk factors for later development of diabetes: a high fasting glucose level at diagnosis of GDM, a delivery more than 3 weeks before term, and an abnormal OGTT 2 months postpartum. Low insulin secretion at diagnosis of

  15. Selenoprotein P is not elevated in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Altinova, Alev E; Iyidir, Ozlem T; Ozkan, Cigdem; Ors, Damla; Ozturk, Merve; Gulbahar, Ozlem; Bozkurt, Nuray; Toruner, Fusun B; Akturk, Mujde; Cakir, Nuri; Arslan, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Selenoprotein P concentrations have been found to be associated with insulin resistance and elevated in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). The aim of the present study was to investigate circulating selenoprotein P level and its possible relationship with metabolic parameters in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Plasma selenoprotein P concentrations were measured in 30 pregnant women with GDM, 35 pregnant women without GDM and 22 healthy nonpregnant women. No difference in selenoprotein P levels was observed among the groups [6.2 (4.5-8.2), 7.9 (4.5-10.7) and 6.7 (5.3-9.1) ng/ml, respectively, p = 0.69]. In pregnant women with and without GDM, selenoprotein P did not correlate with age, gestational age, prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), HbA1c, glucose concentrations at oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), area under curve (AUC) glucose, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides levels (p > 0.05). But, there were statistically significant correlations between selenoprotein P and current BMI (r = -0.28, p = 0.04) and HDL cholesterol levels (r = 0.43, p = 0.01). We found that selenoprotein P concentrations are not elevated in women with GDM but associated with BMI and HDL cholesterol.

  16. A Combined Metabolomic and Proteomic Analysis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hajduk, Joanna; Klupczynska, Agnieszka; Dereziński, Paweł; Matysiak, Jan; Kokot, Piotr; Nowak, Dorota M.; Gajęcka, Marzena; Nowak-Markwitz, Ewa; Kokot, Zenon J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to apply a novel combined metabolomic and proteomic approach in analysis of gestational diabetes mellitus. The investigation was performed with plasma samples derived from pregnant women with diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus (n = 18) and a matched control group (n = 13). The mass spectrometry-based analyses allowed to determine 42 free amino acids and low molecular-weight peptide profiles. Different expressions of several peptides and altered amino acid profiles were observed in the analyzed groups. The combination of proteomic and metabolomic data allowed obtaining the model with a high discriminatory power, where amino acids ethanolamine, l-citrulline, l-asparagine, and peptide ions with m/z 1488.59; 4111.89 and 2913.15 had the highest contribution to the model. The sensitivity (94.44%) and specificity (84.62%), as well as the total group membership classification value (90.32%) calculated from the post hoc classification matrix of a joint model were the highest when compared with a single analysis of either amino acid levels or peptide ion intensities. The obtained results indicated a high potential of integration of proteomic and metabolomics analysis regardless the sample size. This promising approach together with clinical evaluation of the subjects can also be used in the study of other diseases. PMID:26694367

  17. Gestational diabetes mellitus and glucose intolerance among Mexican pregnant adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Torres, Maria Aurora; Rodríguez-Pezino, Jorge; Zambrana-Castañeda, Marcela; Lira-Plascencia, Josefina; Parra, Adalberto

    2003-03-01

    There is an increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) among adolescents (especially females), and the serum glucose concentrations in pregnant women <25 years during a 3-h oral glucose tolerance test (3-h OGTT) seem to be lower than those of pregnant women >25 years. Among 115 Mexican pregnant adolescents (<18 years) we analyzed their serum glucose concentrations during: a) 1-h 50-g glucose challenge test (GCT) performed at 24-28 weeks of gestation (n = 103) or at 29-35 weeks of gestation (n = 12); b) A standard 3-h OGTT performed 3-5 days later. Eight adolescents had an abnormal GCT, three of whom also had an abnormal 3-h OGTT. Sixteen adolescents (13 with previously normal GCT) had an abnormal 3-h OGTT, 15 classified as GGI and one as gestational DM (GDM). Serum glucose concentrations in adolescents with GGI were higher than in adolescents with normal 3-h OGTT: a) at 60 and 120 min during the 3-h OGTT (p < 0.001); and b) when expressed as the area under the glucose curve (p < 0.001). Adolescents with GGI had serum glucose concentrations during the 3-h OGTT similar to adult, non-diabetic pregnant Mexican women. It is suggested that GGI in pregnant adolescents may represent an early sign of a future deterioration in glucose metabolism, leading to a higher risk for GDM in future pregnancies and/or type 2 DM in adulthood. Thus, the current criteria to diagnose GDM in adults may not completely apply to adolescents, especially in ethnic groups with high risk for glucose abnormalities and considering the frequency of multiparous adolescents, especially in developing countries.

  18. Socio-economic status and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus among Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Song, L; Shen, L; Li, H; Liu, B; Zheng, X; Zhang, L; Xu, S; Wang, Y

    2017-06-21

    The relationship between socio-economic status and gestational diabetes mellitus has received little attention. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between socio-economic status and risk of gestational diabetes. Data were obtained from the ongoing Healthy Baby Cohort study in Hubei Province, China, in 2012-2014. Information on educational level and household income was collected using standard questionnaires during face-to-face interviews. Gestational diabetes was defined based on the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Group's criteria. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for gestational diabetes in relation to socio-economic status. Among 6886 participants, 1005 (14.6%) pregnant women were diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Higher educational level was inversely associated with risk of gestational diabetes (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.58, 0.95 for high school and OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.50, 0.76 for college or above). After adjustment for potential confounders, the ORs for gestational diabetes were 0.77 (95% CI, 0.59, 1.00) and 0.65 (95% CI, 0.51, 0.83) for women with high school and college or above education, respectively, compared with women with less than high school education. No significant association between household income and gestational diabetes was observed after adjustment for potential confounders. Subgroup analysis showed that the reduced risk of gestational diabetes with higher educational level was more evident among women with a pre-pregnancy BMI < 24 kg/m(2) (P for interaction = 0.022). Our findings suggested that educational level was a more robust predictor of gestational diabetes than household income among Chinese women. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  19. Plasma YKL-40 during pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rinnov, Anders R; Rathcke, Camilla N; Bonde, Lisbeth; Vilsbøll, Tina; Knop, Filip K

    2015-11-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is characterised by hyperglycaemia during pregnancy. The clinical circumstances involved in the development of GDM leaves the patient at a high risk of the subsequent development of type 2 diabetes. Plasma levels of the inflammation marker YKL-40 are elevated in type 2 diabetes and correlate with fasting plasma glucose levels and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes. With the present study we aimed to determine if pregnancy (and associated insulin resistance) with or without GDM affects plasma YKL-40 levels. Plasma from women diagnosed with GDM and healthy normal glucose-tolerant pregnant women (non-GDM) was obtained at the third trimester of pregnancy and again 3-4 months following delivery, and levels of YKL-40 and interleukin 6 (IL-6; known to regulate YKL-40) were measured. Plasma YKL-40 levels were similarly low during pregnancy in both groups and increased significantly after delivery, but remained lower in the GDM group compared with the non-GDM group postpartum. In contrast, plasma IL-6 levels were not affected by pregnancy or diagnosis of GDM, Nevertheless, YKL-40 levels were associated with IL-6 levels in the non-GDM group (but not in the GDM group). Pregnancy seems to be associated with a temporary reduction in circulating YKL-40, which increases after delivery, but to a much lesser extent in women with GDM than in non-GDM women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Migrant Health: A Preliminary Report on the Incidence of Gestational Diabetes in a Hispanic Migrant Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    Presents the preliminary results of an attempt to screen pregnant Hispanic migrant farm workers for gestational diabetes. They are slightly more prone than the overall population of pregnant women to suffer from it. Provides recommendations for management of women with gestational diabetes, and describes how this is performed at the Indian Health…

  1. Migrant Health: A Preliminary Report on the Incidence of Gestational Diabetes in a Hispanic Migrant Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    Presents the preliminary results of an attempt to screen pregnant Hispanic migrant farm workers for gestational diabetes. They are slightly more prone than the overall population of pregnant women to suffer from it. Provides recommendations for management of women with gestational diabetes, and describes how this is performed at the Indian Health…

  2. Geospatial analysis of food environment demonstrates associations with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kahr, Maike K; Suter, Melissa A; Ballas, Jerasimos; Ramin, Susan M; Monga, Manju; Lee, Wesley; Hu, Min; Shope, Cindy D; Chesnokova, Arina; Krannich, Laura; Griffin, Emily N; Mastrobattista, Joan; Dildy, Gary A; Strehlow, Stacy L; Ramphul, Ryan; Hamilton, Winifred J; Aagaard, Kjersti M

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of most common complications of pregnancy, with incidence rates varying by maternal age, race/ethnicity, obesity, parity, and family history. Given its increasing prevalence in recent decades, covariant environmental and sociodemographic factors may be additional determinants of GDM occurrence. We hypothesized that environmental risk factors, in particular measures of the food environment, may be a diabetes contributor. We employed geospatial modeling in a populous US county to characterize the association of the relative availability of fast food restaurants and supermarkets to GDM. Utilizing a perinatal database with >4900 encoded antenatal and outcome variables inclusive of ZIP code data, 8912 consecutive pregnancies were analyzed for correlations between GDM and food environment based on countywide food permit registration data. Linkage between pregnancies and food environment was achieved on the basis of validated 5-digit ZIP code data. The prevalence of supermarkets and fast food restaurants per 100,000 inhabitants for each ZIP code were gathered from publicly available food permit sources. To independently authenticate our findings with objective data, we measured hemoglobin A1c levels as a function of geospatial distribution of food environment in a matched subset (n = 80). Residence in neighborhoods with a high prevalence of fast food restaurants (fourth quartile) was significantly associated with an increased risk of developing GDM (relative to first quartile: adjusted odds ratio, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-2.19). In multivariate analysis, this association held true after controlling for potential confounders (P = .002). Measurement of hemoglobin A1c levels in a matched subset were significantly increased in association with residence in a ZIP code with a higher fast food/supermarket ratio (n = 80, r = 0.251 P < .05). As demonstrated by geospatial analysis, a relationship of food environment and

  3. Gestational diabetes mellitus in five ethnic groups: a comparison of their clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wong, V W

    2012-03-01

    The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus has been shown to vary between ethnic groups. The differences in the clinical characteristics and outcomes of women with gestational diabetes mellitus from various ethnic groups have not been clearly defined. A retrospective review of women with gestational diabetes mellitus from a single institution between 2007 and 2010 was conducted. The clinical profiles of women from five ethnic groups (South-East Asian, South Asian, Middle Eastern, Anglo-European and Pacific Islander) were documented, including the outcomes of their pregnancy. In this cohort of 827 women from these five ethnic groups, South-East Asians had the lowest BMI, lowest fasting (yet highest 2-h) glucose level on 75-g glucose tolerance test, lowest need for insulin therapy and lowest rate of macrosomia. South Asians had the lowest parity but strongest family history of diabetes. Their offspring also had the lowest birthweight. Women from Pacific Islands had the highest parity, BMI, fasting glucose levels on 75-g glucose tolerance test, HbA(1c) (at diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus as well as at 36 weeks' gestation) and greatest need for insulin therapy. Their offspring also had the highest birthweights. This study highlighted the significant differences in clinical characteristics of women with gestational diabetes mellitus among five ethnic groups. These differences may need to be considered in the management of gestational diabetes mellitus, especially in the interpretation of normality for pregnancy. © 2011 The Author. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  4. Prevalence and risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdullatif D; Mehrass, Amat Al-Khaleq O; Al-Adhroey, Abdulelah H; Al-Shammakh, Abdulqawi A; Amran, Adel A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) continues to be a significant health disorder triggering harmful complications in pregnant women and fetuses. Our knowledge of GDM epidemiology in Yemen is largely based on very limited data. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the prevalence and risk factors of GDM among pregnant women in Dhamar governorate, Yemen. Patients and methods A total of 311 subjects were randomly selected for this cross sectional survey. Health history data and blood samples were collected using a pretested questionnaire. To determine the prevalence of GDM, the fasting and random blood glucose techniques were applied according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association, using alternative methods that are more convenient to the targeted population. Poisson’s regression model incorporating robust sandwich variance was utilized to assess the association of potential risk factors in developing GDM. Results The prevalence of GDM was found to be 5.1% among the study population. Multivariate analysis confirmed age ≥30 years, previous GDM, family history of diabetes, and history of polycystic ovary syndrome as independent risk factors for GDM prevalence. However, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 and previous macrosomic baby were found to be dependent risk factors. Conclusion This study reports new epidemiological information about the prevalence and risk factors of GDM in Yemen. Introduction of proper maternal and neonatal medical care and health education are important in order to save the mother and the baby. PMID:26869814

  5. Maternal nutrition: opportunities in the prevention of gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Samuel, Tinu Mary

    2017-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is currently defined as glucose intolerance that is of variable severity with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. The Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome Study, including 25 000 nondiabetic pregnant women in 15 centers across the world, reported that an average of 17.8% of pregnancies are affected by GDM and its frequency can be as high as 25.5% in some countries, based on the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria. Nevertheless, true global prevalence estimates of GDM are currently lacking due to the high level of heterogeneity in screening approaches, diagnostic criteria, and differences in the characteristics of the populations that were studied. The presence of systemic high blood glucose levels in pregnancy results in an adverse intrauterine environment, which has been shown to have a negative impact on short- and long-term health outcomes for both the mother and her offspring, including increased risks for the infant to develop obesity and for both mother and child to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus later in life. Epigenetic mechanisms that are directly influenced by environmental factors, including nutrition, may play a key role in shaping these future health risks and may be part of this vicious cycle. This article reviews the burden of GDM and the current evidence that supports maternal nutritional interventions as a promising strategy to break the cycle by addressing risk factors associated with GDM. PMID:28049748

  6. Periodontitis and gestational diabetes mellitus in non-smoking females.

    PubMed

    Chokwiriyachit, Anyarat; Dasanayake, Ananda P; Suwannarong, Waraporn; Hormdee, Doosasee; Sumanonta, Gunniga; Prasertchareonsuk, Witoon; Wara-Aswapati, Nawarat; Combellick, Joan; Pitiphat, Waranuch

    2013-07-01

    Chronic inflammation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Periodontal disease is associated with increased levels of inflammatory mediators and may be a risk factor for GDM. The authors aimed to examine the association between periodontitis and GDM among non-smoking pregnant females. This case-control study included 50 females who were diagnosed with GDM and 50 age- and hospital-matched females without diabetes in Khon Kaen, Thailand. Full-mouth periodontal examinations were performed during pregnancy by two calibrated dentists who were unaware of the case-control status. Periodontitis was defined as ≥1 site with probing depth (PD) ≥5 mm and clinical attachment level (CAL) ≥2 mm at the same site. Serum samples were collected to measure C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6 levels. Analyses were performed using conditional logistic regression. Fifty percent of the case females had periodontitis compared to 26% of the controls. Females with GDM had significantly higher mean PD and CAL, more sites with bleeding on probing, and increased levels of CRP compared to the controls. Periodontitis was significantly associated with GDM (odds ratio = 3.00, 95% confidence interval = 1.19 to 7.56). The association remained significant with additional adjustment for family history of diabetes, prepregnancy body mass index, and weight gain during pregnancy. The results suggest that periodontitis is associated with GDM. Therefore, clinicians should assess periodontal conditions of pregnant females.

  7. A review of current treatment strategies for gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Kristi W; Carroll, Dana G; Meyer, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 90% of diabetes cases in pregnant women are considered gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). It is well known that uncontrolled glucose results in poor pregnancy outcomes in both the mother and fetus. Worldwide there are many guidelines with recommendations for appropriate management strategies for GDM once lifestyle modifications have been instituted and failed to achieve control. The efficacy and particularly the safety of other treatment modalities for GDM has been the source of much debate in recent years. Studies that have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of both glyburide and metformin in the management of patients with GDM will be reviewed. There is a lack of evidence with other oral and injectable non-insulin agents to control blood glucose in GDM. The role of insulin will be discussed, with emphasis on insulin analogs. Ideal patient characteristics for each treatment modality will be reviewed. In addition, recommendations for postpartum screening of patients will be described as well as recommendations for use of agents to manage subsequent type 2 diabetes in patients who are breastfeeding. PMID:26213555

  8. Is There a Tendency for Thrombosis in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus?

    PubMed

    Gorar, Suheyla; Alioglu, Bulent; Ademoglu, Esranur; Uyar, Seyit; Bekdemir, Handan; Candan, Zehra; Saglam, Beylan; Koc, Gonul; Culha, Cavit; Aral, Yalcin

    2016-01-01

    Impact of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on the coagulation system, dynamics involved at a pathophysiological level and the exact mechanism remain unclear. To evaluate the association between diabetes-related parameters and hemostatic factors to search for a tendency of thrombosis in GDM. Nineteen pregnant women who had GDM, 16 healthy pregnant and 13 healthy nonpregnant controls admitted to the Endocrinology outpatient clinics were enrolled in the study. Fasting and postprandial glucose, hemoglobin A1c and insulin levels, and insulin resistance; fructosamine, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), plasminogen activator inhibitor Type-1 (PAI-1), tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), fibrinogen, plasminogen and hemoglobin levels, platelet counts, prothrombin time (PT), and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) were studied. One-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, and post hoc Tukey honestly significant difference or Conover's nonparametric multiple comparison tests for comparison of the study groups. PT and aPTT were significantly lower in GDM patients compared to controls (P < 0.05), whereas fibrinogen and plasminogen levels were significantly higher in this group compared to both nonpregnant and healthy pregnant controls (P < 0.05 for each). TAFI, TFPI, PAI-1, and tissue t-PA levels were not significantly different among groups. Our findings indicate tendency to develop thrombosis in GDM similar to diabetes mellitus; but more comprehensive studies with larger sample size are needed to determine the relationship between GDM and hemostasis.

  9. Is it appropriate for Korean women to adopt the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations for gestational weight gain?

    PubMed

    Wie, Jeong Ha; Park, In Yang; Namkung, Jeong; Seo, Hae Won; Jeong, Min Jin; Kwon, Ji Young

    2017-01-01

    The 2009 Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines for gestational weight gain (GWG) are intended for use among women in the United States. Little data are available on whether the 2009 IOM recommendations can be applied to Asian women. This study aimed to evaluate whether the recommendations are related to adverse pregnancy outcomes in Korean pregnant women. A retrospective cohort study was conducted for all singleton-pregnant women at a university hospital in Korea. After classifying the enrolled women into four Korean pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) categories, the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes were analyzed for women who gained inadequate or excessive GWG based on 2009 IOM recommendations. Of 7,843 pregnancies, 64.0% of women had normal pre-pregnancy BMI and 42.7% achieved optimal GWG. Across all BMI categories, adverse pregnancies outcomes such as small for gestational age (SGA), large for gestational age (LGA), preterm birth, preeclampsia, and cesarean due to dystocia were significantly associated with GWG (all P ≤ 0.001).Women with normal BMI who gained inadequate weight were more likely to develop SGA and preterm birth and less likely to develop LGA (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2.21, 1.33, and 0.54, respectively). Whereas, women with normal BMI who gained excessive weight were more likely to develop LGA, preterm birth, preeclampsia, and cesarean section due to dystocia (aOR 2.10, 1.33, 1.37, and 1.37, respectively) and less likely to develop SGA (aOR 0.60). It is tolerable for Korean women to follow recommended GWG from the 2009 IOM guidelines to decrease adverse pregnancy outcomes. This will be helpful for antenatal care on GWG not only for Korean pregnant women, but also other Asian women who have lower BMI criteria than Caucasian women.

  10. Prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus among Swampy Cree women in Moose Factory, James Bay

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, M; Muirhead, M; Huynh, J; Helt, B; Grimmer, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although high rates of gestational diabetes mellitus have been documented in native populations, few studies have examined rates of the disease among native Indians in Canada. The authors conducted a study to estimate the prevalence of gestational diabetes among Swampy Cree women, to identify factors predictive of the occurrence of gestational diabetes, and to identify delivery and infant outcomes related to the presence of the disease. METHODS: Information on Swampy Cree women who gave birth at Weeneebayko Hospital, Moose Factory, James Bay, Ont., between 1987 and 1995 was obtained from medical charts. Patients with and without gestational diabetes were compared. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors of gestational diabetes. Delivery and infant outcomes that occurred secondary to gestational diabetes were also identified by means of logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 1401 deliveries occurred at Weeneebayko Hospital over the study period, of which 1298 were included in the study. Gestational diabetes was diagnosed in 110 (8.5% [95% confidence interval (CI) 6.9%-9.9%]) of the 1298 pregnancies. Factors predictive of gestational diabetes were age 35 years or more (relative risk [RR] 4.1, 95% CI 1.5-11.7), a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy (RR 6.4, 95% CI 3.5-11.7), diastolic blood pressure of 80 mm Hg or higher at the first prenatal visit (RR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.8), weight greater than 80 kg at the first prenatal visit (RR 4.9, 95% CI 1.8-12.9) and having a first-degree relative with diabetes (RR 3.0, 95% CI 1.4-6.1). The only delivery outcome independently associated with the presence of gestational diabetes was an increased likelihood of needing assisted delivery (forceps or vacuum extraction) (RR 2.8, 95% CI 1.1-7.0). Shoulder dystocia was indirectly associated with gestational diabetes owing to increased infant birth weight. Infant outcomes associated with the presence of gestational

  11. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Screening with fasting plasma glucose

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Mukesh M

    2016-01-01

    Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) as a screening test for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has had a checkered history. During the last three decades, a few initial anecdotal reports have given way to the recent well-conducted studies. This review: (1) traces the history; (2) weighs the advantages and disadvantages; (3) addresses the significance in early pregnancy; (4) underscores the benefits after delivery; and (5) emphasizes the cost savings of using the FPG in the screening of GDM. It also highlights the utility of fasting capillary glucose and stresses the value of the FPG in circumventing the cumbersome oral glucose tolerance test. An understanding of all the caveats is crucial to be able to use the FPG for investigating glucose intolerance in pregnancy. Thus, all health professionals can use the patient-friendly FPG to simplify the onerous algorithms available for the screening and diagnosis of GDM - thereby helping each and every pregnant woman. PMID:27525055

  12. Who returns for postpartum glucose screening following gestational diabetes mellitus?

    PubMed Central

    HUNT, Kelly J; CONWAY, Deborah L

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of postpartum impaired glucose regulation (IGR) and factors associated with glucose screening following gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Study Design A prospective cohort study of 707 women with GDM who delivered at University Hospital in San Antonio, Texas. Results 35.5% of 400 women with any postpartum glucose testing had IGR postpartum. 40.6% of 288 women who completed an oral glucose tolerance test had IGR – one third of whom had isolated elevated 2-hour glucose levels. Women who failed to return for postpartum glucose testing (n=308) were more likely to report prior GDM, have higher diagnostic glucose levels, and require insulin during pregnancy than women who returned for postpartum glucose testing. Conclusion Women who returned for postpartum glucose testing had less severe GDM than women who failed to return, suggesting that the true prevalence of postpartum IGR may be even higher than identified in our population. PMID:18241820

  13. Exercise Is Associated with a Reduction in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Yaiza; Mottola, Michelle F; Vargas, Juana; Blanco, Maite; Barakat, Rubén

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a maternal exercise program (land/aquatic activities, both aerobic and muscular conditioning) in preventing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Three hundred and forty-two pregnant women from Spain (age, 33.24 ± 4.3 yr) without obstetric contraindications were recruited for a clinical randomized controlled trial. The intervention group (IG, n = 101) exercised for 60 and 50 min on land and in water, respectively, three times per week. The control group (n = 156) received usual standard care. The prevalence of GDM was reduced in the IG group (IG, 1%, n = 1, vs control group, 8.8%, n = 13 (χ1 = 6.84, P = 0.009)) with a significant risk estimate (odds ratio = 0.103; 95% confidence interval, 0.013-0.803). The exercise program performed during pregnancy reduced the prevalence of GDM by preserving glucose tolerance.

  14. The potential role of biomarkers in predicting gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    van der Lely, Aart Jan; van der Linden, Joke

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes (GD) is a frequent complication during pregnancy and is associated with maternal and neonatal complications. It is suggested that a disturbing environment for the foetus, such as impaired glucose metabolism during intrauterine life, may result in enduring epigenetic changes leading to increased disease risk in adult life. Hence, early prediction of GD is vital. Current risk prediction models are based on maternal and clinical parameters, lacking a strong predictive value. Adipokines are mainly produced by adipocytes and suggested to be a link between obesity and its cardiovascular complications. Various adipokines, including adiponectin, leptin and TNF&, have shown to be dysregulated in GD. This review aims to outline biomarkers potentially associated with the pathophysiology of GD and discuss the role of integrating predictive biomarkers in current clinical risk prediction models, in order to enhance the identification of those at risk. PMID:27492245

  15. Comments on gestational diabetes mellitus: from pathophysiology to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Poulakos, Pavlos; Mintziori, Gesthimani; Tsirou, Efrosini; Taousani, Eleftheria; Savvaki, Dimitra; Harizopoulou, Vikentia; Goulis, Dimitrios G

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a topic of major interest, as it affects up to 16% of pregnant women and may lead to adverse pregnancy outcomes, which, however, are preventable by appropriate treatment. The aim of the present study was to discuss basic concepts and to critically appraise recent updates on practical issues in the field of GDM. GDM pathophysiology, long-term complications including "fetal programming" and GDM diagnosis are discussed, while clinical practice guidelines on follow-up, medical nutrition therapy, oral hypoglycemic agents and insulin treatment are also reviewed. GDM comprises a serious yet preventable public health problem and prevention by lifestyle changes, early detection and adequate treatment can lead to better health outcomes for both mothers with GDM and their offspring.

  16. Assessment of structural cardiac abnormalities and diastolic function in women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Alexandra P; Calderon, Iracema M P; Costa, Roberto A A; Roscani, Meliza G; Magalhães, Claudia G; Borges, Vera T M

    2015-05-01

    The main manifestation of hyperglycaemia during pregnancy is gestational diabetes mellitus. It can herald diabetes mellitus type 2 and its deleterious long-term effects, such as hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to assess diastolic function in women with gestational diabetes mellitus, one of the first signs of future cardiovascular disease. A total of 21 women with gestational diabetes mellitus and 23 healthy pregnant women (control group) between 34 and 37 weeks of gestation underwent echocardiographic assessment. The diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus was made in agreement with the American Diabetes Association criteria. Echocardiographic images obtained were analysed according to the criteria of the American Society of Echocardiography. Data were analysed using Pearson correlation coefficient, analysis of variance and Student's t-test. Women with gestational diabetes mellitus had higher posterior wall and interventricular septum thickness, increased left ventricular mass and left ventricular mass index, lower early diastolic annular velocity and early diastolic annular velocity/late diastolic annular velocity ratio. There was a positive correlation between left ventricular mass index and fasting glucose and pregnancy body mass index. Patients with gestational diabetes mellitus seem to have a different diastolic profile as well as a mildly dysfunctional pattern on echocardiogram, which may show a need for greater glycaemic control. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Getting too sweet: galectin-1 dysregulation in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Blois, Sandra M; Gueuvoghlanian-Silva, Barbara Y; Tirado-González, Irene; Torloni, Maria R; Freitag, Nancy; Mattar, Rosiane; Conrad, Melanie L; Unverdorben, Laura; Barrientos, Gabriela; Knabl, Julia; Toldi, Gergely; Molvarec, Attila; Rose, Matthias; Markert, Udo R; Jeschke, Udo; Daher, Silvia

    2014-07-01

    Galectin-1 (gal-1) is a prototype carbohydrate-binding protein, whose dysregulation is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes such as spontaneous abortion and pre-eclampsia. Furthermore, it is known that faulty gal-1 protein production or gene regulation can be caused by single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the LGALS1 gene. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is also an adverse pregnancy outcome and the most common metabolic disorder during gestation. However, gal-1 expression patterns during GDM remain largely unknown. Our aims were to define local and peripheral gal-1 expression patterns during pregnancy, and to investigate LGALS1 gene polymorphisms in GDM patients. Circulating gal-1 levels were determined by ELISA in GDM patients and normal pregnant controls, and LGALS1 gene polymorphisms were assessed for association with GDM. Placental tissues were collected from control and GDM term pregnancies to evaluate local gal-1 expression by immunofluorescence. Our results show that GDM is associated with a failure to increase circulating gal-1 levels during the second and third trimester, as well as overexpression of gal-1 in placental tissue. Additionally, the LGALS1 polymorphism rs4820294 was associated with the development of GDM. In pregnancies complicated by GDM, we observed gal-1 dysregulation both locally in the placenta and peripherally in the circulation. Furthermore, the association between the LGALS1 polymorphism and GDM may indicate a genetic contribution to this adverse pregnancy outcome.

  18. Examining the Starting Dose of Glyburide in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    GLOVER, Angelica V.; TITA, Alan; BIGGIO, Joseph R.; HARPER, Lorie M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to determine the impact of initial glyburide dosing on pregnancy outcomes. STUDY DESIGN Retrospective cohort of singleton pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes (GDM) from 2007-2013. Women who received glyburide were compared by initial dose: 2.5mg (n=170) versus 5mg (n=154) total daily dose. The primary maternal outcome was hypoglycemia, defined as a blood glucose <60 mg/dL. The primary neonatal outcome was birth weight. Secondary maternal outcomes included time to blood glucose control, preeclampsia, and cesarean delivery. Secondary neonatal outcomes included macrosomia (>4000g), hypoglycemia (<40 mg/dL), shoulder dystocia, and preterm delivery. RESULTS The 5 mg/day glyburide dose did not increase maternal hypoglycemia (26% in the 2.5 mg/day group versus 27% in the 5 mg/day group, AOR 0.67 (CI 0.30-1.49)). An increase in macrosomia in the 5 mg/day group was not significant after adjusting for maternal obesity (AOR 2.16 (CI 0.96-4.88)). Differences in preterm birth and large for gestational age were not significant after adjusting for prior preterm birth and maternal obesity, respectively. CONCLUSIONS A higher starting dose of glyburide for the management of GDM was not associated with increased maternal hypoglycemia or decreased adverse neonatal outcomes. PMID:26368915

  19. Epigenetic signatures of gestational diabetes mellitus on cord blood methylation.

    PubMed

    Haertle, Larissa; El Hajj, Nady; Dittrich, Marcus; Müller, Tobias; Nanda, Indrajit; Lehnen, Harald; Haaf, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Intrauterine exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) confers a lifelong increased risk for metabolic and other complex disorders to the offspring. GDM-induced epigenetic modifications modulating gene regulation and persisting into later life are generally assumed to mediate these elevated disease susceptibilities. To identify candidate genes for fetal programming, we compared genome-wide methylation patterns of fetal cord bloods (FCBs) from GDM and control pregnancies. Using Illumina's 450K methylation arrays and following correction for multiple testing, 65 CpG sites (52 associated with genes) displayed significant methylation differences between GDM and control samples. Four candidate genes, ATP5A1, MFAP4, PRKCH, and SLC17A4, from our methylation screen and one, HIF3A, from the literature were validated by bisulfite pyrosequencing. The effects remained significant after adjustment for the confounding factors maternal BMI, gestational week, and fetal sex in a multivariate regression model. In general, GDM effects on FCB methylation were more pronounced in women with insulin-dependent GDM who had a more severe metabolic phenotype than women with dietetically treated GDM. Our study supports an association between maternal GDM and the epigenetic status of the exposed offspring. Consistent with a multifactorial disease model, the observed FCB methylation changes are of small effect size but affect multiple genes/loci. The identified genes are primary candidates for transmitting GDM effects to the next generation. They also may provide useful biomarkers for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of adverse prenatal exposures.

  20. Interventions to Improve Rate of Diabetes Testing Postpartum in Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Maureen S; Werner, Erika F

    2017-02-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the most common medical complications of pregnancy. In the USA, four million women are screened annually for GDM in pregnancy in part to improve pregnancy outcomes but also because diagnosis predicts a high risk of future type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Therefore, among women with GDM, postpartum care should be focused on T2DM prevention. This review describes the current literature aimed to increase postpartum diabetes testing among women with GDM. Data suggest that proactive patient contact via a health educator, a phone call, or even postal mail is associated with higher rates of postpartum diabetes testing. There may also be utility to changing the timing of postpartum diabetes testing. Despite the widespread knowledge regarding the importance of postpartum testing for women with GDM, testing rates remain low. Alternative testing strategies and large randomized trials addressing postpartum testing are warranted.

  1. The importance of declining insulin requirements during pregnancy in patients with pre-gestational gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ram, Maya; Feinmesser, Larissa; Shinar, Shiri; Maslovitz, Sharon

    2017-08-01

    In patients with pre-gestational and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), insulin requirements often increase during the third trimester of pregnancy in order to maintain proper glycemic control. However, a fraction of patients demonstrate a significant decrease in insulin requirements in late gestation. We aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of decreasing insulin requirements in patients with pre-gestational diabetes and GDM with respect to fetal wellbeing and pregnancy outcome. We performed a retrospective cohort study in a single referral center for gestational diabetes between 1/2010 and 12/2014. Healthy pregnant women with pre-gestational diabetes and GDMA2 and a decrease of at least 30% in insulin requirements over a period of two weeks during the third trimester (group A) were compared to women with stable or increasing insulin requirements (group B). The primary outcome was a composite of situations associated with feto-placental dysfunction (fetal growth restriction, oligohydramnios and cesarean section due to category 2-3 monitor). Secondary outcomes were maternal oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results 6 weeks postpartum, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission rates, Apgar scores ≤7 at 5min, arterial blood pH≤7.1, macrosomia, neonatal hypoglycemia and a composite adverse neonatal outcomes (defined as one or more of the following: respiratory morbidity, cerebral morbidity, phototherapy, need for blood transfusion, necrotizing enterocolitis or death). Group A consisted of 101 women and group B - of 203 women. There were no differences between the groups in demographic characteristics or diagnostic characteristics of diabetes. The frequency of conditions related to feto-placental dysfunction did not differ between the groups (7.9% vs. 8.4%, p=0.61). Secondary outcome measures also did not differ between the groups, regardless of insulin requirements. Decreasing insulin requirements during the third trimester are not associated with

  2. Gestational diabetes and macrosomia by race/ethnicity in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pai-Jong Stacy; Roberson, Emily; Dye, Timothy

    2013-10-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) has been shown to have long-term sequelae for both the mother and infant. Women with GDM are at increased risk of macrosomia, which predisposes the infant to birth injuries. Previous studies noted increased rates of GDM in Asian and Pacific Islander (API) women; however, the rate of macrosomia in API women with GDM is unclear. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between ethnicity, gestational diabetes (GDM), and macrosomia in Hawaii. A retrospective cohort study was performed using Hawaii Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) data. Data from 2009-2011, linked with selected items from birth certificates, were used to examine GDM and macrosomia by ethnicity. SAS-callable SUDAAN 10.0 was used to generate odds ratios, point estimates and standard errors. Data from 4735 respondents were weighted to represent all pregnancies resulting in live births in Hawaii from 2009-2011. The overall prevalence of GDM in Hawaii was 10.9%. The highest prevalence of GDM was in Filipina (13.1%) and Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (12.1%) women. The lowest prevalence was in white women (7.4%). Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, Filipina, and other Asian women all had an increased risk of GDM compared to white women using bivariate analysis. Adjusting for obesity, age, maternal nativity, and smoking, Asian Pacific Islander (API) women, which includes Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, Filipina, and other Asian women, had a 50% increased odds of having GDM compared to white women when compared using multivariate analysis. Among women with GDM, the highest prevalence of macrosomia was in white women (14.5%) while the lowest was in Filipina (5.3%) women. API women in Hawaii have increased rates of GDM compared to white women. Paradoxically, this elevated GDM risk in API women is not associated with an increased rate of macrosomia. This suggests the relationship between GDM and macrosomia is more complex in this population.

  3. Gestational diabetes and macrosomia by race/ethnicity in Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes (GDM) has been shown to have long-term sequelae for both the mother and infant. Women with GDM are at increased risk of macrosomia, which predisposes the infant to birth injuries. Previous studies noted increased rates of GDM in Asian and Pacific Islander (API) women; however, the rate of macrosomia in API women with GDM is unclear. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between ethnicity, gestational diabetes (GDM), and macrosomia in Hawaii. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed using Hawaii Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) data. Data from 2009–2011, linked with selected items from birth certificates, were used to examine GDM and macrosomia by ethnicity. SAS-callable SUDAAN 10.0 was used to generate odds ratios, point estimates and standard errors. Results Data from 4735 respondents were weighted to represent all pregnancies resulting in live births in Hawaii from 2009–2011. The overall prevalence of GDM in Hawaii was 10.9%. The highest prevalence of GDM was in Filipina (13.1%) and Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (12.1%) women. The lowest prevalence was in white women (7.4%). Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, Filipina, and other Asian women all had an increased risk of GDM compared to white women using bivariate analysis. Adjusting for obesity, age, maternal nativity, and smoking, Asian Pacific Islander (API) women, which includes Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, Filipina, and other Asian women, had a 50% increased odds of having GDM compared to white women when compared using multivariate analysis. Among women with GDM, the highest prevalence of macrosomia was in white women (14.5%) while the lowest was in Filipina (5.3%) women. Conclusions API women in Hawaii have increased rates of GDM compared to white women. Paradoxically, this elevated GDM risk in API women is not associated with an increased rate of macrosomia. This suggests the relationship between GDM and macrosomia is more complex in

  4. Role of probiotics in reducing the risk of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Isolauri, E; Rautava, S; Collado, M C; Salminen, S

    2015-08-01

    Overweight and obesity currently constitute a major threat to human well-being. Almost half of the female population are currently overweight. Pregnant overweight women are at risk of gestational diabetes affecting the health of the mother and the child, in both the short and long term. Notwithstanding the extensive scientific interest centred on the problem, research efforts have thus far been unable to devise preventive strategies. Recent scientific advances point to a gut microbiota dysbiosis, with ensuing low-grade inflammation as a contributing element, in obesity and its comorbidities. Such findings would suggest a role for specific probiotics in the search for preventive and therapeutic adjunct applications in gestational diabetes. The aim of the present paper was to critically review recent demonstrations of the role of intestinal microbes in immune and metabolic regulation, which could be exploited in nutritional management of pregnant women by probiotic bacteria. By modulating specific target functions, probiotic dietary intervention may exert clinical effects beyond the nutritional impact of food. As this approach in pregnancy is new, an overview of the role of gut microbiota in shaping host metabolism, together with the definition of probiotics are presented, and finally, specific targets and potential mechanisms for probiotics in pregnancy are discussed. Pregnancy appears to be the most critical stage for interventions aiming to reduce the risk of non-communicable disease in future generations, beyond the immediate dangers attributable to the health of the mother, labour and the neonate. Specific probiotic interventions during pregnancy provide an opportunity, therefore, to promote the health not only of the mother but also of the child.

  5. Moderate and Vigorous Intensity Exercise during Pregnancy and Gestational Weight Gain in Women with Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Samantha F.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Krefman, Amy E.; Hedderson, Monique M.; Brown, Susan D.; Mevi, Ashley; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Ferrara, Assiamira

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the associations of moderate and vigorous intensity exercise during pregnancy with the rate of gestational weight gain (GWG) from gestational diabetes (GDM) diagnosis to delivery, overall and stratified by prepregnancy overweight/obesity. Methods Prospective cohort study with physical activity reported shortly after the GDM diagnosis and prepregnancy weight and post-diagnosis GWG obtained from electronic medical records (n= 1,055). Multinomial logistic regression models in the full cohort and stratified by prepregnancy overweight/obesity estimated associations of moderate and vigorous intensity exercise with GWG below and above the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) prepregnancy BMI-specific recommended ranges for weekly rate of GWG in the second and third trimesters. Results In the full cohort, any participation in vigorous intensity exercise was associated with decreased odds of GWG above recommended ranges as compared to no participation [Odds Ratio (95% Confidence Interval): 0.63 (0.40, 0.99)], with a significant trend for decreasing odds of excess GWG with increasing level of vigorous intensity exercise. Upon stratification by prepregnancy overweight/obesity, significant associations were only observed for BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m2: any vigorous intensity exercise, as compared to none, was associated with 54% decreased odds of excess GWG [0.46 (0.27, 0.79)] and significant trends were detected for decreasing odds of GWG both below and above the IOM’s recommended ranges with increasing level of vigorous exercise (both P ≤ 0.03). No associations were observed for moderate intensity exercise. Conclusions In women with GDM, particularly overweight and obese women, vigorous intensity exercise during pregnancy may reduce the odds of excess GWG. PMID:26955997

  6. Moderate and Vigorous Intensity Exercise During Pregnancy and Gestational Weight Gain in Women with Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Samantha F; Sternfeld, Barbara; Krefman, Amy E; Hedderson, Monique M; Brown, Susan D; Mevi, Ashley; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Quesenberry, Charles P; Ferrara, Assiamira

    2016-06-01

    Objectives To estimate the associations of moderate and vigorous intensity exercise during pregnancy with the rate of gestational weight gain (GWG) from gestational diabetes (GDM) diagnosis to delivery, overall and stratified by prepregnancy overweight/obesity. Methods Prospective cohort study with physical activity reported shortly after the GDM diagnosis and prepregnancy weight and post-diagnosis GWG obtained from electronic health records (n = 1055). Multinomial logistic regression models in the full cohort and stratified by prepregnancy overweight/obesity estimated associations of moderate and vigorous intensity exercise with GWG below and above the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) prepregnancy BMI-specific recommended ranges for weekly rate of GWG in the second and third trimesters. Results In the full cohort, any participation in vigorous intensity exercise was associated with decreased odds of GWG above recommended ranges as compared to no participation [odds ratio (95 % confidence interval): 0.63 (0.40, 0.99)], with a significant trend for decreasing odds of excess GWG with increasing level of vigorous intensity exercise. Upon stratification by prepregnancy overweight/obesity, significant associations were only observed for BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m(2): any vigorous intensity exercise, as compared to none, was associated with 54 % decreased odds of excess GWG [0.46 (0.27, 0.79)] and significant trends were detected for decreasing odds of GWG both below and above the IOM's recommended ranges with increasing level of vigorous exercise (both P ≤ 0.03). No associations were observed for moderate intensity exercise. Conclusions for Practice In women with GDM, particularly overweight and obese women, vigorous intensity exercise during pregnancy may reduce the odds of excess GWG.

  7. Diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus: falling through the net.

    PubMed

    Meek, Claire L; Lewis, Hannah B; Patient, Charlotte; Murphy, Helen R; Simmons, David

    2015-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with increased risks to mother and child, but globally agreed diagnostic criteria remain elusive. Identification of women with GDM is important, as treatment reduces adverse outcomes such as perinatal death, shoulder dystocia and neonatal hypoglycaemia. Recently, the UK's National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommended new diagnostic thresholds for GDM which are different from the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) criteria endorsed by the WHO. The study aim was to assess neonatal and obstetric outcomes among women who would test positive for the IADPSG criteria but negative for the NICE 2015 criteria. Data from 25,543 consecutive singleton live births (2004-2008) were obtained retrospectively from hospital records. Women were screened with a random plasma glucose (RPG; 12-16 weeks) and a 50 g glucose challenge test (GCT; 26-28 weeks). If RPG >7.0 mmol/l, GCT >7.7 mmol/l or symptoms were present, a 75 g OGTT was offered (n = 3,848). In this study, GDM prevalence was 4.13% (NICE 2015) and 4.62% (IADPSG). Women who 'fell through the net', testing NICE-negative but IADPSG-positive (n = 387), had a higher risk of having a large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infant (birthweight >90th percentile for gestational age; adjusted OR [95% CI] 3.12 [2.44, 3.98]), Caesarean delivery (1.44 [1.15, 1.81]) and polyhydramnios (6.90 [3.94, 12.08]) compared with women with negative screening results and no OGTT (n = 21,695). LGA risk was highest among women with fasting plasma glucose 5.1-5.5 mmol/l (n = 167): the mean birthweight was 350 g above that of the reference population and 37.7% of infants were LGA. The IADPSG criteria identify women at substantial risk of complications who would not be identified by the NICE 2015 criteria.

  8. Free Thyroxine During Early Pregnancy and Risk for Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Haddow, James E.; Craig, Wendy Y.; Neveux, Louis M.; Palomaki, Glenn E.; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn; Malone, Fergal D.; D’Alton, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have now reported associations between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and low free thyroxine (fT4) during the second and third trimesters, but not in the first trimester. The present study further examines relationships between low fT4, maternal weight, and GDM among women in the FaSTER (First and Second Trimester Evaluation of Risk) trial, in an effort to determine the extent to which thyroid hormones might contribute to causality. The FaSTER cohort includes 9351 singleton, euthyroid women; 272 of these women were subsequently classified as having GDM. Thyrotropin (TSH), fT4, and thyroid antibodies were measured at 11–14 weeks’ gestation (first trimester) and 15–18.9 weeks’ gestation (second trimester). An earlier report of this cohort documented an inverse relationship between fT4 in the second trimester and maternal weight. In the current analysis, women with GDM were significantly older (32 vs. 28 years) and weighed more (75 vs. 64.5 kg). Maternal weight and age (but not TSH) were significantly associated univariately with fT4 (dependent variable), in the order listed. Second trimester fT4 odds ratios (OR) for GDM were 2.06 [95% CI 1.37–3.09] (unadjusted); and 1.89 [95% CI 1.26–2.84] (adjusted). First trimester odds ratios were not significant: OR 1.45 [95%CI 0.97–2.16] (unadjusted) and 1.11 [95% CI 0.74–1.62] (adjusted). The second trimester fT4/GDM relationship thus appeared to strengthen as gestation progressed. In FaSTER, high maternal weight was associated with both low fT4 and a higher GDM rate in the second trimester. Peripheral deiodinase activity is known to increase with high caloric intake (represented by high weight). We speculate that weight-related low fT4 (the metabolically inactive prohormone) is a marker for deiodinase activity, serving as a substrate for conversion of fT4 to free triiodothyronine (fT3), the active hormone responsible for glucose-related metabolic activity. PMID:26910563

  9. Dietetic management of gestational diabetes in New Zealand: A cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Robyn L; Wall, Clare R; Bloomfield, Frank H; Crowther, Caroline A

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate dietetic practice in the management of gestational diabetes in New Zealand, compare this with evidence-based guidelines and determine the need for New Zealand-specific evidence-based nutrition practice guidelines for gestational diabetes. A 64-item cross-sectional online survey of New Zealand-registered dietitians providing care to women with gestational diabetes was undertaken. Participants were recruited through Dietitians New Zealand, District Health Boards and private practices across New Zealand. The survey examined dietetic service provision, management recommendations, guideline use, service evaluation, compliance with national and international guidelines and the perceived need for New Zealand-specific evidence-based guidelines for the nutritional management of gestational diabetes. Thirty-three (62%) eligible dietitians participated in the survey. There was significant variation in dietetic services and management recommendations. Nine (28%) dietitians felt the service within which they worked did not offer adequate dietetic services for women with gestational diabetes. Compliance with national and international evidence-based guidelines ranged from 28 to 100% depending on the recommendation. Twenty-five (76%) respondents felt there was a need for New Zealand-specific evidence-based nutrition practice guidelines for gestational diabetes. These results highlight differences in dietetic services and practice in New Zealand and variations in compliance with local and international evidence-based guidelines. The development of New Zealand-specific evidence-based nutrition practice guidelines for gestational diabetes is supported. © 2016 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  10. Association of gestational diabetes and breastfeeding on obesity prevalence in predominately Hispanic low-income youth.

    PubMed

    Shearrer, G E; Whaley, S E; Miller, S J; House, B T; Held, T; Davis, J N

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this study was to examine if breastfeeding duration by gestational diabetes mellitus status impacted the prevalence of obesity in offspring. Data were obtained from a 2011 phone survey with caregivers of low-income children (2-4 years) participating in the Women, Infants and Children programme in Los Angeles County. The final sample included 2295 children, 84% Hispanic and 48% female. Chi-square and binary logistic regression were used to assess gestational diabetes status and breastfeeding duration on the prevalence of obesity, with the following a priori covariates: child's ethnicity, birth weight, age in months and sex. Breastfeeding and gestational diabetes were significantly associated with obesity prevalence (P < 0.01). Using gestational diabetes mellitus and no breastfeeding as the referent category, gestational diabetes mellitus offspring who were breastfed ≥12 months had a 72% decrease in obesity prevalence (adjusted odds ratio = 0.28, confidence interval 0.89-0.03, P = 0.05). These findings suggest that > 12 months of breastfeeding duration in the gestational diabetes mellitus group and any duration of breastfeeding in the non-gestational diabetes mellitus mothers is needed to reduce obesity levels in a primarily Hispanic population. © 2014 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2014 World Obesity.

  11. Gestational diabetes. Incidence, maternal characteristics, and perinatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Sepe, S J; Connell, F A; Geiss, L S; Teutsch, S M

    1985-06-01

    Accurate estimates of the incidence of abnormal glucose tolerance during pregnancy are virtually nonexistent. Screening select populations of women with risk factors for the condition and the nonrandom, non-population-based nature of most studies have given rise to wide variances in reported incidence. We analyzed data from the states of Mississippi and Washington and from the National Natality and Fetal Mortality Surveys conducted in 1980 in an attempt to provide more accurate population-based estimates of the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). In the national surveys GDM was noted (screening and diagnostic criteria were unavailable) as a complication in 0.38% of all sampled pregnancies; overt (type I and type II) diabetes was noted in 0.78%. Mean maternal age for the GDM group was 28.4 yr; 85% were white (81% controls) and 15% non-white (19% controls). Prepregnancy weights were higher in the GDM group by an average of 20 lb. However, mean weight gain was less in this group than in controls (23 versus 29 lb). Perinatal mortality was noted in approximately 2.8% (1.3% in controls) of the offspring in GDM-complicated pregnancies and congenital malformations in 6.4% (7.9% in controls). Methodologic problems were encountered and included lack of screening and diagnostic criteria, underreporting, and underrecording.

