Science.gov

Sample records for korozi ve vode

  1. Interpreting observations of molecular outflow sources: the MHD shock code mhd_vode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, D. R.; Pineau des Forêts, G.

    2015-06-01

    The planar MHD shock code mhd_vode has been developed in order to simulate both continuous (C) type shock waves and jump (J) type shock waves in the interstellar medium. The physical and chemical state of the gas in steady-state may also be computed and used as input to a shock wave model. The code is written principally in FORTRAN 90, although some routines remain in FORTRAN 77. The documented program and its input data are described and provided as supplementary material, and the results of exemplary test runs are presented. Our intention is to enable the interested user to run the code for any sensible parameter set and to comprehend the results. With applications to molecular outflow sources in mind, we have computed, and are making available as supplementary material, integrated atomic and molecular line intensities for grids of C- and J-type models; these computations are summarized in the Appendices. Appendix tables, a copy of the current version of the code, and of the two model grids are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/578/A63

  2. 23 CFR 627.7 - VE programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... required to be conducted (as specified in 23 CFR 627.5(b)). (b) STAs shall ensure the required VE analysis... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false VE programs. 627.7 Section 627.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS VALUE...

  3. 23 CFR 627.7 - VE programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... required to be conducted (as specified in 23 CFR 627.5(b)). (b) STAs shall ensure the required VE analysis... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false VE programs. 627.7 Section 627.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS VALUE...

  4. 40 CFR 35.926 - Value engineering (VE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Value engineering (VE). 35.926 Section... engineering (VE). (a) Value engineering proposal. All step 2 grant applications for projects having a... completion of VE analysis and submittal of VE summary reports). (b) Value engineering analysis. For...

  5. 40 CFR 35.926 - Value engineering (VE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Value engineering (VE). 35.926 Section... engineering (VE). (a) Value engineering proposal. All step 2 grant applications for projects having a... completion of VE analysis and submittal of VE summary reports). (b) Value engineering analysis. For...

  6. 40 CFR 35.926 - Value engineering (VE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Value engineering (VE). 35.926 Section... engineering (VE). (a) Value engineering proposal. All step 2 grant applications for projects having a... completion of VE analysis and submittal of VE summary reports). (b) Value engineering analysis. For...

  7. 40 CFR 35.926 - Value engineering (VE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Value engineering (VE). 35.926 Section... engineering (VE). (a) Value engineering proposal. All step 2 grant applications for projects having a... completion of VE analysis and submittal of VE summary reports). (b) Value engineering analysis. For...

  8. Using VE to Strategically Plan Our Future

    SciTech Connect

    Margie Jeffs; Lori Braase; Alison Conner; Darcie Martinson; Jodi Grgich

    2009-06-01

    The Value Engineering (VE) Methodology is an effective tool for business or project strategic planning. In conjunction with the “Balanced Scorecard Approach” (Drs. Robert Kaplan, PhD, and David Norton, PhD, from the Balanced Scorecard Collaborative/Palladium Group), function analysis can be used to develop strategy maps and scorecards. The FAST diagram provides an integrated approach to strategy map development by formulating a cause and effect relationship and establishing the “how” and “why” behind the strategy map. By utilizing the VE Job Plan, one is able to move from strategic thinking all the way through to execution of the strategy.

  9. Interfering with VE-PTP stabilizes endothelial junctions in vivo via Tie-2 in the absence of VE-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Maike; Dierkes, Martina; Küppers, Verena; Vockel, Matthias; Tomm, Janina; Zeuschner, Dagmar; Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander; Koh, Gou Young; Peters, Kevin; Nottebaum, Astrid Fee

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial (VE)–protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) associates with VE-cadherin, thereby supporting its adhesive activity and endothelial junction integrity. VE-PTP also associates with Tie-2, dampening the tyrosine kinase activity of this receptor that can support stabilization of endothelial junctions. Here, we have analyzed how interference with VE-PTP affects the stability of endothelial junctions in vivo. Blocking VE-PTP by antibodies, a specific pharmacological inhibitor (AKB-9778), and gene ablation counteracted vascular leak induction by inflammatory mediators. In addition, leukocyte transmigration through the endothelial barrier was attenuated. Interference with Tie-2 expression in vivo reversed junction-stabilizing effects of AKB-9778 into junction-destabilizing effects. Furthermore, lack of Tie-2 was sufficient to weaken the vessel barrier. Mechanistically, inhibition of VE-PTP stabilized endothelial junctions via Tie-2, which triggered activation of Rap1, which then caused the dissolution of radial stress fibers via Rac1 and suppression of nonmuscle myosin II. Remarkably, VE-cadherin gene ablation did not abolish the junction-stabilizing effect of the VE-PTP inhibitor. Collectively, we conclude that inhibition of VE-PTP stabilizes challenged endothelial junctions in vivo via Tie-2 by a VE-cadherin–independent mechanism. In the absence of Tie-2, however, VE-PTP inhibition destabilizes endothelial barrier integrity in agreement with the VE-cadherin–supportive effect of VE-PTP. PMID:26642851

  10. JoVE: the Journal of Visualized Experiments.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2015-01-01

    The Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) is the world's first scientific video journal and is designed to communicate research and scientific methods in an innovative, intuitive way. JoVE includes a wide range of biomedical videos, from biology to immunology and bioengineering to clinical and translation medicine. This column describes the browsing and searching capabilities of JoVE, as well as its additional features (including the JoVE Scientific Education Database designed for students in scientific fields).

  11. JoVE: the Journal of Visualized Experiments.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2015-01-01

    The Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) is the world's first scientific video journal and is designed to communicate research and scientific methods in an innovative, intuitive way. JoVE includes a wide range of biomedical videos, from biology to immunology and bioengineering to clinical and translation medicine. This column describes the browsing and searching capabilities of JoVE, as well as its additional features (including the JoVE Scientific Education Database designed for students in scientific fields). PMID:25611443

  12. The naïve intuitive statistician: a naïve sampling model of intuitive confidence intervals.

    PubMed

    Juslin, Peter; Winman, Anders; Hansson, Patrik

    2007-07-01

    The perspective of the naïve intuitive statistician is outlined and applied to explain overconfidence when people produce intuitive confidence intervals and why this format leads to more overconfidence than other formally equivalent formats. The naïve sampling model implies that people accurately describe the sample information they have but are naïve in the sense that they uncritically take sample properties as estimates of population properties. A review demonstrates that the naïve sampling model accounts for the robust and important findings in previous research as well as provides novel predictions that are confirmed, including a way to minimize the overconfidence with interval production. The authors discuss the naïve sampling model as a representative of models inspired by the naïve intuitive statistician. PMID:17638502

  13. Naïve point estimation.

    PubMed

    Lindskog, Marcus; Winman, Anders; Juslin, Peter

    2013-05-01

    The capacity of short-term memory is a key constraint when people make online judgments requiring them to rely on samples retrieved from memory (e.g., Dougherty & Hunter, 2003). In this article, the authors compare 2 accounts of how people use knowledge of statistical distributions to make point estimates: either by retrieving precomputed large-sample representations or by retrieving small samples of similar observations post hoc at the time of judgment, as constrained by short-term memory capacity (the naïve sampling model: Juslin, Winman, & Hansson, 2007). Results from four experiments support the predictions by the naïve sampling model, including that participants sometimes guess values that they, when probed, demonstrably know have the lowest probability of occurring. Experiment 1 also demonstrated the operations of an unpredicted recognition-based inference. Computational modeling also incorporating this process demonstrated that the data from all 4 experiments were better predicted by assuming a post hoc sampling process constrained by short-term memory capacity than by assuming abstraction of large-sample representations of the distribution. PMID:22905935

  14. 47 CFR 97.513 - VE session manager requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false VE session manager requirements. 97.513 Section 97.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.513 VE session manager requirements....

  15. 47 CFR 97.513 - VE session manager requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false VE session manager requirements. 97.513 Section 97.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.513 VE session manager requirements....

  16. 47 CFR 97.513 - VE session manager requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false VE session manager requirements. 97.513 Section 97.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.513 VE session manager requirements....

  17. 47 CFR 97.513 - VE session manager requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false VE session manager requirements. 97.513 Section 97.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.513 VE session manager requirements....

  18. 47 CFR 97.513 - VE session manager requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false VE session manager requirements. 97.513 Section 97.513 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.513 VE session manager requirements....

  19. Naïve Bayes classification in R

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Naïve Bayes classification is a kind of simple probabilistic classification methods based on Bayes’ theorem with the assumption of independence between features. The model is trained on training dataset to make predictions by predict() function. This article introduces two functions naiveBayes() and train() for the performance of Naïve Bayes classification. PMID:27429967

  20. 23 CFR 627.9 - Conducting a VE analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... specified in 49 CFR 18.42). (e) For bridge projects, in addition to the requirements in paragraph (d) of... qualified consultants (as defined in 23 CFR 172) to conduct a VE analysis. The consultant shall possess the... to conduct or support a VE analysis if they have a conflict of interest (as specified in 23 CFR...

  1. 23 CFR 627.9 - Conducting a VE analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... specified in 49 CFR 18.42). (e) For bridge projects, in addition to the requirements in paragraph (d) of... qualified consultants (as defined in 23 CFR 172) to conduct a VE analysis. The consultant shall possess the... to conduct or support a VE analysis if they have a conflict of interest (as specified in 23 CFR...

  2. Postoperative infant septicemia caused by Pseudomonas luteola (CDC group Ve-1) and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2).

    PubMed

    Freney, J; Hansen, W; Etienne, J; Vandenesch, F; Fleurette, J

    1988-06-01

    Pseudomonas luteola (CDC group Ve-1) and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2) were both isolated from the same blood culture of a 5-month-old infant, 8 days after open-heart surgery. He quickly responded to appropriate antibiotics. Carbon substrate assimilation tests and fatty acid analysis clearly differentiated these two rarely pathogenic organisms.

  3. Postoperative infant septicemia caused by Pseudomonas luteola (CDC group Ve-1) and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2).

    PubMed

    Freney, J; Hansen, W; Etienne, J; Vandenesch, F; Fleurette, J

    1988-06-01

    Pseudomonas luteola (CDC group Ve-1) and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2) were both isolated from the same blood culture of a 5-month-old infant, 8 days after open-heart surgery. He quickly responded to appropriate antibiotics. Carbon substrate assimilation tests and fatty acid analysis clearly differentiated these two rarely pathogenic organisms. PMID:3384937

  4. Postoperative infant septicemia caused by Pseudomonas luteola (CDC group Ve-1) and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2).

    PubMed Central

    Freney, J; Hansen, W; Etienne, J; Vandenesch, F; Fleurette, J

    1988-01-01

    Pseudomonas luteola (CDC group Ve-1) and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2) were both isolated from the same blood culture of a 5-month-old infant, 8 days after open-heart surgery. He quickly responded to appropriate antibiotics. Carbon substrate assimilation tests and fatty acid analysis clearly differentiated these two rarely pathogenic organisms. PMID:3384937

  5. Agrobacterium radiobacter and CDC group Ve-2 bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, D A; Cherry, J D

    1989-01-01

    Agrobacterium radiobacter and CDC Group Ve-2 are rare human pathogens. The simultaneous infection with both of these bacteria in an immunocompromised host is reported. Review of the UCLA microbiology laboratory records revealed one additional case of A. radiobacter bacteremia and two additional cases of CDC Group Ve-2 bacteremia over a 3-year period. The clinical experience with these organisms is reviewed. Both organisms are opportunistic pathogens with a predilection for patients with foreign bodies in place. Although CDC Group Ve-2 bacteremia may respond to antibiotic therapy alone, the cure of A. radiobacter infections often requires foreign body removal.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... formation, leading to osteopenia, bowed legs, and other skeletal problems common in Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome . In addition, development of nerve cells, particularly those involved in the autonomic nervous system, is abnormal, leading to the problems with breathing, ...

  7. Propeller Research Tunnel - Vought VE-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    Propeller Research Tunnel balance. Vought VE-7 airplane - set-up and balance details. Fred Weick and Donald Wood wrote in NACA TR No. 300: 'The fixed knife edges on the bell cranks are seated on blocks bolted to a rectangular steel frame rigidly fastened to the floor. In addition, this frame is provided with knife edges, links, and counterweights which hold the triangular frame in a fixed lateral position. Screws are also provide for raising the triangular frame from the knife edges while working on the attached apparatus. A stairway at the rear and a grating floor facilitate work on the supports and apparatus mounted on the balance. At each corner of the triangular frame are ball ended steel tubes, adjustable in length and angle, which support the body under test. The forward tubes, in the case of a fuselage with landing gear, have a fitting at the upper end which clamps the axle of the landing gear. The rear post has a ball-and-socket attachment to the fuselage.'

  8. Infections with Chryseomonas luteola (CDC group Ve-1) and Flavimonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2) in neurosurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Kostman, J R; Solomon, F; Fekete, T

    1991-01-01

    During a 20-month period at Temple University Hospital, three cases of infection with bacteria of the Ve group--Chryseomonas luteola (CDC group Ve-1) and Flavimonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2)--were seen in neurosurgical patients. Two of the patients, including one with what is thought to be the first reported case of meningitis due to C. luteola, had complications caused by prosthetic material. A review of the literature revealed 14 well-described cases of infection with C. luteola or F. oryzihabitans, the majority of which were cases of bacteremia or peritonitis in patients undergoing dialysis. The presence of foreign material and the use of corticosteroids may predispose to and influence the course of disease. As prosthetic material becomes even more widely used, the incidence of infection with bacteria of the Ve group will likely increase and the manifestations of the infections will probably become more varied.

  9. Isolation of a Ve homolog, mVe1, and its relationship to Verticillium wilt resistance in Mentha longifolia (L.) Huds.

    PubMed

    Vining, Kelly; Davis, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    As a step toward greater understanding of the genetics of verticillium wilt resistance in plants, we report the sequencing of a candidate wilt resistance gene, mVe1, from the mint diploid model species, Mentha longifolia (Lamiaceae). mVe1 is a putative homolog of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) verticillium wilt (Ve) resistance genes. The mVe1 gene has a coding region of 3,051 bp. The predicted mVe1 protein contains a leucine-rich repeat domain, a common feature of plant disease resistance proteins. We compared 13 mVe1 alleles from three mint species. These alleles shared 96.2-99.6% nucleotide identity. We analyzed four M. longifolia populations segregating with respect to mVe1 alleles and wilt resistance versus susceptibility and found one association between mVe1 genotype and wilt phenotype. We conclude that mVe1 may play a role in mint verticillium wilt resistance, but variation for resistance in our segregating progenies is likely polygenic. Therefore, further investigations of mVe1 and identification of additional candidate genes are both warranted.

  10. GloVe C++ v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Jonathan A.

    2015-12-02

    This code implements the GloVe algorithm for learning word vectors from a text corpus. It uses a modern C++ approach. This algorithm is described in the open literature in the referenced paper by Pennington, Jeffrey, Richard Socher, and Christopher D. Manning.

  11. 40 CFR 35.926 - Value engineering (VE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... project officer. Rejection of any recommendation shall be on the basis of cost-effectiveness, reliability... engineering (VE). (a) Value engineering proposal. All step 2 grant applications for projects having a projected total step 3 grant eligible cost of $10 million or more, excluding the cost for interceptor...

  12. Raltegravir in treatment naïve patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Raltegravir is the first integrase inhibitor approved for the treatment of HIV infection based on the superior efficacy it showed compared to optimized backbone therapy alone in patients harboring multidrug resistant viruses. Studies on naïve patients showed comparable efficacy of raltegravir and efavirenz and just recently the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved raltegravir for the use in naïve patients based on the favorable results of the international double-blind phase III STARTMRK trial. Additional interesting findings were the faster, and not yet explained, decay of HIV-1 RNA and the higher CD4+ cells increase in the raltegravir group as compared to the efavirenz group. Raltegravir is generally well tolerated and adverse events were generally similar in raltegravir and comparator arms throughout all studies. When compared to efavirenz, patients on raltegravir showed less incidence of central nervous system-related adverse events. In studies on experienced patients higher incidence of cancers was found in the raltegravir arm: a relationship with the drug was, however not confirmed in a recent review considering all raltegravir studies. Raltegravir also showed a safe lipid profile expecially in naïve patients, finding that renders the drug attractive for patients with other cardiovascular risk factors. All this characteristics in association with its specific mechanism of action, make raltegravir an interesting drug for naïve patients and a large use in this type of patients is predictable. Only time and experience, however, will tell us whether raltegravir will maintain its promises in the long run. PMID:19959413

  13. Integration of APECS and VE-Suite for data overlay

    SciTech Connect

    McCorkel, D.; Bivins, G.; Jordan, T.; Bryden, M.; Zitney, S.; Widmann, J.; Osawe, M.

    2008-01-01

    In the design of advanced power generation facilities, process simulation tools are being utilized to model plant behavior and quickly analyze results. While such tools enable investigation of crucial aspects of plant design, typical commercial process simulators still do not explore some plant design information, including high-fidelity data from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena, economics data used for policy decisions, operational data after the plant is constructed, and as-built information for use in as-designed models. Software tools must be created that allow disparate sources of information to be integrated for facilitating accurate and effective plant design. At the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) has been developed as an integrated software suite that combines process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus®) and high-fidelity equipment simulation (e.g., FLUENT®). In this paper, the integration of the high-fidelity CFD data with overall process data in a virtual power simulation environment will be described. More specifically, we will highlight VE-Suite, an open-source virtual engineering (VE) software toolkit, and its support of Aspen Plus® Hierarchy blocks via the VE-AspenUnit.

  14. Integration of APECS and VE-Suite for Data Overlay

    SciTech Connect

    McCorkel, Doug; Bivins, Gerrick; Jordan, Terry; Bryden, Mark; Zitney, S.E.; Widmann, John; Osawe, Maxwell

    2008-06-01

    In the design of advanced power generation facilities, process simulation tools are being utilized to model plant behavior and quickly analyze results. While such tools enable investigation of crucial aspects of plant design, typical commercial process simulators still do not explore some plant design information, including high-fidelity data from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena, economics data used for policy decisions, operational data after the plant is constructed, and as-built information for use in as-designed models. Software tools must be created that allow disparate sources of information to be integrated for facilitating accurate and effective plant design. At the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) has been developed as an integrated software suite that combines process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus®) and high-fidelity equipment simulation (e.g., FLUENT®). In this paper, the integration of the high-fidelity CFD data with overall process data in a virtual power simulation environment will be described. More specifically, we will highlight VE-Suite, an open-source virtual engineering (VE) software toolkit, and its support of Aspen Plus® Hierarchy blocks via the VE-AspenUnit.

  15. Ectopic expression of a Ve homolog VvVe gene from Vitis vinifera enhances defense response to Verticillium dahliae infection in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juan; Lin, Jing; Yang, Yuwen; Chen, Tianzi; Ling, Xitie; Zhang, Baolong; Chang, Youhong

    2016-01-15

    Verticillium wilt is a soil borne disease that can cause devastating losses to the production of many economically important crops. A Ve1 homologous gene responding to Verticillium dahliae infection was identified in Vitis vinifera cv. "HeiFeng" by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and was designated as VvVe. The overexpression of VvVe in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants significantly enhanced the resistance to isolate V991 of V. dahliae when compared with the wild type plants. The expressions of defense-related genes including the salicylic acid regulated gene pathogen-related 1 (PR1) but not PR2, the ethylene- and jasmonic acid-regulated genes ethylene response factor 1 (ERF1) and lipoxygenase (LOX) were significantly increased due to over expression of VvVe. And greater accumulation of active oxygen, callose and phenylalanine-ammonia lyase were observed in the leaves of transgenic VvVe tobacco plants than the wild type when under infection by V. dahliae. Moreover, the hypersensitive response mimicking cell death was exclusively occurred in the transgenic VvVe tobacco plants but not in the wild type. Taken together, the VvVe gene is a Ve1 like gene which involves in the signal cascade of salicylic acid, jasmonate, and ethylene defense pathways and enhances defense response to V. dahliae infection in the transgenic tobacco.

  16. Differential Localization of VE- and N-Cadherins in Human Endothelial Cells: VE-Cadherin Competes with N-Cadherin for Junctional Localization

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Pilar; Ruco, Luigi; Dejana, Elisabetta

    1998-01-01

    The two major cadherins of endothelial cells are neural (N)-cadherin and vascular endothelial (VE)- cadherin. Despite similar level of protein expression only VE-cadherin is located at cell–cell contacts, whereas N-cadherin is distributed over the whole cell membrane. Cotransfection of VE-cadherin and N-cadherin in CHO cells resulted in the same distribution as that observed in endothelial cells indicating that the behavior of the two cadherins was not cell specific but related to their structural characteristics. Similar amounts of α- and β-catenins and plakoglobin were associated to VE- and N-cadherins, whereas p120 was higher in the VE-cadherin complex. The presence of VE-cadherin did not affect N-cadherin homotypic adhesive properties or its capacity to localize at junctions when cotransfectants were cocultured with cells transfected with N-cadherin only. To define the molecular domain responsible for the VE-cadherin–dominant activity we prepared a chimeric construct formed by VE-cadherin extracellular region linked to N-cadherin intracellular domain. The chimera lost the capacity to exclude N-cadherin from junctions indicating that the extracellular domain of VE-cadherin alone is not sufficient for the preferential localization of the molecule at the junctions. A truncated mutant of VE-cadherin retaining the full extracellular domain and a short cytoplasmic tail (Arg621–Pro702) lacking the catenin-binding region was able to exclude N-cadherin from junctions. This indicates that the Arg621–Pro702 sequence in the VE-cadherin cytoplasmic tail is required for N-cadherin exclusion from junctions. Competition between cadherins for their clustering at intercellular junctions in the same cell has never been described before. We speculate that, in the endothelium, VE- and N-cadherin play different roles; whereas VE-cadherin mostly promotes the homotypic interaction between endothelial cells, N-cadherin may be responsible for the anchorage of the endothelium

  17. Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) Science Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, D.; Schnase, J. L.; McInerney, M.; Webster, W. P.; Sinno, S.; Thompson, J. H.; Griffith, P. C.; Hoy, E.; Carroll, M.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of climate change are being revealed at alarming rates in the Arctic and Boreal regions of the planet. NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program has launched a major field campaign to study these effects over the next 5 to 8 years. The Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) will challenge scientists to take measurements in the field, study remote observations, and even run models to better understand the impacts of a rapidly changing climate for areas of Alaska and western Canada. The NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has partnered with the Terrestrial Ecology Program to create a science cloud designed for this field campaign - the ABoVE Science Cloud. The cloud combines traditional high performance computing with emerging technologies to create an environment specifically designed for large-scale climate analytics. The ABoVE Science Cloud utilizes (1) virtualized high-speed InfiniBand networks, (2) a combination of high-performance file systems and object storage, and (3) virtual system environments tailored for data intensive, science applications. At the center of the architecture is a large object storage environment, much like a traditional high-performance file system, that supports data proximal processing using technologies like MapReduce on a Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS). Surrounding the storage is a cloud of high performance compute resources with many processing cores and large memory coupled to the storage through an InfiniBand network. Virtual systems can be tailored to a specific scientist and provisioned on the compute resources with extremely high-speed network connectivity to the storage and to other virtual systems. In this talk, we will present the architectural components of the science cloud and examples of how it is being used to meet the needs of the ABoVE campaign. In our experience, the science cloud approach significantly lowers the barriers and risks to organizations

  18. VE1 immunohistochemistry predicts BRAF V600E mutation status and clinical outcome in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schafroth, Christian; Galván, José A.; Centeno, Irene; Koelzer, Viktor H.; Dawson, Heather E.; Sokol, Lena; Rieger, Gregor; Berger, Martin D.; Hädrich, Marion; Rosenberg, Robert; Nitsche, Ulrich; Schnüriger, Beat; Langer, Rupert; Inderbitzin, Daniel; Lugli, Alessandro; Zlobec, Inti

    2015-01-01

    Aim VE1 is a monoclonal antibody detecting mutant BRAFV600E protein by immunohistochemistry. Here we aim to determine the inter-observer agreement and concordance of VE1 with mutational status, investigate heterogeneity in colorectal cancers and metastases and determine the prognostic effect of VE1 in colorectal cancer patients. Methods Concordance of VE1 with mutational status and inter-observer agreement were tested on a pilot cohort of colorectal cancers (n = 34), melanomas (n = 23) and thyroid cancers (n = 8). Two prognostic cohorts were evaluated (n = 259, Cohort 1 and n = 226, Cohort 2) by multiple-punch tissue microarrays. VE1 staining on preoperative biopsies (n = 118 patients) was compared to expression in resections. Primary tumors and metastases from 13 patients were tested for VE1 heterogeneity using a tissue microarray generated from all available blocks (n = 100 blocks). Results Inter-observer agreement was 100% (kappa = 1.0). Concordance between VE1 and V600E mutation was 98.5%. Cohort 1: VE1 positivity (seen in 13.5%) was associated with older age (p = 0.0175) and MLH1 deficiency (p < 0.0001). Cohort 2: VE1 positivity (seen in 12.8%) was associated with female gender (p = 0.0016), right-sided tumor location (p < 0.0001), higher tumor grade (p < 0.0001) and mismatch repair (MMR)-deficiency (p < 0.0001). In survival analysis, MMR status and postoperative therapy were identified as possible confounding factors. Adjusting for these features, VE1 was an unfavorable prognostic factor. Preoperative biopsy staining matched resections in all cases except one. No heterogeneity was found across any primary/metastatic tumor blocks. Conclusion VE1 is highly concordant for V600E and homogeneously expressed suggesting staining can be analysed on resection specimens, preoperative biopsies, metastatic lesions and tissue microarrays. PMID:26496026

  19. VE-cadherin interacts with cell polarity protein Pals1 to regulate vascular lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Benjamin F; Steinbacher, Tim; Hartmann, Christian; Kummer, Daniel; Pajonczyk, Denise; Mirzapourshafiyi, Fatemeh; Nakayama, Masanori; Weide, Thomas; Gerke, Volker; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-09-15

    Blood vessel tubulogenesis requires the formation of stable cell-to-cell contacts and the establishment of apicobasal polarity of vascular endothelial cells. Cell polarity is regulated by highly conserved cell polarity protein complexes such as the Par3-aPKC-Par6 complex and the CRB3-Pals1-PATJ complex, which are expressed by many different cell types and regulate various aspects of cell polarity. Here we describe a functional interaction of VE-cadherin with the cell polarity protein Pals1. Pals1 directly interacts with VE-cadherin through a membrane-proximal motif in the cytoplasmic domain of VE-cadherin. VE-cadherin clusters Pals1 at cell-cell junctions. Mutating the Pals1-binding motif in VE-cadherin abrogates the ability of VE-cadherin to regulate apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. In a similar way, deletion of the Par3-binding motif at the C-terminus of VE-cadherin impairs apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. Our findings indicate that the biological activity of VE-cadherin in regulating endothelial polarity and vascular lumen formation is mediated through its interaction with the two cell polarity proteins Pals1 and Par3.

  20. Building Students' Understanding of Quadratic Equation Concept Using Naïve Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fachrudin, Achmad Dhany; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Darmawijoyo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to know how Naïve Geometry method can support students' understanding about the concept of solving quadratic equations. In this article we will discuss one activities of the four activities we developed. This activity focused on how students linking the Naïve Geometry method with the solving of the quadratic…

  1. Alternative Routes to Induce Naïve Pluripotency in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Galbha; Warrier, Sharat; Ghimire, Sabitri; Broekaert, Dorien; Van der Jeught, Margot; Lierman, Sylvie; Deroo, Tom; Peelman, Luc; Van Soom, Ann; Cornelissen, Ria; Menten, Björn; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo; Roost, Matthias; Slieker, Roderick C; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Deforce, Dieter; De Sutter, Petra; De Sousa Lopes, Susana Chuva; Heindryckx, Björn

    2015-09-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) closely resemble mouse epiblast stem cells exhibiting primed pluripotency unlike mouse ESCs (mESCs), which acquire a naïve pluripotent state. Efforts have been made to trigger naïve pluripotency in hESCs for subsequent unbiased lineage-specific differentiation, a common conundrum faced by primed pluripotent hESCs due to heterogeneity in gene expression existing within and between hESC lines. This required either ectopic expression of naïve genes such as NANOG and KLF2 or inclusion of multiple pluripotency-associated factors. We report here a novel combination of small molecules and growth factors in culture medium (2i/LIF/basic fibroblast growth factor + Ascorbic Acid + Forskolin) facilitating rapid induction of transgene-free naïve pluripotency in hESCs, as well as in mESCs, which has not been shown earlier. The converted naïve hESCs survived long-term single-cell passaging, maintained a normal karyotype, upregulated naïve pluripotency genes, and exhibited dependence on signaling pathways similar to naïve mESCs. Moreover, they undergo global DNA demethylation and show a distinctive long noncoding RNA profile. We propose that in our medium, the FGF signaling pathway via PI3K/AKT/mTORC induced the conversion of primed hESCs toward naïve pluripotency. Collectively, we demonstrate an alternate route to capture naïve pluripotency in hESCs that is fast, reproducible, supports naïve mESC derivation, and allows efficient differentiation.

  2. Chaperones of the endoplasmic reticulum are required for Ve1-mediated resistance to Verticillium.

    PubMed

    Liebrand, Thomas W H; Kombrink, Anja; Zhang, Zhao; Sklenar, Jan; Jones, Alexandra M E; Robatzek, Silke; Thomma, Bart P H J; Joosten, Matthieu H A J

    2014-01-01

    The tomato receptor-like protein (RLP) Ve1 mediates resistance to the vascular fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae. To identify the proteins required for Ve1 function, we transiently expressed and immunopurified functional Ve1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) from Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, followed by mass spectrometry. This resulted in the identification of peptides originating from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident chaperones HSP70 binding proteins (BiPs) and a lectin-type calreticulin (CRT). Knock-down of the different BiPs and CRTs in tomato resulted in compromised Ve1-mediated resistance to V. dahliae in most cases, showing that these chaperones play an important role in Ve1 functionality. Recently, it has been shown that one particular CRT is required for the biogenesis of the RLP-type Cladosporium fulvum resistance protein Cf-4 of tomato, as silencing of CRT3a resulted in a reduced pool of complex glycosylated Cf-4 protein. In contrast, knock-down of the various CRTs in N. benthamiana or N. tabacum did not result in reduced accumulation of mature complex glycosylated Ve1 protein. Together, this study shows that the BiP and CRT ER chaperones differentially contribute to Cf-4- and Ve1-mediated immunity. PMID:24015989

  3. What to Do After You've Gotten the Smallpox Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Do After You’ve Gotten the Smallpox Vaccine The smallpox vaccine contains a live virus called vaccinia. After vaccination, this live virus is present at the vaccine site and can be spread to other parts ...

  4. Fear reactions to snakes in naïve mouse lemurs and pig-tailed macaques.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Lucie; Brandl, Pavel; Frynta, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Primates have been predated on by snakes throughout their evolution and as a result, antipredator responses accompanied by signs of fear are often witnessed in the wild. In captivity, however, the fear of snakes is less clear, as experiments with naïve nonhuman primates have given inconsistent results. In this study, we present evidence that naïve mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus) and putatively naïve pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) do exhibit fear of snakes, even though the apparent reactions are mild. In an experiment with control- or snake-odoured boxes, mouse lemurs clearly avoided feeding in the latter. When the latency of touching rubber models was measured, pig-tailed macaques took longer to touch a toy snake compared with a toy lizard. Our findings that fear of snakes is shown by naïve individuals support the hypothesis that it is innate in primates.

  5. Indeterminate cell histiocytosis with naïve cells

    PubMed Central

    Bakry, Ola A.; Samaka, Rehab M.; Kandil, Mona A.; Younes, Sheren F.

    2013-01-01

    Histiocytoses are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by proliferation and accumulation of cells of mononuclear-macrophage system and dendritic cells. Histiocytoses are categorized according to the cell of origin into Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), Non Langerhans cell histiocytoses and indeterminate cell histiocytosis (ICH). ICH is an extraordinary rare neoplastic dendritic cell disorder that has poorly understood histogenesis and pathogenesis. It is characterized by a proliferation of dendritic cells, which mimic Langerhans cells immunophenotypically (positive for CD1a and S-100 protein), but lack Birbeck granules characteristic of Langerhans cells. Twenty-four year-old Egyptian male was presented with reddish brown chest wall nodule. Clinical, histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructure features are typical for ICH. He was in a good state without any evidence of recurrence or metastasis after 24 months follow up. Peculiar histopathological features were detected in the present case. Many unidentified cells with Hematoxylin & Eosin Langerhans like features showed negative staining for S-100, CD1a, Langerin and CD68. In absence of cellular atypia and mitosis, the infiltrating cells showed epidermotropism that was reported once in ICH as well as neural and perineural invasion that were not previously reported. Therefore we prefer using a tentatively designated diagnosis; dendritic cell tumor, not otherwise specified or newly proposed diagnosis (Indeterminate cell histocytosis with naïve cells) for the present case. PMID:23772299

  6. The interplays among technology and content, immersant and VE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Meehae; Gromala, Diane; Shaw, Chris; Barnes, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The research program aims to explore and examine the fine balance necessary for maintaining the interplays between technology and the immersant, including identifying qualities that contribute to creating and maintaining a sense of "presence" and "immersion" in an immersive virtual reality (IVR) experience. Building upon and extending previous work, we compare sitting meditation with walking meditation in a virtual environment (VE). The Virtual Meditative Walk, a new work-in-progress, integrates VR and biofeedback technologies with a self-directed, uni-directional treadmill. As immersants learn how to meditate while walking, robust, real-time biofeedback technology continuously measures breathing, skin conductance and heart rate. The physiological states of the immersant will in turn affect the audio and stereoscopic visual media through shutter glasses. We plan to test the potential benefits and limitations of this physically active form of meditation with data from a sitting form of meditation. A mixed-methods approach to testing user outcomes parallels the knowledge bases of the collaborative team: a physician, computer scientists and artists.

  7. Validation of the VE1 Immunostain for the BRAF V600E Mutation in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Pearlstein, Michelle V.; Zedek, Daniel C.; Ollila, David W.; Treece, Amanda; Gulley, Margaret L.; Groben, Pamela A.; Thomas, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND BRAF mutation status, and therefore eligibility for BRAF inhibitors, is currently determined by sequencing methods. We assessed the validity of VE1, a monoclonal antibody against the BRAF V600E mutant protein, in the detection of mutant BRAF V600E melanomas as classified by DNA pyrosequencing. METHODS The cases were 76 metastatic melanoma patients with only one known primary melanoma who had had BRAF codon 600 pyrosequencing of either their primary (n=19), metastatic (n=57) melanoma, or both (n=17). All melanomas (n=93) were immunostained with the BRAF VE1 antibody using a red detection system. The staining intensity of these specimens was scored from 0 – 3+ by a dermatopathologist. Scores of 0 and 1+ were considered as negative staining while scores of 2+ and 3+ were considered positive. RESULTS The VE1 antibody demonstrated a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 100% as compared to DNA pyrosequencing results. There was 100% concordance between VE1 immunostaining of primary and metastatic melanomas from the same patient. V600K, V600Q, and V600R BRAF melanomas did not positively stain with VE1. CONCLUSIONS This hospital-based study finds high sensitivity and specificity for the BRAF VE1 immunostain in comparison to pyrosequencing in detection of BRAF V600E in melanomas. PMID:24917033

  8. The aged lymphoid tissue environment fails to support naïve T cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Becklund, Bryan R; Purton, Jared F; Ramsey, Chris; Favre, Stéphanie; Vogt, Tobias K; Martin, Christopher E; Spasova, Darina S; Sarkisyan, Gor; LeRoy, Eric; Tan, Joyce T; Wahlus, Heidi; Bondi-Boyd, Brea; Luther, Sanjiv A; Surh, Charles D

    2016-08-02

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of naïve T cells and a reciprocal increase in the proportion of memory T cells. While reduced thymic output is important, age-dependent changes in factors supporting naïve T cells homeostasis may also be involved. Indeed, we noted a dramatic decrease in the ability of aged mice to support survival and homeostatic proliferation of naïve T cells. The defect was not due to a reduction in IL-7 expression, but from a combination of changes in the secondary lymphoid environment that impaired naïve T cell entry and access to key survival factors. We observed an age-related shift in the expression of homing chemokines and structural deterioration of the stromal network in T cell zones. Treatment with IL-7/mAb complexes can restore naïve T cell homeostatic proliferation in aged mice. Our data suggests that homeostatic mechanisms that support the naïve T cell pool deteriorate with age.

  9. The aged lymphoid tissue environment fails to support naïve T cell homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Becklund, Bryan R.; Purton, Jared F.; Ramsey, Chris; Favre, Stéphanie; Vogt, Tobias K.; Martin, Christopher E.; Spasova, Darina S.; Sarkisyan, Gor; LeRoy, Eric; Tan, Joyce T.; Wahlus, Heidi; Bondi-Boyd, Brea; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Surh, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of naïve T cells and a reciprocal increase in the proportion of memory T cells. While reduced thymic output is important, age-dependent changes in factors supporting naïve T cells homeostasis may also be involved. Indeed, we noted a dramatic decrease in the ability of aged mice to support survival and homeostatic proliferation of naïve T cells. The defect was not due to a reduction in IL-7 expression, but from a combination of changes in the secondary lymphoid environment that impaired naïve T cell entry and access to key survival factors. We observed an age-related shift in the expression of homing chemokines and structural deterioration of the stromal network in T cell zones. Treatment with IL-7/mAb complexes can restore naïve T cell homeostatic proliferation in aged mice. Our data suggests that homeostatic mechanisms that support the naïve T cell pool deteriorate with age. PMID:27480406

  10. Secondary Metabolism and Development Is Mediated by LlmF Control of VeA Subcellular Localization in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Jonathan M.; Theisen, Jeffrey M.; Duran, Rocio M.; Grayburn, W. Scott; Calvo, Ana M.; Keller, Nancy P.

    2013-01-01

    Secondary metabolism and development are linked in Aspergillus through the conserved regulatory velvet complex composed of VeA, VelB, and LaeA. The founding member of the velvet complex, VeA, shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus in response to alterations in light. Here we describe a new interaction partner of VeA identified through a reverse genetics screen looking for LaeA-like methyltransferases in Aspergillus nidulans. One of the putative LaeA-like methyltransferases identified, LlmF, is a negative regulator of sterigmatocystin production and sexual development. LlmF interacts directly with VeA and the repressive function of LlmF is mediated by influencing the localization of VeA, as over-expression of llmF decreases the nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of VeA while deletion of llmF results in an increased nuclear accumulation of VeA. We show that the methyltransferase domain of LlmF is required for function; however, LlmF does not directly methylate VeA in vitro. This study identifies a new interaction partner for VeA and highlights the importance of cellular compartmentalization of VeA for regulation of development and secondary metabolism. PMID:23341778

  11. Stem cells. m6A mRNA methylation facilitates resolution of naïve pluripotency toward differentiation.

    PubMed

    Geula, Shay; Moshitch-Moshkovitz, Sharon; Dominissini, Dan; Mansour, Abed AlFatah; Kol, Nitzan; Salmon-Divon, Mali; Hershkovitz, Vera; Peer, Eyal; Mor, Nofar; Manor, Yair S; Ben-Haim, Moshe Shay; Eyal, Eran; Yunger, Sharon; Pinto, Yishay; Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; Viukov, Sergey; Rais, Yoach; Krupalnik, Vladislav; Chomsky, Elad; Zerbib, Mirie; Maza, Itay; Rechavi, Yoav; Massarwa, Rada; Hanna, Suhair; Amit, Ido; Levanon, Erez Y; Amariglio, Ninette; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Novershtern, Noa; Rechavi, Gideon; Hanna, Jacob H

    2015-02-27

    Naïve and primed pluripotent states retain distinct molecular properties, yet limited knowledge exists on how their state transitions are regulated. Here, we identify Mettl3, an N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) transferase, as a regulator for terminating murine naïve pluripotency. Mettl3 knockout preimplantation epiblasts and naïve embryonic stem cells are depleted for m(6)A in mRNAs, yet are viable. However, they fail to adequately terminate their naïve state and, subsequently, undergo aberrant and restricted lineage priming at the postimplantation stage, which leads to early embryonic lethality. m(6)A predominantly and directly reduces mRNA stability, including that of key naïve pluripotency-promoting transcripts. This study highlights a critical role for an mRNA epigenetic modification in vivo and identifies regulatory modules that functionally influence naïve and primed pluripotency in an opposing manner.

  12. Stem cells. m6A mRNA methylation facilitates resolution of naïve pluripotency toward differentiation.

    PubMed

    Geula, Shay; Moshitch-Moshkovitz, Sharon; Dominissini, Dan; Mansour, Abed AlFatah; Kol, Nitzan; Salmon-Divon, Mali; Hershkovitz, Vera; Peer, Eyal; Mor, Nofar; Manor, Yair S; Ben-Haim, Moshe Shay; Eyal, Eran; Yunger, Sharon; Pinto, Yishay; Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; Viukov, Sergey; Rais, Yoach; Krupalnik, Vladislav; Chomsky, Elad; Zerbib, Mirie; Maza, Itay; Rechavi, Yoav; Massarwa, Rada; Hanna, Suhair; Amit, Ido; Levanon, Erez Y; Amariglio, Ninette; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Novershtern, Noa; Rechavi, Gideon; Hanna, Jacob H

    2015-02-27

    Naïve and primed pluripotent states retain distinct molecular properties, yet limited knowledge exists on how their state transitions are regulated. Here, we identify Mettl3, an N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) transferase, as a regulator for terminating murine naïve pluripotency. Mettl3 knockout preimplantation epiblasts and naïve embryonic stem cells are depleted for m(6)A in mRNAs, yet are viable. However, they fail to adequately terminate their naïve state and, subsequently, undergo aberrant and restricted lineage priming at the postimplantation stage, which leads to early embryonic lethality. m(6)A predominantly and directly reduces mRNA stability, including that of key naïve pluripotency-promoting transcripts. This study highlights a critical role for an mRNA epigenetic modification in vivo and identifies regulatory modules that functionally influence naïve and primed pluripotency in an opposing manner. PMID:25569111

  13. Interfacing with in-Situ Data Networks during the Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, M.; Griffith, P. C.; Duffy, D.; Hoy, E.; Schnase, J. L.; Sinno, S.; Thompson, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) is designed to improve understanding of the causes and impacts of ecological changes in Arctic/boreal regions, and will integrate field-based studies, modeling, and data from airborne and satellite remote sensing. ABoVE will result in a fuller understanding of ecosystem vulnerability and resilience to environmental change in the Arctic and boreal regions of western North America, and provide scientific information required to develop options for societal responses to the impacts of these changes. The studies sponsored by NASA during ABoVE will be coordinated with research and in-situ monitoring activities being sponsored by a number of national and international partners. The NASA Center for Climate Simulation at the Goddard Space Flight Center has partnered with the NASA Carbon Cycle & Ecosystems Office to create a science cloud designed for this field campaign - the ABoVE Science Cloud (ASC). The ASC combines high performance computing with emerging technologies to create an environment specifically designed for large-scale modeling, analysis of remote sensing data, copious disk storage with integrated data management, and integration of core variables from in-situ networks identified by the ABoVE Science Definition Team. In this talk, we will present the scientific requirements driving the development of the ABoVE Science Cloud, discuss the necessary interfaces, both computational and human, with in-situ monitoring networks, and show examples of how the ASC is being used to meet the needs of the ABoVE campaign.

  14. Plasmodium vivax Sporozoite Challenge in Malaria-Naïve and Semi-Immune Colombian Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Forero-Peña, David A.; Rubiano, Kelly; Gómez-Hincapie, José; Martínez, Nora L.; Lopez-Perez, Mary; Castellanos, Angélica; Céspedes, Nora; Palacios, Ricardo; Oñate, José Millán; Herrera, Sócrates

    2014-01-01

    Background Significant progress has been recently achieved in the development of Plasmodium vivax challenge infections in humans, which are essential for vaccine and drug testing. With the goal of accelerating clinical development of malaria vaccines, the outcome of infections experimentally induced in naïve and semi-immune volunteers by infected mosquito bites was compared. Methods Seven malaria-naïve and nine semi-immune Colombian adults (n = 16) were subjected to the bites of 2–4 P. vivax sporozoite-infected Anopheles mosquitoes. Parasitemia levels, malaria clinical manifestations, and immune responses were assessed and compared. Results All volunteers developed infections as confirmed by microscopy and RT-qPCR. No significant difference in the pre-patent period (mean 12.5 and 12.8 days for malaria-naïve and malaria-exposed, respectively) was observed but naïve volunteers developed classical malaria signs and symptoms, while semi-immune volunteers displayed minor or no symptoms at the day of diagnosis. A malaria-naïve volunteer developed a transient low submicroscopic parasitemia that cured spontaneously. Infection induced an increase in specific antibody levels in both groups. Conclusion Sporozoite infectious challenge was safe and reproducible in semi-immune and naïve volunteers. This model will provide information for simultaneous comparison of the protective efficacy of P. vivax vaccines in naïve and semi-immune volunteers under controlled conditions and would accelerate P. vivax vaccine development. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT01585077 PMID:24963662

  15. A Novel Feature Selection Technique for Text Classification Using Naïve Bayes

    PubMed Central

    Dey Sarkar, Subhajit; Goswami, Saptarsi; Agarwal, Aman; Aktar, Javed

    2014-01-01

    With the proliferation of unstructured data, text classification or text categorization has found many applications in topic classification, sentiment analysis, authorship identification, spam detection, and so on. There are many classification algorithms available. Naïve Bayes remains one of the oldest and most popular classifiers. On one hand, implementation of naïve Bayes is simple and, on the other hand, this also requires fewer amounts of training data. From the literature review, it is found that naïve Bayes performs poorly compared to other classifiers in text classification. As a result, this makes the naïve Bayes classifier unusable in spite of the simplicity and intuitiveness of the model. In this paper, we propose a two-step feature selection method based on firstly a univariate feature selection and then feature clustering, where we use the univariate feature selection method to reduce the search space and then apply clustering to select relatively independent feature sets. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by a thorough evaluation and comparison over 13 datasets. The performance improvement thus achieved makes naïve Bayes comparable or superior to other classifiers. The proposed algorithm is shown to outperform other traditional methods like greedy search based wrapper or CFS. PMID:27433512

  16. Comparison of the Ultrastructures of Primed and Naïve Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Dongmei; Bu, Shixia

    2016-02-01

    Culture conditions have been established to maintain the pluripotency of mouse naïve and primed embryonic stem cells (ESCs) using human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) as the feeder layer. In this study, the ultrastructures of mouse primed ESCs grown on hAECs were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Consistent with mouse naïve ESCs, the undifferentiated mouse primed ESC line ESD-EpiSC [ESC-derived epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs)] revealed typical characteristics, including large nuclei, reticulated nucleoli, scanty cytoplasm, and low cytoplasm-to-nuclear ratios. Cells had prominent Golgi apparatus and well-developed endoplasmic reticulum. Adjacent cells were tightly in contact with dense junction desmosomes. However, in EpiSC colonies, cell contact was no longer close like naïve ESCs, and differentiated cells existed. The differentiated cells had small nucleoli with large cytoplasm, which represented primitive mesenchyme. Phagosomes or apoptotic cells were also common in the cytoplasm of differentiated cells, which suggests a differentiation potential. When exposed to leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), ESD-EpiSCs could convert to naïve-like cells. We further analyzed the ultrastructure of converted EpiSCs (cESCs). As compared to ESD-EpiSCs, cESCs showed similar ultrastructural characteristics as naïve ESCs. These findings suggest that ultrastructure could be used to evaluate the pluripotency of ESCs. PMID:26757253

  17. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Controls Vascular Integrity by Regulating VE-Cadherin Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Anna E.; Timmerman, Ilse; Kovacevic, Igor; Hordijk, Peter L.; Adriaanse, Luc; Paatero, Ilkka; Belting, Heinz-Georg; van Buul, Jaap D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a serine protease inhibitor, is expressed and secreted by endothelial cells. Patients with PAI-1 deficiency show a mild to moderate bleeding diathesis, which has been exclusively ascribed to the function of PAI-1 in down-regulating fibrinolysis. We tested the hypothesis that PAI-1 function plays a direct role in controlling vascular integrity and permeability by keeping endothelial cell-cell junctions intact. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized PAI-039, a specific small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1, to investigate the role of PAI-1 in protecting endothelial integrity. In vivo inhibition of PAI-1 resulted in vascular leakage from intersegmental vessels and in the hindbrain of zebrafish embryos. In addition PAI-1 inhibition in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers leads to a marked decrease of transendothelial resistance and disrupted endothelial junctions. The total level of the endothelial junction regulator VE-cadherin was reduced, whereas surface VE-cadherin expression was unaltered. Moreover, PAI-1 inhibition reduced the shedding of VE-cadherin. Finally, we detected an accumulation of VE-cadherin at the Golgi apparatus. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that PAI-1 function is important for the maintenance of endothelial monolayer and vascular integrity by controlling VE-cadherin trafficking to and from the plasma membrane. Our data further suggest that therapies using PAI-1 antagonists like PAI-039 ought to be used with caution to avoid disruption of the vessel wall. PMID:26714278

  18. Optimum Vehicle Component Integration with InVeST (Integrated Vehicle Simulation Testbed)

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, W; Paddack, E; Aceves, S

    2001-12-27

    We have developed an Integrated Vehicle Simulation Testbed (InVeST). InVeST is based on the concept of Co-simulation, and it allows the development of virtual vehicles that can be analyzed and optimized as an overall integrated system. The virtual vehicle is defined by selecting different vehicle components from a component library. Vehicle component models can be written in multiple programming languages running on different computer platforms. At the same time, InVeST provides full protection for proprietary models. Co-simulation is a cost-effective alternative to competing methodologies, such as developing a translator or selecting a single programming language for all vehicle components. InVeST has been recently demonstrated using a transmission model and a transmission controller model. The transmission model was written in SABER and ran on a Sun/Solaris workstation, while the transmission controller was written in MATRIXx and ran on a PC running Windows NT. The demonstration was successfully performed. Future plans include the applicability of Co-simulation and InVeST to analysis and optimization of multiple complex systems, including those of Intelligent Transportation Systems.

  19. First-year medical students' naïve beliefs about respiratory physiology.

    PubMed

    Badenhorst, Elmi; Mamede, Silvia; Abrahams, Amaal; Bugarith, Kishor; Friedling, Jacqui; Gunston, Geney; Kelly-Laubscher, Roisin; Schmidt, Henk G

    2016-09-01

    The present study explored the nature and frequency of physiology naïve beliefs by investigating novices' understanding of the respiratory system. Previous studies have shown considerable misconceptions related to physiology but focused mostly on specific physiological processes of normal respiration. Little is known about novices' broader understanding of breathing in a clinical context. Our study hypothesized that naïve beliefs could hamper participants' ability to understand the interrelatedness of respiratory structures and functions related to breathing during a clinical complication. The study entailed both quantitative and qualitative foci. A two-tier test was designed and administered to 211 first-year medical students. Participants were asked to choose the correct answer out of a set of four options and to substantiate their choices. Questions were purposefully left open to elicit a wide range of responses. Statistical analysis (SPSS) was done to evaluate the frequency of naïve beliefs. Thematic analysis was used to determine themes within the raw data. The majority of participants selected incorrect answers in the multiple-choice question part of the questionnaire. Results from the thematic analysis yielded a considerable range of naïve beliefs about gas exchange, foundational physics, airflow, anatomic structures, and breathing pathways. An awareness of the existence of such naive beliefs in respiratory physiology will allow educators to address them in their teaching and thereby prevent naïve beliefs transforming into misconceptions. PMID:27445283

  20. Stüve-Wiedemann Syndrome: Update on Clinical and Genetic Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Romeo Bertola, Débora; Honjo, Rachel S.; Baratela, Wagner A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bowed long bones, joint restrictions, dysautonomia, and respiratory and feeding difficulties, leading to death in the neonatal period and infancy in several occasions. Since the first cases in 1971, much has been learned about this condition, including its molecular basis - mutations in the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor gene (LIFR) -, natural history and management possibilities. This review aims to highlight the clinical aspects, radiological features, molecular findings, and management strategies in Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome. PMID:27194968

  1. Establishment and Characterization of Naïve Pluripotency in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Sharat; Popovic, Mina; Van der Jeught, Margot; Heindryckx, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells are known to represent the naïve state of pluripotency, while human embryonic stem cells typically represented the primed state of pluripotency, characterized by a higher drift toward differentiation and some other disadvantages. Here we describe an efficient method for rapid, transgene free induction of the naïve pluripotent state in human by applying a novel combination of small molecules and growth factors in the culture medium (2i, LIF, basic fibroblast growth factor, ascorbic acid, and forskolin). Conversion of primed human embryonic stem cells towards the naive pluripotent state should be confirmed by a detailed characterization of the cells, as described in this chapter.

  2. Application Of Small Molecules Favoring Naïve Pluripotency during Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derivation

    PubMed Central

    Van der Jeught, Margot; Taelman, Jasin; Duggal, Galbha; Ghimire, Sabitri; Lierman, Sylvie; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M.; Deforce, Dieter; Deroo, Tom; De Sutter, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In mice, inhibition of both the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular-signal regulated kinase (MEK/Erk) and the Wnt signaling inhibitor glycogen synthase-3β (GSK3β) enables the derivation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) from nonpermissive strains in the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Whereas mESCs are in an uncommitted naïve state, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent a more advanced state, denoted as primed pluripotency. This burdens hESCs with a series of characteristics, which, in contrast to naïve ESCs, makes them not ideal for key applications such as cell-based clinical therapies and human disease modeling. In this study, different small molecule combinations were applied during human ESC derivation. Hereby, we aimed to sustain the naïve pluripotent state, by interfering with various key signaling pathways. First, we tested several combinations on existing, 2i (PD0325901 and CHIR99021)-derived mESCs. All combinations were shown to be equally adequate to sustain the expression of naïve pluripotency markers. Second, these conditions were tested during hESC derivation. Overall, the best results were observed in the presence of medium supplemented with 2i, LIF, and the noncanonical Wnt signaling agonist Wnt5A, alone and combined with epinephrine. In these conditions, outgrowths repeatedly showed an ESC progenitor-like morphology, starting from day 3. Culturing these “progenitor cells” did not result in stable, naïve hESC lines in the current conditions. Although Wnt5A could not promote naïve hESC derivation, we found that it was sustaining the conversion of established hESCs toward a more naïve state. Future work should aim to distinct the effects of the various culture formulations, including our Wnt5A-supplemented medium, reported to promote stable naïve pluripotency in hESCs. PMID:26053517

  3. Application Of Small Molecules Favoring Naïve Pluripotency during Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derivation.

    PubMed

    Van der Jeught, Margot; Taelman, Jasin; Duggal, Galbha; Ghimire, Sabitri; Lierman, Sylvie; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M; Deforce, Dieter; Deroo, Tom; De Sutter, Petra; Heindryckx, Björn

    2015-06-01

    In mice, inhibition of both the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular-signal regulated kinase (MEK/Erk) and the Wnt signaling inhibitor glycogen synthase-3β (GSK3β) enables the derivation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) from nonpermissive strains in the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Whereas mESCs are in an uncommitted naïve state, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent a more advanced state, denoted as primed pluripotency. This burdens hESCs with a series of characteristics, which, in contrast to naïve ESCs, makes them not ideal for key applications such as cell-based clinical therapies and human disease modeling. In this study, different small molecule combinations were applied during human ESC derivation. Hereby, we aimed to sustain the naïve pluripotent state, by interfering with various key signaling pathways. First, we tested several combinations on existing, 2i (PD0325901 and CHIR99021)-derived mESCs. All combinations were shown to be equally adequate to sustain the expression of naïve pluripotency markers. Second, these conditions were tested during hESC derivation. Overall, the best results were observed in the presence of medium supplemented with 2i, LIF, and the noncanonical Wnt signaling agonist Wnt5A, alone and combined with epinephrine. In these conditions, outgrowths repeatedly showed an ESC progenitor-like morphology, starting from day 3. Culturing these "progenitor cells" did not result in stable, naïve hESC lines in the current conditions. Although Wnt5A could not promote naïve hESC derivation, we found that it was sustaining the conversion of established hESCs toward a more naïve state. Future work should aim to distinct the effects of the various culture formulations, including our Wnt5A-supplemented medium, reported to promote stable naïve pluripotency in hESCs.

  4. Lessons about Virtual-Environment Software Systems from 20 years of VE building

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Russell M.; Jerald, Jason; VanderKnyff, Chris; Wendt, Jeremy; Borland, David; Marshburn, David; Sherman, William R.; Whitton, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    What are desirable and undesirable features of virtual-environment (VE) software architectures? What should be present (and absent) from such systems if they are to be optimally useful? How should they be structured? To help answer these questions we present experience from application designers, toolkit designers, and VE system architects along with examples of useful features from existing systems. Topics are organized under the major headings of: 3D space management, supporting display hardware, interaction, event management, time management, computation, portability, and the observation that less can be better. Lessons learned are presented as discussion of the issues, field experiences, nuggets of knowledge, and case studies. PMID:20567602

  5. Stüve-Wiedemann Syndrome: Update on Clinical and Genetic Aspects.

    PubMed

    Romeo Bertola, Débora; Honjo, Rachel S; Baratela, Wagner A R

    2016-04-01

    Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bowed long bones, joint restrictions, dysautonomia, and respiratory and feeding difficulties, leading to death in the neonatal period and infancy in several occasions. Since the first cases in 1971, much has been learned about this condition, including its molecular basis - mutations in the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor gene (LIFR) -, natural history and management possibilities. This review aims to highlight the clinical aspects, radiological features, molecular findings, and management strategies in Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome. PMID:27194968

  6. 76 FR 24883 - DNB Exports LLC, and AFI Elektromekanikanik Ve Elektronik San. Tic. Ltd. Sti. v. Barsan Global...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION DNB Exports LLC, and AFI Elektromekanikanik Ve Elektronik San. Tic. Ltd. Sti. v. Barsan Global... Commission (``Commission'') by DNB Exports LLC (``DNB''), and AFI Elektromekanikanik Ve Elektronik San....

  7. Naïve prey exhibit reduced antipredator behavior and survivorship.

    PubMed

    Martin, Charles W

    2014-01-01

    Prey naiveté has been hypothesized to be one of the major driving forces behind population declines following the introduction of novel predators or release of inexperienced prey into predator rich environments. In these cases, naïve prey may lack sufficient antipredator behavior and, as a result, suffer increased mortality. Despite this, some evidence suggests that many prey utilize a generalized response to predators. Here, the naiveté hypothesis is tested using a predator-prey pair sharing an evolutionary history: the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii Girard, 1852) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides Lacépède, 1802). Using farm-reared, naïve crayfish and wild-caught, experienced individuals, laboratory experiments demonstrated that naïve, farmed crayfish lack behavioral responses to chemical cues from bass, both in terms of movement and use of structural refuge. In contrast, experienced crayfish responded strongly to the same cues. In a subsequent field tethering experiment, these naïve individuals suffered a three-fold increase in predation rate. Based on these results, recognition of predators may not be innate in all prey, and previous experience and learning likely play a key role in the development of antipredator behavior. PMID:25392763

  8. Naïve prey exhibit reduced antipredator behavior and survivorship

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Prey naiveté has been hypothesized to be one of the major driving forces behind population declines following the introduction of novel predators or release of inexperienced prey into predator rich environments. In these cases, naïve prey may lack sufficient antipredator behavior and, as a result, suffer increased mortality. Despite this, some evidence suggests that many prey utilize a generalized response to predators. Here, the naiveté hypothesis is tested using a predator–prey pair sharing an evolutionary history: the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii Girard, 1852) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides Lacépède, 1802). Using farm-reared, naïve crayfish and wild-caught, experienced individuals, laboratory experiments demonstrated that naïve, farmed crayfish lack behavioral responses to chemical cues from bass, both in terms of movement and use of structural refuge. In contrast, experienced crayfish responded strongly to the same cues. In a subsequent field tethering experiment, these naïve individuals suffered a three-fold increase in predation rate. Based on these results, recognition of predators may not be innate in all prey, and previous experience and learning likely play a key role in the development of antipredator behavior. PMID:25392763

  9. Serious infections involving the CDC group Ve bacteria Chryseomonas luteola and Flavimonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, R E; Moriarty, R A; Lewis, D E; Oldfield, E C

    1991-01-01

    Chryseomonas luteola and Flavimonas oryzihabitans are phenotypically similar gram-negative bacilli and are also referred to as CDC groups Ve-1 and Ve-2, respectively. These bacteria are rarely reported as pathogens in humans. Infections described in the literature include primarily bacteremia in critically ill patients and peritonitis in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. We describe three cases of polymicrobial infection secondary to infection with group Ve organisms, including the first reported case (to our knowledge) of CNS infection due to F. oryzihabitans. These three cases and a review of literature suggest an association between the presence of indwelling catheters and polymicrobial infections with CDC group Ve organisms. F. oryzihabitans and C. luteola should be added to the expanding list of nosocomial pathogens with a propensity to infect critically ill patients who have undergone surgical procedures and/or had indwelling catheters placed. The isolation of either of these organisms from clinical specimens should prompt a search for a device-related source.

  10. Report on Tests of Metal Model Propellers in Combination with a Model VE-7 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesley, E P

    1926-01-01

    This report, prepared at the request of the NACA, describes tests of three metal model propellers, in a free air stream and in front of a model of a VE-7 airplane. The effect of introducing the model airplane is shown to be an increase in thrust and power coefficients and efficiency at small slip, and a decrease in the same at large slip.

  11. Cortisol awakening response in drug-naïve panic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jakuszkowiak-Wojten, Katarzyna; Landowski, Jerzy; Wiglusz, Mariusz S; Cubała, Wiesław Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis is involved in the pathophysiology of panic disorder (PD). The findings remain inconsistent. Cortisol awakening response (CAR) is a noninvasive biomarker of stress system activity. We designed the study to assess CAR in drug-naïve PD patients. Materials and methods We assessed CAR in 14 psychotropic drug-naïve outpatients with PD and 14 healthy controls. The severity of PD was assessed with Panic and Agoraphobia Scale. The severity of anxiety and depression was screened with Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results No significant difference in CAR between PD patients and control group was found. No correlations were observed between CAR and anxiety severity measures in PD patients and controls. Limitations The number of participating subjects was relatively small, and the study results apply to nonsuicidal drug-naïve PD patients without agoraphobia and with short-illness duration. There was a lack of control on subjects’ compliance with the sampling instructions. Conclusion The study provides no support for elevated CAR levels in drug-naïve PD patients without agoraphobia. PMID:27390521

  12. Pseudomonas sp. group Ve-2 bacterial peritonitis in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Amber, I J; Reimer, L G

    1987-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. group Ve-2 peritonitis occurred in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis who had recently completed intraperitoneal cephalosporin therapy for culture-negative peritonitis. This is the second reported case of peritonitis in this population of patients due to this unusual organism, which is usually resistant to most cephalosporin antibiotics. PMID:3571484

  13. First-Year Medical Students' Naïve Beliefs about Respiratory Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badenhorst, Elmi; Mamede, Silvia; Abrahams, Amaal; Bugarith, Kishor; Friedling, Jacqui; Gunston, Geney; Kelly-Laubscher, Roisin; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2016-01-01

    The present study explored the nature and frequency of physiology naïve beliefs by investigating novices' understanding of the respiratory system. Previous studies have shown considerable misconceptions related to physiology but focused mostly on specific physiological processes of normal respiration. Little is known about novices' broader…

  14. "You've Got the Power": Documentary Film as a Tool of Environmental Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Darlene E.

    2011-01-01

    Educators call for more creative means to combat the moribund narratives of contemporary environmentalism. Using visual methodology and environmental adult education theory, this article discusses how a documentary film titled "You've Got the Power" works to pose questions about complex environmental issues and develop critical thinking and…

  15. Naïve and memory B cells exhibit distinct biochemical responses following BCR engagement.

    PubMed

    Moens, Leen; Kane, Alisa; Tangye, Stuart G

    2016-09-01

    Immunological memory is characterized by the rapid reactivation of memory B cells that produce large quantities of high-affinity antigen-specific antibodies. This contrasts the response of naïve B cells, and the primary immune response, which is much slower and of lower affinity. Memory responses are critical for protection against infectious diseases and form the basis of most currently available vaccines. Although we have known about the phenomenon of long-lived memory for centuries, the biochemical differences underlying these diverse responses of naïve and memory B cells is incompletely resolved. Here we investigated the nature of B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling in human splenic naïve, IgM(+) memory and isotype-switched memory B cells following multivalent BCR crosslinking. We observed comparable rapid and transient phosphorylation kinetics for proximal (phosphotyrosine and spleen tyrosine kinase) and propagation (B-cell linker, phospholipase Cγ2) signaling components in these different B-cell subsets. However, the magnitude of activation of downstream components of the BCR signaling pathway were greater in memory compared with naïve cells. Although no differences were observed in the magnitude of Ca(2+) mobilization between subsets, IgM(+) memory B cells exhibited a more rapid Ca(2+) mobilization and a greater depletion of the Ca(2+) endoplasmic reticulum stores, while IgG(+) memory B cells had a prolonged Ca(2+) uptake. Collectively, our findings show that intrinsic signaling features of B-cell subsets contribute to the robust response of human memory B cells over naïve B cells. This has implications for our understanding of memory B-cell responses and provides a framework to modulate these responses in the setting of vaccination and immunopathologies, such as immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. PMID:27101923

  16. Small-Molecule Induction of Canine Embryonic Stem Cells Toward Naïve Pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Ian C; Brooks, Courtney R; Teichroeb, Jonathan H; Villagómez, Daniel A; Hess, David A; Séguin, Cheryle A; Betts, Dean H

    2016-08-15

    Naïve and primed pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) reflect discrete pluripotent states that approximate the inner cell mass or the progressively lineage-restricted perigastrulation epiblast, respectively. Cells that occupy primed pluripotency have distinct epigenetic landscapes, transcriptional circuitry, and trophic requirements compared with their naïve counterparts. The existence of multiple pluripotent states has not been explored in dogs, which show promise as outbred biomedical models with more than 300 inherited diseases that also afflict humans. However, our understanding of canine embryogenesis and embryo-derived stem cells is limited. Herein, we converted leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-dependent and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2)-dependent canine embryonic stem cells (cESCs) resembling primed PSCs toward a naïve pluripotent state using LIF and inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 [called 2i and LIF (2iL)]. cESCs propagated in 2iL exhibited significant induction of genes associated with the naïve pluripotent state (eg, REX1, TBX3) and downregulation of primed pluripotency markers (eg, OTX2, FGF5) (P < 0.05). Differential phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and cell fate decisions on exposure to bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) suggested that a novel pluripotent identity has been established with 2iL. Accordingly, cESCs cultured with 2iL formed colonies at a greater efficiency than LIF-FGF2 cESCs following single-cell dissociation. Total genomic DNA methylation and histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation signals were reduced in 2iL-treated cESCs. Our data suggest that 2iL culture conditions promote the conversion of cESCs toward an epigenetically distinct pluripotent state resembling naïve PSCs. PMID:27392793

  17. Rabies virus infection in Eptesicus fuscus bats born in captivity (naïve bats).

    PubMed

    Davis, April D; Jarvis, Jodie A; Pouliott, Craig; Rudd, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The study of rabies virus infection in bats can be challenging due to quarantine requirements, husbandry concerns, genetic differences among animals, and lack of medical history. To date, all rabies virus (RABV) studies in bats have been performed in wild caught animals. Determining the RABV exposure history of a wild caught bat based on the presence or absence of viral neutralizing antibodies (VNA) may be misleading. Previous studies have demonstrated that the presence of VNA following natural or experimental inoculation is often ephemeral. With this knowledge, it is difficult to determine if a seronegative, wild caught bat has been previously exposed to RABV. The influence of prior rabies exposure in healthy, wild caught bats is unknown. To investigate the pathogenesis of RABV infection in bats born in captivity (naïve bats), naïve bats were inoculated intramuscularly with one of two Eptesicus fuscus rabies virus variants, EfV1 or EfV2. To determine the host response to a heterologous RABV, a separate group of naïve bats were inoculated with a Lasionycteris noctivagans RABV (LnV1). Six months following the first inoculation, all bats were challenged with EfV2. Our results indicate that naïve bats may have some level of innate resistance to intramuscular RABV inoculation. Additionally, naïve bats inoculated with the LnV demonstrated the lowest clinical infection rate of all groups. However, primary inoculation with EfV1 or LnV did not appear to be protective against a challenge with the more pathogenic EfV2.

  18. Human α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) epithelial prostate stem cells express low levels of active androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Stuart C; Hepburn, Anastasia C; Wilson, Laura; Coffey, Kelly; Ryan-Munden, Claudia A; Pal, Deepali; Leung, Hing Y; Robson, Craig N; Heer, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are thought to be the cell of origin in malignant transformation in many tissues, but their role in human prostate carcinogenesis continues to be debated. One of the conflicts with this model is that cancer stem cells have been described to lack androgen receptor (AR) expression, which is of established importance in prostate cancer initiation and progression. We re-examined the expression patterns of AR within adult prostate epithelial differentiation using an optimised sensitive and specific approach examining transcript, protein and AR regulated gene expression. Highly enriched populations were isolated consisting of stem (α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE)), transiently amplifying (α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(-VE)) and terminally differentiated (α(2)β(1)(LOW) CD133(-VE)) cells. AR transcript and protein expression was confirmed in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) and CD133(-VE) progenitor cells. Flow cytometry confirmed that median (±SD) fraction of cells expressing AR were 77% (±6%) in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) stem cells and 68% (±12%) in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(-VE) transiently amplifying cells. However, 3-fold lower levels of total AR protein expression (peak and median immunofluorescence) were present in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) stem cells compared with differentiated cells. This finding was confirmed with dual immunostaining of prostate sections for AR and CD133, which again demonstrated low levels of AR within basal CD133(+VE) cells. Activity of the AR was confirmed in prostate progenitor cells by the expression of low levels of the AR regulated genes PSA, KLK2 and TMPRSS2. The confirmation of AR expression in prostate progenitor cells allows integration of the cancer stem cell theory with the established models of prostate cancer initiation based on a functional AR. Further study of specific AR functions in prostate stem and differentiated cells may highlight novel mechanisms of prostate homeostasis and insights into tumourigenesis.

  19. VeA Is Associated with the Response to Oxidative Stress in the Aflatoxin Producer Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Baidya, Sachin; Duran, Rocio M.; Lohmar, Jessica M.; Harris-Coward, Pamela Y.; Cary, Jeffrey W.; Hong, Sung-Yong; Roze, Ludmila V.; Linz, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Survival of fungal species depends on the ability of these organisms to respond to environmental stresses. Osmotic stress or high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can cause stress in fungi resulting in growth inhibition. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells have developed numerous mechanisms to counteract and survive the stress in the presence of ROS. In many fungi, the HOG signaling pathway is crucial for the oxidative stress response as well as for osmotic stress response. This study revealed that while the osmotic stress response is only slightly affected by the master regulator veA, this gene, also known to control morphological development and secondary metabolism in numerous fungal species, has a profound effect on the oxidative stress response in the aflatoxin-producing fungus Aspergillus flavus. We found that the expression of A. flavus homolog genes involved in the HOG signaling pathway is regulated by veA. Deletion of veA resulted in a reduction in transcription levels of oxidative stress response genes after exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, analyses of the effect of VeA on the promoters of cat1 and trxB indicate that the presence of VeA alters DNA-protein complex formation. This is particularly notable in the cat1 promoter, where the absence of VeA results in abnormally stronger complex formation with reduced cat1 expression and more sensitivity to ROS in a veA deletion mutant, suggesting that VeA might prevent binding of negative transcription regulators to the cat1 promoter. Our study also revealed that veA positively influences the expression of the transcription factor gene atfB and that normal formation of DNA-protein complexes in the cat1 promoter is dependent on AtfB. PMID:24951443

  20. Modelling pathogen log10 reduction values achieved by activated sludge treatment using naïve and semi naïve Bayes network models.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Guido; Roser, David J; Sisson, Scott A; Keegan, Alexandra; Khan, Stuart J

    2015-11-15

    Risk management for wastewater treatment and reuse have led to growing interest in understanding and optimising pathogen reduction during biological treatment processes. However, modelling pathogen reduction is often limited by poor characterization of the relationships between variables and incomplete knowledge of removal mechanisms. The aim of this paper was to assess the applicability of Bayesian belief network models to represent associations between pathogen reduction, and operating conditions and monitoring parameters and predict AS performance. Naïve Bayes and semi-naïve Bayes networks were constructed from an activated sludge dataset including operating and monitoring parameters, and removal efficiencies for two pathogens (native Giardia lamblia and seeded Cryptosporidium parvum) and five native microbial indicators (F-RNA bacteriophage, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, coliforms and enterococci). First we defined the Bayesian network structures for the two pathogen log10 reduction values (LRVs) class nodes discretized into two states (< and ≥ 1 LRV) using two different learning algorithms. Eight metrics, such as Prediction Accuracy (PA) and Area Under the receiver operating Curve (AUC), provided a comparison of model prediction performance, certainty and goodness of fit. This comparison was used to select the optimum models. The optimum Tree Augmented naïve models predicted removal efficiency with high AUC when all system parameters were used simultaneously (AUCs for C. parvum and G. lamblia LRVs of 0.95 and 0.87 respectively). However, metrics for individual system parameters showed only the C. parvum model was reliable. By contrast individual parameters for G. lamblia LRV prediction typically obtained low AUC scores (AUC < 0.81). Useful predictors for C. parvum LRV included solids retention time, turbidity and total coliform LRV. The methodology developed appears applicable for predicting pathogen removal efficiency in water treatment

  1. Most microbe-specific naïve CD4⁺ T cells produce memory cells during infection.

    PubMed

    Tubo, Noah J; Fife, Brian T; Pagan, Antonio J; Kotov, Dmitri I; Goldberg, Michael F; Jenkins, Marc K

    2016-01-29

    Infection elicits CD4(+) memory T lymphocytes that participate in protective immunity. Although memory cells are the progeny of naïve T cells, it is unclear that all naïve cells from a polyclonal repertoire have memory cell potential. Using a single-cell adoptive transfer and spleen biopsy method, we found that in mice, essentially all microbe-specific naïve cells produced memory cells during infection. Different clonal memory cell populations had different B cell or macrophage helper compositions that matched effector cell populations generated much earlier in the response. Thus, each microbe-specific naïve CD4(+) T cell produces a distinctive ratio of effector cell types early in the immune response that is maintained as some cells in the clonal population become memory cells.

  2. TheRadio Science Experiment VeRa onboard ESA's Venus Express (VEX) Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeusler, Bernd; Paetzold, M.; Bird, M. K.; Simpson, R. A.; Tyler, L. G.; Dehant, V.; Imamura, T.; Tellmann, S.; Mattei, R.

    2006-09-01

    The VEX spacecraft was successfully injected into the Venus orbit on April 11, 2006. VeRa is an active radio sounding instrument which will measure atmospheric/ionospheric temperature and density profiles, sound with bistatic radar experiments the surface of the planet, will measure its gravity anomalies and investigate also the structure of the corona by analyzing radio carrier signals received on ground in the S- and X-frequency bands. The radio science instrument VeRa is equipped with an ultrastable oscillator (USO) which will be used especially for atmospheric sounding and bistatic radar experiments as frequency reference in the OneWay transmission mode. We will present the current status of the experiment, the results of the commissioning tests and first scientific results.

  3. Naïve pluripotency is associated with global DNA hypomethylation

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Harry G.; McEwen, Kirsten R.; Turp, Aleksandra; Encheva, Vesela; Carroll, Tom; Grabole, Nils; Mansfield, William; Nashun, Buhe; Knezovich, Jaysen G.; Smith, Austin; Surani, M. Azim; Hajkova, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Naïve pluripotent embryonic stem (ESCs) cells and embryonic germ (EGCs) cells are derived from the preimplantation epiblast and primordial germ cells (PGCs), respectively. We investigated whether differences exist between ESCs and EGCs in view of their distinct developmental origins. PGCs are programmed to undergo global DNA demethylation; however we find that EGCs exhibit equivalent levels of global DNA methylation to ESCs. Importantly, inhibition of MEK and Gsk3b by 2i conditions leads to a pronounced reduction in DNA methylation in both cell types. This is driven by Prdm14 and is associated with downregulation of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. However, genomic imprints are maintained in 2i and we report derivation of EGCs with intact genomic imprints. Collectively, our findings establish that culture in 2i instils a naïve pluripotent state with a distinctive epigenetic configuration that parallels molecular features observed in both the preimplantation epiblast and nascent PGCs. PMID:23416945

  4. From naïve pluripotency to chimeras: a new ethical challenge?

    PubMed

    Hyun, Insoo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the prospect of generating and using human stem cells that exhibit a state of naïve pluripotency. Such a pluripotent state might be functionally confirmed by assessing the chimeric contribution of these cells to non-human blastocysts. Furthermore, the generation of naïve human pluripotent stem cells in vitro could lead to the creation of chimeric animal models that can facilitate the study of human development and disease. However, these lines of research raise thorny ethical concerns about the moral status of such chimeric animals. Here, I call attention to these ethical barbs and suggest a way in which to proceed cautiously.

  5. The Naïve Utility Calculus: Computational Principles Underlying Commonsense Psychology.

    PubMed

    Jara-Ettinger, Julian; Gweon, Hyowon; Schulz, Laura E; Tenenbaum, Joshua B

    2016-08-01

    We propose that human social cognition is structured around a basic understanding of ourselves and others as intuitive utility maximizers: from a young age, humans implicitly assume that agents choose goals and actions to maximize the rewards they expect to obtain relative to the costs they expect to incur. This 'naïve utility calculus' allows both children and adults observe the behavior of others and infer their beliefs and desires, their longer-term knowledge and preferences, and even their character: who is knowledgeable or competent, who is praiseworthy or blameworthy, who is friendly, indifferent, or an enemy. We review studies providing support for the naïve utility calculus, and we show how it captures much of the rich social reasoning humans engage in from infancy. PMID:27388875

  6. Boosting naïve Bayesian learning on a large subset of MEDLINE.

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, W. J.

