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  1. EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-23

    ISS032-E-024171 (30 Aug. 2012) --- Backdropped over Andros Island and other parts of the Bahamas, NASA astronaut Sunita Williams and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide (out of frame), both Expedition 32 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station.

  2. EVA Requirements for Exploration EVAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, Bruce; Luna, Bernadette

    2005-01-01

    The exploration program proposed by the President will require extensive extravehicular operations in a wide range of environments. These include Og EVAs in planetary orbits as well as potential contingency EVAs during inter-planetary flight and surface operations on the moon and Mars. The EVA environments and mission requirements are very different for each of these. Commonality among such systems is highly desirable from the programmatic standpoint but the dramatic differences in EVA environments will have a profound impact on EVA system design. This paper will examine the relevant environmental parameters and discuss their impacts on EVA system design. An EVA design philosophy that maximizes EVA system commonality will be discussed.

  3. EVA Physiology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    An introduction to the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in astronauts during EVA. This will include an explanation of Prebreathe Protocols (PB), to affect nitrogen washout as a primary risk mit...

  4. EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6893 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Soichi Noguchi, STS-114 mission specialist representing Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA).

  5. EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6897 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Soichi Noguchi, STS-114 mission specialist representing Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA).

  6. EVA 25

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-24

    View of Rick Mastracchio,in his Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU),working to mate spare Pump Module (PM) Quick Disconnects (QDs) during International Space Station (ISS) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 25. Image was released by astronaut on Twitter.

  7. EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-06919 (3 Aug. 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the extended International Space Station’;s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The blackness of space and Earth’;s horizon form the backdrop for the image.

  8. EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-08-03

    S114-E-6856 (3 August 2005) --- Backdropped by the blackness of space, astronaut Soichi Noguchi, STS-114 mission specialist representing the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), traverses along the P6 truss near the arrays on the international space station during the mission’s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA).

  9. EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6918 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the extended International Space Station’;s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The blackness of space and Earth’;s horizon form the backdrop for the image.

  10. EVA 4 - Massimino during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-03-07

    STS109-323-013 (7 March 2002) --- Astronaut Michael J. Massimino moves about in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Columbia while performing work on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), partially visible behind him. Astronauts Massimino and James H. Newman (out of frame), mission specialists, were participating in the fourth STS-109 space walk (EVA-4).

  11. EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-18

    ISS014-E-10063 (18 Dec. 2006) --- Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam Jr., STS-116 mission specialist, works with the port overhead solar array wing on the International Space Station's P6 truss during the mission's fourth session of extravehicular activity (EVA). European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Christer Fuglesang (out of frame), mission specialist, worked in tandem with Curbeam, using specially prepared, tape-insulated tools, to guide the array wing neatly inside its blanket box during the 6-hour, 38-minute spacewalk.

  12. Risk Management in EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Jonathan; Lutomski, M.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of risk management in Extravehicular Activities (EVA). The contents include: 1) EVA Office at NASA - JSC; 2) EVA Project Risk Management: Why and When; 3) EVA Office Risk Management: How; 4) Criteria for Closing a Risk; 5) Criteria for Accepting a Risk; 6) ISS IRMA Reference Card Data Entry Requirement s; 7) XA/ EVA Office Risk Activity Summary; 8) EVA Significant Change Summary; 9) Integrated Risk Management Application (XA) Matrix, March 31, 2004; 10) ISS Watch Item: 50XX Summary Report; and 11) EVA Project RM Usefulness

  13. Studies Relating to EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session JA1, the discussion focuses on the following topics: The Staged Decompression to the Hypobaric Atmosphere as a Prophylactic Measure Against Decompression Sickness During Repetitive EVA; A New Preoxygenation Procedure for Extravehicular Activity (EVA); Metabolic Assessments During Extra-Vehicular Activity; Evaluation of Safety of Hypobaric Decompressions and EVA From Positions of Probabilistic Theory; Fatty Acid Composition of Plasma Lipids and Erythrocyte Membranes During Simulation of Extravehicular Activity; Biomedical Studies Relating to Decompression Stress with Simulated EVA, Overview; The Joint Angle and Muscle Signature (JAMS) System - Current Uses and Future Applications; and Experimental Investigation of Cooperative Human-Robotic Roles in an EVA Work Site.

  14. EVA medical problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barer, A. S.

    The experience gained in the USSR allows the following conclusions: physiological responses to EVA do not depend on flight duration in qualitative and quantative terms. Physiological responses to EVA are mainly determined by following 3 factors: physiological activities; space suit environmental parameters; physiological stress. This paper reviews problems, associated with altitude decompression sickness; thermal regulation of the body, visual function and physiological psychological stress as well as individual EVA experience in physiological responses.

  15. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 101: Constellation EVA Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Nicole C.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Systems is shown. The topics include: 1) Why do we need space suits? 2) Protection From the Environment; 3) Primary Life Support System (PLSS); 4) Thermal Control; 5) Communications; 6) Helmet and Extravehicular Visor Assy; 7) Hard Upper Torso (HUT) and Arm Assy; 8) Display and Controls Module (DCM); 9) Gloves; 10) Lower Torso Assembly (LTA); 11) What Size Do You Need?; 12) Boot and Sizing Insert; 13) Boot Heel Clip and Foot Restraint; 14) Advanced and Crew Escape Suit; 15) Nominal & Off-Nominal Landing; 16) Gemini Program (mid-1960s); 17) Apollo EVA on Service Module; 18) A Bold Vision for Space Exploration, Authorized by Congress; 19) EVA System Missions; 20) Configurations; 21) Reduced Gravity Program; and 22) Other Opportunities.

  16. EVA Training and Development Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cupples, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Overview: Vast majority of US EVA (ExtraVehicular Activity) training and EVA hardware development occurs at JSC; EVA training facilities used to develop and refine procedures and improve skills; EVA hardware development facilities test hardware to evaluate performance and certify requirement compliance; Environmental chambers enable testing of hardware from as large as suits to as small as individual components in thermal vacuum conditions.

  17. EVA-SCRAM operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanigan, Lee A.; Tamir, David; Weeks, Jack L.; Mcclure, Sidney R.; Kimbrough, Andrew G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper wrestles with the on-orbit operational challenges introduced by the proposed Space Construction, Repair, and Maintenance (SCRAM) tool kit for Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA). SCRAM undertakes a new challenging series of on-orbit tasks in support of the near-term Hubble Space Telescope, Extended Duration Orbiter, Long Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, other orbital platforms, and even the future manned Lunar/Mars missions. These new EVA tasks involve welding, brazing, cutting, coating, heat-treating, and cleaning operations. Anticipated near-term EVA-SCRAM applications include construction of fluid lines and structural members, repair of punctures by orbital debris, refurbishment of surfaces eroded by atomic oxygen, and cleaning of optical, solar panel, and high emissivity radiator surfaces which have been degraded by contaminants. Future EVA-SCRAM applications are also examined, involving mass production tasks automated with robotics and artificial intelligence, for construction of large truss, aerobrake, and reactor shadow shield structures. Realistically achieving EVA-SCRAM is examined by addressing manual, teleoperated, semi-automated, and fully-automated operation modes. The operational challenges posed by EVA-SCRAM tasks are reviewed with respect to capabilities of existing and upcoming EVA systems, such as the Extravehicular Mobility Unit, the Shuttle Remote Manipulating System, the Dexterous End Effector, and the Servicing Aid Tool.

  18. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    View of Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (bottom center), Expedition 36 flight engineer, participating in Russian extravehicular activity (EVA) 33. Also visible are the Progress spacecraft docked to the Pirs Docking Compartment (DC1) with the Service Module (SM) .

  19. EVA Retriever Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The EVA retriever is demonstrated in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF). The retriever moves on the air bearing table 'searching' for its target, in this case tools 'dropped' by astronauts on orbit.

  20. Williams during EVA 36

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-19

    Extravehicular crewmember 1 (EV1) Jeff Williams pauses for a photo after installing a Hemispherical (Hemi) Reflector Cover on Pressurized Mating Adapter 2 (PMA-2) during Extravehicular Activity 36 (EVA 36).

  1. Artemyev post-EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-19

    Cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev, Expedition 40 flight engineer, is photographed still wearing his liquid cooling and ventilation garment after a Russian Extravehicular Activity (EVA). Artemyev is standing in his crew quarters (CQ).

  2. Russian EVA 36.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028082 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Ryazanskiy and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov (out of frame) continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22.

  3. Russian EVA 36.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028094 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy (out of frame) continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22.

  4. Russian EVA 36.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028101 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy (out of frame) continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22.

  5. Russian EVA 36.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028107 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy (out of frame) continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22.

  6. Russian EVA 36.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028067 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy (out of frame) continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22.

  7. Russian EVA 36.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028102 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy (out of frame) continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22.

  8. Russian EVA 36

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028569 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, uses a still camera during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy (out of frame) continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22.

  9. Power assist EVA glove development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Main, John A.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.

    1992-01-01

    The design of the EVA glove is examined, emphasizing the development of a more flexible metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint for the EVA glove. The analysis of the EVA glove MCP joint is reviewed and the glove design process is recapitulated. Experimental tests of the glove are summarized.

  10. Russian EVA 36.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028076 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, uses a digital still camera to expose a photo of his helmet visor during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. Also visible in the reflections in the visor are Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, flight engineer, and various components of the space station and a blue and white portion of Earth. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Ryazanskiy continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22.

  11. Russian EVA 36

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028789 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy, Expedition 37 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, is pictured during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Ryazanskiy and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov (out of frame) continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22. Earth’s horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  12. EVA Glove Research Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Alvin M.; Peterson, Steven W.; Main, John A.; Dickenson, Rueben D.; Shields, Bobby L.; Lorenz, Christine H.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the basic research portion of the extravehicular activity (EVA) glove research program is to gain a greater understanding of the kinematics of the hand, the characteristics of the pressurized EVA glove, and the interaction of the two. Examination of the literature showed that there existed no acceptable, non-invasive method of obtaining accurate biomechanical data on the hand. For this reason a project was initiated to develop magnetic resonance imaging as a tool for biomechanical data acquisition and visualization. Literature reviews also revealed a lack of practical modeling methods for fabric structures, so a basic science research program was also initiated in this area.

  13. Russian EVA 36

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028788 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazanskiy (mostly out of frame at bottom right), both Expedition 37 flight engineers, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Ryazanskiy continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22. Earth’s horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  14. Phillips during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-18

    ISS011-E-11948 (18 August 2005) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA Space Station science officer and flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The 4 hour 58 minute spacewalk by Phillips and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (seen in Phillip’;s helmet visor), commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, was the 62nd EVA in support of Station assembly and maintenance, the 34th conducted from the Station itself, and the 16th from the Pirs Docking Compartment.

  15. Phillips during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-18

    ISS011-E-11958 (18 August 2005) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA Space Station science officer and flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The 4 hour 58 minute spacewalk by Phillips and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (out of frame), commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, was the 62nd EVA in support of Station assembly and maintenance, the 34th conducted from the Station itself, and the 16th from the Pirs Docking Compartment.

  16. Phillips during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-18

    ISS011-E-11947 (18 August 2005) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA Space Station science officer and flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The 4 hour 58 minute spacewalk by Phillips and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (seen in Phillip’;s helmet visor), commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, was the 62nd EVA in support of Station assembly and maintenance, the 34th conducted from the Station itself, and the 16th from the Pirs Docking Compartment.

  17. Phillips during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-18

    ISS011-E-11949 (18 August 2005) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA Space Station science officer and flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The 4 hour 58 minute spacewalk by Phillips and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (seen in Phillip’;s helmet visor), commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, was the 62nd EVA in support of Station assembly and maintenance, the 34th conducted from the Station itself, and the 16th from the Pirs Docking Compartment.

  18. Phillips during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-18

    ISS011-E-11944 (18 August 2005) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA science officer and flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The 4 hour 58 minute spacewalk by Phillips and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (out of frame), commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, was the 62nd EVA in support of station assembly and maintenance, the 34th conducted from the station itself, and the 16th from the Pirs Docking Compartment.

  19. Russian EVA 36

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-09

    ISS037-E-028787 (9 Nov. 2013) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov (left) and Sergey Ryazanskiy, both Expedition 37 flight engineers, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 50-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Ryazanskiy continued the setup of a combination EVA workstation and biaxial pointing platform that was installed during an Expedition 36 spacewalk on Aug. 22. Earth’s horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  20. Real-Time EVA Troubleshooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leestma, David

    2013-01-01

    David Leestma was EV-1 for the STS-41G extravehicular activity (EVA) with Kathy Sullivan (first American female spacewalker). They conducted an EVA to fully demonstrate the feasibility of refueling satellites from the Space Shuttle, and performed the first contingency EVA task involving the Ku-band antenna. STS-41G was the fourth Space Shuttle mission to perform an EVA, and Leestma related his experiences with training, the spacesuit, and EVA tasks that were conducted on October 11, 1984 during this mission.

  1. Russian EVA 39

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-18

    ISS040E099874 (08/18/2014) --- Cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov (red stripe - foreground) and Oleg Artemyev (blue stripe - background), Expedition 40 flight engineers, move to the Russian Service Module for repairs during International Space Station Russian EVA 39 on Aug. 18, 2014.

  2. Russian EVA no. 39.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-18

    ISS040E099355 (08/18/2014) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov (red stripes), Expedition 40 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit outside the International Space Station, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) number 39 in support of science and maintenance. The Solar array is visible in the background.

  3. Russian EVA 39.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-18

    ISS040E099104 (08/18/2014) --- View of Cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev (blue stripe), Expedition 40 flight engineer outside the International Space Station, taken while performing maintenance work on the Russian segment during the Russian EVA 39 on Aug 18 2014.

  4. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035256 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonauts Alexander Misurkin (top) and Fyodor Yurchikhin, both Expedition 36 flight engineers, are pictured in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station following a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Misurkin and Yurchikhin are wearing blue thermal undergarments that complement the Russian Orlan spacesuit.

  5. EVA Skills Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Parazynski and a colleague from Extravehicular Activity (EVA), Robotics, & Crew Systems Operations (DX) worked closely to build the EVA Skills Training Program, and for the first time, defined the gold standards of EVA performance, allowing crewmembers to increase their performance significantly. As part of the program, individuals had the opportunity to learn at their own rate, taking additional water time as required, to achieve that level of performance. This focus on training to one's strengths and weaknesses to bolster them enabled the Crew Office and DX to field a much larger group of spacewalkers for the daunting "wall of EVA" required for the building and maintenance of the ISS. Parazynski also stressed the need for designers to understand the capabilities and the limitations of a human in a spacesuit, as well as opportunities to improve future generations of space. He shared lessons learned (how the Crew Office engaged in these endeavors) and illustrated the need to work as a team to develop these complex systems.

  6. Walheim during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008149 (13 Feb. 2008) --- Anchored to a foot restraint on the station's robotic Canadarm2, astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, transfers a large nitrogen tank assembly -- used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system -- during the second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station.

  7. EVA Suit Microbial Leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    NASA has a strategic knowledge gap (B5-3) about what life signatures leak/vent from our Extravehicular Activity (EVA) systems. This will impact how we search for evidence of life on Mars. Characterizing contamination leaks from our suits will help us comply with planetary protection guidelines, and better plan human exploration missions.

  8. Development of an EVA systems cost model. Volume 3: EVA systems cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The EVA systems cost model presented is based on proposed EVA equipment for the space shuttle program. General information on EVA crewman requirements in a weightless environment and an EVA capabilities overview are provided.

  9. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Hardware & Operations Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Sandra; Marmolejo, Jose

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this presentation are to: Define Extravehicular Activity (EVA), identify the reasons for conducting an EVA, and review the role that EVA has played in the space program; Identify the types of EVAs that may be performed; Describe some of the U.S. Space Station equipment and tools that are used during an EVA, such as the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), the Simplified Aid For EVA Rescue (SAFER), the International Space Station (ISS) Joint Airlock and Russian Docking Compartment 1 (DC-1), and EVA Tools & Equipment; Outline the methods and procedures of EVA Preparation, EVA, and Post-EVA operations; Describe the Russian spacesuit used to perform an EVA; Provide a comparison between U.S. and Russian spacesuit hardware and EVA support; and Define the roles that different training facilities play in EVA training.