  12. Is autoimmune thyroid dysfunction a risk factor for gestational diabetes?

    PubMed

    Pascual Corrales, Eider; Andrada, Patricia; Aubá, María; Ruiz Zambrana, Alvaro; Guillén Grima, Francisco; Salvador, Javier; Escalada, Javier; Galofré, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    Some recent studies have related autoimmune thyroid dysfunction and gestational diabetes (GD). The common factor for both conditions could be the existence of pro-inflammatory homeostasis. The study objective was therefore to assess whether the presence of antithyroid antibodies is related to the occurrence of GD. Fifty-six pregnant women with serum TSH levels ≥ 2.5 mU/mL during the first trimester were retrospectively studied. Antithyroid antibodies were measured, and an O'Sullivan test was performed. GD was diagnosed based on the criteria of the Spanish Group on Diabetes and Pregnancy. Positive antithyroid antibodies were found in 21 (37.50%) women. GD was diagnosed in 15 patients, 6 of whom (10.71%) had positive antibodies, while 9 (16.07%) had negative antibodies. Data were analyzed using exact logistic regression by LogXact-8 Cytel; no statistically significant differences were found between GD patients with positive and negative autoimmunity (OR = 1.15 [95%CI = 0.28-4.51]; P=1.00). The presence of thyroid autoimmunity in women with TSH above the recommended values at the beginning of pregnancy is not associated to development of GD. However, GD prevalence was higher in these patients as compared to the Spanish general population, suggesting the need for closer monitoring in pregnant women with TSH levels ≥ 2.5 mU/mL. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Determinants of gestational diabetes mellitus: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Feleke, Berhanu Elfu

    2017-07-09

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is glucose intolerance first recognized during pregnancy. The objective of this study was to identify the determinant factors of GDM. An unmatched case-control study was conducted. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the profile of study participants and binary logistic regression was used to identify the determinants of GDM. GDM was associated with history of abortion (AOR 5.05 [95% CI: 2.65-9.63]), family history of diabetes mellitus (AOR 8.63 [95% CI: 5.19-14.35]), chronic hypertension (AOR 4.63 [95% CI: 1.27-16.86]), dietary diversification score (AOR 2.96 [95% CI: 2-4.46]), regular physical exercise (AOR 0.03 [95% CI: 0.01-0.04]), history of infertility (AOR 6.19 [95%CI: 1.86-20.16]), history of Caesarean section (AOR 3.24 [95% CI: 1.58-6.63]), previous history of GDM (AOR 8.21 [95% CI: 3.18-21.24]), previous history of intrauterine fetal death (AOR 3.96 [95% CI: 1.56-10.04]), literacy (AOR 0.6 [95% CI: 0.43-0.85]), body mass index (AOR 2.96 [95% CI: 2.08-4.2]), parity (AOR 1.78 [95% CI: 1.3-2.49]). Regular physical exercise should be used as the main tool in preventing GDM.

  14. Prescribing physical activity to prevent and manage gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Colberg, Sheri R; Castorino, Kristin; Jovanovič, Lois

    2013-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is the most prevalent metabolic disorder during pregnancy. Women diagnosed with GDM have a substantially greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes within 5-10 years after delivery, and the risk is increased by excess body weight. Uncontrolled hyperglycemia during pregnancy is potentially harmful to both mother and fetus, resulting in a greater need for Caesarian-section deliveries, delivery of larger infants with more excess body fat, a greater risk of infant death and stillbirth, and an elevated risk of infant hypoglycemia immediately after birth. Fortunately, engaging in physical activity prior to and during pregnancy may lower the risk of developing GDM. Pregnant women should also be advised how to safely increase their physical activity during pregnancy and the postpartum period. An initial approach to becoming more physically active can simply be to encourage women to incorporate more unstructured physical activity into daily living, both before and during pregnancy. Giving women an appropriate exercise prescription can encourage them to participate in physical activity safely and effectively throughout pregnancy to prevent and/or manage GDM. Engaging in 30 min of moderate intensity physical activity on most, if not all, days of the week has been adopted as a recommendation for all pregnant women. PMID:24379915

  15. Genetics of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Maternal Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lowe, William L; Scholtens, Denise M; Sandler, Victoria; Hayes, M Geoffrey

    2016-02-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as abnormal glucose tolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. Women with a history of GDM are at long-term risk for developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM), raising the question to what extent GDM and T2DM share a common genetic architecture. Meta-analysis of candidate gene studies and genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) have identified a number of genes which are reproducibly associated with GDM, including TCF7L2, GCK, KCNJ11, KCNQ1, CDKAL1, IGF2BP2, MTNR1B, and IRS1. These genes are also associated with T2DM. Candidate gene and GWAS have also identified genes associated with maternal metabolic traits, most of which are also associated with metabolic traits in the general population. Two genes, BACE2 and HKDC1, are uniquely associated with maternal metabolic traits. These studies suggest that there are similarities and differences between the genetic architecture of GDM and T2DM and metabolic quantitative traits in pregnant and non-pregnant populations.

  16. Prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus: Where are we now?

    PubMed

    Simmons, D

    2015-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing at a rapid rate, driven by the increasing proportion of the population that is overweight/obese from a young age. More than 25 randomized controlled trials testing whether GDM can be prevented have now reported their findings, but only four different interventions have shown a reduction in the proportion of women with GDM (healthy eating alone, healthy eating with physical activity, myoinositol supplementation and probiotic treatment), and these results have not been replicated. The interventions tested to date include different diets and different forms of physical activity, in combination or alone, vitamin D, myoinositol, probiotics and metformin. Studies could be improved by using the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Group criteria for GDM (which are probably more sensitive to change because of their multiple time points), targeting and tailoring interventions to subgroups most likely to benefit, and separating those with GDM early in pregnancy from those developing GDM de novo. The greatest societal benefit is likely to arise from population-based lifestyle approaches which include those women yet to become pregnant and those who are already pregnant and their families; an approach that is yet to be fully tested. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Seasonal Changes in the Prevalence of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Moses, Robert G; Wong, Veronica C K; Lambert, Kelly; Morris, Gary J; San Gil, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    To determine the effect of different seasons on the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) by using World Health Organization criteria. The results of all pregnancy glucose tolerance tests (GTTs) were prospectively collected over a 3-year period in a temperate climate, and the results were grouped by season. The results of 7,369 pregnancy GTTs were available for consideration. In winter, the median 1-h and 2-h glucose results after GTT were significantly (P < 0.0001) lower than the overall 1-h and 2-h results. The prevalence of GDM at the 1-h diagnostic level was 29% higher in summer and 27% lower in winter than the overall prevalence (P = 0.02). The prevalence of GDM at the 2-h diagnostic level was 28% higher in summer and 31% lower in winter than the overall prevalence (P = 0.01). The prevalence of GDM varies according to seasons, which leads to the possible overdiagnosis of GDM in summer and/or underdiagnosis in winter. Further research into standardization of the GTT or seasonal adjustment of the results may need to be considered. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  18. Increased infection with key periodontal pathogens during gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gogeneni, Himabindu; Buduneli, Nurcan; Ceyhan-Öztürk, Banu; Gümüş, Pınar; Akcali, Aliye; Zeller, Iris; Renaud, Diane E.; Scott, David A.; Özçaka, Özgün

    2015-01-01

    Aim Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), gingivitis, infection with specific periodontal pathogens and systemic inflammation each increase the risk for poor pregnancy outcome. We set out to monitor the interactions of gingivitis and GDM with respect to oral infection and the systemic inflammatory burden. Materials and Methods Four case–control groups (n = 117) were recruited, (1) No gingivitis, No GDM (n = 27); (2) Gingivitis, No GDM (n = 31); (3) No gingivitis, GDM (n = 21); and (4) Gingivitis, GDM (n = 38). Oral infection with three key periodontal pathogens was determined by PCR. Systemic inflammation was determined by quantification of CRP by EIA. Results Gingivitis during pregnancy was associated with oral infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Filifactor alocis and Treponema denticola and combinations thereof (all p < 0.01). GDM was also associated with increased infection with individual and multiple oral pathogens (all p < 0.05). Gingivitis during pregnancy led to a 325% increase in systemic CRP (mean, 2495 versus 8116 ng/ml, p < 0.01). Conclusions Diabetes and gingivitis act in concert to increase risk biomarkers for poor pregnancy outcome. PMID:25959628

  19. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in the subsequent pregnancy: is it worthwhile?

    PubMed

    Lu, George C; Luchesse, Angela; Chapman, Victoria; Cliver, Suzanne; Rouse, Dwight J

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, among women without evidence of gestational diabetes mellitus during their first pregnancy, the likelihood of, and associated risk factors for, the development of gestational diabetes mellitus in the subsequent pregnancy. This was a retrospective cohort study, with a time frame of 1991 to 1999. Of 3710 women without gestational diabetes mellitus in the first pregnancy, 1% (37 women) were subsequently diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus in the second pregnancy. These 37 women, when compared (by means) to women without gestational diabetes mellitus in their second pregnancy, were more likely to be older (age 21 years vs 19 years) and obese (first visit body mass index, 28 kg/m(2) vs 25 kg/m(2)) and to have an interpregnancy weight gain of >5 kg (93% vs 49%) and a longer mean interpregnancy interval (33 months vs 24 months). Regression analysis revealed that, during the first pregnancy, a first visit body mass index of >29 kg/m(2) (odds ratio, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1-4.5) and a serum glucose screen of >101 mg/dL (odds ratio, 8.3; 95% CI, 2.5-27.9) were associated significantly with the development of gestational diabetes mellitus in the second pregnancy, as was an interpregnancy weight gain of >5 kg (odds ratio, 10.8; 95% CI, 2.5-46.3). All women who subsequently had gestational diabetes mellitus had at least one of these risk factors. Among women without gestational diabetes mellitus in the first pregnancy, the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in a second pregnancy is low. Therefore, screening all such women in the second pregnancy may not be justified.

  20. Geospatial Analysis of Food Environment Demonstrates Associations with Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    KAHR, Maike K.; SUTER, Melissa A.; BALLAS, Jerasimos; RAMIN, Susan M.; MONGA, Manju; LEE, Wesley; HU, Min; SHOPE, Cindy D.; CHESNOKOVA, Arina; KRANNICH, Laura; GRIFFIN, Emily N.; MASTROBATTISTA, Joan; DILDY, Gary A.; STREHLOW, Stacy L.; RAMPHUL, Ryan; HAMILTON, Winifred J; AAGAARD, Kjersti M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of most common complications of pregnancy, with incidence rates varying by maternal age, race/ethnicity, obesity, parity, and family history. Given its increasing prevalence in recent decades, co-variant environmental and sociodemographic factors may be additional determinants of GDM occurrence. Objectives We hypothesized that environmental risk factors, in particular measures of the food environment, may be a diabetes contributor. We employed geospatial modeling in a populous U.S. county to characterize the association of the relative availability of fast food restaurants and supermarkets to GDM. Study Design Utilizing a perinatal database with over 4900 encoded antenatal and outcome variables inclusive of zip code data, 8912 consecutive pregnancies were analyzed for correlations between GDM and food environment based on county-wide food permit registration data. Linkage between pregnancies and food environment was achieved on the basis of validated 5 digit zip code data. The prevalence of supermarkets and fast food restaurants per 100,000 inhabitants for each zip code were gathered from publicly available food permit sources. In order to independently authenticate our findings with objective data, we measured hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels as a function of geospatial distribution of food environment in a matched subset (n=80). Results Residence in neighborhoods with a high prevalence of fast food restaurants (fourth quartile) was significantly associated with an increased risk of developing GDM (relative to first quartile, aOR: 1.63 [95% CI 1.21–2.19]). In multivariate analysis, this association held true after controlling for potential confounders (p=0.002). Measurement of HbA1c levels in a matched subset were significantly increased in association with residence in a zip code with a higher fast food/supermarket ratio (n=80, r=0.251 p<0.05). Conclusions As demonstrated by geospatial analysis, a relationship

  1. Epigenetic programming of obesity and diabetes by in utero exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ruchat, Stephanie-May; Hivert, Marie-France; Bouchard, Luigi

    2013-10-01

    It is now well accepted that offspring exposed to maternal undernutrition, obesity, or gestational diabetes mellitus have an increased risk for chronic diseases later in life, supporting the theory of the early origins of chronic diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms through which the exposure to an altered in utero environment translates into the development of chronic diseases are not yet well understood. Recently reported promising results help to resolve this issue. They suggest that epigenetic modifications are a potential mechanism for fetal metabolic programming. This review provides an overview of the relationship between the exposure to an altered intrauterine environment and fetal metabolic programming, focusing on gestational diabetes mellitus and epigenetic variations at adipokine candidate genes. © 2013 International Life Sciences Institute.

  2. Postpartum care and contraception provided to women with gestational and preconception diabetes in California's Medicaid program.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla; Braughton, Monica Y; Riedel, Julie Cross; Cohen, Susannah; Logan, Julia; Howell, Mike; Thiel de Bocanegra, Heike

    2017-08-24

    To compare rates of postpartum care and contraception provided to women with gestational or preconception diabetes mellitus to women with no known diabetes mellitus. A retrospective cohort study of 199,860 women aged 15-44 years who were continuously enrolled in California's Medicaid program, Medi-Cal, from 43 days prior to 99 days after delivering in 2012. Claims for postpartum clinic visits and contraceptive supplies were compared for 11,494 mothers with preconception diabetes, 17,970 mothers with gestational diabetes, and 170,396 mothers without diabetes. Multivariable logistic regression was used to control for maternal age, race/ethnicity, primary language, residence in a primary care shortage area, state-funded healthcare program and Cesarean delivery, when examining the effects of diabetes on postpartum care and contraception. Although postpartum clinic visits were more common with diabetes (55% preconception, 55% gestational, 48% no diabetes, p=<.0001), almost half did not receive any postpartum care within 99 days of delivery. Women with pregnancies complicated by diabetes were more likely to receive permanent contraception than women without diabetes (preconception diabetes, aOR: 1.39, 95% CI: 1.31-1.47; gestational diabetes, aOR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.14-1.27). However, among women without permanent contraception, less than half received any reversible contraception within 99 days of delivery (44% preconception, 43% gestational, 43% no diabetes) and less effective, barrier contraceptives were more commonly provided to women with preconception diabetes than women without diabetes (aOR: 1.24, 95% CI:1.16-1.33). Low-income Californian women with pregnancies complicated by diabetes do not consistently receive postpartum care or contraception that may prevent complication of future pregnancies. Efforts are needed to improve rates of provision of postpartum care and high quality contraceptive services to low income women in California, particularly following

  3. [A brief of gestational diabetes mellitus, risk factors and current criteria of diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Al-Aissa, Zahra; Hadarits, Orsolya; Rosta, Klára; Zóka, András; Rigó, János; Firneisz, Gábor; Somogyi, Anikó

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes is one of the most common metabolic disorders that may cause pathological pregnancy. Treating diabetes recognized during pregnancy results in lowering maternal and fetal complications. These patients present higher risk for excessive weight gain, preeclampsia, delivery with cesarean sections, high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in the future. Fetuses of mothers with gestational diabetes are at higher risk for macrosomia and birth trauma, after delivery they present higher risk of developing neonatal hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and respiratory distress syndrome. There is still no consensus in the recommendations for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus by expert committees. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(8), 283-290.

  4. Sex of the baby and future maternal risk of Type 2 diabetes in women who had gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Retnakaran, R; Shah, B R

    2016-07-01

    Women who develop gestational diabetes mellitus have a chronic defect in the secretion of insulin by the pancreatic β cells that underlies both their diagnostic hyperglycaemia in pregnancy and their elevated lifetime risk of developing Type 2 diabetes in the future. It has recently emerged that carrying a male fetus is associated with poorer maternal β-cell function and an increased risk of gestational diabetes, whereas the development of gestational diabetes when carrying a girl (as compared with a boy) predicts a comparatively higher risk of early progression to Type 2 diabetes before any subsequent pregnancy. In this context, we sought to determine the impact of fetal sex on the long-term risk of Type 2 diabetes in women with gestational diabetes. Using population-based administrative databases, we identified all women in Ontario, Canada, with a singleton live-birth first pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes between April 2000 and March 2010 (n = 23 363). We compared the risk of subsequent Type 2 diabetes after pregnancy in those who carried a girl (n = 11 229) vs. those who carried a boy (n = 12 134). Over median 5.5 years follow-up, 5483 women (23.5%) were diagnosed with diabetes. Compared with those who carried a boy, women who had a girl had an elevated risk of subsequently developing diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.06, 95% CI 1.01-1.12). Among women with gestational diabetes, those who are carrying a girl have a slightly higher overall future risk of Type 2 diabetes. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  5. Lifestyle Interventions to Reduce Risk of Diabetes among Women with Prior Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    While lifestyle interventions involving exercise and a healthy diet in high-risk adults have been found to reduce progression to type 2 diabetes by more than 50%, little attention has been given to the potential benefits of such strategies in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We conducted a literature search of PubMed for English-language studies of randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions among women with a history of GDM. In total, 9 studies were identified which fulfilled the eligibility criteria. The majority of randomized trials of lifestyle interventions in women with GDM have been limited to pilot or feasibility studies. However, preliminary findings suggest that such interventions can improve diabetes risk factors in women with a history of GDM. Larger, well-designed controlled randomized trials are needed to assess the effects of lifestyle interventions on preventing subsequent progression to type 2 diabetes among women with GDM. PMID:25220104

  6. Lifestyle interventions to reduce risk of diabetes among women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    While lifestyle interventions involving exercise and a healthy diet in high-risk adults have been found to reduce progression to type 2 diabetes by >50%, little attention has been given to the potential benefits of such strategies in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We conducted a literature search of PubMed for English language studies of randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions among women with a history of GDM. In total, nine studies were identified which fulfilled the eligibility criteria. The majority of randomized trials of lifestyle interventions in women with GDM have been limited to pilot or feasibility studies. However, preliminary findings suggest that such interventions can improve diabetes risk factors in women with a history of GDM. Larger, well-designed controlled randomized trials are needed to assess the effects of lifestyle interventions on preventing subsequent progression to type 2 diabetes among women with GDM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gestational diabetes mellitus with diabetic ketoacidosis in a Yorkshire terrier bitch.

    PubMed

    Armenise, Andrea; Pastorelli, Gianfranco; Palmisano, Angela; Sontas, Hasan B; Romagnoli, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    A 6 yr old pregnant Yorkshire terrier bitch presented 62 days after mating with an acute history of vomiting and coughing. The owners also reported that the dog was polyuric and polydypsic for the last 2 weeks. Complete blood count, serum biochemistry, and urinalysis revealed hyperglycemia, ketonemia, ketonuria, and metabolic acidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis was diagnosed and after emergency treatment, including fluid therapy, prophylactic antibiotics, and regular insulin, the bitch whelped six healthy normal puppies. Two weeks after treatment, the bitch was clinically normal with normal fructosamine levels. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of gestational diabetes mellitus in a small breed dog.

  8. Preventive letter: doubling the return rate after gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Olmos, Pablo R; Borzone, Gisella R; Berkowitz, Loni; Mertens, Nicolás; Busso, Dolores; Santos, José L; Poblete, José A; Vera, Claudio; Belmar, Cristián; Goldenberg, Denisse; Samith, Bárbara; Acosta, Ana M; Escalona, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    To measure the impact of a "Preventive Letter" designed to encourage the return of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) mothers to follow up visit after delivery, in the context of a worldwide concern about low return rates after delivery of these patients. Mothers with GDM require medical evaluation and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) 6 weeks after delivery, in order to: [a] confirm remission of GDM and [b] provide advice on the prevention of type 2 diabetes. In the year 2003 we developed a "Preventive Letter", containing three aspects: [a] current treatment, [b] suggested management during labor, and [c] a stapled laboratory order for OGTT to be performed 6 weeks after delivery. The return rate after delivery was assessed in two groups of GDM mothers: [a] "Without Preventive Letter" (n = 253), and "With Preventive Letter" (n = 215). Both groups, similar with respect to age (33.0 ± 5.4 and 32.3 ± 4.9 years respectively, p = 0.166) and education time (14.9 ± 1.8 and 15.0 ± 1.8 years respectively, p = 0.494), showed a significant difference in the 1-year return rate after delivery, as assessed by the Kaplan-Meier test: 32.0 % for the group "Without Preventive Letter", and 76.0 % for the group "With Preventive Letter" (p < 0.001). The 1-year return rate after delivery of GDM mothers was 2.4 times higher in the group "With Preventive Letter" than in the group without it. We believe that this low-cost approach could be useful in other institutions caring for pregnant women with diabetes.

  9. [Effectiveness of oral hypoglycemic drugs in the metabolic control of patients with gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Valdés R, Enrique; Soto-Chacón, Emiliano; Lahsen M, Rodolfo; Barrera H, Carlos; Candía P, Paula

    2008-07-01

    Gestational Diabetes is characterized by different degrees of glucose intolerance that produce a series of fetal and perinatal alterations. During many years, in those cases of gestational diabetes that did not respond to nutritional interventions, the use of insulin was a proven treatment to achieve metabolic control and thus a better perinatal outcome. At present, some new oral hypoglycemic drugs, from the family of sulfonylureas and biguanides, have been shown to be safe, of low cost, and apparently effective in the metabolic control of this disease. We review the publications that propose the use of oral hypoglycemic drugs for the metabolic control of gestational diabetes that does not respond to nutritional measures.

  10. Prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Moon, Joon Ho; Kwak, Soo Heon; Jang, Hak C

    2017-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy, is characterized by underlying maternal defects in the β-cell response to insulin during pregnancy. Women with a previous history of GDM have a greater than 7-fold higher risk of developing postpartum diabetes compared with women without GDM. Various risk factors for postpartum diabetes have been identified, including maternal age, glucose levels in pregnancy, family history of diabetes, pre-pregnancy and postpartum body mass index, dietary patterns, physical activity, and breastfeeding. Genetic studies revealed that GDM shares common genetic variants with type 2 diabetes. A number of lifestyle interventional trials that aimed to ameliorate modifiable risk factors, including diet, exercise, and breastfeeding, succeeded in reducing the incidence of postpartum diabetes, weight retention, and other obesity-related morbidities. The present review summarizes the findings of previous studies on the incidence and risk factors of postpartum diabetes and discusses recent lifestyle interventional trials that attempted to prevent postpartum diabetes.

  11. Prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Joon Ho; Kwak, Soo Heon; Jang, Hak C.

    2017-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy, is characterized by underlying maternal defects in the β-cell response to insulin during pregnancy. Women with a previous history of GDM have a greater than 7-fold higher risk of developing postpartum diabetes compared with women without GDM. Various risk factors for postpartum diabetes have been identified, including maternal age, glucose levels in pregnancy, family history of diabetes, pre-pregnancy and postpartum body mass index, dietary patterns, physical activity, and breastfeeding. Genetic studies revealed that GDM shares common genetic variants with type 2 diabetes. A number of lifestyle interventional trials that aimed to ameliorate modifiable risk factors, including diet, exercise, and breastfeeding, succeeded in reducing the incidence of postpartum diabetes, weight retention, and other obesity-related morbidities. The present review summarizes the findings of previous studies on the incidence and risk factors of postpartum diabetes and discusses recent lifestyle interventional trials that attempted to prevent postpartum diabetes. PMID:28049284

  12. [Effect of gestational diabetes on adiposity indicators during the first 18 years of life; systematic review].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Cruz, Arturo; Ortega Cisneros, Armando; Bacardí Gascón, Montserrat

    2014-02-01

    Gestational diabetes has been associated with obesity later in life. However, reported results have not been consistent and the methods used have shown weakness. To analize prospective and retrospective cohort studies that assess the gestational diabetes effects on adiposity indicators in the offspring during their first 18 years. A search was made for prospective or retrospective cohort studies registered in Medline/ Pubmed database, from January 2011 to September 2013 that evaluated the gestational diabetes effects on adiposity indicators at birth or after birth. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. A total of 472,959 pairs of mother and child were studied. Children age at the moment of evaluation ranged from birth to 18 years. In nine out of eleven articles an association between gestational diabetes and adiposity indicators was observed. In seven studies adjustments for potential confounders (pre gestational BMI, maternal age) were made. In five of those an association between gestational diabetes and adiposity was found. The results of this review indicate that the evidence showing that gestational diabetes increase adiposity indicators later in life is moderate. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  13. Immortal time bias in the study of stillbirth risk factors: the example of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hutcheon, Jennifer A; Kuret, Verena; Joseph, K S; Sabr, Yasser; Lim, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    Current understanding of the increased risk for stillbirth in gestational diabetes mellitus is often based on large cohort studies in which the risk of stillbirth in women with this disease is compared with the risk in women without. However, such studies could be susceptible to immortal time bias because, although many cohorts begin at 20 weeks' gestation, pregnancies must "survive" until 24-28 weeks in order to be screened and diagnosed with gestational diabetes. We describe the theoretical potential for immortal time bias in studies of stillbirth and gestational diabetes and then quantify the magnitude of the bias using 2006 United States vital statistics data. Although gestational diabetes was protective against stillbirth when including all births (relative risk = 0.88 [95% confidence interval = 0.79-0.99]), restricting analyses to births at >28 weeks' gestation reversed the effect and diabetes became associated with an increased risk of stillbirth (1.25 [1.11-1.41]). Immortal time before diagnosis of gestational diabetes may bias our understanding of the stillbirth risk associated with this condition.

  14. Low prevalence of glucokinase gene mutations in gestational diabetic patients with good glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Frigeri, H R; Santos, I C R; Réa, R R; Almeida, A C R; Fadel-Picheth, C M T; Pedrosa, F O; Souza, E M; Rego, F G M; Picheth, G

    2012-05-18

    Glucokinase (GCK) plays a key role in glucose homeostasis. Gestational diabetes mellitus increases the risk of gestational complications in pregnant women and fetuses. We screened for mutations in coding and flanking regions of the GCK gene in pregnant women with or without gestational diabetes in a Brazilian population. A sample of 200 pregnant women classified as healthy (control, N = 100) or with gestational diabetes (N = 100) was analyzed for mutations in the GCK gene. All gestational diabetes mellitus patients had good glycemic control maintained by diet alone and no complications during pregnancy. Mutations were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Thirteen of the 200 subjects had GCK gene mutations. The mutations detected were in intron 3 (c.43331A>G, new), intron 6 (c.47702T>C, rs2268574), intron 9 (c.48935C>T, rs2908274), and exon 10 (c.49620G>A, rs13306388). None of these GCK mutations were found to be significantly associated with gestational diabetes mellitus. In summary, we report a low frequency of GCK mutations in a pregnant Brazilian population and describe a new intronic variation (c.43331A>G, intron 3). We conclude that mutations in GCK introns and in non-translatable regions of the GCK gene do not affect glycemic control and are not correlated with gestational diabetes mellitus.

  15. [Basic aspects for the control of gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino

    2005-01-01

    The female population in conditions of greater demand of insulin production, as in the case of pregnancy, can develop gestational diabetes (DG); therefore, the preconceptional attention in patients with suspects of development of DG should include the confirmation that blood glucose is found within the normal range, as well as the indication of a controlled diet. Glucose posprandial determinations two hours after food intake is advisable in patients that need insulin administration, which avoids determinations four times a day. The diet should include between 35 and 40 % of carbohydrates per day, supervised by a dietitian and based on the needs of each woman and the characteristics of the gestation. The combination of ultra-rapid acting insulin associate to ultra-slow acting insulin for application as a unique dose per day has been successfully used, but it is still necessary to determine the best diet for an adequate control of glucose. Oral hypoglycemic medications are not recommended as a DG treatment, since they were traditionally described as having theratogenic activity, by maintaining long hypoglycemic periods. Vaginal delivery is not contraindicated, although to avoid obstetrical complications, a cesarean section can be practiced, taking into account the antecedents of prior birth weight and the characteristics of bone pelvis. After delivery, a monthly posprandial determination at 2 hours should be carried out, where concentrations under 140 mg/dL are considered normal and it should be repeated every year. Insulin resistance can be a physiological state of pregnancy, but the beta-cells of maternal pancreas can be altered from the fetal life and therefore, cause the impossibility to respond to such a metabolic effort as pregnancy.

  16. Effects of Low Glycemic Index Diets on Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jinhua; Heng, Weijun; Gao, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Studies of the effects of low glycemic index (LGI) diets on gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have reported conflicting findings. The aim of the study was to evaluate the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the effects of LGI diets with and without added dietary fiber (DF) on maternal and neonatal outcomes in GDM patients. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBSCO, Springer, Ovid, and Cochrane Library databases for studies of the effects of LGI diets in GDM patients. We performed a meta-analysis of the effects of the LGI diets with and without added dietary fiber (DF) on GDM outcomes. Risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random- and fixed-effects models. Five RCTs involving 302 participants were included in our meta-analysis. No statistically significant differences in the risks of cesarean section delivery, large for gestational age, and small for gestational age were observed. The risk of macrosomia in the LGI groups was significantly lower (RR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.10–0.71; P = 0.008) than that in the control groups. Our subgroup analysis of the effects of DF showed that LGI diets with an increased level of DF, relative to the control diet, reduced the risk of macrosomia beyond that of the LGI diets alone (RR: 0.17 vs 0.47, respectively). The subgroup analysis also showed that LGI diets in which the level of DF was approximately equivalent to that in the control diets significantly reduced the risk of insulin usage (RR = 0.69; 95% CI: 0.52–0.92; P = 0.01). The LGI diets reduced the risk of macrosomia in GDM patients, and LGI diets with added DF reduced the risk of macrosomia further. The LGI diets with levels of DF approximately equivalent to that in the control diets reduced the risk of insulin usage in GDM patients. PMID:27258511

  17. Receipt of preconception care among women with prepregnancy and gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kachoria, R; Oza-Frank, R

    2014-12-01

    To determine the extent of provision of preconception care among women with prepregnancy diabetes or women who develop gestational diabetes compared with women without diabetes and to examine the association between preconception care receipt and diabetes status, adjusting for maternal characteristics. Data were collected from women who completed the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System questionnaire in 10 U.S. states (Hawaii, Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, Ohio, Tennessee, Utah and West Virginia) in the period 2009 to 2010. Weighted, self-reported receipt of preconception care by diabetes status was examined. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the association between preconception care receipt and diabetes status. Overall, 31% of women reported receiving preconception care. Women with prepregnancy diabetes (53%) reported the highest prevalence of preconception care, while women with gestational diabetes and women without diabetes reported a lower prevalence (32 and 31%, respectively). In the adjusted model, there was no difference in reported preconception care receipt between women with gestational diabetes and women without diabetes (odds ratio 1.1, 95% CI 0.9, 1.3), while women with prepregnancy diabetes were significantly more likely to report receipt of preconception care (odds ratio 2.2, 95% CI 1.5, 3.3) than women without diabetes. Although all women of reproductive age should receive preconception care, it is vital that women with known risk factors, such as those with prepregnancy diabetes and with risk factors for gestational diabetes, are counselled before pregnancy to optimize maternal and infant health outcomes. It is encouraging that women with prepregnancy diabetes report receiving preconception care more often than women on average, but preconception care is still not reaching all women at high risk. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  18. Serum Malondialdehyde Concentration and Glutathione Peroxidase Activity in a Longitudinal Study of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, María; Muriach, María; Romero, Francisco J.; Villar, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The main goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of oxidative damage and to quantify its level in gestational diabetes. Methods Thirty-six healthy women and thirty-six women with gestational diabetes were studied in the three trimesters of pregnancy regarding their levels of oxidative stress markers. These women were diagnosed with diabetes in the second trimester of pregnancy. Blood glucose levels after 100g glucose tolerance test were higher than 190, 165 or 145 mg/dl, 1, 2 or 3 hours after glucose intake. Results The group of women with gestational diabetes had higher serum malondialdehyde levels, with significant differences between groups in the first and second trimester. The mean values of serum glutathione peroxidase activity in the diabetic women were significantly lower in the first trimester. In the group of women with gestational diabetes there was a negative linear correlation between serum malondialdehyde concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in the second and third trimester. Conclusions In this observational and longitudinal study in pregnant women, the alterations attributable to oxidative stress were present before the biochemical detection of the HbA1c increase. Usual recommendations once GD is detected (adequate metabolic control, as well as any other normally proposed to these patients) lowered the concentration of malondialdehyde at the end of pregnancy to the same levels of the healthy controls. Serum glutathione peroxidase activity in women with gestational diabetes increased during the gestational period. PMID:27228087

  19. The Institute of Medicine Guidelines for Gestational Weight Gain after a Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Lorie M.; Tita, Alan; Biggio, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of gestational weight gain outside the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations after the diagnosis of gestational diabetes (GDM) on perinatal outcomes. Methods Retrospective cohort study. Women were classified as GWG within, less than, or greater than IOM recommendations for body mass index (BMI) as calculated by gestational weight gain per week after a diagnosis of GDM. Outcomes assessed were preeclampsia, cesarean delivery, A2 GDM, birth weight, small for gestational age, large for gestational age, macrosomia, and preterm delivery. Groups were compared using analysis of variance and chi-squared test for trend, as appropriate. Backwards stepwise logistic regression was used to adjust for significant confounding factors. Results Of 635 subjects, 92 gained within, 175 gained less than, and 368 gained more than IOM recommendations. The risk of cesarean delivery and A2 GDM was increased in those gaining above the IOM recommendations compared to within. For every 1-lb/week increase in weight gain after diagnosis of GDM, there was a 36–83% increase in the risk of preeclampsia, cesarean, A2 GDM, macrosomia, and LGA, without decreases in SGA or preterm delivery. Conclusions Weight gain more than the IOM recommendations per week of gestation after a diagnosis of GDM is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:24971568

  20. In-Hospital Breastfeeding Experiences Among Women with Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Oza-Frank, Reena; Gunderson, Erica P

    2017-06-01

    In-hospital experiences among women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) could impact breastfeeding success. We sought (1) to determine changes in the prevalence of hospital breastfeeding experiences between 2004-2008 and 2009-2011 among women with GDM and women without diabetes; (2) to determine whether GDM is associated with higher occurrence of experiencing Baby-Friendly hospital practices because of their known higher rates of breastfeeding difficulties. Data from the 2004 to 2011 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, a survey of women with a recent live birth from 16 states and New York City, were used based on inclusion of an optional survey question about hospital breastfeeding experiences. We examined the association of in-hospital experiences with GDM within each survey phase using chi-square tests. Weighted multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the association between GDM and hospital breastfeeding experiences. Among 157,187 (8.8% GDM), there were crude differences by GDM status for at least 60% of hospital experiences despite increases in positive hospital experiences between time periods. Women with GDM were less likely to report breastfeeding in the first hour (adjusted odds ratio: 0.83, confidence interval [95% CI] 0.73-0.94), feeding only breast milk in the hospital (0.73, 0.65-0.82), and feeding on demand (0.86, 0.74-0.99) compared with women without diabetes. Women with GDM were significantly more likely to report receiving a pump (1.28, 1.07-1.53) and a formula gift pack (1.17, 1.03-1.34) compared with women without diabetes. Although women with GDM experienced improvements in-hospital breastfeeding experiences over time, disparities in breastfeeding practices remained for five in-patient (hospital) practices that included four negative practices (breastfeeding in the first hour, feeding only breast milk in the hospital, told to feed per mother's preference, receiving a formula gift pack) and one positive practice

  1. Type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes: The influence of changing diagnostic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Noctor, Eoin; Dunne, Fidelma P

    2015-01-01

    A previous diagnosis of gestational diabetes (GDM) carries a lifetime risk of progression to type 2 diabetes of up to 60%. Identification of those women at higher risk of progression to diabetes allows the timely introduction of measures to delay or prevent diabetes onset. However, there is a large degree of variability in the literature with regard to the proportion of women with a history of GDM who go on to develop diabetes. Heterogeneity between cohorts with regard to diagnostic criteria used, duration of follow-up, and the characteristics of the study population limit the ability to make meaningful comparisons across studies. As the new International Association for Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group criteria are increasingly adopted worldwide, the prevalence of GDM is set to increase by two-to three-fold. Here, we review the literature to examine the evolution of diagnostic criteria for GDM, the implications of changing criteria on the proportion of women with previous GDM progressing to diabetes, and how the use of different diagnostic criteria may influence the development of appropriate follow-up strategies. PMID:25789105

  2. Neuropsychological Impairment in School-Aged Children Born to Mothers With Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bolaños, Lourdes; Matute, Esmeralda; Ramírez-Dueñas, María de Lourdes; Zarabozo, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether school-aged children born to mothers with gestational diabetes show delays in their neuropsychological development. Several key neuropsychological characteristics of 32 children aged 7 to 9 years born to mothers with gestational diabetes were examined by comparing their performance on cognitive tasks to that of 28 children aged 8 to 10 years whose mothers had glucose levels within normal limits during pregnancy. The gestational diabetes group showed low performance on graphic, spatial, and bimanual skills and a higher presence of soft neurologic signs. Lower scores for general intellectual level and the working memory index were also evident. Our results suggest that gestational diabetes is associated with mild cognitive impairment.

  3. Genetic variants in PTPRD and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangquan; Liu, Heng; Chen, Minjian; Qin, Yufeng; Wu, Wei; Xia, Yankai; Ji, Chenbo; Guo, Xirong; Wen, Juan; Wang, Xinru

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) showed that two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs17584499 and rs649891) in the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D (PTPRD) were associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D). We sought to determine the influence of the PTPRD variants on the gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) risk. In this research, two SNPs in PTPRD reported in T2D GWASs and six PTPRD expression-related SNPs were genotyped in 964 GDM cases and 1,021 controls using the Sequenom platform. Logistic regression analyses in additive models showed consistently significant associations of PTPRD rs10511544 A>C, rs10756026 T>A and rs10809070 C>G with a decreased risk of GDM [adjusted OR (95% CI) = 0.83 (0.72-0.97) for rs10511544; adjusted OR (95% CI) = 0.81 (0.70-0.94) for rs10756026; adjusted OR (95% CI) = 0.78 (0.65-0.92) for rs10809070]. Furthermore, the risk of GDM was significantly decreased with an increasing number of variant alleles of the three SNPs in a dose-dependent manner (Ptrend = 0.008). Moreover, the haplotype containing variant alleles of the three SNPs were significantly associated with a decreased risk of GDM [adjusted OR (95% CI) = 0.77 (0.64-0.92), P = 0.005], when compared with the most frequent haplotype. However, there were no significant associations for the SNPs reported in the T2D GWASs. Altogether, these findings indicate that the variants of rs10511544, rs10756026 and rs10809070 in PTPRD may contribute to a decreased susceptibility to GDM. Further validation in different ethnic backgrounds and biological function analyses are needed. PMID:27738328

  4. Food choice decision-making by women with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hui, Amy Leung; Sevenhuysen, Gustaaf; Harvey, Dexter; Salamon, Elizabeth

    2014-02-01

    To enhance the dietary education presented to women with gestational diabetes (GDM) by exploring the reasons and experiences that women with GDM reported in making their food-choice decisions after receipt of dietary education from a healthcare professional. Food Choice Map (FCM) semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 30 women with GDM living in the Winnipeg area during their pregnancies. Verbatim transcripts were generated from the interviews. A constant comparative method was used to generate common themes to answer research inquiries. Personal food preferences, hunger and cravings were the main factors affecting food choice decision-making in women with GDM. Although the information from healthcare professionals was 1 factor that affected food choice decision-making for most of the participants, more than half of the women, including all the women who were on insulin, reported difficulties in quick adaptation to dietary management in a limited time period. Information from other sources such as family members, friends, and internet were used to cope with the adaptation. These difficulties led to a sense of decreased control of GDM and were accompanied by frustration, especially for women taking insulin. Food choice decision-making varied for this group of women with GDM. Knowledge and information aided in making healthy food choices and in portion control. However, balancing individual needs and blood glucose control in a short time period was felt to be difficult and created frustration. The findings suggested that dietary consultation needs to be personalized and to be time sensitive to promote confidence in self-control. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical periodontal status and inflammatory cytokines in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Özçaka, Özgün; Ceyhan-Öztürk, Banu; Gümüş, Pınar; Akcalı, Aliye; Nalbantsoy, Ayşe; Buduneli, Nurcan

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to compare clinical periodontal findings as well as gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and IL-33 between women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Serum and GCF samples were collected, full-mouth recordings comprising plaque index, bleeding on probing and probing depth were performed in 96 females with GDM (cases) and 65 non-diabetic pregnant females (controls). Age, smoking status, pre-pregnancy body mass index, pregnancy outcomes were recorded. Serum and GCF IL-10, IL-33, TNF-α levels were determined. The GDM group was significantly older than the control group with an age difference of 3.27 years (mean ages were 32.05 and 28.78 years, respectively) (p<0.0001). Plaque Index (50.0 and 30.0 p=0.005), bleeding on probing (50.0 and 30.0 p=0.003) values were significantly higher in the GDM group. Serum TNF-α concentrations were significantly higher in the nonGDM group than the GDM group (p=0.001). GCF IL-10 concentrations and total amounts were significantly higher in the GDM group than the controls (p=0.004 and p<0.0001, respectively). Elevated GCF IL-10 levels may be a consequence of higher levels of inflammation as indicated by higher PI and BOP in the GDM group. However, the investigated clinical parameters may not have prominent effects on TNF-α and IL-33 levels. These findings provide further support for the importance of periodontal health during pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mild gestational diabetes mellitus and long-term child health.

    PubMed

    Landon, Mark B; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Varner, Michael W; Casey, Brian M; Reddy, Uma M; Wapner, Ronald J; Rouse, Dwight J; Biggio, Joseph R; Thorp, John M; Chien, Edward K; Saade, George; Peaceman, Alan M; Blackwell, Sean C; VanDorsten, J Peter

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate whether treatment of mild gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) confers sustained offspring health benefits, including a lower frequency of obesity. Follow-up study of children (ages 5-10) of women enrolled in a multicenter trial of treatment versus no treatment of mild GDM. Height, weight, blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol were measured. Five hundred of 905 eligible offspring (55%) were enrolled. Maternal baseline characteristics were similar between the follow-up treated and untreated groups. The frequencies of BMI ≥95th (20.8% and 22.9%) and 85th (32.6% and 38.6%) percentiles were not significantly different in treated versus untreated offspring (P = 0.69 and P = 0.26). No associations were observed for BMI z score, log waist circumference, log triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, blood pressure, or log HOMA-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The effect of treatment was different by sex for fasting glucose and log HOMA-IR (P for interaction = 0.002 and 0.02, respectively) but not by age-group (5-6 and 7-10 years) for any outcomes. Female offspring of treated women had significantly lower fasting glucose levels. Although treatment for mild GDM has been associated with neonatal benefits, no reduction in childhood obesity or metabolic dysfunction in the offspring of treated women was found. However, only female offspring of women treated for mild GDM had lower fasting glucose. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  7. Determinants of maternal triglycerides in women with gestational diabetes mellitus in the Metformin in Gestational Diabetes (MiG) study.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Helen L; Dekker Nitert, Marloes; Jones, Lee; O'Rourke, Peter; Lust, Karin; Gatford, Kathryn L; De Blasio, Miles J; Coat, Suzette; Owens, Julie A; Hague, William M; McIntyre, H David; Callaway, Leonie; Rowan, Janet

    2013-07-01

    Factors associated with increasing maternal triglyceride concentrations in late pregnancy include gestational age, obesity, preeclampsia, and altered glucose metabolism. In a subgroup of women in the Metformin in Gestational Diabetes (MiG) trial, maternal plasma triglycerides increased more between enrollment (30 weeks) and 36 weeks in those treated with metformin compared with insulin. The aim of this study was to explain this finding by examining factors potentially related to triglycerides in these women. Of the 733 women randomized to metformin or insulin in the MiG trial, 432 (219 metformin and 213 insulin) had fasting plasma triglycerides measured at enrollment and at 36 weeks. Factors associated with maternal triglycerides were assessed using general linear modeling. Mean plasma triglyceride concentrations were 2.43 (95% CI 2.35-2.51) mmol/L at enrollment. Triglycerides were higher at 36 weeks in women randomized to metformin (2.94 [2.80-3.08] mmol/L; +23.13% [18.72-27.53%]) than insulin (2.65 [2.54-2.77] mmol/L, P = 0.002; +14.36% [10.91-17.82%], P = 0.002). At 36 weeks, triglycerides were associated with HbA1c (P = 0.03), ethnicity (P = 0.001), and treatment allocation (P = 0.005). In insulin-treated women, 36-week triglycerides were associated with 36-week HbA1c (P = 0.02), and in metformin-treated women, they were related to ethnicity. At 36 weeks, maternal triglycerides were related to glucose control in women treated with insulin and ethnicity in women treated with metformin. Whether there are ethnicity-related dietary changes or differences in metformin response that alter the relationship between glucose control and triglycerides requires further study.