    2000-01-01

    We are concerned with the rating of new documents that appear in a large database (MEDLINE) and are candidates for inclusion in a small specialty database (REBASE). The requirement is to rank the new documents as nearly in order of decreasing potential to be added to the smaller database as possible, so as to improve the coverage of the smaller database without increasing the effort of those who manage this specialty database. To perform this ranking task we have considered several machine learning approaches based on the naï ve Bayesian algorithm. We find that adaptive boosting outperforms naï ve Bayes, but that a new form of boosting which we term staged Bayesian retrieval outperforms adaptive boosting. Staged Bayesian retrieval involves two stages of Bayesian retrieval and we further find that if the second stage is replaced by a support vector machine we again obtain a significant improvement over the strictly Bayesian approach. PMID:11080018

  7. Blockade of cholinergic transmission elicits somatic signs in nicotine-naïve adolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Clare E.; Manbeck, Katherine E.; Shelley, David; Harris, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    High doses of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist mecamylamine can elicit somatic signs resembling those associated with nicotine withdrawal in nicotine-naïve adult rats. Understanding this phenomenon, and its possible modulation by acute nicotine and age, could inform the use of mecamylamine as both an experimental tool and potential pharmacotherapy for tobacco dependence and other disorders. This study evaluated the ability of high-dose mecamylamine to elicit somatic signs in adolescent rats, and the potential for acute nicotine pretreatment to potentiate this effect as previously reported in adults. Single or repeated injections of mecamylamine (1.5 or 3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) elicited somatic signs in nicotine-naïve adolescents, but this effect was not influenced by 2 h pretreatment with acute nicotine (0.5 mg/kg, s.c.). In an initial evaluation of the effects of age in this model, mecamylamine (2.25 mg/kg, s.c.) elicited somatic signs in nicotine-naïve adolescents and adults. This effect was modestly enhanced following acute nicotine injections in adults but not in adolescents, even when a higher nicotine dose (1.0 rather than 0.5 mg/kg, s.c.) was used in adolescents to account for age differences in nicotine pharmacokinetics. These studies are the first to show that mecamylamine elicits somatic signs in nicotine-naïve adolescent rats, an effect that should be considered when designing and interpreting studies examining effects of high doses of mecamylamine in adolescents. Our findings also provide preliminary evidence that these signs may be differentially modulated by acute nicotine pretreatment in adolescents versus adults. PMID:26539119

  8. Naïve realism: folk fallacies in the design and use of visual displays.

    PubMed

    Smallman, Harvey S; Cook, Maia B

    2011-07-01

    Often implicit in visual display design and development is a gold standard of photorealism. By approximating direct perception, photorealism appeals to users and designers by being both attractive and apparently effortless. The vexing result from numerous performance evaluations, though, is that increasing realism often impairs performance. Smallman and St. John (2005) labeled misplaced faith in realistic information display Naïve Realism and theorized it resulted from a triplet of folk fallacies about perception. Here, we illustrate issues associated with the wider trend towards realism by focusing on a specific current trend for high-fidelity perspective view (3D) geospatial displays. In two experiments, we validated Naïve Realism for different terrain understanding tasks, explored whether certain individuals are particularly prone to Naïve Realism, and determined the ability of task feedback to mitigate Naïve Realism. Performance was measured for laying and judging a concealed route across realistic terrain shown in different display formats. Task feedback was either implicit, in Experiment 1, or explicit in Experiment 2. Prospective and retrospective intuitions about the best display formats for the tasks were recorded and then related to task performance and participant spatial ability. Participants generally intuited they would perform tasks better with more realism than they actually required. For example, counter to intuitions, lowering fidelity of the terrain display revealed the gross scene layout needed to lay a well-concealed route. Individuals of high spatial ability calibrated their intuitions with only implicit task feedback, whereas those of low spatial ability required salient, explicit feedback to calibrate their intuitions about display realism. Results are discussed in the wider context of applying perceptual science to display design, and combating folk fallacies. PMID:25164404

  9. The challenging definition of naïve patient for biological drug use.

    PubMed

    Biggioggero, Martina; Danova, Marco; Genovese, Umberto; Locatelli, Francesco; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Pane, Fabrizio; Scaglione, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Biosimilar is defined by The European Medical Agency as a biological medicinal product, which is similar but not identical to the biological drug already authorized. The biosimilar and its reference product are expected to display the same safety and efficacy profile and are generally used to treat the same conditions. The Italian Medicines Agency considers biosimilars as a valid therapeutic option with an economic advantage, especially in primary naïve patients with no previous exposure to the originator or with a sufficiently long wash-out period ("secondary naïve"). The identification of "secondary naïve" is not well defined and can be subjected to different variables, mainly the drug biologic effect and its immunogenicity. The first one depends on the type of biologics and on their mechanism of action. The second one is related to the fact that biologicals may be immunogenic and can trigger an anti-drug antibody response (ADA). ADA may behave as neutralizing antibodies blocking the active site of the biological but can also recognize other epitopes favoring the formation of immune-complexes that eventually affect the pharmacodynamics. Moreover, the concomitant immune-suppressive treatment can affect the immunogenicity, even if the exact mechanism remains unknown. In conclusion, the development and use of biosimilars represent a tool for increasing health system sustainability. However it is of paramount importance to distinguish between the pharmacodynamics of a given drug and its immunogenicity being the two aspects unrelated. Thus a detailed definition of "secondary naïve" patients is challenging, and may be related to both the two parameters.

  10. Naïve realism: folk fallacies in the design and use of visual displays.

    PubMed

    Smallman, Harvey S; Cook, Maia B

    2011-07-01

    Often implicit in visual display design and development is a gold standard of photorealism. By approximating direct perception, photorealism appeals to users and designers by being both attractive and apparently effortless. The vexing result from numerous performance evaluations, though, is that increasing realism often impairs performance. Smallman and St. John (2005) labeled misplaced faith in realistic information display Naïve Realism and theorized it resulted from a triplet of folk fallacies about perception. Here, we illustrate issues associated with the wider trend towards realism by focusing on a specific current trend for high-fidelity perspective view (3D) geospatial displays. In two experiments, we validated Naïve Realism for different terrain understanding tasks, explored whether certain individuals are particularly prone to Naïve Realism, and determined the ability of task feedback to mitigate Naïve Realism. Performance was measured for laying and judging a concealed route across realistic terrain shown in different display formats. Task feedback was either implicit, in Experiment 1, or explicit in Experiment 2. Prospective and retrospective intuitions about the best display formats for the tasks were recorded and then related to task performance and participant spatial ability. Participants generally intuited they would perform tasks better with more realism than they actually required. For example, counter to intuitions, lowering fidelity of the terrain display revealed the gross scene layout needed to lay a well-concealed route. Individuals of high spatial ability calibrated their intuitions with only implicit task feedback, whereas those of low spatial ability required salient, explicit feedback to calibrate their intuitions about display realism. Results are discussed in the wider context of applying perceptual science to display design, and combating folk fallacies.

  11. The stochastic dynamics of a Brownian particle in a viscoelastic (VE) medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azese, Martin; Bhattacharya, Sukalyan

    2012-02-01

    The stochastic dynamics of a Brownian particle in a viscoelastic (VE) medium is an important phenomenon from micro-rheological perspective. In micro-rheology, the main question is how to predict the rheological properties by observing the Brownian motion in the it without using a rheometer, as the sample is too precious to be structurally destroyed in a macro-scale experiment. Thus, several theoretical studies tried to relate the features of the stochastic motion to the VE property. However, it seems that none of these theories is complete because their formulations invariably involve heuristic assumptions inherited from the classical results for purely viscous fluid. In this talk, we will present a theory which is devoid of any such arbitrary assumption. Accordingly, we will first generalize the fluctuation-dissipation theorem for VE medium to obtain the velocity correlation function (VCF) for given velocity-response function (VRF) which describes the temporal dependence of velocity of the particle initially driven by an impulse. Our generalized theorem proves VCF and VRF to be unequal, and shows the corresponding equality in classical result for purely viscous fluid as a special case. We will re-examine the validity of Green-Kubo relation so that mean square displacement(MSD) can be associated with VCF. Finally, the linearized hydrodynamic equation for general VE medium will be solved to provide the required VRF. As a result, the property of the medium which is represented by VRF would be revealed by both time-dependence of the VCF and MSD.

  12. Exercise VE and physical performance at altitude are not affected by menstrual cycle phase.

    PubMed

    Beidleman, B A; Rock, P B; Muza, S R; Fulco, C S; Forte, V A; Cymerman, A

    1999-05-01

    We hypothesized that progesterone-mediated ventilatory stimulation during the midluteal phase of the menstrual cycle would increase exercise minute ventilation (VE; l/min) at sea level (SL) and with acute altitude (AA) exposure but would only increase arterial O2 saturation (SaO2, %) with AA exposure. We further hypothesized that an increased exercise SaO2 with AA exposure would enhance O2 transport and improve both peak O2 uptake (VO2 peak; ml x kg-1 x min-1) and submaximal exercise time to exhaustion (Exh; min) in the midluteal phase. Eight female lowlanders [33 +/- 3 (mean +/- SD) yr, 58 +/- 6 kg] completed a VO2 peak and Exh test at 70% of their altitude-specific VO2 peak at SL and with AA exposure to 4,300 m in a hypobaric chamber (446 mmHg) in their early follicular and midluteal phases. Progesterone levels increased (P < 0.05) approximately 20-fold from the early follicular to midluteal phase at SL and AA. Peak VE (101 +/- 17) and submaximal VE (55 +/- 9) were not affected by cycle phase or altitude. Submaximal SaO2 did not differ between cycle phases at SL, but it was 3% higher during the midluteal phase with AA exposure. Neither VO2 peak nor Exh time was affected by cycle phase at SL or AA. We conclude that, despite significantly increased progesterone levels in the midluteal phase, exercise VE is not increased at SL or AA. Moreover, neither maximal nor submaximal exercise performance is affected by menstrual cycle phase at SL or AA.

  13. VE-cadherin facilitates BMP-induced endothelial cell permeability and signaling.

    PubMed

    Benn, Andreas; Bredow, Clara; Casanova, Isabel; Vukičević, Slobodan; Knaus, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Several vascular disorders, such as aberrant angiogenesis, atherosclerosis and pulmonary hypertension, have been linked to dysfunctional BMP signaling. Vascular hyperpermeability via distortion of endothelial cell adherens junctions is a common feature of these diseases, but the role of BMPs in this process has not been investigated. BMP signaling is initiated by binding of ligand to, and activation of, BMP type I (BMPRI) and type II (BMPRII) receptors. Internalization of VE-cadherin as well as c-Src kinase-dependent phosphorylation have been implicated in the loosening of cell-cell contacts, thereby modulating vascular permeability. Here we demonstrate that BMP6 induces hyperpermeabilization of human endothelial cells by inducing internalization and c-Src-dependent phosphorylation of VE-cadherin. Furthermore, we show BMP-dependent physical interaction of VE-cadherin with the BMP receptor ALK2 (BMPRI) and BMPRII, resulting in stabilization of the BMP receptor complex and, thereby, the support of BMP6-Smad signaling. Our results provide first insights into the molecular mechanism of BMP-induced vascular permeability, a hallmark of various vascular diseases, and provide the basis for further investigations of BMPs as regulators of vascular integrity, both under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:26598555

  14. A Multilayer Naïve Bayes Model for Analyzing User's Retweeting Sentiment Tendency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengmeng; Zuo, Wanli; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Today microblogging has increasingly become a means of information diffusion via user's retweeting behavior. Since retweeting content, as context information of microblogging, is an understanding of microblogging, hence, user's retweeting sentiment tendency analysis has gradually become a hot research topic. Targeted at online microblogging, a dynamic social network, we investigate how to exploit dynamic retweeting sentiment features in retweeting sentiment tendency analysis. On the basis of time series of user's network structure information and published text information, we first model dynamic retweeting sentiment features. Then we build Naïve Bayes models from profile-, relationship-, and emotion-based dimensions, respectively. Finally, we build a multilayer Naïve Bayes model based on multidimensional Naïve Bayes models to analyze user's retweeting sentiment tendency towards a microblog. Experiments on real-world dataset demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework. Further experiments are conducted to understand the importance of dynamic retweeting sentiment features and temporal information in retweeting sentiment tendency analysis. What is more, we provide a new train of thought for retweeting sentiment tendency analysis in dynamic social networks. PMID:26417367

  15. VE-cadherin facilitates BMP-induced endothelial cell permeability and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Benn, Andreas; Bredow, Clara; Casanova, Isabel; Vukičević, Slobodan; Knaus, Petra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several vascular disorders, such as aberrant angiogenesis, atherosclerosis and pulmonary hypertension, have been linked to dysfunctional BMP signaling. Vascular hyperpermeability via distortion of endothelial cell adherens junctions is a common feature of these diseases, but the role of BMPs in this process has not been investigated. BMP signaling is initiated by binding of ligand to, and activation of, BMP type I (BMPRI) and type II (BMPRII) receptors. Internalization of VE-cadherin as well as c-Src kinase-dependent phosphorylation have been implicated in the loosening of cell–cell contacts, thereby modulating vascular permeability. Here we demonstrate that BMP6 induces hyperpermeabilization of human endothelial cells by inducing internalization and c-Src-dependent phosphorylation of VE-cadherin. Furthermore, we show BMP-dependent physical interaction of VE-cadherin with the BMP receptor ALK2 (BMPRI) and BMPRII, resulting in stabilization of the BMP receptor complex and, thereby, the support of BMP6-Smad signaling. Our results provide first insights into the molecular mechanism of BMP-induced vascular permeability, a hallmark of various vascular diseases, and provide the basis for further investigations of BMPs as regulators of vascular integrity, both under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:26598555

  16. A Multilayer Naïve Bayes Model for Analyzing User's Retweeting Sentiment Tendency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengmeng; Zuo, Wanli; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Today microblogging has increasingly become a means of information diffusion via user's retweeting behavior. Since retweeting content, as context information of microblogging, is an understanding of microblogging, hence, user's retweeting sentiment tendency analysis has gradually become a hot research topic. Targeted at online microblogging, a dynamic social network, we investigate how to exploit dynamic retweeting sentiment features in retweeting sentiment tendency analysis. On the basis of time series of user's network structure information and published text information, we first model dynamic retweeting sentiment features. Then we build Naïve Bayes models from profile-, relationship-, and emotion-based dimensions, respectively. Finally, we build a multilayer Naïve Bayes model based on multidimensional Naïve Bayes models to analyze user's retweeting sentiment tendency towards a microblog. Experiments on real-world dataset demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework. Further experiments are conducted to understand the importance of dynamic retweeting sentiment features and temporal information in retweeting sentiment tendency analysis. What is more, we provide a new train of thought for retweeting sentiment tendency analysis in dynamic social networks.

  17. A Ve homologous gene from Gossypium barbadense, Gbvdr3, enhances the defense response against Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianzi; Kan, Jialiang; Yang, Yuwen; Ling, Xitie; Chang, Youhong; Zhang, Baolong

    2016-01-01

    The tomato Ve1 gene and several Ve1 homologues are involved in the resistance to Verticillium dahliae. Here, we report on another Ve homologous gene, Gbvdr3, from a Verticillium wilt-resistant cotton cultivar, Gossypium barbadense Hai7124, which has a 3207-bp region that encodes a predicted receptor-like protein. Transient expression analyses indicated that Gbvdr3 is localized in the plasma membrane, and virus-induced gene silencing of Gbvdr3 compromised the resistance of Hai7124 cotton to a defoliating strain of V. dahliae, V991, but not to a non-defoliating strain, BP2. This resistance pattern was further confirmed by over-expression of Gbvdr3 in transgenic Arabidopsis, which significantly elevated the expression of the ethylene-regulated gene GST2, the ethylene- and jasmonic acid-regulated defense-related genes PR3 and PDF1.2, and the salicylic acid-regulated genes PR1 and PR5, but not the PR2 gene. It also triggered the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and callose at early time points during infection by the V991 defoliating strain. In contrast, elevated accumulation of hydrogen peroxide or callose in Gbvdr3-expressed Arabidopsis leaves was not apparent under infection by the non-defoliating strain, BP2. These results suggested that Gbvdr3 is involved in the resistance to a unique spectrum of defoliating V. dahliae strains.

  18. Diesel Exhaust Particle Exposure Causes Redistribution of Endothelial Tube VE-Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Ming-Wei; Kozlosky, John; Po, Iris P.; Strickland, Pamela Ohman; Svoboda, Kathy K. H.; Cooper, Keith; Laumbach, Robert; Gordon, Marion K.

    2010-01-01

    Whether diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) potentially have a direct effect on capillary endothelia was examined by following the adherens junction component, vascular endothelial cell cadherin (VE-cadherin). This molecule is incorporated into endothelial adherens junctions at the cell surface, where it forms homodimeric associations with adjacent cells and contributes to the barrier function of the vasculature (Dejana et al., 2008; Venkiteswaran et al., 2002; Villasante et al., 2007). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that were pre-formed into capillary-like tube networks in vitro were exposed to DEPs for 24 hr. After exposure, the integrity of VE-cadherin in adherens junctions was assessed by immunofluorescence analysis, and demonstrated that increasing concentrations of DEPs caused increasing redistribution of VE-cadherin away from the cell-cell junctions toward intracellular locations. Since HUVEC tube networks are three-dimensional structures, whether particles entered the endothelial cells or tubular lumens was also examined. The data indicate that translocation of the particles does occur. The results, obtained in a setting that removes the confounding effects of inflammatory cells or blood components, suggest that if DEPs encounter alveolar capillaries in vivo, they may be able to directly affect the endothelial cell-cell junctions. PMID:20887764

  19. A distinct plasmablast and naïve B-cell phenotype in primary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Shaun M.; Gibson, Adele; Lucas, Geoff; Nandigam, Raghava; Taylor, Louise; Provan, Drew; Newland, Adrian C.; Savage, Caroline O.; Henderson, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia is an autoimmune disorder in which platelet destruction is a consequence of both B- and T-cell dysregulation. Flow cytometry was used to further characterize the B- and T-cell compartments in a cross-sectional cohort of 26 immune thrombocytopenia patients including antiplatelet antibody positive (n=14) and negative (n=12) patients exposed to a range of therapies, and a cohort of matched healthy volunteers. Markers for B-cell activating factor and its receptors, relevant B-cell activation markers (CD95 and CD21) and markers for CD4+ T-cell subsets, including circulating T-follicular helper-like cells, were included. Our results indicate that an expanded population of CD95+ naïve B cells correlated with disease activity in immune thrombocytopenia patients regardless of treatment status. A population of CD21-naïve B cells was specifically expanded in autoantibody-positive immune thrombocytopenia patients. Furthermore, the B-cell maturation antigen, a receptor for B-cell activating factor, was consistently and strongly up-regulated on plasmablasts from immune thrombocytopenia patients. These observations have parallels in other autoantibody-mediated diseases and suggest that loss of peripheral tolerance in naïve B cells may be an important component of immune thrombocytopenia pathogenesis. Moreover, the B-cell maturation antigen represents a potential target for plasma cell directed therapies in immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:26969086

  20. A distinct plasmablast and naïve B-cell phenotype in primary immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Flint, Shaun M; Gibson, Adele; Lucas, Geoff; Nandigam, Raghava; Taylor, Louise; Provan, Drew; Newland, Adrian C; Savage, Caroline O; Henderson, Robert B

    2016-06-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia is an autoimmune disorder in which platelet destruction is a consequence of both B- and T-cell dysregulation. Flow cytometry was used to further characterize the B- and T-cell compartments in a cross-sectional cohort of 26 immune thrombocytopenia patients including antiplatelet antibody positive (n=14) and negative (n=12) patients exposed to a range of therapies, and a cohort of matched healthy volunteers. Markers for B-cell activating factor and its receptors, relevant B-cell activation markers (CD95 and CD21) and markers for CD4(+) T-cell subsets, including circulating T-follicular helper-like cells, were included. Our results indicate that an expanded population of CD95(+) naïve B cells correlated with disease activity in immune thrombocytopenia patients regardless of treatment status. A population of CD21-naïve B cells was specifically expanded in autoantibody-positive immune thrombocytopenia patients. Furthermore, the B-cell maturation antigen, a receptor for B-cell activating factor, was consistently and strongly up-regulated on plasmablasts from immune thrombocytopenia patients. These observations have parallels in other autoantibody-mediated diseases and suggest that loss of peripheral tolerance in naïve B cells may be an important component of immune thrombocytopenia pathogenesis. Moreover, the B-cell maturation antigen represents a potential target for plasma cell directed therapies in immune thrombocytopenia.

  1. Naïve bats discriminate arctiid moth warning sounds but generalize their aposematic meaning.

    PubMed

    Barber, Jesse R; Chadwell, Brad A; Garrett, Nick; Schmidt-French, Barbara; Conner, William E

    2009-07-01

    Naïve red (Lasiurus borealis Müller) and big brown (Eptesicus fuscus Beauvois) bats quickly learn to avoid noxious sound-producing tiger moths. After this experience with a model tiger moth, bats generalize the meaning of these prey-generated sounds to a second tiger moth species producing a different call. Here we describe the three-dimensional kinematic and bioacoustic details of this behaviour, first, as naïve bats learn to deal with an unpalatable model tiger moth and subsequently, as they avoid acoustic mimics. The tiger moths' first clicks influenced the bats' echolocation behaviour and the percentage of interactions that included terminal buzzes was associated with capture and investigatory behaviour. When the mimic was introduced, the bats decreased both their minimum distance to the tiger moth and the time at which they broke off their attack compared with their exposure to the model on the night before. These kinematic signatures closely match the bats' behaviour on their first night of experience with the model. Minimum distances and time of pursuit cessation increased again by the last night of the mimic's presentation. These kinematic and bioacoustic results show that although naïve bats generalize the meaning of aposematic tiger moth calls, they discriminate the prey-generated signals as different and investigate. Extrapolating to experienced bats, these results suggest that acoustic predators probably exert potent and fine-scaled selective forces on acoustic mimicry complexes.

  2. The Motor Protein Myosin-X Transports VE-Cadherin along Filopodia To Allow the Formation of Early Endothelial Cell-Cell Contacts▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Sébastien; Durmort, Claire; Chervin-Pétinot, Adeline; Heyraud, Stephanie; Dubois, Mathilde; Lambert, Olivier; Maillefaud, Camille; Hewat, Elizabeth; Schaal, Jean Patrick; Huber, Philippe; Gulino-Debrac, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelium (VE), the monolayer of endothelial cells that lines the vascular tree, undergoes damage at the basis of some vascular diseases. Its integrity is maintained by VE-cadherin, an adhesive receptor localized at cell-cell junctions. Here, we show that VE-cadherin is also located at the tip and along filopodia in sparse or subconfluent endothelial cells. We observed that VE-cadherin navigates along intrafilopodial actin filaments. We found that the actin motor protein myosin-X is colocalized and moves synchronously with filopodial VE-cadherin. Immunoprecipitation and pulldown assays confirmed that myosin-X is directly associated with the VE-cadherin complex. Furthermore, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of myosin-X revealed that myosin-X is required for VE-cadherin export to cell edges and filopodia. These features indicate that myosin-X establishes a link between the actin cytoskeleton and VE-cadherin, thereby allowing VE-cadherin transportation along intrafilopodial actin cables. In conclusion, we propose that VE-cadherin trafficking along filopodia using myosin-X motor protein is a prerequisite for cell-cell junction formation. This mechanism may have functional consequences for endothelium repair in pathological settings. PMID:20123970

  3. The rainbow cohort: 96 week follow-up of saquinavir-containing regimens in previously antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve and pre-treated but protease inhibitor (PI)- naïve hiv-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective We have previously reported data from the German cohort of the multinational observational prospective RAINBOW survey which assessed the tolerability and efficacy of ritonavir-boosted saquinavir (SQV/r)-containing regimens over 48 weeks in routine clinical practice. This analysis presents data from antiretroviral (ART)-naïve and pretreated but protease inhibitor (PI)-naïve patients treated in a long-term one line (96 weeks) follow-up of the initial study. Methods All ART-and PI-naïve patients from the initial RAINBOW cohort who had recorded data to one line 96 weeks of treatment were eligible for inclusion in the current analysis. Efficacy assessments included the proportion of patients with HIV-1 RNA < 50 and < 400 copies/mL and changes in CD4 cell count from baseline to week 96. Tolerability assessments included changes in liver enzymes and lipid levels from baseline to week 96. For evaluation of efficacy, intent-to-treat analysis, in which missing values were recorded as failure (ITT), and last-observation-carried-forward (LOCF) analysis were used. Metabolic parameters were assessed using LOCF analysis. Results The analysis included 175 ART-naïve and 109 pretreated but PI-naïve patients. After 96 weeks, a similar proportion of patients in the ART-naïve and in the pretreated but Pi-naïve group had HIV-1 RNA levels < 400 copies/mL (68.0% and 70.6% [ITT], respectively; 96.6% and 90.8% [LOCF], respectively). The proportion of patients with HIV RNA < 50 copies/mL was higher in the ART-naïve group compared with the pretreated but PI-naïve group (61.1% and 56.9% [ITT], respectively; 84.0% and 75.2% [LOCF], respectively). Median change in CD4 cell count from baseline to week 96 was'+263 cells/mm3 (IQR 170; 384. LOCF; p < 0.0001) in the ART-naïve group, and one line +181 cells/mm3 (IQR 60; 309. LOCF; p < 0.0001) in the pretreated but PI-naïve group. Treatment was well tolerated, with only 2.5% of patients withdrawing from treatment due to side

  4. The Fumagillin Gene Cluster, an Example of Hundreds of Genes under veA Control in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Sourabh; Lind, Abigail L.; Lin, Hsiao-Ching; Tang, Yi; Rokas, Antonis; Calvo, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the causative agent of invasive aspergillosis, leading to infection-related mortality in immunocompromised patients. We previously showed that the conserved and unique-to-fungi veA gene affects different cell processes such as morphological development, gliotoxin biosynthesis and protease activity, suggesting a global regulatory effect on the genome of this medically relevant fungus. In this study, RNA sequencing analysis revealed that veA controls the expression of hundreds of genes in A. fumigatus, including those comprising more than a dozen known secondary metabolite gene clusters. Chemical analysis confirmed that veA controls the synthesis of other secondary metabolites in this organism in addition to gliotoxin. Among the secondary metabolite gene clusters regulated by veA is the elusive but recently identified gene cluster responsible for the biosynthesis of fumagillin, a meroterpenoid known for its anti-angiogenic activity by binding to human methionine aminopeptidase 2. The fumagillin gene cluster contains a veA-dependent regulatory gene, fumR (Afu8g00420), encoding a putative C6 type transcription factor. Deletion of fumR results in silencing of the gene cluster and elimination of fumagillin biosynthesis. We found expression of fumR to also be dependent on laeA, a gene encoding another component of the fungal velvet complex. The results in this study argue that veA is a global regulator of secondary metabolism in A. fumigatus, and that veA may be a conduit via which chemical development is coupled to morphological development and other cellular processes. PMID:24116213

  5. Fixed bimonthly aflibercept in naïve and switched neovascular age-related macular degeneration patients: one year outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, Alasdair N; Leaver, Hannah H; Lotery, Andrew J; Goverdhan, Srini V

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine real life clinical outcomes in poorly responsive and treatment-naïve neovascular age related macular degeneration (nvAMD) patients using bimonthly fixed dosing aflibercept regimen. METHODS This was a retrospective study of 165 eyes with nvAMD started on aflibercept at Southampton Eye Unit between June 2013 and June 2014. Patients were either switched from pro re nata (PRN) ranibizumab/bevacizumab due to poor response (107 eyes), or treatment-naïve (58 eyes). Patients initially received 3-monthly intravitreal aflibercept injections followed by 2-monthly fixed doses. Clinic visits were scheduled at month 0, 4, 10 and 12. Mean change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and central retinal thickness (CRT) from baseline were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The proportion of patients maintaining BCVA (<15 letters loss) at 12mo was also evaluated. RESULTS Mean BCVA change at month 12 was +3.29 and +4.67 letters in the switched and naïve aflibercept groups respectively (P<0.01). BCVA was maintained in 95.3% of switched and 96.6% of naïve patients. CRT at month 12 showed a decrease of -6.16 µm in the switched group and -35.36 µm in the naïve group (P<0.01). Patients previously treated with ranibizumab/bevacizumab had on average received 7.4 ranibizumab/bevacizumab injections over 12.6mo, attending 10 clinic visits. The fixed dosing aflibercept regimen required an average of 7.1 injections (naïve group), 7.5 injections (switched group) and 4 clinic visits per year. CONCLUSION Fixed bimonthly aflibercept is effective in both treatment-naïve and poorly responsive nvAMD patients. Adopting a fixed dosing regimen can reduce patient burden without compromising on outcomes. PMID:27588271

  6. Human naïve regulatory T-cells feature high steady-state turnover and are maintained by IL-7

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Caetano, Ana; Foxall, Russell B.; Pires, Ana R.; Matoso, Paula; Fernandes, Susana M.; Ferreira, João; Cheynier, Rémi; Victorino, Rui M. M.; Caramalho, Iris; Barata, João T.; Sousa, Ana E.

    2016-01-01

    Naïve FoxP3-expressing regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are essential to control immune responses via continuous replenishment of the activated-Treg pool with thymus-committed suppressor cells. The mechanisms underlying naïve-Treg maintenance throughout life in face of the age-associated thymic involution remain unclear. We found that in adults thymectomized early in infancy the naïve-Treg pool is remarkably well preserved, in contrast to conventional naïve CD4 T-cells. Naïve-Tregs featured high levels of cycling and pro-survival markers, even in healthy individuals, and contrasted with other circulating naïve/memory CD4 T-cell subsets in terms of their strong γc-cytokine-dependent signaling, particularly in response to IL-7. Accordingly, ex-vivo stimulation of naïve-Tregs with IL-7 induced robust cytokine-dependent signaling, Bcl-2 expression, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent proliferation, whilst preserving naïve phenotype and suppressive capacity. Altogether, our data strongly implicate IL-7 in the thymus-independent long-term survival of functional naïve-Tregs, and highlight the potential of targeting the IL-7 pathway to modulate Tregs in different clinical settings. PMID:26910841

  7. Towards the Integration of APECS with VE-Suite to Create a Comprehensive Virtual Engineering Environment

    SciTech Connect

    McCorkle, D.; Yang, C.; Jordan, T.; Swensen, D.; Zitney, S.E.; Bryden, M.

    2007-06-01

    Modeling and simulation tools are becoming pervasive in the process engineering practice of designing advanced power generation facilities. These tools enable engineers to explore many what-if scenarios before cutting metal or constructing a pilot scale facility. While such tools enable investigation of crucial plant design aspects, typical commercial process simulation tools such as Aspen Plus®, gPROMS®, and HYSYS® still do not explore some plant design information, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena, economics models for policy decisions, operational data after the plant is constructed, and as-built information for use in as-designed models. Software tools must be created that allow disparate sources of information to be integrated if environments are to be constructed where process simulation information can be accessed. At the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) has been developed as an integrated software suite that combines process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus) and high-fidelity equipment simulation (e.g., Fluent® CFD), together with advanced analysis capabilities including case studies, sensitivity analysis, stochastic simulation for risk/uncertainty analysis, and multi-objective optimization. In this paper, we discuss the initial phases of integrating APECS with the immersive and interactive virtual engineering software, VE-Suite, developed at Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory. VE-Suite utilizes the ActiveX (OLE Automation) controls in Aspen Plus wrapped by the CASI library developed by Reaction Engineering International to run the process simulation and query for unit operation results. This integration permits any application that uses the VE-Open interface to integrate with APECS co-simulations, enabling construction of the comprehensive virtual engineering environment needed for the

  8. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Increases Vascular Leakage in Retina through VE-cadherin Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choon-Soo; Kim, Yun Gi; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Park, Jonghanne; Jeong, Heewon; Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The inhibitors of CD26 (dipeptidyl peptidase-4; DPP4) have been widely prescribed to control glucose level in diabetic patients. DPP4-inhibitors, however, accumulate stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), a well-known inducer of vascular leakage and angiogenesis both of which are fundamental pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DPP4-inhibitors on vascular permeability and diabetic retinopathy. DPP4-inhibitor (diprotin A or sitagliptin) increased the phosphorylation of Src and vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) in human endothelial cells and disrupted endothelial cell-to-cell junctions, which were attenuated by CXCR4 (receptor of SDF-1α)-blocker or Src-inhibitor. Disruption of endothelial cell-to-cell junctions in the immuno-fluorescence images correlated with the actual leakage of the endothelial monolayer in the transwell endothelial permeability assay. In the Miles assay, vascular leakage was observed in the ears into which SDF-1α was injected, and this effect was aggravated by DPP4-inhibitor. In the model of retinopathy of prematurity, DPP4-inhibitor increased not only retinal vascularity but also leakage. Additionally, in the murine diabetic retinopathy model, DPP4-inhibitor increased the phosphorylation of Src and VE-cadherin and aggravated vascular leakage in the retinas. Collectively, DPP4-inhibitor induced vascular leakage by augmenting the SDF-1α/CXCR4/Src/VE-cadherin signaling pathway. These data highlight safety issues associated with the use of DPP4-inhibitors. PMID:27381080

  9. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Increases Vascular Leakage in Retina through VE-cadherin Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choon-Soo; Kim, Yun Gi; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Park, Jonghanne; Jeong, Heewon; Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The inhibitors of CD26 (dipeptidyl peptidase-4; DPP4) have been widely prescribed to control glucose level in diabetic patients. DPP4-inhibitors, however, accumulate stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), a well-known inducer of vascular leakage and angiogenesis both of which are fundamental pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DPP4-inhibitors on vascular permeability and diabetic retinopathy. DPP4-inhibitor (diprotin A or sitagliptin) increased the phosphorylation of Src and vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) in human endothelial cells and disrupted endothelial cell-to-cell junctions, which were attenuated by CXCR4 (receptor of SDF-1α)-blocker or Src-inhibitor. Disruption of endothelial cell-to-cell junctions in the immuno-fluorescence images correlated with the actual leakage of the endothelial monolayer in the transwell endothelial permeability assay. In the Miles assay, vascular leakage was observed in the ears into which SDF-1α was injected, and this effect was aggravated by DPP4-inhibitor. In the model of retinopathy of prematurity, DPP4-inhibitor increased not only retinal vascularity but also leakage. Additionally, in the murine diabetic retinopathy model, DPP4-inhibitor increased the phosphorylation of Src and VE-cadherin and aggravated vascular leakage in the retinas. Collectively, DPP4-inhibitor induced vascular leakage by augmenting the SDF-1α/CXCR4/Src/VE-cadherin signaling pathway. These data highlight safety issues associated with the use of DPP4-inhibitors. PMID:27381080

  10. Single Tracking Location Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Viscoelasticity Estimation (STL-VE): A Method for Measuring Tissue Viscoelastic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Jonathan H; Elegbe, Etana; McAleavey, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Single Tracking Location (STL) Shear wave Elasticity Imaging (SWEI) is a method for detecting elastic differences between tissues. It has the advantage of intrinsic speckle bias suppression compared to Multiple Tracking Location (MTL) variants of SWEI. However, the assumption of a linear model leads to an overestimation of the shear modulus in viscoelastic media. A new reconstruction technique denoted Single Tracking Location Viscosity Estimation (STL-VE) is introduced to correct for this overestimation. This technique utilizes the same raw data generated in STL-SWEI imaging. Here, the STL-VE technique is developed by way of a Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) for general viscoelastic materials. The method is then implemented for the particular case of the Kelvin-Voigt Model. Using simulation data, the STL-VE technique is demonstrated and the performance of the estimator is characterized. Finally, the STL-VE method is used to estimate the viscoelastic parameters of ex-vivo bovine liver. We find good agreement between the STL-VE results and the simulation parameters as well as between the liver shear wave data and the modeled data fit. PMID:26168170

  11. Naïve CD4+ T cell frequency varies for different epitopes and predicts repertoire diversity and response magnitude

    PubMed Central

    Moon, James J.; Chu, H. Hamlet; Pepper, Marion; McSorley, Stephen J.; Jameson, Stephen C.; Kedl, Ross M.; Jenkins, Marc K.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Cell-mediated immunity stems from the proliferation of naïve T lymphocytes expressing T cell antigen receptors (TCR) specific for foreign peptides bound to host Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) molecules. Due to the tremendous diversity of the T cell repertoire, naïve T cells specific for any one peptide:MHC complex (pMHC) are extremely rare. Thus, it is not known how many naïve T cells of any given pMHC specificity exist in the body or how that number influences the immune response. Using soluble pMHCII tetramers and magnetic bead enrichment, we found that three different pMHCII-specific naïve CD4+ T cell populations vary in frequency from 20 to 200 cells per mouse. Moreover, naïve population size predicted the size and TCR diversity of the primary CD4+ T cell response after immunization with relevant peptide. Thus, variation in naive T cell frequencies can explain why some peptides are stronger immunogens than others. PMID:17707129

  12. Single tracking location acoustic radiation force impulse viscoelasticity estimation (STL-VE): A method for measuring tissue viscoelastic parameters.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Jonathan H; Elegbe, Etana; McAleavey, Stephen A

    2015-07-01

    Single tracking location (STL) shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) is a method for detecting elastic differences between tissues. It has the advantage of intrinsic speckle bias suppression compared with multiple tracking location variants of SWEI. However, the assumption of a linear model leads to an overestimation of the shear modulus in viscoelastic media. A new reconstruction technique denoted single tracking location viscosity estimation (STL-VE) is introduced to correct for this overestimation. This technique utilizes the same raw data generated in STL-SWEI imaging. Here, the STL-VE technique is developed by way of a maximum likelihood estimation for general viscoelastic materials. The method is then implemented for the particular case of the Kelvin-Voigt Model. Using simulation data, the STL-VE technique is demonstrated and the performance of the estimator is characterized. Finally, the STL-VE method is used to estimate the viscoelastic parameters of ex vivo bovine liver. We find good agreement between the STL-VE results and the simulation parameters as well as between the liver shear wave data and the modeled data fit. PMID:26168170

  13. Ph+/VE-cadherin+ identifies a stem cell like population of acute lymphoblastic leukemia sustained by bone marrow niche cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; O'Leary, Heather; Fortney, James; Gibson, Laura F

    2007-11-01

    Although leukemic stem cells (LSCs) show a symbiotic relationship with bone marrow microenvironmental niches, the mechanism by which the marrow microenvironment contributes to self-renewal and proliferation of LSCs remains elusive. In the present study, we identified a unique subpopulation of Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells coexpressing markers of endothelial cells (including VE-cadherin, PECAM-1, and Flk-1) and committed B-lineage progenitors. After long-term coculture with bone marrow stromal cells, tumor cells formed hematopoietic colonies and cords, expressed early stem- cell markers, and showed endothelial sprouting. Gene expression profiles of LSCs were altered in the presence of stromal cell contact. Stromal cell contact promoted leukemic cell VE-cadherin expression, stabilized beta-catenin, and up-regulated Bcr-abl fusion gene expression. Our study indicates that these specific tumor cells are uniquely positioned to respond to microenvironment-derived self-renewing and proliferative cues. Ph(+)/VE-cadherin(+) tumor subpopulation circumvents the requirement of exogenous Wnt signaling for self-renewal through stromal cell support of leukemic cell VE-cadherin expression and up-regulated Bcr-abl tyrosine kinase activity. These data suggest that strategies targeting signals in the marrow microenvironment that amplify the Bcr-abl/VE-cadherin/beta-catenin axis may have utility in sensitizing drug-resistant leukemic stem cells. PMID:17638851

  14. VE-cadherin is a critical molecule for trophoblast-endothelial cell interaction in decidual spiral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Bulla, Roberta; Villa, Antonello; Bossi, Fleur; Cassetti, Arianna; Radillo, Oriano; Spessotto, Paola; De Seta, Francesco; Guaschino, Secondo; Tedesco, Francesco . E-mail: tedesco@univ.trieste.it

    2005-02-01

    Fetal cytotrophoblasts colonize the decidual spiral arteries during pregnancy and partially replace the endothelium by an as yet unknown mechanism. To clarify this issue, we cocultured trophoblast cells (TCs) and decidual endothelial cells (DECs) isolated from first trimester placentae and found by electron microscopic analysis that TCs adhered to DECs and migrated through the interendothelial junctions within 24 h. Since extravillous TCs were shown by FACS analysis to express vascular-endothelial (VE)-cadherin and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM)-1, we investigated the role of these junctional molecules in TC adhesion to DECs and transendothelial migration of cytotrophoblasts. Both VE-cadherin and PECAM-1 were present at the contact sites between TCs and DECs in decidual sections. TC adhesion and migration were markedly inhibited by mAbs to VE-cadherin and marginally by mAb to PECAM-1. Increased expression of VE-cadherin was observed at the contact areas between TCs and DECs, whereas PECAM-1 was found to be redistributed from intercellular junctions. The induction of apoptosis of DECs by TCs, as the mechanism responsible for their replacement, was ruled out by the negative staining with TUNEL of DECs cocultured with TCs and the absence of DNA fragmentation. In conclusion, VE-cadherin is involved in transendothelial migration of TCs, and replacement of DECs by TCs is not the result of apoptosis.

  15. Foxd3 promotes exit from naïve pluripotency through enhancer decommissioning and inhibits germline specification

    PubMed Central

    Respuela, Patricia; Nikolic, Milos; Tan, Minjia; Frommolt, Peter; Zhao, Yingming; Wysocka, Joanna; Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Following implantation, mouse epiblast cells transit from a naïve to a primed state in which they are competent for both somatic and primordial germ cell (PGC) specification. Using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) as an in vitro model to study the transcriptional regulatory principles orchestrating peri-implantation development, here we show that the transcription factor Foxd3 is necessary for exit from naïve pluripotency and progression to a primed pluripotent state. During this transition, Foxd3 acts as a repressor that dismantles a significant fraction of the naïve pluripotency expression program through decommissioning of active enhancers associated with key naïve pluripotency and early germline genes. Subsequently, Foxd3 needs to be silenced in primed pluripotent cells to allow reactivation of relevant genes required for proper PGC specification. Our findings therefore uncover a cycle of activation and deactivation of Foxd3 required for exit from naïve pluripotency and subsequent PGC specification. PMID:26748758

  16. The actin-binding protein EPS8 binds VE-cadherin and modulates YAP localization and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Disanza, Andrea; Bravi, Luca; Barrios-Rodiles, Miriam; Corada, Monica; Frittoli, Emanuela; Savorani, Cecilia; Lampugnani, Maria Grazia; Boggetti, Barbara; Niessen, Carien; Wrana, Jeff L.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial (VE)–cadherin transfers intracellular signals contributing to vascular hemostasis. Signaling through VE-cadherin requires association and activity of different intracellular partners. Yes-associated protein (YAP)/TAZ transcriptional cofactors are important regulators of cell growth and organ size. We show that EPS8, a signaling adapter regulating actin dynamics, is a novel partner of VE-cadherin and is able to modulate YAP activity. By biochemical and imaging approaches, we demonstrate that EPS8 associates with the VE-cadherin complex of remodeling junctions promoting YAP translocation to the nucleus and transcriptional activation. Conversely, in stabilized junctions, 14–3-3–YAP associates with the VE–cadherin complex, whereas Eps8 is excluded. Junctional association of YAP inhibits nuclear translocation and inactivates its transcriptional activity both in vitro and in vivo in Eps8-null mice. The absence of Eps8 also increases vascular permeability in vivo, but did not induce other major vascular defects. Collectively, we identified novel components of the adherens junction complex, and we introduce a novel molecular mechanism through which the VE-cadherin complex controls YAP transcriptional activity. PMID:26668327

  17. Research on micro-blog character analysis based on Naïve Bayes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Liu, Tong; Wang, Yanbo J.

    2015-07-01

    With the development of Information Technology, people have entered the era of Big Data, and the demand for intelligent information is more intense. How to make computer provide more personalized and efficient service for all walks of life, is something worth exploring. In this paper, we aim to predict user's character by analyzing the textual content of his/her micro-blog, which is the foundation of Personalized Service. Our study describes the method of creating a prediction model about user's character by using Bayesian algorithms. Experimental results show that the Naïve Bayes approach is a valid and promoted analytic method in micro-blog character analysis.

  18. Synthesis of electronically modified Ru-based neutral 16 VE allenylidene olefin metathesis precatalysts.

    PubMed

    Lichtenheldt, Martin; Kress, Steffen; Blechert, Siegfried

    2012-05-04

    Electronic modifications within Ru-based olefin metathesis precatalysts have provided a number of new complexes with significant differences in reactivity profiles. So far, this aspect has not been studied for neutral 16 VE allenylidenes. The first synthesis of electronically altered complexes of this type is reported. Following the classical dehydration approach (vide infra) modified propargyl alcohols were transformed to the targeted allenylidene systems in the presence of PCy₃. The catalytic performance was investigated in RCM reaction (ring closing metathesis) of benchmark substrates such as diallyltosylamide and diethyl diallylmalonate.

  19. [Academician V.E. Sokolov is the head of the General Biology Department].

    PubMed

    Pavlov, D S; Shishkin, V S

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the activity of Academician V.E. Sokolov as head of the General Biology Department of the Russian Academy of Sciences, which he headed from 1985 to 1998. The history of the struggle for the preservation of biological science, carried out by Sokolov and the Department headed by him over more than ten years, is shown based on archival and little-known published materials. Examples are given of the activity of the General Biology Department that had great scientific, public, and nature-conservation significance.

  20. The metabolome regulates the epigenetic landscape during naïve to primed human embryonic stem cell transition

    PubMed Central

    Sperber, Henrik; Mathieu, Julie; Wang, Yuliang; Ferreccio, Amy; Hesson, Jennifer; Xu, Zhuojin; Fischer, Karin A.; Devi, Arikketh; Detraux, Damien; Gu, Haiwei; Battle, Stephanie L.; Showalter, Megan; Valensisi, Cristina; Bielas, Jason H.; Ericson, Nolan G.; Margaretha, Lilyana; Robitaille, Aaron M.; Margineantu, Daciana; Fiehn, Oliver; Hockenbery, David; Blau, C. Anthony; Raftery, Daniel; Margolin, Adam; Hawkins, R. David; Moon, Randall T.; Ware, Carol B.; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2015-01-01

    For nearly a century developmental biologists have recognized that cells from embryos can differ in their potential to differentiate into distinct cell types. Recently, it has been recognized that embryonic stem cells derived from both mice and humans display two stable yet epigenetically distinct states of pluripotency, naïve and primed. We now show that nicotinamide-N-methyl transferase (NNMT) and metabolic state regulate pluripotency in hESCs. Specifically, in naïve hESCs NNMT and its enzymatic product 1-methylnicotinamide (1-MNA) are highly upregulated, and NNMT is required for low SAM levels and H3K27me3 repressive state. NNMT consumes SAM in naïve cells, making it unavailable for histone methylation that represses Wnt and activates HIF pathway in primed hESCs. These data support the hypothesis that the metabolome regulates the epigenetic landscape of the earliest steps in human development. PMID:26571212

  1. Towards the Integration of APECS and VE-Suite for Virtual Power Plant Co-Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S.E.; McCorkle, D.; Yang, C.; Jordan, T.; Swensen, D.; Bryden, M.

    2007-05-01

    Process modeling and simulation tools are widely used for the design and operation of advanced power generation systems. These tools enable engineers to solve the critical process systems engineering problems that arise throughout the lifecycle of a power plant, such as designing a new process, troubleshooting a process unit or optimizing operations of the full process. To analyze the impact of complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena on overall power plant performance, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has developed the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The APECS system is an integrated software suite that combines process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus) and high-fidelity equipment simulations such as those based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD), together with advanced analysis capabilities including case studies, sensitivity analysis, stochastic simulation for risk/uncertainty analysis, and multi-objective optimization. In this paper we discuss the initial phases of the integration of the APECS system with the immersive and interactive virtual engineering software, VE-Suite, developed at Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory. VE-Suite uses the ActiveX (OLE Automation) controls in the Aspen Plus process simulator wrapped by the CASI library developed by Reaction Engineering International to run process/CFD co-simulations and query for results. This integration represents a necessary step in the development of virtual power plant co-simulations that will ultimately reduce the time, cost, and technical risk of developing advanced power generation systems.

  2. Regulation of leukocyte tricarboxylic acid cycle in drug-naïve Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Rafael T; Streck, Emilio L; Forlenza, Orestes V; Brunoni, Andre R; Zanetti, Marcus V; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Diniz, Breno S; Portela, Luis V; Carvalho, André F; Zarate, Carlos A; Gattaz, Wagner F; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo

    2015-09-25

    Several lines of evidence suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD). The tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) is fundamental for mitochondrial energy production and produces substrates used in oxidative phosphorylation by the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The activity of the key TCA cycle enzymes citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase has never been evaluated in BD. In the present study, these enzymes were assayed from leukocytes of drug-naïve BD patients in a major depressive episode (n=18) and compared to 24 age-matched healthy controls. Drug-naïve BD patients did not show differences in activities of citrate synthase (p=0.79), malate dehydrogenase (p=0.17), and succinate dehydrogenase (p=0.35) compared with healthy controls. No correlation between any TCA cycle enzyme activity and severity of depressive symptoms was observed. Overall, these data suggest that the activities of the TCA cycle enzymes are not altered in major depressive episodes of recent-onset BD, which may support the concept of illness staging and neuroprogression in BD. PMID:26297865

  3. Single and paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation in drug naïve epilepsy.

    PubMed

    de Goede, Annika A; Ter Braack, Esther M; van Putten, Michel J A M

    2016-09-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) measures cortical excitability and is therefore potentially suitable as an additional tool for epilepsy diagnostics and therapy evaluation. In this review we discuss the application of TMS in epilepsy research and systematically analyze single and paired pulse TMS outcomes from 31 drug naïve patient studies. Despite a large variety in used TMS protocols, there was no relation between specific protocol aspects and the occurrence of significant results. Protocols were often not in accordance with latest guidelines and recommendations. Cortical excitability, as measured by TMS, was increased in drug naïve epilepsy patients, being most prominent for generalized epilepsy. Single pulse TMS indicated a trend towards a lower resting motor threshold (rMT) and a prolonged cortical silent period (CSP) for generalized epilepsy, while inconclusive results were found for focal epilepsy. The paired pulse TMS outcomes, short intracortical inhibition (SICI) and long intracortical inhibition (LICI), showed the most consistent significant increase in cortical excitability in generalized and focal epilepsy patients. Future epilepsy research should especially focus on the interstimulus intervals 2 and 5ms for SICI, and 250 and 300ms for LICI. Furthermore, combining TMS with electroencephalography (EEG) may contribute to analysis on an individual patient level.

  4. Morbidity and nutrition status of rural drug-naïve Kenyan women living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Charlotte G; Nyandiko, Winstone; Siika, Abraham; Drorbaugh, Natalie; Samari, Goleen; Ettyang, Grace; Ernst, Judith A

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes morbidity in a group of HIV-positive drug-naïve rural women in western Kenya. A total of 226 drug-naïve HIV-positive women were evaluated for baseline morbidity, immune function, and anthropometry before a food-based nutrition intervention. Kenyan nurses visited women in their homes and conducted semi-structured interviews regarding symptoms and physical signs experienced at the time of the visit and during the previous week and physical inspection. Blood and urine samples were examined for determination of immune function (CD4, CD8, and total lymphocyte counts), anaemia, malaria, and pregnancy status. Intradermal skin testing with tuberculin (PPD), candida, and tetanus toxoid antigens was also performed to evaluate cell-mediated immunity. Anthropometry was measured, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Seventy-six per cent of the women reported being sick on the day of the interview or within the previous week. Illnesses considered serious were reported by 13.7% of women. The most frequent morbidity episodes reported were upper respiratory tract infections (13.3%), suspected malaria (5.85%), skeletal pain (4.87%), and stomach pain (4.42%). The most common morbidity signs on physical inspection were respiratory symptoms, most commonly rhinorrhea and coughing. Confirmed malaria and severe diarrhea were significantly associated with a higher BMI. PMID:27681152

  5. Interrogating the relationship between naïve and immune antiviral T cell repertoires.

    PubMed

    La Gruta, Nicole L; Thomas, Paul G

    2013-08-01

    Understanding how naïve virus-specific CD8+ T cells influence the type of immune response generated after virus infection is critical for the development of enhanced therapeutic and vaccination strategies to exploit CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity. Recent technological advances in T cell isolation and T receptor sequencing have allowed for greater understanding of the basic structure of immune T cell repertoires, the diversity of responses within and between individuals, and changes in repertoires over time and in response to infection conditions. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of how T cell repertoires contribute to potent antiviral responses. Additionally we compare the state of the art in receptor sequencing, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of the three most common approaches: next-generation sequencing, template-switch anchored RT-PCR, and multiplex single cell PCR. Finally, we describe how TCR sequencing has delineated the relationship between naïve and immune T cell repertoires.

  6. Regulation of leukocyte tricarboxylic acid cycle in drug-naïve Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Rafael T; Streck, Emilio L; Forlenza, Orestes V; Brunoni, Andre R; Zanetti, Marcus V; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Diniz, Breno S; Portela, Luis V; Carvalho, André F; Zarate, Carlos A; Gattaz, Wagner F; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo

    2015-09-25

    Several lines of evidence suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD). The tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) is fundamental for mitochondrial energy production and produces substrates used in oxidative phosphorylation by the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The activity of the key TCA cycle enzymes citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase has never been evaluated in BD. In the present study, these enzymes were assayed from leukocytes of drug-naïve BD patients in a major depressive episode (n=18) and compared to 24 age-matched healthy controls. Drug-naïve BD patients did not show differences in activities of citrate synthase (p=0.79), malate dehydrogenase (p=0.17), and succinate dehydrogenase (p=0.35) compared with healthy controls. No correlation between any TCA cycle enzyme activity and severity of depressive symptoms was observed. Overall, these data suggest that the activities of the TCA cycle enzymes are not altered in major depressive episodes of recent-onset BD, which may support the concept of illness staging and neuroprogression in BD.

  7. Cerebellar volume deficits in medication-naïve obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Jose, Dania; Kalmady, Sunil V; Agarwal, Sri Mahavir; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Janardhan Reddy, Y C

    2016-08-30

    Even though conventional neurobiological models of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) commonly demonstrate abnormalities involving fronto-striatal circuits, there is emerging evidence regarding the role of posterior brain structures such as cerebellum. In this study, we examined the cerebellar regional volume in a large sample of medication-naïve OCD patients compared to matched healthy controls (HC). In 49 medication naïve right handed OCD patients and 39 age and sex matched HC, sub-region wise volume of cerebellum was extracted from the T1 weighted images using Spatially Unbiased Infra tentorial Template (SUIT) toolbox and compared using hypothesis driven, region of interest approach after clinical assessment with standard scales. After controlling for age, sex and ICV, the subjects with OCD had significantly smaller cerebellum compared to HC, especially in the posterior lobe sub-regions - lobule VI and left crus 1. This study gives preliminary evidence for region specific cerebellar volumetric deficits in the pathophysiological of OCD. Regional cerebellar volume deficits conform to the abnormal connectivity of cerebellum to specific cortical regions and it is indicative of involvement of regions outside the conventional fronto-striatal circuitry. This might be important in the context of cognitive deficits seen in OCD. PMID:27454206

  8. A Study to Evaluate Lipid Profile in Treatment Naïve HIV Positive Patients.

    PubMed

    Devanath, Anitha; Ray, Somdattaa; Kumar, Ravi; Prarthana, B S

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with lipid abnormalities in treatment naïve patients. CD4 count is used for monitoring the HIV infection. Primary objective was to evaluate and correlate lipid profile and CD4 counts in HIV infection. Secondary objective was to evaluate the feasibility of using Lipid profile to monitor the HIV infected treatment naïve patients instead of CD4 counts. 112 patients were selected based on a criteria from ART center in tertiary care center. CD4 counts were assessed and Lipid profile was evaluated enzymatically. A correlation study was done between the lipid profile and the CD4 count and clinical stages of infection. Cholesterol showed no significant correlation in any stage. HDL-C showed significant correlation (p < 0.05) with stage 2 and 4 disease. LDL-C showed no significant correlation in any stage. TGL showed significant correlation (p < 0.05) at stage 4 disease. Hence, HDL-C and TGL can be used as indicators of lipid status and for infection progression in treatment naive HIV patients, while Cholesterol and LDL-C has no role to play.

  9. Single and paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation in drug naïve epilepsy.

    PubMed

    de Goede, Annika A; Ter Braack, Esther M; van Putten, Michel J A M

    2016-09-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) measures cortical excitability and is therefore potentially suitable as an additional tool for epilepsy diagnostics and therapy evaluation. In this review we discuss the application of TMS in epilepsy research and systematically analyze single and paired pulse TMS outcomes from 31 drug naïve patient studies. Despite a large variety in used TMS protocols, there was no relation between specific protocol aspects and the occurrence of significant results. Protocols were often not in accordance with latest guidelines and recommendations. Cortical excitability, as measured by TMS, was increased in drug naïve epilepsy patients, being most prominent for generalized epilepsy. Single pulse TMS indicated a trend towards a lower resting motor threshold (rMT) and a prolonged cortical silent period (CSP) for generalized epilepsy, while inconclusive results were found for focal epilepsy. The paired pulse TMS outcomes, short intracortical inhibition (SICI) and long intracortical inhibition (LICI), showed the most consistent significant increase in cortical excitability in generalized and focal epilepsy patients. Future epilepsy research should especially focus on the interstimulus intervals 2 and 5ms for SICI, and 250 and 300ms for LICI. Furthermore, combining TMS with electroencephalography (EEG) may contribute to analysis on an individual patient level. PMID:27472551

  10. Karhunen-Loève expansion revisited for vector-valued random fields: Scaling, errors and optimal basis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, G.; Soize, C.; Duhamel, D.; Funfschilling, C.

    2013-06-01

    Due to scaling effects, when dealing with vector-valued random fields, the classical Karhunen-Loève expansion, which is optimal with respect to the total mean square error, tends to favorize the components of the random field that have the highest signal energy. When these random fields are to be used in mechanical systems, this phenomenon can introduce undesired biases for the results. This paper presents therefore an adaptation of the Karhunen-Loève expansion that allows us to control these biases and to minimize them. This original decomposition is first analyzed from a theoretical point of view, and is then illustrated on a numerical example.

  11. The Expression of Sterigmatocystin and Penicillin Genes in Aspergillus nidulans Is Controlled by veA, a Gene Required for Sexual Development

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Naoki; Brooks, Wilhelmina; Calvo, Ana M.

    2003-01-01

    Secondary metabolism is commonly associated with morphological development in microorganisms, including fungi. We found that veA, a gene previously shown to control the Aspergillus nidulans sexual/asexual developmental ratio in response to light, also controls secondary metabolism. Specifically, veA regulates the expression of genes implicated in the synthesis of the mycotoxin sterigmatocystin and the antibiotic penicillin. veA is necessary for the expression of the transcription factor aflR, which activates the gene cluster that leads to the production of sterigmatocystin. veA is also necessary for penicillin production. Our results indicated that although veA represses the transcription of the isopenicillin synthetase gene ipnA, it is necessary for the expression of acvA, the key gene in the first step of penicillin biosynthesis, encoding the delta-(l-alpha-aminoadipyl)-l-cysteinyl-d-valine synthetase. With respect to the mechanism of veA in directing morphological development, veA has little effect on the expression of the known sexual transcription factors nsdD and steA. However, we found that veA regulates the expression of the asexual transcription factor brlA by modulating the α/β transcript ratio that controls conidiation. PMID:14665453

  12. The Public's View of Agricultural Education: We've Come a Long Way--Or Have We?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, David E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Includes "We've Come a Long Way--Or Have We?" (Krueger); "If Agricultural Education Were a Coca-Cola" (Doerfert); "Agriculture Is Taught? In High School?" (Elliot); "Let's Tell Our Story" (Davis); "Perception, Reality or Idealism" (Powers, Bull); "Agricultural Education under the Bright Lights" (Foster); and "The Changing Face of Agricultural…

  13. The Communication of Naïve Theories of the Social World in Parent-Child Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalik, Lisa; Rhodes, Marjorie

    2015-01-01

    Three studies examined the communication of naïve theories of social groups in conversations between parents and their 4-year-old children (N = 48). Parent-child dyads read and discussed a storybook in which they either explained why past social interactions had occurred (Study 1) or evaluated whether future social interactions should occur…

  14. Isolation of Flavimonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2) from catheter-induced bacteremia in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Mutters, R; Köppler, H; Krause, T

    1990-12-01

    Bacteria of the newly proposed genus and combination Flavimonas oryzihabitans, previously known as CDC group Ve-2 or Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, are uncommon pathogens. We report here the first isolation of the organism in Germany from a case of bacteremia and describe the phenotypic characteristics of the strain.

  15. Antibody Profiling in Naïve and Semi-immune Individuals Experimentally Challenged with Plasmodium vivax Sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Lopez-Perez, Mary; Dotsey, Emmanuel; Jain, Aarti; Rubiano, Kelly; Felgner, Philip L.; Davies, D. Huw; Herrera, Sócrates

    2016-01-01

    Background Acquisition of malaria immunity in low transmission areas usually occurs after relatively few exposures to the parasite. A recent Plasmodium vivax experimental challenge trial in malaria naïve and semi-immune volunteers from Colombia showed that all naïve individuals developed malaria symptoms, whereas semi-immune subjects were asymptomatic or displayed attenuated symptoms. Sera from these individuals were analyzed by protein microarray to identify antibodies associated with clinical protection. Methodology/Principal Findings Serum samples from naïve (n = 7) and semi-immune (n = 9) volunteers exposed to P. vivax sporozoite-infected mosquito bites were probed against a custom protein microarray displaying 515 P. vivax antigens. The array revealed higher serological responses in semi-immune individuals before the challenge, although malaria naïve individuals also had pre-existing antibodies, which were higher in Colombians than US adults (control group). In both experimental groups the response to the P. vivax challenge peaked at day 45 and returned to near baseline at day 145. Additional analysis indicated that semi-immune volunteers without fever displayed a lower response to the challenge, but recognized new antigens afterwards. Conclusion Clinical protection against experimental challenge in volunteers with previous P. vivax exposure was associated with elevated pre-existing antibodies, an attenuated serological response to the challenge and reactivity to new antigens. PMID:27014875

  16. The Naïve and the Distrustful: state dependency of hippocampal computations in manipulative memory distortion.

    PubMed

    Ludmer, Rachel; Edelson, Micah G; Dudai, Yadin

    2015-02-01

    Flexible mnemonic mechanisms that adjust to different internal mental states can provide a major adaptive advantage. However, little is known regarding how this flexibility is achieved in the human brain. We examined brain activity during retrieval of false memories of a movie, generated by exposing participants to misleading information. Half of the participants suspected the memory manipulation (Distrustful), whereas the other half did not (Naïve). Distrustful displayed more accurate memory performance and a brain signature different than that of Naïve. In Distrustful, the ability to differentiate true from false information was driven by a qualitatively distinct hippocampal activity for endorsed items, consistent with the view that hippocampal encoding allows recollection of a specific source. Conversely, in Naïve, BOLD differences between true and false memories were linearly correlated with accuracy across participants, suggesting that Naïve subjects needed to reinstate and evaluate stored information to discern true from false. We propose that our results lend support to models suggesting that hippocampal activity can exhibit different computational schemes, depending on memorandum attributes. Furthermore, we show that trust, considered as a subjective state of mind, may alter basic hippocampal strategies, influencing the ability to separate real from false memory.

  17. Critical components of Venus Lower and Upper atmospheres with FirefOx and Venus Neutron Spectrometer (VeNuS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izenberg, N. R.; Papadakis, S. J.; Monica, A. H.; Deglau, D. M.; Lawrence, D. J.; Peplowski, P. N.

    2015-10-01

    We present two instrument concepts for understanding critical aspects of Venus' upper and lower atmosphere. FirefOx is an oxygen fugacity sensor for the lower atmosphere, and The Venus Nuclear Spectrometer (VeNuS) studies composition and volcanic activity signals in the upper atmosphere.

  18. Feeding preferences of experienced and naïve goats and sheep for the toxic plant Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ipomoea carnea is a toxic plant that grazing goats and cattle may learn to ingest with repeated exposure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feeding preferences of experienced and non-experienced (naïve) goats and sheep for I. carnea. The study used 3 groups of 5 goats (Group 1, experi...

  19. Isolation of Flavimonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2) from catheter-induced bacteremia in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Mutters, R; Köppler, H; Krause, T

    1990-12-01

    Bacteria of the newly proposed genus and combination Flavimonas oryzihabitans, previously known as CDC group Ve-2 or Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, are uncommon pathogens. We report here the first isolation of the organism in Germany from a case of bacteremia and describe the phenotypic characteristics of the strain. PMID:2091948

  20. Development and expression of maternal behavior in naïve female C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Alsina-Llanes, Marcela; De Brun, Victoria; Olazábal, Daniel E

    2015-03-01

    Naïve female mice are usually described as spontaneously maternal. We investigated how many exposures to pups (15 min vs. 1 hr) were needed to induce full maternal behavior (FMB) in 20-22, 30-35, 60-65-days-old naïve female mice (C57BL/6), and how cohabitation with the parturient mother and newborn siblings facilitated juvenile maternal behavior (MB). Only 20% of the adults displayed FMB immediately after the first exposure to pups. Incomplete MB was present in 11%, 20%, and 30% of juveniles, adolescents and adults, respectively. Three-sixty minute exposures to pups induced FMB in all adult subjects. All naïve juveniles that were not exposed to their siblings and maternal fluids failed to show maternal behavior. In contrast, more than half of the juveniles present at their homecage during delivery of a second litter showed incomplete MB (34.5%) or FMB (21.5%) when tested individually housed in a novel cage. This study suggests that most adult female mice are not spontaneously maternal but gradually sensitized. Besides, naïve juveniles could be inhibited or not motivated to show MB, but display adult-like behavior toward pups if previously exposed to newborn siblings and maternal fluids.

  1. Differences between naïve and expert observers’ vergence and accommodative responses to a range of targets

    PubMed Central

    Horwood, Anna M; Riddell, Patricia M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Vergence and accommodation studies often use adult participants with experience of vision science. Reports of infant and clinical responses are generally more variable and of lower gain, with the implication that differences lie in immaturity or sub-optimal clinical characteristics but expert /naïve differences are rarely considered or quantified. Methods Sixteen undergraduates, naïve to vision science were individually matched by age, visual acuity, refractive error, heterophoria, stereoacuity and near point of accommodation to 2nd & 3rd year orthoptics and optometry undergraduates (“experts”). Accommodation and vergence responses were assessed to targets moving between 33cm, 50 cm, 1m and 2m using a haploscopic device incorporating a PlusoptiX SO4 autorefractor. Disparity, blur and looming cues were separately available or minimised in all combinations. Instruction set was minimal. Results In all cases, vergence and accommodation response slopes (gain) were steeper and closer to 1.0 in the expert group (p=0.001), with the largest expert /naïve differences for both vergence and accommodation being for near targets (p=0.012). For vergence, the differences between expert and naïve response slopes increased with increasingly open-loop targets (linear trend p=0.025). Although we predicted that proximal cues would drive additional response in the experts, the proximity-only cue was the only condition that showed no statistical effect of experience. Conclusions Expert observers provide more accurate responses to near target demand than closely matched naïve observers. We suggest that attention, practice, voluntary and proprioceptive effects may enhance responses in experienced participants when compared to a more typical general population. Differences between adult reports and the developmental and clinical literature may partially reflect expert / naïve effects, as well as developmental change. If developmental and clinical studies are to be compared

  2. Influenza-like illness surveillance on Twitter through automated learning of naïve language.

    PubMed

    Gesualdo, Francesco; Stilo, Giovanni; Agricola, Eleonora; Gonfiantini, Michaela V; Pandolfi, Elisabetta; Velardi, Paola; Tozzi, Alberto E

    2013-01-01

    Twitter has the potential to be a timely and cost-effective source of data for syndromic surveillance. When speaking of an illness, Twitter users often report a combination of symptoms, rather than a suspected or final diagnosis, using naïve, everyday language. We developed a minimally trained algorithm that exploits the abundance of health-related web pages to identify all jargon expressions related to a specific technical term. We then translated an influenza case definition into a Boolean query, each symptom being described by a technical term and all related jargon expressions, as identified by the algorithm. Subsequently, we monitored all tweets that reported a combination of symptoms satisfying the case definition query. In order to geolocalize messages, we defined 3 localization strategies based on codes associated with each tweet. We found a high correlation coefficient between the trend of our influenza-positive tweets and ILI trends identified by US traditional surveillance systems. PMID:24324799

  3. Investigation of Blue Bedding in Cages Housing Treatment-Naïve Hamsters.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vishal D; Walton, Betsy J; Culp, Amanda G; Castellino, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    During the acclimation phase of a preclinical safety study involving Syrian golden hamsters, some of the cages of treatment-naïve animals were noted to contain blue-tinged bedding; the urine of these hamsters was not discolored. We sought to understand the underlying cause of this unusual finding to ensure that the study animals were healthy and free from factors that might confound the interpretation of the study. Analysis of extracts from the blue bedding by using HPLC with inline UV detection and high-resolution mass spectrometry indicated that the color was due to the presence of indigo blue. Furthermore, the indigo blue likely was formed through a series of biochemical events initiated by the intestinal metabolism of tryptophan to an indoxyl metabolite. We offer 2 hypotheses regarding the fate of the indoxyl metabolite: indigo blue formation through oxidative coupling in the liver or through urinary bacterial metabolism.

  4. Using VE for training and augmenting human performance in forestry telemanipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, Jean-Francois; Freedman, Paul; Mackenzie, Paul; Robert, Jean-Marc

    1996-12-01

    Processing harvesters are forestry telemanipulators that can fell, delimb, cut and pile trees in only one sequence of operations. They are complex machines and operators need between 4 and 6 months of practice to become productive. This paper describes work in progress concerning the development of a computerized environment that uses 3D graphics, audio feedback and real-time interactivity to create a virtual environment (VE) similar to one of a processing harvester. This virtual environment will be used both to train operators and to test new user interfaces that could enhance performance and/or reduce operation's learning time, as well as improve the overall productivity by allowing operators to train without taking machines out of service.

  5. Flavimonas oryzihabitans (Pseudomonas oryzihabitans; CDC group Ve-2) bacteremia in the immunocompromised host.

    PubMed

    Decker, C F; Simon, G L; Keiser, J F

    1991-03-01

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans, known previously as Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, and a member of the Centers for Disease Control group Ve-2, is a gram-negative organism that has rarely been implicated as a human pathogen. Flavimonas oryzihabitans appears to be a soil and saprophytic organism that survives in moist environments and is indigenous to rice paddles. To our knowledge, only seven cases of human infection caused by this organism have been reported; they involved four patients with bacteremia and three patients with peritonitis who were receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. In this report, we describe three immunocompromised patients with catheter-associated bacteremia: a patient with cancer, a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and a patient with sickle cell disease. There is emerging clinical evidence that F oryzihabitans should be recognized as an organism that is capable of causing human disease, particularly in immunocompromised patients and with the increased usage of permanent catheters.

  6. Rivaroxaban in atrial fibrillation cardioversion: insights from the X-VeRT trial.

    PubMed

    Farag, Mohamed; Gorog, Diana A

    2015-03-01

    ABSTRACT  Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) have traditionally been the standard of care for the thromboprophylactic anticoagulation of patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) undergoing cardioversion. X-VeRT was the first prospective trial to explore the safety and efficacy of one of the non-VKA oral anticoagulants, rivaroxaban, compared with dose-adjusted VKA as thromboprophylaxis in patients with NVAF scheduled to undergo cardioversion. The protocol allowed either early (1-5 days) or delayed (3-8 weeks) cardioversion to be performed. Rivaroxaban use (20 mg once daily or 15 mg if creatinine clearance was 30-49 ml/min) was associated with a similar incidence of adverse cardiovascular events and bleeding as VKA use; however, rivaroxaban significantly reduced the time to cardioversion in those undergoing delayed cardioversion. Thus, rivaroxaban is a safe alternative to VKAs for thromboprophylaxis in patients with NVAF undergoing elective cardioversion.

  7. Investigation of Blue Bedding in Cages Housing Treatment-Naïve Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vishal D; Walton, Betsy J; Culp, Amanda G; Castellino, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    During the acclimation phase of a preclinical safety study involving Syrian golden hamsters, some of the cages of treatment-naïve animals were noted to contain blue-tinged bedding; the urine of these hamsters was not discolored. We sought to understand the underlying cause of this unusual finding to ensure that the study animals were healthy and free from factors that might confound the interpretation of the study. Analysis of extracts from the blue bedding by using HPLC with inline UV detection and high-resolution mass spectrometry indicated that the color was due to the presence of indigo blue. Furthermore, the indigo blue likely was formed through a series of biochemical events initiated by the intestinal metabolism of tryptophan to an indoxyl metabolite. We offer 2 hypotheses regarding the fate of the indoxyl metabolite: indigo blue formation through oxidative coupling in the liver or through urinary bacterial metabolism. PMID:26632791

  8. Flavimonas oryzihabitans (Pseudomonas oryzihabitans; CDC group Ve-2) bacteremia in the immunocompromised host.

    PubMed

    Decker, C F; Simon, G L; Keiser, J F

    1991-03-01

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans, known previously as Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, and a member of the Centers for Disease Control group Ve-2, is a gram-negative organism that has rarely been implicated as a human pathogen. Flavimonas oryzihabitans appears to be a soil and saprophytic organism that survives in moist environments and is indigenous to rice paddles. To our knowledge, only seven cases of human infection caused by this organism have been reported; they involved four patients with bacteremia and three patients with peritonitis who were receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. In this report, we describe three immunocompromised patients with catheter-associated bacteremia: a patient with cancer, a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and a patient with sickle cell disease. There is emerging clinical evidence that F oryzihabitans should be recognized as an organism that is capable of causing human disease, particularly in immunocompromised patients and with the increased usage of permanent catheters. PMID:2001143

  9. Investigation of Blue Bedding in Cages Housing Treatment-Naïve Hamsters.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vishal D; Walton, Betsy J; Culp, Amanda G; Castellino, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    During the acclimation phase of a preclinical safety study involving Syrian golden hamsters, some of the cages of treatment-naïve animals were noted to contain blue-tinged bedding; the urine of these hamsters was not discolored. We sought to understand the underlying cause of this unusual finding to ensure that the study animals were healthy and free from factors that might confound the interpretation of the study. Analysis of extracts from the blue bedding by using HPLC with inline UV detection and high-resolution mass spectrometry indicated that the color was due to the presence of indigo blue. Furthermore, the indigo blue likely was formed through a series of biochemical events initiated by the intestinal metabolism of tryptophan to an indoxyl metabolite. We offer 2 hypotheses regarding the fate of the indoxyl metabolite: indigo blue formation through oxidative coupling in the liver or through urinary bacterial metabolism. PMID:26632791

  10. Learning accurate and concise naïve Bayes classifiers from attribute value taxonomies and data

    PubMed Central

    Kang, D.-K.; Silvescu, A.; Honavar, V.

    2009-01-01

    In many application domains, there is a need for learning algorithms that can effectively exploit attribute value taxonomies (AVT)—hierarchical groupings of attribute values—to learn compact, comprehensible and accurate classifiers from data—including data that are partially specified. This paper describes AVT-NBL, a natural generalization of the naïve Bayes learner (NBL), for learning classifiers from AVT and data. Our experimental results show that AVT-NBL is able to generate classifiers that are substantially more compact and more accurate than those produced by NBL on a broad range of data sets with different percentages of partially specified values. We also show that AVT-NBL is more efficient in its use of training data: AVT-NBL produces classifiers that outperform those produced by NBL using substantially fewer training examples. PMID:20351793

  11. Influenza-Like Illness Surveillance on Twitter through Automated Learning of Naïve Language

    PubMed Central

    Gesualdo, Francesco; Stilo, Giovanni; Agricola, Eleonora; Gonfiantini, Michaela V.; Pandolfi, Elisabetta; Velardi, Paola; Tozzi, Alberto E.

    2013-01-01

    Twitter has the potential to be a timely and cost-effective source of data for syndromic surveillance. When speaking of an illness, Twitter users often report a combination of symptoms, rather than a suspected or final diagnosis, using naïve, everyday language. We developed a minimally trained algorithm that exploits the abundance of health-related web pages to identify all jargon expressions related to a specific technical term. We then translated an influenza case definition into a Boolean query, each symptom being described by a technical term and all related jargon expressions, as identified by the algorithm. Subsequently, we monitored all tweets that reported a combination of symptoms satisfying the case definition query. In order to geolocalize messages, we defined 3 localization strategies based on codes associated with each tweet. We found a high correlation coefficient between the trend of our influenza-positive tweets and ILI trends identified by US traditional surveillance systems. PMID:24324799

  12. Antipsychotics reverse abnormal EEG complexity in drug-naïve schizophrenia: A multiscale entropy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tetsuya; Cho, Raymond Y.; Mizuno, Tomoyuki; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Murata, Tetsuhito; Takahashi, Koichi; Wada, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis is a novel entropy-based approach for measuring dynamical complexity in physiological systems over a range of temporal scales. To evaluate this analytic approach as an aid to elucidating the pathophysiologic mechanisms in schizophrenia, we examined MSE in EEG activity in drug-naïve schizophrenia subjects pre- and post-treatment with antipsychotics in comparison with traditional EEG analysis. We recorded eyes-closed resting state EEG from frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital regions in drug-naïve 22 schizophrenia and 24 age-matched healthy control subjects. Fifteen patients were re-evaluated within 2–8 weeks after the initiation of antipsychotic treatment. For each participant, MSE was calculated on one continuous 60 second epoch for each experimental session. Schizophrenia subjects showed significantly higher complexity at higher time scales (lower frequencies), than that of healthy controls in fronto-centro-temporal, but not in parieto-occipital regions. Post-treatment, this higher complexity decreased to healthy control subject levels selectively in fronto-central regions, while the increased complexity in temporal sites remained higher. Comparative power analysis identified spectral slowing in frontal regions in pre-treatment schizophrenia subjects, consistent with previous findings, whereas no antipsychotic treatment effect was observed. In summary, multiscale entropy measures identified abnormal dynamical EEG signal complexity in anterior brain areas in schizophrenia that normalized selectively in fronto-central areas with antipsychotic treatment. These findings show that entropy-based analytic methods may serve as a novel approach for characterizing and understanding abnormal cortical dynamics in schizophrenia, and elucidating the therapeutic mechanisms of antipsychotics. PMID:20149880

  13. Bayesian estimation of Karhunen-Loève expansions; A random subspace approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, Kenny; Najm, Habib N.

    2016-08-01

    One of the most widely-used procedures for dimensionality reduction of high dimensional data is Principal Component Analysis (PCA). More broadly, low-dimensional stochastic representation of random fields with finite variance is provided via the well known Karhunen-Loève expansion (KLE). The KLE is analogous to a Fourier series expansion for a random process, where the goal is to find an orthogonal transformation for the data such that the projection of the data onto this orthogonal subspace is optimal in the L2 sense, i.e., which minimizes the mean square error. In practice, this orthogonal transformation is determined by performing an SVD (Singular Value Decomposition) on the sample covariance matrix or on the data matrix itself. Sampling error is typically ignored when quantifying the principal components, or, equivalently, basis functions of the KLE. Furthermore, it is exacerbated when the sample size is much smaller than the dimension of the random field. In this paper, we introduce a Bayesian KLE procedure, allowing one to obtain a probabilistic model on the principal components, which can account for inaccuracies due to limited sample size. The probabilistic model is built via Bayesian inference, from which the posterior becomes the matrix Bingham density over the space of orthonormal matrices. We use a modified Gibbs sampling procedure to sample on this space and then build probabilistic Karhunen-Loève expansions over random subspaces to obtain a set of low-dimensional surrogates of the stochastic process. We illustrate this probabilistic procedure with a finite dimensional stochastic process inspired by Brownian motion.

  14. Radio science investigations by VeRa onboard the Venus Express spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häusler, B.; Pätzold, M.; Tyler, G. L.; Simpson, R. A.; Bird, M. K.; Dehant, V.; Barriot, J.-P.; Eidel, W.; Mattei, R.; Remus, S.; Selle, J.; Tellmann, S.; Imamura, T.