  10. What's NEXT for EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, R. K.

    The NASA Exploration Team (NEXT) promotes a vision of new capabilities through an ongoing, integrated and prioritized investment in leap ahead concepts and technologies. The wise marriage of robotic and human work systems is a key element of this vision. To enable a wide array of future destinations and applications, it is important to develop and implement systems which are scalable, environmentally adaptable, reliable and efficiently productive. This paper highlights a few of the recently envisioned customers and applications for advanced extravehicular activity (EVA) systems. It also summarizes recent conceptual and practical studies to define the features and options of such a system. More importantly, it communicates the need and progress of knowledge capture, clearly defined performance targets, credible decision making tools, tangible benefits and creative leverage. With this integrated long range approach, space exploration and EVA can accelerate and enable the future for all generations.

  11. Russian EVA 34

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-16

    ISS036-E-033402 (16 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (lower left), Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 29-minute spacewalk ? the longest ever conducted by a pair of Russian cosmonauts ? Misurkin and Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) rigged cables for the future arrival of a Russian laboratory module and installed an experiment panel.

  12. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035204 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers.

  13. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035205 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers.

  14. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035126 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers.

  15. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035130 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers.

  16. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035133 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers.

  17. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035124 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers.

  18. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035129 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers.

  19. Russian EVA 34

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-16

    ISS036-E-033400 (16 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (lower left), Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 29-minute spacewalk ? the longest ever conducted by a pair of Russian cosmonauts ? Misurkin and Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) rigged cables for the future arrival of a Russian laboratory module and installed an experiment panel.

  20. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035163 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers.

  1. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008221 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, works on the new Columbus laboratory as he participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  2. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008325 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  3. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008315 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  4. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008219 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  5. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008195 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  6. Fuglesang during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-12-14

    ISS014-E-09800 (14 Dec. 2006) --- Anchored to the International Space Station's Canadarm2 foot restraint, European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Christer Fuglesang, STS-116 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second of three planned sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction resumes on the International Space Station. Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam, Jr. (out of frame), mission specialist, also participated in the spacewalk. The blackness of space and Earth's horizon provide the backdrop for the scene.

  7. Walheim during EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-15

    S122-E-008913 (15 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, holds onto a handrail on the Columbus laboratory, the newest piece of hardware on the International Space Station. In his helmet visor is mirrored the forward section of the Space Shuttle Atlantis, to which the station is docked. Astronaut Stanley Love (out of frame), mission specialist, shared this final period of STS-122 extravehicular activity (EVA) with Walheim.

  8. Robinson during EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-29

    S114-E-6221 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, on the end of the station’s Canadarm2 (out of frame), slowly and cautiously makes his way to the underside of Space Shuttle Discovery to remove gap fillers from between the orbiter’s heat-shielding tiles during the mission’s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA).

  9. Robinson during EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6215 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, on the end of the station’s Canadarm2 (out of frame), slowly and cautiously makes his way to the underside of Space Shuttle Discovery to remove gap fillers from between the orbiter’s heat-shielding tiles during the mission’s third of three sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA).

  10. Curbeam during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-18

    ISS014-E-10084 (18 Dec. 2006) --- Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam Jr., STS-116 mission specialist, works with the port overhead solar array wing on the International Space Station's P6 truss during the mission's fourth session of extravehicular activity (EVA). European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Christer Fuglesang (out of frame), mission specialist, worked in tandem with Curbeam, using specially prepared, tape-insulated tools, to guide the array wing neatly inside its blanket box during the 6-hour, 38-minute spacewalk.

  11. Russian EVA 38.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-19

    Cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev (EV2),in the blue striped Orlan suit,and Cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov,in the red striped Orlan suit,are photographed at work during Russian EVA 38 by Expedition 40 crewmembers aboard the ISS. They are working to Installed the AFAR (Automatic Phased Array Antenna) Unit of the [EKTC] (Integrated Command and Telemetry System) external FU (Feeder Unit) between PI.II-III on Service Module (SM) circumferential handrails.

  12. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008222 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, works on the new Columbus laboratory as he participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  13. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008357 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  14. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008317 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  15. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008401 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  16. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008312 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  17. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008327 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  18. Walheim during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008323 (13 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Walheim and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  19. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008218 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  20. Walheim during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008395 (13 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Walheim and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  1. Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008153 (13 Feb. 2008) --- In the darkness of space, European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Schlegel and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  2. EVA Suits Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-01-01

    Extravehicular Activity (EVA) suits packed inside containers arrive at the Space Station Processing Facility from Johnson Space Center in Texas. The suits will be used by STS-117 crew members to perform several spacewalks during the mission. The mission payload aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis is the S3/S4 integrated truss structure, along with a third set of solar arrays and batteries. The crew of six astronauts will install the truss to continue assembly of the International Space Station.

  3. Space Shuttle/Orbiter EVA and EVA provisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    EVA objectives, procedures, and equipment for the Shuttle are reviewed. The EVA will occur as a planned excursion, to complete a mission objective, or on a contingency basis as support for the mission or to effect repairs to the Orbiter or its payload. Configurations for the placement of the airlock for EVA with and without Spacelab payloads are discussed, along with the various EVA tasks which could be expected as necessary for mission completion. Handholds have been placed in strategic positions on the RMS and along the payload doors, and a safety tether has been incorporated with line extension out to 25 ft. Off-the-shelf tools such as needlenose pliers, forceps, diagonal cutters, etc. are carried as standard equipment for the repair of malfunctioning equipment and doorlatches. Finally, attention is given to EVA lighting, communication, life-support, and work station restraint systems.

  4. Skripochka during EVA 28

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-16

    ISS026-E-027662 (16 Feb. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, Expedition 26 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan-MK spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) focused on the installation of two scientific experiments outside the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Skripochka and Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratyev (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a pair of earthquake and lightning sensing experiments and retrieved a pair of spacecraft material evaluation panels.

  5. Russian EVA 28

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-16

    ISS026-E-027391 (16 Feb. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratyev, Expedition 26 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan-MK spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) focused on the installation of two scientific experiments outside the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Kondratyev and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a pair of earthquake and lightning sensing experiments and retrieved a pair of spacecraft material evaluation panels.

  6. Skripochka during EVA 28

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-16

    ISS026-E-027667 (16 Feb. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, Expedition 26 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan-MK spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) focused on the installation of two scientific experiments outside the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Skripochka and Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratyev (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a pair of earthquake and lightning sensing experiments and retrieved a pair of spacecraft material evaluation panels.

  7. Skripochka during EVA 28

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-16

    ISS026-E-027640 (16 Feb. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, Expedition 26 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan-MK spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) focused on the installation of two scientific experiments outside the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Skripochka and Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratyev (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a pair of earthquake and lightning sensing experiments and retrieved a pair of spacecraft material evaluation panels.

  8. Kondratyev during EVA 28

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-16

    ISS026-E-027368 (16 Feb. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratyev, Expedition 26 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan-MK spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) focused on the installation of two scientific experiments outside the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Kondratyev and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a pair of earthquake and lightning sensing experiments and retrieved a pair of spacecraft material evaluation panels.

  9. Kondratyev during EVA 28

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-16

    ISS026-E-027361 (16 Feb. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratyev, Expedition 26 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan-MK spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) focused on the installation of two scientific experiments outside the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Kondratyev and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a pair of earthquake and lightning sensing experiments and retrieved a pair of spacecraft material evaluation panels.

  10. Russian EVA-31 spacewalk

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-20

    ISS032-E-021080 (20 Aug. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka, Expedition 32 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Padalka and Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-2 cargo boom from the Pirs docking compartment to the Zarya module to prepare Pirs for its eventual replacement with a new Russian multipurpose laboratory module. The two spacewalking cosmonauts also installed micrometeoroid debris shields on the exterior of the Zvezda service module and deployed a small science satellite.

  11. Russian EVA 26

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-15

    ISS025-E-015238 (15 Nov. 2010) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, Expedition 25 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Skripochka and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a multipurpose workstation on the starboard side of the Zvezda Service Module’s large-diameter section and relocated a television camera from one end of the Rassvet docking compartment to the other.

  12. Russian EVA-31 spacewalk

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-20

    ISS032-E-021293 (20 Aug. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko, Expedition 32 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Malenchenko and Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka (out of frame), commander, moved the Strela-2 cargo boom from the Pirs docking compartment to the Zarya module to prepare Pirs for its eventual replacement with a new Russian multipurpose laboratory module. The two spacewalking cosmonauts also installed micrometeoroid debris shields on the exterior of the Zvezda service module and deployed a small science satellite.

  13. Russian EVA-31 spacewalk

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-20

    ISS032-E-020892 (20 Aug. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko, Expedition 32 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Malenchenko and Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka (out of frame), commander, moved the Strela-2 cargo boom from the Pirs docking compartment to the Zarya module to prepare Pirs for its eventual replacement with a new Russian multipurpose laboratory module. The two spacewalking cosmonauts also installed micrometeoroid debris shields on the exterior of the Zvezda service module and deployed a small science satellite.

  14. Russian EVA-31 spacewalk

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-20

    ISS032-E-020576 (20 Aug. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka, Expedition 32 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Padalka and Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-2 cargo boom from the Pirs docking compartment to the Zarya module to prepare Pirs for its eventual replacement with a new Russian multipurpose laboratory module. The two spacewalking cosmonauts also installed micrometeoroid debris shields on the exterior of the Zvezda service module and deployed a small science satellite.

  15. Russian EVA-31 spacewalk

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-20

    ISS032-E-021028 (20 Aug. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka, Expedition 32 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Padalka and Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-2 cargo boom from the Pirs docking compartment to the Zarya module to prepare Pirs for its eventual replacement with a new Russian multipurpose laboratory module. The two spacewalking cosmonauts also installed micrometeoroid debris shields on the exterior of the Zvezda service module and deployed a small science satellite.

  16. Russian EVA-31 spacewalk

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-20

    ISS032-E-021024 (20 Aug. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka, Expedition 32 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Padalka and Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (out of frame), flight engineer, moved the Strela-2 cargo boom from the Pirs docking compartment to the Zarya module to prepare Pirs for its eventual replacement with a new Russian multipurpose laboratory module. The two spacewalking cosmonauts also installed micrometeoroid debris shields on the exterior of the Zvezda service module and deployed a small science satellite.

  17. Russian EVA 26

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-15

    ISS025-E-015066 (15 Nov. 2010) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, Expedition 25 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Skripochka and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a multipurpose workstation on the starboard side of the Zvezda Service Module’s large-diameter section and relocated a television camera from one end of the Rassvet docking compartment to the other.

  18. Russian EVA 26

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-15

    ISS025-E-015217 (15 Nov. 2010) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, Expedition 25 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Skripochka and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a multipurpose workstation on the starboard side of the Zvezda Service Module’s large-diameter section and relocated a television camera from one end of the Rassvet docking compartment to the other.

  19. Russian EVA-31 spacewalk

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-20

    ISS032-E-020884 (20 Aug. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko, Expedition 32 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 51-minute spacewalk, Malenchenko and Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka (out of frame), commander, moved the Strela-2 cargo boom from the Pirs docking compartment to the Zarya module to prepare Pirs for its eventual replacement with a new Russian multipurpose laboratory module. The two spacewalking cosmonauts also installed micrometeoroid debris shields on the exterior of the Zvezda service module and deployed a small science satellite.

  20. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035200 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers. A section of the space station is visible in the reflections in his helmet visor.

  1. Russian EVA 26

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-15

    ISS025-E-015071 (15 Nov. 2010) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, Expedition 25 flight engineer, wearing a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Skripochka and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), flight engineer, installed a multipurpose workstation on the starboard side of the Zvezda Service Module’s large-diameter section and relocated a television camera from one end of the Rassvet docking compartment to the other.

  2. Love during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007794 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Stanley Love, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Love and astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  3. Love during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007771 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Stanley Love, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Love and astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  4. Love during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007853 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Stanley Love, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Love and astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  5. Love during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007850 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Stanley Love, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Love and astronaut Rex Walheim (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  6. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035177 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers. Parts of solar array panels on the orbital outpost are visible in the background,

  7. Russian EVA 35

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-22

    ISS036-E-035198 (22 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 58-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) completed the replacement of a laser communications experiment with a new platform for a small optical camera system, the installation of new spacewalk aids and an inspection of antenna covers. A section of the space station is visible in the reflections in his helmet visor.

  8. Tani during EVA 14

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-01-30

    ISS016-E-026454 (30 Jan. 2008) --- Astronaut Daniel Tani, Expedition 16 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as maintenance and construction continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 10-minute spacewalk, Tani and astronaut Peggy Whitson (out of frame), commander, replaced a motor, known as the Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM), at the base of one of the station's solar wings. The BMRRM is part of the Beta Gimbal Assembly, which experienced electrical failures Dec. 8.

  9. Whitson during EVA 13

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-12-18

    ISS016-E-017370 (18 Dec. 2007) --- Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). During the 6-hour, 56-minute spacewalk, Whitson and astronaut Daniel Tani (out of frame), flight engineer, looked for the cause of partial loss of electrical power to one of the International Space Station's two Beta Gimbal Assemblies (BGA) for starboard solar wings and examined damage to the starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ). The spacewalk was the 100th for the construction and maintenance of the station.

  10. Mastracchio during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021525 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clayton Anderson (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  11. Anderson during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021558 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Anderson and Rick Mastracchio (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  12. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065750 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  13. Behnken during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    S130-E-007862 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission’s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  14. Mastracchio during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021537 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clayton Anderson (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  15. Behnken during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    S130-E-007858 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission’s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  16. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065731 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  17. Mastracchio during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021535 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clayton Anderson (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  18. Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065733 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Nicholas Patrick, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Patrick and Robert Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  19. Mastracchio during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021506 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clayton Anderson (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  20. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065751 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  1. Mastracchio during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021515 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clayton Anderson (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  2. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065722 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  3. Anderson during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021561 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Anderson and Rick Mastracchio (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  4. Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065736 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Nicholas Patrick, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Patrick and Robert Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  5. Anderson during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021562 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Anderson and Rick Mastracchio (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  6. Anderson during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021569 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Anderson and Rick Mastracchio (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  7. Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065735 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Nicholas Patrick, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Patrick and Robert Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  8. Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065734 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Nicholas Patrick, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Patrick and Robert Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  9. Mastracchio during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021529 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clayton Anderson (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  10. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065720 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  11. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065758 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  12. Mastracchio during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021503 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clayton Anderson (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  13. Mastracchio during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-11

    ISS023-E-021510 (11 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 26-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and astronaut Clayton Anderson (out of frame), mission specialist, unhooked and removed the depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the station’s Starboard 1 truss, completing the second of a three-spacewalk coolant tank replacement process.

  14. EVA Performance Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peacock, Brian; Maida, James; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2004-01-01

    Astronaut physical performance capabilities in micro gravity EV A or on planetary surfaces when encumbered by a life support suit and debilitated by a long exposure to micro gravity will be less than unencumbered pre flight capabilities. The big question addressed by human factors engineers is: what can the astronaut be expected to do on EVA or when we arrive at a planetary surface? A second question is: what aids to performance will be needed to enhance the human physical capability? These questions are important for a number of reasons. First it is necessary to carry out accurate planning of human physical demands to ensure that time and energy critical tasks can be carried out with confidence. Second it is important that the crew members (and their ground or planetary base monitors) have a realistic picture of their own capabilities, as excessive fatigue can lead to catastrophic failure. Third it is important to design appropriate equipment to enhance human sensory capabilities, locomotion, materials handling and manipulation. The evidence from physiological research points to musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and neurovestibular degradation during long duration exposure to micro gravity . The evidence from the biomechanics laboratory (and the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory) points to a reduction in range of motion, strength and stamina when encumbered by a pressurized suit. The evidence from a long history of EVAs is that crewmembers are indeed restricted in their physical capabilities. There is a wealth of evidence in the literature on the causes and effects of degraded human performance in the laboratory, in sports and athletics, in industry and in other physically demanding jobs. One approach to this challenge is through biomechanical and performance modeling. Such models must be based on thorough task analysis, reliable human performance data from controlled studies, and functional extrapolations validated in analog contexts. The task analyses currently carried

  15. Walheim during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007828 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Walheim and astronaut Stanley Love (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  16. Walheim during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007884 (11 Feb.2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Walheim and astronaut Stanley Love (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  17. Walheim during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007830 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Walheim and astronaut Stanley Love (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  18. Walheim during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007833 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Walheim and astronaut Stanley Love (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  19. Williams during EVA 6

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-01-31

    ISS014-E-13053 (31 Jan. 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14 flight engineer, participates in the first of three sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA) in nine days, as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour 55-minute spacewalk, Williams and Michael E. Lopez-Alegria (out of frame), commander and NASA space station science officer, reconfigured one of two cooling loops for the Destiny laboratory module, rearranged electrical connections and secured the starboard radiator of the P6 truss after retraction.