  8. Determinants of Maternal Triglycerides in Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in the Metformin in Gestational Diabetes (MiG) Study

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Helen L.; Dekker Nitert, Marloes; Jones, Lee; O’Rourke, Peter; Lust, Karin; Gatford, Kathryn L.; De Blasio, Miles J.; Coat, Suzette; Owens, Julie A.; Hague, William M.; McIntyre, H. David; Callaway, Leonie; Rowan, Janet

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Factors associated with increasing maternal triglyceride concentrations in late pregnancy include gestational age, obesity, preeclampsia, and altered glucose metabolism. In a subgroup of women in the Metformin in Gestational Diabetes (MiG) trial, maternal plasma triglycerides increased more between enrollment (30 weeks) and 36 weeks in those treated with metformin compared with insulin. The aim of this study was to explain this finding by examining factors potentially related to triglycerides in these women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Of the 733 women randomized to metformin or insulin in the MiG trial, 432 (219 metformin and 213 insulin) had fasting plasma triglycerides measured at enrollment and at 36 weeks. Factors associated with maternal triglycerides were assessed using general linear modeling. RESULTS Mean plasma triglyceride concentrations were 2.43 (95% CI 2.35–2.51) mmol/L at enrollment. Triglycerides were higher at 36 weeks in women randomized to metformin (2.94 [2.80–3.08] mmol/L; +23.13% [18.72–27.53%]) than insulin (2.65 [2.54–2.77] mmol/L, P = 0.002; +14.36% [10.91–17.82%], P = 0.002). At 36 weeks, triglycerides were associated with HbA1c (P = 0.03), ethnicity (P = 0.001), and treatment allocation (P = 0.005). In insulin-treated women, 36-week triglycerides were associated with 36-week HbA1c (P = 0.02), and in metformin-treated women, they were related to ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS At 36 weeks, maternal triglycerides were related to glucose control in women treated with insulin and ethnicity in women treated with metformin. Whether there are ethnicity-related dietary changes or differences in metformin response that alter the relationship between glucose control and triglycerides requires further study. PMID:23393209

  9. Type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes mellitus in South Asian women in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gadgil, Meghana D; Oza-Frank, Reena; Kandula, Namratha R; Kanaya, Alka M

    2017-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes. The incidence of both GDM and type 2 diabetes is exceedingly high in South Asian populations. However, the risk of type 2 diabetes after GDM in South Asian women in the United States is unknown. South Asians aged 40 to 84 years without known cardiovascular disease were enrolled in a community-based cohort called Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America study. A history of GDM was elicited through self-report, and type 2 diabetes was ascertained by an oral glucose tolerance test. We performed a multivariable logistic regression analysis to examine the odds of type 2 diabetes after GDM history in this cross-sectional analysis. About 9.7% of women in the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America study self-reported a history of GDM, and were significantly younger, with higher mean diastolic blood pressure and self-reported weight at age 20 and 40 years than women without a history of GDM. In a model adjusted for age, weight at age 40, family history of diabetes, education, income, physical activity, caloric intake, alcohol use, and cigarette smoking, women with a history of GDM had increased odds of having type 2 diabetes compared with women without GDM (OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.3, 7.5). A history of GDM further increases the risk of type 2 diabetes in US South Asian women. Our findings underscore the importance of early postpartum screening in a population at high risk for type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Systematic review A systematic review of metabolite profiling in gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Jennifer; Xiong, Grace; Bentley-Lewis, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Gestational diabetes mellitus is associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes during, as well as subsequent to, pregnancy, including increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Because of the importance of early risk stratification in preventing these complications, improved first-trimester biomarker determination for diagnosing gestational diabetes would enhance our ability to optimise both maternal and fetal health. Metabolomic profiling, the systematic study of small molecule products of biochemical pathways, has shown promise in the identification of key metabolites associated with the pathogenesis of several metabolic diseases, including gestational diabetes. This article provides a systematic review of the current state of research on biomarkers and gestational diabetes and discusses the clinical relevance of metabolomics in the prediction, diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes. Methods We conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE (PubMed) up to the end of February 2014 using the key term combinations of ‘metabolomics,’ ‘metabonomics,’ ‘nuclear magnetic spectroscopy,’ ‘mass spectrometry,’ ‘metabolic profiling’ and ‘amino acid profile’ combined (AND) with ‘gestational diabetes’. Additional articles were identified through searching the reference lists from included studies. Quality assessment of included articles was conducted through the use of QUADOMICS. Results This systematic review included 17 articles. The biomarkers most consistently associated with gestational diabetes were asymmetric dimethylarginine and NEFAs. After QUADOMICS analysis, 13 of the 17 included studies were classified as ‘high quality’. Conclusions/interpretation Existing metabolomic studies of gestational diabetes present inconsistent findings regarding metabolite profile characteristics. Further studies are needed in larger, more racially/ethnically diverse populations. PMID:25193282

  11. Connections between the human gut microbiome and gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ya-Shu; Lu, Jin-Hua; Li, Sheng-Hui; Li, Jun-Hua; Yuan, Ming-Yang; He, Jian-Rong; Chen, Nian-Nian; Xiao, Wan-Qing; Shen, Song-Ying; Qiu, Lan; Wu, Ying-Fang; Hu, Cui-Yue; Wu, Yan-Yan; Li, Wei-Dong; Chen, Qiao-Zhu; Deng, Hong-Wen; Papasian, Christopher J; Xia, Hui-Min; Qiu, Xiu

    2017-08-01

    The human gut microbiome can modulate metabolic health and affect insulin resistance, and it may play an important role in the etiology of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Here, we compared the gut microbial composition of 43 GDM patients and 81 healthy pregnant women via whole-metagenome shotgun sequencing of their fecal samples, collected at 21-29 weeks, to explore associations between GDM and the composition of microbial taxonomic units and functional genes. A metagenome-wide association study identified 154 837 genes, which clustered into 129 metagenome linkage groups (MLGs) for species description, with significant relative abundance differences between the 2 cohorts. Parabacteroides distasonis, Klebsiella variicola, etc., were enriched in GDM patients, whereas Methanobrevibacter smithii, Alistipes spp., Bifidobacterium spp., and Eubacterium spp. were enriched in controls. The ratios of the gross abundances of GDM-enriched MLGs to control-enriched MLGs were positively correlated with blood glucose levels. A random forest model shows that fecal MLGs have excellent discriminatory power to predict GDM status. Our study discovered novel relationships between the gut microbiome and GDM status and suggests that changes in microbial composition may potentially be used to identify individuals at risk for GDM. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Predicting Failure of Glyburide Therapy in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Lorie M.; Glover, Angelica V.; Biggio, Joseph R.; Tita, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Objective We sought to develop a prediction model to identify women with gestational diabetes (GDM) who require insulin to achieve glycemic control. Study Design Retrospective cohort of all singletons with GDM treated with glyburide 2007–2013. Glyburide failure was defined as reaching glyburide 20 mg/day and receiving insulin. Glyburide success was defined as any glyburide dose without insulin and >70% of visits with glycemic control. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to create a prediction model. Results Of 360 women, 63 (17.5%) qualified as glyburide failure and 157 (43.6%) glyburide success. The final prediction model for glyburide failure included prior GDM, GDM diagnosis ≤26 weeks, 1-hour GCT ≥228 mg/dL, 3-hour GTT 1-hour value ≥221 mg/dL, ≥7 post-prandial blood sugars >120 mg/dL in the week glyburide started, and ≥1 blood sugar >200 mg/dL. The model accurately classified 81% of subjects. Conclusions Women with GDM who will require insulin can be identified at initiation of pharmacologic therapy. PMID:26796130

  13. Gestational diabetes mellitus. Unresolved issues and future research directions.

    PubMed Central

    Okun, N.; Verma, A.; Demianczuk, N.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the controversial aspects of gestational diabetes (GDM) and introduce readers to possible relevant research questions that could be examined to provide clinicians with good-quality data on which to base decisions about this relatively common pregnancy-related issue. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: Ongoing review of the English literature related to GDM. Sources were not restricted to prospective, controlled trials, as these are severely limited in number. SYNTHESIS: Controversial issues include the relevance of GDM to clinically meaningful outcomes in the index pregnancy, the effectiveness of current therapy in altering these outcomes, and the resultant questionable relevance of routine screening and diagnosis of an entity with as yet uncertain significance in pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: Suggested questions to be addressed in multicentre controlled trials include randomization with respect to screening and with respect to treatment. Until such trials are completed, continuing with a standard approach to screening, diagnosis, and treatment, such as that suggested by the third international workshop on GDM, is recommended. PMID:9626427

  14. Gestational diabetes mellitus: advocating for policy change in India.

    PubMed

    Madhab, Anand; Prasad, Vishwa Mohan; Kapur, Anil

    2011-11-01

    A multimedia awareness and advocacy campaign for mainstreaming gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the public health domain is described. The multimedia campaign has created awareness about the relevance of GDM to women's health and the health of future generations through direct contact, reaching out to over half a million people in 7 districts of 4 states in northern India. Using mass media, over 3.7 million people have received information on GDM. Through multistakeholder forums, more than 1000 key stakeholders have been encouraged to mainstream GDM into the existing health delivery system. The Indian Ministry of Health has introduced free screening for GDM among the 5 services offered to pregnant women below the poverty line in the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) program. In addition, several state governments, such as in Bihar, Delhi, Jharkhand, and Punjab, have pledged similar initiatives addressing GDM; the Government of Tamil Nadu is already implementing such a policy. Policy development is a complex process that requires action on many fronts. By showcasing evidence, raising awareness, creating public opinion through dialogue and discussion, media can help build a positive environment and momentum for effective policy creation as well as service utilization. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Could Metformin Manage Gestational Diabetes Mellitus instead of Insulin?

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, Walid A.; Mowafy, Hala E.; Abd ElHameid, Azza A.

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) complicates a significant number of pregnancies. Blood glucose control improves perinatal outcomes. Medical nutrition therapy is the foundation in management. Aim of This Study. To evaluate efficacy of metformin in comparison to insulin for managing GDM. Methods. In prospective randomized comparative study, 150 antenatal women whose pregnancies had been complicated by GDM and did not respond to diet alone were recruited from antenatal clinics at Obstetrics Department in Zagazig University Hospitals from November 2012 to December 2014. They were divided randomly into two groups, 75 patients in each, and were subjected to either insulin or metformin medication. Outcomes were comparing the effects of both medications on maternal glycemic control, antenatal complications, and neonatal outcome. Results. No significant difference in controlling high blood sugar in GDM with the use of metformin or insulin (P = 0.95, 0.15). Maternal complications in both groups had no significant difference and fetal outcomes were as well similar except the fact that the hypoglycemia occurred more in insulin group with P value 0.01. Conclusion. Glycaemic control in GDM can be achieved by using metformin orally without increasing risk of maternal hypoglycemia with satisfying neonatal outcome. PMID:27597988

  16. Ethnic enclaves and gestational diabetes among immigrant women in New York City.

    PubMed

    Janevic, T; Borrell, L N; Savitz, D A; Echeverria, S E; Rundle, A

    2014-11-01

    Previous research has shown that immigrants living in their own ethnic enclave are at decreased risk of poor health outcomes, but this question has not been studied in relation to gestational diabetes, an important early marker of lifecourse cardiovascular health. We ascertained gestational diabetes, census tract of residence, and individual-level covariates for Sub-Saharan African, Chinese, South Central Asian, Non-Hispanic Caribbean, Dominican, Puerto Rican, Mexican, and Central and South American migrant women using linked birth-hospital discharge data for 89,703 singleton live births in New York City for the years 2001-2002. Using 2000 census data, for each immigrant group we defined a given census tract as part of an ethnic enclave based on the population distribution for the corresponding ethnic group. We estimated odds ratios for associations between living in an ethnic enclave and risk of gestational diabetes adjusted for neighborhood deprivation, percent commercial space, education, age, parity, and insurance status, using multilevel logistic regression. Overall, we found no effect of ethnic enclave residence on gestational diabetes in most immigrant groups. Among South Central Asian and Mexican women, living in a residential ethnic enclave was associated with an increased odds of gestational diabetes. Several explanations are proposed for these findings. Mechanisms explaining an increased risk of gestational diabetes in South Central Asian and Mexican ethnic enclaves should be examined.

  17. An application of artificial immune recognition system for prediction of diabetes following gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Chun; Su, Chao-Ton; Wang, Pa-Chun

    2011-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a disease prevalent in population and is not easily perceived in its initial stage but may sway a patient very seriously in later stage. In accordance with the estimation of World Health Organization (WHO), there will be 370 million diabetics which are 5.4% of the global people in 2030, so it becomes more and more important to predict whether a pregnant woman has or is likely to acquire diabetes. This study is conducted with the use of the machine learning-Artificial Immune Recognition System (AIRS)-to assist doctors in predicting pregnant women who have premonition of type 2 diabetes. AIRS is proposed by Andrew Watkins in 2001 and it makes use of the metaphor of the vertebrate immune system to recognize antigens, select clone, and memorize cells. Additionally, AIRS includes a mechanism, limited resource, to restrain the number of memory cells from increasing uncontrollably. It has also showed positive results on problems in which it was applied. The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility in using AIRS to predict gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) subsequent DM. The dataset of diabetes has imbalanced data, but the overall classification recall could still reach 62.8%, which is better than the traditional method, logistic regression, and the technique which is thought as one of the powerful classification approaches, support vector machines (SVM).

  18. Postpartum development of type 1 diabetes in Asian Indian women with gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Shanthi Rani, Coimbatore Subramanian; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Uthra, Subash Chandrabose; Vidya, Jaydeep; Sankari, Ganesan Uma; Venkatesan, Ulagamathesan; Rani, Saravanan Jeba; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the postpartum conversion of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) to different types of diabetes among Asian Indian women. Materials and Methods: Using data from electronic medical records, 418 women with GDM seen at a tertiary diabetes care center for diabetes in Chennai in South India between 1991 and 2014 were evaluated for development of diabetes postpartum. Results: Of the 418 GDM women followed up postpartum, 388 progressed to diabetes. Of these 359 (92.5%) developed type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and 29 women (7.5%) developed type 1 diabetes (T1DM). The median time to development of T1DM was 2 years (interquartile range 2 [IQR]) while for T2DM it was 5 years (IQR 6). Women who developed T1DM had significantly lower mean body mass index (BMI) (20.4 ± 2.8 vs. 27.5 ± 4.4 kg/m2, P = 0.001), and higher fasting plasma glucose (222 ± 105 vs. 165 ± 62 mg/dl P = 0.008) and glycated hemoglobin levels (10.2 ± 2.7 vs. 8.5 ± 2.1% P < 0.001) compared to those who developed T2DM. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibodies were present in 24/29 (82.7%) of women who developed T1DM. Conclusion: A small but significant proportion of women with GDM progress to T1DM postpartum. Measurement of GAD antibodies in leaner women with more severe diabetes could help to identify women who are likely to develop T1DM and thus prevent their presentation with acute hyperglycemic emergencies after delivery. PMID:27730084

  19. Postpartum development of type 1 diabetes in Asian Indian women with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Shanthi Rani, Coimbatore Subramanian; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Uthra, Subash Chandrabose; Vidya, Jaydeep; Sankari, Ganesan Uma; Venkatesan, Ulagamathesan; Rani, Saravanan Jeba; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2016-01-01

    To study the postpartum conversion of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) to different types of diabetes among Asian Indian women. Using data from electronic medical records, 418 women with GDM seen at a tertiary diabetes care center for diabetes in Chennai in South India between 1991 and 2014 were evaluated for development of diabetes postpartum. Of the 418 GDM women followed up postpartum, 388 progressed to diabetes. Of these 359 (92.5%) developed type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and 29 women (7.5%) developed type 1 diabetes (T1DM). The median time to development of T1DM was 2 years (interquartile range 2 [IQR]) while for T2DM it was 5 years (IQR 6). Women who developed T1DM had significantly lower mean body mass index (BMI) (20.4 ± 2.8 vs. 27.5 ± 4.4 kg/m(2), P = 0.001), and higher fasting plasma glucose (222 ± 105 vs. 165 ± 62 mg/dl P = 0.008) and glycated hemoglobin levels (10.2 ± 2.7 vs. 8.5 ± 2.1% P < 0.001) compared to those who developed T2DM. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibodies were present in 24/29 (82.7%) of women who developed T1DM. A small but significant proportion of women with GDM progress to T1DM postpartum. Measurement of GAD antibodies in leaner women with more severe diabetes could help to identify women who are likely to develop T1DM and thus prevent their presentation with acute hyperglycemic emergencies after delivery.

  20. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Gestational Diabetes Prevalence and Contribution of Common Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jia; Zhao, Beinan; Wang, Elsie J; Nimbal, Vani; Osmundson, Sarah; Kunz, Liza; Popat, Rita A; Chung, Sukyung; Palaniappan, Latha P

    2015-09-01

    The White House, the American Heart Association, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute have all recently acknowledged the need to disaggregate Asian American subgroups to better understand this heterogeneous racial group. This study aims to assess racial/ethnic differences in relative contribution of risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among Asian subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese), Hispanics, non-Hispanic blacks, and non-Hispanic whites. Pregnant women in 2007-2012 were identified through California state birth certificate records and linked to the electronic health records in a large mixed-payer ambulatory care organisation in Northern California (n = 24 195). Relative risk and population attributable fraction (PAF) for specific racial/ethnic groups were calculated to assess the contributions of advanced maternal age, overweight/obesity (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) standards and World Health Organization (WHO)/American Diabetes Association (ADA) body mass index cut-offs for Asians), family history of type 2 diabetes, and foreign-born status. GDM was most prevalent among Asian Indians (19.3%). Relative risks were similar across all race/ethnic groups. Advanced maternal age had higher PAFs in non-Hispanic whites (22.5%) and Hispanics (22.7%). Meanwhile family history (Asian Indians 22.6%, Chinese 22.9%) and foreign-borne status (Chinese 40.2%, Filipinos 30.2%) had higher PAFs in Asian subgroups. Overweight/obesity was the most important GDM risk factor for non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics, Asian Indians, and Filipinos when the WHO/ADA cut-off points were applied. Advanced maternal age was the only risk factor studied that was modified by race/ethnicity, with non-Hispanic white and Hispanic women being more adversely affected than other racial/ethnic groups. Overweight/obesity, advanced maternal age, family history of type 2

  1. Increased Maternal and Cord Blood Betatrophin in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wawrusiewicz-Kurylonek, Natalia; Telejko, Beata; Kuzmicki, Mariusz; Sobota, Angelika; Lipinska, Danuta; Pliszka, Justyna; Raczkowska, Beata; Kuc, Pawel; Urban, Remigiusz; Szamatowicz, Jacek; Kretowski, Adam; Laudanski, Piotr; Gorska, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to compare maternal and cord blood levels of betatrophin – a new peptide potentially controlling beta cell growth - as well as in its mRNA expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue and placental tissue obtained from pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and gestational diabetes (GDM). Methods Serum betatrophin and irisin concentrations were measured by ELISA in 93 patients with GDM and 97 women with NGT between 24 and 28 week of gestation. Additionally, maternal and cord blood betatrophin and irisin, as well as their genes (C19orf80 and Fndc5) expression were evaluated in 20 patients with GDM and 20 women with NGT at term. Results In both groups, serum betatrophin concentrations were significantly higher in the patients with GDM than in the controls (1.91 [1.40-2.60] ng/ml vs 1.63 [1.21-2.22] ng/ml, p=0.03 and 3.45 [2.77-6.53] ng/ml vs 2.78 [2.16-3.65] ng/ml, p=0.03, respectively). Cord blood betatrophin levels were also higher in the GDM than in the NGT group (20.43 [12.97-28.80] ng/ml vs 15.06 [10.11-21.36] ng/ml, p=0.03). In both groups betatrophin concentrations in arterial cord blood were significantly higher than in maternal serum (p=0.0001). Serum irisin levels were significantly lower in the patients with GDM (1679 [1308-2171] ng/ml) than in the healthy women between 24 and 28 week of pregnancy (1880 [1519-2312] ng/ml, p=0.03). Both C19orf80 and Fndc5 mRNA expression in fat and placental tissue did not differ significantly between the groups studied. Conclusions Our results suggest that an increase in maternal and cord blood betatrophin might be a compensatory mechanism for enhanced insulin demand in GDM. PMID:26115519

  2. Glycosylated haemoglobin for screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Phuah, Eileen; Al-Barazan, Abdul Majeed; Nikakis, Irena; Radford, Andrea; Clarkson, Wade; Trevett, Clinton; Brain, Terry; Gebski, Val; Corbould, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is a cumbersome test that is time consuming, labour intensive and often poorly tolerated by pregnant women. To date, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is the most accepted measure of chronic glycaemia outside of pregnancy. HbA1c is an uncomplicated test, less time consuming, does not require any specific patient preparation and is considered straightforward compared with the OGTT. Therefore, we prospectively tested the utility of the HbA1c when used as a screening tool in pregnancy for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Settings Primary health care. Single tertiary referral centre, Tasmania, Australia. Participants A direct comparison between HbA1c levels and the OGTT results in pregnant women, tested concurrently at the 24–28 gestational week, was undertaken. A full profile of 480 pregnant women during the period from September 2012 to July 2014 was completed. Median and mean age of participants was 29 years (range 18–47 years). Interventions A simultaneous prospective assessment of HbA1c versus standard OGTT in a cohort of consecutive pregnant women presenting to our institute was performed. Results The number of women who had GDM according to OGTT criteria was 57, representing 11.9% of the evaluated 480 pregnant women. Using a cut-off value for HbA1c at 5.1% (32 mmol/mol) for detecting GDM showed sensitivity of 61% and specificity of 68% with negative predictive value (NPV) of 93%, versus sensitivity of 27% and specificity of 95% with NPV of 91% when using HbA1c cut-off value of 5.4% (36 mmol/mol). Conclusions Our results suggest that pregnant women with an HbA1c of≥5.4% (36 mmol/mol) should proceed with an OGTT. This may result in a significant reduction in the burden of testing on both patients and testing facility staff and resources. Further investigations are required to integrate and optimise the HbA1c as a single, non-fasting, screening tool for GDM. Trial registration number ACTRN

  3. [Increased risk of type II diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease after gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Hopmans, Tara-Eileen J P; van Houten, Chantal B; Kasius, Annemieke; Kouznetsova, Ouliana I; Nguyen, Ly A; Rooijmans, Sanne V; Voormolen, Daphne N; van Vliet, Elvira O G; Franx, Arie; Koster, M P H Wendy

    2015-01-01

    To determine the long-term risk of developing type II diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) for women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Two search strategies were used in PubMed and Embase to determine the long-term risks of developing T2D and CVD after a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus. After critical appraisal of the papers found, 11 papers were included, involving a total of 328,423 patients. Absolute and relative risks (RRs) were calculated. Eight studies (n=276,829) reported on the long-term risk of T2D and 4 (n=141,048) on the long-term risk of CVD. Follow-up ranged from 3.5 to 11.5 years for T2D and from 1.2 to 74.0 years for CVD. Women with gestational diabetes had a risk of T2D varying between 9.5% and 37.0% and a risk of CVD of between 0.28% and 15.5%. Women with gestational diabetes were at increased risk of T2D (weighted RR: 13.2; 95% CI: 8.5-20.7) and CVD (weighted RR: 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1-3.7) compared to women without gestational diabetes. Women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus have a significantly increased risk of developing T2D and CVD. It is very important that gestational diabetes is recognised as a cardiovascular risk factor in daily practice. It would be desirable to screen this group of women for the presence of hyperglycaemia and other cardiovascular risk factors. Further research is required to be able to specify the long-term risk of T2D and CVD and to demonstrate whether such screening is cost-effective.

  4. Gestational weight loss and perinatal outcomes in overweight and obese women subsequent to diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yee, Lynn M; Cheng, Yvonne W; Inturrisi, Maribeth; Caughey, Aaron B

    2013-12-01

    To investigate whether gestational weight loss (GWL) after the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in overweight and obese women is associated with improved perinatal outcomes. Obesity and GDM are risk factors for adverse perinatal outcomes, but few studies have investigated weight loss during pregnancy in women with these comorbidities. Retrospective cohort study of 26,205 overweight and obese gestational diabetic women enrolled in the California Diabetes and Pregnancy Program. Women with GWL during program enrollment were compared to those with weight gain. Perinatal outcomes were assessed using chi-square test and multivariable logistic regression analysis. About 5.2% of women experienced GWL. GWL was associated with decreased odds of macrosomia (aOR 0.63, 95% CI 0.52-0.77), NICU admission (aOR 0.51, 95% CI 0.27-0.95), and cesarean delivery (aOR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68-0.97). Odds of SGA status (aOR 1.69, 95% CI 1.32-2.17) and preterm delivery <34 weeks (aOR 1.71, 95% CI 1.23-2.37) were increased. In overweight and obese women with GDM, third trimester weight loss is associated with some improved maternal and neonatal outcomes, although this effect is lessened by increased odds of SGA status and preterm delivery. Further research on weight loss and interventions to improve adherence to weight guidelines in this population is recommended. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  5. Efficacy of probiotic supplement for gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jiajia; Pan, Qiangwei; Chen, Yumei; Zhang, Hongping; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2017-09-19

    Probiotic supplement might be beneficial for gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the results remained controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the efficacy of probiotic supplement in gestational diabetes mellitus. PubMed, Embase, Web of science, EBSCO, and Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of probiotic supplement in gestational diabetes mellitus were included. Two investigators independently searched articles, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies. The primary outcome were fasting serum insulin and fasting plasma glucose. Meta-analysis was performed using the fixed-effect or random-effect model. Six RCTs involving 830 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with control intervention in gestational diabetes mellitus, probiotic supplementation intervention was found to significantly reduce fasting serum insulin (Std. mean difference = -0.95; 95% CI = -1.73 to -0.17; p < .00001) and HOMA-IR (Std. mean difference = -1.12; 95% CI = -2.05 to -0.18; p = .02), but showed no substantial impact on fasting plasma glucose (Std. mean difference = -0.49; 95% CI = -1.05-0.08; p = .09), gestational age (Std. mean difference = 0.07; 95% CI = -0.20-0.34; p = .63), and gestational weight (Std. mean difference = -0.11; 95% CI = -0.38-0.16; p = .43). Compared with control intervention in gestational diabetes mellitus, probiotic supplementation was found to significantly reduce insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and fasting serum insulin, but had no substantial influence on fasting plasma glucose, gestational age and gestational weight.

  6. Immunoregulatory molecules in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Pendeloski, Karen Priscilla Tezotto; Mattar, Rosiane; Torloni, Maria Regina; Gomes, Caio Perez; Alexandre, Sandra Maria; Daher, Silvia

    2015-09-01

    Induction of maternal-fetal immune tolerance is essential for the development of normal pregnancy. Impaired expression of costimulatory molecules may lead to intense inflammatory reaction, a mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The aim of this study was to investigate whether immunoregulatory molecules are involved in the physiopathology of GDM. This case-control study included 30 healthy pregnant women and 20 GDM patients. Flow cytometry was used to assess peripheral blood T subpopulations (CD4(+) and CD8(+)), the expression of immunoregulatory molecules (CD28, ICOS, CTLA-4, and PD-1) and activation markers (CD69 and HLA-DR). Compared to healthy women, GDM patients had a significantly higher frequency of CD4(+)CD69(+) and CD8(+)CD69(+) T cells; only patients with insulin-treated GDM had increased numbers of CD4(+)HLA-DR(+) T cells. We also observed significantly higher percentages of CD4(+)CD28(+)HLA-DR(+), CD3(+)CD4(+)ICOS(+), CD3(+)CD4(+)PD-1(+), CD8(+)CD28(+)CD69(+), CD8(+)CD28(+)HLA-DR(+), CD8(+)CTLA-4(+)HLA-DR(+), and CD3(+)CD8(+)ICOS(+) T cells and lower frequency of CD3(+)CD4(+)CTLA-4(+), CD3(+)CD8(+)CTLA-4(+), and CD8(+)ICOS(+)HLA-DR(+) T cells in GDM patients compared to healthy pregnant women. This first study assessing costimulatory molecules in GDM patients shows that these patients have exacerbated markers of T cell activation along with CTLA-4 deficiency, findings that indicate that the maternal-fetal tolerance is compromised in these patients.

  7. Accelerometry-measured physical activity and inflammation after gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Véronique; Vigneault, Jessica; Weisnagel, S John; Tchernof, André; Robitaille, Julie

    2013-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with adverse metabolic outcomes after delivery. Physical activity practice improves the inflammatory profile; however, whether this association exists in women with prior GDM remains unknown. Our objective was to examine the cardiometabolic and inflammatory risk factors associated with accelerometer-based measures of physical activity in women with prior GDM. Ninety-six women who had GDM between 2003 and 2010 were tested 2.9 ± 2.2 yr after delivery. The physical activity practice was measured with ActiGraph GT3X (ActiGraph™, Pensacola, FL) accelerometers worn ≥ 5 d, and the time spent weekly in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was derived. The waist circumference was measured and the inflammatory marker or cytokine concentrations were measured in fasting plasma by the xMAP technology using the Bio-Plex 200 system. The lipid profile was also measured from fasting blood samples. Only 31% of women accumulated at least 150 min of MVPA per week. No association was observed between the MVPA practice and any of the metabolic measurements in the whole group of women. The MVPA did not differ in groups stratified by waist circumference <88 or ≥ 88 cm. In women with waist circumference <88 cm, the MVPA was negatively correlated with circulating concentrations of C-reactive protein (r = -0.51, P = 0.006), leptin (r = -0.40, P = 0.008), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (r = -0.32, P = 0.04), and triglycerides (r = -0.44, P = 0.003). No association was seen with plasma interleukin-6; tumor necrosis factor-α; and total, LDL, or HDL cholesterol concentrations. These analyses suggest that in the years after delivery, longer time spent in MVPA practice is associated with a lower cardiometabolic risk only in women with prior GDM who do not have abdominal obesity.

  8. Obstetric Outcome in Early and Late Onset Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Easmin, S; Chowdhury, T A; Islam, M R; Beg, A; Jahan, M K; Latif, T; Dhar, S; Alam, M N; Akhter, M

    2015-07-01

    Obstetric outcome in early onset and late onset GDM was compared in a prospective study conducted at the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology in BIRDEM, Dhaka, Bangladesh. A total 120 pregnant women were recruited purposively for the study in which 60 were early onset GDM and 60 were late onset GDM during study period of January 2008 to December 2009. Patients were followed up in different periods of gestation, during delivery and early postpartum period & findings were compared between two groups. BMI & family history of diabetes were significantly higher in early GDM group (p<0.05). Evidence of increased glycaemia was observed in early GDM group & difference of glycaemic status was statistically significant (p<0.05). Insulin was needed in 85% of early onset GDM and 55% in late onset GDM. There was also significant difference (p<0.05). In this study, 23.3% of early onset GDM group developed pre-eclampsia while in late onset GDM it was 10% and was statistically significant (p<0.05). Regarding intrapartum & postpartum complications - perineal tear, PPH wound infection, puerperal sepsis were more in early onset than late onset GDM group with no significant difference. Regarding foetal outcome, 8.3% early GDM group delivered asphyxiated baby in comparison to 3.3% in late GDM group. Twenty percent (20%) of early onset GDM group had to admit their babies in neonatal unit while in late onset group it was 5%. There was significant difference between two groups (p<0.05). Neonatal hypoglycaemia was also statistically significantly (p<0.05) higher in early GDM group. Neonatal hyper-bilirubinaemia, RDS, perinatal death was more in early onset GDM subjects. Early onset GDM subjects are high risk subgroup & have significant deleterious effect on maternal and perinatal outcome than late GDM groups.

  9. Postnatal gestational diabetes mellitus follow-up: Australian women's experiences.

    PubMed

    Kilgour, Catherine; Bogossian, Fiona Elizabeth; Callaway, Leonie; Gallois, Cindy

    2015-12-01

    Postnatal follow-up screening is recommended for all women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). However follow-up rates are poor and highly variable in Australia and internationally. The reasons that mothers are not completing recommended postnatal screening after GDM diagnosis are not well understood or studied. The quality of communication may be an important influence on the completion of postnatal GDM follow-up. To explore and assess women's communication experiences of postnatal GDM follow-up. Theoretical, purposeful sampling was used to identify women diagnosed with GDM. Convergent interviews explored participants' communication experiences with GDM and postnatal follow-up. Transcripts were provided to and updated by participants. Data was analysed with Leximancer(®) (V4, 2011) automated content analysis software. This research was conducted at a major tertiary referral hospital in Queensland, Australia, between December 2012 and July 2013. Women participating in maternity shared care and diagnosed with GDM were interviewed (n=13). Five themes, all concerned with obtaining information, were identified: diagnosis of GDM; seeking GDM information; accessing specialist services; need for postnatal GDM follow-up; and completing GDM follow-up. Results were interpreted using Communication Accommodation Theory (CAT) to explore whether and how the information needs of women were accommodated. Women's interpretations of communication events influenced their knowledge, perceptions and motivation to complete recommended postnatal follow-up. Accommodation of the communication and information needs of women with GDM may be an effective strategy for clinicians to encourage completion of recommended postnatal GDM follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Seasonality of gestational diabetes mellitus: a South Australian population study

    PubMed Central

    Verburg, Petra E; Tucker, Graeme; Scheil, Wendy; Erwich, Jan Jaap H M; Dekker, Gus A; Roberts, Claire T

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether there is a seasonal variation in the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Research design and methods This retrospective cohort study of 60 306 eligible South Australian live-born singletons during 2007–2011 recorded in the South Australian Perinatal Statistics Collection (SAPSC) examined the incidence of GDM in relation to estimated date of conception (eDoC). Fourier series analysis was used to model seasonal trends. Results During the study period, 3632 (6.0%) women were diagnosed with GDM. Seasonal modeling showed a strong relation between GDM and eDoC (p<0.001). Unadjusted and adjusted models (adjusted for maternal age, body mass index (BMI), parity, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and chronic hypertension) demonstrated the presence of a peak incidence occurring among pregnancies with eDoC in winter (June/July/August), with a trough for eDoc in summer (December/January/February). As this was a retrospective study, we could only use variables that had been collected as part of the routine registration system, the SAPSC. Conclusions This study is the first population-based study to demonstrate a seasonal variation for GDM. Several maternal lifestyle and psychosocial factors associated with seasonality and GDM may be influential in the pathophysiologic mechanisms of GDM. Ambient temperature, physical activity, nutrient intake, and vitamin D levels may affect maternal physiology, and fetal and placental development at the cellular level and contribute to the development of GDM. The mechanisms underlying these possible associations are not fully understood and warrant further investigation. PMID:27843556

  11. Screening gestational diabetes mellitus: The role of maternal age

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chun-Heng; Chen, Szu-Chi; Fang, Chi-Tai; Nien, Feng-Jung; Wu, En-Tzu; Lin, Shin-Yu; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Objective Using a specific cutoff of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) to screen gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) can reduce the use of oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT). Since the prevalence of GDM increases with age, this screening method may not be appropriate in healthcare systems where women become pregnant at older ages. Therefore, we aimed to develop a screening algorithm for GDM that takes maternal age into consideration. Methods We included 945 pregnant women without history of GDM who received 75g OGTT to diagnose GDM in 2011. Screening algorithms using FPG with or without age were developed. Another 362 pregnant women were recruited in 2013–2015 as the validation cohort. Results Using FPG criteria alone, more GDM diagnoses were missed in women ≥35 years than in women <35 years (13.2% vs. 5.8%, p <0.001). Among GDM women ≥35 years, 63.6% had FPG <92 mg/dL (5.1 mmol/L). Use of the algorithm with an “age plus FPG” cutoff could reduce the use of OGTT (OGTT%) from 77.6% to 62.9%, while maintaining good sensitivity (from 91.9% to 90.2%) and specificity (from 100% to 100%). Similar reduction in OGTT% was found in the validation cohort (from 86.4% to 76.8%). In the simulation, if the percentage of women ≥35 years were 40% or more, the screening algorithm with an “age plus FPG” cutoff could further reduce OGTT% by 11.0%-18.8%. Conclusions A screening algorithm for GDM that takes maternal age into consideration can reduce the use of OGTT when women become pregnant at older ages. PMID:28296923

  12. Serum irisin concentration in women with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kuzmicki, Mariusz; Telejko, Beata; Lipinska, Danuta; Pliszka, Justyna; Szamatowicz, Michal; Wilk, Juliusz; Zbucka-Kretowska, Monika; Laudanski, Piotr; Kretowski, Adam; Gorska, Maria; Szamatowicz, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    Irisin is a novel myokine and adipokine which induces an increase in total body energy expenditure, improving insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in experimental animals. In the present study, serum irisin concentration was measured by an enzyme immunoassay in 130 women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and 140 BMI-matched patients with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Median irisin level was significantly lower in the patients with GDM than in the NGT subjects (1703.3 [1354.8-2097.9 ng/ml] versus 1873.8 [1519.8-2294.8 ng/ml], p = 0.01); however, 3 months after childbirth its concentrations did not differ markedly between the two groups (1165.9 [872.1-1497.5] ng/ml versus 1139.0 [984.0-1376.7] ng/ml). In the whole group, irisin concentration correlated negatively with 2 h glucose level (R = -0.14, p = 0.03). In the women with NGT, irisin concentration correlated positively with IS(OGTT) (R = 0.22, p = 0.04) and the disposition index (DI(120)) (R = 0.24, p = 0.03), as well as negatively with 2 h insulin level (R = -0.23, p = 0.03) and HOMA-IR (R = -0.24, p = 0.02). Multiple regression analysis revealed that 2 h glucose and DI(120) were the only variables significantly influencing serum irisin (β = 0.158, p = 0.03 and β = 0.159, p = 0.02, respectively). Our results suggest that serum irisin concentration increases markedly in pregnant women, but this increase seems to be significantly lower in patients with GDM.

  13. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Challenges for different ethnic groups

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Lili; Wong, Vincent W

    2015-01-01

    Ethnicity is defined as “belonging to a social group that has a common national or cultural tradition”. Membership of certain ethnic groups has long been associated with increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Studies that examined ethnic differences amongst women with GDM were often conducted in western countries where women from various ethnic backgrounds were represented. The prevalence of GDM appears to be particularly high among women from South Asia and South East Asia, compared to Caucasian, African-American and Hispanic communities. For some, but not all ethnic groups, the body mass index is a risk factor for the development of GDM. Even within a particular ethnic group, those who were born in their native countries have a different risk profile for GDM compared to those born in western countries. In terms of treatment, medical nutrition therapy (MNT) plays a key role in the management of GDM and the prescription of MNT should be culturally sensitive. Limited studies have shown that women who live in an English-speaking country but predominantly speak a language other than English, have lower rates of dietary understanding compared with their English speaking counterparts, and this may affect compliance to therapy. Insulin therapy also plays an important role and there appears to be variation as to the progression of women who progress to requiring insulin among different ethnicities. As for peri-natal outcomes, women from Pacific Islander countries have higher rates of macrosomia, while women from Chinese backgrounds had lower adverse pregnancy outcomes. From a maternal outcome point of view, pregnant women from Asia with GDM have a higher incidence of abnormal glucose tolerance test results post-partum and hence a higher risk of future development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. On the other hand, women from Hispanic or African-American backgrounds with GDM are more likely to develop hypertension post-partum. This review highlights the

  14. Vitamin D Status and Gestational Diabetes: Effect of Smoking Status during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dodds, Linda; Woolcott, Christy G; Weiler, Hope; Spencer, Anne; Forest, Jean-Claude; Armson, B Anthony; Giguère, Yves

    2016-05-01

    Vitamin D status, as measured by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), has been shown in some studies to be inversely associated with gestational diabetes risk. Recently, it has been suggested that maternal smoking status may modify this relationship. We explored the association between 25(OH)D concentration and gestational diabetes and determined if there was an interaction between smoking and 25(OH)D. A nested case-control study was conducted in Halifax, Nova Scotia and Quebec City, Quebec. Women were recruited before 20 weeks gestation and 25(OH)D was measured. Cases were women who developed gestational diabetes and controls were frequency matched to cases on study site, gestational age at blood draw, and season and year of blood draw. Logistic regression models estimated adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Models were tested for multiplicative and additive interaction, which was estimated by relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI). The study included 395 gestational diabetes cases and 1925 controls. Women who smoked during pregnancy and had 25(OH)D concentrations <30 nmol/L had an aOR = 3.73 [95% CI 1.95, 7.14] compared to non-smokers with 25(OH)D concentrations ≥50 nmol/L. Additive interaction was detected between smoking status and 25(OH)D [RERI = 2.44, 95% CI 0.03, 4.85]. Our study supports the inverse association of vitamin D status with gestational diabetes risk, particularly among women who smoke during pregnancy. More research is needed to confirm this finding and, if confirmed, to determine the mechanism by which the combined effect of smoking and low vitamin D status increases the risk of developing gestational diabetes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

    PubMed

    Hillier, Teresa A; Vesco, Kimberly K; Pedula, Kathryn L; Beil, Tracy L; Whitlock, Evelyn P; Pettitt, David J

    2008-05-20

    In 2003, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force concluded that evidence was insufficient to advise for or against routinely screening all pregnant women for gestational diabetes mellitus. To review evidence about the benefits and harms of screening for gestational diabetes. Databases (MEDLINE, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, Health Technology Assessment Database, National Institute for Health and Clinical Effectiveness, and Cochrane Library) were searched for reports published from January 2000 to 15 November 2007 (and from 1966 to 1999 for additional studies on screening at less than 24 weeks' gestation), citations in the 2003 evidence report, and studies identified through consultation of experts and searches of bibliographies. English-language studies that used standard 1- or 2-step testing for gestational diabetes and that evaluated at least 1 of the following outcomes: neonatal mortality; brachial plexus injury; clavicular fracture; admission to a neonatal intensive care unit for hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, or the respiratory distress syndrome; maternal mortality; and preeclampsia or pregnancy-induced hypertension. 2 reviewers evaluated 1607 abstracts, critically appraised 288 articles, and qualitatively synthesized 13 studies. No randomized, controlled trials that directly evaluated the risks and benefits of gestational diabetes screening were found. One good-quality randomized, controlled trial of treatment of mild gestational diabetes in a screening-detected population supported a reduction in serious neonatal complications and showed that gestational diabetes treatment also reduced the risk for gestational hypertension. Very limited evidence was found to evaluate early screening for gestational diabetes (before 24 weeks' gestation). Limited evidence suggests that serious maternal hypoglycemia is rare with treatment and that overall quality of life is not worse among women receiving gestational diabetes treatment compared with women not

  16. Health Behaviors Among Pregnant Latina Women at Risk for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a common complication of pregnancy, increases the risk of subsequent diabetes and obesity. Latina women have over twice the risk for developing GDM as compared to non-Latina white women. Health-promoting practices during pregnancy may improve metabolic status an...

  17. Fasting plasma glucose test at the first prenatal visit as a screen for gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sacks, David A; Chen, Wansu; Wolde-Tsadik, Girma; Buchanan, Thomas A

    2003-06-01

    To determine whether the fasting plasma glucose test administered at the first prenatal visit could serve as an efficient screen for gestational diabetes. A total of 5557 women not known to have diabetes were offered a fasting plasma glucose test at their first prenatal visit. Results less than 100 mg/dL were blinded. A glucose tolerance test was requested immediately of those whose screening test result was 100-125 mg/dL and of all women not identified as having diabetes by their 23rd gestational week. A total of 4507 women (81%) complied with the protocol. Of the 302 women found to have gestational diabetes, 46 (15%) were detected before 24 weeks. A false-positive rate of 57% was found at a threshold fasting glucose concentration giving a sensitivity of 80% for the detection of gestational diabetes. The fasting plasma glucose screening test at the first prenatal visit has good patient compliance. However, its poor specificity (high false-positive rate) makes it an inefficient screening test for gestational diabetes.

  18. Gestational diabetes mellitus screening, management and outcomes in the Cook Islands.

    PubMed

    Aung, Yin Yin May; Sowter, Martin; Kenealy, Timothy; Herman, Josephine; Ekeroma, Alec

    2015-04-17

    To describe current practices for screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in the Cook Islands and consider the implications of alternative screening strategies. Eligible women had antenatal care from January 2009 to December 2012. A non-fasting 50 g glucose challenge between 24 and 28 weeks gestation (positive if 1-hour glucose greater than or equal to 7.8 mmol/L) was followed by a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (gestational diabetes mellitus diagnosed if fasting glucose greater than or equal to 5.2 mmol/L or 2-hour glucose greater than or equal to 8.0 mmol/L; pregnancy impaired glucose tolerance if positive screen and negative diagnostic test). Uptake of the screening programme rose from 49.0% to 99.6% by the end of the study period. 646 women had a glucose challenge; for 186/646 (28.8%) the challenge was positive; 183 had an oral glucose tolerance test; 89/646 (13.8%) had pregnancy impaired glucose tolerance; 94/646 (13.9%) had gestational diabetes mellitus. Median maternal weight gain was 6 kg (gestational diabetes mellitus) and 10 kg (normal glucose tolerance); caesarean section rates were 25% and 11% respectively; baby birthweights were not significantly different. 59 women with gestational diabetes mellitus had a post-natal glucose tolerance test at their 6-week check and 21 (35.6%) had diabetes confirmed. The gestational diabetes mellitus screening programme has a high uptake and current management appears effective in reducing maternal and fetal weight gain. A proposed new screening programme is outlined.

  19. Increased Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness in Pregnant Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yousefzadeh, Gholamreza; Hojat, Hashem; Enhesari, Ahmad; Shokoohi, Mostafa; Eftekhari, Nahid; Sheikhvatan, Mehrdad

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pregnant women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of progressive carotid artery disorders. The current study evaluated carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in pregnant women with gestational diabetes at two time points of mid-term and full-term pregnancy to determine whether gestational diabetes mellitus causes increased IMT. Methods: This cross-sectional study carried out at Afzalipour Hospital (Kerman, Iran) between 2009 and 2010, recruited 50 women who were at high risk of gestational diabetes during pregnancy and had an oral glucose challenge test (OGCT) as screening for gestational diabetes. B-mode ultrasound scans were performed at baseline and at two time points of mid-term pregnancy (20 to 24 weeks) and full-term pregnancy (36 to 38 weeks) on all the participants. The mean IMT of common carotids and internal carotid arteries from two walls (near and far walls) at four different angles was assessed. Results: An overall comparison between the impaired OGCT test group and the control group revealed significant differences in carotid IMT in the mid-term (0.65 ± 0.07 vs. 0.59 ± 0.06 mm; p value = 0.002) and full-term (0.65 ± 0.05 vs. 0.59 ± 0.04 mm; p value < 0.001) pregnancy; however, the trend of the changes in carotid IMT during mid to full-term pregnancy was insignificant in each group (p value > 0.05). Conclusion: Carotid IMT was significantly higher in the women with gestational diabetes than that in the normoglycemic group in different trimesters. This finding denotes that atherosclerosis might start years before the diagnosis of gestational diabetes in vulnerable women. PMID:23323075

  20. Increased carotid artery intima-media thickness in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yousefzadeh, Gholamreza; Hojat, Hashem; Enhesari, Ahmad; Shokoohi, Mostafa; Eftekhari, Nahid; Sheikhvatan, Mehrdad

    2012-11-01

    Pregnant women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of progressive carotid artery disorders. The current study evaluated carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in pregnant women with gestational diabetes at two time points of mid-term and full-term pregnancy to determine whether gestational diabetes mellitus causes increased IMT. This cross-sectional study carried out at Afzalipour Hospital (Kerman, Iran) between 2009 and 2010, recruited 50 women who were at high risk of gestational diabetes during pregnancy and had an oral glucose challenge test (OGCT) as screening for gestational diabetes. B-mode ultrasound scans were performed at baseline and at two time points of mid-term pregnancy (20 to 24 weeks) and full-term pregnancy (36 to 38 weeks) on all the participants. The mean IMT of common carotids and internal carotid arteries from two walls (near and far walls) at four different angles was assessed. An overall comparison between the impaired OGCT test group and the control group revealed significant differences in carotid IMT in the mid-term (0.65 ± 0.07 vs. 0.59 ± 0.06 mm; p value = 0.002) and full-term (0.65 ± 0.05 vs. 0.59 ± 0.04 mm; p value < 0.001) pregnancy; however, the trend of the changes in carotid IMT during mid to full-term pregnancy was insignificant in each group (p value > 0.05). Carotid IMT was significantly higher in the women with gestational diabetes than that in the normoglycemic group in different trimesters. This finding denotes that atherosclerosis might start years before the diagnosis of gestational diabetes in vulnerable women.

  1. Lifestyle interventions for the treatment of women with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Julie; Alwan, Nisreen A; West, Jane; Brown, Stephen; McKinlay, Christopher Jd; Farrar, Diane; Crowther, Caroline A

    2017-05-04

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) is glucose intolerance, first recognised in pregnancy and usually resolving after birth. GDM is associated with both short- and long-term adverse effects for the mother and her infant. Lifestyle interventions are the primary therapeutic strategy for many women with GDM. To evaluate the effects of combined lifestyle interventions with or without pharmacotherapy in treating women with gestational diabetes. We searched the Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (14 May 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (14th May 2016) and reference lists of retrieved studies. We included only randomised controlled trials comparing a lifestyle intervention with usual care or another intervention for the treatment of pregnant women with GDM. Quasi-randomised trials were excluded. Cross-over trials were not eligible for inclusion. Women with pre-existing type 1 or type 2 diabetes were excluded. We used standard methodological procedures expected by the Cochrane Collaboration. All selection of studies, data extraction was conducted independently by two review authors. Fifteen trials (in 45 reports) are included in this review (4501 women, 3768 infants). None of the trials were funded by a conditional grant from a pharmaceutical company. The lifestyle interventions included a wide variety of components such as education, diet, exercise and self-monitoring of blood glucose. The control group included usual antenatal care or diet alone. Using GRADE methodology, the quality of the evidence ranged from high to very low quality. The main reasons for downgrading evidence were inconsistency and risk of bias. We summarised the following data from the important outcomes of this review. Lifestyle intervention versus control groupFor the mother:There was no clear evidence of a difference between lifestyle intervention and control groups for the risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (pre-eclampsia) (average

  2. The postpartum management of women with gestational diabetes using a continuum model for health care.

    PubMed

    Castorino, Kristin; Jovanovič, Lois

    2013-12-01

    Women with gestational diabetes mellitus require a continuum of care before, during, and after pregnancy for optimal management of hyperglycemia. Postpartum education and lifestyle modification should begin during pregnancy, and should continue during the postpartum period. Women should receive education on the long-term risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and should be encouraged to breastfeed, engage in regular physical activity, and select a highly effective contraceptive method in preparation for subsequent pregnancy. Postpartum women with gestational diabetes mellitus should be empowered to take ownership of their own health, including knowledge of health indicators such as weight, waist circumference hemoglobin A1C levels, and fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels.

