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Sample records for kras gene amplification

  1. Loopback rolling circle amplification for ultrasensitive detection of Kras gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huo; Wu, Dong; Jiang, Yifan; Zhang, Rongbo; Wu, Qingzheng; Liu, Yiyun; Li, Feng; Wu, Zai-Sheng

    2017-03-01

    Mutations in Kras gene may be used as a diagnostic marker and a target for treatment of the broad spectrum of human cancers. In this study, we developed a new class of amplification assay, double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB)-based cascade rolling circle amplification (RCA), for ultrasensitive and selective detection of Kras gene in a homogenous solution. Specifically, target DNA can hybridize with DHMB and activate cyclical target strand-displacement polymerization (CTDP) and nicking-mediated strand-displacement polymerization (NMDP). The resulting nicked/displaced fragments substantially outnumber target DNA and cause the cascade rolling circle amplification (C-RCA) and nicked fragment-induced strand-displacement polymerization (NFDP). Even if four amplification processes are designed, only DHMB, padlock probe and polymerization primer are involved. Under optimized conditions, this screening system exhibits a linear range of 5 orders of magnitude (from 100fM to 20nM), and the detection limit is down to 16fM. Moreover, the developed biosensing system offers a high assay specificity for perfectly matched target DNA, and the measured data from practical samples demonstrated the potential application in the cancer diagnoses. As a proof-of-concept genetic assay, the novel signaling strategy, as well as desirable analytical capability, would significantly benefit the development of versatile amplification gene profiling platforms, revealing great promise in biological studies and medical diagnostics.

  2. Comparison of HER2 gene amplification and KRAS alteration in eyelid sebaceous carcinomas with that in other eyelid tumors.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Mi Jung; Shin, Hyung Sik; Nam, Eun Sook; Cho, Seong Jin; Lee, Min Joung; Lee, Samuel; Park, Hye-Rim

    2015-05-01

    Eyelid sebaceous carcinoma (SC) represents a highly aggressive malignancy. Despite the poor prognosis, genetic alterations as potential molecular targets are not available. KRAS mutation and HER2 gene amplification may be candidates related to their genetic alterations. We examined the HER2 and KRAS alteration status in eyelid SCs and compared it with that in other eyelid tumors. The controversial topics of the human papillomavirus (HPV) and p16 expression were also investigated. HER2 amplification was determined by silver in situ hybridization, while immunohistochemistry was performed to study protein expressions in 14 SCs and controls, including 23 other eyelid malignancies and 14 benign tumors. Peptide nucleic acid-mediated PCR clamping and direct sequencing were used to detect KRAS mutations. HER2 protein overexpression was observed in 85.7% (12/14) of the SCs, of which two-thirds showed HER2 gene amplification. HER2 protein overexpression and HER2 amplification were found more frequently in eyelid SCs than in other eyelid tumors. All SCs harbored wild type KRAS genes. No HPV infections were identified in the SCs. Nevertheless, p16 overexpression was found in 71.4% (10/14) of SCs, irrespective of the status of HPV infection. Furthermore, p16 overexpression in eyelid SCs was also significantly higher than that in other eyelid tumors. HER2 protein overexpression, HER2 gene amplifications, and wild type KRAS genes are common in eyelid SCs. HER2 gene amplification may represent potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of eyelid SCs.

  3. The status of Her2 amplification and Kras mutations in mucinous ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuang-Leei; Lee, Ming-Yung; Chao, Wan-Ru; Han, Chih-Ping

    2016-12-28

    Jayson GC et al. remarked in Lancet that nearly 100% of mucinous ovarian cancer cases have Kras mutation as well as a high frequency of Her2 amplification. Using the Abbott PathVysion Her2 DNA Probe Kit and Kras mutant-enriched PCR Kits (FemtoPath®), 21 samples of primary ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinomas from Taiwanese patients were examined to determine the status of Her2 amplification and Kras mutations. Our results showed the Her2 amplification rates were 33.33%, while the Kras mutation rates were 61.90%. We present here our results in order to enlighten the readership that the ~100% Kras mutant frequency and the high Her2 amplification rate reported by Jayson et al. may be too exaggerated to be applicable into all populations. Additionally, we report another 2 novel Kras mutations (A11V, V14I).

  4. Novel Methodology for Rapid Detection of KRAS Mutation Using PNA-LNA Mediated Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Warigaya, Kenji; Tamura, Takaaki; Shimizu, Yuki; Fujimoto, Masakazu; Kojima, Fumiyoshi; Ichinose, Masao; Murata, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Detecting point mutation of human cancer cells quickly and accurately is gaining in importance for pathological diagnosis and choice of therapeutic approach. In the present study, we present novel methodology, peptide nucleic acid—locked nucleic acid mediated loop-mediated isothermal amplification (PNA-LNA mediated LAMP), for rapid detection of KRAS mutation using advantages of both artificial DNA and LAMP. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP reactions occurred under isothermal temperature conditions of with 4 primary primers set for the target regions on the KRAS gene, clamping PNA probe that was complimentary to the wild type sequence and LNA primers complementary to the mutated sequences. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP was applied for cDNA from 4 kinds of pancreatic carcinoma cell lines with or without KRAS point mutation. The amplified DNA products were verified by naked-eye as well as a real-time PCR equipment. By PNA-LNA mediated LAMP, amplification of wild type KRAS DNA was blocked by clamping PNA probe, whereas, mutant type KRAS DNA was significantly amplified within 50 min. Mutant alleles could be detected in samples which diluted until 0.1% of mutant-to-wild type ratio. On the other hand, mutant alleles could be reproducibly with a mutant-to-wild type ratio of 30% by direct sequencing and of 1% by PNA-clamping PCR. The limit of detection (LOD) of PNA-LNA mediated LAMP was much lower than the other conventional methods. Competition of LNA clamping primers complementary to two different subtypes (G12D and G12V) of mutant KRAS gene indicated different amplification time depend on subtypes of mutant cDNA. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP is a simple, rapid, specific and sensitive methodology for the detection of KRAS mutation. PMID:26999437

  5. Novel Methodology for Rapid Detection of KRAS Mutation Using PNA-LNA Mediated Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    PubMed

    Itonaga, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Ibu; Warigaya, Kenji; Tamura, Takaaki; Shimizu, Yuki; Fujimoto, Masakazu; Kojima, Fumiyoshi; Ichinose, Masao; Murata, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Detecting point mutation of human cancer cells quickly and accurately is gaining in importance for pathological diagnosis and choice of therapeutic approach. In the present study, we present novel methodology, peptide nucleic acid-locked nucleic acid mediated loop-mediated isothermal amplification (PNA-LNA mediated LAMP), for rapid detection of KRAS mutation using advantages of both artificial DNA and LAMP. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP reactions occurred under isothermal temperature conditions of with 4 primary primers set for the target regions on the KRAS gene, clamping PNA probe that was complimentary to the wild type sequence and LNA primers complementary to the mutated sequences. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP was applied for cDNA from 4 kinds of pancreatic carcinoma cell lines with or without KRAS point mutation. The amplified DNA products were verified by naked-eye as well as a real-time PCR equipment. By PNA-LNA mediated LAMP, amplification of wild type KRAS DNA was blocked by clamping PNA probe, whereas, mutant type KRAS DNA was significantly amplified within 50 min. Mutant alleles could be detected in samples which diluted until 0.1% of mutant-to-wild type ratio. On the other hand, mutant alleles could be reproducibly with a mutant-to-wild type ratio of 30% by direct sequencing and of 1% by PNA-clamping PCR. The limit of detection (LOD) of PNA-LNA mediated LAMP was much lower than the other conventional methods. Competition of LNA clamping primers complementary to two different subtypes (G12D and G12V) of mutant KRAS gene indicated different amplification time depend on subtypes of mutant cDNA. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP is a simple, rapid, specific and sensitive methodology for the detection of KRAS mutation.

  6. ras gene Amplification and malignant transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Pulciani, S; Santos, E; Long, L K; Sorrentino, V; Barbacid, M

    1985-01-01

    Morphologic transformation of NIH 3T3 mouse cells occurs upon transfection of these cells with large amounts (greater than or equal to 10 micrograms) of recombinant DNA molecules carrying the normal human H-ras-1 proto-oncogene. We provide experimental evidence indicating that transformation of these NIH 3T3 cells results from the combined effect of multiple copies of the H-ras-1 proto-oncogene rather than from spontaneous mutation of one of the transfected H-ras-1 clones (E. Santos, E.P. Reddy, S. Pulciani, R.J. Feldman, and M. Barbacid, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 80:4679-4683, 1983). Levels of H-ras-1 RNA and p21 expression are highly elevated in the NIH 3T3 transformants, and in those cases examined, these levels correlate with the malignant properties of these cells. We have also investigated the presence of amplified ras genes in a variety of human carcinomas. In 75 tumor biopsies, we found amplification of the human K-ras-2 locus in one carcinoma of the lung. These results indicate that ras gene amplification is an alternative pathway by which ras genes may participate in the development of human neoplasia. Images PMID:3915535

  7. A novel KRAS gene mutation report in sporadic colorectal cancer, from Northwest of Iran.

    PubMed

    Dolatkhah, Roya; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Kermani, Iraj Asvadi; Farassati, Faris; Dastgiri, Saeed

    2017-03-01

    While the role of KRAS gene mutations has been widely accepted for predicting responses to anti-EGFR therapy in patients with colorectal cancer, although this study was based on observation of a single case it gives hope that some KRAS gene mutation may have favorable prognosis. More studies are required on patients with similar mutation to validate this finding.

  8. Chromosomal destabilization during gene amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, J C; Wahl, G M

    1990-01-01

    Acentric extrachromosomal elements, such as submicroscopic autonomously replicating circular molecules (episomes) and double minute chromosomes, are common early, and in some cases initial, intermediates of gene amplification in many drug-resistant and tumor cell lines. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the amplification process, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which such extrachromosomal elements are generated and we traced the fate of these amplification intermediates over time. The model system consists of a Chinese hamster cell line (L46) created by gene transfer in which the initial amplification product was shown previously to be an unstable extrachromosomal element containing an inverted duplication spanning more than 160 kilobases (J. C. Ruiz and G. M. Wahl, Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:4302-4313, 1988). In this study, we show that these molecules were formed by a process involving chromosomal deletion. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed at multiple time points on cells with amplified sequences. These studies reveal that the extrachromosomal molecules rapidly integrate into chromosomes, often near or at telomeres, and once integrated, the amplified sequences are themselves unstable. These data provide a molecular and cytogenetic chronology for gene amplification in this model system; an early event involves deletion to generate extrachromosomal elements, and subsequent integration of these elements precipitates a cascade of chromosome instability. Images PMID:2188107

  9. Comparative Roles of Overexpressed and Mutated H- and K-ras in Mammary Carcinogenesis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-08-01

    initiated tumors ) using the mismatch amplification mutation assay ( MAMA ) developed by Cha et al (5). Our initial studies indicated that there was...fold more potent at inducing mammary tumors than the activated K-ras gene. Yet, the K-ras oncogene was still effective at mammary carcinoma induction...transgenic rats harboring a H-ras gene (HrHr transgenics) or K-ras gene (HrKr transgenics) controlled by H-ras gene regulatory elements. Mammary tumor

  10. Alterations in the K-ras and p53 genes in rat lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Belinsky, S.A.; Swafford, D.S.; Finch, G.L.; Mitchell, C.E.

    1997-06-01

    Activation of the K-ras protooncogene and inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene are events common to many types of human cancers. Molecular epidemiology studies have associated mutational profiles in these genes with specific exposures. The purpose of this paper is to review investigations that have examined the role of the K-ras and p53 genes in lung tumors induced in the F344 rat by mutagenic and nonmutagenic exposures. Mutation profiles within the K-ras and p53 genes, if present in rat lung tumors, would help to define some of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer induction by various environmental agents. Pulmonary adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas were induced by tetranitromethane (TNM), 4-methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), beryllium metal, plutonium-239, X-ray, diesel exhaust, or carbon black. These agents were chosen because the tumors they produced could arise via different types of DNA damage. Mutation of the K-ras gene was determined by approaches that included DNA transfection, direct sequencing, mismatch hybridization, and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The frequency for mutation of the K-ras gene was exposure dependent. The transition mutations formed could have been derived from deamination of cytosine. Alteration in the p53 gene was assessed by immunohistochemical analysis for p53 protein and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of exons 4 to 9. None of the 93 adenocarinomas examined was immunoreactive toward the anti-p53 antibody CM1. In contrast, 14 of 71 squamous cell carcinomas exhibited nuclear p53 immunoreactivity with no correlation to type of exposure. However, SSCP analysis only detected mutations in 2 of 14 squamous cell tumors that were immunoreactive, suggesting that protein stabilization did not stem from mutations within the p53 gene. Thus, the p53 gene does not appear to be involved in the genesis of most rat lung tumors. 2 figs., 2 tabs., 48 refs.

  11. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Bin; Ouyang, Ruoyun; Huang, Chenghui; Liu, Franklin; Neill, Daniel; Li, Chuanyuan; Dewhirst, Mark

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) {gamma}H2AX immunostaining to detect {gamma}H2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and

  12. The cornerstone K-RAS mutation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: From cell signaling network, target genes, biological processes to therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Jonckheere, Nicolas; Vasseur, Romain; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2017-03-01

    RAS belongs to the super family of small G proteins and plays crucial roles in signal transduction from membrane receptors in the cell. Mutations of K-RAS oncogene lead to an accumulation of GTP-bound proteins that maintains an active conformation. In the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), one of the most deadly cancers in occidental countries, mutations of the K-RAS oncogene are nearly systematic (>90%). Moreover, K-RAS mutation is the earliest genetic alteration occurring during pancreatic carcinogenetic sequence. In this review, we discuss the central role of K-RAS mutations and their tremendous diversity of biological properties by the interconnected regulation of signaling pathways (MAPKs, NF-κB, PI3K, Ral…). In pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, transcriptome analysis and preclinical animal models showed that K-RAS mutation alters biological behavior of PDAC cells (promoting proliferation, migration and invasion, evading growth suppressors, regulating mucin pattern, and miRNA expression). K-RAS also impacts tumor microenvironment and PDAC metabolism reprogramming. Finally we discuss therapeutic targeting strategies of K-RAS that have been developed without significant clinical success so far. As K-RAS is considered as the undruggable target, targeting its multiple effectors and target genes should be considered as potential alternatives.

  13. KRAS and VEGF gene 3'-UTR single nucleotide polymorphisms predicted susceptibility in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xiaorui; Li, Xin; Xia, Tian; Long, Hanan

    2017-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in tumor-related genes have been reported to play important roles in cancer development. Recent studies have shown that 3’-untranslated regions (UTR) polymorphisms are associated with the occurrence and prognosis of cancers. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between KRAS and VEGF gene 3’-UTR SNPs and genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer (CRC). In this case-control study of 371 CRC cases and 246 healthy controls, we analyzed the association between one SNP (rs1137188G > A) in the KRAS gene and four SNPs (rs3025039C > T, rs3025040C > T, rs3025053G > A and rs10434A > G) in the VEGF gene and CRC susceptibility by the improved multiplex ligase detection reaction (iMLDR) method. We checked the selected SNPs’ minor allele frequency and its distribution in the frequency of Chinese people by Hap-map database and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and used multivariate logistic regression models to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). We found that the rs3025039C variant genotype in the VEGF gene was associated with a significant protection for CRC (AOR = 0.693, 95% CI = 0.485–0.989; P = 0.043 for CC and CT+TT). Nevertheless, the difference was no longer significant after Bonferroni correction (Bonferroni-adjusted P = 0.172). In genetic polymorphisms analysis, we found that the KRAS rs1137188 variant AA genotype had higher portion of tumor size (≥ 5 cm) (P = 0.01; Bonferroni-adjusted P = 0.04), which suggested that the rs1137188 variant AA genotype may significantly be associated with increased progression of CRC. In conclusion, our study suggested that these five SNPs in the KRAS gene and the VEGF gene were not associated with CRC susceptibility in Han Chinese in Sichuan province. PMID:28328959

  14. Association between the KRAS Gene Polymorphisms and Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Lifeng; Rao, Wenwang; Yu, Yaqin; Liu, Xiaoli; Pan, Yuchen; Ma, Yuan; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Shangchao; Sun, Hui; Yu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported the association between MAPK signaling pathway gene polymorphisms and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). KRAS gene, an oncogene from the mammalian RAS gene family plays an important role in the MAPK pathway. This study aimed to identify the potential association of KRAS gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to PTC in a Han Chinese population. A total of 861 patients with PTC, 562 disease controls with nodular goiter and 897 healthy controls were recruited. Four tagSNP polymorphisms (rs12427141, rs712, rs7315339 and rs7960917) of KRAS gene were genotyped by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Statistical analyses and haplotype estimations were conducted using Haploview and Unphased softwares. Only significant differences were observed in genotypic frequencies of the rs7315339 polymorphism (χ2 =7.234, df=2, p=0.027) between PTC and disease controls. Statistically significant differences in both allelic and genotypic genotypes frequencies for rs712 (Genotype, χ2=8.258, p=0.016) and rs12427141 (Allele, χ2=3.992, p=0.046; Genotype, χ2=8.140, p=0.017) were observed between PTC patients and controls. Haplotype analyses revealed higher frequencies of GA and TA haplotypes (p=0.039 and p=0.003, respectively) from rs712- rs12427141 (two-SNP) or TGA and TTG haplotype containing the alleles from rs7960917, rs712 and rs12427141, as well as the GAT haplotype containing the alleles from rs712, rs12427141 and rs7315339 in PTC patients than in healthy controls (p=0.042, p=0.037, p=0.027, respectively). Inversely, the haplotype TTA from rs7960917, rs712 and rs12427141 or the haplotype TAC from rs712, rs12427141 and rs7315339 was significantly less frequent in the PTC patients than in normal control (p=0.003, p=0.003, respectively). These findings suggest the role of these KRAS gene variants in susceptibility to PTC. Moreover, significant differences of the KRAS gene polymorphisms may occur

  15. Amplification-free In Situ KRAS Point Mutation Detection at 60 copies/mL in Urine in a Background of 1000-fold Wild Type

    PubMed Central

    KirimLi, Ceyhun E.; Shih, Wei-Heng; Shih, Wan Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have examined in situ detection of single-nucleotide KRAS mutation in urine using a (Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3)0.65(PbTiO3)0.35 (PMN-PT) piezoelectric plate sensor (PEPS) coated with a 17-nucleotide (nt) locked nucleic acid (LNA) probe DNA complementary to the KRAS mutation. To enhance in situ mutant (MT) DNA detection specificity against the wild type (WT), the detection was carried out in a flow with a flow rate of 4 mL/min and at 63°C with the PEPS vertically situated at the center of the flow in which both the temperature and the flow impingement force discriminated the wild type. Under such conditions, PEPS was shown to specifically detect KRAS MT in situ with 60 copies/mL analytical sensitivity in a background of clinically-relevant 1000-fold more WT in 30 min without DNA isolation, amplification, or labeling. For validation, the detection was followed with detection in a mixture of blue MT fluorescent reporter microspheres (FRMs) (MT FRMs) that bound to only the captured MT and orange WT FRMs that bound to only the captured WT. Microscopic examinations showed that the captured blue MT FRMs still outnumbered the orange WT FRMs by a factor of 4 to 1 even though WT was 1000-fold of MT in urine. Finally, multiplexed specific mutation detection was demonstrated using a 6-PEPS array each with a probe DNA targeting one of the 6 codon-12 KRAS mutations. PMID:26783561

  16. A correction to the research article titled: "Amplification of the driving oncogene, KRAS or BRAF, underpins acquired resistance to MEK1/2 inhibitors in colorectal cancer cells" by A. S. Little, K. Balmanno, M. J. Sale, S. Newman, J. R. Dry, M. Hampson, P. A. W. Edwards, P. D. Smith, S. J. Cook.

    PubMed

    Little, Annette S; Balmanno, Kathryn; Sale, Matthew J; Newman, Scott; Dry, Jonathan R; Hampson, Mark; Edwards, Paul A W; Smith, Paul D; Cook, Simon J

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition of resistance to protein kinase inhibitors is a growing problem in cancer treatment. We modeled acquired resistance to the MEK1/2 (mitogen-activated or extracellular signal–regulated protein kinase kinases 1 and 2) inhibitor selumetinib (AZD6244) in colorectal cancer cell lines harboring mutations in BRAF (COLO205 and HT29 lines) or KRAS (HCT116 and LoVo lines). AZD6244-resistant derivatives were refractory to AZD6244-induced cell cycle arrest and death and exhibited a marked increase in ERK1/2 (extracellular signal–regulated kinases 1 and 2) pathway signaling and cyclin D1 abundance when assessed in the absence of inhibitor. Genomic sequencing revealed no acquired mutations in MEK1 or MEK2, the primary target of AZD6244. Rather, resistant lines showed a marked up-regulation of their respective driving oncogenes, BRAF600E or KRAS13D, due to intrachromosomal amplification. Inhibition of BRAF reversed resistance to AZD6244 in COLO205 cells, which suggested that combined inhibition of MEK1/2 and BRAF may reduce the likelihood of acquired resistance in tumors with BRAF600E. Knockdown of KRAS reversed AZD6244 resistance in HCT116 cells as well as reduced the activation of ERK1/2 and protein kinase B; however, the combined inhibition of ERK1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling had little effect on AZD6244 resistance, suggesting that additional KRAS effector pathways contribute to this process. Microarray analysis identified increased expression of an 18-gene signature previously identified as reflecting MEK1/2 pathway output in resistant cells. Thus, amplification of the driving oncogene (BRAF600E or KRAS13D) can drive acquired resistance to MEK1/2 inhibitors by increasing signaling through the ERK1/2 pathway. However, up-regulation of KRAS13D leads to activation of multiple KRAS effector pathways, underlining the therapeutic challenge posed by KRAS mutations. These results may have implications for the use of combination therapies.

  17. Hormonal Involvement in Breast Cancer Gene Amplification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    re-replication creates extra copies of the gene. This in turn will also increase production of the protein encoded by the amplified gene. Hormonal... increases in MCM proteins and Cdt1 have been shown to induce DNA amplification in yeast (Gopalakrishnan et al., 2001; Nguyen et al., 2001; Green et al...2006) and increased Cdt1 results in re-replication in human cells (Dorn et al., 2008). The N- terminus of Cdt1 is important for re-replication

  18. p53, erbB-2 and K-ras gene alterations are rare in spontaneous and plutonium-239-induced canine lung neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, L.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Lechner, J.F.

    1996-02-01

    Inhalation of high-linear energy transfer radiation in the form of radon progeny is a suspected cause of human lung cancer. To gain insight into the types of genetic derangements caused by this type of radiation, lung tumors from beagle dogs exposed to {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} and those arising in animals with no known carcinogen exposure were examined for evidence of aberrations in genes known to be altered in lung tumors. Altered expression of the p53 tumor suppressor gene and proto-oncogene erbB-2 proteins (p185{sup erbB2}) was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis of 117 tumors representing different histological types in exposed (n = 80) and unexposed (n = 37) animals. Twenty-eight tumors were analyzed for K-ras proto-oncogene mutations by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing. Fourteen percent (16/116) of all lung neoplasms showed elevated nuclear accumulation of p53 protein. Regardless of exposure history, adenosquamous and squamous cell cancers comprised 94% of all tumors with p53 abnormalities. Eighteen percent (21/117) of all tumors had evidence of erbB-2 protein overexpression. K-ras mutations were not detected in codons 12, 13 or 61 of tumors from unexposed (n = 9) or plutonium-exposed dogs (n = 19). These data indicate that p53 and K-ras gene abnormalities as a result of missense mutation are infrequent events in spontaneous and {sup 239}PuO{sub 2}-induced lung neoplasia in this colony of beagle dogs. Alternative mechanisms of gene alteration may be involved in canine pulmonary carcinogenesis. 45 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Amplification and characterization of eukaryotic structural genes.

    PubMed

    Maniatis, T; Efstratiadis, A; Sim, G K; Kafatos, F

    1978-05-01

    An approach to the study of eukaryotic structural genes which are differentially expressed during development is described. This approach involves the isolation and amplification of mRNA sequences by in vitro conversion of mRNA to double-stranded cDNA followed by molecular cloning in bacterial plasmids. This procedure provides highly specific hybridization probes that can be used to identify genes and their contiguous DNA sequences in genomic DNA, and to detect specific RNA transcripts during development. The nature of the method allows the isolation of individual mRNA sequences from a complex population of molecules at different stages of development.

  20. Induction of gene amplification in Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Human erythrocytic in vitro cultures of Honduras I strain of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have been stressed stepwise with increasing concentrations of methotrexate (MTX), a folate antagonist. This selection has produced a strain that is 450 times more resistant to the drug than the original culture. Uptake of sublethal doses of radiolabeled MTX by infected red blood cells was 6-36 times greater in the resistant cultures than in the nonresistant controls. DNA isolated from all of the parasites was probed by hybridization with /sup 35/S-labeled DNA derived from a clone of the yeast thymidylate synthetase (TS) gene. This showed 50 to 100 times more increased hybridization of the TS probe to the DNA from the resistant parasites is direct evidence of gene amplification because DHFR and TS are actually one and the same bifunctional enzyme in P. falciparum. Hence, the evidence presented indicates that induced resistance of the malaria parasite to MTX in this case is due to overproduction of DHFR resulting from amplification of the DHFR-TS gene.

  1. Label-free colorimetric detection of cancer related gene based on two-step amplification of molecular machine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huo; Wu, Dong; Li, Chen-Qiao; Lu, Zheng; Liao, Xiao-Yun; Huang, Jie; Wu, Zai-Sheng

    2017-04-15

    Highly sensitive detection of K-ras gene is of great significance in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. Here, we developed a colorimetric biosensing system for the detection of proto-oncogene K-ras based on enhanced amplification effect of DNA molecular machine, where dual isothermal circular strand-displacement amplification (D-SDA) occurs on two arms in one-to-one correspondence. Specifically, we designed a primer-locked hairpin probe (HP) and a primer-contained linear polymerization template (PPT). In the presence of target gene, HP can hybridize with PPT, forming a DNA molecular machine with dual functional arms (called DFA-machine). Each of the two probes in this machine is able to be extended by polymerase on its counterpart species. Moreover, with the help of nicking endonuclease, the dual isothermal polymerization is converted into dual circular strand-displacement amplification, generating a large amount of anti-hemin aptamer-contained products. After binding to hemins, the aptamer/hemin duplex, horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme, was formed and catalyzed the oxidation of colorless ABTS by H2O2, producing a visible green color. The proposed colorimetric assay exhibits a wide linear range from 0.01 to 150nM with a low detection limit of 10pM. More interestingly, the mutations existing in target gene are easily observed by the naked eye. It should be noted that this colorimetric system was proved by the analysis of K-ras gene of SW620 cell lines. The simple and powerful DFA-machine is expected to provide promising potential in the sensitive detection of biomarkers for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and therapy.

  2. Mechanisms of Gene Duplication and Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Reams, Andrew B.; Roth, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in gene copy number are among the most frequent mutational events in all genomes and were among the mutations for which a physical basis was first known. Yet mechanisms of gene duplication remain uncertain because formation rates are difficult to measure and mechanisms may vary with position in a genome. Duplications are compared here to deletions, which seem formally similar but can arise at very different rates by distinct mechanisms. Methods of assessing duplication rates and dependencies are described with several proposed formation mechanisms. Emphasis is placed on duplications formed in extensively studied experimental situations. Duplications studied in microbes are compared with those observed in metazoan cells, specifically those in genomes of cancer cells. Duplications, and especially their derived amplifications, are suggested to form by multistep processes often under positive selection for increased copy number. PMID:25646380

  3. Mutualism Breakdown by Amplification of Wolbachia Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chrostek, Ewa; Teixeira, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Most insect species are associated with vertically transmitted endosymbionts. Because of the mode of transmission, the fitness of these symbionts is dependent on the fitness of the hosts. Therefore, these endosymbionts need to control their proliferation in order to minimize their cost for the host. The genetic bases and mechanisms of this regulation remain largely undetermined. The maternally inherited bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are the most common endosymbionts of insects, providing some of them with fitness benefits. In Drosophila melanogaster, Wolbachia wMelPop is a unique virulent variant that proliferates massively in the hosts and shortens their lifespan. The genetic bases of wMelPop virulence are unknown, and their identification would allow a better understanding of how Wolbachia levels are regulated. Here we show that amplification of a region containing eight Wolbachia genes, called Octomom, is responsible for wMelPop virulence. Using Drosophila lines selected for carrying Wolbachia with different Octomom copy numbers, we demonstrate that the number of Octomom copies determines Wolbachia titers and the strength of the lethal phenotype. Octomom amplification is unstable, and reversion of copy number to one reverts all the phenotypes. Our results provide a link between genotype and phenotype in Wolbachia and identify a genomic region regulating Wolbachia proliferation. We also prove that these bacteria can evolve rapidly. Rapid evolution by changes in gene copy number may be common in endosymbionts with a high number of mobile elements and other repeated regions. Understanding wMelPop pathogenicity and variability also allows researchers to better control and predict the outcome of releasing mosquitoes transinfected with this variant to block human vector-borne diseases. Our results show that transition from a mutualist to a pathogen may occur because of a single genomic change in the endosymbiont. This implies that there must be constant selection on

  4. Mutualism breakdown by amplification of Wolbachia genes.

    PubMed

    Chrostek, Ewa; Teixeira, Luis

    2015-02-01

    Most insect species are associated with vertically transmitted endosymbionts. Because of the mode of transmission, the fitness of these symbionts is dependent on the fitness of the hosts. Therefore, these endosymbionts need to control their proliferation in order to minimize their cost for the host. The genetic bases and mechanisms of this regulation remain largely undetermined. The maternally inherited bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are the most common endosymbionts of insects, providing some of them with fitness benefits. In Drosophila melanogaster, Wolbachia wMelPop is a unique virulent variant that proliferates massively in the hosts and shortens their lifespan. The genetic bases of wMelPop virulence are unknown, and their identification would allow a better understanding of how Wolbachia levels are regulated. Here we show that amplification of a region containing eight Wolbachia genes, called Octomom, is responsible for wMelPop virulence. Using Drosophila lines selected for carrying Wolbachia with different Octomom copy numbers, we demonstrate that the number of Octomom copies determines Wolbachia titers and the strength of the lethal phenotype. Octomom amplification is unstable, and reversion of copy number to one reverts all the phenotypes. Our results provide a link between genotype and phenotype in Wolbachia and identify a genomic region regulating Wolbachia proliferation. We also prove that these bacteria can evolve rapidly. Rapid evolution by changes in gene copy number may be common in endosymbionts with a high number of mobile elements and other repeated regions. Understanding wMelPop pathogenicity and variability also allows researchers to better control and predict the outcome of releasing mosquitoes transinfected with this variant to block human vector-borne diseases. Our results show that transition from a mutualist to a pathogen may occur because of a single genomic change in the endosymbiont. This implies that there must be constant selection on

  5. A New Microarray Substrate for Ultra-Sensitive Genotyping of KRAS and BRAF Gene Variants in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pinzani, Pamela; Mancini, Irene; Vinci, Serena; Chiari, Marcella; Orlando, Claudio; Cremonesi, Laura; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics of human cancers may increase accuracy in prognosis, facilitate the selection of the optimal therapeutic regimen, improve patient outcome, reduce costs of treatment and favour development of personalized approaches to patient care. Moreover sensitivity and specificity are fundamental characteristics of any diagnostic method. We developed a highly sensitive microarray for the detection of common KRAS and BRAF oncogenic mutations. In colorectal cancer, KRAS and BRAF mutations have been shown to identify a cluster of patients that does not respond to anti-EGFR therapies; the identification of these mutations is therefore clinically extremely important. To verify the technical characteristics of the microarray system for the correct identification of the KRAS mutational status at the two hotspot codons 12 and 13 and of the BRAFV600E mutation in colorectal tumor, we selected 75 samples previously characterized by conventional and CO-amplification at Lower Denaturation temperature-PCR (COLD-PCR) followed by High Resolution Melting analysis and direct sequencing. Among these samples, 60 were collected during surgery and immediately steeped in RNAlater while the 15 remainders were formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. The detection limit of the proposed method was different for the 7 KRAS mutations tested and for the V600E BRAF mutation. In particular, the microarray system has been able to detect a minimum of about 0.01% of mutated alleles in a background of wild-type DNA. A blind validation displayed complete concordance of results. The excellent agreement of the results showed that the new microarray substrate is highly specific in assigning the correct genotype without any enrichment strategy. PMID:23536897

  6. Alcohol and the risk of colon and rectal cancer with mutations in the K-ras gene.

    PubMed

    Bongaerts, Brenda W C; de Goeij, Anton F P M; van den Brandt, Piet A; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2006-04-01

    The first metabolite of alcohol, acetaldehyde, may trigger replication errors and mutations in DNA, which may predispose to developing colorectal cancer (CRC). In a prospective study on colon and rectal cancer, we investigated the following hypotheses: alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk of mutations in the K-ras oncogene, and beer consumption is associated with an increased risk of G-->A mutations in this gene. Therefore, we studied the associations between consumption of alcohol and alcoholic beverages and the risk of CRC without and with specific K-ras gene mutations. In 1986, 120,852 men and women, aged 55-69 years, completed a questionnaire on risk factors for cancer. The case-cohort approach was used for data processing and analyses. After 7.3 years of follow-up, excluding the first 2.3 years, complete data from 4,076 subcohort members, 428 colon and 150 rectal cancer patients, were available for data analyses. Incidence rate ratios (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Compared to abstaining, a total alcohol consumption of 30.0 g/day and more was associated with the risk of colon and rectal cancer with and without a K-ras mutation in both men and women. Independent from alcohol intake, liquor consumption when compared to nonliquor consumption was associated with an increased risk of rectal cancer with a wild type K-ras in men (RR: 2.25, 95% CI: 1.0-5.0). Beer consumption was not clearly associated with the risk of colon and rectal tumors harboring G-->A mutations in the K-ras gene in men. This association could not be assessed in women because of sparse beer consumption. In conclusion, alcohol does not seem to be involved in predisposing to CRC through mutations in the K-ras gene, and specifically beer consumption is not associated with colon and rectal tumors harboring a G-->A mutation.

  7. Gene and library synthesis without amplification: polymerase step reaction (PSR).

    PubMed

    Lee, Zhuo-Bin; Firnhaber, Christopher; Clarke, Jesse; DeDecker, Brian S

    2015-09-01

    Current gene synthesis methods often incorporate a PCR amplification step in order to yield final material sufficient for resolution from multiple off-products. These amplification steps can cause stochastic sampling effects that propagate errors in gene synthesis or decrease variability when applied to the construction of randomized libraries. We have developed a simple DNA polymerase-based gene synthesis reaction, polymerase step reaction (PSR), that assembles DNA oligonucleotides in a unidirectional fashion without the need for amplification. We demonstrate that PSR is efficient, with little off-product production, no detectable error propagation, and maximized variability in the synthesis of a phage display library.

  8. APC, K-ras, and p53 gene mutations in colorectal cancer patients: correlation to clinicopathologic features and postoperative surveillance.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jan-Sing; Lin, Shiu-Ru; Chang, Mei-Yin; Chen, Fang-Ming; Lu, Chien-Yu; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Huang, Yu-Sheng; Huang, Che-Jen; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2005-04-01

    Current researches have proposed a genetic model for colorectal cancer (CRC), in which the sequential accumulation of mutations in specific cancer-related genes, including adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), K-ras, and p53, drives the transition from normal epithelium through increasing adenomatous dysplasia to colorectal cancer. To identify patients with an increased risk of tumor recurrence or metastasis and evaluate the prognostic values of APC, K-ras, and p53 gene mutations, we investigated the frequency of these three mutated genes in tumors and sera of CRC patients. APC, K-ras, and p53 gene mutations in primary tumor tissues and their paired preoperative serum samples of 118 CRC patients were detected by using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis, followed by direct DNA sequencing of the PCR-amplified genomic DNA. Subsequently, serum molecular markers were analyzed for their correlation with patients' clinicopathologic features and presence of postoperative recurrence/metastasis. We did not observe any significant difference in the association of APC or K-ras or p53 gene mutations in primary tumors with patients' demographic data (all were P > 0.05). In contrast, both serum APC and p53 molecular markers were closely correlated with lymph node metastasis and TNM stage (both P < 0.05). Moreover, the serum overall molecular markers (at least one of the three markers) were prominently associated with depth of tumor invasion (P = 0.033), lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001), and TNM stage (P < 0.001). In addition, a significantly higher postoperative metastasis/recurrence rate in patients positive for overall molecular markers compared to those negative for these molecular markers were also demonstrated (P < 0.001). APC and K-ras molecular markers were more frequently observed in patients with locoregional metastasis (both P < 0.05), while p53 molecular marker was usually detected in the cases of peritoneal metastasis (P

  9. Picoliter droplet-based digital peptide nucleic acid clamp PCR and dielectric sorting for low abundant K-ras mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huidan; Sperling, Ralph; Rotem, Assaf; Shan, Lianfeng; Heyman, John; Zhang, Yizhe; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the US, and the 5-year survival of metastatic CRC (mCRC) is less than 10%. Although monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) provide incremental improvements in survival, approximately 40% of mCRC patients with activating KRAS mutations won't benefit from this therapy. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA), a synthetic non-extendable oligonucleotides, can bind strongly to completely complementary wild-type KRAS by Watson-Crick base pairing and suppress its amplification during PCR, while any mutant allele will show unhindered amplification. The method is particularly suitable for the simultaneously detection of several adjoining mutant sites, just as mutations of codons 12 and 13 of KRAS gene where there are totally 12 possible mutation types. In this work, we describe the development and validation of this method, based on the droplet-based digital PCR. Using a microfluidic system, single target DNA molecule is compartmentalized in microdroplets together with PNA specific for wild-type KRAS, thermocycled and the fluorescence of each droplet was detected, followed by sorting and sequencing. It enables the precise determination of all possible mutant KRAS simultaneously, and the precise quantification of a single mutated KRAS in excess background unmutated KRAS.

  10. Functional variants in CYP1B1, KRAS and MTHFR genes are associated with shorter telomere length in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Cerne, Jasmina Z; Pohar-Perme, Maja; Cerkovnik, Petra; Gersak, Ksenija; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2015-07-01

    Estrogens and antioxidants indirectly alleviate telomere attrition. However, available clinical data on the association between hormone exposure and telomere length are inconclusive. In the present study, we examined the effects of exogenous estrogen use and of some genetic factors implicated in estrogen metabolism and oxidative stress response on mean leukocyte telomere length. We studied 259 postmenopausal women. Genotyping was conducted for CYP1B1 (rs1056836), COMT (rs4680), GSTP1 (rs1695), MnSOD (rs4880), KRAS (rs61764370), and MTHFR (rs1801133 and rs1801131) polymorphisms. Mean leukocyte telomere length was measured using a quantitative real-time PCR assay. In multivariate analysis we found no association between oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and mean leukocyte telomere length. The presence of variant alleles in CYP1B1, KRAS and MTHFR genes was statistically significantly associated with shorter mean leukocyte telomere length. Further, the data provided evidence for the effect modification of the association between HRT and mean leukocyte telomere length by the CYP1B1, KRAS and MTHFR genotypes. Our findings suggest that functionally relevant genetic variants within estrogen and folate metabolic pathways may influence telomere length. We propose these genetic factors should be taken into consideration when interpreting associations between hormone exposure and telomere length.

  11. Evaluation of EGFR, KRAS and BRAF gene mutations in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Haluk; Bulut, Ersan; Cengiz, Beyhan; Karakok, Metin; Erturhan, Sakip; Seckiner, Ilker

    2014-01-01

    A subset of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients has been shown to respond to anti-EGFR therapy. As KRAS and BRAF mutations are associated with poor response to anti-EGFR therapy in some cancers, it has been suggested that screening for KRAS and BRAF mutations in RCC may be a promising strategy to identify patients who might respond to EGFR-targeted therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the mutation status of EGFR, KRAS and BRAF in RCC patients. Renal tumors and normal renal samples from forty-eight patients who underwent radical or partial nephrectomy for kidney cancer were used in this study. Histological classification of the tumors was performed according to International Union against Cancer (UICC) / American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) classification. Seventeen patients (48%) had clear-cell RCC, 7 (20%) had chromophobe RCC, and 11 patients (32%) had papillary RCC. DNA isolated from the samples was subjected to melting curve mutation analysis for EGFR, BRAF and KRAS using ABI-3130 DNA sequencer. DNA sequencing analysis of RCC samples, when compared with morphologically normal matched regions, did not show any exon mutations. Our results do not support the notion that EGFR, KRAS and BRAF might be mutated in RCC.

  12. Identification of Genetic Elements Associated with EPSPS Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Todd A.; Wright, Alice A.; Molin, William T.; Lorentz, Lothar; Riggins, Chance W.; Tranel, Patrick J.; Beffa, Roland; Westra, Philip; Powles, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Weed populations can have high genetic plasticity and rapid responses to environmental selection pressures. For example, 100-fold amplification of the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene evolved in the weed species Amaranthus palmeri to confer resistance to glyphosate, the world’s most important herbicide. However, the gene amplification mechanism is unknown. We sequenced the EPSPS gene and genomic regions flanking EPSPS loci in A. palmeri, and searched for mobile genetic elements or repetitive sequences. The EPSPS gene was 10,229 bp, containing 8 exons and 7 introns. The gene amplification likely proceeded through a DNA-mediated mechanism, as introns exist in the amplified gene copies and the entire amplified sequence is at least 30 kb in length. Our data support the presence of two EPSPS loci in susceptible (S) A. palmeri, and that only one of these was amplified in glyphosate-resistant (R) A. palmeri. The EPSPS gene amplification event likely occurred recently, as no sequence polymorphisms were found within introns of amplified EPSPS copies from R individuals. Sequences with homology to miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) were identified next to EPSPS gene copies only in R individuals. Additionally, a putative Activator (Ac) transposase and a repetitive sequence region were associated with amplified EPSPS genes. The mechanism controlling this DNA-mediated amplification remains unknown. Further investigation is necessary to determine if the gene amplification may have proceeded via DNA transposon-mediated replication, and/or unequal recombination between different genomic regions resulting in replication of the EPSPS gene. PMID:23762434

  13. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, Inna; Kazanov, Dina; Lisiansky, Victoria; Starr, Alex; Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah; Arber, Nadir

    2012-01-15

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35-40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our 'gene therapy' approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce {approx} 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by {approx} 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  14. Somatic recombination, gene amplification and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramel, C; Cederberg, H; Magnusson, J; Vogel, E; Natarajan, A T; Mullender, L H; Nivard, J M; Parry, J M; Leyson, A; Comendador, M A; Sierra, L M; Ferreiro, J A; Consuegra, S

    1996-06-12

    The principle objective of this research programme, to analyse chemical induction of somatic recombination and related endpoints, i.e., mobilization of transposing elements and gene amplification, has been approached by means of several assay systems. These have included Drosophila, Saccharomyces and mammalian cell cultures. 6.1. Screening assays for mitotic recombination. A large number of chemicals have been investigated in the three Drosophila assay systems employed--the multiple wing hair/flare wing spot system developed by Graf et al., 1984, the white-ivory system developed by Green et al., 1986 and the white/white+ eye spot assay developed by Vogel (Vogel and Nivard, 1993). Particularly the screening of 181 chemicals, covering a wide array of chemical classes, by the last mentioned assay has shown that measurement of somatic recombination in Drosophila constitutes a sensitive and efficient short-term test which shows a remarkably good correlation with the agent score of 83 short-term tests analysed by ICPEMC (Mendelsohn et al., 1992; Table 2) as well as the assay performance in international collaborative programmes measuring carcinogen/non-carcinogens (de Serres and Ashby, 1981; Ashby et al., 1985, 1988). Also the wing spot assay has gained wide international recognition as a similarly sensitive test. These two assay systems in Drosophila measure both intrachromosomal events and interchromosomal recombination. The white-ivory system on the other hand is based on the loss of a tandem duplication in the white locus, the mechanism of which is less known, but probably involves intrachromosomal recombination. The difference in the mechanism between this assay and the former two was indicated by the lack of response to methotrexate in the white-ivory assay, while this compound was strongly recombinogenic in both the wing spot and white/white+ assays. The use of different strains of Drosophila with the white/white+ assay demonstrated the importance of the

  15. Loop mediated isothermal amplification: An innovative gene amplification technique for animal diseases.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Pravas Ranjan; Sethy, Kamadev; Mohapatra, Swagat; Panda, Debasis

    2016-05-01

    India being a developing country mainly depends on livestock sector for its economy. However, nowadays, there is emergence and reemergence of more transboundary animal diseases. The existing diagnostic techniques are not so quick and with less specificity. To reduce the economy loss, there should be a development of rapid, reliable, robust diagnostic technique, which can work with high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay is a rapid gene amplification technique that amplifies nucleic acid under an isothermal condition with a set of designed primers spanning eight distinct sequences of the target. This assay can be used as an emerging powerful, innovative gene amplification diagnostic tool against various pathogens of livestock diseases. This review is to highlight the basic concept and methodology of this assay in livestock disease.

  16. Loop mediated isothermal amplification: An innovative gene amplification technique for animal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Pravas Ranjan; Sethy, Kamadev; Mohapatra, Swagat; Panda, Debasis

    2016-01-01

    India being a developing country mainly depends on livestock sector for its economy. However, nowadays, there is emergence and reemergence of more transboundary animal diseases. The existing diagnostic techniques are not so quick and with less specificity. To reduce the economy loss, there should be a development of rapid, reliable, robust diagnostic technique, which can work with high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay is a rapid gene amplification technique that amplifies nucleic acid under an isothermal condition with a set of designed primers spanning eight distinct sequences of the target. This assay can be used as an emerging powerful, innovative gene amplification diagnostic tool against various pathogens of livestock diseases. This review is to highlight the basic concept and methodology of this assay in livestock disease. PMID:27284221

  17. Genetic Alterations in K-ras and p53 Cancer Genes in Lung Neoplasms From B6C3F1 Mice Exposed to Cumene

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hue-Hua L.; Ton, Thai-Vu. T.; Kim, Yongbaek; Wakamatsu, Nobuko; Clayton, Natasha P.; Chan, Po-Chuen; Sills, Robert C.; Lahousse, Stephanie A.

    2009-01-01

    The incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas and carcinomas in cumene-treated B6C3F1 mice were significantly greater than those of the controls. We evaluated these lung neoplasms for point mutations in the K-ras and p53 genes that are often mutated in humans. K-ras and p53 mutations were detected by cycle sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA isolated from paraffin-embedded neoplasms. K-ras mutations were detected in 87 % cumene-induced lung neoplasms, and the predominant mutations were exon 1 codon 12 G to T transversions and exon 2 codon 61 A to G transitions. P53 protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry in 56 % cumene-induced neoplasms and mutations were detected in 52 % neoplasms. The predominant mutations were exon 5, codon 155 G to A transitions and codon 133 C to T transitions. No p53 mutation and one of 7 (14 %) K-ras mutation was detected in spontaneous neoplasms. Cumene-induced lung carcinomas showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 4 near the p16 gene (13 %) and on chromosome 6 near the K-ras gene (12 %). No LOH was observed in spontaneous carcinomas or normal lung tissues examined. The pattern of mutations identified in the lung tumors suggests that DNA damage and genomic instability may be contributing factors to the mutation profile and development of lung cancer in mice exposed to cumene. PMID:18648094

  18. Genetic alterations in K-ras and p53 cancer genes in lung neoplasms from B6C3F1 mice exposed to cumene.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hue-Hua L; Ton, Thai-Vu T; Kim, Yongbaek; Wakamatsu, Nobuko; Clayton, Natasha P; Chan, Po-Chuen; Sills, Robert C; Lahousse, Stephanie A

    2008-07-01

    The incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas and carcinomas in cumene-treated B6C3F1 mice were significantly greater than those of the control animals. We evaluated these lung neoplasms for point mutations in the K-ras and p53 genes that are often mutated in humans. K-ras and p53 mutations were detected by cycle sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA isolated from paraffin-embedded neoplasms. K-ras mutations were detected in 87% of cumene-induced lung neoplasms, and the predominant mutations were exon 1 codon 12 G to T transversions and exon 2 codon 61 A to G transitions. P53 protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry in 56% of cumene-induced neoplasms, and mutations were detected in 52% of neoplasms. The predominant mutations were exon 5, codon 155 G to A transitions, and codon 133 C to T transitions. No p53 mutations and one of seven (14%) K-ras mutations were detected in spontaneous neoplasms. Cumene-induced lung carcinomas showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 4 near the p16 gene (13%) and on chromosome 6 near the K-ras gene (12%). No LOH was observed in spontaneous carcinomas or normal lung tissues examined. The pattern of mutations identified in the lung tumors suggests that DNA damage and genomic instability may be contributing factors to the mutation profile and development of lung cancer in mice exposed to cumene.

  19. [miR-143 inhibits cell proliferation through targeted regulating the expression of K-ras gene in HeLa cells].

    PubMed

    Qin, H X; Cui, H K; Pan, Y; Hu, R L; Zhu, L H; Wang, S J

    2016-12-23

    Objective: To explore the effect of microRNA miR-143 on the proliferation of cervical cancer HeLa cells through targeted regulating the expression of K-ras gene. Methods: The luciferase report carrier containing wild type 3'-UTR of K-ras gene (K-ras-wt) or mutated 3'-UTR of the K-ras (K-ras-mut) were co-transfected with iR-143 mimic into the HeLa cells respectively, and the targeting effect of miR-143 in the transfectants was verified by the dual luciferase report system. HeLa cells were also transfected with miR-143 mimic (miR-143 mimic group), mimic control (negative control group), and miR-143 mimic plus K-ras gene (miR-143 mimic+ K-ras group), respectively. The expression of miR-143 in the transfected HeLa cells was detected by real-time PCR (RT-PCR), and the expression of K-ras protein was detected by Western blot. The cell proliferation activity of each group was examined by MTT assay. In addition, human cervical cancer tissue samples (n=5) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue samples (n=5) were also examined for the expression of miR-143 and K-ras protein by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Results: The luciferase report assay showed that co-transfection with miR-143 mimic decreased the luciferase activity of the K-ras-wt significantly, but did not inhibit the luciferase activity of the K-ras-mut. The expression of miR-143 in the HeLa cells transfected with miR-143 mimic was significantly higher than that in the HeLa cells transfected with the mimic control (3.31±0.45 vs 0.97±0.22, P<0.05). The MTT assay revealed that the cell proliferative activity of the miR-143 mimic group was significantly lower than that of the negative control group (P<0.05), and the cell proliferative activity of the miR-143 mimic+ K-ras group was also significantly lower than the control group (P<0.05) but higher than the miR-143 mimic group significantly (P<0.05). The expression levels of K-ras protein in the miR-143 mimic group, the negative control group and the

  20. Identification of genetic elements associated with EPSPS gene amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed populations can have high genetic plasticity and rapid responses to environmental selection pressures. For example, 100-fold amplification of the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene evolved to confer resistance to glyphosate, the world's most important herbicide, in the wee...

  1. Gene amplification confers glyphosate resistance in Amaranthus palmeri

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Todd A.; Zhang, Wenli; Wang, Dafu; Bukun, Bekir; Chisholm, Stephen T.; Shaner, Dale L.; Nissen, Scott J.; Patzoldt, William L.; Tranel, Patrick J.; Culpepper, A. Stanley; Grey, Timothy L.; Webster, Theodore M.; Vencill, William K.; Sammons, R. Douglas; Jiang, Jiming; Preston, Christopher; Leach, Jan E.; Westra, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate became widely used in the United States and other parts of the world after the commercialization of glyphosate-resistant crops. These crops have constitutive overexpression of a glyphosate-insensitive form of the herbicide target site gene, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Increased use of glyphosate over multiple years imposes selective genetic pressure on weed populations. We investigated recently discovered glyphosate-resistant Amaranthus palmeri populations from Georgia, in comparison with normally sensitive populations. EPSPS enzyme activity from resistant and susceptible plants was equally inhibited by glyphosate, which led us to use quantitative PCR to measure relative copy numbers of the EPSPS gene. Genomes of resistant plants contained from 5-fold to more than 160-fold more copies of the EPSPS gene than did genomes of susceptible plants. Quantitative RT-PCR on cDNA revealed that EPSPS expression was positively correlated with genomic EPSPS relative copy number. Immunoblot analyses showed that increased EPSPS protein level also correlated with EPSPS genomic copy number. EPSPS gene amplification was heritable, correlated with resistance in pseudo-F2 populations, and is proposed to be the molecular basis of glyphosate resistance. FISH revealed that EPSPS genes were present on every chromosome and, therefore, gene amplification was likely not caused by unequal chromosome crossing over. This occurrence of gene amplification as an herbicide resistance mechanism in a naturally occurring weed population is particularly significant because it could threaten the sustainable use of glyphosate-resistant crop technology. PMID:20018685

  2. K-Ras gene mutation status as a prognostic and predictive factor in patients with colorectal cancer undergoing irinotecan- or oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Stec, Rafał; Bodnar, Lubomir; Charkiewicz, Radosław; Korniluk, Jan; Rokita, Marta; Smoter, Marta; Ciechowicz, Marzena; Chyczewski, Lech; Nikliński, Jacek; Kozłowski, Wojciech; Szczylik, Cezary

    2012-01-01

    Background: CRC caused more than 600,000 estimated deaths in 2008. Dysregulated signaling through the RAS/RAF/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway due to mutations in K-Ras and B-Raf are common events in CRC. Methods: Incidence of mutations in codons 12 and 13 of K-Ras and exons 11 and 15 of B-Raf were analyzed in amplified PCR products from primary tumors of 273 patients with CRC, and their prognostic and predictive significance was assessed. The prognostic role of clinical and pathological factors was also examined. Results: K-Ras mutations were present in 89 patients (32.6%), of whom 76 (85.4%) had mutations in codon 12 and 10 (11.2%) had mutations in codon 13. B-Raf gene mutations were present in 17 patients (6.9%), of whom 6 (35.3%) had mutations in exon 15. Multivariate analysis revealed a predictive significance for K-Ras mutations with respect to time to progression in patients treated with irinotecan and oxaliplatin as first-line chemotherapy. There was no predictive significance for B-Raf gene mutation status in these patients. The following risk factors were found to affect overall survival (OS) rates: primary tumor location, lymph node involvement grade, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level before treatment, and performance status according to WHO criteria. Conclusions: Based on the results of this study, K-Ras mutation status may be a suitable indicator of patient eligibility and a prognostic indicator for responsiveness to anti-EGFR therapy alone, or in combination with chemotherapy. Also, K-Ras mutation status may predict time to progression in patients treated with irinotecan and oxaliplatin. PMID:22909976

  3. Functional characterization of EMSY gene amplification in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Paul M; Dedes, Konstantin J; Wetterskog, Daniel; Mackay, Alan; Lambros, Maryou B; Mansour, Marthe; Frankum, Jessica; Lord, Christopher J; Natrajan, Rachael; Ashworth, Alan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2011-09-01

    The 11q13-q14 locus is frequently amplified in human cancers, with a complex structure harbouring multiple potential oncogenic drivers. The EMSY gene has been proposed as a driver of the third core of the 11q13-q14 amplicon. This gene encodes a protein reported to be a BRCA2-binding partner, which when over-expressed would lead to impairment of BRCA2 functions and could constitute a mechanism for BRCA2 inactivation in non-hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. We hypothesized that if EMSY amplification abrogates BRCA2 functions, cells harbouring this aberration would be unable to elicit competent homologous recombination DNA repair and, therefore, may have increased sensitivity to genotoxic therapies and potent PARP inhibitors. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization of cell lines from distinct tumour sites, including breast, ovary, pancreas, oesophagus, lung and the oral cavity, led to the identification of 10 cell lines with EMSY amplification and 18 without. EMSY amplification was shown to correlate with EMSY mRNA levels, although not all cell lines harbouring EMSY amplification displayed EMSY mRNA or protein over-expression. RNA interference-mediated silencing of EMSY did not lead to a reduction in cell viability in tumour models harbouring EMSY amplification. Cell lines with and without EMSY amplification displayed a similar ability to elicit RAD51 foci in response to DNA damaging agents, and similar sensitivity to cisplatin and olaparib. Taken together, this suggests that EMSY is unlikely to be a driver of the 11q13-q14 amplicon and does not have a dominant role in modulating the response to agents targeting cells with defective homologous recombination.

  4. Effectiveness of circulating tumor DNA for detection of KRAS gene mutations in colorectal cancer patients: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yi-Xin; Fu, Qiang; Guo, Yan-Yan; Ye, Ming; Zhao, Hui-Xia; Wang, Qi; Peng, Xiu-Mei; Li, Qiu-Wen; Wang, Ru-Liang; Xiao, Wen-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can be identified in the peripheral blood of patients and harbors the genomic alterations found in tumor tissues, which provides a noninvasive approach for detection of gene mutations. We conducted this meta-analysis to investigate whether ctDNA can be used for monitoring KRAS gene mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and Web of Science were searched for the included eligible studies in English, and data were extracted for statistical analysis according to the numbers of true-positive (TP), true-negative (TN), false-positive (FP) and false-negative (FN) cases. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) were calculated, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) was used to evaluate the diagnostic performance. After independent searching and reviewing, 21 studies involving 1,812 cancer patients were analyzed. The overall sensitivity, specificity and DOR were 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] =0.55–0.78), 0.96 (95% CI =0.93–0.98) and 53.95 (95% CI =26.24–110.92), respectively. The AUROC was 0.95 (95% CI =0.92–0.96), which indicated the high diagnostic accuracy of ctDNA. After stratified analysis, we found the higher diagnostic accuracy in subgroup of patients detected in blood sample of plasma. The ctDNA may be an ideal source for detection of KRAS gene mutations in CRC patients with high specificity and diagnostic value. PMID:28243130

  5. Mutational analysis of HRAS and KRAS genes in oral carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Maemoto, Sachiko; Yumoto, Megumi; Ibata, Masato; Torizuka, Sho; Ozawa, Naohumi; Tatsumi, Shunsuke; Hashido, Moeko; Morikawa, Masako; Maeda, Genta; Imai, Kazushi

    2012-07-01

    RAS overexpression and its active mutations are involved in malignant tumorigenesis. However, the mutation rates in oral carcinoma cells differ between populations. In the present study, genomic DNA of oral carcinoma cells (HOC313, TSU, HSC2, HSC3, KOSC2, KOSC3, SCCKN, OSC19, Ca9.22, and Ho1u1 cells) or normal gingival fibroblasts (GF12 cells) derived from a Japanese population were amplified by polymerase chain reaction using primer sets, spanning HRAS and KRAS exons. Nucleotide substitutions were analyzed by single strand conformation polymorphism. In contrast to no substitutions in KRAS, nine different substitutions were detected in HRAS. Of the nine, six substitutions were located at intron 1 (HSC2 and HSC3 cells) or intron 2 (HSC3, SCCKN and Ca9.22 cells), and one each of exon 1 (all cells), exon 2 (HOC313, TSU, HSC2 and HSC3 cells) and the 5' upstream region (all cells). Substitutions at exons 1 and 2 did not affect the amino acid sequence; the exon 1 substitution was positioned at the 5' untranslated region, which may be a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sequence because all the cells were isolated from a Japanese population, and the mutations at exon 2 was a silent mutation. A substitution at the 5' upstream region was an SNP. These data demonstrate that SNPs and point mutations observed in HRAS do not change the amino acid sequence, and suggest that the mutations affecting the amino acid sequence may be a rare event in oral carcinomas of the Japanese population.

  6. Analysis of KRAS and BRAF genes mutation in the central nervous system metastases of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Nicoś, Marcin; Krawczyk, Paweł; Jarosz, Bożena; Sawicki, Marek; Szumiłło, Justyna; Trojanowski, Tomasz; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-05-01

    KRAS mutations are associated with tumor resistance to EGFR TKIs (erlotinib, gefitinib) and to monoclonal antibody against EGFR (cetuximab). Targeted treatment of mutated RAS patients is still considered as a challenge. Inhibitors of c-Met (onartuzumab or tiwantinib) and MEK (selumetinib-a dual inhibitor of MEK1 and MEK2) signaling pathways showed activity in patients with mutations in KRAS that can became an effective approach in carriers of such disorders. BRAF mutation is very rare in patients with NSCLC, and its presence is associated with sensitivity of tumor cells to BRAF inhibitors (vemurafenib, dabrafenib). In the present study, the frequency and type of KRAS and BRAF mutation were assessed in 145 FFPE tissue samples from CNS metastases of NSCLC. In 30 patients, material from the primary tumor was simultaneously available. Real-time PCR technique with allele-specific molecular probe (KRAS/BRAF Mutation Analysis Kit, Entrogen, USA) was used for molecular tests. KRAS mutations were detected in 21.4 % of CNS metastatic lesions and in 23.3 % of corresponding primary tumors. Five mutations were identified both in primary and in metastatic lesions, while one mutation only in primary tumor and one mutation only in the metastatic tumor. Most of mutations were observed in codon 12 of KRAS; however, an individual patient had diagnosed a rare G13D and Q61R substitutions. KRAS mutations were significantly more frequent in adenocarcinoma patients and smokers. Additional analysis indicated one patient with rare coexistence of KRAS and DDR2 mutations. BRAF mutation was not detected in the examined materials. KRAS frequency appears to be similar in primary and CNS.

  7. Genetic disruption of oncogenic Kras sensitizes lung cancer cells to Fas receptor-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mou, Haiwei; Moore, Jill; Malonia, Sunil K; Li, Yingxiang; Ozata, Deniz M; Hough, Soren; Song, Chun-Qing; Smith, Jordan L; Fischer, Andrew; Weng, Zhiping; Green, Michael R; Xue, Wen

    2017-04-04

    Genetic lesions that activate KRAS account for ∼30% of the 1.6 million annual cases of lung cancer. Despite clinical need, KRAS is still undruggable using traditional small-molecule drugs/inhibitors. When oncogenic Kras is suppressed by RNA interference, tumors initially regress but eventually recur and proliferate despite suppression of Kras Here, we show that tumor cells can survive knockout of oncogenic Kras, indicating the existence of Kras-independent survival pathways. Thus, even if clinical KRAS inhibitors were available, resistance would remain an obstacle to treatment. Kras-independent cancer cells exhibit decreased colony formation in vitro but retain the ability to form tumors in mice. Comparing the transcriptomes of oncogenic Kras cells and Kras knockout cells, we identified 603 genes that were specifically up-regulated in Kras knockout cells, including the Fas gene, which encodes a cell surface death receptor involved in physiological regulation of apoptosis. Antibodies recognizing Fas receptor efficiently induced apoptosis of Kras knockout cells but not oncogenic Kras-expressing cells. Increased Fas expression in Kras knockout cells was attributed to decreased association of repressive epigenetic marks at the Fas promoter. Concordant with this observation, treating oncogenic Kras cells with histone deacetylase inhibitor and Fas-activating antibody efficiently induced apoptosis, thus bypassing the need to inhibit Kras. Our results suggest that activation of Fas could be exploited as an Achilles' heel in tumors initiated by oncogenic Kras.

  8. Genotype-driven therapies for non-small cell lung cancer: focus on EGFR, KRAS and ALK gene abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, Elizabeth M; Costa, Daniel B

    2011-05-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) are heterogeneous cancers. In 2004, the identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) somatic mutations provided the first glimpse of a clinically relevant NSCLC oncogene. Approximately 70% of NSCLCs with EGFR mutations (exon 19 deletions or the exon 21 L858R) attain responses to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib, with improved response rate (RR), progression-free survival (PFS) and in some reports overall survival (OS) when compared with EGFR wildtype (WT) cases. Three randomized trials of gefitinib versus chemotherapy (IPASS, WJTOG3405, NEJ002) in stage IV NSCLC have consistently demonstrated better RR and PFS (hazard ratios of 0.48 [IPASS], 0.49 [WJTOG3405] and 0.30 [NEJ002]) for EGFR-mutated NSCLCs treated with gefitinib. Novel irreversible EGFR TKIs (afatinib, XL647, PF00299804) show similar activity in EGFR-mutated patients. A translocation involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene with EML4, identified in 2007, is the most recent oncogene found in NSCLC. Crizotinib (PF02341066), an ALK TKI, has shown impressive activity against ALK translocated NSCLC in an expanded cohort of a phase I trial (NCT00585195). Over 80 patients have been treated and the RR is ∼60% with the 6-month PFS rate exceeding 70%. A registration phase III trial of crizotinib versus second-line chemotherapy (pemetrexed/docetaxel) is underway (PROFILE 1007, NCT00932893). KRAS, EGFR mutations and ALK translocations are mutually exclusive and few EGFR WT NSCLCs respond to EGFR TKIs. The promising results of EGFR and ALK TKIs in molecular subgroups of NSCLCs herald a new age of drug and clinical trial development for patients with NSCLC.

  9. KRAS — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The KRAS gene, a Kirsten ras oncogene homolog from the mammalian ras gene family, encodes a protein that is a member of the small GTPase superfamily. A single amino acid substitution is responsible for an activating mutation. The transforming protein that results is implicated in various malignancies, including lung adenocarcinoma, mucinous adenoma, ductal carcinoma of the pancreas and colorectal carcinoma. Alternative splicing leads to variants encoding two isoforms that differ in the C-terminal region.

  10. Deuterium depleted water effects on survival of lung cancer patients and expression of Kras, Bcl2, and Myc genes in mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Gyöngyi, Zoltán; Budán, Ferenc; Szabó, István; Ember, István; Kiss, István; Krempels, Krisztina; Somlyai, Ildikó; Somlyai, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Although advances in cancer therapies continue to develop, the shortness of the survival of lung cancer patients is still disappointing. Therefore, finding new adjuvant strategies is within the focus of cancer cure. Based on observations that deuterium depletion inhibits the growth of cancer cell lines and suppresses certain proto-oncogenes, we have conducted a clinical study in 129 patients with small cell and nonsmall cell lung cancers who consumed deuterium-depleted drinking water (DDW) as a nontoxic agent in addition to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Median survival time (MST) was 25.9 mo in males and 74.1 mo in female patients; the difference between genders was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Median survival of subjects with brain metastasis was 27.1 mo. Cumulative 5-yr survival probabilities were 19%, 52%, and 33% in males, females, and all patients with brain metastasis, respectively. Gene expression analysis in mouse lung indicated that DDW attenuates 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced expression of Bcl2, Kras, and Myc in females. In conclusion, DDW counteracts the DMBA-induced overexpression of Bcl2, Kras and Myc genes in mouse lung, and it may extend survival of lung cancer patients as a nontoxic anticancer dietary supplement, especially for women with tumors overexpressing cancer-related genes, because MST of DDW-consuming group was 2-4 times longer than it is generally observed in lung cancer patients.

  11. Somatic mutation analysis of KRAS, BRAF, HER2 and PTEN in EGFR mutation-negative non-small cell lung carcinoma: determination of frequency, distribution pattern and identification of novel deletion in HER2 gene from Indian patients.

    PubMed

    Bhaumik, Sangeet; Ahmad, Firoz; Das, Bibhu Ranjan

    2016-10-01

    Somatic mutations of KRAS, BRAF, HER2, PTEN genes are the most important molecular markers after the EGFR gene mutation. The current study evaluated the frequency and distribution pattern of KRAS, BRAF, HER2, PTEN mutation in Indian non-small cell lung carcinoma patients. The frequency of KRAS, BRAF, HER2, PTEN mutations was 6.4 % (14/204), 1.5 % (3/204), 1.5 % (3/204), 0 % (0/204), respectively. KRAS, BRAF, HER2 mutations were more prevalent in males than in females. KRAS and HER2 showed a trend of a higher frequency of mutation in the age group of <60 years, whereas BRAF mutations were more frequent in the age group of ≥60 years. Sequencing analysis of KRAS gene revealed c.34G>T (G12C) (n = 8), c.35G>A (G12D) (n = 3), c.35G>T (G12 V) (n = 1) and c.34G>T (G12C)/c.41T>C (V14A) (n = 2) mutations. Three different BRAF mutations (L584P: n = 1, V600E: n = 1, K601E: n = 1) were detected. Two cases harboured c.2324_2325ins12 (ATACGTGATGGC duplication) in HER2 gene, and one case was positive for NG_007503.2 (NM_001005862.2):c.2218-4del. It is less certain, but still quite possible that this mutation will affect splicing as the deletion of one C actually brings in one additional purine into the region. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates an instance of diverse nature of KRAS, BRAF, HER2 and PTEN gene in Indian patients and confirms that the frequency of these gene mutations varies globally. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Indian study to evaluate KRAS, BRAF, HER2 and PTEN gene mutations.

  12. Targeting Mutant KRAS for Anticancer Therapeutics: A Review of Novel Small Molecule Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanxiang; Kaiser, Christine E.; Frett, Brendan; Li, Hong-yu

    2015-01-01

    The RAS proteins play a role in cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. Aberrant RAS signaling has been found to play a role in 30% of all cancers. KRAS, a key member of the RAS protein family, is an attractive cancer target, as frequent point mutations in the KRAS gene render the protein constitutively active. A number of attempts have been made to target aberrant KRAS signaling by identifying small molecule compounds that (1) are synthetic lethal to mutant KRAS, (2) block KRAS/GEF interactions, (3) inhibit downstream KRAS effectors, or (4) inhibit the post-translational processing of RAS proteins. In addition, inhibition of novel targets outside the main KRAS signaling pathway, specifically the cell cycle related kinase PLK1, has been shown have an effect in cells that harbor mutant KRAS. Herein we review the use of various high-throughput screening assays utilized to identify new small-molecule compounds capable of targeting mutant KRAS-driven cancers. PMID:23566315

  13. Double-hairpin molecular-beacon-based amplification detection for gene diagnosis linked to cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huo; Zhang, Rongbo; Li, Feng; Zhou, Yingying; Peng, Ting; Wang, Xuedong; Shen, Zhifa

    2016-09-01

    A powerful double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB) was developed for cancer-related KRAS gene detection based on the one-to-two stoichiometry. During target DNA detection, DHMB can execute signal transduction even if no any exogenous element is involved. Unlike the conventional molecular beacon based on the one-to-one interaction, one target DNA not only hybridizes with one DHMB and opens its hairpin but also promotes the interaction between two DHMBs, causing the separation of two fluorophores from quenchers. This leads to an enhanced fluorescence signal. As a result, the target KRAS gene is able to be detected within a wide dynamic range from 0.05 to 200 nM with the detection limit of 50 pM, indicating a dramatic improvement compared with traditional molecular beacons. Moreover, the point mutations existing in target DNAs can be easily screened. The potential application for target species in real samples was indicated by the analysis of PCR amplicons of DNAs from the DNA extracted from SW620 cell. Besides becoming a promising candidate probe for molecular biology research and clinical diagnosis of genetic diseases, the DHMB is expected to provide a significant insight into the design of DNA probe-based homogenous sensing systems. Graphical Abstract A powerful double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB) was developed for cancer-related gene KRAS detection based on the one-to-two stoichiometry. Without the help of any exogenous probe, the point mutation is easily screened, and the target DNA can be quantified down to 50 pM, indicating a dramatic improvement compared with traditional molecular beacons.

  14. SPERM RNA AMPLIFICATION FOR GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING BY DNA MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sperm RNA Amplification for Gene Expression Profiling by DNA Microarray Technology
    Hongzu Ren, Kary E. Thompson, Judith E. Schmid and David J. Dix, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triang...

  15. Marked heterogeneity of HER2/NEU gene amplification in endometrial serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Buza, Natalia; Hui, Pei

    2013-12-01

    Significant heterogeneity of HER2 protein expression has been recently observed in HER2 positive endometrial serous carcinomas. Tumor cells with HER2 overexpression and/or gene amplification in a heterogeneous tumor may represent a biologically more aggressive subclone that is clinically relevant to prognosis and potential targeted therapy. To correlate with HER2 protein heterogeneity, we investigated the heterogeneity of HER2/NEU gene amplification in endometrial serous carcinoma. A total of 17 endometrial serous carcinomas with heterogeneous HER2 protein expression were selected for the study, including nine cases with a 3+ and eight cases with a 2+ immunohistochemical score. Initial reflex HER2 FISH was available for seven of the eight 2+ cases, five of which showed HER2/NEU gene amplification. All 17 cases underwent repeat FISH targeting larger tumor tissue areas. Ten cases (72%) displayed striking heterogeneity of HER2/NEU gene copy number in the form of cluster amplification. Diffuse HER2 amplification was observed in four cases, no amplification was seen in three tumors. In cases with cluster amplification, HER2 protein overexpression by immunohistochemistry closely correlated at the cellular level with HER2/NEU gene amplification. In conclusion, the significant percentage of cases with heterogeneous HER2/NEU gene amplification indicates that the existing HER2 testing guidelines designed for breast cancer may not be applicable to endometrial serous carcinoma. Clinical testing on multiple different tumor samples or large tumor tissue sections is recommended for both immunohistochemistry and FISH assessment of HER2 status. Direct comparison with the HER2 immunostaining pattern may be helpful in detecting HER2 amplified areas in a heterogeneous tumor.

  16. How Alterations in the Cdt1 Expression Lead to Gene Amplification in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Charlottesville, VA 22904 kt5m@ri.ncvc.go.jp We examined the effects of Cdt1 for gene amplification by using inducible system . We Obtained and validated...reagents for inducible Cdt1-expression- system . Furthermore, we identified appropriated dose of MTX for testing gene amplification Cdt2 is a key...Doxcycline-inducible Cdt1-expression- system has reported by using Doxcycline (Liontos, Koutsami et al., 2007). We obtained these cell lines and

  17. Oncogene KRAS activates fatty acid synthase, resulting in specific ERK and lipid signatures associated with lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gouw, Arvin M; Eberlin, Livia S; Margulis, Katherine; Sullivan, Delaney K; Toal, Georgia G; Tong, Ling; Zare, Richard N; Felsher, Dean W

    2017-04-11

    KRAS gene mutation causes lung adenocarcinoma. KRAS activation has been associated with altered glucose and glutamine metabolism. Here, we show that KRAS activates lipogenesis, and this activation results in distinct proteomic and lipid signatures. By gene expression analysis, KRAS is shown to be associated with a lipogenesis gene signature and specific induction of fatty acid synthase (FASN). Through desorption electrospray ionization MS imaging (DESI-MSI), specific changes in lipogenesis and specific lipids are identified. By the nanoimmunoassay (NIA), KRAS is found to activate the protein ERK2, whereas ERK1 activation is found in non-KRAS-associated human lung tumors. The inhibition of FASN by cerulenin, a small molecule antibiotic, blocked cellular proliferation of KRAS-associated lung cancer cells. Hence, KRAS is associated with activation of ERK2, induction of FASN, and promotion of lipogenesis. FASN may be a unique target for KRAS-associated lung adenocarcinoma remediation.