    2006-11-01

    The Venus Express Radio Science Experiment (VeRa) uses radio signals at wavelengths of 3.6 and 13 cm ("X"- and "S"-band, respectively) to investigate the Venus surface, neutral atmosphere, ionosphere, and gravity field, as well as the interplanetary medium. An ultrastable oscillator (USO) provides a high quality onboard reference frequency source; instrumentation on Earth is used to record amplitude, phase, propagation time, and polarization of the received signals. Simultaneous, coherent measurements at the two wavelengths allow separation of dispersive media effects from classical Doppler shift. VeRa science objectives include the following: Determination of neutral atmospheric structure from the cloud deck (approximately 40 km altitude) to 100 km altitude from vertical profiles of neutral mass density, temperature, and pressure as a function of local time and season. Within the atmospheric structure, search for, and if detected, study of the vertical structure of localized buoyancy waves, and the presence and properties of planetary waves. Study of the H 2SO 4 vapor absorbing layer in the atmosphere by variations in signal intensity and application of this information to tracing atmospheric motions. Scintillation effects caused by radio wave diffraction within the atmosphere can also provide information on small-scale atmospheric turbulence. Investigation of ionospheric structure from approximately 80 km to the ionopause (<600 km), allowing study of the interaction between solar wind plasma and the Venus atmosphere. Observation of forward-scattered surface echoes obliquely reflected from selected high-elevation targets with anomalous radar properties (such as Maxwell Montes). More generally, such bistatic radar measurements provide information on the roughness and density of the surface material on scales of centimeters to meters. Detection of gravity anomalies, thereby providing insight into the properties of the Venus crust and lithosphere. Measurement of the

  15. Evaluation of acute effects of melatonin on ethanol drinking in ethanol naïve rats

    PubMed Central

    Rather, Zahoor Ahmad; Chowta, Mukta N.; Bolumbu, Ganaraja; Rakesh, K. B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to evaluate the acute effect of melatonin on ethanol drinking in ethanol naïve rats and to determine the specificity of the effect of melatonin on ethanol intake as compared to an intake of plain tap water or sugar water. Materials and Methods: A total of three experiments (2 weeks duration each) using different drinking solutions (ethanol, plain tap water, sugar water) was conducted in individually housed male wistar rats of 5 weeks age. Each animal had access to bottles containing drinking solutions for 2 h a day. In each experiment, on day 1, day 2, day 4, day 5, day 8, day 9, day 11, day 12 rats received drinking solutions. Each individual rat received single doses of saline, melatonin (50 mg and 100 mg/kg), and naltrexone on day 2, 5, 9, and 12, 1-h before receiving drinking solution. The order of drug administration is permuted such a way that each animal received the drugs in a different order in different experiments. Results: Melatonin has significantly decreased ethanol consumption by the rats and effect is dose-dependent. Naltrexone also has caused a significant reduction in the ethanol consumption. The maximum reduction in ethanol consumption was seen with melatonin 100 mg/kg dose compared to melatonin 50 mg/kg and naltrexone. There was no statistically significant effect of melatonin on plain water and sugar solution intake. Conclusions: Melatonin decreases ethanol consumption in ethanol naïve rats. The effect of melatonin is similar to naltrexone affecting selectively ethanol consumption, but not plain water and sugar water consumption. PMID:26288469

  16. Lung Microbiome Analysis in Steroid-Naїve Asthma Patients by Using Whole Sputum

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae-Woo; Choi, Jae-Chol; Shin, Jong-Wook; Kim, Jae-Yeol; Park, In-Won; Choi, Byoung Whui; Park, Heung-Woo; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2016-01-01

    Background Although recent metagenomic approaches have characterized the distinguished microbial compositions in airways of asthmatics, these results did not reach a consensus due to the small sample size, non-standardization of specimens and medication status. We conducted a metagenomics approach by using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of the induced whole sputum representing both the cellular and fluid phases in a relative large number of steroid naïve asthmatics. Methods Induced whole sputum samples obtained from 36 healthy subjects and 89 steroid-naїve asthma patients were analyzed through T-RFLP analysis. Results In contrast to previous reports about microbiota in the asthmatic airways, the diversity of microbial composition was not significantly different between the controls and asthma patients (p=0.937). In an analysis of similarities, the global R-value showed a statistically significant difference but a very low separation (0.148, p=0.002). The dissimilarity in the bacterial communities between groups was 28.74%, and operational taxonomic units (OTUs) contributing to this difference were as follows: OTU 789 (Lachnospiraceae), 517 (Comamonadaceae, Acetobacteraceae , and Chloroplast), 633 (Prevotella), 645 (Actinobacteria and Propionibacterium acnes), 607 (Lactobacillus buchneri, Lactobacillus otakiensis, Lactobacillus sunkii, and Rhodobacteraceae), and 661 (Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Leptotrichiaceae), and they were significantly more prevalent in the sputum of asthma patients than in the sputum of the controls. Conclusion Before starting anti-asthmatic treatment, the microbiota in the whole sputum of patients with asthma showed a marginal difference from the microbiota in the whole sputum of the controls. PMID:27433177

  17. sLORETA intracortical lagged coherence during breath counting in meditation-naïve participants

    PubMed Central

    Milz, Patricia; Faber, Pascal L.; Lehmann, Dietrich; Kochi, Kieko; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated brain functional connectivity comparing no-task resting to breath counting (a meditation exercise but given as task without referring to meditation). Functional connectivity computed as EEG coherence between head-surface data suffers from localization ambiguity, reference dependence, and overestimation due to volume conduction. Lagged coherence between intracortical model sources addresses these criticisms. With this analysis approach, experienced meditators reportedly showed reduced coherence during meditation, meditation-naïve participants have not yet been investigated. 58-channel EEG from 23 healthy, right-handed, meditation-naïve males during resting [3 runs] and breath counting [2 runs] was computed into sLORETA time series of intracortical electrical activity in 19 regions of interest (ROI) corresponding to the cortex underlying 19 scalp electrode sites, for each of the eight independent EEG frequency bands covering 1.5–44 Hz. Intracortical lagged coherences and head-surface conventional coherences were computed between the 19 regions/sites. During breath counting compared to resting, paired t-tests corrected for multiple testing revealed four significantly lower intracortical lagged coherences, but four significantly higher head-surface conventional coherences. Lowered intracortical lagged coherences involved left BA 10 and right BAs 3, 10, 17, 40. In conclusion, intracortical lagged coherence can yield results that are inverted to those of head-surface conventional coherence. The lowered functional connectivity between cognitive control areas and sensory perception areas during meditation-type breath counting compared to resting conceivably reflects the attention to a bodily percept without cognitive reasoning. The reductions in functional connectivity were similar but not as widespread as the reductions reported during meditation in experienced meditators. PMID:24860483

  18. Regulation of Oestrus ovis (Diptera: Oestridae) populations in previously exposed and naïve sheep.

    PubMed

    Jacquiet, Philippe; Tran Thi Ngoc, Trinh; Nouvel, Xavier; Prevot, Françoise; Grisez, Christelle; Yacob, Hailu Tolossa; Bergeaud, Jean-Paul; Hoste, Hervé; Dorchies, Philippe; Tabouret, Guillaume

    2005-05-01

    Larvae of Oestrus ovis (Insecta: Diptera: Oestridae) are common parasites of nasal and sinus cavities of sheep and goats. During larval development, a specific immune reaction is initiated by the host with a humoral local and systemic response and the recruitment of eosinophils and mast cells in the upper airways mucosae. Nevertheless, the roles of these responses in the regulation of O. ovis larvae populations in sheep are not yet known. The aim of this study was to compare the establishment and the development of larvae as well as some inflammatory or immune parameters between different groups of half-sibling sheep: (i) a primed group experimentally infected twice before a challenge infection, (ii and iii) two groups infected once only and previously treated with a long-lasting corticoïd before the challenge (one group) or not (the other group). A fourth group of non-infected animals was added in the experimental design. The larval establishment rate was 23% in the corticoïd treated group compared to about 10% in the two other infected groups. Moreover, the larval development appeared more rapid in the corticoïd treated group than in the two other infected groups suggesting that the inflammatory response is involved in the regulation of O. ovis populations. By contrast, no differences in the establishment rates were shown in the primed group compared to the naïve group (without corticoïd treatment) despite evidence of higher eosinophilia, serum specific IgG, and immediate hypersensibility to excretory-secretory products of larvae. The specific lymphocyte proliferation was reduced in the primed group compared to the naïve one suggesting that an immuno-suppression occurs following repetitive O. ovis infections. PMID:15797479

  19. Antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in naïve and experienced patients in Shiraz, Iran, 2014.

    PubMed

    Naziri, Hamed; Baesi, Kazem; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad R; Tabarraei, Alijan; McFarland, Willi; Davarpanah, Mohamad Ali

    2016-09-01

    Resistance to antiretroviral agents is a significant concern in the clinical management of HIV-infected individuals, particularly in areas of the world where treatment options are limited. In this study, we aimed to identify HIV drug-resistance-associated mutations in 40 drug-naïve patients and 62 patients under antiretroviral therapy (ART) referred to the Shiraz HIV/AIDS Research Center - the first such data available for the south of Iran. HIV reverse transcriptase and protease genes were amplified and sequenced to determine subtypes and antiretroviral- resistance-associated mutations (RAMs). Subtype CRF35-AD recombinant was the most prevalent in all patients (98 of 102, 96 %), followed by subtype A1, and subtype B (one each, 2 %). Among the 40 ART-naïve patients, two mutations associated with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) resistance (two with Y115F and T215I) and three associated with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance (two with G190S and Y181C, four with V179T) were found. Among ART-experienced patients, four mutations associated with resistance to NRTI, four with NNRTI, and five with protease inhibitors (PI) were found. Twenty patients with high levels of resistance were already on second-line therapy. We document for the first time in this region of Iran high levels of ART resistance to multiple drugs. Our findings call for more vigilant systematic ART resistance surveillance, increased resistance testing, careful management of patients with existing regimens, and strong advocacy for expansion of available drugs in Iran. PMID:27368990

  20. Patterns of motor and non-motor features in medication-naïve Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Samay; Park, Seo-Young; Comer, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Background Parkinsonism is defined by motor features (tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural instability). Accompanying non-motor features (e.g., cognitive, autonomic, sleep disturbances) are under-recognized and under-treated. We hypothesized clinical patterns occurring in early, medication-naïve Parkinsonism are distinguished by features such as tremor, sleep, autonomic, and cognitive dysfunction. Methods Clinical and neuroimaging data were obtained in the Parkinson’s Progression Marker Initiative (PPMI). Group comparisons of Parkinsonism with dopaminergic deficits (PDD) (N=388)), controls (N=196), and Parkinsonism with scans without evidence of dopaminergic deficits (SWEDD’s) (N=64) were done with ANOVA, chi-square, and post-hoc pairwise tests. To examine clinical patterns within the PDD group, k-means clustering was performed with non-motor or motor features, or both. Results Among PDD, four non-motor patterns (% of PDD) (impulsive (14.9%), sleep-autonomic (22.9%), cognitive-olfactory (18.0%), and mild (44.1%)), four motor patterns (tremor plus bradykinesia (56.2%), tremor without bradykinesia (16.2%), postural instability (6.7%) and no tremor (20.9%)) and five combined motor/non-motor patterns (tremor with bradykinesia (42.3%), tremor without bradykinesia (15.5%), no tremor and mild non-motor features (17.0%), postural instability with sleep-autonomic disturbances (6.7%) and oldest onset cognitive-olfactory (18.6%)) were observed. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first description of non-motor clinical patterns in early, medication-naïve Parkinsonism, suggesting such features are intrinsic to Parkinsonian disorders. PMID:26227734

  1. Cumulative Incidence and Predictors of Progression in Corticosteroid-Naïve Patients with Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Dai; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Background Assessment of the clinical course of sarcoidosis requires long-term observation. However, the appropriate period of follow-up for sarcoidosis remains unclear, especially in patients without indication of corticosteroid therapy at the time of diagnosis. Objective This study aimed to clarify the cumulative incidence and identify risk factors for disease progression in corticosteroid-naïve sarcoidosis patients. Methods The clinical courses of 150 Japanese patients with sarcoidosis, who were followed for more than 2 years and had no indication for corticosteroid therapy at diagnosis, were retrospectively reviewed. Disease progression was defined as worsening of pulmonary sarcoidosis, development of new organ involvement, or extrapulmonary organ damage. The cumulative incidence of progression was estimated by generating a cumulative incidence curve with the Fine and Gray method. Results The median follow-up duration was 7.7 years (interquartile range, 4.7–13.6 years). Thirty-two (21%) patients experienced disease progression. New organ involvement appeared in 16 patients (11%). The 6-month, and 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year cumulative incidence of progression was 2%, 5%, 15%, 28%, and 31%, respectively. The number of organs involved at diagnosis was an independent predictor for progression with a multifactorial adjusted hazard ratio of 1.71 (95% confidence interval, 1.11–2.62). The optimal cut-off of the number of organs involved at diagnosis to identify future progression was three. Conclusions In corticosteroid-naïve sarcoidosis patients, the risks of disease progression are comparable from 0–5 years and 5–10 years after diagnosis. The number of organs involved at diagnosis is a useful predictor for progression of sarcoidosis. PMID:26575272

  2. A Longitudinal Functional Neuroimaging Study in Medication-Naïve Depression after Antidepressant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Shingo; Pu, Shenghong; Iwanami, Akira; Hirano, Jinichi; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Mimura, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated the potential clinical use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a tool in assisting the diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD); however, it is still unclear whether NIRS signal changes during cognitive task are state- or trait-dependent, and whether NIRS could be a neural predictor of treatment response. Therefore, we conducted a longitudinal study to explore frontal haemodynamic changes following antidepressant treatment in medication-naïve MDD using 52-channel NIRS. This study included 25 medication-naïve individuals with MDD and 62 healthy controls (HC). We performed NIRS scans before and after antidepressant treatment and measured changes of [oxy-Hb] activation during a verbal fluency task (VFT) following treatment. Individuals with MDD showed significantly decreased [oxy-Hb] values during a VFT compared with HC in the bilateral frontal and temporal cortices at baseline. There were no [oxy-Hb] changes between pre- and post-antidepressant treatment time points in the MDD cohort despite significant improvement in depressive symptoms. There was a significant association between mean [oxy-Hb] values during a VFT at baseline and improvement in depressive symptoms following treatment in the bilateral inferior frontal and middle temporal gyri in MDD. These findings suggest that hypofrontality response to a VFT may represent a potential trait marker for depression rather than a state marker. Moreover, the correlation analysis indicates that the NIRS signals before the initiation of treatment may be a biological marker to predict patient’s clinical response to antidepressant treatment. The present study provides further evidence to support a potential application of NIRS for the diagnosis and treatment of depression. PMID:25786240

  3. Heterodimeric protein complex identification by naïve Bayes classifiers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein complexes are basic cellular entities that carry out the functions of their components. It can be found that in databases of protein complexes of yeast like CYC2008, the major type of known protein complexes is heterodimeric complexes. Although a number of methods for trying to predict sets of proteins that form arbitrary types of protein complexes simultaneously have been proposed, it can be found that they often fail to predict heterodimeric complexes. Results In this paper, we have designed several features characterizing heterodimeric protein complexes based on genomic data sets, and proposed a supervised-learning method for the prediction of heterodimeric protein complexes. This method learns the parameters of the features, which are embedded in the naïve Bayes classifier. The log-likelihood ratio derived from the naïve Bayes classifier with the parameter values obtained by maximum likelihood estimation gives the score of a given pair of proteins to predict whether the pair is a heterodimeric complex or not. A five-fold cross-validation shows good performance on yeast. The trained classifiers also show higher predictability than various existing algorithms on yeast data sets with approximate and exact matching criteria. Conclusions Heterodimeric protein complex prediction is a rather harder problem than heteromeric protein complex prediction because heterodimeric protein complex is topologically simpler. However, it turns out that by designing features specialized for heterodimeric protein complexes, predictability of them can be improved. Thus, the design of more sophisticate features for heterodimeric protein complexes as well as the accumulation of more accurate and useful genome-wide data sets will lead to higher predictability of heterodimeric protein complexes. Our tool can be downloaded from http://imi.kyushu-u.ac.jp/~om/. PMID:24299017

  4. HIV DNA Reservoir Increases Risk for Cognitive Disorders in cART-Naïve Patients

    PubMed Central

    Valcour, Victor G.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Agsalda, Melissa; Sailasuta, Napapon; Chalermchai, Thep; Schuetz, Alexandra; Shikuma, Cecilia; Liang, Chin-Yuan; Jirajariyavej, Supunee; Sithinamsuwan, Pasiri; Tipsuk, Somporn; Clifford, David B.; Paul, Robert; Fletcher, James L. K.; Marovich, Mary A.; Slike, Bonnie M.; DeGruttola, Victor; Shiramizu, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Cognitive impairment remains frequent in HIV, despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Leading theories implicate peripheral monocyte HIV DNA reservoirs as a mechanism for spread of the virus to the brain. These reservoirs remain present despite cART. The objective of this study was to determine if the level of HIV DNA in CD14+ enriched monocytes predicted cognitive impairment and brain injury. Methods We enrolled 61 cART-naïve HIV-infected Thais in a prospective study and measured HIV DNA in CD14+ enriched monocyte samples in a blinded fashion. We determined HAND diagnoses by consensus panel and all participants underwent magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to measure markers of brain injury. Immune activation was measured via cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Results The mean (SD) age was 35 (6.9) years, CD4 T-lymphocyte count was 236 (139) and log10 plasma HIV RNA was 4.8 (0.73). Twenty-eight of 61 met HAND criteria. The log10 CD14+ HIV DNA was associated with HAND in unadjusted and adjusted models (p = 0.001). There was a 14.5 increased odds ratio for HAND per 1 log-value of HIV DNA (10-fold increase in copy number). Plasma CD14+ HIV DNA was associated with plasma and CSF neopterin (p = 0.023) and with MRS markers of neuronal injury (lower N-acetyl aspartate) and glial dysfunction (higher myoinositol) in multiple brain regions. Interpretation Reservoir burden of HIV DNA in monocyte-enriched (CD14+) peripheral blood cells increases risk for HAND in treatment-naïve HIV+ subjects and is directly associated with CSF immune activation and both brain injury and glial dysfunction by MRS. PMID:23936155

  5. In Vitro Priming of Naı̈ve T-cells with p-Phenylenediamine and Bandrowski's Base.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Andrew; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Faulkner, Lee; Evely, Jane; Pirmohamed, Munir; Park, Kevin B; Naisbitt, Dean J

    2015-10-19

    p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) is a component of hair dye formulations that is associated with T-cell mediated allergic contact dermatitis. Antigen-specific T-cells from allergic contact dermatitis patients are activated with either PPD or the oxidation product, Bandrowski's base. In nonallergic individuals, T-cells that are activated by Bandrowski's base, but not by PPD, are readily detectable. The aim of the current study was to use an in vitro T-cell priming assay to assess the activation of memory and naı̈ve T-cells from healthy donors with PPD and Bandrowski's base, and to compare these responses to those observed from allergic patients. Both PPD and Bandrowski's base-responsive clones were generated from allergic patients. The majority of Bandrowski's base-responsive clones were CD4+ and displayed a lack of PPD reactivity. In contrast, CD4+ and CD8+ clones displaying PPD reactivity were detected. Approximately 25% of these displayed low levels of reactivity to Bandrowski's base. Clones from the allergic patients secreted a range of cytokines including IFN-γ, Il-13, and Il-22. In healthy donors, Bandrowski's base-specific T-cell proliferative responses and cytokine secretion were detected with both naı̈ve and memory T-cells. T-cell clones generated from the Bandrowski's base-responsive cultures responded to Bandrowski's base but not PPD. PPD-specific naı̈ve and memory T-cell responses were not detected from healthy donors. These data show that Bandrowski's base stimulates pre-existing memory T-cells isolated from healthy donors and primes naı̈ve T-cells when the chemical is bound to autologous dendritic cells. Priming naı̈ve T-cells against PPD failed, suggesting an important individual susceptibility factor is missing from the in vitro T-cell priming assay. PMID:26355666

  6. Tomato immune receptor Ve1 recognizes effector of multiple fungal pathogens uncovered by genome and RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Ronnie; van Esse, H Peter; Maruthachalam, Karunakaran; Bolton, Melvin D; Santhanam, Parthasarathy; Saber, Mojtaba Keykha; Zhang, Zhao; Usami, Toshiyuki; Lievens, Bart; Subbarao, Krishna V; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2012-03-27

    Fungal plant pathogens secrete effector molecules to establish disease on their hosts, and plants in turn use immune receptors to try to intercept these effectors. The tomato immune receptor Ve1 governs resistance to race 1 strains of the soil-borne vascular wilt fungi Verticillium dahliae and Verticillium albo-atrum, but the corresponding Verticillium effector remained unknown thus far. By high-throughput population genome sequencing, a single 50-Kb sequence stretch was identified that only occurs in race 1 strains, and subsequent transcriptome sequencing of Verticillium-infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants revealed only a single highly expressed ORF in this region, designated Ave1 (for Avirulence on Ve1 tomato). Functional analyses confirmed that Ave1 activates Ve1-mediated resistance and demonstrated that Ave1 markedly contributes to fungal virulence, not only on tomato but also on Arabidopsis. Interestingly, Ave1 is homologous to a widespread family of plant natriuretic peptides. Besides plants, homologous proteins were only found in the bacterial plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis and the plant pathogenic fungi Colletotrichum higginsianum, Cercospora beticola, and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. The distribution of Ave1 homologs, coincident with the presence of Ave1 within a flexible genomic region, strongly suggests that Verticillium acquired Ave1 from plants through horizontal gene transfer. Remarkably, by transient expression we show that also the Ave1 homologs from F. oxysporum and C. beticola can activate Ve1-mediated resistance. In line with this observation, Ve1 was found to mediate resistance toward F. oxysporum in tomato, showing that this immune receptor is involved in resistance against multiple fungal pathogens. PMID:22416119

  7. Shear Stress-induced Redistribution of Vascular Endothelial-Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase (VE-PTP) in Endothelial Cells and Its Role in Cell Elongation*

    PubMed Central

    Mantilidewi, Kemala Isnainiasih; Murata, Yoji; Mori, Munemasa; Otsubo, Chihiro; Kotani, Takenori; Kusakari, Shinya; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Matozaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are continuously exposed to shear stress (SS) generated by blood flow. Such stress plays a key role in regulation of various aspects of EC function including cell proliferation and motility as well as changes in cell morphology. Vascular endothelial-protein-tyrosine phosphatase (VE-PTP) is an R3-subtype PTP that possesses multiple fibronectin type III-like domains in its extracellular region and is expressed specifically in ECs. The role of VE-PTP in EC responses to SS has remained unknown, however. Here we show that VE-PTP is diffusely localized in ECs maintained under static culture conditions, whereas it undergoes rapid accumulation at the downstream edge of the cells relative to the direction of flow in response to SS. This redistribution of VE-PTP triggered by SS was found to require its extracellular and transmembrane regions and was promoted by integrin engagement of extracellular matrix ligands. Inhibition of actin polymerization or of Cdc42, Rab5, or Arf6 activities attenuated the SS-induced redistribution of VE-PTP. VE-PTP also underwent endocytosis in the static and SS conditions. SS induced the polarized distribution of internalized VE-PTP. Such an effect was promoted by integrin engagement of fibronectin but prevented by inhibition of Cdc42 activity or of actin polymerization. In addition, depletion of VE-PTP by RNA interference in human umbilical vein ECs blocked cell elongation in the direction of flow induced by SS. Our results suggest that the polarized redistribution of VE-PTP in response to SS plays an important role in the regulation of EC function by blood flow. PMID:24451369

  8. Cardiac Effects of Antiretroviral-Naïve versus Antiretroviral-Exposed HIV Infection in Children

    PubMed Central

    Grobbee, Diederick E.; Burgner, David; Kurniati, Nia

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac involvement in HIV infected children has been frequently reported, but whether this is due to HIV infection itself or to antiretroviral treatment (ART) is unknown. Methods This cross sectional study involved 114 vertically-acquired HIV-infected (56 ART-naive, 58 ART-exposed) and 51 healthy children in Jakarta, Indonesia. Echocardiography was performed to measure dimensions of the left ventricle (LV) and systolic functions. We applied general linear modeling to evaluate the associations between HIV infection/treatment status and cardiac parameters with further adjustment for potential confounders or explanatory variables. Findings are presented as (adjusted) mean differences between each of the two HIV groups and healthy children, with 95% confidence intervals and p values. Results Compared to healthy children, ART-naïve HIV-infected children did not show significant differences in age-and-height adjusted cardiac dimensions apart from larger LV internal diameter (difference 2.0 mm, 95%CI 0.2 to 3.7), whereas ART exposed HIV infection showed thicker LV posterior walls (difference = 1.1 mm, 95%CI 0.5 to 1.6), larger LV internal diameter (difference = 1.7 mm, 95%CI 0.2 to 3.2) and higher LV mass (difference = 14.0 g, 7.4 to 20.5). With respect to systolic function, reduced LV ejection fraction was seen in both ART-naïve HIV infected (adjusted difference = -6.7%, -11.4 to -2.0) and, to a lesser extent, in ART-exposed HIV infected children (difference = -4.5%, -8.5 to -0.4). Inflammation level seemed to be involved in most associations in ART-exposed HIV-infected, but few, if any, for decreased function in the ART-naive ones, whereas lower hemoglobin appeared to partially mediate chamber dilation in both groups and reduced function, mainly in ART-exposed children. Conclusions ART-naive HIV infected children have a substantial decrease in cardiac systolic function, whereas the ART-exposed have thicker ventricular walls with larger internal diameter

  9. Effect of inhaled corticosteroids on blood eosinophil count in steroid-naïve patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Kreindler, James L; Watkins, Michael L; Lettis, Sally; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Locantore, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sputum and blood eosinophil counts have attracted attention as potential biomarkers in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). One question regarding the use of blood eosinophils as a biomarker in COPD is whether their levels are affected by the use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), which are commonly prescribed for COPD. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of peripheral blood leucocytes from a previously completed clinical trial that examined effects of ICS in steroid-naïve patients with COPD. Results and conclusion The data show that the ICS-containing treatment arms (containing fluticasone propionate) had a small effect on peripheral blood eosinophils in steroid-naïve patients with COPD. Trial registration number NCT00358358; Post-results. PMID:27651909

  10. Effect of inhaled corticosteroids on blood eosinophil count in steroid-naïve patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Kreindler, James L; Watkins, Michael L; Lettis, Sally; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Locantore, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sputum and blood eosinophil counts have attracted attention as potential biomarkers in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). One question regarding the use of blood eosinophils as a biomarker in COPD is whether their levels are affected by the use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), which are commonly prescribed for COPD. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of peripheral blood leucocytes from a previously completed clinical trial that examined effects of ICS in steroid-naïve patients with COPD. Results and conclusion The data show that the ICS-containing treatment arms (containing fluticasone propionate) had a small effect on peripheral blood eosinophils in steroid-naïve patients with COPD. Trial registration number NCT00358358; Post-results.

  11. Symmetry is in the eye of the `beeholder': innate preference for bilateral symmetry in flower-naïve bumblebees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Ivana; Gumbert, Andreas; Hempel de Ibarra, Natalie; Kunze, Jan; Giurfa, Martin

    Bilateral symmetry has been considered as an indicator of phenotypic and genotypic quality supporting innate preferences for highly symmetric partners. Insect pollinators preferentially visit flowers of a particular symmetry type, thus leading to the suggestion that they have innate preferences for symmetrical flowers or flower models. Here we show that flower-naïve bumblebees (Bombus terrestris), with no experience of symmetric or asymmetric patterns and whose visual experience was accurately controlled, have innate preferences for bilateral symmetry. The presence of color cues did not influence the bees' original preference. Our results thus show that bilateral symmetry is innately preferred in the context of food search, a fact that supports the selection of symmetry in flower displays. Furthermore, such innate preferences indicate that the nervous system of naïve animals may be primed to respond to relevant sensory cues in the environment.

  12. Overcoming the barrier of narrative adherence in conflicts through awareness of the psychological bias of naïve realism.

    PubMed

    Nasie, Meytal; Bar-Tal, Daniel; Pliskin, Ruthie; Nahhas, Eman; Halperin, Eran

    2014-11-01

    One significant socio-psychological barrier for peaceful resolution of conflicts is each party's adherence to its own collective narrative. We hypothesized that raising awareness to the psychological bias of naïve realism and its identification in oneself would provide a path to overcoming this barrier, thus increasing openness to the adversary's narrative. We conducted three experimental studies in the context of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Studies 1 and 2, conducted among Jewish Israelis and Palestinian Israelis, respectively, revealed that participants with hawkish political ideology reported greater openness to the adversary's narrative when they were made aware of naïve realism bias. Study 3 revealed that hawkish participants at the baseline adhered to the ingroup narrative and resisted the adversary's narrative more than dovish participants. They were also more able to identify the bias in themselves upon learning about it. This identification may explain why the manipulation led to bias correction only among hawkish participants.

  13. Flavimonas oryzihabitans (Pseudomonas oryzihabitans; CDC group Ve-2): an emerging pathogen in peritonitis related to continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis?

    PubMed

    Bendig, J W; Mayes, P J; Eyers, D E; Holmes, B; Chin, T T

    1989-01-01

    A case of peritonitis caused by Flavimonas oryzihabitans (Pseudomonas oryzihabitans; CDC group VE-2) in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis is reported. This is the seventh case of infection caused by this organism reported in the English literature and the third reported case of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis caused by this organism; it is the first case of infection of any kind caused by this organism in England.

  14. Effects of chronic doxepin and amitriptyline administration in naïve mice and in neuropathic pain mice model.

    PubMed

    Mika, J; Jurga, A M; Starnowska, J; Wasylewski, M; Rojewska, E; Makuch, W; Kwiatkowski, K; Malek, N; Przewlocka, B

    2015-05-21

    Neuropathic pain is a severe clinical problem, often appearing as a co-symptom of many diseases or manifesting as a result of damage to the nervous system. Many drugs and agents are currently used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, such as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). The aims of this paper were to test the effects of two classic TCAs, doxepin and amitriptyline, in naïve animals and in a model of neuropathic pain and to determine the role of cytokine activation in the effects of these drugs. All experiments were carried out with Albino-Swiss mice using behavioral tests (von Frey test and the cold plate test) and biochemical analyses (qRT-PCR and Western blot). In the mice subjected to chronic constriction injury (CCI), doxepin and amitriptyline attenuated the symptoms of neuropathic pain and diminished the CCI-induced increase in the levels of spinal interleukin (IL)-6 and -1β mRNA, but not the protein levels of these cytokines, measured on day 12. Unexpectedly, chronic administration of doxepin or amitriptyline for 12 days produced allodynia and hyperalgesia in naïve mice. The treatment with these drugs did not influence the spinal levels of IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA, however, the protein levels of these pronociceptive factors were increased. The administration of ondansetron (5-HT3 receptor antagonist) significantly weakened the allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by both antidepressants in naïve mice; in contrast, yohimbine (α2-adrenergic receptors antagonist) did not influence these effects. Allodynia and hyperalgesia induced in naïve animals by amitriptyline and doxepin may be associated with an increase in the levels of pronociceptive cytokines resulting from 5-HT3-induced hypersensitivity. Our results provide new and important information about the possible side effects of antidepressants. Further investigation of these mechanisms may help to guide decisions about the use of classic TCAs for therapy. PMID:25769941

  15. Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Series of Metal Propellers on a VE-7 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E

    1929-01-01

    An adjustable blade metal propeller was tested at five different angle settings, forming a series varying in pitch. The propeller was mounted on a VE-7 airplane in the twenty-foot propeller research tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The efficiencies were found to be from 4 to 7 per cent higher than those of standard wood propellers operating under the same conditions. The results are given in convenient form for use in selecting propellers for aircraft.

  16. Flavimonas oryzihabitans (Pseudomonas oryzihabitans; CDC group Ve-2): an emerging pathogen in peritonitis related to continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis?

    PubMed

    Bendig, J W; Mayes, P J; Eyers, D E; Holmes, B; Chin, T T

    1989-01-01

    A case of peritonitis caused by Flavimonas oryzihabitans (Pseudomonas oryzihabitans; CDC group VE-2) in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis is reported. This is the seventh case of infection caused by this organism reported in the English literature and the third reported case of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis caused by this organism; it is the first case of infection of any kind caused by this organism in England. PMID:2913032

  17. Interactions of 40LoVe within the ribonucleoprotein complex that forms on the localization element of Xenopus Vg1 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Todd T; Swenson, Lara B; Hartland, Emilia I; Snedden, Donald D; Goodson, Holly V; Huber, Paul W

    2009-07-01

    Proline rich RNA-binding protein (Prrp), which associates with mRNAs that employ the late pathway for localization in Xenopus oocytes, was used as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of an expression library. Several independent clones were recovered that correspond to a paralog of 40LoVe, a factor required for proper localization of Vg1 mRNA to the vegetal cortex. 40LoVe is present in at least three alternatively spliced isoforms; however, only one, corresponding to the variant identified in the two-hybrid screen, can be crosslinked to Vg1 mRNA. In vitro binding assays revealed that 40LoVe has high affinity for RNA, but exhibits little binding specificity on its own. Nonetheless, it was only found associated with localized mRNAs in oocytes. 40LoVe also interacts directly with VgRBP71 and VgRBP60/hnRNP I; it is the latter factor that likely determines the binding specificity of 40LoVe. Initially, 40LoVe binds to Vg1 mRNA in the nucleus and remains with the RNA in the cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical staining of oocytes shows that the protein is distributed between the nucleus and cytoplasm, consistent with nucleocytoplasmic shuttling activity. 40LoVe is excluded from the mitochondrial cloud, which is used by RNAs that localize through the early (METRO) pathway in stage I oocytes; nonetheless, it is associated with at least some early pathway RNAs during later stages of oogenesis. A phylogenetic analysis of 2xRBD hnRNP proteins combined with other experimental evidence suggests that 40LoVe is a distant homolog of Drosophila Squid.

  18. The F-BAR protein pacsin2 inhibits asymmetric VE-cadherin internalization from tensile adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Dorland, Yvonne L.; Malinova, Tsveta S.; van Stalborch, Anne-Marieke D.; Grieve, Adam G.; van Geemen, Daphne; Jansen, Nicolette S.; de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Nawaz, Kalim; Kole, Jeroen; Geerts, Dirk; Musters, René J. P.; de Rooij, Johan; Hordijk, Peter L.; Huveneers, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Vascular homoeostasis, development and disease critically depend on the regulation of endothelial cell–cell junctions. Here we uncover a new role for the F-BAR protein pacsin2 in the control of VE-cadherin-based endothelial adhesion. Pacsin2 concentrates at focal adherens junctions (FAJs) that are experiencing unbalanced actomyosin-based pulling. FAJs move in response to differences in local cytoskeletal geometry and pacsin2 is recruited consistently to the trailing end of fast-moving FAJs via a mechanism that requires an intact F-BAR domain. Photoconversion, photobleaching, immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy reveal polarized dynamics, and organization of junctional proteins between the front of FAJs and their trailing ends. Interestingly, pacsin2 recruitment inhibits internalization of the VE-cadherin complex from FAJ trailing ends and is important for endothelial monolayer integrity. Together, these findings reveal a novel junction protective mechanism during polarized trafficking of VE-cadherin, which supports barrier maintenance within dynamic endothelial tissue. PMID:27417273

  19. Real-Time PCR Assay Targeting the veA Gene for Quantification of Aspergillus carbonarius in Grapes.

    PubMed

    Kizis, Dimosthenis; Nychas, George-John E; Panagou, Efstathios Z

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a SYBR Green I real-time PCR method has been developed for the detection and quantification of Aspergillus carbonarius in grapes by targeting the veA gene with a primer pair (veAF4/veAR4) that specifically amplifies a 91-bp PCR product. The quantification of the fungal DNA was performed by generation of standard curves for two A. carbonarius strains, using spectrophotometrically measured DNA quantities (Log) with a linearity range from 50 to 5 × 10(-4) ng of DNA. A high positive correlation (R(2) > 0.99) between exponential increases of DNA and real-time PCR threshold cycles showed a high amplification efficiency for the assay (E values 100.06 and 101.51%, respectively). Quantification of the fungal genomic DNA in grape samples artificially inoculated with A. carbonarius conidia was successfully performed with a minimum threshold of 10(4) conidia per g of grape berry. The assay developed would allow reliable, specific, and efficient detection and quantification of A. carbonarius in grapes.

  20. The F-BAR protein pacsin2 inhibits asymmetric VE-cadherin internalization from tensile adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Dorland, Yvonne L; Malinova, Tsveta S; van Stalborch, Anne-Marieke D; Grieve, Adam G; van Geemen, Daphne; Jansen, Nicolette S; de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Nawaz, Kalim; Kole, Jeroen; Geerts, Dirk; Musters, René J P; de Rooij, Johan; Hordijk, Peter L; Huveneers, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Vascular homoeostasis, development and disease critically depend on the regulation of endothelial cell-cell junctions. Here we uncover a new role for the F-BAR protein pacsin2 in the control of VE-cadherin-based endothelial adhesion. Pacsin2 concentrates at focal adherens junctions (FAJs) that are experiencing unbalanced actomyosin-based pulling. FAJs move in response to differences in local cytoskeletal geometry and pacsin2 is recruited consistently to the trailing end of fast-moving FAJs via a mechanism that requires an intact F-BAR domain. Photoconversion, photobleaching, immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy reveal polarized dynamics, and organization of junctional proteins between the front of FAJs and their trailing ends. Interestingly, pacsin2 recruitment inhibits internalization of the VE-cadherin complex from FAJ trailing ends and is important for endothelial monolayer integrity. Together, these findings reveal a novel junction protective mechanism during polarized trafficking of VE-cadherin, which supports barrier maintenance within dynamic endothelial tissue. PMID:27417273

  1. HIV Drug Resistance-Associated Mutations in Antiretroviral Naïve HIV-1-Infected Latin American Children

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Ramirez, Luis E.; Rodriguez-Diaz, Roberto; Harris, D. Robert; Hazra, Rohan

    2010-01-01

    Our goal was to describe the presence of HIV drug resistance among HIV-1-infected, antiretroviral (ARV) naïve children and adolescents in Latin America and to examine resistance in these children in relation to drug exposure in the mother. Genotyping was performed on plasma samples obtained at baseline from HIV-1-infected participants in a prospective cohort study in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico (NISDI Pediatric Study). Of 713 HIV-infected children enrolled, 69 were ARV naïve and eligible for the analysis. At enrollment, mean age was 7.3 years; 81.2% were infected with HIV perinatally. Drug resistance mutations (DRMs) were detected in 6 (8.7%; 95% confidence interval 3.1–18.2%) ARV-naïve subjects; none of the mothers of these 6 received ARVs during their pregnancies and none of the children received ARV prophylaxis. Reverse transcriptase mutations K70R and K70E were detected in 3 and 2 subjects, respectively; protease mutation I50 V was detected in 1 subject. Three of the 6 children with DRMs initiated ARV therapy during followup, with a good response in 2. The overall rate of primary drug resistance in this pediatric HIV-infected population was low, and no subjects had more than 1 DRM. Mutations associated with resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were the most prevalent. PMID:22331986

  2. The Motion Verified Red Stars (MoVeRS) Catalog and Low-Mass Field Stars with Warm Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theissen, Christopher; West, Andrew A.; Dhital, Saurav

    2016-01-01

    We present the Motion Verified Red Stars (MoVeRS) catalog of proper motion selected low-mass stars from SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE. These surveys provide a time baseline of ~12 years for sources found in all three surveys, and a precision better than 10 mas/year.The MoVeRS catalog is augmented with proper motions from SDSS+USNO-B and the full sample contains 8,735,004 photometric point-sources selected based on colors and their significant (2σ) proper motions. This catalog will be useful for finding new low-mass common proper motion systems, along with providing a large input catalog for numerous studies of low-mass stars. In addition, we use the MoVeRS catalog to present a preliminary sample of low-mass field stars exhibiting signatures of warm dust (mid-infrared excesses). Such systems are thought to originate from collisions of terrestrial planets, raising even more questions about the habitability of planetary systems around low-mass stars.

  3. Sulfuric acid vapor in the atmosphere of Venus as observed by the Venus Express Radio Science experiment VeRa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oschlisniok, Janusz; Pätzold, Martin; Häusler, Bernd; Tellmann, Silvia; Bird, Mike; Andert, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The cloud deck within Venus' atmosphere, which covers the entire planet between approx. 50 and 70 km altitude, consists mostly of liquid and gaseous sulfuric acid. The gaseous part increases strongly just below the main clouds and builds an approx. 15 km thick haze layer of H2SO4. This region is responsible for a strong absorption of radio waves as seen in VeRa radio science observations. The amount of the absorption, which is used to derive the abundance of gaseous sulfuric acid, depends on the signal frequency. VeRa probed the atmosphere of Venus between 2006 and 2015 with radio signals at 13 cm (S-band) and 3.6 cm (X-band) wavelengths. We present H2SO4 profiles derived from S-band and X-band absorption during the first occultation season in 2006. The comparison of the H2SO4 profiles derived from both frequency bands provides a reliable picture of the H2SO4 abundance. Distinct differences in the S- and X-band profiles may give a clue to increased SO2 abundances. The derived VeRa results shall be compared with results provided by other experiments onboard Venus Express as well as with previous missions.

  4. Deadly intentions: naïve introduced foxes show rapid attraction to odour cues of an unfamiliar native prey

    PubMed Central

    Bytheway, Jenna P.; Price, Catherine J.; Banks, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduced predators have caused declines and extinctions of native species worldwide, seemingly able to find and hunt new, unfamiliar prey from the time of their introduction. Yet, just as native species are often naïve to introduced predators, in theory, introduced predators should initially be naïve in their response to novel native prey. Here we examine the response of free-living introduced red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) to their first encounter with the odour cues of a novel native prey, the long-nosed bandicoot (Perameles nasuta). Despite no experience with bandicoots at the study site, foxes were significantly more interested in bandicoot odour compared to untreated controls and to a co-evolved prey, the black rat (Rattus rattus). So what gives introduced predators a novelty advantage over native prey? Such neophilia towards novel potential food sources carries little costs, however naïve native prey often lack analogous neophobic responses towards novel predators, possibly because predator avoidance is so costly. We propose that this nexus between the costs and benefits of responding to novel information is different for alien predators and native prey, giving alien predators a novelty advantage over native prey. This may explain why some introduced predators have rapid and devastating impacts on native fauna. PMID:27416966

  5. The F-BAR protein pacsin2 inhibits asymmetric VE-cadherin internalization from tensile adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Dorland, Yvonne L; Malinova, Tsveta S; van Stalborch, Anne-Marieke D; Grieve, Adam G; van Geemen, Daphne; Jansen, Nicolette S; de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Nawaz, Kalim; Kole, Jeroen; Geerts, Dirk; Musters, René J P; de Rooij, Johan; Hordijk, Peter L; Huveneers, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Vascular homoeostasis, development and disease critically depend on the regulation of endothelial cell-cell junctions. Here we uncover a new role for the F-BAR protein pacsin2 in the control of VE-cadherin-based endothelial adhesion. Pacsin2 concentrates at focal adherens junctions (FAJs) that are experiencing unbalanced actomyosin-based pulling. FAJs move in response to differences in local cytoskeletal geometry and pacsin2 is recruited consistently to the trailing end of fast-moving FAJs via a mechanism that requires an intact F-BAR domain. Photoconversion, photobleaching, immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy reveal polarized dynamics, and organization of junctional proteins between the front of FAJs and their trailing ends. Interestingly, pacsin2 recruitment inhibits internalization of the VE-cadherin complex from FAJ trailing ends and is important for endothelial monolayer integrity. Together, these findings reveal a novel junction protective mechanism during polarized trafficking of VE-cadherin, which supports barrier maintenance within dynamic endothelial tissue.

  6. Deadly intentions: naïve introduced foxes show rapid attraction to odour cues of an unfamiliar native prey.

    PubMed

    Bytheway, Jenna P; Price, Catherine J; Banks, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Introduced predators have caused declines and extinctions of native species worldwide, seemingly able to find and hunt new, unfamiliar prey from the time of their introduction. Yet, just as native species are often naïve to introduced predators, in theory, introduced predators should initially be naïve in their response to novel native prey. Here we examine the response of free-living introduced red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) to their first encounter with the odour cues of a novel native prey, the long-nosed bandicoot (Perameles nasuta). Despite no experience with bandicoots at the study site, foxes were significantly more interested in bandicoot odour compared to untreated controls and to a co-evolved prey, the black rat (Rattus rattus). So what gives introduced predators a novelty advantage over native prey? Such neophilia towards novel potential food sources carries little costs, however naïve native prey often lack analogous neophobic responses towards novel predators, possibly because predator avoidance is so costly. We propose that this nexus between the costs and benefits of responding to novel information is different for alien predators and native prey, giving alien predators a novelty advantage over native prey. This may explain why some introduced predators have rapid and devastating impacts on native fauna. PMID:27416966

  7. Strong lensing probability in TeVeS (tensor-vector-scalar) theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Daming

    2008-01-15

    We recalculate the strong lensing probability as a function of the image separation in TeVeS (tensor-vector-scalar) cosmology, which is a relativistic version of MOND (MOdified Newtonian Dynamics). The lens is modeled by the Hernquist profile. We assume an open cosmology with {Omega}{sub b} = 0.04 and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.5 and three different kinds of interpolating functions. Two different galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMF) are adopted: PHJ (Panter, Heavens and Jimenez 2004 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 355 764) determined from SDSS data release 1 and Fontana (Fontana et al 2006 Astron. Astrophys. 459 745) from GOODS-MUSIC catalog. We compare our results with both the predicted probabilities for lenses from singular isothermal sphere galaxy halos in LCDM (Lambda cold dark matter) with a Schechter-fit velocity function, and the observational results for the well defined combined sample of the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS) and Jodrell Bank/Very Large Array Astrometric Survey (JVAS). It turns out that the interpolating function {mu}(x) = x/(1+x) combined with Fontana GSMF matches the results from CLASS/JVAS quite well.

  8. The Venus Neutral Atmosphere from the Radio Science Experiment VeRa on Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellmann, S.; Haeusler, B.; Paetzold, M.; Bird, M. K.; Tyler, G. L.

    2008-12-01

    The Venus Express Radio Science Experiment VeRa is sounding the Venus neutral atmosphere and ionosphere using the spacecraft radio subsystem in the oneway radio link mode at X-band (8.4 GHz) and S- band (2.3 GHz). An Ultrastable Oscillator (USO) provides a high quality onboard frequency reference source for the derivation of electron density profiles in the ionosphere and profiles of pressure, temperature and neutral number density of the neutral atmosphere. Radial profiles of neutral number density derived from the occultations cover the altitude range 40 to 90 km, which are converted to vertical profiles of temperature and pressure. The polar orbit of Venus Express provides the opportunity to study the atmosphere at all planetocentric latitudes under varying illumination conditions. Five occultation seasons could be covered so far during the Venus Express mission resulting in a data set of more than 150 profiles of the neutral atmosphere. The thermal structure is investigated with regard to the latitudinal and temporal variability. A distinct cold collar region could be observed on both hemispheres. The tropopause altitude increases in this latitude region while the tropopause temperature shows a strong decrease. Profiles of static stability are found to be latitude-dependent and nearly adiabatic in the middle cloud region.

  9. Infectious diarrhoea in antiretroviral therapy-naïve HIV/AIDS patients in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Wanyiri, Jane W.; Kanyi, Henry; Maina, Samuel; Wang, David E.; Ngugi, Paul; O'Connor, Roberta; Kamau, Timothy; Waithera, Tabitha; Kimani, Gachuhi; Wamae, Claire N.; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Ward, Honorine D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Diarrhoea is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate the aetiological agents, risk factors and clinical features associated with diarrhoea in HIV/AIDS patients in Kenya. Methods Sociodemographic, epidemiological and clinical data were obtained for 164 HIV/AIDS patients (70 with and 94 without diarrhoea) recruited from Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya. Stool samples were examined for enteric pathogens by microscopy and bacteriology. Results Intestinal protozoa and fungi were identified in 70% of patients, more frequently in those with diarrhoea (p<0.001). Helminths were detected in 25.6% of patients overall, and bacterial pathogens were identified in 51% of patients with diarrhoea. Polyparasitism was more common in patients with diarrhoea than those without (p<0.0001). Higher CD4+ T-cell count (OR = 0.995, 95% CI 0.992–0.998) and water treatment (OR = 0.231, 95% CI 0.126–0.830) were associated with a lower risk of diarrhoea, while close contact with cows (OR = 3.200, 95% CI 1.26–8.13) or pigs (OR = 11.176, 95% CI 3.76–43.56) were associated with a higher risk of diarrhoea. Conclusions Multiple enteric pathogens that are causative agents of diarrhoea were isolated from stools of antiretroviral therapy-naïve HIV/AIDS patients, indicating a need for surveillance, treatment and promotion of hygienic practices. PMID:24026463

  10. Reduced anterior cingulate gray matter volume in treatment-naïve clinically depressed adolescents☆

    PubMed Central

    Pannekoek, Justine Nienke; van der Werff, Steven J.A.; van den Bulk, Bianca G.; van Lang, Natasja D.J.; Rombouts, Serge A.R.B.; van Buchem, Mark A.; Vermeiren, Robert R.J.M.; van der Wee, Nic J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent depression is associated with increased risk for suicidality, social and educational impairment, smoking, substance use, obesity, and depression in adulthood. It is of relevance to further our insight in the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this disorder in the developing brain, as this may be essential to optimize treatment and prevention of adolescent depression and its negative clinical trajectories. The equivocal findings of the limited number of studies on neural abnormalities in depressed youth stress the need for further neurobiological investigation of adolescent depression. We therefore performed a voxel-based morphometry study of the hippocampus, amygdala, superior temporal gyrus, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in 26 treatment-naïve, clinically depressed adolescents and 26 pair-wise matched healthy controls. Additionally, an exploratory whole-brain analysis was performed. Clinically depressed adolescents showed a volume reduction of the bilateral dorsal ACC compared to healthy controls. However, no association was found between gray matter volume of the ACC and clinical severity scores for depression or anxiety. Our finding of a smaller ACC in clinically depressed adolescents is consistent with literature on depressed adults. Future research is needed to investigate if gray matter abnormalities precede or follow clinical depression in adolescents. PMID:24501702

  11. Glucose disturbances in first-episode drug-naïve schizophrenia: Relationship to psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang Yang; Chen, Da-Chun; Tan, Yun-Long; An, Hui-Mei; Zunta-Soares, Giovana B; Huang, Xu-Feng; Soares, Jair C

    2015-12-01

    Accumulating evidence shows abnormal glucose metabolism in schizophrenia, even at the onset of psychosis. This study aims to examine the glucose and lipid metabolism in first-episode and drug naïve (FEDN) patients with schizophrenia and to explore their relationships with psychopathology, which have been under-investigated. Fasting glucose and lipid profiles, as well as homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index were determined in 120 never-medicated first-episode and 31 healthy control subjects matched for gender and age. The schizophrenia symptomatology was assessed by the positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS). Our results showed that schizophrenia patients had a significantly higher level of fasting plasma glucose (p<0.0001) and insulin (p=0.038). HOMA, an indicator of insulin resistance was higher in the patients than in the healthy controls (p=0.008). No differences were found between the patients and healthy subjects in the levels of plasma triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein, except that the cholesterol level was higher in the patients than health subjects (p=0.016). A significant negative association between plasma glucose levels and the PANSS positive symptom subscores was observed (p=0.013). Stepwise multiple regression analysis identified insulin resistance, insulin and the PANSS positive symptom subscore as significant predictor factors for glucose level. These results suggest that abnormal glucose metabolism may be associated with the pathogenesis and psychopathology of schizophrenia in the early phases of the disease process.

  12. VE-cadherin cleavage by ovarian cancer microparticles induces β-catenin phosphorylation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Al Thawadi, Hamda; Abu-Kaoud, Nadine; Al Farsi, Haleema; Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Rafii, Shahin; Rafii, Arash; Pasquier, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are increasingly recognized as important mediators of cell-cell communication in tumour growth and metastasis by facilitating angiogenesis-related processes. While the effects of the MPs on recipient cells are usually well described in the literature, the leading process remains unclear. Here we isolated MPs from ovarian cancer cells and investigated their effect on endothelial cells. First, we demonstrated that ovarian cancer MPs trigger β-catenin activation in endothelial cells, inducing the upregulation of Wnt/β-catenin target genes and an increase of angiogenic properties. We showed that this MPs mediated activation of β-catenin in ECs was Wnt/Frizzled independent; but dependent on VE-cadherin localization disruption, αVβ3 integrin activation and MMP activity. Finally, we revealed that Rac1 and AKT were responsible for β-catenin phosphorylation and translocation to the nucleus. Overall, our results indicate that MPs released from cancer cells could play a major role in neo-angiogenesis through activation of beta catenin pathway in endothelial cells.

  13. Resistance against eye flukes: naïve versus previously infected fish.

    PubMed

    Karvonen, Anssi; Paukku, Satu; Seppälä, Otto; Valtonen, E Tellervo

    2005-01-01

    A central issue in fish production is the influence of parasitic infections on fish health in fish farms and on survival prospects after fish-stocking into the wild. Is it preferable to produce fish in infection-free conditions or to allow some infection to elicit resistance in fish? We explored the infection of totally naive and previously infected rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by the trematode parasite Diplostomum spathaceum in laboratory conditions. We found that up to 86.1% of the presented cercariae became established in the lenses of naïve fish, which indicated that these fish were highly susceptible to infection and that innate resistance served little or no protection against the parasite. However, acquired resistance after initial infection decreased parasite establishment by 85.0-89.1%. Parasite establishment was also affected by fish host density as fewer parasites were found in fish in higher densities. The implications of these results for the fish-farming industry and fish-stocking protocols are discussed.

  14. Optimized suppression of coherent noise from seismic data using the Karhunen-Loève transform.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Raúl; Vasconcelos, Giovani L

    2006-07-01

    Signals obtained in land seismic surveys are usually contaminated with coherent noise, among which the ground roll (Rayleigh surface waves) is of major concern for it can severely degrade the quality of the information obtained from the seismic record. This paper presents an optimized filter based on the Karhunen-Loève transform for processing seismic images contaminated with ground roll. In this method, the contaminated region of the seismic record, to be processed by the filter, is selected in such way as to correspond to the maximum of a properly defined coherence index. The main advantages of the method are that the ground roll is suppressed with negligible distortion of the remnant reflection signals and that the filtering procedure can be automated. The image processing technique described in this study should also be relevant for other applications where coherent structures embedded in a complex spatiotemporal pattern need to be identified in a more refined way. In particular, it is argued that the method is appropriate for processing optical coherence tomography images whose quality is often degraded by coherent noise (speckle).

  15. The Ontogeny of Bumblebee Flight Trajectories: From Naïve Explorers to Experienced Foragers

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Juliet L.; Smith, Alan; Clark, Suzanne J.; Reynolds, Don R.; Barron, Mandy C.; Lim, Ka S.; Reynolds, Andy M.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding strategies used by animals to explore their landscape is essential to predict how they exploit patchy resources, and consequently how they are likely to respond to changes in resource distribution. Social bees provide a good model for this and, whilst there are published descriptions of their behaviour on initial learning flights close to the colony, it is still unclear how bees find floral resources over hundreds of metres and how these flights become directed foraging trips. We investigated the spatial ecology of exploration by radar tracking bumblebees, and comparing the flight trajectories of bees with differing experience. The bees left the colony within a day or two of eclosion and flew in complex loops of ever-increasing size around the colony, exhibiting Lévy-flight characteristics constituting an optimal searching strategy. This mathematical pattern can be used to predict how animals exploring individually might exploit a patchy landscape. The bees’ groundspeed, maximum displacement from the nest and total distance travelled on a trip increased significantly with experience. More experienced bees flew direct paths, predominantly flying upwind on their outward trips although forage was available in all directions. The flights differed from those of naïve honeybees: they occurred at an earlier age, showed more complex looping, and resulted in earlier returns of pollen to the colony. In summary bumblebees learn to find home and food rapidly, though phases of orientation, learning and searching were not easily separable, suggesting some multi-tasking. PMID:24265707

  16. VE-cadherin cleavage by ovarian cancer microparticles induces β-catenin phosphorylation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Al Thawadi, Hamda; Abu-Kaoud, Nadine; Al Farsi, Haleema; Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Rafii, Shahin; Rafii, Arash; Pasquier, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are increasingly recognized as important mediators of cell-cell communication in tumour growth and metastasis by facilitating angiogenesis-related processes. While the effects of the MPs on recipient cells are usually well described in the literature, the leading process remains unclear. Here we isolated MPs from ovarian cancer cells and investigated their effect on endothelial cells. First, we demonstrated that ovarian cancer MPs trigger β-catenin activation in endothelial cells, inducing the upregulation of Wnt/β-catenin target genes and an increase of angiogenic properties. We showed that this MPs mediated activation of β-catenin in ECs was Wnt/Frizzled independent; but dependent on VE-cadherin localization disruption, αVβ3 integrin activation and MMP activity. Finally, we revealed that Rac1 and AKT were responsible for β-catenin phosphorylation and translocation to the nucleus. Overall, our results indicate that MPs released from cancer cells could play a major role in neo-angiogenesis through activation of beta catenin pathway in endothelial cells. PMID:26700621

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Motion Verified Red Stars (MoVeRS) (Theissen+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theissen, C. A.; West, A. A.; Dhital, S.

    2015-09-01

    We present a photometric catalog of 8,735,004 proper motion selected low-mass stars (KML-spectral types) within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint, from the combined SDSS-DR10, Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) Point Source Catalog (PSC), and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) AllWISE catalog. Stars were selected using r-i, i-z, r-z, z-J, and z-W1 colors, and SDSS, WISE, and 2MASS astrometry was combined to compute proper motions. The resulting 3,518,150 stars were augmented with proper motions for 5,216,854 earlier type stars from the combined SDSS and United States Naval Observatory B1.0 catalog (USNO-B). We used SDSS+USNO-B proper motions to determine the best criteria for selecting a clean sample of stars. Only stars whose proper motions were greater than their 2-sigma uncertainty were included. Our Motion Verified Red Stars (MoVeRS) catalog is available through SDSS CasJobs and VizieR. (2 data files).

  18. Reactions to small pox vaccine in naïve and previously-vaccinated individuals.

    PubMed

    Auckland, Cressida; Cowlishaw, Alexandra; Morgan, Dilys; Miller, Elizabeth

    2005-07-14

    Two hundred health care workers in England and Wales were vaccinated with the Lister/Elstree strain of the vaccinia virus, and completed health diaries for 21 days or until the lesion had scabbed over. Pain and temperature were measured daily, and all other symptoms recorded freehand by the vaccinee. One hundred and forty two (71%) vaccinees reported pain, of which 25% considered it to be moderate or severe; 32 vaccinees (16%) recorded a temperature of >37.7 degrees C, two of which exceeded 39 degrees C. Other, mainly trivial, adverse events were common; itch was reported in 72%, erythema in 27%, axillary pain or lymphadenopathy in 38%, malaise or flu-like symptoms in 40% and headache in 23%. The incidences of minor adverse events were lower in re-vaccinees, compared with naïve vaccine recipients, significantly so in the case of erythema and general malaise (p=0.001 and 0.006, respectively), perhaps reflecting pre-existing immunity. Major adverse events occurred in two vaccinees (hospital admission, one with cellulitis and one with headache and possible encephalitis), and a further five were treated with antibiotics for local cellulitis. This is the first study to report results derived from active follow-up by diaries in recipients of the Lister/Elstree strain of vaccinia, and to document reductions in trivial adverse events in re-vaccinees.

  19. Follower ants in a tandem pair are not always naïve.

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, Patrick; Raderschall, Chloé A; Narendra, Ajay

    2015-05-29

    In addition to foraging individually several species of ants guide nestmates to a goal by tandem running. We found that the Australian ant, Camponotus consobrinus, forages both individually and by tandem running to head to the same goal, nest-specific native Australian trees on which they forage. While paths of solitary foragers and initial paths of tandem followers showed no differences in heading directions or straightness, tandem followers moved at about half the speed of solitary runs. When leaders were experimentally removed, follower ants initially engaged in a systematic search around the point of interruption, following which they either (a) headed directly towards and successfully reached the foraging trees, or (b) continued searching or (c) returned to the nest. The high incidence of followers that successfully navigated towards the foraging trees on their own provides strong evidence that many tandem followers are in fact experienced foragers. Detailed analysis of the searching behaviour revealed that even seemingly lost followers displayed a directional bias towards the foraging trees in their search path. Our results show that in a foraging context follower ants in a tandem pair are not always naïve.

  20. Hyperhidrosis in Naïve Purpose-Bred Beagle Dogs (Canis familiaris)

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Catherine A; Seeman, Jennifer L; Hoffmann, Guenther

    2011-01-01

    This case study details the unusual clinical findings in a unique paw-pad disorder that recently emerged among 2 male and 1 female naïve purpose-bred beagle dogs (Canis familiaris) newly received into our facility. During acclimation period physical examinations, the affected dogs demonstrated constantly moist, soft paw pads on all 4 feet. No information was available regarding the epidemiology and pathogenesis of this pad condition in beagle dogs. Here, we report the results of physical examination, clinical chemistry analysis, hematology, histopathology, detailed observations, and novel testing techniques performed during the acclimation period. Histopathology of several sections of affected footpads was compared with that of an age-matched dog with clinically normal paw pads. We describe the morphologic features of a distinctive cutaneous canine footpad condition and discuss the possible differential diagnoses. The histologic and clinical features were most consistent with those of hyperhidrosis; to our knowledge, this report is the first description of hyperhidrosis as a distinct condition in purpose-bred beagle dogs. PMID:21640037

  1. Social isolation prompts maternal behavior in sexually naïve male ddN mice.

    PubMed

    Orikasa, Chitose; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Katsumata, Harumi; Sato, Manami; Kondo, Yasuhiko; Minami, Shiro; Sakuma, Yasuo

    2015-11-01

    Maternal behavior in mice is considered to be sexually dimorphic; that is, females show maternal care for their offspring, whereas this behavior is rarely shown in males. Here, we examined how social isolation affects the interaction of adult male mice with pups. Three weeks of isolation during puberty (5-8 weeks old) induced retrieving and crouching when exposed to pups, while males with 1 week isolation (7-8 weeks old) also showed such maternal care, but were less responsive to pups. We also examined the effect of isolation during young adulthood (8-11 weeks old), and found an induction of maternal behavior comparable to that in younger male mice. This effect was blocked by exposure to chemosensory and auditory social signals derived from males in an attached compartment separated by doubled opaque barriers. These results demonstrate that social isolation in both puberty and postpuberty facilitates male maternal behavior in sexually naïve mice. The results also indicate that air-borne chemicals and/or sounds of male conspecifics, including ultrasonic vocalization and noise by their movement may be sufficient to interfere with the isolation effect on induction of maternal behavior in male mice.

  2. Meditation-based treatment yielding immediate relief for meditation-naïve migraineurs.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, Makenzie E; Wachholtz, Amy B

    2014-03-01

    Meditation is gaining popularity as an effective means of managing and attenuating pain and has been particularly effective for migraines. Meditation additionally addresses the negative emotional states known to exist with migraines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of meditation as an immediate intervention for reducing migraine pain as well as alleviating emotional tension, examined herein as a negative affect hypothesized to be correlated with pain. Twenty-seven migraineurs, with two to ten migraines per month, reported migraine-related pain and emotional tension ratings on a Likert scale (ranging from 0 to 10) before and after exposure to a brief meditation-based treatment. All participants were meditation- naïve, and attended one 20-minute guided meditation session based on the Buddhist "loving kindness" approach. After the session, participants reported a 33% decrease in pain and a 43% decrease in emotional tension. The data suggest that a single exposure to a brief meditative technique can significantly reduce pain and tension, as well as offer several clinical implications. It can be concluded that single exposure to a meditative technique can significantly reduce pain and tension. The effectiveness and immediacy of this intervention offers several implications for nurses.

  3. Follower ants in a tandem pair are not always naïve

    PubMed Central

    Schultheiss, Patrick; Raderschall, Chloé A; Narendra, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    In addition to foraging individually several species of ants guide nestmates to a goal by tandem running. We found that the Australian ant, Camponotus consobrinus, forages both individually and by tandem running to head to the same goal, nest-specific native Australian trees on which they forage. While paths of solitary foragers and initial paths of tandem followers showed no differences in heading directions or straightness, tandem followers moved at about half the speed of solitary runs. When leaders were experimentally removed, follower ants initially engaged in a systematic search around the point of interruption, following which they either (a) headed directly towards and successfully reached the foraging trees, or (b) continued searching or (c) returned to the nest. The high incidence of followers that successfully navigated towards the foraging trees on their own provides strong evidence that many tandem followers are in fact experienced foragers. Detailed analysis of the searching behaviour revealed that even seemingly lost followers displayed a directional bias towards the foraging trees in their search path. Our results show that in a foraging context follower ants in a tandem pair are not always naïve. PMID:26021611

  4. Metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia: Differences between antipsychotic-naïve and treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Chadda, Rakesh K.; Ramshankar, Prashanth; Deb, Koushik S.; Sood, Mamta

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in general population and in patients with severe mental illnesses like schizophrenia. This paper reviews studies on MetS in schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, and assesses the contribution of antipsychotics toward the development of MetS. Databases of Medline (PubMed), PsycINFO, and Scopus were searched for MetS, psychotic disorders, and antipsychotic drugs from inception till present. Prevalence of MetS in patients with schizophrenia was found to be ranging from 3.3% to 68.0%. Prevalence in antipsychotic-naïve and antipsychotic-treated patients ranged between 3.3-26.0% and 32.0-68.0% respectively, and was higher in younger patients, female gender and Hispanics, and lower in African-Americans and Orientals. Prevalence of metabolic abnormalities was higher in patients receiving second generation antipsychotics (SGAs), especially with clozapine, olanzapine, and risperidone, as compared to first generation antipsychotics (FGAs). Antipsychotic-induced changes on metabolic indices became evident after 2 weeks and reached maximum at 3 months of treatment. There is a need to sensitize the mental health professionals at all levels about the need of screening and monitoring for MetS in patients receiving antipsychotics. PMID:23960422

  5. VE-cadherin cleavage by ovarian cancer microparticles induces β-catenin phosphorylation in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Thawadi, Hamda Al; Abu-Kaoud, Nadine; Farsi, Haleema Al; Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Rafii, Shahin; Rafii, Arash; Pasquier, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are increasingly recognized as important mediators of cell-cell communication in tumour growth and metastasis by facilitating angiogenesis-related processes. While the effects of the MPs on recipient cells are usually well described in the literature, the leading process remains unclear. Here we isolated MPs from ovarian cancer cells and investigated their effect on endothelial cells. First, we demonstrated that ovarian cancer MPs trigger β-catenin activation in endothelial cells, inducing the upregulation of Wnt/β-catenin target genes and an increase of angiogenic properties. We showed that this MPs mediated activation of β-catenin in ECs was Wnt/Frizzled independent; but dependent on VE-cadherin localization disruption, αVβ3 integrin activation and MMP activity. Finally, we revealed that Rac1 and AKT were responsible for β-catenin phosphorylation and translocation to the nucleus. Overall, our results indicate that MPs released from cancer cells could play a major role in neo-angiogenesis through activation of beta catenin pathway in endothelial cells. PMID:26700621

  6. Transcriptome Analysis of Aspergillus flavus Reveals veA-Dependent Regulation of Secondary Metabolite Gene Clusters, Including the Novel Aflavarin Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Cary, J. W.; Han, Z.; Yin, Y.; Lohmar, J. M.; Shantappa, S.; Harris-Coward, P. Y.; Mack, B.; Ehrlich, K. C.; Wei, Q.; Arroyo-Manzanares, N.; Uka, V.; Vanhaecke, L.; Bhatnagar, D.; Yu, J.; Nierman, W. C.; Johns, M. A.; Sorensen, D.; Shen, H.; De Saeger, S.; Diana Di Mavungu, J.

    2015-01-01

    The global regulatory veA gene governs development and secondary metabolism in numerous fungal species, including Aspergillus flavus. This is especially relevant since A. flavus infects crops of agricultural importance worldwide, contaminating them with potent mycotoxins. The most well-known are aflatoxins, which are cytotoxic and carcinogenic polyketide compounds. The production of aflatoxins and the expression of genes implicated in the production of these mycotoxins are veA dependent. The genes responsible for the synthesis of aflatoxins are clustered, a signature common for genes involved in fungal secondary metabolism. Studies of the A. flavus genome revealed many gene clusters possibly connected to the synthesis of secondary metabolites. Many of these metabolites are still unknown, or the association between a known metabolite and a particular gene cluster has not yet been established. In the present transcriptome study, we show that veA is necessary for the expression of a large number of genes. Twenty-eight out of the predicted 56 secondary metabolite gene clusters include at least one gene that is differentially expressed depending on presence or absence of veA. One of the clusters under the influence of veA is cluster 39. The absence of veA results in a downregulation of the five genes found within this cluster. Interestingly, our results indicate that the cluster is expressed mainly in sclerotia. Chemical analysis of sclerotial extracts revealed that cluster 39 is responsible for the production of aflavarin. PMID:26209694

  7. veA-dependent RNA-pol II transcription elongation factor like protein, RtfA, is associated with secondary metabolism and morphological development in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Vellaisamy; Shantappa, Sourabha; Dhingra, Sourabh; Calvo, Ana M.

    2012-01-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans the global regulatory gene veA is necessary for the biosynthesis of several secondary metabolites, including the mycotoxin sterigmatocystin (ST). In order to identify additional veA-dependent genetic elements involved in regulating ST production, we performed a mutagenesis on a deletion veA (ΔveA) strain to obtain revertant mutants (RM) that regained the capability to produce toxin. Genetic analysis and molecular characterization of one of the revertant mutants, RM3, revealed that a point mutation occurred at the coding region of the rtfA gene, encoding a RNA-pol II transcription elongation factor like protein, similar to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtf1. The A. nidulans rtfA gene product accumulates in nuclei. Deletion of rtfA gene in a ΔveA background restored mycotoxin production in a medium-dependent manner. rtfA also affects the production of other metabolites including penicillin. Biosynthesis of this antibiotic decreased in the absence of rtfA. Furthermore, rtfA is necessary for normal morphological development. Deletion of the rtfA gene in wild-type strains (veA+) resulted in a slight decrease in growth rate, drastic reduction in conidiation, and complete loss of sexual development. This is the first study of an Rtf1 like gene in filamentous fungi. We found rtfA putative orthologs extensively conserved in numerous fungal species. PMID:22783880

  8. Selection of Neospora caninum antigens stimulating bovine CD4+ve T cell responses through immuno-potency screening and proteomic approaches

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Neospora caninum is recognised worldwide as a major cause of bovine infectious abortion. There is a real need to develop effective strategies to control infection during pregnancy which may lead to either abortion or congenital transmission. Due to the intracellular nature of the parasite, cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses involving CD4+ve, CD8+ve, γ/δ TCR+ve T cells and NK cells, as well as production of IFN-γ, are thought to be important for protective immunity. In this study we applied a combination of proteomic and immunological approaches to identify antigens of N. caninum that are recognized by CD4+ve T cell lines derived from infected cattle. Initially, N. caninum tachyzoite Water Soluble Antigens (NcWSA) were fractionated by size-exclusion HPLC and then screened for immune-potency using CD4+ve T cell lines. LC-ESI-MS/MS (liquid chromatography electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry) was employed to catalogue and identify the proteins comprising three immunologically selected fractions and led to the identification of six N. caninum target proteins as well as sixteen functional orthologues of Toxoplasma gondii. This approach allows the screening of biologically reactive antigenic fractions by the immune cells responsible for protection (such as bovine CD4+ve cells) and the subsequent identification of the stimulating components using tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:21813001

  9. Volatile profiling reveals intracellular metabolic changes in Aspergillus parasiticus: veA regulates branched chain amino acid and ethanol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Filamentous fungi in the genus Aspergillus produce a variety of natural products, including aflatoxin, the most potent naturally occurring carcinogen known. Aflatoxin biosynthesis, one of the most highly characterized secondary metabolic pathways, offers a model system to study secondary metabolism in eukaryotes. To control or customize biosynthesis of natural products we must understand how secondary metabolism integrates into the overall cellular metabolic network. By applying a metabolomics approach we analyzed volatile compounds synthesized by Aspergillus parasiticus in an attempt to define the association of secondary metabolism with other metabolic and cellular processes. Results Volatile compounds were examined using solid phase microextraction - gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In the wild type strain Aspergillus parasiticus SU-1, the largest group of volatiles included compounds derived from catabolism of branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, and valine); we also identified alcohols, esters, aldehydes, and lipid-derived volatiles. The number and quantity of the volatiles produced depended on media composition, time of incubation, and light-dark status. A block in aflatoxin biosynthesis or disruption of the global regulator veA affected the volatile profile. In addition to its multiple functions in secondary metabolism and development, VeA negatively regulated catabolism of branched chain amino acids and synthesis of ethanol at the transcriptional level thus playing a role in controlling carbon flow within the cell. Finally, we demonstrated that volatiles generated by a veA disruption mutant are part of the complex regulatory machinery that mediates the effects of VeA on asexual conidiation and sclerotia formation. Conclusions 1) Volatile profiling provides a rapid, effective, and powerful approach to identify changes in intracellular metabolic networks in filamentous fungi. 2) VeA coordinates the biosynthesis of secondary

  10. Changes in naïve and memory T-cells in elite swimmers during a winter training season.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ana Maria; Rama, Luís; Carvalho, Humberto M; Borges, Grasiely; Carvalheiro, Tiago; Gleeson, Michael; Alves, Francisco; Trindade, Hélder; Paiva, Artur

    2014-07-01

    High intensity training regimens appear to put athletes at a higher risk of illness. As these have been linked to alterations in the proportions of differentiated T cells, how training load affects these populations could have important implications for athlete susceptibility to disease. This study examined the effect of a winter training season on the proportions of circulating naïve and memory T cells subsets of high competitive level swimmers. Blood samples were taken at rest at 4 time-points during the season: before the start of the season (t0-September), after 7weeks of an initial period of gradually increasing training load (t1-November), after 6weeks of an intense training cycle (t2-February) and 48h after the main competition (t3-April) and from eleven non-athlete controls at 2 similar time-points (t2 and t3). CD4, CD8 and gamma-delta (γδ) T cells expressing the naïve (CCR7(+)CD45RA(+)), central-memory (CM-CCR7(+)CD45RA(-)), effector-memory (EM-CCR7(-)CD45RA(-)) and terminal effector (TEMRA-CCR7(-)CD45RA(+)) were quantified by flow cytometry. Statistical analyses were performed using multilevel modeling regression. Both T CD4(+) naïve and CM presented a linear increase in response to the first moment of training exposure, and had an exponential decrease until the end of the training exposure. As for TCD4(+) EM, changes were observed from t2 until the end of the training season with an exponential trend, while TCD4(+) TEMRA increased linearly throughout the season. TCD8(+) naïve increased at t1 and decreased exponentially thereafter. TCD8(+) TEMRA values decreased at t1 and increased exponentially until t3. γδT-EM had an increase at t1 and an exponential decrease afterwards. In contrast, γδT-TEMRA decreased at t1 and exponentially increased during the remaining 20weeks of training. An increase in TEMRA and EM T cells alongside a decrease in naïve T cells could leave athletes more susceptible to illness in response to variation in training

  11. The Venus Neutral Atmosphere from the Radio Science Experiment VeRa on Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellmann, Silvia; Haeusler, Bernd; Paetzold, Martin; Bird, Michael; Tyler, G. L.; Andert, Thomas; Remus, Stefan

    The Venus Express Radio Science Experiment VeRa performs regular radio-sounding experi-ments in the Venus neutral atmosphere and ionosphere using the spacecraft radio subsystem in the one-way radio mode at X-band (8.4 GHz) and S-band (2.3 GHz). An Ultra-Stable Oscilla-tor (USO) provides a high quality on-board frequency reference for refractivity measurements, from which electron density profiles in the ionosphere and profiles of pressure, temperature and neutral number density of the neutral atmosphere are derived. Radial profiles of neutral number density from the atmospheric-induced Doppler shift during the occultations cover the altitude range 40-90 km. These are then used to derive vertical profiles of temperature and pressure. The polar orbit of Venus Express provides the opportunity to study the troposphere and meso-sphere at all planetocentric latitudes under varying illumination conditions. Seven occultation seasons have occurred thus far during the Venus Express mission, resulting in a data set with more than 320 neutral atmospheric profiles. The thermal structure is investigated with regard to the latitudinal and temporal variability. The Venus mesosphere shows a high variability resulting from atmospheric waves and turbulence. Profiles of atmospheric static stability are found to be latitude dependent and nearly adiabatic in the middle cloud region. Abrupt changes in the static stability can occur at the boundaries of the middle cloud layer, the vertical dis-tribution of which shows a distinct latitudinal dependence. Correlations of wave activity with the static stability profile will be investigated

  12. Serum alkaline phosphatase negatively affects endothelium-dependent vasodilation in naïve hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Perticone, Francesco; Perticone, Maria; Maio, Raffaele; Sciacqua, Angela; Andreucci, Michele; Tripepi, Giovanni; Corrao, Salvatore; Mallamaci, Francesca; Sesti, Giorgio; Zoccali, Carmine

    2015-10-01

    Tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, promoting arterial calcification in experimental models, is a powerful predictor of total and cardiovascular mortality in general population and in patients with renal or cardiovascular diseases. For this study, to evaluate a possible correlation between serum alkaline phosphatase levels and endothelial function, assessed by strain gauge plethysmography, we enrolled 500 naïve hypertensives divided into increasing tertiles of alkaline phosphatase. The maximal response to acetylcholine was inversely related to alkaline phosphatase (r=−0.55; P<0.001), and this association was independent (r=−0.61; P<0.001) of demographic and classical risk factors, body mass index, estimated glomerular filtration rate, serum phosphorus and calcium, C-reactive protein, and albuminuria. At multiple logistic regression analysis, the risk of endothelial dysfunction was ≈3-fold higher in patients in the third tertile than that of patients in the first tertile. We also tested the combined role of alkaline phosphatase and serum phosphorus on endothelial function. The steepness of the alkaline phosphatase/vasodilating response to acetylcholine relationship was substantially attenuated (P<0.001) in patients with serum phosphorus above the median value when compared with patients with serum phosphorus below the median (−5.0% versus −10.2% per alkaline phosphatase unit, respectively), and this interaction remained highly significant (P<0.001) after adjustment of all the previously mentioned risk factors. Our data support a strong and significant inverse relationship between alkaline phosphatase and endothelium-dependent vasodilation, which was attenuated by relatively higher serum phosphorus levels.

  13. ERP Correlates of Proactive and Reactive Cognitive Control in Treatment-Naïve Adult ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Endestad, Tor; Aasen, Ida Emilia S.; Kropotov, Juri; Knight, Robert Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether treatment naïve adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD; n = 33; 19 female) differed from healthy controls (n = 31; 17 female) in behavioral performance, event-related potential (ERP) indices of preparatory attention (CueP3 and late CNV), and reactive response control (Go P3, NoGo N2, and NoGo P3) derived from a visual cued Go/NoGo task. On several critical measures, Cue P3, late CNV, and NoGo N2, there were no significant differences between the groups. This indicated normal preparatory processes and conflict monitoring in ADHD patients. However, the patients had attenuated Go P3 and NoGoP3 amplitudes relative to controls, suggesting reduced allocation of attentional resources to processes involved in response control. The patients also had a higher rate of Go signal omission errors, but no other performance decrements compared with controls. Reduced Go P3 and NoGo P3 amplitudes were associated with poorer task performance, particularly in the ADHD group. Notably, the ERPs were not associated with self-reported mood or anxiety. The results provide electrophysiological evidence for reduced effortful engagement of attentional resources to both Go and NoGo signals when reactive response control is needed. The absence of group differences in ERP components indexing proactive control points to impairments in specific aspects of cognitive processes in an untreated adult ADHD cohort. The associations between ERPs and task performance provided additional support for the altered electrophysiological responses. PMID:27448275

  14. Proceedings of the XXII A.I.VE.LA. National Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primo Tomasini, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    A.I.VE.LA. - the Italian Association of Laser Velocimetry and non-invasive diagnostics - is a non-profit cultural association whose objective is to promote and support research in the field of non-contact or minimally invasive measurement techniques, particularly electromagnetic-based techniques and optical techniques. Through its Annual Meeting, AIVELA aims to create an active and stimulating forum where current research results and technical advances can be exchanged and the development of new systems for laboratory use, field testing and industrial application can be promoted. The techniques covered include Laser Doppler Anemometry - LDA, Phase Doppler Anemometry - PDA, Image Velocimetry - PIV, Flow visualization techniques, Spectroscopic measurement techniques (LIF, Raman, etc.), Laser Doppler Vibrometry - LDV, Speckle Pattern Interferometry - ESPI, Holographic techniques, Shearography, Digital Image Correlation - DIC, Moiré techniques, Structured light techniques, Infrared imaging, Photoelasticity, Image based measurement techniques, Ultrasonic sensing, Acoustic and Aeroacoustic measurements, etc. The first Annual Meeting was held back in October 1992 and since then there has been a large consensus among the research and scientific communities that the papers presented at the event are of a high scientific interest. The XXII AIVELA Annual Meeting was held at the Faculty of Engineering of University of Rome Tor Vergata on 15-16 December 2014 and was organised in collaboration with the International Master Courses in "Protection Against CBRNe Events". This volume contains a selection of the papers presented at the event. The detailed Programme of the Meeting can be found at: http://www.aivela.org/XXII_Convegno/index.html Trusting our Association and its initiatives will meet your interest, I wish to thank you in advance for your kind attention and hope to meet you soon at one of our events.