  20. Williams during EVA 7

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-02-04

    ISS014-E-13328 (4 Feb. 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14 flight engineer, uses a digital still camera to expose a photo of her helmet visor during today's session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the spacewalk, Williams and Michael E. Lopez-Alegria (out of frame), commander and NASA space station science officer, reconfigured the second of two cooling loops for the Destiny laboratory module, secured the aft radiator of the P6 truss after retraction and prepared the obsolete Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) for removal this summer.

  1. Whitson during EVA 14

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-01-30

    ISS016-E-026031 (30 Jan. 2008) --- Astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as maintenance and construction continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 10-minute spacewalk, Whitson and astronaut Daniel Tani (out of frame), flight engineer, replaced a motor, known as the Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM), at the base of one of the station's solar wings. The BMRRM is part of the Beta Gimbal Assembly, which experienced electrical failures Dec. 8. A blue and white Earth and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  2. Tani during EVA 14

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-01-30

    ISS016-E-026022 (30 Jan. 2008) --- The face of astronaut Daniel Tani, Expedition 16 flight engineer, is easily recognizable as he participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as maintenance and construction continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 10-minute spacewalk, Tani and astronaut Peggy Whitson (out of frame), commander, replaced a motor, known as the Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM), at the base of one of the station's solar wings. The BMRRM is part of the Beta Gimbal Assembly, which experienced electrical failures Dec. 8.

  3. Whitson during EVA 14

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-01-30

    ISS016-E-025993 (30 Jan. 2008) --- Astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as maintenance and construction continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 10-minute spacewalk, Whitson and astronaut Daniel Tani (out of frame), flight engineer, replaced a motor, known as the Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM), at the base of one of the station's solar wings. The BMRRM is part of the Beta Gimbal Assembly, which experienced electrical failures Dec. 8. A blue and white Earth and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  4. Whitson during EVA 14

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-01-30

    ISS016-E-025998 (30 Jan. 2008) --- Astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as maintenance and construction continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 10-minute spacewalk, Whitson and astronaut Daniel Tani (out of frame), flight engineer, replaced a motor, known as the Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM), at the base of one of the station's solar wings. The BMRRM is part of the Beta Gimbal Assembly, which experienced electrical failures Dec. 8. A blue and white Earth and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  5. Whitson during EVA 14

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-01-30

    ISS016-E-025989 (30 Jan. 2008) --- Astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as maintenance and construction continue on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 10-minute spacewalk, Whitson and astronaut Daniel Tani (out of frame), flight engineer, replaced a motor, known as the Bearing Motor Roll Ring Module (BMRRM), at the base of one of the station's solar wings. The BMRRM is part of the Beta Gimbal Assembly, which experienced electrical failures Dec. 8. A blue and white Earth provides the backdrop for the scene.

  6. Chamitoff during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-20

    ISS027-E-035206 (20 May 2011) --- NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff, STS-134 mission specialist, nears the completion of his role in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 19-minute spacewalk, Chamitoff and NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel (out of fame) retrieved long-duration materials exposure experiments and installed another, installed a light on one of the station's rail line handcarts, made preparations for adding ammonia to a cooling loop and installed an antenna for the External Wireless Communication system.

  7. Chamitoff during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-20

    ISS027-E-035219 (20 May 2011) --- NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff, STS-134 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 19-minute spacewalk, Chamitoff and NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel (out of fame) retrieved long-duration materials exposure experiments and installed another, installed a light on one of the station's rail line handcarts, made preparations for adding ammonia to a cooling loop and installed an antenna for the External Wireless Communication system.

  8. Chamitoff during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-20

    ISS027-E-035215 (20 May 2011) --- NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff, STS-134 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 19-minute spacewalk, Chamitoff and NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel (out of fame) retrieved long-duration materials exposure experiments and installed another, installed a light on one of the station's rail line handcarts, made preparations for adding ammonia to a cooling loop and installed an antenna for the External Wireless Communication system.

  9. Parazynski during EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-10-30

    ISS016-E-007423 (30 Oct. 2007) --- Astronaut Scott Parazynski, STS-120 mission specialist, participates in the third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 8-minute spacewalk Parazynski and astronaut Doug Wheelock (out of frame), mission specialist, installed the P6 truss segment with its set of solar arrays to its permanent home, installed a spare main bus switching unit on a stowage platform, and performed a few get-ahead tasks. Also, Parazynski inspected the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) to gather comparison data for the starboard rotary joint.

  10. Kimbrough during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-20

    S126-E-008324 (20 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Shane Kimbrough, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, Kimbrough and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, continued the process of removing debris and applying lubrication around the starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ), replaced four more of the SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies, relocated two equipment carts and applied lubrication to the station's robotic Canadarm2.

  11. Walheim during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007797 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Walheim and astronaut Stanley Love (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  12. Walheim during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-11

    S122-E-007864 (11 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-122 mission specialist, participates in the first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the almost eight-hour spacewalk, Walheim and astronaut Stanley Love (out of frame), mission specialist, installed a grapple fixture on the Columbus laboratory and prepared electrical and data connections on the module while it rested inside Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. The crewmembers also began work to replace a large nitrogen tank used for pressurizing the station's ammonia cooling system.

  13. Whitson during EVA 13

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-12-18

    ISS016-E-017499 (18 Dec. 2007) --- Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). During the 6-hour, 56-minute spacewalk, Whitson and astronaut Daniel Tani (out of frame), flight engineer, looked for the cause of partial loss of electrical power to one of the International Space Station's two Beta Gimbal Assemblies (BGA) for starboard solar wings and examined damage to the starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ). The spacewalk was the 100th for the construction and maintenance of the station. A blue and white Earth provides the background for the scene.

  14. EVA safety: Space suit system interoperability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoog, A. I.; McBarron, J. W.; Abramov, L. P.; Zvezda, A. O.

    1995-01-01

    The results and the recommendations of the International Academy of Astronautics extravehicular activities (IAA EVA) Committee work are presented. The IAA EVA protocols and operation were analyzed for harmonization procedures and for the standardization of safety critical and operationally important interfaces. The key role of EVA and how to improve the situation based on the identified EVA space suit system interoperability deficiencies were considered.

  15. EVA safety: Space suit system interoperability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoog, A. I.; McBarron, J. W.; Abramov, L. P.; Zvezda, A. O.

    1995-01-01

    The results and the recommendations of the International Academy of Astronautics extravehicular activities (IAA EVA) Committee work are presented. The IAA EVA protocols and operation were analyzed for harmonization procedures and for the standardization of safety critical and operationally important interfaces. The key role of EVA and how to improve the situation based on the identified EVA space suit system interoperability deficiencies were considered.

  16. Space shuttle EVA opportunities. [a technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, D. A., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A technology assessment is presented on space extravehicular activities (EVA) that will be possible when the space shuttle orbiter is completed and launched. The use of EVA in payload systems design is discussed. Also discussed is space crew training. The role of EVA in connection with the Large Space Telescope and Skylab are described. The value of EVA in constructing structures in space and orbital assembly is examined. Excellent color illustrations are provided which show the proposed EVA functions that were described.

  17. ChEVAS: Combining Suprarenal EVAS with Chimney Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Torella, Francesco; Chan, Tze Y. Shaikh, Usman; England, Andrew; Fisher, Robert K.; McWilliams, Richard G.

    2015-10-15

    Endovascular sealing with the Nellix{sup ®} endoprosthesis (EVAS) is a new technique to treat infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms. We describe the use of endovascular sealing in conjunction with chimney stents for the renal arteries (chEVAS) in two patients, one with a refractory type Ia endoleak and an expanding aneurysm, and one with a large juxtarenal aneurysm unsuitable for fenestrated endovascular repair (EVAR). Both aneurysms were successfully excluded. Our report confirms the utility of chEVAS in challenging cases, where suprarenal seal is necessary. We suggest that, due to lack of knowledge on its durability, chEVAS should only been considered when more conventional treatment modalities (open repair and fenestrated EVAR) are deemed difficult or unfeasible.

  18. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011440 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed one new one.

  19. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011439 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed one new one.

  20. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011480 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Yurchikhin and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  1. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011747 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (bottom center), Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  2. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011459 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Yurchikhin and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  3. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011479 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Yurchikhin and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  4. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011642 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  5. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011640 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  6. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011481 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Yurchikhin and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  7. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011477 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Yurchikhin and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  8. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011608 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  9. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011598 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed one new one.

  10. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011441 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  11. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011745 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (bottom center), Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame), Expedition 36 flight engineer, replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  12. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011593 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonauts Alexander Misurkin (left) and Fyodor Yurchikhin, both Expedition 36 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Yurchikhin replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed one new one.

  13. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011590 (24 June 2013) --- Russian cosmonauts Alexander Misurkin (left) and Fyodor Yurchikhin, both Expedition 36 flight engineers, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 34-minute spacewalk, Misurkin and Yurchikhin replaced an aging fluid flow control panel on the station's Zarya module as preventative maintenance on the cooling system for the Russian segment of the station. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with a new multipurpose laboratory module. The Russian Federal Space Agency plans to launch a combination research facility, airlock and docking port late this year on a Proton rocket. Yurchikhin and Misurkin also retrieved two science experiments and installed a new one.

  14. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008239 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  15. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008222 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  16. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008078 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  17. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008224 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  18. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008243 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  19. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008053 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  20. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008075 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  1. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008244 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  2. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008050 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  3. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008250 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  4. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008052 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  5. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008241 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  6. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008048 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  7. Bowen during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008074 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  8. Cassidy during EVA-5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-27

    S127-E-009322 (27 July 2009) --- Astronauts Tom Marshburn (left) and Christopher Cassidy, both STS-127 mission specialists, participate in the mission's fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Marshburn and Cassidy secured multi-layer insulation around the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator known as Dextre, split out power channels for two space station Control Moment Gyroscopes, installed video cameras on the front and back of the new Japanese Exposed Facility and performed a number of “get ahead” tasks, including tying down some cables and installing handrails and a portable foot restraint to aid future spacewalkers.

  9. Cassidy during EVA-5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-27

    S127-E-009248 (27 July 2009) --- Astronaut Christopher Cassidy, STS-127 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Cassidy and astronaut Tom Marshburn (out of frame), mission specialist, secured multi-layer insulation around the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator known as Dextre, split out power channels for two space station Control Moment Gyroscopes, installed video cameras on the front and back of the new Japanese Exposed Facility and performed a number of “get ahead” tasks, including tying down some cables and installing handrails and a portable foot restraint to aid future spacewalkers.

  10. Marshburn during EVA-5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-27

    S127-E-009303 (27 July 2009) --- Astronaut Tom Marshburn, STS-127 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Marshburn and astronaut Christopher Cassidy (out of frame), mission specialist, secured multi-layer insulation around the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator known as Dextre, split out power channels for two space station Control Moment Gyroscopes, installed video cameras on the front and back of the new Japanese Exposed Facility and performed a number of “get ahead” tasks, including tying down some cables and installing handrails and a portable foot restraint to aid future spacewalkers.

  11. Cassidy during EVA-5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-27

    S127-E-009315 (27 July 2009) --- Astronaut Christopher Cassidy, STS-127 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Cassidy and astronaut Tom Marshburn (out of frame), mission specialist, secured multi-layer insulation around the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator known as Dextre, split out power channels for two space station Control Moment Gyroscopes, installed video cameras on the front and back of the new Japanese Exposed Facility and performed a number of “get ahead” tasks, including tying down some cables and installing handrails and a portable foot restraint to aid future spacewalkers.

  12. Cassidy during EVA-5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-27

    S127-E-009347 (27 July 2009) --- Astronaut Christopher Cassidy, STS-127 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Cassidy and astronaut Tom Marshburn (out of frame), mission specialist, secured multi-layer insulation around the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator known as Dextre, split out power channels for two space station Control Moment Gyroscopes, installed video cameras on the front and back of the new Japanese Exposed Facility and performed a number of “get ahead” tasks, including tying down some cables and installing handrails and a portable foot restraint to aid future spacewalkers.

  13. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009727 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  14. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009942 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  15. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009941 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  16. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009939 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  17. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009932 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  18. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009915 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  19. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009940 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  20. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009726 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  1. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009930 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  2. Bowen during EVA 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-24

    S126-E-009897 (24 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Bowen and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, completed the lubrication of the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) as well as other station assembly tasks. Bowen returned to the starboard SARJ to install the final trundle bearing assembly, retracted a berthing mechanism latch on the Japanese Kibo Laboratory and reinstalled its thermal cover. Bowen also installed a video camera on the Port 1 truss and attached a Global Positioning System antenna on the Japanese Experiment Module Pressurized Section.

  3. EVA worksite analysis--use of computer analysis for EVA operations development and execution.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D

    1999-01-01

    To sustain the rate of extravehicular activity (EVA) required to assemble and maintain the International Space Station, we must enhance our ability to plan, train for, and execute EVAs. An underlying analysis capability has been developed to ensure EVA access to all external worksites as a starting point for ground training, to generate information needed for on-orbit training, and to react quickly to develop contingency EVA plans, techniques, and procedures. This paper describes the use of computer-based EVA worksite analysis techniques for EVA worksite design. EVA worksite analysis has been used to design 80% of EVA worksites on the U.S. portion of the International Space Station. With the launch of the first U.S. element of the station, EVA worksite analysis is being developed further to support real-time analysis of unplanned EVA operations. This paper describes this development and deployment of EVA worksite analysis for International Space Station (ISS) mission support.

  4. Application of Shuttle EVA Systems to Payloads. Volume 2: Payload EVA Task Completion Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Candidate payload tasks for EVA application were identified and selected, based on an analysis of four representative space shuttle payloads, and typical EVA scenarios with supporting crew timelines and procedures were developed. The EVA preparations and post EVA operations, as well as the timelines emphasizing concurrent payload support functions, were also summarized.

  5. Application of shuttle EVA systems to payloads. Volume 1: EVA systems and operational modes description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Descriptions of the EVA system baselined for the space shuttle program were provided, as well as a compendium of data on available EVA operational modes for payload and orbiter servicing. Operational concepts and techniques to accomplish representative EVA payload tasks are proposed. Some of the subjects discussed include: extravehicular mobility unit, remote manipulator system, airlock, EVA translation aids, restraints, workstations, tools and support equipment.

  6. Post-Shuttle EVA Operations on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Bill; Witt, Vincent; Chullen, Cinda

    2010-01-01

    The EVA hardware used to assemble and maintain the ISS was designed with the assumption that it would be returned to Earth on the Space Shuttle for ground processing, refurbishment, or failure investigation (if necessary). With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, a new concept of operations was developed to enable EVA hardware (EMU, Airlock Systems, EVA tools, and associated support equipment and consumables) to perform ISS EVAs until 2016 and possibly beyond to 2020. Shortly after the decision to retire the Space Shuttle was announced, NASA and the One EVA contractor team jointly initiated the EVA 2010 Project. Challenges were addressed to extend the operating life and certification of EVA hardware, secure the capability to launch EVA hardware safely on alternate launch vehicles, and protect EMU hardware operability on orbit for long durations.

  7. Real-Time EVA Troubleshooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Parazynski focused on the Shuttle Transportation System (STS)-120 Solar Array Repair Extravehicular Activity (EVA) with personal anecdotes and then spoke about what it takes to have a successful EVA during the event, what types of problems can occur during an EVA, particularly with the spacesuit and the safety of the crew, and how to resolve these quickly, safely, and efficiently. He also described the participants and the types of decisions and actions each had to take to ensure success. He described "Team 4," in Houston and on-orbit, as well as anecdotes from his STS-86 and STS-100 missions. Parazynski provided a retrospective on the EVA tools and procedures NASA used in the aftermath of Columbia for shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) inspection and repair. He described his role as the lead astronaut during this effort, and covered all the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL), KC-135, precision air-bearing floor (PABF), vacuum chamber, and 1-G testing performed to develop the tools and techniques that were flown. Parazynski discussed how the EVA community worked together to resolve a huge safety issue, and how his work in the spacesuit was critical to overcoming a design limitation of the Space Shuttle.