  18. A subset of herpes simplex virus replication genes induces DNA amplification within the host cell genome

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, R.; zur Hausen, H. )

    1989-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) induces DNA amplification of target genes within the host cell chromosome. To characterize the HSV genes that mediate the amplification effect, combinations of cloned DNA fragments covering the entire HSV genome were transiently transfected into simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed hamster cells. This led to amplification of the integrated SV40 DNA sequences to a degree comparable to that observed after transfection of intact virion DNA. Transfection of combinations of subclones and of human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter-driven expression constructs for individual open reading frames led to the identification of sic HSV genes which together were necessary and sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification: UL30 (DNA polymerase), UL29 (major DNA-binding protein), UL5, UL8, UL42, and UL52. All of these genes encode proteins necessary for HSV DNA replication. However, an additional gene coding for an HSV origin-binding protein (UL9) was required for origin-dependent HSV DNA replication but was dispensable for SV40 DNA amplification. The results show that a subset of HSV replication genes is sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification. This opens the possibility that HSV expresses functions sufficient for DNA amplification but separate from those responsible for lytic viral growth. HSV infection may thereby induce DNA amplification within the host cell genome without killing the host by lytic viral growth. This may lead to persistence of a cell with a new genetic phenotype, which would have implications for the pathogenicity of the virus in vivo.

  19. Higher metastatic efficiency of KRas G12V than KRas G13D in a colorectal cancer model.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Patricia; Gallardo, Alberto; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Pavón, Miguel Angel; Casanova, Isolda; Trias, Manuel; Mangues, María Antonia; Lopez-Pousa, Antonio; Villaverde, Antonio; Vázquez, Esther; Bardelli, Alberto; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Mangues, Ramón

    2015-02-01

    Although all KRas (protein that in humans is encoded by the KRas gene) point mutants are considered to have a similar prognostic capacity, their transformation and tumorigenic capacities vary widely. We compared the metastatic efficiency of KRas G12V (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog with valine mutation at codon 12) and KRas G13D (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog with aspartic mutation at codon 13) oncogenes in an orthotopic colorectal cancer (CRC) model. Following subcutaneous preconditioning, recombinant clones of the SW48 CRC cell line [Kras wild-type (Kras WT)] expressing the KRas G12V or KRas G13D allele were microinjected in the mouse cecum. The percentage of animals developing lymph node metastasis was higher in KRas G12V than in KRas G13D mice. Microscopic, macroscopic, and visible lymphatic foci were 1.5- to 3.0-fold larger in KRas G12V than in KRas G13D mice (P < 0.05). In the lung, only microfoci were developed in both groups. KRas G12V primary tumors had lower apoptosis (7.0 ± 1.2 vs. 7.4 ± 1.0 per field, P = 0.02), higher tumor budding at the invasion front (1.2 ± 0.2 vs. 0.6 ± 0.1, P = 0.04), and a higher percentage of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)-overexpressing intravasated tumor emboli (49.8 ± 9.4% vs. 12.8 ± 4.4%, P < 0.001) than KRas G13D tumors. KRas G12V primary tumors showed Akt activation, and β5 integrin, vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), and Serpine-1 overexpression, whereas KRas G13D tumors showed integrin β1 and angiopoietin 2 (Angpt2) overexpression. The increased cell survival, invasion, intravasation, and specific molecular regulation observed in KRas G12V tumors is consistent with the higher aggressiveness observed in patients with CRC expressing this oncogene.

  20. Deubiquitinase USP18 Loss Mislocalizes and Destabilizes KRAS in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mustachio, Lisa Maria; Lu, Yun; Tafe, Laura J; Memoli, Vincent; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Mino, Barbara; Villalobos, Pamela Andrea; Wistuba, Ignacio; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Hanash, Samir M; Roszik, Jason; Kawakami, Masanori; Cho, Kwang-Jin; Hancock, John F; Chinyengetere, Fadzai; Hu, Shanhu; Liu, Xi; Freemantle, Sarah J; Dmitrovsky, Ethan

    2017-02-27

    KRAS is frequently mutated in lung cancers and is associated with aggressive biology and chemotherapy resistance. Therefore, innovative approaches are needed to treat these lung cancers. Prior work implicated the interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) deubiquitinase (DUB) USP18 as having anti-neoplastic activity by regulating lung cancer growth and oncoprotein stability. This study demonstrates that USP18 affects the stability of the KRAS oncoprotein. Interestingly, loss of USP18 reduced KRAS expression and engineered gain of USP18 expression increased KRAS protein levels in lung cancer cells. Using the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX), USP18 knockdown significantly reduced the half-life of KRAS, but gain of USP18 expression significantly increased its stability. Intriguingly, loss of USP18 altered KRAS subcellular localization by mislocalizing KRAS from the plasma membrane. To explore the biological consequences, immunohistochemical (IHC) expression profiles of USP18 were compared in lung cancers of KrasLA2/+ versus cyclin E engineered mouse models. USP18 expression was higher in Kras-driven murine lung cancers, indicating a link between KRAS and USP18 expression in vivo. To solidify this association, loss of Usp18 in KrasLA2/+/Usp18-/- mice was found to significantly reduce lung cancers as compared to parental KrasLA2/+ mice. Lastly, translational relevance was confirmed in a human lung cancer panel by showing USP18 IHC expression was significantly higher in KRAS mutant versus wild-type lung adenocarcinomas.

  1. [Principle of LAMP method--a simple and rapid gene amplification method].

    PubMed

    Ushikubo, Hiroshi

    2004-06-01

    So far nucleic acid test (NAT) has been employed in various fields, including infectious disease diagnoses. However, due to its complicated procedures and relatively high cost, it has not been widely utilized in many actual diagnostic applications. We have therefore developed a simple and rapid gene amplification technology, Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) method, which has shown prominent results of surpassing the performance of the conventional gene amplification methods. LAMP method acquires three main features: (1) all reaction can be carried out under isothermal conditions; (2) the amplification efficiency is extremely high and tremendous amount of amplification products can be obtained; and (3) the reaction is highly specific. Furthermore, developed from the standard LAMP method, a rapid LAMP method, by adding in the loop primers, can reduce the amplification time from the previous 1 hour to less than 30 minutes. Enormous amount of white precipitate of magnesium pyrophosphate is produced as a by-product of the amplification, therefore, direct visual detection is possible without using any reaction indicators and detection equipments. We believe LAMP technology, with the integration of these features, can rightly apply to clinical genetic testing, food and environmental analysis, as well as NAT in different fields.

  2. Cortactin gene amplification and expression in breast cancer: a chromogenic in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Dedes, Konstantin J; Lopez-Garcia, Maria-Angeles; Geyer, Felipe C; Lambros, Maryou B K; Savage, Kay; Vatcheva, Radost; Wilkerson, Paul; Wetterskog, Daniel; Lacroix-Triki, Magali; Natrajan, Rachael; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2010-12-01

    Amplification of 11q13 is found in approximately 15% of breast cancers. Cyclin D1 (CCND1) has been reported to be the 'driver' of this amplicon, however, multiple genes map to the smallest region of amplification of 11q13. Out of these genes, cortactin (CTTN) has been shown to be consistently overexpressed at the mRNA level in tumours harbouring 11q13 amplification. The aims of this study are to define whether CTTN is consistently co-amplified with the main core of the 11q13 amplicon, whether it is consistently overexpressed when amplified and to determine correlations between CTTN amplification and overexpression with clinicopathological features of breast cancers and survival of breast cancer patients. CTTN and CCND1 chromogenic in situ hybridisation (CISH) probes and a validated monoclonal antibody against CTTN were applied to a tissue microarray of a cohort of breast cancers from patients treated with anthracycline-based chemotherapy. CTTN and CCND1 amplifications were found in 12.3 and 12.4% of cases, respectively. All cases harbouring CTTN amplification also displayed CCND1 amplification. High expression of CTTN was found in 10.8% of cases and was associated with CTTN amplification, expression of 'basal' markers and topoisomerase IIα. Exploratory subgroup analysis of tumours devoid of 11q13 amplification revealed that high expression of CTTN in the absence of CTTN gene amplification was associated with lymph node negative disease, lack of hormone receptors and FOXA1, expression of 'basal' markers, high Ki-67 indices, p53 nuclear expression, and basal-like and triple negative phenotypes. CTTN expression and CTTN gene amplification were not associated with disease-, metastasis-free and overall survival. In conclusion, CTTN is consistently co-amplified with CCND1 and expressed at higher levels in breast cancers harbouring 11q13 amplification, suggesting that CTTN may also constitute one of the drivers of this amplicon. CTTN expression is not associated with the

  3. Estrogen receptor alpha gene amplification in breast cancer: 25 years of debate.

    PubMed

    Holst, Frederik

    2016-04-10

    Twenty-five years ago, Nembrot and colleagues reported amplification of the estrogen receptor alpha gene (ESR1) in breast cancer, initiating a broad and still ongoing scientific debate on the prevalence and clinical significance of this genetic aberration, which affects one of the most important genes in breast cancer. Since then, a multitude of studies on this topic has been published, covering a wide range of divergent results and arguments. The reported prevalence of this alteration in breast cancer ranges from 0% to 75%, suggesting that ESR1 copy number analysis is hampered by technical and interpreter issues. To date, two major issues related to ESR1 amplification remain to be conclusively addressed: (1) The extent to which abundant amounts of messenger RNA can mimic amplification in standard fluorescence in situ hybridization assays in the analysis of strongly expressed genes like ESR1, and (2) the clinical relevance of ESR1 amplification: Such relevance is strongly disputed, with data showing predictive value for response as well as for resistance of the cancer to anti-estrogen therapies, or for subsequent development of cancers in the case of precursor lesions that display amplification of ESR1. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the various views on ESR1 amplification, and highlights explanations for the contradictions and conflicting data that could inform future ESR1 research.

  4. Trisomy of the Dscr1 gene suppresses early progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia driven by oncogenic Kras

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jang Choon; Shin, Jimin; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •A single extra copy of Dscr1 restrains progression of PanIN-1A to PanIN-1B lesions. •Dscr1 trisomy attenuates calcineurin–NFAT pathway in neoplastic ductal epithelium. •Dscr1 trisomy leads to upregulation of p15{sup INK4b} in neoplastic ductal epithelium. •A single extra copy of Dscr1 reduces epithelial proliferation in early PanIN lesions. •Dscr1 trisomy may protect Down syndrome individuals from pancreatic cancer. -- Abstract: Individuals with Down syndrome exhibit remarkably reduced incidence of most solid tumors including pancreatic cancer. Multiple mechanisms arising from the genetic complexity underlying Down syndrome has been suggested to contribute to such a broad cancer protection. In this study, utilizing a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic cancer, we demonstrate that trisomy of the Down syndrome critical region-1 (Dscr1), an endogenous calcineurin inhibitor localized on chromosome 21, suppresses the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-1A (PanIN-1A) to PanIN-1B lesions without affecting the initiation of PanIN lesions mediated by oncogenic Kras{sup G12D}. In addition, we show that Dscr1 trisomy attenuates nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) accompanied by upregulation of the p15{sup Ink4b} tumor suppressor and reduction of cell proliferation in early PanIN lesions. Our data suggest that attenuation of calcineurin–NFAT signaling in neoplastic pancreatic ductal epithelium by a single extra copy of Dscr1 is sufficient to inhibit the progression of early PanIN lesions driven by oncogenic Kras, and thus may be a potential mechanism underlying reduced incidence of pancreatic cancer in Down syndrome individuals.

  5. Endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-08-15

    K-ras is one of the most frequently mutated genes in virtually all types of human cancers. Using mouse fetal liver erythroid progenitors as a model system, we studied the role of endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation. When oncogenic K-ras is expressed from its endogenous promoter, it hyperactivates cytokine-dependent signaling pathways and results in a partial block in erythroid differentiation. In erythroid progenitors deficient in K-ras, cytokine-dependent Akt activation is greatly reduced, leading to delays in erythroid differentiation. Thus, both loss- and gain-of-Kras functions affect erythroid differentiation through modulation of cytokine signaling. These results support the notion that in human cancer patients oncogenic Ras signaling might be controlled by antagonizing essential cytokines.

  6. Genomic markers of panitumumab resistance including ERBB2/ HER2 in a phase II study of KRAS wild-type (wt) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).

    PubMed

    Barry, Garrett S; Cheang, Maggie C; Chang, Hector Li; Kennecke, Hagen F

    2016-04-05

    A prospective study was conducted to identify biomarkers associated with resistance to panitumumab monotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients with previously treated, codon 12/13 KRAS wt, mCRC were prospectively administered panitumumab 6 mg/kg IV q2weeks. Of 34 panitumumab-treated patients, 11 (32%) had progressive disease at 8 weeks and were classified as non-responders. A Nanostring nCounter-based assay identified a 5-gene expression signature (ERBB2, MLPH, IRX3, MYRF, and KLK6) associated with panitumumab resistance (P = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization determined that the HER2 (ERBB2) protein was overexpressed in 4/11 non-responding and 0/21 responding cases (P = 0.035). Two non-responding tumors had ERBB2 gene amplification only, and one demonstrated both ERBB2 amplification and mutation. A non-codon 12/13 KRAS mutation occurred in one panitumumab-resistant patient and was mutually exclusive with ERBB2/HER2 abnormalities. This study identifies a 5-gene signature associated with non-response to single agent panitumumab, including a subgroup of non-responders with evidence of aberrant ERBB2/HER2 signaling. KRAS wt tumors resistant to EGFRi may be identified by gene signature analysis, and the HER2 pathway plays an important role in resistance to therapy.

  7. Inducible Amplification of Gene Copy Number and Heterologous Protein Production in the Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Morlino, Giovanni B.; Tizzani, Lorenza; Fleer, Reinhard; Frontali, Laura; Bianchi, Michele M.

    1999-01-01

    Heterologous protein production can be doubled by increasing the copy number of the corresponding heterologous gene. We constructed a host-vector system in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that was able to induce copy number amplification of pKD1 plasmid-based vectors upon expression of an integrated copy of the plasmid recombinase gene. We increased the production and secretion of two heterologous proteins, glucoamylase from the yeast Arxula adeninivorans and mammalian interleukin-1β, following gene dosage amplification when the heterologous genes were carried by pKD1-based vectors. The choice of the promoters for expression of the integrated recombinase gene and of the episomal heterologous genes are critical for the mitotic stability of the host-vector system. PMID:10543790

  8. Inducible amplification of gene copy number and heterologous protein production in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Morlino, G B; Tizzani, L; Fleer, R; Frontali, L; Bianchi, M M

    1999-11-01

    Heterologous protein production can be doubled by increasing the copy number of the corresponding heterologous gene. We constructed a host-vector system in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that was able to induce copy number amplification of pKD1 plasmid-based vectors upon expression of an integrated copy of the plasmid recombinase gene. We increased the production and secretion of two heterologous proteins, glucoamylase from the yeast Arxula adeninivorans and mammalian interleukin-1beta, following gene dosage amplification when the heterologous genes were carried by pKD1-based vectors. The choice of the promoters for expression of the integrated recombinase gene and of the episomal heterologous genes are critical for the mitotic stability of the host-vector system.

  9. Amplification of prolamin storage protein genes in different subfamilies of the Poaceae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian-Hong; Messing, Joachim

    2009-11-01

    Prolamins are seed storage proteins in cereals and represent an important source of essential amino acids for feed and food. Genes encoding these proteins resulted from dispersed and tandem amplification. While previous studies have concentrated on protein sequences from different grass species, we now can add a new perspective to their relationships by asking how their genes are shared by ancestry and copied in different lineages of the same family of species. These differences are derived from alignment of chromosomal regions, where collinearity is used to identify prolamin genes in syntenic positions, also called orthologous gene copies. New or paralogous gene copies are inserted in tandem or new locations of the same genome. More importantly, one can detect the loss of older genes. We analyzed chromosomal intervals containing prolamin genes from rice, sorghum, wheat, barley, and Brachypodium, representing different subfamilies of the Poaceae. The Poaceae commonly known as the grasses includes three major subfamilies, the Ehrhartoideae (rice), Pooideae (wheat, barley, and Brachypodium), and Panicoideae (millets, maize, sorghum, and switchgrass). Based on chromosomal position and sequence divergence, it becomes possible to infer the order of gene amplification events. Furthermore, the loss of older genes in different subfamilies seems to permit a faster pace of divergence of paralogous genes. Change in protein structure affects their physical properties, subcellular location, and amino acid composition. On the other hand, regulatory sequence elements and corresponding transcriptional activators of new gene copies are more conserved than coding sequences, consistent with the tissue-specific expression of these genes.

  10. Gene amplification of the transcription factor DP1 and CTNND1 in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Sandra D; Angulo, Barbara; Suarez-Gauthier, Ana; Melchor, Lorenzo; Medina, Pedro P; Sanchez-Verde, Lydia; Torres-Lanzas, Juan; Pita, Guillermo; Benitez, Javier; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse

    2010-09-01

    The search for novel oncogenes is important because they could be the target of future specific anticancer therapies. In the present paper we report the identification of novel amplified genes in lung cancer by means of global gene expression analysis. To screen for amplicons, we aligned the gene expression data according to the position of transcripts in the human genome and searched for clusters of over-expressed genes. We found several clusters with gene over-expression, suggesting an underlying genomic amplification. FISH and microarray analysis for DNA copy number in two clusters, at chromosomes 11q12 and 13q34, confirmed the presence of amplifications spanning about 0.4 and 1 Mb for 11q12 and 13q34, respectively. Amplification at these regions each occurred at a frequency of 3%. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR of each individual transcript within the amplicons allowed us to verify the increased in gene expression of several genes. The p120ctn and DP1 proteins, encoded by two candidate oncogenes, CTNND1 and TFDP1, at 11q12 and 13q amplicons, respectively, showed very strong immunostaining in lung tumours with gene amplification. We then focused on the 13q34 amplicon and in the TFDP1 candidate oncogene. To further determine the oncogenic properties of DP1, we searched for lung cancer cell lines carrying TFDP1 amplification. Depletion of TFDP1 expression by small interference RNA in a lung cancer cell line (HCC33) with TFDP1 amplification and protein over-expression reduced cell viability by 50%. In conclusion, we report the identification of two novel amplicons, at 13q34 and 11q12, each occurring at a frequency of 3% of non-small cell lung cancers. TFDP1, which encodes the E2F-associated transcription factor DP1 is a candidate oncogene at 13q34. The data discussed in this publication have been deposited in NCBIs Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) and are accessible through GEO Series Accession No. GSE21168.

  11. Super resolution imaging of HER2 gene amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Masaya; Kubo, Takuya; Masumoto, Kanako; Iwanaga, Shigeki

    2016-02-01

    HER2 positive breast cancer is currently examined by counting HER2 genes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-stained breast carcinoma samples. In this research, two-dimensional super resolution fluorescence microscopy based on stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), with a spatial resolution of approximately 20 nm in the lateral direction, was used to more precisely distinguish and count HER2 genes in a FISH-stained tissue section. Furthermore, by introducing double-helix point spread function (DH-PSF), an optical phase modulation technique, to super resolution microscopy, three-dimensional images were obtained of HER2 in a breast carcinoma sample approximately 4 μm thick.

  12. Clinical Implications of FADD Gene Amplification and Protein Overexpression in Taiwanese Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Huei-Tzu; Cheng, Sou-De; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Liao, Chun-Ta; Wang, Hung-Ming; Huang, Shiang-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Amplification of 11q13.3 is a frequent event in human cancers, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. This chromosome region contains several genes that are potentially cancer drivers, including FADD (Fas associated via death domain), an apoptotic effector that was previously identified as a novel oncogene in laryngeal/pharyngeal cancer. This study was designed to explore the role of FADD in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) samples from Taiwanese patients, by assessing copy number variations (CNVs) and protein expression and the clinical implications of these factors in 339 male OSCCs. The intensity of FADD protein expression, as determined by immunohistochemistry, was strongly correlated with gene copy number amplification, as analyzed using a TaqMan CNV assay. Both FADD gene copy number amplification and high protein expression were significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001). Patients with both FADD copy number amplification and high protein expression had the shortest disease-free survival (DFS; P = 0.074 and P = 0.002) and overall survival (OS; P = 0.011 and P = 0.027). After adjusting for primary tumor status, tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis and age at diagnosis, DFS was still significantly lower in patients with either copy number amplification or high protein expression (hazard ratio [H.R.] = 1.483; 95% confidence interval [C.I.], 1.044–2.106). In conclusion, our data reveal that FADD gene copy number and protein expression can be considered potential prognostic markers and are closely associated with lymph node metastasis in patients with OSCC in Taiwan. PMID:27764170

  13. Single Synonymous Mutations in KRAS Cause Transformed Phenotypes in NIH3T3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Andrew M.; Bagni, Rachel; Portugal, Franklin; Hartley, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Synonymous mutations in the KRAS gene are clustered at G12, G13, and G60 in human cancers. We constructed 9 stable NIH3T3 cell lines expressing KRAS, each with one of these synonymous mutations. Compared to the negative control cell line expressing the wild type human KRAS gene, all the synonymous mutant lines expressed more KRAS protein, grew more rapidly and to higher densities, and were more invasive in multiple assays. Three of the cell lines showed dramatic loss of contact inhibition, were more refractile under phase contrast, and their refractility was greatly reduced by treatment with trametinib. Codon usage at these glycines is highly conserved in KRAS compared to HRAS, indicating selective pressure. These transformed phenotypes suggest that synonymous mutations found in driver genes such as KRAS may play a role in human cancers. PMID:27684555

  14. K-ras cancer gene mutations in lung tumors from female Swiss (CD-1) mice exposed transplacentally to 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine.

    PubMed

    Koujitani, Takatoshi; Ton, Tai-Vu T; Lahousse, Stephanie A; Hong, Hue-Hua L; Wakamatsu, Nobuko; Sills, Robert C

    2008-12-01

    A transplacental carcinogenicity study was conducted by exposing pregnant Swiss (CD-1) mice to 0, 50, 100, 200, or 300 mg 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT)/kg body weight (BW) daily for the duration of gestation (18-19 days) [National Toxicology Program,2006]. The incidence of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas and carcinomas in the 200 and 300 mg/kg groups was significantly higher (P = 0.027 and 0.007, respectively) in male offspring, but not in females (P = 0.338 and 0.315, respectively). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate K-ras mutation status in lung tumors from the female offspring in AZT exposed groups and to determine whether at the molecular level there were signature K-ras mutations in lung tumors that were different from spontaneous tumors. K-ras mutation was detected by cycle sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified DNA, isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung tumors. K-ras mutations were detected in 17 of 28 (61%) lung tumors from the female offspring in AZT exposed groups. No K-ras mutations were detected in the 8 tumors examined from the female control group. The predominant mutations were Codon 12 G-->T transversions in the 50, 100, and 300 mg/kg groups, and Codon 12 G-->C transversions in the 200 and 300 mg/kg groups. K-ras Codon 12 G-->T transversions (TGT mutations) may be induced by oxidative DNA damage and 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), while K-ras Codon 12 G-->C transversions (CGT mutations) may be due to further oxidative lesions of guanine and 8-oxoG.

  15. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A; Mann, Allison E; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T; Brandt, Bernd W; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A; MacDonald, Sandy J; Thomas, Gavin H; Collins, Matthew J; Lewis, Cecil M; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-11-13

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341-534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions.

  16. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A.; Mann, Allison E.; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T.; Brandt, Bernd W.; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A.; MacDonald, Sandy J.; Thomas, Gavin H.; Collins, Matthew J.; Lewis, Cecil M.; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-01-01

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341–534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions. PMID:26563586

  17. In vitro gene amplification for prenatal diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Rumsby, G; Honour, J W

    1990-01-01

    A simple, rapid, non-radioactive method for detecting homozygous deletions/conversions of the steroid 21-hydroxylase gene is described. In our experience this method will be useful for first trimester prenatal diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia in 17% of families of a child with the salt losing form. This test includes an internal control to monitor the success of amplification. Images PMID:2277381

  18. Gene amplification-associated overexpression of the RNA editing enzyme ADAR1 enhances human lung tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Anadón, C; Guil, S; Simó-Riudalbas, L; Moutinho, C; Setien, F; Martínez-Cardús, A; Moran, S; Villanueva, A; Calaf, M; Vidal, A; Lazo, P A; Zondervan, I; Savola, S; Kohno, T; Yokota, J; de Pouplana, L R; Esteller, M

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of new therapies against particular genetic mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer is a promising avenue for improving patient survival, but the target population is small. There is a need to discover new potential actionable genetic lesions, to which end, non-conventional cancer pathways, such as RNA editing, are worth exploring. Herein we show that the adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme ADAR1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small cancer cell lines and primary tumors in association with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a growth and invasion standpoint, the depletion of ADAR1 expression in amplified cells reduces their tumorigenic potential in cell culture and mouse models, whereas its overexpression has the opposite effects. From a functional perspective, ADAR1 overexpression enhances the editing frequencies of target transcripts such as NEIL1 and miR-381. In the clinical setting, patients with early-stage lung cancer, but harboring ADAR1 gene amplification, have poor outcomes. Overall, our results indicate a role for ADAR1 as a lung cancer oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation that affects downstream RNA editing patterns and patient prognosis. PMID:26640150

  19. Gene amplification-associated overexpression of the RNA editing enzyme ADAR1 enhances human lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Anadón, C; Guil, S; Simó-Riudalbas, L; Moutinho, C; Setien, F; Martínez-Cardús, A; Moran, S; Villanueva, A; Calaf, M; Vidal, A; Lazo, P A; Zondervan, I; Savola, S; Kohno, T; Yokota, J; de Pouplana, L R; Esteller, M

    2016-08-18

    The introduction of new therapies against particular genetic mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer is a promising avenue for improving patient survival, but the target population is small. There is a need to discover new potential actionable genetic lesions, to which end, non-conventional cancer pathways, such as RNA editing, are worth exploring. Herein we show that the adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme ADAR1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small cancer cell lines and primary tumors in association with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a growth and invasion standpoint, the depletion of ADAR1 expression in amplified cells reduces their tumorigenic potential in cell culture and mouse models, whereas its overexpression has the opposite effects. From a functional perspective, ADAR1 overexpression enhances the editing frequencies of target transcripts such as NEIL1 and miR-381. In the clinical setting, patients with early-stage lung cancer, but harboring ADAR1 gene amplification, have poor outcomes. Overall, our results indicate a role for ADAR1 as a lung cancer oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation that affects downstream RNA editing patterns and patient prognosis.

  20. Epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification and protein expression in glioblastoma multiforme: prognostic significance and relationship to other prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Layfield, Lester J; Willmore, Carlynn; Tripp, Sheryl; Jones, Claudia; Jensen, Randy L

    2006-03-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression occurs in a significant percentage of cases of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and amplification has been found in approximately 40% of these neoplasms. Controversy exists as to the prognostic significance of EGFR gene amplification: some reports have indicated that amplification is associated with a poor prognosis, while other authors have reported no relationship between gene amplification and prognosis. Some reports have found a poor prognosis to be associated with amplification of the EGFR gene in patients of all ages with GBM, while other authors have found EGFR amplification to be an independent predictor of prolonged survival in patients with GBM who are older than 60 years of age. The authors studied a series of 34 specimens (32 patients) with histologically proven GBM by immunohistochemistry for the presence of EGFR overexpression and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for gene amplification of the EGFR gene. Results of these studies and data on patient age, sex, functional status, therapy, and survival were correlated to determine which variables were predictive of survival. p53 expression was also determined by immunohistochemistry and correlated with the other variables and survival.

  1. CXCR2 signaling regulates KRAS(G12D)-induced autocrine growth of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Abhilasha; Varney, Michelle; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Ouellette, Michel M.; Batra, Surinder K.; Singh, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of RAS, the master regulator of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), continues to be a challenge. Mutations in various isoforms of RAS gene, including KRAS are known to upregulate CXC chemokines; however, their precise role in KRAS-driven pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this report, we reveal a previously unidentified tumor cell-autonomous role of KRAS(G12D)-induced CXCR2 signaling in mediating growth of neoplastic PDAC cells. Progressively increasing expression of mCXCR2 and its ligands was detected in the malignant ductal cells of Pdx1-cre;LSL-Kras(G12D) mice. Knocking-down CXCR2 in KRAS(G12D)-bearing human pancreatic duct-derived cells demonstrated a significant decrease in the in vitro and in vivo tumor cell proliferation. Furthermore, CXCR2 antagonists showed selective growth inhibition of KRAS(G12D)-bearing cells in vitro. Intriguingly, both genetic and pharmacological inhibition of CXCR2 signaling in KRAS(G12D)-bearing pancreatic ductal cells reduced the levels of KRAS protein, strongly implying the presence of a KRAS-CXCR2 feed-forward loop. Together, these data demonstrate the role of CXCR2 signaling in KRAS(G12D)-induced growth transformation and progression in PDAC. PMID:26771140

  2. mTORC1 upregulation via ERK-dependent gene expression change confers intrinsic resistance to MEK inhibitors in oncogenic KRas-mutant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, N; Fujita, Y; Matsuda, M; Aoki, K

    2015-11-05

    Cancer cells harboring oncogenic BRaf mutants, but not oncogenic KRas mutants, are sensitive to MEK inhibitors (MEKi). The mechanism underlying the intrinsic resistance to MEKi in KRas-mutant cells is under intensive investigation. Here, we pursued this mechanism by live imaging of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activities in oncogenic KRas or BRaf-mutant cancer cells. We established eight cancer cell lines expressing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensors for ERK activity and S6K activity, which was used as a surrogate marker for mTORC1 activity. Under increasing concentrations of MEKi, ERK activity correlated linearly with the cell growth rate in BRaf-mutant cancer cells, but not KRas-mutant cancer cells. The administration of PI3K inhibitors resulted in a linear correlation between ERK activity and cell growth rate in KRas-mutant cancer cells. Intriguingly, mTORC1 activity was correlated linearly with the cell growth rate in both BRaf-mutant cancer cells and KRas-mutant cancer cells. These observations suggested that mTORC1 activity had a pivotal role in cell growth and that the mTORC1 activity was maintained primarily by the ERK pathway in BRaf-mutant cancer cells and by both the ERK and PI3K pathways in KRas-mutant cancer cells. FRET imaging revealed that MEKi inhibited mTORC1 activity with slow kinetics, implying transcriptional control of mTORC1 activity by ERK. In agreement with this observation, MEKi induced the expression of negative regulators of mTORC1, including TSC1, TSC2 and Deptor, which occurred more significantly in BRaf-mutant cells than in KRas-mutant cells. These findings suggested that the suppression of mTORC1 activity and induction of negative regulators of mTORC1 in cancer cells treated for at least 1 day could be used as surrogate markers for the MEKi sensitivity of cancer cells.

  3. Maize R2R3 Myb genes: Sequence analysis reveals amplification in the higher plants.

    PubMed

    Rabinowicz, P D; Braun, E L; Wolfe, A D; Bowen, B; Grotewold, E

    1999-09-01

    Transcription factors containing the Myb-homologous DNA-binding domain are widely found in eukaryotes. In plants, R2R3 Myb-domain proteins are involved in the control of form and metabolism. The Arabidopsis genome harbors >100 R2R3 Myb genes, but few have been found in monocots, animals, and fungi. Using RT-PCR from different maize organs, we cloned 480 fragments corresponding to a 42-44 residue-long sequence spanning the region between the conserved DNA-recognition helices (Myb(BRH)) of R2R3 Myb domains. We determined that maize expresses >80 different R2R3 Myb genes, and evolutionary distances among maize Myb(BRH) sequences indicate that most of the amplification of the R2R3 Myb gene family occurred after the origin of land plants but prior to the separation of monocots and dicots. In addition, evidence is provided for the very recent duplication of particular classes of R2R3 Myb genes in the grasses. Together, these findings render a novel line of evidence for the amplification of the R2R3 Myb gene family in the early history of land plants and suggest that maize provides a possible model system to examine the hypothesis that the expansion of Myb genes is associated with the regulation of novel plant cellular functions.

  4. Detection of Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin gene in lambs by loop mediated isothermal amplification

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, B.; Kumar, N. Vinod; Sreenivasulu, D.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was standardized for rapid detection of Clostridium perfringens. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 fecal samples were collected from enterotoxemia suspected lambs were used for screening of C. perfringens cpa gene by LAMP. The specificity of the LAMP amplified products was tested by digesting with restriction enzyme XmnI for alpha toxin gene. Results: Out of 120 samples screened 112 (93.3%) samples were positive by both LAMP and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of cpa gene which indicated the equal sensitivity of both the tests. The enzyme produced single cut in 162 base pair amplified product of alpha toxin gene at 81 base pair resulting in a single band in gel electrophoresis. Conclusion: Both LAMP and PCR for detection of cpa gene indicated the equal sensitivity of both the tests. Standardization of LAMP reaction for amplification of epsilon and beta toxin genes will help to identify the C. perfringens toxin types from the clinical samples. The test could be a suitable alternative to the PCR in detection of toxin types without the help of sophisticated machinery like thermal cycler. Considering its simplicity in operation and high sensitivity, there is the potential use of this technique in clinical diagnosis and surveillance of infectious diseases. PMID:27051186

  5. Amplification of thermostable lipase genes fragment from thermogenic phase of domestic waste composting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhasanah, Nurbaiti, Santi; Madayanti, Fida; Akhmaloka

    2015-09-01

    Lipases are lipolytic enzymes, catalyze the hydrolysis of fatty acid ester bonds of triglycerides to produce free fatty acids and glycerol. The enzyme is widely used in various fields of biotechnological industry. Hence, lipases with unique properties (e.g.thermostable lipase) are still being explored by variation methods. One of the strategy is by using metagenomic approach to amplify the gene directly from environmental sample. This research was focused on amplification of lipase gene fragment directly from the thermogenic phase of domestic waste composting in aerated trenches. We used domestic waste compost from waste treatment at SABUGA, ITB for the sample. Total chromosomal DNA were directly extracted from several stages at thermogenic phase of compost. The DNA was then directly used as a template for amplification of thermostable lipase gene fragments using a set of internal primers namely Flip-1a and Rlip-1a that has been affixed with a GC clamp in reverse primer. The results showed that the primers amplified the gene from four stages of thermogenic phase with the size of lipase gene fragment of approximately 570 base pairs (bp). These results were further used for Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis to determine diversity of thermostable lipase gene fragments.

  6. A label-free colorimetric isothermal cascade amplification for the detection of disease-related nucleic acids based on double-hairpin molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dong; Xu, Huo; Shi, Haimei; Li, Weihong; Sun, Mengze; Wu, Zai-Sheng

    2017-03-08

    K-Ras mutations at codon 12 play an important role in an early step of carcinogenesis. Here, a label-free colorimetric isothermal cascade amplification for ultrasensitive and specific detection of K-Ras point mutation is developed based on a double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB). The biosensor consists of DHMB probe and a primer-incorporated polymerization template (PPT) designed partly complementary to DHMB. In the presence of polymerase, target DNA is designed to trigger strand displacement amplification (SDA) via promote the hybridization of PPT with DHMB and subsequently initiates cascade amplification process with the help of the nicking endonuclease. During the hybridization and enzymatic reaction, G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzymes are generated, catalyzing the oxidation of ABTS(2-) by H2O2 in the presence of hemin. Utilizing the proposed facile colorimetric scheme, the target DNA can be quantified down to 4 pM with the dynamic response range of 5 orders of magnitude, indicating the substantially improved detection capability. Even more strikingly, point mutation in K-ras gene can be readily observed by the naked eye without the need for the labeling or expensive equipment. Given the high-performance for K-Ras analysis, the enhanced signal transduction capability associated with double-hairpin structure of DHMB provides a novel rout to screen biomarkers, and the descripted colorimetric biosensor seems to hold great promise for diagnostic applications of genetic diseases.

  7. Scalable gene synthesis by selective amplification of DNA pools from high-fidelity microchips.

    PubMed

    Kosuri, Sriram; Eroshenko, Nikolai; Leproust, Emily M; Super, Michael; Way, Jeffrey; Li, Jin Billy; Church, George M

    2010-12-01

    Development of cheap, high-throughput and reliable gene synthesis methods will broadly stimulate progress in biology and biotechnology. Currently, the reliance on column-synthesized oligonucleotides as a source of DNA limits further cost reductions in gene synthesis. Oligonucleotides from DNA microchips can reduce costs by at least an order of magnitude, yet efforts to scale their use have been largely unsuccessful owing to the high error rates and complexity of the oligonucleotide mixtures. Here we use high-fidelity DNA microchips, selective oligonucleotide pool amplification, optimized gene assembly protocols and enzymatic error correction to develop a method for highly parallel gene synthesis. We tested our approach by assembling 47 genes, including 42 challenging therapeutic antibody sequences, encoding a total of ∼35 kilobase pairs of DNA. These assemblies were performed from a complex background containing 13,000 oligonucleotides encoding ∼2.5 megabases of DNA, which is at least 50 times larger than in previously published attempts.

  8. Gene amplification in thyroid cancer: A new mechanism defined by comparative genomic hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.N.; Lai, E.; Fagin, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    More than 12,000 new cases of thyroid cancer develop each year in the USA for which scant information is available on cytogenetic abnormalities. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) now permits the detection and mapping of amplified regions in DNAs without the need for metaphase tumor preparations. Using CGH, we have analyzed the DNA copy number changes in 10 human thyroid tumors. Further, the procedure of CGH was modified by using a chromomycin and sitamycin reverse-banding technique to provide a high resolution assignment of amplified regions. The results revealed a series of copy number changes including amplifications of chromosome bands 1p36, 1q42, 2p13, 2p21, 19q13.1 and losses of chromosome bands 16q12-13 and 16q22-23. The most striking regions of amplifications, band 2p21 and 2p13 were further analyzed by constructing a 90-member chromosome 2 BAC map and using 9 members of this to analyze WRO, a thyroid follicular carcinoma cell line containing double minutes (dm). Eight BACs revealed three copies of chromosome 2; one BAC mapping at the 2p21-22 border revealed significant and variable amplification in all of the metaphase dm`s suggesting a local amplification. Interphase analyses revealed about 40-70 signals per nucleus. The variable signals seen in the WRO cell population suggest the existence of a minor population with higher copy number and smaller amplicon size. In summary, high resolution CGH has been combined with BAC contig construction for the analysis of thyroid tumor to reveal a very specific region amplification on chromosome 2p21 likely to contain a new gene involved in thyroid cancer tumorigenesis.

  9. Gene amplification of the histone methyltransferase SETDB1 contributes to human lung tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Paredes, M; Martinez de Paz, A; Simó-Riudalbas, L; Sayols, S; Moutinho, C; Moran, S; Villanueva, A; Vázquez-Cedeira, M; Lazo, P A; Carneiro, F; Moura, C S; Vieira, J; Teixeira, M R; Esteller, M

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of the histone modification patterns is one of the most common features of human tumors. However, few genetic alterations in the histone modifier genes have been described in tumorigenesis. Herein we show that the histone methyltransferase SETDB1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small and small lung cancer cell lines and primary tumors. The existence of additional copies of the SETDB1 gene in these transformed cells is associated with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a functional standpoint, the depletion of SETDB1 expression in amplified cells reduces cancer growth in cell culture and nude mice models, whereas its overexpression increases the tumor invasiveness. The increased gene dosage of SETDB1 is also associated with enhanced sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effect mediated by the SETDB1-interfering drug mithramycin. Overall, the findings identify SETDB1 as a bona fide oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation in lung cancer and suggest its potential for new therapeutic strategies. PMID:23770855

  10. [Establishment of loop-mediated isothermal amplification technique for rapid detection of NDM-1 gene].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyi; Wu, Na; Zhu, Baoli; Chen, Lei; Zhu, Yuzhuo

    2011-08-01

    We established a rapid detection method of New Delhi Metallo-beta-Lactamase Gene (NDM-1) based on Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP). With the application of LAMP, we designed four sets of LAMP premiers, using NDM-1 gene as the target sequence, and selected the set of optimal primers. Meanwhile, we established optimal reaction systems and conditions to carry out the sensitivity and specificity experiments. The experiment results showed that the whole detection process took only one hour and could be observed visually. In the experiment of sensitivity, NDM-1 gene had a detection limit of 6 copies in each reaction. In the experiment of specificity, we detected NDM-1 gene in 4 pathogen strains (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae), and the total DNA from intestinal microbes and the total DNA from soil microbes. We had not detected the amplification reactions. The detection method established could rapidly detect NDM-1 gene and visualize the experiment result. The method is easy to operate and has high sensitivity and specificity and thus has great application value in basic research laboratories, emergent detection and spot detection.

  11. Gene amplification as a cause of inherited thyroxine-binding globulin excess in two Japanese families

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yuichi; Miura, Yoshitaka; Saito, Hidehiko

    1995-12-01

    T{sub 4}-binding globulin (TBG) is the major thyroid hormone transport protein in man. Inherited abnormalities in the level of serum TBG have been classified as partial deficiency, complete deficiency, and excess. Sequencing analysis of the TBG gene, located on Xq21-22, has uncovered the molecular defects causing partial and complete deficiency. However, the mechanism leading to inherited TBG excess remains unknown. In this study, two Japanese families, F-A and F-T, with inherited TBG excess were analyzed. Serum TBG levels in hemizygous males were 58 and 44 {mu}g/mL, 3- and 2-fold the normal value, respectively. The molecule had normal properties in terms of heat stability and isoelectric focussing pattern. The sequence of the coding region and the promoter activity of the TBG gene were also indistinguishable between hemizygotes and normal subjects. The gene dosage of TBG relative to that of {beta}-globin, which is located on chromosome 11, and Duchenne muscular dystropy, which is located on Xp, was evaluated by coamplification of these target genes using polymerase chain reaction and subsequent quantitation by HPLC. The TBG/{beta}-globin ratios of the affected male and female of F-A were 3.13 and 4.13 times, respectively, that in the normal males. The TBG/Duchenne muscular dystrophy ratios were 2.92 and 2.09 times the normal value, respectively. These results are compatible with three copies of TBG gene on the affected X-chromosome. Similarly, a 2-fold increase in gene dosage was demonstrated in the affected hemizygote of F-T. A 3-fold tandem amplification of the TBG gene was shown by in situ hybridization of prometaphase and interphase chromosomes from the affected male with a biotinylated genomic TBG probe, confirming the gene dosage results. Gene amplification of TBG is the cause of inherited TBG excess in these two families. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Relief of amplification inhibition in PCR with bovine serum albumin or T4 gene 32 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kreader, C.A.

    1996-03-01

    The benefits of adding bovine serum albumin (BSA) or T4 gene 32 proteins (gp32) to PCR were evaluated with reaction mixtures containing substances that inhibit amplification. Whereas 10- to 1,000-fold more FeCl{sub 3}, hemin, fulvic acids, humic acids, tannic acids, or extracts from feces, freshwater, or marine water were accommodated in PCR when either 400 ng of BSA per {mu}l was included in the reactions, neither BSA nor gp32 relieved interference significantly when minimum inhibitory levels of bile salts, bilirubin, EDTA, NaCl, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or Triton X-100 were present. Use of BSA and gp32 together offered no more relief of inhibition than either alone at its optimal level, and neither protein had any noticeable effect on amplification in the absence of inhibitors. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Duplication and amplification of antibiotic resistance genes enable increased resistance in isolates of multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During normal bacterial DNA replication, gene duplication and amplification (GDA) events occur randomly at a low frequency in the genome throughout a population. In the absence of selection, GDA events that increase the number of copies of a bacterial gene (or a set of genes) are lost. Antibiotic ...

  14. Oncogenic Kras is required for both the initiation and maintenance of pancreatic cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Meredith A.; Bednar, Filip; Zhang, Yaqing; Brisset, Jean-Christophe; Galbán, Stefanie; Galbán, Craig J.; Rakshit, Sabita; Flannagan, Karen S.; Adsay, N. Volkan; Pasca di Magliano, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is almost invariably associated with mutations in the KRAS gene, most commonly KRASG12D, that result in a dominant-active form of the KRAS GTPase. However, how KRAS mutations promote pancreatic carcinogenesis is not fully understood, and whether oncogenic KRAS is required for the maintenance of pancreatic cancer has not been established. To address these questions, we generated two mouse models of pancreatic tumorigenesis: mice transgenic for inducible KrasG12D, which allows for inducible, pancreas-specific, and reversible expression of the oncogenic KrasG12D, with or without inactivation of one allele of the tumor suppressor gene p53. Here, we report that, early in tumorigenesis, induction of oncogenic KrasG12D reversibly altered normal epithelial differentiation following tissue damage, leading to precancerous lesions. Inactivation of KrasG12D in established precursor lesions and during progression to cancer led to regression of the lesions, indicating that KrasG12D was required for tumor cell survival. Strikingly, during all stages of carcinogenesis, KrasG12D upregulated Hedgehog signaling, inflammatory pathways, and several pathways known to mediate paracrine interactions between epithelial cells and their surrounding microenvironment, thus promoting formation and maintenance of the fibroinflammatory stroma that plays a pivotal role in pancreatic cancer. Our data establish that epithelial KrasG12D influences multiple cell types to drive pancreatic tumorigenesis and is essential for tumor maintenance. They also strongly support the notion that inhibiting KrasG12D, or its downstream effectors, could provide a new approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22232209

  15. DNMT3B gene amplification predicts resistance to DNA demethylating drugs.

    PubMed

    Simó-Riudalbas, Laia; Melo, Sónia A; Esteller, Manel

    2011-07-01

    Disruption of the DNA methylation landscape is one of the most common features of human tumors. However, genetic alterations of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) have not been described in carcinogenesis. Herein, we show that pancreatic and breast cancer cells undergo gene amplification of the DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B). The presence of extra copies of the DNMT3B gene is linked to higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. Most importantly, the elevated gene dosage of DNMT3B is associated with increased resistance to the growth-inhibitory effect mediated by DNA demethylating agents. In particular, cancer cells harboring DNMT3B gene amplification are less sensitive to the decrease in cell viability caused by 5-azacytidine (Vidaza), 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine (Decitabine), and SGI-1027. Overall, the data confirm DNMT3B as a bona fide oncogene in human cancer and support the incorporation of the DNMT3B copy number assay into current clinical trials assessing the efficacy of DNA demethylating drugs in solid tumors.

  16. Amplification of complete gag gene sequences from geographically distinct equine infectious anemia virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Boldbaatar, Bazartseren; Bazartseren, Tsevel; Koba, Ryota; Murakami, Hironobu; Oguma, Keisuke; Murakami, Kenji; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    In the current study, primers described previously and modified versions of these primers were evaluated for amplification of full-length gag genes from different equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) strains from several countries, including the USA, Germany and Japan. Each strain was inoculated into a primary horse leukocyte culture, and the full-length gag gene was amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Each amplified gag gene was cloned into a plasmid vector for sequencing, and the detectable copy numbers of target DNA were determined. Use of a mixture of two forward primers and one reverse primer in the polymerase chain reaction enabled the amplification of all EIAV strains used in this study. However, further study is required to confirm these primers as universal for all EIAV strains. The nucleotide sequence of gag is considered highly conserved, as evidenced by the use of gag-encoded capsid proteins as a common antigen for the detection of EIAV in serological tests. However, significant sequence variation in the gag genes of different EIAV strains was found in the current study.

  17. Recurrent gene amplifications in human type I endometrial adenocarcinoma detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, Emma; Levan, Kristina; Adamovic, Tatjana; Levan, Göran; Horvath, György

    2008-02-01

    Determining what genes are actively involved in tumor development is important, because they may provide targets for directed therapy. Human tumors are greatly heterogeneous with respect to etiology and genetic background, which complicates the identification of common genetic aberrations. In contrast, genetic and environmental variation can be in part controlled in experimental animals, which facilitates identification of the important changes. In inbred BDII rats, which are genetically predisposed to endometrial adenocarcinomas (EAC), certain chromosome regions exhibit recurrent amplification in the tumors. Previous CGH analysis had shown that a subset of human EAC tumors exhibited increased copy numbers in the homologous chromosomal regions, located in human 2p21 approximately p25 and 7q21 approximately q31. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis on imprints from 13 human EAC tumors, we determined the average copy numbers of each of 15 probes derived from cancer-related genes situated in these chromosome regions. Among the genes analyzed, those most often targeted by amplification were SDC1 and CYP1B1 in 2p21 approximately p25 and CDK6 and MET in 7q21 approximately q31, but all of the 15 genes tested were found to be amplified in at least two tumors.

  18. Higher prevalence and gene amplification of HPV16 in oropharynx as compared to oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    SHIGEISHI, Hideo; SUGIYAMA, Masaru; OHTA, Kouji; RAHMAN, Mohammad Zeshaan; TAKECHI, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The objective of this study was to clarify differences regarding HPV16 infection and gene amplification between the oral cavity and oropharynx in healthy individuals. Material and Methods The subjects were 94 healthy asymptomatic individuals (41 males, 53 females; mean age 58.6 years, range 16-97 years) who visited the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Reconstructive Surgery of the Hiroshima University Hospital from 2014 to 2015. Oral epithelial cells were collected from oral rinse and pharynx gargle samples and placed in saline. The human endogenous retrovirus gene ERV3-1 was used as a reference to estimate the number of human cells in each sample. DNA samples were extracted from approximately 10,000 human cells and tested for HPV16 DNA by PCR using a type-specific primer. Similarly, we analyzed the HPV16 viral copy number in HPV16-positive cases using real-time PCR to examine genomic amplification. Results The percentage of HPV16-positive cases was higher in the gargle (28.7%) as compared to the rinse (16.0%) samples. In the oral rinse samples, males (26.8%) showed a significantly higher rate of HPV16 than females (7.5%) (P=0.021). Importantly, in older subjects (aged 60-89 years), gargle samples showed a significantly higher rate of HPV16 (33.3%) than oral rinse samples (13.7%) (P=0.034). The average number of viral copies was approximately 8 times higher in the gargle than in the oral rinse samples (0.16±0.27 vs. 1.35±1.26 copy numbers per cell), a significant difference (P<0.001). Conclusion Our findings suggest that the oropharynx is more susceptible to HPV16 infection as compared to the oral cavity, while HPV16 gene amplification is also more commonly found in the oropharynx. PMID:27556212

  19. Combined comparative genomic hybridization and genomic microarray for detection of gene amplifications in pulmonary artery intimal sarcomas and adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianming; Roth, Jürgen; Bode-Lesniewska, Beata; Pfaltz, Madeleine; Heitz, Philipp U; Komminoth, Paul

    2002-05-01

    Identification of gene amplifications in human tumors is important for the understanding of tumorigenesis and may lead to discovery of diagnostic and prognostic markers. In this study, we used a microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) technique, combined with conventional CGH, to identify gene amplifications in 43 tumors including eight pulmonary artery intimal sarcomas and 35 adrenocortical tumors. Conventional CGH revealed gains or amplifications of 12q13-q15 in six sarcomas and in two adrenocortical carcinomas. Using microarrays, we demonstrated that, among genes located on 12q13-q15, SAS/CDK4 were amplified in six sarcomas, and MDM2 and GLI in five and four sarcomas, respectively. The two adrenocortical tumors showed coamplifications of SAS/CDK4 and MDM2. Furthermore, PDGFRA (located on 4q12) amplification was identified in five sarcomas. Our data demonstrate: (1) amplifications of SAS/CDK4, MDM2, GLI, and PDGFRA are strongly associated with the tumorigenesis of pulmonary artery intimal sarcomas, whereas SAS/CDK4 and MDM2 coamplification may contribute to the progression of adrenocortical tumors; (2) microarray-based CGH is a useful tool for simultaneous detection of multiple gene amplifications, with a high sensitivity and resolution compared to that of conventional CGH.

  20. Extensive gene amplification and concerted evolution within the CPR family of cuticular proteins in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Cornman, R Scott; Willis, Judith H

    2008-06-01

    Annotation of the Anopheles gambiae genome has revealed a large increase in the number of genes encoding cuticular proteins with the Rebers and Riddiford Consensus (the CPR gene family) relative to Drosophila melanogaster. This increase reflects an expansion of the RR-2 group of CPR genes, particularly the amplification of sets of highly similar paralogs. Patterns of nucleotide variation indicate that extensive concerted evolution is occurring within these clusters. The pattern of concerted evolution is complex, however, as sequence similarity within clusters is uncorrelated with gene order and orientation, and no comparable clusters occur within similarly compact arrays of the RR-1 group in mosquitoes or in either group in D. melanogaster. The dearth of pseudogenes suggests that sequence clusters are maintained by selection for high gene-copy number, perhaps due to selection for high expression rates. This hypothesis is consistent with the apparently parallel evolution of compact gene architectures within sequence clusters relative to single-copy genes. We show that RR-2 proteins from sequence-cluster genes have complex repeats and extreme amino-acid compositions relative to single-copy CPR proteins in An. gambiae, and that the amino-acid composition of the N-terminal and C-terminal sequence flanking the chitin-binding consensus region evolves in a correlated fashion.

  1. Amplification and loss of dihydrofolate reductase genes in a Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, R.J.; Schimke, R.T.

    1981-12-01

    During stepwise increases in the methotrexate concentration in culture medium, the authors selected Chinese hamster ovary cells that contained elevated dihydrofolate reductase levels which were proportional to the number of dihydrofolate reductase gene copies (i.e., gene amplification). The authors studied the dihydrofolate reductase levels in individual cells that underwent the initial steps of methotrexate resistance by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter technique. Such cells constituted a heterogeneous population with differing dihydrofolate reductase levels, and they characteristically lost the elevated enzyme levels when they were grown in the absence of methotrexate. The progeny of individual cells with high enzyme levels behaved differently and could lose all or variable numbers of the amplified genes.

  2. A PCA3 gene-based transcriptional amplification system targeting primary prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Neveu, Bertrand; Jain, Pallavi; Têtu, Bernard; Wu, Lily; Fradet, Yves; Pouliot, Frédéric

    2016-01-12

    Targeting specifically primary prostate cancer (PCa) cells for immune therapy, gene therapy or molecular imaging is of high importance. The PCA3 long non-coding RNA is a unique PCa biomarker and oncogene that has been widely studied. This gene has been mainly exploited as an accurate diagnostic urine biomarker for PCa detection. In this study, the PCA3 promoter was introduced into a new transcriptional amplification system named the 3-Step Transcriptional Amplification System (PCA3-3STA) and cloned into type 5 adenovirus. PCA3-3STA activity was highly specific for PCa cells, ranging between 98.7- and 108.0-fold higher than that for benign primary prostate epithelial or non-PCa cells, respectively. In human PCa xenografts, PCA3-3STA displayed robust bioluminescent signals at levels that are sufficient to translate to positron emission tomography (PET)-based reporter imaging. Remarkably, when freshly isolated benign or cancerous prostate biopsies were infected with PCA3-3STA, the optical signal produced from primary PCa biopsies was significantly higher than from benign prostate biopsies (4.4-fold, p < 0.0001). PCA3-3STA therefore represents a PCa-specific expression system with the potential to target, with high accuracy, primary or metastatic PCa epithelial cells for imaging, vaccines, or gene therapy.

  3. A loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for rapid detection of NDM-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jing; Du, Yijun; Zhu, Xiaoling; Bai, Hua; Luo, Yanbo; Liu, Yuqing

    2012-08-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method was developed for the rapid and sensitive detection of the emerging resistance gene New Delhi Metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM-1), with its specificity and sensitivity having been evaluated. Six primers, including a pair of outer primers, a pair of inner primers, and a pair of loop primers, were specially designed for recognizing eight distinct sequences on the target NDM-1 gene. The amplification reaction was performed within only 40 min under isothermal conditions at 65°C in a regular water bath. The LAMP assay showed good specificity and higher sensitivity than the conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), with a detection limit of 1 pg genomic DNA per tube of one NDM-1-positive reference strain. The detection result for the 345 clinical samples showed 100% consistence with the result by the PCR method, and three contaminated samples could be detected correctly by LAMP assays, while they could not be detected by PCR. The LAMP method reported here demonstrated a potential and valuable means for detection of the NDM-1 gene: easy, rapid, visual, specific, accurate, and sensitive, especially useful for on-the-spot investigation.

  4. Artificial gene amplification reveals an abundance of promiscuous resistance determinants in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Valerie W. C.; Hanson-Manful, Paulina; Patrick, Wayne M.

    2011-01-01

    Duplicated genes provide an important raw material for adaptive evolution. However, the relationship between gene duplication and the emergence of new biochemical functions is complicated, and it has been difficult to quantify the likelihood of evolving novelty in any systematic manner. Here, we describe a comprehensive search for artificially amplified genes that are able to impart new phenotypes on Escherichia coli, provided their expression is up-regulated. We used a high-throughput, library-on-library strategy to screen for resistance to antibiotics and toxins. Cells containing a complete E. coli ORF library were exposed to 237 toxin-containing environments. From 86 of these environments, we identified a total of 115 cases where overexpressed ORFs imparted improved growth. Of the overexpressed ORFs that we tested, most conferred small but reproducible increases in minimum inhibitory concentration (≤16-fold) for their corresponding antibiotics. In many cases, proteins were acting promiscuously to impart resistance. In the absence of toxins, most strains bore no fitness cost associated with ORF overexpression. Our results show that even the genome of a nonpathogenic bacterium harbors a substantial reservoir of resistance genes, which can be readily accessed through overexpression mutations. During the growth of a population under selection, these mutations are most likely to be gene amplifications. Therefore, our work provides validation and biochemical insight into the innovation, amplification, and divergence model of gene evolution under continuous selection [Bergthorsson U, Andersson DI, Roth JR (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:17004–17009], and also illustrates the high frequency at which novel traits can evolve in bacterial populations. PMID:21173244

  5. Potential Role of TRAIL in Metastasis of Mutant KRAS Expressing Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pal, Shyama; Amin, Prayag J; Sainis, K B; Shankar, Bhavani S

    2016-12-01

    Apo2L/tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, TNFSF10) is an important cytokine in the tumor microenvironment and plays a major role in the balance of cell survival/death pathways. Bioinformatic analyses of 839 adenocarcinoma (AC) and 356 squamous cell lung carcinoma patient data (SCC) by cBioPortal (genomic analyses) shows that TRAIL expression leads to differential outcomes of disease free survival in AC and SCC. Oncomine datamining (transcript analyses) reveal that TRAIL is upregulated in 167 SCC as compared to 350 AC patients from six data sets. Genomic analyses using cBioPortal revealed high rates of KRAS mutation in AC accompanied by higher incidence of metastasis and increased amplifications of TRAIL gene in SCC. Bioinformatic analyses of an additional lung cancer patient database also showed that risk of disease progression was significantly increased with high TRAIL expression in AC (461 samples). In vitro studies demonstrated that TRAIL increased phosphorylation of ERK only in adenocarcinoma cell lines with mutant KRAS. This was associated with increased migration that was abrogated by MEK inhibitor PD98059. Effects of increased migration induced by TRAIL persisted even after exposure to ionizing radiation with suppression of DNA damage response. These results help understand the role of TRAIL signaling in metastasis which is essential to develop strategies to revert these signals into pro-apoptotic pathways.

  6. KRAS mutant allele-specific imbalance is associated with worse prognosis in pancreatic cancer and progression to undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Moser, A James; Saka, Burcu; Adsay, N Volkan; Chiosea, Simion I

    2013-10-01

    KRAS codon 12 mutations are present in about 90% of ductal adenocarcinomas and in undifferentiated carcinomas of the pancreas. The role of KRAS copy number changes and resulting KRAS mutant allele-specific imbalance (MASI) in ductal adenocarcinoma (n=94), and its progression into undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas (n=25) was studied by direct sequencing and KRAS fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Semi-quantitative evaluation of sequencing electropherograms showed KRAS MASI (ie, mutant allele peak higher than or equal to the wild-type allele peak) in 22 (18.4%) cases. KRAS FISH (performed on 45 cases) revealed a trend for more frequent KRAS amplification among cases with KRAS MASI (7/20, 35% vs 3/25, 12%, P=0.08). KRAS amplification by FISH was seen only in undifferentiated carcinomas (10/24, 42% vs 0/21 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, 0%, P=0.0007). In 6 of 11 cases with both undifferentiated and well-differentiated components, transition to undifferentiated carcinoma was associated with an increase in KRAS copy number, due to amplification and/or chromosome 12 hyperploidy. Pancreatic carcinomas with KRAS MASI (compared to those without MASI) were predominantly undifferentiated (16/22, 73% vs 9/97, 9%, P<0.001), more likely to present at clinical stage IV (5/22, 23% vs 7/97, 7%, P=0.009), and were associated with shorter overall survival (9 months, 95% confidence interval, 5-13, vs 22 months, 95% confidence interval, 17-27; P=0.015) and shorter disease-free survival (5 months, 95% confidence interval, 2-8 vs 13 months, 95% confidence interval, 10-16; P=0.02). Our findings suggest that in a subset of ductal adenocarcinomas, KRAS MASI correlates with the progression to undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas.

  7. Molecular spectrum of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, and APC somatic gene mutations in Arab patients with colorectal cancer: determination of frequency and distribution pattern

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shamsi, Humaid O.; Jones, Jeremy; Fahmawi, Yazan; Dahbour, Ibrahim; Tabash, Aziz; Abdel-Wahab, Reham; Abousamra, Ahmed O. S.; Shaw, Kenna R.; Xiao, Lianchun; Hassan, Manal M.; Kipp, Benjamin R.; Kopetz, Scott; Soliman, Amr S.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Wolff, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The frequency rates of mutations such as KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA in colorectal cancer (CRC) differ among populations. The aim of this study was to assess mutation frequencies in the Arab population and determine their correlations with certain clinicopathological features. Methods Arab patients from the Arab Gulf region and a population of age- and sex-matched Western patients with CRC whose tumors were evaluated with next-generation sequencing (NGS) were identified and retrospectively reviewed. The mutation rates of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, and APC were recorded, along with clinicopathological features. Other somatic mutation and their rates were also identified. Fisher’s exact test was used to determine the association between mutation status and clinical features. Results A total of 198 cases were identified; 99 Arab patients and 99 Western patients. Fifty-two point seven percent of Arab patients had stage IV disease at initial presentation, 74.2% had left-sided tumors. Eighty-nine point two percent had tubular adenocarcinoma and 10.8% had mucinous adenocarcinoma. The prevalence rates of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, APC, SMAD, FBXW7 mutations in Arab population were 44.4%, 4%, 4%, 13.1%, 52.5%, 27.3%, 2% and 3% respectively. Compared to 48.4%, 4%, 4%, 12.1%, 47.5%, 24.2%, 11.1% and 0% respectively in matched Western population. Associations between these mutations and patient clinicopathological features were not statistically significant. Conclusions This is the first study to report comprehensive hotspot mutations using NGS in Arab patients with CRC. The frequency of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, TP53, APC and PIK3CA mutations were similar to reported frequencies in Western population except SMAD4 that had a lower frequency and higher frequency of FBXW7 mutation. PMID:28078112

  8. Isolation of epithelial cells from tooth brush and gender identification by amplification of SRY gene

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Vikram Simha A; Sriram, G; Saraswathi, TR; Sivapathasundharam, B

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: This study determines the importance of tooth brush from which DNA can be isolated and used for sex determination in forensic analysis. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 samples were collected and stored at room temperature for different periods of time interval. The epithelial cells adhered to the bristles of tooth brush were collected and genomic DNA was extracted and quantified using Nanodrop 1000 spectrophotometer. Results: Gender identification was done by amplification of sex determining region on Y chromosome (SRY) gene using real-time polymerase chain reaction and minimal amount of DNA (in pico grams) with 100% sensitivity and 73.3% specificity, i.e., all male samples showed positive results and out of 15 female samples 4 showed false positive results, i.e wrongly identified as males. Conclusion: With this study, we conclude that PCR is a valuable and sensitive procedure where minute contamination may cause alteration in the result, i.e, 4 females showed false positive result. Minute amount of DNA in picograms, which was collected at different intervals is enough for amplification of SRY gene and tooth brush can be used as one of the very valuable sources of gender identification. PMID:22022136

  9. Recent amplification of the human FRG1 gene during primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Grewal, P K; van Geel, M; Frants, R R; de Jong, P; Hewitt, J E

    1999-02-04

    There is evidence of multiple copies of the FSHD Region Candidate Gene 1 (FRG1) in humans. Analysis of human FRG1 ESTs showed many of them to be non-processed pseudogenes dispersed throughout the genome. To determine when the amplification of FRG1 occurred, we used a PCR-based approach to identify FRG1 sequences from great apes, chimpanzee, gorilla and orang-utan, and an Old World monkey, Macaca mulatta. In common with humans, multiple copies of FRG1 were detected in the great apes. However, in Macaca mulatta, only two FRG1 loci were identified, one presumed to be the homologue of the human chromosome 4q gene. This is strikingly similar to the distribution of a dispersed 3.3-kb repeat family in primates. A member of this family, D4Z4, maps to the subtelomeric region of 4q, in close proximity to FRG1. We propose that an ancestral duplication of distal 4q included FRG1. This duplication is present in Macaca mulatta whose divergence from hominoids is thought to have occurred at least 33 million years ago. We propose that this telomeric region then underwent further amplification and dispersion events in the great ape lineage, with copies of FRG1 and the 3.3-kb repeats being localized in heterochromatic regions.

  10. KRAS oncogene repression in colon cancer cell lines by G-quadruplex binding indolo[3,2-c]quinolines

    PubMed Central

    Lavrado, João; Brito, Hugo; Borralho, Pedro M.; Ohnmacht, Stephan A.; Kim, Nam-Soon; Leitão, Clara; Pisco, Sílvia; Gunaratnam, Mekala; Rodrigues, Cecília M. P.; Moreira, Rui; Neidle, Stephen; Paulo, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    KRAS is one of the most frequently mutated oncogenes in human cancer, yet remaining undruggable. To explore a new therapeutic strategy, a library of 5-methyl-indolo[3,2-c]quinoline derivatives (IQc) with a range of alkyldiamine side chains was designed to target DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes (G4) in the promoter and 5′-UTR mRNA of the KRAS gene. Biophysical experiments showed that di-substituted IQc compounds are potent and selective KRAS G4 stabilizers. They preferentially inhibit the proliferation of KRAS mutant cancer cell lines (0.22 < IC50 < 4.80 μM), down-regulate KRAS promoter activity in a luciferase reporter assay, and reduce both KRAS mRNA and p21KRAS steady-state levels in mutant KRAS colon cancer cell lines. Additionally, IQcs induce cancer cell death by apoptosis, explained in part by their capacity to repress KRAS expression. Overall, the results suggest that targeting mutant KRAS at the gene level with G4 binding small molecules is a promising anticancer strategy. PMID:25853628

  11. Silencing KRAS Overexpression in Cadmium-Transformed Prostate Epithelial Cells Mitigates Malignant Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ngalame, Ntube N O; Waalkes, Michael P; Tokar, Erik J

    2016-09-19

    Cadmium (Cd) is a potential human prostate carcinogen. Chronic Cd exposure malignantly transforms RWPE-1 human prostate epithelial cells into CTPE cells by an unclear mechanism. Previous studies show that RWPE-1 can also be malignantly transformed by arsenic, and KRAS activation is key to causation and maintenance of this phenotype. Although Cd and arsenic can both transform prostate epithelial cells, it is uncertain whether their mechanisms are similar. Thus, here we determined whether KRAS activation is critical in causing and maintaining Cd-induced malignant transformation in CTPE cells. Expression of KRAS, miRNAs, and other genes of interest was analyzed by Western blot and RT-PCR. Following stable KRAS knockdown (KD) by RNA interference using shRNAmir, the malignant phenotype was assessed by various physical and genetic parameters. CTPE cells greatly overexpressed KRAS by 20-fold, indicating a likely role in Cd transformation. Thus, we attempted to reverse the malignant phenotype via KRAS KD. Two weeks after shRNAmir transduction, KRAS protein was undetectable in CTPE KD cells, confirming stable KD. KRAS KD reduced stimulated RAS/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways and markedly mitigated multiple physical and molecular malignant cell characteristics including: hypersecretion of MMP-2, colony formation, cell survival, and expression of cancer-relevant genes (reduced proliferation and cell cycle-related genes; activated tumor suppressor PTEN). However, KRAS KD did not reverse miRNA expression originally down-regulated by Cd transformation. These data strongly suggest KRAS is a key gene in development and maintenance of the Cd-induced malignant phenotype, at least in the prostate. It is not, however, the only genetic factor sustaining this phenotype.

  12. Monosomy of chromosome 17 in breast cancer during interpretation of HER2 gene amplification

    PubMed Central

    Brunelli, Matteo; Nottegar, Alessia; Bogina, Giuseppe; Caliò, Anna; Cima, Luca; Eccher, Albino; Vicentini, Caterina; Marcolini, Lisa; Scarpa, Aldo; Pedron, Serena; Brunello, Eleonora; Knuutila, Sakari; Sapino, Anna; Marchiò, Caterina; Bria, Emilio; Molino, Annamaria; Carbognin, Luisa; Tortora, Giampaolo; Jasani, Bharat; Miller, Keith; Merdol, Ibrahim; Zanatta, Lucia; Laurino, Licia; Wirtanen, Tiina; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Marconi, Marcella; Chilosi, Marco; Manfrin, Erminia; Martignoni, Guido; Bonetti, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Monosomy of chromosome 17 may affect the assessment of HER2 amplification. Notably, the prevalence ranges from 1% up to 49% due to lack of consensus in recognition. We sought to investigate the impact of monosomy of chromosome 17 to interpretation of HER2 gene status. 201 breast carcinoma were reviewed for HER2 gene amplification and chromosome 17 status. FISH analysis was performed by using double probes (LSI/CEP). Absolute gene copy number was also scored per each probe. HER2 FISH test was repeated on serial tissue sections, ranging in thickness from 3 to 20 µm. Ratio was scored and subsequently corrected by monosomy after gold control test using the aCGH method to overcome false interpretation due to artefactual nuclear truncation. HER2 immunotests was performed on all cases. 26/201 cases were amplified (13%). Single signals per CEP17 were revealed in 7/201 (3.5%) cases. Five out of 7 cases appeared monosomic with aCGH (overall, 5/201, 2.5%) and evidenced single signals in >60% of nuclei after second-look on FISH when matching both techniques. Among 5, one case showed amplification with a pattern 7/1 (HER2/CEP17>2) of copies (3+ at immunotest); three cases revealed single signals per both probes (LSI/CEP=1) and one case revealed a 3:1 ratio; all last 4 cases showed 0/1+ immunoscore. We concluded that: 1) monosomy of chromosome 17 may be observed in 2.5% of breast carcinoma; 2) monosomy of chromosome 17 due to biological reasons rather than nuclear truncation was observed when using the cut-off of 60% of nuclei harboring single signals; 3) the skewing of the ratio due to single centromeric 17 probe may lead to false positive evaluation; 4) breast carcinomas showing a 3:1 ratio (HER2/CEP17) usually show negative 0/1+ immunoscore and <6 gene copy number at FISH. PMID:26328251

  13. HER-2/neu and topoisomerase IIa gene amplification and protein expression in invasive breast carcinomas: chromogenic in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Rohit; Lal, Priti; Chen, Beiyun

    2005-06-01

    We studied HER-2/neu (HER-2) and topoisomerase IIa (topo2a) amplification (using chromogenic in situ hybridization) and overexpression (immunohistochemical analysis) in 113 invasive breast carcinomas. A gene copy number/chromosome 17 copy number ratio of 2.0 or higher indicated amplification. A topo2a/chromosome 17 ratio of less than 0.8 indicated gene deletion. HER-2 overexpression was scored according to standard HercepTest guidelines (DAKO, Carpinteria, CA). Overexpression of topo2a was identified when nuclear staining was found in more than 5% of tumor cells. Of 113 tumors, 104 were analyzed successfully for HER-2 and topo2a amplification. Of the 104, 64 showed HER-2 amplification; 25 of these (39%) also showed topo2a amplification. No amplification was found in 40 tumors. Deletion of topo2a was seen in 7 (11%) of 64 HER-2-amplified tumors and 2 (5%) of 40 nonamplified tumors. Of 25 tumors with topo2a amplification, 18 (72%) overexpressed topo2a. Only 3 (4%) of 79 tumors without topo2a amplification overexpressed topo2a. Amplification of topo2a is associated with HER-2 amplification but not vice versa. Amplification of topo2a resulted in protein overexpression in 72% of tumors, but topo2a overexpression rarely occurred without gene amplification. Identification of topo2a and HER-2 status might have therapeutic and prognostic implications.

  14. CASCADE, a platform for controlled gene amplification for high, tunable and selection-free gene expression in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Strucko, Tomas; Buron, Line Due; Jarczynska, Zofia Dorota; Nødvig, Christina Spuur; Mølgaard, Louise; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2017-01-01

    Over-expression of a gene by increasing its copy number is often desirable in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may facilitate elucidation of enzyme functions, and in cell factory design it is used to increase production of proteins and metabolites. Current methods are typically exploiting expression from the multicopy 2 μ-derived plasmid or by targeting genes repeatedly into sequences like Ty or rDNA; in both cases, high gene expression levels are often reached. However, with 2 μ-based plasmid expression, the population of cells is very heterogeneous with respect to protein production; and for integration into repeated sequences it is difficult to determine the genetic setup of the resulting strains and to achieve specific gene doses. For both types of systems, the strains often suffer from genetic instability if proper selection pressure is not applied. Here we present a gene amplification system, CASCADE, which enables construction of strains with defined gene copy numbers. One or more genes can be amplified simultaneously and the resulting strains can be stably propagated on selection-free medium. As proof-of-concept, we have successfully used CASCADE to increase heterologous production of two fluorescent proteins, the enzyme β-galactosidase the fungal polyketide 6-methyl salicylic acid and the plant metabolite vanillin glucoside. PMID:28134264

  15. Sequencing the mouse Y chromosome reveals convergent gene acquisition and amplification on both sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Soh, Y Q Shirleen; Alföldi, Jessica; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Brown, Laura G; Graves, Tina; Minx, Patrick J; Fulton, Robert S; Kremitzki, Colin; Koutseva, Natalia; Mueller, Jacob L; Rozen, Steve; Hughes, Jennifer F; Owens, Elaine; Womack, James E; Murphy, William J; Cao, Qing; de Jong, Pieter; Warren, Wesley C; Wilson, Richard K; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C

    2014-11-06

    We sequenced the MSY (male-specific region of the Y chromosome) of the C57BL/6J strain of the laboratory mouse Mus musculus. In contrast to theories that Y chromosomes are heterochromatic and gene poor, the mouse MSY is 99.9% euchromatic and contains about 700 protein-coding genes. Only 2% of the MSY derives from the ancestral autosomes that gave rise to the mammalian sex chromosomes. Instead, all but 45 of the MSY's genes belong to three acquired, massively amplified gene families that have no homologs on primate MSYs but do have acquired, amplified homologs on the mouse X chromosome. The complete mouse MSY sequence brings to light dramatic forces in sex chromosome evolution: lineage-specific convergent acquisition and amplification of X-Y gene families, possibly fueled by antagonism between acquired X-Y homologs. The mouse MSY sequence presents opportunities for experimental studies of a sex-specific chromosome in its entirety, in a genetically tractable model organism.