  15. A combined DTI and structural MRI study in medicated-naïve chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyi; Lai, Yunyao; Wang, Xijin; Hao, Chuanxi; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Zhenyu; Yu, Xin; Hong, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Disconnection in white matter (WM) pathway and alterations in gray matter (GM) structure have been hypothesized as pathogenesis in schizophrenia. However, the relationship between the abnormal WM integrity and the alteration of GM in anatomically connected areas remains uncertain. Moreover, the potential influence of antipsychotic medication on WM anisotropy and cortical morphology was not excluded in previous studies. In this study, a total number of 34 subjects were enrolled, including 17 medicated-naïve chronic schizophrenia patients and 17 healthy controls. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) were applied to investigate the level of WM integrity. The FreeSurfer surface-based analysis was used to determine GM volume, cortical thickness and the surface area of GM regions which corresponded to abnormal WM fiber tracts. We observed that patients possessed lower fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) and left inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), along with smaller GM volume and cortical thinning in temporal lobe than the healthy controls, which reflected the underlying WM and GM disruption that contributed to the disease. In the patient population, the lower connectivity of ILF and IFOF was positively associated with cortical thickness in left lateral orbitofrontal cortex, superior temporal gyrus and lingual gyrus in males, and positively correlated with GM volume in left lateral orbitofrontal cortex in females. On the other hand, it was negatively correlated with cortical area of middle temporal gyrus in males and temporal pole in females respectively, but not when genders were combined. These findings suggested that abnormal WM integrity and anatomical correspondence of GM alterations in schizophrenia were interdependent on gender-separated analysis in patients with schizophrenia. Moreover, combining TBSS and FreeSurfer might be a useful method to provide significant insight into interacting processes

  16. Mismatched anti-predator behavioral responses in predator-naïve larval anurans.

    PubMed

    Albecker, Molly; Vance-Chalcraft, Heather D

    2015-01-01

    Organisms are adept at altering behaviors to balance the tradeoff between foraging and predation risk in spatially and temporally shifting predator environments. In order to optimize this tradeoff, prey need to be able to display an appropriate response based on degree of predation risk. To be most beneficial in the earliest life stages in which many prey are vulnerable to predation, innate anti-predator responses should scale to match the risk imposed by predators until learned anti-predator responses can occur. We conducted an experiment that examined whether tadpoles with no previous exposure to predators (i.e., predator-naive) exhibit innate antipredator behavioral responses (e.g., via refuge use and spatial avoidance) that match the actual risk posed by each predator. Using 7 treatments (6 free-roaming, lethal predators plus no-predator control), we determined the predation rates of each predator on Lithobates sphenocephalus tadpoles. We recorded behavioral observations on an additional 7 nonlethal treatments (6 caged predators plus no-predator control). Tadpoles exhibited innate responses to fish predators, but not non-fish predators, even though two non-fish predators (newt and crayfish) consumed the most tadpoles. Due to a mismatch between innate response and predator consumption, tadpoles may be vulnerable to greater rates of predation at the earliest life stages before learning can occur. Thus, naïve tadpoles in nature may be at a high risk to predation in the presence of a novel predator until learned anti-predator responses provide additional defenses to the surviving tadpoles. PMID:26664805

  17. Glucose disturbances in first-episode drug-naïve schizophrenia: Relationship to psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang Yang; Chen, Da-Chun; Tan, Yun-Long; An, Hui-Mei; Zunta-Soares, Giovana B; Huang, Xu-Feng; Soares, Jair C

    2015-12-01

    Accumulating evidence shows abnormal glucose metabolism in schizophrenia, even at the onset of psychosis. This study aims to examine the glucose and lipid metabolism in first-episode and drug naïve (FEDN) patients with schizophrenia and to explore their relationships with psychopathology, which have been under-investigated. Fasting glucose and lipid profiles, as well as homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index were determined in 120 never-medicated first-episode and 31 healthy control subjects matched for gender and age. The schizophrenia symptomatology was assessed by the positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS). Our results showed that schizophrenia patients had a significantly higher level of fasting plasma glucose (p<0.0001) and insulin (p=0.038). HOMA, an indicator of insulin resistance was higher in the patients than in the healthy controls (p=0.008). No differences were found between the patients and healthy subjects in the levels of plasma triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein, except that the cholesterol level was higher in the patients than health subjects (p=0.016). A significant negative association between plasma glucose levels and the PANSS positive symptom subscores was observed (p=0.013). Stepwise multiple regression analysis identified insulin resistance, insulin and the PANSS positive symptom subscore as significant predictor factors for glucose level. These results suggest that abnormal glucose metabolism may be associated with the pathogenesis and psychopathology of schizophrenia in the early phases of the disease process. PMID:26385108

  18. Disrupted brain anatomical connectivity in medication-naïve patients with first-episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruibin; Wei, Qinling; Kang, Zhuang; Zalesky, Andrew; Li, Meng; Xu, Yong; Li, Leijun; Wang, Junjing; Zheng, Liangrong; Wang, Bin; Zhao, Jingping; Zhang, Jinbei; Huang, Ruiwang

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies suggested that the topological properties of brain anatomical networks may be aberrant in schizophrenia (SCZ), and most of them focused on the chronic and antipsychotic-medicated SCZ patients which may introduce various confounding factors due to antipsychotic medication and duration of illness. To avoid those potential confounders, a desirable approach is to select medication-naïve, first-episode schizophrenia (FE-SCZ) patients. In this study, we acquired diffusion tensor imaging datasets from 30 FE-SCZ patients and 34 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Taking a distinct gray matter region as a node, inter-regional connectivity as edge and the corresponding streamline counts as edge weight, we constructed whole-brain anatomical networks for both groups, calculated their topological parameters using graph theory, and compared their between-group differences using nonparametric permutation tests. In addition, network-based statistic method was utilized to identify inter-regional connections which were impaired in the FE-SCZ patients. We detected only significantly decreased inter-regional connections in the FE-SCZ patients compared to the controls. These connections were primarily located in the frontal, parietal, occipital, and subcortical regions. Although small-worldness was conserved in the FE-SCZ patients, we found that the network strength and global efficiency as well as the degree were significantly decreased, and shortest path length was significantly increased in the FE-SCZ patients compared to the controls. Most of the regions that showed significantly decreased nodal parameters belonged to the top-down control, sensorimotor, basal ganglia, and limbic-visual system systems. Correlation analysis indicated that the nodal efficiency in the sensorimotor system was negatively correlated with the severity of psychosis symptoms in the FE-SCZ patients. Our results suggest that the network organization is changed in the early stages of the

  19. VE-Cadherin-Independent Cancer Cell Incorporation into the Vascular Endothelium Precedes Transmigration

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is accountable for 90% of cancer deaths. During metastasis, tumor cells break away from the primary tumor, enter the blood and the lymph vessels, and use them as highways to travel to distant sites in the body to form secondary tumors. Cancer cell migration through the endothelium and into the basement membrane represents a critical step in the metastatic cascade, yet it is not well understood. This process is well characterized for immune cells that routinely transmigrate through the endothelium to sites of infection, inflammation, or injury. Previous studies with leukocytes have demonstrated that this step depends heavily on the activation status of the endothelium and subendothelial substrate stiffness. Here, we used a previously established in vitro model of the endothelium and live cell imaging, in order to observe cancer cell transmigration and compare this process to leukocytes. Interestingly, cancer cell transmigration includes an additional step, which we term ‘incorporation’, into the endothelial cell (EC) monolayer. During this phase, cancer cells physically displace ECs, leading to the dislocation of EC VE-cadherin away from EC junctions bordering cancer cells, and spread into the monolayer. In some cases, ECs completely detach from the matrix. Furthermore, cancer cell incorporation occurs independently of the activation status and the subendothelial substrate stiffness for breast cancer and melanoma cells, a notable difference from the process by which leukocytes transmigrate. Meanwhile, pancreatic cancer cell incorporation was dependent on the activation status of the endothelium and changed on very stiff subendothelial substrates. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insights into tumor cell extravasation and demonstrate that incorporation is one of the earliest steps. PMID:25275457

  20. Mismatched anti-predator behavioral responses in predator-naïve larval anurans

    PubMed Central

    Vance-Chalcraft, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Organisms are adept at altering behaviors to balance the tradeoff between foraging and predation risk in spatially and temporally shifting predator environments. In order to optimize this tradeoff, prey need to be able to display an appropriate response based on degree of predation risk. To be most beneficial in the earliest life stages in which many prey are vulnerable to predation, innate anti-predator responses should scale to match the risk imposed by predators until learned anti-predator responses can occur. We conducted an experiment that examined whether tadpoles with no previous exposure to predators (i.e., predator-naive) exhibit innate antipredator behavioral responses (e.g., via refuge use and spatial avoidance) that match the actual risk posed by each predator. Using 7 treatments (6 free-roaming, lethal predators plus no-predator control), we determined the predation rates of each predator on Lithobates sphenocephalus tadpoles. We recorded behavioral observations on an additional 7 nonlethal treatments (6 caged predators plus no-predator control). Tadpoles exhibited innate responses to fish predators, but not non-fish predators, even though two non-fish predators (newt and crayfish) consumed the most tadpoles. Due to a mismatch between innate response and predator consumption, tadpoles may be vulnerable to greater rates of predation at the earliest life stages before learning can occur. Thus, naïve tadpoles in nature may be at a high risk to predation in the presence of a novel predator until learned anti-predator responses provide additional defenses to the surviving tadpoles. PMID:26664805

  1. Hamiltonian Map to Conformal Modification of Spacetime Metric: Kaluza-Klein and TeVeS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, Lawrence; Gershon, Avi; Schiffer, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that the orbits of motion for a wide class of non-relativistic Hamiltonian systems can be described as geodesic flows on a manifold and an associated dual by means of a conformal map. This method can be applied to a four dimensional manifold of orbits in spacetime associated with a relativistic system. We show that a relativistic Hamiltonian which generates Einstein geodesics, with the addition of a world scalar field, can be put into correspondence in this way with another Hamiltonian with conformally modified metric. Such a construction could account for part of the requirements of Bekenstein for achieving the MOND theory of Milgrom in the post-Newtonian limit. The constraints on the MOND theory imposed by the galactic rotation curves, through this correspondence, would then imply constraints on the structure of the world scalar field. We then use the fact that a Hamiltonian with vector gauge fields results, through such a conformal map, in a Kaluza-Klein type theory, and indicate how the TeVeS structure of Bekenstein and Saunders can be put into this framework. We exhibit a class of infinitesimal gauge transformations on the gauge fields {mathcal{U}}_{μ}(x) which preserve the Bekenstein-Sanders condition {mathcal{U}}_{μ}{mathcal{U}}^{μ}=-1. The underlying quantum structure giving rise to these gauge fields is a Hilbert bundle, and the gauge transformations induce a non-commutative behavior to the fields, i.e. they become of Yang-Mills type. Working in the infinitesimal gauge neighborhood of the initial Abelian theory we show that in the Abelian limit the Yang-Mills field equations provide residual nonlinear terms which may avoid the caustic singularity found by Contaldi et al.

  2. Immunohistochemistry for BRAF(V600E) antibody VE1 performed in core needle biopsy samples identifies mutated papillary thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Crescenzi, A; Guidobaldi, L; Nasrollah, N; Taccogna, S; Cicciarella Modica, D D; Turrini, L; Nigri, G; Romanelli, F; Valabrega, S; Giovanella, L; Onetti Muda, A; Trimboli, P

    2014-05-01

    BRAF(V600E) is the most frequent genetic mutation in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and has been reported as an independent predictor of poor prognosis of these patients. Current guidelines do not recommend the use of BRAF(V600E) mutational analysis on cytologic specimens from fine needle aspiration due to several reasons. Recently, immunohistochemistry using VE1, a mouse anti-human BRAF(V600E) antibody, has been reported as a highly reliable technique in detecting BRAF-mutated thyroid and nonthyroid cancers. The aim of this study was to test the reliability of VE1 immunohistochemistry on microhistologic samples from core needle biopsy (CNB) in identifying BRAF-mutated PTC. A series of 30 nodules (size ranging from 7 to 22 mm) from 30 patients who underwent surgery following CNB were included in the study. All these lesions had had inconclusive cytology. In all cases, both VE1 and BRAF(V600E) genotypes were evaluated. After surgery, final histology demonstrated 21 cancers and 9 benign lesions. CNB correctly diagnosed 20/20 PTC and 5/5 adenomatous nodules. One follicular thyroid cancer and 4 benign lesions were assessed at CNB as uncertain follicular neoplasm. VE1 immunohistochemistry revealed 8 mutated PTC and 22 negative cases. A 100% agreement was found when positive and negative VE1 results were compared with BRAF mutational status. These data are the first demonstration that VE1 immunohistochemistry performed on thyroid CNB samples perfectly matches with genetic analysis of BRAF status. Thus, VE1 antibody can be used on thyroid microhistologic specimens to detect BRAF(V600E)-mutated PTC before surgery.

  3. In vivo imaging of lymphocytes in the CNS reveals different behaviour of naïve T cells in health and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) has become a powerful tool in the visualization of immune cell dynamics and cellular communication within the complex biological networks of the inflamed central nervous system (CNS). Whereas many previous studies mainly focused on the role of effector or effector memory T cells, the role of naïve T cells as possible key players in immune regulation directly in the CNS is still highly debated. Methods We applied ex vivo and intravital TPLSM to investigate migratory pathways of naïve T cells in the inflamed and non-inflamed CNS. MACS-sorted naïve CD4+ T cells were either applied on healthy CNS slices or intravenously injected into RAG1 -/- mice, which were affected by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We further checked for the generation of second harmonic generation (SHG) signals produced by extracellular matrix (ECM) structures. Results By applying TPLSM on living brain slices we could show that the migratory capacity of activated CD4+ T cells is not strongly influenced by antigen specificity and is independent of regulatory or effector T cell phenotype. Naïve T cells, however, cannot find sufficient migratory signals in healthy, non-inflamed CNS parenchyma since they only showed stationary behaviour in this context. This is in contrast to the high motility of naïve CD4+ T cells in lymphoid organs. We observed a highly motile migration pattern for naïve T cells as compared to effector CD4+ T cells in inflamed brain tissue of living EAE-affected mice. Interestingly, in the inflamed CNS we could detect reticular structures by their SHG signal which partially co-localises with naïve CD4+ T cell tracks. Conclusions The activation status rather than antigen specificity or regulatory phenotype is the central requirement for CD4+ T cell migration within healthy CNS tissue. However, under inflammatory conditions naïve CD4+ T cells can get access to CNS parenchyma and partially migrate along

  4. Memory-improving activity of Melissa officinalis extract in naïve and scopolamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Soodi, M; Naghdi, N; Hajimehdipoor, H; Choopani, S; Sahraei, E

    2014-01-01

    Melissa officinalis L. (Labiatae) traditionally used in treating neurological disorders has also been identified as a memory-enhancing herb. The extract of M. officinalis has a cholinergic property. The role of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, the neurons that are destroyed in Alzheimer's disease (AD), in learning and memory, is also well known. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of cholinergic system on the memory improving activity of M. officinalis extract. The leaves of M. officinalis were extracted with ethanol 80% using the maceration method. Rats received intra-peritoneal injections of M. officinalis extract in different doses (50-400 mg/kg) alone or in combination with scopolamine (1 mg/kg) before being trained in a Morris water maze (MWM) in a single-day training protocol. After training, the acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE) activity was measured in the hippocampus. Administration of M. officinalis extract (200 mg/kg) could significantly enhance learning and memory of naïve rats (p<0.001) and significantly ameliorate scopolamine-induced learning deficit, but the effect of the extract was not dose dependent, and doses above 200 mg/kg could neither enhance memory in naïve rats nor reverse scopolamine-induced memory impairment. Also, inhibition of AChE activity was observed in both naïve and scopolamine-induced memory-impaired rats. These results suggest that M. officinalis can improve memory and that the cholinergic property of the extract may contribute to the memory-improving effects observed in this study. Then M. officinalis extract has potential therapeutic value in alleviating certain memory impairment observed in AD.

  5. Antiretroviral drug resistance among antiretroviral-naïve and treatment experienced patients infected with HIV in Iran.

    PubMed

    Baesi, Kazem; Ravanshad, Mehrdad; Ghanbarisafari, Maryam; Saberfar, Esmaeil; Seyedalinaghi, Seyedahmad; Volk, Jonathan E

    2014-07-01

    Resistance to antiretroviral therapy (ART) threatens the success of programs to reduce HIV morbidity and mortality, particularly in countries with few treatment options. In the present study, genotype and phenotype data from ART-naïve and experienced hospitalized patients infected with HIV in Tehran, Iran were used to assess the prevalence and types of transmitted (TDR) and acquired drug resistance (ADR) mutations. All 30 participants naïve to ART and 62 of 70 (88.6%) participants receiving ART had detectable viral loads. Among participants receiving ART with sequencing data available (n = 62), 36 (58.1%) had at least one drug resistance mutation; the most common mutations were K103N (21.0%), M184V (19.4%), and the thymidine analogue mutations. Seven (11.3%), 27 (43.5%), and two (3.2%) of these participants had resistance to one, two, and three drug classes, respectively. High-level resistance to efavirenz (EFV) was more common among participants on EFV-based regimens than high-level lopinavir/ritonivar (LPV/r) resistance among those on LPV/r-based regimens (55.3% vs. 6.7%, P < 0.0001). Two (6.7%) antiretroviral-naïve participants had K103N mutations. These findings document an alarmingly high frequency of multiple HIV drug class resistance in Iran, confirm the presence of TDR, and highlight the need for systematic viral load monitoring and drug resistance testing, including at diagnosis. Expanded access to new antiretroviral medications from additional drug classes is needed.

  6. Comparison of Serum Lipid Profile in HIV Positive Patients on ART with ART Naïve Patients

    PubMed Central

    V, Vijay; Shekhanawar, M.S.; Rajeshwari; M, Amareshwaras; D, Shantala

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The widespread use of effective highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV patients has coincided with increasing reports of complications like HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome and the metabolic alterations, affecting the lipid and glucose metabolism. Evidences in support of lipodystrophy and dyslipidaemia associated with First- line HAART in our area is scarce. The aim of the present study was 1) to study and compare Lipid profile in HIV positive patients on ART with that of freshly diagnosed HIV positive patients who were yet to be started on ART. 2) To assess lipodystrophy syndrome in patients on ART. Materials and Methods: Hundred newly diagnosed HIV positive patients who were yet to be started on ART were taken as controls (ART-Naïve).Hundred randomly selected HIV+ patients who were already on First-line ART regimen (Stavudine/Zudovudine + Lamivudine + Nevirapine) for more than 12 months were taken as cases (ART). This study was conducted for a period of 12 months at the VIMS ART centre, Bellary, Karnataka, India. Results: There was a significant increase (p<0.001) in serum Total Cholesterol, LDL-C, TG, VLDL, Non-HDL -C & TC/HDL-C ratio in ART patients compared to ART-naïve patients. Of the 100 ART patients 23 had lipodystrophy syndrome (buffalo hump, abnormal fat deposition around neck & back, buccal fat resorption, increase in abdominal fat). Conclusion: To conclude, it is evident from our study that there is increase in lipid profile (except HDL) in ART patients compared to ART Naïve group and 23 ART patients showed lipodystrophy syndrome. Hence it appears reasonable to measure fasting lipid levels before and 3-6 months after antiretroviral therapy is initiated or when ART regimen is changed. PMID:25478335

  7. Assessment of DNA damage and repair efficiency in drug naïve schizophrenia using comet assay.

    PubMed

    Muraleedharan, Aparna; Menon, Vikas; Rajkumar, Ravi Philip; Chand, Parkash

    2015-09-01

    The etiology of schizophrenia continues to be confounding and elusive. Some knowledge gaps exist in the neurodegenerative theory of schizophrenia. Oxidative DNA damage and repair deficits are relevant to the mechanisms of neurodegeneration but have not been studied in drug naïve schizophrenia. The present study used the comet assay technique to study the extent of DNA damage in circulating peripheral lymphocytes of patients with drug naïve schizophrenia (n = 40) along with an age and gender matched control group (n = 40). We also assessed the DNA repair efficiency in cases following incubation in a nutrient medium. All the assayed comet parameters demonstrated significantly greater baseline DNA damage in cases in comparison to the controls except for head diameter (p < 0.001 for all significant results, p = 0.32 for head diameter). Gender, age and duration of illness (p = 0.21, 0.69 and 0.12 respectively for tail length) did not influence any of the parameters significantly. Significant decrease was noted in the comet tail length and percentage of DNA in comet tail (p < 0.001 for both) in cases following incubation suggesting that the DNA repair machinery was preserved. No difference in DNA repair efficiency was noted between the genders (p = 0.23 for tail length). Our findings confirm the presence of significant baseline DNA damage in schizophrenia even prior to the initiation of anti-psychotic treatment. Additionally, intact genomic repair efficiency was noted in this group as a whole. These results provide some evidence for oxidative DNA damage as molecular link underpinning neurodegeneration in drug naïve schizophrenia.

  8. Parental substance abuse and function of the motivation and behavioral inhibition systems in drug-naïve youth.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Iliyan; Liu, Xun; Shulz, Kurt; Fan, Jin; London, Edythe; Friston, Karl; Halperin, Jeffrey M; Newcorn, Jeffrey H

    2012-02-28

    It is hypothesized that the development of substance abuse (SA) may be due to imbalance in functions of the motivation-reward and behavioral inhibition systems in the brain. This speaks to the search for biological risk factors for SA in drug-naïve children who also exhibit motivational and inhibitory control deficits; however, this type of research is currently lacking. The objective of this study was to establish a neurobiological basis for addiction vulnerability using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in drug-naïve youth with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We hypothesized that children with ADHD alone would show higher activity in regions of the motivation-reward and behavioral inhibition systems than children with ADHD and a parental history of SA. Toward this goal we scanned 20 drug-naïve children with ADHD ages 8-13 while performing an event-related reward task. High (N=10) and low (N=10) risk subjects were identified, based on parental history of SA. The effects of anticipation, conflict, and reward were assessed with appropriate linear contrasts, and between-group differences were assessed using statistical parametric mapping. The two groups did not differ on behavioral measures of the task. The fMRI results show heightened activation in the brain motivational-reward system and reduced activation of the inhibitory control system in high-risk compared to low-risk children. These results suggest that a functional mismatch between these two systems may represent one possible biological underpinning of SA risk, which is conferred by a parental history of addiction.

  9. Transcription Profiling of Malaria-Naïve and Semi-immune Colombian Volunteers in a Plasmodium vivax Sporozoite Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Peña, Monica L.; Vallejo, Andres; Herrera, Sócrates; Gibson, Greg; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Background Continued exposure to malaria-causing parasites in endemic regions of malaria induces significant levels of acquired immunity in adult individuals. A better understanding of the transcriptional basis for this acquired immunological response may provide insight into how the immune system can be boosted during vaccination, and into why infected individuals differ in symptomology. Methodology/Principal Findings Peripheral blood gene expression profiles of 9 semi-immune volunteers from a Plasmodium vivax malaria prevalent region (Buenaventura, Colombia) were compared to those of 7 naïve individuals from a region with no reported transmission of malaria (Cali, Colombia) after a controlled infection mosquito bite challenge with P. vivax. A Fluidigm nanoscale quantitative RT-PCR array was used to survey altered expression of 96 blood informative transcripts at 7 timepoints after controlled infection, and RNASeq was used to contrast pre-infection and early parasitemia timepoints. There was no evidence for transcriptional changes prior to the appearance of blood stage parasites at day 12 or 13, at which time there was a strong interferon response and, unexpectedly, down-regulation of transcripts related to inflammation and innate immunity. This differential expression was confirmed with RNASeq, which also suggested perturbations of aspects of T cell function and erythropoiesis. Despite differences in clinical symptoms between the semi-immune and malaria naïve individuals, only subtle differences in their transcriptomes were observed, although 175 genes showed significantly greater induction or repression in the naïve volunteers from Cali. Conclusion/Significance Gene expression profiling of whole blood reveals the type and duration of the immune response to P. vivax infection, and highlights a subset of genes that may mediate adaptive immunity. PMID:26244760

  10. Long-Term Clinical Remission in Biologically Naïve Crohn's Disease Patients with Adalimumab Therapy, Including Analyses of Switch from Adalimumab to Infliximab.

    PubMed

    Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tanida, Satoshi; Ozeki, Keiji; Katano, Takahito; Shimura, Takaya; Mori, Yoshinori; Kubota, Eiji; Kataoka, Hiromi; Kamiya, Takeshi; Joh, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    There is little evidence regarding the maintenance of long-term clinical remission by adalimumab (ADA) therapy in Crohn's disease (CD) patients naïve to anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment (naïve CD patients), since most CD patients are treated with ADA after infliximab (IFX) therapy. The long-term clinical response to ADA was retrospectively analyzed in 17 naïve CD patients for at least 24 months, and the serum trough IFX levels were evaluated in patients switching from ADA to IFX. Of the 17 naïve CD patients, 14 (82.4%) maintained long-term clinical remission with ADA therapy for at least 24 months, without serious adverse events. The clinical condition of 7 patients was observed for more than 36 months, and 3, 1, 1, and 2 cases maintained remission at months 42, 48, 54, and 60 after ADA therapy, respectively. Three patients (17.6%) switched from ADA to IFX less than 24 months after the start of ADA therapy, and they had remission, retaining trough levels of IFX higher than 1 μg/ml, occasionally by dose escalation. In conclusion, maintenance ADA therapy achieves long-term clinical remission in naïve CD patients. Switching from ADA to IFX is an important therapeutic option in CD patients showing loss of response to ADA, occasionally with dose escalation, based on the analysis of serum IFX trough levels. PMID:27462198

  11. Olodaterol attenuates citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wex, Eva; Bouyssou, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Excessive coughing is a common feature of airway diseases. Different G-protein coupled receptors, including β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AR), have been implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cough reflex. However, the potential antitussive property of β2-AR agonists in patients with respiratory disease is a matter of ongoing debate. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy of the long-acting β2-AR agonist olodaterol with regard to its antitussive property in a pre-clinical model of citric acid-induced cough in guinea pigs and to compare the results to different clinically relevant β2-AR agonists. In our study β2-AR agonists were intratracheally administered, as dry powder, into the lungs of naïve or ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs 15 minutes prior to induction of cough by exposure to citric acid. Cough events were counted over 15 minutes during the citric acid exposure. Olodaterol dose-dependently inhibited the number of cough events in naïve and even more potently and with a greater maximal efficacy in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs (p < 0.01). Formoterol and salmeterol showed a trend towards reducing cough. On the contrary, indacaterol demonstrated pro-tussive properties as it significantly increased the number of coughs, both in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized animals (p < 0.001). In conclusion, olodaterol, at doses eliciting bronchodilation, showed antitussive properties in a model of citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. This is in agreement with pre-clinical and clinical studies showing antitussive efficacy of β2-AR agonists. Indacaterol increased the number of coughs in this model, which concurs with clinical data where a transient cough has been observed after indacaterol inhalation. While the antitussive properties of β2-AR agonists can be explained by their ability to lead to the cAMP-induced hyperpolarization of the neuron membrane thereby inhibiting sensory nerve activation and the

  12. Olodaterol Attenuates Citric Acid-Induced Cough in Naïve and Ovalbumin-Sensitized and Challenged Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wex, Eva; Bouyssou, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Excessive coughing is a common feature of airway diseases. Different G-protein coupled receptors, including β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AR), have been implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cough reflex. However, the potential antitussive property of β2-AR agonists in patients with respiratory disease is a matter of ongoing debate. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy of the long-acting β2-AR agonist olodaterol with regard to its antitussive property in a pre-clinical model of citric acid-induced cough in guinea pigs and to compare the results to different clinically relevant β2-AR agonists. In our study β2-AR agonists were intratracheally administered, as dry powder, into the lungs of naïve or ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs 15 minutes prior to induction of cough by exposure to citric acid. Cough events were counted over 15 minutes during the citric acid exposure. Olodaterol dose-dependently inhibited the number of cough events in naïve and even more potently and with a greater maximal efficacy in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs (p < 0.01). Formoterol and salmeterol showed a trend towards reducing cough. On the contrary, indacaterol demonstrated pro-tussive properties as it significantly increased the number of coughs, both in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized animals (p < 0.001). In conclusion, olodaterol, at doses eliciting bronchodilation, showed antitussive properties in a model of citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. This is in agreement with pre-clinical and clinical studies showing antitussive efficacy of β2-AR agonists. Indacaterol increased the number of coughs in this model, which concurs with clinical data where a transient cough has been observed after indacaterol inhalation. While the antitussive properties of β2-AR agonists can be explained by their ability to lead to the cAMP-induced hyperpolarization of the neuron membrane thereby inhibiting sensory nerve activation and the

  13. Advantages of Karhunen Loève transform over fast Fourier transform for planetary radar and space debris detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2007-04-01

    The present article describes that the range of any radiotelescope (and radar in general) may be increased by virtue of software, if one replaces the fast Fourier transform by the Karhunen Loève transform. The range increases with the inverse of the fourth root of the signal-to-noise ratio when this ratio decreases. Thus, the range on any radiotelescope (and radar) may be increased without changing the hardware at all, but by changing the software only. This improvement in the range of the radiotelescope is currently implemented at the 32-m antenna located at Medicina, near Bologna, in Italy, for both SETI and general radioastronomy.

  14. Water-resources reconnaissance of Île de la Gonâve, Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troester, Joseph W.; Turvey, Michael D.

    Île de la Gonâve is a 750-km2 island off the coast of Haiti. The depth to the water table ranges from less than 30 m in the Eocene and Upper Miocene limestones to over 60 m in the 300-m-thick Quaternary limestone. Annual precipitation ranges from 800-1,400 mm. Most precipitation is lost through evapotranspiration and there is virtually no surface water. Roughly estimated from chloride mass balance, about 4% of the precipitation recharges the karst aquifer. Cave pools and springs are a common source for water. Hand-dug wells provide water in coastal areas. Few productive wells have been drilled deeper than 60 m. Reconnaissance field analyses indicate that groundwater in the interior is a calcium-bicarbonate type, whereas water at the coast is a sodium-chloride type that exceeds World Health Organization recommended values for sodium and chloride. Tests for the presence of hydrogen sulfide-producing bacteria were negative in most drilled wells, but positive in cave pools, hand-dug wells, and most springs, indicating bacterial contamination of most water sources. Because of the difficulties in obtaining freshwater, the 110,000 inhabitants use an average of only 7 L per person per day. L'Île de la Gonâve est une île de 750 km2 au large de la côte d'Haïti. La profondeur de la nappe varie entre moins de 30 m dans les calcaires de l'Éocène et du Miocène supérieur à plus de 60 m dans les calcaires quaternaires épais de 300 m. Les précipitations annuelles sont comprises entre 800-1.400 mm. La plus grande partie des précipitations est perdue par évapotranspiration et il n'y a pratiquement pas d'eau de surface. Le bilan de masse des chlorures permet d'estimer à 4% des précipitations le montant de la recharge de l'aquifère karstique. Des bassins dans les grottes et des sources sont la source d'eau courante. Des puits creusés à la main fournissent de l'eau dans les zones côtières. Quelques puits productifs ont été forés dépassant 60 m de profondeur. L

  15. Water-resources reconnaissance of Île de la Gonâve, Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troester, Joseph W.; Turvey, Michael D.

    Île de la Gonâve is a 750-km2 island off the coast of Haiti. The depth to the water table ranges from less than 30 m in the Eocene and Upper Miocene limestones to over 60 m in the 300-m-thick Quaternary limestone. Annual precipitation ranges from 800-1,400 mm. Most precipitation is lost through evapotranspiration and there is virtually no surface water. Roughly estimated from chloride mass balance, about 4% of the precipitation recharges the karst aquifer. Cave pools and springs are a common source for water. Hand-dug wells provide water in coastal areas. Few productive wells have been drilled deeper than 60 m. Reconnaissance field analyses indicate that groundwater in the interior is a calcium-bicarbonate type, whereas water at the coast is a sodium-chloride type that exceeds World Health Organization recommended values for sodium and chloride. Tests for the presence of hydrogen sulfide-producing bacteria were negative in most drilled wells, but positive in cave pools, hand-dug wells, and most springs, indicating bacterial contamination of most water sources. Because of the difficulties in obtaining freshwater, the 110,000 inhabitants use an average of only 7 L per person per day. L'Île de la Gonâve est une île de 750 km2 au large de la côte d'Haïti. La profondeur de la nappe varie entre moins de 30 m dans les calcaires de l'Éocène et du Miocène supérieur à plus de 60 m dans les calcaires quaternaires épais de 300 m. Les précipitations annuelles sont comprises entre 800-1.400 mm. La plus grande partie des précipitations est perdue par évapotranspiration et il n'y a pratiquement pas d'eau de surface. Le bilan de masse des chlorures permet d'estimer à 4% des précipitations le montant de la recharge de l'aquifère karstique. Des bassins dans les grottes et des sources sont la source d'eau courante. Des puits creusés à la main fournissent de l'eau dans les zones côtières. Quelques puits productifs ont été forés dépassant 60 m de profondeur. L

  16. Retinol and ascorbate drive erasure of epigenetic memory and enhance reprogramming to naïve pluripotency by complementary mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    von Meyenn, Ferdinand; Ravichandran, Mirunalini; Ficz, Gabriella; Oxley, David; Santos, Fátima; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Jurkowski, Tomasz P.; Reik, Wolf

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic memory, in particular DNA methylation, is established during development in differentiating cells and must be erased to create naïve (induced) pluripotent stem cells. The ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes can catalyze the oxidation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and further oxidized derivatives, thereby actively removing this memory. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which the TET enzymes are regulated, and the extent to which they can be manipulated, are poorly understood. Here we report that retinoic acid (RA) or retinol (vitamin A) and ascorbate (vitamin C) act as modulators of TET levels and activity. RA or retinol enhances 5hmC production in naïve embryonic stem cells by activation of TET2 and TET3 transcription, whereas ascorbate potentiates TET activity and 5hmC production through enhanced Fe2+ recycling, and not as a cofactor as reported previously. We find that both ascorbate and RA or retinol promote the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells synergistically and enhance the erasure of epigenetic memory. This mechanistic insight has significance for the development of cell treatments for regenenerative medicine, and enhances our understanding of how intrinsic and extrinsic signals shape the epigenome. PMID:27729528

  17. Project VeSElkA: results of abundance analysis I - HD 71030, HD 95608, HD 116235 and HD 186568

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, F.; Khalack, V.; Yameogo, B.; Thibeault, C.; Gallant, I.

    2015-11-01

    A portion of main-sequence stars, called chemically peculiar (CP) stars, show important abundance anomalies mainly due to atomic diffusion of the species within these stars. Certain CP stars have hydrodynamically stable atmospheres where atomic diffusion may dominate and lead to vertical abundance stratification there. Recently, Project VeSElkA (a word meaning rainbow in Ukrainian and standing for `Vertical Stratification of Element Abundances') was initiated with the goal to detect vertical stratification of chemical abundances in selected CP stars using high-resolution spectra with large signal-to-noise ratios. The first extensive and detailed series of results from atomic-line analysis is presented here for four stars of Project VeSElkA: HD 71030, HD 95608, HD 116235 and HD 186568. These stars were recently observed with ESPaDOnS at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Strong evidence of iron stratification in the atmospheres of HD 95608 and HD 116235 was found. Chromium also shows a steep abundance gradient in the upper atmospheres of these two stars. No evidence of stratification is found for HD 71030 and HD 186568.

  18. Mental models or methodological artefacts? Adults' 'naïve' responses to a test of children's conceptions of the earth.

    PubMed

    Nobes, Gavin; Panagiotaki, Georgia

    2009-05-01

    Vosniadou and Brewer (1992) claim that children's drawings and answers to questions show that they have naive, theory-like 'mental models' of the earth; for example, they believe it to be flat, or hollow with people inside. However, recent studies that have used different methods have found little or no evidence of these misconceptions. The contrasting accounts, and possible reasons for the inconsistent findings, were tested by giving adults (N = 484) either the original task (designed for 5-year olds) or a new version in which the same drawing instructions and questions were rephrased and clarified. Many adults' responses to the original version were identical to children's 'naïve' drawings and answers. The new version elicited substantially fewer non-scientific responses. These findings indicate that even adults find the original instructions and questions ambiguous and confusing, and that this is the principal reason for their non-scientific drawings and answers. Since children must find the task even more confusing than adults, this explanation very probably applies to many of their non-scientific responses, too, and therefore accounts for the discrepant findings of previous research. 'Naïve' responses result largely from misinterpretation of Vosniadou and Brewer's apparently simple task, rather than from mental models of the earth. PMID:18680639

  19. Dermatoglyphic correlates of hippocampus volume: Evaluation of aberrant neurodevelopmental markers in antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kalmady, Sunil V; Shivakumar, Venkataram; Gautham, S; Arasappa, Rashmi; Jose, Dania A; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Gangadhar, B N

    2015-10-30

    Schizophrenia is a disorder of aberrant neurodevelopment is marked by abnormalities in brain structure and dermatoglyphic traits. However, the link between these two (i.e. dermatoglyphic parameters and brain structure) which share ectodermal origin and common developmental window has not been explored extensively. The current study examined dermatoglyphic correlates of hippocampal volume in antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients in comparison with matched healthy controls. Ridge counts and asymmetry measures for palmar inter-digital areas (a-b, b-c, c-d) were obtained using high resolution digital scans of palms from 89 schizophrenia patients [M:F=48:41] and 48 healthy controls [M:F=30:18]. Brain scans were obtained for subset of subjects including 26 antipsychotic-naïve patients [M:F=13:13] and 29 healthy controls [M:F=19:10] using 3 T-MRI. Hippocampal volume and palmar ridge counts were measured by blinded raters with good inter-rater reliability using valid methods. Directional asymmetry (DA) of b-c and bilateral hippocampal volume were significantly lower in patients than controls. Significant positive correlation was found between DA and ridge count of b-c with bilateral anterior hippocampal volume. Study demonstrates the utility of dermatoglyphic markers in identifying structural changes in the brain which may form the basis for neurodevelopmental pathogenesis in schizophrenia. PMID:26385539

  20. Design and construction of a new human naïve single-chain fragment variable antibody library, IORISS1.

    PubMed

    Pasello, Michela; Zamboni, Silvia; Mallano, Alessandra; Flego, Michela; Picci, Piero; Cianfriglia, Maurizio; Scotlandi, Katia

    2016-04-20

    Human monoclonal antibodies are a powerful tool with increasingly successful exploitations and the single chain fragment variable format can be considered the building block for the implementation of more complex and effective antibody-based constructs. Phage display is one of the best and most efficient methods to isolate human antibodies selected from an efficient and variable phage display library. We report a method for the construction of a human naïve single-chain variable fragment library, termed IORISS1. Many different sets of oligonucleotide primers as well as optimized electroporation and ligation reactions were used to generate this library of 1.2×10(9) individual clones. The key difference is the diversity of variable gene templates, which was derived from only 15 non-immunized human donors. The method described here, was used to make a new human naïve single-chain fragment variable phage display library that represents a valuable source of diverse antibodies that can be used as research reagents or as a starting point for the development of therapeutics. Using biopanning, we determined the ability of IORISS1 to yield antibodies. The results we obtained suggest that, by using an optimized protocol, an efficient phage antibody library can be generated. PMID:26945728

  1. Deletion and Allelic Exchange of the Aspergillus fumigatus veA Locus via a Novel Recyclable Marker Module

    PubMed Central

    Krappmann, Sven; Bayram, Özgür; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2005-01-01

    Detailed evaluation of gene functions in an asexual fungus requires advanced methods of molecular biology. For the generation of targeted gene deletions in the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus we designed a novel blaster module allowing dominant selection of transformants due to resistance to phleomycin as well as dominant (counter)selection of a Cre recombinase-mediated marker excision event. For validation purposes we have deleted the A. fumigatus pabaA gene in a wild-type isolate by making use of this cassette. The resulting pabaA::loxP strain served as the recipient for subsequent targeting of the velvet locus. Homologous reconstitution of the deleted gene was performed by an allele whose expression is driven in a nitrogen source-dependent manner, as validated by Northern analyses. Overexpression of the veA locus in A. fumigatus does not result in any obvious phenotype, whereas the sporulation capacities of the veA null mutant are reduced on nitrate-containing medium, a phenotype that is completely restored in the reconstituted strain. PMID:16002655

  2. Dermatoglyphic correlates of hippocampus volume: Evaluation of aberrant neurodevelopmental markers in antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kalmady, Sunil V; Shivakumar, Venkataram; Gautham, S; Arasappa, Rashmi; Jose, Dania A; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Gangadhar, B N

    2015-10-30

    Schizophrenia is a disorder of aberrant neurodevelopment is marked by abnormalities in brain structure and dermatoglyphic traits. However, the link between these two (i.e. dermatoglyphic parameters and brain structure) which share ectodermal origin and common developmental window has not been explored extensively. The current study examined dermatoglyphic correlates of hippocampal volume in antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients in comparison with matched healthy controls. Ridge counts and asymmetry measures for palmar inter-digital areas (a-b, b-c, c-d) were obtained using high resolution digital scans of palms from 89 schizophrenia patients [M:F=48:41] and 48 healthy controls [M:F=30:18]. Brain scans were obtained for subset of subjects including 26 antipsychotic-naïve patients [M:F=13:13] and 29 healthy controls [M:F=19:10] using 3 T-MRI. Hippocampal volume and palmar ridge counts were measured by blinded raters with good inter-rater reliability using valid methods. Directional asymmetry (DA) of b-c and bilateral hippocampal volume were significantly lower in patients than controls. Significant positive correlation was found between DA and ridge count of b-c with bilateral anterior hippocampal volume. Study demonstrates the utility of dermatoglyphic markers in identifying structural changes in the brain which may form the basis for neurodevelopmental pathogenesis in schizophrenia.

  3. Different genome stability proteins underpin primed and naïve adaptation in E. coli CRISPR-Cas immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ivančić-Baće, Ivana; Cass, Simon D; Wearne, Stephen J; Bolt, Edward L

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is a prokaryotic immune system built from capture and integration of invader DNA into CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) loci, termed ‘Adaptation’, which is dependent on Cas1 and Cas2 proteins. In Escherichia coli, Cascade-Cas3 degrades invader DNA to effect immunity, termed ‘Interference’. Adaptation can interact with interference (‘primed’), or is independent of it (‘naïve’). We demonstrate that primed adaptation requires the RecG helicase and PriA protein to be present. Genetic analysis of mutant phenotypes suggests that RecG is needed to dissipate R-loops at blocked replication forks. Additionally, we identify that DNA polymerase I is important for both primed and naive adaptation, and that RecB is needed for naïve adaptation. Purified Cas1-Cas2 protein shows specificity for binding to and nicking forked DNA within single strand gaps, and collapsing forks into DNA duplexes. The data suggest that different genome stability systems interact with primed or naïve adaptation when responding to blocked or collapsed invader DNA replication. In this model, RecG and Cas3 proteins respond to invader DNA replication forks that are blocked by Cascade interference, enabling DNA capture. RecBCD targets DNA ends at collapsed forks, enabling DNA capture without interference. DNA polymerase I is proposed to fill DNA gaps during spacer integration. PMID:26578567

  4. Artesunate inhibits proliferation of naïve CD4(+) T cells but enhances function of effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ho; Cho, Young-Chang; Kim, Kyung Hee; Lee, Ik-Soo; Choi, Hyun Jin; Kang, Bok Yun

    2015-06-01

    Artesunate is an artemisinin derivative from Artemisia annua and is being applied as a first-line drug for malaria treatment. In addition to anti-malarial effects, anti-cancer, anti-viral, and anti-inflammatory activities have been reported for artemisinin derivatives. In this study, we investigated the effects of artesunate on naïve T cell activation and Th1/Th2 differentiation. Artesunate inhibited the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and the production of IL-2, T cell growth factor. Moreover, artesunate reduced the expression of cell surface protein CD25 (IL-2 receptor alpha chain) and CD69 on CD4(+) T cells. Artesunate showed inhibitory effects on naïve T cell activation but artesunate increased the production of IFN-γ and IL-4 under Th1 and Th2 skewed condition respectively. Therefore, these results suggest that artesunate has a negative mitogenic effect on CD4(+) T cells but reinforces the function of effector T cells. PMID:25370606

  5. Transmission of Cyprinid herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3) from goldfish to naïve common carp by cohabitation.

    PubMed

    El-Matbouli, Mansour; Soliman, Hatem

    2011-06-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3) has spread worldwide and has had a major impact on koi and common carp production. Previous studies on the host range of the CyHV-3 found that fish species other than koi and common carp are fully resistant to natural virus exposure. Recently, CyHV-3 was detected in goldfish (Carassius auratus auratus) that were in contact with CyHV-3 infected koi. In the present study, a specific RT-PCR product was amplified from the viral thymidine kinase gene in gills, intestine and brain tissues of CyHV-3 infected goldfish. This implied that CyHV-3 replicated in these goldfish. Also, in the presence of a stress factor such as temperature fluctuation, the CyHV-3 infected goldfish transmitted the virus to cohabitated naïve SPF common carp. CyHV-3 DNA was detected in the cohabitated naïve carp tissues by PCR. The results of this study demonstrate that goldfish is a carrier for CyHV-3, permit virus propagation, and disseminate the virus to susceptible carp causing the disease.

  6. Mental models or methodological artefacts? Adults' 'naïve' responses to a test of children's conceptions of the earth.

    PubMed

    Nobes, Gavin; Panagiotaki, Georgia

    2009-05-01

    Vosniadou and Brewer (1992) claim that children's drawings and answers to questions show that they have naive, theory-like 'mental models' of the earth; for example, they believe it to be flat, or hollow with people inside. However, recent studies that have used different methods have found little or no evidence of these misconceptions. The contrasting accounts, and possible reasons for the inconsistent findings, were tested by giving adults (N = 484) either the original task (designed for 5-year olds) or a new version in which the same drawing instructions and questions were rephrased and clarified. Many adults' responses to the original version were identical to children's 'naïve' drawings and answers. The new version elicited substantially fewer non-scientific responses. These findings indicate that even adults find the original instructions and questions ambiguous and confusing, and that this is the principal reason for their non-scientific drawings and answers. Since children must find the task even more confusing than adults, this explanation very probably applies to many of their non-scientific responses, too, and therefore accounts for the discrepant findings of previous research. 'Naïve' responses result largely from misinterpretation of Vosniadou and Brewer's apparently simple task, rather than from mental models of the earth.

  7. A phase 2 study of idelalisib plus rituximab in treatment-naïve older patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lamanna, Nicole; Kipps, Thomas J.; Flinn, Ian; Zelenetz, Andrew D.; Burger, Jan A.; Keating, Michael; Mitra, Siddhartha; Holes, Leanne; Yu, Albert S.; Johnson, David M.; Miller, Langdon L.; Kim, Yeonhee; Dansey, Roger D.; Dubowy, Ronald L.; Coutre, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Idelalisib is a first-in-class oral inhibitor of PI3Kδ that has shown substantial activity in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To evaluate idelalisib as initial therapy, 64 treatment-naïve older patients with CLL or small lymphocytic leukemia (median age, 71 years; range, 65-90) were treated with rituximab 375 mg/m2 weekly ×8 and idelalisib 150 mg twice daily continuously for 48 weeks. Patients completing 48 weeks without progression could continue to receive idelalisib on an extension study. The median time on treatment was 22.4 months (range, 0.8-45.8+). The overall response rate (ORR) was 97%, including 19% complete responses. The ORR was 100% in patients with del(17p)/TP53 mutations and 97% in those with unmutated IGHV. Progression-free survival was 83% at 36 months. The most frequent (>30%) adverse events (any grade) were diarrhea (including colitis) (64%), rash (58%), pyrexia (42%), nausea (38%), chills (36%), cough (33%), and fatigue (31%). Elevated alanine transaminase/aspartate transaminase was seen in 67% of patients (23% grade ≥3). The combination of idelalisib and rituximab was highly active, resulting in durable disease control in treatment-naïve older patients with CLL. These results support the further development of idelalisib as initial treatment of CLL. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as #NCT01203930. PMID:26472751

  8. İhtimaller Hesabına Dayalı İstanbul ve Çevresindeki Deprem Tehlikesi (Seismic hazard assessment of Istanbul and its surroundings)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gulkan, Polat; Kalkan, E.

    2010-01-01

    Bu yazının amacı, İstanbul ve yakın çevresinin maruz olduğu deprem tehlikesine dair 1999 depremlerinden bu yana devam eden tartışmalara bilimsel verilere ve hesaplara dayanan ve mümkün olduğu ölçüde kolay anlaşılır bir açıklama getirmektir. Depremlerin bir bölgede yaratabileceği tehlike, yani yerin sarsılması yüzünden yapılar üzerinde doğacak deprem etkileri, bölgenin deprem riskine, yani o bölgede olabilecek en yüksek deprem büyüklüğüne ve bölgenin zemin durumuna bağlıdır. Bu çalışmada, deprem oluşturma potansiyeline sahip aktif faylar ve son 500 yılda meydana gelmiş depremler ihtimal hesapları kullanılarak ilişkilendirilmiş ve Marmara Bölgesi’nde deprem sonucu doğacak yer hareketi şiddetinin dağılımı haritalanmıştır. Sunulan yeni deprem tehlike haritaları önceki bölgesel tehlike haritaları ile karşılaştırıldığında, Marmara Bölgesi’nde hissedilebilecek yer hareketi şiddetinde, benzer çalışmalara oranla % 10 ila % 15 arası artış görülmektedir.

  9. Experimental transmission of avian‐like swine H1N1 influenza virus between immunologically naïve and vaccinated pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Lucy E.; Jonczyk, Magdalena; Jervis, Carley M.; Flack, Deborah J.; Lyall, John; Foote, Alasdair; Mumford, Jennifer A.; Brown, Ian H.; Wood, James L.; Elton, Debra M.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Lloyd et al. (2011) Experimental transmission of avian‐like swine H1N1 influenza virus between immunologically naïve and vaccinated pigs. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(5), 357–364. Background  Infection of pigs with swine influenza has been studied experimentally and in the field; however, little information is available on the natural transmission of this virus in pigs. Two studies in an experimental transmission model are presented here, one in immunologically naïve and one in a combination of vaccinated and naïve pigs. Objectives  To investigate the transmission of a recent ‘avian‐like’ swine H1N1 influenza virus in naive piglets, to assess the antibody response to a commercially available vaccine and to determine the efficiency of transmission in pigs after vaccination. Methods  Transmission chains were initiated by intranasal challenge of two immunologically naïve pigs. Animals were monitored daily for clinical signs and virus shedding. Pairs of pigs were sequentially co‐housed, and once virus was detected in recipients, prior donors were removed. In the vaccination study, piglets were vaccinated and circulating antibody levels were monitored by haemagglutination inhibition assay. To study transmission in vaccinates, a pair of infected immunologically naïve animals was co‐housed with vaccinated recipient pigs and further pairs of vaccinates were added sequentially as above. The chain was completed by the addition of naive pigs. Results and conclusions  Transmission of the H1N1 virus was achieved through a chain of six pairs of naïve piglets and through four pairs of vaccinated animals. Transmission occurred with minimal clinical signs and, in vaccinates, at antibody levels higher than previously reported to protect against infection. PMID:21668691

  10. A model to investigate the optimal seeder-to-naïve ratio for successful natural Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae gilt exposure prior to entering the breeding herd.

    PubMed

    Roos, Luiza R; Fano, Eduardo; Homwong, Nitipong; Payne, Brian; Pieters, Maria

    2016-02-29

    Due to the significance of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae as a swine respiratory pathogen, acclimation measures are taken into consideration when obtaining replacement gilts from negative sources to be introduced to endemically infected herds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the optimum seeder-to-naïve gilt ratio in a 4-week period for successful natural exposure to M. hyopneumoniae. Sixty gilts were divided in two groups, 21 2-week old seeder gilts were inoculated with M. hyopneumoniae, and 39 aged-matched naïve gilts were exposed to the seeders during a 4-week period. The exposure was set by dividing the gilts into six groups of 10 with different ratios of seeder-to-naïve, from 1:9 until 6 seeders and 4 naïve gilts. Laryngeal swabs, oral fluids and blood samples were collected from all gilts prior to, during and after inoculation and exposure. Infection in seeders was confirmed by development of clinical signs, seroconversion post-inoculation, and detection of M. hyopneumoniae genetic material. Naïve were considered positive after 4 weeks if M. hyopneumoniae was detected on bronchial swab or fixed lung tissue. As result, 33% (3/9) naïve gilts were positive in the 1:9 ratio, 75% (6/8) in 2:8, 28% (2/7) in 3:7, 33% (2/6) in 4:6, 80% (4/5) in 5:5 and 100% (4/4) in the 6:4 ratio. The estimated transmission rate (β) and expected probability of infection (ψ) were 1.28 per pig/week and 0.6, respectively. In this study, six seeders were required in a group of 10 gilts for successful exposure to M. hyopneumoniae in a 4-week exposure period. PMID:26854344

  11. Temporary Threshold Shifts in Naïve and Experienced Belugas: Can Dampening of the Effects of Fatiguing Sounds Be Learned?

    PubMed

    Popov, Vladimir; Supin, Alexander; Nechaev, Dmitry; Sysueva, Evgenia; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav

    2016-01-01

    In belugas (Delphinapterus leucas), substantial (10-15 dB) differences in temporary threshold shifts (TTSs) were observed between the first and subsequent experimental sessions in the same subjects. In the first session (naïve subject state), the TTSs produced by exposure to fatiguing noises were larger than the TTSs produced in subsequent sessions (experienced subject state). After one to two sessions, the TTSs stabilized. The baseline hearing thresholds did not differ between the naïve and experienced states. One possible explanation for this effect is that the animals learned to dampen their hearing during exposure to fatiguing noises and thus mitigate the impact of those noises.

  12. Estimation of rate constant for VE excitation of the С2(D1Σ) state in Не-СО-О2 discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorian, G.; Cenian, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The paper discusses the experimental results pointing to the efficient channel of the CO vibrational to the C2 electronic energy-transfer. The radiation spectra D1Σu - X1Σg , known as Mulliken bands, are investigated and the relation of their kinetics to a vibrational excitation of CO molecules in the He-CO-O2 plasma is discussed. The rate constant for VE process ( CO(v >= 25) + C2 → CO(v - 25) + C2(D1Σu) ) is estimated, kVE ~ 10-14 см3/с.

  13. Drug usage analysis and health care resources consumption in naïve patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sangiorgi, Diego; Benucci, Maurizio; Nappi, Carmela; Perrone, Valentina; Buda, Stefano; Degli Esposti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The use of biologic agents has revolutionized the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the past 2 decades. These biologic agents directly target molecules and cells involved in the pathogenesis of RA. The purpose of this study was to assess the usage of biologic agents in terms of persistence to treatment, dose escalation, and consumption of health care resources (hospitalizations, drugs, and outpatients service) in the real clinical practice in naïve patients with RA. Methods We conducted a real-world, retrospective, observational cohort study based on data obtained from administrative databases of three Local Health Units in Italy. The population included adults diagnosed with RA who had at least one prescription between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011, for a biologic that was approved for treatment of RA. The patients were followed for 12 months after enrollment. The clinical characteristics of the patients enrolled in this study were also investigated in the 1-year period before the index date. The main and secondary endpoints were evaluated only in biologic-naïve patients without switches. The overall health care costs for patients were evaluated. Results A total of 594 patients met the study criteria (mean age 53.5±13.5, female:male ratio =3:1). Thirty-nine percent received etanercept, 25% adalimumab, 14% infliximab, 10% abatacept, 9% tocilizumab, and 3% golimumab. After 1 year of observation, patients showed similar use of other RA-related medication. For the naïve patients without switches, the persistence levels were: 78% for etanercept, 72% for tocilizumab, 71% for adalimumab, 69% for infliximab, and 64% for abatacept. For all agents, dose escalation was 21.4% for infliximab, 11.5% for adalimumab, 5.6% for abatacept, 4% for tocilizumab, and 3.8% for etanercept. The annual costs per treated patients were €12,803 for adalimumab, €11,924 for etanercept, €11,830 for tocilizumab, €11,201 for infliximab, and €10,943 for

  14. Having Students Create Short Video Clips to Help Transition from Naïve Conceptions about Mechanics to True Newtonian Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corten-Gualtieri, Pascale; Ritter, Christian; Plumat, Jim; Keunings, Roland; Lebrun, Marcel; Raucent, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Most students enter their first university physics course with a system of beliefs and intuitions which are often inconsistent with the Newtonian frame of reference. This article presents an experiment of collaborative learning aiming at helping first-year students in an engineering programme to transition from their naïve intuition about dynamics…

  15. Transcriptome analysis of Aspergillus flavus reveals veA-dependent regulation of secondary metabolite gene clusters, including the novel aflavarin cluster

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The global regulatory veA gene governs development and secondary metabolism in numerous fungal species, including Aspergillus flavus. This is especially relevant since A. flavus infects crops of agricultural importance worldwide, contaminating them with potent mycotoxins. The most well-known are afl...

  16. Parameters of glucose and lipid metabolism at the fasted state in drug-naïve first-episode patients with psychosis: Evidence for insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Petrikis, Petros; Tigas, Stelios; Tzallas, Alexandros T; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Skapinakis, Petros; Mavreas, Venetsanos

    2015-10-30

    Diabetes and dyslipidemia are common in patients with psychosis; this association may be partly related to adverse metabolic effects of antipsychotic medications. We assessed glucose and lipid metabolism during the fasted state in drug-naïve patients with psychosis. Fasting serum concentrations of total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL), glucose, insulin, connecting peptide (C-peptide), homeostatic model assessment index (HOMA-IR), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and serum cortisol were compared between a group of 40 newly diagnosed drug-naïve, first-episode patients with psychosis and a group of 40 healthy controls, matched for age, sex and BMI. Total cholesterol, triglycerides and fasting glucose levels were similar, whereas insulin and C-peptide levels were higher and HDL marginally lower in the patients' group compared to those in healthy controls. Drug-naïve patients with psychosis were more insulin resistant (as assessed by the HOMA-R index) compared to healthy controls. Serum cortisol did not differ between the two groups. There is evidence that drug-naïve, first-episode patients with psychosis are more insulin resistant compared to healthy controls. PMID:26279127

  17. HMGN proteins modulate chromatin regulatory sites and gene expression during activation of naïve B cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaofei; Zhu, Iris; Deng, Tao; Furusawa, Takashi; Rochman, Mark; Vacchio, Melanie S.; Bosselut, Remy; Yamane, Arito; Casellas, Rafael; Landsman, David; Bustin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The activation of naïve B lymphocyte involves rapid and major changes in chromatin organization and gene expression; however, the complete repertoire of nuclear factors affecting these genomic changes is not known. We report that HMGN proteins, which bind to nucleosomes and affect chromatin structure and function, co-localize with, and maintain the intensity of DNase I hypersensitive sites genome wide, in resting but not in activated B cells. Transcription analyses of resting and activated B cells from wild-type and Hmgn−/− mice, show that loss of HMGNs dampens the magnitude of the transcriptional response and alters the pattern of gene expression during the course of B-cell activation; defense response genes are most affected at the onset of activation. Our study provides insights into the biological function of the ubiquitous HMGN chromatin binding proteins and into epigenetic processes that affect the fidelity of the transcriptional response during the activation of B cell lymphocytes. PMID:27112571

  18. MOST Detects g-Modes in the Late-Type Be Star β Canis Minoris (B8 Ve)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saio, H.; Cameron, C.; Kuschnig, R.; Walker, G. A. H.; Matthews, J. M.; Rowe, J. F.; Lee, U.; Huber, D.; Weiss, W. W.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.

    2007-01-01

    The Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) satellite has detected low-amplitude light variations (Δm~1 mmag) in the Be star β CMi (B8 Ve). The observations lasted 41 days and the variations have typical periods ~0.3 days. We demonstrate that the dominant frequencies are consistent with prograde high-order g-modes of m=-1 excited by the Fe bump of opacity in an intermediate-mass (~3.5 Msolar) star with a nearly critical rotation period of 0.38 days. This is the first detection of nonradial g-mode pulsations in a Be star later than B6 leading to the possibility that pulsations are excited in all classical Be stars. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute of Aerospace Studies, and the University of British Columbia with the assistance of the University of Vienna.

  19. Characterization of the Psychological, Physiological and EEG Profile of Acute Betel Quid Intoxication in Naïve Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Peter G.; Chou, Tung-Shan; Shen, Tsu-Wang

    2011-01-01

    Betel quid use and abuse is wide spread in Asia but the physiological basis of intoxication and addiction are unknown. In subjects naïve to the habit of betel quid intoxication, the psychological and physiological profile of intoxication has never been reported. We compared the effect of chewing gum or chewing betel quid, and subsequent betel quid intoxication, on psychological assessment, prospective time interval estimation, numerical and character digit span, computerized 2 choice tests and mental tasks such as reading and mathematics with concurrent monitoring of ECG, EEG and face temperature in healthy, non-sleep deprived, male subjects naïve to the habit of chewing betel quid. Betel quid intoxication, dose dependently induced tachycardia (max 30 bpm) and elevated face temperature (0.7°C) (P<0.001) above the effects observed in response to chewing gum (max 12 bpm and 0.3°C) in 12 subjects. Gross behavioral indices of working memory such as numerical or character digit span in 8 subjects, or simple visual-motor performance such as reaction speed or accuracy in a two choice scenario in 8 subjects were not affected by betel quid intoxication. Betel quid intoxication strongly influenced the psychological aspects of perception such as slowing of the prospective perception of passage of a 1 minute time interval in 8 subjects (P<0.05) and perceived increased arousal (P<0.01) and perceived decreased ability to think (P<0.05) in 31 subjects. The EEG spectral profile recorded from mental states associated with open and closed eyes, and mental tasks such as reading and eyes closed mental arithmetic were significantly modified (P<0.05) relative to chewing gum by betel quid intoxication in 10 subjects. The prevalence of betel quid consumption across a range of social and work settings warrants greater investigation of this widespread but largely under researched drug. PMID:21909371

  20. Characterization of the psychological, physiological and EEG profile of acute betel quid intoxication in naïve subjects.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Peter G; Chou, Tung-Shan; Shen, Tsu-Wang

    2011-01-01

    Betel quid use and abuse is wide spread in Asia but the physiological basis of intoxication and addiction are unknown. In subjects naïve to the habit of betel quid intoxication, the psychological and physiological profile of intoxication has never been reported. We compared the effect of chewing gum or chewing betel quid, and subsequent betel quid intoxication, on psychological assessment, prospective time interval estimation, numerical and character digit span, computerized 2 choice tests and mental tasks such as reading and mathematics with concurrent monitoring of ECG, EEG and face temperature in healthy, non-sleep deprived, male subjects naïve to the habit of chewing betel quid. Betel quid intoxication, dose dependently induced tachycardia (max 30 bpm) and elevated face temperature (0.7°C) (P<0.001) above the effects observed in response to chewing gum (max 12 bpm and 0.3°C) in 12 subjects. Gross behavioral indices of working memory such as numerical or character digit span in 8 subjects, or simple visual-motor performance such as reaction speed or accuracy in a two choice scenario in 8 subjects were not affected by betel quid intoxication. Betel quid intoxication strongly influenced the psychological aspects of perception such as slowing of the prospective perception of passage of a 1 minute time interval in 8 subjects (P<0.05) and perceived increased arousal (P<0.01) and perceived decreased ability to think (P<0.05) in 31 subjects. The EEG spectral profile recorded from mental states associated with open and closed eyes, and mental tasks such as reading and eyes closed mental arithmetic were significantly modified (P<0.05) relative to chewing gum by betel quid intoxication in 10 subjects. The prevalence of betel quid consumption across a range of social and work settings warrants greater investigation of this widespread but largely under researched drug.

  1. Overt and occult hepatitis B virus infection among treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina Pedroso; Lemes, Pollyanne Sousa; Matos, Márcia Alves Dias; Del-Rios, Nativa Helena Alves; Carneiro, Megmar Aparecida Santos; Silva, Ágabo Macedo Costa; Lopes, Carmen Luci Rodrigues; Teles, Sheila Araújo; Aires, Rodrigo Sebba; Lago, Bárbara Vieira; Araujo, Natalia Motta; Martins, Regina Maria Bringel

    2016-07-01

    Although hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection is common, only few data are available on HBV among HIV patients including occult hepatitis B infection (OBI), regardless of serological markers. This study aims to determine the prevalence of OBI and overall HBV infection, associated factors, HBV genotypes, and surface (S) gene mutations in a population of treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted in treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Central Brazil. All samples were tested for HBV serological markers and HBV DNA. Sequence analysis of the S gene and overlapping polymerase gene was preformed. Overall, 25.1% (127/505) of the patients had markers of current or previous HBV infection, which was associated with age over 40 years, history of injection drug use, and homosexual sex. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seroprevalence was 4.9% (25/505). HBV DNA was detected in 39 out of 505 patients: 20 of them were HBsAg-positive and 19 were HBsAg-negative, resulting in an OBI prevalence of 3.8%. Patients with OBI had significantly higher HCV seropositivity rate compared to HBsAg-positive patients. Sequencing of the S gene revealed Y100C, T131N, and D144A mutations. One patient had the M204I and L180M drug-resistance mutations (polymerase). HBV genotypes A (A1, A2), D (D2, D3), and F (F2) were identified. In conclusion, OBI represented almost half of all HBV infections with detectable HBV DNA, suggesting that hepatitis B diagnosis in HIV patients should include in addition to serological markers the detection of HBV DNA. PMID:27061406

  2. Dynamics and molecular evolution of HIV-1 strains in Sicily among antiretroviral naïve patients.

    PubMed

    Tramuto, F; Maida, C M; Bonura, F; Perna, A M; Vitale, F

    2013-06-01

    HIV-1 subtype B is the most frequent strain in Sicily. To date, there is no available data about the genetic diversity of HIV-1 viral strains circulating in Sicily among antiretroviral (ARV) naïve subjects and the role of immigration as potential determinant of evolutionary dynamics of HIV-1 molecular epidemiology. For this purpose, HIV-1 polymerase (pol) sequences obtained from 155 ARV naïve individuals from 2004 to 2009 were phylogenetically analysed. The overall rate of HIV-1 non-B infections was 31.0% (n=48/155), increasing from 7.8% in 2004-2006 to 40.9% in 2009, and about one-third were identified as unique recombinant forms. CRF02_AG was the prevalent non-B clade (n=28/48, 58.3%), while subtype C-related strains were responsible for about 30% HIV-1 infections. Non-B viruses strictly associated with heterosexual transmission (85.4%) and were mostly found among immigrants (77.1%). Phylogenetic analysis of non-B sequences found in foreign-born subjects was geographically correlated to the respective country of origin. Moreover, the detection of non-B viral variants in the autochthonous population may support an increasing genetic diversity in Sicily as well as a local circulation of HIV strains also uncommon in our country. In Sicily, HIV-1 epidemic is still mostly attributable to the B subtype. Nevertheless, migration and population movements are progressively introducing novel HIV-1 subtypes causing a continuous increase of HIV-1 molecular dynamic at local level. Molecular surveillance is needed to monitor the genetic evolution of HIV-1 epidemic.

  3. Predicting mTOR Inhibitors with a Classifier Using Recursive Partitioning and Naïve Bayesian Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Chen, Lei; Liu, Zhihong; Zheng, Minghao; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central controller of cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, and angiogenesis. Thus, there is a great deal of interest in developing clinical drugs based on mTOR. In this paper, in silico models based on multi-scaffolds were developed to predict mTOR inhibitors or non-inhibitors. Methods First 1,264 diverse compounds were collected and categorized as mTOR inhibitors and non-inhibitors. Two methods, recursive partitioning (RP) and naïve Bayesian (NB), were used to build combinatorial classification models of mTOR inhibitors versus non-inhibitors using physicochemical descriptors, fingerprints, and atom center fragments (ACFs). Results A total of 253 models were constructed and the overall predictive accuracies of the best models were more than 90% for both the training set of 964 and the external test set of 300 diverse compounds. The scaffold hopping abilities of the best models were successfully evaluated through predicting 37 new recently published mTOR inhibitors. Compared with the best RP and Bayesian models, the classifier based on ACFs and Bayesian shows comparable or slightly better in performance and scaffold hopping abilities. A web server was developed based on the ACFs and Bayesian method (http://rcdd.sysu.edu.cn/mtor/). This web server can be used to predict whether a compound is an mTOR inhibitor or non-inhibitor online. Conclusion In silico models were constructed to predict mTOR inhibitors using recursive partitioning and naïve Bayesian methods, and a web server (mTOR Predictor) was also developed based on the best model results. Compound prediction or virtual screening can be carried out through our web server. Moreover, the favorable and unfavorable fragments for mTOR inhibitors obtained from Bayesian classifiers will be helpful for lead optimization or the design of new mTOR inhibitors. PMID:24819222

  4. Overt and occult hepatitis B virus infection among treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina Pedroso; Lemes, Pollyanne Sousa; Matos, Márcia Alves Dias; Del-Rios, Nativa Helena Alves; Carneiro, Megmar Aparecida Santos; Silva, Ágabo Macedo Costa; Lopes, Carmen Luci Rodrigues; Teles, Sheila Araújo; Aires, Rodrigo Sebba; Lago, Bárbara Vieira; Araujo, Natalia Motta; Martins, Regina Maria Bringel

    2016-07-01

    Although hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection is common, only few data are available on HBV among HIV patients including occult hepatitis B infection (OBI), regardless of serological markers. This study aims to determine the prevalence of OBI and overall HBV infection, associated factors, HBV genotypes, and surface (S) gene mutations in a population of treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted in treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Central Brazil. All samples were tested for HBV serological markers and HBV DNA. Sequence analysis of the S gene and overlapping polymerase gene was preformed. Overall, 25.1% (127/505) of the patients had markers of current or previous HBV infection, which was associated with age over 40 years, history of injection drug use, and homosexual sex. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seroprevalence was 4.9% (25/505). HBV DNA was detected in 39 out of 505 patients: 20 of them were HBsAg-positive and 19 were HBsAg-negative, resulting in an OBI prevalence of 3.8%. Patients with OBI had significantly higher HCV seropositivity rate compared to HBsAg-positive patients. Sequencing of the S gene revealed Y100C, T131N, and D144A mutations. One patient had the M204I and L180M drug-resistance mutations (polymerase). HBV genotypes A (A1, A2), D (D2, D3), and F (F2) were identified. In conclusion, OBI represented almost half of all HBV infections with detectable HBV DNA, suggesting that hepatitis B diagnosis in HIV patients should include in addition to serological markers the detection of HBV DNA.

  5. Neurocognitive Function in Acromegaly after Surgical Resection of GH-Secreting Adenoma versus Naïve Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Madrazo-Atutxa, Ainara; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Benito-López, Pedro; Gálvez, María Ángeles; Cano, David A.; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Torres-Vela, Elena; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Patients with active untreated acromegaly show mild to moderate neurocognitive disorders that are associated to chronic exposure to growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) hypersecretion. However, it is unknown whether these disorders improve after controlling GH/IGF-I hypersecretion. The aim of this study was to compare neurocognitive functions of patients who successfully underwent GH-secreting adenoma transsphenoidal surgery (cured patients) with patients with naive acromegaly. In addition, we wanted to determine the impact of different clinical and biochemical variables on neurocognitive status in patients with active disease and after long-term cure. A battery of six standardized neuropsychological tests assessed attention, memory and executive functioning. In addition, a quantitative electroencephalography with Low-Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) solution was performed to obtain information about the neurophysiological state of the patients. Neurocognitive data was compared to that of a healthy control group. Multiple linear regression analysis was also conducted using clinical and hormonal parameters to obtain a set of independent predictors of neurocognitive state before and after cure. Both groups of patients scored significantly poorer than the healthy controls on memory tests, especially those assessing visual and verbal recall. Patients with cured acromegaly did not obtain better cognitive measures than naïve patients. Furthermore memory deficits were associated with decreased beta activity in left medial temporal cortex in both groups of patients. Regression analysis showed longer duration of untreated acromegaly was associated with more severe neurocognitive complications, regardless of the diagnostic group, whereas GH levels at the time of assessment was related to neurocognitive outcome only in naïve patients. Longer duration of post-operative biochemical remission of acromegaly was associated with better

  6. Characterization of the psychological, physiological and EEG profile of acute betel quid intoxication in naïve subjects.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Peter G; Chou, Tung-Shan; Shen, Tsu-Wang

    2011-01-01

    Betel quid use and abuse is wide spread in Asia but the physiological basis of intoxication and addiction are unknown. In subjects naïve to the habit of betel quid intoxication, the psychological and physiological profile of intoxication has never been reported. We compared the effect of chewing gum or chewing betel quid, and subsequent betel quid intoxication, on psychological assessment, prospective time interval estimation, numerical and character digit span, computerized 2 choice tests and mental tasks such as reading and mathematics with concurrent monitoring of ECG, EEG and face temperature in healthy, non-sleep deprived, male subjects naïve to the habit of chewing betel quid. Betel quid intoxication, dose dependently induced tachycardia (max 30 bpm) and elevated face temperature (0.7°C) (P<0.001) above the effects observed in response to chewing gum (max 12 bpm and 0.3°C) in 12 subjects. Gross behavioral indices of working memory such as numerical or character digit span in 8 subjects, or simple visual-motor performance such as reaction speed or accuracy in a two choice scenario in 8 subjects were not affected by betel quid intoxication. Betel quid intoxication strongly influenced the psychological aspects of perception such as slowing of the prospective perception of passage of a 1 minute time interval in 8 subjects (P<0.05) and perceived increased arousal (P<0.01) and perceived decreased ability to think (P<0.05) in 31 subjects. The EEG spectral profile recorded from mental states associated with open and closed eyes, and mental tasks such as reading and eyes closed mental arithmetic were significantly modified (P<0.05) relative to chewing gum by betel quid intoxication in 10 subjects. The prevalence of betel quid consumption across a range of social and work settings warrants greater investigation of this widespread but largely under researched drug. PMID:21909371

  7. Comparison of naïve Bayes and logistic regression for computer-aided diagnosis of breast masses using ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cary, Theodore W.; Cwanger, Alyssa; Venkatesh, Santosh S.; Conant, Emily F.; Sehgal, Chandra M.

    2012-03-01

    This study compares the performance of two proven but very different machine learners, Naïve Bayes and logistic regression, for differentiating malignant and benign breast masses using ultrasound imaging. Ultrasound images of 266 masses were analyzed quantitatively for shape, echogenicity, margin characteristics, and texture features. These features along with patient age, race, and mammographic BI-RADS category were used to train Naïve Bayes and logistic regression classifiers to diagnose lesions as malignant or benign. ROC analysis was performed using all of the features and using only a subset that maximized information gain. Performance was determined by the area under the ROC curve, Az, obtained from leave-one-out cross validation. Naïve Bayes showed significant variation (Az 0.733 +/- 0.035 to 0.840 +/- 0.029, P < 0.002) with the choice of features, but the performance of logistic regression was relatively unchanged under feature selection (Az 0.839 +/- 0.029 to 0.859 +/- 0.028, P = 0.605). Out of 34 features, a subset of 6 gave the highest information gain: brightness difference, margin sharpness, depth-to-width, mammographic BI-RADs, age, and race. The probabilities of malignancy determined by Naïve Bayes and logistic regression after feature selection showed significant correlation (R2= 0.87, P < 0.0001). The diagnostic performance of Naïve Bayes and logistic regression can be comparable, but logistic regression is more robust. Since probability of malignancy cannot be measured directly, high correlation between the probabilities derived from two basic but dissimilar models increases confidence in the predictive power of machine learning models for characterizing solid breast masses on ultrasound.

  8. Efficacy of a preservative-free formulation of fixed-combination bimatoprost and timolol (Ganfort PF) in treatment-naïve patients vs previously treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, M Francesca; Goldberg, Ivan; Schiffman, Rhett; Bernstein, Paula; Bejanian, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate, using subgroup analysis, the effect of treatment status on the intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering efficacy of a preservative-free formulation of fixed-combination bimatoprost 0.03%/timolol 0.5% (FCBT PF). Methods A primary, multicenter, randomized, double-masked, 12-week study compared the efficacy and safety of FCBT PF with preserved FCBT (Ganfort®) in 561 patients diagnosed with glaucoma or ocular hypertension. For this analysis, eligible patients were treatment-naïve or had inadequate IOP lowering and underwent a washout of previous treatment. IOP (8 am, 10 am, and 4 pm) was measured at baseline and weeks 2, 6, and 12. Subgroup analysis of the FCBT PF arm assessed changes in average eye IOP from baseline in treatment-naïve vs previously treated patients. To evaluate the effect of treatment status at baseline (treatment-naïve vs previously treated) on IOP reduction in the FCBT PF treatment group, an analysis of covariance model was used with treatment status and investigator as fixed effects, and baseline average eye IOP, age, glaucoma diagnosis, and baseline average eye corneal thickness as covariates. P-values and the 95% confidence intervals were determined using the model. Results In the FCBT PF arm, IOP mean changes from baseline ranged from −8.7 mmHg to −9.8 mmHg in treatment-naïve patients (N=50), compared with −7.3 mmHg to −8.5 mmHg in previously treated patients (N=228). Baseline IOP, age, glaucoma diagnosis, and corneal thickness significantly affected IOP reduction in the FCBT PF group. Adjusting for these covariates, FCBT PF had a greater IOP-lowering effect (0.8–1.7 mmHg) in treatment-naïve patients than previously treated patients, which was statistically significant (P≤0.05) at seven of nine time points. Conclusion In this subgroup analysis, FCBT PF reduced IOP more effectively in treatment-naïve than in previously treated patients possibly due, in part, to altered responsiveness or tachyphylaxis that has

  9. Multiple signal propagation at the tropopause of the Venusian atmosphere: new insights from the Radio Science Experiment (VeRa) onboard Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Maren; Oschlisniok, Janusz; Remus, Stefan; Tellmann, Silvia; Häusler, Bernd; Pätzold, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The rapid change of the refractive index over a short altitude range in a planetary atmosphere can lead to multi-path effects when sounding the atmosphere with radio waves. The Radio Science Experiment (VeRa) [1,2] onboard Venus Express sounded the Venusian atmosphere from 90 km downward to 40 km altitude[3,4]. More than 800 profiles of temperature, pressure and neutral number density could be retrieved which cover almost all local times and latitudes. A specially developed analysis method based on the VeRa open loop receiving technique deciphers the multi-path effect and identifies an inversion layer near the tropopause at an altitude of about 60km. This layer is of particular interest - it separates the stratified troposphere from the highly variable mesosphere and can be a likely location for the formation of gravity waves [5]. The new retrieval method shows an inversion layer up to 15 K colder than commonly thought. Local time and latitude dependence including the influence of the spacecraft trajectory on this effect will be discussed. These results will contribute to a consistent picture of the Venus' thermal atmosphere structure and therefore help to improve atmospheric models.[1] Häusler, B. et al: 'Radio science investigations by VeRa onboard the Venus Express spacecraft' Planetary and Space Science 54, 2006[2] Häusler, B. et al, 'Venus Atmospheric, Ionospheric, Surface and Interplanetery Radio-Wave Propagation Studies with the VeRa Radio Science experiment' Eur. Space Agencys, Spec. Publ., ESA SP 1295, 2007[3] Pätzold, M. et al: 'The structure of Venus' middle atmosphere and ionosphere', Nature 450, 2007[4] Tellmann, S. et al : 'Structure of the Venus neutral atmosphere as observed by the Radio Science experiment VeRa on Venus Express', Journal of Geophysical Research 114, 2009[5] Tellmann, S. et al: 'Small-scale temperature fluctuations seen by the VeRa Radio Science Experiment on Venus Express' Icarus 221, 2012.