  3. Postpartum Diabetes Testing Rates after Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Canadian Women: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Butalia, Sonia; Donovan, Lois; Savu, Anamaria; Johnson, Jeffrey; Edwards, Alun; Kaul, Padma

    2017-05-12

    We assessed the rate and type of postpartum glycemic testing in women with impaired glucose tolerance of pregnancy (IGTp) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We examined whether the likelihood of testing was modulated by patients' characteristics and pregnancy outcomes. Our population-level cohort study included data from 132,905 pregnancies between October 1, 2008, and December 31, 2011, in Alberta, Canada. Laboratory data within 270 days before and 1 year after delivery were used to identify pregnancies involving IGTp/GDM and postpartum glycemic testing, respectively. Logistic regression was used to identify maternal and pregnancy factors associated with postpartum testing. A total of 8,703 pregnancies were affected by IGTp (n=3669) or GDM (n=5034) as defined by the prevailing Canadian Diabetes Association 2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada. By 1 year postpartum, 55.1% had undergone glycemic assessments. Of those, 59.7% had had 75 g oral glucose tolerance tests, 17.4% had had glycated hemoglobin tests without oral glucose tolerance tests and 22.9% had had only fasting or random glucose tests. Women with IGTp or GDM, respectively, who were younger, smokers and residing in rural areas and whose labours were not induced were less likely to be tested postpartum. Having large for gestational age infants was also associated with a lower likelihood of postpartum testing in women with GDM. Despite a universal health-care system in Canada, many women with IGTp or GDM do not undergo postpartum glucose testing. Maternal and pregnancy characteristics influence postpartum testing and provide valuable information for creating targeted strategies to improve postpartum testing in this group of high-risk women. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lactation and Progression to Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus After Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Erica P.; Hurston, Shanta R.; Ning, Xian; Lo, Joan C.; Crites, Yvonne; Walton, David; Dewey, Kathryn G.; Azevedo, Robert A.; Young, Stephen; Fox, Gary; Elmasian, Cathie C.; Salvador, Nora; Lum, Michael; Sternfeld, Barbara; Quesenberry, Charles P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lactation improves glucose metabolism, but its role in preventing type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) after gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) remains uncertain. Objective To evaluate lactation and the 2-year incidence of DM after GDM pregnancy. Design Prospective, observational cohort of women with recent GDM. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01967030) Setting Integrated health care system. Participants 1035 women diagnosed with GDM who delivered singletons at 35 weeks' gestation or later and enrolled in the Study of Women, Infant Feeding and Type 2 Diabetes After GDM Pregnancy from 2008 to 2011. Measurements Three in-person research examinations from 6 to 9 weeks after delivery (baseline) and annual follow-up for 2 years that included 2-hour, 75-g oral glucose tolerance testing; anthropometry; and interviews. Multivariable Weibull regression models evaluated independent associations of lactation measures with incident DM adjusted for potential confounders. Results Of 1010 women without diabetes at baseline, 959 (95%) were evaluated up to 2 years later; 113 (11.8%) developed incident DM. There were graded inverse associations for lactation intensity at baseline with incident DM and adjusted hazard ratios of 0.64, 0.54, and 0.46 for mostly formula or mixed/inconsistent, mostly lactation, and exclusive lactation versus exclusive formula feeding, respectively (P trend = 0.016). Time-dependent lactation duration showed graded inverse associations with incident DM and adjusted hazard ratios of 0.55, 0.50, and 0.43 for greater than 2 to 5 months, greater than 5 to 10 months, and greater than 10 months, respectively, versus 0 to 2 months (P trend = 0.007). Weight change slightly attenuated hazard ratios. Limitation Randomized design is not feasible or desirable for clinical studies of lactation. Conclusion Higher lactation intensity and longer duration were independently associated with lower 2-year incidences of DM after GDM pregnancy. Lactation may prevent DM after GDM

  5. Lactation and Progression to Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus After Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Erica P; Hurston, Shanta R; Ning, Xian; Lo, Joan C; Crites, Yvonne; Walton, David; Dewey, Kathryn G; Azevedo, Robert A; Young, Stephen; Fox, Gary; Elmasian, Cathie C; Salvador, Nora; Lum, Michael; Sternfeld, Barbara; Quesenberry, Charles P

    2015-12-15

    Lactation improves glucose metabolism, but its role in preventing type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) after gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) remains uncertain. To evaluate lactation and the 2-year incidence of DM after GDM pregnancy. Prospective, observational cohort of women with recent GDM. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01967030). Integrated health care system. 1035 women diagnosed with GDM who delivered singletons at 35 weeks' gestation or later and enrolled in the Study of Women, Infant Feeding and Type 2 Diabetes After GDM Pregnancy from 2008 to 2011. Three in-person research examinations from 6 to 9 weeks after delivery (baseline) and annual follow-up for 2 years that included 2-hour, 75-g oral glucose tolerance testing; anthropometry; and interviews. Multivariable Weibull regression models evaluated independent associations of lactation measures with incident DM adjusted for potential confounders. Of 1010 women without diabetes at baseline, 959 (95%) were evaluated up to 2 years later; 113 (11.8%) developed incident DM. There were graded inverse associations for lactation intensity at baseline with incident DM and adjusted hazard ratios of 0.64, 0.54, and 0.46 for mostly formula or mixed/inconsistent, mostly lactation, and exclusive lactation versus exclusive formula feeding, respectively (P trend = 0.016). Time-dependent lactation duration showed graded inverse associations with incident DM and adjusted hazard ratios of 0.55, 0.50, and 0.43 for greater than 2 to 5 months, greater than 5 to 10 months, and greater than 10 months, respectively, versus 0 to 2 months (P trend = 0.007). Weight change slightly attenuated hazard ratios. Randomized design is not feasible or desirable for clinical studies of lactation. Higher lactation intensity and longer duration were independently associated with lower 2-year incidences of DM after GDM pregnancy. Lactation may prevent DM after GDM delivery. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

  6. Fast food consumption and gestational diabetes incidence in the SUN project.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Ligia J; Martínez-González, Miguel A; Basterra-Gortari, Francisco Javier; Gea, Alfredo; Barbagallo, Mario; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira

    2014-01-01

    Gestational diabetes prevalence is increasing, mostly because obesity among women of reproductive age is continuously escalating. We aimed to investigate the incidence of gestational diabetes according to the consumption of fast food in a cohort of university graduates. The prospective dynamic "Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra" (SUN) cohort included data of 3,048 women initially free of diabetes or previous gestational diabetes who reported at least one pregnancy between December 1999 and March 2011. Fast food consumption was assessed through a validated 136-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Fast food was defined as the consumption of hamburgers, sausages, and pizza. Three categories of fast food were established: low (0-3 servings/month), intermediate (>3 servings/month and ≤2 servings/week) and high (>2 servings/week). Non-conditional logistic regression models were used to adjust for potential confounders. We identified 159 incident cases of gestational diabetes during follow-up. After adjusting for age, baseline body mass index, total energy intake, smoking, physical activity, family history of diabetes, cardiovascular disease/hypertension at baseline, parity, adherence to Mediterranean dietary pattern, alcohol intake, fiber intake, and sugar-sweetened soft drinks consumption, fast food consumption was significantly associated with a higher risk of incident gestational diabetes, with multivariate adjusted OR of 1.31 (95% conficence interval [CI]:0.81-2.13) and 1.86 (95% CI: 1.13-3.06) for the intermediate and high categories, respectively, versus the lowest category of baseline fast food consumption (p for linear trend: 0.007). Our results suggest that pre-pregnancy higher consumption of fast food is an independent risk factor for gestational diabetes.

  7. Fast Food Consumption and Gestational Diabetes Incidence in the SUN Project

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Ligia J.; Martínez-González, Miguel A.; Basterra-Gortari, Francisco Javier; Gea, Alfredo; Barbagallo, Mario; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira

    2014-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes prevalence is increasing, mostly because obesity among women of reproductive age is continuously escalating. We aimed to investigate the incidence of gestational diabetes according to the consumption of fast food in a cohort of university graduates. Methods The prospective dynamic “Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra” (SUN) cohort included data of 3,048 women initially free of diabetes or previous gestational diabetes who reported at least one pregnancy between December 1999 and March 2011. Fast food consumption was assessed through a validated 136-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Fast food was defined as the consumption of hamburgers, sausages, and pizza. Three categories of fast food were established: low (0–3 servings/month), intermediate (>3 servings/month and ≤2 servings/week) and high (>2 servings/week). Non-conditional logistic regression models were used to adjust for potential confounders. Results We identified 159 incident cases of gestational diabetes during follow-up. After adjusting for age, baseline body mass index, total energy intake, smoking, physical activity, family history of diabetes, cardiovascular disease/hypertension at baseline, parity, adherence to Mediterranean dietary pattern, alcohol intake, fiber intake, and sugar-sweetened soft drinks consumption, fast food consumption was significantly associated with a higher risk of incident gestational diabetes, with multivariate adjusted OR of 1.31 (95% conficence interval [CI]:0.81–2.13) and 1.86 (95% CI: 1.13–3.06) for the intermediate and high categories, respectively, versus the lowest category of baseline fast food consumption (p for linear trend: 0.007). Conclusion Our results suggest that pre-pregnancy higher consumption of fast food is an independent risk factor for gestational diabetes. PMID:25215961

  8. The FL/AC ratio for prediction of shoulder dystocia in women with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Elaine L; Casey, Brian M; McIntire, Donald D; Twickler, Diane M

    2017-10-01

    To determine if sonographic variables, including fetal femur length to abdominal circumference (FL/AC) ratio, are associated with shoulder dystocia in women with gestational diabetes. This was a retrospective cohort study of women with gestational diabetes who delivered singleton infants at Parkland Hospital from 1997 to 2015. Diagnosis and treatment of gestational diabetes were uniform including sonography at 32-36 weeks. Biometric calculations were evaluated for correlation with shoulder dystocia. During the study period, 6952 women with gestational diabetes underwent a sonogram at a mean gestation of 34.8 ± 1.8 weeks. Of 4183 vaginal deliveries, 66 experienced shoulder dystocia (16/1000). The FL/AC was associated with shoulder dystocia (p < 0.001) with an AUC of 0.70 (95% CI: 0.64-0.77). This was similar to age-adjusted AC and head circumference to AC ratio (HC/AC) (both with an AUC of 0.72). All other measurements, including estimated fetal weight, were inferior. When examining the 257 women with multiple sonograms after 32 weeks' gestation, FL/AC was stable with advancing gestational age (p = 0.54) whereas age-adjusted AC and HC/AC were not (p < 0.001). The FL/AC is associated with shoulder dystocia in women with gestational diabetes. Additionally, it is a simple ratio that is independent of the reference used and remains stable, unlike age-adjusted AC and HC/AC ratio.

  9. [Nutritional status of women with gestational diabetes and characteristics of newborn].

    PubMed

    González Stäger, Maria Angelica; Rodríguez Fernández, Alejandra; Ortega Quintana, Victoria; Oliveras Vega, Leslie

    2012-12-01

    The objective was to determine the relationship between the mother's nutritional status and the newborn's gestational characteristics. A sample of 149 women with gestational diabetes was controlled in the High Risk Obstetric Unit of the Medical Specialties Public Health Center before delivery in the maternity ward of the Hospital Clinico Herminda Martín de Chillán, Chile in 2010. Data were obtained from the perinatal clinical history and the newborn's chart. The variables recorded for the mother were nutritional status, type of delivery, number of pregnancies, and metabolic control. Data for the newborn were weight, length, head circumference, and gestational diagnosis. These data were analyzed by ANOVA, Chi-square test, and Multiple Correspondence. Women with a normal nutritional status were multiparous with natural childbirth; the newborn had an adequate gestational age and normal head circumference. On the other hand, maternal obesity was related to a Cesarean; the newborn was large for gestational age and had a larger head circumference. Overweight women were primiparous and the newborn was small for gestational age with a smaller head circumference (p < 0.01). It was concluded that obesity in women with gestational diabetes explains variables such as type of delivery, number of gestations, and the newborn's diagnosis.

  10. Health literacy in Korean immigrants at risk for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sarah E; Rush, Elizabeth; Henry, Shayna

    2013-06-01

    Rising incidence of type 2 diabetes (DM) in Korean immigrants has highlighted the need for better prevention efforts. Health literacy is an important predictor in the utilization of preventative health measures, however little is known about health literacy in Korean immigrants. This study examined DM risk factors in a sample of 145 at-risk Korean immigrants, their level of health literacy, and associations between health literacy and DM risk factors. Findings indicated a high prevalence of DM risk factors and a low level of health literacy in the sample. Health literacy was correlated with English proficiency, acculturation, and lower waist to hip ratios among all participants, and with lower blood glucose levels among highly acculturated participants. Korean immigrants who are less acculturated may have lower health literacy than those who are more acculturated. Thus, linguistically and culturally sensitive health education should be incorporated into diabetes prevention efforts.

  11. Compliance with treatment regimen in women with gestational diabetes: Living with fear

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Salsali, Mahvash; Rahnavard, Zahra; Parvizy, Soroor

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus is a prevalent pregnancy complication that seriously endangers mothers’ and babies’ health. The aim of this study was to explore factors affecting treatment compliance among women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis approach was employed. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews were conducted with hospitalized pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus. The research was conducted in four teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran; purposive sampling was used. Results: Participants’ experiences regarding factors that influence treatment compliance fell into six categories: Unexpected diagnosis, the need for urgent change, temptation to consume inappropriate foods, life in the shadow of the illness, risk avoidance, and seeking adjustment. Conclusions: Holistic education of families on gestational diabetes, training specialist diabetes nurses, and referral to public health centers and diabetes clinics could increase treatment compliance. These findings could serve patients and the healthcare system in general, if considered by healthcare officials and policy makers. Furthermore, providing outpatient services, considering cultural dietary conventions when recommending diets, and alleviating the stigma associated with diabetes through mass media could also promote treatment compliance. PMID:25949244

  12. Indicators of glycemic control in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kunihiko; Koga, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has become clear that mild abnormal glucose tolerance increases the incidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications, and so the definition and diagnostic criteria of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have been changed. Therefore, in patients with GDM and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus, even stricter glycemic control than before is required to reduce the incidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications. Strict glycemic control cannot be attained without an indicator of glycemic control; this review proposes a reliable indicator. The gold standard indicator of glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus is hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c); however, we have demonstrated that HbA1c does not reflect glycemic control accurately during pregnancy because of iron deficiency. It has also become clear that glycated albumin, another indicator of glycemic control, is not influenced by iron deficiency and therefore might be a better indicator of glycemic control in patients with GDM and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus. However, large-population epidemiological studies are necessary in order to confirm our proposal. Here, we outline the most recent findings about the indicators of glycemic control during pregnancy including fructosamine and 1,5-anhydroglucitol. PMID:26240701

  13. Potential impact of American Diabetes Association (2000) criteria for diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus in Spain.

    PubMed

    Ricart, W; López, J; Mozas, J; Pericot, A; Sancho, M A; González, N; Balsells, M; Luna, R; Cortázar, A; Navarro, P; Ramírez, O; Flández, B; Pallardo, L F; Hernández, A; Ampudia, J; Fernández-Real, J M; Corcoy, R

    2005-06-01

    This study was carried out to determine the impact of American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2000 criteria for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the Spanish population. Pregnant women were assigned to one of four categories: negative screenees, false-positive screenees, ADA-only-GDM (untreated) and GDM according to National Diabetes Data Group (NDDG) criteria (treated). Fetal macrosomia and Caesarean section were defined as primary outcomes, with seven additional secondary outcomes. Of 9,270 pregnant women screened for GDM, 819 (8.8%) met NDDG criteria. If the threshold for defining GDM had been lowered to ADA criteria, an additional 2.8% of women would have been defined as having the condition (relative increase of 31.8%). Maternal characteristics of women with ADA-only-GDM were between those of false-positive screenees and women with NDDG-GDM. The risk of diabetes-associated complications was slightly elevated in the individuals who would have been classified as abnormal only after the adoption of ADA criteria. In addition, the ADA-only-GDM contribution to morbidity was lower than that of other variables, especially BMI. Use of the ADA criteria to identify GDM would result in a 31.8% increase in prevalence compared with NDDG criteria. However, as the contribution of these additionally diagnosed cases to adverse GDM outcomes is not substantial, a change in diagnostic criteria is not warranted in our setting.

  14. Adherence to healthy lifestyle and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus: prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuilin; Tobias, Deirdre K; Chavarro, Jorge E; Bao, Wei; Wang, Dong; Ley, Sylvia H; Hu, Frank B

    2014-09-30

    To quantify the association between a combination of healthy lifestyle factors before pregnancy (healthy body weight, healthy diet, regular exercise, and not smoking) and the risk of gestational diabetes. Prospective cohort study. Nurses' Health Study II, United States. 20,136 singleton live births in 14,437 women without chronic disease. Self reported incident gestational diabetes diagnosed by a physician, validated by medical records in a previous study. Incident first time gestational diabetes was reported in 823 pregnancies. Each lifestyle factor measured was independently and significantly associated with risk of gestational diabetes. The combination of three low risk factors (non-smoker, ≥ 150 minutes a week of moderate to vigorous physical activity, and healthy eating (top two fifths of Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 adherence score)) was associated with a 41% lower risk of gestational diabetes compared with all other pregnancies (relative risk 0.59, 95% confidence interval 0.48 to 0.71). Addition of body mass index (BMI) <25 before pregnancy (giving a combination of four low risk factors) was associated with a 52% lower risk of gestational diabetes compared with all other pregnancies (relative risk 0.48, 0.38 to 0.61). Compared with pregnancies in women who did not meet any of the low risk lifestyle factors, those meeting all four criteria had an 83% lower risk of gestational diabetes (relative risk 0.17, 0.12 to 0.25). The population attributable risk percentage of the four risk factors in combination (smoking, inactivity, overweight, and poor diet) was 47.5% (95% confidence interval 35.6% to 56.6%). A similar population attributable risk percentage (49.2%) was observed when the distributions of the four low risk factors from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-10) data were applied to the calculation. Adherence to a low risk lifestyle before pregnancy is associated with a low risk of gestational diabetes and could be an

  15. Serum concentrations of retinol-binding protein 4 in women with and without gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zemany, L.; Krugluger, W.; Schernthaner, G. H.; Mittermayer, F.; Schnack, C.; Rahman, R.; Brix, J.; Kahn, B. B.; Schernthaner, G.

    2009-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Pregnancy is characterised by temporarily increased insulin resistance. Gestational diabetes occurs when pancreatic beta cell function is unable to compensate for this insulin resistance. Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) could be related to insulin resistance. We hypothesised that RBP4 is elevated in gestational diabetes. Methods Serum RBP4, transthyretin and retinol were cross-sectionally measured in 42 women with gestational diabetes and 45 pregnant controls. Of these, 20 women with and 22 without gestational diabetes were included in an additional longitudinal study. RBP4 was determined by enzyme immunometric assay (EIA) and western blot. Results Women with gestational diabetes had lower RBP4 EIA and western blot levels than controls (median 6.8 [interquartile range, 3.9–14.3] vs 11.3 [7.8–19.9] μg/ml, p<0.001 and 25.1 [21.7–29.6] vs 26.6 [23.5–32.2] μg/ml, p=0.026). Transthyretin and the RBP4:transthyretin molar ratio were comparable between the groups. Serum retinol was lower (p<0.001) and the RBP4 Western blot level: retinol molar ratio was higher in women with gestational diabetes (p=0.044). RBP4 was not associated with the glucose or homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), but in gestational diabetes the RBP4:retinol molar ratio correlated with blood glucose and negatively with 2 h post-load insulin. The RBP4:transthyretin ratio correlated with HOMA-IR and fasting insulin in controls. In women with gestational diabetes RBP4 EIA and western blot levels increased after delivery. Retinol increased in both groups, while transthyretin and the RBP4:transthyretin ratio were not altered after parturition. Conclusions/interpretation RBP4 measured by two different techniques is not elevated, but the RBP4:retinol molar ratio is higher and correlates with fasting blood glucose in women with gestational diabetes. Thus, the RBP4:retinol ratio and the RBP4:transthyretin ratio are more informative than RBP4 levels alone when

  16. Neck circumference might predict gestational diabetes mellitus in Han Chinese women: A nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    He, Fang; He, Hua; Liu, Wenqi; Lin, Junyu; Chen, Bingjun; Lin, Yucong; Zhao, Yitao; Tao, Wen; Xia, Xuefeng

    2017-03-01

    A large neck circumference might be an indicator of metabolic syndrome and its components, and for certain patients is more practical as an index than waist circumference. The demarcation value for neck circumference that suggests metabolic syndrome appears to vary by ethnic group. Gestational diabetes mellitus is considered a component of metabolic syndrome in pregnant women. We investigated whether neck circumference in Han Chinese women is associated with gestational diabetes mellitus in early pregnancy, and determined a predictive demarcation value. A nested case-control study was carried out with 255 women aged 18-35 years. Gestational diabetes mellitus was diagnosed according to the criteria of the American Diabetes Association through a 2-h, 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Of the total population, 41 (16%) women developed gestational diabetes mellitus by 24-28 weeks of gestation. Neck circumference at gestational week 16 positively correlated with pre-pregnancy waist circumference, bodyweight and body mass index, and maternal age (P = 0.029) and hemoglobin A1c at gestational week 24 (P ≤ 0.001). By binary logistic regression, neck circumference was an independent predictor of gestational diabetes mellitus (odds ratio 1.840, 95% confidence interval 1.040-3.254; P = 0.036). According to the receiver operating characteristic curve, for predicting gestational diabetes mellitus the optimal demarcation for neck circumference at gestational week 16 was 35.15 cm. Neck circumference is a viable tool to screen for gestational diabetes mellitus. In this population of pregnant Han Chinese women, a neck circumference of ≥35.15 cm was a predictor of gestational diabetes mellitus. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. The role of gestational diabetes, pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on the risk of newborn macrosomia: results from a prospective multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is crucial to identify in large population samples the most important determinants of excessive fetal growth. The aim of the study was to evaluate the independent role of pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain and gestational diabetes on the risk of macrosomia. Methods A prospective study collected data on mode of delivery and maternal/neonatal outcomes in eleven Hospitals in Italy. Multiple pregnancies and preterm deliveries were excluded. The sample included 14109 women with complete records. Associations between exposure variables and newborn macrosomia were analyzed using Pearson’s chi squared test. Multiple logistic regression models were built to assess the independent association between potential predictors and macrosomia. Results Maternal obesity (adjusted OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.4-2.2), excessive gestational weight gain (adjusted OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.6-2.2) and diabetes (adjusted OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.5-3.0 for gestational; adjusted OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.2-7.6 for pre-gestational) resulted to be independent predictors of macrosomia, when adjusted for other recognized risk factors. Since no significant interaction was found between pre-gestational BMI and gestational weight gain, excessive weight gain should be considered an independent risk factor for macrosomia. In the sub-group of women affected by gestational or pre-gestational diabetes, pre-gestational BMI was not significantly associated to macrosomia, while excessive pregnancy weight gain, maternal height and gestational age at delivery were significantly associated. In this sub-population, pregnancy weight gain less than recommended was not significantly associated to a reduction in macrosomia. Conclusions Our findings indicate that maternal obesity, gestational weight gain excess and diabetes should be considered as independent risk factors for newborn macrosomia. To adequately evaluate the clinical evolution of pregnancy all three variables need to be carefully assessed and

  18. The role of gestational diabetes, pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on the risk of newborn macrosomia: results from a prospective multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Alberico, Salvatore; Montico, Marcella; Barresi, Valentina; Monasta, Lorenzo; Businelli, Caterina; Soini, Valentina; Erenbourg, Anna; Ronfani, Luca; Maso, Gianpaolo

    2014-01-15

    It is crucial to identify in large population samples the most important determinants of excessive fetal growth. The aim of the study was to evaluate the independent role of pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain and gestational diabetes on the risk of macrosomia. A prospective study collected data on mode of delivery and maternal/neonatal outcomes in eleven Hospitals in Italy. Multiple pregnancies and preterm deliveries were excluded. The sample included 14109 women with complete records. Associations between exposure variables and newborn macrosomia were analyzed using Pearson's chi squared test. Multiple logistic regression models were built to assess the independent association between potential predictors and macrosomia. Maternal obesity (adjusted OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.4-2.2), excessive gestational weight gain (adjusted OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.6-2.2) and diabetes (adjusted OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.5-3.0 for gestational; adjusted OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.2-7.6 for pre-gestational) resulted to be independent predictors of macrosomia, when adjusted for other recognized risk factors. Since no significant interaction was found between pre-gestational BMI and gestational weight gain, excessive weight gain should be considered an independent risk factor for macrosomia. In the sub-group of women affected by gestational or pre-gestational diabetes, pre-gestational BMI was not significantly associated to macrosomia, while excessive pregnancy weight gain, maternal height and gestational age at delivery were significantly associated. In this sub-population, pregnancy weight gain less than recommended was not significantly associated to a reduction in macrosomia. Our findings indicate that maternal obesity, gestational weight gain excess and diabetes should be considered as independent risk factors for newborn macrosomia. To adequately evaluate the clinical evolution of pregnancy all three variables need to be carefully assessed and monitored.

  19. Arsenic exposure and prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Korean adults.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Sang Youl; Hwang, You-Cheol; Woo, Jeong-taek; Chin, Sang Ouk; Chon, Suk; Kim, Young Seol

    2013-06-01

    It has been suggested that there is an association between environmental, low-level arsenic exposure and the risk of diabetes mellitus (DM), but little research has been conducted. Here, the glucose tolerance status and urinary creatinine adjusted total arsenic concentrations were analyzed in 3,602 subjects ≥ 20 yr of age who were registered for the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2008-2009. Various demographic parameters were associated with urinary arsenic concentrations. After adjusting for these variables, urinary arsenic concentrations in subjects with DM were significantly higher than those in subjects with normal glucose tolerance and those with impaired fasting glucose (P < 0.001). Compared with the lowest quartile ( < 70.7 µg/g creatinine), the odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for DM were 1.11 (0.73-1.68), 1.42 (0.94-2.13), and 1.56 (1.03-2.36) for urinary arsenic concentrations of 70.7 to < 117.7, 117.7 to < 193.4, and ≥ 193.4 µg/g creatinine, respectively, following multivariate adjustment. Furthermore, the urinary total arsenic concentration was inversely associated with the insulin secretion index, HOMA2 %B (β = -0.033, P = 0.032). These findings suggest that arsenic exposure, possibly involving beta cell dysfunction, is associated with an increased risk of DM in the Korean population.

  20. Higher direct bilirubin levels during mid-pregnancy are associated with lower risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaoqun; Zhong, Chunrong; Zhou, Xuezhen; Chen, Renjuan; Wu, Jiangyue; Wang, Weiye; Li, Xiating; Ding, Huisi; Guo, Yanfang; Gao, Qin; Hu, Xingwen; Xiong, Guoping; Yang, Xuefeng; Hao, Liping; Xiao, Mei; Yang, Nianhong

    2017-01-01

    Bilirubin concentrations have been recently reported to be negatively associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We examined the association between bilirubin concentrations and gestational diabetes mellitus. In a prospective cohort study, 2969 pregnant women were recruited prior to 16 weeks of gestation and were followed up until delivery. The value of bilirubin was tested and oral glucose tolerance test was conducted to screen gestational diabetes mellitus. The relationship between serum bilirubin concentration and gestational weeks was studied by two-piecewise linear regression. A subsample of 1135 participants with serum bilirubin test during 16-18 weeks gestation was conducted to research the association between serum bilirubin levels and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus by logistic regression. Gestational diabetes mellitus developed in 8.5 % of the participants (223 of 2969). Two-piecewise linear regression analyses demonstrated that the levels of bilirubin decreased with gestational week up to the turning point 23 and after that point, levels of bilirubin were increased slightly. In multiple logistic regression analysis, the relative risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus was lower in the highest tertile of direct bilirubin than that in the lowest tertile (RR 0.60; 95 % CI, 0.35-0.89). The results suggested that women with higher serum direct bilirubin levels during the second trimester of pregnancy have lower risk for development of gestational diabetes mellitus.

  1. Estimating risk factors and perinatal outcomes for gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in teen mothers.

    PubMed

    Baker, Arthur M; Haeri, Sina

    2012-11-01

    Our objective was to identify potentially modifiable risk factors and outcomes for gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in a contemporary American teen population. We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of all teenage deliveries (≤18 years old) at one institution over a 4-year period with documented oral glucose tolerance testing. All cases of gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance were identified using the Carpenter and Coustan diagnostic criteria and compared with teenage mothers with normal glucose tolerance testing. Of the 670 included teen deliveries, 668 were either African American or Hispanic/Latino; 31 (5%) were diagnosed with gestational diabetes (n = 5) or impaired glucose tolerance (n = 26). Higher maternal prepregnancy body mass index (34.3 ± 7.8 vs 30.3 ± 6.4, p = 0.001) and morbid obesity (body mass index ≥ 35 kg/m(2) , RR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.6) were associated with gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance. There was no association with weight gain above the Institute of Medicine recommended levels (RR 1.6, 95% CI 0.77-3.4). On postpregnancy follow up, three of the five (60%) teens with gestational diabetes and none of the 26 (0%) teens with impaired glucose tolerance were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. Higher prepregnancy body mass index, especially morbid obesity, places the gravid teen at higher risk for development of gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in pregnancy. The potentially modifiable nature of these risk factors coupled with the emerging teen obesity epidemic underscores the need for increased public health focus on this problem. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. SPRING: an RCT study of probiotics in the prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus in overweight and obese women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity is increasing in the child-bearing population as are the rates of gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is associated with higher rates of Cesarean Section for the mother and increased risks of macrosomia, higher body fat mass, respiratory distress and hypoglycemia for the infant. Prevention of gestational diabetes through life style intervention has proven to be difficult. A Finnish study showed that ingestion of specific probiotics altered the composition of the gut microbiome and thereby metabolism from early gestation and decreased rates of gestational diabetes in normal weight women. In SPRING (the Study of Probiotics IN the prevention of Gestational diabetes), the effectiveness of probiotics ingestion for the prevention of gestational diabetes will be assessed in overweight and obese women. Methods/design SPRING is a multi-center, prospective, double-blind randomized controlled trial run at two tertiary maternity hospitals in Brisbane, Australia. Five hundred and forty (540) women with a BMI > 25.0 kg/m2 will be recruited over 2 years and receive either probiotics or placebo capsules from 16 weeks gestation until delivery. The probiotics capsules contain > 1x109 cfu each of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium lactis BB-12 per capsule. The primary outcome is diagnosis of gestational diabetes at 28 weeks gestation. Secondary outcomes include rates of other pregnancy complications, gestational weight gain, mode of delivery, change in gut microbiome, preterm birth, macrosomia, and infant body composition. The trial has 80% power at a 5% 2-sided significance level to detect a >50% change in the rates of gestational diabetes in this high-risk group of pregnant women. Discussion SPRING will show if probiotics can be used as an easily implementable method of preventing gestational diabetes in the high-risk group of overweight and obese pregnant women. PMID:23442391

  3. SPRING: an RCT study of probiotics in the prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus in overweight and obese women.

    PubMed

    Nitert, Marloes Dekker; Barrett, Helen L; Foxcroft, Katie; Tremellen, Anne; Wilkinson, Shelley; Lingwood, Barbara; Tobin, Jacinta M; McSweeney, Chris; O'Rourke, Peter; McIntyre, H David; Callaway, Leonie K

    2013-02-25

    Obesity is increasing in the child-bearing population as are the rates of gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is associated with higher rates of Cesarean Section for the mother and increased risks of macrosomia, higher body fat mass, respiratory distress and hypoglycemia for the infant. Prevention of gestational diabetes through life style intervention has proven to be difficult. A Finnish study showed that ingestion of specific probiotics altered the composition of the gut microbiome and thereby metabolism from early gestation and decreased rates of gestational diabetes in normal weight women. In SPRING (the Study of Probiotics IN the prevention of Gestational diabetes), the effectiveness of probiotics ingestion for the prevention of gestational diabetes will be assessed in overweight and obese women. SPRING is a multi-center, prospective, double-blind randomized controlled trial run at two tertiary maternity hospitals in Brisbane, Australia. Five hundred and forty (540) women with a BMI > 25.0 kg/m(2) will be recruited over 2 years and receive either probiotics or placebo capsules from 16 weeks gestation until delivery. The probiotics capsules contain > 1x10(9) cfu each of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium lactis BB-12 per capsule. The primary outcome is diagnosis of gestational diabetes at 28 weeks gestation. Secondary outcomes include rates of other pregnancy complications, gestational weight gain, mode of delivery, change in gut microbiome, preterm birth, macrosomia, and infant body composition. The trial has 80% power at a 5% 2-sided significance level to detect a >50% change in the rates of gestational diabetes in this high-risk group of pregnant women. SPRING will show if probiotics can be used as an easily implementable method of preventing gestational diabetes in the high-risk group of overweight and obese pregnant women.

  4. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2014-03-18

    Update of the 2008 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy of screening tests for GDM, the benefits and harms of screening before and after 24 weeks of gestation, and the benefits and harms of treatment in the mother and infant. This recommendation applies to pregnant women who have not been previously diagnosed with type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus. The USPSTF recommends screening for GDM in asymptomatic pregnant women after 24 weeks of gestation. (B recommendation)The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for GDM in asymptomatic pregnant women before 24 weeks of gestation. (I statement).

  5. Maternal Lipids May Predict Fetal Growth in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Krstevska, Brankica; Jovanovska, Sasha Misevska; Krstevska, Slagjana Simeonova; Nakova, Valentina Velkoska; Serafimoski, Vladimir

    2016-11-01

    During diabetic pregnancy, complex metabolic changes occur in the lipid profile. The aim of the study was to determine the predictive values of maternal serum lipid levels on large-for-gestational age newborns during the third trimester in pregnancies of women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Data of forty three pregnancies of women with DM2 and two hundred women with GDM were analyzed. The analysis encompassed the following parameters: age, body mass index (BMI), lipid parameters, HbA1c in first, second and third trimester of pregnancy, preeclampsia and baby birth weight. DM2 and GDM groups showed statistically significant differences in the following variables: total lipids, triglycerides, total cholesterol, BMI, age, baby birth weight, incidence of SGA and preterm delivery (9.4 ± 2.3 vs. 11.0 ± 2.3 mmol/L, 2.4 ± 1.4 vs. 3.4 ± 1.6 mmol/L, 5.5 ± 1.2 vs. 6.4 ± 1.4 mmol/L, 30.6 ± 5.4 vs. 26.9 ± 5.2 kg/m2, 34 ± 7.8 vs. 31.5 ± 5.6 years, 3183 ± 972 vs. 3533 ± 699 g., 20% vs. 7.5%, 27.9 vs. 14%, respectively, p < 0.05). Linear multiple regression analysis demonstrated that triglycerides, LDL-C and total cholesterol were independent predictors of LGA (p < 0.05). Triglycerides and LDL-C in the third trimester of pregnancy are independent predictors for fetal macrosomia in DM2 and GDM pregnancies. Thus, the maternal serum triglycerides and LDL-C levels determined in the maternal blood taken in the third trimester of pregnancy may indentify women who will give birth to LGA newborns.

  6. Family history of diabetes and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in Iran: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Asemi, Zatollah; Lankarani, Kamran B; Tabrizi, Reza; Maharlouei, Najmeh; Naghibzadeh-Tahami, Ahmad; Yousefzadeh, Gholamreza; Sadeghi, Reza; Khatibi, Seyed Reza; Afshari, Mahdi; Khodadost, Mahmoud; Akbari, Maryam

    2016-12-13

    Gestational diabetes is the most prevalent metabolic disorder being firstly diagnosed during pregnancy. The relationship between the family history of diabetes and the gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has been investigated in several primary studies with a number of contradictions in the results. Hence, the purpose of the present study is to determine the relationship between the GDM and the family history of diabetes using the meta-analysis method. All published papers in main national and international databases were systematically searched with some specific keywords to find the related studies between 2000 and 2016. We calculated the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) in analysis for each study using a random-effect and Mantel-Haenzel method. We also determined heterogeneity among these 33 articles and their publication bias. We entered 33 relevant studies of 2516 articles into the meta-analysis process including 2697 women with family history of diabetes mellitus as well as 29134 women without. Of them, 954 and 4372 subjects developed GDM respectively. Combining the results of the primary studies using the meta-analysis method, the overall odds ratio of family history for developing GDM was estimated as of 3.46 (95% CI: 2.80-4.27). This meta-analysis study revealed that the family history of diabetes is an important risk factor for the gestational diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gestational Age, Infant Birth Weight, and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Mothers: Nurses' Health Study II

    MedlinePlus

    ... Birth Weight, and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Mothers: Nurses’ Health Study II Navigate This ... as 10 pounds or more at term. Gestational diabetes In the NHSII 1989 baseline questionnaire and subsequent ...

  8. What I Need to Know about Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Helping Your Child, Tips for Parents . A healthy lifestyle can help your child from becoming overweight or obese and having type 2 diabetes later on. More information about Managing Diabetes is provided in the NIDDK health topics: ...

  9. Human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm alleviates diabetic pathology and improves reproductive outcome in C57BL/KsJ-Lep(db/+) gestational diabetes mellitus mice.

    PubMed

    Xing, Baoheng; Wang, Lili; Li, Qin; Cao, Yalei; Dong, Xiujuan; Liang, Jun; Wu, Xiaohua

    2015-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is a condition commonly encountered during mid to late pregnancy with pathologic manifestations including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and fetal maldevelopment. The cause of gestational diabetes mellitus can be attributed to both genetic and environmental factors, hence complicating its diagnosis and treatment. Pancreatic progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells were shown to be able to effectively treat diabetes in mice. In this study, we have developed a system of treating diabetes using human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm in a mouse model of gestational diabetes mellitus. Human embryonic stem cells were differentiated in vitro into pancreatic endoderm, which were then transplanted into db/+ mice suffering from gestational diabetes mellitus. The transplant greatly improved glucose metabolism and reproductive outcome of the females compared with the control groups. Our findings support the feasibility of using differentiated human embryonic stem cells for treating gestational diabetes mellitus patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of exercise in reducing the risks of gestational diabetes mellitus in obese women.

    PubMed

    Artal, Raul

    2015-01-01

    The global obesity epidemic continues unabated, now rapidly expanding to developing countries. Multiple comorbidities and premature mortality are associated with obesity, most frequently diabetes. The associated financial and economical burden is escalating as well. The sedentary lifestyle adopted by many pregnant women because of traditional practices and the current recommendation for gestational weight gain are contributing factors to the obesity and diabetes epidemic. Physical inactivity is recognized as an independent risk factor for obesity insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes; the physiological and hormonal changes associated with pregnancy magnify this risk. Conversely, evidence and accumulated experience indicate that antenatal lifestyle interventions that include physical activity and judicious dieting could improve the pregnancy outcome and reduce the risk of gestational diabetes and is effective as an adjunctive therapy for diabetes in pregnancy. All major professional organizations, among them American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), American Diabetes Association (ADA), Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG), and Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC), recommend lifestyle interventions that include diet and exercise to prevent or manage gestational diabetes or diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk perception and unrecognized type 2 diabetes in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Janine; Lawson, Margaret L; Gaboury, Isabelle; Keely, Erin

    2009-09-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have a high chance of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) following the index pregnancy, however, little is known of women's perception of this risk. The objectives were to (1) determine women's perception of risk of future development of T2DM following a GDM pregnancy and (2) describe the prevalence of undetected dysglycaemia in a Canadian population. The study was designed as a 9-11 year follow-up study of women previously enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of tight versus minimal intervention for GDM. Women's perception of future risk of diabetes was determined by questionnaire. Fasting lipid profile, height and weight were performed on all participants. Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed on all women without prior history of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). The study was conducted at Ottawa Hospital General Campus and Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, in Ottawa, Canada. Eighty-nine of 299 (30%) of the original cohort were recruited. Eighty-eight women completed the questionnaire and 77 women without known diabetes underwent two hour glucose tolerance testing. Twenty-three (30%) felt their risk was no different than other women or did not know, 27 (35%) felt risk was increased a little and 27 (35%) felt risk was increased a lot. Only 52% (40/77) had normal glucose tolerance. Of all, 25/88 (28%) patients had diabetes (11 previously diagnosed and 14 diagnosed within the study). Of those newly diagnosed with DM2, four (29%) were diagnosed by fasting glucose, six (42%) by two hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) alone and four (29%) by both. Twenty-four of the women (27%) had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Of those with IGT, 12 (57%) had a fasting food glucose < 5.6 mmol/L. In the high-risk perception group with newly diagnosed diabetes, two were overweight, seven were obese, four had a family history of DM2, and all had a waist circumference >88 cm. In conclusion the perception

  12. The Association Between Physical Activity During Pregnancy and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Nasiri-Amiri, Fatemeh; Bakhtiari, Afsaneh; Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Adib Rad, Hajar; Pasha, Hajar

    2016-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is one of the most common complications of pregnancy. Physical activity is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A recent meta-analysis study suggested that more research is needed to investigate the type, duration and intensity of physical activity that can help to reduce the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. The present study aimed to understand the association between physical activity and gestational diabetes mellitus through comparing the type and intensity of physical activity performed by pregnant females with gestational diabetes and healthy pregnant females in the first 20 weeks of their pregnancy. In the current case-control study, 100 pregnant females with gestational diabetes mellitus as the case group and 100 pregnant females as the non-diabetic control group were recruited. The age range of the participants was 18 - 40 years with the gestation of 20 - 28 weeks. To diagnose gestational diabetes mellitus using the criteria introduced by carpenter and coustan females with abnormal glucose challenge test (> 140 mg/dL) were asked to perform the three-hour 100 g oral glucose tolerance test. The details of physical activity were collected by a modified version of the pregnancy physical activity questionnaire. Anthropometric and relevant data were recorded for all of the participants. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 21. Risk estimates were obtained by logistic regression and adjusted for confounders. Females who had low total physical activity according to the pregnancy physical activity questionnaire during early pregnancy were at a significantly higher risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (OR = 4.12, 95% CI (2.28 - 7.43), P = 0.001) compared to the ones who reported higher levels of physical activity. Moreover, after adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), gravidity and a family history of diabetes, females with low physical activity in the domain of transportation activity during 20

  13. The Association Between Physical Activity During Pregnancy and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri-Amiri, Fatemeh; Bakhtiari, Afsaneh; Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Adib Rad, Hajar; Pasha, Hajar

    2016-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus is one of the most common complications of pregnancy. Physical activity is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A recent meta-analysis study suggested that more research is needed to investigate the type, duration and intensity of physical activity that can help to reduce the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. Objectives The present study aimed to understand the association between physical activity and gestational diabetes mellitus through comparing the type and intensity of physical activity performed by pregnant females with gestational diabetes and healthy pregnant females in the first 20 weeks of their pregnancy. Patients and Methods In the current case-control study, 100 pregnant females with gestational diabetes mellitus as the case group and 100 pregnant females as the non-diabetic control group were recruited. The age range of the participants was 18 - 40 years with the gestation of 20 - 28 weeks. To diagnose gestational diabetes mellitus using the criteria introduced by carpenter and coustan females with abnormal glucose challenge test (> 140 mg/dL) were asked to perform the three-hour 100 g oral glucose tolerance test. The details of physical activity were collected by a modified version of the pregnancy physical activity questionnaire. Anthropometric and relevant data were recorded for all of the participants. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 21. Risk estimates were obtained by logistic regression and adjusted for confounders. Results Females who had low total physical activity according to the pregnancy physical activity questionnaire during early pregnancy were at a significantly higher risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (OR = 4.12, 95% CI (2.28 - 7.43), P = 0.001) compared to the ones who reported higher levels of physical activity. Moreover, after adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), gravidity and a family history of diabetes, females with low physical activity in

  14. Diabetes screening after gestational diabetes in England: a quantitative retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Andrew; Butler, Lucilla; Jones, Simon; van Vlymen, Jeremy; Sadek, Khaled; Munro, Neil; Carr, Helen; de Lusignan, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Background The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends postpartum and annual monitoring for diabetes for females who have had a diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Aim To describe the current state of follow-up after GDM in primary care, in England. Design and setting A retrospective cohort study in 127 primary care practices. The total population analysed comprised 473 772 females, of whom 2016 had a diagnosis of GDM. Method Two subgroups of females were analysed using electronic general practice records. In the first group of females (n = 788) the quality of postpartum follow-up was assessed during a 6-month period. The quality of long-term annual follow-up was assessed in a second group of females (n = 718), over a 5-year period. The two outcome measures were blood glucose testing performed within 6 months postpartum (first group) and blood glucose testing performed annually (second group). Results Postpartum follow-up was performed in 146 (18.5%) females within 6 months of delivery. Annual rates of long-term follow-up stayed consistently around 20% a year. Publication of the Diabetes in Pregnancy NICE guidelines, in 2008, had no effect on long-term screening rates. Substantial regional differences were identified among rates of follow-up. Conclusion Monitoring of females after GDM is markedly suboptimal despite current recommendations. PMID:24567578

  15. The inter- and intragenerational impact of gestational diabetes on the epidemic of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Osgood, Nathaniel D; Dyck, Roland F; Grassmann, Winfried K

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the contribution of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) to the historic epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Saskatchewan. We constructed a population-level simulation model of the inter- and intragenerational interaction of GDM and T2DM for the period 1956 to 2006. The model was stratified by gender, ethnicity, and age; parameterized with primary and secondary data; and calibrated to match historic time series. Risk of diabetes was sigmoidally trended to capture exogenous factors. Best-fit calibrations suggested GDM may be responsible for 19% to 30% of the cases of T2DM among Saskatchewan First Nations people, but only for approximately 6% of cases among other persons living in Saskatchewan. The estimated contribution of GDM to the growth in T2DM was highly sensitive to assumptions concerning the post-GDM risk of developing T2DM. GDM may be an important driver for the T2DM epidemic in many subpopulations. Because GDM is a readily identifiable, preventable, and treatable condition, investments in prevention, rapid diagnosis, and evidence-based treatment of GDM in at-risk populations may offer substantial benefit in lowering the T2DM burden over many generations. Model-informed data collection can aid in assessing intervention tradeoffs.

  16. Prevention of Diabetes after Gestational Diabetes: Better Translation of Nutrition and Lifestyle Messages Needed

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Sharleen L.

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and Gestational Diabetes (GDM) are important and escalating problems worldwide. GDM increases the risk of complications in pregnancy and birth, as well as a 1 in 2 chance of developing T2DM later in life. The burden of GDM extends to offspring, who have an increased risk of obesity and diabetes—further perpetuating the cycle of diabetes within families. Clinical trial evidence demonstrates T2DM incidence reduced by up to 50% for women with GDM with nutrition and physical activity changes and the economic modeling suggests cost effectiveness. The key diet-related changes to reduce T2DM risk are reviewed, in addition to breastfeeding. The difficulties associated with the delivery of dietary and lifestyle behaviour change to women after GDM are discussed and focus on: complex healthcare system interactions needed for care delivery; women finding postpartum self-care challenging; and low levels of awareness being present across the board. In addition, studies currently underway to improve care provision in this important area will be examined. PMID:27429288

  17. [Risk factors for fetal macrosomia in patients without gestational diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    García-De la Torre, J I; Rodríguez-Valdez, A; Delgado-Rosas, A

    2016-03-01

    Fetal macrosomia is birth weight of 4,000 grams or more, regardless of gestational age, in Mexico representing about 5.4%. Associated with multiple demographic, physiological, metabolic and genetic factors of each population. Determine the risk factors associated with the development of fetal macrosomia in patients without gestational diabetes mellitus. Retrospective, descriptive and comparative study of patients who came to delivery from January 2012 to June 2014, 88 patients, 23 patients with diagnosis of macrosomia, and 65 patients without macrosomia without gestational diabetes mellitus were included. An incidence of fetal macrosomia of 18.6%. Risk factors such as parity, history of fetal macrosomia, maternal age, maternal height more to 1.70 meters showed no difference, the percentage of overweight 105% showed 69% vs 52% on the control group and gestational diabetes screening altered that present 30.4 vs 20%. Increased incidence of macrosomia was demonstrated in patients with metabolic factors such as the percentage of overweight and screening altered gestational diabetes mellitus, as they showed higher prevalence in the study group, all modifiable with preconception nutritional management and during pregnancy, to reduce initial weight and weight gain, improved fasting and postprandial blood glucose in patients with positive screening and negative tolerance curve carbohydrates to maintain fetal growth curve with in the percentiles.

  18. The economic burden of elevated blood glucose levels in 2012: diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes, gestational diabetes mellitus, and prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Dall, Timothy M; Yang, Wenya; Halder, Pragna; Pang, Bo; Massoudi, Marjan; Wintfeld, Neil; Semilla, April P; Franz, Jerry; Hogan, Paul F

    2014-12-01

    To update estimates of the economic burden of undiagnosed diabetes, prediabetes, and gestational diabetes mellitus in 2012 in the U.S. and to present state-level estimates. Combined with published estimates for diagnosed diabetes, these statistics provide a detailed picture of the economic costs associated with elevated glucose levels. This study estimated health care use and medical expenditures in excess of expected levels occurring in the absence of diabetes or prediabetes. Data sources that were analyzed include Optum medical claims for ∼4.9 million commercially insured patients who were continuously enrolled from 2010 to 2012, Medicare Standard Analytical Files containing medical claims for ∼2.6 million Medicare patients in 2011, and the 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample containing ∼7.8 million hospital discharge records. The indirect economic burden includes reduced labor force participation, missed workdays, and reduced productivity. State-level estimates reflect geographic variation in prevalence, risk factors, and prices. The economic burden associated with diagnosed diabetes (all ages) and undiagnosed diabetes, gestational diabetes, and prediabetes (adults) exceeded $322 billion in 2012, consisting of $244 billion in excess medical costs and $78 billion in reduced productivity. Combined, this amounts to an economic burden exceeding $1,000 for each American in 2012. This national estimate is 48% higher than the $218 billion estimate for 2007. The burden per case averaged $10,970 for diagnosed diabetes, $5,800 for gestational diabetes, $4,030 for undiagnosed diabetes, and $510 for prediabetes. These statistics underscore the importance of finding ways to reduce the burden of prediabetes and diabetes through prevention and treatment. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  19. N-terminal-pro-brain natriuretic peptide is decreased in insulin dependent gestational diabetes mellitus: a prospective cohort trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background N-terminal-pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is elevated in gestational hypertension and preeclampsia. This trial aimed to generate data for gestational diabetes mellitus patients, who are at risk to develop these complications. Methods We have measured NT-proBNP in 223 otherwise healthy women between gestational week 24 and 32 referred to the outpatient diabetes unit in a cross-sectional study. Results 88 control subjects, 45 patients with indication for medical nutrition therapy (MNT) alone and 90 patients who required insulin therapy were included. Groups of women were comparable regarding gestational week. Body mass index before pregnancy and at blood draw was significantly higher in subjects with insulin dependent gestational diabetes mellitus compared to MNT controlled gestational diabetes mellitus. NT-proBNP was significantly lower in patients with insulin dependent gestational diabetes mellitus (35 ± 25 pg/ml) compared to controls (53 ± 43 pg/ml, p = 0.012). Conclusions NT-proBNP is within the reference range of normal subjects in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Differences in body mass index, changes in glomerular filtration rate and haemodynamics may explain lower NT-proBNP concentrations in insulin dependent gestational diabetes mellitus. A false negative interpretation needs to be considered in these women. PMID:21489265

  20. Increased circulating heat shock protein 70 (HSPA1A) levels in gestational diabetes mellitus: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Garamvölgyi, Zoltán; Prohászka, Zoltán; Rigó, János; Kecskeméti, András; Molvarec, Attila

    2015-07-01

    Recent data indicate that serum Hsp70 (HSPA1A) levels are increased in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is no report in the literature on circulating Hsp70 levels in gestational diabetes mellitus. In this pilot study, we measured serum Hsp70 levels in 11 pregnant women with pregestational diabetes, 38 women with gestational diabetes, and 40 healthy pregnant women with ELISA. Plasma glucose levels, serum insulin concentrations, HbA1c values, and the Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) index were also determined. According to our results, serum Hsp70 concentrations were significantly higher in women with pregestational and gestational diabetes mellitus than in healthy pregnant women. In addition, pregestational diabetic women had significantly higher Hsp70 levels than those with gestational diabetes. Furthermore, in the group of women with gestational diabetes mellitus, serum Hsp70 levels showed a significant positive correlation with HbA1c values. However, there was no other relationship between clinical features and metabolic parameters of the study subjects and their serum Hsp70 levels in either study group. In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time in the literature that serum Hsp70 levels are increased and correlate with HbA1c values in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to determine whether circulating Hsp70 plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of gestational diabetes or elevated serum Hsp70 levels are only consequences of the disease.