  16. Amplification of the groESL operon in Pseudomonas putida increases siderophore gene promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Venturi, V; Wolfs, K; Leong, J; Weisbeek, P J

    1994-10-17

    Pseudobactin 358 is the yellow-green fluorescent siderophore [microbial iron(III) transport agent] produced by Pseudomonas putida WCS358 under iron-limiting conditions. The genes encoding pseudobactin 358 biosynthesis are iron-regulated at the level of transcription. In this study, the molecular characterization is reported of a cosmid clone of WCS358 DNA that can stimulate, in an iron-dependent manner, the activity of a WCS358 siderophore gene promoter in the heterologous Pseudomonas strain A225. The functional region in the clone was identified by subcloning, transposon mutagenesis and DNA sequencing as the groESL operon of strain WCS358. This increase in promoter activity was not observed when the groESL genes of strain WCS358 were integrated via a transposon vector into the genome of Pseudomonas A225, indicating that multiple copies of the operon are necessary for the increase in siderophore gene promoter activity. Amplification of the Escherichia coli and WCS358 groESL genes also increased iron-regulated promoter activity in the parent strain WCS358. The groESL operon codes for the chaperone proteins GroES and GroEL, which are responsible for mediating the folding and assembly of many proteins.

  17. Both gene amplification and allelic loss occur at 14q13.3 in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Thomas; Pan, Qiulu; Sironi, Juan; Lutz, Dionne; Tian, Jianmin; Sapkar, Jana; Perez-Soler, Roman; Keller, Steven; Locker, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Because loss of Nkx2-8 increases lung cancer in the mouse, we studied suppressive mechanisms in human lung cancer. Experimental Design NKX2-8 is located within 14q13.3, adjacent to its close relative TTF1/NKX2-1. We first analyzed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of 14q13.3 in 45 matched human lung cancer and control specimens. DNA from tumors with LOH was then analyzed with high-density SNP arrays. For correlation with this genetic analysis, we quantified expression of Nkx2-8 and TTF1 mRNA in tumors. Finally, suppressive function of Nkx2-8 was assessed via colony formation assays in 5 lung cancer cell lines. Results 13/45 (29%) tumors had LOH. In 6 tumors, most adenocarcinomas, LOH was caused by gene amplification. The 0.8 Mb common region of amplification included MBIP, SFTA, TTF1, NKX2-8, and PAX9. In 4 squamous or adenosquamous cancers, LOH was caused by deletion. In 3 other tumors, LOH resulted from whole chromosome mechanisms (14−, 14+, or aneuploidy). The 1.2 Mb common region of deletion included MBIP, SFTA, TTF1, NKX2-8, PAX9, SLC25A21, and MIPOL1. Most tumors had low expression of Nkx2-8. Nevertheless, sequencing did not show NKX2-8 mutations that could explain the low expression. TTF1 overexpression, in contrast, was common and usually independent of Nkx2-8 expression. Finally, stable transfection of Nkx2-8 selectively inhibited growth of H522 lung cancer cells. Conclusions 14q13.3, which contains NKX2-8, is subject to both amplification and deletion in lung cancer. Most tumors have low expression of NKX2-8, and its expression can inhibit growth of some lung cancer cells. PMID:21148747

  18. Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Biosensor for HIV Gene Detection Based on Graphene Stabilized Gold Nanoclusters with Exonuclease Amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yijia; Bai, Xiaoning; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2015-08-26

    Because human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been one of the most terrible viruses in recent decades, early diagnosis of the HIV gene is of great importance for all scientists around the world. In our work, we developed a novel electrochemical biosensor based on one-step ultrasonic synthesized graphene stabilized gold nanocluster (GR/AuNC) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with an exonuclease III (Exo III)-assisted target recycling amplification strategy for the detection of HIV DNA. It is the first time that GR/AuNCs have been used as biosensor platform and aptamer with cytosine-rich base set as capture probe to construct the biosensor. With the combination of cytosine-rich capture probe, good conductivity and high surfaces of GR/AuNCs, and Exo III-assisted target recycling amplification, we realized high sensitivity and good selectivity detection of target HIV DNA with a detection limit of 30 aM (S/N = 3). Furthermore, the proposed biosensor has a promising potential application for target detection in human serum analysis.

  19. Overproduction of Magnetosomes by Genomic Amplification of Biosynthesis-Related Gene Clusters in a Magnetotactic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Lohße, Anna; Kolinko, Isabel; Raschdorf, Oliver; Uebe, René; Borg, Sarah; Brachmann, Andreas; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Müller, Rolf; Zhang, Youming

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Magnetotactic bacteria biosynthesize specific organelles, the magnetosomes, which are membrane-enclosed crystals of a magnetic iron mineral that are aligned in a linear chain. The number and size of magnetosome particles have to be critically controlled to build a sensor sufficiently strong to ensure the efficient alignment of cells within Earth's weak magnetic field while at the same time minimizing the metabolic costs imposed by excessive magnetosome biosynthesis. Apart from their biological function, bacterial magnetosomes have gained considerable interest since they provide a highly useful model for prokaryotic organelle formation and represent biogenic magnetic nanoparticles with exceptional properties. However, potential applications have been hampered by the difficult cultivation of these fastidious bacteria and their poor yields of magnetosomes. In this study, we found that the size and number of magnetosomes within the cell are controlled by many different Mam and Mms proteins. We present a strategy for the overexpression of magnetosome biosynthesis genes in the alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense by chromosomal multiplication of individual and multiple magnetosome gene clusters via transposition. While stepwise amplification of the mms6 operon resulted in the formation of increasingly larger crystals (increase of ∼35%), the duplication of all major magnetosome operons (mamGFDC, mamAB, mms6, and mamXY, comprising 29 genes in total) yielded an overproducing strain in which magnetosome numbers were 2.2-fold increased. We demonstrate that the tuned expression of the mam and mms clusters provides a powerful strategy for the control of magnetosome size and number, thereby setting the stage for high-yield production of tailored magnetic nanoparticles by synthetic biology approaches. IMPORTANCE Before our study, it had remained unknown how the upper sizes and numbers of magnetosomes are genetically regulated, and overproduction of

  20. Downstream of Mutant KRAS, the Transcription Regulator YAP Is Essential for Neoplastic Progression to Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiying; Nandakumar, Nivedita; Shi, Yuhao; Manzano, Mark; Smith, Alias; Graham, Garrett; Gupta, Swati; Vietsch, Eveline E.; Laughlin, Sean Z.; Wadhwa, Mandheer; Chetram, Mahandranauth; Joshi, Mrinmayi; Wang, Fen; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Toretsky, Jeffrey; Wellstein, Anton; Yi, Chunling

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive cancer with poor survival rates and frequently carries oncogenic KRAS mutation. However, KRAS has thus far not been a viable therapeutic target. We found that the abundance of YAP mRNA, which encodes Yes-associated protein (YAP), a protein regulated by the Hippo pathway during tissue development and homeostasis, was increased in human PDAC tissue compared with that in normal pancreatic epithelia. In genetically engineered KrasG12D and KrasG12D: Trp53R172H mouse models, pancreas-specific deletion of Yap halted the progression of early neoplastic lesions to PDAC without affecting normal pancreatic development and endocrine function. Although Yap was dispensable for acinar to ductal metaplasia (ADM), an initial step in the progression to PDAC, Yap was critically required for the proliferation of mutant Kras or Kras:Trp53 neoplastic pancreatic ductal cells in culture and for their growth and progression to invasive PDAC in mice. Yap functioned as a critical transcriptional switch downstream of the oncogenic KRAS–mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, promoting the expression of genes encoding secretory factors that cumulatively sustained neoplastic proliferation, a tumorigenic stromal response in the tumor microenvironment, and PDAC progression in Kras and Kras: Trp53 mutant pancreas tissue. Together, our findings identified Yap as a critical oncogenic KRAS effector and a promising therapeutic target for PDAC and possibly other types of KRAS-mutant cancers. PMID:24803537

  1. Human-specific gene ARHGAP11B promotes basal progenitor amplification and neocortex expansion.

    PubMed

    Florio, Marta; Albert, Mareike; Taverna, Elena; Namba, Takashi; Brandl, Holger; Lewitus, Eric; Haffner, Christiane; Sykes, Alex; Wong, Fong Kuan; Peters, Jula; Guhr, Elaine; Klemroth, Sylvia; Prüfer, Kay; Kelso, Janet; Naumann, Ronald; Nüsslein, Ina; Dahl, Andreas; Lachmann, Robert; Pääbo, Svante; Huttner, Wieland B

    2015-03-27

    Evolutionary expansion of the human neocortex reflects increased amplification of basal progenitors in the subventricular zone, producing more neurons during fetal corticogenesis. In this work, we analyze the transcriptomes of distinct progenitor subpopulations isolated by a cell polarity-based approach from developing mouse and human neocortex. We identify 56 genes preferentially expressed in human apical and basal radial glia that lack mouse orthologs. Among these, ARHGAP11B has the highest degree of radial glia-specific expression. ARHGAP11B arose from partial duplication of ARHGAP11A (which encodes a Rho guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein) on the human lineage after separation from the chimpanzee lineage. Expression of ARHGAP11B in embryonic mouse neocortex promotes basal progenitor generation and self-renewal and can increase cortical plate area and induce gyrification. Hence, ARHGAP11B may have contributed to evolutionary expansion of human neocortex.

  2. PCR-sequencing is a complementary method to amplification refractory mutation system for EGFR gene mutation analysis in FFPE samples.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junchang; Wang, Chunhua; Yu, Xiaoli; Sheng, Danli; Zuo, Chen; Ren, Minpu; Wu, Yaqin; Shen, Jie; Jin, Mei; Xu, Songxiao

    2015-12-01

    Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) is the most popular technology for EGFR gene mutation analysis in China. Cutoff Ct or ΔCt values were used to differentiate low mutation abundance cases from no mutation cases. In this study, all of 359 NSCLC samples were tested by ARMS. Seventeen samples with larger Ct or ΔCt than cutoff values were retested by PCR-sequencing. TKI treatment responses were monitored on the cases with ARMS negative and PCR-sequencing positive results. One exon 18 G719X case, 67 exon 19 deletion cases, 2 exon 20 insertion cases, 1 exon 20 T790M case, 60 exon 21 L858R cases, 5 exon 21 L861Q cases and 201 wild type cases were identified by ARMS. Another 22 cases were evaluated as wild type but had later amplification fluorescent curves. Seventeen out of these 22 cases were retested by PCR-sequencing. It turns out that 3 out of 3 cases with exon 19 deletion later amplifications, 2 out of 2 cases with L858R later amplifications and 4 out of 12 cases with T790M later amplifications were identified as mutation positive. Two cases with exon 19 deletion and L858R respectively were treated by TKI and got responses. Our study indicated that PCR-sequencing might be a complementary way to confirm ARMS results with later amplifications.

  3. Sex identification of pigs using polymerase chain reaction amplification of the amelogenin gene.

    PubMed

    Sembon, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Shun-ichi; Fuchimoto, Dai-ichiro; Iwamoto, Masaki; Kawarasaki, Tatsuo; Onishi, Akira

    2008-11-01

    The amelogenin (AMEL) gene exists on both sex chromosomes of various mammalian species and the length and sequence of the noncoding regions differ between the two chromosome-specific alleles. Because both forms can be amplified using a single primer set, the use of AMEL in polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods has facilitated sex identification in various mammalian species, including cattle, sheep and humans. In this study, we designed PCR primers to yield different-sized products from the AMEL genes on the X (AMELX) and Y (AMELY) chromosomes of pigs. PCR amplification of genomic DNA samples collected from various breeds of pigs (European breeds: Landrace, Large White, Duroc and Berkshire; Chinese breeds: Meishan and Jinhua and their crossbreeds) yielded the expected products. For all breeds, DNA from male pigs produced two bands (520 and 350 bp; AMELX and AMELY, respectively), whereas samples from female pigs generated only the 520 bp product. We then tested the use of PCR of AMEL for sex identification of in vitro-produced (IVP) porcine embryos sampled at 2 or 5 to 6 days after fertilization; germinal vesicle (GV)-stage oocytes and electroactivated embryos were used as controls. More than 88% of the GV-stage oocytes and electroactivated embryos yielded a single 520 bp single band and about 50% of the IVP embryos tested produced both bands. Our findings show that PCR analysis of the AMEL gene is reliable for sex identification of pigs and porcine embryos.

  4. Gene synthesis by integrated polymerase chain assembly and PCR amplification using a high-speed thermocycler

    PubMed Central

    TerMaat, Joel R.; Pienaar, Elsje; Whitney, Scott E.; Mamedov, Tarlan G.; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Polymerase chain assembly (PCA) is a technique used to synthesize genes ranging from a few hundred base pairs to many kilobase pairs in length. In traditional PCA, equimolar concentrations of single stranded DNA oligonucleotides are repeatedly hybridized and extended by a polymerase enzyme into longer dsDNA constructs, with relatively few full-length sequences being assembled. Thus, traditional PCA is followed by a second primer-mediated PCR reaction to amplify the desired full-length sequence to useful, detectable quantities. Integration of assembly and primer-mediated amplification steps into a single reaction using a high-speed thermocycler is shown to produce similar results. For the integrated technique, the effects of oligo concentration, primer concentration, and number of oligonucleotides are explored. The technique is successfully demonstrated for the synthesis of two genes encoding EPCR-1 (653 bp) and pUC19 β-lactamase (929 bp) in under 20 min. However, rapid integrated PCA–PCR was found to be problematic when attempted with the TM-1 gene (1509 bp). Partial oligonucleotide sets of TM-1 could be assembled and amplified simultaneously, indicating that the technique may be limited to a maximum number of oligonucleotides due to competitive annealing and competition for primers. PMID:19799938

  5. Molecular diagnosis of Kingella kingae pericarditis by amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Matta, Matta; Wermert, Delphine; Podglajen, Isabelle; Sanchez, Olivier; Buu-Hoï, Annie; Gutmann, Laurent; Meyer, Guy; Mainardi, Jean-Luc

    2007-09-01

    Kingella kingae is a fastidious gram-negative bacillus that is considered an emerging pathogen in pediatric settings but remains less common in adults. Here we describe a case of pericarditis in an immunocompetent adult host. The microorganism was identified directly from the clinical sample by molecular techniques, i.e., 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequencing.

  6. Activation by Gene Amplification of pitB, Encoding a Third Phosphate Transporter of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, Sally M.; Schoondermark, Paul; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Tommassen, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Two systems for the uptake of inorganic phosphate (Pi) in Escherichia coli, PitA and Pst, have been described. A revertant of a pitA pstS double mutant that could grow on Pi was isolated. We demonstrate that the expression of a new Pi transporter, PitB, is activated in this strain by a gene amplification event. PMID:11443103

  7. Development of a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay Targeting the mpb64 Gene for Diagnosis of Intraocular Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Balne, Praveen Kumar; Barik, Manas Ranjan; Sharma, Savitri

    2013-01-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay targeting the mpb64 gene for the diagnosis of intraocular tuberculosis was highly specific (100%), sensitive (85.7%), rapid, and easy to perform. The LAMP assay can be an alternative to conventional PCR for the diagnosis of ocular tuberculosis in resource-limited settings. PMID:23966513

  8. Lack of correlation between BRCA1 carrier status and HER-2/neu (ERBB2) gene amplification in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, J.S.; Giraldez, R.A.; Flom, K.

    1994-09-01

    We examined 4{mu}m paraffin-embedded tissue sections from twenty female breast tumors for the presence of HER-2/neu (ERBB2) gene amplification. The study population consisted of ten BRCA1 carriers and ten non-BRCA1 carriers. Carrier status was assessed through linkage analysis. Detection of HER-2/neu gene amplification was performed blinded with respect to BRCA1 status. Forty cells representing at least two different areas of each tumor were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a HER-2/neu cosmid probe. We did not find any cases which showed the typical HER-2/neu gene amplification profile (homogeneous distribution of cells with > 4 signals per cell). In half of the cases, small foci that appeared amplified were identified as clusters of cells with > 4 signals. Modifying our analysis to compensate for this, cases were considered to be amplified if nine or more cells out of forty contained over four HER-2/neu signals. For the 10 BRCA1 carrier positive samples, 5 were HER-2/neu amplified and 5 were not. Similarly, of the 10 BRCA1 carrier negative samples, 5 were HER-2/neu amplified and 5 were not. Therefore, we found no statistical correlation between BRCA1 carrier status and amplification of the HER-2/neu gene in the tumors studied.

  9. KRAS driven expression signature has prognostic power superior to mutation status in non‐small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Ádám; Pongor, Lőrinc Sándor; Szabó, András; Santarpia, Mariacarmela

    2016-01-01

    KRAS is the most frequently mutated oncogene in non‐small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the prognostic role of KRAS mutation status in NSCLC still remains controversial. We hypothesize that the expression changes of genes affected by KRAS mutation status will have the most prominent effect and could be used as a prognostic signature in lung cancer. We divided NSCLC patients with mutation and RNA‐seq data into KRAS mutated and wild type groups. Mann‐Whitney test was used to identify genes showing altered expression between these cohorts. Mean expression of the top five genes was designated as a “transcriptomic fingerprint” of the mutation. We evaluated the effect of this signature on clinical outcome in 2,437 NSCLC patients using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Mutation of KRAS was most common in adenocarcinoma. Mutation status and KRAS expression were not correlated to prognosis. The transcriptomic fingerprint of KRAS include FOXRED2, KRAS, TOP1, PEX3 and ABL2. The KRAS signature had a high prognostic power. Similar results were achieved when using the second and third set of strongest genes. Moreover, all cutoff values delivered significant prognostic power (p < 0.01). The KRAS signature also remained significant (p < 0.01) in a multivariate analysis including age, gender, smoking history and tumor stage. We generated a “surrogate signature” of KRAS mutation status in NSCLC patients by computationally linking genotype and gene expression. We show that secondary effects of a mutation can have a higher prognostic relevance than the primary genetic alteration itself. PMID:27859136

  10. Multiple KRAS mutations in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: molecular features of neoplastic clones indicate the selection of divergent populations of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Visani, Michela; de Biase, Dario; Baccarini, Paola; Fabbri, Carlo; Polifemo, Anna Maria; Zanini, Nicola; Pession, Annalisa; Tallini, Giovanni

    2013-12-01

    KRAS is one of the most common genes mutated in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Multiple KRAS mutations may be detected within the same pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but it is usually unclear whether the different mutations represent biologically irrelevant molecular events or whether they indicate the coexistence of distinct sizable neoplastic clones within a given tumor. We identified a case of pancreatic adenocarcinoma with 5 different mutations in the KRAS gene and have been able to characterize the allelic distribution of the KRAS mutations and the size of the neoplastic clones using allele-specific locked nucleic acid polymerase chain reaction and next-generation sequencing (454 GS-Junior). The results indicate that the tumor is composed of 5 distinct cell populations: one is KRAS G12V mutated (~38% of neoplastic cells), the second is KRAS G12V in one allele and KRAS G12D in the other (~32%), the third is KRAS G12V in one allele and KRAS G12R in the other (~24%), and the fourth is KRAS G12V in one allele and KRAS G12C in the other (~6%). The fifth clone, representing a minority of neoplastic cells, has a KRAS Q61H mutation in addition to one of the above alterations. Microsatellite analysis identified mutation of the NR21 marker out of the 13 tested, indicating that the tumor has a defect in maintaining DNA integrity different from loss of conventional DNA mismatch repair. These results are consistent with the successive selection of divergent populations of tumor cells and underscore the relevance of nucleotide instability in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  11. K-ras oncogene mutation in pterygium.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, B T; Yıldırım, M S; Zamani, A; Bozkurt, B

    2017-03-01

    PurposePterygium is claimed to be a benign proliferation triggered by prolonged exposure to ultraviolet radiation. The frequency of K-ras oncogene mutation, which is among the initial mutations in tumorigenesis, is evaluated in this study.Patients and methodsIn this prospective randomized clinical, trial pterygium tissues and normal conjunctiva tissue specimens are obtained from the superotemporal quadrant of patients who underwent primary pterygium excision with autograft transplantation. DNA extraction from tissues was performed using the QIAamp DNA FFPE tissue kit. A PCR reaction was performed to amplify sequences containing codons 12, 13, and 61 of the K-ras gene in DNA. These PCR products then underwent the 'pyrosequencing' procedure for mutations at these codons.ResultsPterygium and normal conjunctival tissue samples of 25 patients (10 females, 15 males) were evaluated in the study. The mean age of the patients was 54.54±13.13 years. Genetic analysis revealed no K-ras mutations in normal conjunctival tissues, whereas pterygium tissues of the same cases demonstrated mutation at codon 12 in one case and mutations at codon 61 in seven cases, which was statistically significant (P<0.05). The point missense mutations at codon 61 were glutamine to arginine (Glu61Arg CAA>CGA) in four cases and glutamine to leucine (Glu61Leu CAA>CTA) in three cases.ConclusionThe significantly higher frequency of codon 61 mutation of the ras oncogene in primary and bilateral pterygium specimens compared with normal conjunctiva supports the tumoral origin of pterygium, and thus set the stage for research into a targeted therapy for pterygium with better outcomes than surgical excision.

  12. Tyrosine kinase activation in breast carcinoma with correlation to HER-2/neu gene amplification and receptor overexpression.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, R; Naeem, R; Marconi, S; Luszcz, J; Garb, J; Gasparini, R; Otis, C N

    2001-12-01

    The HER-2/neu oncogene encodes a transmembrane receptor with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. A pilot study was performed to investigate downstream effects of HER-2/neu (or related growth factor receptor) activation by identifying phosphorylated tyrosine. Fifty-four breast carcinomas were evaluated for HER-2/neu overexpression by the HercepTest (Dako, Carpinteria, CA) and the monoclonal CB11 antibody (Ventana, Tucson, AZ). Phosphotyrosine (an indication of tyrosine kinase activity) was detected by an antiphosphotyrosine mouse monoclonal antibody (Upstate Biotechnology, Lake Placid, NY). The gene amplification status was evaluated in 50 of the 54 cases by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the Ventana gene probe. The HER-2/neu oncogene amplification was detected in 28% (14 of 50) of cases. Of the 14 cases showing oncogene amplification, tyrosine kinase activity was detected in 9 (64.2%) cases. There was moderate agreement between HER-2/neu gene amplification and tyrosine kinase activity (kappa = 0.43). Immunohistochemical staining of 3+ (with both HercepTest and CB11) showed better agreement with HER-2/neu oncogene amplification and increased tyrosine kinase activity than 2+ immunohistochemical staining. Overall, oncogene amplification and overexpression correlated with increased tyrosine kinase activity, supporting the mechanism of tyrosine kinase activation by HER-2/neu amplification and overexpression. However, 7 cases showing increased tyrosine kinase activity did not show gene amplification or 3+ receptor expression (by either HercepTest or CB11), raising the possibility of other growth factor receptors operating via the tyrosine kinase pathway. There was no apparent correlation between tyrosine kinase activity and hormone receptor status (estrogen or progesterone). Increased tyrosine kinase activity is more commonly associated with higher-grade tumors and thus may correlate with aggressive biologic behavior in breast carcinoma. The results of

  13. The effect of forced expression of mutated K-RAS gene on gastrointestinal cancer cell lines and the IGF-1R targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Yasutaka; Adachi, Yasushi; Sasaki, Yasushi; Koide, Hideyuki; Motoya, Masayo; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Takagi, Hideyasu; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Shigeru; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Tokino, Takashi; Carbone, David P; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2017-02-01

    Mutation in K-RAS (K-RAS-MT) plays important roles in both cancer progression and resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy in gastrointestinal tumors. Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling is required for carcinogenicity and progression of many tumors as well. We have previously shown successful therapy for gastrointestinal cancer cell lines bearing a K-RAS mutation using an anti-IGF-1R monoclonal antibody. In this study, we sought to evaluate effects of forced K-RAS-MT expression on gastrointestinal cancer cell lines representing a possible second resistance mechanism for anti-EGFR therapy and IGF-1R-targeted therapy for these transfectants. We made stable transfectants of K-RAS-MT in two gastrointestinal cancer cell lines, colorectal RKO and pancreatic BxPC-3. We assessed the effect of forced expression of K-RAS-MT on proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion in gastrointestinal cancer cells. Then we assessed anti-tumor effects of dominant negative IGF-1R (IGF-1R/dn) and an IGF-1R inhibitor, picropodophyllin, on the K-RAS-MT transfectants. Overexpression of K-RAS-MT in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines led to more aggressive phenotypes, with increased proliferation, decreased apoptosis, and increased motility and invasion. IGF-1R blockade suppressed cell growth, colony formation, migration, and invasion, and up-regulated chemotherapy-induced apoptosis of gastrointestinal cancer cells, even when K-RAS-MT was over-expressed. IGF-1R blockade inhibited the Akt pathway more than the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway in the K-RAS-MT transfectants. IGF-1R/dn, moreover, inhibited the growth of murine xenografts expressing K-RAS-MT. Thus, K-RAS-MT might be important for progressive phonotype observed in gastrointestinal cancers. IGF-1R decoy is a candidate molecular therapeutic approach for gastrointestinal cancers even if K-RAS is mutated. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The Mutant KRAS Gene Up-regulates BCL-XL Protein via STAT3 to Confer Apoptosis Resistance That Is Reversed by BIM Protein Induction and BCL-XL Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Zaanan, Aziz; Okamoto, Koichi; Kawakami, Hisato; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Huang, Shengbing; Sinicrope, Frank A

    2015-09-25

    In colorectal cancers with oncogenic GTPase Kras (KRAS) mutations, inhibition of downstream MEK/ERK signaling has shown limited efficacy, in part because of failure to induce a robust apoptotic response. We studied the mechanism of apoptosis resistance in mutant KRAS cells and sought to enhance the efficacy of a KRAS-specific MEK/ERK inhibitor, GDC-0623. GDC-0623 was shown to potently up-regulate BIM expression to a greater extent versus other MEK inhibitors in isogenic KRAS HCT116 and mutant KRAS SW620 colon cancer cells. ERK silencing enhanced BIM up-regulation by GDC-0623 that was due to its loss of phosphorylation at Ser(69), confirmed by a BIM-EL phosphorylation-defective mutant (S69G) that increased protein stability and blocked BIM induction. Despite BIM and BIK induction, the isogenic KRAS mutant versus wild-type cells remained resistant to GDC-0623-induced apoptosis, in part because of up-regulation of BCL-XL. KRAS knockdown by a doxycycline-inducible shRNA attenuated BCL-XL expression. BCL-XL knockdown sensitized KRAS mutant cells to GDC-0623-mediated apoptosis, as did the BH3 mimetic ABT-263. GDC-0623 plus ABT-263 induced a synergistic apoptosis by a mechanism that includes release of BIM from its sequestration by BCL-XL. Furthermore, mutant KRAS activated p-STAT3 (Tyr(705)) in the absence of IL-6 secretion, and STAT3 knockdown reduced BCL-XL mRNA and protein expression. These data suggest that BCL-XL up-regulation by STAT3 contributes to mutant KRAS-mediated apoptosis resistance. Such resistance can be overcome by potent BIM induction and concurrent BCL-XL antagonism to enable a synergistic apoptotic response.

  15. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a nucleoprotein gene sequence of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arakawa, C.K.; Deering, R.E.; Higman, K.H.; Oshima, K.H.; O'Hara, P.J.; Winton, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction [PCR) was used to amplify a portion of the nucleoprotein [NI gene of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Using a published sequence for the Round Butte isolate of IHNV, a pair of PCR pnmers was synthesized that spanned a 252 nucleotide region of the N gene from residue 319 to residue 570 of the open reading frame. This region included a 30 nucleotide target sequence for a synthetic oligonucleotide probe developed for detection of IHNV N gene messenger RNA. After 25 cycles of amplification of either messenger or genomic RNA, the PCR product (DNA) of the expected size was easily visible on agarose gels stained with ethidium bromide. The specificity of the amplified DNA was confirmed by Southern and dot-blot analysis using the biotinylated oligonucleotide probe. The PCR was able to amplify the N gene sequence of purified genomic RNA from isolates of IHNV representing 5 different electropherotypes. Using the IHNV primer set, no PCR product was obtained from viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus RNA, but 2 higher molecular weight products were synthesized from hirame rhabdovirus RNA that did not hybridize with the biotinylated probe. The PCR could be efficiently performed with all IHNV genomic RNA template concentrations tested (1 ng to 1 pg). The lowest level of sensitivity was not determined. The PCR was used to amplify RNA extracted from infected cell cultures and selected tissues of Infected rainbow trout. The combination of PCR and nucleic acid probe promises to provide a detection method for IHNV that is rapid, h~ghly specific, and sensitive.

  16. Colorimetric TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Fusion Detection in Prostate Cancer Urinary Samples via Recombinase Polymerase Amplification.

    PubMed

    Koo, Kevin M; Wee, Eugene J H; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    TMPRSS2 (Exon 1)-ERG (Exon 4) is the most frequent gene fusion event in prostate cancer (PC), and is highly PC-specific unlike the current serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) biomarker. However, TMPRSS2-ERG levels are currently measured with quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) which is time-consuming and requires costly equipment, thus limiting its use in clinical diagnostics. Herein, we report a novel rapid, cost-efficient and minimal-equipment assay named "FusBLU" for detecting TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions from urine. TMPRSS2-ERG mRNA was amplified by isothermal reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA), magnetically-isolated, and detected through horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed colorimetric reaction. FusBLU was specific for TMPRSS2-ERG mRNA with a low visual detection limit of 10(5) copies. We also demonstrated assay readout versatility on 3 potentially useful platforms. The colorimetric readout was detectable by naked eye for a quick yes/no evaluation of gene fusion presence. On the other hand, a more quantitative TMPRSS2-ERG detection was achievable by absorbance/electrochemical measurements. FusBLU was successfully applied to 12 urinary samples and results were validated by gold-standard RT-qPCR. We also showed that sediment RNA was likely the main source of TMPRSS2-ERG mRNA in urinary samples. We believe that our assay is a potential clinical screening tool for PC and could also have wide applications for other disease-related fusion genes.

  17. Colorimetric TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Fusion Detection in Prostate Cancer Urinary Samples via Recombinase Polymerase Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Kevin M.; Wee, Eugene J.H.; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    TMPRSS2 (Exon 1)-ERG (Exon 4) is the most frequent gene fusion event in prostate cancer (PC), and is highly PC-specific unlike the current serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) biomarker. However, TMPRSS2-ERG levels are currently measured with quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) which is time-consuming and requires costly equipment, thus limiting its use in clinical diagnostics. Herein, we report a novel rapid, cost-efficient and minimal-equipment assay named “FusBLU” for detecting TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions from urine. TMPRSS2-ERG mRNA was amplified by isothermal reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA), magnetically-isolated, and detected through horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed colorimetric reaction. FusBLU was specific for TMPRSS2-ERG mRNA with a low visual detection limit of 105 copies. We also demonstrated assay readout versatility on 3 potentially useful platforms. The colorimetric readout was detectable by naked eye for a quick yes/no evaluation of gene fusion presence. On the other hand, a more quantitative TMPRSS2-ERG detection was achievable by absorbance/electrochemical measurements. FusBLU was successfully applied to 12 urinary samples and results were validated by gold-standard RT-qPCR. We also showed that sediment RNA was likely the main source of TMPRSS2-ERG mRNA in urinary samples. We believe that our assay is a potential clinical screening tool for PC and could also have wide applications for other disease-related fusion genes. PMID:27375789

  18. Lager yeasts possess dynamic genomes that undergo rearrangements and gene amplification in response to stress.

    PubMed

    James, Tharappel C; Usher, Jane; Campbell, Susan; Bond, Ursula

    2008-03-01

    A long-term goal of the brewing industry is to identify yeast strains with increased tolerance to the stresses experienced during the brewing process. We have characterised the genomes of a number of stress-tolerant mutants, derived from the lager yeast strain CMBS-33, that were selected for tolerance to high temperatures and to growth in high specific gravity wort. Our results indicate that the heat-tolerant strains have undergone a number of gross chromosomal rearrangements when compared to the parental strain. To determine if such rearrangements can spontaneously arise in response to exposure to stress conditions experienced during the brewing process, we examined the chromosome integrity of both the stress-tolerant strains and their parent during a single round of fermentation under a variety of environmental stresses. Our results show that the lager yeast genome shows tremendous plasticity during fermentation, especially when fermentations are carried out in high specific gravity wort and at higher than normal temperatures. Many localised regions of gene amplification were observed especially at the telomeres and at the rRNA gene locus on chromosome XII, and general chromosomal instability was evident. However, gross chromosomal rearrangements were not detected, indicating that continued selection in the stress conditions are required to obtain clonal isolates with stable rearrangements. Taken together, the data suggest that lager yeasts display a high degree of genomic plasticity and undergo genomic changes in response to environmental stress.

  19. Concurrent AURKA and MYCN Gene Amplifications Are Harbingers of Lethal Treatment-Related Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer1 2

    PubMed Central

    Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Beltran, Himisha; Park, Kyung; MacDonald, Theresa Y; Robinson, Brian D; Tagawa, Scott T; Perner, Sven; Bismar, Tarek A; Erbersdobler, Andreas; Dhir, Rajiv; Nelson, Joel B; Nanus, David M; Rubin, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC), also referred to as anaplastic prostate cancer, is a lethal tumor that most commonly arises in late stages of prostate adenocarcinoma (PCA) with predilection to metastasize to visceral organs. In the current study, we explore for evidence that Aurora kinase A (AURKA) and N-myc (MYCN) gene abnormalities are harbingers of treatment-related NEPC (t-NEPC). We studied primary prostate tissue from 15 hormone naïve PCAs, 51 castration-resistant prostate cancers, and 15 metastatic tumors from 72 patients at different stages of disease progression to t-NEPC, some with multiple specimens. Histologic evaluation, immunohistochemistry, and fluorescence in situ hybridization were performed and correlated with clinical variables. AURKA amplification was identified in overall 65% of PCAs (hormone naïve and treated) from patients that developed t-NEPC and in 86% of metastases. Concurrent amplification of MYCN was present in 70% of primary PCAs, 69% of treated PCAs, and 83% of metastases. In contrast, in an unselected PCA cohort, AURKA and MYCN amplifications were identified in only 5% of 169 cases. When metastatic t-NEPC was compared to primary PCA from the same patients, there was 100% concordance of ERG rearrangement, 100% concordance of AURKA amplification, and 60% concordance of MYCN amplification. In tumors with mixed features, there was also 100% concordance of ERG rearrangement and 94% concordance of AURKA and MYCN co-amplification between areas of NEPC and adenocarcinoma. AURKA and MYCN amplifications may be prognostic and predictive biomarkers, as they are harbingers of tumors at risk of progressing to t-NEPC after hormonal therapy. PMID:23358695

  20. Gene Amplification on Demand Accelerates Cellobiose Utilization in Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Eun Joong; Skerker, Jeffrey M.; Kim, Soo Rin; Wei, Na; Turner, Timothy L.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Efficient microbial utilization of cellulosic sugars is essential for the economic production of biofuels and chemicals. Although the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a robust microbial platform widely used in ethanol plants using sugar cane and corn starch in large-scale operations, glucose repression is one of the significant barriers to the efficient fermentation of cellulosic sugar mixtures. A recent study demonstrated that intracellular utilization of cellobiose by engineered yeast expressing a cellobiose transporter (encoded by cdt-1) and an intracellular β-glucosidase (encoded by gh1-1) can alleviate glucose repression, resulting in the simultaneous cofermentation of cellobiose and nonglucose sugars. Here we report enhanced cellobiose fermentation by engineered yeast expressing cdt-1 and gh1-1 through laboratory evolution. When cdt-1 and gh1-1 were integrated into the genome of yeast, the single copy integrant showed a low cellobiose consumption rate. However, cellobiose fermentation rates by engineered yeast increased gradually during serial subcultures on cellobiose. Finally, an evolved strain exhibited a 15-fold-higher cellobiose fermentation rate. To identify the responsible mutations in the evolved strain, genome sequencing was performed. Interestingly, no mutations affecting cellobiose fermentation were identified, but the evolved strain contained 9 copies of cdt-1 and 23 copies of gh1-1. We also traced the copy numbers of cdt-1 and gh1-1 of mixed populations during the serial subcultures. The copy numbers of cdt-1 and gh1-1 in the cultures increased gradually with similar ratios as cellobiose fermentation rates of the cultures increased. These results suggest that the cellobiose assimilation pathway (transport and hydrolysis) might be a rate-limiting step in engineered yeast and copies of genes coding for metabolic enzymes might be amplified in yeast if there is a growth advantage. This study indicates that on-demand gene amplification

  1. Towards in vivo amplification: Overcoming hurdles in the use of hematopoietic stem cells in transplantation and gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nagree, Murtaza S; López-Vásquez, Lucía; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of safer and more efficient gene transfer methods, gene therapy has become a viable solution for many inherited and acquired disorders. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a prime cell compartment for gene therapy aimed at correcting blood-based disorders, as well as those amenable to metabolic outcomes that can effect cross-correction. While some resounding clinical successes have recently been demonstrated, ample room remains to increase the therapeutic output from HSC-directed gene therapy. In vivo amplification of therapeutic cells is one avenue to achieve enhanced gene product delivery. To date, attempts have been made to provide HSCs with resistance to cytotoxic drugs, to include drug-inducible growth modules specific to HSCs, and to increase the engraftment potential of transduced HSCs. This review aims to summarize amplification strategies that have been developed and tested and to discuss their advantages along with barriers faced towards their clinical adaptation. In addition, next-generation strategies to circumvent current limitations of specific amplification schemas are discussed. PMID:26730268

  2. DNA sequence templates adjacent nucleosome and ORC sites at gene amplification origins in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zimmer, Kurt; Rusch, Douglas B; Paranjape, Neha; Podicheti, Ram; Tang, Haixu; Calvi, Brian R

    2015-10-15

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication are bound by the origin recognition complex (ORC), which scaffolds assembly of a pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) that is then activated to initiate replication. Both pre-RC assembly and activation are strongly influenced by developmental changes to the epigenome, but molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. We have been examining the activation of origins responsible for developmental gene amplification in Drosophila. At a specific time in oogenesis, somatic follicle cells transition from genomic replication to a locus-specific replication from six amplicon origins. Previous evidence indicated that these amplicon origins are activated by nucleosome acetylation, but how this affects origin chromatin is unknown. Here, we examine nucleosome position in follicle cells using micrococcal nuclease digestion with Ilumina sequencing. The results indicate that ORC binding sites and other essential origin sequences are nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs). Nucleosome position at the amplicons was highly similar among developmental stages during which ORC is or is not bound, indicating that being an NDR is not sufficient to specify ORC binding. Importantly, the data suggest that nucleosomes and ORC have opposite preferences for DNA sequence and structure. We propose that nucleosome hyperacetylation promotes pre-RC assembly onto adjacent DNA sequences that are disfavored by nucleosomes but favored by ORC.

  3. Complex oncogenic translocations with gene amplification are initiated by specific DNA breaks in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wright, Sarah M; Woo, Yong H; Alley, Travis L; Shirley, Bobbi-Jo; Akeson, Ellen C; Snow, Kathy J; Maas, Sarah A; Elwell, Rachel L; Foreman, Oded; Mills, Kevin D

    2009-05-15

    Chromosomal instability is a hallmark of many tumor types. Complex chromosomal rearrangements with associated gene amplification, known as complicons, characterize many hematologic and solid cancers. Whereas chromosomal aberrations, including complicons, are useful diagnostic and prognostic cancer markers, their molecular origins are not known. Although accumulating evidence has implicated DNA double-strand break repair in suppression of oncogenic genome instability, the genomic elements required for chromosome rearrangements, especially complex lesions, have not been elucidated. Using a mouse model of B-lineage lymphoma, characterized by complicon formation involving the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus and the c-myc oncogene, we have now investigated the requirement for specific genomic segments as donors for complex rearrangements. We now show that specific DNA double-strand breaks, occurring within a narrow segment of Igh, are necessary to initiate complicon formation. By contrast, neither specific DNA breaks nor the powerful intronic enhancer Emu are required for complicon-independent oncogenesis. This study is the first to delineate mechanisms of complex versus simple instability and the first to identify specific chromosomal elements required for complex chromosomal aberrations. These findings will illuminate genomic cancer susceptibility and risk factors.

  4. Activating HER2 mutations in HER2 gene amplification negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Ron; Kavuri, Shyam M.; Searleman, Adam C.; Shen, Wei; Shen, Dong; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Monsey, John; Goel, Nicholas; Aronson, Adam B.; Li, Shunqiang; Ma, Cynthia X.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Ellis, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Data from eight breast cancer genome sequencing projects identified 25 patients with HER2 somatic mutations in cancers lacking HER2 gene amplification. To determine the phenotype of these mutations, we functionally characterized thirteen HER2 mutations using in vitro kinase assays, protein structure analysis, cell culture and xenograft experiments. Seven of these mutations are activating mutations, including G309A, D769H, D769Y, V777L, P780ins, V842I, and R896C. HER2 in-frame deletion 755-759, which is homologous to EGFR exon 19 in-frame deletions, had a neomorphic phenotype with increased phosphorylation of EGFR or HER3. L755S produced lapatinib resistance, but was not an activating mutation in our experimental systems. All of these mutations were sensitive to the irreversible kinase inhibitor, neratinib. These findings demonstrate that HER2 somatic mutation is an alternative mechanism to activate HER2 in breast cancer and they validate HER2 somatic mutations as drug targets for breast cancer treatment. PMID:23220880

  5. Detection of sequences homologous to human retroviral DNA in multiple sclerosis by gene amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, S.J.; Ehrlich, G.D.; Abbott, M.A.; Hurwitz, B.J.; Waldmann, T.A.; Poiesz, B.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Twenty-one patients with multiple sclerosis, chronic progressive type, were examined for DNA sequences homologous to a human retrovirus. Genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells was analyzed for the presence of homologous sequences to the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) long terminal repeat, 3{prime} gag, pol, and env domains by the enzymatic in vitro gene amplification technique, polymerase chain reaction. Positive identification of homologous pol sequences was made in the amplified DNA from six of these patients (29%). Three of these six patients (14%) also tested positive for the env region, but not for the other regions tested. In contrast, none of the samples from 35 normal individuals studied was positive when amplified and tested with the same primers and probes. Comparison of patterns obtained from controls and from patients with adult T-cell leukemia or tropical spastic paraparesis suggests that the DNA sequences identified are exogenous to the human genome and may correspond to a human retroviral species. The data support the detection of a human retroviral agent in some patients with multiple sclerosis.

  6. BHK cell lines with increased rates of gene amplification are hypersensitive to ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Giulotto, E.; Bertoni, L.; Attolini, C.; Rainaldi, G.; Anglana, M. )

    1991-04-15

    Four cell lines (MP1, -4, -5, -7), isolated from baby hamster kidney cells after simultaneous selection with N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate and methotrexate, have previously been shown to amplify their DNA at an increased rate. We now show that all four lines are hypersensitive to killing by UV light and mitomycin C. At high doses of UV light or mitomycin C, the MP lines survived less than 10% or less than 5% as well as parental cells, respectively. After UV irradiation, inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis was greater in MP than in parental cells, and recovery was slower or absent. A 2- to 3.5-fold increase in the frequency of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange was also seen in the four cell lines. In MP5, unscheduled DNA replication after treatment with UV light was only approximately 70% as great as in parental cells and the other MP lines. In MP4 and MP7 cells S phase was elongated. Although their individual properties confirm that the four cell lines are independent, their common properties suggest a relationship between tolerance of DNA damage and gene amplification.

  7. DNA sequence templates adjacent nucleosome and ORC sites at gene amplification origins in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Zimmer, Kurt; Rusch, Douglas B.; Paranjape, Neha; Podicheti, Ram; Tang, Haixu; Calvi, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication are bound by the origin recognition complex (ORC), which scaffolds assembly of a pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) that is then activated to initiate replication. Both pre-RC assembly and activation are strongly influenced by developmental changes to the epigenome, but molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. We have been examining the activation of origins responsible for developmental gene amplification in Drosophila. At a specific time in oogenesis, somatic follicle cells transition from genomic replication to a locus-specific replication from six amplicon origins. Previous evidence indicated that these amplicon origins are activated by nucleosome acetylation, but how this affects origin chromatin is unknown. Here, we examine nucleosome position in follicle cells using micrococcal nuclease digestion with Ilumina sequencing. The results indicate that ORC binding sites and other essential origin sequences are nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs). Nucleosome position at the amplicons was highly similar among developmental stages during which ORC is or is not bound, indicating that being an NDR is not sufficient to specify ORC binding. Importantly, the data suggest that nucleosomes and ORC have opposite preferences for DNA sequence and structure. We propose that nucleosome hyperacetylation promotes pre-RC assembly onto adjacent DNA sequences that are disfavored by nucleosomes but favored by ORC. PMID:26227968

  8. Amplification of hTERT and hTERC genes in leukemic cells with high expression and activity of telomerase.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Tomasz; Januszkiewicz, Danuta; Zawada, Mariola; Pernak, Monika; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Rembowska, Jolanta; Nowicka, Karina; Mankowski, Przemyslaw; Nowak, Jerzy

    2006-08-01

    Reactivation of telomerase plays an important role in carcinogenesis. Malignant cells almost always possess high activity and expression of telomerase. The aim of this study was to see whether there is any relationship between telomerase activity and expression and hTERT and hTERC gene amplification in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL) cells. In addition telomere length was tested in leukemic cells at the time of diagnosis and during remission. Expression of the three components of telomerase (hTERT, hTERC and TP1) as well as telomerase activity was found both in ALL and ANLL cells. Telomerase activity was diminished in patients in remission. The leukemic cells showed considerable heterogeneity of terminal restriction fragments, that is telomere length. ALL cells showed a variable pattern of telomere length in contrast to ANLL cells which produced a predominantly short telomere pattern. Telomere length in the lymphocytes of leukemia patients was shorter in remission as compared to the time of diagnosis. FISH analysis revealed amplification of hTERT and hTERC genes in ALL and ANLL cells. Quantitative analysis showed that leukemic cells possess higher number of hTERT and hTERC copies than the normal PBL. Our results suggest that the activation of telomerase in leukemic cells is connected with amplification of hTERT and hTERC genes. The high expression and activity of telomerase found in leukemic cells may be partially explained by amplified hTERT and hTERC genes. Amplification of the telomerase genes seems to be a common event in carcinogenesis and may play a role in telomerase reactivation leading to cell immortalization.

  9. A universal primer set for PCR amplification of nuclear histone H4 genes from all animal species.

    PubMed

    Pineau, Pascal; Henry, Michel; Suspène, Rodolphe; Marchio, Agnès; Dettai, Agnès; Debruyne, Régis; Petit, Thierry; Lécu, Alexis; Moisson, Pierre; Dejean, Anne; Wain-Hobson, Simon; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre

    2005-03-01

    To control the quality of genomic DNA of samples from a wide variety of animals, a heminested PCR assay specifically targeting a nuclear gene has been developed. The histone H4 gene family comprises a small number of genes considered among the most conserved genes in living organisms. Tissue samples from necropsies and from cells belonging to 43 different species were studied, eight samples from invertebrates and 35 samples from vertebrates covering all classes. Ancient DNA samples from three Siberian woolly mammoths (Mammuthus primigenius) dating between 40,000 and 49,000 years before present were also tested for PCR amplification. Performance of HIST2H4 amplification were also compared with those of previously published universal PCRs (28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and cytochrome b). Overall, 95% of species studied yielded an amplification product, including some old samples from gorilla and chimpanzees. The data indicate that the HIST2H4 amplimers are, thus, suitable for both DNA quality testing as well as species identification in the animal kingdom.

  10. A repeat protein-based DNA polymerase inhibitor for an efficient and accurate gene amplification by PCR.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Da-Eun; Shin, Yong-Keol; Munashingha, Palinda Ruvan; Park, So-Yeon; Seo, Yeon-Soo; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-12-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a thermostable DNA polymerase is the most widely applied method in many areas of research, including life sciences, biotechnology, and medical sciences. However, a conventional PCR incurs an amplification of undesired genes mainly owing to non-specifically annealed primers and the formation of a primer-dimer complex. Herein, we present the development of a Taq DNA polymerase-specific repebody, which is a small-sized protein binder composed of leucine rich repeat (LRR) modules, as a thermolabile inhibitor for a precise and accurate gene amplification by PCR. We selected a repebody that specifically binds to the DNA polymerase through a phage display, and increased its affinity to up to 10 nM through a modular evolution approach. The repebody was shown to effectively inhibit DNA polymerase activity at low temperature and undergo thermal denaturation at high temperature, leading to a rapid and full recovery of the polymerase activity, during the initial denaturation step of the PCR. The performance and utility of the repebody was demonstrated through an accurate and efficient amplification of a target gene without nonspecific gene products in both conventional and real-time PCRs. The repebody is expected to be effectively utilized as a thermolabile inhibitor in a PCR. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2544-2552. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. KRAS Mutation as a Potential Prognostic Biomarker of Biliary Tract Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Masaaki; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Ohtsuka, Kouki; Matsushima, Satsuki; Ohkura, Yasuo; Furuse, Junji; Watanabe, Takashi; Mori, Toshiyuki; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to identify the unique molecular characteristics of biliary tract cancer (BTC) for the development of novel molecular-targeted therapies. MATERIALS AND METHODS We performed mutational analysis of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and FBXW7 and immunohistochemical analysis of EGFR and TP53 in 63 Japanese patients with BTC and retrospectively evaluated the association between the molecular characteristics and clinicopathological features of BTC. RESULTS KRAS mutations were identified in 9 (14%) of the 63 BTC patients; no mutations were detected within the analyzed regions of BRAF, PIK3CA, and FBXW7. EGFR overexpression was observed in 5 (8%) of the 63 tumors, while TP53 overexpression was observed in 48% (30/63) of the patients. Overall survival of patients with KRAS mutation was significantly shorter than that of patients with the wild-type KRAS gene (P = 0.005). By multivariate analysis incorporating molecular and clinicopathological features, KRAS mutations and lymph node metastasis were identified to be independently associated with shorter overall survival (KRAS, P = 0.004; lymph node metastasis, P = 0.015). CONCLUSIONS Our data suggest that KRAS mutation is a poor prognosis predictive biomarker for the survival in BTC patients. PMID:28008299

  12. Effects of mRNA amplification on gene expression ratios in cDNA experiments estimated by analysis of variance

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Vigdis; Løland, Anders; Holden, Marit; Langaas, Mette; Rue, Håvard; Liu, Fang; Myklebost, Ola; Fodstad, Øystein; Hovig, Eivind; Smith-Sørensen, Birgitte

    2003-01-01

    Background A limiting factor of cDNA microarray technology is the need for a substantial amount of RNA per labeling reaction. Thus, 20–200 micro-grams total RNA or 0.5–2 micro-grams poly (A) RNA is typically required for monitoring gene expression. In addition, gene expression profiles from large, heterogeneous cell populations provide complex patterns from which biological data for the target cells may be difficult to extract. In this study, we chose to investigate a widely used mRNA amplification protocol that allows gene expression studies to be performed on samples with limited starting material. We present a quantitative study of the variation and noise present in our data set obtained from experiments with either amplified or non-amplified material. Results Using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple hypothesis testing, we estimated the impact of amplification on the preservation of gene expression ratios. Both methods showed that the gene expression ratios were not completely preserved between amplified and non-amplified material. We also compared the expression ratios between the two cell lines for the amplified material with expression ratios between the two cell lines for the non-amplified material for each gene. With the aid of multiple t-testing with a false discovery rate of 5%, we found that 10% of the genes investigated showed significantly different expression ratios. Conclusion Although the ratios were not fully preserved, amplification may prove to be extremely useful with respect to characterizing low expressing genes. PMID:12659661

  13. Regulation of pattern formation and gene amplification during Drosophila oogenesis by the miR-318 microRNA.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wanzhong; Deng, Qiannan; Guo, Ting; Hong, Xin; Kugler, Jan-Michael; Yang, Xiaohang; Cohen, Stephen M

    2015-05-01

    Pattern formation during epithelial development requires the coordination of multiple signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the functions of an ovary-enriched miRNA, miR-318, in epithelial development during Drosophila oogenesis. mir-318 maternal loss-of-function mutants were female-sterile and laid eggs with abnormal morphology. Removal of mir-318 disrupted the dorsal-anterior follicle cell patterning, resulting in abnormal dorsal appendages. mir-318 mutant females also produced thin and fragile eggshells due to impaired chorion gene amplification. We provide evidence that the ecdysone signaling pathway activates expression of miR-318 and that miR-318 cooperates with Tramtrack69 to control the switch from endocycling to chorion gene amplification during differentiation of the follicular epithelium. The multiple functions of miR-318 in oogenesis illustrate the importance of miRNAs in maintaining cell fate and in promoting the developmental transition in the female follicular epithelium.

  14. Certified DNA Reference Materials to Compare HER2 Gene Amplification Measurements Using Next-Generation Sequencing Methods.

    PubMed

    Lih, Chih-Jian; Si, Han; Das, Biswajit; Harrington, Robin D; Harper, Kneshay N; Sims, David J; McGregor, Paul M; Camalier, Corinne E; Kayserian, Andrew Y; Williams, P Mickey; He, Hua-Jun; Almeida, Jamie L; Lund, Steve P; Choquette, Steve; Cole, Kenneth D

    2016-09-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Materials 2373 is a set of genomic DNA samples prepared from five breast cancer cell lines with certified values for the ratio of the HER2 gene copy number to the copy numbers of reference genes determined by real-time quantitative PCR and digital PCR. Targeted-amplicon, whole-exome, and whole-genome sequencing measurements were used with the reference material to compare the performance of both the laboratory steps and the bioinformatic approaches of the different methods using a range of amplification ratios. Although good reproducibility was observed in each next-generation sequencing method, slightly different HER2 copy numbers associated with platform-specific biases were obtained. This study clearly demonstrates the value of Standard Reference Materials 2373 as reference material and as a calibrator for evaluating assay performance as well as for increasing confidence in reporting HER2 amplification for clinical applications.

  15. No strong association between HER-2/neu protein overexpression and gene amplification in high-grade invasive urothelial carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Caner, Vildan; Turk, Nilay Sen; Duzcan, Fusun; Tufan, N Lale Satiroglu; Kelten, E Canan; Zencir, Sevil; Dodurga, Yavuz; Bagci, Huseyin; Duzcan, S Ender

    2008-09-01

    The generation of urothelial carcinoma is caused by the accumulation of various molecular changes, as in most malignancies. There are conflicting data about the status of HER-2/neu oncogene in urothelial carcinomas. The aim of this study was to determine the status of HER-2/neu oncogene in high-grade invasive urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder both in protein and DNA level. We evaluated HER-2/neu protein overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and gene amplification by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and real-time quantitative PCR in paraffin-embedded samples of high-grade invasive urothelial carcinoma obtained from 36 patients. Polysomy 17 was also assessed by FISH. Immunohistochemically, HER-2/neu protein overexpression was observed in 22 (61.1%) tumors (ten tumors with score 3+ and 12 with score 2+). Fourteen of 36 tumors (38.9%) were evaluated as negative (score 0 or 1+). Complete concordance between FISH and the PCR was seen in all of the samples scored as 0 and 1+ by IHC. HER-2/neu gene amplification was observed in three of 27 (11.1%) tumors by FISH (nine samples were non-informative) and in eight of 36 (22.2%) tumors by the PCR. The complete concordance between HER2-2/neu protein overexpression and gene amplification was seen only in three of 27 tumors. Polysomy 17 was seen in nine tumors (33.3%). The results indicated that, in contrast to breast cancer, there was no strong association between HER-2/neu overexpression and gene amplification in invasive urothelial carcinomas, and polysomy 17 was higher in tumors showing HER-2/neu overexpression.

  16. Frequent mutations of KRAS in addition to BRAF in colorectal serrated adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stefanius, Karoliina; Ylitalo, Laura; Tuomisto, Anne; Kuivila, Rami; Kantola, Tiina; Sirniö, Päivi; Karttunen, Tuomo J; Mäkinen, Markus J

    2011-01-01

    Aims To define the occurrence of KRAS and BRAF mutations, microsatellite instability (MSI), and MGMT and hMLH1 methylation and expression in colorectal serrated adenocarcinoma. Methods and results KRAS codon 12/13 and 59/61 and BRAF V600E mutations, MSI, and MGMT and hMLH1 methylation and expression in 42 serrated adenocarcinomas and 17 serrated adenomas were compared with those in 59 non-serrated colorectal carcinomas (CRCs) and nine adenomas. KRAS and BRAF mutations were observed in 45% and 33% of serrated adenocarcinomas and in 27% and 0% of non-serrated CRCs (P < 0.001). The KRAS c12G→A transition was the predominant type of mutation in serrated adenocarcinomas. Forty-two per cent of BRAF-mutated serrated adenocarcinomas showed high-level MSI (MSI-H) (P = 0.075), 100% showed hMLH1 methylation (P = 0.001) and 90.9% showed MGMT methylation (P = 0.019). Fifty-six per cent of serrated adenocarcinomas with microsatellite stability/low-level microsatellite instability harboured KRAS mutations. In non-serrated cancers, KRAS mutations were not associated with MSI status. Conclusions A high combined mutation rate (79–82%) of KRAS and BRAF in serrated adenomas and adenocarcinomas indicates that mitogen-activated protein kinase activation is a crucial part of the serrated pathway. BRAF mutations are specific for serrated adenocarcinoma and identify a subset of serrated adenocarcinomas with gene methylation and a tendency for MSI-H. A high frequency of KRAS mutations in serrated adenocarcinomas suggests that a significant proportion of KRAS-mutated CRCs originate from serrated precursors, thus challenging the traditional model of Vogelstein. PMID:21457162

  17. Overexpression and amplification of glutathione S-transferase pi gene in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Pavelic, Z P; Li, Y; Gleich, L; Gartside, P S; Pavelic, L; Gluckman, J L; Stambrook, P J

    1997-01-01

    Human glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-pi) may serve as a useful tumor marker because of the high frequency with which it is found in elevated levels in several tumor types. To determine whether GST-pi is useful as an indicator for cancers of the head and neck, expression of GST-pi mRNA was investigated by Northern analysis in this tumor type. Overexpression of GST-pi mRNA was detected in 9 of 36 (25%) primary head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). When Southern blot analysis was used to examine the relationship between overexpression and amplification of the GST-pi gene, only 3 of 36 tumors (8%) showed GST-pi gene amplification. Thus, gene amplification is not critical to GST-pi mRNA overexpression in HNSCCs. Moderately and poorly differentiated HNSCCs tended to manifest elevated GST-pi mRNA compared with well differentiated tumors (30% for moderately and poorly differentiated tumors versus none of the well differentiated tumors examined). However, there was no significant correlation between GST-% mRNA overexpression and clinical stage, T stage (tumor size), N stage (neck nodal status), pathological nodes, or patient survival.

  18. Amplification of the multidrug resistance gene pfmdr1 in Plasmodium falciparum has arisen as multiple independent events.

    PubMed

    Triglia, T; Foote, S J; Kemp, D J; Cowman, A F

    1991-10-01

    The multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype in mammalian tumor cells can involve amplification of mdr genes that results in overexpression of the protein product termed P-glycoprotein. Chloroquine resistance (CQR) in Plasmodium falciparum has similarities with the MDR phenotype in tumor cells, and some isolates of P. falciparum have amplified levels of the pfmdr1 gene. To investigate the nature and origin of pfmdr1 amplicons, we have cloned large regions of a 110-kb amplicon from the CQR cloned isolate B8 by using the yeast artificial chromosome system. We have identified and sequenced the breakpoints of the amplicon by a novel method employing inverted polymerase chain reaction that is applicable to analysis of any large-scale repeat. We show that the five copies of the amplicon in this isolate are in a head to tail configuration. A string of 30 A's flank the breakpoints on each side of the amplified segment, suggesting a mechanism for the origin of the tandem amplification. Polymerase chain reaction analysis with oligonucleotides that cross the B8 breakpoint has shown in 26 independent CQR isolates, 16 of which contain amplified copies of pfmdr1, that amplification of the pfmdr1 gene in P. falciparum has arisen as multiple independent events. These results suggest that this region of the genome is under strong selective pressure.

  19. [Influence of reaction optimization on the results of PCR amplification of Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes among Staphylococcus aureus isolates].

    PubMed

    Karahan, Zeynep Ceren; Dolapçi, Iştar; Tekeli, Alper

    2009-10-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is an important virulence determinant of Staphylococcus aureus. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the genes encoding PVL is the most widely used method for determining PVL-positivity. In this study, we used two different primer sets and different annealing temperatures for each set to investigate the effect of optimization of PCR parameters on the amplification results. A total of 321 S. aureus clinical isolates (84.4% methicillin-resistant S. aureus, 76.9% nosocomial) were included to the study. Two different primer sets and two different annealing temperatures were applied for the amplification of PVL gene. For this purpose while luk-PV-1 and luk-PV-2 primers and 55 degrees C and 58 degrees C annealing temperatures were used to amplify the 433 bp region inhabiting the luk-S PV and luk-F PV genes, PVLup and PVLdn primers and 50 degrees C and 48 degrees C annealing temperatures were used to amplify the 1918 bp region inhabiting the same genes. luk-PV-1 and luk-PV-2 primers yielded amplicons at 55 degrees C in 50.2% (161/321) and at 58 degrees C in 1.6% (5/321) of the isolates. To discriminate the positive amplicons from the crossly amplified PCR products, restriction endonuclease analysis was performed and it was observed that the five amplicons generated by luk-PV-1 and luk-PV-2 primers at 58 degrees C were cut by BspH1 enzyme as expected for the positive amplicons. None of the isolates yielded amplicons by PVLup and PVLdn primers at 50 degrees C, however, only 1.6% of the isolates yielded amplicons at 48 degrees C. These isolates were the same with the ones that were PVL positive with luk-PV-1 and luk-PV-2 primers at 58 degrees C. These data revealed that only 1.6% of the study isolates were PVL positive. These results showed that inappropriate cycling conditions may lead to false-negative or false-positive results in PVL-gene amplification. Restriction endonuclease or sequence analysis may be used to differentiate

  20. Reliability of differential PCR for the detection of EGFR and MDM2 gene amplification in DNA extracted from FFPE glioma tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, S.B.; Abbott, K.; Varma, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    A series of 43 human gliomas, consisting of 30 glioblastomas, 7 anaplastic astrocytomas, 3 low grade astrocytomas, 2 ependymomas, and 1 oligodendroglioma, was studied for amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) genes. DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections was analyzed by differential PCR and the results were compared with slot blot examination of DNA extracted from frozen tissue from the same neoplasms. Twelve glioblastomas (40%) showed amplification of the EGFR gene, and overexpression of EGFR was evident in each of these tumors as indicated by the immunoperoxidase technique. Two of the tumors with EGFR gene amplification also revealed amplification of the MDM2 gene, while one additional glioblastoma revealed MDM2 amplification only. A 100% concordance in the detection of amplification was observed between differential PCR and slot blot analysis; consequently these results indicate that differential PCR using DNA extracted front archival tissue sections is a reliable method of demonstrating gene amplifications in glial tumors. 29 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Pattern of HER-2 Gene Amplification and Protein Expression in Benign, Borderline, and Malignant Ovarian Serous and Mucinous Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Rabab A A; Makboul, Rania; Elsers, Dalia A H; Elsaba, Tarek M A M; Thalab, Abeer M A B; Shaaban, Omar M

    2016-06-15

    Amplification of HER-2 gene and overexpression of HER-2 receptor play a significant role in the progression of a number of malignancies such as breast cancer. Trastuzumab (anti-HER-2 therapeutic agent) has been used successfully in treatment of breast cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the pattern of HER-2 gene amplification and of HER-2 receptor expression in a spectrum of serous and mucinous ovarian tumors to determine whether HER-2 is altered in these neoplasms similar to that occurring in breast cancer. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded microarray tissue sections from 212 specimens were stained with HER-2 antibody using immunohistochemistry and with anti-HER-2 DNA probe using chromogenic in situ hybridization. Specimens consisted of 65 benign tumors (50 serous and 15 mucinous), 26 borderline (13 serous and 13 mucinous), 73 malignant (53 serous carcinoma and 20 mucinous carcinoma), 18 metastatic deposits (13 serous and 5 mucinous), in addition to 30 normal tissues (16 ovarian surface and 14 normal fallopian tube). HER-2 protein-positive expression was not detected in the normal or the benign tissues. Borderline neoplasms showed positive staining, but no overexpression. HER-2 overexpression was seen only in 4 carcinoma specimens: 1/53 (1.8%) primary serous carcinomas and 3/20 (15%) primary mucinous carcinomas. HER-2 gene amplification was seen in 4 specimens: 2 primary mucinous carcinomas and 2 malignant deposits of these 2 mucinous carcinomas. In conclusion, alteration of HER-2 was not detected in ovarian serous neoplasms; however, in mucinous carcinoma, HER-2 amplification and overexpression occur more frequently.

  2. Discordance in HER2 gene amplification in circulating and disseminated tumor cells in patients with operable breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Bischoff, Farideh; Ann Mayer, Julie; Wong, Karina; Pham, Tam; Kuerer, Henry; Lodhi, Ashutosh; Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Hall, Carolyn; Lucci, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene amplification in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) might be useful for modifying Herceptin therapy in breast cancer. In the process of investigating the utility of a microfluidic platform for detecting HER2 gene amplification in these cells, we observed novel results on discordance of HER2 status. Peripheral blood (8.5 mL) and bone marrow (BM) (7.5–10 mL) were collected prospectively from patients with clinical stages I–IV breast cancer. Mononuclear cells were recovered, stained with cytokeratin (CK), CD45, and DAPI, and processed through microfluidic channels for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). A ratio of HER2:CEP17 >2 in any CK+/CD45 or CK−/CD45 cell was regarded as positive for HER2 gene amplification. Peripheral blood from 95 patients and BM from 78 patients were studied. We found CK+/CD45−/DAPI+ CTCs in 27.3% of patients. We evaluated HER2 gene amplification by FISH in 88 blood and 78 BM specimens and found HER2+ CTCs in 1 of 9 (11.1%) and HER2+ DTCs (27.2%) in 3 of 11 patients with HER2+ primary tumor. Among patients with a HER2− primary tumor, 5 of 79 had HER2+ CTCs (6.3%) and 14 of 67 had HER2+ DTCs (20.8%). The overall rate of discordance in HER2 status was 15% between primary tumor and CTCs and 28.2% between primary tumor and DTCs. HER2 was amplified in CTCs and DTCs in a portion of both HER2+ and HER2− primary tumors. HER2 discordance was more frequent for DTCs. The clinical implications of evaluating HER2 status in CTCs and DTCs in breast cancer needs to be established in prospective clinical trials. The cell enrichment and extraction microfluidic technology provides a sensitive platform for evaluation of HER2 gene amplification in CTCs and DTCs. PMID:23634290

  3. Selective Targeting of CTNNB1-, KRAS- or MYC-Driven Cell Growth by Combinations of Existing Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Uitdehaag, Joost C. M.; de Roos, Jeroen A. D. M.; van Doornmalen, Antoon M.; Prinsen, Martine B. W.; Spijkers-Hagelstein, Jill A. P.; de Vetter, Judith R. F.; de Man, Jos; Buijsman, Rogier C.; Zaman, Guido J. R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of combination drug treatment in cancer therapy is to improve response rate and to decrease the probability of the development of drug resistance. Preferably, drug combinations are synergistic rather than additive, and, ideally, drug combinations work synergistically only in cancer cells and not in non-malignant cells. We have developed a workflow to identify such targeted synergies, and applied this approach to selectively inhibit the proliferation of cell lines with mutations in genes that are difficult to modulate with small molecules. The approach is based on curve shift analysis, which we demonstrate is a more robust method of determining synergy than combination matrix screening with Bliss-scoring. We show that the MEK inhibitor trametinib is more synergistic in combination with the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib than with vemurafenib, another BRAF inhibitor. In addition, we show that the combination of MEK and BRAF inhibitors is synergistic in BRAF-mutant melanoma cells, and additive or antagonistic in, respectively, BRAF-wild type melanoma cells and non-malignant fibroblasts. This combination exemplifies that synergistic action of drugs can depend on cancer genotype. Next, we used curve shift analysis to identify new drug combinations that specifically inhibit cancer cell proliferation driven by difficult-to-drug cancer genes. Combination studies were performed with compounds that as single agents showed preference for inhibition of cancer cells with mutations in either the CTNNB1 gene (coding for β-catenin), KRAS, or cancer cells expressing increased copy numbers of MYC. We demonstrate that the Wnt-pathway inhibitor ICG-001 and trametinib acted synergistically in Wnt-pathway-mutant cell lines. The ERBB2 inhibitor TAK-165 was synergistic with trametinib in KRAS-mutant cell lines. The EGFR/ERBB2 inhibitor neratinib acted synergistically with the spindle poison docetaxel and with the Aurora kinase inhibitor GSK-1070916 in cell lines with MYC amplification

  4. Identification of DNA lesions using a third base pair for amplification and nanopore sequencing.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Jan; Ding, Yun; Fleming, Aaron M; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2015-11-06

    Damage to the genome is implicated in the progression of cancer and stress-induced diseases. DNA lesions exist in low levels, and cannot be amplified by standard PCR because they are frequently strong blocks to polymerases. Here, we describe a method for PCR amplification of lesion-containing DNA in which the site and identity could be marked, copied and sequenced. Critical for this method is installation of either the dNaM or d5SICS nucleotides at the lesion site after processing via the base excision repair process. These marker nucleotides constitute an unnatural base pair, allowing large quantities of marked DNA to be made by PCR amplification. Sanger sequencing confirms the potential for this method to locate lesions by marking, amplifying and sequencing a lesion in the KRAS gene. Detection using the α-hemolysin nanopore is also developed to analyse the markers in individual DNA strands with the potential to identify multiple lesions per strand.

  5. KRAS and PIK3CA mutations in colorectal adenocarcinomas correlate with aggressive histological features and behavior.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sejin; Hong, Mineui; Shin, Mi Kyung; Kim, Byung Chun; Shin, Hyung-Sik; Yu, Eunsil; Hong, Seung-Mo; Kim, Jihun; Chun, Sung Min; Kim, Tae-Im; Choi, Kyung-Chan; Ko, Young Woong; Kim, Jeong Won

    2017-02-08

    Tumor budding (TB) in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and has been recently characterized as an indicator of poor prognosis along with lymphovascular tumor emboli (LVE), perineural invasion (PNI), and an infiltrative growth pattern. Mutations in the genes of the Ras-MAPK and PI3K pathways are associated with EMT and an aggressive CRC phenotype and have been used in patient stratification for anti-EGF receptor therapies; however, the impact of these mutations on CRC morphology and behavior remains unclear. In this study, using a multi-gene panel, we detected KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, and POLE mutations in 90 CRCs and investigated their associations with clinicopathological parameters, including TB. Our results showed that 21 of 34 tumors with high-grade TB had KRAS mutations (P=.001) and KRAS G12D and PIK3CA exon 9 variants were significantly associated with high-grade TB (P=.002 and .006, respectively); furthermore, tumors with KRAS mutations in exons 3 and 4 tended to have LVE and PNI (P=.044 and .049, respectively). PIK3CA exon 9 mutations indicated a tendency for shorter disease-free survival (P=.030), whereas BRAF mutations were associated with extracellular mucin deposition (P=.016). Our study revealed a correlation of KRAS mutations with high-grade TB, an association of certain KRAS and PIK3CA variants with aggressive clinicopathological features, as well as a possible relationship between BRAF mutations and mucin production in CRC.

  6. An XIST-related small RNA regulates KRAS G-quadruplex formation beyond X-inactivation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuli C; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Yuo, Chung-Yee; Chan, Wen-Ling; Chang, Ya-Sian; Chang, Wen-Hsin; Wu, Shou-Mei; Chou, Han-Lin; Liu, Ta-Chih; Lu, Chi-Yu; Yang, Wen-Kuang; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2016-12-27

    X-inactive-specific transcript (XIST), a long non-coding RNA, is essential for the initiation of X-chromosome inactivation. However, little is known about other roles of XIST in the physiological process in eukaryotic cells. In this study, the bioinformatics approaches revealed XIST could be processed into a small non-coding RNA XPi2. The XPi2 RNA was confirmed by a northern blot assay; its expression was gender-independent, suggesting the role of XPi2 was beyond X-chromosome inactivation. The pull-down assay combined with LC-MS-MS identified two XPi2-associated proteins, nucleolin and hnRNP A1, connected to the formation of G-quadruplex. Moreover, the microarray data showed the knockdown of XPi2 down-regulated the KRAS pathway. Consistently, we tested the expression of ten genes, including KRAS, which was correlated with a G-quadruplex formation and found the knockdown of XPi2 caused a dramatic decrease in the transcription level of KRAS among the ten genes. The results of CD/NMR assay also supported the interaction of XPi2 and the polypurine-polypyrimidine element of KRAS. Accordingly, XPi2 may stimulate the KRAS expression by attenuating G-quadruplex formation. Our present work sheds light on the novel role of small RNA XPi2 in modulating the G-quadruplex formation which may play some essential roles in the KRAS- associated carcinogenesis.

  7. An XIST-related small RNA regulates KRAS G-quadruplex formation beyond X-inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yuli C.; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Yuo, Chung-Yee; Chan, Wen-Ling; Chang, Ya-Sian; Chang, Wen-Hsin; Wu, Shou-Mei; Chou, Han-Lin; Liu, Ta-Chih; Lu, Chi-Yu; Yang, Wen-Kuang; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2016-01-01

    X-inactive-specific transcript (XIST), a long non-coding RNA, is essential for the initiation of X-chromosome inactivation. However, little is known about other roles of XIST in the physiological process in eukaryotic cells. In this study, the bioinformatics approaches revealed XIST could be processed into a small non-coding RNA XPi2. The XPi2 RNA was confirmed by a northern blot assay; its expression was gender-independent, suggesting the role of XPi2 was beyond X-chromosome inactivation. The pull-down assay combined with LC-MS-MS identified two XPi2-associated proteins, nucleolin and hnRNP A1, connected to the formation of G-quadruplex. Moreover, the microarray data showed the knockdown of XPi2 down-regulated the KRAS pathway. Consistently, we tested the expression of ten genes, including KRAS, which was correlated with a G-quadruplex formation and found the knockdown of XPi2 caused a dramatic decrease in the transcription level of KRAS among the ten genes. The results of CD/NMR assay also supported the interaction of XPi2 and the polypurine-polypyrimidine element of KRAS. Accordingly, XPi2 may stimulate the KRAS expression by attenuating G-quadruplex formation. Our present work sheds light on the novel role of small RNA XPi2 in modulating the G-quadruplex formation which may play some essential roles in the KRAS- associated carcinogenesis. PMID:27880931

  8. Use of aiiA gene amplification for AHL-lactonase production from endophytic bacterium Enterobacter species.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P S; Rai, V Ravishankar

    2015-01-01

    AHL-lactonase has gained renewed interest due to biotechnological applications such as antiquorum sensing, antibiofilm strategies, biofouling, etc. In our study, the production of AHL-lactonase from endophytic bacteria Enterobacter aerogenes VT66 was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) using central composite design (CCD) for four different cultural conditions. The relative activity of AHL-lactonase was correlated with amplification of aiiA homologous gene amplification with respect to cultural conditions. Statistical analysis by ANOVA of the quadratic regression model showed that the RSM model constructed is highly significant, as indicated by F-test with a low probability value (p(model) < 0.0001) and high regression coefficient (0.9997) as well as lower coefficient of variation (1.86%) indicate that suitability of variable parameters. The quadratic regression model of AHL-lactonase production in terms of relative activity was built and the optimal cultural conditions for maximum enzyme production were determined as 32.5 °C temperature, pH 7.0, 350 μM of substrate concentration and 33 h of incubation time. The enhanced AHL-lactonase yielded 1.33 fold increases in relative activity and it positively correlated with the amplification of aiiA gene.