  8. EVA dosimetry in manned spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Thomson, I

    1999-12-06

    Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) will become a large part of the astronaut's work on board the International Space Station (ISS). It is already well known that long duration space missions inside a spacecraft lead to radiation doses which are high enough to be a significant health risk to the crew. The doses received during EVA, however, have not been quantified to the same degree. This paper reviews the space radiation environment and the current dose limits to critical organs. Results of preliminary radiation dosimetry experiments on the external surface of the BION series of satellites indicate that EVA doses will vary considerably due to a number of factors such as EVA suit shielding, temporal fluctuations and spacecraft orbit and shielding. It is concluded that measurement of doses to crew members who engage in EVA should be done on board the spacecraft. An experiment is described which will lead the way to implementing this plan on the ISS. It is expected that results of this experiment will help future crew mitigate the risks of ionising radiation in space.

  9. EVA Systems Technology Gaps and Priorities 2017

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Brian J.; Buffington, Jesse A.

    2017-01-01

    Performance of Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) has been and will continue to be a critical capability for human space flight. Human exploration missions beyond LEO will require EVA capability for either contingency or nominal activities to support mission objectives and reduce mission risk. EVA systems encompass a wide array of products across pressure suits, life support systems, EVA tools and unique spacecraft interface hardware (i.e. EVA Translation Paths and EVA Worksites). In a fiscally limited environment with evolving transportation and habitation options, it is paramount that the EVA community's strategic planning and architecture integration products be reviewed and vetted for traceability between the mission needs far into the future to the known technology and knowledge gaps to the current investments across EVA systems. To ascertain EVA technology and knowledge gaps many things need to be brought together, assessed and analyzed. This includes an understanding of the destination environments, various mission concept of operations, current state of the art of EVA systems, EVA operational lessons learned, and reference advanced capabilities. A combined assessment of these inputs should result in well-defined list of gaps. This list can then be prioritized depending on the mission need dates and time scale of the technology or knowledge gap closure plan. This paper will summarize the current state of EVA related technology and knowledge gaps derived from NASA's Exploration EVA Reference Architecture and Operations Concept products. By linking these products and articulating NASA's approach to strategic development for EVA across all credible destinations an EVA could be done in, the identification of these gaps is then used to illustrate the tactical and strategic planning for the EVA technology development portfolio. Finally, this paper illustrates the various "touch points" with other human exploration risk identification areas including human health and

  10. EVA console personnel during STS-61 simulations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-09-01

    Susan P. Rainwater monitors an extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation from the EVA console at JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC) during joint integrated simulations for the STS-61 mission. Astronauts assigned to extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were simultaneously rehearsing in a neutral buoyancy tank at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Alabama.

  11. Advanced EVA system design requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Design requirements and criteria for the Space Station Advanced Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) including crew enclosures, portable life support systems, maneuvering propulsion systems, and related extravehicular activity (EVA) support equipment were defined and established. The EVA mission requirements, environments, and medical and physiological requirements, as well as opertional, procedures, and training issues were considered.

  12. Miniature EVA Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey

    2012-01-01

    As NASA embarks upon developing the Next-Generation Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Radio for deep space exploration, the demands on EVA battery life will substantially increase. The number of modes and frequency bands required will continue to grow in order to enable efficient and complex multi-mode operations including communications, navigation, and tracking applications. Whether conducting astronaut excursions, communicating to soldiers, or first responders responding to emergency hazards, NASA has developed an innovative, affordable, miniaturized, power-efficient software defined radio that offers unprecedented power-efficient flexibility. This lightweight, programmable, S-band, multi-service, frequency- agile EVA software defined radio (SDR) supports data, telemetry, voice, and both standard and high-definition video. Features include a modular design, an easily scalable architecture, and the EVA SDR allows for both stationary and mobile battery powered handheld operations. Currently, the radio is equipped with an S-band RF section. However, its scalable architecture can accommodate multiple RF sections simultaneously to cover multiple frequency bands. The EVA SDR also supports multiple network protocols. It currently implements a Hybrid Mesh Network based on the 802.11s open standard protocol. The radio targets RF channel data rates up to 20 Mbps and can be equipped with a real-time operating system (RTOS) that can be switched off for power-aware applications. The EVA SDR's modular design permits implementation of the same hardware at all Network Nodes concept. This approach assures the portability of the same software into any radio in the system. It also brings several benefits to the entire system including reducing system maintenance, system complexity, and development cost.

  13. Space Station EVA System Evolution Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouen, Michael N. (Technical Monitor); Slade, H. G.; Panzarella, L. N.; Anderson, D. E.; Simonds, C.

    1990-01-01

    Evaluation of Space Station Freedom support of manned exploration is in progress to identify SSF EVA system evolution requirements and capabilities. The output from these studies will provide data to support the preliminary design process to ensure that Space Station EVA system requirements for future missions (including the Transportation Node) are adequately considered and reflected. The study considers SSF support of future missions and the EVA system baseline to determine adequacy of EVA requirements and capabilities, and to identify additional requirements, capabilities, and necessary technology upgrades. EVA demands levied by formal requirements and indicated by evolution mission scenarios are high for the out-years of Space Station Freedom. An EVA system designed to meet the baseline requirements can easily evolve to meet evolution demands with few exceptions. Results to date indicate that upgrades or modifications to the EVA system may be necessary to meet all forseeable hangar induced EVA environments. Work continues to quantity the EVA capability in this regard. Evolution mission scenarios with EVA in and around unshielded nuclear propulsion engines are inconsistent with anthropomorphic EVA capabilities.

  14. GEMINI-9 - EARTH SKY - EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-05

    S66-38050 (5 June 1966) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan took this close-up view of the Gemini-9A spacecraft during his extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Gemini-9A mission. Taken during the 32nd revolution of the 72-hour, 21-minute spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA

  15. European EVA decompression sickness risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Lorenz; Wenzel, Jürgen; Skoog, A. I.; Luck, S.; Svensson, Bengt

    For the first manned flight of Hermes there will be a capability of performing EVA. The European EVA Space Suit will be an anthropomorphic system with an internal pressure of 500 hPa of pure oxygen. The pressure reduction from the Hermes cabin pressure of 1013 hPa will induce a risk for Decompression Sickness (DCS) for the EVA crewmember if no adequate protective procedures are implemented. Specific decompression procedures have to be developed. From a critical review of the literature and by using knowledge gained from research conducted in the past in the fields of diving and aerospace medicine safe protective procedures are proposed for the European EVA scenario. An R factor of 1.2 and a tissue half-time ( t1/2) of 360 minutes in a single-tissue model have been identified as appropriate operational values. On the basis of an acceptable risk level of approximately 1%, oxygen prebreathing times are proposed for (a) direct pressure reduction from 1013 hPa to a suit pressure of 500 hPa, and (b) staged decompression using a 700 hPa intermediate stage in the spacecraft cabin. In addition, factors which influence individual susceptibility to DCS are identified. Recommendations are also given in the areas of crew selection and medical monitoring requirements together with therapeutic measures that can be implemented in the Hermes scenario. A method for demonstration of the validity of proposed risks and procedures is proposed.

  16. The Education of Eva Hoffman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proefriedt, William

    1991-01-01

    Reviews the autobiography of Eva Hoffman, "Lost in Translation: A Life in a New Language" (Dutton, 1989). Hoffman, whose family left Poland in the 1950s, offers a consciously bicultural view of the immigrant experience, in contrast to many autobiographies of those who forsake the old world for the new. (DM)

  17. Post-Shuttle EVA Operations on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Witt, Vincent; Chullen, Cinda

    2010-01-01

    The expected retirement of the NASA Space Transportation System (also known as the Space Shuttle ) by 2011 will pose a significant challenge to Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) on-board the International Space Station (ISS). The EVA hardware currently used to assemble and maintain the ISS was designed assuming that it would be returned to Earth on the Space Shuttle for refurbishment, or if necessary for failure investigation. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, a new concept of operations was developed to enable EVA hardware (Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Airlock Systems, EVA tools, and associated support hardware and consumables) to perform ISS EVAs until 2015, and possibly beyond to 2020. Shortly after the decision to retire the Space Shuttle was announced, the EVA 2010 Project was jointly initiated by NASA and the One EVA contractor team. The challenges addressed were to extend the operating life and certification of EVA hardware, to secure the capability to launch EVA hardware safely on alternate launch vehicles, to protect for EMU hardware operability on-orbit, and to determine the source of high water purity to support recharge of PLSSs (no longer available via Shuttle). EVA 2010 Project includes the following tasks: the development of a launch fixture that would allow the EMU Portable Life Support System (PLSS) to be launched on-board alternate vehicles; extension of the EMU hardware maintenance interval from 3 years (current certification) to a minimum of 6 years (to extend to 2015); testing of recycled ISS Water Processor Assembly (WPA) water for use in the EMU cooling system in lieu of water resupplied by International Partner (IP) vehicles; development of techniques to remove & replace critical components in the PLSS on-orbit (not routine); extension of on-orbit certification of EVA tools; and development of an EVA hardware logistical plan to support the ISS without the Space Shuttle. Assumptions for the EVA 2010 Project included no more

  18. EVA 2 - MS Wolf with EVA tool kit on SSRMS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-10

    STS112-709-073K (10 October 2002) --- Astronaut David A. Wolf, STS-112 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) or Canadarm2, carries the Starboard One (S1) outboard nadir external camera. The camera was installed on the end of the S1 Truss on the International Space Station (ISS) during the mission’s first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA).

  19. EVA 2 - MS Wolf with EVA tool kit on SSRMS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-10

    STS112-709-073N (10 October 2002) --- Astronaut David A. Wolf, STS-112 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) or Canadarm2, carries the Starboard One (S1) outboard nadir external camera. The camera was installed on the end of the S1 Truss on the International Space Station (ISS) during the mission’s first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA).

  20. Mars EVA Suit Airlock (MESA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, Stephen; Böttcher, Jörg; Steinsiek, Frank

    The Astrium Space Infrastructure Division has begun an in-house research activity of an Earth-based simulation facility supporting future manned missions to Mars. This research unit will help to prepare and support planned missions in the following ways: 1) to enable the investigation and analysis of contamination issues in advance of a human visit to Mars; 2) as a design tool to investigate and simulate crew operations; 3) to simulate crew operation during an actual mission; 4) to enable on-surface scientific operations without leaving the shirt-sleeve habitation environment ("glove box principle"). The MESA module is a surface EVA facility attached to the main habitation or laboratory module, or mobile pressurized rover. It will be sealed, but not pressurized, and provide protection against the harsh Martian environment. This module will include a second crew airlock for safety reasons. The compartment can also be used to provide an external working bench and experiment area for the crew. A simpler MESA concept provides only an open shelter against wind and dust. This concept does not incorporate working and experimental areas. The principle idea behind the MESA concept is to tackle the issue of contamination by minimizing the decontamination processes needed to clean surface equipment and crew suit surfaces after an EVA excursion prior to the astronaut re-entering the habitable area. The technical solution envisages the use of a dedicated crew suit airlock. This airlock uses an EVA suit which is externally attached by its back-pack to the EVA compartment area facing the Martian environment. The crew donns the suit from inside the habitable volume through the airlock on the back of the suit. The surface EVA can be accomplished after closing the back-pack and detaching the suit. A special technical design concept foresees an extendable suit back-pack, so that the astronaut can operate outside and in the vincinity of the module. The key driver in the investigation

  1. EVA Radio DRATS 2011 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, Aaron J.; Bakula, Casey J.

    2012-01-01

    In the Fall of 2011, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) participated in the Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) field experiments held near Flagstaff, Arizona. The objective of the DRATS outing is to provide analog mission testing of candidate technologies for space exploration, especially those technologies applicable to human exploration of extra- terrestrial rocky bodies. These activities are performed at locations with similarities to extra-terrestrial conditions. This report describes the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Dual-Band Radio Communication System which was demonstrated during the 2011 outing. The EVA radio system is designed to transport both voice and telemetry data through a mobile ad hoc wireless network and employs a dual-band radio configuration. Some key characteristics of this system include: 1. Dual-band radio configuration. 2. Intelligent switching between two different capability wireless networks. 3. Self-healing network. 4. Simultaneous data and voice communication.

  2. Interfacing with an EVA Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy

    2011-01-01

    A NASA spacesuit under the EVA Technology Domain consists of a suit system; a PLSS; and a Power, Avionics, and Software (PAS) system. Ross described the basic functions, components, and interfaces of the PLSS, which consists of oxygen, ventilation, and thermal control subsystems; electronics; and interfaces. Design challenges were reviewed from a packaging perspective. Ross also discussed the development of the PLSS over the last two decades.

  3. EVA 22 photos camera 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-09

    ISS036-E-016625 (9 July 2013) --- Anchored to a Canadarm2 mobile foot restraint, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Parmitano and NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (out of frame), flight engineer, prepared the space station for a new Russian module and performed additional installations on the station’s backbone.

  4. EVA 22 photos camera 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-09

    ISS036-E-016630 (9 July 2013) --- Anchored to a Canadarm2 mobile foot restraint, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 36 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Parmitano and NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (out of frame), flight engineer, prepared the space station for a new Russian module and performed additional installations on the station’s backbone.

  5. View taken during EVA 29

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-03

    ISS028-E-020778 (3 Aug. 2011) --- Russian cosmonauts Sergei Volkov and Alexander Samokutyaev (out of frame), both Expedition 28 flight engineers, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Russian segment of the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 23-minute spacewalk, Volkov and Samokutyaev moved a cargo boom from one airlock to another, installed a prototype laser communications system and deployed an amateur radio micro-satellite.

  6. View taken during EVA 29

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-03

    ISS028-E-020805 (3 Aug. 2011) --- Russian cosmonauts Sergei Volkov and Alexander Samokutyaev (out of frame), both Expedition 28 flight engineers, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Russian segment of the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 23-minute spacewalk, Volkov and Samokutyaev moved a cargo boom from one airlock to another, installed a prototype laser communications system and deployed an amateur radio micro-satellite.

  7. View taken during EVA 29

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-03

    ISS028-E-020792 (3 Aug. 2011) --- Russian cosmonauts Sergei Volkov and Alexander Samokutyaev (out of frame), both Expedition 28 flight engineers, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Russian segment of the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 23-minute spacewalk, Volkov and Samokutyaev moved a cargo boom from one airlock to another, installed a prototype laser communications system and deployed an amateur radio micro-satellite.

  8. View taken during EVA 29

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-03

    ISS028-E-020782 (3 Aug. 2011) --- Russian cosmonauts Sergei Volkov and Alexander Samokutyaev (out of frame), both Expedition 28 flight engineers, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Russian segment of the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 23-minute spacewalk, Volkov and Samokutyaev moved a cargo boom from one airlock to another, installed a prototype laser communications system and deployed an amateur radio micro-satellite.

  9. STS-64 Mission Photograph - Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Mark Lee floats freely as he tests the new backpack called the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. SAFER is designed for use in the event a crew member becomes untethered while conducting an EVA. The STS-64 mission marked the first untethered U.S. EVA in 10 years, and was launched on September 9, 1994, aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery.

  10. Climbing the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Wall - Safely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuentes, Jose; Greene, Stacie

    2010-01-01

    The success of the EVA team, that includes the EVA project office, Crew Office, Mission Operations, Engineering and Safety, is assured by the full integration of all necessary disciplines. Safety participation in all activities from hardware development concepts, certification and crew training, provides for a strong partnership within the team. Early involvement of Safety on the EVA team has mitigated risk and produced a high degree of mission success.

  11. EVA space construction - Experience and fundamental issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Watson, Judith J.; Ross, Jerry L.; Spring, Sherwood C.; Havens, Kathryn A.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented from EVA space construction studies performed in 1 g, simulated 0 g, and on-orbit. The studies include tests of astronaut participation on the Mobile Work Station concept and the Swing-Arm Beam Erector. Also, results from the Experimental Assembly of Structures in EVA and the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structure programs are summarized. EVA construction applications for the Space Station are discussed and construction scenarios are developed.

  12. EVA Systems Flight Controller Talks With Students

    NASA Image and Video Library

    From NASA's International Space Station Mission Control Center, EVA Systems Flight Controller Sandy Fletcher participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students from Northtowne Ele...

  13. Advanced EVA system design requirements study: EVAS/space station system interface requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, T. G.

    1985-01-01

    The definition of the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) systems interface requirements and accomodations for effective integration of a production EVA capability into the space station are contained. A description of the EVA systems for which the space station must provide the various interfaces and accomodations are provided. The discussion and analyses of the various space station areas in which the EVA interfaces are required and/or from which implications for EVA system design requirements are derived, are included. The rationale is provided for all EVAS mechanical, fluid, electrical, communications, and data system interfaces as well as exterior and interior requirements necessary to facilitate EVA operations. Results of the studies supporting these discussions are presented in the appendix.