  10. Generation of Naïve Bovine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using PiggyBac Transposition of Doxycycline-Inducible Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Takamasa; Tsukiyama, Tomoyuki; Kimura, Koji; Matsuyama, Shuichi; Minami, Naojiro; Yamada, Masayasu; Imai, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Generation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in large domestic animals has achieved only limited success; most of the PSCs obtained to date have been classified as primed PSCs, which possess very little capacity to produce chimeric offspring. By contrast, mouse PSCs have been classified as naïve PSCs that can contribute to most of the tissues of chimeras, including germ cells. Here, we describe the generation of two different types of bovine induced pluripotent stem cells (biPSCs) from amnion cells, achieved through introduction of piggyBac vectors containing doxycycline-inducible transcription factors (Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc). One type of biPSCs, cultured in medium supplemented with knockout serum replacement (KSR), FGF2, and bovine leukemia inhibitory factor (bLIF), had a flattened morphology like human PSCs; these were classified as primed-type. The other type biPSCs, cultured in KSR, bLIF, Mek/Erk inhibitor, GSK3 inhibitor and forskolin, had a compact morphology like mouse PSCs; these were classified as naïve-type. Cells could easily be switched between these two types of biPSCs by changing the culture conditions. Both types of biPSCs had strong alkaline phosphatase activity, expressed pluripotent markers (OCT3/4, NANOG, REX1, ESRRβ, STELLA, and SOCS3), and formed embryoid bodies that gave rise to differentiated cells from all three embryonic germ layers. However, only naïve-type biPSCs showed the hallmarks of naïve mouse PSCs, such as LIF-dependent proliferation, lack of FGF5 expression, and active XIST expression with two active X chromosomes. Furthermore, naïve-type biPSCs could contribute to the inner cell mass (ICM) of host blastocysts and most tissues within chimeric embryos. This is the first report of generation of biPSCs with several characteristics similar to those of naïve mouse PSCs and a demonstrated potential to contribute to chimeras. PMID:26287611

  11. Efficacy of golimumab plus methotrexate in methotrexate-naïve patients with severe active rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Emery, Paul; Fleischmann, Roy M; Hsia, Elizabeth C; Xu, Stephen; Zhou, Yiying; Baker, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the treatment benefit of golimumab + methotrexate (MTX) vs. MTX monotherapy in MTX-naïve patients with severe active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This was a post hoc analysis of MTX-naïve RA patients in the GO-BEFORE trial who were randomized to receive placebo + MTX (n = 160), golimumab 50 mg + MTX (n = 159), or golimumab 100 mg + MTX (n = 159). Subsets of patients with severe disease were identified using these baseline criteria: C-reactive protein (CRP) ≥1.5 mg/dL, CRP ≥3.0 mg/dL, swollen joint count (SJC) ≥10 and tender joint count (TJC) ≥12, SJC ≥ 20/TJC ≥ 12, 28-joint count Disease Activity Score using CRP (DAS28-CRP) >5.1, and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody-positive status. The treatment effect of golimumab + MTX vs. MTX alone was evaluated for these outcomes: the proportions of patients achieving ≥20, 50, and 70 % improvement in the American College of Rheumatology criteria; DAS28-CRP European League Against Rheumatism response; DAS28-CRP <2.6, clinically meaningful improvement in physical function; and change in van der Heijde-Sharp score ≤0 at week 52. Clinical response was greater in the golimumab + MTX groups vs. placebo + MTX for all of the outcomes evaluated. Furthermore, the treatment effect of golimumab + MTX was consistently greater among patients in the severe disease subsets when compared with the overall GO-BEFORE trial population. The treatment benefit of golimumab + MTX vs. MTX monotherapy was most pronounced within the subsets of patients with CRP ≥3.0 mg/dL and SJC ≥ 20/TJC ≥ 12. Following treatment with golimumab + MTX, improvements in RA signs/symptoms and in progression of structural damage were evident for the overall GO-BEFORE population, with the treatment effect more pronounced among patients with severe active disease.

  12. Historical Incidence of Spontaneous Lesions in Kidneys from Naïve Swine Utilized In Interventional Renal Denervation Studies.

    PubMed

    Rouselle, Serge D; Dillon, Krista N; Rousselle-Sabiac, Theo H; Brady, Dane A; Tunev, Stefan; Tellez, Armando

    2016-08-01

    The use of preclinical animal models is integral to the safety assessment, pathogenesis research, and testing of diagnostic technologies and therapeutic interventions. With inherent similarity to human anatomy and physiology, various porcine models have been the preferred preclinical model in some research areas such as medical devices, wound healing, and skin therapies. The porcine model has been the cornerstone for interventional cardiology for the evaluation and development of this catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) therapy. The porcine model provides similar vascular access and renal neurovascular anatomy to humans. In these preclinical studies, the downstream kidneys from treated arteries are assessed for possible histopathological changes in the vessel dependent territories. In assessing renal safety following RDN, it becomes critical to distinguish treatment-related changes from pre-existing background pathologies. The incidence of background pathological changes in porcine kidneys has not been previously established in normal clinically healthy. Samples from the cranial, middle, and caudal portion of 331 naïve kidneys from 181 swine were processed histologically to slides and evaluated microscopically. The most commonly encountered spontaneous changes were chronic pyelonephritis found in nearly half of the evaluated naïve kidneys (∼40 %; score 1 = 91 %, score 2 = 8.4 %, score 3 = 0.76 %) followed by chronic interstitial inflammation in 9.7 % of the kidneys (score 1 = 90.6 %, score 2 = 9.4 %). Interestingly, there were a few rare spontaneous vascular changes that could potentially affect data interpretation in interventional and toxicology studies: arteritis and arteriolar dissection. The presence of pelvic cysts was a common occurrence (6.3 %) in the kidney. The domestic swine is a widely used preclinical species in interventional research, namely in the emerging field of transcatheter renal denervation. This

  13. [Data on rilpivirine in treatment-naïve patients. Lessons from ECHO, THRIVE and STaR].

    PubMed

    Domingo, Pere; Ribera, Esteban

    2013-06-01

    Rilpivirine (RPV) is a new, second-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) that has been recently approved for use in the initial antiretroviral therapy (ART) of treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients, combined with two nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI). The approved dose is 25mg once daily with food. RPV has been assessed in a phase IIb study (TMC278-C204) and in three phase III trials (ECHO, THRIVE and STaR). In all of them, RPV was compared with the gold standard, efavirenz (EFV); these studies enrolled a large number of patients (n=1,349 on RPV). RPV was non-inferior to EFV at 48 and 96 weeks. In all the studies and study arms, the tolerability of RPV was better than that of EFV, especially for neuropsychiatric adverse effects, rash, and lipid profile. An analysis of the combined data from the ECHO and THRIVE trials showed marked differences, depending on baseline viral load. The therapeutic efficacy of RPV was superior to that of EFV in patients with a baseline viral load ≤ 100,000 copies/mL, due to a similar virological efficacy and a better tolerability profile. However, in patients with a baseline viral load ≥ 100,000 copies/mL, virological failure was more frequent in the RPV arm, especially in patients with a viral load ≥ 500,000 copies/mL. Emerging resistance mutations to RPV were commonly detected in patients with virological failure, especially in those with a higher baseline viral load. In view of these results, the European Medications Agency and the US Food and Drug Administration have approved the use of RPV in treatment-naïve patients with a baseline viral load ≤ 100,000 copies/mL. Some treatment guidelines have already included RPV among their recommendations. The guidelines of the US Department of Health and Human Services (DHSS) and the International Antiviral Society-USA ((IAS-USA), while awaiting additional data, consider RPV-based regimens as an alternative regimen. The Gesida

  14. Transmitted Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral-Naïve Injection Drug Users with Chronic HIV-1 Infection in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Memarnejadian, Arash; Menbari, Shahoo; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Abdi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The growing incidence and transmission of drug resistant HIV-1 strains due to widespread use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) can jeopardize the success of first-line ART. While there is a known moderate prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) among newly infected Iranians, no data exist about the rate of these primary resistance mutations among the ART-naïve, chronically infected individuals who are, in fact, the main candidates for ART initiation. To address this issue, we collected blood samples from 40 ART-naïve injection drug-users (IDUs) with chronic HIV-1 infection (seroconversion time ranging from 2 to 9 years) living in Sanandaj, Iran, followed by sequencing of the protease and reverse-transcriptase regions from their HIV-1 genome. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequenced regions revealed that all samples were CRF35_AD. Transmitted resistance mutations were interpreted as surveillance drug-resistant mutations (SDRMs) based on the world health organization (WHO) algorithm. The frequency of SDRMs to any class of antiretroviral drugs was 15%, which included mutations to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, 10%), with M41L and M184V as the most common (5%), and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs, 5%), with K103N as the only detected mutation (5%). Although not in the WHO SDRMs list, several minor protease inhibitor resistant mutations listed in the International Antiviral Society-USA panel were identified, of which M36I, H69K, L89M/V/I (each one 100%) and K20R/T (92.5%) can be considered as polymorphic signatures for CRF35_AD.The relatively high rate of TDR mutations in our study raises concerns about the risk of treatment failure in chronically infected IDUs of Sanandaj city. These results suggest that routine resistance testing should be considered before the therapy initiation in this area. Additional surveillance studies are required to generalize this deduction to other cities of Iran. PMID:25962088

  15. Transmitted Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral-Naïve Injection Drug Users with Chronic HIV-1 Infection in Iran.

    PubMed

    Memarnejadian, Arash; Menbari, Shahoo; Mansouri, Seyed Ali; Sadeghi, Leila; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Abdi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The growing incidence and transmission of drug resistant HIV-1 strains due to widespread use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) can jeopardize the success of first-line ART. While there is a known moderate prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) among newly infected Iranians, no data exist about the rate of these primary resistance mutations among the ART-naïve, chronically infected individuals who are, in fact, the main candidates for ART initiation. To address this issue, we collected blood samples from 40 ART-naïve injection drug-users (IDUs) with chronic HIV-1 infection (seroconversion time ranging from 2 to 9 years) living in Sanandaj, Iran, followed by sequencing of the protease and reverse-transcriptase regions from their HIV-1 genome. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequenced regions revealed that all samples were CRF35_AD. Transmitted resistance mutations were interpreted as surveillance drug-resistant mutations (SDRMs) based on the world health organization (WHO) algorithm. The frequency of SDRMs to any class of antiretroviral drugs was 15%, which included mutations to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, 10%), with M41L and M184V as the most common (5%), and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs, 5%), with K103N as the only detected mutation (5%). Although not in the WHO SDRMs list, several minor protease inhibitor resistant mutations listed in the International Antiviral Society-USA panel were identified, of which M36I, H69K, L89M/V/I (each one 100%) and K20R/T (92.5%) can be considered as polymorphic signatures for CRF35_AD.The relatively high rate of TDR mutations in our study raises concerns about the risk of treatment failure in chronically infected IDUs of Sanandaj city. These results suggest that routine resistance testing should be considered before the therapy initiation in this area. Additional surveillance studies are required to generalize this deduction to other cities of Iran. PMID:25962088

  16. Temporary Threshold Shifts in Naïve and Experienced Belugas: Can Dampening of the Effects of Fatiguing Sounds Be Learned?

    PubMed

    Popov, Vladimir; Supin, Alexander; Nechaev, Dmitry; Sysueva, Evgenia; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav

    2016-01-01

    In belugas (Delphinapterus leucas), substantial (10-15 dB) differences in temporary threshold shifts (TTSs) were observed between the first and subsequent experimental sessions in the same subjects. In the first session (naïve subject state), the TTSs produced by exposure to fatiguing noises were larger than the TTSs produced in subsequent sessions (experienced subject state). After one to two sessions, the TTSs stabilized. The baseline hearing thresholds did not differ between the naïve and experienced states. One possible explanation for this effect is that the animals learned to dampen their hearing during exposure to fatiguing noises and thus mitigate the impact of those noises. PMID:26611042

  17. Maraviroc Clinical Test (MCT) as an alternative tool to decide CCR5-antagonists prescription in naïve HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Genebat, Miguel; de Pablo-Bernal, Rebeca S; Pulido, Ildefonso; Jiménez-Mejías, Manuel E; Martínez, Onofre; Pacheco, Yolanda M; Raffi-El-Idrissi Benhia, Mohammed; Abad, María Antonia; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel; Leal, Manuel

    2015-09-01

    Our aim was to analyze the virological response to a combined antiretroviral therapy started after Maraviroc Clinical Test (MCT) in naïve HIV-infected patients. Forty-one patients were exposed to MCT, based on an 8-day MVC monotherapy. If undetectability or a viral load reduction >1 log10 HIV-RNA copies/ml was achieved, a MVC-containing cART was prescribed. Forty patients showed a positive MCT; undetectability after 48weeks on cART was achieved in 34/41 (82.9%) patients. The result of MCT was compared with a genotypic tropism method and with Trofile®, showing 10.7% and 18.75% discordance rates, respectively. MCT is a reliable tool to decide CCR5-antagonists prescription, also in the naïve scenario where most patients show a virological response to MVC independently the tropism result reported by genotypic or phenotypic methods.

  18. The TCR’s sensitivity to self-peptide–MHC dictates the ability of naïve CD8+ T cells to respond to foreign antigens

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Ross B.; Hamilton, Sara E.; Xing, Yan; Best, J. Adam; Goldrath, Ananda W.; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Jameson, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    The strength of self-peptide–major histocompatibility complex (MHC) recognition dictates naïve CD8+ T cell homeostasis, but its effect on foreign antigen reactivity is controversial. As CD5 expression correlates with self-recognition, we studied CD5lo and CD5hi naïve CD8+ T cells. Gene expression characteristics suggested CD5hi cells were better poised for reactivity and differentiation compared to the CD5lo population, and we found that the CD5hi pool exhibited more efficient clonal recruitment and expansion, as well as enhanced reactivity to inflammatory cues, during recognition of foreign antigen. Yet foreign peptide–MHC recognition was similar for both subsets. Thus, CD8+ T cells with higher self-reactivity dominate the immune response against foreign antigens, with implications for T cell repertoire diversity and autoimmunity. PMID:25419629

  19. Encoding and recall of finger sequences in experienced pianists compared with musically naïve controls: a combined behavioral and functional imaging study.

    PubMed

    Pau, S; Jahn, G; Sakreida, K; Domin, M; Lotze, M

    2013-01-01

    Long-term intensive sensorimotor training alters functional representation of the motor and sensory system and might even result in structural changes. However, there is not much knowledge about how previous training impacts learning transfer and functional representation. We tested 14 amateur pianists and 15 musically naïve participants in a short-term finger sequence training procedure, differing considerably from piano playing and measured associated functional representation with functional magnetic resonance imaging. The conditions consisted of encoding a finger sequence indicated by hand symbols ("sequence encoding") and subsequently replaying the sequence from memory, both with and without auditory feedback ("sequence retrieval"). Piano players activated motor areas and the mirror neuron system more strongly than musically naïve participants during encoding. When retrieving the sequence, musically naïve participants showed higher activation in similar brain areas. Thus, retrieval activations of naïve participants were comparable to encoding activations of piano players, who during retrieval performed the sequences more accurately despite lower motor activations. Interestingly, both groups showed primary auditory activation even during sequence retrieval without auditory feedback, supporting previous reports about coactivation of the auditory cortex after learned association with motor performance. When playing with auditory feedback, only pianists lateralized to the left auditory cortex. During encoding activation in left primary somatosensory cortex in the height of the finger representations had a predictive value for increased motor performance later on (error rates). Contrarily, decreased performance was associated with increased visual cortex activation during encoding. Our study extends previous reports about training transfer of motor knowledge resulting in superior training effects in musicians. Performance increase went along with activity in

  20. Long-lasting stem cell-like memory CD8+ T cells with a naïve-like profile upon yellow fever vaccination.

    PubMed

    Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A; Soneson, Charlotte; Cagnon, Laurène; Gannon, Philippe O; Allard, Mathilde; Abed Maillard, Samia; Montandon, Nicole; Rufer, Nathalie; Waldvogel, Sophie; Delorenzi, Mauro; Speiser, Daniel E

    2015-04-01

    Efficient and persisting immune memory is essential for long-term protection from infectious and malignant diseases. The yellow fever (YF) vaccine is a live attenuated virus that mediates lifelong protection, with recent studies showing that the CD8(+) T cell response is particularly robust. Yet, limited data exist regarding the long-term CD8(+) T cell response, with no studies beyond 5 years after vaccination. We investigated 41 vaccinees, spanning 0.27 to 35 years after vaccination. YF-specific CD8(+) T cells were readily detected in almost all donors (38 of 41), with frequencies decreasing with time. As previously described, effector cells dominated the response early after vaccination. We detected a population of naïve-like YF-specific CD8(+) T cells that was stably maintained for more than 25 years and was capable of self-renewal ex vivo. In-depth analyses of markers and genome-wide mRNA profiling showed that naïve-like YF-specific CD8(+) T cells in vaccinees (i) were distinct from genuine naïve cells in unvaccinated donors, (ii) resembled the recently described stem cell-like memory subset (Tscm), and (iii) among all differentiated subsets, had profiles closest to naïve cells. Our findings reveal that CD8(+) Tscm are efficiently induced by a vaccine in humans, persist for decades, and preserve a naïveness-like profile. These data support YF vaccination as an optimal mechanistic model for the study of long-lasting memory CD8(+) T cells in humans.

  1. Comparison of the clinical outcomes between antiviral-naïve patients treated with entecavir and lamivudine-resistant patients receiving adefovir add-on lamivudine combination treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Joo; Park, Soo Kyung; Yang, Hyo Joon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Il; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Choi, Kyu Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To analyze the effects of preexisting lamivudine (LAM) resistance and applying antiviral treatment (adefovir [ADV] add-on LAM combination treatment) on long-term treatment outcomes, and comparing the clinical outcomes of antiviral-naïve chronic hepatitis B patients receiving entecavir (ETV) monotherapy. Methods This study enrolled 73 antiviral-naïve patients who received 0.5-mg ETV as an initial therapy and 54 patients who received ADV add-on LAM combination treatment as a rescue therapy from July 2006 to July 2010. Results During 24-month treatments, the decreases in serum log10HBV-DNA values (copies/mL) were significantly greater in the antiviral-naïve patients treated with ETV than the patients receiving ADV add-on LAM combination treatment. The biochemical response rates for alanine aminotransferase normalization at 6 months (ETV) and 12 months (ADV add-on LAM) were 90.4% (66/73) and 77.8% (42/54), respectively (P=0.048). A Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that the rates of serologic response, viral breakthrough, and emergence of genotypic resistance did not differ significantly between the two patient groups. There were also no significant intergroup differences in the rates of disease progression (PD) and new development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Conclusion The long-term clinical outcomes of antiviral-naïve patients treated with ETV and LAM-resistant patients receiving ADV add-on LAM combination treatment were comparable in terms of the emergence of HCC and disease progression. PMID:27729626

  2. Two doses of candidate TB vaccine MVA85A in antiretroviral therapy (ART) naïve subjects gives comparable immunogenicity to one dose in ART+ subjects.

    PubMed

    Dieye, Tandakha N; Ndiaye, Birahim P; Dieng, Alle B; Fall, Marema; Brittain, Nathaniel; Britain, Nathaniel; Vermaak, Samantha; Camara, Makhtar; Diop-Ndiaye, Halimatou; Ngom-Gueye, Ndeye Fatou; Diaw, Papa A; Toure-Kane, Coumba; Sow, Papa S; Mboup, Souleymane; McShane, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global public health problem exacerbated by the HIV epidemic. Here we evaluate a candidate TB vaccine, MVA85A, in a Phase I study in HIV-infected adults in Senegal. 24 patients were enrolled: Group 1∶12, antiretroviral therapy (ART) naïve, adults, with CD4 counts >300 and HIV RNA load <100,000 copies/ml. Group 2∶12 adults, stable on ART, with CD4 counts >300, and an undetectable HIV RNA load. Safety was evaluated by occurrence of local and systemic adverse events (AEs) and by monitoring of CD4 count, HIV RNA load, haematology and biochemistry. Immunogenicity was evaluated by ex-vivo interferon-gamma ELISpot assay. 87.7% of AEs were mild; 11.6% were moderate; and 0.7% were severe. 29.2% of AEs were systemic; 70.8% were expected local AEs. There were no vaccine-related Serious Adverse Events (SAEs) or clinically significant effects on HIV RNA load or CD4 count. In ART naive subjects, the first MVA85A immunisation induced a significant immune response at 1 and 4 weeks post-immunisation, which contracted to baseline by 12 weeks. Durability of immunogenicity in subjects on ART persisted out to 24 weeks post-vaccination. A second dose of MVA85A at 12 months enhanced immunogenicity in ART naïve subjects. Subjects on ART had higher responses after the first vaccination compared with ART naïve subjects; responses were comparable after 2 immunisations. In conclusion, MVA85A is well-tolerated and immunogenic in HIV-infected subjects in Senegal. A two dose regimen in ART naïve subjects is comparable in immunogenicity to a single dose in subjects on ART. Clinicaltrials.gov trial identifier NCT00731471.

  3. Distinct Kinetics of Effector CD8+ Cytotoxic T Cells after Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi in Naïve or Vaccinated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tzelepis, Fanny; de Alencar, Bruna C. G.; Penido, Marcus L. O.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Persechini, Pedro M.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of effector CD8+-T-cell responses to specific Trypanosoma cruzi epitopes was investigated after challenge. Our results suggest that the delayed kinetics differs from that observed in other microbial infections and facilitates the establishment of the disease in naïve mice. In contrast, in vaccinated mice, the swift CD8+-T-cell response helps host survival after challenge. PMID:16552083

  4. VE-Cadherin Cleavage by LasB Protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Facilitates Type III Secretion System Toxicity in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Golovkine, Guillaume; Faudry, Eric; Bouillot, Stéphanie; Voulhoux, Romé; Attrée, Ina; Huber, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Infection of the vascular system by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) occurs during bacterial dissemination in the body or in blood-borne infections. Type 3 secretion system (T3SS) toxins from Pa induce a massive retraction when injected into endothelial cells. Here, we addressed the role of type 2 secretion system (T2SS) effectors in this process. Mutants with an inactive T2SS were much less effective than wild-type strains at inducing cell retraction. Furthermore, secretomes from wild-typeswere sufficient to trigger cell-cell junction opening when applied to cells, while T2SS-inactivated mutants had minimal activity. Intoxication was associated with decreased levels of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, a homophilic adhesive protein located at endothelial cell-cell junctions. During the process, the protein was cleaved in the middle of its extracellular domain (positions 335 and 349). VE-cadherin attrition was T3SS-independent but T2SS-dependent. Interestingly, the epithelial (E)-cadherin was unaffected by T2SS effectors, indicating that this mechanism is specific to endothelial cells. We showed that one of the T2SS effectors, the protease LasB, directly affected VE-cadherin proteolysis, hence promoting cell-cell junction disruption. Furthermore, mouse infection with Pa to induce acute pneumonia lead to significant decreases in lung VE-cadherin levels, whereas the decrease was minimal with T2SS-inactivated or LasB-deleted mutant strains. We conclude that the T2SS plays a pivotal role during Pa infection of the vascular system by breaching the endothelial barrier, and propose a model in which the T2SS and the T3SS cooperate to intoxicate endothelial cells. PMID:24626230

  5. Heightened self-reactivity associated with selective survival, but not expansion, of naïve virus-specific CD8+ T cells in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kylie M.; Zaloumis, Sophie G.; Cukalac, Tania; Kan, Wan-Ting; Sng, Xavier Y. X.; Mirams, Michiko; Watson, Katherine A.; Doherty, Peter C.; Thomas, Paul G.; Handel, Andreas; La Gruta, Nicole L.

    2016-01-01

    In advanced age, decreased CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses to novel pathogens and cancer is paralleled by a decline in the number and function of naïve CTL precursors (CTLp). Although the age-related fall in CD8+ T-cell numbers is well established, neither the underlying mechanisms nor the extent of variation for different epitope specificities have been defined. Furthermore, naïve CD8+ T cells expressing high levels of CD44 accumulate with age, but it is unknown whether this accumulation reflects their preferential survival or an age-dependent driver of CD8+ T-cell proliferation. Here, we track the number and phenotype of four influenza A virus (IAV)-specific CTLp populations in naïve C57BL/6 (B6) mice during aging, and compare T-cell receptor (TCR) clonal diversity for the CD44hi and CD44lo subsets of one such population. We show differential onset of decline for several IAV-specific CD8+ T-cell populations with advanced age that parallel age-associated changes in the B6 immunodominance hierarchy, suggestive of distinct impacts of aging on different epitope-specific populations. Despite finding no evidence of clonal expansions in an aged, epitope-specific TCR repertoire, nonrandom alterations in TCR usage were observed, along with elevated CD5 and CD8 coreceptor expression. Collectively, these data demonstrate that naïve CD8+ T cells expressing markers of heightened self-recognition are selectively retained, but not clonally expanded, during aging. PMID:26787864

  6. Systemizers Are Better Code-Breakers: Self-Reported Systemizing Predicts Code-Breaking Performance in Expert Hackers and Naïve Participants.

    PubMed

    Harvey, India; Bolgan, Samuela; Mosca, Daniel; McLean, Colin; Rusconi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Studies on hacking have typically focused on motivational aspects and general personality traits of the individuals who engage in hacking; little systematic research has been conducted on predispositions that may be associated not only with the choice to pursue a hacking career but also with performance in either naïve or expert populations. Here, we test the hypotheses that two traits that are typically enhanced in autism spectrum disorders-attention to detail and systemizing-may be positively related to both the choice of pursuing a career in information security and skilled performance in a prototypical hacking task (i.e., crypto-analysis or code-breaking). A group of naïve participants and of ethical hackers completed the Autism Spectrum Quotient, including an attention to detail scale, and the Systemizing Quotient (Baron-Cohen et al., 2001, 2003). They were also tested with behavioral tasks involving code-breaking and a control task involving security X-ray image interpretation. Hackers reported significantly higher systemizing and attention to detail than non-hackers. We found a positive relation between self-reported systemizing (but not attention to detail) and code-breaking skills in both hackers and non-hackers, whereas attention to detail (but not systemizing) was related with performance in the X-ray screening task in both groups, as previously reported with naïve participants (Rusconi et al., 2015). We discuss the theoretical and translational implications of our findings. PMID:27242491

  7. Systemizers Are Better Code-Breakers: Self-Reported Systemizing Predicts Code-Breaking Performance in Expert Hackers and Naïve Participants

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, India; Bolgan, Samuela; Mosca, Daniel; McLean, Colin; Rusconi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Studies on hacking have typically focused on motivational aspects and general personality traits of the individuals who engage in hacking; little systematic research has been conducted on predispositions that may be associated not only with the choice to pursue a hacking career but also with performance in either naïve or expert populations. Here, we test the hypotheses that two traits that are typically enhanced in autism spectrum disorders—attention to detail and systemizing—may be positively related to both the choice of pursuing a career in information security and skilled performance in a prototypical hacking task (i.e., crypto-analysis or code-breaking). A group of naïve participants and of ethical hackers completed the Autism Spectrum Quotient, including an attention to detail scale, and the Systemizing Quotient (Baron-Cohen et al., 2001, 2003). They were also tested with behavioral tasks involving code-breaking and a control task involving security X-ray image interpretation. Hackers reported significantly higher systemizing and attention to detail than non-hackers. We found a positive relation between self-reported systemizing (but not attention to detail) and code-breaking skills in both hackers and non-hackers, whereas attention to detail (but not systemizing) was related with performance in the X-ray screening task in both groups, as previously reported with naïve participants (Rusconi et al., 2015). We discuss the theoretical and translational implications of our findings. PMID:27242491

  8. microRNA-276a Functions in Ellipsoid Body and Mushroom Body Neurons for Naïve and Conditioned Olfactory Avoidance in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanhe; Cressy, Michael; Qin, Hongtao; Fulga, Tudor; Van Vactor, David; Dubnau, Josh

    2013-01-01

    microRNA-mediated gene regulation plays a key role in brain development and function. But there are few cases in which the roles of individual miRNAs have been elucidated in behaving animals. We report a miR-276a::DopR regulatory module in Drosophila that functions in distinct circuits for naïve odor responses and conditioned odor memory. Drosophila olfactory aversive memory involves convergence of the odors (conditioned stimulus, CS) and the electric shock (unconditioned stimulus, US) in mushroom body (MB) neurons. Dopamine receptor, DopR, mediates the US inputs onto MB. Distinct dopaminergic neurons also innervate ellipsoid body (EB), where DopR function modulates arousal to external stimuli. We demonstrate that miR-276a is required in MB neurons for memory formation and in EB for naïve responses to odors. Both roles of miR-276a are mediated by tuning DopR expression. The dual role of this miR-276a::DopR genetic module in these two neural circuits highlights the importance of miRNA-mediated gene regulation within distinct circuits underlying both naïve behavioral responses and memory. PMID:23536094

  9. Elevated impulsivity and impaired decision-making in abstinent Ecstasy (MDMA) users compared to polydrug and drug-naïve controls.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Michael John; Impallomeni, Lara Chiara; Pirona, Alessandro; Rogers, Robert David

    2006-07-01

    Ecstasy (MDMA; 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) has a well-recognized neurotoxic effect on central serotonergic (5-HT) systems in animals, and there is some evidence of persistent serotonergic dysregulation in human ecstasy users. Serotonin is believed to mediate impulsive behavior and effective decision-making. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate impulsive behavior and decision-making in abstinent regular ecstasy users. Three groups were compared: 'ecstasy users' (recreational ecstasy users who reported modest use of illicit drugs other than cannabis), 'polydrug controls' (ecstasy naïve illicit drug users), and 'drug-naïve controls'. All participants completed personal details and general drug history questionnaires, the National Adult Reading Test, Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFF20), a risky decision-making task (RDMT), and the Card Arranging Reward Responsivity Objective Test (CARROT). The groups did not differ on the CARROT measure of responsiveness to financial incentive; however, the ecstasy group displayed significantly elevated MFF20 impulsivity, and showed reduced discrimination between magnitudes of prospective gains and losses when making risky decisions, compared to the 'polydrug' and 'drug-naïve' control groups. These findings may reflect a vulnerability of 5-HT systems in the orbital prefrontal cortex and interconnected corticolimbic circuitry to the cumulative neurotoxic effects of ecstasy and have clinical significance for regular ecstasy users. The combination of elevated impulsivity and impaired use of reinforcement cues in uncertain decision-making may comprise risk factors for continued drug abuse and everyday functioning. PMID:16292322

  10. Prolonged exposure of naïve CD8+ T cells to interleukin-7 or interleukin-15 stimulates proliferation without differentiation or loss of telomere length

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Diana L; Bérard, Marion; Soares, Maria V D; Oldham, Janine; Cook, Joanne E; Akbar, Arne N; Tough, David F; Beverley, Peter C L

    2006-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-7 and IL-15 are cytokines implicated in homeostatic control of the peripheral CD8 T-cell pool. We compared the effects of IL-7 and IL-15 on survival and proliferation of purified human CD8+ T-cell subsets. Low concentrations of either cytokine reduced the spontaneous apoptosis of all subsets, and enhancement of survival corresponded to the extent of Bcl-2 up-regulation. Surprisingly, although minimal proliferation of naïve CD8+ T cells was observed during the first week of culture with cytokines, a marked expansion of these cells occurred at later time points, particularly in response to IL-15. This occurred largely without phenotypic change or acquisition of effector function, indicating a dissociation of differentiation from proliferation. Notably, progression of naïve CD8+ T cells through several cell divisions resulted in up-regulation of telomerase and the maintenance of telomere length. These data show that IL-7 and IL-15 induce cell proliferation and rescue from apoptosis in a concentration, time and subset-dependent manner, and have implications for the homeostatic expansion of the naïve CD8+ T-cell pool. PMID:17005004

  11. CMV-Specific T-cells Generated From Naïve T-cells Recognize Atypical Epitopes And May Be Protective in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Patrick J.; Melenhorst, Jan J.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Scheinberg, Phillip; Blaney, James W.; Demmler-Harrison, Gail; Cruz, C. Russell; Lam, Sharon; Krance, Robert A.; Leung, Kathryn S.; Martinez, Caridad A.; Liu, Hao; Heslop, Helen E.; Rooney, Cliona M.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Barrett, A. John; Rodgers, John R.; Bollard, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of adult-seropositive, cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific T-cells can effectively restore antiviral immunity after transplantation. Lack of CMV-specific memory T-cells in blood from CMV-seronegative adult and cord blood (CB) donors restricts the availability of donor-derived virus-specific T-cells for immunoprophylaxis. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of naïve-donor-derived CMV-specific T-cell therapy for transplant recipients. Primed naïve T-cells recognized only atypical epitopes and with a similar avidity to CMV-seropositive-derived T-cells recognizing typical epitopes, but T-cells from CMV-seropositive donors recognizing atypical epitopes had a lower avidity suggesting the loss of high-avidity T-cells over time. Clonotypic analysis revealed T-cells recognizing atypical CMVpp65 epitopes in the peripheral blood of recipients of CB grafts who did not develop CMV. T-cell receptors from atypical epitopes were most common in unmanipulated CB units explaining why these T-cells expanded. When infused to recipients, naïve donor-derived virus specific T-cells that recognized atypical epitopes were associated with prolonged periods of CMV-free survival and complete remission. PMID:25925682

  12. Systemizers Are Better Code-Breakers: Self-Reported Systemizing Predicts Code-Breaking Performance in Expert Hackers and Naïve Participants.

    PubMed

    Harvey, India; Bolgan, Samuela; Mosca, Daniel; McLean, Colin; Rusconi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Studies on hacking have typically focused on motivational aspects and general personality traits of the individuals who engage in hacking; little systematic research has been conducted on predispositions that may be associated not only with the choice to pursue a hacking career but also with performance in either naïve or expert populations. Here, we test the hypotheses that two traits that are typically enhanced in autism spectrum disorders-attention to detail and systemizing-may be positively related to both the choice of pursuing a career in information security and skilled performance in a prototypical hacking task (i.e., crypto-analysis or code-breaking). A group of naïve participants and of ethical hackers completed the Autism Spectrum Quotient, including an attention to detail scale, and the Systemizing Quotient (Baron-Cohen et al., 2001, 2003). They were also tested with behavioral tasks involving code-breaking and a control task involving security X-ray image interpretation. Hackers reported significantly higher systemizing and attention to detail than non-hackers. We found a positive relation between self-reported systemizing (but not attention to detail) and code-breaking skills in both hackers and non-hackers, whereas attention to detail (but not systemizing) was related with performance in the X-ray screening task in both groups, as previously reported with naïve participants (Rusconi et al., 2015). We discuss the theoretical and translational implications of our findings.

  13. Prolonged exposure of naïve CD8+ T cells to interleukin-7 or interleukin-15 stimulates proliferation without differentiation or loss of telomere length.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Diana L; Bérard, Marion; Soares, Maria V D; Oldham, Janine; Cook, Joanne E; Akbar, Arne N; Tough, David F; Beverley, Peter C L

    2006-10-01

    Interleukin (IL)-7 and IL-15 are cytokines implicated in homeostatic control of the peripheral CD8 T-cell pool. We compared the effects of IL-7 and IL-15 on survival and proliferation of purified human CD8+ T-cell subsets. Low concentrations of either cytokine reduced the spontaneous apoptosis of all subsets, and enhancement of survival corresponded to the extent of Bcl-2 up-regulation. Surprisingly, although minimal proliferation of naïve CD8+ T cells was observed during the first week of culture with cytokines, a marked expansion of these cells occurred at later time points, particularly in response to IL-15. This occurred largely without phenotypic change or acquisition of effector function, indicating a dissociation of differentiation from proliferation. Notably, progression of naïve CD8+ T cells through several cell divisions resulted in up-regulation of telomerase and the maintenance of telomere length. These data show that IL-7 and IL-15 induce cell proliferation and rescue from apoptosis in a concentration, time and subset-dependent manner, and have implications for the homeostatic expansion of the naïve CD8+ T-cell pool. PMID:17005004

  14. Specific Antibody Production by Blood B Cells is Retained in Late Stage Drug-naïve HIV-infected Africans

    PubMed Central

    Béniguel, Lydie; Bégaud, Evelyne; Cognasse, Fabrice; Gabrié, Philippe; Mbolidi, Christophe D.; Marovich, Mary A.; Cazorla, Céline; Lucht, Frédéric; Genin, Christian; Garraud, Olivier

    2004-01-01

    Unseparated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from drug-naïve African individuals living in a context of multi-infections and presenting with high viral load (VL), were cultured in vitro and tested for their ability to produce antibodies (Abs) reacting with HIV-1 antigens. Within these PBMCs, circulating B cells were differentiated in vitro and produced IgG Abs against not only ENV, but also GAG and POL proteins. Under similar experimental conditions, HAART treated patients produced Abs to ENV proteins only. The in vitro antibody production by drug-naïve individuals' PBMCs depended on exogenous cytokines (IL-2 and IL-10) but neither on the re-stimulation of reactive cells in cultures by purified HIV-1-gp 160 antigen nor on the re-engagement of CD40 surface molecules. Further, it was not abrogated by the addition of various monoclonal Abs (mAbs) to co-stimulatory molecules. This suggests that the in vitro antibody production by drug-naïve individuals' PBMCs resulted from the maturation of already envelope and core antigen-primed, differentiated B cells, presumably pre-plasma cells, which are not known to circulate at homeostasy. As in vitro produced Abs retained the capacity of binding antigen and forming complexes, this study provides pre-clinical support for functional humoral responses despite major HIV- and other tropical pathogen-induced B cell perturbations. PMID:15330447

  15. Naïve CD8+ T cell derived tumor-specific cytotoxic effectors as a potential remedy for overcoming TGF-β immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hong Hanh; Kim, Therasa; Song, Sang Yun; Park, Somang; Cho, Hyang Hee; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Je-Jung; Kim, Hee-Ok; Cho, Jae-Ho; Yang, Deok-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Despite of the potential implications for cancer immunotherapy, conventional approaches using in vitro expanded CD8+ T cells have suboptimal outcomes, mostly due to loss of functionality from cellular exhaustion. We therefore investigated the phenotypic and functional differences among in vitro activated CD8+ T cells of three different sources, namely naïve (NTeff), memory (MTeff) and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILeff) from human and mice, to better understand mechanisms behind potent effector functions and potential for overcoming current limitations. In line with the greater proliferation activity and longer telomere lengths of NTeff populations, cells of naïve origin exhibited significantly less amounts of T cell exhaustion markers than those of MTeff and TILeff, and moreover, acquired distinct expression patterns of memory-promoting transcription factors, T-bet and Eomes, induced in a rapid and sustainable manner. NTeff cells appeared to have lower expression of Foxp1 and were refractory to apoptosis upon TGF-β conditioning, implying better survival potential and resistance to tumor-induced immune suppression. Of CD8+ T cell pools activated to tumor-specific CTLs, naïve cell generated effectors possessed the most potent cytotoxic activity, validating implications for use in rational design of adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27306834

  16. Dissociated large-scale functional connectivity networks of the precuneus in medication-naïve first-episode depression.

    PubMed

    Peng, Daihui; Liddle, Elizabeth B; Iwabuchi, Sarina J; Zhang, Chen; Wu, Zhiguo; Liu, Jun; Jiang, Kaida; Xu, Lin; Liddle, Peter F; Palaniyappan, Lena; Fang, Yiru

    2015-06-30

    An imbalance in neural activity within large-scale networks appears to be an important pathophysiological aspect of depression. Yet, there is little consensus regarding the abnormality within the default mode network (DMN) in major depressive disorder (MDD). In the present study, 16 first-episode, medication-naïve patients with MDD and 16 matched healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at rest. With the precuneus (a central node of the DMN) as a seed region, functional connectivity (FC) was measured across the entire brain. The association between the FC of the precuneus and overall symptom severity was assessed using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Patients with MDD exhibited a more negative relationship between the precuneus and the non-DMN regions, including the sensory processing regions (fusiform gyrus, postcentral gyrus) and the secondary motor cortex (supplementary motor area and precentral gyrus). Moreover, greater severity of depression was associated with greater anti-correlation between the precuneus and the temporo-parietal junction as well as stronger positive connectivity between the precuneus and the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. These results indicate that dissociated large-scale networks of the precuneus may contribute to the clinical expression of depression in MDD. PMID:25957017

  17. The structure of the Venus neutral atmosphere from the Radio Science Experiment VeRa on Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellmann, Silvia; Bird, Mike; Verweyen, Alice; Haeusler, Bernd; Paetzold, Martin; Tyler, G. L.

    The Venus Express Radio Science Experiment VeRa uses one-way radio signals at X-band and S-band for the sounding of the Venus neutral atmosphere and ionosphere. An Ultrastable Oscillator (USO) provides a high quality onboard frequency reference source for this one-way radio link. Simultaneous, coherent measurements at two wavelengths allow separation of dispersive media effects from the classical Doppler shift. Electron density profiles of the ionosphere and profiles of pressure, temperature and neutral number density of the neutral atmosphere can be derived via an Abel transform with an altitude resolution of only a few hundred metres in the altitude range between about 40 and 100 km. Three occultation seasons could be covered during the nominal mission of Venus Express resulting in a data set of about 140 profiles of the neutral atmosphere. Another three occultation seasons are planned during the extended mission. The polar orbit of Venus Express provides the opportunity to study the atmosphere at all planetocentric latitudes under varying illumination conditions. Day-night and latitudinal variations of the thermal structure, the high variability of the atmosphere above the troposphere and signal absorption effects caused by the H2SO4 vapour can be investigated with the resulting data set.

  18. The Structure of the Venus Neutral Atmosphere from the Radio Science Experiment VeRa on Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellmann, S.; Häusler, B.; Pätzold, M.; Bird, M.; Tyler, G. L.

    2007-08-01

    The Venus Express Radio Science Experiment VeRa uses one-way radio signals at X-band and S-band for the sounding of the Venus neutral atmosphere and ionosphere. An Ultrastable Oscillator (USO) provides a high quality onboard frequency reference source for this dual-frequency one-way radio link. Simultaneous, coherent measurements at two wavelengths allow separation of dispersive media effects from the classical Doppler shift. Electron density profiles of the ionosphere and profiles of pressure, temperature and neutral number density of the neutral atmosphere can be derived via an Abel transform with an altitude resolution of only a few hundred metres from the cloud deck to ~ 100 km. Two occultation seasons took place in the first year of observation. A total number of 42 profiles occultation experiments were conducted. The polar orbit of Venus Express provides the opportunity to study the atmosphere at all planetocentric latitudes under varying illumination conditions. Special attention will be given to day-night variations of the atmospheric structure and the temperature distribution at high polar latitudes on both hemispheres ("cold collar region") and signal absorption effects caused by the H2SO4 vapour.

  19. The Structure of the Venus Neutral Atmosphere from the Radio Science Experiment VeRa on Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellmann, S. A.; Häusler, B.; Pätzold, M.; Bird, M. K.; Tyler, G. L.

    2007-12-01

    The Venus Express Radio Science Experiment VeRa is sounding the Venus neutral atmosphere and ionosphere using the spacecraft radio subsystem in the oneway radio link mode. An Ultrastable Oscillator (USO) provides a high quality onboard frequency reference source for the derivation of electron density profiles in the ionosphere and profiles of pressure, temperature and neutral number density of the neutral atmosphere. The measurement configuration allows an altitude resolution of only a few hundred metres from the cloud deck at about 40 km to approximately 100 km. Three occultation seasons could be covered in the first two years of the Venus Express mission resulting in a data set of about 140 profiles of the neutral atmosphere. The polar orbit of Venus Express provides the opportunity to study the atmosphere at all planetocentric latitudes under varying illumination conditions. Special attention will be given to day-night variations of the thermal structure and the temperature distribution at high polar latitudes on both hemispheres ("cold collar region") and signal absorption effects caused by the H2SO4 vapour.

  20. Pressure Distribution over a Wing and Tail Rib of a VE-7 and of a TS Airplane in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, J W , Jr

    1928-01-01

    This investigation was made to determine the pressure distribution over a rib of the wing and over a rib of the horizontal tail surface of an airplane in flight and to obtain information as to the time correlation of the loads occurring on these ribs. Two airplanes, VE-7 and TS, were selected in order to obtain the information for a thin and a thick wing section. In each case the pressure distribution was recorded for the full range of angle of attack in level flight and throughout violent maneuvers. The results show: (a) that the present rib load specifications in use by the Army Air Corps and the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, are in fair agreement with the loads actually occurring in flight, but could be slightly improved; (b) that there appears to be no definite sequence in which wing and tail surface ribs reach their respective maximum loads in different maneuvers; (c) that in accelerated flight, at air speeds less than or equal to 60 per cent of the maximum speed, the accelerations measured agree very closely with the theoretically possible maximum accelerations. In maneuvers at higher air speeds the observed accelerations were smaller than those theoretically possible. (author)

  1. Assessing sandy beach macrofaunal patterns along large-scale environmental gradients: A Fuzzy Naïve Bayes approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzeda, Fabio; Zangrilli, Maria Paola; Defeo, Omar

    2016-06-01

    A Fuzzy Naïve Bayes (FNB) classifier was developed to assess large-scale variations in abundance, species richness and diversity of the macrofauna inhabiting fifteen Uruguayan sandy beaches affected by the effects of beach morphodynamics and the estuarine gradient generated by Rio de la Plata. Information from six beaches was used to estimate FNB parameters, while abiotic data of the remaining nine beaches were used to forecast abundance, species richness and diversity. FNB simulations reproduced the general increasing trend of target variables from inner estuarine reflective beaches to marine dissipative ones. The FNB model also identified a threshold value of salinity range beyond which diversity markedly increased towards marine beaches. Salinity range is suggested as an ecological master factor governing distributional patterns in sandy beach macrofauna. However, the model: 1) underestimated abundance and species richness at the innermost estuarine beach, with the lowest salinity, and 2) overestimated species richness in marine beaches with a reflective morphodynamic state, which is strongly linked to low abundance, species richness and diversity. Therefore, future modeling efforts should be refined by giving a dissimilar weigh to the gradients defined by estuarine (estuarine beaches) and morphodynamic (marine beaches) variables, which could improve predictions of target variables. Our modeling approach could be applied to a wide spectrum of issues, ranging from basic ecology to social-ecological systems. This approach seems relevant, given the current challenge to develop predictive methodologies to assess the simultaneous and nonlinear effects of anthropogenic and natural impacts in coastal ecosystems.

  2. Utilizing computerized entertainment education in the development of decision aids for lower literate and naïve computer users.

    PubMed

    Jibaja-Weiss, Maria L; Volk, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Decision aids have been developed by using various delivery methods, including interactive computer programs. Such programs, however, still rely heavily on written information, health and digital literacy, and reading ease. We describe an approach to overcome these potential barriers for low-literate, underserved populations by making design considerations for poor readers and naïve computer users and by using concepts from entertainment education to engage the user and to contextualize the content for the user. The system design goals are to make the program both didactic and entertaining and the navigation and graphical user interface as simple as possible. One entertainment education strategy, the soap opera, is linked seamlessly to interactive learning modules to enhance the content of the soap opera episodes. The edutainment decision aid model (EDAM) guides developers through the design process. Although designing patient decision aids that are educational, entertaining, and targeted toward poor readers and those with limited computer skills is a complex task, it is a promising strategy for aiding this population. Entertainment education may be a highly effective approach to promoting informed decision making for patients with low health literacy.

  3. ATAC-seq on biobanked specimens defines a unique chromatin accessibility structure in naïve SLE B cells.

    PubMed

    Scharer, Christopher D; Blalock, Emily L; Barwick, Benjamin G; Haines, Robert R; Wei, Chungwen; Sanz, Ignacio; Boss, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    Biobanking is a widespread practice for storing biological samples for future studies ranging from genotyping to RNA analysis. However, methods that probe the status of the epigenome are lacking. Here, the framework for applying the Assay for Transposase Accessible Sequencing (ATAC-seq) to biobanked specimens is described and was used to examine the accessibility landscape of naïve B cells from Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) patients undergoing disease flares. An SLE specific chromatin accessibility signature was identified. Changes in accessibility occurred at loci surrounding genes involved in B cell activation and contained motifs for transcription factors that regulate B cell activation and differentiation. These data provide evidence for an altered epigenetic programming in SLE B cells and identify loci and transcription factor networks that potentially impact disease. The ability to determine the chromatin accessibility landscape and identify cis-regulatory elements has broad application to studies using biorepositories and offers significant advantages to improve the molecular information obtained from biobanked samples. PMID:27249108

  4. Event-related potentials in drug-naïve pediatric patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Ota, Toyosaku; Nakanishi, Yoko; Matsuura, Hiroki; Okazaki, Kosuke; Kishimoto, Naoko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Iwasaka, Hidemi; Iida, Junzo; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2015-12-15

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is one of the most common mental health disorders, characterized by obsessive thoughts and/or compulsive behaviors, which may involve specific disorders in cognition and/or information processing. Event-related potentials (ERPs) are commonly used as physiological measures of cognitive function as they are easily measured and noninvasive. In the present study, 20 drug-naïve pediatric patients with OCD were compared with 20 healthy control participants who were age- and sex-matched to perform the ERP. Based on the guidelines for evoked potential measurement, the P300 and mismatch negativity (MMN) were obtained by auditory odd-ball tasks. We found that the amplitudes of the P300 components in the Fz, Cz, Pz, C3, and C4 regions were significantly smaller in the OCD group compared with the control group. There were no between-group differences in P300 latency, MMN amplitude, or MMN latency. Moreover, we found significant correlations between scores on the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) and P300 amplitudes at Cz, Pz, and C3. The present study is the first to report smaller P300s and the associations between P300 abnormalities and CY-BOCS scores.

  5. A Randomized Trial of Pharmacogenetic Warfarin Dosing in Naïve Patients with Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Fogar, Paola; Padoan, Andrea; Nante, Giovanni; Pelloso, Michela; Moz, Stefania; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Groppa, Francesca; Bozzato, Dania; Tiso, Enrico; Gnatta, Elisa; Denas, Gentian; Padayattil Jose, Seena; Padrini, Roberto; Basso, Daniela; Plebani, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Genotype-guided warfarin dosing have been proposed to improve patient’s management. This study is aimed to determine whether a CYP2C9- VKORC1- CYP4F2-based pharmacogenetic algorithm is superior to a standard, clinically adopted, pharmacodynamic method. Two-hundred naïve patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation were randomized to trial arms and 180 completed the study. No significant differences were found in the number of out-of-range INRs (INR<2.0 or >3.0) (p = 0.79) and in the mean percentage of time spent in the therapeutic range (TTR) after 19 days in the pharmacogenetic (51.9%) and in the control arm (53.2%, p = 0.71). The percentage of time spent at INR>4.0 was significantly lower in the pharmacogenetic (0.7%) than in the control arm (1.8%) (p = 0.02). Genotype-guided warfarin dosing is not superior in overall anticoagulation control when compared to accurate clinical standard of care. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01178034 PMID:26710337

  6. Abnormal expansion of naïve B lymphocytes after unrelated cord blood transplantation – a case report

    PubMed Central

    SHONO, Y; TOUBAI, T; OTA, S; IBATA, M; MASHIKO, S; HIRATE, D; MIURA, Y; UMEHARA, S; TOYOSHIMA, N; TANAKA, J; ASAKA, M; IMAMURA, M

    2006-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman underwent unrelated cord blood transplantation (U-CBT) for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)-related secondary AML. She showed impressive increases in the number of CD19+ B cells in bone marrow and CD19+27−IgD+ B cells in peripheral blood from about 1 month to 3 months after U-CBT. The serum level of IL-6 temporarily increased after transplantation, and this increase seemed to be correlated with the expansion of CD19+ B cells. Although, compared with BMT, little is known about the kinetics of hematological and immunological reconstitution in U-CBT, there was initial B-cell recovery after CBT as some described. This B cell recovery may be associated with a high number of B-cell precursors present in cord blood (CB). The phenomenon of naïve B lymphocyte expansion that we found might be associated with a high number of B-cell precursors present in CB. PMID:16999729

  7. Successful sulfonylurea treatment of an insulin-naïve neonate with diabetes mellitus due to a KCNJ11 mutation.

    PubMed

    Wambach, Jennifer A; Marshall, Bess A; Koster, Joseph C; White, Neil H; Nichols, Colin G

    2010-06-01

    Activating mutations in the K(ATP)-channel cause neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM), and patients have been safely transitioned from insulin to sulfonylureas. We report a male infant with permanent NDM (PNDM), born to a PNDM mother. Blood glucose began to rise on day of life (DOL) 2, and sulfonylurea (glyburide) therapy was initiated on DOL 5. Glucose was subsequently well controlled and normal at 3 months. A K(ATP) mutation (R201H; KCNJ11) was detected in the infant, the mother, and 6-yr-old sister with PNDM; both were also subsequently transitioned off insulin onto glyburide. To our knowledge, this is the youngest NDM patient to receive oral glyburide and, importantly, the only one deliberately initiated on sulfonylureas. Strikingly, the current dose (0.017 mg/kg/d) is below the reported therapeutic range and approximately 75-fold lower than doses required by the affected sister and mother. Pancreatic insulin disappears in an animal model of K(ATP)-induced NDM, unless glycemia is well controlled, thus, a dramatically lower glyburide requirement in the infant may reflect preserved insulin content because of early sulfonylurea intervention. Safe and effective initiation of glyburide in an insulin-naïve neonatal patient with K(ATP)-dependent PNDM argues for early detection and sulfonylurea intervention.

  8. Karhunen-Loève treatment to remove noise and facilitate data analysis in sensing, spectroscopy and other applications.

    PubMed

    Zaharov, V V; Farahi, R H; Snyder, P J; Davison, B H; Passian, A

    2014-11-21

    Resolving weak spectral variations in the dynamic response of materials that are either dominated or excited by stochastic processes remains a challenge. Responses that are thermal in origin are particularly relevant examples due to the delocalized nature of heat. Despite its inherent properties in dealing with stochastic processes, the Karhunen-Loève expansion has not been fully exploited in measurement of systems that are driven solely by random forces or can exhibit large thermally driven random fluctuations. Here, we present experimental results and analysis of the archetypes (a) the resonant excitation and transient response of an atomic force microscope probe by the ambient random fluctuations and nanoscale photothermal sample response, and (b) the photothermally scattered photons in pump-probe spectroscopy. In each case, the dynamic process is represented as an infinite series with random coefficients to obtain pertinent frequency shifts and spectral peaks and demonstrate spectral enhancement for a set of compounds including the spectrally complex biomass. The considered cases find important applications in nanoscale material characterization, biosensing, and spectral identification of biological and chemical agents. PMID:25252650

  9. Carbon assimilation and digestive toxicity in naïve grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) exposed to dietary cadmium.

    PubMed

    Seebaugh, David R; Wallace, William G; L'Amoreaux, William J; Stewart, Gillian M

    2012-03-01

    Naïve grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio were pulse-fed cadmium-contaminated meals containing carbon-14, fluorescent or near-infrared markers and analyzed for carbon assimilation efficiency, gut residence time, feces elimination rate, extracellular digestive protease activity or gut pH. Carbon assimilation efficiency (~83%), minimum gut residence time (~435 min) and proventriculus pH (~5.29 to ~6.01) were not impacted significantly by cadmium ingestion. A dose-dependent decrease in feces elimination rate (from ~14.4 to ~6.4 mm h(-1)) was observed for shrimp for 2 h following minimum gut residence time. Protease activities increased ~2.4-fold over the range of dietary cadmium exposures, however, this variation was not dose-dependent. Differential impacts of cadmium exposure on carbon and cadmium assimilation reported previously are consistent with work involving shrimp subjected to chronic field exposure. The influence of ingested cadmium on feces elimination rate may be related to pre-assimilatory impacts on packaging, intestinal transport or release of feces. Protease activities may have been influenced by pre-assimilatory interactions between available cadmium ions in gut fluid and enzyme-secreting cells of the hepatopancreatic epithelium or direct impacts on active enzymes.

  10. Influence of Perspective of Action Observation Training on Residual Limb Control in Naïve Prosthesis Usage.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Delisa T; Cusack, William F; Lawson, Regan; Hardy, Ashley; Kistenberg, Robert; Wheaton, Lewis A

    2016-01-01

    Prior work in amputees and partial limb immobilization have shown improved neural and behavioral outcomes in using their residual limb with prosthesis when undergoing observation-based training with a prosthesis-using actor compared to an intact limb. It was posited that these improvements are due to an alignment of user with the actor. It may be affected by visual angles that allow emphasis of critical joint actions which may promote behavioral changes. The purpose of this study was to examine how viewing perspective of observation-based training effects prosthesis adaptation in naïve device users. Twenty nonamputated prosthesis users learned how to use an upper extremity prosthetic device while viewing a training video from either a sagittal or coronal perspective. These views were chosen as they place visual emphasis on different aspects of task performance to the device. The authors found that perspective of actions has a significant role in adaptation of the residual limb while using upper limb prostheses. Perspectives that demonstrate elbow adaptations to prosthesis usage may enhance the functional motor outcomes of action observation therapy. This work has potential implications on how prosthetic device operation is conveyed to persons adapting to prostheses through action observation based therapy. PMID:27253208

  11. Mechanotransduction of shear stress occurs through changes in VE-cadherin and PECAM-1 tension: implications for cell migration.

    PubMed

    Conway, Daniel E; Schwartz, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has shown that cadherins at cell-cell junctions bear tensile forces. Using novel FRET-based tension sensors, we showed first that in response to shear stress, endothelial cells rapidly reduce mechanical tension on vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. Second, we observed a simultaneous increase in tension on platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1, induced by an interaction with vimentin. In this commentary, we discuss how our results fit with existing data on cadherins as important mediators of mechanotransduction, in particular, in cell migration where mechanical tension across cadherins may communicate the direction of movement. The ability of PECAM-1 to bear mechanical tension may also be important in other PECAM-1 functions, such as leukocyte transmigration through the endothelium. Additionally, our observation that vimentin expression was required for PECAM-1 tension and mechanotransduction of fluid flow suggests that intermediate filaments are capable of transmitting tension. Overall, our results argue against models where an external force is passively transferred across the cytoskeleton, and instead suggest that cells actively respond to extracellular forces by modulating tension across junctional proteins.

  12. Inferring relevant control mechanisms for Interleukin-12 signaling in naïve CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Finley, Stacey D.; Gupta, Deepti; Cheng, Ning; Klinke, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a key cytokine involved in shaping cell-mediated immunity to intracellular pathogens. IL-12 initiates a cellular response via the IL-12 signaling pathway, a member of the JAK/STAT family of signaling networks. The JAK/STAT pathway includes several regulatory elements; however, the dynamics of these mechanisms are not fully understood. Therefore, the objective of this study was to infer the relative importance of regulatory mechanisms that modulate the activation of STAT4 in naïve CD4+ T cells. Dynamic changes in protein expression and activity were measured using flow cytometry and these data were used to calibrate a mathematical model of IL-12 signaling. An empirical Bayesian approach was used to infer the relative strength of different regulatory mechanism in the system. The model predicted that IL-12 receptor expression is regulated via a dynamic, autonomous program that was independent of STAT4 activation. A time scale analysis identified the signaling events that limited the cellular response, including ligand binding and receptor degradation. In summary, a mathematical model of the canonical IL-12 signaling pathway used in conjunction with a Bayesian framework provided high confidence predictions of the system-specific control mechanisms from the available experimental observations. PMID:20479776

  13. Neural correlates of mindful self-awareness in mindfulness meditators and meditation-naïve subjects revisited.

    PubMed

    Lutz, J; Brühl, A B; Scheerer, H; Jäncke, L; Herwig, U

    2016-09-01

    Mindful self-awareness is central to mindfulness meditation and plays a key role in its salutary effects. It has been related to decreased activation in cortical midline structures (CMS) and amygdala, and increased activation in somatosensory regions. However, findings in untrained individuals are contradictory, and scarce in experienced meditators. Using fMRI, we investigated experienced mindfulness meditators (LTM, n=21, average 4652 practice-hours) and matched meditation-naïve participants (MNP, n=19) during short periods of mindful self-awareness (FEEL) and self-referential thinking (THINK). We report somatosensory activations and decreases in CMS during FEEL for both groups, but significantly stronger decreases in prefrontal CMS in LTM. LTM further showed decreases in language-related and amygdala regions, but the latter was not significantly different between groups. Overall, higher activations in amygdala and mid-line regions during FEEL were related to levels of depressiveness. Neural patterns of mindful self-awareness emerge already in MNP but more pronounced in LTM. Specifically, meditation training might reduce self-reference and verbalization during mindful awareness. We further corroborate the suggested link between mindfulness and healthy self-related functions on the neural level. Longitudinal studies need to corroborate these findings. PMID:27377788

  14. Regulation of naïve fetal T-cell migration by the chemokines Exodus-2 and Exodus-3.

    PubMed

    Christopherson, K; Brahmi, Z; Hromas, R

    1999-08-01

    We and other workers have recently isolated three novel CC chemokines termed Exodus-1/LARC/Mip-3alpha, Exodus-2/6Ckine/SLC/TCA4, and Exodus-3/Mip-3beta/CKbeta11/ELC. These chemokines share an amino terminal Asp-Cys-Cys-Leu sequence, unique among all chemokines. They also selectively regulate migration of adult T cells. Indeed, there is evidence that Exodus-2 and -3 are critical for adult T-cell adhesion to high endothelial venules in lymph nodes, a rate-limiting step for T-cell trafficking through nodal tissue. Less is known of the factors controlling migration of naïve human fetal T cells. We tested whether these chemokines could regulate chemotaxis in cord blood T-cell populations, and compared that efficacy with normal peripheral blood adult T cells. The findings indicated that naive CD45RA+ cord blood T-cell migration is stimulated by Exodus-2 and -3, and CD4+ cord blood T cells are attracted preferentially by Exodus-2 or -3 as compared with CD8+. Exodus-2 and -3 are likely to be critical in regulating the flux of naive CD4 + fetal T-cell population of secondary lymphoid tissue.

  15. Fungal infection reduces herbivore-induced plant volatiles of maize but does not affect naïve parasitoids.

    PubMed

    Rostás, Michael; Ton, Jurriaan; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte; Turlings, Ted C J

    2006-09-01

    Plants attacked by insects release volatile compounds that attract the herbivores' natural enemies. This so-called indirect defense is plastic and may be affected by an array of biotic and abiotic factors. We investigated the effect of fungal infection as a biotic stress agent on the emission of herbivore-induced volatiles and the possible consequences for the attraction of two parasitoid species. Maize seedlings that were simultaneously attacked by the fungus Setosphaeria turcica and larvae of Spodoptera littoralis emitted a blend of volatiles that was qualitatively similar to the blend emitted by maize that was damaged by only the herbivore, but there was a clear quantitative difference. When simultaneously challenged by fungus and herbivore, the maize plants emitted in total 47% less of the volatiles. Emissions of green leaf volatiles were unaffected. In a six-arm olfactometer, the parasitoids Cotesia marginiventris and Microplitis rufiventris responded equally well to odors of herbivore-damaged and fungus- and herbivore-damaged maize plants. Healthy and fungus-infected plants were not attractive. An additional experiment showed that the performance of S. littoralis caterpillars was not affected by the presence of the pathogen, nor was there an effect on larvae of M. rufiventris developing inside the caterpillars. Our results confirm previous indications that naïve wasps may respond primarily to the green leaf volatiles.

  16. Neural correlates of mindful self-awareness in mindfulness meditators and meditation-naïve subjects revisited.

    PubMed

    Lutz, J; Brühl, A B; Scheerer, H; Jäncke, L; Herwig, U

    2016-09-01

    Mindful self-awareness is central to mindfulness meditation and plays a key role in its salutary effects. It has been related to decreased activation in cortical midline structures (CMS) and amygdala, and increased activation in somatosensory regions. However, findings in untrained individuals are contradictory, and scarce in experienced meditators. Using fMRI, we investigated experienced mindfulness meditators (LTM, n=21, average 4652 practice-hours) and matched meditation-naïve participants (MNP, n=19) during short periods of mindful self-awareness (FEEL) and self-referential thinking (THINK). We report somatosensory activations and decreases in CMS during FEEL for both groups, but significantly stronger decreases in prefrontal CMS in LTM. LTM further showed decreases in language-related and amygdala regions, but the latter was not significantly different between groups. Overall, higher activations in amygdala and mid-line regions during FEEL were related to levels of depressiveness. Neural patterns of mindful self-awareness emerge already in MNP but more pronounced in LTM. Specifically, meditation training might reduce self-reference and verbalization during mindful awareness. We further corroborate the suggested link between mindfulness and healthy self-related functions on the neural level. Longitudinal studies need to corroborate these findings.

  17. Utilizing computerized entertainment education in the development of decision aids for lower literate and naïve computer users.

    PubMed

    Jibaja-Weiss, Maria L; Volk, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Decision aids have been developed by using various delivery methods, including interactive computer programs. Such programs, however, still rely heavily on written information, health and digital literacy, and reading ease. We describe an approach to overcome these potential barriers for low-literate, underserved populations by making design considerations for poor readers and naïve computer users and by using concepts from entertainment education to engage the user and to contextualize the content for the user. The system design goals are to make the program both didactic and entertaining and the navigation and graphical user interface as simple as possible. One entertainment education strategy, the soap opera, is linked seamlessly to interactive learning modules to enhance the content of the soap opera episodes. The edutainment decision aid model (EDAM) guides developers through the design process. Although designing patient decision aids that are educational, entertaining, and targeted toward poor readers and those with limited computer skills is a complex task, it is a promising strategy for aiding this population. Entertainment education may be a highly effective approach to promoting informed decision making for patients with low health literacy. PMID:17934944

  18. Persisting primitive reflexes in medication-naïve girls with attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Konicarova, Jana; Bob, Petr; Raboch, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Recent and historical findings suggest that later-developed functions during brain ontogenesis related to higher levels of cognitive and motor integration tend to replace the older, more primitive, ones, and the persistence of the older functions may be linked to specific neuropsychiatric disorders. Currently, there is growing evidence to suggest that persisting primitive reflexes may be related to developmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Preliminary data also suggest that persisting primitive reflexes may be specifically linked to attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods In the study reported here, we tested to what extent the persisting primitive asymmetric tonic neck reflex and symmetric tonic neck reflex are related to ADHD symptoms measured by Conners’ Parent Questionnaire in 35 medication-naïve girls of school age (8–11 years) with ADHD. The results were compared with those of a control group of 30 girls of the same age. Results This study showed that persisting primitive reflexes are closely linked to ADHD symptoms. Conclusion The data suggest that ADHD symptoms may be linked to more primitive neural mechanisms interfering with higher brain functions due to insufficiently developed cognitive and motor integration. PMID:24092983

  19. Continuation maintenance therapy with S-1 in chemotherapy-naïve patients with advanced squamous cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Seiichiro; Karayama, Masato; Inui, Naoki; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Kuroishi, Shigeki; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Yokomura, Koshi; Koshimizu, Naoki; Toyoshima, Mikio; Imokawa, Shiro; Asada, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Masafumi; Yamada, Takashi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-08-01

    Objectives Maintenance therapy is a standard therapeutic strategy in non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer. However, there is no consensus regarding the benefit of maintenance therapy for patients with squamous cell lung cancer. We assessed maintenance therapy with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine agent, following induction therapy with carboplatin and S-1 in patients with squamous cell lung cancer. Methods In this phase II trial, chemotherapy-naïve patients with squamous cell lung cancer were enrolled to induction therapy with four cycles of carboplatin (at an area under the curve of 5 on day 1) and S-1 (80 mg/m(2)/day on days 1-14) in a 28-day cycle. Patients who achieved disease control after induction therapy received maintenance therapy with S-1 in a 21-day cycle until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival after administration of maintenance therapy. Results Fifty-one patients were enrolled in the study. The median progression-free survival from the start of maintenance therapy was 3.0 months (95 % confidence interval, 2.5-3.5). The most common toxicities associated with maintenance therapy were anemia, thrombocytopenia, and fatigue, but they were not severe. Conclusion S-1 maintenance therapy might be a feasible treatment option in patients with squamous cell lung cancer.

  20. Reduction of Caudate Nucleus Volumes in Neuroleptic-Naïve Female Subjects with Schizotypal Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Min-Seong; Levitt, James J.; McCarley, Robert W.; Seidman, Larry J.; Dickey, Chandlee C.; Niznikiewicz, Margaret A.; Voglmaier, Martina M.; Zamani, Payman; Long, Katherine R.; Kim, Sunnie S.; Shenton, Martha E.

    2009-01-01

    Background The caudate nucleus might contribute to the psychopathological and cognitive deficits observed in schizotypal personality disorder (SPD), a schizophrenia spectrum disorder. Here we focused on female patients, because this group is underrepresented in studies of SPD and schizophrenia, and we might learn more about the caudate and clinical and cognitive impairments that are unique to female patients diagnosed with SPD. Methods Magnetic resonance imaging scans, obtained on a 1.5-T magnet with 1.5-mm contiguous slices, were used to measure the caudate in 32 neuroleptic-naïve women with SPD and in 29 female normal comparison subjects. Subjects were group-matched for age, parental socioeconomic status, and intelligence quotient. Results We found significantly reduced left and right caudate relative volume (8.3%, 7.7%) in female SPD subjects compared with normal comparison subjects. In female SPD subjects, we found significant correlations between smaller total caudate relative volume and worse performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting test (nonperseverative errors) and on the California Verbal Learning Test (verbal memory and learning), and significant correlations between smaller total caudate relative volume and both positive and negative symptoms on the Structured Interview for Schizotypy. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that, for female SPD subjects, smaller caudate volume is associated with poorer cognitive performance and more schizotypal symptomatology. PMID:16460694

  1. Viral metagenomics in drug-naïve, first-onset schizophrenia patients with prominent negative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Canuti, Marta; van Beveren, Nico J M; Jazaeri Farsani, Seyed Mohammad; de Vries, Michel; Deijs, Martin; Jebbink, Maarten F; Zaaijer, Hans L; van Schaik, Barbera D C; van Kampen, Antoine H C; van der Kuyl, Antoinette C; de Haan, Lieuwe; Storosum, Jitschak G; van der Hoek, Lia

    2015-10-30

    Although several studies suggest a virus or (endogenous) retrovirus involvement at the time of onset of schizophrenia, the unequivocal identification of one or more infectious agents, by means of an undirected catch-all technique, has never been conducted. In this study VIDISCA, a virus discovery method, was used in combination with Roche-454 high-throughput sequencing as a tool to determine the possible presence of viruses (known or unknown) in blood of first-onset drugs-naïve schizophrenic patients with prominent negative symptoms. Two viruses (the Anellovirus Torque Teno virus and GB virus C) were detected. Both viruses are commonly found in healthy individuals and no clear link with disease was ever established. Viruses from the family Anelloviridae were also identified in the control population (4.8%). Besides, one patient sample was positive for human endogenous retroviruses type K (HML-2) RNA but no specific predominant strain was detected, instead 119 different variants were found. In conclusion, these findings indicate no evidence for viral or endogenous retroviral involvement in sera at the time of onset of schizophrenia.

  2. An Automatic Multidocument Text Summarization Approach Based on Naïve Bayesian Classifier Using Timestamp Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ramanujam, Nedunchelian; Kaliappan, Manivannan

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, automatic multidocument text summarization systems can successfully retrieve the summary sentences from the input documents. But, it has many limitations such as inaccurate extraction to essential sentences, low coverage, poor coherence among the sentences, and redundancy. This paper introduces a new concept of timestamp approach with Naïve Bayesian Classification approach for multidocument text summarization. The timestamp provides the summary an ordered look, which achieves the coherent looking summary. It extracts the more relevant information from the multiple documents. Here, scoring strategy is also used to calculate the score for the words to obtain the word frequency. The higher linguistic quality is estimated in terms of readability and comprehensibility. In order to show the efficiency of the proposed method, this paper presents the comparison between the proposed methods with the existing MEAD algorithm. The timestamp procedure is also applied on the MEAD algorithm and the results are examined with the proposed method. The results show that the proposed method results in lesser time than the existing MEAD algorithm to execute the summarization process. Moreover, the proposed method results in better precision, recall, and F-score than the existing clustering with lexical chaining approach. PMID:27034971

  3. Mismatch negativity in tobacco-naïve cannabis users and its alteration with acute nicotine administration.

    PubMed

    Impey, Danielle; El-Marj, Nicole; Parks, Andrea; Choueiry, Joelle; Fisher, Derek; Knott, Verner J

    2015-09-01

    Chronic cannabis use may interact with factors, such as age of onset of cannabis use, family history, and genetic factors, to elicit schizophrenia (SZ)-like symptoms, including sensory and cognitive deficits. However, evidence of a relationship between cannabis use and cognitive impairment is confounded by concomitant use of tobacco. The objective of this study was to compare tobacco-naïve cannabis users with individuals without a history of tobacco/cannabis use on the auditory mismatch negativity (MMN) event-related potential (ERP), a neural measure of auditory deviance detection which is diminished in SZ. An exploratory arm of the study, conducted within a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled design, examined the acute effects of nicotine gum (6mg) on MMN in cannabis users. MMN was recorded in response to 5 deviant stimuli within an optimal MMN paradigm in 44 healthy, non-tobacco smoking volunteers aged 18-26. Cannabis users (n=21) started smoking cannabis prior to age 17, at least 1 joint per month. To examine the effects of chronicity, users were grouped into relatively heavy long-term (HLT; n=11) users and light short-term (LST; n=10) users. Impaired deviance detection was shown in cannabis users vs. nonusers as reflected by a smaller MMN to duration deviants. Chronicity of use was also associated with MMN alterations, as HLTs displayed a reduced duration and gap MMN vs. LSTs. Compared with placebo, nicotine treatment enhanced select MMN deviants in cannabis user subgroups. As deficits associated with early and persistent cannabis use are similar to those seen in SZ, these dose-dependant disturbances in early sensory processing with cannabis use may be one cognitive pathway which mediates an increased risk for SZ in vulnerable youth, and be influenced by concurrent cigarette smoking behavior.

  4. Gp120/CD4 blocking antibodies are frequently elicited in ART-naïve chronically HIV-1 infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Jorge; Molinos-Albert, Luis Manuel; Rodríguez de la Concepción, Maria Luisa; Marfil, Silvia; García, Elisabet; Derking, Ronald; Sanders, Rogier W; Clotet, Bonaventura; Blanco, Julià

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies with the ability to block the interaction of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 with CD4, including those overlapping the CD4 binding site (CD4bs antibodies), can protect from infection by HIV-1, and their elicitation may be an interesting goal for any vaccination strategy. To identify gp120/CD4 blocking antibodies in plasma samples from HIV-1 infected individuals we have developed a competitive flow cytometry-based functional assay. In a cohort of treatment-naïve chronically infected patients, we showed that gp120/CD4 blocking antibodies were frequently elicited (detected in 97% plasma samples) and correlated with binding to trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. However, no correlation was observed between functional CD4 binding blockade data and titer of CD4bs antibodies determined by ELISA using resurfaced gp120 proteins. Consistently, plasma samples lacking CD4bs antibodies were able to block the interaction between gp120 and its receptor, indicating that antibodies recognizing other epitopes, such as PGT126 and PG16, can also play the same role. Antibodies blocking CD4 binding increased over time and correlated positively with the capacity of plasma samples to neutralize the laboratory-adapted NL4.3 and BaL virus isolates, suggesting their potential contribution to the neutralizing workforce of plasma in vivo. Determining whether this response can be boosted to achieve broadly neutralizing antibodies may provide valuable information for the design of new strategies aimed to improve the anti-HIV-1 humoral response and to develop a successful HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:25803681

  5. Knocking on Heaven's Door: Are Novel Invaders Necessarily Facing Naïve Native Species on Islands?

    PubMed

    Gérard, Agathe; Jourdan, Hervé; Millon, Alexandre; Vidal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The impact of alien predator species on insular native biota has often been attributed to island prey naïveté (i.e. lack of, or inefficient, anti-predator behavior). Only rarely, however, has the concept of island prey naïveté been tested, and then only a posteriori (i.e. hundreds or thousands of years after alien species introduction). The presence of native or anciently introduced predators or competitors may be crucial for the recognition and development of adaptive behavior toward unknown predators or competitors of the same archetype (i.e. a set of species that occupy a similar ecological niche and show similar morphological and behavioral traits when interacting with other species). Here, we tested whether two squamates endemic to New Caledonia, a skink, Caledoniscincus austrocaledonicus, and a gecko, Bavayia septuiclavis, recognized and responded to the odor of two major invaders introduced into the Pacific islands, but not yet into New Caledonia. We chose one predator, the small Indian mongoose Herpestes javanicus and one competitor, the cane toad Rhinella marina, which belong respectively to the same archetype as the following two species already introduced into New Caledonia in the nineteenth century: the feral cat Felis catus and the golden bell frog Litoria aurea. Our experiment reveals that geckos are naïve with respect to the odors of both an unknown predator and an unknown competitor, as well as to the odors of a predator and a competitor they have lived with for centuries. In contrast, skinks seem to have lost some naïveté regarding the odor of a predator they have lived with for centuries and seem "predisposed" to avoid the odor of an unknown potential competitor. These results indicate that insular species living in contact with invasive alien species for centuries may be, although not systematically, predisposed toward developing adaptive behavior with respect to species belonging to the same archetype and introduced into their native

  6. Stellar Activity at the End of the Main Sequence: GHRS Observations of the M8 Ve Star VB 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.; Brown, Alexander; Giampapa, Mark S.; Ambruster, Carol

    1995-01-01

    We present Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph observations of the M8 Ve star VB 10 (equal to G1 752B), located very near the end of the stellar main sequence, and its dM3.5 binary companion G1 752A. These coeval stars provide a test bed for studying whether the outer atmospheres of stars respond to changes in internal structure as stars become fully convective near mass 0.3 solar mass (about spectral type M5), where the nature of the stellar magnetic dynamo presumably changes, and near the transition from red to brown dwarfs near mass 0.08 solar mass (about spectral type M9), when hydrogen burning ceases at the end of the main sequence. We obtain upper limits for the quiescent emission of VB 10 but observe a transition region spectrum during a large flare, which indicates that some type of magnetic dynamo must be present. Two indirect lines of evidence-scaling from the observed X-ray emission and scaling from a time-resolved flare on AD Leo suggest that the fraction of the stellar bolometric luminosity that heats the transition region of VB 10 outside of obvious flares is comparable to, or larger than, that for G1 752A. This suggests an increase in the magnetic heating rates, as measured by L(sub line)/L(sub bol) ratios, across the radiative/convective core boundary and as stars approach the red/brown dwarf boundary. These results provide new constraints for dynamo models and models of coronal and transition-region heating in late-type stars.