  9. Amplification and overexpression of TGIF2, a novel homeobox gene of the TALE superclass, in ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Imoto, I; Pimkhaokham, A; Watanabe, T; Saito-Ohara, F; Soeda, E; Inazawa, J

    2000-09-16

    Homeodomain transcription factors play important roles in directing cellular proliferation and differentiation. A TALE-superclass homeodomain protein, multifunctional repressor of TGFbeta-induced transcription. Here we report identification of TGIF2, a novel TALE-superclass homeodomain protein that shows distinct homology with TGIF, especially in its DNA-binding domain. TGIF2 is expressed ubiquitously in human tissues, with the highest levels being found in heart, kidney, and testis. The TGIF2 product contains a putative nuclear localization signal; translocation of the protein to the nucleus was confirmed by transfection of epitope-tagged cDNA. TGIF2 lies on chromosome 20q11.2-12. Since amplification of 20q is often observed among ovarian cancers, we determined the status of DNA copy-number and expression of TGIF2 in 14 ovarian-cancer cell lines. This gene was over-expressed in all lines that showed amplification by FISH analysis. The results suggested that TGIF2 may play an important role in the development and/or progression of some ovarian tumors through a mechanism of gene amplification.

  10. EPSPS Gene Amplification in Glyphosate-Resistant Italian Ryegrass (Lolium perenne ssp. multiflorum) Populations from Arkansas (United States).

    PubMed

    Salas, Reiofeli A; Scott, Robert C; Dayan, Franck E; Burgos, Nilda R

    2015-07-01

    Glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass was detected in Arkansas (United States) in 2007. In 2014, 45 populations were confirmed resistant in eight counties across the state. The level of resistance and resistance mechanisms in six populations were studied to assess the severity of the problem and identify alternative management approaches. Dose-response bioassays, glyphosate absorption and translocation experiments, herbicide target (EPSPS) gene sequence analysis, and gene amplification assays were conducted. The dose causing 50% growth reduction (GR50) was 7-19 times higher for the resistant population than for the susceptible standard. Uptake and translocation of (14)C-glyphosate were similar in resistant and susceptible plants, and no mutation in the EPSPS gene known to be associated with resistance to glyphosate was detected. Resistant plants contained from 11- to >100-fold more copies of the EPSPS gene than the susceptible plants, whereas the susceptible plants had only one copy of EPSPS. Plants surviving the recommended dose of glyphosate contained at least 10 copies. The EPSPS copy number was positively related to glyphosate resistance level (r = 80). Therefore, resistance to glyphosate in these populations is due to multiplication of the target site. Resistance mechanisms could be location-specific. Suppressing the mechanism for gene amplification may overcome resistance.

  11. Optimized Multiplex Detection of 7 KRAS Mutations by Taqman Allele-Specific qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Orue, Andrea; Rieber, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the KRAS mutational status of tumor samples is essential to manage patients with colorectal or lung cancer, since these mutations preclude treatment with monoclonal anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies. We report an inexpensive, rapid multiplex allele-specific qPCR method detecting the 7 most clinically relevant KRAS somatic mutations with concomitant amplification of non-mutated KRAS in tumor cells and tissues from CRC patients. Positive samples evidenced in the multiplex assay were further subjected to individual allele-specific analysis, to define the specific mutation. Reference human cancer DNA harbouring either G12A, G12C, G12D, G12R, G12S, G12V and G13D confirmed assay specificity with ≤1% sensitivity of mutant alleles. KRAS multiplex mutation analysis usefulness was also demonstrated with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) from CRC biopsies. Conclusion. Co-amplification of non-mutated DNA avoided false negatives from degraded samples. Moreover, this cost effective assay is compatible with mutation detection by DNA sequencing in FFPE tissues, but with a greater sensitivity when mutant DNA concentrations are limiting. PMID:27632281

  12. Prognostic role of KRAS mutations in Sardinian patients with colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Palomba, Grazia; Cossu, Antonio; Paliogiannis, Panagiotis; Pazzola, Antonio; Baldino, Giovanni; Scartozzi, Mario; Ionta, Maria Teresa; Ortu, Salvatore; Capelli, Francesca; Lanzillo, Annamaria; Sedda, Tito; Sanna, Giovanni; Barca, Michela; Virdis, Luciano; Budroni, Mario; Palmieri, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The presence of mutations in the KRAS gene is a predictor of a poor clinical response to EGFR-targeted agents in patients affected by colorectal cancer (CRC), but its significance as a global prognostic factor remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of the KRAS mutational status on time to first metastasis (TTM) and overall survival (OS) in a cohort of Sardinian CRC patients. A total of 551 patients with metastatic CRC at the time of enrolment were included. Clinical and pathological features of the disease, including follow-up information, were obtained from medical records and cancer registry data. For mutational analysis formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples were processed using a standard protocol. The coding sequence and splice junctions of exons 2 and 3 of the KRAS gene were screened for mutations by direct automated sequencing. Overall, 186 KRAS mutations were detected in 183/551 (33%) patients: 125 (67%) were located in codon 12, 36 (19%) in codon 13, and 18 (10%) in codon 61. The remaining mutations (7; 4%) were detected in uncommonly-affected codons. No significant correlation between KRAS mutations and gender, age, anatomical location and stage of the disease at the time of diagnosis was identified. Furthermore, no prognostic value of KRAS mutations was found considering either TTM or OS. When patients were stratified by KRAS mutational status and gender, males were significantly associated with a longer TTM. The results of the present study indicate that KRAS mutation correlated with a slower metastatic progression in males with CRC from Sardinia, irrespective of the age at diagnosis and the codon of the mutation. PMID:27446446

  13. Isolation of epithelial cells from acrylic removable dentures and gender identification by amplification of SRY gene using real time PCR.

    PubMed

    George, Renjith; Sriram, G; Saraswathi, Tr; Sivapathasundharam, B

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the usefulness of acrylic dentures as the source of DNA for forensic analysis. Thirty-eight samples (21 males and 17 females) were collected and stored for different time periods. The epithelial cells adhered to the dentures were retrieved and the genomic DNA was extracted. All the samples yielded sufficient amount of DNA for analysis irrespective of the storage time. Gender determination was done by amplification of the sex determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY) using real-time polymerase chain reaction with 100% accuracy, within minimal time. With this study, we conclude that saliva-stained acrylic dentures can act as a source of forensic DNA and co-amplification of SRY gene with other routine sex typing markers will give unambiguous gender identification.

  14. Oncogenic KRAS triggers MAPK-dependent errors in mitosis and MYC-dependent sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents

    PubMed Central

    Perera, David; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS induces cell proliferation and transformation, but little is known about its effects on cell division. Functional genetic screens have recently revealed that cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic KRAS are sensitive to interference with mitosis, but neither the mechanism nor the uniformity of anti-mitotic drug sensitivity connected with mutant KRAS expression are yet clear. Here, we report that acute expression of oncogenic KRAS in HeLa cells induces mitotic delay and defects in chromosome segregation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation and de-regulated expression of several mitosis-related genes. These anomalies are accompanied by increased sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents, a phenotype dependent on the transcription factor MYC and its downstream target anti-apoptotic protein BCL-XL. Unexpectedly, we find no correlation between KRAS mutational status or MYC expression levels and anti-mitotic drug sensitivity when surveying a large database of anti-cancer drug responses. However, we report that the co-existence of KRAS mutations and high MYC expression predicts anti-mitotic drug sensitivity. Our findings reveal a novel function of oncogenic KRAS in regulating accurate mitotic progression and suggest new avenues to therapeutically target KRAS-mutant tumours and stratify patients in ongoing clinical trials of anti-mitotic drugs. PMID:27412232

  15. KRAS mutation leads to decreased expression of regulator of calcineurin 2, resulting in tumor proliferation in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niitsu, H; Hinoi, T; Kawaguchi, Y; Sentani, K; Yuge, R; Kitadai, Y; Sotomaru, Y; Adachi, T; Saito, Y; Miguchi, M; Kochi, M; Sada, H; Shimomura, M; Oue, N; Yasui, W; Ohdan, H

    2016-01-01

    KRAS mutations occur in 30–40% of all cases of human colorectal cancer (CRC). However, to date, specific therapeutic agents against KRAS-mutated CRC have not been developed. We previously described the generation of mouse models of colon cancer with and without Kras mutations (CDX2P-G22Cre;Apcflox/flox; LSL-KrasG12D and CDX2P-G22Cre;Apcflox/flox mice, respectively). Here, the two mouse models were compared to identify candidate genes, which may represent novel therapeutic targets or predictive biomarkers. Differentially expressed genes in tumors from the two mouse models were identified using microarray analysis, and their expression was compared by quantitative reverse transcription–PCR (qRT–PCR) and immunohistochemical analyses in mouse tumors and surgical specimens of human CRC, with or without KRAS mutations, respectively. Furthermore, the functions of candidate genes were studied using human CRC cell lines. Microarray analysis of 34 000 transcripts resulted in the identification of 19 candidate genes. qRT–PCR analysis data showed that four of these candidate genes (Clps, Irx5, Bex1 and Rcan2) exhibited decreased expression in the Kras-mutated mouse model. The expression of the regulator of calcineurin 2 (RCAN2) was also observed to be lower in KRAS-mutated human CRC. Moreover, inhibitory function for cancer cell proliferation dependent on calcineurin was indicated with overexpression and short hairpin RNA knockdown of RCAN2 in human CRC cell lines. KRAS mutations in CRC lead to a decrease in RCAN2 expression, resulting in tumor proliferation due to derepression of calcineurin–nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling. Our findings suggest that calcineurin–NFAT signal may represent a novel molecular target for the treatment of KRAS-mutated CRC. PMID:27526107

  16. PCR-mediated recombination of the amplification products of the Hibiscus tiliaceus cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linghui; Tang, Tian; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2007-03-31

    PCR-mediated recombination describes the process of in vitro chimera formation from related template sequences present in a single PCR amplification. The high levels of genetic redundancy in eukaryotic genomes should make recombination artifacts occur readily. However, few evolutionary biologists adequately consider this phenomenon when studying gene lineages. The cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GapC), which encodes a NADP-dependent nonphosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the cytosol, is a classical low-copy nuclear gene marker and is commonly used in molecular evolutionary studies. Here, we report on the occurrence of PCR-mediated recombination in the GapC gene family of Hibiscus tiliaceus. The study suggests that recombinant areas appear to be correlated with DNA template secondary structures. Our observations highlight that recombination artifacts should be considered when studying specific and allelic phylogenies. The authors suggest that nested PCR be used to suppress PCR-mediated recombination.

  17. Ladder-like amplification of the type I interferon gene cluster in the human osteosarcoma cell line MG63.

    PubMed

    Marella, Narasimharao V; Zeitz, Michael J; Malyavantham, Kishore S; Pliss, Artem; Matsui, Sei-ichi; Goetze, Sandra; Bode, Juergen; Raska, Ivan; Berezney, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    The organization of the type I interferon (IFN) gene cluster (9p21.3) was studied in a human osteosarcoma cell line (MG63). Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) showed an amplification of approximately 6-fold which ended at both ends of the gene cluster with a deletion that extended throughout the 9p21.3 band. Spectral karyotyping (SKY) combined with fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) identified an arrangement of the gene cluster in a ladder-like array of 5-7 'bands' spanning a single chromosome termed the 'IFN chromosome'. Chromosome painting revealed that the IFN chromosome is derived from components of chromosomes 4, 8 and 9. Labelling with centromeric probes demonstrated a ladder-like amplification of centromeric 4 and 9 sequences that co-localized with each other and a similar banding pattern of chromosome 4, as well as alternating with the IFN gene clusters. In contrast, centromere 8 was not detected on the IFN chromosome. One of the amplified centromeric 9 bands was identified as the functional centromere based on its location at the chromosome constriction and immunolocalization of the CENP-C protein. A model is presented for the generation of the IFN chromosome that involves breakage-fusion-bridge events.

  18. Optimization of direct whole blood PCR amplification with applications on a static thermostat chip.

    PubMed

    Qu, Bai-Yan; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Tian, Xiao-Xi; Chen, Kun; Fang, Fang

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, direct whole blood PCR amplifications on a static chip thermostat without sample purifications are demonstrated; in these amplifications, problems such as cross-interferences and contaminations could be avoided. The amplification conditions, such as the compositions of reagents and thermal programs, were investigated systematically by a GeneAmp PCR system with a native p53 gene segment (about 543 bp) of human genome and an exterior lambda DNA segment (about 500 bp) as targets. Direct amplifications of p53 and K-ras (about 157 bp) gene segments from 0.5 microL blood samples were successfully demonstrated by a static PCR chip with an indium tin oxide glass substrate. The chip thermostat has a typical size of 25 mm x 25 mm, and a polyethylene tube was used as the PCR vial on the glass surface of the chip. Fuzzy proportional integration-differentiation algorithms were adopted in temperature controls of the chip with an aid of a micro-Pt100 sensor. In the direct PCR with the thermostat chip, the whole process only involves automatic thermal programs. This work demonstrated that a chip PCR for field test without desktop facilities is possible either for a point of care test or for forensic analysis.

  19. Amplification of TLO Mediator Subunit Genes Facilitate Filamentous Growth in Candida Spp.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongle; Moran, Gary P.; Myers, Lawrence C.

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous growth is a hallmark of C. albicans pathogenicity compared to less-virulent ascomycetes. A multitude of transcription factors regulate filamentous growth in response to specific environmental cues. Our work, however, suggests the evolutionary history of C. albicans that resulted in its filamentous growth plasticity may be tied to a change in the general transcription machinery rather than transcription factors and their specific targets. A key genomic difference between C. albicans and its less-virulent relatives, including its closest relative C. dubliniensis, is the unique expansion of the TLO (TeLOmere-associated) gene family in C. albicans. Individual Tlo proteins are fungal-specific subunits of Mediator, a large multi-subunit eukaryotic transcriptional co-activator complex. This amplification results in a large pool of ‘free,’ non-Mediator associated, Tlo protein present in C. albicans, but not in C. dubliniensis or other ascomycetes with attenuated virulence. We show that engineering a large ‘free’ pool of the C. dubliniensis Tlo2 (CdTlo2) protein in C. dubliniensis, through overexpression, results in a number of filamentation phenotypes typically associated only with C. albicans. The amplitude of these phenotypes is proportional to the amount of overexpressed CdTlo2 protein. Overexpression of other C. dubliniensis and C. albicans Tlo proteins do result in these phenotypes. Tlo proteins and their orthologs contain a Mediator interaction domain, and a potent transcriptional activation domain. Nuclear localization of the CdTlo2 activation domain, facilitated naturally by the Tlo Mediator binding domain or artificially through an appended nuclear localization signal, is sufficient for the CdTlo2 overexpression phenotypes. A C. albicans med3 null mutant causes multiple defects including the inability to localize Tlo proteins to the nucleus and reduced virulence in a murine systemic infection model. Our data supports a model in which the

  20. Across the universe of K-RAS mutations in non-small-cell-lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Piva, Sheila; Ganzinelli, Monica; Garassino, Marina Chiara; Caiola, Elisa; Farina, Gabriella; Broggini, Massimo; Marabese, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    RAS family proteins are important signaling molecules that regulate cell growth, survival and differentiation by coupling receptor activation to downstream effector pathways. Three distinct genes encode for the three different proteins H-, K-, and N- RAS. These proteins share high sequence homology, particularly at the N-Terminal domain. Among them, K-RAS is one of the most frequently mutated in human cancer. The majority of the mutations present in K-RAS are at codon 12 (from 80 to 100%) followed by codon 13 and 61. In all cases, aminoacid change leads to a constitutively activated protein. K-RAS mutations have a role in tumor development as well as in tumor progression and resistance. Despite the various studies which have been published, the prognostic and predictive role of K-RAS mutations is still under debate. Keeping in mind that the glycine present at position 12 can be substituted by valine, aspartic acid or cysteine, it could be well understood that each different substitution plays a different role in K-RAS-dependent processes. The present article focuses on the molecular and biological characteristics of K-RAS protein, its role in NSCLC tumor development and progression. We also present an overview of the preclinical models both in vitro and in vivo available to determine the role of K-RAS in tumor progression and response to treatment and on the recent results obtained in this field. Finally, we have considered the impact of KRAS mutations in clinical practice, analyzing the different recent trials that have taken into consideration K-RAS.

  1. Whole-genome amplification: a useful approach to characterize new genes in unculturable protozoan parasites such as Bonamia exitiosa.

    PubMed

    Prado-Alvarez, Maria; Couraleau, Yann; Chollet, Bruno; Tourbiez, Delphine; Arzul, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    Bonamia exitiosa is an intracellular parasite (Haplosporidia) that has been associated with mass mortalities in oyster populations in the Southern hemisphere. This parasite was recently detected in the Northern hemisphere including Europe. Some representatives of the Bonamia genus have not been well categorized yet due to the lack of genomic information. In the present work, we have applied Whole-Genome Amplification (WGA) technique in order to characterize the actin gene in the unculturable protozoan B. exitiosa. This is the first protein coding gene described in this species. Molecular analysis revealed that B. exitiosa actin is more similar to Bonamia ostreae actin gene-1. Actin phylogeny placed the Bonamia sp. infected oysters in the same clade where the herein described B. exitiosa actin resolved, offering novel information about the classification of the genus. Our results showed that WGA methodology is a promising and valuable technique to be applied to unculturable protozoans whose genomic material is limited.

  2. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis on capillary electrophoresis instruments for a rapid gene copy number study.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Stéphane; Currie-Fraser, Erica; Xu, Licen; Coffa, Jordy

    2008-09-01

    Annotated DNA samples that had been previously analyzed were tested using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assays containing probes targeting BRCA1, BRCA2, and MMR (MLH1/MSH2 genes) and the 9p21 chromosomal region. MLPA polymerase chain reaction products were separated on a capillary electrophoresis platform, and the data were analyzed using GeneMapper v4.0 software (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA). After signal normalization, loci regions that had undergone deletions or duplications were identified using the GeneMapper Report Manager and verified using the DyeScale functionality. The results highlight an easy-to-use, optimal sample preparation and analysis workflow that can be used for both small- and large-scale studies.

  3. Enhancement of methotrexate resistance and dihydrofolate reductase gene amplification by treatment of mouse 3T6 cells with hydroxyurea.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, P C; Tlsty, T D; Schimke, R T

    1983-01-01

    We investigated various parameters associated with the initial selection of mouse 3T6 cells for resistance to single concentrations of methotrexate and characterized resistant colonies for the presence of additional (amplified) copies of the dihydrofolate reductase gene. Our results indicate that the frequency of occurrence of dihydrofolate reductase gene amplification varies with the selecting concentration of methotrexate and is highly variable between clonally derived sublines of mouse 3T6 cells. Second, we increased the frequency of occurrence of cells with amplified dihydrofolate reductase genes by transiently inhibiting DNA synthesis with hydroxyurea before the selection of cells in single concentrations of methotrexate. This effect was dependent on the concentration of hydroxyurea, the time of exposure to the drug, and the time interval between the removal of hydroxyurea and the selection of cells in methotrexate. Images PMID:6877240

  4. Gene amplification at a locus encoding a putative Na+/H+ antiporter confers sodium and lithium tolerance in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Z P; McCullough, N; Martel, R; Hemmingsen, S; Young, P G

    1992-01-01

    We have identified a new locus, sodium 2 (sod2) based on selection for increased LiCl tolerance in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Tolerant strains have enhanced pH-dependent Na+ export capacity and sodium transport experiments suggest that the gene encodes an Na+/H+ antiport. The predicted sod2 gene product can be placed in the broad class of transporters which possess 12 hydrophobic transmembrane domains. The protein shows some sequence similarity to the human and bacterial Na+/H+ antiporters. Overexpression of sod2 increased Na+ export capacity and conferred sodium tolerance. Osmotolerance was not affected and sod2 cells were unaffected for growth in K+. In a sod2 disruption strain cells were incapable of exporting sodium. They were hypersensitive to Na+ or Li+ and could not grow under conditions that approximate pH7. The sod2 gene amplification could be selected stepwise and the degree of such amplification correlated with the level of Na+ or Li+ tolerance. Images PMID:1314171

  5. An electrochemical biosensor for double-stranded Wnt7B gene detection based on enzymatic isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Li, Junlong; Chen, Zhongping; Xiang, Yu; Zhou, Lili; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Zhang; Sun, Kexin; Yin, Dan; Li, Yi; Xie, Guoming

    2016-12-15

    Wnt7B gene plays an important role in the development and progression of breast cancer, gastric cancer, esophageal cancer and pancreatic cancer. While, the natural state of DNA is double stranded, which makes it difficult to be directly detected. Here, we develop an electrochemical biosensor method for Wnt7B gene detection without the need to denature the target. This method firstly used nicking enzyme for exploiting in the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Then, long single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) was generated from the cutting site through polymerase extension reaction. Whereafter, the long ssDNA triggered a hairpin self-assembly recycling reaction, which gave rise to another isothermal amplification reaction. Last, short ssDNA was formed after the this amplification process, which could hybridize with the capture probe immobilized on Au electrode and result in signal variation. This method showed excellent analytical performance for dsDNA, of which the linear range was 2fM to 500pM and the detection limit was 1.6fM (S/N=3). It also showed an good results when applied to the real sample of Wnt7B gene detection.

  6. The PRKD1 promoter is a target of the KRas-NF-κB pathway in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Döppler, Heike; Panayiotou, Richard; Reid, Elizabeth M.; Maimo, Willibroad; Bastea, Ligia; Storz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of PRKD1 and its gene product protein kinase D1 (PKD1) are linked to oncogenic signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, but a direct functional relationship to oncogenic KRas has not been established so far. We here describe the PRKD1 gene promoter as a target for oncogenic KRas signaling. We demonstrate that KRas-induced activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway is one mechanism of how PRKD1 expression is increased and identify the binding sites for NF-κB in the PRKD1 promoter. Altogether, these results describe a novel mechanism governing PRKD1 gene expression in PDA and provide a functional link between oncogenic KRas, NF-κB and expression of PRKD1. PMID:27649783

  7. Accumulation of wild-type p53 protein in astrocytomas is not mediated by MDM2 gene amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, M.P.; Louis, D.N. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1993-05-01

    The authors have previously described ten cases of astrocytoma (three WHO grade II, four grade III and four grade IV) with seemingly contradictory results on immunohistochemical analysis of the p53 protein and molecular genetic analysis of the p53 gene. Fixed, embedded tissues from these cases were immunohistochemically positive with the PAb 1801 antibody, which supposedly implies the presence of mutant protein. These ten cases, however, did not have mutations in exons 5 through 8 of the p53 gene, the conserved regions in which almost all human mutations have been described. The authors suggested that these cases might either represent overexpression of wild-type p53 protein (since the PAb 1801 antibody reacts with both wild-type and mutant p53 protein) or mutations in less conserved regions of the gene. To investigate these possibilities further, they performed single strand conformational polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing on p53 exons 4, 9 and 10 in the nine cases with available DNA, since rare mutations have been noted at these loci. None of the cases showed alterations, making it highly unlikely that these tumors harbor mutations in exons of the p53 gene. They also performed immunohistochemistry on frozen sections from seven available tumors, using the mutant-specific antibody PAb 240 in addition to PAb 1801. All tumors continued to show positive staining with PAb 1801, but only one tumor reacted with PAb 240. The results support the hypothesis that the accumulated p53 protein in most cases is wild-type. Because the product of the MDM2 oncogene can bind to wild-type p53 protein, and because MDM2 amplification has recently been demonstrated in human tumors, the authors evaluated MDM2 amplification in the nine astrocytomas with available DNA. Using slot blot analysis with a 96-base pair, PCR-generated probe to the first exon of the MDM2 gene, they were unable to show MDM2 gene amplification in these tumors or in other assayed astrocytomas.

  8. Oncogenic KRAS signalling in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Eser, S; Schnieke, A; Schneider, G; Saur, D

    2014-08-26

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is almost universally fatal. The annual number of deaths equals the number of newly diagnosed cases, despite maximal treatment. The overall 5-year survival rate of <5% has remained stubbornly unchanged over the last 30 years, despite tremendous efforts in preclinical and clinical science. There is unquestionably an urgent need to further improve our understanding of pancreatic cancer biology, treatment response and relapse, and to identify novel therapeutic targets. Rigorous research in the field has uncovered genetic aberrations that occur during PDAC development and progression. In most cases, PDAC is initiated by oncogenic mutant KRAS, which has been shown to drive pancreatic neoplasia. However, all attempts to target KRAS directly have failed in the clinic and KRAS is widely assumed to be undruggable. This has led to intense efforts to identify druggable critical downstream targets and nodes orchestrated by mutationally activated KRAS. This includes context-specific KRAS effector pathways, synthetic lethal interaction partners and KRAS-driven metabolic changes. Here, we review recent advances in oncogenic KRAS signalling and discuss how these might benefit PDAC treatment in the future.

  9. Quantification and assessment of viability of Cryptococcus neoformans by LightCycler amplification of capsule gene mRNA.

    PubMed

    Amjad, Muhammad; Kfoury, Najla; Cha, Raymond; Mobarak, Reem

    2004-12-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen. It infects the central nervous system causing meningitis, which is fatal if untreated, especially in AIDS and immunosuppressed patients. In this study a method of quantification and assessment of viability of C. neoformans by LightCycler RT-PCR amplification of the capsule gene mRNA is established. The sequence of primers and probes were derived from C. neoformans capsular CAP10 gene mRNA (GenBank accession number AF144574), and were species specific. Agarose gel electrophoresis analysis of LightCycler RT-PCR product showed a single band of 223 bp in length. In order to develop an internal control a 223 bp exon fragment of capsule mRNA was cloned in the pCR2.1 plasmid vector and RNA was generated by in vitro transcription. To determine the sensitivity of the assay, serial dilutions of in vitro-transcribed RNA with known concentrations and copy numbers, and serially diluted cultures of viable and nonviable C. neoformans were used. Under optimal conditions as little as 0.472 fg of capsule mRNA could be detected, corresponding to 1-10 c.f.u. ml(-1) of the sample. No amplification was observed from up to 10(5) heat/UV radiation-killed yeast cells and RNA of other bacterial and fungal pathogens and human genomic DNA or RNA. The amplification of capsule mRNA represents a sensitive, specific and quantitative means of detection of viable C. neoformans in clinical specimens and can be useful in the evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of antifungal drugs in the treatment of C. neoformans meningitis.

  10. Altered regulation of DNA ligase IV activity by aberrant promoter DNA methylation and gene amplification in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuhmann, Christine; Li, Carmen; Kloor, Matthias; Salou, Mariam; Weigel, Christoph; Schmidt, Christopher R; Ng, Linda W C; Tsui, Wendy W Y; Leung, Suet Y; Yuen, Siu T; Becker, Natalia; Weichenhan, Dieter; Plass, Christoph; Schmezer, Peter; Chan, Tsun L; Popanda, Odilia

    2014-04-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) presents as a very heterogeneous disease which cannot sufficiently be characterized with the currently known genetic and epigenetic markers. To identify new markers for CRC we scrutinized the methylation status of 231 DNA repair-related genes by methyl-CpG immunoprecipitation followed by global methylation profiling on a CpG island microarray, as altered expression of these genes could drive genomic and chromosomal instability observed in these tumors. We show for the first time hypermethylation of MMP9, DNMT3A and LIG4 in CRC which was confirmed in two CRC patient groups with different ethnicity. DNA ligase IV (LIG4) showed strong differential promoter methylation (up to 60%) which coincided with downregulation of mRNA in 51% of cases. This functional association of LIG4 methylation and gene expression was supported by LIG4 re-expression in 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-treated colon cancer cell lines, and reduced ligase IV amounts and end-joining activity in extracts of tumors with hypermethylation. Methylation of LIG4 was not associated with other genetic and epigenetic markers of CRC in our study. As LIG4 is located on chromosome 13 which is frequently amplified in CRC, two loci were tested for gene amplification in a subset of 47 cases. Comparison of amplification, methylation and expression data revealed that, in 30% of samples, the LIG4 gene was amplified and methylated, but expression was not changed. In conclusion, hypermethylation of the LIG4 promoter is a new mechanism to control ligase IV expression. It may represent a new epigenetic marker for CRC independent of known markers.

  11. Amplification and expression of a salivary gland DNA puff gene in the prothoracic gland of Bradysia hygida (Diptera: Sciaridae).

    PubMed

    Candido-Silva, Juliana Aparecida; Machado, Maiaro Cabral Rosa; Hartfelder, Klaus Hartmann; de Almeida, Jorge Cury; Paçó-Larson, Maria Luisa; Monesi, Nadia

    2015-03-01

    The DNA puff BhC4-1 gene, located in DNA puff C4 of Bradysiahygida, is amplified and expressed in the salivary gland at the end of the fourth larval instar as a late response to the increase in 20-hydroxyecdysone titer that triggers metamorphosis. Functional studies revealed that the mechanisms that regulate BhC4-1 expression in the salivary gland are conserved in transgenic Drosophila. These studies also led to the identification of a cis-regulatory module that drives developmentally regulated expression of BhC4-1-lacZ in the prothoracic gland cells of the ring gland, a compound organ which in Drosophila results from the fusion of the prothoracic glands, the corpus allatum and the corpus cardiacum. Here we have investigated the occurrence of BhC4-1 expression in B. hygida prothoracic glands. We report the identification of the B. hygida prothoracic gland and demonstrate that it releases ecdysone. Using RT-qPCR, western blots and immunolocalization experiments, we demonstrate that the BhC4-1 mRNA and the BhC4-1 protein are both expressed in the B. hygida prothoracic glands at the same time that DNA puff C4 is formed in the salivary gland. We also show that BhC4-1 is concomitantly amplified 4.8-fold in the prothoracic gland and 23-fold in the salivary gland. Our results reveal the occurrence of stage specific expression of a DNA puff gene in the prothoracic glands of B. hygida, and extend previous studies that have shown that DNA puff genes expression is not restricted to the salivary gland. In addition, the description of stage specific gene amplification in the prothoracic glands of B. hygida constitutes the first demonstration that gene amplification in Diptera might occur concomitantly in two different tissues in the same developmental stage.

  12. Rapid and specific detection of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene in Vibrio parahaemolyticus by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Jiro; Sugawara, Chiyo; Akahane, Kenji; Hashimoto, Keiji; Kojima, Tadashi; Ikedo, Masanari; Konuma, Hirotaka; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko

    2009-04-01

    Several investigators have reported that thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin are important virulence factors of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, but it has been difficult to detect these factors rapidly in seafood and other environmental samples. A novel nucleic acid amplification method, termed the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), which amplifies DNA with high specificity and rapidity under isothermal conditions, was applied. In this study, we designed tdh gene-specific LAMP primers for detection of TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus. The specificity of this assay was evaluated with 32 strains of TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus, one strain of TDH-producing Grimontia hollisae, 10 strains of TDH-nonproducing V. parahaemolyticus, and 94 strains of TDH-nonproducing bacteria, and the sensitivity was high enough to detect one cell per test. Moreover, to investigate the detection of TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus in oysters, the LAMP assay was performed with enrichment culture in alkaline peptone water of oyster samples inoculated with TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus and TDH-nonproducing V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus after enrichment in alkaline peptone water. These results suggest that the LAMP assay targeting tdh gene has high sensitivity and specificity and is useful to detect TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus in oyster after enrichment.

  13. Gene amplification and microsatellite instability induced in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells by alpha particles and heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Gene amplification and microsatellite alteration are useful markers of genomic instability in tumor and transformed cell lines. It has been suggested that genomic instability contributes to the progression of tumorigenesis by accumulating genetic changes. In this study, amplification of the carbamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbamylase, dihydro-orotase (CAD) gene in transformed and tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by either alpha particles or (56)Fe ions was assessed by measuring resistance to N-(phosphonacetyl)-l-aspartate (PALA). In addition, alterations of microsatellite loci located on chromosomes 3p and 18q were analyzed in a series of primary and secondary tumor cell lines generated in nude mice. The frequency of PALA-resistant colonies was 1-3 x 10(-3) in tumor cell lines, 5-8 x 10(-5) in transformed cells prior to inoculation into nude mice, and less than 10(-7) in control BEP2D cells. Microsatellite alterations were detected in all 11 tumor cell lines examined at the following loci: D18S34, D18S363, D18S877, D3S1038 and D3S1607. No significant difference in either PALA resistance or microsatellite instability was found in tumor cell lines that were induced by alpha particles compared to those induced by (56)Fe ions.

  14. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Listeria ivanovii by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification of the smcL Gene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Xu, Huaqing; Dai, Hang; Meng, Shuang; Ye, Changyun

    2014-01-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for rapid and sensitive detection of the L. ivanovii strains had been developed and evaluated in this study. Oligonucleotide primers specific for L. ivanovii species were designed corresponding to smcL gene sequences. The primers set comprise six primers targeting eight regions on the species-specific gene smcL. The LAMP assay could be completed within 1 h at 64°C in a water bath. Amplification products were directly observed by the Loopamp Fluorescent Detection Reagent (FD) or detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Moreover, the LAMP reactions were also detected by real-time measurement of turbidity. The exclusivity of 77 non-L. ivanovii and the inclusivity of 17 L. ivanovii were both 100% in the assay. Sensitivity of the LAMP assay was 250 fg DNA and 16 CFU per reaction for detection of L. ivanovii in pure cultures and simulated human stool. The LAMP assay was 10 and 100-fold more sensitive than quantitative PCR (qPCR) and conventional PCR assays,respectively. When applied to human stool samples spiked with low level (8 CFU/0.5 g) of L. ivanovii strains, the new LAMP assay described here achieved positive detection after 6 hours enrichment. In conclusion, the new LAMP assay in this study can be used as a valuable, rapid and sensitive detection tool for the detection of L. ivanovii in field, medical and veterinary laboratories. PMID:25549337

  15. Solution structure of an oncogenic DNA duplex, the K-ras gene and the sequence containing a central C.A or A.G mismatch as a function of pH: nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Boulard, Y; Cognet, J A; Gabarro-Arpa, J; Le Bret, M; Carbonnaux, C; Fazakerley, G V

    1995-02-10

    The DNA duplex 5' d(GCCACCAGCTC)-d(GAGCTGGTGGC) corresponds to the sequence 29 to 39 of the K-ras gene, which contains a hot spot for mutations. This has been studied by one and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, energy minimization and molecular dynamics. The results show that it adopts a globally B-DNA type structure. We have introduced, at the central base-pair, the mismatches C.A and A.G. The mismatch position is that of the first base of the Gly12 codon, the hot spot. For the C.A mismatch we observe a structural change as a function of pH with an apparent pKa of 7.2. At low pH, the mismatch pair adopts a structure close to a classic wobble conformation with the cytidine residue displaced into the major groove. It is stabilised by two hydrogen bonds in which the adenosine residue is protonated and the cytidine residue has a significant C3'-endo population. At high pH, the mispair structure is in equilibrium between wobble and reverse wobble conformations. Similar studies are reported on the A.G mismatch, which also undergoes a transition as a function of pH. 31P spectra have been recorded on all systems and as a function of pH. No evidence for BII phosphodiester backbone conformations was found. The NMR results are well corroborated by molecular dynamics calculations performed with or without distance constraints. The dynamics at the mismatch sites have been examined. Although the overall structures are close to B-DNA, helical parameters fluctuate differently at these sites. Different hydrogen bonding alternatives in dynamic equilibrium that can involve three-centred hydrogen bonds are observed.

  16. Improved gene amplification by cell-cycle engineering combined with the Cre-loxP system in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Rima; Tsutsui, Tomomi; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Onitsuka, Masayoshi; Omasa, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    The dihydrofolate reductase gene amplification system is widely used in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for the industrial production of therapeutic proteins. To enhance the efficiency of conventional gene amplification systems, we previously presented a novel method using cell-cycle checkpoint engineering. Here, we constructed high-producing and stable cells by the conditional expression of mutant cell division cycle 25 homolog B (CDC25B) using the Cre-loxP system. A bispecific antibody-producing CHO DG44-derived cell line was transfected with floxed mutant CDC25B. After inducing gene amplification in the presence of 250 nM methotrexate, mutant CDC25B sequence was removed by Cre recombinase protein expression. Overexpression of the floxed mutant CDC25B significantly enhanced the efficiency of transgene amplification and productivity. Moreover, the specific production rate of the isolated clone CHO Cre-1 and Cre-2 were approximately 11-fold and 15-fold higher than that of mock-transfected clone CHO Mock-S. Chromosomal aneuploidy was increased by mutant CDC25B overexpression, but Cre-1 and Cre-2 did not show any changes in chromosome number during long-term cultivation, as is the case with CHO Mock-S. Our results suggest that high-producing and stable cells can be constructed by conditionally controlling a cell-cycle checkpoint integrated in conventional gene amplification systems.

  17. Mutations of KRAS/NRAS/BRAF predict cetuximab resistance in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hung-Chih; Thiam, Tan Kien; Lu, Yen-Jung; Yeh, Chien Yuh; Tsai, Wen-Sy; You, Jeng Fu; Hung, Hsin Yuan; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Hsu, An; Chen, Hua-Chien; Chen, Shu-Jen; Yang, Tsai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 45% of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients with wild-type KRAS exon 2 are resistant to cetuximab treatment. We set out to identify additional genetic markers that might predict the response to cetuximab treatment. Fifty-three wild-type KRAS exon 2 mCRC patients were treated with cetuximab/irinotecan-based chemotherapy as a first- or third-line therapy. The mutational statuses of 10 EGFR pathway genes were analyzed in primary tumors using next-generation sequencing. BRAF, PIK3CA, KRAS (exons 3 and 4), NRAS, PTEN, and AKT1 mutations were detected in 6, 6, 5, 4, 1, and 1 patient, respectively. Four of the BRAF mutations were non-V600 variants. Four tumors harbored multiple co-existing (complex) mutations. All patients with BRAF mutations or complex mutation patterns were cetuximab non-responders. All patients but one harboring KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF mutations were non-responders. Mutations in any one of these three genes were associated with a poor response rate (7.1%) and reduced survival (PFS = 8.0 months) compared to wild-type patients (74.4% and 11.6 months). Our data suggest that KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations predict response to cetuximab treatment in mCRC patients. PMID:26989027

  18. Genetic Evidence for XPC-KRAS Interactions During Lung Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; He, Nonggao; Gu, Dongsheng; Wickliffe, Jeff; Salazar, James; Boldogh, Istavan; Xie, Jingwu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer causes more deaths than breast, colorectal and prostate cancers combined. Despite major advances in targeted therapy in a subset of lung adenocarcinomas, the overall 5-year survival rate for lung cancer worldwide has not significantly changed for the last few decades. DNA repair deficiency is known to contribute to lung cancer development. In fact, human polymorphisms in DNA repair genes such as xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) are highly associated with lung cancer incidence. However, the direct genetic evidence for the role of XPC for lung cancer development is still lacking. Mutations of the Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras) or its downstream effector genes occur in almost all lung cancer cells, and there are a number of mouse models for lung cancer using these mutations. Using activated Kras, KrasLA1, as a driver for lung cancer development in mice, we showed for the first time that mice with KrasLA1 and Xpc knockout had worst outcomes in lung cancer development, and this phenotype was associated with accumulated DNA damage. Using cultured cells, we demonstrated that induced expression of oncogenic KRASG12V led to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as DNA damage, and both can be suppressed by anti-oxidants. Thus, it appears that XPC may help repair DNA damage caused by KRAS-mediated production of ROS. PMID:26554912

  19. Mutant K-RAS Promotes Invasion and Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer Through GTPase Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Padavano, Julianna; Henkhaus, Rebecca S; Chen, Hwudaurw; Skovan, Bethany A; Cui, Haiyan; Ignatenko, Natalia A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies, characterized by the local invasion into surrounding tissues and early metastasis to distant organs. Oncogenic mutations of the K-RAS gene occur in more than 90% of human pancreatic cancers. The goal of this study was to investigate the functional significance and downstream effectors of mutant K-RAS oncogene in the pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis. We applied the homologous recombination technique to stably disrupt K-RAS oncogene in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2, which carries the mutant K-RASG12C oncogene in both alleles. Using in vitro assays, we found that clones with disrupted mutant K-RAS gene exhibited low RAS activity, reduced growth rates, increased sensitivity to the apoptosis inducing agents, and suppressed motility and invasiveness. In vivo assays showed that clones with decreased RAS activity had reduced tumor formation ability in mouse xenograft model and increased survival rates in the mouse orthotopic pancreatic cancer model. We further examined molecular pathways downstream of mutant K-RAS and identified RhoA GTP activating protein 5, caveolin-1, and RAS-like small GTPase A (RalA) as key effector molecules, which control mutant K-RAS-dependent migration and invasion in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Our study provides rational for targeting RhoA and RalA GTPase signaling pathways for inhibition of pancreatic cancer metastasis. PMID:26512205

  20. Structure and evolution of the U2 small nuclear RNA multigene family in primates: gene amplification under natural selection?

    PubMed Central

    Matera, A G; Weiner, A M; Schmid, C W

    1990-01-01

    The organization of U2 genes was compared in apes, Old World monkeys, and the prosimian galago. In humans and all apes (gibbon, orangutan, gorilla, and chimpanzee), the U2 genes were organized as a tandem repeat of a 6-kb element; however, the restriction maps of the 6-kb elements in these divergent species differed slightly, demonstrating that mechanisms must exist for maintaining sequence homogeneity within this tandem array. In Old World monkeys, the U2 genes were organized as a tandem repeat of an 11-kb element; the restriction maps of the 11-kb elements in baboon and two closely related macaques, bonnet and rhesus monkeys, also differed slightly, confirming that efficient sequence homogenization is an intrinsic property of the U2 tandem array. Interestingly, the 11-kb monkey repeat unit differed from the 6-kb hominid repeat unit by a 5-kb block of monkey-specific sequence. Finally, we found that the U2 genes of the prosimian galago were dispersed rather than tandemly repeated, suggesting that the hominid and Old World monkey U2 tandem arrays resulted from independent amplifications of a common ancestral U2 gene. Alternatively, the 5-kb monkey-specific sequence could have been inserted into the 6-kb array or deleted from the 11-kb array soon after divergence of the hominid and Old World monkey lineages. Images PMID:2233721

  1. Pharmacological strategies to target oncogenic KRAS signaling in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiao-Ching; Huang, Po-Hsien; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2017-03-01

    The clear importance of mutated KRAS as a therapeutic target has driven the investigation of multiple approaches to inhibit oncogenic KRAS signaling at different molecular levels. However, no KRAS-targeted therapy has reached the clinic to date, which underlies the intrinsic difficulty in developing effective, direct inhibitors of KRAS. Thus, this article provides an overview of the history and recent progress in the development of pharmacological strategies to target oncogenic KRAS with small molecule agents. Mechanistically, these KRAS-targeted agents can be classified into the following four categories. (1) Small-molecule RAS-binding ligands that prevent RAS activation by binding within or outside the nucleotide-binding motif. (2) Inhibitors of KRAS membrane anchorage. (3) Inhibitors that bind to RAS-binding domains of RAS-effector proteins. (4) Inhibitors of KRAS expression. The advantage and limitation of each type of these anti-KRAS agents are discussed.

  2. Development of a reliable dual-gene amplification RT-PCR assay for the detection of Turkey Meningoencephalitis virus in Turkey brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Irit; Raibstein, Israel; Al-Tori, Amira; Khinich, Yevgeny; Simanov, Michael; Yuval, Chanoch; Perk, Shimon; Lublin, Avishai

    2012-11-01

    The Turkey Meningoencephalitis virus (TMEV) causes neuroparalytic signs, paresis, in-coordination, morbidity and mortality in turkeys. In parallel to the increased worldwide scientific interest in veterinary avian flaviviruses, including the Bagaza, Tembusu and Tembusu-related BYD virus, TMEV-caused disease also reemergence in commercial turkeys during late summer of 2010. While initially TMEV was detected by NS5-gene RT-PCR, subsequently, the env-gene RT-PCR was employed. As lately several inconsistencies were observed between the clinical, serological and molecular detection of the TMEV env gene, this study evaluated whether genetic changes occurred in the recently isolated viruses, and sought to optimize and improve the direct TMEV amplification from brain tissues of affected turkeys. The main findings indicated that no changes occurred during the years in the TMEV genome, but the PCR detection sensitivities of the env and NS5 genes differed. The RT-PCR and RNA purification were optimized for direct amplification from brain tissues without pre-replication of clinical samples in tissue cultures or in embryonated eggs. The amplification sensitivity of the NS5-gene was 10-100 times more than the env-gene when separate. The new dual-gene amplification RT-PCR was similar to that of the NS5 gene, therefore the assay can be considered as a reliable diagnostic assay. Cases where one of the two amplicons would be RT-PCR negative would alert and warn on the virus identity, and possible genetic changes. In addition, the biochemical environment of the dual-gene amplification reaction seemed to contribute in deleting non-specific byproducts that occasionally appeared in the singular RT-PCR assays on RNA purified from brain tissues.

  3. Genome-Wide Analyses Identify Recurrent Amplifications of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases and Cell-Cycle Regulatory Genes in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Paugh, Barbara S.; Broniscer, Alberto; Qu, Chunxu; Miller, Claudia P.; Zhang, Junyuan; Tatevossian, Ruth G.; Olson, James M.; Geyer, J. Russell; Chi, Susan N.; da Silva, Nasjla Saba; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Baker, Justin N.; Gajjar, Amar; Ellison, David W.; Baker, Suzanne J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Long-term survival for children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is less than 10%, and new therapeutic targets are urgently required. We evaluated a large cohort of DIPGs to identify recurrent genomic abnormalities and gene expression signatures underlying DIPG. Patients and Methods Single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays were used to compare the frequencies of genomic copy number abnormalities in 43 DIPGs and eight low-grade brainstem gliomas with data from adult and pediatric (non-DIPG) glioblastomas, and expression profiles were evaluated using gene expression arrays for 27 DIPGs, six low-grade brainstem gliomas, and 66 nonbrainstem low-grade gliomas. Results Frequencies of specific large-scale and focal imbalances varied significantly between DIPGs and nonbrainstem pediatric glioblastomas. Focal amplifications of genes within the receptor tyrosine kinase–Ras–phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway were found in 47% of DIPGs, the most common of which involved PDGFRA and MET. Thirty percent of DIPGs contained focal amplifications of cell-cycle regulatory genes controlling retinoblastoma protein (RB) phosphorylation, and 21% had concurrent amplification of genes from both pathways. Some tumors showed heterogeneity in amplification patterns. DIPGs showed distinct gene expression signatures related to developmental processes compared with nonbrainstem pediatric high-grade gliomas, whereas expression signatures of low-grade brainstem and nonbrainstem gliomas were similar. Conclusion DIPGs comprise a molecularly related but distinct subgroup of pediatric gliomas. Genomic studies suggest that targeted inhibition of receptor tyrosine kinases and RB regulatory proteins may be useful therapies for DIPG. PMID:21931021

  4. Combinatorial codon scrambling enables scalable gene synthesis and amplification of repetitive proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Nicholas C.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2016-04-01

    Most genes are synthesized using seamless assembly methods that rely on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, PCR of genes encoding repetitive proteins either fails or generates nonspecific products. Motivated by the need to efficiently generate new protein polymers through high-throughput gene synthesis, here we report a codon-scrambling algorithm that enables the PCR-based gene synthesis of repetitive proteins by exploiting the codon redundancy of amino acids and finding the least-repetitive synonymous gene sequence. We also show that the codon-scrambling problem is analogous to the well-known travelling salesman problem, and obtain an exact solution to it by using De Bruijn graphs and a modern mixed integer linear programme solver. As experimental proof of the utility of this approach, we use it to optimize the synthetic genes for 19 repetitive proteins, and show that the gene fragments are amenable to PCR-based gene assembly and recombinant expression.

  5. Kras is required for adult hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Damnernsawad, Alisa; Kong, Guangyao; Wen, Zhi; Liu, Yangang; Rajagopalan, Adhithi; You, Xiaona; Wang, Jinyong; Zhou, Yun; Ranheim, Erik A.; Luo, Hongbo R.; Chang, Qiang; Zhang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that Kras is dispensable for fetal liver hematopoiesis, but its rolein adult hematopoiesis remains unclear. Here, we generated a Kras conditional knockout allele to address this question. Deletion of Kras in adult bone marrow is mediated by Vav-Cre or inducible Mx1-Cre. We find that loss of Kras leads to greatly reduced TPO signaling in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and multipotent progenitors (MPPs), while SCF-evoked ERK1/2 activation is not affected. The compromised TPO signaling is associated with reduced long term- and intermediate-term HSC compartments and a bias towards myeloid differentiation in MPPs. Although GM-CSF-evoked ERK1/2 activation is only moderately decreased in Kras−/− myeloid progenitors, it is blunted in neutrophils and neutrophil survival is significantly reduced in vitro. At 9–12 months old, Kras conditional knockout mice develop profound hematopoietic defects, including splenomegaly, an expanded neutrophil compartment, and reduced B cell number. In a serial transplantation assay, the reconstitution potential of Kras−/− bone marrow cells is greatly compromised, which is attributable to defects in the self-renewal of Kras−/− HSCs and defects in differentiated hematopietic cells. Our results demonstrate that Kras is a major regulator of TPO and GM-CSF signaling in specific populations of hematopoietic cells and its function is required for adult hematopoiesis. PMID:26972179

  6. KRAS and TP53 mutations in bronchoscopy samples from former lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weimin; Jin, Jide; Yin, Jinling; Land, Stephanie; Gaither-Davis, Autumn; Christie, Neil; Luketich, James D; Siegfried, Jill M; Keohavong, Phouthone

    2017-02-01

    Mutations in the KRAS and TP53 genes have been found frequently in lung tumors and specimens from individuals at high risk for lung cancer and have been suggested as predictive markers for lung cancer. In order to assess the prognostic value of these two genes' mutations in lung cancer recurrence, we analyzed mutations in codon 12 of the KRAS gene and in hotspot codons of the TP53 gene in 176 bronchial biopsies obtained from 77 former lung cancer patients. Forty-seven patients (61.0%) showed mutations, including 35/77 (45.5%) in the KRAS gene and 25/77 (32.5%) in the TP53 gene, among them 13/77 (16.9%) had mutations in both genes. When grouped according to past or current smoking status, a higher proportion of current smokers showed mutations, in particular those in the TP53 gene (P = 0.07), compared with ex-smokers. These mutations were found in both abnormal lesions (8/20 or 40%) and histologically normal tissues (70/156 or 44.9%) (P = 0.812). They consisted primarily of G to A transition and G to T transversion in both the KRAS (41/56 or 73.2%) and TP53 (24/34 or 70.6%) genes, consistent with mutations found in lung tumors of smoking lung cancer patients. Overall, recurrence-free survival (RFS) among all subjects could be explained by age at diagnosis, tumor stage, tumor subtype, and smoking (P < 0.05, Cox proportional hazard). Therefore, KRAS and TP53 mutations were frequently detected in bronchial tissues of former lung cancer patients. However, the presence of mutation of bronchial biopsies was not significantly associated with a shorter RFS time. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Analysis of receptor tyrosine kinase gene amplification on the example of FGFR1.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Diana; von Mässenhausen, Anne; Perner, Sven

    2015-01-01

    FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) is a molecular cytogenetic method to detect large-scale genetic alterations in tissue and/or cells. Numerical aberrations (deletions and amplifications) and structural aberrations (translocations and fusions) are detectable. Probes bind complementary to the DNA strand of the region of interest. Subsequently, the probes are detected via fluorochromes and appear as colored dots that can be assessed under the fluorescence microscope.In situ hybridization is divided into three steps: pretreatment, hybridization, and posthybridization. Pretreatment opens up the cell membranes for hybridization, so that the probe can bind to the complementary DNA target. Posthybridization includes washing steps to remove excessive probes and detection of probes via secondary marked fluorochromes. DAPI stains nuclei and serves as mounting media.

  8. TaqMan probes as blocking agents for enriched PCR amplification and DNA melting analysis of mutant genes.

    PubMed

    Botezatu, Irina V; Panchuk, Irina O; Stroganova, Anna M; Senderovich, Anastasia I; Kondratova, Valentina N; Shelepov, Valery P; Lichtenstein, Anatoly V

    2017-02-01

    Asymmetric PCR and DNA melting analysis with TaqMan probes applied for mutation detection is effectively used in clinical diagnostics. The method is simple, cost-effective, and carried out in a closed-tube format, minimizing time, labor, and risk of sample cross-contamination. Although DNA melting analysis is more sensitive than Sanger sequencing (mutation detection thresholds are ~5% and 15%-20%, respectively), it is less sensitive than more labor-intensive and expensive techniques such as pyrosequencing and droplet digital PCR. Here, we demonstrate that, under specially selected conditions of asymmetric PCR, TaqMan probes can play the role of blocking agents. Preferential blocking of the wild-type allele brings about enriched amplification of mutant alleles. As a result, an ~10-fold increase in the detection sensitivity for mutant BRAF and NRAS genes was achieved.

  9. Molecular detection of field isolates of Turkey Eimeria by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the cytochrome c oxidase I gene.

    PubMed

    Rathinam, T; Gadde, U; Chapman, H D

    2015-07-01

    Oocysts of Eimeria spp. were isolated from litter samples obtained from 30 commercial turkey farms. Genomic DNA was extracted from clean oocysts, and polymerase chain amplification of the species-specific cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene was performed for five species of turkey Eimeria. The species tested were Eimeria adenoeides, Eimeria meleagrimitis, Eimeria meleagridis, Eimeria dispersa, and Eimeria gallopavonis. All DNA samples were positive for E. meleagrimitis, nine were positive for E. adenoeides, two were positive for E. dispersa, and none for E. meleagridis and E. gallopavonis. E. meleagrimitis occurred as a single species in 21 (70 %) of the farms while 9 (30 %) farms had a mixed species with E. meleagrimitis and E. adenoeides and 2 (7 %) were triple positive with E. meleagrimitis, E. adenoeides, and E. dispersa. This is the first account of the field prevalence of turkey Eimeria species using molecular methods.

  10. Detection of genomic amplification of the human telomerase gene TERC, a potential marker for triage of women with HPV-positive, abnormal Pap smears.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Sonia; Sowjanya, Pavani; Wangsa, Darawalee; Hjerpe, Anders; Johansson, Bo; Auer, Gert; Gravitt, Patti E; Larsson, Catharina; Wallin, Keng-Ling; Ried, Thomas; Heselmeyer-Haddad, Kerstin

    2009-11-01

    The vast majority of invasive cervical carcinomas harbor additional copies of the chromosome arm 3q, resulting in genomic amplification of the human telomerase gene TERC. Here, we evaluated TERC amplification in routinely collected liquid based cytology (LBC) samples with histologically confirmed diagnoses. A set of 78 LBC samples from a Swedish patient cohort were analyzed with a four-color fluorescence in situ hybridization probe panel that included TERC. Clinical follow-up included additional histological evaluation and Pap smears. Human papillomavirus status was available for all cases. The correlation of cytology, TERC amplification, human papillomavirus typing, and histological diagnosis showed that infection with high-risk human papillomavirus was detected in 64% of the LBC samples with normal histopathology, in 65% of the cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)1, 95% of the CIN2, 96% of the CIN3 lesions, and all carcinomas. Seven percent of the lesions with normal histopathology were positive for TERC amplification, 24% of the CIN1, 64% of the CIN2, 91% of the CIN3 lesions, and 100% of invasive carcinomas. This demonstrates that detection of genomic amplification of TERC in LBC samples can identify patients with histopathologically confirmed CIN3 or cancer. Indeed, the proportion of TERC-positive cases increases with the severity of dysplasia. Among the markers tested, detection of TERC amplification in cytological samples has the highest combined sensitivity and specificity for discernment of low-grade from high-grade dysplasia and cancer.

  11. Detection of Genomic Amplification of the Human Telomerase Gene TERC, a Potential Marker for Triage of Women with HPV-Positive, Abnormal Pap Smears

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Sonia; Sowjanya, Pavani; Wangsa, Darawalee; Hjerpe, Anders; Johansson, Bo; Auer, Gert; Gravitt, Patti E.; Larsson, Catharina; Wallin, Keng-Ling; Ried, Thomas; Heselmeyer-Haddad, Kerstin

    2009-01-01

    The vast majority of invasive cervical carcinomas harbor additional copies of the chromosome arm 3q, resulting in genomic amplification of the human telomerase gene TERC. Here, we evaluated TERC amplification in routinely collected liquid based cytology (LBC) samples with histologically confirmed diagnoses. A set of 78 LBC samples from a Swedish patient cohort were analyzed with a four-color fluorescence in situ hybridization probe panel that included TERC. Clinical follow-up included additional histological evaluation and Pap smears. Human papillomavirus status was available for all cases. The correlation of cytology, TERC amplification, human papillomavirus typing, and histological diagnosis showed that infection with high-risk human papillomavirus was detected in 64% of the LBC samples with normal histopathology, in 65% of the cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)1, 95% of the CIN2, 96% of the CIN3 lesions, and all carcinomas. Seven percent of the lesions with normal histopathology were positive for TERC amplification, 24% of the CIN1, 64% of the CIN2, 91% of the CIN3 lesions, and 100% of invasive carcinomas. This demonstrates that detection of genomic amplification of TERC in LBC samples can identify patients with histopathologically confirmed CIN3 or cancer. Indeed, the proportion of TERC-positive cases increases with the severity of dysplasia. Among the markers tested, detection of TERC amplification in cytological samples has the highest combined sensitivity and specificity for discernment of low-grade from high-grade dysplasia and cancer. PMID:19880826

  12. DNA amplification in neutral liposomes for safe and efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmin; Koo, Heebeom; Na, Jin Hee; Lee, Kyung Eun; Jeong, Seo Young; Choi, Kuiwon; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2014-05-27

    In general, traditional gene carriers contain strong cationic charges to efficiently load anionic genes, but this cationic character also leads to destabilization of plasma membranes and causes severe cytotoxicity. Here, we developed a PCR-based nanofactory as a safe gene delivery system. A few template plasmid DNA can be amplified by PCR inside liposomes about 200 nm in diameter, and the quantity of loaded genes highly increased by more than 8.8-fold. The liposome membrane was composed of neutral lipids free from cationic charges. Consequently, this system is nontoxic, unlike other traditional cationic gene carriers. Intense red fluorescent protein (RFP) expression in CHO-K1 cells showed that the amplified genes could be successfully transfected to cells. Animal experiments with the luciferase gene also showed in vivo gene expression by our system without toxicity. We think that this PCR-based nanofactory system can overcome the toxicity problem that is the critical limitation of current gene delivery to clinical application.

  13. Different susceptibility to lung tumorigenesis in mice with an identical Kras 2 intron 2

    SciTech Connect

    Manenti, G.; Falvella, F.S.; Gariboldi, M.; Dragani, T.A.; Pierotti, M.A.

    1995-09-20

    The A/J mouse strain is genetically susceptible to pulmonary tumorigenesis. We have performed a genetic linkage analysis to map pulmonary adenoma susceptibility (Pas) loci in an urethane-treated (A/J X Mus spretus) x C57BL/6J (ASB) interspecific testcross. In this interspecific cross we have confirmed our previous results in AC3F2 mice on the mapping of the Pas1 locus to the digital region of chromosome 6, near Kras2. The A/J and M. spretus strains differed as the Pas1 locus, with the M. spretus providing the resistant allele. In the latter strain, we studied the nucleotide sequence of a portion of the second intron of Kras2 that contains polymorphisms associated with lung tumor susceptibility in several inbred strains. The lung tumor-resistant M. spretus strain had the same specific nucleotide sequence of susceptible strains. Mutations in codon 61 of Kras2 in urethane-induced lung tumors from ASF1 hybrids involved the A/J allele in all cases, while the M. spretus allele was never affected. Our results indicate that the M. spretus and A/J mice have an identical structure of the second intron of the Kras2 gene, but they differ in genetic susceptibility to pulmonary tumorigenesis and in mutability of their Kras2 allele. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Mutational landscape of EGFR-, MYC-, and Kras-driven genetically engineered mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, David G.; Politi, Katerina; Bhutkar, Arjun; Chen, Frances K.; Song, Xiaoling; Pirun, Mono; Santiago, Philip M.; Kim-Kiselak, Caroline; Platt, James T.; Lee, Emily; Hodges, Emily; Rosebrock, Adam P.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Jacks, Tyler; Varmus, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of cancer are increasingly being used to assess putative driver mutations identified by large-scale sequencing of human cancer genomes. To accurately interpret experiments that introduce additional mutations, an understanding of the somatic genetic profile and evolution of GEMM tumors is necessary. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing of tumors from three GEMMs of lung adenocarcinoma driven by mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras), or overexpression of MYC proto-oncogene. Tumors from EGFR- and Kras-driven models exhibited, respectively, 0.02 and 0.07 nonsynonymous mutations per megabase, a dramatically lower average mutational frequency than observed in human lung adenocarcinomas. Tumors from models driven by strong cancer drivers (mutant EGFR and Kras) harbored few mutations in known cancer genes, whereas tumors driven by MYC, a weaker initiating oncogene in the murine lung, acquired recurrent clonal oncogenic Kras mutations. In addition, although EGFR- and Kras-driven models both exhibited recurrent whole-chromosome DNA copy number alterations, the specific chromosomes altered by gain or loss were different in each model. These data demonstrate that GEMM tumors exhibit relatively simple somatic genotypes compared with human cancers of a similar type, making these autochthonous model systems useful for additive engineering approaches to assess the potential of novel mutations on tumorigenesis, cancer progression, and drug sensitivity. PMID:27702896

  15. Altered detoxification status and increased resistance to oxidative stress by K-ras transformation.

    PubMed

    Recktenwald, Christian V; Kellner, Roland; Lichtenfels, Rudolf; Seliger, Barbara

    2008-12-15

    Mutated K-ras is frequently found in human malignancies and plays a key role in many signal transduction processes resulting in an altered gene and/or protein expression pattern. Proteins controlled by a constitutive activated mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway are primarily related to alterations in the mitochondrial and nuclear compartments. Therefore, different K-Ras mutants and respective control cells were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis using basic pH gradients. This approach led to the identification of differentially expressed proteins, such as members of the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein family, and enzymes involved in cellular detoxification as well as in oxidative stress. Increased expression of these enzymes was paralleled by an elevated tolerance of K-ras mutants against the cytotoxic potential of hydrogen peroxide and formaldehyde as well as an altered redox status based on enhanced intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels indicating an improved detoxification potential of defined K-ras transfectants, whereas down-regulation by RNA interference of candidate proteins reversed the tolerance against these compounds. This hypothesis is supported by an up-regulated expression of a key enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway resulting in an increased production of NADPH required for anabolic processes as well as the rebuilding of oxidized GSH. Both the enhanced resistance against xenobiotic compounds as well as an altered oxidative pathway might confer growth advantages for tumor cells carrying dominant-positive K-ras mutations such as in lung or pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  16. A new rapid amplification of cDNA ends method for extremely guanine plus cytosine-rich genes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianzong; Jarvis, Donald L

    2006-09-15

    Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) is widely used to determine the 5'- and 3'-terminal nucleotide sequences of genes. Many different RACE methods have been developed to meet various requirements, but none addresses the difficult problems that arise when trying to isolate the ends of extremely guanine plus cytosine (GC)-rich genes. In this study, we found that we were unable to isolate the correct 5' or 3' end of an insect gene, which appeared to include extremely GC-rich sequences, using current RACE methods. Thus, we developed a new RACE method that can be used for this purpose. This new method entails first-strand cDNA synthesis at 70 degrees C with Thermo-X reverse transcriptase in the presence of homoectoine, followed by a polymerase chain reaction with 98 degrees C denaturation steps and Phusion DNA polymerase in the presence of 1M betaine and 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The use of these conditions yielded 5'- and 3'-RACE products that were approximately 80% GC over 213 and 162bp, respectively, and included shorter internal regions of 82 to 89% GC.

  17. Characterization of a novel oncogenic K-ras mutation in colon cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Akagi, Kiwamu . E-mail: akagi@cancer-c.pref.saitama.jp; Uchibori, Ryosuke; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Kurosawa, Keiko; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Kozu, Tomoko

    2007-01-19

    Activating mutations of RAS are frequently observed in subsets of human cancers, indicating that RAS activation is involved in tumorigenesis. Here, we identified and characterized a novel G to T transversion mutation of the K-ras gene at the third position of codon 19 (TTG) which substituted phenylalanine for leucine in 3 primary colon carcinomas. Biological and biochemical activity was examined using transformed NIH3T3 cells expressing mutant or wild-type K-ras. Transformants harboring the K-ras mutation at codon 19 showed proliferative capacity under serum-starved conditions, less contact inhibition, anchorage-independent growth, tumorigenicity in nude mice and elevation of active Ras-GTP levels. These results indicated that this novel mutation possesses high oncogenic activity.

  18. Amplification of HER2 and TOP2A and deletion of TOP2A genes in a series of Taiwanese breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jim-Ray; Chien, Hui-Ping; Chen, Kuo-Su; Hwang, Cheng-Cheng; Chen, Huang-Yang; Yeh, Kun-Yan; Hsieh, Tsan-Yu; Chang, Liang-Che; Hsu, Yuan-Chun; Lu, Ren-Jie; Hua, Chung-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The prognostic relevance of topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A) copy number change remains not well established. This study is aimed to investigate the frequency and pattern of TOP2A aberrations; to correlate TOP2A alterations with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status and clinicopathological parameters, and further to explore prognostic value of TOP2A and HER2 status in breast cancer in Taiwan. Methods: We analyzed tissue samples from 311 invasive carcinomas in tissue microarrays for TOP2A and HER2 status by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Results: TOP2A copy number change is an infrequent genetic event (9.8% amplification and 2.7% deletion) and is present in both HER2-amplified and nonamplified tumors. TOP2A amplification is statistically associated with age >50 at diagnosis (P = 0.016) and HER2 amplification (P < 0.001). HER2 amplification, but not TOP2A amplification, is a predictor of unfavorable prognosis (P = 0.002). Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that higher histologic grading, positive nodal involvement, and HER2 positivity were associated with poorer overall survival. Cytogenetically, double minutes-type amplification is the predominant pattern for both genes (HER2: 64% and TOP2A: 93.1%). Homogeneous staining region-type signals of both genes are resistant to RNase digestion, supporting that these were not nuclear accumulation of mRNA transcripts. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate the prognostic value of tumor grading, nodal involvement, and HER2 status in Taiwanese breast cancer. TOP2A aberrations are an infrequent event independent of HER2 status, and TOP2A amplification carries no prognostic value. The predictive value of TOP2A aberrations in patients of breast cancer taking athracycline-containing treatment in Taiwan remains to be determined in prospectively well-designed clinical trials. PMID:28079792

  19. Amplification of the telomerase RNA component gene as a new genetic marker for disease progression and prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-D; Ma, J; Wang, F-Y; Peng, L-B; Wang, X; Shi, S-S; Ma, H-H; Lu, Z-F; Lu, G-M; Zhou, X-J

    2013-01-01

    Amplification of the human telomerase RNA component (TERC) gene was found in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). However, its roles in the progression and prognosis of ESCC have not been well understood. The amplification of TERC in normal mucosa, low-grade and high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and invasive ESCC samples were evaluated using a fluorescence in situ hybridization assay. The amplification of TERC invariably occurred in high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive ESCC, partially occurred in low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia specimens, and seldom occurred in normal mucosa. The average signal ratio of TERC to chromosome 3 centromere-specific probe (TERC/CSP3) was 1.00 ± 0.01 (average ± standard deviation) in normal mucosas, 1.01 ± 0.08 in low-grade intraepithelial neoplasias, 1.39 ± 0.26 in high-grade intraepithelial neoplasias, and 1.56 ± 0.41 in invasive ESCC. High TERC/CSP3 ratio was positively associated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.005) and advanced tumor stage (P = 0.045). Patients with high amplification of TERC had poor survival (P = 0.01). The amplification of TERC could be used as a new genomic marker for disease progression and prognosis of ESCC. The amplified TERC gene may be a potential therapeutic target for ESCC.

  20. Spectroscopic investigation of the interaction between G-quadruplex of KRAS promoter sequence and three isoquinoline alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Li-Na; Xie, Meng-Xia

    2017-01-01

    KRAS promoter can form G-quadruplex structure and regulate gene transcription. The drugs which can bind with G-quadruplex of KRAS promoter may be potential remedy for treatment of cancers associated with KRAS mutation. The interaction mechanism between the G-quadruplex of KRAS promoter and three isoquinoline alkaloids (jatrorrhizine, berberine and sanguinarine) has been investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic methods. The results showed that the three alkaloids can form complexes with G-quadruplex KRAS promoter with the molecular ratio of 1:1, and the binding constants were (0.90 ± 0.16) × 106 L mol- 1, (0.93 ± 0.21) × 106 L mol- 1 and (1.16 ± 0.45) × 106 L mol- 1 for jatrorrhizine, berberine and sanguinarine. The absorption spectra, KI quenching and fluorescence anisotropy and polarization studies suggested jatrorrhizine and berberine interacted with G-quadruplex by not only end-stacking binding mode but also grooves or loops binding mode, while sanguinarine by end-stacking binding mode. Sanguinarine was more beneficial to maintain the stability and parallel conformation of KRAS promoter G-quadruplex. MTT assay was performed to evaluate antiproliferation effects of the three isoquinoline alkaloids on SW620 cells, and the antiproliferation effects of the three alkaloids were sanguinarine > berberine > jatrorrhizine. All the three alkaloids can bind with KRAS promoter G-quadruplex, and sanguinarine had the better binding property and antiproliferation effects on SW620 cells. The results obtained are meaningful to explore potential reagents targeting the parallel G-quadruplex structure of KRAS promoter for gene theraphy of colorectal carcinomas.

  1. Rapid detection of the Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) gene by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP).

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ryuichi; Nakano, Akiyo; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Ubagai, Tsuneyuki; Kikuchi-Ueda, Takane; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Tansho-Nagakawa, Shigeru; Kamoshida, Go; Mu, Xiaoqin; Ono, Yasuo

    2015-03-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPC), which are associated with resistance to carbapenem, have recently spread worldwide and have become a global concern. It is necessary to detect KPC-producing organisms in clinical settings to be able to control the spread of this resistance. We have developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for rapid detection of KPC producers. LAMP primer sets were designed to recognize the homologous regions of blaKPC-2 to blaKPC-17 and could amplify blaKPC rapidly. The specificity and sensitivity of the primers in the LAMP reactions for blaKPC detection were determined. This LAMP assay was able to specifically detect KPC producers at 68 °C, and no cross-reactivity was observed for other types of β-lactamase (class A, B, C, or D) producers. The detection limit for this assay was found to be 10(0) CFU per tube, in 25 min, which was 10-fold more sensitive than a PCR assay for blaKPC detection. Then, the sensitivity of the LAMP reactions for blaKPC detection in human specimens (sputum samples, urine samples, fecal samples and blood samples) was analyzed; it was observed that the LAMP assay had almost the same sensitivity in these samples as when using purified DNA. The LAMP assay is easy to perform and rapid. It may therefore be routinely applied for detection of KPC producers in the clinical laboratory.

  2. High frequency of ribosomal protein gene deletions in Italian Diamond-Blackfan anemia patients detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay

    PubMed Central

    Quarello, Paola; Garelli, Emanuela; Brusco, Alfredo; Carando, Adriana; Mancini, Cecilia; Pappi, Patrizia; Vinti, Luciana; Svahn, Johanna; Dianzani, Irma; Ramenghi, Ugo

    2012-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is an autosomal dominant disease due to mutations in nine ribosomal protein encoding genes. Because most mutations are loss of function and detected by direct sequencing of coding exons, we reasoned that part of the approximately 50% mutation negative patients may have carried a copy number variant of ribosomal protein genes. As a proof of concept, we designed a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay targeted to screen the six genes that are most frequently mutated in Diamond-Blackfan anemia patients: RPS17, RPS19, RPS26, RPL5, RPL11, and RPL35A. Using this assay we showed that deletions represent approximately 20% of all mutations. The combination of sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis of these six genes allows the genetic characterization of approximately 65% of patients, showing that Diamond-Blackfan anemia is indisputably a ribosomopathy. PMID:22689679

  3. Vectors for gene expression and amplification in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Juretzek, T; Le Dall, M; Mauersberger, S; Gaillardin, C; Barth, G; Nicaud, J

    2001-01-30

    New vector systems were developed for gene expression in Y. lipolytica. These plasmids contain: (a) as integration target sequences, either a rDNA region or the long terminal repeat zeta of the Y. lipolytica retrotransposon Ylt1; (b) the YlURA3 gene as selection marker for Y. lipolytica, either as the non-defective ura3d1 allele for single integration or the promotor truncated ura3d4 allele for multiple integration; (c) the inducible ICL1 or XPR2 promoters for gene expression; and (d) unique restriction sites for gene insertion. Multiple plasmid integration occurred as inserted tandem-repeats, which are present at 3-39 copies per cell. A correlation between gene copy number and the expressed enzyme activity was demonstrated with Escherichia coli lacZ as reporter gene under the control of the regulated ICL1 promoter. Increases in copy numbers from 5 to 13 for the lacZ expression cassettes resulted in an up to 10-11-fold linear increase of the beta-galactosidase activity in multicopy transformants during their growth on ethanol or glucose, compared with the low-copy replicative plasmid transformants (1.6 plasmid copies). These new tools will enhance the interest in Y. lipolytica as an alternative host for heterologous protein production.