  1. American Diabetes Association Workshop-Conference on gestational diabetes: summary and recommendations.

    PubMed

    1980-01-01

    Gestational diabetes is defined as glucose intolerance recognized during pregnancy. Research is necessary to achieve more accurate diagnosis, precise definition of outcome criteria and assessment of their significance, correlation of outcomes with maternal variables, and more effective therapies to control glucose levels. Until such information is available, the following guidelines are proposed. All pregnant women should be screened for glucose intolerance between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. The diagnosis should be based on O'Sullivan's oral glucose tolerance procedure. Management should include high risk pregnancy surveillance and nutritional counseling. Some centers advocate insulin administration if dietary management does not consistently maintain the fasting plasma glucose below 105 mg/dl and the 2-h postprandial glucose below 120 mg/dl. However, the point at which insulin therapy should be instituted remains to be established. All agree that close control of plasma glucose is importance in reducing fetal and perinatal morbidity and mortality.

  2. Identification of trends in scientific publications related to genetic polymorphisms in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gomes, J S; Minasi, L B; da Cruz, A D; Rodrigues, F M

    2016-05-09

    Gestational diabetes is a genetic multifactorial systemic disease that has been extensively studied. Consequently, there is a large volume of scientific literature pertaining to genes associated with gestational diabetes. The aim of this study was to characterize the main trends in scientific publications focusing on the associations between genetic polymorphisms and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The related articles were extracted from Scopus using the key words "genetic polymorphism" and "gestational diabetes mellitus"; the collected data focused on various fields (medical, biochemical, etc.) and included papers published within December 2013. One hundred and eighty-three relevant articles published between 1987 and 2013 were identified; we observed a significantly increasing trend in the number of publications pertaining to GDM. A majority of the articles focused on the medical (59.9%), biochemical, and genetics and molecular biological (29.6%) aspects of the disease. The genes coding for transcription factor 7-like 2 and glucokinase (TCF7L2, 29% and GCK, 28%) were predominantly studied and reported. This study helped quantify the growth in research pertaining to GDM; researchers from the USA have published a majority of the publications related to GDM. Several candidate genes have been linked to diabetes; however, the specific gene locus responsible for GDM has not yet been identified. The results of this study could help determine the orientation of future research on genetic factors associated with GDM.

  3. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Gestational Diabetes in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    JAFARI-SHOBEIRI, Mehri; GHOJAZADEH, Morteza; AZAMI-AGHDASH, Saber; NAGHAVI-BEHZAD, Mohammad; PIRI, Reza; POURALI-AKBAR, Yasmin; NASROLLAH-ZADEH, Raheleh; BAYAT-KHAJEH, Parvaneh; MOHAMMADI, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gestational Diabetes (GD) is one of the major public health issues. The purpose of the present study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the risk factors and prevalence rate of this disorder in Iran. Methods: This systematic review and meta- analysis article was prepared using the databases of Science Direct, Pub-Med, Scopus, Magiran, Iranmedex and SID, Google search engine, Gray Literature, reference lists check and hand searching using keywords such as “prevalence”, “gestational diabetes mellitus”, “GDM”, “risk factor*”, “Iran” and “Postpartum Diabetes”. The selected papers were fully reviewed and the required information for the systematic review was extracted and summarized using extraction table in Microsoft Office Excel software. Results: Twenty-four of 1011 papers were quite relevant to the objectives of the review so they were included. The mean age of the participants was 29.43±4.97 yr and the prevalence of GDM was 3.41% (the highest and the lowest prevalence rates were 18.6% and 1.3% respectively). Among the influential factors mentioned in the literature, potential causes of GDM are gestational age, history of gestational diabetes, family history of diabetes, body mass index, abortions and parity, and history of macrosomia. Conclusion: Considering the high prevalence of postpartum diabetes and its related factors in Iran, strategic planning for disease prevention and reduction is inevitable. PMID:26587467

  4. Gestational diabetes and gestational impaired glucose tolerance in 1653 teenage pregnancies: prevalence, risk factors and pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Karcaaltincaba, Deniz; Buyukkaragoz, Bahar; Kandemir, Omer; Yalvac, Serdar; Kıykac-Altınbaş, Sadiman; Haberal, Ali

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and gestational impaired glucose tolerance (GIGT) in adolescent pregnancies, associated risk factors, and pregnancy complications. Retrospective study. Community-based teaching hospital. Results of 1653 pregnant women age ≤ 19 years in 2005-2007 were reviewed. All pregnant women screened with 50-g glucose challenge test (GCT) and patients with a GCT result ≥ 140 mg/dl underwent a 3-hour 100-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). GDM was diagnosed with at least two abnormal results and GIGT was diagnosed with one abnormal result. GDM and GIGT cases were evaluated for the presence of any associated risk factors and effects of presence of risk factors on pregnancy outcomes. The prevalence of GDM was 0.85% (95% CI, 0.41-1.29), GIGT was 0.5% (95% CI, 0.15-0.81) and GDM+GIGT was 1.35% (95% CI, 0.78-1.88) by Carpenter and Coustan criteria. 68% of patients had at least one of the risk factors including body mass index ≥ 25, family history of diabetes and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Only 9.1% (n = 2) of them required insulin for glucose regulation during pregnancy with 9.1% (n = 2) macrosomia rate. All patients were primiparous and cesarean delivery rate was 27.3% (n = 6). We could not find any effect of presence of risk factors on pregnancy outcomes in GDM and GIGT cases. We demonstrated that GDM and GIGT are strongly associated with high BMI before pregnancy, PCOS, and family history of diabetes. Since GDM is a state of prediabetes, it is important to diagnose in adolescent pregnancies considering their life expectancy to take preventive measures to avoid diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2011 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Insulin aspart in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and pregestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Deepaklal, M. C.; Joseph, Kurian; Rekha, Kurian; Nandita, Thakkar

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study was undertaken to assess the effectiveness and safety of insulin aspart in patients with gestational and pregestational diabetes. Settings and Design: An open-label, prospective, nonrandomized, comparative, and observational study conducted at single center in India. Subjects and Methods: A total of 276 patients were in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) group, 79 were in the pre-GDM group. Patients were started on insulin therapy (insulin aspart ± neutral protamine hagedorn) once medical nutrition therapy for 2 weeks failed to achieve control, that is., fasting plasma glucose ≥90 mg/dL and/or 1.0 h postprandial plasma glucose ≥130 mg/dL. Insulin dose was titrated to keep the blood glucose values between 90 and 130 mg/dL. Patients were followed once every 4 weeks until the 28th week, then once every 2 weeks until 32nd week, then once every week until delivery, and the final visit was on 60 ± 7 days. The final outcome was assessed in terms of incidence of macrosomia (>3.5 kg body weight) between the two groups and episodes of confirmed (blood glucose <56 mg/dL) minor or major maternal hypoglycemia. Results: There was no statistically significant difference among the two groups in terms of incidence of macrosomia that is., it was 5.1%, 8.9% in GDM, pre-GDM group, respectively. Conclusions: Insulin aspart was found safe in pregnancy, however, more studies with double-blind, standard controlled studies are required to confirm the findings of this study. PMID:26425478

  6. Influence of exercise intervention on gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Wang, H; Ren, M

    2017-04-12

    Exercise intervention might be a promising approach to prevent gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the results remained controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the effect of exercise intervention on gestational diabetes mellitus. PubMed, EMbase, Web of science, EBSCO, and Cochrane library databases were systematically searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of exercise intervention on gestational diabetes mellitus were included. Two investigators independently searched articles, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies. The primary outcome was the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm birth, and gestational age at birth. Meta-analysis was performed using random-effect model. Five RCTs involving 1872 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with control intervention, exercise intervention was found to significantly reduce the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (std. mean difference 0.62; 95% CI 0.43-0.89; P = 0.01), but demonstrated no influence on preterm birth (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.44-1.99; P = 0.86), gestational age at birth (std. mean difference -0.03; 95% CI -0.12 to 0.07; P = 0.60), glucose 2-h post-OGTT (std. mean difference -1.02; 95% CI -2.75 to 0.71; P = 0.25), birth weight (std. mean difference -0.10; 95% CI -0.25 to 0.04; P = 0.16), Apgar score less than 7 (OR 0.78; 95% CI 0.21-2.91; P = 0.71), and preeclampsia (OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.53-2.07; P = 0.88). Compared to control intervention, exercise intervention was found to significantly reduce the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus, but had no significant influence on preterm birth, gestational age at birth, glucose 2-h post-OGTT, birth weight, Apgar score less than 7, and preeclampsia.

  7. A Predictive Metabolic Signature for the Transition From Gestational Diabetes Mellitus to Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Allalou, Amina; Nalla, Amarnadh; Prentice, Kacey J; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Ming; Dai, Feihan F; Ning, Xian; Osborne, Lucy R; Cox, Brian J; Gunderson, Erica P; Wheeler, Michael B

    2016-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects 3-14% of pregnancies, with 20-50% of these women progressing to type 2 diabetes (T2D) within 5 years. This study sought to develop a metabolomics signature to predict the transition from GDM to T2D. A prospective cohort of 1,035 women with GDM pregnancy were enrolled at 6-9 weeks postpartum (baseline) and were screened for T2D annually for 2 years. Of 1,010 women without T2D at baseline, 113 progressed to T2D within 2 years. T2D developed in another 17 women between 2 and 4 years. A nested case-control design used 122 incident case patients matched to non-case patients by age, prepregnancy BMI, and race/ethnicity. We conducted metabolomics with baseline fasting plasma and identified 21 metabolites that significantly differed by incident T2D status. Machine learning optimization resulted in a decision tree modeling that predicted T2D incidence with a discriminative power of 83.0% in the training set and 76.9% in an independent testing set, which is far superior to measuring fasting plasma glucose levels alone. The American Diabetes Association recommends T2D screening in the early postpartum period via oral glucose tolerance testing after GDM, which is a time-consuming and inconvenient procedure. Our metabolomics signature predicted T2D incidence from a single fasting blood sample. This study represents the first metabolomics study of the transition from GDM to T2D validated in an independent testing set, facilitating early interventions. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  8. Transient gestational diabetes insipidus: report of two cases and review of pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    El-Hennawy, A S; Bassi, T; Koradia, N; Bocirnea, A

    2003-11-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder characterized by polyuria and polydipsia due to the inability of the kidneys to concentrate urine. We report two cases of transient gestational diabetes insipidus in which patients responded to intranasal DDAVP (1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin) with greater than 50% increase in urine osmolality and marked reduction in urine output. Intranasal DDAVP was discontinued after their discharge and both patients maintained normal urine output and appropriate urine osmolality. In determining whether diabetes insipidus is present in a patient who is polyuric and hypernatremic, a urine osmolality below that of the plasma suggests the presence of diabetes insipidus. Understanding of the pathophysiology may soon lead to improved methods of prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

  9. Modelling effective diagnosis of risk complications in gestational diabetes mellitus: an e-diabetic expert system for pregnant women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedevi, E.; Vijaya Lakshmi, K.; Chaitanya Krishna, E.; Padmavathamma, M.

    2012-04-01

    Diabetes is a chronic illness that requires continuous medical care and patient self-management education to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications. This paper deals with study and development of algorithm to develop an initial stage expert system to provide diagnosis to the pregnant women who are suffering from Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) by means of Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT).

  10. Metabolic syndrome independently predicts future diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam H; Ahn, Chang Ho; Moon, Joon Ho; Kwak, Soo Heon; Choi, Sung Hee; Lim, Soo; Park, Kyong Soo; Metzger, Boyd E; Jang, Hak C

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an established predisposing condition for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, it is not thoroughly evaluated whether MetS increases the risk of T2DM in women with a previous history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who already at high risk of T2DM compared with the general population. We investigated the impact of MetS on the development of postpartum diabetes in women with a history of GDM.This was a multicenter, prospective cohort study of women diagnosed with GDM. The follow-up evaluations, including the oral glucose tolerance test, were completed at 6 weeks postpartum and annually thereafter. MetS was diagnosed at the initial postpartum evaluation according to the revised criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III. The risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the follow-up period was analyzed based on the presence of MetS, and the adjusted risk was calculated using a Cox proportional hazards model.A total of 412 women without diabetes at the initial postpartum evaluation participated in the annual follow-up for median 3.8 years. MetS was prevalent in 66 (19.2%) women at the initial postpartum evaluation. The incidences of diabetes in women with and without MetS were 825 and 227 per 10,000 person-years, respectively (P < 0.001). The presence of MetS was an independent risk factor for T2DM, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.23 (95% confidence interval 1.04-5.08) in multivariate analysis after adjustment for clinical and metabolic parameters. When we considered MetS and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) separately, women with MetS, IFG, or both had an increased risk of T2DM, with HRs of 4.17, 4.36, and 6.98, respectively.The presence of MetS during the early postpartum period is an independent risk factor for the development of T2DM in women with a previous history of GDM.

  11. [Gestational diabetes mellitus: data from outpatient department for women for years 1994-1998].

    PubMed

    Kanadys, W M; Oleszczuk, J

    1999-10-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus. This study involved analysis of data collected prospectively from a cohort of women who received prenatal care from Outpatient Department for Women, from 1994 to 1998. The population consisted of 1017 pregnant women. It is a group of patients living mainly in geographical area, including Czechów district in Lublin. Therefore, it represents quantitative relations characteristics in natural conditions of the place of residence of a larger group of municipality population. Glucose challenge test (GCT) according to indications of Experts Team of Polish Diabetologic Society in early diagnostics of gestational diabetes melitus--a 50-g loading dose of glucose and 1-h test was considered abnormal if value was 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L). Patients with abnormal GCT underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (GTT) according to criteria the World Health Organization, e.g., venous plasma glucose 2 h after 75 g oral glucose load > 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L). From patients screened for GDM between 24 and 28 wk gestation, 59 (5.8%) showed an abnormal GCT and from these 18 (1.8%) had an abnormal GTT. The testing sequence was repeated in 32 wk gestation among patients with normal GTT after an abnormal GCT and 1 had abnormal GTT. Incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus is shown to be 1.9%.

  12. Maternal pre-pregnancy and gestational diabetes, obesity, gestational weight gain, and risk of cancer in young children: a population-based study in California.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Zuelma A; Ritz, Beate; Virk, Jasveer; Cockburn, Myles; Heck, Julia E

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to examine the influence of pre-pregnancy diabetes, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational diabetes, and gestational weight gain on childhood cancer risk in offspring. We identified cancer cases (n = 11,149) younger than age 6 years at diagnosis from the California Cancer Registry registered between 1988 and 2013. Controls (n = 270,147) were randomly sampled from California birth records, and frequency matched by year of birth to all childhood cancers during the study period. Exposure and covariate information were extracted from birth records. Unconditional logistic regression models were generated to assess the importance of pre-pregnancy diabetes, pre-pregnancy BMI, gestational diabetes, and gestational weight gain on childhood cancer risk. We observed increased risks of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Wilms' tumor in children of mothers with pre-pregnancy diabetes [odds ratio (OR) 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.37 (1.11, 1.69); OR (95 % CI) 1.45 (0.97, 2.18), respectively]. When born to mothers who were overweight prior to pregnancy (BMI 25-<30), children were at increased risk of leukemia [OR (95 % CI) 1.27 (1.01, 1.59)]. Insufficient gestational weight gain increased the risk of acute myeloid leukemia [OR (95 % CI) 1.50 (0.92, 2.42)] while excessive gestational weight gain increased the risk of astrocytomas [OR (95 % CI) 1.56 (0.97, 2.50)]. No associations were found between gestational diabetes and childhood cancer risk in offspring. We estimated elevated risks of several childhood cancers in the offspring of mothers who had diabetes and were overweight prior to pregnancy, as well as mothers who gained insufficient or excessive weight. Since few studies have focused on these factors in relation to childhood cancer, replication of our findings in future studies is warranted.

  13. Diagnosis a posteriori? Assessing gestational diabetes screening and management in Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Utz, Bettina; Assarag, Bouchra; Essolbi, Amina; Barkat, Amina; Benkaddour, Yassir Ait; De Brouwere, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Background In Morocco, gestational diabetes affects 1 in 10 pregnant women, but knowledge about screening and management practices outside university settings is limited. Objective To provide a comprehensive picture about the current situation of screening and management of gestational diabetes at different levels of care and to highlight existing challenges. Design We conducted a descriptive mixed methods study in the districts of Al Haouz and Marrakech by using both quantitative and qualitative methods, including document reviews of 369 antenatal cards and 299 hospital files, health facility inventories related to resource availability, 20 key informant interviews as well as focus group discussions with 32 pregnant women and exit interviews with 122 antenatal care (ANC) clients. Quantitative data were descriptively analyzed using STATA Version 13, whereas qualitative data were thematically analyzed using NVIVO Version 10. Results The findings revealed that sensitization of women about gestational diabetes is low, and only 34.4% have ever heard about it before attending ANC. Fasting blood sugar is used for screening, and women are sent to external laboratories for testing. A fasting blood sugar of 0.92 g/l and above was documented in 12.3% of all antenatal cards examined. Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes are usually referred to a specialist despite general practitioners at health center level being responsible for the management of non-pregnant diabetic patients. Conclusions Decentralization of screening for gestational diabetes and initial management of uncomplicated cases at the primary level of care could ease access to care and reduce the number of mothers who are diagnosed after a complication occurred. PMID:27863534

  14. Gestational diabetes influences retinal Muller cells in rat’s offspring

    PubMed Central

    Tabasi, Akramsadat; Ghafari, Soraya; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Shekari, Majid Asadi; Golalipour, Mohammad Jafar

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): The Muller cell is the principal glial cell of the vertebrate retina. The expression of Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the Muller cells was used as a cellular marker for retinal damage. This study was done to evaluate the effect of gestational diabetes on retinal Muller cells in rat’s offspring. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 12 Wistar rat dams were randomly allocated in control and diabetic groups. Gestational diabetes was induced by 40 mg/kg/body weight of streptozotocin at the first day of gestation, intraperitoneally. Dams in control group received an equivalent volume normal saline. Eye of six offspring of each group were removed at postnatal day 28 (P28). The histopathological changes in retina were examined through H&E staining and ultrastructure transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The expression of GFAP was examined using Immunohisto-chemical staining of GFAP in Muller cells. Photographs of retina were taken using Olympus BX51 microscope and a digital camera DP12 and EM LEO906; Zeiss, Germany. Results: In the control rat’s offspring, GFAP expression was not significant in Muller cells. According to the optical microscope images, GFAP expression was observed in the processes of the Muller cell in the inner plexiform layer of retina in offspring of diabetic mothers. In TEM technique, nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic bodies were observed in Muller cell of diabetic offspring. Conclusion: This study showed that the uncontrolled gestational diabetes can increase GFAP expression in Muller cells and retinal thickness of retinal layer in rat offspring’s, therefore uncontrolled gestational can damage the Muller cells. PMID:28293400

  15. Trends and Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Gestational Diabetes Among Pregnant Women in New York City, 1990–2001

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Lorna E.; Berger, Diana; Ellis, Jennifer A.; Bettegowda, Vani R.; Brown, Gina; Matte, Thomas; Bassett, Mary; Frieden, Thomas R.

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed gestational diabetes mellitus trends in New York City between 1990 and 2001 by using information obtained from birth certificates. Gestational diabetes diagnoses among women who delivered babies increased 46%, from 2.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]=2.5, 2.7) to 3.8% (95% CI=3.7, 3.9) of births. Prevalence was highest among South and Central Asian women (11%). Given risks for adverse fetal outcomes and maternal chronic diabetes, prompt screening is critical. Metabolic control should be maintained during pregnancy and assessed postpartum for women with gestational diabetes. PMID:16051928

  16. Factors associated with diabetes mellitus prediction among pregnant Arab subjects with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Aljohani, Naji; Al Serehi, Amal; Ahmed, Amjad M; Buhary, Badr Aldin M; Alzahrani, Saad; At-Taras, Eeman; Almujally, Najla; Alsharqi, Maha; Alqahtani, Mohammed; Almalki, Mussa

    2015-01-01

    There is scarcity of available information on the possible significant risk factors related to diabetes mellitus (DM) prediction among expectant Saudi mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The present study is the first to identify such risk factors in the Arab cohort. A total of 300 pregnant subjects (mean age 33.45 ± 6.5 years) were randomly selected from all the deliveries registered at the Obstetrics Department of King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh Saudi Arabia from April 2011 to March 2013. Demographic and baseline glycemic information were collected. A total of 7 highly significant and independent risk factors were identified: age, obesity, and family history of DM, GDM < 20 weeks, macrosomia, insulin therapy and recurrent GDM. Among these factors, subjects who had insulin therapy use are 5 times more likely to develop DMT2 (p-value 3.94 × 10(-14)) followed by recurrent GDM [odds-ratio 4.69 (Confidence Interval 2.34-4.84); P = 1.24 × 10(-13)). The identification of the risk factors mentioned with their respective predictive powers in the detection of DMT2 needs to be taken seriously in the post-partum assessment of Saudi pregnant patients at highest risk.

  17. A Korean version of the Appraisal of Diabetes Scale (ADS-K): psychometric evaluation with a population of Koreans with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hyun; Lee, Young Whee; Lee, Kwan-Woo; Nam, Moonsuk; Kim, Yong Seong; Han, Seung Jin

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Appraisal of Diabetes Scale (ADS) in Korean patients with Type 2 diabetes. The English-language version of the ADS was translated into Korean using a forward-and-backward translation technique. The Korean version of the ADS (ADS-K) was administered to 250 patients who were recruited from two university hospitals. The data were analyzed using principal-component analysis, Cronbach's alpha, analysis of variance, t test, and Pearson's correlation. Six of seven items were meaningfully clustered into a two-factor structure by principal-component analysis, these factors accounting for 63.75% of the total variance. The underlying structure was consistent regardless of either gender or the presence of complications. The Cronbach's alpha of the subscales ranged from .71 to .79, indicating an acceptable internal consistency reliability. As hypothesized, the ADS-K score was moderately correlated with the diabetes-specific quality of life and had satisfactory convergent validity. The known-groups validity of the ADS-K was established using depression groups and HbA1c control status. The ADS-K demonstrated good psychometric properties. In addition, it possessed satisfactory practical properties, such as acceptability and feasibility. Therefore, the ADS-K appears to be suitable for use in both clinical research and clinical practice. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Elemental contents in serum of pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinsong; Tan, Mingguang; Huang, Zongzhi; Sheng, Liqin; Ge, Yongxin; Zhang, Hongde; Jiang, Mingli; Zhang, Guilin

    2002-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by hyperglycemia and is closely related to trace elements. Quite a few pregnant women suffer from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Investigation of the changes of elemental contents in serum of the pregnant women with IGT and GDM is significant in the etiological research and cure of the diseases. In the present work, the elements Cu, Zn, Ca, Sr, Mg, P, Fe, and Al in the serum of pregnant women were determined. The elemental contents in different experimental groups were compared. Also, the correlation between elemental contents and gestational period was observed. The results showed that compared with normal pregnant women, the Cu contents in serum of pregnant women with GDM increased, but Zn contents had a decreasing trend. In addition, for all pregnant women, the Ca contents in serum had an obvious inverse correlation with gestational period.

  19. Understanding Cultural Issues in Diabetes Self-Management Behaviors of Korean Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eun Seok; Yang, Kyeongra; Lee, Jia; Min, Jiwon; Kim, Kevin H.; Dunbar, Sandra B.; Jennings, Bonnie Mowinski

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore potential factors affecting self-management behaviors in Korean immigrants with type 2 diabetes mellitus (KIT2Ds). Methods A qualitative descriptive design guided this study. Semi-structured interviews lasting 45-60 minutes were conducted with 20 KIT2Ds in the participant’s preferred language; in all cases this was Korean. Each interview was audio-taped, transcribed, and analyzed using conventional content analysis. Data analysis was performed in two steps. The data written in Korean were initially analyzed by three bilingual researchers. A qualitative researcher then participated in the analysis to refine the findings for presentation to an English speaking audience while staying true to the data and preserving the nuanced Korean meanings. Results The mean age of the sample was 64. 5 ± 11.6 years (9 men and 11 women). The mean years of staying in the U. S. and age at diabetes mellitus diagnosis were 23.6 ± 9.7 years and 52.5 ± 12.3 years, respectively. Three major ideas were identified: (a) issues on treatment regimen related to both medications and diet, (b) resources that helped or hindered their ability to manage diabetes, and (c) the physician/patient relationship. Conclusions There were important cultural nuances that need to be addressed to better prepare KIT2Ds to manage their diabetes more effectively. A culture specific program should extend beyond a diabetes self-management education delivered in Korean language. Rather, content and education methods need to consider acculturation effects on diabetes management behaviors. PMID:23019236

  20. Prenatal exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus as an independent risk factor for long-term neuropsychiatric morbidity of the offspring.

    PubMed

    Nahum Sacks, Kira; Friger, Michael; Shoham-Vardi, Ilana; Abokaf, Hanaa; Spiegel, Efrat; Sergienko, Ruslan; Landau, Daniella; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-09-01

    The reported rates of gestational diabetes mellitus are constantly escalating and little is known about long-term complications in the offspring. Evidence from the field of epigenetics strongly advocates the need for research on the neuropsychiatric complications in offspring prenatally exposed to gestational diabetes mellitus. We sought to assess whether in utero exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus increases the risk of long-term neuropsychiatric morbidity in the offspring. A population-based cohort study compared the incidence of hospitalizations due to neuropsychiatric disease between singletons exposed and unexposed to gestational diabetes mellitus. Deliveries occurred in the years 1991 through 2014 in a regional tertiary medical center. Perinatal deaths, multiple gestations, mothers with pregestational diabetes or lack of prenatal care, and children with congenital malformations were excluded from the study. A multivariate generalized estimating equation logistic regression model analysis was used to control for confounders and for maternal clusters. During the study period 231,271 deliveries met the inclusion criteria; 5.4% of the births were to mothers diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (n = 12,642), of these 4.3% had gestational diabetes type A1 (n = 10,076) and 1.1% had gestational diabetes type A2 (n = 2566). During the follow-up period, a significant linear association was noted between the severity of the gestational diabetes (no gestational diabetes, gestational diabetes mellitus A1, gestational diabetes mellitus A2) and neuropsychiatric disease of the offspring (1.02% vs 1.36% vs 1.68%, respectively, P < .001). A Kaplan-Meier curve demonstrated that children born to women with gestational diabetes mellitus had higher cumulative incidence of neuropsychiatric morbidity. Using a generalized estimating equation multivariable logistic regression model, controlling for time-to-event, maternal age, gestational age at delivery, maternal

  1. Gestational Diabetes and Preeclampsia in Association with Air Pollution at Levels below Current Air Quality Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, Kristina; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna; Rylander, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Background: Several studies have estimated associations between air pollution and birth outcomes, but few have evaluated potential effects on pregnancy complications. Objective: We investigated whether low-level exposure to air pollution is associated with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. Methods: High-quality registry information on 81,110 singleton pregnancy outcomes in southern Sweden during 1999–2005 was linked to individual-level exposure estimates with high spatial resolution. Modeled exposure to nitrogen oxides (NOx), expressed as mean concentrations per trimester, and proximity to roads of different traffic densities were used as proxy indicators of exposure to combustion-related air pollution. The data were analyzed by logistic regression, with and without adjusting for potential confounders. Results: The prevalence of gestational diabetes increased with each NOx quartile, with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.69 (95% CI: 1.41, 2.03) for the highest (> 22.7 µg/m3) compared with the lowest quartile (2.5–8.9 µg/m3) of exposure during the second trimester. The adjusted OR for acquiring preeclampsia after exposure during the third trimester was 1.51 (1.32, 1.73) in the highest quartile of NOx compared with the lowest. Both outcomes were associated with high traffic density, but ORs were significant for gestational diabetes only. Conclusion: NOx exposure during pregnancy was associated with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia in an area with air pollution levels below current air quality guidelines. PMID:23563048

  2. Food Perceptions and Concerns of Aboriginal Women Coping with Gestational Diabetes in Winnipeg, Manitoba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, Hannah Tait

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe how Aboriginal women in an urban setting perceive dietary treatment recommendations associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Design: Semi-structured explanatory model interviews explored Aboriginal women's illness experiences with GDM. Setting and Participants: Twenty-nine self-declared Aboriginal women who had…

  3. Food Perceptions and Concerns of Aboriginal Women Coping with Gestational Diabetes in Winnipeg, Manitoba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, Hannah Tait

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe how Aboriginal women in an urban setting perceive dietary treatment recommendations associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Design: Semi-structured explanatory model interviews explored Aboriginal women's illness experiences with GDM. Setting and Participants: Twenty-nine self-declared Aboriginal women who had…

  4. Urinary incontinence and vaginal squeeze pressure two years post-cesarean delivery in primiparous women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Angélica Mércia Pascon; Dias, Adriano; Marini, Gabriela; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos; Witkin, Steven; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of urinary incontinence and associated vaginal squeeze pressure in primiparous women with and without previous gestational diabetes mellitus two years post-cesarean delivery. METHODS: Primiparous women who delivered by cesarean two years previously were interviewed about the delivery and the occurrence of incontinence. Incontinence was reported by the women and vaginal pressure evaluated by a Perina perineometer. Sixty-three women with gestational diabetes and 98 women without the disease were screened for incontinence and vaginal pressure. Multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate the independent effects of gestational diabetes. RESULTS: The prevalence of gestational incontinence was higher among women with gestational diabetes during their pregnancies (50.8% vs. 31.6%) and two years after a cesarean (44.8% vs. 18.4%). Decreased vaginal pressure was also significantly higher among women with gestational diabetes (53.9% vs. 37.8%). Maternal weight gain and newborn weight were risk factors for decreased vaginal pressure. Maternal age, gestational incontinence and decreased vaginal pressure were risk factors for incontinence two years after a cesarean. In a multivariate logistic model, gestational diabetes was an independent risk factor for gestational incontinence. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of incontinence and decreased vaginal pressure two years post-cesarean were elevated among women with gestational diabetes compared to women who were normoglycemic during pregnancy. We confirmed an association between gestational diabetes mellitus and a subsequent decrease of vaginal pressure two years post-cesarean. These results may warrant more comprehensive prospective and translational studies. PMID:21915481

  5. Prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus in Europe: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Eades, Claire E; Cameron, Dawn M; Evans, Josie M M

    2017-07-01

    Estimates of the prevalence of gestational diabetes vary widely. It is important to have a clear understanding of the prevalence of this condition to be able to plan interventions and health care provision. This paper describes a meta-analysis of primary research data reporting the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus in the general pregnant population of developed countries in Europe. Four electronic databases were systematically searched in May 2016. English language articles reporting gestational diabetes mellitus prevalence using universal screening in general pregnant population samples from developed countries in Europe were included. All papers identified by the search were screened by one author, and then half screened independently by a second author and half by a third author. Data were extracted by one author. Values for the measures of interest were combined using a random effects model and analysis of the effects of moderator variables was carried out. A total of 3258 abstracts were screened, with 40 studies included in the review. Overall prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus was 5.4% (3.8-7.8). Maternal age, year of data collection, country, area of Europe, week of gestation at testing, and diagnostic criteria were found to have a significant univariate effect on GDM prevalence, and area, week of gestation at testing and year of data collection remained statistically significant in multivariate analysis. Quality category was significant in multivariate but not univariate analysis. This meta-analysis shows prevalence of GDM that is at the upper end of previous estimates in Europe. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Macrosomia Predictors in Infants Born to Cuban Mothers with Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jeddú; Grandía, Raiden; Padilla, Liset; Rodríguez, Suilbert; Hernández García, Pilar; Lang Prieto, Jacinto; Márquez-Guillén, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    INTRODUCTION Fetal macrosomia is the most important complication in infants of women with diabetes, whether preconceptional or gestational. Its occurrence is related to certain maternal and fetal conditions and negatively affects maternal and perinatal outcomes. The definitive diagnosis is made at birth if a newborn weighs >4000 g. OBJECTIVE Identify which maternal and fetal conditions could be macrosomia predictors in infants born to Cuban mothers with gestational diabetes. METHODS A case-control study comprising 236 women with gestational diabetes who bore live infants (118 with macrosomia and 118 without) was conducted in the América Arias University Maternity Hospital, Havana, Cuba, during 2002-2012. The dependent variable was macrosomia (birth weight >4000 g). Independent maternal variables included body mass index at pregnancy onset, overweight or obesity at pregnancy onset, gestational age at diabetes diagnosis, pregnancy weight gain, glycemic control, triglycerides and cholesterol. Fetal variables examined included third-semester fetal abdominal circumference, estimated fetal weight at ≥28 weeks (absolute and percentilized by Campbell and Wilkin, and Usher and McLean curves). Chi square was used to compare continuous variables (proportions) and the student t test (X ± SD) for categorical variables, with significance threshold set at p <0.05. ORs and their 95% CIs were calculated. RESULTS Significant differences between cases and controls were found in most variables studied, with the exception of late gestational diabetes diagnosis, total fasting cholesterol and hypercholesterolemia. The highest OR for macrosomia were for maternal hypertriglyceridemia (OR 4.80, CI 2.34-9.84), third-trimester fetal abdominal circumference >75th percentile (OR 7.54, CI 4.04-14.06), and estimated fetal weight >90th percentile by Campbell and Wilkin curves (OR 4.75, CI 1.42-15.84) and by Usher and McLean curves (OR 8.81, CI 4.25-18.26). CONCLUSIONS Most variables assessed

  7. Are the new IADPSG criteria for gestational diabetes useful in a country with a very high prevalence?

    PubMed

    Minsart, Anne-Frederique; N'guyen, Thai-Son Pierre; Dimtsu, Hirut; Ratsimandresy, Rachel; Dada, Fouad; Ali Hadji, Rachid

    2014-09-01

    The International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups released new recommendations on screening methods and diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes. The main objectives of the present study were to analyze characteristics of mothers who underwent the new screening test, and to assess the prevalence of gestational diabetes and related pregnancy complications such as the 5-minute Apgar score <7, in a urban maternity clinic in Djibouti. The effect of treating gestational diabetes was also evaluated. Totally, 231 mothers underwent the new screening test, and 106 were diagnosed as having gestational diabetes (45.9%). Mothers with gestational diabetes had an excess risk of low Apgar scores, even after adjustment for socio-economic and medical covariates, with an odds ratio of 6.34 (1.77-22.66), p value <0.005. Only 46.2% of mothers with gestational diabetes followed the recommendations regarding treatment. Among these patients, 18.6% of infants from untreated mothers had a 5-minute Apgar score <7, compared to 3.9% infants from treated mothers (p value = 0.017). After adjustment, untreated mothers still had a high excess risk of low Apgar scores, although non-significant, with an odds ratio of 4.67 (0.78-27.87), p value = 0.09. In conclusion, gestational diabetes is highly prevalent in Djibouti and is related to low Apgar scores.

  8. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor Pro12Ala polymorphism and the risks of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihong; Xu, Wenting; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-λ (PPAR-λ) is a member of nuclear receptor superfamily and acts as a ligand-dependent transcription factor often found in the adrenal gland, the spleen, and adipose tissue. The Pro12Ala polymorphism of PPAR-λ has been associated with the risks of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM); however, association studies have provided conflicting results. The aim of this Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) compliant meta-analysis is to reach a more up-to-date and accurate estimation of the relationship between Pro12Ala genetic polymorphisms and the risks of GDM. Methods: Eligible studies were retrieved by searching PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Ovid, WanFang, and Chinese National Knowledge Databases and selected according to a pre-defined inclusion criterion. The risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa quality assessment scale. The per-allele odds ratio (OR) of risk allele proline (Pro) was compared between cases and controls in each study to describe the association between the Pro allele and an individual's risk of GDM. The ORs were pooled using both the random-effects model (the DerSimonian and Laird method) and the fixed effects model (the Mantel-Haenszel method) and the 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was calculated using Woolf method. Results: The final meta-analysis included a total of 11 articles of 12 data sets consisting of 7054 controls and 2980 GDM cases. Our results demonstrate that the Pro allele is not associated with GDM [OR: across multiple populations, 95% CI: 0.98–1.24; P(Z) = 0.01; P(Q) = 0.003]. In the stratified analysis by ethnicity, significantly increased risks were found for the Chinese (OR = 2.36; 95% CI: 1.47–3.78) and Korean (OR = 1.39; 95% CI: 1.00–1.93) populations. Conclusion: These data suggest the potential role of Pro allele in the pathogenesis of GDM in Asian populations. Although the funnel plot

  9. Pre-Conception Dyslipidemia Is Associated with Development of Preeclampsia and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Baumfeld, Yael; Novack, Lena; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Sheiner, Eyal; Henkin, Yakov; Sherf, Michael; Novack, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The association between glucose intolerance, elevated blood pressure and abnormal lipid levels is well established and comprises the basis of metabolic syndrome pathophysiology. We hypothesize that abnormal preconception lipid levels are associated with the increased risk of severe pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes mellitus. Methods We included all singleton deliveries (n = 27,721) of women without known cardiovascular morbidity and preeclampsia and gestational diabetes mellitus during previous pregnancies. Association between preconception low high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc level≤50 mg/dL), high triglycerides (level≥150 mg/dL) and the primary outcome (composite of gestational diabetes mellitus/or preeclampsia) was assessed using Generalized Estimation Equations. Results Primary outcome of preeclampsia and/or gestational diabetes was observed in a total of 3,243 subjects (11.7%). Elevated triglycerides and low HDLc were independently associated with the primary outcome: with odds ratio (OR) of 1.61 (95% CI 1.29–2.01) and OR = 1.33 (95% CI 1.09–1.63), respectively, after adjusting for maternal age, weight, blood pressure, repeated abortions, fertility treatments and fasting glucose. There was an interaction between the effects of HDLc≤50 mg/dL and triglycerides≥150 mg/dL with an OR of 2.69 (95% CI 1.73–4.19). Conclusions Our analysis showed an increased rate of preeclampsia and/or gestational diabetes in women with low HDLc and high triglycerides values prior to conception. In view of the severity of these pregnancy complications, we believe this finding warrants a routine screening for the abnormal lipid profile among women of a child-bearing age. PMID:26452270

  10. A hospital based study of prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus in an urban population of India.

    PubMed

    Jali, M V; Desai, B R; Gowda, S; Kambar, S; Jali, S M

    2011-11-01

    A cross-sectional institutional-based study was undertaken to know the prevalence of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) among Indian pregnant women. 325 pregnant women were screened for evidence of diabetes who were previously not known to be diabetic. They underwent 75 g, 2 hour, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Chi-square test was done for statistically association of variables in GDM. The results of this study indicate that bad obstetrics history, obese patient on high calorie diet especially non vegetarian diet with less physical activity are highly prone to develop GDM.

  11. Diagnostic protocol for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (IADPSG/ADA, 2011): influence on the occurrence of GDM and mild gestational hyperglycemia (MGH) and on the perinatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sirimarco, Mariana Pinto; Guerra, Helena Maciel; Lisboa, Eduardo Guimarães; Vernini, Joice Monalisa; Cassetari, Bianca Nicolosi; de Araujo Costa, Roberto Antonio; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; de Mattos Paranhos Calderon, Iracema

    2017-01-01

    In August 2011, the Specialized Center for Diabetes and Pregnancy of the Botucatu Medical School/Unesp adopted a new diagnostic protocol for gestational diabetes mellitus, recommended by the American Diabetes Association and the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Group. The glycemic profile was evaluated using the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) used to diagnose mild gestational hyperglycemia, recognized and treated in our department as gestational diabetes mellitus. The cost-effectiveness of the new guidelines and the continued need for the evaluation of the glycemic profile, as part of our Service protocol, are controversial and require further investigation. We aimed to assess the impact of the new guidelines on the evaluation of mild gestational hyperglycemia and gestational diabetes mellitus, the incidence of adverse perinatal outcomes, and the association between the 75-g OGTT and the glycemic profile for the diagnosis of mild gestational hyperglycemia. This cross-sectional study was performed identifying a convenience sample of pregnant women and their newborns. The women used our Service for diagnostic procedures, prenatal care and delivery, both before (January 2008 to August 14, 2011) and after (August 15, 2011 to December 2014) the protocol modification. The following variables were compared, following stratification according to diagnostic protocol: prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus and mild gestational hyperglycemia, newborns large for gestational age, macrosomia, first cesarean delivery, and newborn hospital stay. Statistical analysis was performed using Poisson regression, the Student's t test, the Chi square or Fisher's exact test and risk estimate. The statistical significance threshold was set at 95% (p < 0.05). The new protocol resulted in an 85% increase in the number of women with GDM, but failed to identify 17.3% of pregnant women classified as having mild gestational hyperglycemia, despite a

  12. The potential impact of new diagnostic criteria on the frequency of gestational diabetes mellitus in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Claesson, Rickard; Ekelund, Magnus; Berntorp, Kerstin

    2013-10-01

    The International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) has suggested new diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus. Many centers in Europe still use the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. In southern Sweden we use the 2-h threshold of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes criteria based on universal screening with a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. We have retrospectively scrutinized oral glucose tolerance tests in a subset of 174 women included in a previous study, diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus 1996-1999. A complete repeat oral glucose tolerance test was performed directly after diagnosis in 120 women. When applying the current Swedish criteria, and the IADPSG and the WHO criteria to the material, gestational diabetes mellitus was confirmed in 67% (80/120), 84% (101/120), and 80% (96/120), respectively. Hence, 26% (101/80) more women were identified by the IADPSG criteria and 20% (96/80) more women by the WHO criteria, compared with the criteria presently in use.

  13. Postpartum glucose tolerance in women with gestational diabetes using levonorgestrel intrauterine contraception.

    PubMed

    Kiley, Jessica W; Hammond, Cassing; Niznik, Charlotte; Rademaker, Alfred; Liu, Dachao; Shulman, Lee P

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum contraception is critical in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We evaluated the effect of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on glucose tolerance in postpartum women with GDM. The study is a descriptive analysis of 12-month glucose tolerance in women with recent GDM who used the LNG-IUS, the copper IUD or postpartum sterilization. Twelve months postpartum, 3 of 13 LNG-IUS users (23.1%) and 1 of 6 nonhormonal contraceptive users (16.6%) had prediabetes. No woman developed overt diabetes. This study is the first and only to measure the metabolic effects of the LNG-IUS women with GDM. Larger trials are necessary. Use of levonorgestrel intrauterine contraception does not appear to negatively affect glucose tolerance in postpartum women with a history of gestational diabetes. Additional appropriately powered clinical studies are needed to confirm these results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of lifestyle interventions in the prevention of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Ilana J; Feig, Denice S

    2014-01-01

    Gestational diabetes is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, increased costs, and long-term risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the mother. Observational data have shown an association between reduced weight gain, healthy eating, and physical activity and reduced rates of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Despite this, most randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions to prevent GDM have been negative. Dietary approaches appear to be more successful than exercise or a combination of diet and exercise at decreasing GDM. Reasons for negative studies may include lack of power, lack of intervention uptake, and severity of placenta mediated insulin resistance. Future studies should be powered for a reduction in GDM, monitor lifestyle changes closely, and include a psychological component in the intervention.

  15. Who's responsible for the care of women during and after a pregnancy affected by gestational diabetes?

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Shelley A; Lim, Siew S; Upham, Susan; Pennington, Andrew; O'Reilly, Sharleen L; Asproloupos, Dino; McIntyre, H David; Dunbar, James A

    2014-08-04

    Despite its increasing incidence and high conferred risk to women and their children, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is managed inconsistently during and after pregnancy due to an absence of a systemic approach to managing these women. New guidelines for GDM testing and diagnosis are based on stronger evidence, but raise concerns about increased workloads and confusion in a landscape of multiple, conflicting guidelines. Postnatal care and long-term preventive measures are particularly fragmented, with no professional group taking responsibility for this crucial role. Clearer guidelines and assistance from existing frameworks, such as the National Gestational Diabetes Register, could enable general practitioners to take ownership of the management of women at risk of type 2 diabetes following GDM, applying the principles of chronic disease management long term.

  16. Association of Periodontitis With Urinary Albumin Excretion in Korean Adults With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyungdo; Nam, Ga Eun; Kim, Do Hoon; Park, Jun-Beom; Ko, Youngkyung; Roh, Yong Kyun; Cho, Kyung Hwan; Park, Yong Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Albuminuria and periodontitis are both commonly associated with systemic inflammation. However, the association between urinary albumin excretion (UAE) and periodontitis in patients with type 2 diabetes has not been fully investigated. This study aimed to investigate the association between UAE and periodontitis in Korean adults with type 2 diabetes. This study performed a cross-sectional analysis and used hierarchical multivariable logistic regression analysis models. Data from the 2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. A total of 547 patients, with type 2 diabetes without renal impairment, were included in this study. UAE was assessed using the urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR). A community periodontal index greater than or equal to code 3 was used to define periodontitis. The risk of periodontitis tended to increase as UACR increased even after adjustment for potential confounders (P for trend in the odds ratios = 0.05 in model 1; 0.02 in model 2; and 0.01 in model 3). In a subgroup analysis, the prevalence of periodontitis was significantly higher in the patients with albuminuria (UACR >30 mg/g) than in those without albuminuria among patients younger than 65 years (P = 0.03), those with newly diagnosed diabetes (P = 0.04), or those without obesity (P = .04). UAE was positively associated with the risk of periodontitis in Korean adults with type 2 diabetes. In the patients who were younger, were newly diagnosed with diabetes, or had normal body mass index, individuals with albuminuria were more likely to have a higher prevalence of periodontitis. Early identification of periodontitis may be helpful in Korean diabetic adults with increased UAE. PMID:26496329

  17. Depression among Korean Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Ansan-Community-Based Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Young; Kim, So Young; Gil, Jong Won; Park, Min Hee; Park, Jong-Hyock; Kim, Yeonjung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There are an increasing number of studies being carried out on depression in patients with diabetes. Individuals with diabetes have been reported as having a higher prevalence of depression compared to those without diabetes. However, only a few studies involving Korean patients have been conducted. The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence of depression and to find various risk factors according to the degree of depression among Korean patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods An Ansan-community-based epidemiological study was conducted from 2005 to 2012. The total number of participants in this study was 3,540, from which patients with diabetes (n = 753) have been selected. The presence of depression was evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory total score. Results The prevalence of depression was 28.8%. The mean age of participants was 55.5 ± 8.2 years. We divided the participants into three groups (without-depression, moderate-depression, and severe-depression groups) to examine the depression prevalence among Korean T2DM patients. The unemployed participants had 2.40 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21–4.76], the low-income participants had 2.57 (95% CI 1.52–4.35), the participants using an oral diabetes medicine or insulin had 2.03 (95% CI 1.25–3.32), the participants who are currently smoking had 2.03 (95% CI 1.10–3.73), and those without regular exercise had 1.91 (95% CI 1.17–3.14) times higher odds of depression in the severe-depression group, compared with the without-depression group. Conclusion There was a significant association between depression prevalence and diabetes, and we found various risk factors according to the degree of depression in Korean patients with T2DM. PMID:26473089

  18. Comparison of maternal morbidity and medical costs during pregnancy and delivery between patients with gestational diabetes and patients with pre-existing diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Son, K H; Lim, N-K; Lee, J-W; Cho, M-C; Park, H-Y

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effects of gestational diabetes and pre-existing diabetes on maternal morbidity and medical costs, using data from the Korea National Health Insurance Claims Database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. Methods Delivery cases in 2010, 2011 and 2012 (459 842, 442 225 and 380 431 deliveries) were extracted from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database. The complications and medical costs were compared among the following three pregnancy groups: normal, gestational diabetes and pre-existing diabetes. Results Although, the rates of pre-existing diabetes did not fluctuate (2.5, 2.4 and 2.7%) throughout the study, the rate of gestational diabetes steadily increased (4.6, 6.2 and 8.0%). Furthermore, the rates of pre-existing diabetes and gestational diabetes increased in conjunction with maternal age, pre-existing hypertension and cases of multiple pregnancy. The risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension, urinary tract infections, premature delivery, liver disease and chronic renal disease were greater in the gestational diabetes and pre-existing diabetes groups than in the normal group. The risk of venous thromboembolism, antepartum haemorrhage, shoulder dystocia and placenta disorder were greater in the pre-existing diabetes group, but not the gestational diabetes group, compared with the normal group. The medical costs associated with delivery, the costs during pregnancy and the number of in-hospital days for the subjects in the pre-existing diabetes group were the highest among the three groups. Conclusions The study showed that the rates of pre-existing diabetes and gestational diabetes increased with maternal age at pregnancy and were associated with increases in medical costs and pregnancy-related complications. PMID:25472691

  19. Women’s experiences of factors that facilitate or inhibit gestational diabetes self-management

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes rates have increased dramatically in the past two decades and this pattern of increase appears to relate primarily to the obesity epidemic, older maternal age and migration from world areas of high GDM risk. Women from disadvantaged and migrant backgrounds are most at risk of developing and of mismanaging this condition. The aim of the study was to explore the factors that facilitated or inhibited gestational diabetes self-management among women in a socially deprived area. Methods Fifteen pregnant women, with a diagnosis of gestational diabetes, were purposively recruited for this study. Qualitative semi structured interviews and 1 focus group were conducted when participants were approximately 28–38 weeks gestation. The study’s theoretical framework was based on interpretative phenomenology and data was analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Women in this study identified a number of factors that complicated their task of GDM self-management. Barriers included: (1) time pressures; (2) physical constraints; (3) social constraints; (4) limited comprehension of requirements, and (5) insulin as an easier option. Factors facilitating GDM self-management included: thinking about the baby and psychological support from partners and families. Conclusion Women from low socio economic and migrant backgrounds often struggle to comprehend GDM self-management requirements. To improve adherence to management plans, these women require educational and supportive services that are culturally appropriate and aimed at a low level of literacy. PMID:22988897

  20. Zinc and selenium levels in women with gestational diabetes mellitus at Medani Hospital, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, H Z; Elbashir, L M; Hamdan, S Z; Elhassan, E M; Adam, I

    2014-10-01

    Gestational diabetes is a common medical disorder in pregnancy. There is a growing body of evidence of the association between zinc, selenium status and diabetes mellitus during pregnancy. A case-control study was conducted at Medani Hospital, Sudan, to compare zinc and selenium levels in pregnant women with gestational diabetes and normal pregnant women (controls). The two groups (31 in each arm) were well-matched in age, parity, gestational age, haemoglobin and body mass index. Zinc and selenium levels were measured using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. There were no significant differences in the median (interquartile) zinc (498.9 [395-703] vs 486.4 [404-667] μg/l, p = 0.905) and selenium (164.4 [61-415] vs 204 [68-541] μg/l, p = 0.838) values between the two groups. There were no significant correlations between zinc and selenium, or between these trace elements and body mass index, gestational age and blood glucose levels.