  7. Mismatch negativity in tobacco-naïve cannabis users and its alteration with acute nicotine administration.

    PubMed

    Impey, Danielle; El-Marj, Nicole; Parks, Andrea; Choueiry, Joelle; Fisher, Derek; Knott, Verner J

    2015-09-01

    Chronic cannabis use may interact with factors, such as age of onset of cannabis use, family history, and genetic factors, to elicit schizophrenia (SZ)-like symptoms, including sensory and cognitive deficits. However, evidence of a relationship between cannabis use and cognitive impairment is confounded by concomitant use of tobacco. The objective of this study was to compare tobacco-naïve cannabis users with individuals without a history of tobacco/cannabis use on the auditory mismatch negativity (MMN) event-related potential (ERP), a neural measure of auditory deviance detection which is diminished in SZ. An exploratory arm of the study, conducted within a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled design, examined the acute effects of nicotine gum (6mg) on MMN in cannabis users. MMN was recorded in response to 5 deviant stimuli within an optimal MMN paradigm in 44 healthy, non-tobacco smoking volunteers aged 18-26. Cannabis users (n=21) started smoking cannabis prior to age 17, at least 1 joint per month. To examine the effects of chronicity, users were grouped into relatively heavy long-term (HLT; n=11) users and light short-term (LST; n=10) users. Impaired deviance detection was shown in cannabis users vs. nonusers as reflected by a smaller MMN to duration deviants. Chronicity of use was also associated with MMN alterations, as HLTs displayed a reduced duration and gap MMN vs. LSTs. Compared with placebo, nicotine treatment enhanced select MMN deviants in cannabis user subgroups. As deficits associated with early and persistent cannabis use are similar to those seen in SZ, these dose-dependant disturbances in early sensory processing with cannabis use may be one cognitive pathway which mediates an increased risk for SZ in vulnerable youth, and be influenced by concurrent cigarette smoking behavior. PMID:26188167

  8. Knocking on Heaven's Door: Are Novel Invaders Necessarily Facing Naïve Native Species on Islands?

    PubMed

    Gérard, Agathe; Jourdan, Hervé; Millon, Alexandre; Vidal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The impact of alien predator species on insular native biota has often been attributed to island prey naïveté (i.e. lack of, or inefficient, anti-predator behavior). Only rarely, however, has the concept of island prey naïveté been tested, and then only a posteriori (i.e. hundreds or thousands of years after alien species introduction). The presence of native or anciently introduced predators or competitors may be crucial for the recognition and development of adaptive behavior toward unknown predators or competitors of the same archetype (i.e. a set of species that occupy a similar ecological niche and show similar morphological and behavioral traits when interacting with other species). Here, we tested whether two squamates endemic to New Caledonia, a skink, Caledoniscincus austrocaledonicus, and a gecko, Bavayia septuiclavis, recognized and responded to the odor of two major invaders introduced into the Pacific islands, but not yet into New Caledonia. We chose one predator, the small Indian mongoose Herpestes javanicus and one competitor, the cane toad Rhinella marina, which belong respectively to the same archetype as the following two species already introduced into New Caledonia in the nineteenth century: the feral cat Felis catus and the golden bell frog Litoria aurea. Our experiment reveals that geckos are naïve with respect to the odors of both an unknown predator and an unknown competitor, as well as to the odors of a predator and a competitor they have lived with for centuries. In contrast, skinks seem to have lost some naïveté regarding the odor of a predator they have lived with for centuries and seem "predisposed" to avoid the odor of an unknown potential competitor. These results indicate that insular species living in contact with invasive alien species for centuries may be, although not systematically, predisposed toward developing adaptive behavior with respect to species belonging to the same archetype and introduced into their native

  9. Evidence for Persistence of Ectromelia Virus in Inbred Mice, Recrudescence Following Immunosuppression and Transmission to Naïve Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakala, Isaac G.; Chaudhri, Geeta; Scalzo, Anthony A.; Eldi, Preethi; Newsome, Timothy P.; Buller, Robert M.; Karupiah, Gunasegaran

    2015-01-01

    Orthopoxviruses (OPV), including variola, vaccinia, monkeypox, cowpox and ectromelia viruses cause acute infections in their hosts. With the exception of variola virus (VARV), the etiological agent of smallpox, other OPV have been reported to persist in a variety of animal species following natural or experimental infection. Despite the implications and significance for the ecology and epidemiology of diseases these viruses cause, those reports have never been thoroughly investigated. We used the mouse pathogen ectromelia virus (ECTV), the agent of mousepox and a close relative of VARV to investigate virus persistence in inbred mice. We provide evidence that ECTV causes a persistent infection in some susceptible strains of mice in which low levels of virus genomes were detected in various tissues late in infection. The bone marrow (BM) and blood appeared to be key sites of persistence. Contemporaneous with virus persistence, antiviral CD8 T cell responses were demonstrable over the entire 25-week study period, with a change in the immunodominance hierarchy evident during the first 3 weeks. Some virus-encoded host response modifiers were found to modulate virus persistence whereas host genes encoded by the NKC and MHC class I reduced the potential for persistence. When susceptible strains of mice that had apparently recovered from infection were subjected to sustained immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide (CTX), animals succumbed to mousepox with high titers of infectious virus in various organs. CTX treated index mice transmitted virus to, and caused disease in, co-housed naïve mice. The most surprising but significant finding was that immunosuppression of disease-resistant C57BL/6 mice several weeks after recovery from primary infection generated high titers of virus in multiple tissues. Resistant mice showed no evidence of a persistent infection. This is the strongest evidence that ECTV can persist in inbred mice, regardless of their resistance status. PMID

  10. Integrated Population Pharmacokinetic/Viral Dynamic Modeling of Lopinavir/Ritonavir in HIV-1 Treatment Naïve Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; D'Argenio, David Z.; Acosta, Edward P.; Sheth, Anandi N.; Delille, Cecile; Lennox, Jeffrey L.; Kerstner-Wood, Corenna; Ofotokun, Ighovwerha

    2014-01-01

    Background Lopinavir (LPV)/ritonavir (RTV) co-formulation (LPV/RTV) is a widely used protease inhibitor (PI) based regimen to treat HIV-infection. As with all PIs, the trough concentration (Ctrough) is a primary determinant of response, but the optimum exposure remains poorly defined. The primary objective was to develop an integrated LPV population pharmacokinetic model to investigate the influence of α-1-acid glycoprotein (AAG) and link total and free LPV exposure to pharmacodynamic changes in HIV-1 RNA and assess viral dynamic and drug efficacy parameters. Methods Data from 35 treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients initiating therapy with LPV/RTV 400/100 mg orally twice daily across two studies were used for model development and simulations using ADAPT. Total LPV (LPVt) and RTV concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection. Free LPV (LPVf) concentrations were measured using equilibrium dialysis and mass spectrometry. Results LPVt typical value of clearance (CLLPVt/F) was 4.73 L/h and distribution volume (VLPVt/F) was 55.7 L. Clearance (CLLPVf/F) and distibution volume (Vf/F) for LPVf were 596 L/h and 6370 L, respectively. Virion clearance rate was 0.0350 h-1. Simulated LPVLPVt Ctrough at 90% (EC90) and 95% (EC95) maximum response were 316 and 726 ng/mL, respectively. Conclusion The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model provides a useful tool to quantitatively describe the relationship between LPV/RTV exposure and viral response. This comprehensive modeling and simulation approach could be used as a surrogate assessment of ARV where adequate early phase dose-ranging studies are lacking in order to define target trough concentrations and possibly refine dosing recommendations. PMID:24311282

  11. The reliability and validity of the Danish Draft Board Cognitive Ability Test: Børge Prien's Prøve.

    PubMed

    Teasdale, Thomas W; Hartmann, Peter V W; Pedersen, Christoffer H; Bertelsen, Mette

    2011-04-01

    The Danish Draft Board has used the same test for assessing general cognitive ability, the Børge Prien's Prøve (BPP), for over 50 years during which time all men on reaching the age of 18 become liable for conscription. Data from the test has, over the decades, been used in numerous and wide-ranging research studies. Nonetheless, owing to the special circumstances of its administration, some psychometric properties, which are generally assessed for psychological tests, have not previously been investigated for the BPP. First, since the test is only used at the assessment phase, retesting with the BPP occurs only rarely and under exceptional circumstances. Therefore, its Test-Retest reliability has hitherto not been documented. Second, questions have often been raised as to whether the validity of the BPP is undermined by either a lack of motivation and under-performing among some of the men taking the test, being, as they are, compelled to do so, and/or by gradual obsolescence of the test over the decades of its use. We here present findings from three new studies to show that (a) the BPP has a satisfactory Test-Retest reliability, r=0.77, (b) BPP test scores are not positively associated with expressed attitude to being called upon to serve conscription and (c) the correlation between the BPP and a measure of educational level has remained stable (at about 0.5) through the last two decades. Taken together these three findings further support the continuing value of the BPP in research relating to cognitive ability. PMID:21198650

  12. Gp120/CD4 Blocking Antibodies Are Frequently Elicited in ART-Naïve Chronically HIV-1 Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Jorge; Molinos-Albert, Luis Manuel; de la Concepción, Maria Luisa Rodríguez; Marfil, Silvia; García, Elisabet; Derking, Ronald; Sanders, Rogier W.; Clotet, Bonaventura; Blanco, Julià

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies with the ability to block the interaction of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 with CD4, including those overlapping the CD4 binding site (CD4bs antibodies), can protect from infection by HIV-1, and their elicitation may be an interesting goal for any vaccination strategy. To identify gp120/CD4 blocking antibodies in plasma samples from HIV-1 infected individuals we have developed a competitive flow cytometry-based functional assay. In a cohort of treatment-naïve chronically infected patients, we showed that gp120/CD4 blocking antibodies were frequently elicited (detected in 97% plasma samples) and correlated with binding to trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. However, no correlation was observed between functional CD4 binding blockade data and titer of CD4bs antibodies determined by ELISA using resurfaced gp120 proteins. Consistently, plasma samples lacking CD4bs antibodies were able to block the interaction between gp120 and its receptor, indicating that antibodies recognizing other epitopes, such as PGT126 and PG16, can also play the same role. Antibodies blocking CD4 binding increased over time and correlated positively with the capacity of plasma samples to neutralize the laboratory-adapted NL4.3 and BaL virus isolates, suggesting their potential contribution to the neutralizing workforce of plasma in vivo. Determining whether this response can be boosted to achieve broadly neutralizing antibodies may provide valuable information for the design of new strategies aimed to improve the anti-HIV-1 humoral response and to develop a successful HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:25803681

  13. Cannabidiol reduces the anxiety induced by simulated public speaking in treatment-naïve social phobia patients.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschi, Mateus M; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Chagas, Marcos Hortes Nisihara; de Oliveira, Danielle Chaves Gomes; De Martinis, Bruno Spinosa; Kapczinski, Flávio; Quevedo, João; Roesler, Rafael; Schröder, Nadja; Nardi, Antonio E; Martín-Santos, Rocio; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecílio; Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Crippa, José Alexandre S

    2011-05-01

    Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) is one of the most common anxiety conditions with impairment in social life. Cannabidiol (CBD), one major non-psychotomimetic compound of the cannabis sativa plant, has shown anxiolytic effects both in humans and in animals. This preliminary study aimed to compare the effects of a simulation public speaking test (SPST) on healthy control (HC) patients and treatment-naïve SAD patients who received a single dose of CBD or placebo. A total of 24 never-treated patients with SAD were allocated to receive either CBD (600 mg; n=12) or placebo (placebo; n=12) in a double-blind randomized design 1 h and a half before the test. The same number of HC (n=12) performed the SPST without receiving any medication. Each volunteer participated in only one experimental session in a double-blind procedure. Subjective ratings on the Visual Analogue Mood Scale (VAMS) and Negative Self-Statement scale (SSPS-N) and physiological measures (blood pressure, heart rate, and skin conductance) were measured at six different time points during the SPST. The results were submitted to a repeated-measures analysis of variance. Pretreatment with CBD significantly reduced anxiety, cognitive impairment and discomfort in their speech performance, and significantly decreased alert in their anticipatory speech. The placebo group presented higher anxiety, cognitive impairment, discomfort, and alert levels when compared with the control group as assessed with the VAMS. The SSPS-N scores evidenced significant increases during the testing of placebo group that was almost abolished in the CBD group. No significant differences were observed between CBD and HC in SSPS-N scores or in the cognitive impairment, discomfort, and alert factors of VAMS. The increase in anxiety induced by the SPST on subjects with SAD was reduced with the use of CBD, resulting in a similar response as the HC. PMID:21307846

  14. Visual targeting of components of floral colour patterns in flower-naïve bumblebees ( Bombus terrestris; Apidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunau, Klaus; Fieselmann, Gabriele; Heuschen, Britta; van de Loo, Antje

    2006-07-01

    Floral colour patterns are contrasting colour patches on flowers, a part of the signalling apparatus that was considered to display shape and colour signals used by flower-visitors to detect flowers and locate the site of floral reward. Here, we show that flower-naïve bumblebees ( Bombus terrestris) spontaneously direct their approach towards the outside margin of artificial flowers, which provides contrast between these dummy flowers and the background. If no floral guides are present, the bumblebees continue to approach the margin and finally touch the marginal area of the dummy flower with the tips of their antennae. Whilst approaching dummy flowers that also have a central floral guide, the bumblebees change their direction of flight: Initially, they approach the margin, later they switch to approaching the colour guide, and finally they precisely touch the floral guide with their antennae. Variation of the shape of equally sized dummy flowers did not alter the bumblebees’ preferential orientation towards the guide. Using reciprocal combinations of guide colour and surrounding colour, we showed that the approach from a distance towards the corolla and the antennal contact with the guide are elicited by the same colour parameter: spectral purity. As a consequence, the dummy flowers eliciting the greatest frequency of antennal reactions at the guide are those that combine a floral guide of high spectral purity with a corolla of less spectral purity. Our results support the hypothesis that floral guides direct bumblebees’ approaches to the site of first contact with the flower, which is achieved by the tips of the antennae.

  15. Work productivity among treatment-naïve patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C infection receiving telaprevir combination treatment.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, J; Vera-Llonch, M; Donepudi, M; Suthoff, E; Younossi, Z; Goss, T F

    2015-01-01

    Work productivity is impacted in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients and has been linked to treatment. In two Phase 3 trials, ADVANCE and ILLUMINATE, treatment-naïve genotype 1 chronic HCV-infected patients received 12-week telaprevir (T) with 24 (T12PR24)- or 48 (T12PR48)-week peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin. The objective of this analysis was to examine the impact of chronic HCV infection and its treatment with combination therapy on work productivity. The 5-item, self-reported work productivity questionnaire (WPQ) was administered in Phase 3 trials to assess unemployment status, days unable to work due to HCV/treatment, reduced hours worked and impact on productivity in prior 4 weeks. Descriptive statistics and multivariate regression analyses were employed in analyses of pooled trial data. About 1147 patients were included; 22% (n = 255) were unemployed at baseline, with 8% being unemployed due to health reasons. At week 12, there were no differences by treatment regimen in the number of days unable to work. At week 48, improvements were observed earlier among patients receiving the shorter duration of T combination treatment. Mean (95% CI) change from baseline in days unable to work was -0.48 (-0.85, -0.11) days for T12PR24, 1.43 (0.63, 2.24) days for T12PR48 and 1.24 (0.18, 2.30) days for PR48 with placebo. Predictors of days unable to work were identified and include demographic characteristics, pretreatment and on-treatment levels of fatigue, as well regional variation. In post hoc analyses of the ADVANCE and ILLUMINATE trials, work productivity decreased during the initial 12 weeks regardless of treatment group. PMID:24528927

  16. Accessibility and Quality of Online Cancer-Related Clinical Trial Information for Naïve Searchers.

    PubMed

    Abel, Gregory A; Cronin, Angel M; Earles, Kristofer; Gray, Stacy W

    2015-10-01

    Although the Internet may help to increase cancer patients' awareness of clinical trials, little is known about the accessibility and quality of online clinical trial information. We simulated the experience of a naïve cancer patient without clinical trial knowledge by searching three popular search engines for treatment information for breast, lung, and prostate cancer, and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Two coders independently evaluated website content for accessibility and quality. We screened 120 websites and identified 40 unique sites for analysis. Overall, 85% [95% confidence interval (CI), 70%-94%] of sites mentioned clinical trials on the landing page and 68% (51%-81%) included links to specific trials. Overall readability was poor. Approximately half of websites (36%-68%) included information on the potential benefits and risks of clinical trials and 40% provided information about when the site had been updated (25%-57%). Among sites with links to specific clinical trials, only 44% (25%-65%) provided an interactive interface that would allow patients to customize search results; breast (100%) and prostate (50%) sites were more interactive than lung (25%) and MDS (14%; P = 0.007). Although cancer clinical trial information is widely available on the Internet, its quality is highly variable. Given the fact that many emerging cancer therapeutics are personalized based on disease or genomic characteristics, interactive web-based interfaces could serve as powerful vehicles to help patients locate appropriate clinical trials. Without enhanced efforts to ensure greater interactivity of cancer treatment websites, patient awareness of relevant clinical trials may remain low. PMID:26265204

  17. Evolution of an Eurasian avian-like influenza virus in naïve and vaccinated pigs.

    PubMed

    Murcia, Pablo R; Hughes, Joseph; Battista, Patrizia; Lloyd, Lucy; Baillie, Gregory J; Ramirez-Gonzalez, Ricardo H; Ormond, Doug; Oliver, Karen; Elton, Debra; Mumford, Jennifer A; Caccamo, Mario; Kellam, Paul; Grenfell, Bryan T; Holmes, Edward C; Wood, James L N

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses are characterized by an ability to cross species boundaries and evade host immunity, sometimes with devastating consequences. The 2009 pandemic of H1N1 influenza A virus highlights the importance of pigs in influenza emergence, particularly as intermediate hosts by which avian viruses adapt to mammals before emerging in humans. Although segment reassortment has commonly been associated with influenza emergence, an expanded host-range is also likely to be associated with the accumulation of specific beneficial point mutations. To better understand the mechanisms that shape the genetic diversity of avian-like viruses in pigs, we studied the evolutionary dynamics of an Eurasian Avian-like swine influenza virus (EA-SIV) in naïve and vaccinated pigs linked by natural transmission. We analyzed multiple clones of the hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) gene derived from consecutive daily viral populations. Strikingly, we observed both transient and fixed changes in the consensus sequence along the transmission chain. Hence, the mutational spectrum of intra-host EA-SIV populations is highly dynamic and allele fixation can occur with extreme rapidity. In addition, mutations that could potentially alter host-range and antigenicity were transmitted between animals and mixed infections were commonplace, even in vaccinated pigs. Finally, we repeatedly detected distinct stop codons in virus samples from co-housed pigs, suggesting that they persisted within hosts and were transmitted among them. This implies that mutations that reduce viral fitness in one host, but which could lead to fitness benefits in a novel host, can circulate at low frequencies. PMID:22693449

  18. Evidence for Persistence of Ectromelia Virus in Inbred Mice, Recrudescence Following Immunosuppression and Transmission to Naïve Mice.

    PubMed

    Sakala, Isaac G; Chaudhri, Geeta; Scalzo, Anthony A; Eldi, Preethi; Newsome, Timothy P; Buller, Robert M; Karupiah, Gunasegaran

    2015-12-01

    Orthopoxviruses (OPV), including variola, vaccinia, monkeypox, cowpox and ectromelia viruses cause acute infections in their hosts. With the exception of variola virus (VARV), the etiological agent of smallpox, other OPV have been reported to persist in a variety of animal species following natural or experimental infection. Despite the implications and significance for the ecology and epidemiology of diseases these viruses cause, those reports have never been thoroughly investigated. We used the mouse pathogen ectromelia virus (ECTV), the agent of mousepox and a close relative of VARV to investigate virus persistence in inbred mice. We provide evidence that ECTV causes a persistent infection in some susceptible strains of mice in which low levels of virus genomes were detected in various tissues late in infection. The bone marrow (BM) and blood appeared to be key sites of persistence. Contemporaneous with virus persistence, antiviral CD8 T cell responses were demonstrable over the entire 25-week study period, with a change in the immunodominance hierarchy evident during the first 3 weeks. Some virus-encoded host response modifiers were found to modulate virus persistence whereas host genes encoded by the NKC and MHC class I reduced the potential for persistence. When susceptible strains of mice that had apparently recovered from infection were subjected to sustained immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide (CTX), animals succumbed to mousepox with high titers of infectious virus in various organs. CTX treated index mice transmitted virus to, and caused disease in, co-housed naïve mice. The most surprising but significant finding was that immunosuppression of disease-resistant C57BL/6 mice several weeks after recovery from primary infection generated high titers of virus in multiple tissues. Resistant mice showed no evidence of a persistent infection. This is the strongest evidence that ECTV can persist in inbred mice, regardless of their resistance status. PMID

  19. TEMEL ETİK KURAMLAR AÇISINDAN ADALET ve SAĞLIK HAKKI KAVRAMLARININ DEĞERLENDİRMESİ1,2

    PubMed Central

    Ekmekçi, Perihan Elif; Arda, Berna

    2015-01-01

    Sağlık hakkı temel bir insan hakkıdır. Ancak günümüzde sağlık hakkının hayata geçmesi, sağlık sunumunda gereksinim duyulan kaynakların kısıtlı olması nedeniyle engeller ile karşılaşmaktadır. Ayrıca tıp alanındaki hızlı teknolojik ilerlemeler, tanı ve tedavi imkânlarının her geçen gün gelişmesine yol açmaktadır. Bu durum, sağlık hizmetlerinin sunumunu dağıtıcı adaletin bir süjesi haline getirmektedir. Adalet kavramının tanımlanabilmesi için öncelikle, birey ya da toplulukların bir şeye ilişkin hak talebinde bulunmalarının koşullarını tanımlanmalı daha sonra hak edilenin kim tarafından ve nasıl verileceğinin belirlenmelidir. Etik kuramlar, etik açıdan doğru eyleyebilmek için hangi dayanak noktalarından yola çıkarak hangi değerleri önceleyerek karar vermek gerektiği konusunda kendi paradigmalarını oluşturmuşlardır. Adalet ve sağlık hakkı gibi temel kavramlar, temel etik kuramlar tarafından, o kuramın bağlamı içinde değerlendirilmekte ve anlam kazanmaktadır. Sağlık hakkı bazı etik kuramlar tarafından insan varlığının doğal bir bileşeni olarak tanımlanırken, bazı etik kuramlar tarafından bağlamsal olarak kabul edilmekte bazıları tarafından ise reddedilmekte, adalet kavramı ve bağlantılı olarak adaletin materyal ve formal ilkeleri gibi kavramların içerikleri ve taşıdıkları değerler içinden bakılan etik kuramın paradigmasına bağlı olarak farklıklar içermektedir. Etik kuramların paradigmaları sadece kavramların tanımlanmasında değil, aynı zamanda pratik uygulamalarda da farklı yaklaşımları gerektirmektedir. Bu çalışmada, erdem etiği, faydacı etik kuram, ödev etiği, liberal etik kuram ve kommuniteryan etik kuramın adalet ve sağlık hakkını nasıl kavramsallaştırdıklarını ortaya konmaktır. Bu amaçla öncelikle her bir etik kuramın genel çerçevesi tanımlanmış ve bu çerçevenin çizdiği teorik paradigma i

  20. The transition of mouse pluripotent stem cells from the naïve to the primed state requires Fas signaling through 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate structures recognized by the HS4C3 antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Kazumi; Van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Nishihara, Shoko

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Fas transcript increases during the transition from the naïve to the primed state. ► 3OST-5 transcript, the HS4C3 epitope synthesis gene, increases during the transition. ► Fas signaling regulates the transition from the naïve to the primed state. ► HS4C3-binding epitope regulates the transition from the naïve to the primed state. ► Fas signaling is regulated by the HS4C3 epitope during the transition. -- Abstract: The characteristics of pluripotent embryonic stem cells of human and mouse are different. The properties of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are similar to those of mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs), which are in a later developmental pluripotency state, the so-called “primed state” compared to mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) which are in a naïve state. As a result of the properties of the primed state, hESCs proliferate slowly, cannot survive as single cells, and can only be transfected with genes at low efficiency. Generating hESCs in the naïve state is necessary to overcome these problems and allow their application in regenerative medicine. Therefore, clarifying the mechanism of the transition between the naïve and primed states in pluripotent stem cells is important for the establishment of stable methods of generating naïve state hESCs. However, the signaling pathways which contribute to the transition between the naïve and primed states are still unclear. In this study, we carried out induction from mESCs to mEpiSC-like cells (mEpiSCLCs), and observed an increase in the activation of Fas signaling during the induction. The expression of Fgf5, an epiblast marker, was diminished by inhibition of Fas signaling using the caspase-8 and -3 blocking peptides, IETD and DEVD, respectively. Furthermore, during the induction, we observed increased expression of 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate (HS) structures synthesized by HS 3-O-sulfotransferase (3OST), which are recognized by the HS4C3 antibody (HS4C3-binding epitope

  1. Evaluation of Basal Renal Function in Treatment-naïve Patients with Malignancy and Comparison with Age Matched Healthy Control

    PubMed Central

    Barai, Sukanta; Gambhir, Sanjay; Jain, Suruchi; Rastogi, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the prevalence of renal insufficiency in patients with malignancy at baseline before initiation of therapy. The published studies based on patient with prior exposure to cytotoxic therapy have reported a high prevalence of renal impairment. However, these studies have utilized creatinine-based glomerular filtration rate (GFR) prediction equations to assess the level of renal function. These equations are known to have some serious limitations in reliably predicting GFR. The aim of the study was to accurately document the state of renal function in treatment-naïve cancer patients and compare them against age-matched healthy controls using a reference “creatinine independent” GFR measurement technique. Age-matched comparison of GFR of 1,373 treatment-naïve cancer patients and 1,089 healthy controls were done retrospectively. There was no difference in GFR between cancer and healthy group when analyzed under various age groups, though the overall mean GFR in healthy controls was significantly higher compared to cancer group (80.14 ± 17.63 mL vs 74.43 ± 20.84, P 0≤ 0.01), whereas the mean age in control arm was significantly lower compared to cancer group (44.24 ± 17.63 years vs. 50.70 ± 20.84 years, P ≤ 0.01). Treatment-naïve cancer patients have identical renal function to their healthy age-matched peers. Malignancy per se does not directly lead to the decline in filtration capacity of the kidneys. PMID:27651734

  2. Temporal studies into attachment, VE-cadherin perturbation, and paracellular migration of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells across umbilical vein endothelial monolayers.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Neven A; Leach, Lopa

    2015-02-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells from Wharton's jelly of human umbilical cords (WJ-MSC) are a valuable alternate source of stem cells. Their role in situ and whether they can interact and cross intact endothelial monolayers requires elucidation. The aim of this study was to investigate the dynamic interactions between WJ-MSC and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), including attachment, transit times, extravasation pathway, and the effects of WJ-MSC on junctional vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. HUVEC were grown to near confluence in endothelial media and to full confluence in mixed media before the addition of PKH26-labelled WJ-MSC. Time lapse fluorescence microscopy showed stem cells undergoing membrane blebbing followed by amoeboid movement on HUVEC monolayers before rounding up and changing shape toward the spindle-shaped morphology during/after transmigration to subendothelial positions. Cells demonstrated a time lag of 60 min before paracellular extravasation, confirmed by confocal microscopy. Forty-six percent of attached cells crossed in the first 2 h. By 16 h, a majority of cells had transmigrated with >96% of cells crossing by 22 h. There were concomitant changes in endothelial junctional VE-cadherin with statistically significant increases in discontinuous staining at 2 h, return to control values at 16 h, even as from 22 h onward HUVEC displayed increased percentage of junctions with continuous staining and upregulation of protein. Our data suggests that WJ-MSC crosses the endothelial barrier through the paracellular pathway and can influence junctional organization of HUVEC with discreet perturbation of VE-cadherin preceding transmigration followed by upregulation once the adluminal side is reached. The latter may reflect a perivascular support function of WJ-MSC in the umbilical cord.

  3. Efficacy of Once Daily Darunavir/Ritonavir in PI-Naïve, NNRTI-Experienced Patients in the ODIN Trial.

    PubMed

    Geretti, Anna Maria; Moeketsi, Mathe; Demasi, Ralph; van Delft, Yvon; Mohammed, Perry

    2015-01-01

    Background. An exploratory subanalysis of the ODIN trial was performed to evaluate the efficacy of darunavir/ritonavir (DRV/r) 800/100 mg OD versus 600/100 mg BID in patients who were NNRTI-experienced but PI-naïve. Methods. ODIN was a phase III, 48-week study comparing DRV/r OD versus BID in 590 treatment-experienced patients with no DRV resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) at screening. Patients received DRV/r 800/100 mg OD or DRV/r 600/100 mg BID plus ≥2 NRTIs. Of the 590 patients randomized, 272 (46%) were NNRTI-experienced but PI-naïve. Results. Overall, 272 patients received DRV/r OD (n = 135) or BID (n = 137) plus ≥2 optimised NRTIs. The mean age was 39 years; 35% were female; 27% were Black, 24% Caucasian, 26% Oriental/Asian, and 23% other races; 17% were recruited in South Africa; and 48% had non-B HIV-1 subtypes. Mean baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA load was 4.10 log10⁡ copies/mL; median CD4 cell count was 258 cells/μL. At week 48, 111/135 (82%) of DRV/r OD and 109/137 (80%) of DRV/r BID patients achieved an HIV-1 RNA load <50 copies/mL. No patient developed primary PI RAMs. Conclusion. DRV/r 800/100 mg OD in combination with ≥2 optimised NRTIs led to virological suppression <50 copies/mL in 82% of NNRTI-experienced, PI-naïve patients by week 48. PMID:26357568

  4. Disrupted Structural and Functional Connectivity in Prefrontal-Hippocampus Circuitry in First-Episode Medication-Naïve Adolescent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Haiyang; Wu, Feng; Kong, Lingtao; Tang, Yanqing; Zhou, Qian; Chang, Miao; Zhou, Yifang; Jiang, Xiaowei; Li, Songbai; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence implicates abnormalities in prefrontal-hippocampus neural circuitry in major depressive disorder (MDD). This study investigates the potential disruptions in prefrontal-hippocampus structural and functional connectivity, as well as their relationship in first-episode medication-naïve adolescents with MDD in order to investigate the early stage of the illness without confounds of illness course and medication exposure. Methods Diffusion tensor imaging and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data were acquired from 26 first-episode medication-naïve MDD adolescents and 31 healthy controls (HC). Fractional anisotropy (FA) values of the fornix and the prefrontal-hippocampus functional connectivity was compared between MDD and HC groups. The correlation between the FA value of fornix and the strength of the functional connectivity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) region showing significant differences between the two groups was identified. Results Compared with the HC group, adolescent MDD group had significant lower FA values in the fornix, as well as decreased functional connectivity in four PFC regions. Significant negative correlations were observed between fornix FA values and functional connectivity from hippocampus to PFC within the HC group. There was no significant correlation between the fornix FA and the strength of functional connectivity within the adolescent MDD group. Conclusions First-episode medication-naïve adolescent MDD showed decreased structural and functional connectivity as well as deficits of the association between structural and functional connectivity shown in HC in the PFC-hippocampus neural circuitry. These findings suggest that abnormal PFC-hippocampus neural circuitry may present in the early onset of MDD and play an important role in the neuropathophysiology of MDD. PMID:26863301

  5. Striatal D2/3 Binding Potential Values in Drug-Naïve First-Episode Schizophrenia Patients Correlate With Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Sanne; Pinborg, Lars Hageman; Svarer, Claus; Jensen, Lars Thorbjørn; Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Allerup, Peter; Bak, Nikolaj; Rasmussen, Hans; Frandsen, Erik; Rostrup, Egill; Glenthøj, Birte Yding

    2015-01-01

    One of best validated findings in schizophrenia research is the association between blockade of dopamine D2 receptors and the effects of antipsychotics on positive psychotic symptoms. The aim of the present study was to examine correlations between baseline striatal D2/3 receptor binding potential (BPp) values and treatment outcome in a cohort of antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia patients. Additionally, we wished to investigate associations between striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor blockade and alterations of negative symptoms as well as functioning and subjective well-being. Twenty-eight antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients and 26 controls were included in the study. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with [123I]iodobenzamide ([123I]-IBZM) was used to examine striatal D2/3 receptor BPp. Patients were examined before and after 6 weeks of treatment with the D2/3 receptor antagonist amisulpride. There was a significant negative correlation between striatal D2/3 receptor BPp at baseline and improvement of positive symptoms in the total group of patients. Comparing patients responding to treatment to nonresponders further showed significantly lower baseline BPp in the responders. At follow-up, the patients demonstrated a negative correlation between the blockade and functioning, whereas no associations between blockade and negative symptoms or subjective well-being were observed. The results show an association between striatal BPp of dopamine D2/3 receptors in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode patients with schizophrenia and treatment response. Patients with a low BPp have a better treatment response than patients with a high BPp. The results further suggest that functioning may decline at high levels of dopamine receptor blockade. PMID:25698711

  6. Striatal D(2/3) Binding Potential Values in Drug-Naïve First-Episode Schizophrenia Patients Correlate With Treatment Outcome.

    PubMed

    Wulff, Sanne; Pinborg, Lars Hageman; Svarer, Claus; Jensen, Lars Thorbjørn; Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Allerup, Peter; Bak, Nikolaj; Rasmussen, Hans; Frandsen, Erik; Rostrup, Egill; Glenthøj, Birte Yding

    2015-09-01

    One of best validated findings in schizophrenia research is the association between blockade of dopamine D2 receptors and the effects of antipsychotics on positive psychotic symptoms. The aim of the present study was to examine correlations between baseline striatal D(2/3) receptor binding potential (BP(p)) values and treatment outcome in a cohort of antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia patients. Additionally, we wished to investigate associations between striatal dopamine D(2/3) receptor blockade and alterations of negative symptoms as well as functioning and subjective well-being. Twenty-eight antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients and 26 controls were included in the study. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with [(123)I]iodobenzamide ([(123)I]-IBZM) was used to examine striatal D(2/3) receptor BP(p). Patients were examined before and after 6 weeks of treatment with the D(2/3) receptor antagonist amisulpride. There was a significant negative correlation between striatal D(2/3) receptor BP(p) at baseline and improvement of positive symptoms in the total group of patients. Comparing patients responding to treatment to nonresponders further showed significantly lower baseline BP(p) in the responders. At follow-up, the patients demonstrated a negative correlation between the blockade and functioning, whereas no associations between blockade and negative symptoms or subjective well-being were observed. The results show an association between striatal BP(p) of dopamine D(2/3) receptors in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode patients with schizophrenia and treatment response. Patients with a low BP(p) have a better treatment response than patients with a high BP(p). The results further suggest that functioning may decline at high levels of dopamine receptor blockade.

  7. The impact of 6-month training preparation for an Ironman triathlon on the proportions of naïve, memory and senescent T cells in resting blood.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Cormac; Galloway, Stuart D R; Neal, Craig; Hunter, Angus M; McFarlin, Brian K; Spielmann, Guilllaume; Simpson, Richard J

    2012-08-01

    Athletes appear to be at a greater risk of illness while undertaking arduous training regimens in preparation for endurance events. As infection susceptibility has been linked with increased proportions of differentiated and senescent T cells in the periphery, changes in the proportions of these cell types due to long-term high-volume exercise training could have important implications for athlete infection risk. This study examined the effects of 6-month training preparation for an Ironman triathlon on the proportions of naïve, memory and senescent T cells in resting blood. Ten club-level triathletes (9 males; 1 female: 43 ± 3 years) were sampled at 27 (December), 21 (January), 15 (March), 9 (May) and 3 (June) weeks before an Ironman Triathlon. An additional sample was collected 2-week post-competition (August). Four-colour flow cytometry was used for the phenotypic analysis of CD4+ and CD8+ blood T cells. Proportions of differentiated (KLRG1+/CD57-) CD8+ T cells and "transitional" (CD45RA+/CD45RO+) CD4+ and CD8+ T cells increased with training, as the values in June were elevated 37, 142 and 116%, respectively, from those observed in December. Proportions of senescent (KLRG1+/CD57+) CD4+ or CD8+ T cells did not change during the training phase. Two weeks post-race, proportions of differentiated CD8+ T cells had returned to baseline values, while the proportions of senescent CD4+ T cells increased 192% alongside a 31% reduction in naïve (CD45RA+/CD45RO-) cells. In conclusion, increases in differentiated and "transitional" T cells due to arduous exercise training could compromise host protection to novel pathogens and increase athlete infection risk, although whether or not the composition of naïve and differentiated T cells in blood can serve as prognostic biomarkers in athletes remains to be established.

  8. Efficacy and safety of sofosbuvir-based therapy for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C in treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi; Wang, Yawen; Zhang, Guanjun; Li, Na; Zhu, Qianqian; Chang, Hongyun; Han, Qunying; Lv, Yi; Liu, Zhengwen

    2014-08-01

    Sofosbuvir, a hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase inhibitor, is a new direct-acting antiviral for chronic HCV infection. This systematic review and proportional meta-analysis examined the efficacy and safety of sofosbuvir-based therapy for chronic HCV infection in treatment-naïve and -experienced patients. Medline, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, EMBASE and Web of Science databases were searched. Clinical trials examining sofosbuvir plus ribavirin (RBV) and pegylated interferon-α (peg-IFN) or sofosbuvir plus RBV among adults with chronic HCV infection were included. Data were extracted on virological responses including sustained virological response at post-treatment Week 12 (SVR12), relapse, treatment discontinuation due to an adverse event (AE), virological breakthrough during treatment, and AEs. One trial and 13 treatment arms/cohorts from seven studies met the criteria for analysis in treatment-naïve patients who were treated with sofosbuvir, RBV and peg-IFN; the SVR12 was 89% (95% CI 85-92%), relapse was 5% and the serious adverse event (SAE) rate was 4%. Six treatment arms/cohorts met the criteria for analysis in treatment-naïve patients who were treated with sofosbuvir and RBV; the SVR12 was 72% (95% CI 60-81%), relapse was 27% and the SAE rate was 3%. Three treatment arms/cohorts met the criteria for analysis in treatment-experienced patients who were treated with sofosbuvir and RBV; the SVR12 was 51% (95% CI 27-75%), relapse was 46% and the SAE rate was 4%. In conclusion, sofosbuvir-based treatment is effective and safe in treating chronic HCV infection, although the SVR12 of its combination with RBV, especially in treatment-experienced patients, requires improvement.

  9. Evaluation of Basal Renal Function in Treatment-naïve Patients with Malignancy and Comparison with Age Matched Healthy Control

    PubMed Central

    Barai, Sukanta; Gambhir, Sanjay; Jain, Suruchi; Rastogi, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the prevalence of renal insufficiency in patients with malignancy at baseline before initiation of therapy. The published studies based on patient with prior exposure to cytotoxic therapy have reported a high prevalence of renal impairment. However, these studies have utilized creatinine-based glomerular filtration rate (GFR) prediction equations to assess the level of renal function. These equations are known to have some serious limitations in reliably predicting GFR. The aim of the study was to accurately document the state of renal function in treatment-naïve cancer patients and compare them against age-matched healthy controls using a reference “creatinine independent” GFR measurement technique. Age-matched comparison of GFR of 1,373 treatment-naïve cancer patients and 1,089 healthy controls were done retrospectively. There was no difference in GFR between cancer and healthy group when analyzed under various age groups, though the overall mean GFR in healthy controls was significantly higher compared to cancer group (80.14 ± 17.63 mL vs 74.43 ± 20.84, P 0≤ 0.01), whereas the mean age in control arm was significantly lower compared to cancer group (44.24 ± 17.63 years vs. 50.70 ± 20.84 years, P ≤ 0.01). Treatment-naïve cancer patients have identical renal function to their healthy age-matched peers. Malignancy per se does not directly lead to the decline in filtration capacity of the kidneys.

  10. (28)Silicon radiation-induced enhancement of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of naïve and cognitively tested mice.

    PubMed

    Raber, Jacob; Rudobeck, Emil; Campbell-Beachler, Mary; Allen, Antiño R; Allen, Barrett; Rosi, Susanna; Nelson, Gregory A; Ramachandran, Shaila; Turner, Jennifer; Fike, John R; Vlkolinsky, Roman

    2014-04-01

    The space radiation environment consists of multiple species of high-energy charge particles (HZE), including (56)Fe and (28)Si nuclei, that may impact neuronal cells, but their damaging effects on the central nervous system (CNS) have been poorly defined. Hippocampus-dependent memory functions have been shown to be highly sensitive to (56)Fe HZE particles, which poses a significant risk to the cognitive performance of astronauts during space missions. While low doses of (56)Fe radiation do not induce cell death of mature neurons, they affect synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region, the principal neuronal output of the hippocampal formation involved in memory formation. The effects of (28)Si on the CNS have not been defined. Compared to behaviorally naïve mice, cognitive testing might affect synaptic plasticity and the effects of (28)Si radiation on synaptic plasticity might be modulated by prior cognitive testing. Therefore, in the current study, we quantified the effects of whole-body (28)Si radiation (600 MeV/n, 0.25 and 1 Gy) on hippocampus-dependent contextual freezing and synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region of animals not exposed (behaviorally naïve mice) and animals exposed to the contextual freezing test (cognitively tested mice). In behaviorally naïve mice exposed to 0.25 and 1 Gy of (28)Si radiation, the magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP) was enhanced. However, in mice irradiated with 0.25 Gy contextual fear conditioning was enhanced and was associated with a further enhancement of the LTP magnitude. Such increase in synaptic plasticity was not seen in cognitively tested mice irradiated with 1 Gy. Thus, low dose (28)Si radiation has effects on synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and these effects are modulated by cognitive testing in a contextual fear-conditioning test. PMID:24673255

  11. Evaluation of Basal Renal Function in Treatment-naïve Patients with Malignancy and Comparison with Age Matched Healthy Control.

    PubMed

    Barai, Sukanta; Gambhir, Sanjay; Jain, Suruchi; Rastogi, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the prevalence of renal insufficiency in patients with malignancy at baseline before initiation of therapy. The published studies based on patient with prior exposure to cytotoxic therapy have reported a high prevalence of renal impairment. However, these studies have utilized creatinine-based glomerular filtration rate (GFR) prediction equations to assess the level of renal function. These equations are known to have some serious limitations in reliably predicting GFR. The aim of the study was to accurately document the state of renal function in treatment-naïve cancer patients and compare them against age-matched healthy controls using a reference "creatinine independent" GFR measurement technique. Age-matched comparison of GFR of 1,373 treatment-naïve cancer patients and 1,089 healthy controls were done retrospectively. There was no difference in GFR between cancer and healthy group when analyzed under various age groups, though the overall mean GFR in healthy controls was significantly higher compared to cancer group (80.14 ± 17.63 mL vs 74.43 ± 20.84, P 0≤ 0.01), whereas the mean age in control arm was significantly lower compared to cancer group (44.24 ± 17.63 years vs. 50.70 ± 20.84 years, P ≤ 0.01). Treatment-naïve cancer patients have identical renal function to their healthy age-matched peers. Malignancy per se does not directly lead to the decline in filtration capacity of the kidneys. PMID:27651734

  12. (28)Silicon radiation-induced enhancement of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of naïve and cognitively tested mice.

    PubMed

    Raber, Jacob; Rudobeck, Emil; Campbell-Beachler, Mary; Allen, Antiño R; Allen, Barrett; Rosi, Susanna; Nelson, Gregory A; Ramachandran, Shaila; Turner, Jennifer; Fike, John R; Vlkolinsky, Roman

    2014-04-01

    The space radiation environment consists of multiple species of high-energy charge particles (HZE), including (56)Fe and (28)Si nuclei, that may impact neuronal cells, but their damaging effects on the central nervous system (CNS) have been poorly defined. Hippocampus-dependent memory functions have been shown to be highly sensitive to (56)Fe HZE particles, which poses a significant risk to the cognitive performance of astronauts during space missions. While low doses of (56)Fe radiation do not induce cell death of mature neurons, they affect synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region, the principal neuronal output of the hippocampal formation involved in memory formation. The effects of (28)Si on the CNS have not been defined. Compared to behaviorally naïve mice, cognitive testing might affect synaptic plasticity and the effects of (28)Si radiation on synaptic plasticity might be modulated by prior cognitive testing. Therefore, in the current study, we quantified the effects of whole-body (28)Si radiation (600 MeV/n, 0.25 and 1 Gy) on hippocampus-dependent contextual freezing and synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region of animals not exposed (behaviorally naïve mice) and animals exposed to the contextual freezing test (cognitively tested mice). In behaviorally naïve mice exposed to 0.25 and 1 Gy of (28)Si radiation, the magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP) was enhanced. However, in mice irradiated with 0.25 Gy contextual fear conditioning was enhanced and was associated with a further enhancement of the LTP magnitude. Such increase in synaptic plasticity was not seen in cognitively tested mice irradiated with 1 Gy. Thus, low dose (28)Si radiation has effects on synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and these effects are modulated by cognitive testing in a contextual fear-conditioning test.

  13. Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in naïve CD4+ T cells from patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Altorok, Nezam; Coit, Patrick; Hughes, Travis; Koelsch, Kristi A.; Stone, Donald U.; Rasmussen, Astrid; Radfar, Lida; Scofield, R. Hal; Sivils, Kathy L.; Farris, A. Darise; Sawalha, Amr H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) is a systemic autoimmune disease with incompletely understood etiology. Very little is known about the role of epigenetic dysregulation in the pathogenesis of pSS. Methods We performed a genome-wide DNA methylation study in naïve CD4+ T cells in eleven pSS patients compared to age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched healthy controls. Cytosine methylation was quantified using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array and validated using bisulfite sequencing. Results We identified 553 hypomethylated and 200 hypermethylated CpG sites in naïve CD4+ T cells from pSS patients compared to healthy matched controls, representing 311 hypomethylated and 115 hypermethylated gene regions. Hypomethylated genes in pSS include LTA, coding for Lymphotoxin α. Other relevant genes such as CD247, TNFRSF25, PTPRC, GSTM1 and PDCD1 were also hypomethylated. The interferon signature pathway was represented by hypomethylation of STAT1, IFI44L, USP18 and IFITM1. A group of genes encoding for members of the solute carrier proteins were differentially methylated. In addition, the transcription factor RUNX1 was hypermethylated in patients, suggesting a possible connection to lymphoma predisposition. Gene ontology (GO) analysis of hypomethylated genes demonstrated enrichment of genes involved in lymphocyte activation and immune response. GO terms for hypermethylated genes included antigen processing and presentation. Conclusion This is the first epigenome-wide DNA methylation study in pSS. Our data highlight a role for DNA methylation in pSS and identify disease-associated DNA methylation changes in several genes and pathways in naïve CD4+ T cells in pSS that may be involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:24574234

  14. Is Bone Loss Linked to Chronic Inflammation in Antiretroviral-Naïve HIV-Infected Adults? A 48 Week Matched Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    HILEMAN, Corrilynn O; LABBATO, Danielle E; STORER, Norma J; TANGPRICHA, Vin; MCCOMSEY, Grace A

    2015-01-01

    Objective Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been implicated in bone loss in HIV. The role of inflammation and vitamin D is unclear and better investigated in ART-naïve individuals. Design and Methods This is a 48-week, prospective, cohort study to compare baseline and change in hip and spine bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual energy Xray absorptiometry (DXA) in HIV-infected, ART-naïve adults and healthy controls matched by age, sex, and race. We also studied associations between bone loss and inflammation markers and plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) using logistic regression. Results 47 HIV-infected adults and 41 controls were included. Baseline 25(OH)D, BMD at total hip, trochanter, and spine, and prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis were similar between groups. In the HIV-infected group, total hip and trochanter, but not spine, BMD decreased over 48 weeks (hip −0.005 (−0.026-0.008)g/cm2, p=0.02 within-group; trochanter −0.013 (−0.03-0.003), p<0.01). BMD did not change at any site within controls. The HIV-infected group was more likely to have bone loss at the trochanter (p=0.03). This risk persisted after adjustment for age, sex, race, BMI, smoking, and hepatitis C (OR 4 (95% CI 1.2-15.8)). In the HIV-infected group, higher IL-6 concentrations (p=0.04) and Caucasian race (p<0.01) were independently associated with progression to osteopenia or osteoporosis, but not 25(OH)D levels. Conclusion BMD at the total hip and trochanter sites decreased in the HIV-infected, ART-naïve adults, but not controls, over this 48-week study. Higher serum IL-6 concentrations were associated with progression to osteopenia or osteoporosis status in the HIV-infected group. PMID:24871454

  15. Low-Frequency NNRTI-Resistant HIV-1 Variants and Relationship to Mutational Load in Antiretroviral-Naïve Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shaili; Lataillade, Max; Kyriakides, Tassos C.; Chiarella, Jennifer; St. John, Elizabeth P.; Webb, Suzin; Moreno, Elizabeth A.; Simen, Birgitte B.; Kozal, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Low-frequency HIV variants possessing resistance mutations against non‑nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI), especially at HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) amino acid (aa) positions K103 and Y181, have been shown to adversely affect treatment response. Therapeutic failure correlates with both the mutant viral variant frequency and the mutational load. We determined the prevalence of NNRTI resistance mutations at several RT aa positions in viruses from 204 antiretroviral (ARV)-naïve HIV-infected individuals using deep sequencing, and examined the relationship between mutant variant frequency and mutational load for those variants. Deep sequencing to ≥0.4% levels found variants with major NNRTI-resistance mutations having a Stanford-HIVdb algorithm value ≥30 for efavirenz and/or nevirapine in 52/204 (25.5%) ARV-naïve HIV-infected persons. Eighteen different major NNRTI mutations were identified at 11 different positions, with the majority of variants being at frequency >1%. The frequency of these variants correlated strongly with the mutational load, but this correlation weakened at low frequencies. Deep sequencing detected additional major NNRTI-resistant viral variants in treatment-naïve HIV-infected individuals. Our study suggests the significance of screening for mutations at all RT aa positions (in addition to K103 and Y181) to estimate the true burden of pre-treatment NNRTI-resistance. An important finding was that variants at low frequency had a wide range of mutational loads (>100-fold) suggesting that frequency alone may underestimate the impact of specific NNRTI-resistant variants. We recommend further evaluation of all low-frequency NNRTI-drug resistant variants with special attention given to the impact of mutational loads of these variants on treatment outcomes. PMID:25256391

  16. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Drug-Resistance Mutations in Chronically Infected Individuals Receiving or Naïve to HAART in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Burda, Sherri T.; Viswanath, Ragupathy; Zhao, Jiangqin; Kinge, Thompson; Anyangwe, Christopher; Tinyami, Erick T.; Haldar, Bijayesh; Powell, Rebecca L.R.; Jarido, Veronica; Hewlett, Indira K.; Nyambi, Phillipe N.

    2010-01-01

    The most common first-line, highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) received by individuals infected with HIV-1 in Cameroon is the combination therapy Triomune, comprised of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) and one non-NRTI (NNRTI). To examine the efficacy of these drugs in Cameroon, where diverse non-B HIV-1 subtypes and recombinant viruses predominate, the reverse transcriptase (RT) viral sequences in patient plasma were analyzed for the presence of mutations that confer drug resistance. Forty-nine HIV-1-positive individuals were randomly selected from those receiving care in HIV/AIDS outpatient clinics in the South-West and North-West Regions of Cameroon. Among the 28 patients receiving HAART, 39% (11/28) had resistance to NRTIs, and 46% (13/28) to NNRTIs after a median of 12 months from the start of therapy. Among those with drug-resistance mutations, there was a median of 14 months from the start of HAART, versus 9 months for those without; no difference was observed in the average viral load (10,997 copies/ml vs. 8,056 copies/ml). In contrast, drug-naïve individuals had a significantly higher average viral load (27,929 copies/ml) than those receiving HAART (9,527 copies/ml). Strikingly, among the 21 drug-naïve individuals, 24% harbored viruses with drug-resistance mutations, suggesting that HIV-1 drug-resistant variants are being transmitted in Cameroon. Given the high frequency of resistance mutations among those on first-line HAART, coupled with the high prevalence of HIV-1 variants with drug-resistance mutations among drug-naïve individuals, this study emphasizes the need for extensive monitoring of resistance mutations and the introduction of a second-line HAART strategy in Cameroon. PMID:20029816

  17. Brain structures implicated in the four-plate test in naïve and experienced Swiss mice using injection of diazepam and the 5-HT2A agonist DOI.

    PubMed

    Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Massé, Fabienne; Cogrel, Nicolas; Hascoët, Martine; Bourin, Michel

    2009-12-01

    Four-plate test-retest (FPT-R) is a useful tool to study aversive memory and abolishment of benzodiazepine effects in experienced mice to four-plate test (FPT), namely one-trial tolerance. In the present study, we have used local injections paradigm, in order to localize structures implied in anxiolytic-like effects of two drugs in naïve and experienced mice: a benzodiazepine, diazepam that is only active in naïve mice; and a 5-HT(2A/2C) agonist, DOI that exert its anxiolytic-like effect both in naïve and experienced mice. Periacqueductal grey substance, three sub-regions of hippocampus (CA1, CA2 and CA3) and two nuclei of amygdala (BLA and LA) have been studied. Local injections did not cause any modifications of ambulatory activity. DOI injections elicit anxiolytic-like effects only when injected into CA2, in naïve and experienced mice. Diazepam had an anxiolytic-like effect in naïve mice, only when injected into lateral nucleus of amygdala; and in experienced mice when injected into PAG. These results help us to better understand the way of action of these two compounds and the structures functionally involved in their effects and in one-trial tolerance (OTT).

  18. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Mutations in Treatment Naïve and Experienced Panamanian Subjects: Impact on National Use of EFV-Based Schemes.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Yaxelis; Castillo Mewa, Juan; Martínez, Alexander A; Zaldívar, Yamitzel; Sosa, Néstor; Arteaga, Griselda; Armién, Blas; Bautista, Christian T; García-Morales, Claudia; Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Bello, Gonzalo; Pascale, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    The use of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected subjects prevents AIDS-related illness and delayed occurrence of death. In Panama, rollout of ART started in 1999 and national coverage has reached 62.8% since then. The objective of this study was to determine the level and patterns of acquired drug resistance mutations of clinical relevance (ADR-CRM) and surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) from 717 HIV-1 pol gene sequences obtained from 467 ARV drug-experienced and 250 ARV drug-naïve HIV-1 subtypes B infected subjects during 2007-2013, respectively. The overall prevalence of SDRM and of ADR-CRM during the study period was 9.2% and 87.6%, respectively. The majority of subjects with ADR-CRM had a pattern of mutations that confer resistance to at least two classes of ARV inhibitors. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations K103N and P225H were more prevalent in both ARV drug-naïve and ARV drug-experienced subjects. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation M184V was more frequent in ARV drug-experienced individuals, while T215YFrev and M41L were more frequent in ARV drug-naïve subjects. Prevalence of mutations associated to protease inhibitors (PI) was lower than 4.1% in both types of subjects. Therefore, there is a high level of resistance (>73%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine, Lamivudine and Azidothymidine in ARV drug-experienced subjects, and an intermediate to high level of resistance (5-10%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine in ARV drug-naïve subjects. During the study period, we observed an increasing trend in the prevalence of ADR-CRM in subjects under first-line schemes, but not significant changes in the prevalence of SDRM. These results reinforce the paramount importance of a national surveillance system of ADR-CRM and SDRM for national management policies of subjects living with HIV.

  19. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Mutations in Treatment Naïve and Experienced Panamanian Subjects: Impact on National Use of EFV-Based Schemes.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Yaxelis; Castillo Mewa, Juan; Martínez, Alexander A; Zaldívar, Yamitzel; Sosa, Néstor; Arteaga, Griselda; Armién, Blas; Bautista, Christian T; García-Morales, Claudia; Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Bello, Gonzalo; Pascale, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    The use of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected subjects prevents AIDS-related illness and delayed occurrence of death. In Panama, rollout of ART started in 1999 and national coverage has reached 62.8% since then. The objective of this study was to determine the level and patterns of acquired drug resistance mutations of clinical relevance (ADR-CRM) and surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) from 717 HIV-1 pol gene sequences obtained from 467 ARV drug-experienced and 250 ARV drug-naïve HIV-1 subtypes B infected subjects during 2007-2013, respectively. The overall prevalence of SDRM and of ADR-CRM during the study period was 9.2% and 87.6%, respectively. The majority of subjects with ADR-CRM had a pattern of mutations that confer resistance to at least two classes of ARV inhibitors. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations K103N and P225H were more prevalent in both ARV drug-naïve and ARV drug-experienced subjects. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation M184V was more frequent in ARV drug-experienced individuals, while T215YFrev and M41L were more frequent in ARV drug-naïve subjects. Prevalence of mutations associated to protease inhibitors (PI) was lower than 4.1% in both types of subjects. Therefore, there is a high level of resistance (>73%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine, Lamivudine and Azidothymidine in ARV drug-experienced subjects, and an intermediate to high level of resistance (5-10%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine in ARV drug-naïve subjects. During the study period, we observed an increasing trend in the prevalence of ADR-CRM in subjects under first-line schemes, but not significant changes in the prevalence of SDRM. These results reinforce the paramount importance of a national surveillance system of ADR-CRM and SDRM for national management policies of subjects living with HIV. PMID:27119150

  20. Comparison of efavirenz and protease inhibitor based combination antiretroviral therapy regimens in treatment-naïve people living with HIV with baseline resistance.

    PubMed

    Lim, Charlotte; McFaul, Katie; Kabagambe, Samuel; Sonecha, Sonali; Jones, Rachael; Asboe, David; Pozniak, Anton; Nwokolo, Nneka; Boffito, Marta

    2016-07-17

    A retrospective cohort analysis comparing the efficacy of boosted protease inhibitor-based and efavirenz-based combination antiretroviral therapy in treatment-naïve people living with HIV with baseline resistance found that efavirenz-based treatment led to a shorter mean time to undetectable viral load. A higher proportion of patients with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor related baseline resistance mutations in the efavirenz-treatment group achieved an undetectable viral load at both 6 and 12 months post-treatment initiation, compared with the boosted protease-inhibitor-treatment group.Supplementary content: http://links.lww.com/QAD/A930. PMID:27139315

  1. Increasing HIV-1 pretreatment drug resistance among antiretroviral-naïve adults initiating treatment between 2006 and 2014 in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Chung, Michael H; Silverman, Rachel; Beck, Ingrid A; Yatich, Nelly; Dross, Sandra; McKernan-Mullin, Jennifer; Bii, Stephen; Tapia, Kenneth; Stern, Joshua; Chohan, Bhavna; Sakr, Samah R; Kiarie, James N; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2016-06-19

    Antiretroviral-naïve adults initiating antiretroviral therapy in Nairobi, Kenya were tested for HIV-1 drug resistance at codons K103N, Y181C, G190A, M184V, and K65R using an oligonucleotide ligation assay. Prevalence of pretreatment drug resistance increased from 3.89% in 2006 to 10.93% in 2014 (P < 0.001), and 95% of those with resistance had at least one nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation. Resistance to tenofovir (K65R) was found in 2014 but not in 2006. PMID:27058353

  2. Quantitative hepatitis B core antibody level is associated with inflammatory activity in treatment-naïve chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Min-Ran; Lu, Jian-Hua; Ye, Li-Hong; Sun, Xing-Li; Zheng, Yan-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Quan; Zhang, Hai-Cong; Liu, Yun-Yan; Lv, Ying; Huang, Yan; Dai, Er-Hei

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) levels vary during different phases of disease in treatment-naïve chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients and can be used as a predictor of both interferon-α and nucleoside analogue therapy response. However, there is no information on the association between the quantitative serum anti-HBc (qAnti-HBc) level and liver inflammation in CHB patients. Therefore, we investigated these relationships in a large cohort of treatment-naïve CHB patients. A total of 624 treatment-naïve CHB patients were included in the study. The serum qAnti-HBc level was moderately correlated with ALT and AST levels (P < 0.001) in both hepatitis B e antigen-positive (HBeAg [+]) and HBeAg-negative (HBeAg [-]) CHB patients. CHB patients with no to mild inflammation (G0-1) had significantly lower serum qAnti-HBc levels than patients with moderate to severe inflammation (G2-4) (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis suggested that a serum qAnti-HBc cut-off value of 4.36 log10 IU/mL provided a sensitivity of 71.68%, specificity of 73.81%, positive predictive value of 78.43%, and negative predictive value of 66.24% in HBeAg (+) CHB patients with moderate to severe inflammation (G≥2). A cut-off value of 4.62 log10 IU/mL provided a sensitivity of 54.29%, specificity of 90.00%, positive predictive value of 95.00%, and negative predictive value of 36.00% in HBeAg (-) CHB patients with moderate to severe inflammation (G≥2). Serum qAnti-HBc levels were positively associated with liver inflammation grade. Furthermore, we identified optimal serum qAnti-HBc cut-off values for the prediction of inflammation activity in both HBeAg (+) and HBeAg (-) treatment-naïve CHB patients. PMID:27559949

  3. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Mutations in Treatment Naïve and Experienced Panamanian Subjects: Impact on National Use of EFV-Based Schemes

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Yaxelis; Castillo Mewa, Juan; Martínez, Alexander A.; Zaldívar, Yamitzel; Sosa, Néstor; Arteaga, Griselda; Armién, Blas; Bautista, Christian T.; García-Morales, Claudia; Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Bello, Gonzalo; Pascale, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected subjects prevents AIDS-related illness and delayed occurrence of death. In Panama, rollout of ART started in 1999 and national coverage has reached 62.8% since then. The objective of this study was to determine the level and patterns of acquired drug resistance mutations of clinical relevance (ADR-CRM) and surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) from 717 HIV-1 pol gene sequences obtained from 467 ARV drug-experienced and 250 ARV drug-naïve HIV-1 subtypes B infected subjects during 2007–2013, respectively. The overall prevalence of SDRM and of ADR-CRM during the study period was 9.2% and 87.6%, respectively. The majority of subjects with ADR-CRM had a pattern of mutations that confer resistance to at least two classes of ARV inhibitors. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations K103N and P225H were more prevalent in both ARV drug-naïve and ARV drug-experienced subjects. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation M184V was more frequent in ARV drug-experienced individuals, while T215YFrev and M41L were more frequent in ARV drug-naïve subjects. Prevalence of mutations associated to protease inhibitors (PI) was lower than 4.1% in both types of subjects. Therefore, there is a high level of resistance (>73%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine, Lamivudine and Azidothymidine in ARV drug-experienced subjects, and an intermediate to high level of resistance (5–10%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine in ARV drug-naïve subjects. During the study period, we observed an increasing trend in the prevalence of ADR-CRM in subjects under first-line schemes, but not significant changes in the prevalence of SDRM. These results reinforce the paramount importance of a national surveillance system of ADR-CRM and SDRM for national management policies of subjects living with HIV. PMID:27119150

  4. Naïve Learners Show Cross-Domain Transfer after Distributional Learning: The Case of Lexical and Musical Pitch

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Jia Hoong; Burnham, Denis; Stevens, Catherine J.; Escudero, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Experienced listeners of a particular acoustic cue in either speech or music appear to have an advantage when perceiving a similar cue in the other domain (i.e., they exhibit cross-domain transfer). One explanation for cross-domain transfer relates to the acquisition of the foundations of speech and music: if acquiring pitch-based elements in speech or music results in heightened attention to pitch in general, then cross-domain transfer of pitch may be observed, which may explain the cross-domain phenomenon seen among listeners of a tone language and listeners with musical training. Here, we investigate this possibility in naïve adult learners, who were trained to acquire pitch-based elements using a distributional learning paradigm, to provide a proof-of-concept for the explanation. Learners were exposed to a stimulus distribution spanning either a Thai lexical tone minimal pair or a novel musical chord minimal pair. Within each domain, the distribution highlights pitch to facilitate learning of two different sounds (Bimodal distribution) or the distribution minimizes pitch so that the input is inferred to be from a single sound (Unimodal distribution). Learning was assessed before and after exposure to the distribution using discrimination tasks with both Thai tone and musical chord minimal pairs. We hypothesize: (i) distributional learning for learners in both the tone and the chord distributions, that is, pre-to-post improvement in discrimination after exposure to the Bimodal but not the Unimodal distribution; and (ii) for both the tone and chord conditions, learners in the Bimodal conditions but not those in the Unimodal conditions will show cross-domain transfer, as indexed by improvement in discrimination of test items in the domain other than what they were trained on. The results support both hypotheses, suggesting that distributional learning is not only used to acquire the foundations of speech and music, but may also play a role in cross

  5. Naïve Learners Show Cross-Domain Transfer after Distributional Learning: The Case of Lexical and Musical Pitch.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jia Hoong; Burnham, Denis; Stevens, Catherine J; Escudero, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Experienced listeners of a particular acoustic cue in either speech or music appear to have an advantage when perceiving a similar cue in the other domain (i.e., they exhibit cross-domain transfer). One explanation for cross-domain transfer relates to the acquisition of the foundations of speech and music: if acquiring pitch-based elements in speech or music results in heightened attention to pitch in general, then cross-domain transfer of pitch may be observed, which may explain the cross-domain phenomenon seen among listeners of a tone language and listeners with musical training. Here, we investigate this possibility in naïve adult learners, who were trained to acquire pitch-based elements using a distributional learning paradigm, to provide a proof-of-concept for the explanation. Learners were exposed to a stimulus distribution spanning either a Thai lexical tone minimal pair or a novel musical chord minimal pair. Within each domain, the distribution highlights pitch to facilitate learning of two different sounds (Bimodal distribution) or the distribution minimizes pitch so that the input is inferred to be from a single sound (Unimodal distribution). Learning was assessed before and after exposure to the distribution using discrimination tasks with both Thai tone and musical chord minimal pairs. We hypothesize: (i) distributional learning for learners in both the tone and the chord distributions, that is, pre-to-post improvement in discrimination after exposure to the Bimodal but not the Unimodal distribution; and (ii) for both the tone and chord conditions, learners in the Bimodal conditions but not those in the Unimodal conditions will show cross-domain transfer, as indexed by improvement in discrimination of test items in the domain other than what they were trained on. The results support both hypotheses, suggesting that distributional learning is not only used to acquire the foundations of speech and music, but may also play a role in cross

  6. Immunologic response in treatment-naïve HIV-2-infected patients: the IeDEA West Africa cohort

    PubMed Central

    Balestre, Eric; Ekouevi, Didier Koumavi; Tchounga, Boris; Eholie, Serge Paul; Messou, Eugène; Sawadogo, Adrien; Thiébaut, Rodolphe; May, Margaret T; Sterne, Jonathan Ac; Dabis, François

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among individuals infected with HIV-2 is poorly described. We compared the immunological response among patients treated with three nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) to boosted protease inhibitor (PI) and unboosted PI-based regimens in West Africa. Methods This prospective cohort study enrolled treatment-naïve HIV-2-infected patients within the International Epidemiological Databases to Evaluate AIDS collaboration in West Africa. We used mixed models to compare the CD4 count response to treatment over 12 months between regimens. Results Of 422 HIV-2-infected patients, 285 (67.5%) were treated with a boosted PI-based regimen, 104 (24.6%) with an unboosted PI-based regimen and 33 (7.8%) with three NRTIs. Treatment groups were comparable with regard to gender (54.5% female) and median age at ART initiation (45.3 years; interquartile range 38.3 to 51.8). Treatment groups differed by clinical stage (21.2%, 16.8% and 17.3% at CDC Stage C or World Health Organization Stage IV for the triple NRTI, boosted PI and unboosted PI groups, respectively, p=0.02), median length of follow-up (12.9, 17.7 and 44.0 months for the triple NRTI, the boosted PI and the unboosted PI groups, respectively, p<0.001) and baseline median CD4 count (192, 173 and 129 cells/µl in the triple NRTI, the boosted PI and the unboosted PI-based regimen groups, respectively, p=0.003). CD4 count recovery at 12 months was higher for patients treated with boosted PI-based regimens than those treated with three NRTIs or with unboosted PI-based regimens (191 cells/µl, 95% CI 142 to 241; 110 cells/µl, 95% CI 29 to 192; 133 cells/µl, 95% CI 80 to 186, respectively, p=0.004). Conclusions In this observational study using African data, boosted PI-containing regimens had better immunological response compared to triple NRTI combinations and unboosted PI-based regimens at 12 months. A randomized clinical trial is still required to determine

  7. Renal involvement in lupus is characterized by unique DNA methylation changes in naïve CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Coit, Patrick; Renauer, Paul; Jeffries, Matlock A; Merrill, Joan T; McCune, W Joseph; Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen; Sawalha, Amr H

    2015-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a multi-system disease characterized by wide-spread DNA methylation changes. To identify epigenetic susceptibility loci for lupus nephritis, genome-wide DNA methylation changes in naïve CD4+ T cells were compared between two sets of lupus patients with and without a history of renal involvement. A total of 56 lupus patients (28 with renal involvement and 28 without renal involvement), and 56 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched healthy controls were included in our study. We identified 191 CG sites and 121 genes that were only differentially methylated in lupus patients with but not without a history of renal involvement. The tyrosine kinase gene TNK2 involved in cell trafficking and tissue invasion, and the phosphatase gene DUSP5 which dephosphorylates and inhibits the ERK signaling pathway, were among the most hypomethylated. Independent of disease activity, renal involvement is characterized by more robust demethylation in interferon regulated genes differentially methylated in both sets of lupus patients with and without renal involvement (fold change 1.4, P = 0.0014). The type-I interferon master regulator gene IRF7 is only hypomethylated in lupus patients with renal involvement. IRF-7 is an upstream transcription factor that regulates several loci demethylated only with renal involvement such as CD80, HERC5, IFI44, IRF7, ISG15, ISG20, ITGAX, and PARP12 (P = 1.78 × 10(-6)). Among the CG sites only hypomethylated with renal involvement, CG10152449 in CHST12 has a sensitivity of 85.7% and a specificity of 64.3% for stratifying lupus patients for a history of renal involvement (P = 0.0029). Our data identified novel epigenetic susceptibility loci that are differentially methylated with renal involvement in lupus. These loci will help better understand lupus nephritis, and provide a proof of principle for the potential applicability of specific methylation changes as predictors for specific organ involvement in lupus. PMID

  8. Knocking on Heaven's Door: Are Novel Invaders Necessarily Facing Naïve Native Species on Islands?

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Agathe; Jourdan, Hervé; Millon, Alexandre; Vidal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The impact of alien predator species on insular native biota has often been attributed to island prey naïveté (i.e. lack of, or inefficient, anti-predator behavior). Only rarely, however, has the concept of island prey naïveté been tested, and then only a posteriori (i.e. hundreds or thousands of years after alien species introduction). The presence of native or anciently introduced predators or competitors may be crucial for the recognition and development of adaptive behavior toward unknown predators or competitors of the same archetype (i.e. a set of species that occupy a similar ecological niche and show similar morphological and behavioral traits when interacting with other species). Here, we tested whether two squamates endemic to New Caledonia, a skink, Caledoniscincus austrocaledonicus, and a gecko, Bavayia septuiclavis, recognized and responded to the odor of two major invaders introduced into the Pacific islands, but not yet into New Caledonia. We chose one predator, the small Indian mongoose Herpestes javanicus and one competitor, the cane toad Rhinella marina, which belong respectively to the same archetype as the following two species already introduced into New Caledonia in the nineteenth century: the feral cat Felis catus and the golden bell frog Litoria aurea. Our experiment reveals that geckos are naïve with respect to the odors of both an unknown predator and an unknown competitor, as well as to the odors of a predator and a competitor they have lived with for centuries. In contrast, skinks seem to have lost some naïveté regarding the odor of a predator they have lived with for centuries and seem “predisposed” to avoid the odor of an unknown potential competitor. These results indicate that insular species living in contact with invasive alien species for centuries may be, although not systematically, predisposed toward developing adaptive behavior with respect to species belonging to the same archetype and introduced into their native

  9. VE-Suite

    2006-10-01

    an open source virtual engineering software toolkit that simplifies information management so users can simultaneously interact with engineering analyses and graphical models to create a virtual decision-making environment.

  10. Naïve Students' Conceptual Development and Beliefs: The Need for Multiple Analyses to Determine what Contributes to Student Success in a University Introductory Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hye-Eun; Treagust, David F.; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    This research involved naïve physics learners who were interested in majoring in science or engineering. In a semester-long quasi-experimental study, open-ended pretests and weekly interviews were used to analyse the progressive development of students’ conceptions relating to sound and wave motion. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted to elucidate: (1) how their conceptions developed from everyday conceptions to unclear scientific conceptions to scientific conceptions, and (2) their beliefs of physics knowledge. Despite efforts to enable these students to learn physics, the findings showed that only two out of ten students developed acceptable physics conceptions during the course that would enable them to pursue the subject to a higher level. Also, students’ conceptual development was found to be related to their cognitive understanding and to epistemological beliefs of physics. Therefore, to facilitate naïve physics learners’ success in a general physics course, in addition to the acquisition of content knowledge, explicit emphasis needs to be placed on the nature of physics knowledge.

  11. Successful closure of treatment-naïve, flat edge (Type II), full-thickness macular hole using inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Nazimul; Hussain, Anjli

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to present the outcome of the internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling flap technique for a treatment-naïve, flat edge (Type II), full-thickness macular hole (MH). Methods A 52-year-old man presented with complaints of decreased vision and seeing black spot. He was diagnosed to have a flat edge, full-thickness MH, which was confirmed by optical coherence tomography (OCT). He underwent 23G vitrectomy with brilliant blue G-assisted inverted ILM peeling with an inverted flap over the hole followed by fluid gas exchange. Results Postoperative follow-up until 3 months showed successful closure of the MH, which was confirmed by OCT. The best-corrected visual acuity improved from baseline 6/60 to 6/12 at the final follow-up. Conclusion Using the inverted ILM flap technique, a treatment-naïve, flat edge (Type II), full thickness MH achieved successful anatomical and functional outcomes. PMID:27785110

  12. Wood identification of Dalbergia nigra (CITES Appendix I) using quantitative wood anatomy, principal components analysis and naïve Bayes classification

    PubMed Central

    Gasson, Peter; Miller, Regis; Stekel, Dov J.; Whinder, Frances; Ziemińska, Kasia

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Dalbergia nigra is one of the most valuable timber species of its genus, having been traded for over 300 years. Due to over-exploitation it is facing extinction and trade has been banned under CITES Appendix I since 1992. Current methods, primarily comparative wood anatomy, are inadequate for conclusive species identification. This study aims to find a set of anatomical characters that distinguish the wood of D. nigra from other commercially important species of Dalbergia from Latin America. Methods Qualitative and quantitative wood anatomy, principal components analysis and naïve Bayes classification were conducted on 43 specimens of Dalbergia, eight D. nigra and 35 from six other Latin American species. Key Results Dalbergia cearensis and D. miscolobium can be distinguished from D. nigra on the basis of vessel frequency for the former, and ray frequency for the latter. Principal components analysis was unable to provide any further basis for separating the species. Naïve Bayes classification using the four characters: minimum vessel diameter; frequency of solitary vessels; mean ray width; and frequency of axially fused rays, classified all eight D. nigra correctly with no false negatives, but there was a false positive rate of 36·36 %. Conclusions Wood anatomy alone cannot distinguish D. nigra from all other commercially important Dalbergia species likely to be encountered by customs officials, but can be used to reduce the number of specimens that would need further study. PMID:19884155

  13. Activation Outcomes Induced in Naïve CD8 T-Cells by Macrophages Primed via “Phagocytic” and Nonphagocytic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Olazabal, Isabel María; Martín-Cofreces, Noa Beatriz; Mittelbrunn, María; Martínez del Hoyo, Gloria; Alarcón, Balbino

    2008-01-01

    The array of phagocytic receptors expressed by macrophages make them very efficient at pathogen clearance, and the phagocytic process links innate with adaptive immunity. Primary macrophages modulate antigen cross-presentation and T-cell activation. We assessed ex vivo the putative role of different phagocytic receptors in immune synapse formation with CD8 naïve T-cells from OT-I transgenic mice and compared this with the administration of antigen as a soluble peptide. Macrophages that have phagocytosed antigen induce T-cell microtubule-organizing center and F-actin cytoskeleton relocalization to the contact site, as well as the recruitment of proximal T-cell receptor signals such as activated Vav1 and PKCθ. At the same doses of loaded antigen (1 μM), “phagocytic” macrophages were more efficient than peptide-antigen–loaded macrophages at forming productive immune synapses with T-cells, as indicated by active T-cell TCR/CD3 conformation, LAT phosphorylation, IL-2 production, and T-cell proliferation. Similar T-cell proliferation efficiency was obtained when low doses of soluble peptide (3–30 nM) were loaded on macrophages. These results suggest that the pathway used for antigen uptake may modulate the antigen density presented on MHC-I, resulting in different signals induced in naïve CD8 T-cells, leading either to CD8 T-cell activation or anergy. PMID:18077558

  14. Inability to demonstrate fish-to-fish transmission of Ichthyophonus from laboratory infected Pacific herring Clupea pallasii to naïve conspecifics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregg, J.L.; Grady, C.A.; Friedman, C.S.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    The parasite Ichthyophonus is enzootic in many marine fish populations of the northern Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Forage fishes are a likely source of infection for higher trophic level predators; however, the processes that maintain Ichthyophonus in forage fish populations (primarily clupeids) are not well understood. Lack of an identified intermediate host has led to the convenient hypothesis that the parasite can be maintained within populations of schooling fishes by waterborne fish-to-fish transmission. To test this hypothesis we established Ichthyophonus infections in Age-1 and young-of-the-year (YOY) Pacific herring Clupea pallasii (Valenciennes) via intraperitoneal (IP) injection and cohabitated these donors with naïve conspecifics (sentinels) in the laboratory. IP injections established infection in 75 to 84% of donor herring, and this exposure led to clinical disease and mortality in the YOY cohort. However, after cohabitation for 113 d no infections were detected in naïve sentinels. These data do not preclude the possibility of fish-to-fish transmission, but they do suggest that other transmission processes are necessary to maintain Ichthyophonus in wild Pacific herring populations.

  15. An explanatory analysis of driver injury severity in rear-end crashes using a decision table/Naïve Bayes (DTNB) hybrid classifier.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong; Zhang, Guohui; Yang, Jinfu; Milton, John C; Alcántara, Adélamar Dely

    2016-05-01

    Rear-end crashes are a major type of traffic crashes in the U.S. Of practical necessity is a comprehensive examination of its mechanism that results in injuries and fatalities. Decision table (DT) and Naïve Bayes (NB) methods have both been used widely but separately for solving classification problems in multiple areas except for traffic safety research. Based on a two-year rear-end crash dataset, this paper applies a decision table/Naïve Bayes (DTNB) hybrid classifier to select the deterministic attributes and predict driver injury outcomes in rear-end crashes. The test results show that the hybrid classifier performs reasonably well, which was indicated by several performance evaluation measurements, such as accuracy, F-measure, ROC, and AUC. Fifteen significant attributes were found to be significant in predicting driver injury severities, including weather, lighting conditions, road geometry characteristics, driver behavior information, etc. The extracted decision rules demonstrate that heavy vehicle involvement, a comfortable traffic environment, inferior lighting conditions, two-lane rural roadways, vehicle disabled damage, and two-vehicle crashes would increase the likelihood of drivers sustaining fatal injuries. The research limitations on data size, data structure, and result presentation are also summarized. The applied methodology and estimation results provide insights for developing effective countermeasures to alleviate rear-end crash injury severities and improve traffic system safety performance.