  14. Mission control activity during STS-61 EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-12-07

    Flight controller Susan P. Rainwater observes as two astronauts work through a lengthy period of extravehicular activity (EVA) in the cargo bay of the Earth-looking Space Shuttle Endeavour. Rainwater's EVA console was one of Mission Control's busiest during this eleven-day Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission in Earth orbit.

  15. Advanced EVA system design requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, T. G.

    1988-01-01

    The results are presented of a study to identify specific criteria regarding space station extravehicular activity system (EVAS) hardware requirements. Key EVA design issues include maintainability, technology readiness, LSS volume vs. EVA time available, suit pressure/cabin pressure relationship and productivity effects, crew autonomy, integration of EVA as a program resource, and standardization of task interfaces. A variety of DOD EVA systems issues were taken into consideration. Recommendations include: (1) crew limitations, not hardware limitations; (2) capability to perform all of 15 generic missions; (3) 90 days on-orbit maintainability with 50 percent duty cycle as minimum; and (4) use by payload sponsors of JSC document 10615A plus a Generic Tool Kit and Specialized Tool Kit description. EVA baseline design requirements and criteria, including requirements of various subsystems, are outlined. Space station/EVA system interface requirements and EVA accommodations are discussed in the areas of atmosphere composition and pressure, communications, data management, logistics, safe haven, SS exterior and interior requirements, and SS airlock.

  16. "Astronaut STS-123 EVA 1, NBL Training"

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-18

    • Event (Mission for flight / Class for training): STS-118 (13A.1) • Title: STS-118 EVA 1 NBL • Date: 4-18-07 • Location: NBL • Key words: 118, 13A.1, S5, NBL • Description: NBL underwater photos of STS-118 EVA 1 S5 install.

  17. EVA 2010: Preparing for International Space Station EVA Operations Post-Space Shuttle Retirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; West, William W.

    2010-01-01

    The expected retirement of the NASA Space Transportation System (also known as the Space Shuttle ) by 2011 will pose a significant challenge to Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) on-board the International Space Station (ISS). The EVA hardware currently used to assemble and maintain the ISS was designed assuming that it would be returned to Earth on the Space Shuttle for refurbishment, or if necessary for failure investigation. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, a new concept of operations was developed to enable EVA hardware (Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Airlock Systems, EVA tools, and associated support hardware and consumables) to perform ISS EVAs until 2015, and possibly beyond to 2020. Shortly after the decision to retire the Space Shuttle was announced, the EVA 2010 Project was jointly initiated by NASA and the OneEVA contractor team. The challenges addressed were to extend the operating life and certification of EVA hardware, to secure the capability to launch EVA hardware safely on alternate launch vehicles, to protect for EMU hardware operability on-orbit, and to determine the source of high water purity to support recharge of PLSSs (no longer available via Shuttle). EVA 2010 Project includes the following tasks: the development of a launch fixture that would allow the EMU Portable Life Support System (PLSS) to be launched on-board alternate vehicles; extension of the EMU hardware maintenance interval from 3 years (current certification) to a minimum of 6 years (to extend to 2015); testing of recycled ISS Water Processor Assembly (WPA) water for use in the EMU cooling system in lieu of water resupplied by International Partner (IP) vehicles; development of techniques to remove & replace critical components in the PLSS on-orbit (not routine); extension of on-orbit certification of EVA tools; and development of an EVA hardware logistical plan to support the ISS without the Space Shuttle. Assumptions for the EVA 2010 Project included no more than

  18. EVA 2010: Preparing for International Space Station EVA Operations Post-Space Shuttle Retirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; West, William W.

    2010-01-01

    The expected retirement of the NASA Space Transportation System (also known as the Space Shuttle ) by 2011 will pose a significant challenge to Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) on-board the International Space Station (ISS). The EVA hardware currently used to assemble and maintain the ISS was designed assuming that it would be returned to Earth on the Space Shuttle for refurbishment, or if necessary for failure investigation. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, a new concept of operations was developed to enable EVA hardware (Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Airlock Systems, EVA tools, and associated support hardware and consumables) to perform ISS EVAs until 2015, and possibly beyond to 2020. Shortly after the decision to retire the Space Shuttle was announced, the EVA 2010 Project was jointly initiated by NASA and the OneEVA contractor team. The challenges addressed were to extend the operating life and certification of EVA hardware, to secure the capability to launch EVA hardware safely on alternate launch vehicles, to protect for EMU hardware operability on-orbit, and to determine the source of high water purity to support recharge of PLSSs (no longer available via Shuttle). EVA 2010 Project includes the following tasks: the development of a launch fixture that would allow the EMU Portable Life Support System (PLSS) to be launched on-board alternate vehicles; extension of the EMU hardware maintenance interval from 3 years (current certification) to a minimum of 6 years (to extend to 2015); testing of recycled ISS Water Processor Assembly (WPA) water for use in the EMU cooling system in lieu of water resupplied by International Partner (IP) vehicles; development of techniques to remove & replace critical components in the PLSS on-orbit (not routine); extension of on-orbit certification of EVA tools; and development of an EVA hardware logistical plan to support the ISS without the Space Shuttle. Assumptions for the EVA 2010 Project included no more than

  19. Emergency vehicle alert system (EVAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Bill; Crump, Roger; Harper, Warren; Myneni, Krishna

    1995-01-01

    The Emergency Vehicle Alert System (EVAS) program is sponsored by the NASA/MSFC Technology Utilization (TU) office. The program was conceived to support the needs of hearing impaired drivers. The objective of the program is to develop a low-cost, small device which can be located in a personal vehicle and warn the driver, via a visual means, of the approach of an emergency vehicle. Many different technologies might be developed for this purpose and each has its own advantages and drawbacks. The requirements for an acoustic detection system, appear to be pretty stringent and may not allow the development of a reliable, low-cost device in the near future. The problems include variations in the sirens between various types of emergency vehicles, distortions due to wind and surrounding objects, competing background noise, sophisticated signal processing requirements, and omni-directional coverage requirements. Another approach is to use a Radio Frequency (RF) signal between the Emergency Vehicle (EV) and the Personal Vehicle (PV). This approach requires a transmitter on each EV and a receiver in each PV, however it is virtually assured that a system can be developed which works. With this approach, the real technology issue is how to make a system work as inexpensively as possible. This report gives a brief summary of the EVAS program from its inception and concentrates on describing the activities that occurred during Phase 4. References 1-3 describe activities under Phases 1-3. In the fourth phase of the program, the major effort to be expended was in development of the microcontroller system for the PV, refinement of some system elements and packaging for demonstration purposes. An EVAS system was developed and demonstrated which used standard spread spectrum modems with minor modifications.

  20. Exploration EVA Purge Flow Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Moses; Conger, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    An advanced future spacesuit will require properly sized suit and helmet purge flow rates in order to sustain a crew member with a failed Portable Life Support System (PLSS) during an Extravehicular Activity (EVA). A computational fluid dynamics evaluation was performed to estimate the helmet purge flow rate required to washout carbon dioxide and to prevent the condensing ("fogging") of water vapor on the helmet visor. An additional investigation predicted the suit purge flow rate required to provide sufficient convective cooling to keep the crew member comfortable. This paper summarizes the results of these evaluations.

  1. Whitson after EVA 1 completed

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-14

    ISS005-E-09719 (14 August 2002) --- Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, Expedition Five flight engineer, photographed in her thermal undergarment prior to donning a Russian Orlan spacesuit, prepares for an upcoming session of extravehicular activity (EVA) from the Pirs docking compartment on the International Space Station (ISS). The spacewalk is scheduled for August 16, 2002, which will be the 42nd spacewalk at the station and the 17th based out of the station. Whitson and cosmonaut Valery G. Korzun, mission commander, will install six debris panels on the Zvezda Service Module. The panels are designed to shield Zvezda from potential space debris impacts.

  2. Exploration EVA Purge Flow Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Moses; Conger, Bruce; Campbell, Colin

    2011-01-01

    An advanced future spacesuit will require properly sized suit and helmet purge flow rates in order to sustain a crew member with a failed Portable Life Support System (PLSS) during an Extravehicular Activity (EVA). A computational fluid dynamics evaluation was performed to estimate the helmet purge flow rate required to washout carbon dioxide and to prevent the condensing ("fogging") of water vapor on the helmet visor. An additional investigation predicted the suit purge flow rate required to provide sufficient convective cooling to keep the crew member comfortable. This paper summarizes the results of these evaluations.

  3. View taken during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-07

    S88-E-5060 (12-08-98) --- Astronaut James H. Newman is seen near the Unity module during late phases of the first of three scheduled spacewalks on STS-88. At the end of the extravehicular activity (EVA), astronauts Newman and Jerry L. Ross, both mission specialists, were successful in mating 40 cables and connectors running 76 feet from the Zarya control module to Unity, with the 35-ton complex towering over Endeavour's cargo bay. The spacewalk last 7 hours and 21 minutes. This photo was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) at 03:50:28 GMT, Dec. 8.

  4. Feustel during EVA 1 Ingress

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-20

    ISS027-E-035287 (20 May 2011) --- NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel, STS-134 mission specialist, is pictured during the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 19-minute spacewalk, Feustel and astronaut Greg Chamitoff (out of fame) retrieved long-duration materials exposure experiments and installed another, installed a light on one of the station's rail line handcarts, made preparations for adding ammonia to a cooling loop and installed an antenna for the External Wireless Communication system.

  5. Feustel during EVA 1 Ingress

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-20

    ISS027-E-035266 (20 May 2011) --- NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel, STS-134 mission specialist, is pictured during the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 19-minute spacewalk, Feustel and astronaut Greg Chamitoff (out of fame) retrieved long-duration materials exposure experiments and installed another, installed a light on one of the station's rail line handcarts, made preparations for adding ammonia to a cooling loop and installed an antenna for the External Wireless Communication system.

  6. EVA 5 - Grunsfeld installs radiator

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-03-08

    STS109-315-007 (8 March 2002) --- Astronaut John M. Grunsfeld, STS-109 payload commander, anchored on the end of the Space Shuttle Columbia’s Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robotic arm, moves toward the giant Hubble Space Telescope (HST) temporarily hosted in the orbiter’s cargo bay. Astronaut Richard M. Linnehan (out of frame) works in tandem with Grunsfeld during this fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Activities for the space walk centered around the Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) to install a Cryogenic Cooler and its Cooling System Radiator.

  7. EVA Wiki - Transforming Knowledge Management for EVA Flight Controllers and Instructors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Stephanie S.; Alpert, Brian K.; Montalvo, Edwin James; Welsh, Lawrence Daren; Wray, Scott; Mavridis, Costa

    2016-01-01

    The EVA Wiki was recently implemented as the primary knowledge database to retain critical knowledge and skills in the EVA Operations group at NASA's Johnson Space Center by ensuring that information is recorded in a common, easy to search repository. Prior to the EVA Wiki, information required for EVA flight controllers and instructors was scattered across different sources, including multiple file share directories, SharePoint, individual computers, and paper archives. Many documents were outdated, and data was often difficult to find and distribute. In 2011, a team recognized that these knowledge management problems could be solved by creating an EVA Wiki using MediaWiki, a free and open-source software developed by the Wikimedia Foundation. The EVA Wiki developed into an EVA-specific Wikipedia on an internal NASA server. While the technical implementation of the wiki had many challenges, one of the biggest hurdles came from a cultural shift. Like many enterprise organizations, the EVA Operations group was accustomed to hierarchical data structures and individually-owned documents. Instead of sorting files into various folders, the wiki searches content. Rather than having a single document owner, the wiki harmonized the efforts of many contributors and established an automated revision controlled system. As the group adapted to the wiki, the usefulness of this single portal for information became apparent. It transformed into a useful data mining tool for EVA flight controllers and instructors, as well as hundreds of others that support the EVA. Program managers, engineers, astronauts, flight directors, and flight controllers in differing disciplines now have an easier-to-use, searchable system to find EVA data. This paper presents the benefits the EVA Wiki has brought to NASA's EVA community, as well as the cultural challenges it had to overcome.

  8. EVA Wiki - Transforming Knowledge Management for EVA Flight Controllers and Instructors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Stephanie S.; Alpert, Brian K.; Montalvo, Edwin James; Welsh, Lawrence Daren; Wray, Scott; Mavridis, Costa

    2016-01-01

    The EVA Wiki was recently implemented as the primary knowledge database to retain critical knowledge and skills in the EVA Operations group at NASA's Johnson Space Center by ensuring that information is recorded in a common, easy to search repository. Prior to the EVA Wiki, information required for EVA flight controllers and instructors was scattered across different sources, including multiple file share directories, SharePoint, individual computers, and paper archives. Many documents were outdated, and data was often difficult to find and distribute. In 2011, a team recognized that these knowledge management problems could be solved by creating an EVA Wiki using MediaWiki, a free and open-source software developed by the Wikimedia Foundation. The EVA Wiki developed into an EVA-specific Wikipedia on an internal NASA server. While the technical implementation of the wiki had many challenges, one of the biggest hurdles came from a cultural shift. Like many enterprise organizations, the EVA Operations group was accustomed to hierarchical data structures and individually-owned documents. Instead of sorting files into various folders, the wiki searches content. Rather than having a single document owner, the wiki harmonized the efforts of many contributors and established an automated revision controlled system. As the group adapted to the wiki, the usefulness of this single portal for information became apparent. It transformed into a useful data mining tool for EVA flight controllers and instructors, as well as hundreds of others that support EVA. Program managers, engineers, astronauts, flight directors, and flight controllers in differing disciplines now have an easier-to-use, searchable system to find EVA data. This paper presents the benefits the EVA Wiki has brought to NASA's EVA community, as well as the cultural challenges it had to overcome.

  9. Manned NEO Mission EVA Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2011-01-01

    The President has proposed to land astronauts on an asteroid by 2025. However, Manned NEO (Near Earth Objects) Missions will present a host of new and exciting problems that will need to be better defined and solved before such a mission is launched. Here I will focus on the challenges for conducting asteroidal EVAs. Specfically, crew locomotion, sampling, drilling, documentation, and instrument deployment issues arising from the micro gravity environments associated with NEOs. Therefore, novel methods and techniques will need to be developed and tested in order to achieve specific mission science objectives. Walking or driving on the surface will not be a realistic option due to the small sizes (10 s to 100 s of meters in diameter) and hence extremely low gravity of the present day known candidate NEOs. EVAs will have to be carried out with crew members either using a self propelled device (akin to the MMU and SAFER units used on Shuttle/ISS) and or tethers. When using tethers a grid system could be deployed which is anchored to the asteroid. These anchor points could be inserted by firing penetrators into the surface from the spacecraft while it is still at a safe standoff distance. These penetrators would pull double duty by being laden with scientific instrumentation to probe the subsurface. Dust and debris generated by sample collection and locomotion in a microgravity environment could also pose some problems that will require forethought.

  10. Walking to Olympus: An EVA Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portree, David S. F.; Trevino, Robert C.

    1997-01-01

    Spacewalkers enjoy a view of Earth once reserved for Apollo, Zeus, and other denizens of Mt. Olympus. During humanity's first extravehicular activity (EVA), Alexei Leonov floated above Gibraltar, the rock ancient seafarers saw as the gateway to the great unknown Atlantic. The symbolism was clear, Leonov stepped past a new Gibraltar when he stepped into space. More than 32 years and 154 EVAs later, Jerry Linenger conducted an EVA with Vladimir Tsibliyev as part of International Space Station Phase 1. They floated together above Gibraltar. Today the symbolism has new meaning: humanity is starting to think of stepping out of Earth orbit, space travel's new Gibraltar, and perhaps obtaining a new olympian view, a close-up look at Olympus Mons on Mars. Walking to Olympus: An EVA Chronology chronicles the 154 EVAs conducted from March 1965 to April 1997. It is intended to make clear the crucial role played by EVA in the history of spaceflight, as well as to chronicle the large body of EVA "lessons learned." Russia and the U.S. define EVA differently. Russian cosmonauts are said to perform EVA any time they are in vacuum in a space suit. A U.S. astronaut must have at least his head outside his spacecraft before he is said to perform an EVA. The difference is based in differing spacecraft design philoso- phies. Russian and Soviet spacecraft have always had a specialized airlock through which the EVA cosmonaut egressed, leaving the main habitable volume of the spacecraft pressurized. The U.S. Gemini and Apollo vehicles, on the other hand, depressurized their entire habitable volume for egress. In this document, we apply the Russian definition to Russian EVAS, and the U.S. definition to U.S. EVAS. Thus, for example, Gemini 4 Command Pilot James McDivitt does not share the honor of being first American spacewalker with Ed White, even though he was suited and in vacuum when White stepped out into space. Non-EVA spaceflights are listed in the chronology to provide context and to

  11. Software For Integration Of EVA And Telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drews, Michael L.; Smith, Jeffrey H.; Estus, Jay M.; Heneghan, Cate; Zimmerman, Wayne; Fiorini, Paolo; Schenker, Paul S.; Mcaffee, Douglas A.