  4. Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS-Mutant Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0225 TITLE: Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS- Mutant Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Eric Collisson...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS- Mutant Lung Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0225 5c...one RAS-dependent. This Aim is underway and has verified that KRAS is indeed essential in the KRAS mutant mouse cell lines. Specific Aim 2. To

  5. Comparison of in situ hybridization methods for the assessment of HER-2/neu gene amplification status in breast cancer using a tissue microarray

    PubMed Central

    Malicka-Durczak, Anna; Korski, Konstanty; Ibbs, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Background This project compared HER-2/neu gene status in breast cancers, as demonstrated by FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) and CISH (chromogenic in situ hybridization) and using a tissue microarray (TMA). The study also aimed to show whether the TMA technique could be used in clinical diagnostics, rather than remain a scientific tool. Materials and methods A TMA was constructed using 121 breast cancer specimens, 6 cores from each specimen. Demonstration and assessment of HER-2/neu gene status was by FISH (Vysis Path) and CISH (DAKO Duo CISH). Results The 121 breast cancer specimens were divided into 3 groups by HER-2 status, as determined by immunohistochemistry. In the HER-2 negative group no amplification was observed in 36 out of 40 cases. 3 cases showed amplification by both methods and one by CISH alone. The equivocal HER-2 group showed no amplification in 30 out of 41 cases and amplification in 9 cases. One case was FISH negative CISH positive and one was discarded. In the HER-2 positive group, amplification was confirmed in 37 of the 40 cases by both methods. 3 cases were unsuitable for assessment. Conclusions This study indicated that CISH is a sensitive alternative to FISH in detecting HER2 gene amplification and may replace FISH in HER2 testing. Good agreement was observed between methods (98.5% – 119 out of 121 cases). Furthermore, as only 4 out of 121 cases were unsuitable for assessment (no signal or missing TMA cores) – it may be feasible to use TMA in diagnostics. PMID:24377000

  6. Fusion of the Dhfr/Mtx and IR/MAR gene amplification methods produces a rapid and efficient method for stable recombinant protein production.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Chiemi; Araki, Yoshio; Miki, Daisuke; Shimizu, Noriaki

    2012-01-01

    Amplification of the dihydrofolate reductase gene (Dhfr) by methotrexate (Mtx) exposure is commonly used for recombinant protein expression in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. However, this method is both time- and labor-intensive, and the high-producing cells that are generated are frequently unstable in culture. Another gene amplification method is based on using a plasmid bearing a mammalian replication initiation region (IR) and a matrix attachment region (MAR), which result in the spontaneous initiation of gene amplification in transfected cells. The IR/MAR and Dhfr/Mtx methods of gene amplification are based on entirely different principles. In this study, we combine these two methods to yield a novel method, termed the IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method, which was used to express three proteins, the Fc receptor, GFP, and recombinant antibody. The fusion method resulted in a dramatic increase in expression of all three proteins in two CHO sub-lines, DXB-11, and DG44. The IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion amplified the genes rapidly and efficiently, and produced larger amounts of antibody than the Dhfr/Mtx or IR/MAR methods alone. While the amplified structure produced by the Dhfr/Mtx method was highly unstable, and the antibody production rate rapidly decreased with the culture time of the cells, the IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method resulted in stable amplification and generated clonal cells that produced large amounts of antibody protein over a long period of time. In summary, the novel IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method enables isolation of stable cells that produce larger amounts of a target recombinant protein more rapidly and easily than either the Dhfr/Mtx or IR/MAR methods alone.

  7. A novel universal DNA labeling and amplification system for rapid microarray-based detection of 117 antibiotic resistance genes in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Christian; Endimiani, Andrea; Perreten, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and simple DNA labeling system has been developed for disposable microarrays and has been validated for the detection of 117 antibiotic resistance genes abundant in Gram-positive bacteria. The DNA was fragmented and amplified using phi-29 polymerase and random primers with linkers. Labeling and further amplification were then performed by classic PCR amplification using biotinylated primers specific for the linkers. The microarray developed by Perreten et al. (Perreten, V., Vorlet-Fawer, L., Slickers, P., Ehricht, R., Kuhnert, P., Frey, J., 2005. Microarray-based detection of 90 antibiotic resistance genes of gram-positive bacteria. J.Clin.Microbiol. 43, 2291-2302.) was improved by additional oligonucleotides. A total of 244 oligonucleotides (26 to 37 nucleotide length and with similar melting temperatures) were spotted on the microarray, including genes conferring resistance to clinically important antibiotic classes like β-lactams, macrolides, aminoglycosides, glycopeptides and tetracyclines. Each antibiotic resistance gene is represented by at least 2 oligonucleotides designed from consensus sequences of gene families. The specificity of the oligonucleotides and the quality of the amplification and labeling were verified by analysis of a collection of 65 strains belonging to 24 species. Association between genotype and phenotype was verified for 6 antibiotics using 77 Staphylococcus strains belonging to different species and revealed 95% test specificity and a 93% predictive value of a positive test. The DNA labeling and amplification is independent of the species and of the target genes and could be used for different types of microarrays. This system has also the advantage to detect several genes within one bacterium at once, like in Staphylococcus aureus strain BM3318, in which up to 15 genes were detected. This new microarray-based detection system offers a large potential for applications in clinical diagnostic, basic research, food safety and

  8. Modified PCR methods for 3' end amplification from serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) tags.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang-Jie; Wang, Zhao-Xia; Qiao, Zhong-Dong

    2009-05-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a powerful technique to study gene expression at the genome level. However, a disadvantage of the shortness of SAGE tags is that it prevents further study of SAGE library data, thus limiting extensive application of the SAGE method in gene expression studies. However, this problem can be solved by extension of the SAGE tags to 3' cDNAs. Therefore, several methods based on PCR have been developed to generate a 3' longer fragment cDNA corresponding to a SAGE tag. The list of modified methods is extensive, and includes rapid RT-PCR analysis of unknown SAGE tags (RAST-PCR), generation of longer cDNA fragments from SAGE tags for gene identification (GLGI), a high-throughput GLGI procedure, reverse SAGE (rSAGE), two-step analysis of unknown SAGE tags (TSAT-PCR), etc. These procedures are constantly being updated because they have characteristics and advantages that can be shared. Development of these methods has promoted the widespread use of the SAGE technique, and has accelerated the speed of studies of large-scale gene expression.

  9. Gene identification using exon amplification on human chromosome 18q21: implications for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Huo, Y; Patel, S; Zhu, X; Swift-Scanlan, T; Reeves, R H; DePaulo, R; Ross, C A; McInnis, M G

    2000-09-01

    We previously reported linkage between bipolar disorder and a region on human chromosome (HC) 18q21. To identify genes in this region, exon trapping was performed on cosmids isolated from an HC18-specific cosmid library (LL18NC02) using 47 sequence tagged site (STS) markers from 18q21 as hybridization probes. A total of 285 unique sequences (exons) were obtained from 850 sequenced clones. Homology searching of the databases using NCBI's BLAST algorithms revealed that 31 exons have identity to known genes and/or ESTs, seven are identical to regions of finished genomic sequences in the 18q21 region, 20 have significant similarity (>30% sequence identity) to genes from human and/or other species, 19 were repetitive sequences, and 208 sequences (72%) are novel. Seventy per cent of the trapped sequences were predicted to be derived from genes using library screening and RT-PCR analyses. This represents an initial stage in characterizing genes in a susceptibility region for further study in bipolar disorder or other diseases that map to this region.

  10. Development of reverse transcription recombinase polymerase amplification assay for avian influenza H5N1 HA gene detection.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Nahed; Arafa, Abdel-Satar; Abd El Wahed, Ahmed; El-Sanousi, Ahmed A; Weidmann, Manfred; Shalaby, Mohamed A

    2015-10-01

    The 2006 outbreaks of H5N1 avian influenza in Egypt interrupted poultry production and caused staggering economic damage. In addition, H5N1 avian influenza viruses represent a significant threat to public health. Therefore, the rapid detection of H5 viruses is very important in order to control the disease. In this study, a qualitative reverse transcription recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) assay for the detection of hemagglutinin gene of H5 subtype influenza viruses was developed. The results were compared to the real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). An in vitro transcribed RNA standard of 970 nucleotides of the hemagglutinin gene was developed and used to determine the assay sensitivity. The developed H5 RT-RPA assay was able to detect one RNA molecule within 7 min, while in real-time RT-PCR, at least 90 min was required. H5 RT-RPA assay did not detect nucleic acid extracted from H5 negative samples or from other pathogens producing respiratory manifestation in poultry. The clinical performance of the H5 RT-RPA assay was tested in 30 samples collected between 2014 and 2015; the sensitivity of H5 RT-RPA and real-time RT-PCR was 100%. In conclusion, H5 RT-RPA was faster than real-time RT-PCR and easily operable in a portable device. Moreover, it had an equivalent sensitivity and specificity.

  11. Foxm1 transcription factor is required for the initiation of lung tumorigenesis by oncogenic Kras(G12D.).

    PubMed

    Wang, I-C; Ustiyan, V; Zhang, Y; Cai, Y; Kalin, T V; Kalinichenko, V V

    2014-11-13

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of deaths in cancer patients in the United States. Identification of new molecular targets is clearly needed to improve therapeutic outcomes of this devastating human disease. Activating mutations in K-Ras oncogene and increased expression of FOXM1 protein are associated with poor prognosis in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Transgenic expression of activated Kras(G12D) in mouse respiratory epithelium is sufficient to induce lung adenocarcinomas; however, transcriptional mechanisms regulated by K-Ras during the initiation of lung cancer remain poorly understood. Foxm1 transcription factor, a downstream target of K-Ras, stimulates cellular proliferation during embryogenesis, organ repair and tumor growth, but its role in tumor initiation is unknown. In the present study, we used transgenic mice expressing Kras(G12D) under control of Sftpc promoter to demonstrate that Foxm1 was induced in type II epithelial cells before the formation of lung tumors. Conditional deletion of Foxm1 from Kras(G12D)-expressing respiratory epithelium prevented the initiation of lung tumors in vivo. The loss of Foxm1 inhibited expression of K-Ras target genes critical for the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways, including Ikbkb, Nfkb1, Nfkb2, Rela, Jnk1, N-Myc, Pttg1 and Cdkn2a. Transgenic overexpression of activated FOXM1 mutant was sufficient to induce expression of these genes in alveolar type II cells. FOXM1 directly bound to promoter regions of Ikbkb, Nfkb2, N-Myc, Pttg1 and Cdkn2a, indicating that these genes are direct FOXM1 targets. FOXM1 is required for K-Ras-mediated lung tumorigenesis by activating genes critical for the NF-κB and JNK pathways.

  12. Determination of True ERBB2 Gene Amplification in Breast Cancer by Quantitative PCR Using a Reference and a Novel Control Gene.

    PubMed

    Chamizo, Cristina; Rojo, Federico; Madoz-Gúrpide, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (ERBB2/HER2) is amplified and overexpressed in 20% to 25% of breast carcinomas, correlates with poor outcome, and is an indication for treatment with trastuzumab. Accurate assessment of ERBB2 status is crucial for proper prognosis and to offer appropriate treatment for patients. ERBB2 status is generally determined by immunohistochemistry or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and sporadically by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We developed a new algorithm, termed quantitative PCR algorithm (QPA) score, and compared its performance with the gold standard FISH assay. The QPA is a computation of the relative number of copies of the ERBB2 gene with respect to a nonstandard, short-arm centromeric sequence on chromosome 17, and referenced to a single-copy gene, RPP30. This provides a more reliable determination of ERBB2 amplification, reducing the false polysomy 17 error. A total of 69 breast carcinoma samples were tested for quantitative real-time PCR and FISH, and the degree of concordance was analyzed. Sixty-two cases were in agreement between the 2 methods, and the contingency study assigned a κ value of 0.729 for their correlation. A receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to determine the optimal cut-off point for ERBB2 amplification, which was estimated at a QPA=1.53 (sensitivity=0.863; specificity=0.944). Our data conclude that the QPA is able to determine ERBB2 gene status with high accuracy, while also overcoming the limitations of conventional techniques and providing better cost-effectiveness.

  13. Gene Amplification Is A Mechanism For Rapid Weed Evolution To Herbicide Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The herbicide glyphosate became widely used in the U.S. and other parts of the world following the introduction of glyphosate-resistant crops. These crops were created by introduction of a modified 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene, the herbicide target site. Increased use of ...

  14. Accidental Amplification and Inactivation of a Methyltransferase Gene Eliminates Cytosine Methylation in Mycosphaerella Graminicola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A de novo search for repetitive elements in the genome sequence of the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola identified a family of repeats containing a DNA methyltransferase sequence (MgDNMT), which is a homologue of the Neurospora crassa Dim-2 gene. A total of 28 MgDNMT sequences was identifie...

  15. Glycoproteomic Approach Identifies KRAS as a Positive Regulator of CREG1 in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Clark, David J.; Mei, Yuping; Sun, Shisheng; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Austin J.; Mao, Li

    2016-01-01

    Protein glycosylation plays a fundamental role in a multitude of biological processes, and the associated aberrant expression of glycoproteins in cancer has made them attractive biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In this study, we examined differentially expressed glycoproteins in cell lines derived from three different states of lung tumorigenesis: an immortalized bronchial epithelial cell (HBE) line, a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line harboring a Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) activation mutation and a NSCLC cell line harboring an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation deletion. Using a Triple SILAC proteomic quantification strategy paired with hydrazide chemistry N-linked glycopeptide enrichment, we quantified 118 glycopeptides in the three cell lines derived from 82 glycoproteins. Proteomic profiling revealed 27 glycopeptides overexpressed in both NSCLC cell lines, 6 glycopeptides overexpressed only in the EGFR mutant cells and 19 glycopeptides overexpressed only in the KRAS mutant cells. Further investigation of a panel of NSCLC cell lines found that Cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG1) overexpression was closely correlated with KRAS mutation status in NSCLC cells and could be down-regulated by inhibition of KRAS expression. Our results indicate that CREG1 is a down-stream effector of KRAS in a sub-type of NSCLC cells and a novel candidate biomarker or therapeutic target for KRAS mutant NSCLC. PMID:26722374

  16. Mutant Kras copy number defines metabolic reprogramming and therapeutic susceptibilities.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Emma M; Gaude, Edoardo; Turrell, Frances K; Frezza, Christian; Martins, Carla P

    2016-03-03

    The RAS/MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signalling pathway is frequently deregulated in non-small-cell lung cancer, often through KRAS activating mutations. A single endogenous mutant Kras allele is sufficient to promote lung tumour formation in mice but malignant progression requires additional genetic alterations. We recently showed that advanced lung tumours from Kras(G12D/+);p53-null mice frequently exhibit Kras(G12D) allelic enrichment (Kras(G12D)/Kras(wild-type) > 1) (ref. 7), implying that mutant Kras copy gains are positively selected during progression. Here we show, through a comprehensive analysis of mutant Kras homozygous and heterozygous mouse embryonic fibroblasts and lung cancer cells, that these genotypes are phenotypically distinct. In particular, Kras(G12D/G12D) cells exhibit a glycolytic switch coupled to increased channelling of glucose-derived metabolites into the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glutathione biosynthesis, resulting in enhanced glutathione-mediated detoxification. This metabolic rewiring is recapitulated in mutant KRAS homozygous non-small-cell lung cancer cells and in vivo, in spontaneous advanced murine lung tumours (which display a high frequency of Kras(G12D) copy gain), but not in the corresponding early tumours (Kras(G12D) heterozygous). Finally, we demonstrate that mutant Kras copy gain creates unique metabolic dependences that can be exploited to selectively target these aggressive mutant Kras tumours. Our data demonstrate that mutant Kras lung tumours are not a single disease but rather a heterogeneous group comprising two classes of tumours with distinct metabolic profiles, prognosis and therapeutic susceptibility, which can be discriminated on the basis of their relative mutant allelic content. We also provide the first, to our knowledge, in vivo evidence of metabolic rewiring during lung cancer malignant progression.

  17. Prognostic significance of K-Ras mutation rate in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Bruno; Cremolini, Chiara; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Russo, Antonio; Mannavola, Francesco; Perrone, Giuseppe; Pantano, Francesco; Loupakis, Fotios; Rossini, Daniele; Ongaro, Elena; Bonazzina, Erica; Dell'Aquila, Emanuela; Imperatori, Marco; Zoccoli, Alice; Bronte, Giuseppe; De Maglio, Giovanna; Fontanini, Gabriella; Natoli, Clara; Falcone, Alfredo; Santini, Daniele; Onetti-Muda, Andrea; Siena, Salvatore; Tonini, Giuseppe; Aprile, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Activating mutations of K-Ras gene have a well-established role as predictors of resistance to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. Their prognostic value is controversial, and no data regarding the prognostic value of mutation rate, defined as the percentage of mutated alleles/tumor sample, are available. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of K-Rasmutation rate in a homogenous cohort of mCRC patients receiving first-line doublet plus bevacizumab. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study enrolled 397 K-Ras mutant mCRC patients from 6 Italian centers, and 263 patients were fully evaluable for our analysis. K-Ras mutation rate was assessed by pyrosequencing. Patients with less than 60% of cancer cells in tumor tissue were excluded. No patients received anti-EGFR containing anticancer therapy, at any time. Median mutation rate was 40% and was adopted as cut-off. The primary and secondary endpoints were PFS and OS respectively. Results: At univariate analysis, K-Ras mutation rate higher than 40% was significantly associated with lower PFS (7.3 vs 9.1 months; P < 0.0001) and OS (21 vs 31 months; P = 0.004). A multivariate model adjusted for age at diagnosis, site of origin of tumor tissue (primary vs metastases), referral center, number of metastatic sites, and first-line chemotherapy backbone, showed that K-Ras mutation rate remained a significant predictor of PFS and OS in the whole population. Discussion: Our data demonstrate an association between K-Ras mutation rate and prognosis in mCRC patients treated with bevacizumab-containing first-line therapy. These data deserve to be verified in an independent validation set. PMID:26384309

  18. EGFR and KRAS mutations in Turkish non-small cell lung cancer patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bircan, Sema; Baloglu, Huseyin; Kucukodaci, Zafer; Bircan, Ahmet

    2014-08-01

    EGFR and KRAS mutation profile in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) shows wide variations due to geographic and ethnic background. We aimed to determine the frequency and types of EGFR and KRAS mutations in a sample group of Turkish NSCLC cases. The study included 14 adenocarcinomas (ACs), 11 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) patients selected from archival material including small biopsy or surgical specimens. Their formalin fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues were used for genomic DNA extraction for EGFR exon 19 and 21, and KRAS exon 2 mutations. Eleven NSCLCs (44 %) had EGFR mutations. Exon 19 and 21 mutations were found in 8 (32 %) and 5 (20 %) cases. Two cases showed double EGFR mutations. In ACs, 5 (35.7 %) patients had EGFR gene mutation, 3 in exon 19 and 3 in exon 21. In SCCs, 6 (54.5 %) cases had EGFR mutation, 5 in exon 19 and 2 in exon 21. All exon 19 mutations were deletion-type mutations. For exon 21, 3 cases had L858R point mutation (CTG>CGG) and two cases showed deletion-type mutations. Six (24 %) NSCLCs showed KRAS mutations (three ACC, three SCC), 5 codon 12 mutations (G>T, T>C, G>A) and one codon 13 mutation (G>T). Three NSCLC cases showed both EGFR and KRAS mutations together. The profile of KRAS mutation in our AC cases was quite similar to those seen in the Western countries; however, frequency and clustering of EGFR mutations were similar to those seen in the Eastern countries.

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirate-derived preclinical pancreatic cancer models reveal panitumumab sensitivity in KRAS wild-type tumors.

    PubMed

    Berry, William; Algar, Elizabeth; Kumar, Beena; Desmond, Christopher; Swan, Michael; Jenkins, Brendan J; Croagh, Daniel

    2017-05-15

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is largely refractory to existing therapies used in unselected patient trials, thus emphasizing the pressing need for new approaches for patient selection in personalized medicine. KRAS mutations occur in 90% of PC patients and confer resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors (e.g., panitumumab), suggesting that KRAS wild-type PC patients may benefit from targeted panitumumab therapy. Here, we use tumor tissue procured by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirate (EUS-FNA) to compare the in vivo sensitivity in patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) of KRAS wild-type and mutant PC tumors to panitumumab, and to profile the molecular signature of these tumors in patients with metastatic or localized disease. Specifically, RNASeq of EUS-FNA-derived tumor RNA from localized (n = 20) and metastatic (n = 20) PC cases revealed a comparable transcriptome profile. Screening the KRAS mutation status of tumor genomic DNA obtained from EUS-FNAs stratified PC patients into either KRAS wild-type or mutant cohorts, and the engraftment of representative KRAS wild-type and mutant EUS-FNA tumor samples into NOD/SCID mice revealed that the growth of KRAS wild-type, but not mutant, PDXs was selectively suppressed with panitumumab. Furthermore, in silico transcriptome interrogation of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)-derived KRAS wild-type (n = 38) and mutant (n = 132) PC tumors revealed 391 differentially expressed genes. Taken together, our study validates EUS-FNA for the application of a novel translational pipeline comprising KRAS mutation screening and PDXs, applicable to all PC patients, to evaluate personalized anti-EGFR therapy in patients with KRAS wild-type tumors.

  20. Identification of druggable cancer driver genes amplified across TCGA datasets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; McGee, Jeremy; Chen, Xianming; Doman, Thompson N; Gong, Xueqian; Zhang, Youyan; Hamm, Nicole; Ma, Xiwen; Higgs, Richard E; Bhagwat, Shripad V; Buchanan, Sean; Peng, Sheng-Bin; Staschke, Kirk A; Yadav, Vipin; Yue, Yong; Kouros-Mehr, Hosein

    2014-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) projects have advanced our understanding of the driver mutations, genetic backgrounds, and key pathways activated across cancer types. Analysis of TCGA datasets have mostly focused on somatic mutations and translocations, with less emphasis placed on gene amplifications. Here we describe a bioinformatics screening strategy to identify putative cancer driver genes amplified across TCGA datasets. We carried out GISTIC2 analysis of TCGA datasets spanning 16 cancer subtypes and identified 486 genes that were amplified in two or more datasets. The list was narrowed to 75 cancer-associated genes with potential "druggable" properties. The majority of the genes were localized to 14 amplicons spread across the genome. To identify potential cancer driver genes, we analyzed gene copy number and mRNA expression data from individual patient samples and identified 42 putative cancer driver genes linked to diverse oncogenic processes. Oncogenic activity was further validated by siRNA/shRNA knockdown and by referencing the Project Achilles datasets. The amplified genes represented a number of gene families, including epigenetic regulators, cell cycle-associated genes, DNA damage response/repair genes, metabolic regulators, and genes linked to the Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, JAK/STAT, NF-KB and MAPK signaling pathways. Among the 42 putative driver genes were known driver genes, such as EGFR, ERBB2 and PIK3CA. Wild-type KRAS was amplified in several cancer types, and KRAS-amplified cancer cell lines were most sensitive to KRAS shRNA, suggesting that KRAS amplification was an independent oncogenic event. A number of MAP kinase adapters were co-amplified with their receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the FGFR adapter FRS2 and the EGFR family adapters GRB2 and GRB7. The ubiquitin-like ligase DCUN1D1 and the histone methyltransferase NSD3 were also identified as novel putative cancer driver genes. We discuss the patient tailoring implications for existing cancer

  1. Amplification of a DEAD box protein gene in retinoblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Godbout, R; Squire, J

    1993-01-01

    DEAD box proteins, characterized by the conserved motif Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp, are putative RNA helicases implicated in a number of cellular processes involving alteration of RNA secondary structure such as translation initiation, nuclear and mitochondrial splicing, and ribosome and spliceosome assembly. Based on their distribution patterns, some members of this family are believed to be involved in embryogenesis, spermatogenesis, and cellular growth and division. Here, we report that the mRNA encoding a DEAD box protein, designated HuDBP-RB, is present at elevated levels in two of six retinoblastoma (RB) cell lines tested and is preferentially expressed in fetal tissues of neuroectodermal origin. It is not possible to classify HuDBP-RB as a member of any of the DEAD box protein subgroups identified to date since the regions of amino acid similarity between HuDBP-RB and other DEAD box proteins are restricted to the conserved motifs found in all members of this family. The HuDBP-RB gene, which has been mapped to chromosome band 2p24, is amplified in the RB cell lines that overexpress HuDBP-RB RNA. Furthermore, the MYCN gene is also present in multiple copies in these two cell lines, suggesting coamplification of the two genes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7689221

  2. Amplification of TGFβ Induced ITGB6 Gene Transcription May Promote Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tatler, Amanda L.; Goodwin, Amanda T.; Gbolahan, Olumide; Saini, Gauri; Porte, Joanne; John, Alison E.; Clifford, Rachel L.; Violette, Shelia M.; Weinreb, Paul H.; Parfrey, Helen; Wolters, Paul J.; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating, progressive disease with poor survival rates and limited treatment options. Upregulation of αvβ6 integrins within the alveolar epithelial cells is a characteristic feature of IPF and correlates with poor patient survival. The pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ1 can upregulate αvβ6 integrin expression but the molecular mechanisms driving this effect have not previously been elucidated. We confirm that stimulation with exogenous TGFβ1 increases expression of the integrin β6 subunit gene (ITGB6) and αvβ6 integrin cell surface expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via transcriptional activation of the ITGB6 gene, but does not result from effects on ITGB6 mRNA stability. Basal expression of ITGB6 in, and αvβ6 integrins on, lung epithelial cells occurs via homeostatic αvβ6-mediated TGFβ1 activation in the absence of exogenous stimulation, and can be amplified by TGFβ1 activation. Fundamentally, we show for the first time that TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via canonical Smad signalling since dominant negative constructs directed against Smad3 and 4 inhibit ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, disruption of a Smad binding site at -798 in the ITGB6 promoter abolishes TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that TGFβ1 stimulation of lung epithelial cells results in direct binding of Smad3, and Smad4, to the ITGB6 gene promoter within this region. Finally, using an adenoviral TGFβ1 over-expression model of pulmonary fibrosis we demonstrate that Smad3 is crucial for TGFβ1-induced αvβ6 integrin expression within the alveolar epithelium in vivo. Together, these data confirm that a homeostatic, autocrine loop of αvβ6 integrin activated TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 gene expression regulates epithelial basal αvβ6 integrin expression, and demonstrates that this occurs via Smad

  3. Improvement of antitumor activity by gene amplification with a replicating but nondisseminating adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Bourbeau, Denis; Lau, Cara Jean; Jaime, Jairo; Koty, Zafiro; Zehntner, Simone P; Lavoie, Geneviève; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Nalbantoglu, Josephine; Massie, Bernard

    2007-04-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach for cancer treatment; however, efficacy of current vectors remains insufficient. To improve the success of suicide gene therapy, we constructed a replication-competent adenoviral vector that has its protease gene deleted and expresses bacterial cytosine deaminase fused with bacterial uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CU). The prodrug, 5-fluorocytosine, is transformed into the highly toxic and tissue-diffusible 5-fluorouracil by CU in infected cells. This vector is incapable of producing infectious particles but is able to undergo a single round of replication, thereby increasing transgene copy number and expression. In the presence of 5-FC, compared with the first-generation vector (AdCU), the replication-competent vector, Ad(dPS)CU-IRES-E1A, was significantly more efficacious for in vitro tumor cell killing and in bystander assays, whereas 25-fold fewer viral particles were required in a three-dimensional spheroid model. For in vivo experiments, in which virus was injected into preestablished intracranial glioma xenografts, followed by 5-FC treatment, mice receiving Ad(dPS)CU-IRES-E1A had significantly smaller tumors at 35 days postinjection as well as significantly longer median survival than mice treated with the replication-deficient, protease-deleted vector [Ad(dPS)CU]. In an immunocompetent syngeneic model, Ad(dPS)CU + 5-FC-treated mice had a median survival of only 23 days, whereas Ad(dPS)CU-IRES-E1A + 5-FC-treated animals had a survival of 57.1% at 365 days. In conclusion, Ad(dPS)CU-IRES-E1A in the presence of 5-FC produces more potent tumoricidal effects than its replication-deficient counterparts.

  4. Assessment of HER2 gene amplification in adenocarcinomas of the stomach or gastroesophageal junction in the INT-0116/SWOG9008 clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, M. A.; Gundacker, H. M.; Benedetti, J.; Macdonald, J. S.; Baranda, J. C.; Levin, W. J.; Blanke, C. D.; Elatre, W.; Weng, P.; Zhou, J. Y.; Lenz, H. J.; Press, M. F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Trastuzumab has been approved for patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive metastatic gastric carcinoma; however, relatively little is known about the role of HER2 in the natural history of this disease. Patients and methods Patients enrolled in the INT-0116/SWOG9008 phase III gastric cancer clinical trial with available tissue specimens were retrospectively evaluated for HER2 gene amplification by FISH and overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The original trial was designed to evaluate the benefit of postoperative chemoradiation compared with surgery alone. Results HER2 gene amplification rate by FISH was 10.9% among 258 patients evaluated. HER2 overexpression rate by IHC was 12.2% among 148 patients evaluated, with 90% agreement between FISH and IHC. There was a significant interaction between HER2 amplification and treatment with respect to both disease-free survival (DFS) (P = 0.020) and overall survival (OS) (P = 0.034). Among patients with HER2-non-amplified cancers, treated patients had a median OS of 44 months compared with 24 months in the surgery-only arm (P = 0.003). Among patients with HER2-amplified cancers, there was no significant difference in survival based on treatment arm. HER2 status was not a prognostic marker among patients who received no postoperative chemoradiation. Conclusion Patients lacking HER2 amplification benefited from treatment as indicated by both DFS and OS. Clinical trial INT-0116/SWOG9008 phase III. PMID:23524864

  5. Sequence Variation in Amplification Target Genes and Standards Influences Interlaboratory Comparison of BK Virus DNA Load Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Morgane; Meddeb, Mariam; Sueur, Charlotte; Domingo-Calap, Pilar; Soulier, Eric; Chabaud, Angeline; Perrin, Peggy; Moulin, Bruno; Bahram, Seiamak; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Caillard, Sophie; Barth, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    International guidelines define a BK virus (BKV) load of ≥4 log10 copies/ml as presumptive of BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVN) and a cutoff for therapeutic intervention. To investigate whether BKV DNA loads (BKVL) are comparable between laboratories, 2 panels of 15 and 8 clinical specimens (urine, whole blood, and plasma) harboring different BKV genotypes were distributed to 20 and 27 French hospital centers in 2013 and 2014, respectively. Although 68% of the reported results fell within the acceptable range of the expected result ±0.5 log10, the interlaboratory variation ranged from 1.32 to 5.55 log10. Polymorphisms specific to BKV genotypes II and IV, namely, the number and position of mutations in amplification target genes and/or deletion in standards, arose as major sources of interlaboratory disagreements. The diversity of DNA purification methods also contributed to the interlaboratory variability, in particular for urine samples. Our data strongly suggest that (i) commercial external quality controls for BKVL assessment should include all major BKV genotypes to allow a correct evaluation of BKV assays, and (ii) the BKV sequence of commercial standards should be provided to users to verify the absence of mismatches with the primers and probes of their BKV assays. Finally, the optimization of primer and probe design and standardization of DNA extraction methods may substantially decrease interlaboratory variability and allow interinstitutional studies to define a universal cutoff for presumptive BKVN and, ultimately, ensure adequate patient care. PMID:26468499

  6. Rapid and sensitive detection of Plesiomonas shigelloides by cross-priming amplification of the hugA gene

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Shuang; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    Plesiomonas shigelloides (P. shigelloides) is implicated as an aetiological agent of human gastroenteritis in humans, for which reliable laboratory detection of P. shigelloides is clinically and epidemiologically desirable. A simple molecular method for rapid detection of P. shigelloides using cross-priming amplification (CPA) has been developed, with hugA as the target. The hugA gene is required for haem iron utilisation and is critical for the survival and growth of P. shigelloides. The assay output was visualised as a colour change with no need to open the reaction tubes, and no false-positive results were detected for the 33 non- P. shigelloides strains examined to assess assay specificity. The limit of detection was 200 fg P. shigelloides DNA per reaction and 3×103 CFU per g in human stools, which was 100 and 10-fold more sensitive than polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The CPA method was used to detect the presence of P. shigelloides in stool specimens from 70 patients with diarrhoea and 30 environmental water samples, with no difference in accuracy between the CPA assay and the biological culture. The present study, therefore, suggests that the P. shigelloides hugA CPA assay may represent a valuable tool for rapid and sensitive detection of P. shigelloides in primary care facilities and clinical laboratories. PMID:27878230

  7. Sex identification based on AMEL gene PCR amplification from blue sheep (Pseudois nayaur) fecal DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Yang, Y Y; Wang, X M; Liu, Z S; Wang, Z H; Ding, Y Z

    2015-08-07

    The use of noninvasive genetic sampling to identify the sex of wild animals is an extremely valuable and important tool in molecular ecology and wildlife conservation. Sex determination using the amelogenin gene has been conducted in many species because only a single pair of primers is required to amplify both X- and Y-linked alleles. However, this method has not been used in field research with the feces of wildlife. In this study, we applied this method to 222 fecal samples from wild blue sheep (Pseudois nayaur) using amelogenin primers (SE47/SE48) after testing the effectiveness of sex determination using tissue samples and fecal samples from blue sheep of known sex. We found this method to be highly reliable (80.2%) for blue sheep. Amelogenin can be used to identify the sex of wild animals using fecal samples.

  8. Gene Amplifications in Well-Differentiated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Inactivate the p53 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wenwei; Feng, Zhaohui; Modica, Ippolito; Klimstra, David S.; Song, Lin; Allen, Peter J.; Brennan, Murray F.; Levine, Arnold J.; Tang, Laura H.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) comprise a group of rare tumors derived from the diffuse neuroendocrine system or islet endocrine cells of the pancreas. The molecular mechanisms underlying NETs are largely unknown. The tumor suppressor p53 plays a critical role in maintaining genomic stability and tumor prevention. The p53 pathway is tightly regulated by a number of proteins, among which MDM2, MDM4, and WIP1 are key negative regulators of p53 protein levels or activity. Aberrant activation of these negative regulators can attenuate the p53 function that serves as an important mechanism of tumorigenesis. In this study, several genetic alterations in pancreatic NETs were studied. These tumors exhibit various chromosomal aberrations throughout the whole genome as examined by array-based comparative genomic hybridization. Although p53 mutations are rare in NETs (<3%), this study presents evidence that the p53 pathway is altered in pancreatic NETs through aberrant activation of its negative regulators. A high percentage of pancreatic NETs contain extra gene copies of MDM2 (22%), MDM4 (30%), and WIP1 (51%), which are correlated with expression of corresponding mRNAs and proteins. In addition, there is a higher frequency (23% v. 15% in the control population) of the G/G genotype of MDM2 SNP309, a functional single-nucleotide polymorphism in the MDM2 gene that attenuates the function of the p53 protein. Overall, approximately 70% of pancreatic NETs have one or more of these genetic changes. These findings suggest that the negative regulation of p53 function could be an important mechanism for the initiation and/or progression of pancreatic NETs, and reactivation of p53 could be a potential therapeutic strategy for patients with this disease. PMID:20871795

  9. KIT amplification and gene mutations in acral/mucosal melanoma in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jina; Lee, Jeeyun; Jang, Jiryeon; Lee, Eui Jin; Jang, Kee Taek; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Kyoung-Mee

    2011-06-01

    Mucosal and acral melanomas have demonstrated different genetic alterations and biological behavior compared with more common cutaneous melanomas. It was recently reported that gain-of-function KIT mutations and/or copy number increases are more common in mucosal and acral melanomas. Thus, we studied the frequency and pattern of KIT aberrations in mucosal and acral melanomas in Korea. We analyzed 97 patients who were pathologically confirmed with mucosal or acral melanoma between 1997 and 2010 at Samsung Medical Center. Of the 97 melanoma patients, 92 were screened for mutations in KIT exons 11, 13, 17, and 18, BRAF and NRAS genes. KIT copy number was assessed by quantitative, real-time PCR. Of the 97 patients, 55 (56.7%) were mucosal, 40 (41.2%) were acral melanoma, and two were of unknown primary origin. Among seven cases with KIT mutation, five (60.0%) occurred in exon 11, one (20.0%) in exon 17, and one (20.0%) in exon 13. Point mutations were the most common, resulting in substitutions in exon 11 (K558R, T574A, L576P, and V559A), exon 13 (N655K), and exon 17 (N822K). A novel Thr574Ala (c.1720A>G) KIT mutation, which has not been reported in melanoma or other tumor types, was identified in one genital melanoma case. Of the 97 mucosal or acral melanoma specimens, 49 were tested for KIT gene copy number changes using quantitative PCR. Increased KIT copy number was identified in 15 patients: seven (40%) of 20 acral melanomas and eight (31%) of 26 mucosal melanomas. Our study implicates that a significant proportion of acral and mucosal melanomas have KIT mutations in Asian population.

  10. Kras mutations increase telomerase activity and targeting telomerase is a promising therapeutic strategy for Kras-mutant NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bowen; Zhang, Lianmin; Qian, Dong; Li, Chenguang; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Shengguang; Zhu, Jinfang; Gao, Liuwei; Zhang, Qiang; Jia, Bin; Hao, Ligang; Wang, Changli; Zhang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    As shortened telomeres inhibit tumor formation and prolong life span in a KrasG12D mouse lung cancer model, we investigated the implications of telomerase in Kras-mutant NSCLC. We found that Kras mutations increased TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase) mRNA expression and telomerase activity and telomere length in both immortalized bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) and lung adenocarcinoma cells (Calu-3). MEK inhibition led to reduced TERT expression and telomerase activity. Furthermore, telomerase inhibitor BIBR1532 shortened telomere length and inhibited mutant Kras-induced long-term proliferation, colony formation and migration capabilities of BEAS-2B and Calu-3 cells. Importantly, BIBR1532 sensitized oncogenic Kras expressing Calu-3 cells to chemotherapeutic agents. The Calu-3-KrasG12D xenograft mouse model confirmed that BIBR1532 enhanced the antitumor efficacy of paclitaxel in vivo. In addition, higher TERT expression was seen in Kras-mutant NSCLC than that with wild-type Kras. Our data suggest that Kras mutations increase telomerase activity and telomere length by activating the RAS/MEK pathway, which contributes to an aggressive phenotype of NSCLC. Kras mutations-induced lung tumorigenesis and chemoresistance are attenuated by telomerase inhibition. Targeting telomerase/telomere may be a promising therapeutic strategy for patients with Kras-mutant NSCLC. PMID:27329725

  11. The polyamine metabolism genes ornithine decarboxylase and antizyme 2 predict aggressive behavior in neuroblastomas with and without MYCN amplification

    PubMed Central

    Geerts, Dirk; Koster, Jan; Albert, David; Koomoa, Dana-Lynn T.; Feith, David J.; Pegg, Anthony E.; Volckmann, Richard; Caron, Huib; Versteeg, Rogier; Bachmann, André S.

    2010-01-01

    High polyamine (PA) levels and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) over-expression are well-known phenomena in many aggressive cancer types. We analyzed the expression of ODC and ODC-activity regulating genes antizymes 1-3 (OAZ1-3) and AZ inhibitors 1-2 (AZ-IN1-2) in human neuroblastoma (NB) tumors and correlated these with genetic and clinical features of NB. Since ODC is a known target gene of MYCN, the correlation between ODC and MYCN was of special interest. Data were obtained from Affymetrix micro-array analysis of 88 NB tumor samples. In addition, mRNA expression levels of ODC, OAZ2, and MYCN in a MYCN-inducible NB cell line were determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. ODC mRNA expression in NB tumors was significantly predictive of decreased overall survival probability and correlated with several unfavorable clinical NB characteristics (all P < 0.005). Interestingly, high ODC mRNA expression also showed significant correlation with poor survival prognosis in Kaplan-Meier analyses stratified for patients without MYCN amplification, suggesting an additional role for ODC independent of MYCN. Conversely, high OAZ2 mRNA expression correlated with increased survival and with several favorable clinical NB characteristics (all P < 0.003). In addition, we provide first evidence of a role for MYCN-associated transcription factors MAD2 and MAD7 in ODC regulation. In NB cell cultures, ectopic over-expression of MYCN altered ODC, but not OAZ2 mRNA levels. In conclusion, these data suggest that elevated ODC and low OAZ2 mRNA expression levels correlate with several unfavorable genetic and clinical features in NB, offering new insights into PA pathways and PA metabolism-targeting therapy in NB. PMID:19960435

  12. Ping-pong amplification of a retroviral vector achieves high-level gene expression: human growth hormone production.

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, S L; Kabat, D

    1990-01-01

    Retroviral vectors offer major advantages for gene transfer studies but have not been useful for producing proteins in large quantities. This deficiency has resulted in part from interference to superinfection, which limits the numbers of active proviruses in cells. Recently, we found that these vectors amplify when they are added as calcium phosphate precipitates to cocultures of cells that package retroviruses into ecotropic and amphotropic host range envelopes. Helper-free virions from either cell type can infect the other without interference, resulting in theoretically limitless back-and-forth (ping-pong) vector replication. In initial studies, however, amplifications of a vector that contained the human growth hormone gene ceased when the hormone produced was 0.3% or less of cellular protein synthesis. This limit was caused by two factors. First, recombinant shutoff viruses that are replication defective and encode envelope glycoproteins form at a low probability during any round of the vector replication cycle and these spread in cocultures, thereby establishing interference. Single cells in shutoff cocultures therefore synthesize both ecotropic and amphotropic envelope glycoproteins, and they release promiscuous (presumably hybrid) virions. The probability of forming shutoff viruses before the vector had amplified to a high multiplicity was reduced by using small cocultures. Second, cells with large numbers of proviruses are unhealthy and their proviral expression can be unstable. Stable expresser cell clones were obtained by selection. Thereby, cell lines were readily obtained that stably produce human growth hormone as 4 to 6% of the total protein synthesis. A ping-pong retroviral vector can be used for high-level protein production in vertebrate cells. Images PMID:2352330

  13. KRAS, BRAF, and TP53 deep sequencing for colorectal carcinoma patient diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rechsteiner, Markus; von Teichman, Adriana; Rüschoff, Jan H; Fankhauser, Niklaus; Pestalozzi, Bernhard; Schraml, Peter; Weber, Achim; Wild, Peter; Zimmermann, Dieter; Moch, Holger

    2013-05-01

    In colorectal carcinoma, KRAS (alias Ki-ras) and BRAF mutations have emerged as predictors of resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody treatment and worse patient outcome, respectively. In this study, we aimed to establish a high-throughput deep sequencing workflow according to 454 pyrosequencing technology to cope with the increasing demand for sequence information at medical institutions. A cohort of 81 patients with known KRAS mutation status detected by Sanger sequencing was chosen for deep sequencing. The workflow allowed us to analyze seven amplicons (one BRAF, two KRAS, and four TP53 exons) of nine patients in parallel in one deep sequencing run. Target amplification and variant calling showed reproducible results with input DNA derived from FFPE tissue that ranged from 0.4 to 50 ng with the use of different targets and multiplex identifiers. Equimolar pooling of each amplicon in a deep sequencing run was necessary to counterbalance differences in patient tissue quality. Five BRAF and 49 TP53 mutations with functional consequences were detected. The lowest mutation frequency detected in a patient tumor population was 5% in TP53 exon 5. This low-frequency mutation was successfully verified in a second PCR and deep sequencing run. In summary, our workflow allows us to process 315 targets a week and provides the quality, flexibility, and speed needed to be integrated as standard procedure for mutational analysis in diagnostics.

  14. Alterations in K-ras, APC and p53-multiple genetic pathway in colorectal cancer among Indians.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Pooja; Anwar, Mumtaz; Nanda, Neha; Kochhar, Rakesh; Wig, Jai Dev; Vaiphei, Kim; Mahmood, Safrun

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing rapidly in Asian countries during the past few decades, but no comprehensive analysis has been done to find out the exact cause of this disease. In this study, we investigated the frequencies of mutations and expression pattern of K-ras, APC (adenomatosis polyposis coli) and p53 in tumor, adjoining and distant normal mucosa and to correlate these alterations with patients clinicopathological parameters as well as with the survival. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction digestion was used to detect mutations in K-ras and PCR-SSCP (Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism) followed by DNA sequencing was used to detect mutations in APC and p53 genes. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression pattern of K-ras, APC and p53 proteins. The frequencies of mutations of K-ras, APC and p53 in 30 tumor tissues samples were 26.7 %, 46.7 % and 20 %, respectively. Only 3.3 % of tumors contained mutations in all the three genes. The most common combination of mutation was APC and p53 whereas mutation in both p53 and K-ras were extremely rare. There was no association between the mutations and expression pattern of K-ras, APC and p53 (p>0.05). In Indians, the frequency of alterations of K-ras and APC is similar as in Westerns, whereas the frequency of p53 mutation is slightly lower. The lack of multiple mutations in tumor specimens suggests that these genetic alterations might have independent influences on CRC development and there could be multiple alternative genetic pathways to CRC in our present study cohort.

  15. Identification of endotrypanum species from a sloth, a squirrel and Lutzomyia sandflies in ecuador by PCR amplification and sequencing of the mini-exon gene.

    PubMed

    Katakura, Ken; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Furuya, Masato; Uezato, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Shigeo; Okamoto, Munehiro; Gomez L, Eduardo A; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2003-05-01

    PCR amplification and nucleotide sequencing of the mini-exon gene revealed that four strains isolated from a sloth (Choloepus hoffmanni), a squirrel (Sciurus granatensis) and two sandflies (Lutzomyia hartmanni) in Ecuador were indistinguishable from Endotrypanum monterogeii. Another strain isolated from Lu. hartmanni showed the high sequence similarity to E. schaudinni. Since three of these strains have been previously identified as Leishmania (Viannia) equatorensis, the results demonstrate that L. (V.) equatorensis is genetically closely related to the genus Endotrypanum. The present study also indicates that Endotrypanum species are distributed in arboreal animals and sandflies in Ecuador, and that mini-exon gene amplification is useful for epidemiological studies of Leishmania and Endotrypanum in the New World.

  16. Peripheral amplification of sweating – a role for calcitonin gene-related peptide

    PubMed Central

    Schlereth, Tanja; Dittmar, Jan Oliver; Seewald, Bianca; Birklein, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Neuropeptides are the mediators of neurogenic inflammation. Some pain disorders, e.g. complex regional pain syndromes, are characterized by increased neurogenic inflammation and by exaggerated sudomotor function. The aim of this study was to explore whether neuropeptides have a peripheral effect on human sweating. We investigated the effects of different concentrations of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and substance P (SP) on acetylcholine-induced axon reflex sweating in healthy subjects (total n = 18). All substances were applied via dermal microdialysis. The experiments were done in a parallel setting: ACh alone and ACh combined with CGRP, VIP or SP in various concentrations were applied. Acetylcholine (10−2m) always elicited a sweating response, neuropeptides alone did not. However, CGRP significantly enhanced ACh-induced sweating (P < 0.01). Post hoc tests revealed that CGRP in physiological concentrations of 10−7–10−9m was most effective. VIP at any concentration had no significant effect on axon reflex sweating. The duration of the sweating response (P < 0.01), but not the amount of sweat, was reduced by SP. ACh-induced skin blood flow was significantly increased by CGRP (P < 0.01), but unaltered by VIP and SP. The results indicate that CGRP amplifies axon reflex sweating in human skin. PMID:16931551

  17. Peripheral amplification of sweating--a role for calcitonin gene-related peptide.

    PubMed

    Schlereth, Tanja; Dittmar, Jan Oliver; Seewald, Bianca; Birklein, Frank

    2006-11-01

    Neuropeptides are the mediators of neurogenic inflammation. Some pain disorders, e.g. complex regional pain syndromes, are characterized by increased neurogenic inflammation and by exaggerated sudomotor function. The aim of this study was to explore whether neuropeptides have a peripheral effect on human sweating. We investigated the effects of different concentrations of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and substance P (SP) on acetylcholine-induced axon reflex sweating in healthy subjects (total n = 18). All substances were applied via dermal microdialysis. The experiments were done in a parallel setting: ACh alone and ACh combined with CGRP, VIP or SP in various concentrations were applied. Acetylcholine (10(-2) m) always elicited a sweating response, neuropeptides alone did not. However, CGRP significantly enhanced ACh-induced sweating (P < 0.01). Post hoc tests revealed that CGRP in physiological concentrations of 10(-7)-10(-9) m was most effective. VIP at any concentration had no significant effect on axon reflex sweating. The duration of the sweating response (P < 0.01), but not the amount of sweat, was reduced by SP. ACh-induced skin blood flow was significantly increased by CGRP (P < 0.01), but unaltered by VIP and SP. The results indicate that CGRP amplifies axon reflex sweating in human skin.

  18. Intensity of Mutualism Breakdown Is Determined by Temperature Not Amplification of Wolbachia Genes

    PubMed Central

    Frentiu, Francesca D.; Horn, Emilie; Ritchie, Fiona K.; van Swinderen, Bruno; Weible, Michael W.; O’Neill, Scott L.; Brownlie, Jeremy C.

    2016-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally transmitted intracellular bacterial symbionts that infect approximately 40% of all insect species. Though several strains of Wolbachia naturally infect Drosophila melanogaster and provide resistance against viral pathogens, or provision metabolites during periods of nutritional stress, one virulent strain, wMelPop, reduces fly lifespan by half, possibly as a consequence of over-replication. While the mechanisms that allow wMelPop to over-replicate are still of debate, a unique tandem repeat locus in the wMelPop genome that contains eight genes, referred to as the “Octomom” locus has been identified and is thought to play an important regulatory role. Estimates of Octomom locus copy number correlated increasing copy number to both Wolbachia bacterial density and increased pathology. Here we demonstrate that infected fly pathology is not dependent on an increased Octomom copy number, but does strongly correlate with increasing temperature. When measured across developmental time, we also show Octomom copy number to be highly variable across developmental time within a single generation. Using a second pathogenic strain of Wolbachia, we further demonstrate reduced insect lifespan can occur independently of a high Octomom locus copy number. Taken together, this data demonstrates that the mechanism/s of wMelPop virulence is more complex than has been previously described. PMID:27661080

  19. Species identification of Asini Corii Collas (donkey glue) by PCR amplification of cytochrome b gene.

    PubMed

    Kumeta, Yukie; Maruyama, Takuro; Asama, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Hakamatsuka, Takashi; Goda, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    Asini Corii Collas (ACC; donkey glue) is a crude drug used to promote hematopoiesis and arrest bleeding. Because adulteration of the drug with substances from other animals such as horses, cattle, and pigs has been found, we examined PCR methods based on the sequence of the cytochrome b gene for source species identification. Two strategies for extracting DNA from ACC were compared, and the ion-exchange resin procedure was revealed to be more suitable than the silica-based one. Using DNA extracted from ACC by the ion-exchange resin procedure, PCR methods for species-specific detection of donkey, horse, cattle, and pig substances were established. When these species-specific PCR methods were applied to ACC, amplicons were obtained only by the donkey-specific PCR. Cattle-specific PCR detected as little as 0.1% admixture of cattle glue in the ACC. These results suggest that the species-specific PCR methods established in this study would be useful for simple and easy detection of adulteration of ACC.

  20. Involvement of facultative apomixis in inheritance of EPSPS gene amplification in glyphosate-resistant Amaranthus palmeri.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniela N; Pan, Zhiqiang; Duke, Stephen O; Nandula, Vijay K; Baldwin, Brian S; Shaw, David R; Dayan, Franck E

    2014-01-01

    The inheritance of glyphosate resistance in two Amaranthus palmeri populations (R1 and R2) was examined in reciprocal crosses (RC) and second reciprocal crosses (2RC) between glyphosate-resistant (R) and -susceptible (S) parents of this dioecious species. R populations and Female-R × Male-S crosses contain higher 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene copy numbers than the S population. EPSPS expression, EPSPS enzyme activity, EPSPS protein quantity, and level of resistance to glyphosate correlated positively with genomic EPSPS relative copy number. Transfer of resistance was more influenced by the female than the male parent in spite of the fact that the multiple copies of EPSPS are amplified in the nuclear genome. This led us to hypothesize that this perplexing pattern of inheritance may result from apomictic seed production in A. palmeri. We confirmed that reproductively isolated R and S female plants produced seeds, indicating that A. palmeri can produce seeds both sexually and apomictically (facultative apomixis). This apomictic trait accounts for the low copy number inheritance in the Female-S × Male-R offsprings. Apomixis may also enhance the stability of the glyphosate resistance trait in the R populations in the absence of reproductive partners.

  1. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) improves the PCR-based isolation of immunoglobulin variable region genes from murine and human lymphoma cells and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Doenecke, A; Winnacker, E L; Hallek, M

    1997-10-01

    The isolation of rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes is usually performed by PCR with consensus primers binding to conserved regions within the V sequences. However, the isolation of Ig genes by this method is hampered in 15-35% by technical difficulties, mostly mismatches of oligonucleotide primers to V sequences. In order to obtain DNA sequences from V heavy chain (VH) genes which could not be amplified with consensus primers, we used a modified PCR technique, the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR in combination with new heavy chain constant region primers for the isolation of human and murine VH genes. In comparison, consensus primer PCR with different sets of previously published oligonucleotide primers was used. Both methods were applied to isolate VH genes from murine B cell lymphoma (A20 and BCL1), myeloma (NS1) and hybridoma (SP6) cell lines and from freshly isolated human chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphoma cells. RACE PCR allowed the amplification and subsequent cloning of the complete VH gene in all cases. In contrast, consensus primer PCR failed to isolate the VH sequence of the murine A20 cell line; this was explained by a mismatch of consensus primers with VH sequences. When both PCR methods amplified VH sequences, the DNA sequences obtained were identical. Taken together, RACE PCR represents a reliable and versatile method for the isolation of VH genes from human and murine lymphoma cells, in particular if consensus primer PCR fails.

  2. Feasibility of using tissue microarrays for the assessment of HER-2 gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Rohit; Lal, Priti; Chen, Beiyun

    2004-12-01

    Tissue microarrays (TMAs) have been commonly used to study protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). However, limited data exist on the validity of using TMAs to study gene amplification. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using breast carcinoma TMAs to study HER-2 gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In addition, hormonal receptor status (ER and PR) and HER-2 protein overexpression by IHC were also studied, and results were compared with whole tissue sections. FISH for HER-2 was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from 114 invasive breast carcinomas both on whole tissue sections and on TMAs containing the same tumors. The TMA was created using 0.6-mm tissue cores with four sampled cores per tumor from the same tissue block used for whole section FISH. The PathVysion HER-2 probe kit was used for the FISH analysis. A ratio of HER-2:Chromosome17 > or =2.0 was interpreted as positive for gene amplification. The ER or PR was interpreted as positive when nuclear staining was detected in more than 10% of tumor cells. The HER-2 IHC (HercepTest; DAKO Corp, Carpinteria, CA) results were interpreted as 0, 1+, 2+, and 3+ according to standard criteria. The FISH results in the TMA and whole sections were concordant in 99 out of 101 successfully analyzed cases (99%). The FISH scores were consistent among the two to four cores in the majority of the cases. ER and PR results were concordant between whole sections and TMA cores in 97% (107/110) and 89% (97/109) cases, respectively. The overall concordance for HER-2 status by IHC between whole sections and TMA cores was 86% (94 out of 109 cases). TMAs are a reliable approach to study HER-2 gene amplification in a high throughput manner.

  3. Mutated KRAS Results in Overexpression of DUSP4, a MAP-Kinase Phosphatase, and SMYD3, a Histone Methyltransferase, in Rectal Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Gaedcke, Jochen; Grade, Marian; Jung, Klaus; Camps, Jordi; Jo, Peter; Emons, Georg; Gehoff, Anastasia; Sax, Ulrich; Schirmer, Markus; Becker, Heinz; Beissbarth, Tim; Ried, Thomas; Ghadimi, B. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mutations of the KRAS oncogene are predictive for resistance to treatment with antibodies against the epithelial growth factor receptor in patients with colorectal cancer. Overcoming this therapeutic dilemma could potentially be achieved by the introduction of drugs that inhibit signaling pathways that are activated by KRAS mutations. To identify comprehensively such signaling pathways we profiled pretreatment biopsies and normal mucosa from 65 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer - 30 of which carried mutated KRAS - using global gene expression microarrays. By comparing all tumor tissues exclusively to matched normal mucosa, we could improve assay sensitivity, and identified a total of 22,297 features that were differentially expressed (adjusted P-value <0.05) between normal mucosa and cancer, including several novel potential rectal cancer genes. We then used this comprehensive description of the rectal cancer transcriptome as the baseline for identifying KRAS-dependent alterations. The presence of activating KRAS mutations is significantly correlated to an upregulation of 13 genes (adjusted P-value <0.05), among them DUSP4, a MAP-kinase phosphatase, and SMYD3, a histone methyltransferase. Inhibition of the expression of both genes has previously been shown using the MEK1-inhibitor PD98059 and the antibacterial compound Novobiocin, respectively. These findings suggest a potential approach to overcome resistance to treatment with antibodies against the epithelial growth factor receptor in patients with KRAS-mutant rectal carcinomas. PMID:20725992

  4. Discordance of Mutation Statuses of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and K-ras between Primary Adenocarcinoma of Lung and Brain Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Rau, Kun-Ming; Chen, Han-Ku; Shiu, Li-Yen; Chao, Tsai-Ling; Lo, Yi-Ping; Wang, Chin-Chou; Lin, Meng-Chih; Huang, Chao-Cheng

    2016-04-07

    Mutations on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) of adenocarcinomas of lung have been found to be associated with increased sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and K-ras mutations may correlate with primary resistance. We aimed to explore the discordant mutation statuses of EGFR and K-ras between primary tumors and matched brain metastases in adenocarcinomas of lung. We used a sensitive Scorpion ARMS method to analyze EGFR mutation, and Sanger sequencing followed by allele-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction to analyze K-ras mutation. Forty-nine paired tissues with both primary adenocarcinoma of lung and matched brain metastasis were collected. Thirteen patients (26.5%) were discordant for the status of EGFR between primary and metastatic sites. K-ras gene could be checked in paired specimens from 33 patients, thirteen patients (39.6%) were discordant for the status of K-ras. In primary lung adenocarcinoma, there were 14 patients of mutant EGFR had mutant K-ras synchronously. This study revealed that the status of EGFR mutation in lung adenocarcinomas is relatively consistent between primary and metastatic sites compared to K-ras mutation. However, there are still a few cases of adenocarcinoma of lung showing discordance for the status of EGFR mutation. Repeated analysis of EGFR mutation is highly recommended if tissue from metastatic or recurrent site is available for the evaluation of target therapy.

  5. KRAS Mutation Test in Korean Patients with Colorectal Carcinomas: A Methodological Comparison between Sanger Sequencing and a Real-Time PCR-Based Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Hak; Chung, Arthur Minwoo; Lee, Ahwon; Oh, Woo Jin; Choi, Yeong Jin; Lee, Youn-Soo; Jung, Eun Sun

    2017-01-01

    Background Mutations in the KRAS gene have been identified in approximately 50% of colorectal cancers (CRCs). KRAS mutations are well established biomarkers in anti–epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. Therefore, assessment of KRAS mutations is needed in CRC patients to ensure appropriate treatment. Methods We compared the analytical performance of the cobas test to Sanger sequencing in 264 CRC cases. In addition, discordant specimens were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing. Results KRAS mutations for codons 12/13 were detected in 43.2% of cases (114/264) by Sanger sequencing. Of 257 evaluable specimens for comparison, KRAS mutations were detected in 112 cases (43.6%) by Sanger sequencing and 118 cases (45.9%) by the cobas test. Concordance between the cobas test and Sanger sequencing for each lot was 93.8% positive percent agreement (PPA) and 91.0% negative percent agreement (NPA) for codons 12/13. Results from the cobas test and Sanger sequencing were discordant for 20 cases (7.8%). Twenty discrepant cases were subsequently subjected to 454 pyrosequencing. After comprehensive analysis of the results from combined Sanger sequencing–454 pyrosequencing and the cobas test, PPA was 97.5% and NPA was 100%. Conclusions The cobas test is an accurate and sensitive test for detecting KRAS-activating mutations and has analytical power equivalent to Sanger sequencing. Prescreening using the cobas test with subsequent application of Sanger sequencing is the best strategy for routine detection of KRAS mutations in CRC. PMID:28013534

  6. MicroRNA-143 replenishment re-sensitizes colorectal cancer cells harboring mutant, but not wild-type, KRAS to paclitaxel treatment.

    PubMed

    Fei, Bing-Yuan; Wang, Xiu-Ying; Fang, Xue-Dong

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) global incidence is one of the highest among cancers. The KRAS gene has been shown as a robust biomarker for poor prognosis and drug resistance. MicroRNA-143 (miR-143) and let-7 are families of tumor suppressor microRNAs that are often downregulated in CRC, especially with coexistent KRAS mutations. In order to evaluate if miR-143 and/or let-7b replenishment would re-sensitize CRC cells to paclitaxel treatment, we investigated in effect of miR-143 and let-7b replenishments on sensitivity to paclitaxel treatment in KRAS mutant LoVo and wild-type SW48 CRC cell lines. Our results showed that miR-143, but not let-7b, increased sensitization of KRAS mutant tumor cells to paclitaxel. Furthermore, transfection of miR-143, but not let-7b, mimic negatively regulated the expression of mutant but not wild-type KRAS. Combination of miR-143 mimic and paclitaxel induced the onset of apoptosis, and reverted in vitro metastatic properties (migration and invasion) in KRAS mutant tumor cells. MiR-143 thus can be used as a chemosensitizer for the treatment of KRAS mutant tumors and warrants further investigations in in vitro and pre-clinical in vivo models.

  7. USP39 Deubiquitinase Is Essential for KRAS Oncogene-driven Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fraile, Julia M; Manchado, Eusebio; Lujambio, Amaia; Quesada, Víctor; Campos-Iglesias, Diana; Webb, Thomas R; Lowe, Scott W; López-Otín, Carlos; Freije, José M P

    2017-03-10

    KRAS is the most frequently mutated oncogene in human cancer, but its therapeutic targeting remains challenging. Here, we report a synthetic lethal screen with a library of deubiquitinases and identify USP39, which encodes an essential splicing factor, as a critical gene for the viability of KRAS-dependent cells. We show that splicing fidelity inhibitors decrease preferentially the proliferation rate of KRAS-active cells. Moreover, depletion of DHX38, encoding an USP39-interacting splicing factor, also reduces the viability of these cells. In agreement with these results, USP39 depletion caused a significant reduction in pre-mRNA splicing efficiency, as demonstrated through RNA-seq experiments. Furthermore, we show that USP39 is up-regulated in lung and colon carcinomas and its expression correlates with KRAS levels and poor clinical outcome. Accordingly, our work provides critical information for the development of splicing-directed antitumor treatments and supports the potential of USP39-targeting strategies as the basis of new anticancer therapies.

  8. ATDC induces an invasive switch in KRAS-induced pancreatic tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lidong; Yang, Huibin; Abel, Ethan V.; Ney, Gina M.; Palmbos, Phillip L.; Bednar, Filip; Zhang, Yaqing; Leflein, Jacob; Waghray, Meghna; Owens, Scott; Wilkinson, John E.; Prasad, Jayendra; Ljungman, Mats; Rhim, Andrew D.; Pasca di Magliano, Marina

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is linked to activating mutations in KRAS. However, in PDA mouse models, expression of oncogenic mutant KRAS during development gives rise to tumors only after a prolonged latency or following induction of pancreatitis. Here we describe a novel mouse model expressing ataxia telangiectasia group D complementing gene (ATDC, also known as TRIM29 [tripartite motif 29]) that, in the presence of oncogenic KRAS, accelerates pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) formation and the development of invasive and metastatic cancers. We found that ATDC up-regulates CD44 in mouse and human PanIN lesions via activation of β-catenin signaling, leading to the induction of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype characterized by expression of Zeb1 and Snail1. We show that ATDC is up-regulated by oncogenic Kras in a subset of PanIN cells that are capable of invading the surrounding stroma. These results delineate a novel molecular pathway for EMT in pancreatic tumorigenesis, showing that ATDC is a proximal regulator of EMT. PMID:25593307

  9. Characterization of Abcc4 gene amplification in stepwise-selected mouse J774 macrophages resistant to the topoisomerase II inhibitor ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Béatrice; Ameye, Geneviève; Vallet, Coralie M; Tulkens, Paul M; Poirel, Hélène A; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of J774 mouse macrophages to stepwise increasing concentrations of ciprofloxacin, an antibiotic inhibiting bacterial topoisomerases, selects for resistant cells that overexpress the efflux transporter Abcc4 (Marquez et al. [2009] Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 53: 2410-2416), encoded by the Abcc4 gene located on Chromosome 14qE4. In this study, we report the genomic alterations occurring along the selection process. Abcc4 expression progressively increased upon selection rounds, with exponential changes observed between cells exposed to 150 and 200 µM of ciprofloxacin, accompanied by a commensurate decrease in ciprofloxacin accumulation. Molecular cytogenetics experiments showed that this overexpression is linked to Abcc4 gene overrepresentation, grading from a partial trisomy of Chr 14 at the first step of selection (cells exposed to 100 µM ciprofloxacin), to low-level amplifications (around three copies) of Abcc4 locus on 1 or 2 Chr 14 (cells exposed to 150 µM ciprofloxacin), followed by high-level amplification of Abcc4 as homogeneous staining region (hsr), inserted on 3 different derivative Chromosomes (cells exposed to 200 µM ciprofloxacin). In revertant cells obtained after more than 60 passages of culture without drug, the Abcc4 hsr amplification was lost in approx. 70% of the population. These data suggest that exposing cells to sufficient concentrations of an antibiotic with low affinity for eukaryotic topoisomerases can cause major genomic alterations that may lead to the overexpression of the transporter responsible for its efflux. Gene amplification appears therefore as a mechanism of resistance that can be triggered by non-anticancer agents but contribute to cross-resistance, and is partially and slowly reversible.

  10. Multiplexed real-time PCR amplification of tlh, tdh and trh genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus and its rapid detection in shellfish and Gulf of Mexico water.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Amy V; Bej, Asim K

    2010-10-01

    In this study, we have developed a SYBR Green I-based real-time multiplexed PCR assay for the detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Gulf of Mexico water (gulf water), artificially seeded and natural oysters targeting three hemolysin genes, tlh, tdh and trh in a single reaction. Post-amplification melt-temperature analysis confirmed the amplification of all three targeted genes with high specificity. The detection sensitivity was 10 cfu (initial inoculum) in 1 ml of gulf water or oyster tissue homogenate, following 5 h enrichment. The results showed 58% of the oysters to be positive for tlh, indicating the presence of V. parahaemolyticus; of which 21% were positive for tdh; and 0.7% for trh, signifying the presence of pathogenic strains. The C(t) values showed that oyster tissue matrix had some level of inhibition, whereas the gulf water had negligible effect on PCR amplification. The assay was rapid (approximately 8 h), specific and sensitive, meeting the ISSC guidelines. Rapid detection using real-time multiplexed PCR will help reduce V. parahaemolyticus-related disease outbreaks, thereby increasing consumer confidence and economic success of the seafood industry.

  11. K-ras genetic mutation and influencing factor analysis for Han and Uygur nationality colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Eli, Mayinur; Mollayup, Ablikim; Muattar; Liu, Chao; Zheng, Chao; Bao, Yong-Xing

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the K-ras genetic mutation status in colorectal cancer patients, compare the difference of K-ras genetic mutation rate in Han and Uygur nationality and analyze the influencing factor. 91 cases (52 cases of Han nationality and 39 cases of Uygur nationality) of colorectal biopsy or surgical ablation pathology specimen from the first affiliated hospital of Xinjiang Medical University during January, 2010 to March, 2013 were collected to detect the 12th and 13th code mutation status of K-ras gene exon 2 with pyrosequencing method and compare the difference of K-ras gene mutation rate between Han and Uygur nationality patients. Single factor analysis and multiple factor logistic regression analysis were utilized to analyze the influencing factor for K-ras genetic mutation. 33 cases of patients with K-ras genetic mutation were found from the 91 cases colorectal cancer patients and the total mutation rate was 36.3%. Among them, 24 cases (72.7%) were found with mutation only in the 12th code, 9 cases (27.3%) were found with mutation only in the 13th code and no one case was found with mutation in both the two codes. Mutation rate of the 12th code in the Uygur nationality was significantly higher than that in the Han nationality (P<0.05), but there were no significant difference in the comparison of the total mutation rate and the 13th code mutation rate between the two groups (P>0.05). There were no associativity (P>0.05) between the K-ras genetic mutation and sex, age, smoking history, drinking history, tumor location, macropathology type, differentiation level, staging, invasive depth, lymph nodes transferring and metastasis in colorectal cancer patients (P>0.05). K-ras genetic mutation rate is high in colorectal cancer patients. The mutation rate of 12th code in Uygur nationality is higher than that in Han nationality. There is no significant associativity between K-ras genetic mutation rate and patients’ clinical pathology characteristic. PMID:26309716

  12. K-ras genetic mutation and influencing factor analysis for Han and Uygur nationality colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Eli, Mayinur; Mollayup, Ablikim; Muattar; Liu, Chao; Zheng, Chao; Bao, Yong-Xing

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the K-ras genetic mutation status in colorectal cancer patients, compare the difference of K-ras genetic mutation rate in Han and Uygur nationality and analyze the influencing factor. 91 cases (52 cases of Han nationality and 39 cases of Uygur nationality) of colorectal biopsy or surgical ablation pathology specimen from the first affiliated hospital of Xinjiang Medical University during January, 2010 to March, 2013 were collected to detect the 12th and 13th code mutation status of K-ras gene exon 2 with pyrosequencing method and compare the difference of K-ras gene mutation rate between Han and Uygur nationality patients. Single factor analysis and multiple factor logistic regression analysis were utilized to analyze the influencing factor for K-ras genetic mutation. 33 cases of patients with K-ras genetic mutation were found from the 91 cases colorectal cancer patients and the total mutation rate was 36.3%. Among them, 24 cases (72.7%) were found with mutation only in the 12th code, 9 cases (27.3%) were found with mutation only in the 13th code and no one case was found with mutation in both the two codes. Mutation rate of the 12th code in the Uygur nationality was significantly higher than that in the Han nationality (P<0.05), but there were no significant difference in the comparison of the total mutation rate and the 13th code mutation rate between the two groups (P>0.05). There were no associativity (P>0.05) between the K-ras genetic mutation and sex, age, smoking history, drinking history, tumor location, macropathology type, differentiation level, staging, invasive depth, lymph nodes transferring and metastasis in colorectal cancer patients (P>0.05). K-ras genetic mutation rate is high in colorectal cancer patients. The mutation rate of 12th code in Uygur nationality is higher than that in Han nationality. There is no significant associativity between K-ras genetic mutation rate and patients' clinical pathology characteristic.

  13. Limitations to the development of recombinant human embryonic kidney 293E cells using glutamine synthetase-mediated gene amplification: Methionine sulfoximine resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Da Young; Noh, Soo Min; Lee, Gyun Min

    2016-08-10

    To investigate the feasibility of glutamine synthetase (GS)-mediated gene amplification in HEK293 cells for the high-level stable production of therapeutic proteins, HEK293E cells were transfected by the GS expression vector containing antibody genes and were selected at various methionine sulfoximine (MSX) concentrations in 96-well plates. For a comparison, CHOK1 cells were transfected by the same GS expression vector and selected at various MSX concentrations. Unlike CHOK1 cells, HEK293E cells producing high levels of antibodies were not selected at all. For HEK293E cells, the number of wells with the cell pool did not decrease with an increase in the concentration of MSX up to 500μM MSX. A q-RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the antibody genes in the HEK293E cells, unlike the CHOK1 cells, were not amplified after increasing the MSX concentration. It was found that the GS activity in HEK293E cells was much higher than that in CHOK1 cells (P<0.05). In a glutamine-free medium, the GS activity of HEK293E cells was approximately 4.8 times higher than that in CHOK1 cells. Accordingly, it is inferred that high GS activity of HEK293E cells results in elevated resistance to MSX and therefore hampers GS-mediated gene amplification by MSX. Thus, in order to apply the GS-mediated gene amplification system to HEK293 cells, the endogenous GS expression level in HEK293 cells needs to be minimized by knock-out or down-regulation methods.

  14. A combinatorial strategy for treating KRAS-mutant lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Manchado, Eusebio; Weissmueller, Susann; Morris, John P; Chen, Chi-Chao; Wullenkord, Ramona; Lujambio, Amaia; de Stanchina, Elisa; Poirier, John T; Gainor, Justin F; Corcoran, Ryan B; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Rudin, Charles M; Rosen, Neal; Lowe, Scott W

    2016-06-30

    Therapeutic targeting of KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma represents a major goal of clinical oncology. KRAS itself has proved difficult to inhibit, and the effectiveness of agents that target key KRAS effectors has been thwarted by activation of compensatory or parallel pathways that limit their efficacy as single agents. Here we take a systematic approach towards identifying combination targets for trametinib, a MEK inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, which acts downstream of KRAS to suppress signalling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. Informed by a short-hairpin RNA screen, we show that trametinib provokes a compensatory response involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) that leads to signalling rebound and adaptive drug resistance. As a consequence, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of FGFR1 in combination with trametinib enhances tumour cell death in vitro and in vivo. This compensatory response shows distinct specificities: it is dominated by FGFR1 in KRAS-mutant lung and pancreatic cancer cells, but is not activated or involves other mechanisms in KRAS wild-type lung and KRAS-mutant colon cancer cells. Importantly, KRAS-mutant lung cancer cells and patients’ tumours treated with trametinib show an increase in FRS2 phosphorylation, a biomarker of FGFR activation; this increase is abolished by FGFR1 inhibition and correlates with sensitivity to trametinib and FGFR inhibitor combinations. These results demonstrate that FGFR1 can mediate adaptive resistance to trametinib and validate a combinatorial approach for treating KRAS-mutant lung cancer.

  15. A combinatorial strategy for treating KRAS mutant lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manchado, Eusebio; Weissmueller, Susann; Morris, John P.; Chen, Chi-Chao; Wullenkord, Ramona; Lujambio, Amaia; de Stanchina, Elisa; Poirier, John T.; Gainor, Justin F.; Corcoran, Ryan B.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Rudin, Charles M.; Rosen, Neal; Lowe, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma represents a major goal of clinical oncology. KRAS itself has proven difficult to inhibit, and the effectiveness of agents that target key KRAS effectors has been thwarted by activation of compensatory or parallel pathways that limit their efficacy as single agents. Here we take a systematic approach towards identifying combination targets for trametinib, an FDA-approved MEK inhibitor that acts downstream of KRAS to suppress signaling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. Informed by a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen, we show that trametinib provokes a compensatory response involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) that leads to signaling rebound and adaptive drug resistance. As a consequence, genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of FGFR1 in combination with trametinib enhances tumor cell death in vitro and in vivo. This compensatory response shows distinct specificities – it is dominated by FGFR1 in KRAS mutant lung and pancreatic cancer cells, but is not activated or involves other mechanisms in KRAS wild-type lung and KRAS-mutant colon cancer cells. Importantly, KRAS-mutant lung cancer cells and patient tumors treated with trametinib show an increase in FRS2 phosphorylation, a biomarker of FGFR activation; this increase is abolished by FGFR1 inhibition and correlates with sensitivity to trametinib and FGFR inhibitor combinations. These results demonstrate that FGFR1 can mediate adaptive resistance to trametinib and validate a combinatorial approach for treating KRAS-mutant lung cancer. PMID:27338794

  16. Low somatic K-ras mutation frequency in colorectal cancer diagnosed under the age of 45 years.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Kathryn; Mead, Leeanne; Smith, Letitia D; Royce, Simon G; Tesoriero, Andrea A; Young, Joanne P; Haydon, Andrew; Grubb, Garry; Giles, Graham G; Jenkins, Mark A; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C

    2006-07-01

    Somatic mutation of K-ras is known to be a common event in colorectal cancer tumourigenesis however its association with age at onset has not been widely explored. In this study, we have analyzed tumours from a population-based study of colorectal cancer diagnosed before the age of 45 years, in which cases had been previously screened for germ-line mismatch repair gene mutations and for microsatellite instability. We used a micro-dissection and sequencing approach to search for somatic K-ras mutations in codons 12, 13 and 61 in 101 early-onset colorectal cancers. Six (6%) somatic K-ras mutations were detected; five in codon 12 (4 G>T transitions and 1 G>A) and one in codon 13 (G>A transition). All codon 12 mutations were identified in microsatellite stable tumours and the codon 13 mutation was identified in a MSI-high tumour. Four cases with K-ras mutations had no reported family history of colorectal cancer and two had some family history of colorectal cancer. None were known to carry a germ-line mutation in hMSH2, hMLH1, hMSH6 or hPMS2. The role of somatic K-ras mutations in early-onset colorectal cancer carcinogenesis appears to be minor, in contrast to its significant role in colorectal cancer of later age of onset.