  16. Live imaging of X chromosome reactivation dynamics in early mouse development can discriminate naïve from primed pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shin; Hosoi, Yusuke; Shiura, Hirosuke; Yamagata, Kazuo; Takahashi, Saori; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Kohda, Takashi; Okabe, Masaru; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2016-08-15

    Pluripotent stem cells can be classified into two distinct states, naïve and primed, which show different degrees of potency. One difficulty in stem cell research is the inability to distinguish these states in live cells. Studies on female mice have shown that reactivation of inactive X chromosomes occurs in the naïve state, while one of the X chromosomes is inactivated in the primed state. Therefore, we aimed to distinguish the two states by monitoring X chromosome reactivation. Thus far, X chromosome reactivation has been analysed using fixed cells; here, we inserted different fluorescent reporter gene cassettes (mCherry and eGFP) into each X chromosome. Using these knock-in 'Momiji' mice, we detected X chromosome reactivation accurately in live embryos, and confirmed that the pluripotent states of embryos were stable ex vivo, as represented by embryonic and epiblast stem cells in terms of X chromosome reactivation. Thus, Momiji mice provide a simple and accurate method for identifying stem cell status based on X chromosome reactivation.

  17. Chilades pandava mothers discriminate among Cycas species during oviposition choice tests, but only in an endemic naïve population.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Lindström, Anders J; Marler, Paris N

    2016-08-01

    Host and non-host plant species communicate with insect herbivores to influence oviposition decisions. We studied if Chilades pandava female adults expressed oviposition preferences among host Cycas species in 2 choice tests, counting 39,420 eggs among assays from 4 butterfly populations. A naïve butterfly population from Cycas nongnoochiae habitat oviposited 2.2-fold more eggs on leaves of Cycas species that are susceptible to butterfly herbivory than on leaves of its native host Cycas nongnoochiae. In contrast, Chilades pandava populations experienced with novel Cycas species in Thailand, Philippines, and Guam exhibited no preference in choice tests between leaves of susceptible versus leaves of minimally damaged Cycas species. The results indicated that oviposition deterrents and/or stimulants partly mediate the sustainable relationship between an endemic Cycas species and the naïve Chilades pandava population from its habitat. Alternatively, differences in infochemicals among Cycas species do not enable discrimination in oviposition choices for Chilades pandava populations that have experienced Cycas species exhibiting no evolutionary history with Chilades pandava. PMID:27391307

  18. ve-SEQ: Robust, unbiased enrichment for streamlined detection and whole-genome sequencing of HCV and other highly diverse pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Trebes, Amy; Brown, Anthony; Klenerman, Paul; Buck, David; Piazza, Paolo; Barnes, Eleanor; Bowden, Rory

    2015-01-01

    The routine availability of high-depth virus sequence data would allow the sensitive detection of resistance-associated variants that can jeopardize HIV or hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment. We introduce ve-SEQ, a high-throughput method for sequence-specific enrichment and characterization of whole-virus genomes at up to 20% divergence from a reference sequence and 1,000-fold greater sensitivity than direct sequencing. The extreme genetic diversity of HCV led us to implement an algorithm for the efficient design of panels of oligonucleotide probes to capture any sequence among a defined set of targets without detectable bias. ve-SEQ enables efficient detection and sequencing of any HCV genome, including mixtures and intra-host variants, in a single experiment, with greater tolerance of sequence diversity than standard amplification methods and greater sensitivity than metagenomic sequencing, features that are directly applicable to other pathogens or arbitrary groups of target organisms, allowing the combination of sensitive detection with sequencing in many settings. PMID:27092241

  19. Bimatoprost/timolol fixed combination versus latanoprost in treatment-naïve glaucoma patients at high risk of progression: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Diaz, Esperanza; Silva Cotta, Jose; Muñoz-Negrete, Francisco J; Gutierrez-Ortiz, Consuelo; Morgan-Warren, Robert J; Maltman, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare a fixed combination of 0.03% bimatoprost and 0.5% timolol (BTFC) with latanoprost monotherapy (LM) in treatment-naïve patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) and risk factors for glaucomatous progression. Methods Patients were enrolled at 15 sites in Spain and Portugal, and were randomized 1:1 to BTFC or LM. Patients instilled one drop of medication once per day at 8 pm for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was change in intraocular pressure (IOP) at 12 weeks. Results Of 81 patients enrolled, 43 were randomized to BTFC and 38 to LM. Mean (SD) change in IOP from baseline to 12 weeks was significantly greater for BTFC than for LM: −13.5 mmHg (4.48) versus −11.4 mmHg (3.19), respectively (P=0.003). Similarly, at 12 weeks, significantly more BTFC patients than LM patients had IOP reductions of ≥40% (74.4% versus 47.4%, P=0.015) or ≥50% (46.5% versus 15.8%, P=0.003). Adverse events were more frequent with BTFC than with LM (33 versus 13 events), but most were mild in severity. The only serious adverse event (colon cancer) was adjudged unrelated to the study medication. Conclusion BTFC was effective and well tolerated in treatment-naïve patients with OAG at high risk of progression. PMID:24748767

  20. The frequency of naïve and early-activated hapten-specific B cell subsets dictates the efficacy of a therapeutic vaccine against prescription opioid abuse

    PubMed Central

    Laudenbach, Megan; Baruffaldi, Federico; Vervacke, Jeffrey S; Distefano, Mark D; Titcombe, Philip J; Mueller, Daniel L; Tubo, Noah J; Griffith, Thomas S; Pravetoni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Translation of therapeutic vaccines for addiction, cancer or other chronic non-communicable diseases has been slow because only a small subset of immunized subjects achieved effective antibody levels. We hypothesize that individual variability in the number of naïve and early-activated hapten-specific B cells determines post-vaccination serum antibody levels and vaccine efficacy. Using a model vaccine against the highly abused prescription opioid oxycodone, the polyclonal B cell population specific for an oxycodone-based hapten (6OXY) was analyzed by flow cytometry paired with antigen-based magnetic enrichment. A higher frequency of 6OXY-specific B cells in either spleen biopsies or blood, before and after immunization, correlated to subsequent greater oxycodone-specific serum antibody titers and their efficacy in blocking oxycodone distribution to the brain and oxycodone-induced behavior in mice. The magnitude of 6OXY-specific B cell activation and vaccine efficacy was tightly correlated to the size of the CD4+ T cell population. The frequency of enriched 6OXY-specific B cells was consistent across various mouse tissues. These data provide novel evidence that variations in the frequency of naïve or early-activated vaccine-specific B and T cells can account for individual responses to vaccines and may predict the clinical efficacy of a therapeutic vaccine. PMID:25972483

  1. Recruitment in HIV/AIDS treatment naïve clinical trials in the HAART era - influence of gender, sexual orientation and race

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, P; Eron, JJ; Leone, PA; Adimora, AA; Wohl, DA; Miller, WC

    2010-01-01

    Background In the United States, women, racial/ethnic minorities and persons who acquire HIV infection through heterosexual intercourse represent an increasing proportion of HIV infected persons, yet are frequently underrepresented in clinical trials. We assessed the demographic predictors of trial participation in antiretroviral naïve patients. Methods Patients were characterized as trial participants if highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was initiated within a clinical trial. Prevalence ratios (PR) were obtained using binomial regression. Results Between 1996–2006, 30% of 738 treatment naïve patients initiated HAART in a clinical trial. Trial participation rates for MSM, heterosexual men, and women were respectively 36.5%, 29.6% and 24.3%. After adjustment for other factors, heterosexual men appeared less likely to participate in trials compared to MSM (PR: 0.79, 95%CI 0.57, 1.11) while women were as likely to participate as MSM (PR 0.97, 95%CI 0.68, 1.39). The participation rate in blacks (25.9%) was lower compared to non-blacks (37.5%) (adjusted PR 0.80, 95%CI 0.60, 1.06). Conclusions In our clinical setting gender did not appear to impact participation in HIV treatment trials but blacks were slightly less likely to participate in these trials. Considering the substantial proportion of HIV patients who are black, future trials need to consider strategies to incorporate underrepresented populations. PMID:20807254

  2. The RNA-binding protein quaking maintains endothelial barrier function and affects VE-cadherin and β-catenin protein expression.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Ruben G; van der Veer, Eric P; Prins, Jurriën; Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J C; Zhang, Huayu; Roeten, Marko K; Bijkerk, Roel; de Boer, Hetty C; Rabelink, Ton J; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van Gils, Janine M

    2016-02-24

    Proper regulation of endothelial cell-cell contacts is essential for physiological functioning of the endothelium. Interendothelial junctions are actively involved in the control of vascular leakage, leukocyte diapedesis, and the initiation and progression of angiogenesis. We found that the RNA-binding protein quaking is highly expressed by endothelial cells, and that its expression was augmented by prolonged culture under laminar flow and the transcription factor KLF2 binding to the promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that quaking directly binds to the mRNA of VE-cadherin and β-catenin and can induce mRNA translation mediated by the 3'UTR of these genes. Reduced quaking levels attenuated VE-cadherin and β-catenin expression and endothelial barrier function in vitro and resulted in increased bradykinin-induced vascular leakage in vivo. Taken together, we report that quaking is essential in maintaining endothelial barrier function. Our results provide novel insight into the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling vascular integrity.

  3. The VeTOOLS Project: an example of how to strengthen collaboration between scientists and Civil Protections in disaster risk reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Joan; Bartolini, Stefania; Becerril, Laura

    2016-04-01

    VeTOOLS is a project funded by the European Commission's Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection department (ECHO), and aims at creating an integrated software platform specially designed to assess and manage volcanic risk. The project facilitates interaction and cooperation between scientists and Civil Protection Agencies in order to share, unify, and exchange procedures, methodologies and technologies to effectively reduce the impacts of volcanic disasters. The project aims at 1) improving and developing volcanic risk assessment and management capacities in active volcanic regions; 2) developing universal methodologies, scenario definitions, response strategies and alert protocols to cope with the full range of volcanic threats; 4) improving quantitative methods and tools for vulnerability and risk assessment; and 5) defining thresholds and protocols for civil protection. With these objectives, the VeTOOLS project points to two of the Sendai Framework resolutions for implementing it: i) Provide guidance on methodologies and standards for risk assessments, disaster risk modelling and the use of data; ii) Promote and support the availability and application of science and technology to decision-making, and offers a good example on how a close collaboration between science and civil protection is an effective way to contribute to DRR. European Commission ECHO Grant SI2.695524

  4. The RNA-binding protein quaking maintains endothelial barrier function and affects VE-cadherin and β-catenin protein expression

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Ruben G.; van der Veer, Eric P.; Prins, Jurriën; Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J. C.; Zhang, Huayu; Roeten, Marko K.; Bijkerk, Roel; de Boer, Hetty C.; Rabelink, Ton J.; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van Gils, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    Proper regulation of endothelial cell-cell contacts is essential for physiological functioning of the endothelium. Interendothelial junctions are actively involved in the control of vascular leakage, leukocyte diapedesis, and the initiation and progression of angiogenesis. We found that the RNA-binding protein quaking is highly expressed by endothelial cells, and that its expression was augmented by prolonged culture under laminar flow and the transcription factor KLF2 binding to the promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that quaking directly binds to the mRNA of VE-cadherin and β-catenin and can induce mRNA translation mediated by the 3′UTR of these genes. Reduced quaking levels attenuated VE-cadherin and β-catenin expression and endothelial barrier function in vitro and resulted in increased bradykinin-induced vascular leakage in vivo. Taken together, we report that quaking is essential in maintaining endothelial barrier function. Our results provide novel insight into the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling vascular integrity. PMID:26905650

  5. Chilades pandava mothers discriminate among Cycas species during oviposition choice tests, but only in an endemic naïve population.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Lindström, Anders J; Marler, Paris N

    2016-08-01

    Host and non-host plant species communicate with insect herbivores to influence oviposition decisions. We studied if Chilades pandava female adults expressed oviposition preferences among host Cycas species in 2 choice tests, counting 39,420 eggs among assays from 4 butterfly populations. A naïve butterfly population from Cycas nongnoochiae habitat oviposited 2.2-fold more eggs on leaves of Cycas species that are susceptible to butterfly herbivory than on leaves of its native host Cycas nongnoochiae. In contrast, Chilades pandava populations experienced with novel Cycas species in Thailand, Philippines, and Guam exhibited no preference in choice tests between leaves of susceptible versus leaves of minimally damaged Cycas species. The results indicated that oviposition deterrents and/or stimulants partly mediate the sustainable relationship between an endemic Cycas species and the naïve Chilades pandava population from its habitat. Alternatively, differences in infochemicals among Cycas species do not enable discrimination in oviposition choices for Chilades pandava populations that have experienced Cycas species exhibiting no evolutionary history with Chilades pandava.

  6. Live imaging of X chromosome reactivation dynamics in early mouse development can discriminate naïve from primed pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shin; Hosoi, Yusuke; Shiura, Hirosuke; Yamagata, Kazuo; Takahashi, Saori; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Kohda, Takashi; Okabe, Masaru; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2016-08-15

    Pluripotent stem cells can be classified into two distinct states, naïve and primed, which show different degrees of potency. One difficulty in stem cell research is the inability to distinguish these states in live cells. Studies on female mice have shown that reactivation of inactive X chromosomes occurs in the naïve state, while one of the X chromosomes is inactivated in the primed state. Therefore, we aimed to distinguish the two states by monitoring X chromosome reactivation. Thus far, X chromosome reactivation has been analysed using fixed cells; here, we inserted different fluorescent reporter gene cassettes (mCherry and eGFP) into each X chromosome. Using these knock-in 'Momiji' mice, we detected X chromosome reactivation accurately in live embryos, and confirmed that the pluripotent states of embryos were stable ex vivo, as represented by embryonic and epiblast stem cells in terms of X chromosome reactivation. Thus, Momiji mice provide a simple and accurate method for identifying stem cell status based on X chromosome reactivation. PMID:27471261

  7. Do patients with active RA have differences in disease activity and perceptions if anti-TNF naïve versus anti-TNF experienced? Baseline results of the optimization of adalimumab trial

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Janet; Thorne, J. Carter; Haraoui, Boulos Paul; Psaradellis, Eliofotisti; Sampalis, John

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The chance of a good response in RA is attenuated in previous anti-TNF users who start new anti-TNF therapy compared to biologic naïve patients. In active RA, those with previous anti-TNF exposure compared to anti-TNF naïve may have different baseline disease activity and patient perceptions when starting a new anti-TNF treatment that could explain the observed response differences. Material/Methods The aim of this study was a post hoc analysis of baseline characteristics of patients enrolled in the Optimization of Adalimumab study that was a treat to target vs. routine care study in patients initiating adalimumab. As per the protocol, a maximum of 20% anti-TNF experienced patients were enrolled in the 300 patient trial. Twelve (4.0%) were excluded who previously used other biologics. Baseline characteristics including age, gender, tender and swollen joint counts, disease activity (DAS28), function (HAQ-DI), patient global assessment, patient satisfaction with current treatment, and inflammatory markers (CRP, ESR), were compared between previously anti-TNF experienced [etanercept or infliximab (EXP)], and anti-TNF naïve patients (NAÏVE). Results The mean (SD) age was 54.8 (13.3) years; 81.0% were female, and 237 (79.0%) were anti-TNF naïve while 51 (17.0%) patients were anti-TNF experienced (29 with etanercept, 16 with infliximab, and 6 for both). The mean (SD) baseline in EXP versus NAÏVE groups respectively was: CRP=21.7(32.9) vs. 17.5(20.7); ESR=28.7(22.5) vs. 29.8(20.4); SJC=10.5(6.0) vs. 10.7(5.6); TJC=12.8(7.1) vs. 12.3(7.3); and DAS28=6.0(1.2) vs. 5.8(1.1). None of the between-group differences were statistically significant, however, the HAQ-DI in EXP was 1.7(0.6) compared to 1.5(0.7) for the NAÏVE (P=0.021). Additionally, EXP patients had a higher patient global score [71.3(26.1) vs. 61.9(26.2), P=0.021]. Conclusions Although anti-TNF naïve and experienced patients who initiated adalimumab were similar, with respect to several

  8. Anxiogenic profile of AM-251, a selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, in plus-maze-naïve and plus-maze-experienced mice.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, R J; Evans, P M; Murphy, A

    2005-09-01

    The notoriously inconsistent effects of cannabinoids on anxiety-like behaviour may be explained by recent research on CB1 receptor knockout (CB1-KO) mice suggesting that cannabinoids exert bidirectional effects via the CB1 receptor (anxiolysis) and a novel rimonabant-sensitive neuronal cannabinoid receptor (anxiogenesis). This hypothesis is supported by the anxiogenic-like profile of AM-251, an analogue of rimonabant that is a potent and selective CB1 receptor antagonist but which, unlike rimonabant, has no activity at the novel receptor. As we have previously shown that rimonabant reduces anxiety-like behaviour in test-experienced animals only, the current study assessed the effects of AM-251 (1.5-3.0 mg/kg) in male Swiss-Webster mice that were either plus-maze-naïve or had been exposed undrugged to the apparatus 24 h prior to testing. Results confirmed that prior maze experience per se significantly increases behavioural indices of anxiety without altering measures of general activity. In maze-naïve mice, the lower dose of AM-251 (1.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced % open-arm time and increased grooming while the higher dose (3.0 mg/kg) additionally reduced open-arm entries and total head-dipping, and increased closed-arm returns. These anxiogenic-like effects were observed in the absence of significant changes in general activity levels. Although AM-251 had a very similar profile in maze-experienced animals, significant drug effects on open-arm avoidance measures were precluded by experientially-induced changes in behavioural baselines (i.e. 'ceiling' effects). Nevertheless, AM-251 again significantly reduced total head-dipping and increased grooming (3.0 mg/kg) and, unlike effects in naïve animals, both doses markedly reduced time spent on the centre platform and increased time spent in the enclosed arms. Against a baseline of almost total open-arm avoidance, the pattern of behavioural change in maze-experienced mice would also be consistent with an anxiogenic

  9. Dynamics of Onchocerca volvulus Microfilarial Densities after Ivermectin Treatment in an Ivermectin-naïve and a Multiply Treated Population from Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Pion, Sébastien D. S.; Nana-Djeunga, Hugues C.; Kamgno, Joseph; Tendongfor, Nicholas; Wanji, Samuel; Njiokou, Flobert; Prichard, Roger K.; Boussinesq, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objective Ivermectin has been the keystone of onchocerciasis control for the last 25 years. Sub-optimal responses to the drug have been reported in Ghanaian communities under long-term treatment. We assessed, in two Cameroonian foci, whether the microfilaricidal and/or embryostatic effects of ivermectin on Onchocerca volvulus have been altered after several years of drug pressure. Methods We compared the dynamics of O. volvulus skin microfilarial densities after ivermectin treatment in two cohorts with contrasting exposure to this drug: one received repeated treatment for 13 years whereas the other had no history of large-scale treatments (referred to as controls). Microfilarial densities were assessed 15, 80 and 180 days after ivermectin in 122 multiply treated and 127 ivermectin-naïve individuals. Comparisons were adjusted for individual factors related to microfilarial density: age and number of nodules. Findings Two weeks post ivermectin, microfilarial density dropped equally (98% reduction) in the ivermectin-naïve and multiply treated groups. Between 15 and 180 days post ivermectin, the proportion of individuals with skin microfilariae doubled (from 30.8% to 67.8%) in controls and quadrupled (from 19.8% to 76.9%) in multiply treated individuals but the mean densities remained low in both sites. In fact, between 15 and 80 days, the repopulation rate was significantly higher in the multiply treated individuals than in the controls but no such difference was demonstrated when extending the follow-up to 180 days. The repopulation rate by microfilariae was associated with host factors: negatively with age and positively with the number of nodules. Conclusion These observations may indicate that the worms from the multi-treated area recover mf productivity earlier but would be less productive than the worms from the ivermectin-naïve area between 80 and 180 days after ivermectin. Moreover, they do not support the operation of a strong cumulative effect

  10. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping from antiretroviral therapy (ART) naïve and first-line treatment failures in Djiboutian patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In this study we report the prevalence of antiretroviral drug resistant HIV-1 genotypes of virus isolated from Djiboutian patients who failed first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) and from ART naïve patients. Patients and methods A total of 35 blood samples from 16 patients who showed first-line ART failure (>1000 viral genome copies/ml) and 19 ART-naïve patients were collected in Djibouti from October 2009 to December 2009. Both the protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) genes were amplified and sequenced using National Agency for AIDS Research (ANRS) protocols. The Stanford HIV database algorithm was used for interpretation of resistance data and genotyping. Results Among the 16 patients with first-line ART failure, nine (56.2%) showed reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strains: two (12.5%) were resistant to nucleoside (NRTI), one (6.25%) to non-nucleoside (NNRTI) reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and six (37.5%) to both. Analysis of the DNA sequencing data indicated that the most common mutations conferring drug resistance were M184V (38%) for NRTI and K103N (25%) for NNRTI. Only NRTI primary mutations K101Q, K103N and the PI minor mutation L10V were found in ART naïve individuals. No protease inhibitor resistant strains were detected. In our study, we found no detectable resistance in ∼ 44% of all patients who experienced therapeutic failure which was explained by low compliance, co-infection with tuberculosis and malnutrition. Genotyping revealed that 65.7% of samples were infected with subtype C, 20% with CRF02_AG, 8.5% with B, 2.9% with CRF02_AG/C and 2.9% with K/C. Conclusion The results of this first study about drug resistance mutations in first-line ART failures show the importance of performing drug resistance mutation test which guides the choice of a second-line regimen. This will improve the management of HIV-infected Djiboutian patients. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here

  11. Neutralizing inhibitors in the airways of naïve ferrets do not play a major role in modulating the virulence of H3 subtype influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Job, Emma R; Pizzolla, Angela; Nebl, Thomas; Short, Kirsty R; Deng, Yi-Mo; Carolan, Louise; Laurie, Karen L; Brooks, Andrew G; Reading, Patrick C

    2016-07-01

    Many insights regarding the pathogenesis of human influenza A virus (IAV) infections have come from studies in mice and ferrets. Surfactant protein (SP)-D is the major neutralizing inhibitor of IAV in mouse airway fluids and SP-D-resistant IAV mutants show enhanced virus replication and virulence in mice. Herein, we demonstrate that sialylated glycoproteins, rather than SP-D, represent the major neutralizing inhibitors against H3 subtype viruses in airway fluids from naïve ferrets. Moreover, while resistance to neutralizing inhibitors is a critical factor in modulating virus replication and disease in the mouse model, it does not appear to be so in the ferret model, as H3 mutants resistant to either SP-D or sialylated glycoproteins in ferret airway fluids did not show enhanced virulence in ferrets. These data have important implications for our understanding of pathogenesis and immunity to human IAV infections in these two widely used animal models of infection. PMID:27110707

  12. Resveratrol regulates naïve CD 8+ T-cell proliferation by upregulating IFN-γ-induced tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase expression

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Kyung Tae; Cho, Joon; Chun, Sung Hak; Jang, Jong-Hwa; Cha, Gil Sun; Jung, In Duk; Jang, Dong Deuk; Park, Yeong-Min

    2015-01-01

    We found that resveratrol enhances interferon (IFN)-γ-induced tryptophanyl-tRNA-synthetase (TTS) expression in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Resveratrol-induced TTS expression is associated with glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activity. In addition, we found that resveratrol regulates naïve CD8+ T-cell polarization by modulating GSK-3β activity in IFN-γ-stimulated BMDCs, and that resveratol induces upregulation of TTS in CD8+ T-cells in the in vivo tumor environment. Taken together, resveratrol upregulates IFN-γ-induced TTS expression in a GSK-3β-dependent manner, and this TTS modulation is crucial for DC-mediated T-cell modulation. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(5): 283-288] PMID:25248565

  13. Having students create short video clips to help transition from naïve conceptions about mechanics to true Newtonian physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corten-Gualtieri, Pascale; Ritter, Christian; Plumat, Jim; Keunings, Roland; Lebrun, Marcel; Raucent, Benoit

    2016-07-01

    Most students enter their first university physics course with a system of beliefs and intuitions which are often inconsistent with the Newtonian frame of reference. This article presents an experiment of collaborative learning aiming at helping first-year students in an engineering programme to transition from their naïve intuition about dynamics to the Newtonian way of thinking. In a first activity, students were asked to critically analyse the contents of two video clips from the point of view of Newtonian mechanics. In a second activity, students had to design and realise their own video clip to illustrate a given aspect of Newtonian mechanics. The preparation of the scenario for the second activity required looking up and assimilating scientific knowledge. The efficiency of the activity was assessed on an enhanced version of the statistical analysis method proposed by Hestenes and Halloun, which relies on a pre-test and a post-test to measure individual learning.

  14. Habit learning by naïve macaques is marked by response sharpening of striatal neurons representing the cost and outcome of acquired action sequences

    PubMed Central

    Desrochers, Theresa M.; Amemori, Ken-ichi; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Over a century of scientific work has focused on defining the factors motivating behavioral learning. Observations in animals and humans trained on a wide range of tasks support reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms as accounting for the learning. Still unknown, however, are the signals that drive learning in naïve, untrained subjects. Here, we capitalized on a sequential saccade task in which macaque monkeys acquired repetitive scanning sequences without instruction. We found that spike activity in the caudate nucleus after each trial corresponded to an integrated cost-benefit signal that was highly correlated with the degree of naturalistic untutored learning by the monkeys. Across learning, neurons encoding both cost and outcome gradually acquired increasingly sharp phasic trial-end responses that paralleled the development of the habit-like, repetitive saccade sequences. Our findings demonstrate a novel integrated cost-benefit signal by which RL and its neural correlates could drive naturalistic behaviors in freely behaving primates. PMID:26291166

  15. Response to antiretroviral therapy (ART): comparing women with previous use of zidovudine monotherapy (ZDVm) in pregnancy with ART naïve women

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Short-term zidovudine monotherapy (ZDVm) remains an option for some pregnant HIV-positive women not requiring treatment for their own health but may affect treatment responses once antiretroviral therapy (ART) is subsequently started. Methods Data were obtained by linking two UK studies: the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (UK CHIC) study and the National Study of HIV in Pregnancy and Childhood (NSHPC). Treatment responses were assessed for 2028 women initiating ART at least one year after HIV-diagnosis. Outcomes were compared using logistic regression, proportional hazards regression or linear regression. Results In adjusted analyses, ART-naïve (n = 1937) and ZDVm-experienced (n = 91) women had similar increases in CD4 count and a similar proportion achieving virological suppression; both groups had a low risk of AIDS. Conclusions In this setting, antenatal ZDVm exposure did not adversely impact on outcomes once ART was initiated for the woman’s health. PMID:24593018

  16. The use of decision trees and naïve Bayes algorithms and trace element patterns for controlling the authenticity of free-range-pastured hens' eggs.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Rommel Melgaço; Nacano, Letícia Ramos; Freitas, Rodolfo; Batista, Bruno Lemos; Barbosa, Fernando

    2014-09-01

    This article aims to evaluate 2 machine learning algorithms, decision trees and naïve Bayes (NB), for egg classification (free-range eggs compared with battery eggs). The database used for the study consisted of 15 chemical elements (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cs, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Pb, Se, Sr, V, and Zn) determined in 52 eggs samples (20 free-range and 32 battery eggs) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Our results demonstrated that decision trees and NB associated with the mineral contents of eggs provide a high level of accuracy (above 80% and 90%, respectively) for classification between free-range and battery eggs and can be used as an alternative method for adulteration evaluation.

  17. HIV reverse transcriptase gene mutations in anti-retroviral treatment naïve rural people living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Mohanakrishnan, K; Kasthuri, A; Amsavathani, S K; Sumathi, G

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to find out the mutational variations of reverse transcriptase (RT) gene of HIV, after the traditional drug usage among anti-retroviral therapy naïve rural people living with HIV/AIDS. HIV Reactive patients, who were exposed for indigenous medicines such as Siddha, Ayurveda etc., for a minimum period of 6 months were taken for this study. Among 40 patients, two samples (5.55%) demonstrated high-level mutational resistance variations for nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) and non-NRTI. The predominant polymorphisms detected were K122E (91.7%), V60I (91.7%), V35T (89%), Q207E (89%), D177E (89%), T200A (86.1%), S48T (83.33%), K173A (80.6%).

  18. Behavioral responses of predator-naïve dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli) to odor cues of the European ferret fed with different prey species.

    PubMed

    Apfelbach, Raimund; Soini, Helena A; Vasilieva, Nina Y; Novotny, Milos V

    2015-07-01

    Many mammalian predators are able to identify their prey by odors and, vice versa, numerous prey species recognize predator odors as well. The present paper reports on the behavioral responses of predator-naïve dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli) towards the urine odors of carnivorous ferrets, which were raised on either a chicken, mouse or hamster diet. Chemical composition from ferret urines of the different diet groups was analyzed, while quantitative differences in urinary volatile constituents were observed through capillary gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. In a Y-maze arrangement, hamsters were offered several two-choice odor discrimination tasks and their behavior was quantified. Hamsters were easily able to discriminate the urine odor of ferrets fed with mice against ferrets fed with hamsters. This is probably the first report indicating that a prey species can distinguish urine odors of even an unknown predator species that has been fed different prey species. The analytical data complemented behavioral assays.

  19. HIV reverse transcriptase gene mutations in anti-retroviral treatment naïve rural people living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Mohanakrishnan, K; Kasthuri, A; Amsavathani, S K; Sumathi, G

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to find out the mutational variations of reverse transcriptase (RT) gene of HIV, after the traditional drug usage among anti-retroviral therapy naïve rural people living with HIV/AIDS. HIV Reactive patients, who were exposed for indigenous medicines such as Siddha, Ayurveda etc., for a minimum period of 6 months were taken for this study. Among 40 patients, two samples (5.55%) demonstrated high-level mutational resistance variations for nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) and non-NRTI. The predominant polymorphisms detected were K122E (91.7%), V60I (91.7%), V35T (89%), Q207E (89%), D177E (89%), T200A (86.1%), S48T (83.33%), K173A (80.6%). PMID:26470965

  20. Serial follow-up of presurgical treatment using pasireotide long-acting release with or without octreotide long-acting release for naïve active acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jan-Shun; Tseng, Ham-Min; Chang, Tien-Chun

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the serial changes of GH and IGF-1 in seven patients with naïve, active acromegaly following presurgical treatment of the somatostatin analog pasireotide long-acting release (LAR) and octreotide LAR. The patients were treated with pasireotide LAR with or without octreotide LAR for two years and underwent transsphenoidal adenomectomy. After treatment with the somatostatin analogs, the surgical cure rate was similar to that in patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgery alone. Diabetes insipidus was not identified in any patients after the operation. Pasireotide LAR was effective on GH as well as IGF-1 suppression and tumor size decreasing when used as the primary therapy. Future large-population studies to investigate the surgical curative rate after presurgical treatment with somatostatin analogs in patients with acromegaly and macroadenomas close to the cavernous sinus are warranted. However, that hyperglycemia developed following pre-surgical treatment with pasireotide should take into consideration. PMID:27117887

  1. A Discrete Choice Conjoint Experiment to Evaluate Parent Preferences for Treatment of Young, Medication Naïve Children with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Cunningham, Charles E.; Pelham, William E.; Rimas, Heather L.; Greiner, Andrew R.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Waxmonsky, James; Fabiano, Gregory A.; Robb, Jessica A.; Burrows-MacLean, Lisa; Scime, Mindy; Hoffman, Martin T.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined treatment preferences of 183 parents of young (average age = 5.8 years; SD = 0.6), medication naïve children with ADHD. Preferences were evaluated using a discrete choice experiment in which parents made choices between different combinations of treatment characteristics, outcomes, and costs. Latent class analysis yielded two segments of parents: (1) Medication Avoidant parents constituted 70.5% of the sample whose treatment decisions were strongly influenced by a desire to avoid medication; (2) Outcome Oriented parents constituted 29.5% of the sample whose treatment decisions were most influenced by a desire for positive treatment outcomes. Parents in the Outcome Oriented segment were more stressed and depressed, had lower socioeconomic status and education, were more likely to be single parents, and had more disruptive and impaired children. Simulations predicted that parents would prefer treatments with behavior therapy over treatments with stimulant medication only. PMID:21722027

  2. Extensive scaling and nonuniformity of the Karhunen-Lo{grave e}ve decomposition for the spiral-defect chaos state

    SciTech Connect

    Zoldi, S.M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.; Greenside, H.S.

    1998-12-01

    By analyzing large-aspect-ratio spiral-defect chaos (SDC) convection images, we show that the Karhunen-Lo{grave e}ve decomposition (KLD) scales extensively for subsystem sizes larger than 4d ({ital d} is the fluid depth), which strongly suggests that SDC is extensively chaotic. From this extensive scaling, the intensive length {xi}{sub KLD} is computed and found to have a different dependence on the Rayleigh number than the two-point correlation length {xi}{sub 2}. Local computations of {xi}{sub KLD} reveal a spatial nonuniformity of SDC images that extends over radii 18d{lt}r{lt}45d in a {Gamma}=109 aspect-ratio cell. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Body Composition, Soluble Markers of Inflammation, and Bone Mineral Density in Antiretroviral Therapy-Naïve HIV-1 Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Todd T.; Chen, Yun; Currier, Judith S.; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Rothenberg, Jennifer; Dubé, Michael P.; Murphy, Robert; Stein, James H.; McComsey, Grace A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between bone mineral density (BMD), inflammatory markers, and alterations in fat and lean mass in untreated HIV-infected individuals. Design Cross-sectional analysis of antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve persons enrolled into a randomized clinical trial Methods Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for BMD, lean and fat mass, and a laboratory assessment were performed. Soluble biomarkers included adipocytokines (leptin, adiponectin), inflammatory markers (hsCRP, IL-6), and markers related to bone metabolism (osteoprotegerin (OPG)), receptor activator of NFκB Ligand (RANKL)). BMD at the lumbar spine, total hip, and femoral neck was expressed as a Z-score (number of standard deviations away from an age-, race-, sex-matched reference population). Results 331 subjects had a median (Q1, Q3) age of 36 (28,45) years, were 89% male, and 44% white. The prevalence of low BMD (Z-score ≤ −2 at any of the 3 sites) was 10%. No associations were detected between Z-scores and hsCRP, IL-6, or RANKL (P≥0.1). In a linear model adjusting for age, gender, race, and total fat mass, lower lumbar spine Z-scores were associated with lower total lean mass, higher serum adiponectin, and lower OPG. Results at the total hip or femoral neck were similar. Conclusions Among ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals, lower BMD was associated with lower lean mass, higher adiponectin, and lower OPG, but not HIV disease variables or any of the inflammatory markers. These findings may have implications for bone metabolism in untreated HIV, in which hypoadiponectinemia and higher OPG may mitigate bone loss. PMID:23591634

  4. Clinical-scale selection and viral transduction of human naïve and central memory CD8+ T cells for adoptive cell therapy of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Casati, Anna; Varghaei-Nahvi, Azam; Feldman, Steven Alexander; Assenmacher, Mario; Rosenberg, Steven Aaron; Dudley, Mark Edward; Scheffold, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The adoptive transfer of lymphocytes genetically engineered to express tumor-specific antigen receptors is a potent strategy to treat cancer patients. T lymphocyte subsets, such as naïve or central memory T cells, selected in vitro prior to genetic engineering have been extensively investigated in preclinical mouse models, where they demonstrated improved therapeutic efficacy. However, so far, this is challenging to realize in the clinical setting, since good manufacturing practices (GMP) procedures for complex cell sorting and genetic manipulation are limited. To be able to directly compare the immunological attributes and therapeutic efficacy of naïve (T(N)) and central memory (T(CM)) CD8(+) T cells, we investigated clinical-scale procedures for their parallel selection and in vitro manipulation. We also evaluated currently available GMP-grade reagents for stimulation of T cell subsets, including a new type of anti-CD3/anti-CD28 nanomatrix. An optimized protocol was established for the isolation of both CD8(+) T(N) cells (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(+)) and CD8(+) T(CM) (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(-)) from a single patient. The highly enriched T cell subsets can be efficiently transduced and expanded to large cell numbers, sufficient for clinical applications and equivalent to or better than current cell and gene therapy approaches with unselected lymphocyte populations. The GMP protocols for selection of T(N) and T(CM) we reported here will be the basis for clinical trials analyzing safety, in vivo persistence and clinical efficacy in cancer patients and will help to generate a more reliable and efficacious cellular product.

  5. Phase II DeCOG-Study of Ipilimumab in Pretreated and Treatment-Naïve Patients with Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Lisa; Vaubel, Julia; Mohr, Peter; Hauschild, Axel; Utikal, Jochen; Simon, Jan; Garbe, Claus; Herbst, Rudolf; Enk, Alexander; Kämpgen, Eckhart; Livingstone, Elisabeth; Bluhm, Leonie; Rompel, Rainer; Griewank, Klaus G.; Fluck, Michael; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Up to 50% of patients with uveal melanoma (UM) develop metastatic disease with limited treatment options. The immunomodulating agent ipilimumab has shown an overall survival (OS) benefit in patients with cutaneous metastatic melanoma in two phase III trials. As patients with UM were excluded in these studies, the Dermatologic Cooperative Oncology Group (DeCOG) conducted a phase II to assess the efficacy and safety of ipilimumab in patients with metastatic UM. Patients and Methods We undertook a multicenter phase II study in patients with different subtypes of metastatic melanoma. Here we present data on patients with metastatic UM (pretreated and treatment-naïve) who received up to four cycles of ipilimumab administered at a dose of 3 mg/kg in 3 week intervals. Tumor assessments were conducted at baseline, weeks 12, 24, 36 and 48 according to RECIST 1.1 criteria. Adverse events (AEs), including immune-related AEs were graded according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) v.4.0. Primary endpoint was the OS rate at 12 months. Results Forty five pretreated (85%) and eight treatment-naïve (15%) patients received at least one dose of ipilimumab. 1-year and 2-year OS rates were 22% and 7%, respectively. Median OS was 6.8 months (95% CI 3.7–8.1), median progression-free survival 2.8 months (95% CI 2.5–2.9). The disease control rate at weeks 12 and 24 was 47% and 21%, respectively. Sixteen patients had stable disease (47%), none experienced partial or complete response. Treatment-related AEs were observed in 35 patients (66%), including 19 grade 3–4 events (36%). One drug-related death due to pancytopenia was observed. Conclusions Ipilimumab has very limited clinical activity in patients with metastatic UM. Toxicity was manageable when treated as per protocol-specific guidelines. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01355120 PMID:25761109

  6. Naïve rat umbilical cord matrix stem cells significantly attenuate mammary tumor growth through modulation of endogenous immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Kawabata, Atsushi; Ohta, Naomi; Seiler, Garret; Pyle, Marla M.; Ishiguro, Susumu; Zhang, Yong Qing; Becker, Kevin G.; Troyer, Deryl; Tamura, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    Background aims Un-engineered human and rat umbilical cord matrix stem cells (UCMSCs) attenuate growth of several types of tumors in mice and rats. However, the mechanism by which UCMSCs attenuate tumor growth has not been studied rigorously. Methods The possible mechanisms of tumor growth attenuation by rat UCMSCs were studied using orthotopic Mat B III rat mammary tumor grafts in female F344 rats. Tumor-infiltrating leukocytes were identified and quantified by immunohistochemistry analysis. Potential cytokines involved in lymphocyte infiltration in the tumors were determined by microarray and Western blot analysis. The Boyden chamber migration assay was performed for the functional analysis of identified cytokines. Results Rat UCMSCs markedly attenuated tumor growth; this attenuation was accompanied by considerable lymphocyte infiltration. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that most infiltrating lymphocytes in the rat UCMSC-treated tumors were CD3+ T cells. In addition, treatment with rat UCMSCs significantly increased infiltration of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells and natural killer (NK) cells throughout tumor tissue. CD68+ monocytes/macrophages and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells were scarcely observed, only in the tumors of the phosphate-buffered saline control group. Microarray analysis of rat UCMSCs demonstrated that monocyte chemotactic protein-1 is involved in rat UCMSC-induced lymphocyte infiltration in the tumor tissues. Conclusions These results suggest that naïve rat UCMSCs attenuated mammary tumor growth at least in part by enhancing host anti-tumor immune responses. Naïve UCMSCs can be used as powerful therapeutic cells for breast cancer treatment, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 may be a key molecule to enhance the effect of UCMSCs at the tumor site. PMID:23474329

  7. Different Variants in Reverse Transcriptase Domain Determined by Ultra-deep Sequencing in Treatment-naïve and Treated Indonesian Patients Infected with Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Wasityastuti, Widya; Yano, Yoshihiko; Widasari, Dewiyani Indah; Yamani, Laura Navika; Ratnasari, Neneng; Heriyanto, Didik Setyo; Okada, Rina; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Murakami, Yoshiki; Azuma, Takeshi; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2016-01-01

    A nucleos(t)ide analog (NA) is the common antiviral drug available for directly treating hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, its application has led to the emergence of NA-resistant mutations mostly in a conserved region of the reverse transcriptase domain of HBV polymerase. Harboring NA-resistant mutations decreases drug effectiveness and increases the frequency of end-stage liver disease. The invention of next-generation sequencing that can generate thousands of sequences from viral complex mixtures provides opportunities to detect minor changes and early viral evolution under drug stress. The present study used ultra-deep sequencing to evaluate discrepant quasispecies in the reverse transcriptase domain of HBV including NA-resistant hotspots between seven treatment-naïve Indonesian patients infected with HBV and five at the early phase of treatment. The most common sub-genotype was HBV B3 (83.34%). The substitution rate of variants determined among amino acids with a ratio of ≥ 1% changes was higher among the population in conserved regions (23.19% vs. 4.59%, P = 0.001) and in the inter-reverse transcriptase domain (23.95% vs. 2.94%, P = 0.002) in treatment naïve, than in treated patients. Nine hotspots of antiviral resistance were identified in both groups, and the mean frequency of changes in all patients was < 1%. The known rtM204I mutation was the most frequent in both groups. The lower rate of variants in HBV quasispecies in patients undergoing treatment could be associated with virus elimination and the extinction of sensitive species by NA therapy. The present findings imply that HBV quasispecies dynamically change during treatment. PMID:27492206

  8. An observational study of bimatoprost 0.01% in treatment-naïve patients with primary open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension: the CLEAR trial

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Donald R; Simonyi, Susan; Bhogal, Meetu; Sigouin, Christopher S; Crichton, Andrew C; Discepola, Marino; Hutnik, Cindy ML; Yan, David B

    2012-01-01

    Background This study was designed to evaluate the occurrence and severity of ocular hyperemia in subjects with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) due to primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) or ocular hypertension (OHT) following treatment with bimatoprost 0.01% in a real-world clinical setting. Methods This was an open-label, observational study conducted at 67 centers in Canada. Subjects with elevated IOP due to POAG or OHT instilled bimatoprost 0.01% topically as monotherapy once daily. Ocular hyperemia was graded by the investigator at baseline and weeks 6 and 12 using a photographic five-point grading scale. Change in IOP from baseline was also evaluated at these time points. This analysis includes only the subgroup of 522 subjects who were naïve to IOP-lowering medication prior to the study. Results After 12 weeks of treatment with bimatoprost 0.01%, hyperemia was graded as none-to-mild (grades 0, +0.5, or +1) for 93.3% of subjects and as moderate-to-severe (grades +2 or +3) for 6.7%. At weeks 6 and 12, most subjects (93.2% and 93.5%) had no change in hyperemia grade from baseline. IOP was reduced by 7.4 mmHg (29.8%) at week 6 and 7.7 mmHg (30.9%) at week 12 from baseline. Conclusion This real-world, observational study found that bimatoprost 0.01% instilled once daily reduced IOP by a mean of 30% from baseline without moderate or severe ocular hyperemia in 93% of treatment-naïve subjects with POAG or OHT. PMID:23269858

  9. EDS1 in tomato is required for resistance mediated by TIR-class R genes and the receptor-like R gene Ve.

    PubMed

    Hu, Gongshe; deHart, Amy K A; Li, Yansu; Ustach, Carolyn; Handley, Vanessa; Navarre, Roy; Hwang, Chin-Feng; Aegerter, Brenna J; Williamson, Valerie M; Baker, Barbara

    2005-05-01

    In tobacco and other Solanaceae species, the tobacco N gene confers resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), and leads to induction of standard defense and resistance responses. Here, we report the use of N-transgenic tomato to identify a fast-neutron mutant, sun1-1 (suppressor of N), that is defective in N-mediated resistance. Induction of salicylic acid (SA) and expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, each signatures of systemic acquired resistance, are both dramatically suppressed in sun1-1 plants after TMV treatment compared to wild-type plants. Application of exogenous SA restores PR gene expression, indicating that SUN1 acts upstream of SA. Upon challenge with additional pathogens, we found that the sun1-1 mutation impairs resistance mediated by certain resistance (R) genes, (Bs4, I, and Ve), but not others (Mi-1). In addition, sun1-1 plants exhibit enhanced susceptibility to TMV, as well as to virulent pathogens. sun1-1 has been identified as an EDS1 homolog present on chromosome 6 of tomato. The discovery of enhanced susceptibility in the sun1-1 (Le_eds1-1) mutant plant, which contrasts to reports in Nicotiana benthamiana using virus-induced gene silencing, provides evidence that the intersection of R gene-mediated pathways with general resistance pathways is conserved in a Solanaceous species. In tomato, EDS1 is important for mediating resistance to a broad range of pathogens (viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens), yet shows specificity in the class of R genes that it affects (TIR-NBS-LRR as opposed to CC-NBS-LRR). In addition, a requirement for EDS1 for Ve-mediated resistance in tomato exposes that the receptor-like R gene class may also require EDS1.

  10. Direct-acting Antiviral Agents Resistance-associated Polymorphisms in Chinese Treatment-naïve Patients Infected with Genotype 1b Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Rao, Hui-Ying; Xie, Xing-Wang; Wei, Lai

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been reported that several baseline polymorphisms of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) agents resistance-associated variants (RAVs) would affect the treatment outcomes of patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (CHC). The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of DAAs RAVs in treatment-naïve GT1b CHC patients. Methods: Direct sequencing and ultra-deep sequencing of the HCV NS3, NS5A, and NS5B gene were performed in baseline serum samples of treatment-naïve patients infected with genotype 1b hepatitis C virus (HCVs). Results: One hundred and sixty CHC patients were studied. Complete sequence information was obtained for 145 patients (NS3), 148 patients (NS5A), and 137 patients (NS5B). Treatment-failure associated variants of DAAs were detected: 56.6% (82/145) of the patients presented S122G for simeprevir (NS3 protease inhibitor); 10.1% (14/148) of the patients presented Y93H for daclatasvir and ledipasvir (NS5A protein inhibitors); 94.2% (129/137) of the patients presented C316N for sofosbuvir (NS5B polymerase inhibitor). Nearly, all of the DAAs RAVs detected by ultra-deep sequencing could be detected by direct sequencing. Conclusions: The majority of genotype 1b CHC patients in China present a virus population carrying HCV DAAs RAVs. Pretreatment sequencing of HCV genome might need to be performed when patients infected with GT1b HCV receiving DAAs-containing regimens in China. Population sequencing would be quite quantified for the work. PMID:26415801

  11. Natural Polymorphisms Conferring Resistance to HCV Protease and Polymerase Inhibitors in Treatment-Naïve HIV/HCV Co-Infected Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Charles; Hu, Fengyu; Ning, Chuanyi; Lan, Yun; Tang, Xiaoping; Tucker, Joseph D.; Cai, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Background The advent of direct-acting agents (DAAs) has improved treatment of HCV in HIV co-infection, but may be limited by primary drug resistance. This study reports the prevalence of natural polymorphisms conferring resistance to NS3/4A protease inhibitors and NS5B polymerase inhibitors in treatment-naïve HIV/HCV co-infected individuals in China. Methods Population based NS3/4A sequencing was completed for 778 treatment-naïve HIV/HCV co-infected patients from twelve provinces. NS3 sequences were amplified by nested PCR using in-house primers for genotypes 1–6. NS5B sequencing was completed for genotyping in 350 sequences. Resistance-associated variants (RAVs) were identified in positions associated with HCV resistance. Results Overall, 72.8% (566/778) of all HCV sequences had at least one RAV associated with HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor resistance. Variants were found in 3.6% (7/193) of genotype 1, 100% (23/23) of genotype 2, 100% (237/237) of genotype 3 and 92% (299/325) of genotype 6 sequences. The Q80K variant was present in 98.4% of genotype 6a sequences. High-level RAVs were rare, occurring in only 0.8% of patients. 93% (64/69) patients with genotype 1b also carried the C316N variant associated with NS5B low-level resistance. Conclusions The low frequency of high-level RAVs associated with primary HCV DAA resistance among all genotypes in HIV/HCV co-infected patients is encouraging. Further phenotypic studies and clinical research are needed. PMID:27341031

  12. DNA methylation patterns in naïve CD4+ T cells identify epigenetic susceptibility loci for malar rash and discoid rash in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Renauer, Paul; Coit, Patrick; Jeffries, Matlock A; Merrill, Joan T; McCune, W Joseph; Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen; Sawalha, Amr H

    2015-01-01

    Objective Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterised by heterogeneous clinical manifestations, autoantibody production and epigenetic dysregulation in T cells. We sought to investigate the epigenetic contribution to the development of cutaneous manifestations in SLE. Methods We performed genome-wide DNA methylation analyses in patients with SLE stratified by a history of malar rash, discoid rash or neither cutaneous manifestation, and age, sex and ethnicity matched healthy controls. We characterised differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in naïve CD4+ T cells unique to each disease subset, and assessed functional relationships between DMRs using bioinformatic approaches. Results We identified 36 and 37 unique DMRs that contribute to the epigenetic susceptibility to malar rash and discoid rash, respectively. These DMRs were primarily localised to genes mediating cell proliferation and apoptosis. Hypomethylation of MIR886 and TRIM69, and hypermethylation of RNF39 were specific to patients with SLE with a history of malar rash. Hypomethylation of the cytoskeleton-related gene RHOJ was specific to patients with SLE with a history of discoid rash. In addition, discoid rash-specific hypomethylated DMRs were found in genes involved in antigen-processing and presentation such as TAP1 and PSMB8. Network analyses showed that DMRs in patients with SLE with but not without a history of cutaneous manifestations are associated with TAP-dependent processing and major histocompatibility-class I antigen cross-presentation (p=3.66×10−18 in malar rash, and 3.67×10−13 in discoid rash). Conclusions We characterised DNA methylation changes in naïve CD4+ T cells specific to malar rash and discoid rash in patients with SLE. These data suggest unique epigenetic susceptibility loci that predispose to or are associated with the development of cutaneous manifestations in SLE. PMID:26405558

  13. Interstitial lung abnormalities in treatment-naïve advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients are associated with shorter survival

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Mizuki; Cardarella, Stephanie; Dahlberg, Suzanne E.; Araki, Tetsuro; Lydon, Christine; Jackman, David M.; Rabin, Michael S.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Johnson, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Interstitial lung diseases are associated with increased risk of lung cancer. The prevalence of ILA at diagnosis of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its impact on overall survival (OS) remain to be investigated. Materials and Method The study included 120 treatment-naïve stage IV NSCLC patients (53 males, 67 females). ILA was scored on CT prior to any systemic therapy using a 4-point scale [0=no evidence of ILA, 1=equivocal for ILA, 2=suspicious for ILA, 3=ILA] by a sequential reading method previously reported. ILA scores of 2 or 3 indicated the presence of ILA. Results ILA was present in 17 patients (14%) with advanced NSCLC prior to any treatment (score3:n=2, score2:n=15). These 17 patients were significantly older (median age: 69 vs. 63, p=0.04) and had a heavier smoking history (median: 40 vs. 15.5 pack-year, p=0.003) than those with ILA score 0 or 1. Higher ILA scores were associated with shorter OS (p=0.001). Median OS of the 17 patients with ILA was 7.2 months [95%CI: 2.9-9.4] compared to 14.8 months [95%CI: 11.1-18.4] in patients with ILA score 0 or 1 (p=0.002). In a multivariate model, the presence of ILA remained significant for increased risk for death (HR=2.09, p=0.028) after adjusting for first-line systemic therapy (chemotherapy, p<0.001; TKI, p<0.001; each compared to no therapy) and pack years of smoking (p=0.40). Conclusion Radiographic ILA was present in 14% of treatment-naïve advanced NSCLC patients. Higher ILA scores were associated with shorter OS, indicating that ILA could be a marker of shorter survival in advanced NSCLC. PMID:25726730

  14. Effect of BMI and fat mass on HIV disease progression in HIV-infected, antiretroviral treatment-naïve adults in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Martinez, S S; Campa, A; Bussmann, H; Moyo, S; Makhema, J; Huffman, F G; Williams, O D; Essex, M; Marlink, R; Baum, M K

    2016-06-01

    An obesity paradox has been proposed in many conditions including HIV. Studies conducted to investigate obesity and its effect on HIV disease progression have been inconclusive and are lacking for African settings. This study investigated the relationship between overweight/obesity (BMI≥25 kg/m2) and HIV disease progression in HIV+ asymptomatic adults not on antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Botswana over 18 months. A cohort study in asymptomatic, ART-naïve, HIV+ adults included 217 participants, 139 with BMI of 18·0-24·9 kg/m2 and seventy-eight participants with BMI≥25 kg/m2. The primary outcome was time to event (≥25 % decrease in cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) cell count) during 18 months of follow-up; secondary outcomes were time to event of CD4 cell count<250 cells/µl and AIDS-defining conditions. Proportional survival hazard models were used to compare hazard ratios (HR) on time to events of HIV disease progression over 18 months. Higher baseline BMI was associated with significantly lower risk of an AIDS-defining condition during the follow-up (HR 0·218; 95 % CI 0·068, 0·701; P=0·011). Higher fat mass at baseline was also significantly associated with decreased risk of AIDS-defining conditions during the follow-up (HR 0·855; 95 % CI 0·741, 0·987; P=0·033) and the combined outcome of having CD4 cell count≤250/µl and AIDS-defining conditions, whichever occurred earlier (HR 0·918; 95 % CI 0·847, 0·994; P=0·036). All models were adjusted for covariates. Higher BMI and fat mass among the HIV-infected, ART-naïve participants were associated with slower disease progression. Mechanistic research is needed to evaluate the association between BMI, fat mass and HIV disease progression. PMID:27087233

  15. Stressful Presentations: Mild Cold Stress in Laboratory Mice Influences Phenotype of Dendritic Cells in Naïve and Tumor-Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kokolus, Kathleen M.; Spangler, Haley M.; Povinelli, Benjamin J.; Farren, Matthew R.; Lee, Kelvin P.; Repasky, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to stimulate and regulate T cells is critical to effective anti-tumor immunity. Therefore, it is important to fully recognize any inherent factors which may influence DC function under experimental conditions, especially in laboratory mice since they are used so heavily to model immune responses. The goals of this report are to 1) briefly summarize previous work revealing how DCs respond to various forms of physiological stress and 2) to present new data highlighting the potential for chronic mild cold stress inherent to mice housed at the required standard ambient temperatures to influence baseline DCs properties in naïve and tumor-bearing mice. As recent data from our group shows that CD8+ T cell function is significantly altered by chronic mild cold stress and since DC function is crucial for CD8+ T cell activation, we wondered whether housing temperature may also be influencing DC function. Here we report that there are several significant phenotypical and functional differences among DC subsets in naïve and tumor-bearing mice housed at either standard housing temperature or at a thermoneutral ambient temperature, which significantly reduces the extent of cold stress. The new data presented here strongly suggests that, by itself, the housing temperature of mice can affect fundamental properties and functions of DCs. Therefore differences in basal levels of stress due to housing should be taken into consideration when interpreting experiments designed to evaluate the impact of additional variables, including other stressors on DC function. PMID:24575090

  16. Silibinin prevents prostate cancer cell-mediated differentiation of naïve fibroblasts into cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype by targeting TGF β2.

    PubMed

    Ting, Harold J; Deep, Gagan; Jain, Anil K; Cimic, Adela; Sirintrapun, Joseph; Romero, Lina M; Cramer, Scott D; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-09-01

    Tumor microenvironment (TM) is an essential element in prostate cancer (PCA), offering unique opportunities for its prevention. TM includes naïve fibroblasts that are recruited by nascent neoplastic lesion and altered into 'cancer-associated fibroblasts' (CAFs) that promote PCA. A better understanding and targeting of interaction between PCA cells and fibroblasts and inhibiting CAF phenotype through non-toxic agents are novel approaches to prevent PCA progression. One well-studied cancer chemopreventive agent is silibinin, and thus, we examined its efficacy against PCA cells-mediated differentiation of naïve fibroblasts into a myofibroblastic-phenotype similar to that found in CAFs. Silibinin's direct inhibitory effect on the phenotype of CAFs derived directly from PCA patients was also assessed. Human prostate stromal cells (PrSCs) exposed to control conditioned media (CCM) from human PCA PC3 cells showed more invasiveness, with increased alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin expression, and differentiation into a phenotype we identified in CAFs. Importantly, silibinin (at physiologically achievable concentrations) inhibited α-SMA expression and invasiveness in differentiated fibroblasts and prostate CAFs directly, as well as indirectly by targeting PCA cells. The observed increase in α-SMA and CAF-like phenotype was transforming growth factor (TGF) β2 dependent, which was strongly inhibited by silibinin. Furthermore, induction of α-SMA and CAF phenotype by CCM were also strongly inhibited by a TGFβ2-neutralizing antibody. The inhibitory effect of silibinin on TGFβ2 expression and CAF-like biomarkers was also observed in PC3 tumors. Together, these findings highlight the potential usefulness of silibinin in PCA prevention through targeting the CAF phenotype in the prostate TM.

  17. Clinical-scale selection and viral transduction of human naïve and central memory CD8+ T cells for adoptive cell therapy of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Casati, Anna; Varghaei-Nahvi, Azam; Feldman, Steven Alexander; Assenmacher, Mario; Rosenberg, Steven Aaron; Dudley, Mark Edward; Scheffold, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The adoptive transfer of lymphocytes genetically engineered to express tumor-specific antigen receptors is a potent strategy to treat cancer patients. T lymphocyte subsets, such as naïve or central memory T cells, selected in vitro prior to genetic engineering have been extensively investigated in preclinical mouse models, where they demonstrated improved therapeutic efficacy. However, so far, this is challenging to realize in the clinical setting, since good manufacturing practices (GMP) procedures for complex cell sorting and genetic manipulation are limited. To be able to directly compare the immunological attributes and therapeutic efficacy of naïve (T(N)) and central memory (T(CM)) CD8(+) T cells, we investigated clinical-scale procedures for their parallel selection and in vitro manipulation. We also evaluated currently available GMP-grade reagents for stimulation of T cell subsets, including a new type of anti-CD3/anti-CD28 nanomatrix. An optimized protocol was established for the isolation of both CD8(+) T(N) cells (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(+)) and CD8(+) T(CM) (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(-)) from a single patient. The highly enriched T cell subsets can be efficiently transduced and expanded to large cell numbers, sufficient for clinical applications and equivalent to or better than current cell and gene therapy approaches with unselected lymphocyte populations. The GMP protocols for selection of T(N) and T(CM) we reported here will be the basis for clinical trials analyzing safety, in vivo persistence and clinical efficacy in cancer patients and will help to generate a more reliable and efficacious cellular product. PMID:23903715

  18. Silibinin Prevents Prostate Cancer Cell-Mediated Differentiation of Naïve Fibroblasts into Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Phenotype by Targeting TGF β2

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Harold; Deep, Gagan; Jain, Anil K.; Cimic, Adela; Sirintrapun, Joseph; Romero, Lina M.; Cramer, Scott D.; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment is an essential element in prostate cancer (PCA), offering unique opportunities for its prevention. Tumor microenvironment includes naïve fibroblasts that are recruited by nascent neoplastic lesion and altered into ‘cancer-associated fibroblasts’ (CAFs) that promote PCA. A better understanding and targeting of interaction between PCA cells and fibroblasts and inhibiting CAF phenotype through non-toxic agents are novel approaches to prevent PCA progression. One well-studied cancer chemopreventive agent is silibinin, and thus, we examined its efficacy against PCA cells-mediated differentiation of naïve fibroblasts into a myofibroblastic-phenotype similar to that found in CAFs. Silibinin’s direct inhibitory effect on the phenotype of CAFs derived directly from PCA patients was also assessed. Human prostate stromal cells (PrSCs) exposed to control conditioned media (CCM) from human PCA PC3 cells showed more invasiveness, with increased α-SMA (alpha-smooth muscle actin) and vimentin expression, and differentiation into a phenotype we identified in CAFs. Importantly, silibinin (at physiologically-achievable concentrations) inhibited α-SMA expression and invasiveness in differentiated fibroblasts and prostate CAFs directly, as well as indirectly by targeting PCA cells. The observed increase in α-SMA and CAF-like phenotype was transforming growth factor (TGF) β2 dependent, which was strongly inhibited by silibinin. Furthermore, induction of ±-SMA and CAF phenotype by CCM were also strongly inhibited by a TGFβ2-neutralizing antibody. The inhibitory effect of silibinin on TGFβ2 expression and CAF-like biomarkers was also observed in PC3 tumors. Together, these findings highlight the potential usefulness of silibinin in PCA prevention through targeting the CAF phenotype in the prostate tumor microenvironment. PMID:24615813

  19. In silico target predictions: defining a benchmarking data set and comparison of performance of the multiclass Naïve Bayes and Parzen-Rosenblatt window.

    PubMed

    Koutsoukas, Alexios; Lowe, Robert; Kalantarmotamedi, Yasaman; Mussa, Hamse Y; Klaffke, Werner; Mitchell, John B O; Glen, Robert C; Bender, Andreas

    2013-08-26

    In this study, two probabilistic machine-learning algorithms were compared for in silico target prediction of bioactive molecules, namely the well-established Laplacian-modified Naïve Bayes classifier (NB) and the more recently introduced (to Cheminformatics) Parzen-Rosenblatt Window. Both classifiers were trained in conjunction with circular fingerprints on a large data set of bioactive compounds extracted from ChEMBL, covering 894 human protein targets with more than 155,000 ligand-protein pairs. This data set is also provided as a benchmark data set for future target prediction methods due to its size as well as the number of bioactivity classes it contains. In addition to evaluating the methods, different performance measures were explored. This is not as straightforward as in binary classification settings, due to the number of classes, the possibility of multiple class memberships, and the need to translate model scores into "yes/no" predictions for assessing model performance. Both algorithms achieved a recall of correct targets that exceeds 80% in the top 1% of predictions. Performance depends significantly on the underlying diversity and size of a given class of bioactive compounds, with small classes and low structural similarity affecting both algorithms to different degrees. When tested on an external test set extracted from WOMBAT covering more than 500 targets by excluding all compounds with Tanimoto similarity above 0.8 to compounds from the ChEMBL data set, the current methodologies achieved a recall of 63.3% and 66.6% among the top 1% for Naïve Bayes and Parzen-Rosenblatt Window, respectively. While those numbers seem to indicate lower performance, they are also more realistic for settings where protein targets need to be established for novel chemical substances.

  20. Ghrelin and GHS-R1A signaling within the ventral and laterodorsal tegmental area regulate sexual behavior in sexually naïve male mice.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Garcia, Luna; Egecioglu, Emil; Studer, Erik; Westberg, Lars; Jerlhag, Elisabet

    2015-12-01

    In addition to food intake and energy balance regulation, ghrelin mediate the rewarding and motivational properties of palatable food as well as addictive drugs. The ability of ghrelin to regulate reinforcement involves the cholinergic-dopaminergic reward link, which encompasses a cholinergic projection from the laterodorsal tegmental area (LDTg) to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) together with mesolimbic dopaminergic projections from the VTA to the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Recently, systemic ghrelin was shown to regulate sexual behavior and motivation in male mice via dopamine neurotransmission. The present study therefore elucidates the role of ghrelin and ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) antagonist treatment within NAc, VTA or LDTg for sexual behavior in sexually naïve male mice. Local administration of the GHSR-1A antagonist, JMV2959, into the VTA or LDTg was found to reduce the preference for female mice, the number of mounts and the duration of mounting as well as to prolong the latency to mount. This was further substantiated by the findings that ghrelin administration into the VTA or LDTg increased the number of mounts and the duration of mounting and decreased the latency to mount. Moreover, ghrelin administered into the LDTg increased the preference for female mice. Accumbal administration of ghrelin increased whereas GHS-R1A antagonist decreased the intake of palatable food, but did not alter sexual behavior. In males exposed to sexual interaction, systemic administration of ghrelin increases whereas JMV2959 decreases the turnover of dopamine in the VTA. These data suggest that ghrelin signaling within the tegmental areas is required for sexual behavior in sexually naïve male mice.

  1. Stochastic uncertainty analysis for solute transport in randomly heterogeneous media using a Karhunen-Loève-based moment equation approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Gaisheng; Lu, Zhiming; Zhang, Dongxiao

    2007-01-01

    A new approach has been developed for solving solute transport problems in randomly heterogeneous media using the Karhunen-Loève-based moment equation (KLME) technique proposed by Zhang and Lu (2004). The KLME approach combines the Karhunen-Loève decomposition of the underlying random conductivity field and the perturbative and polynomial expansions of dependent variables including the hydraulic head, flow velocity, dispersion coefficient, and solute concentration. The equations obtained in this approach are sequential, and their structure is formulated in the same form as the original governing equations such that any existing simulator, such as Modular Three-Dimensional Multispecies Transport Model for Simulation of Advection, Dispersion, and Chemical Reactions of Contaminants in Groundwater Systems (MT3DMS), can be directly applied as the solver. Through a series of two-dimensional examples, the validity of the KLME approach is evaluated against the classical Monte Carlo simulations. Results indicate that under the flow and transport conditions examined in this work, the KLME approach provides an accurate representation of the mean concentration. For the concentration variance, the accuracy of the KLME approach is good when the conductivity variance is 0.5. As the conductivity variance increases up to 1.0, the mismatch on the concentration variance becomes large, although the mean concentration can still be accurately reproduced by the KLME approach. Our results also indicate that when the conductivity variance is relatively large, neglecting the effects of the cross terms between velocity fluctuations and local dispersivities, as done in some previous studies, can produce noticeable errors, and a rigorous treatment of the dispersion terms becomes more appropriate.

  2. Effect of BMI and fat mass on HIV disease progression in HIV-infected, antiretroviral treatment-naïve adults in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Martinez, S S; Campa, A; Bussmann, H; Moyo, S; Makhema, J; Huffman, F G; Williams, O D; Essex, M; Marlink, R; Baum, M K

    2016-06-01

    An obesity paradox has been proposed in many conditions including HIV. Studies conducted to investigate obesity and its effect on HIV disease progression have been inconclusive and are lacking for African settings. This study investigated the relationship between overweight/obesity (BMI≥25 kg/m2) and HIV disease progression in HIV+ asymptomatic adults not on antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Botswana over 18 months. A cohort study in asymptomatic, ART-naïve, HIV+ adults included 217 participants, 139 with BMI of 18·0-24·9 kg/m2 and seventy-eight participants with BMI≥25 kg/m2. The primary outcome was time to event (≥25 % decrease in cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) cell count) during 18 months of follow-up; secondary outcomes were time to event of CD4 cell count<250 cells/µl and AIDS-defining conditions. Proportional survival hazard models were used to compare hazard ratios (HR) on time to events of HIV disease progression over 18 months. Higher baseline BMI was associated with significantly lower risk of an AIDS-defining condition during the follow-up (HR 0·218; 95 % CI 0·068, 0·701; P=0·011). Higher fat mass at baseline was also significantly associated with decreased risk of AIDS-defining conditions during the follow-up (HR 0·855; 95 % CI 0·741, 0·987; P=0·033) and the combined outcome of having CD4 cell count≤250/µl and AIDS-defining conditions, whichever occurred earlier (HR 0·918; 95 % CI 0·847, 0·994; P=0·036). All models were adjusted for covariates. Higher BMI and fat mass among the HIV-infected, ART-naïve participants were associated with slower disease progression. Mechanistic research is needed to evaluate the association between BMI, fat mass and HIV disease progression.

  3. Functional characterization of a veA-dependent polyketide synthase gene in Aspergillus flavus necessary for the synthesis of asparasone, a sclerotium-specific pigment.

    PubMed

    Cary, Jeffrey W; Harris-Coward, Pamela Y; Ehrlich, Kenneth C; Di Mavungu, José Diana; Malysheva, Svetlana V; De Saeger, Sarah; Dowd, Patrick F; Shantappa, Sourabha; Martens, Stacey L; Calvo, Ana M

    2014-03-01

    The filamentous fungus, Aspergillus flavus, produces the toxic and carcinogenic, polyketide synthase (PKS)-derived family of secondary metabolites termed aflatoxins. While analysis of the A. flavus genome has identified many other PKSs capable of producing secondary metabolites, to date, only a few other metabolites have been identified. In the process of studying how the developmental regulator, VeA, affects A. flavus secondary metabolism we discovered that mutation of veA caused a dramatic down-regulation of transcription of a polyketide synthase gene belonging to cluster 27 and the loss of the ability of the fungi to produce sclerotia. Inactivation of the cluster 27 pks (pks27) resulted in formation of greyish-yellow sclerotia rather than the dark brown sclerotia normally produced by A. flavus while conidial pigmentation was unaffected. One metabolite produced by Pks27 was identified by thin layer chromatography and mass spectral analysis as the known anthraquinone, asparasone A. Sclerotia produced by pks27 mutants were significantly less resistant to insect predation than were the sclerotia produced by the wild-type and more susceptible to the deleterious effects of ultraviolet light and heat. Normal sclerotia were previously thought to be resistant to damage because of a process of melanization similar to that known for pigmentation of conidia. Our results show that the dark brown pigments in sclerotia derive from anthraquinones produced by Pks27 rather than from the typical tetrahydronapthalene melanin production pathway. To our knowledge this is the first report on the genes involved in the biosynthesis of pigments important for sclerotial survival. PMID:24412484

  4. Undernutrition and anaemia among HAART-naïve HIV infected children in Ile-Ife, Nigeria: a case-controlled, hospital based study

    PubMed Central

    Anyabolu, Henry Chineme; Adejuyigbe, Ebunoluwa Aderonke; Adeodu, Oluwagbemiga Oyewole

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Case control studies that assess the burden and factors associated with undernutrition and anaemia among HAART naïve HIV infected children in Nigeria is very sparse. This will help to formulate nutritional programs among these children. Methods Seventy HAART naive HIV infected children aged 18 months and above were as well as seventy age and sex matched HIV negative children were recruited from August 2007 to January 2009 at Paediatric Clinic of Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Their bio data, WHO clinical stage, anthropometric measurements, haematocrit, serum albumin and CD4 counts were taken with other parameters according to a study proforma. Results The prevalence of stunting, underweight and wasting among the HIV infected subjects were 48. 6%,58. 6% and 31. 4% respectively which as significantly higher than 28. 1%, 7. 1% and 28. 1% among the HIV negative controls. 20. 1% of the HIV infected children were marasmic compared to 2. 3% of the controls. Triple anthropometric failure was found in 7. 1% of the subjects as compared to none among the controls. Anaemia is significantly more prevalent among the subjects than the controls (70. 0% vs 31. 4%; p<0. 001). The prevalence of anaemia was higher in the HIV infected subjects with undernutrition. Low socioeconomic status, hypoalbuminemia and severe immunosuppression are significantly associated with higher undernutrition prevalence. Conclusion Several years after availability of HAART, undernutrition and anaemia remain widely prevalent among newly presenting HAART naïve HIV infected Nigerian children. Nutritional supplementation and evaluation for anaemia still need close attention in the management of these children. PMID:25400844

  5. Decreases in percentages of naïve CD4 and CD8 T cells and increases in percentages of memory CD8 T-cell subsets in the peripheral blood lymphocyte populations of A-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Mika; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Hayashi, Tomonori; Nakachi, Kei; Kyoizumi, Seishi

    2004-03-01

    Our previous studies have revealed a clear dose-dependent decrease in the percentage of naïve CD4 T cells that are phenotypically CD45RA+ in PBL among A-bomb survivors. However, whether there is a similar radiation effect on CD8 T cells has remained undetermined because of the unreliability of CD45 isoforms as markers of naïve and memory subsets among the CD8 T-cell population. In the present study, we used double labeling with CD45RO and CD62L for reliable identification of naïve and memory cell subsets in both CD4 and CD8 T-cell populations among 533 Hiroshima A-bomb survivors. Statistically significant dose-dependent decreases in the percentages of CD45RO-/CD62L+ naïve cells were found in the CD8 T-cell population as well as in the CD4 T-cell population. Furthermore, the percentages of CD45RO+/CD62L+ and CD45RO+/CD62L- memory T cells were found to increase significantly with increasing radiation dose in the CD8 T-cell population but not in the CD4 T-cell population. These results suggest that the prior A-bomb exposure has induced long-lasting deficits in both naïve CD4 and CD8 T- cell populations along with increased proportions of these particular subsets of the memory CD8 T-cell population.