    1991-01-01

    Telerobotics/EVA Joint Analysis Systems (TEJAS) computer program is hypermedia information software system using object-oriented programming to bridge gap between crew-EVA and telerobotics activities. TEJAS Version 1.0 contains 20 HyperCard stacks using visual, customizable interface of icon buttons, pop-up menus, and relational commands to store, link, and standardize related information about primitives, technologies, tasks, assumptions, and open issues involved in space-telerobot or crew-EVA tasks. Runs on any Apple MacIntosh personal computer.

  12. EVA Suit Microbial Leakage Investigation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, Jay; Baker, Christopher; Clayton, Ronald; Rucker, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this project is to collect microbial samples from various EVA suits to determine how much microbial contamination is typically released during simulated planetary exploration activities. Data will be released to the planetary protection and science communities, and advanced EVA system designers. In the best case scenario, we will discover that very little microbial contamination leaks from our current or prototype suit designs, in the worst case scenario, we will identify leak paths, learn more about what affects leakage--and we'll have a new, flight-certified swab tool for our EVA toolbox.

  13. Helms during EVA on the ISS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-06

    STS102-325-023 (11 March 2001) --- Astronaut Susan J. Helms completes a scheduled space walk task on the International Space Station (ISS). This extravehicular activity (EVA), on which Helms was joined by astronaut James S. Voss (out of frame), was the first of two scheduled STS-102 EVA sessions. The pair, destined to become members of the Expedition Two crew aboard the station later in the mission, rode aboard Discovery into orbit and at the time of this EVA were still regarded as STS-102 mission specialists.

  14. EVA Wiki - Transforming Knowledge Management for EVA Flight Controllers and Instructors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The EVA (Extravehicular Activity) Wiki was recently implemented as the primary knowledge database to retain critical knowledge and skills in the EVA Operations group at NASA's Johnson Space Center by ensuring that information is recorded in a common, searchable repository. Prior to the EVA Wiki, information required for EVA flight controllers and instructors was scattered across different sources, including multiple file share directories, SharePoint, individual computers, and paper archives. Many documents were outdated, and data was often difficult to find and distribute. In 2011, a team recognized that these knowledge management problems could be solved by creating an EVA Wiki using MediaWiki, a free and open-source software developed by the Wikimedia Foundation. The EVA Wiki developed into an EVA-specific Wikipedia on an internal NASA server. While the technical implementation of the wiki had many challenges, the one of the biggest hurdles came from a cultural shift. Like many enterprise organizations, the EVA Operations group was accustomed to hierarchical data structures and individually-owned documents. Instead of sorting files into various folders, the wiki searches content. Rather than having a single document owner, the wiki harmonized the efforts of many contributors and established an automated revision control system. As the group adapted to the wiki, the usefulness of this single portal for information became apparent. It transformed into a useful data mining tool for EVA flight controllers and instructors, and also for hundreds of other NASA and contract employees. Program managers, engineers, astronauts, flight directors, and flight controllers in differing disciplines now have an easier-to-use, searchable system to find EVA data. This paper presents the benefits the EVA Wiki has brought to NASA's EVA community, as well as the cultural challenges it had to overcome.

  15. Korzun after EVA 1 completed

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-14

    ISS005-E-09725 (14 August 2002) --- Cosmonaut Valery G. Korzun, Expedition Five mission commander, attired in his thermal undergarment prior to donning a Russian Orlan spacesuit, prepares for an upcoming session of extravehicular activity (EVA) from the Pirs docking compartment on the International Space Station (ISS). The spacewalk is scheduled for August 16, 2002, which will be the 42nd spacewalk at the station and the 17th based out of the station. Korzun and astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, flight engineer, will install six debris panels on the Zvezda Service Module. The panels are designed to shield Zvezda from potential space debris impacts. Korzun, who represents Rosaviakosmos, is also scheduled for a spacewalk on August 22, 2002.

  16. Astronaut Bernard Harris on RMS during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut Bernard A. Harris, Jr., payload commander, watches astronaut C. Michael Foale (out of frame), mission specialist, during the late phases of their shared extravehicular activity (EVA) in the STS-63 Space Shuttle Discovery's cargo bay.

  17. Astronaut Bernard Harris on RMS during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut Bernard A. Harris, Jr., payload commander, standing on a foot restraint attached to the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm carries astronaut C. Michael Foale, mission specialist, during their shared extravehicular activity (EVA) in the Space Shuttle Discovery's cargo bay.

  18. EVA Physiology, Systems and Performance [EPSP] Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a general overview of the biomedical and technological challenges of Extravehicular Activity (EVA). The topics covered include: 1) Prebreathe Protocols; 2) Lunar Suit Testing and Development; and 3) Lunar Electric Rover and Exploration Operations Concepts.

  19. Virts Self-Portrait during EVA 29

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-21

    The camera is reflected in his helmet visor as Extravehicular crewmember 2 (EV2) Terry Virts takes a self-portrait during Extravehicular Activity 29 (EVA 29). Image was released by astronaut on Twitter.

  20. Gemini 12 spacecraft seen during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-13

    S66-63011 (13 Nov. 1966) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot of the Gemini-12 spaceflight, took this picture of the Gemini-12 spacecraft during standup extravehicular activity (EVA) with the hatch open. Photo credit: NASA

  1. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Views - STS-41B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1984-02-12

    Astronaut Robert L. Stewart, Mission Specialist (MS), uses his hands to control his movement in space while using the nitrogen propelled Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU). He is participating in a EVA, a few meters away from the cabin of the Shuttle Challenger. MS Stewart is centered in a background of clouds and Earth in this view of his EVA. He is floating without tethers attaching him to the Shuttle.

  2. STS-64 extravehicular activity (EVA) hardware view

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-01-21

    S93-26920 (8 Sept. 1994) --- Scott Bleisath, an extravehicular activity (EVA) engineer, demonstrates the hand control module for the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system making its first flight on the scheduled September STS-64 mission. Astronauts Mark C. Lee and Carl J. Meade are the spacewalkers assigned to test the system in space. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  3. STS-64 extravehicular activity (EVA) hardware view

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-01-21

    S93-26918 (8 Sept. 1994) --- Scott Bleisath, an extravehicular activity (EVA) engineer, demonstrates the hand control module for the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system making its first flight on the scheduled September STS-64 mission. Astronauts Mark C. Lee and Carl J. Meade are the spacewalkers assigned to test the system in space. Unidentified technicians and engineers look on. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  4. EVA Health and Human Performance Benchmarking Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, A. F.; Norcross, J.; Jarvis, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple HRP Risks and Gaps require detailed characterization of human health and performance during exploration extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks; however, a rigorous and comprehensive methodology for characterizing and comparing the health and human performance implications of current and future EVA spacesuit designs does not exist. This study will identify and implement functional tasks and metrics, both objective and subjective, that are relevant to health and human performance, such as metabolic expenditure, suit fit, discomfort, suited postural stability, cognitive performance, and potentially biochemical responses for humans working inside different EVA suits doing functional tasks under the appropriate simulated reduced gravity environments. This study will provide health and human performance benchmark data for humans working in current EVA suits (EMU, Mark III, and Z2) as well as shirtsleeves using a standard set of tasks and metrics with quantified reliability. Results and methodologies developed during this test will provide benchmark data against which future EVA suits, and different suit configurations (eg, varied pressure, mass, CG) may be reliably compared in subsequent tests. Results will also inform fitness for duty standards as well as design requirements and operations concepts for future EVA suits and other exploration systems.

  5. Applications of EVA guidelines and design criteria. Volume 3: EVA systems cost model formating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, N. E.

    1973-01-01

    The development of a model for estimating the impact of manned EVA costs on future payloads is discussed. Basic information on the EV crewman requirements, equipment, physical and operational characteristics, and vehicle interfaces is provided. The cost model is being designed to allow system designers to quantify the impact of EVA on vehicle and payload systems.

  6. Power assist EVA glove development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Main, John A.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.

    1992-01-01

    Structural modeling of the EVA glove indicates that flexibility in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint can be improved by selectively lowering the elasticity of the glove fabric. Two strategies are used to accomplish this. One method uses coil springs on the back of the glove to carry the tension in the glove skin due to pressurization. These springs carry the loads normally borne by the glove fabric, but are more easily deformed. An active system was also designed for the same purpose and uses gas filled bladders attached to the back of the EVA glove that change the dimensions of the back of the glove and allow the glove to bend at the MCP joint, thus providing greater flexibility at this joint. A threshold control scheme was devised to control the action of the joint actuators. Input to the controller was provided by thin resistive pressure sensors placed between the hand and the pressurized glove. The pressure sensors consist of a layer of polyester film that has a thin layer of ink screened on the surface. The resistivity of the ink is pressure dependent, so an extremely thin pressure sensor can be fabricated by covering the ink patch with another layer of polyester film and measuring the changing resistance of the ink with a bridge circuit. In order to sense the force between the hand and the glove at the MCP joint, a sensor was placed on the palmar face of the middle finger. The resultant signal was used by the controller to decide whether to fill or exhaust the bladder actuators on the back of the glove. The information from the sensor can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a given control scheme or glove design since the magnitude of the measured pressures gives some idea of the torque required to bend a glove finger at the MCP joint. Tests of this actuator, sensor, and control system were conducted in an 57.2 kPa glove box by performing a series of 90 degree finger bends with a glove without an MCP joint assembly, a glove with the coil spring

  7. Payload bay activity during second EVA of STS-72 mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-16

    STS072-393-008 (17 Jan. 1996) --- Astronaut Leroy Chiao gives a thumbs up signal, marking the success of his second extravehicular activity (EVA) in three days. Chiao was joined by astronaut Winston E. Scott on this EVA.

  8. EVA: Evryscopes for the Arctic and Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richichi, A.; Law, N.; Tasuya, O.; Fors, O.; Dennihy, E.; Carlberg, R.; Tuthill, P.; Ashley, M.; Soonthornthum, B.

    2017-06-01

    We are planning to build Evryscopes for the Arctic and Antarctic (EVA), which will enable the first ultra-wide-field, high-cadence sky survey to be conducted from both Poles. The system is based on the successful Evryscope concept, already installed and operating since 2015 at Cerro Tololo in Chile with the following characteristics: robotic operation, 8,000 square degrees simultaneous sky coverage, 2-minute cadence, milli-mag level photometric accuracy, pipelined data processing for real-time analysis and full data storage for off-line analysis. The initial location proposed for EVA is the PEARL station on Ellesmere island; later also an antarctic location shall be selected. The science goals enabled by this unique combination of almost full-sky coverage and high temporal cadence are numerous, and include among others ground-breaking forays in the fields of exoplanets, stellar variability, asteroseismology, supernovae and other transient events. The EVA polar locations will enable uninterrupted observations lasting in principle over weeks and months. EVA will be fully robotic. We discuss the EVA science drivers and expected results, and present the logistics and the outline of the project which is expected to have first light in the winter of 2018. The cost envelope can be kept very competitive thanks to R&D already employed for the CTIO Evryscope, to our experience with both Arctic and Antarctic locations, and to the use of off-the-shelf components.

  9. Advanced EVA system design requirements study, executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Design requirements and criteria for the space station advanced Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) including crew enclosures, portable life support systems, maneuvering propulsion systems, and related EVA support equipment were established. The EVA mission requirements, environments, and medical and physiological requirements, as well as operational, procedures and training issues were considered.

  10. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Microbial Swab Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    When we send humans to search for life on Mars, we'll need to know what we brought with us versus what may already be there. To ensure our crewed spacecraft meet planetary protection requirements--and to protect our science from human contamination--we'll need to know whether micro-organisms are leaking/venting from our ships and spacesuits. This is easily done by swabbing external vents and surfaces for analysis, but there was no US EVA tool for that job. NASA engineers developed an EVA-compatible swab tool that can be used to collect data on current hardware, which will influence eventual Mars life support and EVA hardware designs.

  11. A prototype power assist EVA glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Main, John A.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.

    1991-01-01

    The most recent generation of space suit EVA gloves has addressed the problem of loose fit and stiffness in the fingers, but it remains difficult to build a glove assembly with low metacarpophalangeal joint stiffness. Fatigue due to constantly displacing the glove from a neutral position has been reported as the limiting factor in some EVA activities. This paper outlines an actuation system that uses gas filled bladders attached to the back of the EVA glove to provide the necessary force to bend the glove at the metacarpal joint, thus providing greater endurance during finger grasping tasks. A simple on-off controller senses hand movement through small pressure sensors between the finger and the glove restraint. The controller then fills or exhausts the bladders on the back of the glove to effectively move the neutral position of the glove as the hand inside moves.

  12. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and Lee M.E. Morin work in tandem on the fourth scheduled EVA session for the STS-110 mission aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis. Ross is anchored on the mobile foot restraint on the International Space Station's (ISS) Canadarm2, while Morin works inside the S0 (S-zero) truss. The STS-110 mission prepared the Station for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting a 43-foot-long S0 truss and preparing the Mobile Transporter. The 27,000 pound S0 Truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and marked the first time all spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  13. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission astronauts Steven L. Smith (right) and Rex J. Walheim work in tandem on the third scheduled EVA session in which they released the locking bolts on the Mobile Transporter and rewired the Station's robotic arm (out of frame). Part of the Destiny laboratory and a glimpse of the Earth's horizon are seen in the lower portion of this digital image. The STS-110 mission prepared the International Space Station (ISS) for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting the S0 (S-zero) Truss and the Mobile Transporter. The 43-foot-long S0 truss weighing in at 27,000 pounds was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and marked the first time all spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  14. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission astronaut Rex J. Walheim, accompanied by astronaut Steven L. Smith (out of frame) translates along the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS) during the third scheduled EVA session. The duo released the locking bolts on the Mobile Transporter and rewired the Station's robotic arm. The STS-110 mission prepared the ISS for future space walks by installing and outfitting the S0 (S-Zero) Truss and the Mobile Transporter. The 43-foot-long S0 truss weighing in at 27,000 pounds was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver space walkers around the Station and marked the first time all space walks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  15. STS-110 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission astronaut Rex J. Walheim, accompanied by astronaut Steven L. Smith (out of frame) translates along the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS) during the third scheduled EVA session. The duo released the locking bolts on the Mobile Transporter and rewired the Station's robotic arm. The STS-110 mission prepared the ISS for future space walks by installing and outfitting the S0 (S-Zero) Truss and the Mobile Transporter. The 43-foot-long S0 truss weighing in at 27,000 pounds was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver space walkers around the Station and marked the first time all space walks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  16. Creating a Lunar EVA Work Envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Brand N.; Howard, Robert; Rajulu, Sudhakar; Smitherman, David

    2009-01-01

    A work envelope has been defined for weightless Extravehicular Activity (EVA) based on the Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), but there is no equivalent for planetary operations. The weightless work envelope is essential for planning all EVA tasks because it determines the location of removable parts, making sure they are within reach and visibility of the suited crew member. In addition, using the envelope positions the structural hard points for foot restraints that allow placing both hands on the job and provides a load path for reacting forces. EVA operations are always constrained by time. Tasks are carefully planned to ensure the crew has enough breathing oxygen, cooling water, and battery power. Planning first involves computers using a virtual work envelope to model tasks, next suited crew members in a simulated environment refine the tasks. For weightless operations, this process is well developed, but planetary EVA is different and no work envelope has been defined. The primary difference between weightless and planetary work envelopes is gravity. It influences anthropometry, horizontal and vertical mobility, and reaction load paths and introduces effort into doing "overhead" work. Additionally, the use of spacesuits other than the EMU, and their impacts on range of motion, must be taken into account. This paper presents the analysis leading to a concept for a planetary EVA work envelope with emphasis on lunar operations. There is some urgency in creating this concept because NASA has begun building and testing development hardware for the lunar surface, including rovers, habitats and cargo off-loading equipment. Just as with microgravity operations, a lunar EVA work envelope is needed to guide designers in the formative stages of the program with the objective of avoiding difficult and costly rework.