  1. Effects of treatment in women with gestational diabetes mellitus: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Karl; Koch, Klaus; Jeitler, Klaus; Matyas, Eva; Bender, Ralf; Bastian, Hilda; Lange, Stefan; Siebenhofer, Andrea

    2010-04-01

    To summarise the benefits and harms of treatments for women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Embase, Medline, AMED, BIOSIS, CCMed, CDMS, CDSR, CENTRAL, CINAHL, DARE, HTA, NHS EED, Heclinet, SciSearch, several publishers' databases, and reference lists of relevant secondary literature up to October 2009. Review methods Included studies were randomised controlled trials of specific treatment for gestational diabetes compared with usual care or "intensified" compared with "less intensified" specific treatment. Five randomised controlled trials matched the inclusion criteria for specific versus usual treatment. All studies used a two step approach with a 50 g glucose challenge test or screening for risk factors, or both, and a subsequent 75 g or 100 g oral glucose tolerance test. Meta-analyses did not show significant differences for most single end points judged to be of direct clinical importance. In women specifically treated for gestational diabetes, shoulder dystocia was significantly less common (odds ratio 0.40, 95% confidence interval 0.21 to 0.75), and one randomised controlled trial reported a significant reduction of pre-eclampsia (2.5 v 5.5%, P=0.02). For the surrogate end point of large for gestational age infants, the odds ratio was 0.48 (0.38 to 0.62). In the 13 randomised controlled trials of different intensities of specific treatments, meta-analysis showed a significant reduction of shoulder dystocia in women with more intensive treatment (0.31, 0.14 to 0.70). Treatment for gestational diabetes, consisting of treatment to lower blood glucose concentration alone or with special obstetric care, seems to lower the risk for some perinatal complications. Decisions regarding treatment should take into account that the evidence of benefit is derived from trials for which women were selected with a two step strategy (glucose challenge test/screening for risk factors and oral glucose

  2. Strategies to Optimize Participation in Diabetes Prevention Programs following Gestational Diabetes: A Focus Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Kaberi; Da Costa, Deborah; Pillay, Sabrina; De Civita, Mirella; Gougeon, Réjeanne; Leong, Aaron; Bacon, Simon; Stotland, Stephen; Chetty, V. Tony; Garfield, Natasha; Majdan, Agnieszka; Meltzer, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Objective We performed a qualitative study among women within 5 years of Gestational Diabetes (GDM) diagnosis. Our aim was to identify the key elements that would enhance participation in a type 2 diabetes (DM2) prevention program. Research Design and Methods Potential participants received up to three invitation letters from their GDM physician. Four focus groups were held. Discussants were invited to comment on potential facilitators/barriers to participation and were probed on attitudes towards meal replacement and Internet/social media tools. Recurring themes were identified through qualitative content analysis of discussion transcripts. Results Among the 1,201 contacted and 79 eligible/interested, 29 women attended a focus group discussion. More than half of discussants were overweight/obese, and less than half were physically active. For DM2 prevention, a strong need for social support to achieve changes in dietary and physical activity habits was expressed. In this regard, face-to-face interactions with peers and professionals were preferred, with adjunctive roles for Internet/social media. Further, direct participation of partners/spouses in a DM2 prevention program was viewed as important to enhance support for behavioural change at home. Discussants highlighted work and child-related responsibilities as potential barriers to participation, and emphasized the importance of childcare support to allow attendance. Meal replacements were viewed with little interest, with concerns that their use would provide a poor example of eating behaviour to children. Conclusions Among women within 5 years of a GDM diagnosis who participated in a focus group discussion, participation in a DM2 prevention program would be enhanced by face-to-face interactions with professionals and peers, provision of childcare support, and inclusion of spouses/partners. PMID:23861824

  3. A medical nutrition therapy program improves perinatal outcomes in Mexican pregnant women with gestational diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Balas-Nakash, Margie; Parra-Covarrubias, Adalberto; Rodriguez-Cano, Ameyalli; Ramirez-Torres, Aurora; Ortega-González, Carlos; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes in pregnancy is a major public health problem in Mexico. Nutrition therapy is an important component of treatment. Intensive nutrition intervention has not been implemented for Mexican pregnant women with diabetes. Its effect on different types of diabetes mellitus has not been studied. The authors assessed the effect of a medical nutrition therapy (MNT) program on perinatal complications in Mexico City. Quasi-experimental design with a historical control. Women were assigned to a MNT program (n = 88) and were followed up with every 2 weeks until delivery (2004-2007). The control group (n = 86) was selected from medical charts (2001-2003) and the same inclusion criteria were used. In each group, 55% of women had type 2 diabetes mellitus and 45% had gestational diabetes. The MNT program included a moderate intake of carbohydrate (40%-45% of total energy) and reduction in energy intake, capillary glucose self-monitoring, and education. The control group received usual hospital routine care. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, chi-square, and multivariate logistic regression (OR, 95% CI) as indicated. Women in the MNT program had a lower risk of preeclampsia, fewer maternal hospitalization, and neonatal deaths in both types of diabetes. Low birth weight was less frequent only in women with gestational diabetes receiving MNT, while neonatal intensive care unit admissions were lower only in women with type 2 diabetes. An intensive MNT program, including counseling, education, and capillary glucose self-monitoring, has a positive effect over preeclampsia, maternal hospitalization, and neonatal death in women with diabetes in pregnancy. MNT guidelines should be implemented in Mexican health care facilities treating diabetes in pregnancy.

  4. Periodontitis and type 2 diabetes among women with previous gestational diabetes: epidemiological and immunological aspects in a follow-up of three years

    PubMed Central

    ESTEVES LIMA, Rafael Paschoal; COTA, Luis Otávio Miranda; SILVA, Tarcília Aparecida; CORTELLI, Sheila Cavalca; CORTELLI, José Roberto; COSTA, Fernando Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Periodontitis can contribute to the development of insulin resistance. Gestational diabetes is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Therefore, periodontitis, when associated with gestational diabetes, could increase the risk for the development of type 2 diabetes after pregnancy. Objective The aim of this study was to verify the incidence on the development of type 2 diabetes in women with previous gestational diabetes with and without periodontitis after a three-year time interval. Material and Methods Initial sample of this follow-up study consisted of 90 women diagnosed with gestational diabetes who underwent periodontal examination. After three years, 49 women were subjected to new periodontal examination and biological, behavioral, and social data of interest were collected. Additionally, the quantification of the C-reactive protein in blood samples was performed. Fasting glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels were requested. Saliva samples were collected for quantification of interleukin 6 and 10, tumor necrosis factor α, matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9. Results The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus was 18.4% and of periodontitis was 10.2%. There was no significant difference in the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus among women with and without periodontitis. It was observed impact of C-reactive protein in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, it was not observed impact of periodontitis on the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus among women with previous gestational diabetes. Conclusions It was not observed impact of periodontitis on the development of type 2 diabetes among women with previous gestational diabetes. The impact of C-reactive protein in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus highlights the importance of an inflammatory process in the diabetes pathogenesis. PMID:28403353

  5. ENDOCRINOLOGY OF PREGNANCY: Gestational diabetes mellitus: definition, aetiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Baz, Baz; Riveline, Jean-Pierre; Gautier, Jean-François

    2016-02-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) is defined as a glucose intolerance resulting in hyperglycaemia of variable severity with onset during pregnancy. This review aims to revisit the pathogenesis and aetiology of GDM in order to better understand its clinical presentation and outcomes. During normal pregnancy, insulin sensitivity declines with advancing gestation. These modifications are due to placental factors, progesterone and estrogen. In a physiological situation, a compensatory increase in insulin secretion maintains a normal glucose homeostasis. GDM occurs if pancreatic β-cells are unable to face the increased insulin demand during pregnancy. GDM is most commonly a forerunner of type 2 diabetes (T2D) - the most prevalent form of diabetes. These women share similar characteristics with predisposed subjects to T2D: insulin resistance before and after pregnancy, and carry more T2D risk alleles. Auto-immune and monogenic diabetes are more rare aetiologies of GDM. Adverse pregnancy outcomes of GDM are mainly related to macrosomia caused by fetal hyperinsulinism in response to high glucose levels coming from maternal hyperglycaemia. Screening recommendations and diagnosis criteria of GDM have been recently updated. High risk patients should be screened as early as possible using fasting plasma glucose, and if normal, at 24-28 weeks of gestation using 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. The treatment of GDM is based on education with trained nurses and dieticians, and if necessary insulin therapy.

  6. Role of patient education level in predicting macrosomia among women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chung, J H; Voss, K J; Caughey, A B; Wing, D A; Henderson, E J D; Major, C A

    2006-06-01

    To evaluate the role of education level in predicting the risk of macrosomia among women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Women with gestational diabetes, who were referred to the California Diabetes and Pregnancy Sweet Success Program between June 2001 and December 2002, were included in the study. Multiple logistic regression was used estimate the risk of macrosomia, defined as a birth weight >4000 g. Compared to college-educated women, high school- and middle school-educated women were 21% (relative risk (RR), 1.21; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.01-1.44) and 35% (RR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.09-1.70) more likely to deliver a macrosomic infant, respectively. Gestational diabetics with a lower level of educational attainment appear to have an increased risk of macrosomia. Future studies are necessary to determine whether this finding reflects a variation in adherence to recommended treatments by education/literacy level, or if it is a surrogate marker for intrinsic, biological differences or differences in lifestyle.

  7. Alpha-tocopherol concentration in serum and colostrum of mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Fernanda Barros S.; Clemente, Heleni Aires; Bezerra, Dalila Fernandes; Grilo, Evellyn Câmara; de Melo, Larisse Rayanne M.; Bellot, Paula Emília N. R.; Dantas, Raquel Costa S.; Dimenstein, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare the levels of α-tocopherol in colostrum and in the serum of healthy and diabetic mothers. METHODS: This cross-sectional study enrolled 51 volunteer mothers, 20 with the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus and 31 without associated diseases. Serum and colostrum samples were collected in fasting in the immediate postpartum period and α-tocopherol was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In order to define the nutritional status of vitamin E, the cutoff point for the serum (697.7µg/dL) was adopted. Student's t-test for independent variables compared the average concentrations of α-tocopherol in the serum and in the colostrum between control and gestational diabetes mellitus groups. Pearson's correlation was used to assess the relationship between the concentration of α-tocopherol in serum and colostrum for both groups. Differences were considered significant when p<0.05. RESULTS: The α-tocopherol concentration in colostrum was 1,483.1±533.8µg/dL for Control Group and 1,368.8±681.8µg/dL for diabetic women, without differences between groups (p=0.50). However, α-tocopherol concentration in the serum was 1,059.5±372.7µg/dL in the Control Group and 1,391.4±531.5µg/dL in the diabetic one (p<0.01). No correlation was found between the concentration of α-tocopherol in the serum and in the colostrum for control and diabetic groups. CONCLUSIONS: The groups had adequate nutritional status of vitamin E. Gestational diabetes was not associated with changes in α-tocopherol concentration in colostrum. PMID:25119748

  8. Neurodevelopmental outcome at early school age of children born to mothers with gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ornoy, A; Wolf, A; Ratzon, N; Greenbaum, C; Dulitzky, M

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To study the metabolic derangements in the second half of pregnancy caused by gestational diabetes, on the long term development of children.
METHODS—The neuropsychological function of 32 school age children born to 32 mothers with well controlled gestational diabetes and 57 control children matched by age, birth order, and parental socioeconomic status was studied.
RESULTS—There were no differences in head circumference and height, but the children born to diabetic mothers were heavier. The verbal IQ scores of index children below the age of 9 years were lower than those of control children. No differences were found between the groups in various sensory and motor functions and in the Touwen and Prechtl neurological test. The young index group children performed less well than controls in fine and gross motor functions, as observed on the Bruininks-Oseretzky test of motor proficiency. The scores of young children born to mothers with gestational diabetes were also lower than controls on the Pollack tapper test, and there were more index group children who scored abnormally on the parents' Conners questionnaire. No correlation was found between the performance of the index group children on various neurodevelopmental tests and the severity of perinatal complications. The differences tended to disappear with age.
CONCLUSIONS—Gestational diabetes, as a result of the metabolic abnormalities in the second half of pregnancy, induces long term minor neurological deficits which are more pronounced in younger children. There does not seem to be any direct relation between the appearance of congenital anomalies and neurodevelopmental outcome.

 PMID:10375355

  9. Perinatal outcomes in gestational diabetes in relation to ethnicity in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Kosman, M W M; Eskes, S A; van Selst, J; Birnie, E; van Gemund, N; Karsdorp, V H M; Roeters van Lennep, J E; Castro Cabezas, M

    2016-01-01

    The influence of ethnicity in women with gestational diabetes in relation to maternal, pregnancy and neonatal outcome is not well defined. To compare the perinatal outcome in women with gestational diabetes between different ethnic groups reflecting the multi-ethnic population in the Netherlands. Patients with gestational diabetes (n = 388) who visited the multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for Diabetes Care and Obstetrics of the Sint Franciscus Gasthuis in Rotterdam between 2010 and 2013 were included. Ethnicity was distinguished into six groups: Moroccan (n = 100); Turkish (n = 43); Caucasian (n = 146); Suriname-Creole (n = 23); Suriname-Hindu (n = 32); and Miscellaneous (n = 44). Caucasians were the largest group with gestational diabetes (37.7%), followed by Moroccans (25.8%). Body mass index before pregnancy was highest in Surinamese-Creole women, followed by Turks and Moroccans (p < 0.001). Gravidity and parity were highest in Moroccans. Gravidity was lowest in Surinamese-Hindus and parity was lowest in Caucasians (p < 0.001). There was also a remarkable, significant difference in the mode of delivery between the ethnicities with the lowest number of normal deliveries in Caucasians and the highest in Moroccans (p = 0.03). Assisted delivery occurred most frequently in Caucasian women, although there was no difference in the frequency of caesarean sections. Birth weight was the only neonatal parameter showing significant differences between the ethnicities, with the highest birth weight for Moroccan children and the lowest for Surinamese children (3542 g vs. 3200; p = 0.001). This study did not show major differences in maternal or neonatal complications, however there are significant disparities in (percentile) birth weight and mode of delivery across the different ethnic groups.

  10. Current status of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Korea: report of a hospital-based study of type 2 diabetic patients in Korea by the diabetic neuropathy study group of the korean diabetes association.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong Chul; Kim, Sang Soo; Ko, Kyung Soo; Cha, Bong-Yun

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is the most common complication associated with diabetes. DPN can present as a loss of sensation, may lead to neuropathic ulcers, and is a leading cause of amputation. Reported estimates of the prevalence of DPN vary due to differences in study populations and diagnostic criteria. Furthermore, the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of DPN in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are not as well understood as those of other complications of diabetes such as retinal and renal disease. Recently, the Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of the Korean Diabetes Association (KDA) conducted a study investigating the impact of DPN on disease burden and quality of life in patients with T2DM and has published some data that are representative of the nation. This review investigated the prevalence and associated clinical implications of DPN in Korean patients with diabetes based on the KDA study.

  11. The Association of Family History of Premature Cardiovascular Disease or Diabetes Mellitus on the Occurrence of Gestational Hypertensive Disease and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong-Ju; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Heesun; Ahn, So-Yeon; Oh, Kyung Joon; Park, Hyun-Young; Lee, Hea Young; Cho, Myeong Chan; Chung, Ick-Mo; Shin, Mi-Seung; Park, Sung-Ji; Shim, Chi Young; Han, Seong Woo; Chae, In-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Gestational hypertensive diseases (GHD) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life. However, the association between gestational medical diseases and familial history of CVD has not been investigated to date. In the present study, we examined the association between familial history of CVD and GHD or GDM via reliable questionnaires in a large cohort of registered nurses. Methods The Korean Nurses’ Survey was conducted through a web-based computer-assisted self-interview, which was developed through consultation with cardiologists, gynecologists, and statisticians. We enrolled a total of 9,989 female registered nurses who reliably answered the questionnaires including family history of premature CVD (FHpCVD), hypertension (FHH), and diabetes mellitus (FHDM) based on their medical knowledge. Either multivariable logistic regression analysis or generalized estimation equation was used to clarify the effect of positive family histories on GHD and GDM in subjects or at each repeated pregnancy in an individual. Results In this survey, 3,695 subjects had at least 1 pregnancy and 8,783 cumulative pregnancies. Among them, 247 interviewees (6.3%) experienced GHD and 120 (3.1%) experienced GDM. In a multivariable analysis adjusted for age, obstetric, and gynecologic variables, age at the first pregnancy over 35 years (adjusted OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.02–2.43) and FHpCVD (adjusted OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.16–2.22) were risk factors for GHD in individuals, whereas FHH was not. FHDM and history of infertility therapy were risk factors for GDM in individuals (adjusted OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.86–3.86; 1.84, 95% CI 1.05–3.23, respectively). In any repeated pregnancies in an individual, age at the current pregnancy and at the first pregnancy, and FHpCVD were risk factors for GHD, while age at the current pregnancy, history of infertility therapy, and FHDM were risk factors for GDM. Conclusions The FHpCVD and FHDM are

  12. [Gestational diabetes and the new screening test's impact].

    PubMed

    Massa, Ana Catarina; Rangel, Ricardo; Cardoso, Manuela; Campos, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: Em 2011, foi introduzido um novo rastreio para a diabetes gestacional que permitiu um diagnóstico mais precoce e de maior número de casos com o intuito de reduzir complicações maternas e perinatais. O objectivo deste estudo foi avaliar a prevalência da diabetes gestacional, comparar resultados obstétricos e perinatais do anterior e presente rastreio e os resultados e realização da prova de reclassificação pós-parto. Material e Métodos: Estudo retrospectivo em gestações simples e diabetes gestacional diagnosticados em 2009 (n = 223) e 2012 (n = 237), vigiadas na Maternidade Dr. Alfredo da Costa, Portugal. Após consulta de processos clínicos procedeu-se à análise de características demográficas, história médica e obstétrica, aumento ponderal durante a gravidez, idade gestacional do diagnóstico, terapêutica utilizada, resultados perinatais e reclassificação pós-parto, seguida de comparação destas variáveis entre os anos de 2009 e 2012. Resultados: Em 2012, houve maior prevalência de diabetes gestacional, ganho ponderal inferior (p < 0,001), maior recurso à terapêutica farmacológica (p < 0,001) e aumento dos casos diagnosticados no primeiro e segundo trimestres (p < 0,001). Relativamente aos resultados neonatais, o peso médio do recém-nascido ao nascer foi significativamente menor (p = 0,001) com diminuição dos recém-nascidos grandes para a idade gestacional (p = 0,002). A taxa de reclassificação pós-parto foi semelhante nos dois anos mas em 2012 houve um aumento dos resultados normais e diminuição das anomalias da glicémia em jejum. Discussão: Critérios mais apertados do actual rastreio permitiram a redução da maioria das complicações da diabetes gestacional levantando novas questões. Conclusão: A introdução do actual rastreio resultou num aumento de prevalência, diagnóstico mais precoce e redução da macrossomia.

  13. Variation in Postpartum Glycemic Screening in Women With a History of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, Emma Morton; LeCates, Robert Franklin; Zhang, Fang; Wharam, James Franklin; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Oken, Emily

    2016-07-01

    To assess patterns and predictors of postpartum diabetes screening in a commercially insured, geographically and sociodemographically diverse sample of women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Using commercial insurance claims (2000-2012) from all 50 states, we conducted a retrospective cohort study in 447,556 women with at least one delivery and continuous enrollment 1 year before and after delivery. We identified women with a gestational diabetes mellitus pregnancy and examined postpartum diabetes screening type and timing and performed logistic regression to identify screening predictors. Gestational diabetes mellitus was diagnosed in 32,253 (7.2%) women during the study timeframe. Three fourths received no screening within 1 year postpartum. Rates of recommended 75-g oral glucose tolerance testing within 6-12 weeks were low but increased over time (27 [2%] in 2001 compared with 249 [7%] in 2011, adjusted odds ratio [OR] 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.0-47). Among women screened, those in the Northeast (19%) and South (18%) were least likely to receive a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test within 0-12 weeks (adjusted OR 0.4 for each, CI 0.4-0.5) compared with the West (36%). Asian women were most likely to receive any screening (18%; adjusted OR 1.5, CI 1.3-1.6) compared with white women (12%). Black women were most likely to receive hemoglobin A1c (21%; adjusted OR 2.0, CI 1.3-3.2) compared with white women (11%). Antepartum antiglycemic medication (21%; adjusted OR 2.1, CI 2.0-2.3) or visit to a nutritionist-diabetes educator (19%; adjusted OR 1.6, CI 1.4-1.7) or endocrinologist (23%; adjusted OR 1.7, CI 1.6-1.9) predicted screening within 12 weeks postpartum. Postpartum diabetes screening remains widely underused among commercially insured women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Differences in screening by geography, race, and antepartum care can inform health system and public health interventions to increase diabetes detection in this high

  14. Intergenerational transmission of macrosomia in women with gestational diabetes and normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ogonowski, J; Miazgowski, T

    2015-12-01

    It has been suggested that neonatal macrosomia may contribute to increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in later life. Much less is known about the association between maternal birth weight (MBW) and offspring birth weight (OBW). This retrospective study evaluated the prevalence of macrosomia in women with treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and normal glucose tolerance during pregnancy. The study also investigated associations between MBW and OBW. Medical records of 519 pregnant women with treated GDM and 766 women with normal glucose tolerance, referred to the Gestational Diabetes Outpatient Clinic in Szczecin, Poland, were analyzed. The following data were assessed: maternal age, pregravid body weight, height, gestational weight gain, prior GDM, prior macrosomia, MBW and OBW. Birth weight was classified as small for gestational age (SGA), appropriate for gestational age (AGA), large for gestational age (LGA) and macrosomia (≥4000g). OBW was obtained from birth certificates, and MBW was obtained from birth certificates or self-report. The overall prevalence of macrosomia was 8.1%, and was comparable in subgroups of women with and without GDM (7.7% and 8.4%, respectively; p=0.905). The frequencies of SGA, AGA and LGA did not differ between study groups. A positive correlation was found between MBW and OBW in women with treated GDM (r=0.211, p<0.001) and in women with normal glucose tolerance (r=0.220, p<0.001). Regardless of glucose tolerance status during pregnancy, the greatest proportion of macrosomic babies were born to mothers who were themselves born macrosomic (26.5% in mothers with GDM and 20.0% in mothers with normal glucose tolerance; p=0.631). On logistic regression, MBW was found to be a robust predictor of macrosomia in offspring [odds ratio (OR) 1.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-2.36 in women with treated GDM; OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.07-1.76 in women with normal glucose tolerance). Other independent predictors of fetal macrosomia

  15. [Development of a Psychological Insulin Resistance Scale for Korean Patients with Diabetes].

    PubMed

    Song, Youngshin; Jeon, Younghee; Cho, Jeonghwa; Kim, Bohyun

    2016-12-01

    This study was done to develop and validate a measure to evaluate the Korean version of psychological insulin resistance (K-PIR) in patients with diabetes in Korea. Items were initially generated from literature reviews and interviews with 19 patients with diabetes. The content validity of the items was evaluated by experts. Participants were 424 patients with diabetes recruited through convenience sampling. A cross-sectional survey was designed for item-analysis, exploratory factor analysis with principal axis factoring, and confirmatory factor analysis. Cronbach's alpha was calculated to measure the internal consistency. For the 24 items of the Korean version of psychological insulin resistance, six items were eliminated because of low correlation with the other items. Exploratory factor analysis with 18-item showed that two factors (psycho-cognitive factor and supportive factor) explained 41.8% of the variance, and the factor structure of K-PIR model had a good fit. Internal consistency of K-PIR with 18 items revealed good reliability. The findings show that the K-PIR is reliable for measuring the psychological resistance to insulin therapy for Korean patients with diabetes. However, further study is needed to evaluate the validation because the proportion of variation of K-PIR was low in this study.

  16. Variation in Excessive Fetal Growth across Levels of Prenatal Care among Women with Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hale, Nathan L; Probst, Janice C; Liu, Jihong; Bennett, Kevin J; Martin, Amy Brock; Glover, Saundra

    2011-10-01

    Examine the association between prenatal care and excessive fetal growth outcomes among mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We conducted a retrospective analysis of 2004-2007 singleton live births to South Carolina women, limited to those for whom both birth certificate and hospital discharge data were available (N = 179 957). Gestational diabetes mellitus was identified from birth certificate and/or hospital discharge claims. Measures of excessive fetal growth were large for gestational age (90th and 95th percentiles) and macrosomia (birth weight > 4500 g). The Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization index was used to measure prenatal care. Gestational diabetes mellitus was recorded for 6.9% of women in the study population. Women with GDM were more likely than other women to have an infant with excessive fetal growth, regardless of the level of prenatal care; however, there was a significant interaction between GDM status and levels of prenatal care. All women with GDM had increased odds for large infant outcomes. However, those receiving inadequate prenatal care were markedly more likely to experience excessive fetal growth outcomes (odds ratio = 1.38, confidence interval = 1.15-1.66) than women also with GDM and intermediate/adequate prenatal care. Similar patterns were noted for large for gestational age (95th) and macrosomia (total birth weight ≥ 4500 g). Observed associations suggest a link between inadequate prenatal care and a higher risk for excessive fetal growth among women with GDM. Further research is needed to clarify the nature of the association and suggest ways to get high-risk women into care sooner.

  17. Predictors of cesarean delivery in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gascho, Carmem Luiza Lucht; Leandro, Danieli Mayumi Kimura; Ribeiro E Silva, Thiago; Silva, Jean Carl

    2017-02-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate which risk factors may lead patients with gestational diabetes mellitus to cesarean delivery. Methods This was a retrospective, descriptive study. The subjects of the study were pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus attending a public maternity hospital in the south of Brazil. The primary outcomes assessed were based on maternal and fetal characteristics. The data were correlated using an odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (95%CI), calculated using multinomial logistic regression. Results A total of 392 patients with gestational diabetes mellitus were analyzed, and 57.4% of them had cesarean deliveries. Among the maternal characteristics, the mean age of the patients and the pregestational body mass index were greater when a cesarean delivery was performed (p = 0.029 and p < 0.01 respectively). Gestational age at birth, newborn weight, weight class according to gestational age, and Apgar score were not significant. The analysis of the OR showed that the chance of cesarean delivery was 2.25 times (95%CI = 1.49-2.39) greater if the pregnant woman was obese, 4.6 times (95%CI = 3.017-7.150) greater if she was a primigravida, and 5.2 times (95%CI = 2.702-10.003) greater if she had a previous cesarean delivery. The other parameters analyzed showed no differences. Conclusion The factors that led to an increase in the occurrence of cesarean deliveries included history of a prior cesarean section, first pregnancy, and obesity.

  18. Prescribing exercise for prevention and treatment of gestational diabetes: review of suggested recommendations.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Cristina; Battini, Lorella; Aragona, Michele; Lencioni, Cristina; Ottanelli, Serena; Romano, Matilde; Calabrese, Maria; Cuccuru, Ilaria; De Bellis, Alessandra; Mori, Mary Liana; Leopardi, Anna; Sabbatini, Gigliola; Bottone, Pietro; Miccoli, Roberto; Trojano, Giuseppe; Salerno, Maria Giovanna; Del Prato, Stefano; Bertolotto, Alessandra

    2017-04-01

    Exercise has been proved to be safe during pregnancy and to offer benefits for both mother and fetus; moreover, physical activity may represent a useful tool for gestational diabetes prevention and treatment. Therefore, all women in uncomplicated pregnancy should be encouraged to engage in physical activity as part of a healthy lifestyle. However, exercise in pregnancy needs a careful medical evaluation to exclude medical or obstetric contraindications to exercise, and an appropriate prescription considering frequency, intensity, type and duration of exercise, to carefully balance between potential benefits and potential harmful effects. Moreover, some precautions related to anatomical and functional adaptations observed during pregnancy should be taken into consideration. This review summarized the suggested recommendations for physical activity among pregnant women with focus on gestational diabetes.

  19. Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Screening Strategies in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin Yu; Finkelstein, Eric A; Ng, Mor Jack; Yap, Fabian; Yeo, George S H; Rajadurai, Victor Samuel; Chong, Yap Seng; Gluckman, Peter D; Saw, Seang Mei; Kwek, Kenneth Y C; Tan, Kok Hian

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis from the payer's perspective in Singapore of 3 gestational diabetes mellitus screening strategies: universal, targeted, or no screening. A decision tree model assessed the primary outcome: incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Probabilities, costs, and utilities were derived from the literature, the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) birth cohort study, and the KK Women's and Children's Hospital's database. Relative to targeted screening using risk factors, universal screening generates an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $USD10,630/QALY gained. Sensitivity analyses show that disease prevalence rates and intervention effectiveness of glycemic management have the biggest impacts on the ICERs. Based on the model and best available data, universal screening is a cost-effective approach for reducing the complications of gestational diabetes mellitus in Singapore as compared with the targeted screening approach or no screening.

  20. Chronic renal failure, diabetes mellitus type-II, and gestation: an overwhelming combination.

    PubMed

    Kontomanolis, E N; Panagoutsos, S; Pasadakis, P; Koukouli, Z; Liberis, A

    2016-01-01

    This case report highlights on a child-bearer with chronic renal failure and diabetes mellitus type-II. Chronic renal failure (CRF) with diabetes mellitus (DM) type I in gestation is a rare case of a high-risk pregnancy. What is of significance though in this gestation, is that conception was achieved with the patient treated by a dialysis program. Furthermore, neither hypertension nor intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) were detected and the patient was normotensive throughout gestation with no clinical signs of anemia. Strict and frequent application of the dialysis programs eradicates the uremic intrauterine environment, reduces the amniotic fluid volume, eliminates the chances of uterine rupture, leads to a longer gestation, increases the newborn's birth weight, and offers an optimal fetal survival rate; this is of note mainly in patients with cesarean sections reported in their medical history. To eliminate the complications of a premature delivery, the present authors had to find the right time point to give birth to this baby taking into account lung maturity, amniotic fluid volume, and preservation of the anatomical uterine integrity.

  1. Periodontitis and type 2 diabetes among women with previous gestational diabetes: epidemiological and immunological aspects in a follow-up of three years.

    PubMed

    Esteves Lima, Rafael Paschoal; Cota, Luis Otávio Miranda; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida; Cortelli, Sheila Cavalca; Cortelli, José Roberto; Costa, Fernando Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the incidence on the development of type 2 diabetes in women with previous gestational diabetes with and without periodontitis after a three-year time interval. Initial sample of this follow-up study consisted of 90 women diagnosed with gestational diabetes who underwent periodontal examination. After three years, 49 women were subjected to new periodontal examination and biological, behavioral, and social data of interest were collected. Additionally, the quantification of the C-reactive protein in blood samples was performed. Fasting glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels were requested. Saliva samples were collected for quantification of interleukin 6 and 10, tumor necrosis factor α, matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9. The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus was 18.4% and of periodontitis was 10.2%. There was no significant difference in the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus among women with and without periodontitis. It was observed impact of C-reactive protein in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, it was not observed impact of periodontitis on the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus among women with previous gestational diabetes. It was not observed impact of periodontitis on the development of type 2 diabetes among women with previous gestational diabetes. The impact of C-reactive protein in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus highlights the importance of an inflammatory process in the diabetes pathogenesis.

  2. Diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus in the community.

    PubMed

    Seshiah, V; Balaji, V; Shah, Siddharth N; Joshi, Shashank; Das, A K; Sahay, B K; Banerjee, Samar; Zargar, A H; Balaji, Madhuri

    2012-08-01

    Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group India (DIPSI) recommends 2-h Plasma glucose (PG) > or = 140 mg/dL with 75g oral glucose load to diagnose GDM, akin to WHO criteria. Recently, International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) recommends any one value of Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) > or = 92 mg/ dL, 1-h PG > or = 180 mg/dL or 2-h PG > or = 153 mg/dL to diagnose GDM. The objective of this study was to find out whether DIPSI guidelines could still be continued to diagnose GDM in our country, as this requires one blood test compared to three tests of IADPSG, which is expensive. Consecutive pregnant women (N = 1463) underwent 75g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The proportion of GDM was computed based on IADPSG and DIPSI criteria and the discordant pair of diagnosing GDM was examined by McNemar test. Analysis was two tailed and P-value <0.05 was considered for statistical significance. The prevalence of GDM was 14.6% (N = 214) by IADPSG criteria and 13.4% (n = 196) by DIPSI criteria. The discordant pair between the two criteria examined by McNemar's test indicated that there was no statistical significance (P = 0.21) and thereby implying a close agreement between these two procedures. DIPSI procedure is cost-effective, without compromising the clinical equipoise and can be continued to diagnose GDM in our country, as well as other less resource countries.

  3. [Programming nutritional and metabolic disorders: the diabetic environment during gestation].

    PubMed

    Motte, E; Beauval, B; Laurent, M; Melki, I; Schmit, A; Vottier, G; Mitanchez, D

    2010-01-01

    During the last years, obesity and subsequent metabolic disorders and cardiovascular diseases have tremendously increased. Recent studies have shown that risk factors of cardiovascular diseases appear as soon as in infancy. In many situations, these disorders are programmed in early life during fetal development. These observations have lead to the concept of programming. The first studies on this subject underlined the link between poor fetal growth and the risk of nutritional and metabolic disorders during adulthood. But, it is now evident that excess of fetal growth as it is observed during pregnancy with maternal diabetes leads to the same consequences. The metabolic syndrome or syndrome X is the name for a clustering of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and type II diabetes that are of metabolic origin. This syndrome, first described in the adults, is more and more studied during childhood and adolescence. Metabolic syndrome is now described in youth, particularly in subjects with risk factors as obesity. Alterations of intra-uterine environment lead to modified early development and represent short-term adaptations transmitted from one generation to another. This intergeneration effect contributes to the burden of adult metabolic disorders and cardiovascular diseases, as seen in the last decades. There is considerable evidence for the contribution of epigenetic mechanisms for the lifelong and the intergenerational alteration of gene transcription by variation in the early life environment. One of the major challenges in the following years is to promote public health programs which are aimed at prevention of long-term consequences of fetal programming.

  4. Relationship between red cell distribution width and early renal injury in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dong; Zhao, Jiangtao; Jian, Liguo; Ding, Tongbin; Liu, Shichao

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies found that red cell distribution width was related to adverse cardiovascular events. However, few studies reported the relationship between red cell distribution width and early-stage renal injury in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Using a cross-sectional design, 334 pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus were enrolled according to the criterion of inclusion and exclusion. Demographic and clinical examination data were collected. Depended on the urine albumin, study population were divided into case group (n = 118) and control group (n = 216). Compared with control group, the case group tend to be higher red cell distribution width level (13.6 ± 0.9 vs.12.5 ± 0.6, p < 0.001). The red cell distribution width was positively associated with albuminuria creatinine ratio (r = 0.567, p < 0.001). Multiple logistic regressions showed that red cell distribution width was still associated with early-stage renal injury after adjusting for many other potential cofounders. Compared with the first quartile, the risk ratio of the second, the third and the fourth quartile were 1.38 (95%CI: 1.06-1.80), 1.57 (95%CI: 1.21-2.97), 2.71 (95%CI: 2.08-3.54), respectively. Besides, systolic blood pressure, estimated glomerular filtration rate, uric acid and blood urea nitrogen were also significantly associated with renal injury in gestational diabetes mellitus patients. The elevated red cell distribution width level might be a predictor of early-stage renal injury in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus. As an easy and routine examination index, red cell distribution width may provide better clinical guidance when combined with other important indices.

  5. Exercise improves glycaemic control in women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Anne L; Shields, Nora; Taylor, Nicholas F; Frawley, Helena C

    2016-10-01

    Does exercise improve postprandial glycaemic control in women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus? A systematic review of randomised trials. Pregnant women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus. Exercise, performed more than once a week, sufficient to achieve an aerobic effect or changes in muscle metabolism. Postprandial blood glucose, fasting blood glucose, glycated haemoglobin, requirement for insulin, adverse events and adherence. This systematic review identified eight randomised, controlled trials involving 588 participants; seven trials (544 participants) had data that were suitable for meta-analysis. Five trials scored ≥ 6 on the PEDro scale, indicating a relatively low risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed that exercise, as an adjunct to standard care, significantly improved postprandial glycaemic control (MD -0.33mmol/L, 95% CI -0.49 to -0.17) and lowered fasting blood glucose (MD -0.31 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.56 to -0.05) when compared with standard care alone, with no increase in adverse events. Effects of similar magnitude were found for aerobic and resistance exercise programs, if performed at a moderate intensity or greater, for 20 to 30minutes, three to four times per week. Meta-analysis did not show that exercise significantly reduced the requirement for insulin. All studies reported that complications or other adverse events were either similar or reduced with exercise. Aerobic or resistance exercise, performed at a moderate intensity at least three times per week, safely helps to control postprandial blood glucose levels and other measures of glycaemic control in women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus. PROSPERO CRD42015019106. [Harrison AL, Shields N, Taylor NF, Frawley HC (2016) Exercise improves glycaemic control in women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.Journal of Physiotherapy62: 188-196]. Copyright © 2016 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  6. Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein change in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wen-Jin; Wang, Du-Juan; Deng, Ren-Tang; Huang, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Mei-Lian; Jang, You-Ming; Wen, Shu; Yang, Hong-Ling; Huang, Xian-zhang

    2015-09-01

    We compared urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) among non-pregnant and pregnant women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Higher urinary L-FABP was found in pregnant with and without GDM, and considerably higher urinary L-FABP was found in the GDM group compared with the non-GDM group. Hyperglycemia and anemia were related with high urinary L-FABP expression.

  7. Gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnancy outcomes among Chinese and South Asian women in Canada.

    PubMed

    Mukerji, Geetha; Chiu, Maria; Shah, Baiju R

    2013-02-01

    To determine the association between Chinese or South Asian ethnicity and adverse neonatal and maternal outcomes for women with gestational diabetes compared to the general population. A cohort study was conducted using population-based health care databases in Ontario, Canada. All 35,577 women aged 15-49 with gestational diabetes who had live births between April 2002 and March 2011 were identified. Their delivery hospitalization records and the birth records of their neonates were examined to identify adverse neonatal outcomes and adverse maternal outcomes. Compared to infants of mothers from the general population (55.5%), infants of Chinese mothers had a lower risk of an adverse outcome at delivery (42.9%, adjusted odds ratio 0.63, 95% confidence interval 0.58-0.68), whereas infants of South Asian mothers had a higher risk (58.9%, adjusted odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.23). Chinese women also had a lower risk of adverse maternal outcomes (32.4%, adjusted odds ratio 0.58, 95% confidence interval 0.54-0.63) compared to general population women (41.2%), whereas the risk for South Asian women was not different (39.4%, adjusted odds ratio 0.94, 95% confidence interval 0.88-1.02) from that of general population women. The risk of complications of gestational diabetes differs significantly between Chinese and South Asian patients and the general population in Ontario. Tailored interventions for gestational diabetes management may be required to improve pregnancy outcomes in high-risk ethnic groups.

  8. Type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes mellitus differentially impact placental pathologic characteristics of uteroplacental malperfusion.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Jennifer; Yamada, Jessica; Beauharnais, Catherine; Wenger, Julia B; Thadhani, Ravi I; Wexler, Deborah; Roberts, Drucilla J; Bentley-Lewis, Rhonda

    2015-10-01

    During a pregnancy complicated by diabetes, the placenta undergoes a number of functional and structural pathologic changes. However, differences across studies may reflect pathophysiologic differences of diabetes types under investigation. We examined placental pathology from women ages 18-40 years with self-identified race/ethnicity; singleton, live births; and type 1 (T1DM; n = 36), type 2 (T2DM; n = 37), or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM; n = 126). Clinical data were abstracted from medical records. Placental diagnoses were independently re-reviewed by a perinatal pathologist. Multivariable analyses adjusting for race, gestational weight gain, gestational age, and systolic blood pressure were conducted. Women with T1DM compared with either T2DM or GDM had higher gestational weight gain (mean ± SD, T1DM vs. T2DM: 28.5 ± 12.4 vs. 20.5 ± 13.4 kg, p = 0.03; or GDM: 21.3 ± 12.7 kg, p = 0.009) and insulin use (T2DM: 100.0% vs. 85.3%, p = 0.02; or GDM: 4.0%, p < 0.001). Women with T1DM compared with either T2DM or GDM also had a similarly lower prevalence of placental infarcts in univariate analyses; however, these findings did not remain significant after multivariable adjustment. Also, placentas from women with T2DM compared to GDM had higher rates of decidual vasculopathy when excluding women with preeclampsia (10.3 vs. 1.6%, p = 0.049) and diffuse chorangiosis (62.2 vs. 32.5%, p < 0.001) but a lower rate of villous immaturity (10.8 vs. 90.5%, p = 0.007) after full adjustment. Placental vasculopathic abnormalities differ by maternal diabetes type, potentially reflecting underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. Further research on placental pathology and metabolic derangements is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Gestational diabetes mellitus treatment reduces obesity-induced adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes: the St. Carlos gestational study

    PubMed Central

    Assaf-Balut, Carla; Familiar, Cristina; García de la Torre, Nuria; Rubio, Miguel A; Bordiú, Elena; del Valle, Laura; Lara, Miriam; Ruiz, Teresa; Ortolá, Ana; Crespo, Irene; Duran, Alejandra; Herraiz, Miguel A; Izquierdo, Nuria; Perez, Noelia; Torrejon, Maria J; Runkle, Isabelle; Montañez, Carmen; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso L

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) increase the morbidity of the mother and newborn, which could increase further should they coexist. We aimed to determine the risk of adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes associated with excess weight (EW), and within this group identify potential differences between those with and without GDM. Methods We carried out a post-hoc analysis of the St. Carlos Gestational Study which included 3312 pregnant women, arranged in 3 groups: normal-weight women (NWw) (2398/72.4%), overweight women (OWw) (649/19.6%) and obese women (OBw) (265/8%). OWw and OBw were grouped as EW women (EWw). We analyzed variables related to adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. Results The relative risk (95% CI) for GDM was 1.82 (1.47 to 2.25; p<0.0001) for OWw, and 3.26 (2.45 to 4.35; p<0.0001) in OBw. Univariate analysis showed associations of EW to higher rates of prematurity, birth weight >90th centile, newborns admitted to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), instrumental delivery and cesarean delivery (all p<0.005). Multivariate analysis, adjusted for parity and ethnicity, showed that EW increased the risk of prematurity, admission to NICU, cesarean and instrumental delivery, especially in EWw without GDM. NWw with GDM had a significantly lower risk of admission to NICU and cesarean delivery, compared with NWw without GDM. Conclusions EW is detrimental for pregnancy and neonatal outcomes, and treatment of GDM contributes to lowering the risk in EWw and NWw. Applying the same lifestyle changes to all pregnant women, independent of their weight or GDM condition, could improve these outcomes. PMID:28074143

  10. Gestational diabetes mellitus treatment reduces obesity-induced adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes: the St. Carlos gestational study.

    PubMed

    Assaf-Balut, Carla; Familiar, Cristina; García de la Torre, Nuria; Rubio, Miguel A; Bordiú, Elena; Del Valle, Laura; Lara, Miriam; Ruiz, Teresa; Ortolá, Ana; Crespo, Irene; Duran, Alejandra; Herraiz, Miguel A; Izquierdo, Nuria; Perez, Noelia; Torrejon, Maria J; Runkle, Isabelle; Montañez, Carmen; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso L

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) increase the morbidity of the mother and newborn, which could increase further should they coexist. We aimed to determine the risk of adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes associated with excess weight (EW), and within this group identify potential differences between those with and without GDM. We carried out a post-hoc analysis of the St. Carlos Gestational Study which included 3312 pregnant women, arranged in 3 groups: normal-weight women (NWw) (2398/72.4%), overweight women (OWw) (649/19.6%) and obese women (OBw) (265/8%). OWw and OBw were grouped as EW women (EWw). We analyzed variables related to adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. The relative risk (95% CI) for GDM was 1.82 (1.47 to 2.25; p<0.0001) for OWw, and 3.26 (2.45 to 4.35; p<0.0001) in OBw. Univariate analysis showed associations of EW to higher rates of prematurity, birth weight >90th centile, newborns admitted to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), instrumental delivery and cesarean delivery (all p<0.005). Multivariate analysis, adjusted for parity and ethnicity, showed that EW increased the risk of prematurity, admission to NICU, cesarean and instrumental delivery, especially in EWw without GDM. NWw with GDM had a significantly lower risk of admission to NICU and cesarean delivery, compared with NWw without GDM. EW is detrimental for pregnancy and neonatal outcomes, and treatment of GDM contributes to lowering the risk in EWw and NWw. Applying the same lifestyle changes to all pregnant women, independent of their weight or GDM condition, could improve these outcomes.

  11. PROGRAMMING OF GROWTH, INSULIN RESISTANCE AND VASCULAR DYSFUNCTION IN OFFSPRING OF LATE GESTATION DIABETIC RATS

    PubMed Central

    Segar, Emily M.; Norris, Andrew W.; Yao, Jian-Rong; Hu, Shanming; Koppenhafer, Stacia L.; Roghair, Robert D.; Segar, Jeffrey L.; Scholz, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    The offspring of diabetic mothers (ODM) have an increased risk of developing metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunction. However, few studies have focused on susceptibility to disease in offspring of mothers developing diabetes during pregnancy. We developed an animal model of late-gestation diabetic pregnancy and characterized metabolic and vascular function in the offspring. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (50 mg/kg, i.p.) in pregnant rats on gestational day 13 and partially controlled by twice-daily injections of insulin. At 2 months of age, ODM had slightly better glucose tolerance than controls (p < 0.05), however, by 6 months of age this trend reversed. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp revealed insulin resistance in male ODM (p < 0.05). In 6-8 mo old female ODM, aortas showed significantly enhanced contractility to potassium chloride (KCl), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and noradrenaline (NA). No differences in responses to endothelin-1 and noradrenaline were apparent with co-administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA). Relaxation to acetylcholine but not nitroprusside was significantly impaired in female ODM. In contrast, males displayed no between group differences in response to vasoconstrictors while relaxation to nitroprusside and acetylcholine was greater in ODM compared to control animals. Thus, development of diabetes during pregnancy programs gender specific insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction in adult offspring. PMID:19203348

  12. Programming of growth, insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction in offspring of late gestation diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Segar, Emily M; Norris, Andrew W; Yao, Jian-Rong; Hu, Shanming; Koppenhafer, Stacia L; Roghair, Robert D; Segar, Jeffrey L; Scholz, Thomas D

    2009-07-02

    ODM (offspring of diabetic mothers) have an increased risk of developing metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunction; however, few studies have focused on the susceptibility to disease in offspring of mothers developing diabetes during pregnancy. We developed an animal model of late gestation diabetic pregnancy and characterized metabolic and vascular function in the offspring. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (50 mg/kg of body weight, intraperitoneally) in pregnant rats on gestational day 13 and was partially controlled by twice-daily injections of insulin. At 2 months of age, ODM had slightly better glucose tolerance than controls (P<0.05); however, by 6 months of age this trend had reversed. A euglycaemic-hyperinsulinamic clamp revealed insulin resistance in male ODM (P<0.05). In 6-8-month-old female ODM, aortas had significantly enhanced contractility in response to KCl, ET-1 (endothelin-1) and NA (noradrenaline). No differences in responses to ET-1 and NA were apparent with co-administration of L-NNA (NG-nitro-L-arginine). Relaxation in response to ACh (acetylcholine), but not SNP (sodium nitroprusside), was significantly impaired in female ODM. In contrast, males had no between-group differences in response to vasoconstrictors, whereas relaxation to SNP and ACh was greater in ODM compared with control animals. Thus the development of diabetes during pregnancy programmes gender-specific insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction in adult offspring.