  6. Türk Lise Öğrencilerinde Okul Terkinin Yordanması: Aracı ve Etkileşim Değişkenleri ile Bir Model Testi

    PubMed Central

    Özer, Arif; Gençtanirim, Dilek; Ergene, Tuncay

    2011-01-01

    Bu araştırmada ilk olarak, dürtüsel davranma ile okulu terk etme riski arasındaki ilişkiye disiplin cezası almanın, antisosyal davranışların ve sigara-alkol kullanımının aracılık edip etmediği incelenmiştir. İkinci olarak, öğretmen desteği ve antisosyal davranış etkileşiminin okulu terk etme riski üzerindeki etkisi test edilmiştir. Araştırma grubunu 2009-2010 yılında Ankara İlinde genel liselere devam eden 478 öğrenci oluşturmuştur. Sonuçlar okulu terk etme riskini aile ve arkadaş desteğinin azalttığını, dürtüsel davranmanın ise artırdığını göstermiştir. Ayrıca disiplin cezası, alkol-sigara kullanma ve antisosyal davranışlar okulu terk etme riskini artıran aracı değişkenlerdir. Antisosyal davranışlarla okulu terk etme arasındaki ilişki öğretmen desteğine bağlı olarak değişmektedir. Öğrencilerin cinsiyet ve başarıları ile okulu terk etme riskleri arasında anlamlı bir ilişki bulunmamaktadır. PMID:22003257

  7. A Comparison of the Diabetes Risk Score in HIV/AIDS Patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) and HAART-Naïve Patients at the Limbe Regional Hospital, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Dimala, Christian Akem; Atashili, Julius; Mbuagbaw, Josephine C.; Wilfred, Akam; Monekosso, Gottlieb L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been associated with dysglycaemia. However, there is scarce data on the risk of developing diabetes mellitus (DM) in HIV/AIDS patients in Africa. Objectives Primarily to quantify and compare the risk of having diabetes mellitus in HIV/AIDS patients on HAART and HAART-naïve patients in Limbe, Cameroon; and secondarily to determine if there is an association between HAART and increased DM risk. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Limbe Regional Hospital HIV treatment center between April and June 2013, involving 200 HIV/AIDS patients (100 on first-line HAART regimens for at least 12 months matched by age and gender to 100 HAART-naïve patients). The Diabetes Risk Score (DRS) was calculated using a clinically validated model based on routinely recorded primary care parameters. A DRS ≥ 7% was considered as indicative of an increased risk of developing DM. Results The median DRS was significantly higher in patients on HAART (2.30%) than in HAART-naïve patients (1.62%), p = 0.002. The prevalence of the increased DM risk (DRS ≥ 7%) was significantly higher in patients on HAART, 31% (95% CI: 22.13–41.03) than in HAART-naïve patients, 17% (95% CI: 10.23–25.82), p = 0.020. HAART was significantly associated with an increased DM risk, the odds ratio of the HAART group compared to the HAART-naïve group was 2.19 (95% CI: 1.12–4.30, p = 0.020). However, no association was found after adjusting for BMI-defined overweight, hypertension, age, sex, family history of DM and smoking (Odds ratio = 1.22, 95% CI: 0.42–3.59, p = 0.708). Higher BMI and hypertension accounted for the increased risk of DM in patients on HAART. Also, more than 82% of the participants were receiving or had ever used Zidovudine based HAART regimens. Conclusion HIV/AIDS patients on HAART could be at a greater risk of having DM than HAART-naïve patients as a result of the effect of HAART on risk factors of DM such as BMI

  8. Efficacy of Second Generation Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents for Treatment Naïve Hepatitis C Genotype 1: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sobhonslidsuk, Abhasnee; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Teerawattananon, Yot

    2015-01-01

    Background The treatment of hepatitis C (HCV) infections has significantly changed in the past few years due to the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). DAAs could improve the sustained virological response compared to pegylated interferon with ribavirin (PR). However, there has been no evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that directly compare the efficacy among the different regimens of DAAs. Aim Therefore, we performed a systematic review and network meta-analysis aiming to compare the treatment efficacy between different DAA regimens for treatment naïve HCV genotype 1. Methods Medline and Scopus were searched up to 25th May 2015. RCTs investigating the efficacy of second generation DAA regimens for treatment naïve HCV genotype 1 were eligible for the review. Due to the lower efficacy and more side effects of first generation DAAs, this review included only second generation DAAs approved by the US or EU Food and Drug Administration, that comprised of simeprevir (SMV), sofosbuvir (SOF), daclatasvir (DCV), ledipasvir (LDV), and paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir plus dasabuvir (PrOD). Primary outcomes were sustained virological response at weeks 12 (SVR12) and 24 (SVR24) after the end of treatment and adverse drug events (i.e. serious adverse events, anemia, and fatigue). Efficacy of all treatment regimens were compared by applying a multivariate random effect meta-analysis. Incidence rates of SVR12 and SVR24, and adverse drug events of each treatment regimen were pooled using ‘pmeta’ command in STATA program. Results Overall, 869 studies were reviewed and 16 studies were eligible for this study. Compared with the PR regimen, SOF plus PR, SMV plus PR, and DVC plus PR regimens yielded significantly higher probability of having SVR24 with pooled risk ratios (RR) of 1.98 (95% CI 1.24, 3.14), 1.46 (95% CI: 1.22, 1.75), and 1.68 (95% CI: 1.14, 2.46), respectively. Pooled incidence rates of SVR12 and SVR24 in all treatment regimens

  9. Evaluation of Dual Therapy in Real Life Setting in Treatment-Naïve Turkish Patients with HCV Infection: A Multicenter, Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Gürbüz, Yunus; Tülek, Necla Eren; Tütüncü, Emin Ediz; Koruk, Süda Tekin; Aygen, Bilgehan; Demirtürk, Neşe; Kınıklı, Sami; Kaya, Ali; Yıldırmak, Taner; Süer, Kaya; Korkmaz, Fatime; Ural, Onur; Akhan, Sıla; Günal, Özgür; Tuna, Nazan; Köse, Şükran; Gönen, İbak; Örmen, Bahar; Türker, Nesrin; Saltoğlu, Neşe; Batırel, Ayşe; Tuncer, Günay; Bulut, Cemal; Sırmatel, Fatma; Ulçay, Asım; Karagöz, Ergenekon; Tosun, Derviş; Şener, Alper; Aynıoğlu, Aynur; Altunok, Elif Sargın

    2016-01-01

    Background: Before the introduction of direct-acting antivirals in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C patients, the combination of peginterferon alpha and ribavirin was the standard therapy. Observational studies that investigated sustained virological response (SVR) rates by these drugs yielded different outcomes. Aims: The goal of the study was to demonstrate real life data concerning SVR rate achieved by peginterferon alpha plus ribavirin in patients who were treatment-naïve. Study Design: A multicenter, retrospective observational study. Methods: The study was conducted retrospectively on 1214 treatment naïve-patients, being treated with peginterferon alpha-2a or 2b plus ribavirin in respect of the current guidelines between 2005 and 2013. The patients’ data were collected from 22 centers via a standard form, which has been prepared for this study. The data included demographic and clinical characteristics (gender, age, body weight, initial Hepatitis C virus RNA (HCV RNA) level, disease staging) as well as course of treatment (duration of treatment, outcomes, discontinuations and adverse events). Renal insufficiency, decompensated liver disease, history of transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy or autoimmune liver disease were exclusion criteria for the study. Treatment efficacy was assessed according to the patient’s demographic characteristics, baseline viral load, genotype, and fibrosis scores. Results: The mean age of the patients was 50.74 (±0.64) years. Most of them were infected with genotype 1 (91.8%). SVR was achieved in 761 (62.7%) patients. SVR rate was 59.1% in genotype 1, 89.4% in genotype 2, 93.8% in genotype 3, and 33.3% in genotype 4 patients. Patients with lower viral load yielded higher SVR (65.8% vs. 58.4%, p=0.09). SVR rates according to histologic severity were found to be 69.3%, 66.3%, 59.9%, 47.3%, and 45.5% in patients with fibrosis stage 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. The predictors of SVR were male gender, genotype 2

  10. A phase II study evaluating the toxicity and efficacy of single-agent temsirolimus in chemotherapy-naïve castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kruczek, K; Ratterman, M; Tolzien, K; Sulo, S; Lestingi, T M; Nabhan, C

    2013-01-01

    Background: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is deregulated in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We investigated the efficacy and toxicity of temsirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, in chemotherapy-naïve CRPC. Methods: In this phase II open label study, eligible patients received IV temsirolimus at 25 mg weekly until objective disease progression, unacceptable toxicity or investigator's discretion. Toxicity was assessed every 4 weeks and responses every 8 weeks. Primary end point was calculating the overall response (OR) rate as well as measuring stable disease (SD) to assess the overall clinical benefit calculated as OR+SD. Secondary end points included prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) changes and time to progression biochemically and radiographically. Correlative studies included prospective assessment of quality of life (QoL) using two previously validated scales. Results: Although the sponsor halted the study early, 21 patients were enrolled of which, 15 were evaluable for efficacy and OR. Median age was 74 (range: 57–89), median PSA was 237.5 ng ml−1 (range: 8.2–2360), visceral disease present in 11 patients (52%), and 17 patients (81%) patients had Gleason score (7–10). Two patients had a partial response (PR) and eight had SD. The OR was 13% (2/15) and the overall clinical benefit (OR+SD) was 67% (10/15). Median time to radiographic disease progression was 2 months (range 2–10 months). Biochemical response assessment was available for 14/15 patients. Any PSA decline was observed in four patients (28.5% 4/14) with one patient (7%) having >50% PSA decline. Median time to progression by PSA was 2 months (range 1–10 months). With a median follow-up of 32 months, median overall survival (OS) was 13 months (range: 2–37) and three patients remain alive at the data cutoff (5/2013) for an OS of 14% at 4 years on an intent-to-treat analysis. Major non-haematologic toxicities included fatigue (19%) and pneumonia (14%). Main

  11. Impact of telephonic interviews on persistence and daily adherence to insulin treatment in insulin-naïve type 2 diabetes patients: dropout study

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Dilek Gogas; Bilen, Habip; Sancak, Seda; Garip, Tayfun; Hekimsoy, Zeliha; Sahin, Ibrahim; Yilmaz, Murat; Aydin, Hasan; Atmaca, Aysegul; Sert, Murat; Karakaya, Pinar; Arpaci, Dilek; Oguz, Aytekin; Guvener, Nilgun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of sequential telephonic interviews on treatment persistence and daily adherence to insulin injections among insulin-naïve type 2 diabetes patients initiated on different insulin regimens in a 3-month period. Methods A total of 1,456 insulin-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes (mean [standard deviation, SD] age: 56.0 [12.0] years, 49.1% were females) initiated on insulin therapy and consecutively randomized to sequential (n=733) and single (n=723) telephonic interview groups were included. Data on insulin treatment and self-reported blood glucose values were obtained via telephone interview. Logistic regression analysis was performed for factors predicting increased likelihood of persistence and skipping an injection. Results Overall, 76.8% patients (83.2% in sequential vs 70.3% in single interview group, (P<0.001) remained on insulin treatment at the third month. Significantly higher rate for skipping doses was noted in basal bolus than in other regimens (27.0% vs 15.0% for premixed and 15.8% basal insulin, respectively, P<0.0001). Logistic regression analysis revealed sequential telephonic interview (odds ratio [OR], 1.531; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.093–2.143; P=0.013), higher hemoglobin A1c levels (OR, 1.090; 95% CI, 0.999–1.189; P=0.049), and less negative appraisal of insulin therapy as significant predictors of higher persistence. Basal bolus regimen (OR, 1.583; 95% CI, 1.011–2.479; P=0.045) and higher hemoglobin A1c levels (OR, 1.114; 95% CI, 1.028–1.207; P=0.008) were the significant predictors of increased likelihood of skipping an injection. Conclusion Our findings revealed positive influence of sequential telephonic interview, although including no intervention in treatment, on achieving better treatment persistence in type 2 diabetes patients initiating insulin. PMID:27274207

  12. Safe and Effective Use of the Once Weekly Dulaglutide Single-Dose Pen in Injection-Naïve Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Matfin, Glenn; Van Brunt, Kate; Zimmermann, Alan G.; Threlkeld, Rebecca; Ignaut, Debra A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This 4-week, phase 3b, multicenter, open-label, single-arm, outpatient study demonstrated the safe and effective use of the dulaglutide single-dose pen containing 0.5 mL of placebo for subcutaneous injection in injection-naïve adult patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), with A1C ≤ 8.5% (69 mmol/mol), BMI ≥ 23 kg/m2 and ≤ 45 kg/m2. Method: Patients completed a modified self-injecting subscale of the Diabetes Fear of Injecting and Self-Testing Questionnaire (mD-FISQ) and were trained to self-inject with the single-dose pen. Patients completed the initial self-injection at the site, injected at home for 2 subsequent weeks, and returned to the site for the final injection. The initial and final self-injections were evaluated for success; the final (initial) self-injection success rate was the primary (secondary) outcome measure, and the primary (secondary) objective was to demonstrate this success rate as being significantly greater than 80%. Patients recorded their level of pain after each injection. After the final injection, patients completed the mD-FISQ and the Medication Delivery Device Assessment Battery (MDDAB) to assess their perceptions of the single-dose pen, including ease of use and experience with the device. Results: Among 211 patients (mean age: 61 years), the primary objective was met, with a final injection success rate of 99.1% (95% CI: 96.6% to 99.7%). Among 214 patients, the initial injection success rate was 97.2% (95% CI: 94.0% to 98.7%), meeting the key secondary objective. Overall, most patients (>96%) found the device easy to use, were satisfied with the device, and would be willing to continue to use the single-dose pen after the study. There was a significant reduction (P < .001) from baseline to study end in patients’ fear of self-injecting, as measured by the mD-FISQ. Conclusions: The dulaglutide single-dose pen was found to be a safe and effective device for use by patients with T2D who were injection-naïve. A

  13. Differential activation of dendritic cells by toll-like receptors causes diverse differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells from allergic patients

    PubMed Central

    Deifl, S.; Kitzmüller, C.; Steinberger, P.; Himly, M.; Jahn-Schmid, B.; Fischer, G. F.; Zlabinger, G. J.; Bohle, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background To avert the differentiation of allergen-specific Th2 cells in atopic individuals is a major goal in the prevention and therapy of IgE-mediated allergy. We aimed to compare different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists regarding their effects on antigen-presenting cells and the differentiation of naïve T cells from allergic patients. Methods Monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDC) from allergic patients were stimulated with Pam3CSK4 (TLR1/2 ligand), FSL-1 (TLR2/6 ligand), monophosphoryl lipid (MPL)-A, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, both TLR4 ligands), and flagellin (TLR5 ligand). Allergen uptake and upregulation of CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD58, CCR7 and PD-L1 were analyzed by flow cytometry. Functional maturation of mdDC was tested in mixed leukocyte reactions, and the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-10 and members of the IL-12 family was assessed. TLR-ligand-activated mdDC were used to stimulate naïve CD4+ T cells, and cytokine responses were assessed in supernatants and intracellularly. Results All TLR ligands except flagellin enhanced allergen uptake. All TLR ligands induced functional maturation of mdDC with differential expression of surface molecules and cytokines and promoted the differentiation of IFN-γ-producing T cells. LPS-matured mdDC exclusively induced Th1-like responses, whereas mdDC stimulated with the other TLR ligands induced both Th1- and Th0-like cells. Pam3CSK4 and flagellin additionally induced Th2-like cells. Th1-like responses were associated with higher expression levels of co-stimulatory molecules, PD-L1, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-12p70. None of the TLR-ligand-stimulated mdDC induced IL-10- or IL-17-producing T cells. Conclusion Different TLR ligands differently influence T-cell responses due to varying activation of the three signals relevant for T-cell activation, that is, antigen presentation, co-stimulation and cytokine milieu. PMID:25093709

  14. Imaging Characteristics of Driver Mutations in EGFR, KRAS, and ALK among Treatment-Naïve Patients with Advanced Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jangchul; Kobayashi, Yoshihisa; Urayama, Kevin Y.; Yamaura, Hidekazu; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hida, Toyoaki

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the computed tomography characteristics of treatment-naïve patients with lung adenocarcinoma and known driver mutations in EGFR, KRAS, or ALK. Patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma (stage IIIB–IV) and known mutations in EGFR, KRAS, or ALK were assessed. The radiological findings for the main tumor and intra-thoracic status were retrospectively analyzed in each group, and the groups’ characteristics were compared. We identified 265 treatment-naïve patients with non-small-cell carcinoma, who had EGFR mutations (n = 159), KRAS mutations (n = 55), or ALK rearrangements (n = 51). Among the three groups, we evaluated only patients with stage IIIB–IV lung adenocarcinoma who had EGFR mutations (n = 126), KRAS mutations (n = 35), or ALK rearrangements (n = 47). We found that ground-glass opacity at the main tumor was significantly more common among EGFR-positive patients, compared to ALK-positive patients (p = 0.009). Lymphadenopathy was significantly more common among ALK-positive patients, compared to EGFR-positive patients (p = 0.003). Extranodal invasion was significantly more common among ALK-positive patients, compared to EGFR-positive patients and KRAS-positive patients (p = 0.001 and p = 0.049, respectively). Lymphangitis was significantly more common among ALK-positive patients, compared to EGFR-positive patients (p = 0.049). Pleural effusion was significantly less common among KRAS-positive patients, compared to EGFR-positive patients and ALK-positive patients (p = 0.046 and p = 0.026, respectively). Lung metastases were significantly more common among EGFR-positive patients, compared to KRAS-positive patients and ALK-positive patients (p = 0.007 and p = 0.04, respectively). In conclusion, EGFR mutations were associated with ground-glass opacity, KRAS-positive tumors were generally solid and less likely to metastasize to the lung and pleura, and ALK-positive tumors tended to present with lymphadenopathy, extranodal

  15. Renal Function Impairment and Associated Factors among HAART Naïve and Experienced Adult HIV Positive Individuals in Southwest Ethiopia: A Comparative Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mekuria, Yewulsew; Yilma, Daniel; Mekonnen, Zeleke; Kassa, Tesfaye; Gedefaw, Lealem

    2016-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and its treatment cause renal diseases. Renal disease is associated with an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV positive individuals than in the general population. It has been also associated with adverse outcomes, such as complications of decreased renal functions and progression to renal failure. Objective To determine the prevalence and factors associated with renal function impairment among highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) naive and HAART experienced adult HIV positive individuals. Methods A facility based comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in Jimma University Specialized Hospital (JUSH) from June to September 2014. HIV positive individuals who visited JUSH during the study period were included in the study. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected using a structured questionnaire. Blood specimen was analyzed for renal function tests. Descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney U test and logistic regression analysis were done using SPSS version 16 software. Results A total of 446 HIV positive individuals, 223 HAART naïve and 223 HAART experienced, were recruited. The overall prevalence of renal function impairment was 18.2% [95%CI: 14.6–21.7]. The prevalence of renal impairment in HAART naive and HAART experienced persons was 28.7% [95%CI: 23.1–34.4] and 7.6% [95%CI: 4.6–11.6], respectively. Age ≥ 50 years (AOR = 3.6; 95% CI 1.4, 9.6), advanced WHO stage (AOR = 2.3; 95% CI 1.1, 4.7), and CD4 count <200 (AOR = 6.9; 95% CI 3.3, 14.2) were independent risk factors among HAART naive participants. Female gender (AOR = 6.6; 95 CI % 1.2, 34), age ≥ 50 years (AOR = 12.1; 95% CI 1.7, 84) and CD4 count <200 (AOR = 17; 95% CI 5.2, 58) were independent risk factors among HAART experienced participants. Conclusion The prevalence of renal function impairment was higher among HAART naïve than HAART experienced HIV positive individuals. Renal function impairment was

  16. Coupling Self-Organizing Maps with a Naïve Bayesian classifier: A case study for classifying Vermont streams using geomorphic, habitat and biological assessment data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fytilis, N.; Rizzo, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Environmental managers are increasingly required to forecast the long-term effects and the resilience or vulnerability of biophysical systems to human-generated stresses. Mitigation strategies for hydrological and environmental systems need to be assessed in the presence of uncertainty. An important aspect of such complex systems is the assessment of variable uncertainty on the model response outputs. We develop a new classification tool that couples a Naïve Bayesian Classifier with a modified Kohonen Self-Organizing Map to tackle this challenge. For proof-of-concept, we use rapid geomorphic and reach-scale habitat assessments data from over 2500 Vermont stream reaches (~1371 stream miles) assessed by the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources (VTANR). In addition, the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation (VTDEC) estimates stream habitat biodiversity indices (macro-invertebrates and fish) and a variety of water quality data. Our approach fully utilizes the existing VTANR and VTDEC data sets to improve classification of stream-reach habitat and biological integrity. The combined SOM-Naïve Bayesian architecture is sufficiently flexible to allow for continual updates and increased accuracy associated with acquiring new data. The Kohonen Self-Organizing Map (SOM) is an unsupervised artificial neural network that autonomously analyzes properties inherent in a given a set of data. It is typically used to cluster data vectors into similar categories when a priori classes do not exist. The ability of the SOM to convert nonlinear, high dimensional data to some user-defined lower dimension and mine large amounts of data types (i.e., discrete or continuous, biological or geomorphic data) makes it ideal for characterizing the sensitivity of river networks in a variety of contexts. The procedure is data-driven, and therefore does not require the development of site-specific, process-based classification stream models, or sets of if-then-else rules associated with

  17. Clinical response to eliglustat in treatment-naïve patients with Gaucher disease type 1: Post-hoc comparison to imiglucerase-treated patients enrolled in the International Collaborative Gaucher Group Gaucher Registry.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Jennifer; Underhill, Lisa H; Taylor, John S; Angell, Jennifer; Peterschmitt, M Judith

    2016-09-01

    Eliglustat is a recently approved oral therapy in the United States and Europe for adults with Gaucher disease type 1 who are CYP2D6 extensive, intermediate, or poor metabolizers (> 90% of patients) that has been shown to decrease spleen and liver volume and increase hemoglobin concentrations and platelet counts in untreated adults with Gaucher disease type 1 and maintain these parameters in patients previously stabilized on enzyme replacement therapy. In a post-hoc analysis, we compared the results of eliglustat treatment in treatment-naïve patients in two clinical studies with the results of imiglucerase treatment among a cohort of treatment-naïve patients with comparable baseline hematologic and visceral parameters in the International Collaborative Gaucher Group Gaucher Registry. Organ volumes and hematologic parameters improved from baseline in both treatment groups, with a time course and degree of improvement in eliglustat-treated patients similar to imiglucerase-treated patients. PMID:27408819

  18. Sosyal İletişim Ölçeğinin Okul Öncesi Çocuklardaki Geçerlik ve Güvenirliği

    PubMed Central

    Öner, Pınar; Öner, Özgür; Çöp, Esra; Munir, Kerim M.

    2014-01-01

    ÖZET Sosyal iletişim ölçeğinin okul öncesi çocuklardaki geçerlik ve güvenirliği Amaç Bu çalışmada Otizm Spektrum Bozukluklarının değerlendirilmesinde kullanılan Sosyal İletişim Ölçeğinin (SİÖ) Türkçe’ye uyarlanarak geçerlik ve güvenirliğinin belirlenmesi amaçlanmıştır. SİÖ, Otizm Tanı Görüşmesi (Autism Diagnostic Interview-ADI) temel alınarak hazırlanmış ve bu görüşmenin kısaltılarak ölçek haline getirilmiş şeklidir. Yöntem 2010–2011 yıllarında polikliniğimize başvuran olgular arasından DSM-IV ölçütlerine göre otizm (n=49) ve Başka Türlü Adlandırılamayan Yaygın Gelişimsel Bozukluk (n=18) tanısı alan 18–60 ay arası çocuklar, Otizm Spektrum Bozukluğu (OSB) grubu olarak çalışmaya alınmıştır. Kontrol grubu olarak aynı yaş grubundaki gelişimsel geriliği olan (25 Mental Retardasyon, 26 konuşma gecikmesi) 51 çocuk ve tipik gelişim gösteren 71 çocuk çalışmaya alınmıştır. Grupların ölçek puanlarının karşılaştırılmasında tek yönlü varyans analizi ve post-hoc Tukey HSD testi kullanılmıştır. Güvenilirlik analizi için iç tutarlılık göstergesi olarak Cronbach alfa değerleri, madde-toplam puan korelasyonları ve test-tekrar test güvenirliği hesaplanmıştır. Faktörlerin belirlenmesi için ana bileşenler yöntemi ve varimax rotasyonu kullanılmıştır. Kesim noktaları, duyarlılık, özgüllük, negatif ve pozitif yordayıcı değerlerin hesaplanması için Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) eğrileri kullanılmıştır. Bulgular Ana bileşenler yöntemi ve bunu izleyen varimax rotasyonu sonucunda 3 faktör elde edilmiştir. Bu faktörler sırasıyla İletişim, Karşılıklı Sosyal Etkileşim ve Basmakalıp Davranışlar/Kısıtlı İlgi Alanları olarak adlandırılmıştır. Ölçeğin toplam puanının Cronbach alfa değeri 0.88 olarak bulunmuştur. Ölçeğin toplam puanı için test-tekrar test güvenilirliği (r=0.90, p<0.01) olarak

  19. T cells of atomic bomb survivors respond poorly to stimulation by Staphylococcus aureus toxins in vitro: does this stem from their peripheral lymphocyte populations having a diminished naïve CD4 T-cell content?

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Yamaoka, Mika; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Hayashi, Tomonori; Koyama, Kazuaki; Kodama, Kazunori; MacPhee, Donald G; Kyoizumi, Seishi

    2002-12-01

    We found previously that the peripheral CD4 T-cell populations of heavily exposed A-bomb survivors contained fewer naïve T cells than we detected in the corresponding unexposed controls. To determine whether this demonstrable impairment of the CD4 T-cell immunity of A-bomb survivors was likely to affect the responsiveness of their immune systems to infection by common pathogens, we tested the T cells of 723 survivors for their ability to proliferate in vitro after a challenge by each of the Staphylococcus aureus toxins SEB, SEC-2, SEC-3, SEE and TSST-1. The results presented here reveal that the proliferative responses of T cells of A-bomb survivors became progressively weaker as the radiation dose increased and did so in a manner that correlated well with the decreasing CD45RA-positive (naïve) [but not CD45RA-negative (memory)] CD4 T-cell percentages that we found in their peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) populations. We also noted that the T cells of survivors with a history of myocardial infarction tended to respond poorly to several (or even all) of the S. aureus toxins, and that these same individuals had proportionally fewer CD45RA-positive (naïve) CD4 T cells in their PBL populations than we detected in survivors with no myocardial infarction in their history. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that A-bomb irradiation led to an impairment of the ability of exposed individuals to maintain their naïve T-cell pools. This may explain why A-bomb survivors tend to respond poorly to toxins encoded by the common pathogenic bacterium S. aureus.

  20. Assessment of the neurotoxic potential of exposure to 50Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) in naïve and chemically stressed PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Martje W G D M; Kock, Marjolijn D M; Westerink, Remco H S

    2014-09-01

    Increasing exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF), generated by power lines and electric appliances, raises concern about potential adverse health effects of ELF-EMF. The central nervous system is expected to be particularly vulnerable to ELF-EMF as its function strongly depends on electrical excitability. We therefore investigated effects of acute (30min) and sub-chronic (48h) exposure to 50Hz ELF-EMF on naïve and chemically stressed pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. The latter have higher levels of iron and/or reactive oxygen species (ROS) and display increased vulnerability to environmental insults. Effects of ELF-EMF on Ca(2+)-homeostasis, ROS production and membrane integrity were assessed using Fura-2 single cell fluorescence microscopy, H2-DCFDA and CFDA assays, respectively. Our data demonstrate that acute exposure of naïve PC12 cells to 50Hz ELF-EMF up to 1000μT fails to affect basal or depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i. Moreover, sub-chronic ELF-EMF exposure up to 1000μT has no consistent effects on Ca(2+)-homeostasis in naïve PC12 cells and does not affect ROS production and membrane integrity. Notably, in chemically stressed PC12 cells both acute and sub-chronic ELF-EMF exposure also failed to exert consistent effects on Ca(2+)-homeostasis, ROS production and membrane integrity. Our combined findings thus indicate that exposure to 50Hz ELF-EMF up to 1000μT, i.e. 10,000 times above background exposure, does not induce neurotoxic effects in vitro, neither in naïve nor in chemically stressed PC12 cells. Though our data require confirmation, e.g. in developing neuronal cells in vitro or (developing) animals, it appears that the neurotoxic risk of ELF-EMF exposure is limited.

  1. Genome-wide DNA methylation study suggests epigenetic accessibility and transcriptional poising of interferon-regulated genes in naïve CD4+ T cells from lupus patients.

    PubMed

    Coit, Patrick; Jeffries, Matlock; Altorok, Nezam; Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Koelsch, Kristi A; Wren, Jonathan D; Merrill, Joan T; McCune, W Joseph; Sawalha, Amr H

    2013-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease characterized by multi-system involvement and autoantibody production. Abnormal T cell DNA methylation and type-I interferon play an important role in the pathogenesis of lupus. We performed a genome-wide DNA methylation study in two independent sets of lupus patients and matched healthy controls to characterize the DNA methylome in naïve CD4+ T cells in lupus. DNA methylation was quantified for over 485,000 methylation sites across the genome, and differentially methylated sites between lupus patients and controls were identified and then independently replicated. Gene expression analysis was also performed from the same cells to investigate the relationship between the DNA methylation changes observed and mRNA expression levels. We identified and replicated 86 differentially methylated CG sites between patients and controls in 47 genes, with the majority being hypomethylated. We observed significant hypomethylation in interferon-regulated genes in naïve CD4+ T cells from lupus patients, including IFIT1, IFIT3, MX1, STAT1, IFI44L, USP18, TRIM22 and BST2, suggesting epigenetic transcriptional accessibility in these genetic loci. Indeed, the majority of the hypomethylated genes (21 out of 35 hypomethylated genes) are regulated by type I interferon. The hypomethylation in interferon-regulated genes was not related to lupus disease activity. Gene expression analysis showed overexpression of these genes in total but not naïve CD4+ T cells from lupus patients. Our data suggest epigenetic "poising" of interferon-regulated genes in lupus naïve CD4+ T cells, argue for a novel pathogenic implication for abnormal T cell DNA methylation in lupus, and suggest a mechanism for type-I interferon hyper-responsiveness in lupus T cells.

  2. The cumulative effect of coffee and a mental stress task on heart rate, blood pressure, and mental alertness is similar in caffeine-naïve and caffeine-habituated females.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Michael D; Galloway, Ashley V; Dickau, Leanne J; Hudson, Megan K

    2008-09-01

    Most North American workers drink coffee throughout their workday, although the cumulative effect of job stress and coffee is not well known. Research has shown that coffee affects the cardiovascular system and mental alertness primarily through the active ingredient caffeine; however, the dose of caffeine used in these studies is greater than a normal cup of coffee. In addition, these changes have been mostly determined in male caffeine-habituated consumers. Therefore, this study examined the effect of a normal cup of coffee on the cardiovascular and mental alertness response both before and after a mental stress task in 10 caffeine-naïve (23 +/- 5.0 years) and 10 caffeine-habituated (25 +/- 6 years) females. Blood pressure, heart rate, and mental alertness were taken at baseline (before coffee), 50 minutes after finishing coffee and immediately after a 9-minute mental stress task. The volume of coffee ingested for a 15-minute period was 350 mL (12 oz), which is equivalent to 140 mg of caffeine. The combined effect of coffee and mental stress significantly decreased diastolic blood pressure (Delta8 mm Hg) and increased heart rate (Delta6 beats per minute) and mental alertness (Delta67.3%) in caffeine-naïve and caffeine-habituated females, whereas systolic blood pressure (Delta10.3 mm Hg) only increased in the caffeine-naïve participants. Our results indicate that a normal cup of coffee can effect changes in blood pressure and mental alertness and that mental stress may alter the magnitude of change; however, the transient increase in systolic blood pressure after drinking coffee in caffeine-naïve participants requires further investigation.

  3. Plasma aldosterone and left ventricular diastolic function in treatment-naïve patients with hypertension: tissue-Doppler imaging study.

    PubMed

    Catena, Cristiana; Verheyen, Nicolas; Pilz, Stefan; Kraigher-Krainer, Elisabeth; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Sechi, Leonardo A; Pieske, Burkert

    2015-06-01

    Aldosterone has hypertrophic and profibrotic effects on the heart. The relationship between plasma aldosterone levels and left ventricular diastolic function in hypertension, however, is unclear. The aim of this study was to examine this relationship in treatment-naïve hypertensive patients free of comorbidities that could affect left ventricular diastolic filling properties. In 115 patients with primary hypertension who were eating a standard diet and 100 matched normotensive controls, we measured plasma aldosterone and active renin levels and performed both conventional echocardiography and tissue-Doppler imaging for assessment of left ventricular diastolic function. Left ventricular hypertrophy was found in 21% of hypertensive patients, and diastolic dysfunction was detected in 20% by conventional echocardiography and in 58% by tissue-Doppler imaging. Patients with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction at tissue-Doppler imaging were older and more frequently men, had greater body mass index, blood pressure, alcohol intake, left ventricular mass index, relative wall thickness, and lower plasma aldosterone levels than patients with preserved diastolic function. Plasma aldosterone correlated directly with left ventricular mass index in addition to age, body mass index, and systolic blood pressure. Plasma aldosterone was also directly related to e' velocity at tissue-Doppler imaging, but this relationship was lost after multivariate adjustment. In conclusion, plasma aldosterone levels are associated with left ventricular hypertrophy but have no independent relationship with left ventricular diastolic properties in hypertensive patients. PMID:25801873

  4. Therapeutic outcome of 6198 interferon-naïve Egyptian patients with chronic hepatitis C: a real-life experience and lessons to be learned in DAAs' era.

    PubMed

    Zayed, N; Gamal Eldeen, H; Elmakhzangy, H; Seif, M; El-Akel, W; Awad, T; Esmat, G; Mabrouk, M

    2016-07-01

    Antiviral therapy for HCV infection has been validated in randomized controlled clinical trials, but its value in the real world is less well studied. There is relatively little data on real-world responses to interferon-based therapies for patients with genotype 4 infection. We aimed to examine experience with large-scale access to antiviral therapy in chronic HCV in a real-life clinical setting in Egypt. Detailed pretreatment data of 6198 IFN-naïve chronic HCV patients who had received PEG-IFN/RBV therapy at Cairo-Fatemic Hospital, Egypt, between 2009 and 2012 were obtained from the HCV database. At week 12, 95.7% of patients had undetectable HCV RNA, and by week 24 and 48, breakthrough was 6% and 4%, respectively. However, 43.7% of patients discontinued treatment prematurely, and intent to treat end of treatment response was 44.6% (79.3% per protocol). Sustai-ned response data were available from only 1281 patients and was 84.9%. Haematological abnormalities were comparable in patients who did or did not comply with therapy. This is the first real-world, large-scale experience of antiviral therapy in chronic HCV in Egypt. Suboptimal response in HCV predominantly genotype 4 was mainly driven by noncompliance as well as gaps in the healthcare system leading to treatment discontinuation. These results need to be considered in the era of all oral antiviral regimes.

  5. Relationship between clinical and patient-reported outcomes in a phase 3 trial of tofacitinib or MTX in MTX-naïve patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, Roy; Strand, Vibeke; Wilkinson, Bethanie; Kwok, Kenneth; Bananis, Eustratios

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the relationship between clinical measures and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with tofacitinib or methotrexate (MTX). Methods In a phase 3 randomised controlled trial, patients (N=956) who were MTX-naïve or had received ≤3 doses were randomised and received tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg twice daily or MTX titrated to 20 mg/week. Outcomes included: per cent of patients achieving American College of Rheumatology 70% responses (ACR70), ACR50, low disease activity (LDA) by Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI ≤11) and Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI ≤10), remission by SDAI (≤3.3) and CDAI (≤2.8), patient-reported Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI scores <0.5), pain and global assessment of disease activity. Results At month 6, most patients who achieved LDA/remission by one definition achieved LDA/remission with others; however, discordance between measures was greater with MTX than with tofacitinib. As expected, concordance between CDAI and SDAI responses was high. Overall, patients achieving LDA or ACR50 responses reported less improvement in PROs (HAQ-DI, pain and patient global assessment) compared with clinical measures (tender and swollen joint counts). Conclusions Variability in levels of responses between clinical outcomes and PROs should be considered when setting treat-to-target goals in patients with RA. Trial registration number NCT01039688; Post-results. PMID:27175296

  6. Altered functional connectivity links in neuroleptic-naïve and neuroleptic-treated patients with schizophrenia, and their relation to symptoms including volition

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Weidan; Rolls, Edmund T.; Guo, Shuixia; Liu, Haihong; Yu, Yun; Xue, Zhimin; Feng, Jianfeng; Liu, Zhening

    2014-01-01

    In order to analyze functional connectivity in untreated and treated patients with schizophrenia, resting-state fMRI data were obtained for whole-brain functional connectivity analysis from 22 first-episode neuroleptic-naïve schizophrenia (NNS), 61 first-episode neuroleptic-treated schizophrenia (NTS) patients, and 60 healthy controls (HC). Reductions were found in untreated and treated patients in the functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate gyrus and precuneus, and this was correlated with the reduction in volition from the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS), that is in the willful initiation, sustenance, and control of thoughts, behavior, movements, and speech, and with the general and negative symptoms. In addition in both patient groups interhemispheric functional connectivity was weaker between the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala and temporal pole. These functional connectivity changes and the related symptoms were not treated by the neuroleptics. Differences between the patient groups were that there were more strong functional connectivity links in the NNS patients (including in hippocampal, frontal, and striatal circuits) than in the NTS patients. These findings with a whole brain analysis in untreated and treated patients with schizophrenia provide evidence on some of the brain regions implicated in the volitional, other general, and negative symptoms, of schizophrenia that are not treated by neuroleptics so have implications for the development of other treatments; and provide evidence on some brain systems in which neuroleptics do alter the functional connectivity. PMID:25389520

  7. Plasma aldosterone and left ventricular diastolic function in treatment-naïve patients with hypertension: tissue-Doppler imaging study.

    PubMed

    Catena, Cristiana; Verheyen, Nicolas; Pilz, Stefan; Kraigher-Krainer, Elisabeth; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Sechi, Leonardo A; Pieske, Burkert

    2015-06-01

    Aldosterone has hypertrophic and profibrotic effects on the heart. The relationship between plasma aldosterone levels and left ventricular diastolic function in hypertension, however, is unclear. The aim of this study was to examine this relationship in treatment-naïve hypertensive patients free of comorbidities that could affect left ventricular diastolic filling properties. In 115 patients with primary hypertension who were eating a standard diet and 100 matched normotensive controls, we measured plasma aldosterone and active renin levels and performed both conventional echocardiography and tissue-Doppler imaging for assessment of left ventricular diastolic function. Left ventricular hypertrophy was found in 21% of hypertensive patients, and diastolic dysfunction was detected in 20% by conventional echocardiography and in 58% by tissue-Doppler imaging. Patients with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction at tissue-Doppler imaging were older and more frequently men, had greater body mass index, blood pressure, alcohol intake, left ventricular mass index, relative wall thickness, and lower plasma aldosterone levels than patients with preserved diastolic function. Plasma aldosterone correlated directly with left ventricular mass index in addition to age, body mass index, and systolic blood pressure. Plasma aldosterone was also directly related to e' velocity at tissue-Doppler imaging, but this relationship was lost after multivariate adjustment. In conclusion, plasma aldosterone levels are associated with left ventricular hypertrophy but have no independent relationship with left ventricular diastolic properties in hypertensive patients.

  8. High prevalence and association of HIV-1 non-B subtype with specific sexual transmission risk among antiretroviral naïve patients in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dias, Cláudia Fontoura; Nunes, Cynara Carvalho; Freitas, Isabela Osório; Lamego, Isabel Saraiva; Oliveira, Ilda Maria Rodrigues de; Gilli, Sabrina; Rodrigues, Rosângela; Brigido, Luis Fernando

    2009-01-01

    In South Brazil the circulation of two HIV-1 subtypes with different characteristics represents an important scenario for the study of the impact of HIV-1 diversity on the evolution of the HIV-1 epidemic and AIDS disease. HIV-1 B, the predominant variant in industrialized countries and HIV-1 C, the most prevalent subtype in areas with rapid epidemic growth, are implicated in most infections. We evaluated blood samples from 128 antiretroviral (ARV) naïve patients recruited at entry to the largest HIV outpatient service in Porto Alegre. Based on partial pol region sequencing, HIV-1 C was observed in 29%, HIV-1 B in 22.6% and, the recently identified CRF31_BC, in 23.4% of 128 volunteers. Other variants were HIV-1 F in 10% and other mosaics in 5.5%. In order to evaluate the association of socio-behavioral characteristics and HIV-1 subtypes, interviews and laboratory evaluation were performed at entry. Our data suggest an established epidemic of the three major variants, without any evidence of partitioning in either of the subgroups analyzed. However, anal sex practices were associated with subtype B, which could indicate a greater transmissibility of non-B variants by vaginal intercourse. This study provides baseline information for epidemiologic surveillance of the changes of the molecular characteristics of HIV-1 epidemics in this region.

  9. Associations of hippocampal metabolism and regional brain grey matter in neuroleptic-naïve ultra-high-risk subjects and first-episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Nenadic, Igor; Maitra, Raka; Basu, Soumyajit; Dietzek, Maren; Schönfeld, Nils; Lorenz, Carsten; Gussew, Alexander; Amminger, G Paul; McGorry, Patrick; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Sauer, Heinrich; Gaser, Christian; Smesny, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Hippocampal pathology has been shown to be central to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and a putative risk marker for developing psychosis. We applied both (1)H MRS (proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy) at 3Tesla and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of high-resolution brain structural images in order to study the association of the metabolites glutamate (Glu) and N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) in the hippocampus with whole-brain morphometry in 31 persons at ultra-high-risk for psychosis (UHR), 18 first-episode schizophrenia patients (Sz), and 42 healthy controls (all subjects being neuroleptic-naïve). Significantly diverging associations emerged for UHR subjects hippocampal glutamate showed positive correlation with the left superior frontal cortex, not seen in Sz or controls, while in first-episode schizophrenia patients a negative correlation was significant between glutamate and a left prefrontal area. For NAA, we observed different associations for left prefrontal and caudate clusters bilaterally for both high-risk and first-episode schizophrenia subjects, diverging from the pattern seen in healthy subjects. Our results suggest that associations of hippocampal metabolites in key areas of schizophrenia might vary due to liability to or onset of the disorder.

  10. Selfie and the city: a world-wide, large, and ecologically valid database reveals a two-pronged side bias in naïve self-portraits.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Nicola; Bertamini, Marco; Protti, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Self-portraits are more likely to show the artist's right than left cheek. This phenomenon may have a psychobiological basis: Self-portraitists often copy their subject from mirrors and, if they prefer to present their left cheek (more expressive due to right-lateralization of emotions) to the mirror, this would result in a right-cheek bias in the painting. We tested this hypothesis using SelfieCity (3200 selfies posted on Instagram from December 4 through 12, 2013 from New York, Sao Paulo, Berlin, Moskow, and Bangkok), which includes two selfie-taking styles: a "standard" (photograph of selfie-taker) and a "mirror" (photograph of mirror reflection of selfie-taker) style. We show that the first style reveals a left cheek bias, whereas the second reveals a right cheek bias. Thus side biases observed in a world-wide, large, and ecologically valid database of naïve self-portraits provide strong support for a role of psychobiological factors in the artistic composition of self-portraits.

  11. Getting ready for invasions: can background level of risk predict the ability of naïve prey to survive novel predators?

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Maud C O; Crane, Adam L; Brown, Grant E; Chivers, Douglas P

    2015-02-06

    Factors predicting the outcome of predator invasions on native prey communities are critical to our understanding of invasion ecology. Here, we tested whether background level of risk affected the survival of prey to novel predators, both native and invasive, predicting that high-risk environments would better prepare prey for invasions. We used naïve woodfrog as our prey and exposed them to a high or low risk regime either as embryos (prenatal exposure) or as larvae (recent exposure). Tadpoles were then tested for their survival in the presence of 4 novel predators: two dytiscid beetles, crayfish and trout. Survival was affected by both risk level and predator type. High risk was beneficial to prey exposed to the dytiscids larvae (ambush predators), but detrimental to prey exposed to crayfish or trout (pursuit predators). No effect of ontogeny of risk was found. We further documented that high-risk tadpoles were overall more active than their low-risk counterparts, explaining the patterns found with survival. Our results provide insights into the relationship between risk and resilience to predator invasions.

  12. Engineering human peripheral blood stem cell grafts that are depleted of naïve T cells and retain functional pathogen-specific memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, Marie; Heimfeld, Shelly; Jones, Lori A; Turtle, Cameron; Krause, Diane; Riddell, Stanley R; Shlomchik, Warren

    2014-05-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a frequent major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Approaches that selectively deplete T cells that cause GVHD from allogeneic stem cell grafts and preserve T cells specific for pathogens may improve HCT outcomes. It has been hypothesized that the majority of T cells that can cause GVHD reside within the naïve T cell (TN) subset, and previous studies performed in mouse models and with human cells in vitro support this hypothesis. As a prelude to translating these findings to the clinic, we developed and evaluated a novel 2-step clinically compliant procedure for manipulating peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) to remove TN, preserve CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells, and provide for a fixed dose of memory T cells (TM) that includes T cells with specificity for common opportunistic pathogens encountered after HCT. Our studies demonstrate effective and reproducible performance of the immunomagnetic cell selection procedure for depleting TN. Moreover, after cell processing, the CD45RA-depleted PBSC products are enriched for CD4(+) and CD8(+) TM with a central memory phenotype and contain TM cells that are capable of proliferating and producing effector cytokines in response to opportunistic pathogens.

  13. Distribution of sulphuric acid aerosols in the clouds and upper haze of Venus using Venus Express VAST and VeRa temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Christopher D.; Gao, Peter; Schulte, Rick; Bougher, Stephen W.; Yung, Yuk L.; Bardeen, Charles G.; Wilquet, Valérie; Vandaele, Ann Carine; Mahieux, Arnaud; Tellmann, Silvia; Pätzold, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Observations from Pioneer Venus and from SPICAV/SOIR aboard Venus Express (VEx) have shown the upper haze (UH) of Venus to be highly spatially and temporally variable, and populated by multiple particle size modes. Previous models of this system (e.g., Gao et al., 2014. Icarus 231, 83-98), using a typical temperature profile representative of the atmosphere (viz., equatorial VIRA profile), did not investigate the effect of temperature on the UH particle distributions. We show that the inclusion of latitude-dependent temperature profiles for both the morning and evening terminators of Venus helps to explain how the atmospheric aerosol distributions vary spatially. In this work we use temperature profiles obtained by two instruments onboard VEx, VeRa and SPICAV/SOIR, to represent the latitudinal temperature dependence. We find that there are no significant differences between results for the morning and evening terminators at any latitude and that the cloud base moves downwards as the latitude increases due to decreasing temperatures. The UH is not affected much by varying the temperature profiles; however, the haze does show some periodic differences, and is slightly thicker at the poles than at the equator. We also find that the sulphuric acid "rain" seen in previous models may be restricted to the equatorial regions of Venus, such that the particle size distribution is relatively stable at higher latitudes and at the poles.

  14. Getting ready for invasions: can background level of risk predict the ability of naïve prey to survive novel predators?

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Maud C. O.; Crane, Adam L.; Brown, Grant E.; Chivers, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    Factors predicting the outcome of predator invasions on native prey communities are critical to our understanding of invasion ecology. Here, we tested whether background level of risk affected the survival of prey to novel predators, both native and invasive, predicting that high-risk environments would better prepare prey for invasions. We used naïve woodfrog as our prey and exposed them to a high or low risk regime either as embryos (prenatal exposure) or as larvae (recent exposure). Tadpoles were then tested for their survival in the presence of 4 novel predators: two dytiscid beetles, crayfish and trout. Survival was affected by both risk level and predator type. High risk was beneficial to prey exposed to the dytiscids larvae (ambush predators), but detrimental to prey exposed to crayfish or trout (pursuit predators). No effect of ontogeny of risk was found. We further documented that high-risk tadpoles were overall more active than their low-risk counterparts, explaining the patterns found with survival. Our results provide insights into the relationship between risk and resilience to predator invasions. PMID:25655436

  15. Altered functional connectivity links in neuroleptic-naïve and neuroleptic-treated patients with schizophrenia, and their relation to symptoms including volition.

    PubMed

    Pu, Weidan; Rolls, Edmund T; Guo, Shuixia; Liu, Haihong; Yu, Yun; Xue, Zhimin; Feng, Jianfeng; Liu, Zhening

    2014-01-01

    In order to analyze functional connectivity in untreated and treated patients with schizophrenia, resting-state fMRI data were obtained for whole-brain functional connectivity analysis from 22 first-episode neuroleptic-naïve schizophrenia (NNS), 61 first-episode neuroleptic-treated schizophrenia (NTS) patients, and 60 healthy controls (HC). Reductions were found in untreated and treated patients in the functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate gyrus and precuneus, and this was correlated with the reduction in volition from the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS), that is in the willful initiation, sustenance, and control of thoughts, behavior, movements, and speech, and with the general and negative symptoms. In addition in both patient groups interhemispheric functional connectivity was weaker between the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala and temporal pole. These functional connectivity changes and the related symptoms were not treated by the neuroleptics. Differences between the patient groups were that there were more strong functional connectivity links in the NNS patients (including in hippocampal, frontal, and striatal circuits) than in the NTS patients. These findings with a whole brain analysis in untreated and treated patients with schizophrenia provide evidence on some of the brain regions implicated in the volitional, other general, and negative symptoms, of schizophrenia that are not treated by neuroleptics so have implications for the development of other treatments; and provide evidence on some brain systems in which neuroleptics do alter the functional connectivity.

  16. White matter alterations in first episode treatment-naïve patients with deficit schizophrenia: a combined VBM and DTI study.

    PubMed

    Lei, Wei; Li, Na; Deng, Wei; Li, Mingli; Huang, Chaohua; Ma, Xiaohong; Wang, Qiang; Guo, Wanjun; Li, Yinfei; Jiang, Lijun; Zhou, Yi; Hu, Xun; McAlonan, Grainne Mary; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Categorizing 'deficit schizophrenia' (DS) as distinct from 'non-deficit' schizophrenia (NDS) may help reduce heterogeneity within schizophrenia. However, it is unknown if DS has a discrete white matter signature. Here we used MRI to compare white matter volume (voxel-based morphometry) and microstructural integrity (fractional anisotropy, FA) in first-episode treatment-naïve patients with DS and NDS and their unaffected relatives to control groups of similar age. We found that white matter disruption was prominent in DS compared to controls; the DS group had lower volumes in the cerebellum, bilateral extra-nuclear and bilateral frontoparietal regions, and lower FA in the body of corpus callosum, posterior superior longitudinal fasciculus and uncinate fasciculus. The DS group also had lower volume in bilateral extra-nuclear regions compared to NDS, and the volume of these clusters was negatively correlated with deficit symptom ratings. NDS patients however, had no significant volume alterations and limited disruption of microstructural integrity compared to controls. Finally, first-degree relatives of those with DS shared volume abnormalities in right extra-nuclear white matter. Thus, white matter pathology in schizophrenia is most evident in the deficit condition, and lower extra-nuclear white matter volumes in both DS patients and their relatives may represent a brain structural 'endophenotype' for DS. PMID:26257373

  17. Associations of hippocampal metabolism and regional brain grey matter in neuroleptic-naïve ultra-high-risk subjects and first-episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Nenadic, Igor; Maitra, Raka; Basu, Soumyajit; Dietzek, Maren; Schönfeld, Nils; Lorenz, Carsten; Gussew, Alexander; Amminger, G Paul; McGorry, Patrick; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Sauer, Heinrich; Gaser, Christian; Smesny, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Hippocampal pathology has been shown to be central to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and a putative risk marker for developing psychosis. We applied both (1)H MRS (proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy) at 3Tesla and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of high-resolution brain structural images in order to study the association of the metabolites glutamate (Glu) and N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) in the hippocampus with whole-brain morphometry in 31 persons at ultra-high-risk for psychosis (UHR), 18 first-episode schizophrenia patients (Sz), and 42 healthy controls (all subjects being neuroleptic-naïve). Significantly diverging associations emerged for UHR subjects hippocampal glutamate showed positive correlation with the left superior frontal cortex, not seen in Sz or controls, while in first-episode schizophrenia patients a negative correlation was significant between glutamate and a left prefrontal area. For NAA, we observed different associations for left prefrontal and caudate clusters bilaterally for both high-risk and first-episode schizophrenia subjects, diverging from the pattern seen in healthy subjects. Our results suggest that associations of hippocampal metabolites in key areas of schizophrenia might vary due to liability to or onset of the disorder. PMID:26088723

  18. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Psychoeducational Intervention in Treatment-Naïve Patients with Antidepressant Medication in Primary Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Casañas, R.; Catalán, R.; Penadés, R.; Real, J.; Valero, S.; Muñoz, MA.; Lalucat-Jo, LL.; Casas, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. There is evidence supporting the effectiveness of psychoeducation (PE) in patients with symptoms of depression in primary care (PC), but very few studies have assessed this intervention in antidepressant-naïve patients. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a PE program in these patients, since the use of antidepressant (AD) medication may interfere with the effects of the intervention. Methods. 106 participants were included, 50 from the PE program (12 weekly 1.5-hour sessions) and 56 from the control group (CG) that received the usual care. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 3, 6, and 9 months. The main outcome measures were the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and remission based on the BDI. The analysis was carried out on an intention-to-treat basis. Results. The PE program group showed remission of symptoms of 40% (P = 0.001) posttreatment and 42% (P = 0.012) at 6 months. The analysis only showed significant differences in the BDI score posttreatment (P = 0.008; effect size Cohen's d′ = 0.55). Conclusions. The PE intervention is an effective treatment in the depressive population not treated with AD medication. Before taking an AD, psychoeducational intervention should be considered. PMID:26380366

  19. Selfie and the City: A World-Wide, Large, and Ecologically Valid Database Reveals a Two-Pronged Side Bias in Naïve Self-Portraits

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Nicola; Bertamini, Marco; Protti, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Self-portraits are more likely to show the artist’s right than left cheek. This phenomenon may have a psychobiological basis: Self-portraitists often copy their subject from mirrors and, if they prefer to present their left cheek (more expressive due to right-lateralization of emotions) to the mirror, this would result in a right-cheek bias in the painting. We tested this hypothesis using SelfieCity (3200 selfies posted on Instagram from December 4 through 12, 2013 from New York, Sao Paulo, Berlin, Moskow, and Bangkok), which includes two selfie-taking styles: a “standard” (photograph of selfie-taker) and a “mirror” (photograph of mirror reflection of selfie-taker) style. We show that the first style reveals a left cheek bias, whereas the second reveals a right cheek bias. Thus side biases observed in a world-wide, large, and ecologically valid database of naïve self-portraits provide strong support for a role of psychobiological factors in the artistic composition of self-portraits. PMID:25915767

  20. Depression in Caregivers of Status-Naïve Pediatric HIV Patients Participating in a Status Disclosure Study in Haiti and the Dominican Republic: Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Dévieux, Jessy G.; Pinzón-Iregui, María Claudia; Abreu-Pérez, Rosa; Lerebours-Nadal, Leonel; Gaston, Stephanie; Dean, Andrew G.; Halpern, Mina; Rouzier, Vanessa; Bertrand, Rachel; Rosenberg, Rhonda; Pape, Jean William; Nicholas, Stephen W.; Blasini, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    A pilot study is underway to assess safety and acceptability of an intervention to disclose their HIV infection status to status-naïve pediatric antiretroviral therapy patients in Hispaniola [the island shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic (DR)]. Of 22 Haiti and 47 DR caregivers recruited to date, 68.2% Haiti and 34.0% DR caregivers had clinically significant depressive symptomatology at the time of enrollment (p = 0.008). Depressive symptom prevalence was higher in Haiti caregivers who were female (81.3% vs. 0 in males; p = 0.02) and in DR caregivers who were patients’ mothers (50.0%) or grandmothers (66.7%; 56.0% combined) than others (9.1%), (p < 0.001). Internalized stigma was more commonly reported by Haiti (85.7%) than DR (53.2%; p = 0.01) caregivers; 56.4% of Haiti and DR caregivers reporting internalized stigma vs. 26.1% of caregivers denying it had depressive symptoms (p = 0.02). Depression is common in Hispaniola caregivers possibly affecting disclosure timing. Study participation presents opportunities for addressing caregiver depression. PMID:25389181

  1. Short-term Effects of Risperidone Monotherapy on Spontaneous Brain Activity in First-episode Treatment-naïve Schizophrenia Patients: A Longitudinal fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Mao-Lin; Zong, Xiao-Fen; Zheng, Jun-Jie; Pantazatos, Spiro P.; Miller, Jeffrey M.; Li, Zong-Chang; Liao, Yan-Hui; He, Ying; Zhou, Jun; Sang, De-En; Zhao, Hong-Zeng; Lv, Lu-Xian; Tang, Jin-Song; Mann, J. John; Chen, Xiao-Gang

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether abnormal spontaneous neural activation patterns found in chronic schizophrenia patients (CSP) are part of the pathogenesis of disease, consequences of chronic illness, or effects of antipsychotic treatment. We performed a longitudinal resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in 42 treatment-naïve first-episode schizophrenia patients (FESP) at baseline and then after 8-weeks of risperidone monotherapy, and compared the findings to 38 healthy volunteers. Spontaneous brain activity was quantified using the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF) and regional homogeneity (ReHo) and compared between patients and controls. Pretreatment, patients exhibited higher fALFF in left caudate compared with controls. After treatment, patients had elevated fALFF in bilateral putamen and right caudate, and increased ReHo in right caudate and left putamen. Greater increase of fALFF in the left putamen correlated with less improvement in positive symptoms. Thus, abnormalities of spontaneous neural activity in chronic schizophrenia is at least partly due to a medication effect. The observed post-treatment increase in striatal intrinsic activity may reflect counter-therapeutic functional adaptation to dopamine D2 receptor occupancy required for medication effects on psychosis. PMID:27698361

  2. Detection of Natural Resistance-Associated Substitutions by Ion Semiconductor Technology in HCV1b Positive, Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents-Naïve Patients

    PubMed Central

    Marascio, Nadia; Pavia, Grazia; Strazzulla, Alessio; Dierckx, Tim; Cuypers, Lize; Vrancken, Bram; Barreca, Giorgio Settimo; Mirante, Teresa; Malanga, Donatella; Oliveira, Duarte Mendes; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Torti, Carlo; Liberto, Maria Carla; Focà, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) can negatively impact the response to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) agents-based therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Herein, we set out to characterize the RASs in the HCV1b genome from serum samples of DAA-naïve patients in the context of the SINERGIE (South Italian Network for Rational Guidelines and International Epidemiology, 2014) project. We deep-sequenced the NS3/4A protease region of the viral population using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine, and patient-specific majority rule consensus sequence summaries were constructed with a combination of freely available next generation sequencing data analysis software. We detected NS3/4A protease major and minor variants associated with resistance to boceprevir (V36L), telaprevir (V36L, I132V), simeprevir (V36L), and grazoprevir (V36L, V170I). Furthermore, we sequenced part of HCV NS5B polymerase using Sanger-sequencing and detected a natural RAS for dasabuvir (C316N). This mutation could be important for treatment strategies in cases of previous therapy failure. PMID:27618896

  3. Depression in caregivers of status-naïve pediatric HIV patients participating in a status disclosure study in Haiti and the Dominican Republic: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Beck-Sagué, Consuelo M; Dévieux, Jessy G; Pinzón-Iregui, María Claudia; Abreu-Pérez, Rosa; Lerebours-Nadal, Leonel; Gaston, Stephanie; Dean, Andrew G; Halpern, Mina; Rouzier, Vanessa; Bertrand, Rachel; Rosenberg, Rhonda; Pape, Jean William; Nicholas, Stephen W; Blasini, Ileana

    2015-02-01

    A pilot study is underway to assess safety and acceptability of an intervention to disclose their HIV infection status to status-naïve pediatric antiretroviral therapy patients in Hispaniola [the island shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic (DR)]. Of 22 Haiti and 47 DR caregivers recruited to date, 68.2% Haiti and 34.0% DR caregivers had clinically significant depressive symptomatology at the time of enrollment (p = 0.008). Depressive symptom prevalence was higher in Haiti caregivers who were female (81.3% vs. 0 in males; p = 0.02) and in DR caregivers who were patients' mothers (50.0%) or grandmothers (66.7%; 56.0% combined) than others (9.1%), (p < 0.001). Internalized stigma was more commonly reported by Haiti (85.7%) than DR (53.2%; p = 0.01) caregivers; 56.4% of Haiti and DR caregivers reporting internalized stigma vs. 26.1% of caregivers denying it had depressive symptoms (p = 0.02). Depression is common in Hispaniola caregivers possibly affecting disclosure timing. Study participation presents opportunities for addressing caregiver depression.

  4. Prevalence of HIV Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV Type 1 Isolates in Antiretroviral Therapy Naïve Population from Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, S.; Ahmad, H.; Shekhar, R. C.; Kumar, N.; Dar, L.; Samantaray, J. C.; Sharma, S. K.; Bhargava, A.; Pandey, R. M.; Mitsuyasu, R. L.; Fahey, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The increased use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with HIV, adversely leading to the emergence of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR). In this study we aim to evaluate the prevalence of HIVDR mutations in ART-naive HIV-1 infected patients from northern India. Design. Analysis was performed using Viroseq genotyping system based on sequencing of entire protease and two-thirds of the Reverse Transcriptase (RT) region of pol gene. Results. Seventy three chronic HIV-1 infected ART naïve patients eligible for first line ART were enrolled from April 2006 to August 2008. In 68 patients DNA was successfully amplified and sequencing was done. 97% of HIV-1 strains belonged to subtype C, and one each to subtype A1 and subtype B. The overall prevalence of primary DRMs was 2.9% [2/68, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.3%–10.2%]. One patient had a major RT mutation M184V, known to confer resistance to lamivudine, and another had a major protease inhibitor (PI) mutation D30N that imparts resistance to nelfinavir. Conclusion. Our study shows that primary HIVDR mutations have a prevalence of 2.9% among ART-naive chronic HIV-1 infected individuals. PMID:22496972

  5. Task-evoked substantia nigra hyperactivity associated with prefrontal hypofunction, prefrontonigral disconnectivity and nigrostriatal connectivity predicting psychosis severity in medication naïve first episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong H; Westphal, Andrew J; Minzenberg, Michael J; Niendam, Tara; Ragland, J Daniel; Lesh, Tyler; Solomon, Marjorie; Carter, Cameron S

    2014-11-01

    The widely cited prefrontal dysfunction - excess subcortical dopamine model of schizophrenia posits that prefrontal deficits give rise to cognitive impairments and the disinhibition of subcortical dopamine release underlying psychosis. While this has been one of the most influential schizophrenia models, only a handful of studies have provided evidence supporting it directly in patients with schizophrenia. We previously demonstrated task-evoked substantia nigra hyperactivity in the context of prefrontal hypofunction and prefrontonigral functional disconnectivity. In addition, nigrostriatal functional connectivity was identified as a potential marker of psychosis. Because patients in this prior study had chronic schizophrenia and were treated with antipsychotics, in the present study we tested whether these findings were confounded by illness chronicity and medication effects by seeking to reproduce these findings in an independent sample of antipsychotic naïve, first episode (FE) patients. We compared event-related fMRI activations from 12 FE patients with 15 demographically matched healthy control subjects during cognitive testing. We found substantia nigra hyperactivity associated with prefrontal hypofunction and prefrontonigral functional disconnectivity, as well as the magnitude of nigrostriatal functional connectivity positively correlating with severity of psychosis. This study adds to the body of evidence supporting the prefrontal-dopamine model of schizophrenia and further validates nigrostriatal functional connectivity as a marker of psychosis.

  6. Clinical signs and hematologic, cytokine, and plasma nitric oxide alterations in response to Strongylus vulgaris infection in helminth-naïve ponies

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to determine the effect of infection with Strongylus vulgaris on serum cytokines and plasma nitric oxide (NO) concentrations in helminth-naïve ponies. Group 1 (n = 21) was given 500 S. vulgaris L3 larvae and group 2 (n = 7) received a saline control. Ponies were monitored daily for clinical signs, and blood was collected for complete blood cell counts and serum cytokines (TNF, IL-1, IL-6) quantification. Group 1 ponies were depressed, anorexic, and febrile for variable periods of time. Plasma NO was increased on day 21 in group 1 and on days 9 and 21 in group 2. Significant increases in total white blood cell counts, fibrinogen, and plasma protein concentrations in group 1 were found. Significant decreases in red blood cell counts and packed cell volume were also noted in group 1. There were no differences in serum cytokines across time in either group of ponies. Despite the lack of proinflammatory cytokine induction with the apparent inflammatory response to S. vulgaris there is evidence of a potential role of NO. PMID:15352544

  7. Specific Detection of Naturally Occurring Hepatitis C Virus Mutants with Resistance to Telaprevir and Boceprevir (Protease Inhibitors) among Treatment-Naïve Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca-Coronado, Salvador; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Ruiz-Tovar, Karina; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra Yolanda; Rivera-Osorio, Pilar; Vazquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; Carpio-Pedroza, Juan Carlos; Ruíz-Pacheco, Juan Alberto; Cazares, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The use of telaprevir and boceprevir, both protease inhibitors (PI), as part of the specifically targeted antiviral therapy for hepatitis C (STAT-C) has significantly improved sustained virologic response (SVR) rates. However, different clinical studies have also identified several mutations associated with viral resistance to both PIs. In the absence of selective pressure, drug-resistant hepatitis C virus (HCV) mutants are generally present at low frequency, making mutation detection challenging. Here, we describe a mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA) PCR method for the specific detection of naturally occurring drug-resistant HCV mutants. MAMA PCR successfully identified the corresponding HCV variants, while conventional methods such as direct sequencing, endpoint limiting dilution (EPLD), and bacterial cloning were not sensitive enough to detect circulating drug-resistant mutants in clinical specimens. Ultradeep pyrosequencing was used to confirm the presence of the corresponding HCV mutants. In treatment-naïve patients, the frequency of all resistant variants was below 1%. Deep amplicon sequencing allowed a detailed analysis of the structure of the viral population among these patients, showing that the evolution of the NS3 is limited to a rather small sequence space. Monitoring of HCV drug resistance before and during treatment is likely to provide important information for management of patients undergoing anti-HCV therapy. PMID:22116161

  8. Application of Karhunen-Loève Expansions for the Dynamic Analysis of a Natural Convection Loop for Known Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Tobias; Pacheco-Vega, Arturo

    2012-11-01

    In the present study we use Karhunen-Loève (KL) expansions to model the dynamic behavior of a single-phase natural convection loop. The loop is filled with an incompressible fluid that exchanges heat through the walls of its toroidal shape. Influx and efflux of energy take place at different parts of the loop. The focus here is a sinusoidal variation of the heat flux exchanged with the environment for three different scenarios; i.e., stable, limit cycles and chaos. For the analysis, one-dimensional models, in which the tilt angle and the amplitude of the heat flux are used as parameters, were first developed under suitable assumptions and then solved numerically to generate the data from which the KL-based models could be constructed. The method of snapshots, along with a Galerkin projection, was then used to find the basis functions and corresponding constants of each expansion, thus producing the optimal representation of the system. Results from this study indicate that the dimension of the KL-based dynamical system depends on the linear stability of the steady states; the number of basis functions necessary to describe the system increases with increased complexity of the system operation. When compared to typical dynamical systems based on Fourier expansions the KL-based models are, in general, more compact and equally accurate in the dynamic description of the natural convection loop.

  9. Detection of Natural Resistance-Associated Substitutions by Ion Semiconductor Technology in HCV1b Positive, Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents-Naïve Patients.

    PubMed

    Marascio, Nadia; Pavia, Grazia; Strazzulla, Alessio; Dierckx, Tim; Cuypers, Lize; Vrancken, Bram; Barreca, Giorgio Settimo; Mirante, Teresa; Malanga, Donatella; Oliveira, Duarte Mendes; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Torti, Carlo; Liberto, Maria Carla; Focà, Alfredo; The Sinergie-Umg Study Group

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) can negatively impact the response to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) agents-based therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Herein, we set out to characterize the RASs in the HCV1b genome from serum samples of DAA-naïve patients in the context of the SINERGIE (South Italian Network for Rational Guidelines and International Epidemiology, 2014) project. We deep-sequenced the NS3/4A protease region of the viral population using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine, and patient-specific majority rule consensus sequence summaries were constructed with a combination of freely available next generation sequencing data analysis software. We detected NS3/4A protease major and minor variants associated with resistance to boceprevir (V36L), telaprevir (V36L, I132V), simeprevir (V36L), and grazoprevir (V36L, V170I). Furthermore, we sequenced part of HCV NS5B polymerase using Sanger-sequencing and detected a natural RAS for dasabuvir (C316N). This mutation could be important for treatment strategies in cases of previous therapy failure. PMID:27618896

  10. Endonasal dilatation of the Eustachian tube (EET) in children: feasibility and the role of tubomanometry (Estève) in outcomes measurement.

    PubMed

    Jenckel, Friederike; Kappo, Natalie; Gliese, Alexandra; Loewenthal, Maureen; Lörincz, Balazs B; Knecht, Rainald; Dalchow, Carsten V

    2015-12-01

    Studies on endonasal dilatation of the Eustachian tube (EET) utilizing a balloon catheter have shown encouraging results over the last years. This retrospective analysis presents our outcomes with EET in children with chronic obstructive dysfunction of the Eustachian tube, as well as the role of tubomanometry (TMM, Estève) as a diagnostic tool in the pre- and postoperative assessment of the Eustachian tube (ET) dysfunction. The data of 33 children, having undergone EET between September 2010 and March 2014, were retrospectively evaluated. They were assessed using tubomanometry before and after the EET. The R-data as the rate of Eustachian tube function in tubomanometry (TMM) were pre- and postoperatively matched with the clinical outcomes. Moreover, the patients' complaints before and after the procedure were analyzed. We did not see any EET-related complications in children. Most patients noticed a relief of their complaints. In the same time, tubomanometry was not able to show improved tube function or favorable postoperative changes in the R-data. Ear-related symptoms (e.g. otorrhea, otalgia, hearing loss) have been improved. EET is a feasible method in adults as well as in children to treat chronic tube dysfunction. However, tubomanometry does not seem to be the adequate tool to evaluate the tube function and thus the success rate of EET in children with chronic dysfunction of the Eustachian tube.

  11. OREGANO_VE: a new parallelised 3D solver for the general (non-)linear Maxwell visco-elastic problem: validation and application to the calculation of surface deformation in the earthquake cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Tadashi; Houseman, Gregory; Hamling, Ian; Postek, Elek

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a new parallelized 3-D numerical code, OREGANO_VE, for the solution of the general visco-elastic problem in a rectangular block domain. The mechanical equilibrium equation is solved using the finite element method for a (non-)linear Maxwell visco-elastic rheology. Time-dependent displacement and/or traction boundary conditions can be applied. Matrix assembly is based on a tetrahedral element defined by 4 vertex nodes and 6 nodes located at the midpoints of the edges, and within which displacement is described by a quadratic interpolation function. For evaluating viscoelastic relaxation, an explicit time-stepping algorithm (Zienkiewicz and Cormeau, Int. J. Num. Meth. Eng., 8, 821-845, 1974) is employed. We test the accurate implementation of the OREGANO_VE by comparing numerical and analytic (or semi-analytic half-space) solutions to different problems in a range of applications: (1) equilibration of stress in a constant density layer after gravity is switched on at t = 0 tests the implementation of spatially variable viscosity and non-Newtonian viscosity; (2) displacement of the welded interface between two blocks of differing viscosity tests the implementation of viscosity discontinuities, (3) displacement of the upper surface of a layer under applied normal load tests the implementation of time-dependent surface tractions (4) visco-elastic response to dyke intrusion (compared with the solution in a half-space) tests the implementation of all aspects. In each case, the accuracy of the code is validated subject to use of a sufficiently small time step, providing assurance that the OREGANO_VE code can be applied to a range of visco-elastic relaxation processes in three dimensions, including post-seismic deformation and post-glacial uplift. The OREGANO_VE code includes a capability for representation of prescribed fault slip on an internal fault. The surface displacement associated with large earthquakes can be detected by some geodetic observations

  12. Efficient Reprogramming of Naïve-Like Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Porcine Adipose-Derived Stem Cells with a Feeder-Independent and Serum-Free System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Xia; Liu, Tong; Pu, Yong; Li, Yunsheng; Cao, Zubing; Cao, Hongguo; Liu, Ya; Zhang, Xiaorong; Zhang, Yunhai

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are somatic cells reprogrammed by ectopic expression of transcription factors or small molecule treatment, which resemble embryonic stem cells (ESCs). They hold great promise for improving the generation of genetically modified large animals. However, few porcine iPSCs (piPSCs) lines obtained currently can support development of cloned embryos. Here, we generated iPSCs from porcine adipose-derived stem cells (pADSCs), using drug-inducible expression of defined human factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4). Reprogramming of iPSCs from pADSCs was more efficient than from fibroblasts, regardless of using feeder-independent or feeder-dependent manners. By addition of Lif-2i medium containing mouse Lif, CHIR99021 and PD0325901 (Lif-2i), naïve-like piPSCs were obtained under feeder-independent and serum-free conditions. These successfully reprogrammed piPSCs were characterized by short cell cycle intervals, alkaline phosphatase (AP) staining, expression of Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, SSEA3 and SSEA4, and normal karyotypes. The resemblance of piPSCs to naïve ESCs was confirmed by their packed dome morphology, growth after single-cell dissociation, Lif-dependency, up-regulation of Stella and Eras, low expression levels of TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81 and MHC I and activation of both X chromosomes. Full reprogramming of naïve-like piPSCs was evaluated by the significant up-regulation of Lin28, Esrrb, Utf1 and Dppa5, differentiating into cell types of all three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, nuclear transfer embryos from naïve-like piPSCs could develop to blastocysts with improved quality. Thus, we provided an efficient protocol for generating naïve-like piPSCs from pADSCs in a feeder-independent and serum-free system with controlled regulation of exogenous genes, which may facilitate optimization of culture media and the production of transgenic pigs. PMID:24465482

  13. Assessment and restoring soil functionality in degraded areas of organic vineyards. The preliminary results of the ReSolVe project in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priori, Simone; Agnelli, Alessandro; Castaldini, Maurizio; D'Avino, Lorenzo; D'Errico, Giada; Gagnarli, Elena; Giudi, Silvia; Goggioli, Donatella; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Landi, Silvia; Leprini, Marco; Pellegrini, Sergio; Perria, Rita; Puccioni, Sergio; Simoni, Sauro; Storchi, Paolo; Valboa, Giuseppe; Zombardo, Alessandra; Costantini, Edoardo

    2016-04-01

    In both conventional and organic Italian vineyards, it is quite common to have areas characterized by problems in vine health, grape production and quality, often caused by improper land preparation before vine plantation and/or management. Causes for soil malfunctioning can include: reduced contribution of the soil fauna to the ecosystem services (i.e. nutrient cycles), poor organic matter content, imbalance of some element ratio, altered pH, water deficiency, soil compaction and/or scarce oxygenation. ReSolVe is a transnational and interdisciplinary 3-years research project aimed at testing the effects of selected organic strategies for restoring optimal soil functionality in degraded areas within vineyard. The different restoring strategies implemented in each plot will be: i) compost produced on farm by manure + pruning residue + grass, ii) faba bean and barley green manure, iii) sowing and dry mulching with Trifolium squarrosum L. During two years of such treatments, the trend of the soil features and the grapevine status will be monitored in detail, to reveal the positive and negative effects of such treatments. The project involves 8 research groups in 6 different EU countries (Italy, France, Spain, Sweden, Slovenia, and Turkey), with experts from several disciplines, including soil science, ecology, microbiology, grapevine physiology, viticulture, and biometry. The experimental vineyards are situated in Italy (Chianti hills and Maremma plain, Tuscany), France (Bordeaux and Languedoc), Spain (La Rioja) and Slovenia (Primorska) for winegrape, and in Turkey (Adana and Mersin) for table grape. Soil features before implementing restoring strategies showed lower content of soil organic matter and enzyme activities, and higher carbonates in degraded areas than in the non-degraded areas. The Biological Soil Quality values of microarthropods were always high, in comparison with data registered in similarly managed vineyards or stable ecosystems, and the data showed

  14. Relative sea-level change, climate, and sequence boundaries: insights from the Kimmeridgian to Berriasian platform carbonates of Mount Salève (E France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bover-Arnal, Telm; Strasser, André

    2013-03-01

    The present study analyses the stratal architecture of the Late Jurassic (Kimmeridgian) to Early Cretaceous (Berriasian) sedimentary succession of Mount Salève (E France), and four Berriasian stratigraphic intervals containing four sequence-boundary zones reflecting lowering trends of the relative sea-level evolution. Massive Kimmeridgian limestones characterized by the presence of colonial corals appear to be stacked in an aggrading pattern. These non-bedded thick deposits, which are interpreted to have formed in balance between relative sea-level rise and carbonate accumulation, suggest a keep-up transgressive system. Above, well-bedded Tithonian-to-Berriasian peritidal carbonates reflect a general loss of accommodation. These strata are interpreted as a highstand normal-regressive unit. During the early phase of this major normal regression, the vertical repetition of upper intertidal/lower supratidal lithofacies indicates an aggrading depositional system. This is in agreement with an early stage of a highstand phase of relative sea level. The Berriasian sequence-boundary zones investigated (up to 4 m thick) developed under different climatic conditions and correspond to higher-frequency, forced- and normal-regressive stages of relative sea-level changes. According to the classical sequence-stratigraphic principles, these sequence-boundary zones comprise more than one candidate surface for a sequence boundary. Three sequence-boundary zones studied in Early Berriasian rocks lack coarse siliciclastic grains, contain a calcrete crust, as well as marly levels with higher abundances of illite with respect to kaolinite, and exhibit fossilized algal-microbial laminites with desiccation polygons. These sedimentary features are consistent with more arid conditions. A sequence-boundary zone interpreted for the Late Berriasian corresponds to a coal horizon. The strata above and below this coal contain abundant quartz and marly intervals with a higher kaolinite content

  15. Once-daily dolutegravir is superior to once-daily darunavir/ritonavir in treatment-naïve HIV-1-positive individuals: 96 week results from FLAMINGO

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Jean-Michel; Clotet, Bonaventura; van Lunzen, Jan; Lazzarin, Adriano; Cavassini, Matthias; Henry, Keith; Kulagin, Valeriv; Givens, Naomi; Brennan, Clare; de Oliveira, Carlos Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Dolutegravir (DTG) 50 mg once daily was superior to darunavir/ritonavir (DRV/r) 800 mg/100 mg once daily through Week 48, with 90% vs. 83% of participants achieving HIV RNA 50 c/mL (p=0.025) [1]. We present data through Week 96. Material and Methods FLAMINGO is a multicentre, randomized, open-label, Phase IIIb non-inferiority study, in which HIV-1-positive ART-naïve adults with HIV-1 RNA≥1000 c/mL and no evidence of viral resistance were randomized 1:1 to receive DTG or DRV/r, with investigator-selected backbone NRTIs (TDF/FTC or ABC/3TC). Participants were stratified by screening HIV-1 RNA (≤100K c/mL) and NRTI backbone. Results A total of 484 adults were randomized and treated; 25% had baseline HIV RNA 100K c/mL. At Week 96, the proportion of participants with HIV RNA 50 c/mL was 80% in the DTG arm vs. 68% in the DRV/r arm (adjusted difference 12.4%; 95% CI 4.7, 20.2%; p=0.002). Secondary analyses supported primary results: per-protocol [(DTG 83% vs. DRV/r 70%), 95% CI 12.9 (5.3, 20.6)] and treatment-related discontinuation = failure [(98% vs. 95%), 95% CI 3.2 (−0.3, 6.7)]. Overall virologic non-response (DTG 8%; DRV/r 12%) and non-response due to other reasons (DTG 12%; DRV/r 21%) occurred less frequently on DTG. As at Week 48, the difference between arms was most pronounced in participants with high baseline viral load (82% vs. 52% response through Week 96) and in the TDF/FTC stratum (79% vs. 64%); consistent responses were seen in the ABC/3TC stratum (82% vs. 75%). Six participants (DTG 2, none post-Week 48; DRV/r 4, two post-Week 48) experienced protocol-defined virologic failure (PDVF; confirmed viral load 200 c/mL on or after Week 24); none had treatment-emergent resistance to study drugs. Most frequent drug-related adverse events (AEs) were diarrhoea, nausea and headache, with diarrhoea significantly more common on DRV/r (24%) than DTG (10%). Significantly more participants had Grade 2 fasting LDL toxicities on DRV/r (22%) vs. DTG (7

  16. Assessment of Time and Frequency Domain Parameters of Heart Rate Variability and Interictal Cardiac Rhythm Abnormalities in Drug-naïve Patients with Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Ozden; Cincin, Altug; Pehlivan, Aslihan; Midi, Ipek; Kepez, Alper; Agan, Kadriye

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Epilepsy is a disease known to occur with autonomous phenomenons. Earlier studies indicate decreased heart rate variability (HRV) during ictal and interictal periods among epilepsy patients. In this study, we aim to investigate cardiac rhythm abnormalities and HRV during interictal period between drug-naïve patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and healthy control group. Methods: Twenty-six patients with IGE and 26 healthy individuals included in the study. In order to eliminate any structural cardiac pathology, transthoracic echocardiography was performed in all subjects and time and frequency domain parameters of HRV were evaluated after 24-hour rhythm holter monitoring. Results: Between two groups, no significant difference was detected in terms of mean heart rate and maximum duration between the start of the Q waves and the end of the T waves (QT intervals). In the time domain analysis of HRV, no statically significant difference was detected for standard deviation of all R - R intervals and root-mean-square of successive differences between patient and control group (p = 0,070 and p = 0,104 respectively). In the frequency domain analysis of HRV, patients tended to display lower total power and very low frequency power than did healthy subjects, but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is no major effect of the epilepsy on HRV in patients with IGE. It should be emphasized that, in this study, HRV was evaluated only in patients with IGE and that the results are not proper to be generalized for patients with partial seizures. PMID:27390676

  17. Cytotherapy with naïve rat umbilical cord matrix stem cells significantly attenuates growth of murine pancreatic cancer cells and increases mouse survival in syngeneic mice

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Chiyo; Maurya, Dharmendra Kumar; Pyle, Marla M.; Troyer, Deryl; Tamura, Masaaki

    2010-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer, sometimes called a “silent killer,” is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, with a very poor prognosis. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality in the United States. Methods A mouse peritoneal model was used to test the ability of un-engineered rat umbilical cord matrix derived stem cells (UCMSCs) to control growth of pancreatic cancer. In vivo results are supported by various in vitro assays such as MTT, direct cell count, [3H] thymidine uptake, and soft agar colony assays. Results Co-culture of rat UCMSCs with PAN02 murine pancreatic carcinoma cells (UCMSCs:PAN02, 1:6 and 1:3) caused G0/G1 arrest and significantly attenuated the proliferation of PAN02 tumor cells as monitored by MTT assay, direct cell counts, and [3H] thymidine uptake assay. Rat UCMSCs also significantly reduced PAN02 colony size and number as measured by soft agar colony assay. The in vivo mouse studies showed that rat UCMSCs treatment significantly decreased the peritoneal PAN02 tumor burden 3 weeks after tumor transplantation and increased mouse survival time. Histological study revealed that intraperitoneally administered rat UCMSCs survived for at least 3 weeks, and the majority were found near or inside the tumor. Discussion These results indicate that naïve rat UCMSCs alone remarkably attenuate the growth of pancreatic carcinoma cells in vitro and in a mouse peritoneal model. Thus, these studies imply that UCMSCs could be a potential tool for targeted cytotherapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:20345214

  18. Prospective Study on the Incidence and Progression of Clinical Signs in Naïve Dogs Naturally Infected by Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Foglia Manzillo, Valentina; Di Muccio, Trentina; Cappiello, Sivia; Scalone, Aldo; Paparcone, Rosa; Fiorentino, Eleonora; Gizzarelli, Manuela; Gramiccia, Marina; Gradoni, Luigi; Oliva, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of clinical and clinicopathological signs associated with the progression of infection was evaluated prospectively in 329 naïve young dogs exposed to Leishmania infantum transmission and examined periodically during 22 months (M). The dogs were part of Leishmania vaccine investigations performed under natural conditions. Vaccinated groups were considered in the evaluation when the vaccine resulted non-protective and the appearance and progression of signs did not differ statistically from controls at each time point, otherwise only control groups were included. 115 beagles were part of 3 studies (A to C) performed in the same kennel; 214 owned dogs (29 breeds, 2.3% beagles) were included in a study (D) performed in 45 endemic sites. At M22 the prevalence of any Leishmania infection stage classified as subpatent, active asymptomatic, or symptomatic was 59.8% in studies A–C and 29.2% in study D. Despite different breed composition and infection incidence, the relative proportion of active infections and the progression and type of clinical and clinicopathological signs have been similar in both study sets. All asymptomatic active infections recorded have invariably progressed to full-blown disease, resulting in 56 sick dogs at M22. In these dogs, lymph nodes enlargement and weight loss — recorded from M12 — were the most common signs. Cutaneous signs were seen late (M18) and less frequently. Ocular signs appeared