  17. Preparing for space - EVA training at the European Astronaut Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolender, Hans; Stevenin, Hervé; Bessone, Loredana; Torres, Antonio

    2006-11-01

    The European Astronaut Centre has developed an Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training course for ESA astronauts to bridge the gap between their scuba diving certification and the spacesuit qualification provided by NASA. ESA astronauts André Kuipers and Frank De Winne have already completed this "EVA Pre-Familiarisation Training Programme" before their training at NASA. In June 2006, an international crew of experienced EVA astronauts approved the course as good preparation for suited EVA training; they recommended that portions of it be used to help maintain EVA proficiency for astronauts.

  18. EVA Physiology and Medical Considerations Working in the Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott

    2012-01-01

    This "EVA Physiology and Medical Considerations Working in the Suit" presentation covers several topics related to the medical implications and physiological effects of suited operations in space from the perspective of a physician with considerable first-hand Extravehicular Activity (EVA) experience. Key themes include EVA physiology working in a pressure suit in the vacuum of space, basic EVA life support and work support, Thermal Protection System (TPS) inspections and repairs, and discussions of the physical challenges of an EVA. Parazynski covers the common injuries and significant risks during EVAs, as well as physical training required to prepare for EVAs. He also shares overall suit physiological and medical knowledge with the next generation of Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) system designers.

  19. Modified EVA Encapsulant Formulations for Low Temperature Processing: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Z.; Pern, F. J.; Glick, S. H.

    2001-10-01

    Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: We have developed several new ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) formulations modified on the basis of NREL patented EVA formulations [1]. The new formulations can be cured to a desired gel content of {approx}80% in the ambient at temperatures 20-30 C lower than the typical conditions in vacuum (i.e. {approx}150 C). Glass/glass laminates showed transmittance spectra that are essentially the same as that of EVA 15295P in the visible and NIR regions but higher in the UV region. Results of fluorescence analysis of the ambient-processed new EVA formulations showed the concentrations of the curing-generated {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carbonyl chromophores, which are responsible for the UV induced EVA discoloration and photodegradation, were considerably lower than that of EVA 15295P, therefore suggesting a better photochemical stability of new EVA formulations.

  20. Development of Damp-Heat Resistant Self-Primed EVA and Non-EVA Encapsulant Formulations at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Jorgensen, G. J.

    2005-11-01

    Self-primed ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) and non-EVA (PMG) encapsulant formulations were developed that have greater resistance to damp heat exposure at 85 deg C and 85% relative humidity (RH) (in terms of adhesion strength to glass substrates) than a commonly used commercial EVA product. The self-primed EVA formulations were developed on the basis of high-performing glass priming formulations that have previously proven to significantly enhance the adhesion strength of unprimed and primed EVA films on glass substrates during damp heat exposure. The PMG encapsulant formulations were based on an ethylene-methylacrylate copolymer containing glycidyl methacrylate.

  1. Fabrication of Essex EVA ratchet wrenches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanvalkenburgh, C. N.; Loughead, T. E.

    1982-01-01

    The extravehicular activity (EVA) ratchet wrench was developed. Shortly after Space Telescope (ST) maintenance simulations began, the need for a specialized maintenance tool arose. With inputs of tool requirements and design recommendations, several development model wrenches were tested in conjunction with ST neutral buoyancy simulations. The wrench design was modified and refined.

  2. STS-125 Preflight Training - EVA RCC Repair

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-04-02

    JSC2008-E-031816 (2 April 2008) --- Astronauts John M. Grunsfeld (right), Michael J. Massimino, Andrew J. Feustel and Michael T. Good, all STS-125 mission specialists, participate in an extravehicular activity (EVA) hardware training session in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Tomas Gonzalez-Torres (left) assisted the crewmembers.

  3. STS-125 Preflight Training - EVA RCC Repair

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-04-02

    JSC2008-E-031808 (2 April 2008) --- Astronauts John M. Grunsfeld (right), Andrew J. Feustel, Michael T. Good and Michael J. Massimino (second left), all STS-125 mission specialists, participate in an extravehicular activity (EVA) hardware training session in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Tomas Gonzalez-Torres (left) assisted the crewmembers.

  4. Astronaut Dale Gardner rehearses during EVA practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, 51-A mission specialist, rehearses control of manned maneuvering unit (MMU) during a practice for an extravehicular activity (EVA). Gardner is in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory at JSC. Gardner works to deploy a large stinger device designed for locking onto the orbiting satellites via entering a spent engine's nozzle.

  5. Astronaut Dale Gardner rehearses during EVA practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, 51-A mission specialist, rehearses control of manned maneuvering unit (MMU) during a practice for an extravehicular activity (EVA). Gardner is in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory at JSC. Gardner handles a stinger device to make initial contact with one of the two satellites they will be working with.

  6. Gemini 12 spacecraft seen during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-13

    S66-63007 (12 Nov. 1966) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot of the Gemini-12 spaceflight, took this picture of the Gemini-12 spacecraft during standup extravehicular activity (EVA) with the hatch open. This is a view looking forward showing the adapter section. Photo credit: NASA

  7. Gemini 12 spacecraft seen during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-13

    S66-62920 (13 Nov. 1966) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot of the Gemini-12 spaceflight, took this picture of the Gemini-12 spacecraft during standup extravehicular activity (EVA) with the hatch open. This is a view to the rear showing the adapter section. Photo credit: NASA

  8. EVA 3 - Robinson on Canadarm2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6644 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the International Space Station’;s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The blackness of space and Earth’;s horizon form the backdrop for the image.

  9. EVA 3 - Robinson on Canadarm2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6650 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the International Space Station’;s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Robinson holds a digital still camera, updated for use on spacewalks, in his left hand.

  10. EVA 3 - Robinson on Canadarm2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6646 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the International Space Station’;s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The blackness of space and Earth’;s horizon form the backdrop for the image.

  11. EVA 3 - Robinson on Canadarm2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6642 (3 Aug. 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the International Space Station’s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The blackness of space and Earth’s horizon form the backdrop for the image.

  12. EVA 3 - Robinson on Canadarm2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6647 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the International Space Station’;s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The blackness of space and Earth’;s horizon form the backdrop for the image.

  13. EVA 3 - Robinson on Canadarm2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6652 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the International Space Station’;s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’;s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). A blue and white Earth forms the backdrop for the image.

  14. Walheim and Love during EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-15

    S122-E-008750 (15 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Rex Walheim (foreground), mission specialist, shares a spacewalk task with astronaut Stanley Love (partially obscured at top of frame), mission specialist. The two astronauts had paired up for the first of three scheduled STS-122 sessions of extravehicular activity earlier in the week and came back out for this final EVA on Feb. 15.

  15. Active personal radiation monitor for lunar EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straume, Tore; Borak, Tom; Braby, L. A.; Lusby, Terry; Semones, Edward J.; Vazquez, Marcelo E.

    As astronauts return to the Moon-and this time, work for extended periods-there will be a critical need for crew personnel radiation monitoring as they operate lunar rovers or otherwise perform a myriad of extravehicular activities (EVAs). Our focus is on development of a small personal radiation monitor for lunar EVA that responds to the complex radiation quality and changing dose rates on the Moon. Of particular concern are active monitoring capabilities that provide both early warning and radiation dosimetry information during solar particle events (SPEs). To accomplish this, we are developing small detectors integrated with modern high speed, low power microelectronics to measure dose-rate and dose-mean lineal energy in real time. The monitor is designed to perform over the range of dose rates and LETs expected from both GCR and SPE radiations during lunar EVA missions. The monitor design provides simultaneous measurement of dose-equivalent rates at two tissue-equivalent depths simulating skin and marrow. The compact personal monitor is estimated to be the size of a cell phone and would fit on an EVA spacesuit (e.g., in backpack) or in a toolbox. The four-year development effort (which began December 2007) will result in a prototype radiation monitor field tested and characterized for the major radiations expected on the surface of the Moon. We acknowledge support from NSBRI through grants to NASA Ames Research Center (T. Straume, PI) and Colorado State University (T. Borak, PI).

  16. Astronaut Dale Gardner rehearses during EVA practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, 51-A mission specialist, rehearses control of manned maneuvering unit (MMU) during a practice for an extravehicular activity (EVA). Gardner is in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory at JSC. Gardner handles a stinger device to make initial contact with one of the two satellites they will be working with.

  17. Tile survey seen during EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6396 (3 August 2005) --- Space Shuttle Discovery’s underside thermal protection tiles are featured in this image photographed by astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, during the mission’s third session of extravehicular activities (EVA). Lake Nasser along the Nile River, Egypt is visible near Discovery’s starboard wing.

  18. Fuglesang replaces TV Camera during first EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-13

    ISS014-E-09561 (12 Dec. 2006) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Christer Fuglesang, STS-116 mission specialist, replaces a faulty TV camera on the exterior of the International Space Station during the mission's first of three planned sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam, Jr. (out of frame), mission specialist, also participated in the 6-hour, 36-minute spacewalk.

  19. Scott and Doi conduct second EVA activities.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-12-03

    STS087-375-015 (19 November – 5 December 1997) --- Astronaut Winston E. Scott, mission specialist, during one of two extravehicular activities (EVA) in the cargo bay of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia, is backdropped against a blue “blanket” of ocean water. This view was taken with a 35mm camera.

  20. Foreman completes EVA 2 during Joint Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-16

    S123-E-006420 (16 March 2008) --- Attired in his Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuit, astronaut Mike Foreman, STS-123 mission specialist, gives a "thumbs-up" signal in the Quest Airlock of the International Space Station as the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) draws to a close. Astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, assisted Foreman.

  1. MS Wolf leaves airlock during EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-14

    STS112-E-05516 (14 October 2002) --- Astronaut David A. Wolf, STS-112 mission specialist, exits the Quest Airlock on the International Space Station (ISS) to begin the third and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-112 mission. Astronaut Piers J. Sellers (out of frame), mission specialist, joined Wolf on the spacewalk.

  2. MS Wolf prepares for EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-12

    STS112-E-5239 (12 October 2002) --- Astronaut David A. Wolf, STS-112 mission specialist, is only a helmet donning and several minutes away from being ready for the mission's second extravehicular activity (EVA). Wolf was later joined by astronaut Piers J. Sellers for the six hour, four minute spacewalk.

  3. Improved flexibility of an EVA glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggeman, G. W.; Held, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    A student design contest was held between four universities. The project was to improve the flexibility of the NASA extra-vehicular activities (EVA) glove with the internal pressure increased from 4 psi to 8 psi. The Kansas State University team used an experimental design methodology and an industrial management scheme. This approach succeeded in making Kansas State University the winner of the competition.

  4. Effective Teamwork: The EVA NBL Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, Lori

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the experience of improving the operation of the ExtraVehiclar Activity (EVA) Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory as a team of NASA employees and contractors. It reviews specific recommendations to use in turning a struggling organization around as a NASA/contractor team

  5. EVA - A Textual Data Processing Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakopin, Primoz

    EVA, a text processing tool designed to be self-contained and useful for a variety of languages, is described briefly, and its extensive coded character set is illustrated. Features, specifications, and database functions are noted. Its application in development of a Slovenian literary dictionary is also described. (MSE)

  6. CETA truck and EVA restraint system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beals, David C.; Merson, Wayne R.

    1991-01-01

    The Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) experiment is an extravehicular activity (EVA) Space Transportation System (STS) based flight experiment which will explore various modes of transporting astronauts and light equipment for Space Station Freedom (SSF). The basic elements of CETA are: (1) two 25 foot long sections of monorail, which will be EVA assembled in the STS cargo bay to become a single 50 ft. rail called the track; (2) a wheeled baseplate called the truck which rolls along the track and can accept three cart concepts; and (3) the three carts which are designated manual, electric, and mechanical. The three carts serve as the astronaut restraint and locomotive interfaces with the track. The manual cart is powered by the astronaut grasping the track's handrail and pulling himself along. The electric cart is operated by an astronaut turning a generator which powers the electric motor and drives the cart. The mechanical cart is driven by a Bendix type transmission and is similar in concept to a man-propelled railroad cart. During launch and landing, the truck is attached to the deployable track by means of EVA removable restraint bolts and held in position by a system of retractable shims. These shims are positioned on the exterior of the rail for launch and landing and rotate out of the way for the duration of the experiment. The shims are held in position by strips of Velcro nap, which rub against the sides of the shim and exert a tailored force. The amount of force required to rotate the shims was a major EVA concern, along with operational repeatability and extreme temperature effects. The restraint system was tested in a thermal-vac and vibration environment and was shown to meet all of the initial design requirements. Using design inputs from the astronauts who will perform the EVA, CETA evolved through an iterative design process and represented a cooperative effort.

  7. One hundred US EVAs: a perspective on spacewalks.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Richard C; McBarron, James W; Manatt, Scott A; McMann, Harold J; Fullerton, Richard K

    2002-01-01

    In the 36 years between June 1965 and February 2001, the US human space flight program has conducted 100 spacewalks, or extravehicular activities (EVAs), as NASA officially calls them. EVA occurs when astronauts wearing spacesuits travel outside their protective spacecraft to perform tasks in the space vacuum environment. US EVA started with pioneering feasibility tests during the Gemini Program. The Apollo Program required sending astronauts to the moon and performing EVA to explore the lunar surface. EVA supported scientific mission objectives of the Skylab program, but may be best remembered for repairing launch damage to the vehicle and thus saving the program. EVA capability on Shuttle was initially planned to be a kit that could be flown at will, and was primarily intended for coping with vehicle return emergencies. The Skylab emergency and the pivotal role of EVA in salvaging that program quickly promoted Shuttle EVA to an essential element for achieving mission objectives, including retrieving satellites and developing techniques to assemble and maintain the International Space Station (ISS). Now, EVA is supporting assembly of ISS. This paper highlights development of US EVA capability within the context of the overarching mission objectives of the US human space flight program. c2002 International Astronautical Federation. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. EVA-Compatible Microbial Swab Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    When we send humans to search for life on Mars, we'll need to know what we brought with us versus what may already be there. To ensure our crewed spacecraft meet planetary protection requirements—and to protect our science from human contamination—we'll need to know whether micro-organisms are leaking/venting from our ships and spacesuits. This is easily done by swabbing external vents and suit surfaces for analysis, but requires a specialized tool for the job. Engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently developed an Extravehicular Activity (EVA)-compatible swab tool that can be used to sample current space suits and life support systems. Data collected now will influence Mars life support and EVA hardware early in the planning process, before design changes become difficult and expensive.NASA’s EVA swab tool pairs a Space Shuttle-era tool handle with a commercially available swab tip mounted into a custom-designed end effector. A glove-compatible release mechanism allows the handle to quickly switch between swab tips, much like a shaving razor handle can snap onto a disposable blade cartridge. Swab tips are stowed inside individual sterile containers, each fitted with a microbial filter that allows the container to equalize atmospheric pressure, but prevents cabin contaminants from rushing into the container when passing from the EVA environment into a pressurized cabin. A bank of containers arrayed inside a tool caddy allows up to six individual samples to be collected during a given spacewalk.NASA plans to use the tool in 2016 to collect samples from various spacesuits during ground testing to determine what (if any) human-borne microbial contamination leaks from the suit under simulated thermal vacuum conditions. Next, the tool will be used on board the International Space Station to assess the types of microbial contaminants found on external environmental control and life support system vents. Data will support

  9. Views of EVA performed during STS-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Two STS-6 mission specialists busy near the aft bulkhead were photographed with a 70mm camera. Astronauts F. Story Musgrave (at winch device near center) and Donald H. Peterson are setting up winch operations at the aft bulkhead as a simulation for a contingency extravehicular activity (EVA). The orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods are seen in the background (30211); Musgrave translates down the Challenger's payload bay door hinge line with a bag of latch tools. In the lower left foreground are three canisters containing three getaway special (GAS) experiments. Part of the starboard wing and OMS pod are seen in the background. The gold-foil protected object on the right is the airborne support equipment for the inertial upper stage (IUS) (30212); Peterson (starboard side) and Musgrave evaluate the handrail system on the starboard longeron and aft bulkhead during an EVA. Behind them the vertical stabilizer and OMS pods frame a portion of Mexico's state of Jalisco (30213); Musgrave sus

  10. EVA assembly of large space structure element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Bush, H. G.; Heard, W. L., Jr.; Stokes, J. W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a test program to assess the potential of manned extravehicular activity (EVA) assembly of erectable space trusses are described. Seventeen tests were conducted in which six "space-weight" columns were assembled into a regular tetrahedral cell by a team of two "space"-suited test subjects. This cell represents the fundamental "element" of a tetrahedral truss structure. The tests were conducted under simulated zero-gravity conditions. Both manual and simulated remote manipulator system modes were evaluated. Articulation limits of the pressure suit and zero gravity could be accommodated by work stations with foot restraints. The results of this study have confirmed that astronaut EVA assembly of large, erectable space structures is well within man's capabilities.