  17. Differential gene expression in neurospora crassa cell types: amplification of rRNA genes. Progress report, July 1979-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The significant results obtained during 1979 to 1980 of the current research program are as follows: (1) the differential rRNA gene amplification in germinated conidia of N.crassa was confirmed. N.crassa rDNAs showed differences in degrees of homology with isolated DNAs from other Neurospora species which could be due to heterogeneity in internal spacers. Studies with N.crassa rDNA clones were initiated to study their heterogeneities. The organization of the Institutional Biohazard Committee (IBC) for Recombinant DNA research was completed and necessary certifications for the laboratory and the workers were obtained in accordance with the P/sub 2/EK/sub 1/ containment regulation of N.I.H. Known 17S and 26S N.crassa rDNA probes are being used to detect differences, if any, in restriction cleavage sites in rDNAs of different cell types and developmental mutants of N.crassa. DNAs from these N.crassa cells are restricted with EcoR/sub 1/ and Hind III and cleaved fragments separated by gel electrophoresis are transferred into nitrocellulose papers. Experiments are underway now to see if there are any changes in cleavage sites by annealing with /sup 32/P or /sup 3/H-17S or 26S rDNA probes followed by autoradiography.

  18. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) for Rapid Detection and Quantification of Dehalococcoides Biomarker Genes in Commercial Reductive Dechlorinating Cultures KB-1 and SDC-9

    PubMed Central

    Kanitkar, Yogendra H.; Stedtfeld, Robert D.; Steffan, Robert J.; Hashsham, Syed A.

    2016-01-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) protocols specific to the reductive dehalogenase (RDase) genes vcrA, bvcA, and tceA are commonly used to quantify Dehalococcoides spp. in groundwater from chlorinated solvent-contaminated sites. In this study, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was developed as an alternative approach for the quantification of these genes. LAMP does not require a real-time thermal cycler (i.e., amplification is isothermal), allowing the method to be performed using less-expensive and potentially field-deployable detection devices. Six LAMP primers were designed for each of three RDase genes (vcrA, bvcA, and tceA) using Primer Explorer V4. The LAMP assays were compared to conventional qPCR approaches using plasmid standards, two commercially available bioaugmentation cultures, KB-1 and SDC-9 (both contain Dehalococcoides species). DNA was extracted over a growth cycle from KB-1 and SDC-9 cultures amended with trichloroethene and vinyl chloride, respectively. All three genes were quantified for KB-1, whereas only vcrA was quantified for SDC-9. A comparison of LAMP and qPCR using standard plasmids indicated that quantification results were similar over a large range of gene concentrations. In addition, the quantitative increase in gene concentrations over one growth cycle of KB-1 and SDC-9 using LAMP was comparable to that of qPCR. The developed LAMP assays for vcrA and tceA genes were validated by comparing quantification on the Gene-Z handheld platform and a real-time thermal cycler using DNA isolated from eight groundwater samples obtained from an SDC-9-bioaugmented site (Tulsa, OK). These assays will be particularly useful at sites subject to bioaugmentation with these two commonly used Dehalococcoides species-containing cultures. PMID:26746711

  19. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) for Rapid Detection and Quantification of Dehalococcoides Biomarker Genes in Commercial Reductive Dechlorinating Cultures KB-1 and SDC-9.

    PubMed

    Kanitkar, Yogendra H; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Steffan, Robert J; Hashsham, Syed A; Cupples, Alison M

    2016-01-08

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) protocols specific to the reductive dehalogenase (RDase) genes vcrA, bvcA, and tceA are commonly used to quantify Dehalococcoides spp. in groundwater from chlorinated solvent-contaminated sites. In this study, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was developed as an alternative approach for the quantification of these genes. LAMP does not require a real-time thermal cycler (i.e., amplification is isothermal), allowing the method to be performed using less-expensive and potentially field-deployable detection devices. Six LAMP primers were designed for each of three RDase genes (vcrA, bvcA, and tceA) using Primer Explorer V4. The LAMP assays were compared to conventional qPCR approaches using plasmid standards, two commercially available bioaugmentation cultures, KB-1 and SDC-9 (both contain Dehalococcoides species). DNA was extracted over a growth cycle from KB-1 and SDC-9 cultures amended with trichloroethene and vinyl chloride, respectively. All three genes were quantified for KB-1, whereas only vcrA was quantified for SDC-9. A comparison of LAMP and qPCR using standard plasmids indicated that quantification results were similar over a large range of gene concentrations. In addition, the quantitative increase in gene concentrations over one growth cycle of KB-1 and SDC-9 using LAMP was comparable to that of qPCR. The developed LAMP assays for vcrA and tceA genes were validated by comparing quantification on the Gene-Z handheld platform and a real-time thermal cycler using DNA isolated from eight groundwater samples obtained from an SDC-9-bioaugmented site (Tulsa, OK). These assays will be particularly useful at sites subject to bioaugmentation with these two commonly used Dehalococcoides species-containing cultures.

  20. Frederick National Lab and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network Award Fellowships for KRAS Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) recently formed a partnership with the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) to award a one-year fellowship to two scientists whose research will help lead to new therapies for pancreatic cancer. The scientists will focus on KRAS, a gene in the RAS family that is mutated in 95 percent of pancreatic cancers, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

  1. A rapid assay for detection of Rose rosette virus using reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification using multiple gene targets.

    PubMed

    Babu, Binoy; Washburn, Brian K; Miller, Steven H; Poduch, Kristina; Sarigul, Tulin; Knox, Gary W; Ochoa-Corona, Francisco M; Paret, Mathews L

    2017-02-01

    Rose rosette disease caused by Rose rosette virus (RRV; genus Emaravirus) is the most economically relevant disease of Knock Out(®) series roses in the U.S. As there are no effective chemical control options for the disease, the most critical disease management strategies include the use of virus free clean plants for propagation and early detection and destruction of infected plants. The current diagnostic techniques for RRV including end-point reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) are highly sensitive, but limited to diagnostic labs with the equipment and expertise; and is time consuming. To address this limitation, an isothermal reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) assay based on multiple gene targets for specific detection of RRV was developed. The assay is highly specific and did not cross react with other viruses belonging to the inclusive and exclusive genus. Dilution assays using the in vitro transcripts showed that the primer sets designed (RPA-267, RPA-131, and RPA-321) are highly sensitive, consistently detecting RRV with a detection limit of 1fg/μL. Testing of the infected plants using the primer sets indicated that the virus could be detected from leaves, stems and petals of roses. The primer pair RPA-267 produced 100% positive detection of the virus from infected leaf tissues, while primer set RPA-131 produced 100% detection from stems and petals. The primer set RPA-321 produced 83%, 87.5% and 75% positive detection from leaves, petals and stem tissues, respectively. In addition, the assay has been efficiently used in the detection of RRV infecting Knock Out(®) roses, collected from different states in the U.S. The assay can be completed in 20min as compared to the end-point RT-PCR assay (3-4h) and RT-qPCR (1.5h). The RT-RPA assay is reliable, rapid, highly sensitive, and can be easily used in diagnostic laboratories for detection of RRV with no need for any special

  2. A rapid loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for detection of the macrolide-streptogramin type B resistance gene msrA in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiao-Qin; Liu, Bin-Bin; Hui, Ephraim; Huang, William; Yao, Li-Chen; Duo, Li-Bo; Sun, Wen-Ying; Li, Gui-Qiu; Wang, Fu-Xiang; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2016-12-01

    Macrolide-streptogramin type B resistance (the MSB phenotype) is a multidrug resistance phenotype in Staphylococcus aureus conferred by the resistance gene msrA. However, bacteria having the MSB phenotype are susceptible to lincosamides and 16-membered ring macrolides, which makes profiling resistance genes necessary and urgent for timely and appropriate use of antimicrobials. In this study, the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was optimized for prompt detection of the msrA gene. msrA gene sequences were obtained from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database and primers were designed using the LAMP primer designing software PrimerExplorer v.4, which together recognize seven distinct regions of the msrA gene. The specific LAMP primer set designed in this study could amplify the msrA gene within 25min at an isothermal temperature of 62°C. More importantly, the msrA gene could be detected at a sensitivity as low as 100pg. Furthermore, this optimized LAMP assay provided swift detection of the msrA gene even directly from human specimens. In conclusion, this assay may have great clinical application potential for detection of the msrA gene.

  3. The full-length E1-circumflexE4 protein of human papillomavirus type 18 modulates differentiation-dependent viral DNA amplification and late gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Regina; Ryan, Gordon B.; Knight, Gillian L.; Laimins, Laimonis A.; Roberts, Sally . E-mail: s.roberts@bham.ac.uk

    2007-06-05

    Activation of the productive phase of the human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle in differentiated keratinocytes is coincident with high-level expression of E1-circumflexE4 protein. To determine the role of E1-circumflexE4 in the HPV replication cycle, we constructed HPV18 mutant genomes in which expression of the full-length E1-circumflexE4 protein was abrogated. Undifferentiated keratinocytes containing mutant genomes showed enhanced proliferation when compared to cells containing wildtype genomes, but there were no differences in maintenance of viral episomes. Following differentiation, cells with mutant genomes exhibited reduced levels of viral DNA amplification and late gene expression, compared to wildtype genome-containing cells. This indicates that HPV18 E1-circumflexE4 plays an important role in regulating HPV late functions, and it may also function in the early phase of the replication cycle. Our finding that full-length HPV18 E1-circumflexE4 protein plays a significant role in promoting viral genome amplification concurs with a similar report with HPV31, but is in contrast to an HPV11 study where viral DNA amplification was not dependent on full-length E1-circumflexE4 expression, and to HPV16 where only C-terminal truncations in E1-circumflexE4 abrogated vegetative genome replication. This suggests that type-specific differences exist between various E1-circumflexE4 proteins.

  4. Comparison of HER2 gene amplification assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and HER2 protein expression assessed by immunohistochemistry in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yano, Tomonori; Doi, Toshihiko; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Boku, Narikazu; Hashizume, Kaoru; Nakanishi, Mamoru; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2006-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody to HER2 protein is widely used in the treatment of patients with HER2-overexpressing breast cancer and has also been found to exhibit antitumor activity in human gastric cancer cells that overexpress HER2. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of HER2 overexpression and concordance between the results for protein expression and gene amplification in both surgical and biopsy specimens of gastric cancer as assessed with two commercial kits, one for immunohistochemistry (IHC) and the other for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The specimens consisted of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of biopsy specimens and surgically resected tumors from 200 cases of invasive gastric cancer that had been treated surgically at the National Cancer Center Hospital East. The lesions were analyzed with the IHC kit, and expression was graded by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved grading system. Gene amplification was evaluated by FISH. IHC revealed HER2 overexpression in 46 of the 200 (23%) cases. The FISH assay was technically successful in 199 cases (99.5%), and gene amplification was observed in 54 cases (27.1%). The concordance rate between the results obtained by IHC and FISH was 86.9%. The concordance rate between the findings in the surgically resected tumors and the 200 pre-treatment biopsy specimens was 88.7%. HER2 expression can be assessed in gastric cancer with a commercial kit as previously reported in breast cancer. Even small biopsy specimens were found to be suitable for evaluating gastric cancer for HER2 overexpression.

  5. A novel gene trap method using terminator-REMI and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kosuke; Saito, Tamao; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Morio, Takahiro; Maeda, Mineko; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Ochiai, Hiroshi

    2003-07-17

    We describe a novel restriction enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) method for gene trapping in Dictyostelium based on the use of a terminator-deficient vector. The vector has a blasticidin deaminase (bsr) gene as a selectable marker but lacks a terminator containing a poly(A) addition signal (AATAAA). Thus, the vector was expected to integrate into the coding region of a gene to create a fusion transcript flanked by the 3' proximal region of the trapped gene. The trapped gene can be identified by simply amplifying the fusion transcript by 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (3'-RACE). In the analysis of 35 integration events into known genes, the vectors were found to be integrated 20 times in close proximity to the 3' ends of the genes and in the direction of transcription. This strictly localized insertion seemed to be mediated by negative selection via the surveillance system referred to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. In contrast, in 15 events the vector integrated in the opposite direction to transcription and at random positions throughout the coding sequence. Analysis of the trapped 3' sequences showed that the transcription of the fusion gene terminated prematurely without the apparent use of an endogenous terminator; nevertheless the transcript did exhibit a poly(A) tail. Based on these results, we designated the method terminator-REMI. Using this method, we have generated a library of tagged Dictyostelium clones from which we have thus far isolated 242 developmental mutants.

  6. Determination of the relative expression levels of rubisco small subunit genes in Arabidopsis by rapid amplification of cDNA ends.

    PubMed

    Yoon, M; Putterill, J J; Ross, G S; Laing, W A

    2001-04-15

    Multigene families are common in higher organisms. However, due to the close similarities between members, it is often difficult to assess the individual contribution of each gene to the overall expression of the family. In Arabidopsis thaliana, there are four genes encoding the small subunits (SSU) of ribulose-1.5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (rubisco) whose nucleotide sequences are up to 98.4% identical. In order to overcome the technical limitations associated with gene-specific probes (or primers) commonly used in existing methods, we developed a new gene expression assay based on the RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) technique with a single pair of primers. With this RACE gene expression assay, we were able to determine the relative transcript levels between four Arabidopsis SSU genes. We found that the relative SSU gene expression differed significantly between plants grown at different temperatures. Our observation raises the possibility that an adaptation of rubisco to the environment may be achieved through the specific synthesis of the SSU proteins, which is determined by the relative expression levels between the SSU genes.

  7. Topoisomerase II alpha gene amplification is a favorable prognostic factor in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer treated with trastuzumab

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The vast majority of patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC) treated with trastuzumab eventually develop resistance to this agent. There is an unmet need therefore, for identifying biological markers with possible prognostic/predictive value in such patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic role of topoisomerase II alpha gene (TOP2A) amplification and protein (TopoIIa) expression in patients treated with trastuzumab-containing regimens. Methods Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue samples were retrospectively collected from 225 eligible patients treated with trastuzumab. Protein expression of ER, PgR, Ki67, PTEN, HER2 and TopoIIa were centrally assessed by immunohistochemistry. HER2 and TOP2A gene amplification was evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization. PIK3CA mutations were identified by single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. Survival was evaluated from the initiation of trastuzumab as 1st line treatment to the date of last follow-up or death. Results Among the 225 samples analyzed, only 137 (61%) were found to be HER2-positive. TOP2A was amplified in 41% and deleted in 16% of such tumors. TOP2A gene amplification was more frequent in ER-negative tumors. TopoIIa protein expression was observed in the majority (65%) of the samples and was associated with ER-positive status, high Ki67 expression, presence of PTEN protein and PIK3CA mutations. Median follow-up for patients treated in the 1st line was 51 months. Survival was more prolonged with trastuzumab-containing treatment in HER2-positive patients (50 months, log-rank, p=0.007). TOP2A non-amplified or deleted tumors were associated with increased risk for death compared to TOP2A amplified tumors (HR=2.16, Wald’s p=0.010 and HR=2.67, p=0.009, respectively). In multivariate analysis, a significant interaction of TOP2A with anthracycline treatment (either in the adjuvant or the 1st line setting) was observed for survival (Wald’s p=0

  8. Identification of goose (Anser anser) and mule duck (Anasplatyrhynchos x Cairina moschata) foie gras by multiplex polymerase chain reaction amplification of the 5S RDNA gene.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M A; García, T; González, I; Asensio, L; Fernández, A; Lobo, E; Hernández, P E; Martín, R

    2001-06-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the nuclear 5S rDNA gene has been used for the identification of goose and mule duck foie gras. Two species-specific reverse primers were designed and used in a multiplex reaction, together with a forward universal primer, to amplify specific fragments of the 5S rDNA in each species. The different sizes of the species-specific amplicons, separated by agarose gel electrophoresis, allowed clear identification of goose and mule duck foie gras samples. This genetic marker can be useful for detecting fraudulent substitution of the duck liver for the more expensive goose liver.

  9. Copy number changes of clinically actionable genes in melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer and colorectal cancer-A survey across 822 routine diagnostic cases.

    PubMed

    Pfarr, Nicole; Penzel, Roland; Klauschen, Frederick; Heim, Daniel; Brandt, Regine; Kazdal, Daniel; Jesinghaus, Moritz; Herpel, Esther; Schirmacher, Peter; Warth, Arne; Weichert, Wilko; Endris, Volker; Stenzinger, Albrecht

    2016-11-01

    Targeted deep massive parallel sequencing has been implemented in routine molecular diagnostics for high-throughput genetic profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cancer samples. This approach is widely used to interrogate simple somatic mutations but experience with the analysis of copy number variations (CNV) is limited. Here, we retrospectively analyzed CNV in 822 cancer cases (135 melanoma, 468 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), 219 colorectal cancers (CRC)). We observed a decreasing frequency of CNV in clinically actionable genes from melanoma to NSCLC to CRC. The overall cohort displayed 168 (20%) amplifications in 17 druggable targets. The majority of BRAF mutant melanomas (54%) showed co-occurring CNV in other genes, mainly affecting CDKN2A. Subsets showed clustered deletions in ABL1, NOTCH1, RET or STK11, GNA11, and JAK3. Most NRAS mutant melanomas (49%) harbored CNVs in other genes with CDKN2A and FGFR3 being most frequently affected. Five BRAF/NRASwt tumors had co-amplifications of KDR, KIT, PDGFRA and another six mutated KIT. Among all NSCLC, we identified 14 EGFRamp (with ten EGFRmut) and eight KRASamp (with seven KRASmut). KRASmut tumors displayed frequent amplifications of MYC (n = 10) and MDM2 (n = 5). Fifteen KRAS/EGFR/BRAFwt tumors had MET mutations/amplifications. In CRC, amplified IGF2 was most prevalent (n = 13) followed by MYC (n = 9). Two cases showed amplified KRAS wildtype alleles. Two of the KRASmut cases harbored amplifications of NRAS and three KRASwt cases amplification of EGFR. In conclusion, we demonstrate that our approach i) facilitates detection of CNV, ii) enables detection of known CNV patterns, and iii) uncovers new CNV of clinically actionable genes in FFPE tissue samples across cancers. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. K-Ras mutation detection in liquid biopsy and tumor tissue as prognostic biomarker in patients with pancreatic cancer: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Zheng, Yuanting; Sun, Hong; Zhuang, Rongyuan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Tianshu; Cai, Weimin

    2016-07-01

    K-Ras gene mutations have been found in most pancreatic cancers; however, conflicting data on the prognostic value of K-Ras mutations in pancreatic cancer have been published. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess its prognostic significance. Literature searches of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Google Scholar were performed through December 2015 to identify publications exploring the association of K-Ras mutation with overall survival. Forty eligible studies involving 3427 patients with pancreatic cancer were included in the present meta-analysis. Our analysis showed a hazard ratio (HR) of negative association with survival of 1.61 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.36-1.90; p < 0.01] in K-Ras mutant pancreatic cancer patients. In subgroup analyses, K-Ras mutations detected in tumor tissues and in liquid biopsies had HRs of 1.37 (95 % CI 1.20-1.57; p < 0.01) and 3.16 (95 % CI 2.1-4.71; p < 0.01), respectively. In addition, the HR was higher when K-Ras mutations were detected in fresh frozen samples (HR = 2.01, 95 % CI 1.28-3.16, p = 0.002) than in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples (HR = 1.29, 95 % CI 1.12-1.49, p < 0.01). Though K-Ras alterations are more frequent among non-East Asian individuals than East Asian individuals, there were no significant differences in HRs of survival between the two ethnic subgroups. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that K-Ras mutations are associated with a worse overall survival in pancreatic cancer patients, especially when mutations are detected in liquid biopsies or fresh frozen tumor tissue samples.

  11. Uniparental disomies, homozygous deletions, amplifications, and target genes in mantle cell lymphoma revealed by integrative high-resolution whole-genome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Beà, Sílvia; Salaverria, Itziar; Armengol, Lluís; Pinyol, Magda; Fernández, Verónica; Hartmann, Elena M.; Jares, Pedro; Amador, Virginia; Hernández, Luís; Navarro, Alba; Ott, German; Rosenwald, Andreas; Estivill, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is genetically characterized by the t(11;14)(q13;q32) translocation and a high number of secondary chromosomal alterations. However, only a limited number of target genes have been identified. We have studied 10 MCL cell lines and 28 primary tumors with a combination of a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism array and gene expression profiling. We detected highly altered genomes in the majority of the samples with a high number of partial uniparental disomies (UPDs). The UPD at 17p was one of the most common, and it was associated with TP53 gene inactivation. Homozygous deletions targeted 4 known tumor suppressor genes (CDKN2C, BCL2L11, CDKN2A, and RB1) and 6 new genes (FAF1, MAP2, SP100, MOBKL2B, ZNF280A, and PRAME). Gene amplification coupled with overexpression was identified in 35 different regions. The most recurrent amplified regions were 11q13.3-q13.5, 13q31.3, and 18q21.33, which targeted CCND1, C13orf25, and BCL2, respectively. Interestingly, the breakpoints flanking all the genomic alterations, including UPDs, were significantly associated with genomic regions enriched in copy number variants and segmental duplications, suggesting that the recombination at these regions may play a role in the genomic instability of MCL. This integrative genomic analysis has revealed target genes that may be potentially relevant in MCL pathogenesis. PMID:18984860

  12. Suppression of KRas-mutant cancer through the combined inhibition of KRAS with PLK1 and ROCK

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jieqiong; Hu, Kewen; Guo, Jiawei; Cheng, Feixiong; Lv, Jing; Jiang, Wenhao; Lu, Weiqiang; Liu, Jinsong; Pang, Xiufeng; Liu, Mingyao

    2016-01-01

    No effective targeted therapies exist for cancers with somatic KRAS mutations. Here we develop a synthetic lethal chemical screen in isogenic KRAS-mutant and wild-type cells to identify clinical drug pairs. Our results show that dual inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) leads to the synergistic effects in KRAS-mutant cancers. Microarray analysis reveals that this combinatory inhibition significantly increases transcription and activity of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1, leading to specific G2/M phase blockade in KRAS-mutant cells. Overexpression of p21WAF1/CIP1, either by cDNA transfection or clinical drugs, preferentially impairs the growth of KRAS-mutant cells, suggesting a druggable synthetic lethal interaction between KRAS and p21WAF1/CIP1. Co-administration of BI-2536 and fasudil either in the LSL-KRASG12D mouse model or in a patient tumour explant mouse model of KRAS-mutant lung cancer suppresses tumour growth and significantly prolongs mouse survival, suggesting a strong synergy in vivo and a potential avenue for therapeutic treatment of KRAS-mutant cancers. PMID:27193833

  13. Circular rapid amplification of cDNA ends for high-throughput extension cloning of partial genes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Glenn K; Wang, Jonathan T; Yang, Junming; Au-Young, Janice; Stuve, Laura L

    2004-07-01

    The rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) procedure is a widely used PCR-based method to clone the cDNA ends of mRNA transcripts. Current RACE methods often produce a high background of nonspecific PCR products, which can exclude the identification of the target cDNA of interest. We describe here an improved RACE procedure using circular cDNA templates and demonstrate the successful extension cloning of 4406 cDNAs.

  14. Protein kinase Cα suppresses Kras-mediated lung tumor formation through activation of a p38 MAPK-TGFβ signaling axis

    PubMed Central

    Hill, KS; Erdogan, E; Khoor, A; Walsh, MP; Leitges, M; Murray, NR; Fields, AP

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) can activate both pro- and anti-tumorigenic signaling depending upon cellular context. Here, we investigated the role of PKCα in lung tumorigenesis in vivo. Gene expression data sets revealed that primary human non-small lung cancers (NSCLC) express significantly decreased PKCα levels, indicating that loss of PKCα expression is a recurrent event in NSCLC. We evaluated the functional relevance of PKCα loss during lung tumorigenesis in three murine lung adenocarcinoma models (LSL-Kras, LA2-Kras and urethane exposure). Genetic deletion of PKCα resulted in a significant increase in lung tumor number, size, burden and grade, bypass of oncogene-induced senescence, progression from adenoma to carcinoma and a significant decrease in survival in vivo. The tumor promoting effect of PKCα loss was reflected in enhanced Kras-mediated expansion of bronchio-alveolar stem cells (BASCs), putative tumor-initiating cells, both in vitro and in vivo. LSL-Kras/Prkca−/− mice exhibited a decrease in phospho-p38 MAPK in BASCs in vitro and in tumors in vivo, and treatment of LSL-Kras BASCs with a p38 inhibitor resulted in increased colony size indistinguishable from that observed in LSL-Kras/Prkca−/− BASCs. In addition, LSL-Kras/Prkca−/− BASCs exhibited a modest but reproducible increase in TGFβ1 mRNA, and addition of exogenous TGFβ1 to LSL-Kras BASCs results in enhanced growth similar to untreated BASCs from LSL-Kras/Prkca−/− mice. Conversely, a TGFβR1 inhibitor reversed the effects of PKCα loss in LSL-Kras/Prkca−/−BASCs. Finally, we identified the inhibitors of DNA binding (Id) Id1–3 and the Wilm’s Tumor 1 as potential downstream targets of PKCα-dependent tumor suppressor activity in vitro and in vivo. We conclude that PKCα suppresses tumor initiation and progression, at least in part, through a PKCα-p38MAPK-TGFβ signaling axis that regulates tumor cell proliferation and Kras-induced senescence. Our results provide the

  15. A combined oncogenic pathway signature of BRAF, KRAS and PI3KCA mutation improves colorectal cancer classification and cetuximab treatment prediction

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Sun; Simon, Iris; Moreno, Victor; Roepman, Paul; Tabernero, Josep; Snel, Mireille; van't Veer, Laura; Salazar, Ramon; Bernards, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop gene expression profiles that characterise KRAS-, BRAF- or PIK3CA-activated- tumours, and to explore whether these profiles might be helpful in predicting the response to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway inhibitors better than mutation status alone. Design Fresh frozen tumour samples from 381 colorectal cancer (CRC) patients were collected and mutations in KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA were assessed. Using microarray data, three individual oncogenic and a combined model were developed and validated in an independent set of 80 CRC patients, and in a dataset from metastatic CRC patients treated with cetuximab. Results 175 tumours (45.9%) harboured oncogenic mutations in KRAS (30.2%), BRAF (11.0%) and PIK3CA (11.5%). Activating mutation signatures for KRAS (75 genes), for BRAF (58 genes,) and for PIK3CA (49 genes) were developed. The development of a combined oncogenic pathway signature-classified tumours as ‘activated oncogenic’, or as ‘wildtype-like’ with a sensitivity of 90.3% and a specificity of 61.7%. The identified signature revealed other mechanisms that can activate ERK/MAPK pathway in KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA wildtype patients. The combined signature is associated with response to cetuximab treatment in patients with metastatic CRC (HR 2.51, p<0.0009). Conclusion A combined oncogenic pathway signature allows the identification of patients with an active EGFR-signalling pathway that could benefit from downstream pathway inhibition. PMID:22798500

  16. Inactivation of Sag/Rbx2/Roc2 e3 ubiquitin ligase triggers senescence and inhibits kras-induced immortalization.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mingjia; Li, Hua; Sun, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Our recent study showed that SAG/RBX2 E3 ubiquitin ligase regulates apoptosis and vasculogenesis by promoting degradation of NOXA and NF1, and co-operates with Kras to promote lung tumorigenesis by activating NFκB and mTOR pathways via targeted degradation of tumor suppressive substrates including IκB, DEPTOR, p21 and p27. Here we investigated the role of Sag/Rbx2 E3 ligase in cellular senescence and immortalization of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and report that Sag is required for proper cell proliferation and Kras(G12D)-induced immortalization. Sag inactivation by genetic deletion remarkably suppresses cell proliferation by inducing senescence, which is associated with accumulation of p16, but not p53. Mechanistically, Sag deletion caused accumulation of Jun-B, a substrate of Sag-Fbxw7 E3 ligase and a transcription factor that drives p16 transcription. Importantly, senescence triggered by Sag deletion can be largely rescued by simultaneous deletion of Cdkn2a, the p16 encoding gene, indicating its causal role. Furthermore, Kras(G12D)-induced immortalization can also be abrogated by Sag deletion via senescence induction, which is again rescued by simultaneous deletion of Cdkn2a. Finally, we found that Sag deletion inactivates Kras(G12D) activity and block the MAPK signaling pathway, together with accumulated p16, to induce senescence. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Sag is a Kras(G12D)-cooperating oncogene required for Kras(G12D)-induced immortalization and transformation, and targeting SAG-SCF E3 ligase may, therefore, have therapeutic value for senescence-based cancer treatment.

  17. Inactivation of Sag/Rbx2/Roc2 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Triggers Senescence and Inhibits Kras-Induced Immortalization

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Mingjia; Li, Hua; Sun, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Our recent study showed that SAG/RBX2 E3 ubiquitin ligase regulates apoptosis and vasculogenesis by promoting degradation of NOXA and NF1, and co-operates with Kras to promote lung tumorigenesis by activating NFκB and mTOR pathways via targeted degradation of tumor suppressive substrates including IκB, DEPTOR, p21 and p27. Here we investigated the role of Sag/Rbx2 E3 ligase in cellular senescence and immortalization of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and report that Sag is required for proper cell proliferation and KrasG12D-induced immortalization. Sag inactivation by genetic deletion remarkably suppresses cell proliferation by inducing senescence, which is associated with accumulation of p16, but not p53. Mechanistically, Sag deletion caused accumulation of Jun-B, a substrate of Sag-Fbxw7 E3 ligase and a transcription factor that drives p16 transcription. Importantly, senescence triggered by Sag deletion can be largely rescued by simultaneous deletion of Cdkn2a, the p16 encoding gene, indicating its causal role. Furthermore, KrasG12D-induced immortalization can also be abrogated by Sag deletion via senescence induction, which is again rescued by simultaneous deletion of Cdkn2a. Finally, we found that Sag deletion inactivates KrasG12D activity and block the MAPK signaling pathway, together with accumulated p16, to induce senescence. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Sag is a KrasG12D-cooperating oncogene required for KrasG12D-induced immortalization and transformation, and targeting SAG-SCF E3 ligase may, therefore, have therapeutic value for senescence-based cancer treatment. PMID:25622904

  18. microRNA classifiers are powerful diagnostic/prognostic tools in ALK-, EGFR-, and KRAS-driven lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Pierluigi; Cascione, Luciano; Landi, Lorenza; Carasi, Stefania; Lovat, Francesca; Tibaldi, Carmelo; Alì, Greta; D'Incecco, Armida; Minuti, Gabriele; Chella, Antonio; Fontanini, Gabriella; Fassan, Matteo; Cappuzzo, Federico; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-12-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) can act as oncosuppressors or oncogenes, induce chemoresistance or chemosensitivity, and are major posttranscriptional gene regulators. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), EGF receptor (EGFR), and V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) are major drivers of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to assess the miRNA profiles of NSCLCs driven by translocated ALK, mutant EGFR, or mutant KRAS to find driver-specific diagnostic and prognostic miRNA signatures. A total of 85 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples were considered: 67 primary NSCLCs and 18 matched normal lung tissues. Of the 67 primary NSCLCs, 17 were echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-ALK translocated (ALK(+)) lung cancers; the remaining 50 were not (ALK(-)). Of the 50 ALK(-) primary NSCLCs, 24 were EGFR and KRAS mutation-negative (i.e., WT; triple negative); 11 were mutant EGFR (EGFR(+)), and 15 were mutant KRAS (KRAS(+)). We developed a diagnostic classifier that shows how miR-1253, miR-504, and miR-26a-5p expression levels can classify NSCLCs as ALK-translocated, mutant EGFR, or mutant KRAS versus mutation-free. We also generated a prognostic classifier based on miR-769-5p and Let-7d-5p expression levels that can predict overall survival. This classifier showed better performance than the commonly used classifiers based on mutational status. Although it has several limitations, this study shows that miRNA signatures and classifiers have great potential as powerful, cost-effective next-generation tools to improve and complement current genetic tests. Further studies of these miRNAs can help define their roles in NSCLC biology and in identifying best-performing chemotherapy regimens.

  19. Targeting KRAS Oncogene in Colon Cancer Cells with 7-Carboxylate Indolo[3,2-b]quinoline Tri-Alkylamine Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Hugo; Martins, Ana Cláudia; Lavrado, João; Mendes, Eduarda; Francisco, Ana Paula; Santos, Sofia A.; Ohnmacht, Stephan A.; Kim, Nam-Soon; Rodrigues, Cecília M. P.; Moreira, Rui; Neidle, Stephen; Borralho, Pedro M.; Paulo, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Background A guanine-rich strand within the promoter of the KRAS gene can fold into an intra-molecular G-quadruplex structure (G4), which has an important role in the regulation of KRAS transcription. We have previously identified indolo[3,2-b]quinolines with a 7-carboxylate group and three alkylamine side chains (IQ3A) as effective G4 stabilizers and promising selective anticancer leads. Herein we investigated the anticancer mechanism of action of these compounds, which we hypothesized due to stabilization of the G4 sequence in the KRAS promoter and subsequent down-regulation of gene expression. Methodology/Principal Findings IQ3A compounds showed greater stabilization of G4 compared to duplex DNA structures and reduced KRAS promoter activity in a dual luciferase reporter assay. Moreover, IQ3A compounds showed high anti-proliferative activity in HCT116 and SW620 colon cancer cells (IC50 < 2.69 μM), without eliciting cell death in non-malignant HEK293T human embryonic kidney, and human colon fibroblasts CCD18co. IQ3A compounds significantly reduced KRAS mRNA and protein steady-state levels at IC50 concentrations, and increased p53 protein steady-state levels and cell death by apoptosis in HCT116 cells (mut KRAS, wt p53). Furthermore, KRAS silencing in HCT116 p53 wild-type (p53(+/+)) and null (p53(-/-)) isogenic cell lines induced a higher level of cell death, and a higher IQ3A-induced cell death in HCT116 p53(+/+) compared to HCT116 p53(-/-). Conclusions Herein we provide evidence that G4 ligands such as IQ3A compounds can target G4 motifs present in KRAS promoter, down-regulate the expression of the mutant KRAS gene through inhibition of transcription and translation, and induce cell death by apoptosis in colon cancer cell lines. Thus, targeting KRAS at the genomic level with G4 ligands may be a new anticancer therapy strategy for colon cancer. PMID:26024321

  20. Chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) to detect HER2 gene amplification in breast and gastric cancer: comparison with immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Kiyose, Shinichiro; Igarashi, Hisaki; Nagura, Kiyoko; Kamo, Takaharu; Kawane, Kazunori; Mori, Hiroki; Ozawa, Takachika; Maeda, Matsuyoshi; Konno, Keisuke; Hoshino, Hideaki; Konno, Hiroyuki; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Shinmura, Kazuya; Hattori, Naohiko; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2012-11-01

    The chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) assay, designed to detect the amplification of the HER2 gene in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) breast cancer (BC) and gastric cancer (GC) tissue specimens, was evaluated in 125 FFPE BC cases and 198 FFPE GC cases for which the HER2 status had been predetermined using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In the 125 BC cases and the 198 gastric cases, we found a very good concordance (98.4% and 99.0%, respectively) between CISH and FISH. In particular, we evaluated the polysomy cases, as these cases often have ambiguous treatment options in clinical practice. The polysomy of chromosome 17 was defined as the presence of three or more CEP17 signals in at least 10% of the tumor cells. In the 50 BC cases and 54 GC cases displaying chromosome 17 polysomy, the concordance between FISH and CISH was 98.0% and 98.1%, respectively. These results indicate that CISH could provide an accurate and practical alternative to FISH for the clinical diagnosis of HER2 gene amplification in FFPE BC and FFPE GC samples.

  1. MET Gene Amplification and MET Receptor Activation Are Not Sufficient to Predict Efficacy of Combined MET and EGFR Inhibitors in EGFR TKI-Resistant NSCLC Cells

    PubMed Central

    Presutti, Dario; Santini, Simonetta; Cardinali, Beatrice; Papoff, Giuliana; Lalli, Cristiana; Samperna, Simone; Fustaino, Valentina; Giannini, Giuseppe; Ruberti, Giovina

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), member of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family, plays a critical role in regulating multiple cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, cell migration and cell survival. Deregulation of the EGFR signaling has been found to be associated with the development of a variety of human malignancies including lung, breast, and ovarian cancers, making inhibition of EGFR the most promising molecular targeted therapy developed in the past decade against cancer. Human non small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) with activating mutations in the EGFR gene frequently experience significant tumor regression when treated with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), although acquired resistance invariably develops. Resistance to TKI treatments has been associated to secondary mutations in the EGFR gene or to activation of additional bypass signaling pathways including the ones mediated by receptor tyrosine kinases, Fas receptor and NF-kB. In more than 30–40% of cases, however, the mechanisms underpinning drug-resistance are still unknown. The establishment of cellular and mouse models can facilitate the unveiling of mechanisms leading to drug-resistance and the development or validation of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at overcoming resistance and enhancing outcomes in NSCLC patients. Here we describe the establishment and characterization of EGFR TKI-resistant NSCLC cell lines and a pilot study on the effects of a combined MET and EGFR inhibitors treatment. The characterization of the erlotinib-resistant cell lines confirmed the association of EGFR TKI resistance with loss of EGFR gene amplification and/or AXL overexpression and/or MET gene amplification and MET receptor activation. These cellular models can be instrumental to further investigate the signaling pathways associated to EGFR TKI-resistance. Finally the drugs combination pilot study shows that MET gene amplification and MET receptor activation

  2. The mystery of oncogenic KRAS: Lessons from studying its wild-type counter part.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuan-I; Damnernsawad, Alisa; Kong, Guangyao; You, Xiaona; Wang, Demin; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-22

    Using conditional knock-in mouse models, we and others have shown that despite the very high sequence identity between Nras and Kras proteins, oncogenic Kras displays a much stronger leukemogenic activity than oncogenic Nras in vivo. In this manuscript, we will summarize our recent work of characterizing wild-type Kras function in adult hematopoiesis and in oncogenic Kras-induced leukemogenesis. We attribute the strong leukemogenic activity of oncogenic Kras to 2 unique aspects of Kras signaling. First, Kras is required in mediating cell type- and cytokine-specific ERK1/2 signaling. Second, oncogenic Kras, but not oncogenic Nras, induces hyperactivation of wild-type Ras, which significantly enhances Ras signaling in vivo. We will also discuss a possible mechanism that mediates oncogenic Kras-evoked hyperactivation of wild-type Ras and a potential approach to down-regulate oncogenic Kras signaling.

  3. High-resolution genomic mapping reveals consistent amplification of the fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2 gene in well-differentiated and dedifferentiated liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoke; Asmann, Yan W; Erickson-Johnson, Michele R; Oliveira, Jennifer L; Zhang, Hongying; Moura, Rafael D; Lazar, Alexander J; Lev, Dina; Bill, Katelynn; Lloyd, Ricardo V; Yaszemski, Michael J; Maran, Avudaiappan; Oliveira, Andre M

    2011-11-01

    Well-differentiated liposarcoma (WDLS) is one of the most common malignant mesenchymal tumors and dedifferentiated liposarcoma (DDLS) is a malignant tumor consisting of both WDLS and a transformed nonlipogenic sarcomatous component. Cytogenetically, WDLS is characterized by the presence of ring or giant rod chromosomes containing several amplified genes, including MDM2, TSPAN31, CDK4, and others mainly derived from chromosome bands 12q13-15. However, the 12q13-15 amplicon is large and discontinuous. The focus of this study was to identify novel critical genes that are consistently amplified in primary (nonrecurrent) WDLS and with potential relevance for future targeted therapy. Using a high-resolution (5.0 kb) "single nucleotide polymorphism"/copy number variation microarray to screen the whole genome in a series of primary WDLS, two consistently amplified areas were found on chromosome 12: one region containing the MDM2 and CPM genes, and another region containing the FRS2 gene. Based on these findings, we further validated FRS2 amplification in both WDLS and DDLS. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed FRS2 amplification in all WDLS and DDLS tested (n = 57). Real time PCR showed FRS2 mRNA transcriptional upregulation in WDLS (n = 19) and DDLS (n = 13) but not in lipoma (n = 5) and normal fat (n = 9). Immunoblotting revealed high expression levels of phospho-FRS2 at Y436 and slightly overexpression of total FRS2 protein in liposarcoma but not in normal fat or preadipocytes. Considering the critical role of FRS2 in mediating fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling, our findings indicate that FRS2 signaling should be further investigated as a potential therapeutic target for liposarcoma.

  4. Low frequency KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer patients and the presence of multiple mutations in oncogenic drivers in non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liyan; Huang, Jiaqi; Morehouse, Chris; Zhu, Wei; Korolevich, Susana; Sui, Dan; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Lehmann, Kim; Liu, Zheng; Kiefer, Christine; Czapiga, Meggan; Su, Xinying; Brohawn, Philip; Gu, Yi; Higgs, Brandon W; Yao, Yihong

    2013-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity can confound the results of mutation analyses in oncodriver genes using traditional methods thereby challenging the application of targeted cancer therapy strategies for patients Ultradeep sequencing can detect low frequency and expanded clonal mutations in primary tumors to better inform treatment decisions. KRAS coding exons in 61 treatment-naive colorectal cancer (CRC) tumors and KRAS, EGFR, ALK, and MET in lung tumors from three Chinese non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were sequenced using ultradeep sequencing methods. Forty-one percent of CRC patients (25/61) harbored mutations in the KRAS active domain, eight of which (13%) were not detected by Sanger sequencing. Three (of eight) had frequencies less than 10% and one patient harbored more than one mutation. Low frequency KRAS active (G12R) and EGFR kinase domain mutations (G719A) were identified in one NSCLC patient. A second NSCLC patient showed an EML4-ALK fusion with ALK, EGFR, and MET mutations. A third NSCLC patient harbored multiple low frequency mutations in KRAS, EGFR, and MET as well as ALK gene copy number increases. Within the same patient, multiple low frequency mutations occurred within a gene. A complex pattern of intrinsic low frequency driver mutations in well-known tumor oncogenes may exist prior to treatment, resulting in resistance to targeted therapies. Ultradeep sequencing can characterize intratumor heterogeneity and identify such mutations to ultimately affect treatment decisions.

  5. Master Regulators of Oncogenic KRAS Response in Pancreatic Cancer: An Integrative Network Biology Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background KRAS is the most frequently mutated gene in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional response to oncogenic KRAS are still not fully understood. We aimed to uncover transcription factors that regulate the transcriptional response of oncogenic KRAS in pancreatic cancer and to understand their clinical relevance. Methods and Findings We applied a well-established network biology approach (master regulator analysis) to combine a transcriptional signature for oncogenic KRAS derived from a murine isogenic cell line with a coexpression network derived by integrating 560 human pancreatic cancer cases across seven studies. The datasets included the ICGC cohort (n = 242), the TCGA cohort (n = 178), and five smaller studies (n = 17, 25, 26, 36, and 36). 55 transcription factors were coexpressed with a significant number of genes in the transcriptional signature (gene set enrichment analysis [GSEA] p < 0.01). Community detection in the coexpression network identified 27 of the 55 transcription factors contributing to three major biological processes: Notch pathway, down-regulated Hedgehog/Wnt pathway, and cell cycle. The activities of these processes define three distinct subtypes of PDAC, which demonstrate differences in survival and mutational load as well as stromal and immune cell composition. The Hedgehog subgroup showed worst survival (hazard ratio 1.73, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.72, coxPH test p = 0.018) and the Notch subgroup the best (hazard ratio 0.62, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.93, coxPH test p = 0.019). The cell cycle subtype showed highest mutational burden (ANOVA p < 0.01) and the smallest amount of stromal admixture (ANOVA p < 2.2e–16). This study is limited by the information provided in published datasets, not all of which provide mutational profiles, survival data, or the specifics of treatment history. Conclusions Our results characterize the regulatory mechanisms underlying the transcriptional response to oncogenic

  6. Novel deletion of the E3A ubiquitin protein ligase gene detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification in a patient with Angelman syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Calì, Francesco; Ragalmuto, Alda; Chiavetta, Valeria; Calabrese, Giuseppe; Fichera, Marco; Vinci, Mirella; Ruggeri, Giuseppa; Schinocca, Pietro; Sturnio, Maurizio; Romano, Salvatore; Elia, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurobehavioural disorder caused by failure of expression of the maternal copy of the imprinted domain located on 15q11-q13. There are different mechanisms leading to AS: maternal microdeletion, uniparental disomy, defects in a putative imprinting centre, mutations of the E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (UBE3A) gene. However, some of suspected cases of AS are still scored negative to all the latter mutations. Recently, it has been shown that a proportion of negative cases bear large deletions overlapping one or more exons of the UBE3A gene. These deletions are difficult to detect by conventional gene-scanning methods due to the masking effect by the non-deleted allele. In this study, we have used for the first time multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and comparative multiplex dosage analysis (CMDA) to search for large deletions affecting the UBE3A gene. Using this approach, we identified a novel causative deletion involving exon 8 in an affected sibling. Based on our results, we propose the use of MLPA as a fast, accurate and inexpensive test to detect large deletions in the UBE3A gene in a small but significant percentage of AS patients. PMID:21072004

  7. SPRED1 Interferes with K-ras but Not H-ras Membrane Anchorage and Signaling.

    PubMed

    Siljamäki, Elina; Abankwa, Daniel

    2016-10-15

    The Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is tightly controlled by negative feedback regulators, such as the tumor suppressor SPRED1. The SPRED1 gene also carries loss-of-function mutations in the RASopathy Legius syndrome. Growth factor stimulation translocates SPRED1 to the plasma membrane, triggering its inhibitory activity. However, it remains unclear whether SPRED1 there acts at the level of Ras or Raf. We show that pharmacological or galectin-1 (Gal-1)-mediated induction of B- and C-Raf-containing dimers translocates SPRED1 to the plasma membrane. This is facilitated in particular by SPRED1 interaction with B-Raf and, via its N terminus, with Gal-1. The physiological significance of these novel interactions is supported by two Legius syndrome-associated mutations that show diminished binding to both Gal-1 and B-Raf. On the plasma membrane, SPRED1 becomes enriched in acidic membrane domains to specifically perturb membrane organization and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling of active K-ras4B (here, K-ras) but not H-ras. However, SPRED1 also blocks on the nanoscale the positive effects of Gal-1 on H-ras. Therefore, a combinatorial expression of SPRED1 and Gal-1 potentially regulates specific patterns of K-ras- and H-ras-dependent signaling output. More broadly, our results open up the possibility that related SPRED and Sprouty proteins act in a similar Ras and Raf isoform-specific manner.

  8. CYP1B1 polymorphisms and k-ras mutations in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Crous-Bou, Marta; De Vivo, Immaculata; Porta, Miquel; Pumarega, José A; López, Tomàs; Alguacil, Joan; Morales, Eva; Malats, Núria; Rifà, Juli; Hunter, David J; Real, Francisco X

    2008-05-01

    The frequency of CYP1B1 polymorphisms in pancreatic cancer has never been reported. There is also no evidence on the relationship between CYP1B1 variants and mutations in ras genes (K-, H- or N-ras) in any human neoplasm. We analyzed the following CYP1B1 polymorphisms in 129 incident cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA): the m1 allele (Val to Leu at codon 432) and the m2 allele (Asn to Ser at codon 453). The calculated frequencies for the m1 Val and m2 Asn alleles were 0.45 and 0.68, respectively. CYP1B1 genotypes were out of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium; this was largely due to K-ras mutated PDA cases. The Val/Val genotype was over five times more frequent in PDA cases with a K-ras mutation than in wild-type cases (OR = 5.25; P = 0.121). In PDA, polymorphisms in CYP1B1 might be related with K-ras activation pathways.

  9. Rapid KRAS Mutation Detection via Hybridization-Induced Aggregation of Microbeads.

    PubMed

    Sloane, Hillary S; Kelly, Kimberly A; Landers, James P

    2015-10-20

    Using hybridization-induced aggregation (HIA), a unique bead-based DNA detection technology scalable for a microchip platform, we describe a simplistic, low-cost method for rapid mutation testing. HIA utilizes a pair of sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes bound to magnetic microbeads. Hybridization to a target DNA strand tethers the beads together, inducing bead aggregation. By simply using the extent of bead aggregation as a measure of the hybridization efficiency, we avoid the need for additional labels and sophisticated analytical equipment. Through strategic manipulation of the assay design and experimental parameters, we use HIA to facilitate, for the first time, the detection of single base mutations in a gene segment and, specifically, the detection of activating KRAS mutations. Following the development and optimization of the assay, we apply it for KRAS mutation analysis of four human cancer cell lines. Ultimately, we present a proof-of-principle method for detecting any of the common KRAS mutations in a single-step, 2 min assay, using only one set of oligonucleotide probes, for a total analysis time of less than 10 min post-PCR. The assay is performed at room temperature and uses simple, inexpensive instrumentation that permits multiplexed analysis.

  10. Cancer stem cell drugs target K-ras signaling in a stemness context

    PubMed Central

    Najumudeen, A K; Jaiswal, A; Lectez, B; Oetken-Lindholm, C; Guzmán, C; Siljamäki, E; Posada, I M D; Lacey, E; Aittokallio, T; Abankwa, D

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered to be responsible for treatment relapse and have therefore become a major target in cancer research. Salinomycin is the most established CSC inhibitor. However, its primary mechanistic target is still unclear, impeding the discovery of compounds with similar anti-CSC activity. Here, we show that salinomycin very specifically interferes with the activity of K-ras4B, but not H-ras, by disrupting its nanoscale membrane organization. We found that caveolae negatively regulate the sensitivity to this drug. On the basis of this novel mechanistic insight, we defined a K-ras-associated and stem cell-derived gene expression signature that predicts the drug response of cancer cells to salinomycin. Consistent with therapy resistance of CSC, 8% of tumor samples in the TCGA-database displayed our signature and were associated with a significantly higher mortality. Using our K-ras-specific screening platform, we identified several new candidate CSC drugs. Two of these, ophiobolin A and conglobatin A, possessed a similar or higher potency than salinomycin. Finally, we established that the most potent compound, ophiobolin A, exerts its K-ras4B-specific activity through inactivation of calmodulin. Our data suggest that specific interference with the K-ras4B/calmodulin interaction selectively inhibits CSC. PMID:26973241

  11. Anti-tumor activity of ESX1 on cancer cells harboring oncogenic K-ras mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Junta; Ishikawa, Susumu; Hamada, Jun-Ichi; Yanagihara, Masatomo; Koike, Takao; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2008-05-23

    Human ESX1 is a 65-kilodalton (kDa) paired-like homeoprotein that is proteolytically processed into N-terminal 45-kDa and C-terminal 20-kDa fragments. The N-terminal ESX1 fragment, which contains the homeodomain, localizes to the nucleus and represses mRNA transcription from the K-ras gene. When we inoculated human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 constitutive expressing N-terminal region of ESX1 (N-ESX1) into nude mice, transfectant cells uniformly showed decreased tumor-forming activity compared with that of the parental cells. Furthermore, pretreatment of HCT116 carcinoma cells with a fusion protein consisting of N-ESX1 and the protein-transduction domain derived from the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 TAT protein gave rise to a dramatic reduction in the tumorigenicity of HCT116 cells in nude mice. Our results provide first in vivo evidence for the molecular targeting therapeutic application of the K-ras repressor ESX1, especially TAT-mediated transduction of N-ESX1, in the treatment of human cancers having oncogenic K-ras mutations.

  12. SPRED1 Interferes with K-ras but Not H-ras Membrane Anchorage and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Siljamäki, Elina

    2016-01-01

    The Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is tightly controlled by negative feedback regulators, such as the tumor suppressor SPRED1. The SPRED1 gene also carries loss-of-function mutations in the RASopathy Legius syndrome. Growth factor stimulation translocates SPRED1 to the plasma membrane, triggering its inhibitory activity. However, it remains unclear whether SPRED1 there acts at the level of Ras or Raf. We show that pharmacological or galectin-1 (Gal-1)-mediated induction of B- and C-Raf-containing dimers translocates SPRED1 to the plasma membrane. This is facilitated in particular by SPRED1 interaction with B-Raf and, via its N terminus, with Gal-1. The physiological significance of these novel interactions is supported by two Legius syndrome-associated mutations that show diminished binding to both Gal-1 and B-Raf. On the plasma membrane, SPRED1 becomes enriched in acidic membrane domains to specifically perturb membrane organization and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling of active K-ras4B (here, K-ras) but not H-ras. However, SPRED1 also blocks on the nanoscale the positive effects of Gal-1 on H-ras. Therefore, a combinatorial expression of SPRED1 and Gal-1 potentially regulates specific patterns of K-ras- and H-ras-dependent signaling output. More broadly, our results open up the possibility that related SPRED and Sprouty proteins act in a similar Ras and Raf isoform-specific manner. PMID:27503857

  13. Isothermal Multiple Displacement Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Isothermal multiple strand displacement amplification (IMDA) of the whole human genome is a promising method for procuring abundant DNA from valuable and often limited clinical specimens. However, whether DNA generated by this method is of high quality and a faithful replication of the DNA in the original specimen, allowing for subsequent molecular diagnostic testing, requires verification. In this study, we evaluated the suitability of IMDA-generated DNA (IMDA-DNA) for detecting antigen receptor gene rearrangements, chromosomal translocations, and gene mutations using Southern blot analysis, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods, or sequencing methods in 28 lymphoma and leukemia clinical specimens. Molecular testing before and after whole genome amplification of these specimens using the IMDA technique showed concordance in 27 of 28 (96%) specimens. Analysis of IMDA-DNA by Southern blot analysis detected restriction fragments >12 kilobases long. No amplification bias was observed at all loci tested demonstrating that this method can be useful in generating large amounts of unbiased, high molecular weight DNA from limited clinical specimens. PMID:15269301

  14. Deletion/duplication mutation screening of TP53 gene in patients with transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification.

    PubMed

    Bazrafshani, Mohammad Reza R; Nowshadi, Pouriaali A; Shirian, Sadegh; Daneshbod, Yahya; Nabipour, Fatemeh; Mokhtari, Maral; Hosseini, Fatemehsadat; Dehghan, Somayeh; Saeedzadeh, Abolfazl; Mosayebi, Ziba

    2016-02-01

    Bladder cancer is a molecular disease driven by the accumulation of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. The aim of this study was to detect the deletions/duplication mutations in TP53 gene exons using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) method in the patients with transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). The achieved formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from 60 patients with TCC of bladder were screened for exonal deletions or duplications of every 12 TP53 gene exons using MLPA. The pathological sections were examined by three pathologists and categorized according to the WHO scoring guideline as 18 (30%) grade I, 22 (37%) grade II, 13 (22%) grade III, and 7 (11%) grade IV cases of TCC. None mutation changes of TP53 gene were detected in 24 (40%) of the patients. Furthermore, mutation changes including, 15 (25%) deletion, 17 (28%) duplication, and 4 (7%) both deletion and duplication cases were observed among 60 samples. From 12 exons of TP53 gene, exon 1 was more subjected to exonal deletion. Deletion of exon 1 of TP53 gene has occurred in 11 (35.4%) patients with TCC. In general, most mutations of TP53, either deletion or duplication, were found in exon 1, which was statistically significant. In addition, no relation between the TCC tumor grade and any type of mutation were observed in this research. MLPA is a simple and efficient method to analyze genomic deletions and duplications of all 12 exons of TP53 gene. The finding of this report that most of the mutations of TP53 occur in exon 1 is in contrast to that of the other reports suggesting that exons 5-8 are the most (frequently) mutated exons of TP53 gene. The mutations of exon 1 of TP53 gene may play an important role in the tumorogenesis of TCC.

  15. Amplification of the rat m2 muscarinic receptor gene by the polymerase chain reaction: Functional expression of the M sub 2 muscarinic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, J.; Bloom, J.W.; Yamamura, H.I.; Roeske, W.R. )

    1990-01-01

    A selective amplification of the coding sequence of the rat M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor gene was achieved by the polymerase chain reaction. The error rate of this amplification system under conditions specified was 1 nucleotide substitution in 841 base pairs. In vitro expression of this gene in murine fibroblasts (B82) via the eukaryotic expression vector, pH{beta}APr-1-neo, resulted in high level expression of specific ({sup 3}H)(-)MQNB binding in transfected B82 cell lines. One of these clones, M2LKB2-2, showed a stable expression of ({sup 3}H)(-)MQNB binding with a K{sub d} value of 265 pM and a B{sub max} value of 411{plus minus}50 fmol/10{sup 6} cells. Cardiac selective muscarinic antagonists such as himbacine and AF-DX 116 show high affinities for this binding site in the M2LKB2-2 cells. The rank order of potency of several antagonists in inhibiting ({sup 3}H)(-)MQNB binding in these cells conformed to the characteristics of an M{sub 2} type muscarinic receptor. Carbachol showed a single affinity state for the receptors in the M2LKB2-2 cells with a K{sub i} value of 2.0 {mu}M. This receptor appeared to be inversely coupled to adenylate cyclase via a pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein. Carbachol also had a slight stimulatory effect on the hydrolysis of inositol lipids. The polymerase chain reaction proves highly effective in cloning genes from genomic material, as demonstrated by the first in vitro functional expression of the rat M{sub 2} type muscarinic receptor.

  16. Real-time microfluidic recombinase polymerase amplification for the toxin B gene of Clostridium difficile on a SlipChip platform.

    PubMed

    Tsaloglou, M-N; Watson, R J; Rushworth, C M; Zhao, Y; Niu, X; Sutton, J M; Morgan, H

    2015-01-07

    Clostridium difficile is one of the key bacterial pathogens that cause infectious diarrhoea both in the developed and developing world. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods are increasingly used for identification of toxinogenic infection by clinical labs. For this purpose, we developed a low-cost microfluidic platform based on the SlipChip concept and implemented real-time isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The on-chip RPA assay targets the Clostridium difficile toxin B gene (tcdB) coding for toxin B, one of the proteins responsible for bacterial toxicity. The device was fabricated in clear acrylic using rapid prototyping methods. It has six replicate 500 nL reaction wells as well as two sets of 500 nL control wells. The reaction can be monitored in real-time using exonuclease fluorescent probes with an initial sample volume of as little as 6.4 μL. We demonstrated a limit of detection of 1000 DNA copies, corresponding to 1 fg, at a time-to-result of <20 minutes. This miniaturised platform for pathogen detection has potential for use in resource-limited environments or at the point-of-care because of its ease of use and low cost, particularly if combined with preserved reagents.

  17. Improved efficiency in amplification of Escherichia coli o-antigen gene clusters using genome-wide sequence comparison

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: In many bacteria including E. coli, genes encoding O-antigens are clustered in the chromosome, with a 39-bp JUMPstart sequence and gnd gene located upstream and downstream of the cluster, respectively. For determining the DNA sequence of the E. coli O-antigen gene cluster, one set of P...

  18. Kinetic Hairpin Oligonucleotide Blockers for Selective Amplification of Rare Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yanwei; Sanchez, J. Aquiles; Wangh, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of rare mutant alleles in an excess of wild type alleles is increasingly important in cancer diagnosis. Several methods for selective amplification of a mutant allele via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been reported, but each of these methods has its own limitations. A common problem is that Taq DNA polymerase errors early during amplification generate false positive mutations which also accumulate exponentially. In this paper, we described a novel method using hairpin oligonucleotide blockers that can selectively inhibit the amplification of wild type DNA during LATE-PCR amplification. LATE-PCR generates double-stranded DNA exponentially followed by linear amplification of single-stranded DNA. The efficiency of the blocker is optimized by adjusting the LATE-PCR temperature cycling profile. We also demonstrate that it is possible to minimize false positive signals caused by Taq DNA polymerase errors by using a mismatched excess primer plus a modified PCR profile to preferentially enrich for mutant target sequences prior to the start of the exponential phase of LATE-PCR amplification. In combination these procedures permit amplification of specific KRAS mutations in the presence of more than 10,000 fold excess of wild type DNA without false positive signals. PMID:25082368

  19. Assessment of DDR2, BRAF, EGFR and KRAS mutations as therapeutic targets in non-adenocarcinoma lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yashima, Hideaki; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Araki, Takuya; Aomori, Tohru; Ohtaki, Yoichi; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Enokida, Yasuaki; Atsumi, Jun; Nakamura, Tomonori; Takeyoshi, Izumi; Yamamoto, Koujirou

    2014-09-01

    Molecular-targeted therapy has not been established in non-adenocarcinoma lung cancer (non-AdLC), as no targets that affect the clinical efficacy of molecular-targeted drugs have yet been identified. In this study, we investigated the frequency of genetic variations in discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) in non-AdLC patients, in order to evaluate the possibility of genetic mutations in these genes being used as therapeutic targets for the treatment of patients with non-AdLC. For this purpose, we enrolled 150 non-AdLC patients who had undergone surgery at the Gunma University Hospital between December, 2003 and December, 2012. Genetic mutations in the EGFR, KRAS, DDR2 and BRAF genes were detected by a sequencing method or probe assay using DNA derived from cancer tissues. No somatic mutations in DDR2 or BRAF were detected in non-AdLC patients. Conversely, genetic mutations in EGFR exon 19 were found in 3 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 3 adenosquamous carcinoma patients, whereas KRAS codon 12 mutations were also found in 3 SCC patients and 1 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma patient. EGFR and KRAS mutations were mutually exclusive. This study indicated that, although DDR2 and BRAF mutations may only rarely be used as therapeutic targets, EGFR and KRAS mutations may represent candidate therapeutic targets, at least in the non-AdLC patients investigated.

  20. miR-181a shows tumor suppressive effect against oral squamous cell carcinoma cells by downregulating K-ras

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Bae, Susan D.; Hong, Hannah S.; Kim, Reuben H.; Kang, Mo K.; Park, No-Hee

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} MicroRNA-181a (miR-181a) was frequently downregulated in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). {yields} Overexpression of miR-181a suppressed OSCC growth. {yields} K-ras is a novel target of miR-181a. {yields} Decreased miR-181a expression is attributed to its lower promoter activity in OSCC. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are epigenetic regulators of gene expression, and their deregulation plays an important role in human cancer, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Recently, we found that miRNA-181a (miR-181a) was upregulated during replicative senescence of normal human oral keratinocytes. Since senescence is considered as a tumor suppressive mechanism, we thus investigated the expression and biological role of miR-181a in OSCC. We found that miR-181a was frequently downregulated in OSCC. Ectopic expression of miR-181a suppressed proliferation and anchorage independent growth ability of OSCC. Moreover, miR-181a dramatically reduces the growth of OSCC on three dimensional organotypic raft culture. We also identified K-ras as a novel target of miR-181a. miR-181a decreased K-ras protein level as well as the luciferase activity of reporter vectors containing the 3'-untranslated region of K-ras gene. Finally, we defined a minimal regulatory region of miR-181a and found a positive correlation between its promoter activity and the level of miR-181a expression. In conclusion, miR-181a may function as an OSCC suppressor by targeting on K-ras oncogene. Thus, miR-181a should be considered for therapeutic application for OSCC.

  1. A gene for a Class II DNA photolyase from Oryza sativa: cloning of the cDNA by dilution-amplification.

    PubMed

    Hirouchi, T; Nakajima, S; Najrana, T; Tanaka, M; Matsunaga, T; Hidema, J; Teranishi, M; Fujino, T; Kumagai, T; Yamamoto, K

    2003-07-01

    Ultraviolet radiation induces the formation of two classes of photoproducts in DNA-the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and the pyrimidine [6-4] pyrimidone photoproduct (6-4 product). Many organisms produce enzymes, termed photolyases, which specifically bind to these lesions and split them via a UV-A/blue light-dependent mechanism, thereby reversing the damage. These photolyases are specific for either CPDs or 6-4 products. Two classes of photolyases (class I and class II) repair CPDs. A gene that encodes a protein with class II CPD photolyase activity in vitro has been cloned from several plants including Arabidopsis thaliana, Cucumis sativus and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We report here the isolation of a homolog of this gene from rice (Oryza sativa), which was cloned on the basis of sequence similarity and PCR-based dilution-amplification. The cDNA comprises a very GC-rich (75%) 5; region, while the 3; portion has a GC content of 50%. This gene encodes a protein with CPD photolyase activity when expressed in E. coli. The CPD photolyase gene encodes at least two types of mRNA, formed by alternative splicing of exon 5. One of the mRNAs encodes an ORF for 506 amino acid residues, while the other is predicted to code for 364 amino acid residues. The two RNAs occur in about equal amounts in O. sativa cells.

  2. Rapid detection of blaNDM, blaKPC, blaIMP, and blaVIM carbapenemase genes in bacteria by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cancan; Zheng, Fen; Rui, Yongyu

    2014-12-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed and evaluated for rapid detection of blaKPC, blaNDM, blaIMP, and blaVIM carbapenemase genes. Six oligonucleotides, including outer, inner, and loop primers, were designed for eight distinct regions in each target gene. Two qualitative criteria were used to evaluate LAMP reactions: visual inspection of color change and real-time detection of fluorescence change. The lower detection limit was 10 colony forming units (CFU) per reaction for real-time detection and 100 CFU per reaction for visual inspection for each gene. Two hundred twenty-two carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates (including 100 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 100 Acinetobacter sp., and 22 Enterobacteriaceae) were tested by LAMP assay. At the same time, these isolates were confirmed by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing analysis. In these clinical isolates, the results of 11 strains with blaNDM, 11 strains with blaKPC, 11 strains with blaVIM, and 2 strains with blaIMP obtained using LAMP assays were concordant with conventional PCR. The LAMP method reported here may be a useful and powerful tool for rapid detection of blaNDM, blaKPC, blaIMP, and blaVIM carbapenemase genes in bacteria.

  3. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification: Rapid and sensitive detection of the antibiotic resistance gene ISAba1-blaOXA-51-like in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaoqin; Nakano, Ryuichi; Nakano, Akiyo; Ubagai, Tsuneyuki; Kikuchi-Ueda, Takane; Tansho-Nagakawa, Shigeru; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Kamoshida, Go; Endo, Shiro; Yano, Hisakazu; Ono, Yasuo

    2016-02-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, which are mainly induced by the production of OXA-type β-lactamases, are among the leading causes of nosocomial infections worldwide. Among the β-lactamase genes, the presence of the OXA-51-like gene carrying the upstream insertion sequence, ISAba1, was found to be one of the most prevalent carbapenem resistance mechanisms utilized by these bacteria. Consequently, it is necessary to develop a rapid detection method for ISAba1-blaOXA-51-like sequence for the timely and appropriate antibiotic treatment of A. baumannii infection. In this study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was optimized for ISAba1-blaOXA-51-like detection. The LAMP primer set was designed to recognize distinct sequences in the ISAba1-blaOXA-51-like gene and could amplify the gene within 25 min at an isothermal temperature of 60°C. This LAMP assay was able to detect the ISAba1-blaOXA-51-like gene with high specificity; in addition, no cross-reactivity was observed for other types of β-lactamase producers (OXA-23-like, OXA-40-like, OXA-58-like, and IMP-1), as indicated by the absence of false positive or false negative results. The detection limit for this assay was found to be 10(0)CFU per tube which was 100-fold more sensitive than a polymerase chain reaction assay for ISAba1-blaOXA-51-like detection. Furthermore, the LAMP assay provided swift detection of the ISAba1-blaOXA-51-like gene, even directly from clinical specimens. In summary, we have described a new, rapid assay for the detection of the ISAba1-blaOXA-51-like gene from A. baumannii that could be useful in a clinical setting. This method might facilitate epidemiological studies and allow monitoring of the emergence of drug resistant strains.

  4. Mutant Kras- and p16-regulated NOX4 activation overcomes metabolic checkpoints in development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Huai-Qiang; Ying, Haoqiang; Tian, Tian; Ling, Jianhua; Fu, Jie; Lu, Yu; Wu, Min; Yang, Lifeng; Achreja, Abhinav; Chen, Gang; Zhuang, Zhuonan; Wang, Huamin; Nagrath, Deepak; Yao, Jun; Hung, Mien-Chie; DePinho, Ronald A.; Huang, Peng; Xu, Rui-Hua; Chiao, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    Kras activation and p16 inactivation are required to develop pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the biochemical mechanisms underlying these double alterations remain unclear. Here we discover that NAD(P)H oxidase 4 (NOX4), an enzyme known to catalyse the oxidation of NAD(P)H, is upregulated when p16 is inactivated by looking at gene expression profiling studies. Activation of NOX4 requires catalytic subunit p22phox, which is upregulated following Kras activation. Both alterations are also detectable in PDAC cell lines and patient specimens. Furthermore, we show that elevated NOX4 activity accelerates oxidation of NADH and supports increased glycolysis by generating NAD+, a substrate for GAPDH-mediated glycolytic reaction, promoting PDAC cell growth. Mechanistically, NOX4 was induced through p16-Rb-regulated E2F and p22phox was induced by KrasG12V-activated NF-κB. In conclusion, we provide a biochemical explanation for the cooperation between p16 inactivation and Kras activation in PDAC development and suggest that NOX4 is a potential therapeutic target for PDAC. PMID:28232723

  5. RelA regulates CXCL1/CXCR2-dependent oncogene-induced senescence in murine Kras-driven pancreatic carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lesina, Marina; Wörmann, Sonja Maria; Diakopoulos, Kalliope Nina; Korneeva, Olga; Wimmer, Margit; Sperveslage, Jan; Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Kehl, Timo; Saur, Dieter; Heikenwälder, Mathias; Steiner, Jörg Manfred; Wang, Timothy Cragin; Sansom, Owen J.; Schmid, Roland Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppression that is mediated by oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is considered to function as a safeguard during development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the mechanisms that regulate OIS in PDAC are poorly understood. Here, we have determined that nuclear RelA reinforces OIS to inhibit carcinogenesis in the Kras mouse model of PDAC. Inactivation of RelA accelerated pancreatic lesion formation in Kras mice by abrogating the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) gene transcription signature. Using genetic and pharmacological tools, we determined that RelA activation promotes OIS via elevation of the SASP factor CXCL1 (also known as KC), which activates CXCR2, during pancreatic carcinogenesis. In Kras mice, pancreas-specific inactivation of CXCR2 prevented OIS and was correlated with increased tumor proliferation and decreased survival. Moreover, reductions in CXCR2 levels were associated with advanced neoplastic lesions in tissue from human pancreatic specimens. Genetically disabling OIS in Kras mice caused RelA to promote tumor proliferation, suggesting a dual role for RelA signaling in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest a pivotal role for RelA in regulating OIS in preneoplastic lesions and implicate the RelA/CXCL1/CXCR2 axis as an essential mechanism of tumor surveillance in PDAC. PMID:27454298

  6. Mutant Kras- and p16-regulated NOX4 activation overcomes metabolic checkpoints in development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ju, Huai-Qiang; Ying, Haoqiang; Tian, Tian; Ling, Jianhua; Fu, Jie; Lu, Yu; Wu, Min; Yang, Lifeng; Achreja, Abhinav; Chen, Gang; Zhuang, Zhuonan; Wang, Huamin; Nagrath, Deepak; Yao, Jun; Hung, Mien-Chie; DePinho, Ronald A; Huang, Peng; Xu, Rui-Hua; Chiao, Paul J

    2017-02-24

    Kras activation and p16 inactivation are required to develop pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the biochemical mechanisms underlying these double alterations remain unclear. Here we discover that NAD(P)H oxidase 4 (NOX4), an enzyme known to catalyse the oxidation of NAD(P)H, is upregulated when p16 is inactivated by looking at gene expression profiling studies. Activation of NOX4 requires catalytic subunit p22(phox), which is upregulated following Kras activation. Both alterations are also detectable in PDAC cell lines and patient specimens. Furthermore, we show that elevated NOX4 activity accelerates oxidation of NADH and supports increased glycolysis by generating NAD(+), a substrate for GAPDH-mediated glycolytic reaction, promoting PDAC cell growth. Mechanistically, NOX4 was induced through p16-Rb-regulated E2F and p22(phox) was induced by Kras(G12V)-activated NF-κB. In conclusion, we provide a biochemical explanation for the cooperation between p16 inactivation and Kras activation in PDAC development and suggest that NOX4 is a potential therapeutic target for PDAC.

  7. Primary mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the breast with amplification of the HER2 gene confirmed by FISH - case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kucukzeybek, Betul Bolat; Yigit, Seyran; Sari, Ayşegul Akder; Rezanko, Turkan; Durak, Evren; Sadullahoglu, Canan

    2014-03-01

    Fifty five-years-old woman was presented to the general surgery upon the palpation of a mass in her left breast. In the excisional biopsy performed, partially cystic tumor of 2 × 1 cm with solid areas was macroscopically observed. After through microscopic examination, the patient was diagnosed as invasive mucinous cystadenocarcinoma and the tumor was found to be ER- and PR-negative and C-erbB2 (2+). In the fluorescent in situ hybridization, HER2/neu gene amplification was observed. Here, we present the clinical, cytological, morphological and immunohistochemical features of a very rare type of breast carcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the breast, with the review of the relevant literature.

  8. Efficient selection of high-producing subclones during gene amplification of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells by flow cytometry and cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Borth, N; Zeyda, M; Kunert, R; Katinger, H

    The screening procedure for high-producing cell lines is extremely time- and labor-intensive and costly, and is at present guided by an empirical approach based on individual experience. Flow cytometry and cell sorting, with its ability to analyze and separate single cells, an ideal method in the selection of such rare cells. The isolation of recombinant cell lines is especially difficult due to repeated gene amplification, which introduces high mutational variation into the population. We have established and evaluated a modification of a previous method that traps secreted product on the surface of the secreting cell, thus allowing direct analysis of single cell specific production rates. This method was used to select for high-producing subclones of a recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line producing a human antibody against HIV-1 by repeated rounds of gene amplification and cell sorting. This cell line has been amplified in previous investigations, so that the amount of work and testing required by traditional methods can be compared with the protocol described herein. Forty-five 96-well plates were necessary to obtain a high-producing subclone by limited dilution methods, whereas only five plates were required when cell sorting was used. The specific production rate of the best clone obtained by sorting, however, was five times that of the clone obtained by traditional methods. In contrast to the clones obtained by limited dilution, which consisted of several populations of low- and high-producing cells even at high methotrexate concentrations (6.4 microM), the clones isolated by sorting were already homogeneous at 0.8 microM methotrexate.