  13. Peptidome profiling of umbilical cord plasma associated with gestational diabetes-induced fetal macrosomia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Lan; Ding, Hongjuan; Huo, Ran; Shi, Zhonghua

    2016-04-29

    Fetal macrosomia, defined as a birth weight ≥4000g, may affect 15-45% of newborns of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The associations between endogenous peptides and gestational diabetes-induced macrosomia have not been investigated extensively by peptidome analysis. Here, we analyzed the umbilical cord plasma by combining ultrafiltration using molecular weight cut-off filters and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to investigate potential associations of GDM with macrosomia. As macrosomic babies have increased susceptibility to obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in later life, we also aimed to identify specific biomarkers to detect these future diseases. Thirty pairs of GDM mothers and controls were randomly divided into three subgroups. We identified 235 peptides of around 1000-3000Da, originating from 115 proteins. Analyzing the cleavage sites revealed that these peptides were cleaved in regulation, which may reflect the protease activity and distribution in umbilical cord plasma. Four identified peptides, of 2471.7, 1077.2, 1446.5 and 2372.7Da, were significantly differentially expressed in the GDM macrosomia groups compared with controls, whose precursors may play a critical role in developing GDM macrosomia. We provide for the first time a validated GDM macrosomia peptidome profile and identify potential biomarkers linking the effects of macrosomia to later-life diseases. Fetal macrosomia is the predominant adverse outcome of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), which is a frequent medical condition during pregnancy. Till now, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying gestational diabetes-induced macrosomia are still not elucidated. With high detection sensitivity and high throughput of peptidome technology, it is now possible to systemically identify peptides possibly involved in the umbilical cord plasma of GDM induced macrosomia cases. With LC-MS/MS based quantification, totally, we identified 235

  14. Windows of Opportunity for Lifestyle Interventions to Prevent Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Suzanne

    2016-11-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is linked with several acute maternal health risks and long-term development of type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Intrauterine exposure to GDM similarly increases offspring risk of early-life health complications and later disease. GDM recurrence is common, affecting 40 to 73% of women, and augments associated maternal/fetal/child health risks. Modifiable and independent risk factors for GDM include maternal excessive gestational weight gain and prepregnancy overweight and obesity. Lifestyle interventions that target diet, activity, and behavioral strategies can effectively modify body weight. Randomized clinical trials testing the effects of lifestyle interventions during pregnancy to reduce excessive gestational weight gain have generally shown mixed effects on reducing GDM incidence. Trials testing the effects of postpartum lifestyle interventions among women with a history of GDM have shown reduced incidence of diabetes and improved cardiovascular disease risk factors. However, the long-term effects of interpregnancy or prepregnancy lifestyle interventions on subsequent GDM remain unknown. Future adequately powered and well-controlled clinical trials are needed to determine the effects of lifestyle interventions to prevent GDM and identify pathways to effectively reach reproductive-aged women across all levels of society, before, during, and after pregnancy.

  15. Evaluation of DIABNET, a decision support system for therapy planning in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hernando, M E; Gómez, E J; Corcoy, R; del Pozo, F

    2000-07-01

    DIABNET is a knowledge-based system designed to aid doctors with therapy planning in gestational diabetes. The system core is a qualitative model, implemented by a Causal Probabilistic Network, that is able to detect the insulin effectiveness on a daily basis. DIABNET analyses monitoring data and proposes quantitative changes in insulin therapy and qualitative diet modifications. This paper proposes an evaluation methodology to assess the system performance when working in a real scenario. The methodology manages the absence of a gold standard and includes: a subjective analysis based on questionnaires and an objective analysis based on a quantitative comparison of the system's and experts' proposals. The paper also shows the results of two experiments in which expert diabetologists evaluated the therapeutical advice provided by DIABNET during the follow up of 9 patients with gestational diabetes. DIABNET detected the need of a therapy modification in 92% of the cases showing its appropriateness for automatic alarm generation. Around 80% of the proposals were accepted by experts. The evaluation results are encouraging and allow characterisation of the system's performance when proposing therapy modifications. Evaluation in its turn helps to refine the knowledge managed by DIABNET and enables us to look towards the further clinical use of DIABNET as a decision tool in gestational diabetes integrated in a telemedicine service.

  16. Impacts of dietary fat changes on pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiyan; Jiang, Hongyi; Yang, Liping; Zhang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the impact of increasing polyunsaturated fatty acid intake on blood glucose, lipid metabolism, and pregnancy outcomes of pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Under constant total energy and protein intake, 84 pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus were randomly divided into the experimental and control groups, which were given oil-rich and conventional low-oil meals, respectively. After the dietary intervention, the intake and energy supply of fat and the three fatty acids were significantly higher in the experimental group than the control group (p<0.001). The intake and energy supply of polyunsaturated fatty acids increased significantly post-intervention in the experimental group but did not change in the control group. In both the intervention and the control group, fasting blood glucose, 2 h postprandial plasma glucose, and the insulin resistance index decreased significantly post-intervention (p<0.05); the lipid changes were consistent between groups. Pregnancy outcomes did not differ significantly between the two groups (p>0.05). An appropriate increase in polyunsaturated fatty acid intake benefits pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus as well as fetuses, as long as the diet therapy follows basic recommendations and total energy intake is strictly controlled.

  17. Associations of lipid levels during gestation with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus: a prospective longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hong; Liu, Xiaohua; Chen, Yan; HE, Biwei; Cheng, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess associations of elevated lipid levels during gestation with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods This prospective cohort study was conducted in a tertiary maternal hospital in Shanghai, China from February to November 2014. Lipid constituents, including triglycerides (TGs), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) of 1310 eligible women were assessed in the first (10–13+ weeks), second (22–28 weeks) and third (30–35 weeks) trimesters consecutively. Associations of lipid profiles with HDP and/or GDM outcomes were assessed. Results Compared with the normal group, maternal TG concentrations were higher in the HDP/GDM groups across the three trimesters (p<0.001); TC and LDL-c amounts were only higher in the first trimester for the HDP and GDM groups (p<0.05). HDL-c levels were similar in the three groups. Compared with intermediate TG levels (25–75th centile), higher TG amounts (>75th centile) were associated with increased risk of HDP/GDM in each trimester with aORs (95% CI) of 2.04 (1.41 to 2.95), 1.81 (1.25 to 2.63) and 1.78 (1.24 to 2.54), respectively. High TG elevation from the first to third trimesters (>75th centile) was associated with increased risk of HDP, with an aOR of 2.09 (1.16 to 3.78). High TG elevation before 28 weeks was associated with increased risk of GDM, with an aOR of 1.67 (1.10 to 2.54). TG elevation was positively correlated with weight gain during gestation (R=0.089, p=0.005). Conclusions Controlling weight gain during pregnancy could decrease TG elevation and reduce the risk of HDP/GDM. TGs could be used as follow-up parameters during complicated pregnancy, while other lipids are meaningful only in the first trimester. PMID:28011814

  18. Association of recently identified type 2 diabetes gene variants with Gestational Diabetes in Asian Indian population.

    PubMed

    Kanthimathi, Sekar; Chidambaram, Manickam; Bodhini, Dhanasekaran; Liju, Samuel; Bhavatharini, Aruyerchelvan; Uma, Ram; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan; Radha, Venkatesan

    2017-06-01

    Earlier studies have provided evidence that the gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) share common genetic background. A recent genome wide association study (GWAS) showed a strong association of six novel gene variants with T2DM among south Asians but not with Europeans. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these variants that confer susceptibility to T2DM in Asian Indian population also correlate with GDM in Asian Indian population. In addition to these novel variants, three T2DM associated SNPs that were previously identified by GWAS in Caucasian populations, which also showed association with T2DM in south Indian population in our previous study were also evaluated for their susceptibility to GDM in our population. The study groups comprised unrelated pregnant women with GDM (n = 518) and pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) (n = 1220). A total of nine SNPs in or near nine loci, namely AP3S2 (rs2028299), BAZ1B (rs12056034), CDKN2A/B (rs7020996), GRB14 (rs3923113), HHEX (rs7923837), HMG20A (rs7178572), HNF4A (rs4812829), ST6GAL1 (rs16861329) and VPS26A (rs1802295) were genotyped using the MassARRAY system. Among these nine SNPs that previously showed an association with T2DM in Asian Indians, HMG20A (rs7178572) and HNF4A (rs4812829) gene variants showed a significant association with GDM. The risk alleles of rs7178572 in HMG20A and rs4812829 in HNF4A gene conferred 1.24 and 1.28 times higher risk independently and about 1.44 and 1.97 times increased susceptibility to GDM for one and two risk genotypes, respectively. We report that the HMG20A (rs7178572) and HNF4A (rs4812829) variants that have previously shown a strong association with T2DM in Asian Indians also contributes significant risk to GDM in this population. This is the first report of the association of HMG20A (rs7178572) and HNF4A (rs4812829) variants with GDM.

  19. Gestational Diabetes Alters Offspring DNA Methylation Profiles in Human and Rat: Identification of Key Pathways Involved in Endocrine System Disorders, Insulin Signaling, Diabetes Signaling, and ILK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, Sophie; Guillemin, Claire; Ergaz, Zivanit; Dimov, Sergiy; Suderman, Matthew; Weinstein-Fudim, Liza; Ornoy, Asher; Szyf, Moshe

    2015-06-01

    Gestational diabetes is associated with risk for metabolic disease later in life. Using a cross-species approach in rat and humans, we examined the hypothesis that gestational diabetes during pregnancy triggers changes in the methylome of the offspring that might be mediating these risks. We show in a gestation diabetes rat model, the Cohen diabetic rat, that gestational diabetes triggers wide alterations in DNA methylation in the placenta in both candidate diabetes genes and genome-wide promoters, thus providing evidence for a causal relationship between diabetes during pregnancy and DNA methylation alterations. There is a significant overlap between differentially methylated genes in the placenta and the liver of the rat offspring. Several genes differentially methylated in rat placenta exposed to maternal diabetes are also differentially methylated in the human placenta of offspring exposed to gestational diabetes in utero. DNA methylation changes inversely correlate with changes in expression. The changes in DNA methylation affect known functional gene pathways involved in endocrine function, metabolism, and insulin responses. These data provide support to the hypothesis that early-life exposures and their effects on metabolic disease are mediated by DNA methylation changes. This has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  20. Lifestyle patterns in early pregnancy linked to gestational diabetes mellitus diagnoses when using IADPSG criteria. The St Carlos gestational study.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Gracia, Teresa; Duran, Alejandra; Fuentes, Manuel; Rubio, Miguel A; Runkle, Isabelle; Carrera, Evelyn F; Torrejón, María J; Bordiú, Elena; Valle, Laura Del; García de la Torre, Nuria; Bedia, Ana R; Montañez, Carmen; Familiar, Cristina; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso L

    2016-06-01

    Early-pregnancy lifestyle (EPL) could influence the development of gestational diabetes mellitus(GDM), depending on the diagnostic criteria used. We studied EPL in 1750 pregnant women using Carpenter-Coustan criteria(CCc), and in 1526 with the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria(IADPSGc). GDM risk factors were assessed in women between 24 and 28 weeks of gestational age during two consecutive years. A semiquantitative frequent-food-consumption questionnaire was used to evaluate lifestyle during pregnancy. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess GDM risk with different lifestyle patterns. Using IADPSGc, the GDM ORs (95%CI) for intake/week were: nuts >3 times: 0.59 (0.39-0.91; p < 0.015), refined cereals ≤1 serving: 0.72(0.58-0.89; p < 0.003), juices <4 servings: 0.77 (0.62-0.95; p < 0.017), cookies and pastries <4 servings: 0.71(0.57-0.89; p < 0.003) as compared to opposite habits. No significant nutritional patterns were found to be significant using CCc. The OR (95%CI) for GDM with none of the four risk patterns as compared to having three-four risk factors was 0.21(0.07-0.62; p < 0.005), remaining significant after stratification by BMI, age, obstetric events, parity and family history. The multiple logistic regression model including nutritional categories and pregestational BMI, age, obstetric history, parity, personal/family history, had an area under the curve(AUC) of the receiver operating curve(ROC) for the probability to predict GDM of 0.66 (CI 95%: 0.63-0.69; p < 0.001). Our study is the first to identify four early-pregnancy nutritional patterns associated with the GDM when using IADPSGc. Adherence to a low-risk nutritional pattern from early pregnancy on could be an effective strategy for GDM prevention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  1. Consequences of gestational and pregestational diabetes on placental function and birth weight.

    PubMed

    Vambergue, Anne; Fajardy, Isabelle

    2011-11-15

    Maternal diabetes constitutes an unfavorable environment for embryonic and fetoplacental development. Despite current treatments, pregnant women with pregestational diabetes are at increased risk for congenital malformations, materno-fetal complications, placental abnormalities and intrauterine malprogramming. The complications during pregnancy concern the mother (gravidic hypertension and/or preeclampsia, cesarean section) and the fetus (macrosomia or intrauterine growth restriction, shoulder dystocia, hypoglycemia and respiratory distress). The fetoplacental impairment and intrauterine programming of diseases in the offspring's later life induced by gestational diabetes are similar to those induced by type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite the existence of several developmental and morphological differences in the placenta from rodents and women, there are similarities in the alterations induced by maternal diabetes in the placenta from diabetic patients and diabetic experimental models. From both human and rodent diabetic experimental models, it has been suggested that the placenta is a compromised target that largely suffers the impact of maternal diabetes. Depending on the maternal metabolic and proinflammatory derangements, macrosomia is explained by an excessive availability of nutrients and an increase in fetal insulin release, a phenotype related to the programming of glucose intolerance. The degree of fetal damage and placental dysfunction and the availability and utilisation of fetal substrates can lead to the induction of macrosomia or intrauterine growth restriction. In maternal diabetes, both the maternal environment and the genetic background are important in the complex and multifactorial processes that induce damage to the embryo, the placenta, the fetus and the offspring. Nevertheless, further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms that govern the early embryo development, the induction of congenital anomalies and fetal

  2. Consequences of gestational and pregestational diabetes on placental function and birth weight

    PubMed Central

    Vambergue, Anne; Fajardy, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Maternal diabetes constitutes an unfavorable environment for embryonic and fetoplacental development. Despite current treatments, pregnant women with pregestational diabetes are at increased risk for congenital malformations, materno-fetal complications, placental abnormalities and intrauterine malprogramming. The complications during pregnancy concern the mother (gravidic hypertension and/or preeclampsia, cesarean section) and the fetus (macrosomia or intrauterine growth restriction, shoulder dystocia, hypoglycemia and respiratory distress). The fetoplacental impairment and intrauterine programming of diseases in the offspring’s later life induced by gestational diabetes are similar to those induced by type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite the existence of several developmental and morphological differences in the placenta from rodents and women, there are similarities in the alterations induced by maternal diabetes in the placenta from diabetic patients and diabetic experimental models. From both human and rodent diabetic experimental models, it has been suggested that the placenta is a compromised target that largely suffers the impact of maternal diabetes. Depending on the maternal metabolic and proinflammatory derangements, macrosomia is explained by an excessive availability of nutrients and an increase in fetal insulin release, a phenotype related to the programming of glucose intolerance. The degree of fetal damage and placental dysfunction and the availability and utilisation of fetal substrates can lead to the induction of macrosomia or intrauterine growth restriction. In maternal diabetes, both the maternal environment and the genetic background are important in the complex and multifactorial processes that induce damage to the embryo, the placenta, the fetus and the offspring. Nevertheless, further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms that govern the early embryo development, the induction of congenital anomalies and fetal

  3. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among Korean adults using the new International Diabetes Federation definition and the new abdominal obesity criteria for the Korean people.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Man; Kim, Dae Jung; Jung, In Hyun; Park, Chanwang; Park, Jong

    2007-07-01

    This study was performed to compare the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) definitions, and abdominal obesity criteria of WHO and the Korean Society for the Study of Obesity (KSSO) in Korean adults. A total of 4452 adults aged > or =20 years from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001 were analyzed. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome estimated by NCEP definition with WHO criteria, NCEP with KSSO, IDF with WHO, and IDF with KSSO were 26.7%, 23.7%, 23.8% and 17.5%, respectively. The agreement percent among the four definitions ranged from 88.7% to 100% in men, and from 85.6% to 94.9% in women. The NCEP-defined metabolic syndrome was more strongly associated with hypertension and diabetes than the IDF-defined metabolic syndrome (age-adjusted odds ratio: 5.1 versus 3.6 for hypertension and 6.4 versus 3.2 for diabetes in men, respectively; 5.4 versus 3.4-4.3 for hypertension and 11.1 versus 3.8-4.2 for diabetes in women, respectively). Both definitions of the metabolic syndrome were associated with coronary heart disease or stroke only in women. Prospective studies are warranted to evaluate the predictive ability of the new definition of the metabolic syndrome and the new criteria of abdominal obesity for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in Korean adults.

  4. Maternal TSH level and TPOAb status in early pregnancy and their relationship to the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ying, Hao; Tang, Yu-Ping; Bao, Yi-Rong; Su, Xiu-Juan; Cai, XueYa; Li, Yu-Hong; Wang, De-Fen

    2016-12-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism is common in pregnant women and often related to adverse pregnancy outcomes, but its relationship with gestational diabetes remains controversial. In particular, the impact of thyroperoxidase antibodies status on the relationship between subclinical hypothyroidism and gestational diabetes is not clear. We investigated the association between combined thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level and thyroperoxidase antibodies status in early pregnancy (<20 weeks of gestation) and gestational diabetes mellitus. A total of 7084 pregnant women met the inclusion criteria, which included thyroperoxidase antibodies-positive subclinical hypothyroidism [TSH(H)TPOAb(+)] (n = 78), thyroperoxidase antibodies-negative subclinical hypothyroidism [TSH(H)TPOAb(-)] (n = 281), thyroperoxidase antibodies-positive euthyroidism [TSH(N)TPOAb(+)] (n = 648), and thyroperoxidase antibodies-negative euthyroidism [TSH(N)TPOAb(-)] (n = 6077). Of the 7084 cases included in our study, 1141 cases were diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus at 24-28 weeks of pregnancy. The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus in TSH(N)TPOAb(-), TSH(H)TPOAb(-), TSH(N)TPOAb(+), and TSH(H)TPOAb(+) was 14.65, 19.57, 24.85, and 46.15 %, respectively. Compared with TSH(N)TPOAb(-) women, the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus was increased in all other groups of women in early pregnancy. After dividing early pregnancy into first and second trimesters, we found that TSH(H)TPOAb(-) women in the first trimester do not show this increase. Our study suggests that subclinical hypothyroidism and thyroperoxidase antibodies-positive euthyroidism in early pregnancy are associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

  5. Treatment With Diet and Exercise for Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosed Using IADPSG Criteria.

    PubMed

    Kgosidialwa, Oratile; Egan, Aoife M; Carmody, Louise; Kirwan, Breda; Gunning, Patricia; Dunne, Fidelma P

    2015-12-01

    Prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and obesity continue to increase. This study aimed to ascertain whether diet and exercise is a successful intervention for women with GDM and whether a subset of these women have comparable outcomes to those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). This was a retrospective cohort study of five antenatal centers along the Irish Atlantic seaboard of 567 women diagnosed with GDM and 2499 women with NGT during pregnancy. Diet and exercise therapy on diagnosis of GDM were prescribed and multiple maternal and neonatal outcomes were examined. Infants of women with GDM were more likely to be hypoglycemic (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 7.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.94-17.9) at birth. They were more likely to be admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (aOR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.60-2.91). Macrosomia and large-for-gestational-age rates were lower in the GDM group (aOR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.37-0.64 and aOR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.46-0.82, respectively). There was no increase in small for gestational age among offspring of women with GDM (aOR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.49-1.34). Women with diet-treated GDM and body mass index (BMI) < 25 kg/m(2) had similar outcomes to those with NGT of the same BMI group. Obesity increased risk for poor pregnancy outcomes regardless of diabetes status. Medical nutritional therapy and exercise for women with GDM may be successful in lowering rates of large for gestational age and macrosomia without increasing small-for-gestational-age rates. Women with GDM and a BMI less than 25 kg/m(2) had outcomes similar to those with NGT suggesting that these women could potentially be treated in a less resource intensive setting.

  6. Barriers to postpartum screening for type 2 diabetes: a qualitative study of women with previous gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Forough; Rahimparvar, Seyedeh Fatemeh Vasegh; Mehrdad, Neda; Keramat, Afsaneh

    2017-01-01

    Risk of developing type 2 diabetes is increased in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Postpartum glycemic screening is recommended in women with recent GDM. But this screening rate is low and the reasons are unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of Iranian women with recent GDM on barriers of postpartum screening for diabetes. This qualitative study was conducted in Tehran, Iran in 2016. Semi-structured interview was used for data collection. 22 women with recent GDM were interviewed. These women gave birth in Tehran hospitals at a minimum of 6 months before interview. The missed screening defined as not attending to laboratory for Fasting Blood Sugar and/or Oral Glucose Tolerance Test, 6 week to 6 month after their child birthing. The data was analyzed by content analysis method. Themes and sub-themes that illustrated the barriers to postpartum diabetes screening were: inadequate education (about developing diabetes in the future, implementation of the screening, and glucometer validity in diagnosis of diabetes), perceiving the screening as difficult (feeling comfortable with the glucometer, poor laboratory conditions, issues related to the baby/babies, and financial problems), improper attitudes toward the screening (unwilling to get diagnosed, not giving priority to oneself, having false beliefs) and procrastination (gap to intention and action, self-deception and self-regulation failure). Women with recent GDM reported several barriers for postpartum diabetes screening. This study help to develop the evidence-based interventions for improving this screening rate.

  7. Association between Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D Levels and Type 2 Diabetes in Korean Adults

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyun; Choi, Jin-Su; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Lee, Young-Hoon; Nam, Hae-Sung; Park, Kyeong-Soo; Ryu, So-Yeon; Choi, Seong-Woo; Oh, Su-Hyun; Kim, Sun A; Shin, Min-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that a vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of type 2 diabetes. This study evaluated the association between serum vitamin D levels and type 2 diabetes in Korean adults. This study included 9,014 subjects (3,600 males and 5,414 females) aged ≥50 years who participated in the Dong-gu Study. The subjects were divided into groups in whom the serum vitamin D level was severely deficient (<10 ng/mL), deficient (10 to <20 ng/mL), insufficient (20 to <30 ng/mL) and sufficient (≥30 ng/mL). Type 2 diabetes was defined by a fasting blood glucose level of ≥126 mg/dL and/or an HbA1c proportion of ≥6.5% and/or self-reported current use of diabetes medication. Multiple logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association between vitamin D status and type 2 diabetes. The age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 22.6%, 22.5% and 18.4% and 12.7% for severely deficient, deficient, insufficient, and sufficient, respectively. Multivariate modeling revealed that subjects with insufficient or sufficient vitamin D levels were at a lower risk of type 2 diabetes than were subjects with deficient vitamin D levels [odds ratio (OR), 0.82; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.71–0.94 and OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.35–0.74, respectively]. Higher serum vitamin D levels were associated with a reduced risk of diabetes in Korean adults, suggesting that vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:28184342

  8. Glycemic Excursions in Type 1 Diabetes in Pregnancy: A Semiparametric Statistical Approach to Identify Sensitive Time Points during Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Resmi; Khoury, Jane; Altaye, Mekibib; Dolan, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To examine the gestational glycemic profile and identify specific times during pregnancy that variability in glucose levels, measured by change in velocity and acceleration/deceleration of blood glucose fluctuations, is associated with delivery of a large-for-gestational-age (LGA) baby, in women with type 1 diabetes. Methods. Retrospective analysis of capillary blood glucose levels measured multiple times daily throughout gestation in women with type 1 diabetes was performed using semiparametric mixed models. Results. Velocity and acceleration/deceleration in glucose levels varied across gestation regardless of delivery outcome. Compared to women delivering LGA babies, those delivering babies appropriate for gestational age exhibited significantly smaller rates of change and less variation in glucose levels between 180 days of gestation and birth. Conclusions. Use of innovative statistical methods enabled detection of gestational intervals in which blood glucose fluctuation parameters might influence the likelihood of delivering LGA baby in mothers with type 1 diabetes. Understanding dynamics and being able to visualize gestational changes in blood glucose are a potentially useful tool to assist care providers in determining the optimal timing to initiate continuous glucose monitoring. PMID:28280744

  9. Gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy as vascular risk signals: an overview and grading of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Nerenberg, Kara; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Dasgupta, Kaberi

    2014-07-01

    The occurrence of common pregnancy-related medical disorders identifies women at high risk of developing future vascular disease. Systematic reviews of cohort studies demonstrate that gestational diabetes confers a 7-fold risk increase for type 2 diabetes, and preeclampsia confers a 1.8-fold risk increase for type 2 diabetes and 3.4-fold risk increase for hypertension. Gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) increase the risk of premature vascular disease, but the 2-fold risk increase associated with preeclampsia is only partially explained by the development of traditional vascular risk factors. Despite the compelling evidence for gestational diabetes and HDP as vascular risk indicators, there are no published Canadian vascular prevention guidelines that recognize these postpartum women. In contrast, the 2011 American Heart Association guidelines on cardiovascular disease in women include gestational diabetes and HDP in their vascular risk assessment. Studies indicate that the importance surveillance of vascular risk factors in these women after pregnancy is underappreciated by the women themselves and their physicians. Although a prudent diet and physically active lifestyle were demonstrated to reduce diabetes risk in women with a gestational diabetes history in the American Diabetes Prevention Program trial, adoption of these health behaviours is low; qualitative studies confirm a need for tailored strategies that address barriers and provide social support. Further research is also needed on approaches to reduce vascular risk in women with a history of gestational diabetes and HDP. Otherwise, an early window of opportunity for chronic disease prevention in young, high-risk women will be missed.

  10. Gestational diabetes mellitus is associated with increased leukocyte peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ expression

    PubMed Central

    Mac-Marcjanek, Katarzyna; Nadel, Iwona; Woźniak, Lucyna; Cypryk, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated transcription factor of the nuclear receptor superfamily that is involved in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism as well as inflammation; thereby it participates in metabolic diseases including diabetes. Although PPARγ expression has been observed in different tissues of diabetic patients, its level in leukocytes from subjects affected by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has not yet been reported. This study aimed to investigate leukocyte PPARG expression in GDM patients at 24–33 weeks of gestation and, in turn, to correlate these alterations with anthropometric and metabolic parameters of patients. Material and methods Leukocytes were isolated from the blood of normal glucose tolerant (NGT; n = 34) and GDM (n = 77) pregnant women between 24 and 33 weeks of gestation. Leukocyte PPARG mRNA expression was determined by semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Univariate correlation analysis was performed to investigate associations between PPARG expression and clinical characteristics of patients. Results Leukocyte PPARG mRNA level was significantly higher in GDM than NGT women (p < 0.05). In the whole study group, PPARG expression positively correlated with plasma glucose concentrations at 1 h (r = 0.222, p = 0.049) and 2 h (r = 0.315, p = 0.020) of 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and negatively correlated with plasma HDL cholesterol concentration (r = -0.351, p = 0.010). Conclusions The correlation between leukocyte PPARG overexpression and hyperglycaemia suggests that PPARG mRNA expression in these cells might be up-regulated in high-glucose conditions in GDM patients at 24–33 weeks of gestation. PMID:26322090

  11. Macrosomia Rates in Women with Diet-Controlled Gestational Diabetes: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Presneill, Jeffrey; Cade, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background Current data on the rates of macrosomia in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are heterogenous. No study has specifically examined macrosomia rates in women with diet-controlled gestational diabetes. Aims To compare the rates of macrosomia between mothers with diet-controlled GDM to mothers without diabetes mellitus. Methods A retrospective study in which all patients with diet-controlled GDM and singleton pregnancies in 2014 were considered for inclusion in the study. These cases were individually matched to mothers without GDM and without type 1 or 2 diabetes. Cases were matched to parity, age, and BMI. Controls were selected from the same year and as close as possible to the date of delivery of the case. Primary outcomes were macrosomia, defined by estimated fetal weight >90th centile and >95th centile (separately). Results The estimated adjusted odds ratio for the presence of maternal GDM in the presence of EFW > 90th percentile (adjusted for maternal age, BMI, gravidity, parity, baby gender, and EGA) was 0.63 (95% CI 0.30–1.3; P = 0.21). The estimated adjusted odds ratio for the association of maternal GDM and EFW > 95th percentile was 0.66 (95% CI 0.26–1.7; P = 0.38). Conclusions Our findings suggest that macrosomia is not increased in women with diet-controlled GDM. The study registration number is AQA 16/01. PMID:28928985

  12. Educational and intervention programmes for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) management: An integrative review.

    PubMed

    Carolan-OIah, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a serious pregnancy disorder, which is linked to stillbirth, birth damage and later development of type 2 diabetes. Rates of GDM have increased dramatically in the past 20 years, related to obesity, sedentary lifestyles and ethnicity. The aim of this integrative review was to identify and to critically review existing self-management programmes for GDM. A search for studies published between 2000 and 2013 was conducted on: PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, OvidSP, ProQuest, SCOPUS and Wiley online library. GDM search terms included gestational diabetes mellitus; GDM, pregnancy diabetes. Search terms for self-management programmes, included educational programmes; lifestyle intervention; exercise, diet, weight management in pregnancy; life-style interventions. Fifty papers were located in the search, and 12 were included in the review. Interventions fell into three main groups: (1) dietary and exercise interventions; (2) self-monitoring of blood glucose levels; and (3) counselling/behavioural interventions. This review found that although interventions varied in approach, most were successful in reducing insulin requirements; in reducing rates of macrosomia and hypertensive disorders, and in improving levels of knowledge and pregnancy outcomes. Only one study found that the intervention did not contribute some positive outcome. Interventions that include adopting a low glycemic index diet and increasing levels of activity appear to be successful at reducing maternal blood glucose levels and reducing insulin requirements during pregnancy. Reducing maternal blood glucose levels, in turn, is associated with a reduction of macrosomia and maternal weight gain.

  13. Gestational diabetes in a Mexican-U.S. border population: prevalence and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Meza, E; Barraza, L; Martínez, G; Fernández, V; Ramos-Jáquez, E; Cano-Vargas, C; Valdez-Torres, A; Izaguirre, R

    1995-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of gestational diabetes (GD) in a Mexican-U.S. border population and to observe the response of such a population to a 100 gram challenge of glucose. The sample was a cross section of 519 pregnant women accesing different health institutions in Juarez, Mexico, with 24-36 weeks of gestation. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with a 100 gram challenge of glucose was done on all. Results were interpreted according to the diagnostic criteria of O'Sullivan and Mahan. Information on family history of diabetes, obstetric history, height and weight was obtained. A total of 20.4% of the patients examined had some kind of glucose intolerance 11% with GD and 9.4% with one abnormal value during the glucose tolerance test. The patients with GD tended to be older, had higher gravidity, lower height, higher weight and reported frequently a family history of diabetes. The patients with one abnormal value were similar to those with GD in weight and number of pregnancies, and were comparable to the group with normal glucose tolerance test in height and family history of diabetes. We found a high prevalence of GD and of one abnormal value during the OGTT in a Mexican population. The recommendations for screening for GD must be consistently implemented in pregnant women of Mexican ancestry.

  14. Exercise is associated with metabolism regulation and complications in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jin-Won; Park, Jeong Eun; Jung, Jin Hee; Lee, Jung Hwa; Sim, Kang Hee; Kim, Min Hee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the current evidence for the effect of exercise on glycemic control, the lipid profile, body composition, vascular health, and complications in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 1,263 patients receiving outpatient care at 13 general hospitals located in Seoul and Gyeonggido who were subjected to examinations in the areas of blood glucose management, complications management, and diabetes education between March 19 and May 29, 2013. The relations between exercise and various regulatory factors including patient’s general and clinical characteristics, metabolic regulation, achievement of goals for metabolic regulation, and complication incidence in patients with type 2 diabetes were investigated. [Results] Exercise management was associated with a decrease in systolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, postprandial glucose, hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and low-density lipoprotein Regarding achievement of goals for metabolic regulation, significant odds ratios were observed for the effect of exercise treatment on blood pressure, fasting glucose, postprandial glucose, hemoglobin A1c, triglyceride, HDL in men, and BMI in patients with type 2 diabetes. Moreover, exercise management was associated with decreased occurrence of cerebrovasculopathy. [Conclusion] In conclusion, exercise induced metabolic regulation of glycemic control, the lipid profile, and body composition, as well as vascular health and complications, in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26311952

  15. A survey of diabetic educators and patients for the revision of korean food exchange lists.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Won; Kweon, Mee Ra; Park, Young Mi; Woo, Mi Hye; Yoo, Hye Sook; Lim, Jeong Hyun; Koo, Bo Kyung; Kim, Chong Hwa; Kim, Hae Jin; Park, Jae Sun; Shin, Choong Ho; Won, Kyu Chang; Lim, Soo; Jang, Hak Chul

    2011-04-01

    Food exchange lists are one of the main methods of nutritional education. However, Korean food exchange lists have not been revised since 1994. Therefore, we surveyed the opinions of diabetes educators and patients with diabetes regarding the need for revision of the current food exchange lists. For two weeks beginning on 10 March 2008, a 12-item questionnaire regarding the opinion and need for revision of the current food exchange lists was e-mailed to diabetes educators nationwide. Another 15-question survey was administered to patients with diabetes in 13 hospitals located in the Seoul and Gyeonggi regions of Korea. We obtained survey responses from 101 diabetes educators and 209 patients; 65 (64.3%) of the educators answered that the current food exchange lists should be revised. The items that needed revision were the glycemic index, addition of new foods and reaffirmation of exchange standard amounts. The patients demanded specific education about choosing appropriate foods, a balanced meal plan, proper snacks, and dining intake. Our survey results demonstrate the need to revise the Korean food exchange lists. This process should focus on glycemic index, the addition of new foods and reconfirmation of one exchange reference unit.

  16. Insulin resistance is associated with gallstones even in non-obese, non-diabetic Korean men.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yoosoo; Sung, Eunju; Ryu, Seungho; Park, Yong-Woo; Jang, Yu Mi; Park, Minseon

    2008-08-01

    It remains unclear as to whether insulin resistance alone or in the presence of wellknown risk factors, such as diabetes or obesity, is associated with gallstones in men. The aim of this study was to determine whether insulin resistance is associated independently with gallstone disease in non-diabetic men, regardless of obesity. Study subjects were 19,503 Korean men, aged 30-69 yr, with fasting blood glucose level <126 mg/dL and without a documented history of diabetes. Gallbladder status was assessed via abdominal ultrasonography after overnight fast. Body mass index and waist circumference were measured. Insulin resistance was estimated by the Homeostasis Model Assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The prevalence of obesity, abdominal obesity, and metabolic syndrome in the subjects with gallstones were higher than in those without. The prevalence of elevated HOMA (>75 percentile) in subjects with gallstones was significantly higher than in those without, and this association remained even after the obesity stratification was applied. In multiple logistic regression analyses, only age and HOMA proved to be independent predictors of gallstones. Insulin resistance was positively associated with gallstones in non-diabetic Korean men, and this occurred regardless of obesity. Gallstones appear to be a marker for insulin resistance, even in non-diabetic, nonobese men.

  17. Detection of subsequent episodes of gestational diabetes mellitus: a need for specific guidelines.

    PubMed

    Maser, Raelene E; Lenhard, M James; Henderson, Bernardine C; Cobb, Rosemary S; Hands, Kathleen E

    2004-01-01

    Guidelines for detection of individuals with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) indicate that glucose testing for women with a history of GDM should occur as soon as feasible with retesting of an initially negative screen to occur between the 24th and 28th week of gestation. The aim of this study was to evaluate medical records for individuals enrolled in a GDM management program that presented with two subsequent pregnancies with GDM and to determine if more specific guidelines for detection are needed. Records (n=60) from both pregnancies were reviewed for gestational age at enrollment, delivery, and when insulin was started, infant birth weights and complications (e.g., hypoglycemia), and maternal complications (e.g., emergency cesarean section). Over half [33/60 (55%)] of the women required insulin during both pregnancies, while 16.7% (10/60) required insulin during the second enrollment for GDM but not the first. For those requiring insulin during both pregnancies, 88% (29/33) required it earlier during the subsequent pregnancy (31.5+/-2.7 vs. 21.6+/-8.4 weeks of gestation, P<.001). During the subsequent pregnancy, approximately 1/2 of the women requiring insulin needed it before the 24th week of gestation while 1/3 required it by the 15th week. Also during the subsequent pregnancy, neonate birth weights declined (3494+/-521 vs. 3356+/-515 g, P<.05) and there were fewer complications. Given that approximately 70% of the women required insulin therapy during a subsequent GDM pregnancy and that this therapy was on average necessary by the 22nd week of gestation, we recommend that specific guidelines be established with a definitive time frame determined for the detection of repeat episodes of GDM.

  18. Shear wave elastography of the placenta in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Mehmet Aytac; Kilic, Fahrettin; Kayadibi, Yasemin; Alici Davutoglu, Ebru; Imamoglu, Metehan; Bakan, Selim; Mihmanli, Ismail; Kantarci, Fatih; Madazli, Riza

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate placental elasticty in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and non-diabetic controls. Thirty-three pregnant women with GDM according to the current criteria of the American Diabetes Association and 43 healthy pregnant women who were admitted to the antenatal clinic were recruited for this case-control study. Elasticity values of both the peripheral and the central parts of the placentas of the patients in both groups were determined by shear wave elastography (SWE) imaging. Mean elasticity values of both the central and the peripheral part of the placentas were significantly higher in GDM pregnancies (p < 0.001). No difference was observed in the mean elasticity values of the central and the peripheral part of the placentas in two groups (p > 0.05). SWE imaging technology might provide a quantitative assessment of the morphological pathologies of placentas in pregnant women with GDM.

  19. Impact of breastfeeding on maternal metabolism: implications for women with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Erica P

    2014-02-01

    Lactating compared with nonlactating women display more favorable metabolic parameters, including less atherogenic blood lipids, lower fasting and postprandial blood glucose as well as insulin, and greater insulin sensitivity in the first 4 months postpartum. However, direct evidence demonstrating that these metabolic changes persist from delivery to postweaning is much less available. Studies have reported that longer lactation duration may reduce long-term risk of cardiometabolic disease, including type 2 diabetes, but findings from most studies are limited by self-report of disease outcomes, absence of longitudinal biochemical data, or no assessment of maternal lifestyle behaviors. Studies of women with a history gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) also reported associations between lactation duration and lower the incidence of type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. The mechanisms are not understood, but hormonal regulation of pancreatic β-cell proliferation and function or other metabolic pathways may mediate the lactation association with cardiometabolic disease in women.

  20. Is there a socioeconomic gradient in the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus?

    PubMed

    Cullinan, J; Gillespie, P; Owens, L; Avalos, G; Dunne, F P

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies have shown an association between Type 2 diabetes and lower socioeconomic status. This link is less clear in those with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We test for a socioeconomic gradient in the prevalence of GDM by analysing data on 9,842 pregnant women who were offered testing for GDM in the Atlantic Diabetes in Pregnancy universal screening programme. A bivariate probit model relating GDM prevalence to socioeconomic status was estimated, controlling for variation in screening uptake rates across socioeconomic groups. The estimated increased prevalence of GDM is 8.6% [95% CI 2.7%-12.0%] for women in the lowest socioeconomic group when compared to the highest, suggesting a strong socioeconomic gradient in the prevalence of GDM. This gradient is found to be driven by differences in personal, clinical and lifestyle factors across socioeconomic groups.

  1. Impact of pre-gestational and gestational diabetes mellitus on the expression of glucose transporters GLUT-1, GLUT-4 and GLUT-9 in human term placenta.

    PubMed

    Stanirowski, Paweł Jan; Szukiewicz, Dariusz; Pyzlak, Michał; Abdalla, Nabil; Sawicki, Włodzimierz; Cendrowski, Krzysztof

    2017-03-01

    Various studies in placental tissue suggest that diabetes mellitus alters the expression of glucose transporter (GLUT) proteins, with insulin therapy being a possible modulatory factor. The aim of the present study was quantitative evaluation of the expression of glucose transporters (GLUT-1, GLUT-4, GLUT-9) in the placenta of women in both, uncomplicated and diabetic pregnancy. Additionally, the effect of insulin therapy on the expression of selected glucose transporter isoforms was analyzed. Term placental samples were obtained from healthy control (n = 25) and diabetic pregnancies, including diet-controlled gestational diabetes mellitus (GDMG1) (n = 16), insulin-controlled gestational diabetes mellitus (GDMG2) (n = 6), and pre-gestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM) (n = 6). Computer-assisted quantitative morphometry of stained placental sections was performed to determine the expression of selected glucose transporter proteins. Morphometric analysis revealed a significant increase in the expression of GLUT-4 and GLUT-9 in insulin-dependent diabetic women (GDMG2 + PGDM) as compared to both, control and GDMG1 groups (p < .05). Significantly increased GLUT-1 expression was observed only in placental specimens from patients with PGDM (p < .05). No statistically significant differences in GLUT expression were found between GDMG1 patients and healthy controls. The results of the study confirmed the presence of GLUT-1, GLUT-4 and GLUT-9 proteins in the trophoblast from both, uncomplicated and diabetic pregnancies. In addition, insulin therapy may increase placental expression of GLUT-4 and GLUT-9, and partially GLUT-1, in women with GDMG2/PGDM.

  2. The Association of Metabolic Syndrome with Diabetic Retinopathy: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008–2012

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tai Kyong; Won, Jae Yon; Shin, Jeong Ah; Park, Yong-Moon; Yim, Hyeon Woo; Park, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Aims To explore gender differences and associations between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components, and diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Korean adults aged 40 years and older with diabetes. Methods We analyzed data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (2008–2012). In total, 2,576 type 2 diabetic participants, aged 40 and older, were evaluated. Seven standard retinal fundus photographs were obtained after pupil dilation in both eyes. DR was graded using the modified Airlie House classification system. Vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) included proliferative diabetic retinopathy and clinically significant macular edema. MetS was defined according to the Joint Interim Statement, proposed in 2009, by the International Diabetes Federation and the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between MetS and its individual components with DR and VTDR. Results After controlling for confounders, MetS was not associated with DR in men or women. Moreover, the risk for DR or VTDR did not increase with increasing MetS components. However, high waist circumference was significantly inversely associated with VTDR (adjusted odds ratio = 0.36; 95% confidence interval = 0.14–0.93) only in men. Conclusions MetS was not associated with DR or VTDR in a Korean diabetic population. However, among MetS components, it seems that abdominal obesity was inversely associated with VTDR in Korean diabetic men. PMID:27275953

  3. Effect of oral protein hydrolysate on glucose control in patients with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Langeza; Schrier, Nicole L; Bruins, Maaike J; Steegers, Eric A P; van den Meiracker, Anton H; Visser, Willy

    2017-03-16

    In type 2 diabetic patients, a casein-based protein hydrolysate has been shown to increase plasma insulin and to lower plasma glucose. In the present study, we examined the acute and prolonged effects of protein hydrolysate on postprandial glucose, insulin and C-peptide responses after a standardised breakfast and the effect on daily glucose control in patients with gestational diabetes. In a single-centre randomised double blind placebo controlled design, patients with mild gestational diabetes (no use of insulin or oral antidiabetic agents; n = 26/group) were allocated to receive a protein hydrolysate drink, 8.5 g before breakfast and 8.5 g before dinner or a placebo drink which was identical to the protein hydrolysate drink in appearance and taste, yet lacked carbohydrate, fat or protein, for 8 days. Baseline characteristics including fasting levels of glucose, insulin, C-peptide and insulin-glucose ratio were similar between the groups. Compared to the placebo drink, neither the first dose of the protein hydrolysate drink nor the final dose had effects on 4-h area under the curve for plasma levels of insulin and C-peptide, or the insulin-to-glucose ratio; however, plasma glucose was moderately lower between t = 45, 60 and 75 min. In addition, mean daily capillary glucose levels were lower in the protein hydrolysate group. Two patients in the PH drink group had to be withdrawn because of vomiting after the first dose. In patients with gestational diabetes, a twice-daily dose of 8.5 g of protein hydrolysate of casein had no insulinotropic effects, but did moderately reduce plasma glucose levels, suggesting an increase in insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  4. Level of implementation of guidelines on screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes: A national survey.

    PubMed

    Pintaudi, Basilio; Fresa, Raffaella; Dalfrà, Mariagrazia; Marcone, Teresa; Dodesini, Alessandro Roberto; Napoli, Angela; Bonomo, Matteo

    2016-03-01

    To describe the degree of diffusion and acceptance of national guideline on screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes (GDM) among Italian diabetes centers and to detect possible areas for benchmarking. In 2013 the Italian Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group structured a national survey, focused on GDM screening and diagnostic procedures, that was administered to diabetologists. Overall, 122 diabetologists of 122 different diabetes centers (21.7% territorial, 78.3% hospital/University) completed the questionnaire. All respondents declared to execute a 75 g-oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as diagnostic test. Almost one in five centers preferred a universal screening procedure, the others executing a selective risk factors-based screening. In patients at high risk for GDM the OGTT was performed at 16-18 weeks' gestation in 84.0% of the cases; only 6.5% of respondents preferred to execute it as soon as possible; and 9.5% used to wait until 24-28 weeks' gestation. In the case of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 5.1 mmol/l (92 mg/dl), two third of respondents used to proceed with the execution of the complete diagnostic OGTT, the others considering sufficient the FPG value for the diagnosis. Good level of reception of national recommendations was documented. The diagnostic procedure was generally accepted and applied. Some criticisms were specifically linked to the choice of universal or risk factor-based screening procedure, and to the right time for executing the OGTT in women at high risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Unfavorable cytokine and adhesion molecule profiles during and after pregnancy, in women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Roca-Rodríguez, María Del Mar; López-Tinoco, Cristina; Fernández-Deudero, Álvaro; Murri, Mora; García-Palacios, María Victoria; García-Valero, María Del Amor; Tinahones, Francisco José; Aguilar-Diosdado, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is a significant risk factor for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. To assess the relationships between components of the metabolic syndrome and cytokine and adhesion molecule levels in women with GDM during pregnancy and after delivery. A prospective case-control study on a sample of 126 pregnant women (63 with and 63 without gestational diabetes mellitus). In an intra-subject analysis, 41 women with history of gestational diabetes mellitus and 21 controls were re-assessed in the postpartum period. Clinical data and levels of cytokines and adhesion molecules were recorded during weeks 24-29 of pregnancy and 12 months after delivery. In the postpartum period, there were significantly higher levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha in both cases and controls, and of adiponectin in controls. Cases showed higher leptin levels, with no significant differences during and after pregnancy. No significant differences were seen in adhesion molecules and interleukin-6 between cases and controls during pregnancy and in the postpartum period, but levels of both were higher in cases. During pregnancy and after delivery, adiponectin decreased in cases and increased in controls. Significant positive correlations were seen between adiponectin and fasting blood glucose levels and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and also between leptin and tumor necrosis factor alpha levels. The results suggest that increased inflammation and transient hyperglycemia during pregnancy would represent a latent form of metabolic syndrome, with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus and future cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of exercise during pregnancy to prevent gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Xie, Rongrong; Shen, Cainuo; Shu, Lianting

    2017-05-14

    Exercise showed some potential in preventing gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the results remained controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the impact of exercise during pregnancy on gestational diabetes mellitus. PubMed, EMbase, Web of science, EBSCO, and Cochrane library databases were systematically searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the influence of exercise during pregnancy on gestational diabetes mellitus were included. Two investigators independently searched articles, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies. The primary outcome was the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus. Meta-analysis was performed using random-effect model. Six RCTs involving 2164 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Compared with control intervention, exercise intervention was associated with significantly decreased incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (Std. mean difference = 0.59; 95%CI = 0.39-.88; p = .01), but had no effect on gestational age at birth (Std. mean difference = -0.03; 95%CI = -0.12 to 0.07; p = .60), the number of preterm birth (OR = 0.85; 95%CI = 0.43-1.66; p = .63), glucose 2-h post-OGTT (Std. mean difference = -1.02; 95%CI = -2.75 to 0.71; p = .25), birth weight (Std. mean difference = -0.13; 95%CI = -0.26 to 0.01; p = .06), and Apgar score less than 7 (OR = .78; 95%CI = 0.21-2.91; p = .71). Compared to control intervention, exercise intervention could significantly decrease the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus, but showed no impact on gestational age at birth, preterm birth, glucose 2-h post-OGTT, birth weight, and Apgar score less than 7.

  7. Effects of treatment in women with gestational diabetes mellitus: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Klaus; Jeitler, Klaus; Matyas, Eva; Bender, Ralf; Bastian, Hilda; Lange, Stefan; Siebenhofer, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Objective To summarise the benefits and harms of treatments for women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Data sources Embase, Medline, AMED, BIOSIS, CCMed, CDMS, CDSR, CENTRAL, CINAHL, DARE, HTA, NHS EED, Heclinet, SciSearch, several publishers’ databases, and reference lists of relevant secondary literature up to October 2009. Review methods Included studies were randomised controlled trials of specific treatment for gestational diabetes compared with usual care or “intensified” compared with “less intensified” specific treatment. Results Five randomised controlled trials matched the inclusion criteria for specific versus usual treatment. All studies used a two step approach with a 50 g glucose challenge test or screening for risk factors, or both, and a subsequent 75 g or 100 g oral glucose tolerance test. Meta-analyses did not show significant differences for most single end points judged to be of direct clinical importance. In women specifically treated for gestational diabetes, shoulder dystocia was significantly less common (odds ratio 0.40, 95% confidence interval 0.21 to 0.75), and one randomised controlled trial reported a significant reduction of pre-eclampsia (2.5 v 5.5%, P=0.02). For the surrogate end point of large for gestational age infants, the odds ratio was 0.48 (0.38 to 0.62). In the 13 randomised controlled trials of different intensities of specific treatments, meta-analysis showed a significant reduction of shoulder dystocia in women with more intensive treatment (0.31, 0.14 to 0.70). Conclusions Treatment for gestational diabetes, consisting of treatment to lower blood glucose concentration alone or with special obstetric care, seems to lower the risk for some perinatal complications. Decisions regarding treatment should take into account that the evidence of benefit is derived from trials for which women were selected with a two step strategy (glucose

  8. Pre-Pregnancy Fast Food Consumption Is Associated with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus among Tehranian Women.