  9. Correlation of HER2 overexpression with gene amplification and its relation to chromosome 17 aneuploidy: a 5-year experience with invasive ductal and lobular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Aziza; Khoor, Andras; Radhakrishnan, Reshmitha; Radhakrishnan, Anu; Cohen, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    The HER2 oncogene shows expression or amplification, or both, in approximately 15% to 20% of breast cancers and has been associated with poor prognosis and a response to trastuzumab therapy. HER2 gene status determines the eligibility of breast cancer patients for trastuzumab therapy and a large fraction (41-56%) of these patients respond to targeted therapy. Several studies have related the increased expression of HER2 to an increased copy number of chromosome 17, rather than amplification of the HER2 gene. We compared the results of immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization in both invasive ductal and invasive lobular carcinomas, to determine the frequency of chromosome 17 aneuploidy associated with discordant results. In total, 390 invasive ductal carcinomas and 180 invasive lobular carcinomas diagnosed from January 2000 to December 2005 were included in the study only if results were available for immunohistochemistry (HercepTest; DAKO, Carpinteria, California) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (PathVysion HER2 DNA Probe Kit; Abbott Laboratories, Des Plaines, Illinois). Tumors classified as invasive ductal carcinomas were graded according to the Bloom-Richardson grading system. Correlation between the results of immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed for all categories. Among invasive ductal carcinomas, 29% (115/390) showed chromosome 17 aneuploidy, mostly associated with grade 3/HER2 2+ (45%) or grade 2/HER2 3+ (55%) that were not amplified. Also, 34% (12/35) of invasive lobular carcinomas showed chromosome 17 aneuploidy; approximately one-third of these cases were HER2 2+ (33%) and HER2 3+ (37%) that were not amplified. Discordance between the results of immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization in both ductal and lobular carcinomas is largely associated with chromosome 17 aneuploidy.

  10. Diagnostic application of KRAS mutation testing in uterine microglandular proliferations.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei; Abi-Raad, Rita; Alomari, Ahmed K; Hui, Pei; Buza, Natalia

    2015-07-01

    Microglandular proliferations often pose a diagnostic challenge in small endocervical and endometrial biopsies. Microglandular hyperplasia (MGH) is one of the most common pseudoneoplastic glandular proliferations of uterine cervix, which can closely mimic endometrial adenocarcinomas (EAC) with a microglandular pattern (microglandular EAC). Although MGH is typically characterized by relatively uniform nuclei and rare to absent mitoses, atypical forms with architectural and/or cytologic deviation from the usual morphology have been previously described. Recently, a series of MGH with high mitotic activity has also been documented. Although careful morphological assessment and immunohistochemical workup can resolve the diagnostic dilemma in some cases, additional differential diagnostic tools are needed to separate both the common and atypical variants of MGH from EAC with microglandular pattern. Frequent KRAS mutation has been previously reported in endometrial complex mucinous lesions and endometrial mucinous carcinomas. However, the diagnostic utility of KRAS mutation analysis has not yet been explored in the context of cervical and endometrial microglandular lesions. Twelve mitotically active MGH cases and 15 cases of EAC with microglandular growth pattern were selected for the study. KRAS mutation analysis was performed in all cases by highly sensitive single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. Clinical history and follow-up data were retrieved from electronic medical records. KRAS mutation was absent in all MGH cases, whereas 9 (60%) of 15 microglandular EAC cases tested positive for KRAS mutation. Our data indicate that KRAS mutation analysis may offer additional discriminatory power in separating benign MGH from EAC with microglandular pattern.

  11. Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Is Dependent on Oncogenic Kras in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Meredith A.; Brisset, Jean-Christophe; Zhang, Yaqing; Bednar, Filip; Pierre, Josette; Heist, Kevin A.; Galbán, Craig J.; Galbán, Stefanie; di Magliano, Marina Pasca

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest human malignancies, and its prognosis has not improved over the past 40 years. Mouse models that spontaneously develop pancreatic adenocarcinoma and mimic the progression of the human disease are emerging as a new tool to investigate the basic biology of this disease and identify potential therapeutic targets. Here, we describe a new model of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma based on pancreas-specific, inducible and reversible expression of an oncogenic form of Kras, together with pancreas-specific expression of a mutant form of the tumor suppressor p53. Using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging to follow individual animals in longitudinal studies, we show that both primary and metastatic lesions depend on continuous Kras activity for their maintenance. However, re-activation of Kras* following prolonged inactivation leads to rapid tumor relapse, raising the concern that Kras*-resistance might eventually be acquired. Thus, our data identifies Kras* as a key oncogene in pancreatic cancer maintenance, but raises the possibility of acquired resistance should Kras inhibitors become available for use in pancreatic cancer. PMID:23226501

  12. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for sensitive and rapid detection of the tdh and trh genes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and related Vibrio species.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Wataru; Kumeda, Yuko; Misawa, Naoaki; Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2010-02-01

    Thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) are the major virulence determinants of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. TRH is further differentiated into TRH1 and TRH2 on the basis of genetic and phenotypic differences. We developed a novel and highly specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for sensitive and rapid detection of the tdh, trh1, and trh2 genes of V. parahaemolyticus. The LAMP assay was designed for both combined and individual detection of the tdh, trh1, and trh2 genes and combined detection of the trh1 and trh2 genes. Our results showed that it gave the same results as DNA probes and conventional PCR assays for 125 strains of V. parahaemolyticus, 3 strains of Grimontia hollisae, and 2 strains of Vibrio mimicus carrying the tdh, trh1, and trh2 genes in various combinations. No LAMP products were detected for any of the 20 bacterial strains lacking the tdh, trh1, and trh2 genes. The sensitivities of the LAMP assay for detection of tdh-, trh1-, and trh2-carrying V. parahaemolyticus strains in spiked shrimp samples were 0.8, 21.3, and 5.0 CFU per LAMP reaction tube, respectively. Starting with DNA extraction from a single colony and from spiked shrimp samples, the LAMP assay required only 27 to 60 min and less than 80 min, respectively. This is the first report of a rapid and specific LAMP assay for detection and differentiation of the tdh, trh1, and trh2 genes of V. parahaemolyticus and related Vibrio species.

  13. Development and Application of Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assays for Rapid Visual Detection of cry2Ab and cry3A Genes in Genetically-Modified Crops

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feiwu; Yan, Wei; Long, Likun; Qi, Xing; Li, Congcong; Zhang, Shihong

    2014-01-01

    The cry2Ab and cry3A genes are two of the most important insect-resistant exogenous genes and had been widely used in genetically-modified crops. To develop more effective alternatives for the quick identification of genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) containing these genes, a rapid and visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method to detect the cry2Ab and cry3A genes is described in this study. The LAMP assay can be finished within 60 min at an isothermal condition of 63 °C. The derived LAMP products can be obtained by a real-time turbidimeter via monitoring the white turbidity or directly observed by the naked eye through adding SYBR Green I dye. The specificity of the LAMP assay was determined by analyzing thirteen insect-resistant genetically-modified (GM) crop events with different Bt genes. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the LAMP assay was evaluated by diluting the template genomic DNA. Results showed that the limit of detection of the established LAMP assays was approximately five copies of haploid genomic DNA, about five-fold greater than that of conventional PCR assays. All of the results indicated that this established rapid and visual LAMP assay was quick, accurate and cost effective, with high specificity and sensitivity. In addition, this method does not need specific expensive instruments or facilities, which can provide a simpler and quicker approach to detecting the cry2Ab and cry3A genes in GM crops, especially for on-site, large-scale test purposes in the field. PMID:25167136

  14. Development and application of loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays for rapid visual detection of cry2Ab and cry3A genes in genetically-modified crops.

    PubMed

    Li, Feiwu; Yan, Wei; Long, Likun; Qi, Xing; Li, Congcong; Zhang, Shihong

    2014-08-27

    The cry2Ab and cry3A genes are two of the most important insect-resistant exogenous genes and had been widely used in genetically-modified crops. To develop more effective alternatives for the quick identification of genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) containing these genes, a rapid and visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method to detect the cry2Ab and cry3A genes is described in this study. The LAMP assay can be finished within 60 min at an isothermal condition of 63 °C. The derived LAMP products can be obtained by a real-time turbidimeter via monitoring the white turbidity or directly observed by the naked eye through adding SYBR Green I dye. The specificity of the LAMP assay was determined by analyzing thirteen insect-resistant genetically-modified (GM) crop events with different Bt genes. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the LAMP assay was evaluated by diluting the template genomic DNA. Results showed that the limit of detection of the established LAMP assays was approximately five copies of haploid genomic DNA, about five-fold greater than that of conventional PCR assays. All of the results indicated that this established rapid and visual LAMP assay was quick, accurate and cost effective, with high specificity and sensitivity. In addition, this method does not need specific expensive instruments or facilities, which can provide a simpler and quicker approach to detecting the cry2Ab and cry3A genes in GM crops, especially for on-site, large-scale test purposes in the field.

  15. A PCR-based sex determination method for possible application in caprine gender selection by simultaneous amplification of the Sry and Aml-X genes.

    PubMed

    Phua, Alice Choon Yen; Abdullah, Ramli Bin; Mohamed, Zulqarnain

    2003-08-01

    Sex determination of livestock is performed to achieve the objectives of livestock breeding programmes. Techniques for sex determination have evolved from karyotyping to detecting Y-specific antigens and recently to the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which appears to be the most sensitive, accurate, rapid and reliable method to date. In this study, a PCR-based sex determination method for potential application in goat breeding programmes was developed. Primers were designed to amplify a portion of the X amelogenin gene (Aml-X) on the X chromosome to give a 300 bp product and Sry gene on the Y chromosome to give a 116 bp product. PCR optimization was performed using DNA template extracted from a whole blood sample of Jermasia goats (German Fawn x Katjang) of both sexes. It was possible to identify the sex chromosomes by amplifying both male- and female-specific genes simultaneously in a duplex reaction with males yielding two bands and females yielding one band. The Aml-X primer set, which served as an internal control primer, did not interfere with amplification of the Y-specific sequence even when a low amount of DNA (1 ng) was used. The duplex reaction subjected to a blind test showed 100% (14/14) concordance, proving its accuracy and reliability. The primer sets used were found to be highly specific and were suitable for gender selection of goats.

  16. A regulatory gene (ccaR) required for cephamycin and clavulanic acid production in Streptomyces clavuligerus: amplification results in overproduction of both beta-lactam compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Llarena, F J; Liras, P; Rodríguez-García, A; Martín, J F

    1997-01-01

    A regulatory gene (ccaR), located within the cephamycin gene cluster of Streptomyces clavuligerus, is linked to a gene (blp) encoding a protein similar to a beta-lactamase-inhibitory protein. Expression of ccaR is required for cephamycin and clavulanic acid biosynthesis in S. clavuligerus. The ccaR-encoded protein resembles the ActII-ORF4, RedD, AfsR, and DnrI regulatory proteins of other Streptomyces species, all of which share several motifs. Disruption of ccaR by targeted double recombination resulted in the loss of the ability to synthesize cephamycin and clavulanic acid. Complementation of the disrupted mutant with ccaR restored production of both secondary metabolites. ccaR was expressed as a monocistronic transcript at 24 and 48 h in S. clavuligerus cultures (preceding the phase of antibiotic accumulation), but no transcript hybridization signals were observed at 72 or 96 h. This expression pattern is consistent with those of regulatory proteins required for antibiotic biosynthesis. Amplification of ccaR in S. clavuligerus resulted in a two- to threefold increase in the production of cephamycin and clavulanic acid. PMID:9068654

  17. An improved method for detection of Edwardsiella tarda by loop-mediated isothermal amplification by targeting the EsrB gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guosi; Zhang, Qingli; Han, Nana; Shi, Chengyin; Wang, Xiuhua; Liu, Qinghui; Huang, Jie

    2012-07-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a major pathogen in aquatic environments that can cause heavy economic losses. An improved method for quick and accurate detection of E. tarda by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with two additional loop primers was developed by targeting the EsrB gene ( EsrB — LAMP). In this method, the Mg2+ concentration, reaction temperature, and reaction time were optimized to 8 mmol/L, 61°C, and 40 min, respectively. The detection limit with the EsrB gene was as low as 10 copies, which is 100 times more sensitive than that of conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The EsrB-LAMP assay was shown more sensitive and rapid than previously reported LAMP assays targeting the hemolysin gene ( hemolysin -LAMP) for detection of E. tarda. The EsrB -LAMP was also highly specific to E. tarda and had no cross-reaction with 13 other strains of bacteria. The assay can be carried out in a simple heating device and the EsrB-LAMP products can be visually detected by adding fluorescent dye to the reaction mixture. Taken together, the improved EsrB-LAMP diagnostic protocol has the potential for detection of E. tarda from indoor and outdoor samples.

  18. Inherited amplification of an active gene in the cytochrome P450 CYP2D locus as a cause of ultrarapid metabolism of debrisoquine

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, I.; Lundqvist, E.; Ingelman-Sundberg, M. ); Bertilsson, L.; Dahl, M.L.; Sjoeqvist, F. )

    1993-11-15

    Deficient hydroxylation of debrisoquine is an autosomal recessive trait that affects [approx]7% of the Caucasian population. These individuals (poor metabolizers) carry deficient:CYP2D6 gene variants and have an impaired metabolism of several commonly used drugs. The opposite phenomenon also exists, and certain individuals metabolize the drugs very rapidly, resulting in subtherapeutic plasma concentrations at normal doses. In the present study, the authors have investigated the molecular genetic basis for ultrarapid metabolism of debrisoquine. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the CYP2D locus in two families with very rapid metabolism of debrisoquine [metabolic ratio (MR) for debrisoquine = 0.01-0.1] revealed the variant CYP2D6 gene CYP2D6L. EcoRI RFLP and Xba I pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analyses showed that this gene had been amplified 12-fold in three members (father and his two children) of one of the families, and two copies were present among members of the other family. The CYP2D6L gene had an open reading frame and carried two mutations causing amino acid substitutions: one in exon 6, yielding an Arg-296[yields]Cys exchange and one in exon 9 causing Ser-486[yields]Thr. The MR of subjects carrying one copy of the CYP2D6L gene did not significantly differ from that of those with the wild-type gene, indicating that the structural alterations were not of importance for the catalytic properties of the gene product. Examination of the MR among subjects carrying wild-type CYP2D6, CYP2D6L, or deficient alleles revealed a relationship between the number of active genes and MR. The data show the principle of inherited amplification of an active gene. Furthermore, the finding of a specific haplotype with two or more active CYP2D6 genes allows genotyping for ultrarapid drug metabolizers. This genotyping could be of predictive value for individualized and more efficient drug therapy.

  19. Dietary heme iron and the risk of colorectal cancer with specific mutations in KRAS and APC.

    PubMed

    Gilsing, Anne M J; Fransen, Fiona; de Kok, Theo M; Goldbohm, Alexandra R; Schouten, Leo J; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; van Engeland, Manon; van den Brandt, Piet A; de Goeij, Anton F P M; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2013-12-01

    Red meat intake has been linked to increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, experimental studies suggest a role for dietary heme iron. Because heme iron was shown to promote specific mutations, it would be insightful to link heme iron data to CRC with mutations in key genes in an observational, population-based study. We investigated the association between dietary heme iron intake and risk of CRC with mutations in APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) and KRAS (Kirsten ras) and P53 overexpression in the Netherlands Cohort Study. After 7.3 years of follow-up, excluding the first 2.3 years due to incomplete coverage of the pathology registry and to avoid preclinical disease, adjusted hazard ratios (including adjustment for total meat) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated, using 4026 subcohort members (aged 55-69 years at baseline), 435 colon and 140 rectal cancer patients. When comparing the highest with the lowest tertile of intake, heme iron intake was associated with an increased risk of CRC harboring activating mutations in KRAS (hazard ratio = 1.71, 95% confidence interval: 1.15-2.57; P for trend = 0.03) and CRC without truncating mutations in APC (hazard ratio = 1.79, 95% confidence interval: 1.23-2.60; P for trend = 0.003). We observed a positive association between heme iron intake and the risk of CRC with activating G>A mutations in KRAS (P for trend = 0.01) and overall G>A mutations in APC (P for trend = 0.005). No associations were found with CRC harboring G>T mutations in KRAS/APC. Heme iron intake was positively associated with the risk of P53 overexpressed tumors but not with tumors without P53 overexpression (Pheterogeneity = 0.12). Heme iron intake was associated with an increased risk of colorectal tumors harboring G>A transitions in KRAS and APC and overexpression of P53. These novel findings suggest that alkylating rather than oxidative DNA-damaging mechanisms are involved in heme

  20. IS THE AMPLIFICATION OF c-MYC, MLL AND RUNX1 GENES IN AML AND MDS PATIENTS WITH TRISOMY 8, 11 AND 21 A FACTOR FOR A CLONAL EVOLUTION IN THEIR KARYOTYPE?

    PubMed

    Angelova, S; Spassov, B; Nikolova, V; Christov, I; Tzvetkov, N; Simeonova, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was 1) to define if the amplification of c-MYC, MLL and RUNX1 genes is related to the progressive changes of the karyotype in patients with AML and MDS with trisomy 8, 11 and 21 (+8, +11 and +21) in bone marrow and 2) can that amplification be accepted as part of the clonal evolution (CE). Karyotype analysis was performed in 179 patients with AML or MDS with the different chromosomal aberrations (CA) aged 16-81. The findings were distributed as follow: initiating balanced CA (n = 60), aneuploidia (n = 55), unbalanced CA (n = 64). Amplification of c-MYC, MLL and RUNX1 genes by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was found in 35% (7 out of 20) of AML and MDS patients with +8, +11 u +21 as single CA in their karyotype; in 63.6% of pts (7 out of 11)--with additional numerical or structural CA and in 75% (9 out of 12)--with complex karyotype. We assume that the amplification of the respective chromosomal regions in patients with +8, +11 and +21 is related to CE. Considering the amplification as a factor of CE, we established 3 patterns of karyotype development depending on the type of the initiating CA in it. Significant statistical differences were found between the three patterns regarding the karyotype distribution in the different stages of progression (p < 0.001).

  1. Association between coffee drinking and K-ras mutations in exocrine pancreatic cancer. PANKRAS II Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Porta, M.; Malats, N.; Guarner, L.; Carrato, A.; Rifa, J.; Salas, A.; Corominas, J. M.; Andreu, M.; Real, F. X.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To analyse the relation between coffee consumption and mutations in the K-ras gene in exocrine pancreatic cancer. DESIGN: Case- case study. Consumption of coffee among cases with the activating mutation in the K-ras gene was compared with that of cases without the mutation. SETTING AND PATIENTS: All cases of pancreatic cancer newly diagnosed at five hospitals in Spain during three years were included in the PANKRAS II Study (n = 185, of whom 121 whose tissue was available for molecular analysis are the object of the present report). Over 88% were personally interviewed in hospital. DNA was amplified from paraffin wax embedded tissues, and mutations in codon 12 of K-ras were detected by the artificial RFLP technique. MAIN RESULTS: Mutations were found in tumours from 94 of 121 patients (77.7%). Mutations were more common among regular coffee drinkers than among non-regular coffee drinkers (82.0% v 55.6%, p = 0.018, n = 107). The odds ratio adjusted by age, sex, smoking and alcohol drinking was 5.41 (95% CI 1.64, 17.78). The weekly intake of coffee was significantly higher among patients with a mutated tumour (mean of 14.5 cups/week v 8.8 among patients with a wild type tumour, p < 0.05). With respect to non- regular coffee drinkers, the odds ratio of a mutated tumour adjusted by age, sex, smoking and alcohol drinking was 3.26 for drinkers of 2-7 cups/week, 5.77 for drinkers of 8-14 cups/week and 9.99 for drinkers of > or = 15 cups/week (p < 0.01, test for trend). CONCLUSIONS: Pancreatic cancer cases without activating mutations in the K-ras gene had drank significantly less coffee than cases with a mutation, with a significant dose response relation: the less they drank, the less likely their tumours were to harbour a mutation. In exocrine pancreatic cancer the K-ras gene may be activated less often among non-regular coffee drinkers than among regular drinkers. Caffeine, other coffee compounds or other factors with which coffee drinking is

  2. Prevalence of KRAS, BRAF, PI3K and EGFR mutations among Asian patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    PHUA, LEE CHENG; NG, HUI WEN; YEO, ANGIE HUI LING; CHEN, ELYA; LO, MICHELLE SHU MEI; CHEAH, PEH YEAN; CHAN, ERIC CHUN YONG; KOH, POH KOON; HO, HAN KIAT

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in oncogenes along the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway have been implicated in the resistance to cetuximab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, the relative significance of these mutations based on their frequencies of occurrence in the Singaporean population remains unclear. In the present study, the prevalence of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and EGFR somatic mutations were determined among Singaporean patients with mCRC. DNA extracted from 45 pairs of surgically resected tumor and normal mucosa samples was subjected to direct sequencing or restriction fragment length polymorphism. Associations of the genetic mutations with various clinicopathological parameters were further explored. Mutations in either codon 12 or 13 of KRAS were confirmed as prominent phenomena among the included Singaporean mCRC patients, at a prevalence comparable with that of Caucasian and patients of other Asian ethnicities [33.3% (90% confidence interval, 21.8–44.9%)]. KRAS mutation was not associated with clinicopathological features, including age, gender and ethnicity of patients, or the tumor site, differentiation and mucinous status. Conversely, the prevalence of BRAF (0%), PI3K (2.2%) and EGFR (0%) mutations were low. The results of the present study indicate that KRAS mutations are prevalent among the studied population, and confirm the low prevalence of BRAF, PI3K and EGFR mutations. KRAS should be prioritized as an investigational gene for future studies of predictive biomarkers of cetuximab response among Singaporean patients with mCRC. PMID:26622882

  3. Rapid, Sensitive Detection of Bartonella quintana by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification of the groEL Gene

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shoukui; Niu, Lina; Luo, Lijuan; Song, Xiuping; Sun, Jimin; Liu, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    Trench fever, caused by Bartonella quintana, is recognized as a re-emerging and neglected disease. Rapid and sensitive detection approaches are urgently required to monitor and help control B. quintana infections. Here, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), which amplifies target DNA at a fixed temperature with high sensitivity, specificity and rapidity, was employed to detect B. quintana. Thirty-six strains, including 10 B. quintana, 13 other Bartonella spp., and 13 other common pathogens, were applied to verify and evaluate the LAMP assay. The specificity of the LAMP assay was 100%, and the limit of detection was 125 fg/reaction. The LAMP assay was compared with qPCR in the examination of 100 rhesus and 20 rhesus-feeder blood samples; the diagnostic accuracy was found to be 100% when LAMP was compared to qPCR, but the LAMP assay was significantly more sensitive (p < 0.05). Thus, LAMP methodology is a useful for diagnosis of trench fever in humans and primates, especially in low-resource settings, because of its rapid, sensitive detection that does not require sophisticated equipment. PMID:27916953

  4. KRAS-mutation incidence and prognostic value are metastatic site-specific in lung adenocarcinoma: poor prognosis in patients with KRAS mutation and bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lohinai, Zoltan; Klikovits, Thomas; Moldvay, Judit; Ostoros, Gyula; Raso, Erzsebet; Timar, Jozsef; Fabian, Katalin; Kovalszky, Ilona; Kenessey, István; Aigner, Clemens; Renyi-Vamos, Ferenc; Klepetko, Walter; Dome, Balazs; Hegedus, Balazs

    2017-01-01

    Current guidelines lack comprehensive information on the metastatic site-specific role of KRAS mutation in lung adenocarcinoma (LADC). We investigated the effect of KRAS mutation on overall survival (OS) in this setting. In our retrospective study, 500 consecutive Caucasian metastatic LADC patients with known KRAS mutational status were analyzed after excluding 32 patients with EGFR mutations. KRAS mutation incidence was 28.6%. The most frequent metastatic sites were lung (45.6%), bone (26.2%), adrenal gland (17.4%), brain (16.8%), pleura (15.6%) and liver (11%). Patients with intrapulmonary metastasis had significantly increased KRAS mutation frequency compared to those with extrapulmonary metastases (35% vs 26.5%, p = 0.0125). In contrast, pleural dissemination and liver involvement were associated with significantly decreased KRAS mutation incidence (vs all other metastatic sites; 17% (p < 0.001) and 16% (p = 0.02) vs 33%, respectively). Strikingly, we found a significant prognostic effect of KRAS status only in the bone metastatic subcohort (KRAS-wild-type vs KRAS-mutant; median OS 9.7 v 3.7 months; HR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.79; p  = 0.003). Our study suggests that KRAS mutation frequency in LADC patients shows a metastatic site dependent variation and, moreover, that the presence of KRAS mutation is associated with significantly worse outcome in bone metastatic cases. PMID:28051122

  5. Conformational SERS Classification of K-Ras Point Mutations for Cancer Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Morla-Folch, Judit; Gisbert-Quilis, Patricia; Masetti, Matteo; Garcia-Rico, Eduardo; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A; Guerrini, Luca

    2017-02-20

    Point mutations in Ras oncogenes are routinely screened for diagnostics and treatment of tumors (especially in colorectal cancer). Here, we develop an optical approach based on direct SERS coupled with chemometrics for the study of the specific conformations that single-point mutations impose on a relatively large fragment of the K-Ras gene (141 nucleobases). Results obtained offer the unambiguous classification of different mutations providing a potentially useful insight for diagnostics and treatment of cancer in a sensitive, fast, direct and inexpensive manner.

  6. Serum-Based Quantification of MYCN Gene Amplification in Young Patients with Neuroblastoma: Potential Utility as a Surrogate Biomarker for Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Yagyu, Shigeki; Iehara, Tomoko; Tanaka, Shiro; Gotoh, Takahiro; Misawa-Furihata, Akiko; Sugimoto, Tohru; London, Wendy B.; Hogarty, Michael D.; Teramukai, Satoshi; Nakagawara, Akira; Hiyama, Eiso; Maris, John M.; Hosoi, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    We previously developed a method for determining MYCN gene amplification status using cell-free DNA fragments released from cancer cells into the blood of patients with neuroblastoma (NB). Here, we analyzed the relationship between MYCN amplification (MNA) status and neuroblastoma prognosis. We screened serum samples from 151 patients with NB for MNA, using real-time quantitative PCR, and compared the results with MYCN status determined using paired tumor samples. We additionally investigated whether MNA status correlates with patient survival. When a cut-off value of 5 was used, serum-based MNA analysis was found to show good sensitivity (86%) and very high specificity (95%). The sensitivities for stage 1 and 2 might be acceptable, even though it is not as good as for stage 3 and 4 (67% for stage 1 and 2, 92% for stage 3, and 87% for stage 4). MNA status correlated with overall survival in our cohort of 82 patients, with survival data available (p < 0.01). The hazard ratio of MNA status was 4.98 in patients diagnosed at less than 18 months of age (95% confidence interval, 1.00–24.78), and 1.41 (95% confidence interval, 0.63–3.14) for those diagnosed at 18 months of age or older. Serum-based MNA analysis is rapid and non-invasive compared with tumor-based MNA analysis, and has potential to predict tumor MNA status. There is still a room to improve the sensitivity of the test for tumors of stages 1 and 2, nonetheless this assay might help to determine therapeutic strategies prior to tumor biopsy, especially for patients with a life-threatening condition, as well as for patients of less than 18 months of age whose risk-grouping and treatment allocation depends on their MNA status. PMID:27513929

  7. Hyd5 gene-based detection of the major gushing-inducing Fusarium spp. in a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay.

    PubMed

    Denschlag, Carla; Vogel, Rudi F; Niessen, Ludwig

    2012-06-01

    Fusarium graminearum and the closely related F. culmorum were found to be associated with over foaming of bottled beer (gushing) when contaminated brewing malt is used. The presence of highly surface active hydrophobins produced by these fungi upon growth on wheat or barley in the field or during malting may affect bubble formation and stability in gushing beers and other carbonated beverages. Aiming for a method for the rapid and user friendly analysis of unmalted and malted cereals during quality control in the brewing industry, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for the detection of Fusarium spp. capable of producing the gushing inducing hydrophobin Hyd5p was set up. A set of primers was designed towards a 221 bp region within the hyd5 gene of F. culmorum. The LAMP product was verified by sequencing a 150 bp portion. Testing specificity with purified DNA from 99 different fungal species as well as barley and wheat showed that DNA synthesis only occurred during LAMP when DNA of the closely related species F. graminearum, F. culmorum, F. cerealis and F. lunulosporum were used as template. In-tube indirect detection of DNA amplification was applied using manganese-quenched calcein as fluorescence indicator for pyrophosphate produced during DNA synthesis. The assay had a detection limit of 0.74 pg of purified target DNA which corresponds 20 copy numbers per reaction within 30 minutes using a simple heating block. Analysis of Fusarium infected cereals revealed that the assay was able to detect F. graminearum at a level of 0.5% of infected grains in uninfected barley by analysis of surface washings without further sample preparation. Results show that the hyd5 based LAMP assay can be a rapid, useful and sensitive tool for quality control in the brewing and malting industry.

  8. Fast and simple detection methods for the 4-base pair deletion of canine MDR1/ ABCB1 gene by PCR and isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Stiedl, Cathrin P; Weber, Karin

    2017-03-01

    Dogs with a 4-bp deletion in the MDR1 (or ABCB1) gene show intolerance to certain drugs routinely used in veterinary medicine, such as ivermectin, vincristine, and doxorubicin. The mutation leads to a dysfunctional P-glycoprotein drug transporter, which results in drug accumulation in the brain and severe neurotoxicity. A rapid and accurate in-house test to determine the genotype of patients in cases of acute neurotoxic signs or in tumor patients is desirable. We describe a cost-effective detection method with simple technical equipment for veterinary practice. Two allele-specific methods are presented, which allow discrimination of all genotypes, require little hands-on time, and show the results within ~1 h after DNA sampling. DNA from buccal swabs of 115 dogs with known genotype (no mutation, n = 54; heterozygous for the mutation, n = 37; homozygous for the mutation, n = 24) was extracted either by using a column-based extraction kit or by heating swabs in a simple NaOH-Tris buffer. Amplification was performed either by allele-specific fast polymerase chain reaction or by allele-specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). Analysis was done either on agarose gels, by simple endpoint visualization using ultraviolet light, or by measuring the increase of fluorescence and time to threshold crossing. Commercial master mixes reduced the preparation time and minimized sources of error in both methods. Both methods allowed the discrimination of all 3 genotypes, and the results of the new methods matched the results of the previous genotyping. The presented methods could be used for fast individual MDR1/ ABCB1 genotyping with less equipment than existing methods.

  9. The SPANX gene family of cancer/testis-specific antigens: rapid evolution and amplification in African great apes and hominids.

    PubMed

    Kouprina, Natalay; Mullokandov, Michael; Rogozin, Igor B; Collins, N Keith; Solomon, Greg; Otstot, John; Risinger, John I; Koonin, Eugene V; Barrett, J Carl; Larionov, Vladimir

    2004-03-02

    Human sperm protein associated with the nucleus on the X chromosome (SPANX) genes comprise a gene family with five known members (SPANX-A1, -A2, -B, -C, and -D), encoding cancer/testis-specific antigens that are potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. These highly similar paralogous genes cluster on the X chromosome at Xq27. We isolated and sequenced primate genomic clones homologous to human SPANX. Analysis of these clones and search of the human genome sequence revealed an uncharacterized group of genes, SPANX-N, which are present in all primates as well as in mouse and rat. In humans, four SPANX-N genes comprise a series of tandem duplicates at Xq27; a fifth member of this subfamily is located at Xp11. Similarly to SPANX-A/D, human SPANX-N genes are expressed in normal testis and some melanoma cell lines; testis-specific expression of SPANX is also conserved in mouse. Analysis of the taxonomic distribution of the long and short forms of the intron indicates that SPANX-N is the ancestral form, from which the SPANX-A/D subfamily evolved in the common ancestor of the hominoid lineage. Strikingly, the coding sequences of the SPANX genes evolved much faster than the intron and the 5' untranslated region. There is a strong correlation between the rates of evolution of synonymous and nonsynonymous codon positions, both of which are accelerated 2-fold or more compared to the noncoding sequences. Thus, evolution of the SPANX family appears to have involved positive selection that affected not only the protein sequence but also the synonymous sites in the coding sequence.

  10. Chromosomal localization of the murine RFC-1 gene encoding a folate transporter and its amplification in an antifolate resistant variant overproducing the transporter.

    PubMed

    Roy, K; Chiao, J H; Spengler, B A; Tolner, B; Yang, C H; Biedler, J L; Sirotnak, F M

    1998-08-01

    83 cells. These results document the amplification at the site of a putative HSR in an L1210 cell variant of the RFC-1 gene regulating expression of the one-carbon, reduced folate transporter.

  11. Massively parallel sequencing of phyllodes tumours of the breast reveals actionable mutations, and TERT promoter hotspot mutations and TERT gene amplification as likely drivers of progression

    PubMed Central

    Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Murray, Melissa; Burke, Kathleen A; Edelweiss, Marcia; Geyer, Felipe C; Macedo, Gabriel S; Inagaki, Akiko; Papanastasiou, Anastasios D; Martelotto, Luciano G; Marchio, Caterina; Lim, Raymond S; Ioris, Rafael A; Nahar, Pooja K; De Bruijn, Ino; Smyth, Lillian; Akram, Muzaffar; Ross, Dara; Petrini, John H; Norton, Larry; Solit, David B; Baselga, Jose; Brogi, Edi; Ladanyi, Marc; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumours (PTs) are breast fibroepithelial lesions that are graded based on histological criteria as benign, borderline or malignant. PTs may recur locally. Borderline PTs and malignant PTs may metastasize to distant sites. Breast fibroepithelial lesions, including PTs and fibroadenomas, are characterized by recurrent MED12 exon 2 somatic mutations. We sought to define the repertoire of somatic genetic alterations in PTs and whether these may assist in the differential diagnosis of these lesions. We collected 100 fibroadenomas, 40 benign PTs, 14 borderline PTs and 22 malignant PTs. Six, 6 and 13 benign, borderline and malignant PTs respectively and their matched normal tissue were subjected to targeted massively parallel sequencing (MPS) using the MSK-IMPACT sequencing assay. Recurrent MED12 mutations were found in 56% of PTs; in addition, mutations affecting cancer genes (e.g. TP53, RB1, SETD2 and EGFR) were exclusively detected in borderline and malignant PTs. We found a novel recurrent clonal hotspot mutation in the TERT promoter (−124 C>T) in 52% and TERT gene amplification in 4% of PTs. Laser capture microdissection revealed that these mutations were restricted to the mesenchymal component of PTs. Sequencing analysis of the entire cohort revealed that the frequency of TERT alterations increased from benign (18%), to borderline (57%) and to malignant PTs (68%; P<0.01), and TERT alterations were associated with increased levels of TERT mRNA (P<0.001). No TERT alterations were observed in fibroadenomas. An analysis of TERT promoter sequencing and gene amplification distinguished PTs from fibroadenomas with a sensitivity and a positive predictive value of 100% (CI 95.38%–100%) and 100% (CI 85.86%–100%), respectively, and a sensitivity and a negative predictive value of 39% (CI 28.65%–51.36%) and 68% (CI 60.21%–75.78%), respectively. Our results suggest that TERT alterations may drive the progression of PTs, and may assist in the differential

  12. A novel gene amplification causes upregulation of the PatAB ABC transporter and fluoroquinolone resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Baylay, Alison J; Ivens, Alasdair; Piddock, Laura J V

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of the ABC transporter genes patA and patB confers efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae and is also linked to pneumococcal stress responses. Although upregulation of patAB has been observed in many laboratory mutants and clinical isolates, the regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of these genes are unknown. In this study, we aimed to identify the cause of high-level constitutive overexpression of patAB in M184, a multidrug-resistant mutant of S. pneumoniae R6. Using a whole-genome transformation and sequencing approach, we identified a novel duplication of a 9.2-kb region of the M184 genome which included the patAB genes. This duplication did not affect growth and was semistable with a low segregation rate. The expression levels of patAB in M184 were much higher than those that could be fully explained by doubling of the gene dosage alone, and inactivation of the first copy of patA had no effect on multidrug resistance. Using a green fluorescent protein reporter system, increased patAB expression was ascribed to transcriptional read-through from a tRNA gene upstream of the second copy of patAB. This is the first report of a large genomic duplication causing antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae and also of a genomic duplication causing antibiotic resistance by a promoter switching mechanism.

  13. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification of the sefA Gene for Rapid Detection of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jiansen; Zhuang, Linlin; Zhu, Chunhong; Shi, Shourong; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Linji; Yu, Yan; Dou, Xinhong; Xu, Bu; Wang, Chengming

    2016-04-01

    Salmonella spp. pose a threat to both human and animal health, with more than 2600 serovars having been reported to date. Salmonella serovars are usually identified by slide agglutination tests, which are labor intensive and time consuming. In an attempt to develop a more rapid screening method for the major poultry Salmonella serovars, we developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, which directly detected the sefA gene, a fimbrial operon gene existing in several specific serovars of Salmonella enterica including the major poultry serovars, namely Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) and Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (Salmonella Gallinarum). With the 177 bacterial strains we tested, positive reactions were only observed with 85 strains of serovar Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum. The detection limit of the LAMP assay was 4 CFU/reaction with genomic DNAs of Salmonella Enteritidis (ATCC 13076) from pure culture and 400 CFU/ reaction with DNA extracted from spiked chicken feces. The LAMP assay was more sensitive than conventional culture, especially without enrichment, in detecting Salmonella Enteritidis (CMCC 50041) in the spiked fecal samples. The results show the sefA LAMP method is a rapid, sensitive, specific, and practical method for directly detection of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum in chickens. The sefA LAMP assay can potentially serve as new on-site diagnostics in the poultry industry.

  14. A comparison of the reliability of two gene targets in loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays for detecting leptospiral DNA in canine urine.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, Fabio; Zanoni, Renato Giulio; Zambon, Elisa; Turba, Maria Elena

    2017-01-01

    We compared 2 novel loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays that target either the 16S ribosomal RNA ( rrs) gene or the gene encoding a 32-kDa leptospiral lipoprotein ( lipL32) in order to assess the effect of the target on the accuracy of the LAMP assays. The most sensitive assay was the rrs assay with a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.2 × 10(1) genome equivalents per reaction. The novel lipL32 assay showed an LOD of 1.2 × 10(2) genome equivalents per reaction. Both assays showed adequate specificity when tested against a collection of bacteria commonly found in voided canine urine. However, when field samples were assayed, the rrs assays gave many false-positive results and a poor positive predictive value of 8.33%. In conclusion, even if the LAMP assay is used in low prevalence areas, the lipL32 assay would be preferable. Conversely, the higher analytical sensitivity of the rrs assay could be effectively used as a screening test in endemic areas with high disease prevalence, followed by confirmation of the positive results using the lipL32 assay.

  15. Amplification and analysis of promoter region of insulin receptor gene in a patient with leprechaunism associated with severe insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Haruta, T; Imamura, T; Iwanishi, M; Egawa, K; Goji, K; Kobayashi, M

    1995-04-01

    A patient with leprechaunism associated with severe insulin resistance was studied to identify the molecular and genetic basis for insulin resistance. Insulin binding and surface labeling of transformed lymphocytes prepared from the patient showed a significantly decreased insulin receptor number on the cell surface. Southern blot analysis of the insulin receptor gene showed no evidence of large insertions or deletions. Furthermore, direct sequencing of all 22 exons and exon-intron junctions of the insulin receptor gene failed to show any missense mutations, nonsense mutations, or mutations at exon-intron junctions. However, Northern blot analysis indicated significantly decreased insulin receptor mRNA expression in the patient's cells. Moreover, restriction endonuclease digestion of the amplified cDNA suggested that the expression levels of one allele were less efficient than the other. These findings suggested that the regulatory region of the insulin receptor gene might have abnormalities. Therefore, we examined the 5' flanking region of the insulin receptor gene. Southern blot analysis showed no major deletions or insertions between positions -1,823 and -2 relative to the translation initiation site. A 5' flanking region of the insulin receptor gene spanning positions -881 approximately +7 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and introduced into a reporter plasmid carrying the human growth hormone (hGH) gene. The nucleotide sequence of the amplified fragment showed two polymorphic sites at positions -603 and -500 in the patient, as well as in normal subjects. No other abnormal sequence was found in the patient. Promoter activity measured by hGH expression in transfected mouse L cells was not influenced by the polymorphism at position -603 located in a cluster of GC boxes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. PCR amplification of RoTat 1.2 VSG gene in Trypanosoma evansi isolates in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ngaira, J M; Njagi, E N M; Ngeranwa, J J N; Olembo, N K

    2004-02-26

    A direct card agglutination test for Trypanosoma evansi, CATT/T. evansi based on the predominant variable antigen-type (pVAT) RoTat 1.2 was evaluated previously in the field in Isiolo District, Kenya. Sixteen out of 51 (31.4%) parasitologically positive camels were negative by the antibody detection test. In the present study, trypanosomes isolated from the camels were analysed in an attempt to determine the cause of the false negative results of CATT/T. evansi. A total of 20 field isolates comprised 16 stocks from camels that were negative by CATT/T. evansi, and 4 from CATT/T. evansi-positive camels. In addition, 15 known T. evansi and four T. brucei were used as reference. Purified DNA samples were tested using an established RoTat 1.2-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that yields a 488 bp product for the specific detection of T. evansi. Antibodies to RoTat 1.2 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) were used in Western blotting to detect RoTat 1.2 VSG linear epitopes. Results of PCR and Western blot showed that the 16 stocks isolated from CATT/T. evansi-negative camels fell into three groups. In Group 1, both the RoTat 1.2 VSG gene and the VSG were absent in three stocks. In five trypanosome stocks in Group 2, the RoTat 1.2 VSG gene was detected, but Western blot was negative indicating absence of the expressed VSG. Five other stocks containing the RoTat 1.2 VSG gene were also in this group. The RoTat 1.2 VSG gene was detected and Western blot was positive in all four trypanosome stocks in Group 3. All four stocks from CATT/T. evansi-positive camels contained the RoTat 1.2 VSG gene and the expressed VSG. The reference T. evansi KETRI 2479 lacked the RoTat 1.2 VSG gene and there was no immune reactivity detected by Western blot. The rest of the reference T. evansi stocks examined contained the RoTat 1.2 VSG gene. All the four T. brucei samples examined were negative by PCR and Western blot. In conclusion, this study showed that the RoTat 1.2 VSG gene was absent

  17. Growth Regulation via Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-4 and -2 in Association with Mutant K-ras in Lung Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hanako; Yazawa, Takuya; Suzuki, Takehisa; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Okudela, Koji; Ikeda, Masaichi; Hamada, Kenji; Yamada-Okabe, Hisafumi; Yao, Masayuki; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Takahashi, Takashi; Kamma, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    Gain-of-function point mutations in K-ras affect early events in pulmonary bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. We investigated altered mRNA expression on K-Ras activation in human peripheral lung epithelial cells (HPL1A) using oligonucleotide microarrays. Mutated K-Ras stably expressed in HPL1A accelerated cell growth and induced the expression of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein (IGFBP)-4 and IGFBP-2, which modulate cell growth via IGF. Other lung epithelial cell lines (NHBE and HPL1D) revealed the same phenomena as HPL1A by mutated K-ras transgene. Lung cancer cell growth was also accelerated by mutated K-ras gene transduction, whereas IGFBP-4/2 induction was weaker compared with mutated K-Ras-expressing lung epithelial cells. To understand the differences in IGFBP-4/2 inducibility via K-Ras-activated signaling between nonneoplastic lung epithelia and lung carcinoma, we addressed the mechanisms of IGFBP-4/2 transcriptional activation. Our results revealed that Egr-1, which is induced on activation of Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, is crucial for transactivation of IGFBP-4/2. Furthermore, IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-2 promoters were often hypermethylated in lung carcinoma, yielding low basal expression/weak induction of IGFBP-4/2. These findings suggest that continuous K-Ras activation accelerates cell growth and evokes a feedback system through IGFBP-4/2 to prevent excessive growth. Moreover, this growth regulation is disrupted in lung cancers because of promoter hypermethylation of IGFBP-4/2 genes. PMID:17071580

  18. An integrative approach unveils FOSL1 as an oncogene vulnerability in KRAS-driven lung and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo, Adrian; Perurena, Naiara; Guruceaga, Elisabet; Mazur, Pawel K.; Martinez-Canarias, Susana; Zandueta, Carolina; Valencia, Karmele; Arricibita, Andrea; Gwinn, Dana; Sayles, Leanne C.; Chuang, Chen-Hua; Guembe, Laura; Bailey, Peter; Chang, David K.; Biankin, Andrew; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Andersen, Jesper B.; Khatri, Purvesh; Bozec, Aline; Sweet-Cordero, E. Alejandro; Sage, Julien; Lecanda, Fernando; Vicent, Silve

    2017-01-01

    KRAS mutated tumours represent a large fraction of human cancers, but the vast majority remains refractory to current clinical therapies. Thus, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms triggered by KRAS oncogene may yield alternative therapeutic strategies. Here we report the identification of a common transcriptional signature across mutant KRAS cancers of distinct tissue origin that includes the transcription factor FOSL1. High FOSL1 expression identifies mutant KRAS lung and pancreatic cancer patients with the worst survival outcome. Furthermore, FOSL1 genetic inhibition is detrimental to both KRAS-driven tumour types. Mechanistically, FOSL1 links the KRAS oncogene to components of the mitotic machinery, a pathway previously postulated to function orthogonally to oncogenic KRAS. FOSL1 targets include AURKA, whose inhibition impairs viability of mutant KRAS cells. Lastly, combination of AURKA and MEK inhibitors induces a deleterious effect on mutant KRAS cells. Our findings unveil KRAS downstream effectors that provide opportunities to treat KRAS-driven cancers. PMID:28220783

  19. Gene Amplification by PCR and Subcloning into a GFP-Fusion Plasmid Expression Vector as a Molecular Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornhorst, Joshua A.; Deibel, Michael A.; Mulnix, Amy B.

    2004-01-01

    A novel experimental sequence for the advanced undergraduate laboratory course has been developed at Earlham College. Utilizing recent improvements in molecular techniques for a time-sensitive environment, undergraduates were able to create a chimera of a selected gene and green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a bacterial expression plasmid over the…

  20. KRAS insertion mutations are oncogenic and exhibit distinct functional properties

    PubMed Central

    White, Yasmine; Bagchi, Aditi; Van Ziffle, Jessica; Inguva, Anagha; Bollag, Gideon; Zhang, Chao; Carias, Heidi; Dickens, David; Loh, Mignon; Shannon, Kevin; Firestone, Ari J.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS mutations introduce discrete amino acid substitutions that reduce intrinsic Ras GTPase activity and confer resistance to GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Here we discover a partial duplication of the switch 2 domain of K-Ras encoding a tandem repeat of amino acids G60_A66dup in a child with an atypical myeloproliferative neoplasm. K-Ras proteins containing this tandem duplication or a similar five amino acid E62_A66dup mutation identified in lung and colon cancers transform the growth of primary myeloid progenitors and of Ba/F3 cells. Recombinant K-RasG60_A66dup and K-RasE62_A66dup proteins display reduced intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rates, accumulate in the GTP-bound conformation and are resistant to GAP-mediated GTP hydrolysis. Remarkably, K-Ras proteins with switch 2 insertions are impaired for PI3 kinase binding and Akt activation, and are hypersensitive to MEK inhibition. These studies illuminate a new class of oncogenic KRAS mutations and reveal unexpected plasticity in oncogenic Ras proteins that has diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:26854029

  1. Gene amplification and immunohistochemical expression of ERBB2 and EGFR in cervical carcinogenesis. Correlation with cell-cycle markers and HPV presence.

    PubMed

    Conesa-Zamora, Pablo; Torres-Moreno, Daniel; Isaac, María A; Pérez-Guillermo, Miguel

    2013-10-01

    Although the members of the epidermal growth factor receptor family ERBB2 and EGFR are important therapeutic targets in the treatment of malignant neoplasias, little is known about their role in cervical carcinogenesis. Our objective was to evaluate the dysfunction of ERBB2 and EGFR at the gene copy number and protein expression level in neoplastic lesions of the uterine cervix with the aim of obtaining information about its role in cervical carcinogenesis and their possible use as therapeutic targets in these diseases. We studied gene amplification and protein expression of ERBB2 and EGFR and their relationship with Ki67, p16 and p53 and HPV presence in 22 normal/benign (N/B) cervices, 20 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 70 high-grade SILs (HSILs) and 32 invasive squamous cervical carcinomas (ISCCs). No cases showed selective amplification of ERBB2 or EGFR but corresponding chromosome-specific probes displayed chromosome 17 and 7 polyploidy associated with the grade of the lesion (p<0.0001 and p=0.004, respectively) and with the positive expression of Ki67 and p16 (p<0.01). Concurrent polyploidy for both chromosomes was statistically related (p<0.0001). ERBB2 immunohistochemical expression was not observed in any of the study cases except for one ISCC but EGFR was associated with higher-grade lesions (N/B plus LSIL 21.4% vs. HSIL plus ISCC 45.5%; p=0.007). No association was observed between EGFR expression and that of cell-cycle markers or HPV presence. Increased copy number of EGFR and ERBB2 is due to polyploidy of 7 and 17 chromosomes, this being a phenomenon associated with lesion severity and with an increase in the expression of cell-cycle markers. EGFR, but not ERBB2, is expressed in precursor lesions of squamous cervical neoplasia and is related to the neoplastic progression but not to proliferation marker expression and therefore ERBB2 and this calls into question the usefulness of ERBB2 as a therapeutic target.

  2. New nitrogen-fixing microorganisms detected in oligotrophic oceans by amplification of nitrogenase (nifH) genes

    SciTech Connect

    Zehr, J.P.; Mellon, M.T.; Zani, S.

    1998-09-01

    Oligotrophic oceanic waters of the central ocean gyres typically have extremely low dissolved fixed inorganic nitrogen concentrations, but few nitrogen-fixing microorganisms from the oceanic environment have been cultivated. Nitrogenase gene (nifH) sequences amplified directly from oceanic waters showed that the open ocean contains more diverse diazotrophic microbial populations and more diverse habitats for nitrogen fixers than previously observed by classical microbiological techniques. Nitrogenase genes derived from unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria, as well as from the {alpha} and {gamma} subdivisions of the class Proteobacteria, were found in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. nifH sequences that cluster phylogenetically with sequences from sulfate reducers or clostridia were found associated with planktonic crustaceans. Nitrogenase sequence types obtained from invertebrates represented phylotypes distinct from the phylotypes detected in the picoplankton size fraction. The results indicate that there are in the oceanic environment several distinct potentially nitrogen-fixing microbial assemblages that include representatives of diverse phylotypes.

  3. New nitrogen-fixing microorganisms detected in oligotrophic oceans by amplification of Nitrogenase (nifH) genes.

    PubMed

    Zehr, J P; Mellon, M T; Zani, S

    1998-09-01

    Oligotrophic oceanic waters of the central ocean gyres typically have extremely low dissolved fixed inorganic nitrogen concentrations, but few nitrogen-fixing microorganisms from the oceanic environment have been cultivated. Nitrogenase gene (nifH) sequences amplified directly from oceanic waters showed that the open ocean contains more diverse diazotrophic microbial populations and more diverse habitats for nitrogen fixers than previously observed by classical microbiological techniques. Nitrogenase genes derived from unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria, as well as from the alpha and gamma subdivisions of the class Proteobacteria, were found in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. nifH sequences that cluster phylogenetically with sequences from sulfate reducers or clostridia were found associated with planktonic crustaceans. Nitrogenase sequence types obtained from invertebrates represented phylotypes distinct from the phylotypes detected in the picoplankton size fraction. The results indicate that there are in the oceanic environment several distinct potentially nitrogen-fixing microbial assemblages that include representatives of diverse phylotypes.

  4. Multiplex PCR-based simultaneous amplification of selectable marker and reporter genes for the screening of genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Gurinder Jit; Chhabra, Rashmi; Singh, Monika

    2009-06-24

    The development and commercialization of genetically modified (GM) crops with enhanced insect and herbicide resistance, abiotic stress tolerance, and improved nutritional quality has expanded dramatically. Notwithstanding the huge potential benefits of GM crops, the perceived environmental risks associated with these crops need to be addressed in proper perspective. One critical concern is the adventitious presence or unintentional mixing of GM seed in non-GM seed lots, which can seriously affect the global seed market. It would therefore be necessary though a challenging task to develop reliable, efficient, and economical assays for GM detection, identification, and quantification in non-GM seed lots. This can be systematically undertaken by preliminary screening for control elements and selectable or scorable (reporter) marker genes. In this study, simplex and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays individually as well as simultaneously amplifying the commonly used selectable marker genes, i.e., aadA, bar, hpt, nptII, pat encoding, respectively, for aminoglycoside-3'-adenyltransferase, Streptococcus viridochromogenes phosphinothricin-N-acetyltransferase, hygromycin phosphotransferase, neomycin phosphotransferase, Streptococcus hygroscopicus phosphinothricin-N-acetyltransferase, and a reporter gene uidA encoding beta-d-glucuronidase, were developed as a reliable tool for qualitative screening of GM crops. The efficiency of the assays was also standardized in the test samples prepared by artificial mixing of transgenic seed samples in different proportions. The developed multiplex PCR assays will be useful in verifying the GM status of a sample irrespective of the crop and GM trait.

  5. DNA deamination enables direct PCR amplification of the cystatin B (CSTB) gene-associated dodecamer repeat expansion in myoclonus epilepsy type Unverricht-Lundborg.

    PubMed

    Weinhaeusel, Andreas; Morris, Michael A; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Haas, Oskar A

    2003-11-01

    The Unverricht-Lundborg type of progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is caused by the dysfunction of the cystatin B (CSTB) gene product. In the vast majority of affected cases, mRNA transcription is impaired by a biallelic expansion of a dodecamer repeat within the 5'-untranslated region of the respective gene. Since this minisatellite contains exclusively G and C nucleotides, direct PCR analysis of allele expansion is extremely difficult and error prone. To circumvent these problems, we have developed a PCR assay that is based on the deamination of the DNA prior to amplification. We have developed a method based on PCR after DNA deamination of the GC-rich repeat region, which improves the PCR condition to such an extent that we were not only able to reliably amplify expanded alleles of affected individuals (homozygotes and compound heterozygotes), but also the two alleles of full mutation carriers, whose analysis is particularly difficult because of PCR bias and heteroduplex formation between the two alleles. We used promoter- and repeat-specific primer combinations to investigate whether dodecamer repeat expansion concurs with de novo methylation of the CSTB gene promoter in a similar fashion to other repeat expansion syndromes. We confirmed previous evidence obtained by HpaII digestion and Southern blot analysis that both the promoter and the repeat regions are unmethylated, in both healthy and affected individuals. Thus, in contrast to certain trinucleotide repeat expansion-associated diseases, such as fragile X syndrome (FRAXA) and myotonic dystrophy, methylation analyses can not be utilized for indirect diagnostic testing.

  6. Prevalence and coexistence of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, NRAS, TP53, and APC mutations in Indian colorectal cancer patients: Next-generation sequencing-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Jauhri, Mayank; Bhatnagar, Akanksha; Gupta, Satish; Bp, Manasa; Minhas, Sachin; Shokeen, Yogender; Aggarwal, Shyam

    2017-02-01

    Colorectal cancer incidences are on a rise in India. In this study, we have analyzed the mutation frequencies of six potential biomarkers, their coexistence, association with clinicopathological characteristics, and tumor location in Indian colorectal cancer patients. Next-generation sequencing was performed to identify mutations in the six potential biomarker genes using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of 112 colorectal cancer patients. The mutation frequency observed in KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, NRAS, TP53, and APC was 35.7%, 7.1%, 16.1%, 6.3%, 39.3%, and 29.5%, respectively. The significant associations of mutations were KRAS with age less than 60 years (p = 0.041), PIK3CA with males (p = 0.032), tumor stage I-II (p = 0.013), lack of metastasis in lymph nodes (p = 0.040), NRAS with rectum (p = 0.002), and APC with T2 stage of tumor growth (p = 0.013). No single patient harbored mutations in these six genes or any five genes simultaneously. Significance was noted in coexistence of KRAS with APC (p = 0.024) and mutual exclusion of KRAS with BRAF (p = 0.029). PIK3CA exon 9 was observed to be more frequently associated with KRAS mutations than PIK3CA exon 20 (p = 0.072). NRAS mutations were mutually exclusive with BRAF and PIK3CA mutations. As per our knowledge, this is the first next-generation sequencing-based biomarker study in Indian colorectal cancer patients. Frequent coexistence of gene mutations in pairs and triplets suggests that synergistic effect of overlapping mutations might further trigger the disease. In addition, infrequent coexistence of multiple gene mutations hints toward different signaling pathways for colorectal cancer tumorigenesis.

  7. Prevalence of G-to-T transversions among K-ras oncogene mutations in human colorectal tumors in Yugoslavia.

    PubMed

    Urosević, N; Krtolica, K; Skaro-Milić, A; Knezević-Usaj, S; Dujić, A

    1993-05-08

    Human colorectal carcinoma tissue sampled from 37 patients, routinely graded into Dukes' stages A, B and C and histologically examined for the level of differentiation, were analyzed for the presence of point mutations in the K-ras oncogene. Seventeen cases out of the 37 analyzed were found to have a mutation in either the 12th or the 13th codon of the K-ras gene, giving an overall frequency of mutation of 46%. The incidence of mutations in Dukes' stages A, B and C was 33, 46 and 58% respectively. Although the frequency of mutation appears to be similar to that reported for the USA population, the spectrum of point mutations in codons 12 and 13 of the K-ras gene in the Yugoslav population appears to differ significantly. G-to-T transversions make up 77% of all mutations present, with the distribution as follows: 18% at the first base and 59% at the second base of codons 12 and 13. G-to-A transitions at the second base is the only other mutation identified, occurring mainly in codon 13 in colorectal tumors of all 3 stages.

  8. Isolation and characterisation of the human lung NK-2 receptor gene using rapid amplification of cDNA ends.

    PubMed

    Graham, A; Hopkins, B; Powell, S J; Danks, P; Briggs, I

    1991-05-31

    Functional cDNA clones for human NK-2 receptor were isolated from human lung RNA using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based method (RACE-PCR). In this method the cDNA was isolated as 5' end and 3'-end fragments; the entire cDNA was obtained by RNA-PCR. The sequence derived was 398 amino acids in length encoding an open-reading frame that was highly homologous to both the bovine and rat NK-2 receptor. The entire human cDNA sequence was cloned into a mammalian expression vector and mRNA was synthesised by in vitro transcription. Applications of tachykinins caused membrane current responses in Xenopus oocytes injected with the in vitro synthesised mRNA. The most potent of the three tachykinin peptides tested was neurokinin A. We have screened a human cosmid library and isolated a clone which contains the entire NK-2 receptor gene. The gene contains five exons and we have determined the complete sequence of the exons and the intron-exon junctions.

  9. [The amplification of CYP9 genes as a preadaptation of the black garden ant Lasius niger to urban conditions].

    PubMed

    Konorov, E A; Nikitin, M A

    2015-01-01

    Ants are one of the most ancient and successful groups of eusocial animals and they are spread all over the world. The nucleotide sequences of the genomes of eight ant species were determined by the year 2014. In these species, the mechanisms of ecological success, cast differentiation, and social communication were studied at genomic level. In ants, the genes of the cytochromes P450 involved in metabolism of xenobiotics and various endogenic substances are amplified. Although the substrates for several cytochrome P450 families have been identified, the functions of the ninth family, which is one of the most amplified, remain unknown. The black garden ant Lasius niger is one of the spices that have successfully adapted to urban conditions. To study the mechanisms of adaptation, we have read and annotated the nucleotide sequence of the L. niger genome; we have predicted the functions of the CYP9 genes using virtual screening. The obtained data allow us to suggest that cytochromes P450 are involved in the metabolism of various xenobiotics such as phytotoxins, mycotoxins, and insecticides. We assume that the functional divergence of the new CYP9 duplications was initially aimed at developing resistance to various mycotoxins, in particular to those produced by Fusarium fungi and, subsequently, to other xenobiotics.

  10. Inhibition of Acid Sphingomyelinase Depletes Cellular Phosphatidylserine and Mislocalizes K-Ras from the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Zhou, Yong; Maekawa, Masashi; Ma, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras must localize to the plasma membrane for biological activity; thus, preventing plasma membrane interaction blocks K-Ras signal output. Here we show that inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) mislocalizes both the K-Ras isoforms K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B from the plasma membrane to the endomembrane and inhibits their nanoclustering. We found that fendiline, a potent ASM inhibitor, reduces the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and cholesterol content of the inner plasma membrane. These lipid changes are causative because supplementation of fendiline-treated cells with exogenous PtdSer rapidly restores K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding, nanoclustering, and signal output. Conversely, supplementation with exogenous cholesterol restores K-Ras4A but not K-Ras4B nanoclustering. These experiments reveal different operational pools of PtdSer on the plasma membrane. Inhibition of ASM elevates cellular sphingomyelin and reduces cellular ceramide levels. Concordantly, delivery of recombinant ASM or exogenous ceramide to fendiline-treated cells rapidly relocalizes K-Ras4B and PtdSer to the plasma membrane. K-Ras4B mislocalization is also recapitulated in ASM-deficient Neimann-Pick type A and B fibroblasts. This study identifies sphingomyelin metabolism as an indirect regulator of K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B signaling through the control of PtdSer plasma membrane content. It also demonstrates the critical and selective importance of PtdSer to K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding and nanoscale spatial organization. PMID:26572827

  11. Inhibition of Acid Sphingomyelinase Depletes Cellular Phosphatidylserine and Mislocalizes K-Ras from the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Zhou, Yong; Maekawa, Masashi; Ma, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei; Fairn, Gregory D; Hancock, John F

    2015-11-16

    K-Ras must localize to the plasma membrane for biological activity; thus, preventing plasma membrane interaction blocks K-Ras signal output. Here we show that inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) mislocalizes both the K-Ras isoforms K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B from the plasma membrane to the endomembrane and inhibits their nanoclustering. We found that fendiline, a potent ASM inhibitor, reduces the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and cholesterol content of the inner plasma membrane. These lipid changes are causative because supplementation of fendiline-treated cells with exogenous PtdSer rapidly restores K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding, nanoclustering, and signal output. Conversely, supplementation with exogenous cholesterol restores K-Ras4A but not K-Ras4B nanoclustering. These experiments reveal different operational pools of PtdSer on the plasma membrane. Inhibition of ASM elevates cellular sphingomyelin and reduces cellular ceramide levels. Concordantly, delivery of recombinant ASM or exogenous ceramide to fendiline-treated cells rapidly relocalizes K-Ras4B and PtdSer to the plasma membrane. K-Ras4B mislocalization is also recapitulated in ASM-deficient Neimann-Pick type A and B fibroblasts. This study identifies sphingomyelin metabolism as an indirect regulator of K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B signaling through the control of PtdSer plasma membrane content. It also demonstrates the critical and selective importance of PtdSer to K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding and nanoscale spatial organization.

  12. Early recognition of lung cancer by integrin targeted imaging in K-ras mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ermolayev, Vladimir; Mohajerani, Pouyan; Ale, Angelique; Sarantopoulos, Athanasios; Aichler, Michaela; Kayser, Gian; Walch, Axel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2015-09-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer is characterized by slow progression and high heterogeneity of tumors. Integrins play an important role in lung cancer development and metastasis and were suggested as a tumor marker; however their role in anticancer therapy remains controversial. In this work, we demonstrate the potential of integrin-targeted imaging to recognize early lesions in transgenic mouse model of lung cancer based on spontaneous introduction of mutated human gene bearing K-ras mutation. We conducted ex vivo and fluorescence molecular tomography-X-ray computed tomography (FMT-XCT) in vivo imaging and analysis for specific targeting of early lung lesions and tumors in rodent preclinical model for lung cancer. The lesions and tumors were characterized by histology, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry using a panel of cancer markers. Ex vivo, the integrin-targeted fluorescent signal significantly differed between wild type lung tissue and K-ras pulmonary lesions (PL) at all ages studied. The panel of immunofluorescence experiments demonstrated that PL, which only partially show cancer cell features were detected by αvβ3-integrin targeted imaging. Human patient material analysis confirmed the specificity of target localization in different lung cancer types. Most importantly, small tumors in the lungs of 4-week-old animals could be noninvasively detected in vivo on the fluorescence channel of FMT-XCT. Our findings demonstrated αvβ3-integrin targeted fluorescent imaging to specifically detect premalignant pleural lesions in K-ras mice. Integrin targeted imaging may find application areas in preclinical research and clinical practice, such as early lung cancer diagnostics, intraoperative assistance or therapy monitoring.

  13. Dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of colorectal cancer with specific mutations in KRAS and APC.

    PubMed

    Hogervorst, Janneke G F; de Bruijn-Geraets, Daisy; Schouten, Leo J; van Engeland, Manon; de Kok, Theo M C M; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2014-05-01

    Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is present in heat-treated carbohydrate-rich foods. Epidemiological studies have not shown a clear association between acrylamide intake and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. This may be due to the molecular heterogeneity in colorectal tumors, which was not taken into consideration before. Since the acrylamide metabolite glycidamide induces specific DNA mutations in rodents, we investigated whether acrylamide is associated with CRC risk characterized by mutations in Kirsten-ras (KRAS) and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC); key genes in colorectal carcinogenesis. This case-cohort analysis, within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, was based on 7.3 years of follow-up. Acrylamide intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Mutation analysis of codons 1286-1520 in exon 15 in APC and codons 12 and 13 in exon 1 in KRAS was performed on tumor tissue of 733 cases. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards analysis. Among men, acrylamide intake was statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of particularly tumors with an activating KRAS mutation {HR fourth versus first quartile: 2.12 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16-3.87], P trend: 0.01}. Among women, acrylamide intake was statistically significantly associated with a decreased risk of particularly tumors with a truncating APC mutation (fourth versus first quartile: 0.47 (95% CI: 0.23-0.94), P trend: 0.02), but only in the highest quartile of intake. This is the first study to show that acrylamide might be associated with CRC with specific somatic mutations, differentially in men and women. More research is needed to corroborate or refute these findings.

  14. Frequency and Clinical Implication of the R450H Mutation in the Thyrotropin Receptor Gene in the Japanese Population Detected by Smart Amplification Process 2

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, Yoshimaro; Aoki, Tomoyuki; Morimura, Tadashi; Araki, Osamu; Kimura, Takao; Ogiwara, Takayuki; Kotajima, Nobuo; Yanagawa, Masumi; Murakami, Masami

    2014-01-01

    In Japanese pediatric patients with thyrotropin (TSH) resistance, the R450H mutation in TSH receptor gene (TSHR) is occasionally observed. We studied the frequency and clinical implication of the R450H mutation in TSHR in the general population of Japanese adults using smart amplification process 2 (SmartAmp2). We designed SmartAmp2 primer sets to detect this mutation using a drop of whole blood. We analyzed thyroid function, antithyroid antibodies, and this mutation in 429 Japanese participants who had not been found to have thyroid disease. Two cases without antithyroid antibodies were heterozygous for the R450H mutation in TSHR. Thus, the prevalence of this mutation was 0.47% in the general population and 0.63% among those without antithyroid antibodies. Their serum TSH concentrations were higher than the average TSH concentration not only in subjects without antithyroid antibodies but also in those with antithyroid antibodies. The R450H mutation in TSHR is relatively common in the Japanese population and potentially affects thyroid function. The present study demonstrates that the SmartAmp2 method is useful to detect the R450H mutation in TSHR, which is one of the common causes of TSH resistance in the Japanese population. PMID:24895636

  15. Development and Diagnostic Evaluation of Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Using a New Gene Target for Rapid Detection of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Somaye; Alvandi, Amirhooshang; Pajavand, Hamid; Navabi, Jafar; Najafi, Farid; Abiri, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori cause chronic gastritis and subsequent diseases like gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma. Current methods for detecting H. pylori have several disadvantages and it is of utmost importance to develop a simple, quick, accurate, and cost-effective diagnostic test. Objectives The aim of this study was to set up and evaluate a diagnostic value of loop- mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for detecting H. pylori. Patients and Methods The analytical sensitivity values (limit of detection) of LAMP and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were determined using serial dilutions of H. pylori DNA. Analytical specificity of the methods using new designed primers targeted ureC gene was also determined. Results The detection limits of the LAMP and PCR assay were similar and were 10 fg of pure DNA of H. pylori, which is equal to 6 copy numbers of H. pylori genome. Analytical specificity of the tests was 100% because the tests were positive only with H. pylori DNA. Conclusions The analytical sensitivity of LAMP and PCR methods, using the designed primers, was 8 times more than any other reported methods. The designed methods are specific and sensitive for detection of H. pylori in different clinical and environmental samples. PMID:27540449

  16. A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay targeting 16S rRNA gene for rapid detection of Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Ning, Changshen; Wang, Jinhong; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiaoxing; Cui, Yanyan; Yan, Yaqun; Wang, Rongjun; Jian, Fuchun; Zhang, Longxian

    2017-01-24

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is a zoonotic pathogen and the causative agent of human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) in humans and tick-borne fever in various kinds of animals. In the present study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for rapid detection of A. phagocytophilum was developed using primers specific to 16S rRNA gene of this organism. The LAMP assay was performed at 65 C for 60 min and terminated at 80 C for 10 min. The optimal reaction conditions, under which no cross-reaction was observed with other closely related tick borne parasites (Anaplasma bovis, Anaplasma ovis, Theileria luwenshuni, Babesia motasi and Schistosoma japonicum) was established. The assay exhibited much higher sensitivity when compared with conventional PCR (1 copy vs 1000 copies). To evaluate the applicability of the LAMP assay, 94 sheep field blood samples were analyzed for A. phagocytophilum infection using LAMP, nested PCR and conventional PCR assay at the same time. A positive LAMP result was obtained from 53 of the 94 samples (56.4%), while only 12 (12.8%) and 3 (3.2%) were tested positive by nested PCR and conventional PCR, respectively. In conclusion, this LAMP assay is a specific, sensitive, and rapid method for the detection of A. phagocytophilum in sheep.

  17. Deregulated miRNAs in Hereditary Breast Cancer Revealed a Role for miR-30c in Regulating KRAS Oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Tanic, Miljana; Yanowsky, Kira; Rodriguez-Antona, Cristina; Andrés, Raquel; Márquez-Rodas, Iván; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Martinez-Delgado, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant miRNA expression has been previously established in breast cancer and has clinical relevance. However, no studies so far have defined miRNAs deregulated in hereditary breast tumors. In this study we investigated the role of miRNAs in hereditary breast tumors comparing with normal breast tissue. Global miRNA expression profiling using Exiqon microarrays was performed on 22 hereditary breast tumors and 15 non-tumoral breast tissues. We identified 19 miRNAs differentially expressed, most of them down-regulated in tumors. An important proportion of deregulated miRNAs in hereditary tumors were previously identified commonly deregulated in sporadic breast tumors. Under-expression of these miRNAs was validated by qRT-PCR in additional 18 sporadic breast tumors and their normal breast tissue counterparts. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed that deregulated miRNAs collectively targeted a number of genes belonging to signaling pathways such as MAPK, ErbB, mTOR, and those regulating cell motility or adhesion. In silico prediction detected KRAS oncogene as target of several deregulated miRNAs. In particular, we experimentally validated KRAS as a miR-30c target. Luciferase assays confirmed that miR-30c binds the 3′UTR of KRAS transcripts and expression of pre-miR-30c down-regulated KRAS mRNA and protein. Furthermore, miR-30c overexpression inhibited proliferation of breast cancer cells. Our results identify miRNAs associated to hereditary breast cancer, as well as miRNAs commonly miss-expressed in hereditary and sporadic tumors, suggesting common underlying mechanisms of tumor progression. In addition, we provide evidence that KRAS is a target of miR-30c, and that this miRNA suppresses breast cancer cell growth potentially through inhibition of KRAS signaling. PMID:22701724

  18. K-ras activation occurs frequently in mucinous adenocarcinomas and rarely in other common epithelial tumors of the human ovary.

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, T.; Weghorst, C. M.; Inoue, M.; Tanizawa, O.; Rice, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    To explore the role of mutational activation of members of the ras family of cellular protooncogenes in the development of human ovarian neoplasms, a series of 37 ovarian tumors from Japanese patients was studied. These included 30 common epithelial tumors (1 mucinous tumor of borderline malignancy, 7 mucinous adenocarcinomas, and 22 nonmucinous carcinomas: 10 serous, 3 clear cell, 8 endometrioid, and 1 undifferentiated), 5 tumors of germ cell origin, and 2 sex cord/stromal cell tumors. Polymerase chain reaction was performed from selected areas of deparaffinized sections of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue, and the presence of activating point mutations in codons 12, 13, and 61 of the H-, N-, and K-ras genes was probed by dot-blot hybridization analysis with mutation specific oligonucleotides. Mutations in K-ras were also looked for by direct genomic sequencing. The overall frequency of ras gene mutations was 10/37 (27%). Mutations were detected only in K-ras, and were found in most of the mucinous tumors, including the one such tumor of borderline malignancy (6/8; 75%). In one mucinous adenocarcinoma, two mutations were detected in paraffin-embedded material that had not previously been found in high molecular weight DNA isolated from frozen tissue from the same case. K-ras mutations occurred significantly more frequently in mucinous tumors (6/8, 75%) than in serous carcinomas (2/10, 20%; P = 0.031) or in all nonmucinous types of epithelial ovarian tumors combined (3/22, 14%; P = 0.0031). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1656759

  19. Role of the RS1 sequence of the cholera vibrio in amplification of the segment of plasmid DNA carrying the gene of resistance to tetracycline and the genes of cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Fil'kova, S.L.; Il'ina, T.S.; Gintsburg, A.L.; Yanishevskii, N.V.; Smirnov, G.B.

    1988-11-01

    The hybrid plasmid pCO107, representing cointegrate 14(2)-5(2) of two plasmids, an F-derivative (pOX38) and a PBR322-derivative (pCT105) with an RS1 sequence of the cholera vibrio cloned in its makeup, contains two copes of RS1 at the sites of union of the two plasmids. Using a tetracycline resistance marker (Tc/sup R/) of the plasmid pCT105, clones were isolated which have an elevated level of resistance to tetracycline (an increase of from 4- to 30-fold). Using restriction analysis and the Southern blot method of hybridization it was shown that the increase in the level of resistance of tetracycline is associated with the amplification of pCT105 portion of the cointegrate, and that the process of amplification is governed by the presence of direct repeats of the RS1 sequence at its ends. The increase in the number of copies of the pCT105 segment, which contains in its composition the genes of cholera toxin (vct), is accompanied by an increase in toxin production.

  20. Molecular and Functional Characteristics of Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells Transformed by KrasG12D and loss of Pten in a Mouse Model in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, Lisa K.; Fan, Heng-Yu; Liu, Zhilin; White, Lisa D.; Marshall, Alexandra; Gunaratne, Preethi; Anderson, Matthew L.; Creighton, Chad J.; Xin, Li; Deavers, Michael; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Richards, JoAnne S.

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a complex and deadly disease that remains difficult to detect at an early curable stage. Furthermore, although some oncogenic (Kras, Pten/PI3K and Trp53) pathways that are frequently mutated, deleted or amplified in ovarian cancer are known, how these pathways initiate and drive specific morphological phenotypes and tumor outcomes remain unclear. We recently generated Pten fl/fl; KrasG12D;Amhr2-Cre mice to disrupt the Pten gene and express a stable mutant form of KrasG12D in ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells. Based on histopathologic criteria, the mutant mice developed low-grade ovarian serous papillary adenocarcinomas at an early age and with 100% penetrance. This highly reproducible phenotype provides the first mouse model in which to study this ovarian cancer subtype. OSE cells isolated from ovaries of mutant mice at 5 and 10 weeks of age exhibit temporal changes in the expression of specific Mullerian epithelial marker genes, grow in soft agar and develop ectopic invasive tumors in recipient mice, indicating that the cells are transformed. Gene profiling identified specific mRNAs and microRNAs differentially expressed in purified OSE cells derived from tumors of the mutant mice compared to WT OSE cells. Mapping of transcripts or genes between the mouse OSE mutant datasets, the Kras signature from human cancer cell lines and the human ovarian tumor array datasets, documented significant overlap, indicating that KRAS is a key driver of OSE transformation in this context. Two key hallmarks of the mutant OSE cells in these mice are the elevated expression of the tumor suppressorsTrp53 (p53) and its microRNA target, miR-34a-c. We propose that elevated TRP53 and miR-34a-c may exert negatively regulatory effects that reduce the proliferative potential of OSE cells leading to the low-grade serous adenocarcinoma phenotype. PMID:21423204

  1. Development and evaluation of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for detection of Ehrlichia canis DNA in naturally infected dogs using the p30 gene.

    PubMed

    Pinhanelli, V C; Costa, P N M; Silva, G; Aguiar, D M; Silva, C M L; Fachin, A L; Marins, M

    2015-12-22

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) is a common tick-borne disease caused by the rickettsial bacterium Ehrlichia canis (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae). In view of the different stages and variable clinical signs of CME, which can overlap with those of other infections, a conclusive diagnosis can more readily be obtained by combining clinical and hematological evaluations with molecular diagnostic methods. In this study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay targeting the p30 gene of E. canis was developed. The assay was developed using DNA extracted from E. canis-infected cultures of the macrophage cell line DH82 and samples from dogs testing positive for E. canis DNA by PCR. The LAMP assay was compared to a p30-based PCR assay, using DNA extracted from EDTA-anticoagulated blood samples of 137 dogs from an endemic region in Brazil. The LAMP assay was sensitive enough to detect a single copy of the target gene, and identified 74 (54.0%) E. canis DNA-positive samples, while the p30 PCR assay detected 50 positive samples (36.5%) among the field samples. Agreement between the two assays was observed in 42 positive and 55 negative samples. However, 32 positive samples that were not detected by the PCR assay were identified by the LAMP assay, while eight samples identified as E. canis-positive by PCR showed negative results in LAMP. The developed E. canis LAMP assay showed the potential to maximize the use of nucleic acid tests in a veterinary clinical laboratory, and to improve the diagnosis of CME.

  2. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR (T-ARMS-PCR) rapidly identified a critical missense mutation (P236T) of bovine ACADVL gene affecting growth traits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sihuan; Dang, Yonglong; Zhang, Qingfeng; Qin, Qiaomei; Lei, Chuzhao; Chen, Hong; Lan, Xianyong

    2015-04-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain (ACADVL), encoding ACADVL protein, targets the inner mitochondrial membrane where it catalyzes the first step of the mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway and plays an important role in body metabolism and oxidation of long chain fatty acid releasing energy. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR (T-ARMS-PCR) is an easy-to-operate, rapid, inexpensive, and exact method for SNP genotyping. Herein, T-ARMS-PCR was carried out to detect a critical missense mutation (AC_000176:g.2885C>A; Pro236Thr) within the ACADVL gene in 644 individuals from two cattle breeds. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the T-ARMS-PCR at this locus, the genotype of the sampled individuals was also identified by PCR-RFLP. The concordance between these two methods was 98.76%. Statistical analysis showed that the bovine ACADVL gene had a significant effect on chest width (P<0.05), chest depth (P<0.05), and hip width (P<0.05) in the Qinchuan breed. The cattle with AA genotype had superior growth traits compared to cattle with AC and/or CC genotypes. The "A" allele had positive effects on growth traits. Therefore, T-ARMS-PCR can replace PCR-RFLP for rapid genotyping of this mutation, which could be used as a DNA marker for selecting individuals with superior growth traits in the Qinchuan breed. These findings contribute to breeding and genetics in beef cattle industry.

  3. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Bartonella bacilliformis in Experimentally Infected Sand Flies by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) of the Pap31 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn; Atkins, Erin H.; Johnson, Richard N.; Grieco, John P.; Ching, Wei Mei; Chao, Chien Chung

    2014-01-01

    Background Carrion' disease, caused by Bartonella bacilliformis, remains truly neglected due to its focal geographical nature. A wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, including asymptomatic bacteremia, and lack of a sensitive diagnostic test can potentially lead to a spread of the disease into non-endemic regions where competent sand fly vectors may be present. A reliable test capable of detecting B. bacilliformis is urgently needed. Our objective is to develop a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay targeting the pap31 gene to detect B. bacilliformis. Methods and Findings The sensitivity of the LAMP was evaluated in comparison to qPCR using plasmid DNA containing the target gene and genomic DNA in the absence and presence of human or sand fly DNA. The detection limit of LAMP was 1 to 10 copies/µL, depending on the sample metrics. No cross-reaction was observed when testing against a panel of various closely related bacteria. The utility of the LAMP was further compared to qPCR by the examination of 74 Lutzomyia longipalpis sand flies artificially fed on blood spiked with B. bacilliformis and harvested at days (D) 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 post feeding. Only 86% of sand flies at D1 and 63% of flies at D3 were positive by qPCR. LAMP was able to detect B. bacilliformis in all those flies confirmed positive by qPCR. However, none of the flies after D3 were positive by either LAMP or qPCR. In addition to demonstrating the sensitivity of the LAMP assay, these results suggest that B. bacilliformis cannot propagate in artificially fed L. longipalpis. Conclusions The LAMP assay is as sensitive as qPCR for the detection of B. bacilliformis and could be useful to support diagnosis of patients in low-resource settings and also to identify B. bacilliformis in the sand fly vector. PMID:25522230

  4. Absolute Quantitation of Met Using Mass Spectrometry for Clinical Application: Assay Precision, Stability, and Correlation with MET Gene Amplification in FFPE Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Catenacci, Daniel V. T.; Liao, Wei-Li; Thyparambil, Sheeno; Henderson, Les; Xu, Peng; Zhao, Lei; Rambo, Brittany; Hart, John; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Bengali, Kathleen; Uzzell, Jamar; Darfler, Marlene; Krizman, David B.; Cecchi, Fabiola; Bottaro, Donald P.; Karrison, Theodore; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Hembrough, Todd; Burrows, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Background Overexpression of Met tyrosine kinase receptor is associated with poor prognosis. Overexpression, and particularly MET amplification, are predictive of response to Met-specific therapy in preclinical models. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues is currently used to select for ‘high Met’ expressing tumors for Met inhibitor trials. IHC suffers from antibody non-specificity, lack of quantitative resolution, and, when quantifying multiple proteins, inefficient use of scarce tissue. Methods After describing the development of the Liquid-Tissue-Selected Reaction Monitoring-mass spectrometry (LT-SRM-MS) Met assay, we evaluated the expression level of Met in 130 FFPE gastroesophageal cancer (GEC) tissues. We assessed the correlation of SRM Met expression to IHC and mean MET gene copy number (GCN)/nucleus or MET/CEP7 ratio by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Proteomic mapping of recombinant Met identified 418TEFTTALQR426 as the optimal SRM peptide. Limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) for this peptide were 150 and 200 amol/µg tumor protein, respectively. The assay demonstrated excellent precision and temporal stability of measurements in serial sections analyzed one year apart. Expression levels of 130 GEC tissues ranged (<150 amol/µg to 4669.5 amol/µg. High correlation was observed between SRM Met expression and both MET GCN and MET/CEP7 ratio as determined by FISH (n = 30; R2 = 0.898). IHC did not correlate well with SRM (n = 44; R2 = 0.537) nor FISH GCN (n = 31; R2 = 0.509). A Met SRM level of ≥1500 amol/µg was 100% sensitive (95% CI 0.69–1) and 100% specific (95% CI 0.92–1) for MET amplification. Conclusions The Met SRM assay measured the absolute Met levels in clinical tissues with high precision. Compared to IHC, SRM provided a quantitative and linear measurement of Met expression, reliably distinguishing between non-amplified and amplified MET

  5. Coexistence of MSI with KRAS mutation is associated with worse prognosis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Yan, Wen-Yue; Xie, Li; Cheng, Lei; Yang, Mi; Li, Li; Shi, Jiong; Liu, Bao-Rui; Qian, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Kristen rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and microsatellite instability (MSI) are prognostic markers of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the clinical value is still not fully understood, when giving the consideration to both the molecular makers. Five hundred fifty-one patients with CRC were retrospectively assessed by determining their clinicopathological features. KRAS mutations were detected by polymerase chain reaction. MSI, a defect in the mismatch repair (MMR) system, was detected by immunohistochemistry. The prognostic value of KRAS in combination with MSI was studied. Among 551 CRC patients, mutations in KRAS codon 12 and KRAS codon 13 were detected in 34.5% and 10.5% of patients, respectively. Four hundred one tumors were randomly selected to detect for MMR proteins expression. In this analysis, 30 (7.5%) tumors that had at least 1 MMR protein loss were defined as MMR protein-deficient (MMR-D), and the remaining tumors were classed as MMR protein-intact (MMR-I). According to KRAS mutation and MSI status, CRC was classified into 4 groups: Group 1, KRAS-mutated and MMR-I; Group 2, KRAS-mutated and MMR-D; Group 3, KRAS wild and MMR-I; and Group 4, KRAS wild and MMR-D. We found that patients in Group4 had the best prognosis. In conclusion, combination status of KRAS and MSI status may be used as a prognostic biomarker for CRC patient, if validated by larger studies. PMID:27977612

  6. Detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from clinical and environmental samples by amplification of the exotoxin A gene using PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, A A; Cerniglia, C E

    1994-01-01

    PCR was used to detect Pseudomonas aeruginosa from water samples by amplifying a 396-bp region of the exotoxin A (ETA) structural gene sequence. The identify of the amplified 396-bp fragment was confirmed by digesting it with PvuI restriction endonuclease, which produced the predicted 246- and 150-bp fragments. Specific primers amplified ETA-positive P. aeruginosa DNA, whereas other species of Pseudomonas and GC-rich bacteria did not yield any 396-bp fragment. The specificity and sensitivity of the assay were 100 and 96%, respectively, which confirms the assay's reliability for diagnostic and epidemiological studies. The assay can detect as few as 5 to 10 cells in a 10-ml water sample or 0.1 pg of P. aeruginosa DNA per reaction mixture (5 microliters) by ethidium bromide staining of an agarose gel. Ten-times-lower concentrations were detected by hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probe internal to the PCR product. With this PCR method, ETA-positive P. aeruginosa was detected in animal cage water samples at a level of 40 cells per ml. This method is rapid and less cumbersome than other diagnostic methods for the identification of P. aeruginosa strains. The method described can be used to detect a low level of P. aeruginosa from environmental and clinical samples without the use of selective media or additional biochemical tests. Images PMID:7986047

  7. Erbin is a novel substrate of the Sag-βTrCP E3 ligase that regulates KrasG12D-induced skin tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chuan-Ming; Wei, Dongping; Zhao, Lili; Marchetto, Sylvie; Mei, Lin; Borg, Jean-Paul; Sun, Yi

    2015-06-08

    SAG/RBX2 is the RING (really interesting new gene) component of Cullin-RING ligase, which is required for its activity. An organ-specific role of SAG in tumorigenesis is unknown. We recently showed that Sag/Rbx2, upon lung-targeted deletion, suppressed Kras(G12D)-induced tumorigenesis via inactivating NF-κB and mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. In contrast, we report here that, upon skin-targeted deletion, Sag significantly accelerated Kras(G12D)-induced papillomagenesis. In Kras(G12D)-expressing primary keratinocytes, Sag deletion promotes proliferation by inhibiting autophagy and senescence, by inactivating the Ras-Erk pathway, and by blocking reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. This is achieved by accumulation of Erbin to block Ras activation of Raf and Nrf2 to scavenge ROS and can be rescued by knockdown of Nrf2 or Erbin. Simultaneous one-allele deletion of the Erbin-encoding gene Erbb2ip partially rescued the phenotypes. Finally, we characterized Erbin as a novel substrate of SAG-βTrCP E3 ligase. By degrading Erbin and Nrf2, Sag activates the Ras-Raf pathway and causes ROS accumulation to trigger autophagy and senescence, eventually delaying Kras(G12D)-induced papillomagenesis and thus acting as a skin-specific tumor suppressor.

  8. Erbin is a novel substrate of the Sag-βTrCP E3 ligase that regulates KrasG12D-induced skin tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chuan-Ming; Wei, Dongping; Zhao, Lili; Marchetto, Sylvie; Mei, Lin; Borg, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    SAG/RBX2 is the RING (really interesting new gene) component of Cullin-RING ligase, which is required for its activity. An organ-specific role of SAG in tumorigenesis is unknown. We recently showed that Sag/Rbx2, upon lung-targeted deletion, suppressed KrasG12D-induced tumorigenesis via inactivating NF-κB and mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. In contrast, we report here that, upon skin-targeted deletion, Sag significantly accelerated KrasG12D-induced papillomagenesis. In KrasG12D-expressing primary keratinocytes, Sag deletion promotes proliferation by inhibiting autophagy and senescence, by inactivating the Ras–Erk pathway, and by blocking reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. This is achieved by accumulation of Erbin to block Ras activation of Raf and Nrf2 to scavenge ROS and can be rescued by knockdown of Nrf2 or Erbin. Simultaneous one-allele deletion of the Erbin-encoding gene Erbb2ip partially rescued the phenotypes. Finally, we characterized Erbin as a novel substrate of SAG-βTrCP E3 ligase. By degrading Erbin and Nrf2, Sag activates the Ras–Raf pathway and causes ROS accumulation to trigger autophagy and senescence, eventually delaying KrasG12D-induced papillomagenesis and thus acting as a skin-specific tumor suppressor. PMID:26056141

  9. Nested polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing analysis of the light-chain and heavy-chain variable regions in the influenza A H1N1 virus hemagglutinin monoclonal antibody gene.

    PubMed

    Li, H J; Guo, C Y; Sun, J Y; Sun, L J; Zhao, P H; Hu, L; Li, Y; Hu, J

    2014-06-11

    The nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was used for the amplification of the influenza A H1N1 virus hemagglutinin monoclonal antibody light-chain and heavy-chain genes. Sequence analysis of the obtained genes was then used to identify common cloning methods of the mouse immunoglobulin-kappa (Igκ) light-chain and heavy-chain variable gene regions. Twenty-two pairs of amplification primers for the mouse Igκ light-chain and heavy-chain variable gene regions were designed, and 6 mouse anti-human H1N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin monoclonal antibody light-chain and heavy-chain variable gene regions were cloned and sequenced. Comparative analysis was conducted between our results and the mouse Ig sequences published in the National Center of Biotechnology Information (NCBI). The nested PCR method effectively avoided cloning the pseudogenes of the monoclonal antibody, and the amino acid sequence obtained was consistent with the characteristics of the mouse Ig variable region. A general method of cloning the mouse Ig light-chain and heavy-chain variable gene regions was established, which provides a basis for further cloning of mouse monoclonal antibody variable gene regions. This study also provides data for further studies of H1N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin antibody binding sites.

  10. Efficient PCR-Based Amplification of Diverse Alcohol Dehydrogenase Genes from Metagenomes for Improving Biocatalysis: Screening of Gene-Specific Amplicons from Metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Kariya, Satomi; Kurokawa, Junji

    2014-01-01

    Screening of gene-specific amplicons from metagenomes (S-GAM) has tremendous biotechnological potential. We used this approach to isolate alcohol dehydrogenase (adh) genes from metagenomes based on the Leifsonia species adh gene (lsadh), the enzyme product of which can produce various chiral alcohols. A primer combination was synthesized by reference to homologs of lsadh, and PCR was used to amplify nearly full-length adh genes from metagenomic DNAs. All adh preparations were fused with lsadh at the terminal region and used to construct Escherichia coli plasmid libraries. Of the approximately 2,000 colonies obtained, 1,200 clones were identified as adh positive (∼60%). Finally, 40 adh genes, Hladh-001 to Hladh-040 (for homologous Leifsonia adh), were identified from 223 clones with high efficiency, which were randomly sequenced from the 1,200 clones. The Hladh genes obtained via this approach encoded a wide variety of amino acid sequences (8 to 99%). After screening, the enzymes obtained (HLADH-012 and HLADH-021) were confirmed to be superior to LSADH in some respects for the production of anti-Prelog chiral alcohols. PMID:25085492

  11. Akt mediated ROS-dependent selective targeting of mutant KRAS tumors.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Kartini; Rezlan, Majidah; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2014-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in a variety of cellular processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to cell death. Previously, we reported the ability of a small molecule compound, C1, to induce ROS dependent autophagy associated apoptosis in human cancer cell lines and primary tumor cells (Wong C. et al. 2010). Our ongoing investigations have unraveled a hitherto undefined novel signaling network involving hyper-phosphorylation of Akt and Akt-mediated ROS production in cancer cell lines. Interestingly, drug-induced Akt activation is selectively seen in cell lines that carry mutant KRAS; HCT116 cells that carry the V13D KRAS mutation respond favorably to C1 while HT29 cells expressing wild type KRAS are relatively resistant. Of note, not only does the compound target mutant KRAS expressing cells but also induces RAS activation as evidenced by the PAK pull down assay. Corroborating this, pharmacological inhibition as well as siRNA mediated silencing of KRAS or Akt, blocked C1-induced ROS production and rescued tumor colony forming ability in HCT116 cells. To further confirm the involvement of KRAS, we made use of mutant KRAS transformed RWPE-1 prostate epithelial cells. Notably, drug-induced ROS generation and death sensitivity was significantly higher in RWPE-1-KRAS cells than the RWPE-1-vector cells, thus confirming the results obtained with mutant KRAS colorectal carcinoma cell line. Lastly, we made use of HCT116 mutant KRAS knockout cells (KO) where the mutant KRAS allele had been deleted, thus expressing a single wild-type KRAS allele. Exposure of the KO cells to C1 failed to induce Akt activation and mitochondrial ROS production. Taken together, results show the involvement of activated Akt in ROS-mediated selective targeting of mutant KRAS expressing tumors, which could have therapeutic implications given the paucity of chemotherapeutic strategies specifically targeting KRAS mutant cancers.

  12. Estrogen withdrawal, increased breast cancer risk and the KRAS-variant

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Terri P; Jung, Song-Yi; Kerin, Michael J; Salzman, David W; Nallur, Sunitha; Nemec, Antonio A; Dookwah, Michelle; Sadofsky, Jackie; Paranjape, Trupti; Kelly, Olivia; Chan, Elcie; Miller, Nicola; Sweeney, Karl J; Zelterman, Daniel; Sweasy, Joann; Pilarski, Robert; Telesca, Donatello; Slack, Frank J; Weidhaas, Joanne B

    2015-01-01

    The KRAS-variant is a biologically functional, microRNA binding site variant, which predicts increased cancer risk especially for women. Because external exposures, such as chemotherapy, differentially impact the effect of this mutation, we evaluated the association of estrogen exposures, breast cancer (BC) risk and tumor biology in women with the KRAS-variant. Women with BC (n = 1712), the subset with the KRAS-variant (n = 286) and KRAS-variant unaffected controls (n = 80) were evaluated, and hormonal exposures, KRAS-variant status, and pathology were compared. The impact of estrogen withdrawal on transformation of isogenic normal breast cell lines with or without the KRAS-variant was studied. Finally, the association and presentation characteristics of the KRAS-variant and multiple primary breast cancer (MPBC) were evaluated. KRAS-variant BC patients were more likely to have ovarian removal pre-BC diagnosis than non-variant BC patients (p = 0.033). In addition, KRAS-variant BC patients also appeared to have a lower estrogen state than KRAS-variant unaffected controls, with a lower BMI (P < 0.001). Finally, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) discontinuation in KRAS-variant patients was associated with a diagnosis of triple negative BC (P < 0.001). Biologically confirming our clinical findings, acute estrogen withdrawal led to oncogenic transformation in KRAS-variant positive isogenic cell lines. Finally, KRAS-variant BC patients had greater than an 11-fold increased risk of presenting with MPBC compared to non-variant patients (45.39% vs 6.78%, OR 11.44 [3.42–37.87], P < 0.001). Thus, estrogen withdrawal and a low estrogen state appear to increase BC risk and to predict aggressive tumor biology in women with the KRAS-variant, who are also significantly more likely to present with multiple primary breast cancer. PMID:25961464

  13. Gene Amplification and Functional Diversification of Melanocortin 4 Receptor at an Extremely Polymorphic Locus Controlling Sexual Maturation in the Platyfish

    PubMed Central

    Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Selz, Yvonne; Hoffmann, Carsten; Froschauer, Alexander; Schultheis, Christina; Schmidt, Cornelia; Zhou, Qingchun; Bernhardt, Wolfgang; Hanel, Reinhold; Böhne, Astrid; Brunet, Frédéric; Ségurens, Béatrice; Couloux, Arnaud; Bernard-Samain, Sylvie; Barbe, Valérie; Ozouf-Costaz, Catherine; Galiana, Delphine; Lohse, Martin J.; Schartl, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    In two swordtail species of the genus Xiphophorus, the onset of puberty has been shown to be modulated at the P locus by sequence polymorphism and gene copy-number variation affecting the type 4 melanocortin hormone receptor Mc4r. The system works through the interaction of two allelic types, one encoding wild type and the other dominant-negative receptors. We have analyzed the structure and evolution of the P locus in the platyfish Xiphophorus maculatus, where as many as nine alleles of P determining the onset of sexual maturity in males and females, fecundity in females, and adult size in males are located on both the X and Y chromosomes in a region linked to the master sex-determining locus. In this species, mc4r has been amplified to up to 10 copies on both the X and Y chromosomes through recent large serial duplications. Subsequently, mc4r paralogues have diverged considerably into many different subtypes. Certain copies have acquired new untranslated regions through genomic rearrangements, and transposable element insertions and other mutations have accumulated in promoter regions, possibly explaining observed deviations from the classical mc4r transcriptional pattern. In the mc4r-coding sequence, in-frame insertions and deletions as well as nonsense and missense mutations have generated a high diversity of Mc4r-predicted proteins. Most of these variants are expressed in embryos, adults, and/or tumors. Functional receptor characterization demonstrated major divergence in pharmacological behavior for Mc4r receptors encoded by different copies of platyfish mc4r, with differences in constitutive activity as well as binding and stimulation by hormones. The high degree of allelic and copy-number variation observed between individuals can explain the high level of polymorphism for sexual maturation, fecundity, and body size in the platyfish: multiple combinations of Mc4r variants with different biochemical properties might interact to modulate the melanocortin

  14. DNA vaccine elicits an efficient antitumor response by targeting the mutant Kras in a transgenic mouse lung cancer model.

    PubMed

    Weng, T-Y; Yen, M-C; Huang, C-T; Hung, J-J; Chen, Y-L; Chen, W-C; Wang, C-Y; Chang, J-Y; Lai, M-D

    2014-10-01

    Mutant Kras (V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) is observed in more than 20% of non-small-cell lung cancers; however, no effective Kras target therapy is available at present. The Kras DNA vaccine may represent as a novel immunotherapeutic agent in lung cancer. In this study, we investigated the antitumor efficacy of the Kras DNA vaccine in a genetically engineered inducible mouse lung tumor model driven by Kras(G12D). Lung tumors were induced by doxycycline, and the therapeutic effects of Kras DNA vaccine were evaluated with delivery of Kras(G12D) plasmids. Mutant Kras(G12D) DNA vaccine significantly decreased the tumor nodules. A dominant-negative mutant Kras(G12D)N17, devoid of oncogenic activity, achieved similar therapeutic effects. The T-helper 1 immune response was enhanced in mice treated with Kras DNA vaccine. Splenocytes from mice receiving Kras DNA vaccine presented an antigen-specific response by treatment with peptides of Kras but not Hras or OVA. The number of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells increased after Kras vaccination. In contrast, Kras DNA vaccine was not effective in the lung tumor in transgenic mice, which was induced by mutant L858R epidermal growth factor receptor. Overall, these results indicate that Kras DNA vaccine produces an effective antitumor response in transgenic mice, and may be useful in treating lung cancer-carrying Ras mutation.

  15. Effects of hypoxanthine substitution in peptide nucleic acids targeting KRAS2 oncogenic mRNA molecules: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Jeffrey M; Wampole, Matthew E; Chen, Chang-Po; Sethi, Dalip; Singh, Amrita; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Wang, Fan; Gray, Brian D; Thakur, Mathew L; Wickstrom, Eric

    2013-10-03

    Genetic disorders can arise from single base substitutions in a single gene. A single base substitution for wild type guanine in the twelfth codon of KRAS2 mRNA occurs frequently to initiate lung, pancreatic, and colon cancer. We have observed single base mismatch specificity in radioimaging of mutant KRAS2 mRNA in tumors in mice by in vivo hybridization with radiolabeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) dodecamers. We hypothesized that multimutant specificity could be achieved with a PNA dodecamer incorporating hypoxanthine, which can form Watson-Crick base pairs with adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we show that hypoxanthine substitutions in PNAs are tolerated in KRAS2 RNA:PNA duplexes where wild type guanine is replaced by mutant uracil or adenine in RNA. To validate our predictions, we synthesized PNA dodecamers with hypoxanthine, and then measured the thermal stability of RNA:PNA duplexes. Circular dichroism thermal melting results showed that hypoxanthine-containing PNAs are more stable in duplexes where hypoxanthine-adenine and hypoxanthine-uracil base pairs are formed than single mismatch duplexes or duplexes containing hypoxanthine-guanine opposition.

  16. MicroRNA-31 initiates lung tumorigenesis and promotes mutant KRAS-driven lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Mick D.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Moyo, Tamara; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Duszynski, Robert; Arrate, Maria Pia; Chen, Xi; Zhao, Zhongming; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Andl, Thomas; Eischen, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miR) are important regulators of gene expression, and aberrant miR expression has been linked to oncogenesis; however, little is understood about their contribution to lung tumorigenesis. Here, we determined that miR-31 is overexpressed in human lung adenocarcinoma and this overexpression independently correlates with decreased patient survival. We developed a transgenic mouse model that allows for lung-specific expression of miR-31 to test the oncogenic potential of miR-31 in the lung. Using this model, we observed that miR-31 induction results in lung hyperplasia, followed by adenoma formation and later adenocarcinoma development. Moreover, induced expression of miR-31 in mice cooperated with mutant KRAS to accelerate lung tumorigenesis. We determined that miR-31 regulates lung epithelial cell growth and identified 6 negative regulators of RAS/MAPK signaling as direct targets of miR-31. Our study distinguishes miR-31 as a driver of lung tumorigenesis that promotes mutant KRAS-mediated oncogenesis and reveals that miR-31 directly targets and reduces expression of negative regulators of RAS/MAPK signaling. PMID:26657862

  17. Inactivation of SAG/RBX2 E3 ubiquitin ligase suppresses KrasG12D-driven lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Tan, Mingjia; Jia, Lijun; Wei, Dongping; Zhao, Yongchao; Chen, Guoan; Xu, Jie; Zhao, Lili; Thomas, Dafydd; Beer, David G; Sun, Yi

    2014-02-01

    Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) are a family of E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes that rely on either RING-box 1 (RBX1) or sensitive to apoptosis gene (SAG), also known as RBX2, for activity. RBX1 and SAG are both overexpressed in human lung cancer; however, their contribution to patient survival and lung tumorigenesis is unknown. Here, we report that overexpression of SAG, but not RBX1, correlates with poor patient prognosis and more advanced disease. We found that SAG is overexpressed in murine KrasG12D-driven lung tumors and that Sag deletion suppressed lung tumorigenesis and extended murine life span. Using cultured lung cancer cells, we showed that SAG knockdown suppressed growth and survival, inactivated both NF-κB and mTOR pathways, and resulted in accumulation of tumor suppressor substrates, including p21, p27, NOXA, and BIM. Importantly, growth suppression by SAG knockdown was partially rescued by simultaneous knockdown of p21 or the mTOR inhibitor DEPTOR. Treatment with MLN4924, a small molecule inhibitor of CRL E3s, also inhibited the formation of KrasG12D-induced lung tumors through a similar mechanism involving inactivation of NF-κB and mTOR and accumulation of tumor suppressor substrates. Together, our results demonstrate that Sag is a Kras-cooperating oncogene that promotes lung tumorigenesis and suggest that targeting SAG-CRL E3 ligases may be an effective therapeutic approach for Kras-driven lung cancers.

  18. A subset of high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinomas shows up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-7 associated with nuclear beta-catenin immunoreactivity, independent of EGFR and HER-2 gene amplification or expression.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Giuseppe; Scarpa, Aldo; Veronesi, Giulia; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Del Curto, Barbara; Moore, Patrick S; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Sonzogni, Angelica; Masullo, Michele; Viale, Giuseppe

    2005-12-01

    Nuclear translocation of beta-catenin has been correlated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression/activation in non-small cell lung cancer. Less is known on beta-catenin transactivation in high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors and on the status of beta-catenin activating EGFR and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) or beta-catenin target genes cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7). beta-catenin immunoreactivity was evaluated in 51 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas (LCNEC) and 45 small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLC). Nineteen cases were assessed for beta-catenin gene exon 3 mutations, expression of MMP-7, and expression/gene amplification of EGFR, HER-2, and cyclin D1. beta-catenin was expressed in all 96 high-grade neuroendocrine tumors, the vast majority (94%) showing >50% immunopositive cells. A disarrayed immunoreactivity, however, was commonly encountered consisting in variably altered membrane-associated patterns of staining along with progressive accumulation of cytoplasmic immunoreactivity. In LCNEC, but not in SCLC, the disarrayed patterns correlated with EGFR and HER-2 protein expression. beta-catenin nuclear accumulation was found in nine tumors, including seven LCNEC and two SCLC, and was always associated with disarrayed immunoreactivity and increased MMP-7, but not cyclin D1 expression. These cases, however, did not show beta-catenin gene mutations or EGFR and HER-2 gene amplification or expression. No association was found between nuclear beta-catenin and any clinicopathological variable including patients' survival. The subcellular compartmentalization of beta-catenin is profoundly altered in high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors. A minor subset of these tumors shows beta-catenin nuclear accumulation in association with increased expression of MMP-7, but not of cyclin D1, independent of EGFR and HER-2 gene amplification or expression.

  19. Sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity: validation of the methods of actinobacterial DNA extraction and optimization of 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Franco, Christopher M M; Zhang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Experiments were designed to validate the two common DNA extraction protocols (CTAB-based method and DNeasy Blood & Tissue Kit) used to effectively recover actinobacterial DNA from sponge samples in order to study the sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity. This was done by artificially spiking sponge samples with actinobacteria (spores, mycelia and a combination of the two). Our results demonstrated that both DNA extraction methods were effective in obtaining DNA from the sponge samples as well as the sponge samples spiked with different amounts of actinobacteria. However, it was noted that in the presence of the sponge, the bacterial 16S rRNA gene could not be amplified unless the combined DNA template was diluted. To test the hypothesis that the extracted sponge DNA contained inhibitors, dilutions of the DNA extracts were tested for six sponge species representing five orders. The results suggested that the inhibitors were co-extracted with the sponge DNA, and a high dilution of this DNA was required for the successful PCR amplification for most of the samples. The optimized PCR conditions, including primer selection, PCR reaction system and program optimization, further improved the PCR performance. However, no single PCR condition was found to be suitable for the diverse sponge samples using various primer sets. These results highlight for the first time that the DNA extraction methods used are effective in obtaining actinobacterial DNA and that the presence of inhibitors in the sponge DNA requires high dilution coupled with fine tuning of the PCR conditions to achieve success in the study of sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity.

  20. Rapid production of full-length cDNAs from rare transcripts: amplification using a single gene-specific oligonucleotide primer.

    PubMed Central

    Frohman, M A; Dush, M K; Martin, G R

    1988-01-01

    We have devised a simple and efficient cDNA cloning strategy that overcomes many of the difficulties encountered in obtaining full-length cDNA clones of low-abundance mRNAs. In essence, cDNAs are generated by using the DNA polymerase chain reaction technique to amplify copies of the region between a single point in the transcript and the 3' or 5' end. The minimum information required for this amplification is a single short stretch of sequence within the mRNA to be cloned. Since the cDNAs can be produced in one day, examined by Southern blotting the next, and readily cloned, large numbers of full-length cDNA clones of rare transcripts can be rapidly produced. Moreover, separation of amplified cDNAs by gel electrophoresis allows precise selection by size prior to cloning and thus facilitates the isolation of cDNAs representing variant mRNAs, such as those produced by alternative splicing or by the use of alternative promoters. The efficacy of this method was demonstrated by isolating cDNA clones of mRNA from int-2, a mouse gene that expresses four different transcripts at low abundance, the longest of which is approximately 2.9 kilobases. After less than 0.05% of the cDNAs produced had been screened, 29 independent int-2 clones were isolated. Sequence analysis demonstrated that the 3' and 5' ends of all four int-2 mRNAs were accurately represented by these clones. Images PMID:2461560

  1. Analysis of actinomycete communities by specific amplification of genes encoding 16S rRNA and gel-electrophoretic separation in denaturing gradients.

    PubMed Central

    Heuer, H; Krsek, M; Baker, P; Smalla, K; Wellington, E M

    1997-01-01

    A group-specific primer, F243 (positions 226 to 243, Escherichia coli numbering), was developed by comparison of sequences of genes encoding 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) for the detection of actinomycetes in the environment with PCR and temperature or denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE or DGGE, respectively). The specificity of the forward primer in combination with different reverse ones was tested with genomic DNA from a variety of bacterial strains. Most actinomycetes investigated could be separated by TGGE and DGGE, with both techniques giving similar results. Two strategies were employed to study natural microbial communities. First, we used the selective amplification of actinomycete sequences (E. coli positions 226 to 528) for direct analysis of the products in denaturing gradients. Second, a nested PCR providing actinomycete-specific fragments (E. coli positions 226 to 1401) was used which served as template for a PCR when conserved primers were used. The products (E. coli positions 968 to 1401) of this indirect approach were then separated by use of gradient gels. Both approaches allowed detection of actinomycete communities in soil. The second strategy allowed the estimation of the relative abundance of actinomycetes within the bacterial community. Mixtures of PCR-derived 16S rDNA fragments were used as model communities consisting of five actinomycetes and five other bacterial species. Actinomycete products were obtained over a 100-fold dilution range of the actinomycete DNA in the model community by specific PCR; detection of the diluted actinomycete DNA was not possible when conserved primers were used. The methods tested for detection were applied to monitor actinomycete community changes in potato rhizosphere and to investigate actinomycete diversity in different soils. PMID:9251210

  2. SIRT2 deletion enhances KRAS-induced tumorigenesis in vivo by regulating K147 acetylation status

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ha Yong; Biancucci, Marco; Kang, Hong-Jun; O'Callaghan, Carol; Park, Seong-Hoon; Principe, Daniel R.; Jiang, Haiyan; Yan, Yufan; Satchell, Karla Fullner; Raparia, Kirtee; Gius, David; Vassilopoulos, Athanassios

    2016-01-01

    The observation that cellular transformation depends on breaching a crucial KRAS activity threshold, along with the finding that only a small percentage of cellsharboring KRAS mutations are transformed, support the idea that additional, not fully uncovered, regulatory mechanisms may contribute to KRAS activation. Here we report that KrasG12D mice lacking Sirt2 show an aggressive tumorigenic phenotype as compared to KrasG12D mice. This phenotype includes increased proliferation, KRAS acetylation, and activation of RAS downstream signaling markers. Mechanistically, KRAS K147 is identified as a novel SIRT2-specific deacetylation target by mass spectrometry, whereas its acetylation status directly regulates KRAS activity, ultimately exerting an impact on cellular behavior as revealed by cell proliferation, colony formation, and tumor growth. Given the significance of KRAS activity as a driver in tumorigenesis, identification of K147 acetylation as a novel post-translational modification directed by SIRT2 in vivo may provide a better understanding of the mechanistic link regarding the crosstalk between non-genetic and genetic factors in KRAS driven tumors. PMID:27637077

  3. A novel 2-pyrone derivative, BHP, impedes oncogenic KRAS-driven malignant progression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Rae-Kwon; Suh, Yongjoon; Lim, Eun-Jung; Yoo, Ki-Chun; Lee, Ga-Haeng; Cui, Yan-Hong; Son, Arang; Hwang, Eunji; Uddin, Nizam; Yi, Joo-Mi; Kang, Seok-Gu; Lee, Su-Jae

    2013-08-28

    Elevated KRAS expression has been frequently associated with cancer progression including breast cancer; however, therapeutic approaches targeting KRAS have been widely unsuccessful and KRAS mutant cancers remain unsolved problem in cancer therapy. In this study, we found that a new 2-pyrone derivative, 5-bromo-3-(3-hydroxyprop-1-ynyl)-2H-pyran-2-one (BHP) can block KRAS-driven breast cancer progression. Importantly, treatment with BHP effectively suppressed the migratory and invasive properties along with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells that carry oncogenic KRAS and mesenchymal malignant phenotypes. In parallel, BHP also sensitized the cells to anticancer treatment. Consistently, forced-expression of oncogenic KRAS bestowed the migratory and invasive properties, mesenchymal transition and resistance to anticancer treatment into normal human mammalian breast cells MCF10A and relatively non-malignant MCF7 and SK-BR3 breast cancer cells; however, treatment with BHP blocked those KRAS-induced malignant phenotypes. Notably, BHP interfered the interaction of KRAS with Raf-1 in concentration-dependent manner, thereby blocking the downstream effectors of KRAS signaling that is PI3K/AKT and ERK. Taken together, our findings indicate that the BHP, an α-pyrone derivative, suppresses malignant breast cancer progression by targeting of oncogenic KRAS signaling pathways.

  4. Lifetime alcohol intake is associated with an increased risk of KRAS+ and BRAF-/KRAS- but not BRAF+ colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jayasekara, Harindra; MacInnis, Robert J; Williamson, Elizabeth J; Hodge, Allison M; Clendenning, Mark; Rosty, Christophe; Walters, Rhiannon; Room, Robin; Southey, Melissa C; Jenkins, Mark A; Milne, Roger L; Hopper, John L; Giles, Graham G; Buchanan, Daniel D; English, Dallas R

    2017-04-01

    Ethanol in alcoholic beverages is a causative agent for colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer is a biologically heterogeneous disease, and molecular subtypes defined by the presence of somatic mutations in BRAF and KRAS are known to exist. We examined associations between lifetime alcohol intake and molecular and anatomic subtypes of colorectal cancer. We calculated usual alcohol intake for 10-year periods from age 20 using recalled frequency and quantity of beverage-specific consumption for 38,149 participants aged 40-69 years from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. Cox regression was performed to derive hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between lifetime alcohol intake and colorectal cancer risk. Heterogeneity in the HRs across subtypes of colorectal cancer was assessed. A positive dose-dependent association between lifetime alcohol intake and overall colorectal cancer risk (mean follow-up = 14.6 years; n = 596 colon and n = 326 rectal cancer) was observed (HR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.04-1.12 per 10 g/day increment). The risk was greater for rectal than colon cancer (phomogeneity  = 0.02). Alcohol intake was associated with increased risks of KRAS+ (HR = 1.07, 95% CI: 1.00-1.15) and BRAF-/KRAS- (HR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.00-1.11) but not BRAF+ tumors (HR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.78-1.01; phomogeneity  = 0.01). Alcohol intake is associated with an increased risk of KRAS+ and BRAF-/KRAS- tumors originating via specific molecular pathways including the traditional adenoma-carcinoma pathway but not with BRAF+ tumors originating via the serrated pathway. Therefore, limiting alcohol intake from a young age might reduce colorectal cancer originating via the traditional adenoma-carcinoma pathway.

  5. KRAS and BRAF Mutations and PTEN Expression Do Not Predict Efficacy of Cetuximab-Based Chemoradiotherapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Erben, Philipp; Stroebel, Philipp; Horisberger, Karoline; Popa, Juliana; Bohn, Beatrice; Hanfstein, Benjamin; Kaehler, Georg; Kienle, Peter; Post, Stefan; Wenz, Frederik; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Mutations in KRAS and BRAF genes as well as the loss of expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) (deleted on chromosome 10) are associated with impaired activity of antibodies directed against epidermal growth factor receptor in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The predictive and prognostic value of the KRAS and BRAF point mutations as well as PTEN expression in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) treated with cetuximab-based neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is unknown. Methods and Materials: We have conducted phase I and II trials of the combination of weekly administration of cetuximab and irinotecan and daily doses of capecitabine in conjunction with radiotherapy (45 Gy plus 5.4 Gy) in patients with LARC (stage uT3/4 or uN+). The status of KRAS and BRAF mutations was determined with direct sequencing, and PTEN expression status was determined with immunohistochemistry testing of diagnostic tumor biopsies. Tumor regression was evaluated by using standardized regression grading, and disease-free survival (DFS) was calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 57 patients were available for analyses. A total of 31.6% of patients carried mutations in the KRAS genes. No BRAF mutations were found, while the loss of PTEN expression was observed in 9.6% of patients. Six patients achieved complete remission, and the 3-year DFS rate was 73%. No correlation was seen between tumor regression or DFS rate and a single marker or a combination of all markers. Conclusions: In the present series, no BRAF mutation was detected. The presence of KRAS mutations and loss of PTEN expression were not associated with impaired response to cetuximab-based chemoradiotherapy and 3-year DFS.

  6. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay targeting the blaCTX-M9 gene for detection of extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Thirapanmethee, Krit; Pothisamutyothin, Kanokporn; Nathisuwan, Surakit; Chomnawang, Mullika T; Wiwat, Chanpen

    2014-12-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) produced by Enterobacteriaceae are one of the resistance mechanisms to most β-lactam antibiotics. ESBLs are currently a major problem in both hospitals and community settings worldwide. Rapid and reliable means of detecting ESBL-producing bacteria is necessary for identification, prevention and treatment. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a technique that rapidly amplifies DNA with high specificity and sensitivity under isothermal conditions. This study was aimed to develop a convenient, accurate and inexpensive method for detecting ESBL-producing bacteria by a LAMP technique. ESBLs-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated from a tertiary hospital in Bangkok, Thailand and reconfirmed by double-disk synergy test. A set of four specific oligonucleotide primers of LAMP for detection of bla(CTX-M9) gene was designed based on bla(CTX-M9) from E. coli (GenBank Accession No. AJ416345). The LAMP reaction was amplified under isothermal temperature at 63°C for 60 min. Ladder-like patterns of band sizes from 226 bp of the bla(CTX-M9) DNA target was observed. The LAMP product was further analyzed by restriction digestion with MboI and TaqI endonucleases. The fragments generated were approximately 168, 177 and 250 bp in size for MboI digestion and 165, 193, 229, 281 and 314 bp for TaqI digestion, which is in agreement with the predicted sizes. The sensitivity of the LAMP technique to bla(CTX-M9) was greater than that of the PCR method by at least 10,000-fold. These results showed that the LAMP primers specifically amplified only the bla(CTX-M9) gene. Moreover, the presence of LAMP amplicon was simply determined by adding SYBR Green I in the reaction. In conclusion, this technique for detection of ESBLs is convenient, reliable and easy to perform routinely in hospitals or laboratory units in developing countries.

  7. Dietary supplementation of lutein reduces colon carcinogenesis in DMH-treated rats by modulating K-ras, PKB, and β-catenin proteins.

    PubMed

    Reynoso-Camacho, R; González-Jasso, E; Ferriz-Martínez, R; Villalón-Corona, B; Loarca-Piña, G F; Salgado, L M; Ramos-Gomez, M

    2011-01-01

    In colon cancer, disturbances have been detected in genes coding for proteins involved in cellular proliferation, such as K-ras, β-catenin, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), and the protein kinase B (PKB). Although carotenoids such as lutein have an important role to prevent and treat some types of cancer, there are very few studies about the effect of lutein against colon cancer and its activity at the molecular level. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the chemoprotective activity of lutein against colon cancer induced by dimethylhydrazine (DMH). The results showed a significant increase in protein expression for K-ras and β-catenin in tumors of DMH-treated rats. Simultaneously, we detected changes in the phosphorylation state of ERK1/2 and PKB in DMH-treated animals. Lutein given in the diet (0.002%), before (prevention) and after (treatment) DMH administration, diminished the number of tumors by 55% and 32%, respectively. Moreover, lutein significantly decreased in tumors the expression of K-ras (25%) and β-catenin (28%) and the amount of pPKB (32%), during the prevention, and 39%, 26%, and 26% during the treatment stage, respectively. This study demonstrates the chemoprotective effect of lutein against colon cancer by modulating the proliferative activity of K-ras, PKB, and β-catenin proteins.

  8. Assessment of MAGE-A expression in resected non-small cell lung cancer in relation to clinicopathologic features and mutational status of EGFR and KRAS.

    PubMed

    Ayyoub, Maha; Memeo, Lorenzo; Alvarez-Fernández, Emilio; Colarossi, Cristina; Costanzo, Rosario; Aiello, Eleonora; Martinetti, Daniela; Valmori, Danila

    2014-10-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a major public health problem, accounting for more cancer-related deaths than any other cancer. Both immunotherapy, based on the expression of tumor-specific antigens, and targeted therapy, based on the presence of oncogenic mutations, are under development for NSCLC. In this study, we analyzed the expression of MAGE-A, a cancer-testis antigen, in tumors from a cohort of patients with resected NSCLC with respect to their clinicopathologic characteristics and their mutational status for the EGFR and KRAS genes. We found MAGE-A expression by IHC in 43% of the tumors. MAGE-A expression was significantly more frequent in squamous tumors than in adenocarcinomas, did not correlate with disease stage, but was correlated significantly with high tumor grade and worse survival. EGFR and KRAS mutations were present in adenocarcinomas, but not in squamous tumors. Whereas the presence of EGFR mutations did not seem to affect survival, the presence of KRAS mutations was associated with early-stage disease and better survival. MAGE-A expression was absent from adenocarcinomas with KRAS mutations, but not significantly different in tumors with or without EGFR mutations. Together, the reported results provide guidance for the design of combination therapies in patients with NSCLC.

  9. Oncogenic K-Ras and Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Prevent FAS-Mediated Apoptosis in Fibroblasts through Activation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Hirotaka; Yonehara, Shin

    2000-01-01

    By an expression cloning method using Fas-transgenic Balb3T3 cells, we tried to obtain inhibitory genes against Fas-mediated apoptosis and identified proto-oncogene c-K-ras. Transient expression of K-Ras mutants revealed that oncogenic mutant K-Ras (RasV12) strongly inhibited, whereas dominant-inhibitory mutant K-Ras (RasN17) enhanced, Fas-mediated apoptosis by inhibiting Fas-triggered activation of caspases without affecting an expression level of Fas. Among the target molecules of Ras, including Raf (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase [MAPKKK]), phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI-3) kinase, and Ral guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RalGDS), only the constitutively active form of Raf (Raf-CAAX) could inhibit Fas-mediated apoptosis. In addition, the constitutively active form of MAPKK (SDSE-MAPKK) suppressed Fas-mediated apoptosis, and MKP-1, a phosphatase specific for classical MAPK, canceled the protective activity of oncogenic K-Ras (K-RasV12), Raf-CAAX, and SDSE-MAPKK. Furthermore, physiological activation of Ras by basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) protected Fas-transgenic Balb3T3 cells from Fas-mediated apoptosis. bFGF protection was also dependent on the activation of the MAPK pathway through Ras. All the results indicate that the activation of MAPK through Ras inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis in Balb3T3 cells, which may play a role in oncogenesis. PMID:10662780

  10. TUMORAL TISSUE SPECIFIC PROMOTER HYPERMETHYLATION OF DISTINCT TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENES IN A CASE WITH NONSMALL CELL LUNG CARCINOMA: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Sulhattin; Dogan, Tamer; Koksal, Binnur; Yildirim, Malik Ejder; Gumus, Cesur; Elagoz, Sahenda; Akkurt, Ibrahim; Ozdemir, Oztürk

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective: Non-small cell lung carcinoma is an aggressive phenomenon and the epigenetical alterations of some tumor supressor genes have been reported for the different tumor types. Case Presentation: It is presented a case report concerning a 43 years old male with NSCLC on the lower segment of the right lung. The patient underwent a diag-nostic excisional thin-needle biopsy and after the histological confirmation. We examined the promoter methylation status of some distinct tumor supressor genes in tumoral and blood tissues of the case after sodium bisulfite conversion and DNA amplification with methylation specific multiplex PCR technique. Both tissues were also searched for G to A transitions in codons 12 and 13 of the K-ras proto-oncogene. Results: Tumor specimen showed fully methyl pattern profiles for the SFRP2, p16, DAPK1 and partially hyper-methylated profile for the p53 and MGMT genes in this case with non-small lung carci-noma. Blood speicemen showed normal hypomethylated profiles for all studied TS genes. The K-ras proto-oncogene was in normal structure both in blood and tumoral spiecemens that examined. Conclusion: Results indicate that genes exhibit tumor suppressor activi-ties in blood, but exhibit epigenetic inactivation in carcinoma cell. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that epigenetic mechanisms may play an important role in the non-small cell lung carcinogenesis in human. PMID:21264081

  11. MUC1 Positive, Kras and Pten Driven Mouse Gynecologic Tumors Replicate Human Tumors and Vary in Survival and Nuclear Grade Based on Anatomical Location

    PubMed Central

    Elishaev, Esther; Zhang, Lixin; Mony, Jyothi T.; Brozick, Joan; Edwards, Robert P.; Vlad, Anda M.

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of Kras oncogene and deletions of Pten tumor suppressor gene play important roles in cancers of the female genital tract. We developed here new preclinical models for gynecologic cancers, using conditional (Cre-loxP) mice with floxed genetic alterations in Kras and Pten. The triple transgenic mice, briefly called MUC1KrasPten, express human MUC1 antigen as self and carry a silent oncogenic KrasG12D and Pten deletion mutation. Injection of Cre-encoding adenovirus (AdCre) in the ovarian bursa, oviduct or uterus activates the floxed mutations and initiates ovarian, oviductal, and endometrial cancer, respectively. Anatomical site-specific Cre-loxP recombination throughout the genital tract of MUC1KrasPten mice leads to MUC1 positive genital tract tumors, and the development of these tumors is influenced by the anatomical environment. Endometrioid histology was consistently displayed in all tumors of the murine genital tract (ovaries, oviducts, and uterus). Tumors showed increased expression of MUC1 glycoprotein and triggered de novo antibodies in tumor bearing hosts, mimicking the immunobiology seen in patients. In contrast to the ovarian and endometrial tumors, oviductal tumors showed higher nuclear grade. Survival for oviduct tumors was significantly lower than for endometrial tumors (p = 0.0015), yet similar to survival for ovarian cancer. Oviducts seem to favor the development of high grade tumors, providing preclinical evidence in support of the postulated role of fallopian tubes as the originating site for high grade human ovarian tumors. PMID:25078979

  12. Deregulation of the miR-16-KRAS axis promotes colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    You, Chaoying; Liang, Hongwei; Sun, Wu; Li, Jialu; Liu, Yanqing; Fan, Qian; Zhang, Haiyang; Yue, Xin; Li, Jing; Chen, Xi; Ba, Yi

    2016-01-01

    KRAS plays a significant role in the etiology and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the mechanism underlying this process has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the KRAS protein levels were higher in CRC tissues than in the normal adjacent tissues, whereas its mRNA levels varied irregularly, suggesting that a post-transcriptional mechanism is involved in the regulation of KRAS. Then, we performed bioinformatic analyses to search for miRNAs that potentially target KRAS. We predicted and experimentally validated that miR-16 directly recognizes the 3′-UTR of the KRAS transcript and regulates KRAS expression. Furthermore, the in vitro results showed that the repression of KRAS by miR-16 suppressed the proliferation and invasion and induced the apoptosis of CRC cells, and the in vivo results revealed that miR-16 exerted a tumor-suppressive effect by negatively regulating KRAS in xenograft mice. Taken together, our findings provide evidence supporting the role of miR-16 as a tumor suppressor in CRC by targeting KRAS. PMID:27857191

  13. Targeting adhesion signaling in KRAS, LKB1 mutant lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-Ross, Melissa; Konen, Jessica; Koo, Junghui; Shupe, John; Robinson, Brian S; Wiles, Walter Guy; Huang, Chunzi; Martin, W David; Behera, Madhusmita; Smith, Geoffrey H; Hill, Charles E; Rossi, Michael R; Sica, Gabriel L; Rupji, Manali; Chen, Zhengjia; Kowalski, Jeanne; Kasinski, Andrea L; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Fu, Haian; Khuri, Fadlo R; Zhou, Wei; Marcus, Adam I

    2017-03-09

    Loss of LKB1 activity is prevalent in KRAS mutant lung adenocarcinoma and promotes aggressive and treatment-resistant tumors. Previous studies have shown that LKB1 is a negative regulator of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), but in vivo studies testing the efficacy of FAK inhibition in LKB1 mutant cancers are lacking. Here, we took a pharmacologic approach to show that FAK inhibition is an effective early-treatment strategy for this high-risk molecular subtype. We established a lenti-Cre-induced Kras and Lkb1 mutant genetically engineered mouse model (KLLenti) that develops 100% lung adenocarcinoma and showed that high spatiotemporal FAK activation occurs in collective invasive cells that are surrounded by high levels of collagen. Modeling invasion in 3D, loss of Lkb1, but not p53, was sufficient to drive collective invasion and collagen alignment that was highly sensitive to FAK inhibition. Treatment of early, stage-matched KLLenti tumors with FAK inhibitor monotherapy resulted in a striking effect on tumor progression, invasion, and tumor-associated collagen. Chronic treatment extended survival and impeded local lymph node spread. Lastly, we identified focally upregulated FAK and collagen-associated collective invasion in KRAS and LKB1 comutated human lung adenocarcinoma patients. Our results suggest that patients with LKB1 mutant tumors should be stratified for early treatment with FAK inhibitors.

  14. Targeting adhesion signaling in KRAS, LKB1 mutant lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Konen, Jessica; Koo, Junghui; Robinson, Brian S.; Wiles, Walter Guy; Huang, Chunzi; Martin, W. David; Behera, Madhusmita; Smith, Geoffrey H.; Hill, Charles E.; Rossi, Michael R.; Sica, Gabriel L.; Rupji, Manali; Chen, Zhengjia; Kowalski, Jeanne; Kasinski, Andrea L.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Marcus, Adam I.

    2017-01-01

    Loss of LKB1 activity is prevalent in KRAS mutant lung adenocarcinoma and promotes aggressive and treatment-resistant tumors. Previous studies have shown that LKB1 is a negative regulator of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), but in vivo studies testing the efficacy of FAK inhibition in LKB1 mutant cancers are lacking. Here, we took a pharmacologic approach to show that FAK inhibition is an effective early-treatment strategy for this high-risk molecular subtype. We established a lenti-Cre–induced Kras and Lkb1 mutant genetically engineered mouse model (KLLenti) that develops 100% lung adenocarcinoma and showed that high spatiotemporal FAK activation occurs in collective invasive cells that are surrounded by high levels of collagen. Modeling invasion in 3D, loss of Lkb1, but not p53, was sufficient to drive collective invasion and collagen alignment that was highly sensitive to FAK inhibition. Treatment of early, stage-matched KLLenti tumors with FAK inhibitor monotherapy resulted in a striking effect on tumor progression, invasion, and tumor-associated collagen. Chronic treatment extended survival and impeded local lymph node spread. Lastly, we identified focally upregulated FAK and collagen-associated collective invasion in KRAS and LKB1 comutated human lung adenocarcinoma patients. Our results suggest that patients with LKB1 mutant tumors should be stratified for early treatment with FAK inhibitors. PMID:28289710

  15. Targeting pathways downstream of KRAS in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zehua; Golay, Hadrien G; Barbie, David A

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS activation is responsible for the most common genetic subtype of lung cancer. Although many of the major downstream signaling pathways that KRAS engages have been defined, these discoveries have yet to translate into effective targeted therapy. Much of the current focus has been directed at inhibiting the activation of RAF/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling, but clinical trials combining multiple different agents that target these pathways have failed to show significant activity. In this article, we will discuss the evidence for RAF and PI3K as key downstream RAS effectors, as well as the RAL guanine exchange factor, which is equally essential for transformation. Furthermore, we will delineate alternative pathways, including cytokine activation and autophagy, which are co-opted by oncogenic RAS signaling and also represent attractive targets for therapy. Finally, we will present strategies for combining inhibitors of these downstream KRAS signaling pathways in a rational fashion, as multitargeted therapy will be required to achieve a cure. PMID:25303301

  16. Challenges in detecting pre-malignant pancreatic lesions during acute pancreatitis using a serum microRNA assay: a study based on KrasG12D transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xiafei; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Wenze; Ye, Adam Yongxin; Song, Wei; Dai, Hongmei; Wang, Xianze; Wu, Fan; You, Lei; Wu, Wenming; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis accelerates the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions in a pancreas-specific KrasG12D mouse model. The purpose of this study was to explore whether serum microRNAs (miRNAs) can serve as sensitive biomarkers to detect occult PanIN in the setting of acute pancreatitis. Serum miRNA profiles were quantified by an array-based method and normalized by both Variance Stabilization Normalization (VSN) and invariant methods. Individual miRNAs were validated by TaqMan real-time PCR with synthetic spike-in C. elegans miRNAs as external controls. Serum miRNA profiles distinguished KrasG12D mice with pancreatitis from wild-type mice without pancreatitis, but failed to differentiate KrasG12D mice with pancreatitis from wild-type mice with pancreatitis. Most individual miRNAs that increased in KrasG12D mice with pancreatitis were not significantly different between KrasG12D mice without pancreatitis and wild-type mice without pancreatitis. Mechanistically, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) of the mRNA array data and immunohistochemical assays showed that caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis involved acinar cell loss and immune cell infiltration, which might contribute to serum miRNA profile changes. This study highlighted the challenges in using sensitive serum miRNA biomarker screening for the early detection of pancreatic malignancies during acute pancreatitis. PMID:27009811

  17. Differential gene expression in Neurospora crassa cell types: heterogeneity and amplification of rRNA genes. Progress report, July 1980-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    The significant results obtained during 1980-1981 year of the current research program are as follows: I. Studies on heterogeneity of multiple copies of rDNAs from N. crassa cell types are being continued, such as: (1) Autoradiographs of Southern transfers of EcoR/sub 1/ restricted fragments of nuclear DNA from conidia, germinated conidia (sprouts) and mycelia of N. crassa were compared after hybridization with /sup 32/P-rDNA probe. The nuclear DNA of two hours sprout and of 16 hours mycelia gave similar hybridization patterns with EcoR/sub 1/ digest, but no such hybridization pattern was evident in conidial DNA digest; (2) Procedure for concentration of rDNAs from Neurospora species and cell types was standardized; restriction analysis of purified rDNAs is being done; (3) 35S total rDNA clone, 17S rDNA clone and 26S rDNA subclone are being used to see gross differences in the precursor rRNAs of different cell types; (4) Comparison of DNA:DNA homologies of rRNA genes with different Neurospora species. II. Post-mitochondrial DNAs of N. crassa are found to be rDNA-like and were further characterized by electron microscopic studies and are found to be approximately twice the size of SV-40 DNAs. These N. crassa post-mitochondrial DNAs hybridized with /sup 32/P-labeled N. crassa nuclear DNAs. III. Previous studies on differential RNase sensitive DNA polymerase activity in N. Crassa cell types and on evolution of sexual morphogenesis in the genus Neurospora are completed and published. RNase sensitive DNA polymerase activity is found to be in the post-mitochondrial fraction. Heterothallism in the genus Neurospora is evolved from homothallism.

  18. KRAS/BRAF Analysis in Ovarian Low-Grade Serous Carcinoma Having Synchronous All Pathological Precursor Regions.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kohei; Nakayama, Kentaro; Ishibashi, Tomoka; Ishikawa, Noriyoshi; Ishikawa, Masako; Katagiri, Hiroshi; Minamoto, Toshiko; Sato, Emi; Sanuki, Kaori; Yamashita, Hitomi; Iida, Kouji; Sultana, Razia; Kyo, Satoru

    2016-04-26

    Ovarian low-grade serous carcinoma is thought to begin as a serous cystadenoma or adenofibroma that progresses in a slow stepwise fashion. Among the low-grade serous carcinomas, there is a high frequency of activating mutations in the KRAS or BRAF genes; however, it remains unclear as to how these mutations contribute to tumor progression. This is the first report to track the histopathological progression of serous adenofibroma to low-grade serous carcinoma. Each stage was individually analyzed by pathological and molecular genetic methods to determine what differences occur between the distinct stages of progression.

  19. Altered DNA Binding and Amplification of Human Breast Cancer Suppressor Gene BRCA1 Induced by a Novel Antitumor Compound, [Ru(η6-p-phenylethacrynate)Cl2(pta)

    PubMed Central

    Chakree, Korawan; Ovatlarnporn, Chitchamai; Dyson, Paul J.; Ratanaphan, Adisorn

    2012-01-01

    The ruthenium-based complex [Ru(η6-p-phenylethacrynate)Cl2(pta)] (pta = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphatricyclo-[3.3.1.1]decane), termed ethaRAPTA, is an interesting antitumor compound. The elucidation of the molecular mechanism of drug activity is central to the drug development program. To this end, we have characterized the ethaRAPTA interaction with DNA, including probing the sequence specific modified DNA structural stability and DNA amplification using the breast cancer suppressor gene 1 (BRCA1) of human breast and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines as models. The preference of ethaRAPTA base binding is in the order A > G > T > C. Once modified, the ethaRAPTA-induced BRCA1 structure has higher thermal stability than the modified equivalents of its related compound, RAPTA-C. EthaRAPTA exhibits a higher efficiency than RAPTA-C in inhibiting BRCA1 amplification. With respect to both compounds, the inhibition of BRCA1 amplification is more effective in an isolated system than in cell lines. These data provide evidence that will help to understand the process of elucidating the pathways involved in the response induced by ethaRAPTA. PMID:23202946

  20. Genomic Landscape of Experimental Bladder Cancer in Rodents and Its Application to Human Bladder Cancer: Gene Amplification and Potential Overexpression of Cyp2a5/CYP2A6 Are Associated with the Invasive Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kanemoto, Kazuhiro; Fukuta, Katsuhiro; Kawai, Noriyasu; Tozawa, Keiichi; Ochiai, Masako; Okamoto, Koji; Ohnami, Sumiko; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Kanai, Yae; Katoh, Masaru; Yasui, Takahiro; Kohri, Kenjiro; Kakizoe, Tadao; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Non-muscle invasive (superficial) bladder cancer is a low-grade malignancy with good prognosis, while muscle invasive (invasive) bladder cancer is a high-grade malignancy with poor prognosis. N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) induces superficial bladder cancers with papillary morphology in rats and invasive bladder cancers with infiltrating phenotype in mice. In this study, we analyzed genomic landscapes of rodent BBN-induced bladder cancers using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). While no significant copy number alterations were detected in superficial bladder tumors in rats, copy number gains in chromosomal regions 2D-E1, 7qA3, 9F2, and 11C-D were detected in invasive bladder tumors in mice. Amplification of representative genes located on 2D-E1 and 7qA3 chromosomal regions was confirmed by quantitative PCR. Cyp2a22 and Cyp2a5 genes but not Cyp2g1, Cyp2a12, and Rab4b genes on mouse chromosome 7qA3 were amplified in invasive bladder cancers. Although the human ortholog gene of Cyp2a22 has not been confirmed, the mouse Cyp2a5 gene is the ortholog of the human CYP2A6 gene located in chromosomal region 19q13.2, and CYP2A6 was identified by database search as one of the closest human homolog to mouse Cyp2a22. Considering a possibility that this region may be related to mouse 7qA3, we analyzed CYP2A6 copy number and expression in human bladder cancer using cell lines and resected tumor specimens. Although only one of eight cell lines showed more than one copy increase of the CYP2A6 gene, CYP2A6 amplification was detected in six out of 18 primary bladder tumors where it was associated with the invasive phenotype. Immunohistochemical analyses of 118 primary bladder tumors revealed that CYP2A6 protein expression was also higher in invasive tumors, especially in those of the scattered type. Together, these findings indicate that the amplification and overexpression of the CYP2A6 gene are characteristic of human bladder cancers with

  1. Chelerythrine down regulates expression of VEGFA, BCL2 and KRAS by arresting G-Quadruplex structures at their promoter regions

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Jagannath; Mondal, Soma; Bhattacharjee, Payel; Sengupta, Pallabi; Roychowdhury, Tanaya; Saha, Pranay; Kundu, Pallob; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu

    2017-01-01

    A putative anticancer plant alkaloid, Chelerythrine binds to G-quadruplexes at promoters of VEGFA, BCL2 and KRAS genes and down regulates their expression. The association of Chelerythrine to G-quadruplex at the promoters of these oncogenes were monitored using UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence anisotropy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, CD melting, isothermal titration calorimetry, molecular dynamics simulation and quantitative RT-PCR technique. The pronounced hypochromism accompanied by red shifts in UV absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ethidium bromide displacement assay indicates end stacking mode of interaction of Chelerythrine with the corresponding G-quadruplex structures. An increase in fluorescence anisotropy and CD melting temperature of Chelerythrine-quadruplex complex revealed the formation of stable Chelerythrine-quadruplex complex. Isothermal titration calorimetry data confirmed that Chelerythrine-quadruplex complex formation is thermodynamically favourable. Results of quantative RT-PCR experiment in combination with luciferase assay showed that Chelerythrine treatment to MCF7 breast cancer cells effectively down regulated transcript level of all three genes, suggesting that Chelerythrine efficiently binds to in cellulo quadruplex motifs. MD simulation provides the molecular picture showing interaction between Chelerythrine and G-quadruplex. Binding of Chelerythrine with BCL2, VEGFA and KRAS genes involved in evasion, angiogenesis and self sufficiency of cancer cells provides a new insight for the development of future therapeutics against cancer. PMID:28102286

  2. Chelerythrine down regulates expression of VEGFA, BCL2 and KRAS by arresting G-Quadruplex structures at their promoter regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Jagannath; Mondal, Soma; Bhattacharjee, Payel; Sengupta, Pallabi; Roychowdhury, Tanaya; Saha, Pranay; Kundu, Pallob; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu

    2017-01-01

    A putative anticancer plant alkaloid, Chelerythrine binds to G-quadruplexes at promoters of VEGFA, BCL2 and KRAS genes and down regulates their expression. The association of Chelerythrine to G-quadruplex at the promoters of these oncogenes were monitored using UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence anisotropy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, CD melting, isothermal titration calorimetry, molecular dynamics simulation and quantitative RT-PCR technique. The pronounced hypochromism accompanied by red shifts in UV absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ethidium bromide displacement assay indicates end stacking mode of interaction of Chelerythrine with the corresponding G-quadruplex structures. An increase in fluorescence anisotropy and CD melting temperature of Chelerythrine-quadruplex complex revealed the formation of stable Chelerythrine-quadruplex complex. Isothermal titration calorimetry data confirmed that Chelerythrine-quadruplex complex formation is thermodynamically favourable. Results of quantative RT-PCR experiment in combination with luciferase assay showed that Chelerythrine treatment to MCF7 breast cancer cells effectively down regulated transcript level of all three genes, suggesting that Chelerythrine efficiently binds to in cellulo quadruplex motifs. MD simulation provides the molecular picture showing interaction between Chelerythrine and G-quadruplex. Binding of Chelerythrine with BCL2, VEGFA and KRAS genes involved in evasion, angiogenesis and self sufficiency of cancer cells provides a new insight for the development of future therapeutics against cancer.

  3. An in Vivo shRNA-Drug Screen to Identify Novel Targeted Therapy Combinations for KRAS Mutant Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0420 TITLE: An in Vivo shRNA-Drug Screen to Identify Novel Targeted Therapy Combinations for KRAS Mutant Cancers...2012 - 31 Aug 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An in Vivo shRNA-Drug Screen to Identify Novel Targeted Therapy Combinations for KRAS Mutant Cancers...through the MAPK pathway, a key KRAS effector) to kill KRAS mutant pancreatic cancer cells in order to develop novel therapeutic combinations for these

  4. Multiplex RT-PCR Amplification of HIV Genes to Create a Completely Autologous DC-Based Immunotherapy for the Treatment of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tcherepanova, Irina; Harris, Jason; Starr, Aijing; Cleveland, Jaclyn; Ketteringham, Helen; Calderhead, David; Horvatinovich, Joe; Healey, Don; Nicolette, Charles A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Effective therapy for HIV-infected individuals remains an unmet medical need. Promising clinical trials with dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy consisting of autologous DC loaded with autologous virus have been reported, however, these approaches depend on large numbers of HIV virions to generate sufficient doses for even limited treatment regimens. Methodology/Principal Findings The present study describes a novel approach for RT-PCR amplification of HIV antigens. Previously, RT-PCR amplification of autologous viral sequences has been confounded by the high mutation rate of the virus which results in unreliable primer-template binding. To resolve this problem we developed a multiplex RT-PCR strategy that allows reliable strain-independent amplification of highly polymorphic target antigens from any patient and requires neither viral sequence data nor custom-designed PCR primers for each individual. We demonstrate the application of our RT-PCR process to amplify translationally-competent RNA encoding regions of Gag, Vpr, Rev and Nef. The products amplified using this method represent a complex mixture of autologous antigens encoded by viral quasispecies. We further demonstrate that DCs electroporated with in vitro-transcribed HIV RNAs are capable of stimulating poly-antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in vitro. Conclusion/Significance This study describes a strategy to overcome patient to patient viral diversity enabling strain-independent RT-PCR amplification of RNAs encoding sequence divergent quasispecies of Gag, Vpr, Rev and Nef from small volumes of infectious plasma. The approach allows creation of a completely autologous therapy that does not require advance knowledge of the HIV genomic sequences, does not have yield limitations and has no intact virus in the final product. The simultaneous use of autologous viral antigens and DCs may provoke broad patient-specific immune responses that could potentially induce effective control of viral

  5. Gene amplification: developments, and applications for medical diagnostics. January 1985-February 1989 (Citations from the Biobusiness data base). Report for January 1985-February 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning genetic amplification, a revolutionary new DNA probe technology. Companies on the cutting edge of this technology are discussed, and mention is made of their licensing agreements. Applications in clinical diagnosis for such diseases as acquired immune deficiency syndrome and leukemia, and applications for prenatal testing, and forensic testing are examined. (Contains 55 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  6. The expression of SALL4 is significantly associated with EGFR, but not KRAS or EML4-ALK mutations in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiangbo; Qian, Rulin; Zhang, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide; unfortunately, its prognosis is still very poor. Therefore, developing the target molecular is very important for lung cancer diagnosis and treatment, especially in the early stage. With this in view, spalt-like transcription factor 4 (SALL4) is considered a potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis in cancers, including lung cancer. Methods In order to better investigate the association between the expression of SALL4 and driver genes mutation, 450 histopathologically diagnosed patients with lung cancer and 11 non-cancer patients were enrolled to test the expression of SALL4 and the status of driver genes mutation. This investigation included epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), and a fusion gene of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) and the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). Results The results of the study showed that females harbored more EGFR mutation in adenocarcinoma (ADC). The mutation rate of KRAS and EML4-ALK was about 5%, and the double mutations of EGFR/EML4-ALK were higher than EGFR/KRAS. In the expression analysis, the expression of SALL4 was much higher in cancer tissues than normally expected, especially in tissues that carried EGFR mutation (P<0.05), however, there were no significant differences between different mutation types. Likewise, there were no significant differences between expression of SALL4 and KRAS and EML4-ALK mutations. Conclusions SALL4 is up regulated in lung cancer specimens and harbors EGFR mutation; this finding indicates that SALL4 expression may be relevant with EGFR, which could provide a new insight to lung cancer therapy. The mechanism needs further investigation and analysis. PMID:27867542

  7. XPO1-dependent nuclear export is a druggable vulnerability in KRAS-mutant lung cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The common participation of oncogenic KRAS proteins in many of the most lethal human cancers, together with the ease of detecting somatic KRAS mutant alleles in patient samples, has spurred persistent and intensive efforts to develop drugs that inhibit KRAS activity.

  8. Absence of K-Ras Reduces Proliferation and Migration But Increases Extracellular Matrix Synthesis in Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Félix, José M; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Cuesta, Cristina; Eleno, Nélida; Crespo, Piero; López-Novoa, José M; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    The involvement of Ras-GTPases in the development of renal fibrosis has been addressed in the last decade. We have previously shown that H- and N-Ras isoforms participate in the regulation of fibrosis. Herein, we assessed the role of K-Ras in cellular processes involved in the development of fibrosis: proliferation, migration, and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins synthesis. K-Ras knockout (KO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (K-ras(-/-) ) stimulated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) exhibited reduced proliferation and impaired mobility than wild-type fibroblasts. Moreover, an increase on ECM production was observed in K-Ras KO fibroblasts in basal conditions. The absence of K-Ras was accompanied by reduced Ras activation and ERK phosphorylation, and increased AKT phosphorylation, but no differences were observed in TGF-β1-induced Smad signaling. The MEK inhibitor U0126 decreased cell proliferation independently of the presence of K-ras but reduced migration and ECM proteins expression only in wild-type fibroblasts, while the PI3K-AKT inhibitor LY294002 decreased cell proliferation, migration, and ECM synthesis in both types of fibroblasts. Thus, our data unveil that K-Ras and its downstream effector pathways distinctively regulate key biological processes in the development of fibrosis. Moreover, we show that K-Ras may be a crucial mediator in TGF-β1-mediated effects in this cell type. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2224-2235, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Visual, base-specific detection of nucleic acid hybridization using polymerization-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ryan R; Johnson, Leah M; Bowman, Christopher N

    2009-03-15

    Polymerization-based signal amplification offers sensitive visualization of biotinylated biomolecules functionalized to glass microarrays in a manner suitable for point-of-care use. Here we report using this method for visual detection of multiplexed nucleic acid hybridizations from complex media and develop an application toward point mutation detection and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing. Primer extension reactions were employed to label selectively and universally all complementary surface DNA hybrids with photoinitiators, permitting simultaneous and dynamic photopolymerization from positive sites to 0.5-nM target concentrations. Dramatic improvements in signal ratios between complementary and mismatched hybrids enabled visual discrimination of single base differences in KRAS codon-12 biomarkers.<