    PubMed

    Lamyian, Minoor; Hosseinpour-Niazi, Somayeh; Mirmiran, Parvin; Moghaddam Banaem, Lida; Goshtasebi, Azita; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between fast food consumption and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among Tehranian women. This study was conducted over a 17-month period, on a random sample of pregnant women (n = 1026), aged 18-45 years, attending prenatal clinics in five hospitals affiliated with universities of medical sciences, located in different districts of Tehran, Iran. Dietary data were collected during gestational age ≤6 weeks, using a 168-item valid and reliable food frequency questionnaire. Consumption of total fast foods including hamburgers, sausages, bologna (beef), pizza and French fries was calculated. Between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation, all pregnant women underwent a scheduled 100 g 3 h oral glucose tolerance test. GDM was defined according to the American Diabetes Association definition. The mean age and pre-pregnancy body mass index BMI of participants were 26.7 ± 4.3 years and 25.4 ± 4.5 Kg/m², respectively. A total of 71 women developed GDM. After adjustment for confounders, the OR (95% CI) for GDM for total fast food consumption was 2.12 (1.12-5.43) and for French fries it was 2.18 (1.05-4.70). No significant association was found between hamburgers, sausages, bologna (beef), pizza and GDM. Fast food consumption in women of reproductive age was found to have undesirable effects in the prevalence of GDM.

  9. Pre-Pregnancy Fast Food Consumption Is Associated with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus among Tehranian Women

    PubMed Central

    Lamyian, Minoor; Hosseinpour-Niazi, Somayeh; Mirmiran, Parvin; Moghaddam Banaem, Lida; Goshtasebi, Azita; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between fast food consumption and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among Tehranian women. This study was conducted over a 17-month period, on a random sample of pregnant women (n = 1026), aged 18–45 years, attending prenatal clinics in five hospitals affiliated with universities of medical sciences, located in different districts of Tehran, Iran. Dietary data were collected during gestational age ≤6 weeks, using a 168-item valid and reliable food frequency questionnaire. Consumption of total fast foods including hamburgers, sausages, bologna (beef), pizza and French fries was calculated. Between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation, all pregnant women underwent a scheduled 100 g 3 h oral glucose tolerance test. GDM was defined according to the American Diabetes Association definition. The mean age and pre-pregnancy body mass index BMI of participants were 26.7 ± 4.3 years and 25.4 ± 4.5 Kg/m2, respectively. A total of 71 women developed GDM. After adjustment for confounders, the OR (95% CI) for GDM for total fast food consumption was 2.12 (1.12–5.43) and for French fries it was 2.18 (1.05–4.70). No significant association was found between hamburgers, sausages, bologna (beef), pizza and GDM. Fast food consumption in women of reproductive age was found to have undesirable effects in the prevalence of GDM. PMID:28257029

  10. Myopia is Inversely Associated With the Prevalence of Diabetic Retinopathy in the South Korean Population.

    PubMed

    Chao, Daniel L; Lin, Shuai-Chun; Chen, Rebecca; Lin, Shan C

    2016-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of irreversible vision loss. Recent studies have suggested that myopia may be negatively correlated with the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy. We sought to further investigate the association between refractive error and the likelihood of having diabetic retinopathy in a cross-sectional, population-based study of the South Korean population. Cross-sectional study. Data were included from right eyes of 13 424 participants who were 40 years and older with gradable fundus photographs of the Fourth and the Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Diabetic retinopathy was graded using standard fundus photographs. Autorefraction data were collected to calculate spherical equivalent of refraction in diopters (D) and further classified into 4 groups: hyperopia (≥1.0 D), emmetropia (-0.99 D to 0.99 D), mild myopia (-1.0 D to -2.99 D), and moderate to high myopia (≤-3.0 D). Demographic, comorbidity, and health-related behavior information was obtained via interview. A multivariate model was used to evaluate the association between the diagnosis of any diabetic retinopathy and the refractive status. Mild myopia and moderate to high myopia groups were negatively associated with development of any diabetic retinopathy (odds ratio [OR] 0.42; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.18-0.97 and OR 0.14; 95% CI 0.02-0.88, respectively). In addition, for every 1 D increase in spherical equivalent, there was a 30% increase of having diabetic retinopathy (OR 1.30; 95% CI, 1.08-1.58). Our results from a population-based study suggest that myopic status is associated with lower odds of having diabetic retinopathy in the South Korean population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Adiponectin, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen and tissue plasminogen activator antigen levels among glucose-intolerant women with and without histories of gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, C.; Christophi, C. A.; Goldberg, R. B.; Perreault, L.; Dabelea, D.; Marcovina, S. M.; Pi-Sunyer, X.; Barrett-Connor, E.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To examine concentrations of biomarkers (adiponectin, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen and tissue plasminogen-activator antigen) associated with glucose homeostasis and diabetes risk by history of gestational diabetes. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of the Diabetes Prevention Program, a randomized trial of lifestyle intervention or metformin for diabetes prevention. At baseline, participants were overweight and had impaired glucose tolerance. Biomarkers at baseline and 1 year after enrolment were compared between parous women with (n=350) and without a history of gestational diabetes (n=1466). Cox proportional hazard models evaluated whether history of gestational diabetes was associated with diabetes risk, after adjustment for baseline biomarker levels as well as for change in biomarker levels, demographic factors and anthropometrics. Results At baseline, women with histories of gestational diabetes had lower adiponectin (7.5 μg/ml vs. 8.7 μg/ml; p<0.0001) and greater log C-reactive protein (−0.90 mg/l vs. −0.78 mg/l, p=0.04) levels than women without histories of gestational diabetes, but these associations did not persist after adjustment for demographic factors. Fibrinogen and tissue plasminogen-activator antigen were similar between women with and without histories of gestational diabetes. Women with and without histories of gestational diabetes had a similar pattern of changes in biomarkers within randomization arm. Adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, baseline weight, change in weight, baseline biomarker level and change in biomarker level did not significantly alter the association between history of gestational diabetes and diabetes risk. Conclusions Among women with impaired glucose tolerance, biomarkers in women with and without histories of gestational diabetes are similar and respond similarly to lifestyle changes and metformin. Adjustment for biomarker levels did not explain the higher risk of diabetes observed in women with

  12. Prenatal Clinical Assessment of NT-proBNP as a Diagnostic Tool for Preeclampsia, Gestational Hypertension and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sadlecki, Pawel; Grabiec, Marek; Walentowicz-Sadlecka, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Common complications of pregnancy include preeclampsia (PE), gestational hypertension (GH) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Hypertensive disorders (PE/GH) and GDM may result in greater maternal, fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Women with PE/GH, one of the most common causes of heart burden in an obstetrical setting, present with elevated serum levels of BNP and NT-proBNP. The aim of this study was to shed more light on the role of NT-proBNP in pathophysiology of PE, GH and GDM. The study included 156 pregnant women with singleton pregnancies. A total of 26 women developed arterial hypertension during pregnancy, 14 were diagnosed with PE, and GDM was detected in 81 patients. The control group included 35 women with uncomplicated pregnancies, normal arterial blood pressure and normal glucose concentrations. Patients with GH presented with significantly higher serum concentrations of NT-proBNPthan normotensive women (65.5 vs. 37.4 pg/ml; p = 0.0136). Serum levels of NT-proBNP in patients with PE were the highest of all the analyzed subsets, being significantly higher than in women without this condition (89.00 vs. 37.4pg/ml,p = 0,0136). However, women with and without GDM did not differ significantly in terms of their serum NT-proBNPconcentrations. Serum NT-proBNP (pg/ml) (p = 0.0001) and BMI (p<0.0001) turned out to be independent predictors of GH on multivariate logistic regression analysis.Moreover, serum NT-proBNP (pg/ml) was identified as an independent indicator of PE (p = 0.0016). A significant inverse correlation was found between birth weight and maternal serum NT-proBNP concentrations. In our opinion, NT-proBNP can be a useful clinical marker of GH and PE. Determination of NT-proBNP levels may be helpful in identification of patients with PE and GH and in their qualification for intensive treatment; this in turn, may be reflected by better neonatal outcomes. PMID:27685993

  13. Impact of gestational diabetes on the risk of diabetes following pregnancy among Chinese and South Asian women.

    PubMed

    Mukerji, G; Chiu, M; Shah, B R

    2012-08-01

    Ethnicity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are both risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes. However, it is uncertain whether ethnicity modifies the effect of GDM on diabetes risk. We aimed to determine the risk of diabetes following pregnancy with and without GDM for Chinese and South Asian women compared with white women. Using healthcare databases, all 1,050,108 women aged 20-49 with live births between January 1995 and June 2008 in Ontario were identified. They were followed for up to 15 years for the diagnosis of diabetes. The age-standardised prevalences of GDM were 4.1%, 7.1% and 2.9% for Chinese, South Asian and white women, respectively. The cumulative incidence of diagnosed diabetes at the median follow-up time of 7.6 years was 16.5% and 1.8% for Chinese women with and without GDM, 31.8% and 3.6% for South Asian women with and without GDM, and 25.7% and 1.8% for white women with and without GDM. The presence of GDM conferred an increase in the risk for diabetes after pregnancy of more than 13-fold in white women, but only a nine- to tenfold increase among Chinese and South Asian women. Although one-third of South Asian women with GDM were diagnosed with diabetes within 8 years postpartum, the incremental impact of GDM on diabetes risk was not as strong among Chinese and South Asian women as it was among white women.

  14. The role of blood groups in the development of diabetes mellitus after gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Karagoz, Hatice; Erden, Abdulsamet; Ozer, Ozerhan; Esmeray, Kubra; Cetinkaya, Ali; Avci, Deniz; Karahan, Samet; Basak, Mustafa; Bulut, Kadir; Mutlu, Hasan; Simsek, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common condition that is defined as glucose intolerance of varying degree with onset or first recognition during pregnancy and it affects approximately 5% of all pregnancies all over the world. GDM is not only associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes such as macrosomia, dystocia, birth trauma, and metabolic complications in newborns, but it is also a strong predictor of transitioning to overt DM postpartum. The association of ABO blood groups with DM has been observed before in several epidemiological and genetic studies and resulted with inconsistent findings, but still there are not enough studies in the literature about the association of ABO blood groups with GDM. In this study, we aimed at investigating any possible relationship between the ABO blood group system and GDM and also the transitioning of GDM to overt DM postpartum, in Turkey. Patients and methods A total of 233 patients with GDM from Kayseri Training and Research Hospital between 2002 and 2012 were included in the study. The cases that have serologically determined blood groups and Rh factor in the hospital records were included in the study, and the patients with unknown blood groups were excluded. Patients were classified according to blood groups (A, B, AB, and O) and Rh status (+/−). GDM was diagnosed based on the glucose cut-points of the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Society Groups. The distributions of blood groups of the patients with GDM were compared with the distribution of blood groups of 17,314 healthy donors who were admitted to the Turkish Red Crescent Blood Service in our city in 2012. Results There was a significant difference between the patients with GDM and control group in terms of distribution of ABO blood groups. Blood group AB was found to be higher in the patients with GDM compared to the control group (P=0.029). When the patients were compared according to the development of DM, the ratio

  15. Surrogate markers of the kidney and liver in the assessment of gestational diabetes mellitus and fetal outcome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Shao-Gang, Ma; Liang, Cheng; Feng, Bai; Wei, Xu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether serum levels of butyrylcho-linesterase activity, cystatin C, and pre-albumin has the potential value as γ-glutamyl transferase in reflecting gestational diabetes mellitus and its fetal outcome. Seventy-six gestational diabetes mellitus women and 76 pregnancies with normal glucose tolerance in the second trimester were enrolled. Maternal serum parameters of butyrylcholinesterase activity, γ-glutamyl transferase, cystatin C, and pre-albumin were detected and evaluated. The pregnant complications and fetal outcome were also evaluated. Levels of butyrylcholinesterase activity, γ-glutamyl transferase, cystatin C, pre-albumin and glycemic variables were higher in the gestational diabetes mellitus patients than in the controls. Levels of butyrylcholinesterase activity were significantly correlated to the levels of fasting plasma glucose, cystatin C, and γ- glutamyl transferase (p < 0.05) in the gestational diabetes mellitus group. There were statistical differences in cases of preterm delivery, preeclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage. Higher levels of γ-glutamyl transferase and pre-albumin were risk markers for gestational diabetes mellitus (p < 0.05). The diagnosis curve demonstrated that γ-glutamyl transferase had a significant advantage over other markers (p < 0.001) but no significance compared with pre-albumin (p = 0.096). None of the detected markers showed predictive value for fetal outcome. Serum levels of butyrylcholinesterase activity, γ-glutamyl transferase, cystatin C and pre-albumin were correlated with gestational diabetes mellitus status but not with the fetal outcome. Pre-albumin can be equivalent as γ-glutamyl transferase in reflecting the presence of gestational diabetes mellitus.

  16. Periodontal disease in gestational and type 1 diabetes mellitus pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, D R; Romito, G A; Dib, S A

    2011-07-01

    The present study evaluated the relationship between periodontal disease and its clinical variables in Brazilian non-diabetic pregnant women (C), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), or type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). A periodontal exam was performed in one hundred and sixty-one pregnant women (GDM:80; T1DM:31; C:50) by a single-blinded calibrated examiner who recorded plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), bleeding index (BI), gingival margin location (GM), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP), and tooth mobility index (MI). The medical variables were age, pregestational body mass index (pre-BMI), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c) ). The GI, GM, PD, CAL, BOP, and MI were significantly higher (P < 0.01) among GDM and T1DM than for C. The PI was higher in GDM and similar between C and T1DM. The Adjusted Final Model for medical variables to evaluate the effects of groups on periodontal parameters confirmed these results. The presence of periodontal disease was significantly higher in Brazilian diabetic pregnancies (GDM and T1DM) when compared to non-diabetic pregnant women (C). The degree of periodontal disease was similar between the GDM and T1DM groups. Age, pregestational BMI, and HbA(1c) were factors related to CAL development in these two types of diabetes mellitus. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Screening and subsequent management for gestational diabetes for improving maternal and infant health

    PubMed Central

    Tieu, Joanna; Middleton, Philippa; McPhee, Andrew J; Crowther, Caroline A

    2014-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a form of diabetes that occurs in pregnancy. Although GDM usually resolves following birth, it is associated with significant morbidities for mother and baby both perinatally and in the long term. There is strong evidence to support treatment for GDM. However, there is little consensus on whether or not screening for GDM will improve maternal and infant health and if so, the most appropriate protocol to follow. Objectives To assess the effects of different methods of screening for gestational diabetes mellitus and maternal and infant outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (April 2010). Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised trials evaluating the effects of different methods of screening for gestational diabetes mellitus. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently conducted data extraction and quality assessment. We resolved disagreements through discussion or through a third author. Main results We included four trials involving 3972 women were included in the review. One quasi-randomised trial compared risk factor screening with universal or routine screening by 50 g oral glucose challenge testing. Women in the universal screening group were more likely to be diagnosed with GDM (one trial, 3152 women, risk ratio (RR) 0.44 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.26 to 0.75). Infants of mothers in the risk factor screening group were born marginally earlier than infants of mothers in the routine screening group (one trial, 3152 women, mean difference −0.15 weeks, 95% CI −0.27 to −0.53). The remaining three trials evaluated different methods of administering a 50 g glucose load. Two small trials compared glucose monomer with glucose polymer testing, with one of these trials including a candy bar group. One trial compared a glucose solution with food. No differences in diagnosis of GDM were found between each comparison. Overall

  18. Behavior modification techniques used to prevent gestational diabetes: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Skouteris, Helen; Morris, Heather; Nagle, Cate; Nankervis, Alison

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and obesity is increasing in developed countries, presenting significant challenges to acute care and public health. The aim of this study is to systematically review published controlled trials evaluating behavior modification interventions to prevent the development of GDM. Nine studies were identified involving such techniques as repetition of information, use of verbal and written educational information, goal setting, and planning, in addition to group and individual counseling sessions. Of the 3 trials with GDM incidence as a primary outcome, only 1 showed a significant reduction. GDM was a secondary outcome in 6 studies where the prevention of excessive gestational weight gain was the primary outcome and only 1 trial study determined an effective intervention. The small number of effective interventions highlights a significant gap in evidence to inform maternity health policy and practice.

  19. Clinical Characteristics of Diabetic Patients Transferred to Korean Referral Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Min Young; Kim, Sang Soo; Lee, In Kyu; Baek, Hong Sun; Lee, Hyoung Woo; Chung, Min Young

    2014-01-01

    Background We evaluated the disease profile and clinical management, including the status of both glycemic control and complications, in patients with diabetes who were transferred to referral hospitals in Korea. Methods Patients referred to 20 referral hospitals in Gyeongsangnam/Gyeongsangbuk-do and Jeollanam/Jeollabuk-do with at least a 1-year history of diabetes between January and June 2011 were retrospectively reviewed using medical records, laboratory tests, and questionnaires. Results A total of 654 patients were enrolled in the study. In total, 437 patients (67%) were transferred from clinics and 197 (30%) patients were transferred from hospitals. A total of 279 patients (43%) visited higher medical institutions without a written medical request. The main reason for the referral was glycemic control in 433 patients (66%). Seventy-three patients (11%) had received more than one session of diabetic education. Only 177 patients (27%) had been routinely self-monitoring blood glucose, and 146 patients (22%) were monitoring hemoglobin A1c. In addition, proper evaluations for diabetic complications were performed for 74 patients (11%). The most common complication was neuropathy (32%) followed by nephropathy (31%). In total, 538 patients (82%) had been taking oral hypoglycemic agents. A relatively large number of patients (44%) had been taking antihypertensive medications. Conclusion We investigated the clinical characteristics of diabetic patients and identified specific problems in diabetic management prior to the transfer. We also found several problems in the medical system, which were divided into three medical institutions having different roles in Korea. Our findings suggested that the relationships among medical institutions have to be improved, particularly for diabetes. PMID:25349826

  20. [Concept Analysis for Psychological Insulin Resistance in Korean People with Diabetes].

    PubMed

    Song, Youngshin

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the concept for psychological insulin resistance in the Korean population with diabetes. The Hybrid model was used to perform the concept analysis of psychological insulin resistance. Results from both the theoretical review with 26 studies and a field study including 19 participants with diabetes were included in final process. The preceding factors of psychological insulin resistance were uncontrolled blood glucose and change in daily life. The concept of psychological insulin resistance was found to have three categories with 8 attributes such as emotional factors (negative feeling), cognitive factors (low awareness and knowledge, low confidence for self-injection) and supportive factors (economic burden, dependency life, embarrassing, feeling about supporters, feeling of trust in, vs mistrust of health care providers). The 8 attributes included 30 indicators. The psychological insulin resistance of population with diabetes in Korea was defined as a complex phenomenon associated with insulin therapy that can be affected by emotional factors, cognitive factors, and supportive relational factors. Based on the results, a tool for measuring psychological insulin resistance of Koreans with diabetes and effective programs for enhancing insulin adherence should be developed in future studies.

  1. Use of hemoglobin A1c as an early predictor of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fong, Alex; Serra, Allison E; Gabby, Lauryn; Wing, Deborah A; Berkowitz, Kathleen M

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess an early hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1c) value from 5.7-6.4% as an early predictor of progression to gestational diabetes (GDM). A retrospective cohort study was performed on all women who delivered at a single institution over 2 years who had an early screening HgbA1c test performed at ≤20 weeks of gestation. Women with known preexisting diabetes mellitus or HgbA1c values ≥6.5% were excluded. The primary outcome was GDM development. Secondary outcomes included delivery route, maternal weight gain, birthweight, and neonatal morbidities. Women with an HgbA1c value of 5.7-6.4% were compared with those with an HgbA1c level of <5.7%. Nearly one-third of those patients in the HgbA1c 5.7-6.4% group (27.3%) experience the development of GDM compared with only 8.7% in the HgbA1c <5.7% group (odds ratio, 3.9; 95% confidence level, 2.0-7.7). This 3-fold increase remained significant (adjusted odds ratio, 2.4) after adjustment for age, prepregnancy body mass index, gestational age at HgbA1c collection, gestational age at screening, ethnicity, and method of screening. There were no significant differences in the need for medical treatment, weight gain, delivery route, birthweight, macrosomia, or neonatal morbidities. More than 10% of patients in our cohort had an early screening HgbA1c value of 5.7-6.4%. Women in this group have a significantly higher risk of progression to GDM compared with women with normal HgbA1c values and should be considered for closer GDM surveillance and possible intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Maternal vitamin D status as a critical determinant in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Senti, Jeanine; Thiele, Doria K; Anderson, Cindy Miller

    2012-01-01

    To synthesize published research to determine the evidence for the association between maternal vitamin D status during pregnancy and the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Literature searches were conducted for data based articles that examined maternal vitamin D during pregnancy, GDM, glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance using the PubMed, CINAHL, and SCOPUS data bases and reference lists from reviewed papers. Primary research studies published in the English language between 1999 and 2011 reporting findings regarding the association of vitamin D with glucose homeostasis during pregnancy and GDM. Study characteristics and findings related to vitamin D status determinants, gestational timing, and measures of glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance. Six data based articles met the criteria for study inclusion. Study findings comprised solely Level-2 evidence for the association of maternal vitamin D deficiency and risk of GDM. The majority of studies (66%) were conducted between 24 and 30 weeks gestation. Five (83%) studies reported an inverse relationship between circulating vitamin D levels and markers of glucose homeostasis associated with gestational diabetes or an increased risk for GDM associated with reduced maternal levels of vitamin D. In one study, researchers did not identify an association between vitamin D and GDM but did identify an association between higher vitamin D levels and lower fasting glucose and insulin levels. Maternal vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency is prevalent among gravid women and is associated with markers of altered glucose homeostasis. These findings underscore the need for mechanistic and clinical studies to determine optimal vitamin D status in pregnancy for reduction in the risk for GDM with implications for vitamin D supplementation as a potential target for GDM prevention. © 2012 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  3. Artemisia Extract Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus by Up-Regulating Adiponectin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xia; Sun, Hong; Zhang, Jing; Ji, Xianghong

    2016-12-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has affected a great number of pregnant women worldwide. Artemisia extracts have been found to exhibit a potent antidiabetic effect in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to examine the effects of Artemisia extract on insulin resistance and lipid profiles in pregnant GDM patients. Patients in their second trimester were randomly assigned to the Artemisia extract group (AE) or to a placebo group (PO). They were instructed to consume either AE or PO daily for a period of 10 weeks. Glucose and insulin profiles and adiponectin level were assessed at baseline (week 0) and after the treatment (week 10). Compared to the PO group, fasting plasma glucose, serum insulin levels, homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and β-cell function (HOMA-B) were significantly reduced in the AE group participants. Moreover, levels of circulating adiponectin were also significantly up-regulated in the AE group, which also positively contributed to improved insulin sensitivity. Daily administration of Artemisia extract improves insulin sensitivity by up-regulating adiponectin in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  4. Timing of treatment initiation for mild gestational diabetes mellitus and perinatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Palatnik, Anna; Mele, Lisa; Landon, Mark B; Reddy, Uma M; Ramin, Susan M; Carpenter, Marshall W; Wapner, Ronald J; Varner, Michael W; Rouse, Dwight J; Thorp, John M; Sciscione, Anthony; Catalano, Patrick; Saade, George R; Caritis, Steve N; Sorokin, Yoram

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between gestational age (GA) at the time of treatment initiation for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and maternal and perinatal outcomes. We conducted a secondary analysis of a multicenter randomized treatment trial of mild GDM in which women with mild GDM were assigned randomly to treatment vs usual care. The primary outcome of the original trial, as well as this analysis, was a composite perinatal adverse outcome that included neonatal hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, hyperinsulinemia, and perinatal death. Other outcomes that were examined included the frequency of large for GA, birthweight, neonatal intensive care unit admission, gestational hypertension/preeclampsia, and cesarean delivery. The interaction between GA at treatment initiation (stratified as 24-26, 27, 28, 29, and ≥30 weeks of gestation) and treatment group (treated vs routine care), with the outcomes of interest, was used to determine whether GA at treatment initiation was associated with outcome differences. Of 958 women whose cases were analyzed, those who initiated treatment at an earlier GA did not gain an additional treatment benefit compared with those who initiated treatment at a later GA (probability value for interaction with the primary outcome, .44). Similarly, there was no evidence that other outcomes were improved significantly by earlier initiation of GDM treatment (large for GA, P = .76; neonatal intensive care unit admission, P = .8; cesarean delivery, P = .82). The only outcome that had a significant interaction between GA and treatment was gestational hypertension/preeclampsia (P = .04), although there was not a clear cut GA trend where this outcome improved with treatment. Earlier initiation of treatment of mild GDM was not associated with stronger effect of treatment on perinatal outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Risk of Vaginal Infections at Early Gestation in Patients with Diabetic Conditions during Pregnancy: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Marschalek, Julian; Farr, Alex; Kiss, Herbert; Hagmann, Michael; Göbl, Christian S; Trofaier, Marie-Louise; Kueronya, Verena; Petricevic, Ljubomir

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are reported to be at increased risk for infections of the genital tract. This study aimed to compare the prevalence of asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis (BV) and Candida colonization at early gestation between pregnant women with and without diabetic conditions during pregnancy. We included data from 8, 486 singleton pregnancies that underwent an antenatal infection screen-and-treat programme at our department. All women with GDM or pre-existing diabetes were retrospectively assigned to the diabetic group (DIAB), whereas non-diabetic women served as controls (CON). Prevalence for BV and Candida colonization was 9% and 14% in the DIAB group, and 9% and 13% in the CON group, respectively (n.s.). No significant difference regarding stillbirth and preterm delivery (PTD), defined as a delivery earlier than 37 + 0 (37 weeks plus 0 days) weeks of gestation was found. We could not find an increased risk of colonization with vaginal pathogens at early gestation in pregnant women with diabetes, compared to non-diabetic women. Large prospective studies are needed to evaluate the long-term risk of colonization with vaginal pathogens during the course of pregnancy in these women. PMID:27167850

  6. Maternal adiposity and blood pressure in pregnancy: varying relations by ethnicity and gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wai-Yee; Kwek, Kenneth; Chong, Yap-Seng; Lee, Yung-Seng; Yap, Fabian; Chan, Yiong-Huak; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Saw, Seang-Mei; Pan, An

    2014-04-01

    Greater maternal adiposity is a potentially modifiable risk factor for elevated blood pressure during pregnancy; however, the association has been little studied in Asian populations, and no study has evaluated potential differences in the adiposity-blood pressure relation between ethnic groups or interaction with gestational diabetes. We performed a cross-sectional evaluation of a Singapore mother-offspring cohort comprising 799 pregnant Chinese, Malay and Indian women. Data on body weight, height, skinfold thickness and glycaemia (oral glucose tolerance test) were collected during the 2nd trimester; peripheral SBP and DBP were measured using an oscillometric device and central pressures by noninvasive radial applanation tonometry. The associations between adiposity measures BMI and sum of skinfold thickness and blood pressure outcomes were examined by linear regression with adjustment for potential confounders. Higher maternal BMI was associated with elevated peripheral and central pressures: the increases in pressure (mmHg) for each kg/m(2) increase in BMI were 1.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.36) for peripheral SBP, 0.76 (0.63-0.89) for peripheral DBP, 1.02 (0.87-1.17) for central systolic pressure and 0.26 (0.16-0.37) for central pulse pressure. The associations were generally stronger in Chinese women (P-interaction = 0.03 for central pulse pressure) and individuals with gestational diabetes (P-interaction = 0.03 for DBP and P-interaction = 0.046 for central systolic pressure). Similar patterns of results were found when using skinfold thickness as the measure of adiposity. Maternal adiposity is associated with higher peripheral and central blood pressures during pregnancy. Stronger associations in Chinese women and individuals with gestational diabetes warrant further investigation.

  7. Exercise during pregnancy and gestational diabetes-related adverse effects: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Ruben; Pelaez, Mireia; Lopez, Carmina; Lucia, Alejandro; Ruiz, Jonatan R

    2013-07-01

    To examine the effect of regular moderate-intensity exercise (three training sessions/week) on the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM, primary outcome). We also examined if the exercise intervention modifies the association between GDM and birth weight and risk of macrosomia, gestational age, risk of caesarean delivery and maternal weight gain (secondary outcomes). We randomly assigned 510 healthy gravida to either an exercise intervention or a usual care (control) group (n=255 each). The exercise programme focused on moderate-intensity resistance and aerobic exercises (three times/week, 50-55 min/session). GDM diabetes was diagnosed according to the WHO criteria and the International Association for Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG). The intervention did not reduce the risk of developing GDM (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.50 to 1.40) when using the WHO criteria. We observed that the intervention reduced by 58% the GDM-related risk (WHO criteria) of having a newborn with macrosomia (OR 1.76, 95% CI 0.04 to 78.90 vs 4.22, 95% CI 1.35 to 13.19) in exercise and control groups, respectively), and by 34% the GDM-related risk of having acute and elective caesarean delivery (OR 1.30, 95% CI 0.44 to 3.84 vs 1.99, 95% CI 0.98 to 4.06 in exercise and control groups, respectively). Gestational age was similar across the treatment groups (control, exercise) and GDM category (GDM or non-GDM), and maternal weight gain was ∼12% lower in the exercise group independent of whether women developed GDM. The results were similar when the IADPSG criteria were used instead. Regular moderate-intensity exercise performed over the second-third trimesters of pregnancy can be used to attenuate important GDM-related adverse outcomes.

  8. Association between History of Gestational Diabetes and Exclusive Breastfeeding at Hospital Discharge.

    PubMed

    Haile, Zelalem T; Oza-Frank, Reena; Azulay Chertok, Ilana R; Passen, Nina

    2016-08-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding is recommended in the first 6 months of life, especially for infants born to women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Yet, women with a history of GDM face challenges with exclusive breastfeeding in the early postpartum period, a critical period for setting up longer term breastfeeding success. Minimal research has been published on associated risk factors for not exclusively breastfeeding. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between GDM and exclusive breastfeeding at hospital discharge. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis including 2038 women who participated in the population-based Infant Feeding Practices Study II between May 2005 and June 2007. Gestational diabetes mellitus prevalence was 5.8%. The crude prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding at hospital discharge was 62.2% among women with GDM compared to 75.4% of women without GDM (P < .01). After adjusting for sociodemographic, behavioral, and anthropometric factors, the odds of exclusive breastfeeding were lower among women with GDM compared to women without diabetes (odds ratio = 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.92). Furthermore, women who had gestational weight gain (GWG) below the Institute of Medicine guidelines had lower odds of exclusive breastfeeding compared to women who had normal GWG (odds ratio = 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.85). Women with GDM history and women with inadequate GWG may need additional education to promote exclusive breastfeeding during maternal hospital stay. It is important for health care providers to assess both factors when providing education on exclusive breastfeeding and to support these women's breastfeeding efforts in the early postpartum period to maximize potential for longer term breastfeeding success. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. A longitudinal study of sleep duration in pregnancy and subsequent risk of gestational diabetes: findings from a prospective, multiracial cohort.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Shristi; Hinkle, Stefanie N; Zhu, Yeyi; Albert, Paul S; Zhang, Cuilin

    2017-04-01

    Both short and prolonged sleep duration have been linked to impaired glucose metabolism. Sleep patterns change during pregnancy, but prospective data are limited on their relation to gestational diabetes. We sought to prospectively examine the trimester-specific (first and second trimester) association between typical sleep duration in pregnancy and subsequent risk of gestational diabetes, as well as the influence of compensatory daytime napping on this association. In the prospective, multiracial Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Fetal Growth Studies-Singleton Cohort, 2581 pregnant women reported their typical sleep duration and napping frequency in the first and second trimesters. Diagnosis of gestational diabetes (n = 107; 4.1%) was based on medical records review. Adjusted relative risks with 95% confidence intervals for gestational diabetes were estimated with Poisson regression, adjusting for demographics, prepregnancy body mass index, and other risk factors. From the first and second trimester, sleep duration and napping frequency declined. Sleeping duration in the second but not first trimester was significantly related to risk of gestational diabetes. The association between second-trimester sleep and gestational diabetes differed by prepregnancy obesity status (P for interaction = .04). Among nonobese but not obese women, both sleeping >8-9 hours or <8-9 hours were significantly related to risk of gestational diabetes: 5-6 hours (adjusted relative risk, 2.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-4.99); 7 hours (adjusted relative risk, 2.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.68); or ≥10 hours (adjusted relative risk, 2.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-4.67). Significant effect modification by napping frequency was also observed in the second trimester (P for interaction = .03). Significant and positive association between reduced sleep (5-7 hours) and gestational diabetes was observed among women napping rarely

  10. The Influence of Gestational Diabetes on Neurodevelopment of Children in the First Two Years of Life: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Anqi; Broekman, Birit F. P.; Wong, Eric Qinlong; Gluckman, Peter D.; Godfrey, Keith M.; Saw, Seang Mei; Soh, Shu-E; Kwek, Kenneth; Chong, Yap-Seng; Meaney, Michael J.; Kramer, Michael S.; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objective Analyze the relation of gestational diabetes and maternal blood glucose levels to early cognitive functions in the first two years of life. Methods In a prospective Singaporean birth cohort study, pregnant women were screened for gestational diabetes at 26–28 weeks gestation using a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Four hundred and seventy three children (n = 74 and n = 399 born to mothers with and without gestational diabetes respectively) underwent neurocognitive assessments at 6, 18, and/or 24 month, including electrophysiology during an attentional task and behavioral measures of attention, memory and cognition. Results Gestational diabetes is related to left hemisphere EPmax amplitude differences (oddball versus standard) at both six (P = 0.039) and eighteen months (P = 0.039), with mean amplitudes suggesting offspring of mothers with gestational diabetes exhibit greater neuronal activity to standard stimuli and less to oddball stimuli. Associations between 2-hour maternal glucose levels and the difference in EPmax amplitude were marginal at 6 months [adjusted β = -0.19 (95% CI: -0.42 to +0.04) μV, P = 0.100] and significant at 18 months [adjusted β = -0.27 (95% CI: -0.49 to -0.06) μV, P = 0.014], and the EPmax amplitude difference (oddball-standard) associated with the Bayley Scales of Infant and toddler Development-III cognitive score at 24 months [β = 0.598 (95% CI: 0.158 to 1.038), P = 0.008]. Conclusion Gestational diabetes and maternal blood glucose levels are associated with offspring neuronal activity during an attentional task at both six and eighteen months. Such electrophysiological differences are likely functionally important, having been previously linked to attention problems later in life. PMID:27603522

  11. The Influence of Gestational Diabetes on Neurodevelopment of Children in the First Two Years of Life: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shirong; Qiu, Anqi; Broekman, Birit F P; Wong, Eric Qinlong; Gluckman, Peter D; Godfrey, Keith M; Saw, Seang Mei; Soh, Shu-E; Kwek, Kenneth; Chong, Yap-Seng; Meaney, Michael J; Kramer, Michael S; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Analyze the relation of gestational diabetes and maternal blood glucose levels to early cognitive functions in the first two years of life. In a prospective Singaporean birth cohort study, pregnant women were screened for gestational diabetes at 26-28 weeks gestation using a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Four hundred and seventy three children (n = 74 and n = 399 born to mothers with and without gestational diabetes respectively) underwent neurocognitive assessments at 6, 18, and/or 24 month, including electrophysiology during an attentional task and behavioral measures of attention, memory and cognition. Gestational diabetes is related to left hemisphere EPmax amplitude differences (oddball versus standard) at both six (P = 0.039) and eighteen months (P = 0.039), with mean amplitudes suggesting offspring of mothers with gestational diabetes exhibit greater neuronal activity to standard stimuli and less to oddball stimuli. Associations between 2-hour maternal glucose levels and the difference in EPmax amplitude were marginal at 6 months [adjusted β = -0.19 (95% CI: -0.42 to +0.04) μV, P = 0.100] and significant at 18 months [adjusted β = -0.27 (95% CI: -0.49 to -0.06) μV, P = 0.014], and the EPmax amplitude difference (oddball-standard) associated with the Bayley Scales of Infant and toddler Development-III cognitive score at 24 months [β = 0.598 (95% CI: 0.158 to 1.038), P = 0.008]. Gestational diabetes and maternal blood glucose levels are associated with offspring neuronal activity during an attentional task at both six and eighteen months. Such electrophysiological differences are likely functionally important, having been previously linked to attention problems later in life.

  12. Expression of β human chorionic gonadotropin in the placenta of gestational diabetic mothers: an immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Sak, Muhammed Erdal; Deveci, Engin; Evsen, Mehmet Siddik; Kalkanhi, Sevgi; Baran, Ozlem; Ozekinci, Selver; Seker, Uğur

    2013-02-01

    To investigate morphologic differences of the placenta in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes compared to nondiabetic pregnancies. This was a comparative morphological study of the placentas from 20 women with gestational diabetes and 20 healthy pregnancies at 28-35 weeks of gestation. The presence of lesions such as fibrinoid necrosis, villous edema, syncytial knot and vascular lesions like chorangiosis was apparent, mainly in the diabetes group. There was an apparent decrease in the intensity of the human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) immunostaining in the syncytiotrophoblast from the 28th to 35th weeks of gestation in the placentas of the healthy control group. No hCG immunostaining was observed in the villous or intervillous areas of any of the placentas. In diabetic placentas the expression of hCG was homogeneous with a moderate to intense immunoreactivity in the syncytiotrophoblast. Several syncytiotrophoblast cells showed dilations of both rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum and loss and alteration of microvilli, and large vacuoles were observed just below the plasma membrane, as well as irregularities in the mitochondria. Syncytial cells play an important role in the placental transition. Increased expression of beta-hCG, deterioration, degeneration of organelles and cell structure and the basal membrane disorder in chorionic vessels were seen in placentas with gestational diabetes. These changes can affect placental transfer. However, further studies are needed to clarify this issue.

  13. A hybrid knowledge based system for therapy adjustment in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hernando, M E; Gómez, E J; Corcoy, R; del Pozo, F; Arredondo, M T

    1994-01-01

    This poster describes a system to analyze self-monitoring data of gestational diabetic patients, for obtaining an assessment of their metabolic control with the final goal of supporting decision-making in therapy adjustment. The system is able to manage incomplete data and to make temporal reasoning under uncertainty, the two most important constraints when analyzing ambulatory monitoring data. Two different formalism have been used to represent and manage the knowledge: a dynamic Bayesian network and a production system based on rules. The outcomes provided by the whole system are: information on possible patient transgressions of the prescribed treatment and recommendations of treatment adjustments.

  14. Inflammatory and Other Biomarkers: Role in Pathophysiology and Prediction of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Abell, Sally K.; De Courten, Barbora; Boyle, Jacqueline A.; Teede, Helena J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding pathophysiology and identifying mothers at risk of major pregnancy complications is vital to effective prevention and optimal management. However, in current antenatal care, understanding of pathophysiology of complications is limited. In gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), risk prediction is mostly based on maternal history and clinical risk factors and may not optimally identify high risk pregnancies. Hence, universal screening is widely recommended. Here, we will explore the literature on GDM and biomarkers including inflammatory markers, adipokines, endothelial function and lipids to advance understanding of pathophysiology and explore risk prediction, with a goal to guide prevention and treatment of GDM. PMID:26110385

  15. Fasting plasma glucose as a screening test for gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Mukesh M; Dhatt, Gurdeep S

    2007-02-01

    Although debated, most preeminent expert panels recommend routine screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Among the many tests that have been used and evaluated for the screening of GDM, the fasting plasma glucose (FPG) remains very appealing. It is easy to administer, well tolerated, inexpensive, reproducible and patient friendly. However attractive, the FPG has given varied results in different populations and its use as a screening test for GDM remains uncertain. This review will objectively assess the available studies to find the real value of FPG as a screening test for GDM.

  16. A hybrid knowledge based system for therapy adjustment in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Hernando, M. E.; Gómez, E. J.; Corcoy, R.; del Pozo, F.; Arredondo, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    This poster describes a system to analyze self-monitoring data of gestational diabetic patients, for obtaining an assessment of their metabolic control with the final goal of supporting decision-making in therapy adjustment. The system is able to manage incomplete data and to make temporal reasoning under uncertainty, the two most important constraints when analyzing ambulatory monitoring data. Two different formalism have been used to represent and manage the knowledge: a dynamic Bayesian network and a production system based on rules. The outcomes provided by the whole system are: information on possible patient transgressions of the prescribed treatment and recommendations of treatment adjustments. PMID:7950077

  17. The Relative Contribution of Prepregnancy Overweight and Obesity, Gestational Weight Gain, and IADPSG-Defined Gestational Diabetes Mellitus to Fetal Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Black, Mary Helen; Sacks, David A.; Xiang, Anny H.; Lawrence, Jean M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) criteria for diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) identifies women and infants at risk for adverse outcomes, which are also strongly associated with maternal overweight, obesity, and excess gestational weight gain. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a retrospective study of 9,835 women who delivered at ≥20 weeks’ gestation; had a prenatal, 2-h, 75-g oral glucose tolerance test; and were not treated with diet, exercise, or antidiabetic medications during pregnancy. Women were classified as having GDM based on IADPSG criteria and were categorized into six mutually exclusive prepregnancy BMI/GDM groups: normal weight ± GDM, overweight ± GDM, and obese ± GDM. RESULTS Overall, 5,851 (59.5%) women were overweight or obese and 1,892 (19.2%) had GDM. Of those with GDM, 1,443 (76.3%) were overweight or obese. The prevalence of large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants was significantly higher for overweight and obese women without GDM compared with their normal-weight counterparts. Among women without GDM, 21.6% of LGA infants were attributable to maternal overweight and obesity, and the combination of being overweight or obese and having GDM accounted for 23.3% of LGA infants. Increasing gestational weight gain was associated with a higher prevalence of LGA in all groups. CONCLUSIONS Prepregnancy overweight and obesity account for a high proportion of LGA, even in the absence of GDM. Interventions that focus on maternal overweight/obesity and gestational weight gain, regardless of GDM status, have the potential to reach far more women at risk for having an LGA infant. PMID:22891256

  18. The relative contribution of prepregnancy overweight and obesity, gestational weight gain, and IADPSG-defined gestational diabetes mellitus to fetal overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Black, Mary Helen; Sacks, David A; Xiang, Anny H; Lawrence, Jean M

    2013-01-01

    The International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) criteria for diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) identifies women and infants at risk for adverse outcomes, which are also strongly associated with maternal overweight, obesity, and excess gestational weight gain. We conducted a retrospective study of 9,835 women who delivered at ≥20 weeks' gestation; had a prenatal, 2-h, 75-g oral glucose tolerance test; and were not treated with diet, exercise, or antidiabetic medications during pregnancy. Women were classified as having GDM based on IADPSG criteria and were categorized into six mutually exclusive prepregnancy BMI/GDM groups: normal weight ± GDM, overweight ± GDM, and obese ± GDM. Overall, 5,851 (59.5%) women were overweight or obese and 1,892 (19.2%) had GDM. Of those with GDM, 1,443 (76.3%) were overweight or obese. The prevalence of large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants was significantly higher for overweight and obese women without GDM compared with their normal-weight counterparts. Among women without GDM, 21.6% of LGA infants were attributable to maternal overweight and obesity, and the combination of being overweight or obese and having GDM accounted for 23.3% of LGA infants. Increasing gestational weight gain was associated with a higher prevalence of LGA in all groups. Prepregnancy overweight and obesity account for a high proportion of LGA, even in the absence of GDM. Interventions that focus on maternal overweight/obesity and gestational weight gain, regardless of GDM status, have the potential to reach far more women at risk for having an LGA infant.

  19. Induction of labor before 40 weeks is associated with lower rate of cesarean delivery in women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Nir; Ray, Joel G; Geary, Michael; Bedard, Daniel; Yang, Cathy; Sprague, Ann; Murray-Davis, Beth; Barrett, Jon; Berger, Howard

    2016-03-01

    In women with gestational diabetes mellitus, it is not clear whether routine induction of labor at <40 weeks of gestation is beneficial to mother and newborn infant. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes among women with gestational diabetes mellitus who had induction of labor at either 38 or 39 weeks with those whose pregnancy was managed expectantly. We included all women in Ontario, Canada, with diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus who had a singleton hospital birth at ≥38 + 0 weeks of gestation between April 2012 and March 2014. Data were obtained from the Better Outcomes Registry & Network Ontario, which is a province-wide registry of all births in Ontario, Canada. Women who underwent induction of labor at 38 + 0 to 38 + 6 weeks of gestation (38-IOL; n = 1188) were compared with those who remained undelivered until 39 + 0 weeks of gestation (38-Expectant; n = 5229). Separately, those women who underwent induction of labor at 39 + 0 to 39 + 6 weeks of gestation (39-IOL; n = 1036) were compared with women who remained undelivered until 40 + 0 weeks of gestation (39-Expectant; n = 2162). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were adjusted for maternal age, parity, insulin treatment, and prepregnancy body mass index. Of 281,480 women who gave birth during the study period, 14,600 women (5.2%) had gestational diabetes mellitus; of these, 8392 women (57.5%) met all inclusion criteria. Compared with the 38-Expectant group, those women in the 38-IOL group had lower odds for cesarean delivery (adjusted odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.90), higher odds for neonatal intensive care unit admission (adjusted odds ratio, 1.36; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.69), and no difference in other maternal-newborn infant outcomes. Compared with the 39-Expectant group, women in the 39-IOL group likewise had lower odds for cesarean delivery (adjusted odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-0.93) but no difference in neonatal intensive care

  20. Application of New Cholesterol Guidelines to the Korean Adult Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bu Kyung; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Ha, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Dae Jung

    2015-11-01

    The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) 2013 joint guidelines for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia expand the indications for statin therapy. This study was performed to estimate the numbers of diabetic patients indicated for statin therapy according to the Third Adult Treatment Panel (ATP-III) of the National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines and the new ACC/AHA guidelines in Korea. We analyzed the data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2010-2012. Patients with diabetes over 30 yr of age were analyzed by the two guidelines. Of the total 1,975 diabetic patients, only 377 (19.1%) were receiving drugs for dyslipidemia. Among 1,598 patients who had not taken any medications for dyslipidemia, 65.6% would be indicated for statin therapy according to the ATP-III guidelines. When we apply the new guidelines, 94.3% would be eligible for statin therapy. Among the total diabetic patients, the new guidelines, compared with the ATP-III guidelines, increase the number eligible for statin therapy from 53.1% to 76.2%. The new guidelines would increase the indication for statin therapy for most diabetic patients. At present, many diabetic patients do not receive appropriate statin therapy. Therefore efforts should be made to develop the Korean guidelines and to ensure that more diabetic patients receive appropriate statin therapy.

  1. Glucose Fluctuations during Gestation: An Additional Tool for Monitoring Pregnancy Complicated by Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dalfrà, M. G.; Chilelli, N. C.; Di Cianni, G.; Mello, G.; Lencioni, C.; Biagioni, S.; Scalese, M.; Sartore, G.; Lapolla, A.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) gives a unique insight into magnitude and duration of daily glucose fluctuations. Limited data are available on glucose variability (GV) in pregnancy. We aimed to assess GV in healthy pregnant women and cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus or gestational diabetes (GDM) and its possible association with HbA1c. CGM was performed in 50 pregnant women (20 type 1, 20 GDM, and 10 healthy controls) in all three trimesters of pregnancy. We calculated mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE), standard deviation (SD), interquartile range (IQR), and continuous overlapping net glycemic action (CONGA), as parameters of GV. The high blood glycemic index (HBGI) and low blood glycemic index (LBGI) were also measured as indicators of hyperhypoglycemic risk. Women with type 1 diabetes showed higher GV, with a 2-fold higher risk of hyperglycemic spikes during the day, than healthy pregnant women or GDM ones. GDM women had only slightly higher GV parameters than healthy controls. HbA1c did not correlate with GV indicators in type 1 diabetes or GDM pregnancies. We provided new evidence of the importance of certain GV indicators in pregnant women with GDM or type 1 diabetes and recommended the use of CGM specifically in these populations. PMID:24319455

  2. Gestational diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/pubmed/24424622 . Review Date 4/26/2017 Updated by: Irina Burd, MD, PhD, Associate Professor ... constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 1997-2017, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial ...

  3. 'Is gestational diabetes a severe illness?' exploring beliefs and self-care behaviour among women with gestational diabetes living in a rural area of the south east of China.

    PubMed

    Ge, Li; Wikby, Kerstin; Rask, Mikael

    2016-12-01

    This study explores beliefs about illness and health and self-care behaviour among women with gestational diabetes living in a rural area of the south east of China. A qualitative exploratory study using semi-structured interviews and qualitative content analysis. A hospital located in the outskirts of a city in the south east of China. Seventeen women with gestational diabetes in 34-38th pregnant weeks. The beliefs about gestational diabetes among the women in the present study were found to be bidirectional. Some of them feared the illness and its negative influence on health, while others believed that it was not a severe illness and disbelieved the diagnosis of gestational diabetes. They related their illness and health to the individual, social and natural factors. They mainly sought help from the professional sector, but did not fully comply with the professionals' advice. Diet control and exercise were their main self-care measures, but none of them self-monitored their blood glucose. They demonstrated their misunderstanding about diet control and self-monitoring of blood glucose. This study highlighted the serious lack of knowledge, lower level of risk awareness and poor self-care behaviour among women in this group. Health professionals were found to be the m