  11. Skylab 3 crewmen practice EVA procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The three prime crewmen of the Skylab 3 mission practice procedures which will be used during the extravehicular activity (EVA) portion of the scheduled Skylab rate gyro six-pac installation. They are Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott (center), Astronaut Alan L. Bean (center background) and Astronaut Jack R. Lousma (right). Garriott is working with a mock-up of a trunion plug plate which is on the space station's deployment assembly. This picture was taken during Skylab 3 prelaunch training at JSC. In the left foreground with back to camera is Astronaut Russell L. Schweickart, who is assisting with the Skylab 3 training. Another training officer is in the left background (31322); Lousma practices procedures for EVA in his extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). He is working with a mock-up of a trunion plug plate which is on the space station's deployment assembly (31323).

  12. Multi-EVA communications system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A communications concept is analyzed to establish requirements of a confident candidate system for space shuttle. Conceptual baseline configurations, EVA's-to-spacecraft via PCM/FDM and spacecraft-to-EVA via PAM/FM, and respective functional performance requirements are discussed. The baseline system is analyzed to determine link characteristics, EMI levels at various frequency bands, and determination of desirable spectrum. Selected L- and S-Band links are analyzed to ascertain signal design parameters. A trade-off is performed, which establishes L-Band frequency as the best compromise. The results of the analysis along with the reliability/safety aspects and physical characteristics of the candidate system, indicate that the initial baseline concept meets functional requirements, but is poor from standpoint of overall space shuttle program cost.

  13. Walheim and Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008200 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel (top) and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim, both STS-122 mission specialists, participate in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Walheim and Schlegel worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  14. Walheim and Schlegel during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008199 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel (right) and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim, both STS-122 mission specialists, participate in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Walheim and Schlegel worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  15. EVA 3 - Robinson on Canadarm2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-03

    S114-E-6645 (3 August 2005) --- Discovery served as NASA's Return to Flight vehicle following the Columbia accident. Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, anchored to a foot restraint on the international space station’s Canadarm2, participates in the mission’s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The blackness of space and Earth’s horizon form the backdrop for the image. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  16. Volkov and Samokutyaev during Russian EVA 29

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-03

    ISS028-E-020965 (3 Aug. 2011) --- Russian cosmonauts Sergei Volkov and Alexander Samokutyaev (out of frame), both Expedition 28 flight engineers, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Russian segment of the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 23-minute spacewalk, Volkov and Samokutyaev moved a cargo boom from one airlock to another, installed a prototype laser communications system and deployed an amateur radio micro-satellite.

  17. Volkov and Samokutyaev during Russian EVA 29

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-03

    ISS028-E-020962 (3 Aug. 2011) --- Russian cosmonauts Sergei Volkov and Alexander Samokutyaev, both Expedition 28 flight engineers, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Russian segment of the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 23-minute spacewalk, Volkov and Samokutyaev moved a cargo boom from one airlock to another, installed a prototype laser communications system and deployed an amateur radio micro-satellite.

  18. Curbeam replaces TV Camera during first EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-13

    ISS014-E-09536 (12 Dec. 2006) --- Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., STS-116 mission specialist, prepares to replace a faulty TV camera on the exterior of the International Space Station during the mission's first of three planned sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Christer Fuglesang (out of frame), mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA), also participated in the 6-hour, 36-minute spacewalk.

  19. Mission control activity during STS-61 EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Gregory J. Harbaugh, spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM), observes as two astronauts work through a lengthy period of extravehicular activity (EVA) in the cargo bay of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour. Seen on the screen in the front of the flight control room, preparing to work with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) magnetometers, are astronauts F. Story Musgrave and Jeffrey A. Hoffman. Lead flight director Milt Heflin is partially visible at left edge of frame.

  20. The feasibility of Doppler monitoring during EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barer, A.; Filipenkov, S.; Katuntsev, V.; Vogt, L.; Wenzel, J.

    1995-07-01

    During extravehicular activities (EVA) outside the spacecraft, astronauts have to work under reduced pressure in a space suit. This pressure reduction induces the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) by the formation of gas bubbles from excess nitrogen dissolved in the organism by breathing air at normal pressure. Under laboratory conditions the gas bubbles moving in the blood stream can be detected by the non-invasive ultrasonic Doppler method. By early detection of excessive bubble formation the development of DCS symptoms may be prevented by early application of preventative measures. The method could also be useful when applied in the space suit in order to compare the results of laboratory tests with operational results, because there is a discrepancy according to the DCS risk of laboratory experiments and actual EVA missions, where no symptoms have been reported yet. A prototype Doppler sensor has been developed and implemented in the Russian Orlan suit. To investigate the feasibility of this method under simulated space conditions, the equipment has been used in a series of 12 thermovacuum chamber tests with suited subjects, where intravenous bubble formation was compared to unsuited control experiments. In more than 50% of the suited tests good Doppler recordings could be achieved. In some cases with unsatisfying results the signal could be improved by breathholding. Although the results do not yet allow any conclusion about a possible difference between suited and unsuited subjects due to the small number of tests performed, the method proved its feasibility for use in EVA suits and should be further developed to enhance the safety of EVA procedures.

  1. The feasibility of Doppler monitoring during EVA.

    PubMed

    Barer, A; Filipenkov, S; Katuntsev, V; Vogt, L; Wenzel, J

    1995-07-01

    During extravehicular activities (EVA) outside the spacecraft, astronauts have to work under reduced pressure in a space suit. This pressure reduction induces the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) by the formation of gas bubbles from excess nitrogen dissolved in the organism by breathing air at normal pressure. Under laboratory conditions the gas bubbles moving in the blood stream can be detected by the non-invasive ultrasonic Doppler method. By early detection of excessive bubble formation the development of DCS symptoms may be prevented by early application of preventative measures. The method could also be useful when applied in the space suit in order to compare the results of laboratory tests with operational results, because there is a discrepancy according to the DCS risk of laboratory experiments and actual EVA missions, where no symptoms have been reported yet. A prototype Doppler sensor has been developed and implemented in the Russian Orlan suit. To investigate the feasibility of this method under simulated space conditions, the equipment has been used in a series of 12 thermovacuum chamber tests with suited subjects, where intravenous bubble formation was compared to unsuited control experiments. In more than 50% of the suited tests good Doppler recordings could be achieved. In some cases with unsatisfying results the signal could be improved by breathholding. Although the results do not yet allow any conclusion about a possible difference between suited and unsuited subjects due to the small number of tests performed, the method proved its feasibility for use in EVA suits and should be further developed to enhance the safety of EVA procedures.

  2. EVA 2 - MS Newman with camera

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-03-05

    STS109-E-5642 (5 March 2002) --- Astronaut James H. Newman, mission specialist, peers into Columbia's crew cabin during a brief break in work on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), latched down just a few feet behind him in Columbia's cargo bay. Astronauts Newman and Michael J. Massimino are making their first extravehicular activity (EVA) of the mission, following the act of two other crewmembers on the previous day. The image was recorded with a digital still camera.

  3. Schlegel and Walheim during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008187 (13 Feb. 2008) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Hans Schlegel (left) and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim, both STS-122 mission specialists, participate in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, among other tasks, Walheim and Schlegel worked to replace a nitrogen tank used to pressurize the station's ammonia cooling system.

  4. Russian EVA 34 pictures from MRM2.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-16

    ISS036-E-033158 (16 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 29-minute spacewalk ? the longest ever conducted by a pair of Russian cosmonauts ? Yurchikhin and Alexander Misurkin (out of frame) rigged cables for the future arrival of a Russian laboratory module and installed an experiment panel.

  5. Russian EVA 34 pictures from MRM2.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-16

    ISS036-E-033058 (16 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 29-minute spacewalk ? the longest ever conducted by a pair of Russian cosmonauts ? Misurkin and Fyodor Yurchikhin (out of frame) rigged cables for the future arrival of a Russian laboratory module and installed an experiment panel.

  6. Russian EVA 34 pictures from MRM2.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-16

    ISS036-E-033161 (16 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 29-minute spacewalk ? the longest ever conducted by a pair of Russian cosmonauts ? Yurchikhin and Alexander Misurkin (out of frame) rigged cables for the future arrival of a Russian laboratory module and installed an experiment panel.

  7. Russian EVA 34 pictures from MRM2.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-16

    ISS036-E-033166 (16 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 29-minute spacewalk ? the longest ever conducted by a pair of Russian cosmonauts ? Yurchikhin and Alexander Misurkin (out of frame) rigged cables for the future arrival of a Russian laboratory module and installed an experiment panel.

  8. Russian EVA 34 pictures from MRM2.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-16

    ISS036-E-033109 (16 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 29-minute spacewalk ? the longest ever conducted by a pair of Russian cosmonauts ? Yurchikhin and Alexander Misurkin (out of frame) rigged cables for the future arrival of a Russian laboratory module and installed an experiment panel.

  9. Russian EVA 34 pictures from MRM2.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-16

    ISS036-E-033160 (16 Aug. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, Expedition 36 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) to continue outfitting the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 29-minute spacewalk ? the longest ever conducted by a pair of Russian cosmonauts ? Yurchikhin and Alexander Misurkin (out of frame) rigged cables for the future arrival of a Russian laboratory module and installed an experiment panel.

  10. Eva Szabo, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Eva Szabo is Chief of the Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group at the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention. She graduated from Yale University with a BS in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, received her MD from Duke University, and completed her internal medicine residency at Bellevue-NYU Medical Center. After completing her medical oncology fellowship at the National Cancer Institute, Dr. |

  11. Dry run for first of two EVAs

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-03

    ISS036-E-014713 (3 July 2013) --- NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (left) and European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, both Expedition 36 flight engineers, don their Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuits for a ?dry run? in the International Space Station?s Quest airlock in preparation for the first of two sessions of extravehicular (EVA) scheduled for July 9 and July 16. NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, flight engineer, uses a computer in the background.

  12. Dry run for first of two EVAs

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-03

    ISS036-E-014724 (3 July 2013) --- NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (left) and European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, both Expedition 36 flight engineers, attired in their Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuits, participate in a ?dry run? in the International Space Station?s Quest airlock in preparation for the first of two sessions of extravehicular (EVA) scheduled for July 9 and July 16. NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, flight engineer, assists Cassidy and Parmitano.

  13. Dry run for first of two EVAs

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-03

    ISS036-E-014714 (3 July 2013) --- NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (left background) and European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, both Expedition 36 flight engineers, don their Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuits for a ?dry run? in the International Space Station?s Quest airlock in preparation for the first of two sessions of extravehicular (EVA) scheduled for July 9 and July 16. NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, flight engineer, assists Cassidy and Parmitano.

  14. Dry run for first of two EVAs

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-03

    View of NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (left) and European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano (right), Expedition 36 flight engineers, preparing for a dry run in the International Space Stations Quest airlock in preparation for the first of two sessions of extravehicular (EVA) scheduled for July 9 and July 16. Both have donned their EMUs. Astronaut Karen Nyberg, Expetition 36 flight engineer, is visible in the center.

  15. Astronaut Jack Lousma seen outside Skylab space station during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, is seen outside the Skylab space station in Earth orbit during the August 5, 1973 Skylab 3 extravehicular activity (EVA) in this photographic reproduction taken from a television transmission made by a color TV camera aboard the space station. Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, participated in the EVA with Lousma. During the EVA the two crewmen deployed the twin pole solar shield to help shade the Orbital Workshop.

  16. Collaborative Human Engineering Work in Space Exploration Extravehicular Activities (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeSantis, Lena; Whitmore, Mihriban

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on extravehicular activities in space exploration in collaboration with other NASA centers, industries, and universities is shown. The topics include: 1) Concept of Operations for Future EVA activities; 2) Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS); 3) Advanced EVA Walkback Test; 4) Walkback Subjective Results; 5) Integrated Suit Test 1; 6) Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS); 7) Flex PLSS Design Process; and 8) EVA Information System; 9)

  17. A Human Machine Interface for EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, L.

    EVA astronauts work in a challenging environment that includes high rate of muscle fatigue, haptic and proprioception impairment, lack of dexterity and interaction with robotic equipment. Currently they are heavily dependent on support from on-board crew and ground station staff for information and robotics operation. They are limited to the operation of simple controls on the suit exterior and external robot controls that are difficult to operate because of the heavy gloves that are part of the EVA suit. A wearable human machine interface (HMI) inside the suit provides a powerful alternative for robot teleoperation, procedure checklist access, generic equipment operation via virtual control panels and general information retrieval and presentation. The HMI proposed here includes speech input and output, a simple 6 degree of freedom (dof) pointing device and a heads up display (HUD). The essential characteristic of this interface is that it offers an alternative to the standard keyboard and mouse interface of a desktop computer. The astronaut's speech is used as input to command mode changes, execute arbitrary computer commands and generate text. The HMI can respond with speech also in order to confirm selections, provide status and feedback and present text output. A candidate 6 dof pointing device is Measurand's Shapetape, a flexible "tape" substrate to which is attached an optic fiber with embedded sensors. Measurement of the modulation of the light passing through the fiber can be used to compute the shape of the tape and, in particular, the position and orientation of the end of the Shapetape. It can be used to provide any kind of 3d geometric information including robot teleoperation control. The HUD can overlay graphical information onto the astronaut's visual field including robot joint torques, end effector configuration, procedure checklists and virtual control panels. With suitable tracking information about the position and orientation of the EVA suit

  18. Astronaut Story Musgrave during STS-6 EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-04-07

    STS006-45-124 (7 April 1983) --- Astronaut F. Story Musgrave, STS-6 mission specialist, translates down the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Challenger’s payload bay door hinge line with a bag of latch tools. This photograph is among the first five still frames that recorded the April 7 extravehicular activity (EVA) of Dr. Musgrave and Donald H. Peterson, the flight’s other mission specialist. It was photographed with a handheld 70mm camera from inside the cabin by one of two crew members who remained on the flight deck during the EVA. Dr. Musgrave’s task here was to evaluate the techniques required to move along the payload bay’s edge with tools. In the lower left foreground are three canisters containing three getaway special (GAS) experiments. Part of the starboard wind and orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod are seen back dropped against the blackness of space. The gold-foil protected object partially out of frame on the right is the airborne support equipment for the now vacated inertial upper stage (IUS) which aided the deployment of the tracking and data relay satellite on the flight’s first day. Astronauts Paul J. Weitz, command and Karol J. Bobko, pilot, remained inside the Challenger during the EVA. Photo credit: NASA

  19. Eva Physiology, Systems, and Performance (EPSP) Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Extravehicular activity (EVA) is any activity performed by astronauts outside their space vehicle or habitat. EVA may be performed on orbit, such as outside the Space Shuttle or the International Space Station, or on a planetary surface such as Mars or on the moon. Astronauts wear a pressurized suit that provides environmental protection, mobility, life support, and communications while they work in the harsh conditions of a microgravity environment. Exploration missions to the moon and Mars may last many days and will include many types of EVAs; exploration, science, construction and maintenance. The effectiveness and success of these EVA-filled missions is dependent on the ability to perform tasks efficiently. The EVA Physiology, Systems and Performance (EPSP) project will conduct a number of studies to understand human performance during EVA, from a molecular level to full-scale equipment and suit design aspects, with the aim of developing safe and efficient systems for Exploration missions and the Constellation Program. The EPSP project will 1) develop Exploration Mission EVA suit requirements for metabolic and thermal loading, optional center of gravity location, biomedical sensors, hydration, nutrition, and human biomedical interactions; 2) develop validated EVA prebreathe protocols that meet medical, vehicle, and habitat constraints while minimizing crew time and thus increasing EVA work efficiency; and 3) define exploration decompression sickness (DCS) risks, policy, and mission success statistics and develop a DCS risk definition report.

  20. EVA - Don't Leave Earth Without It

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cupples, J. Scott; Smith, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Modern manned space programs come in two categories: those that need Extravehicular Activity (EVA) and those that will need EVA. This paper discusses major milestones in the Shuttle Program where EVA was used to save payloads, enhance on-orbit capabilities, and build structures in order to ensure success of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) missions. In conjunction, the Extravehicular Mobility Unit s (EMU) design, and hence, its capabilities evolved as its mission evolved. It is the intent that lessons can be drawn from these case studies so that EVA compatibility is designed into future vehicles and payloads.

  1. Eva Physiology, Systems, and Performance (EPSP) Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Extravehicular activity (EVA) is any activity performed by astronauts outside their space vehicle or habitat. EVA may be performed on orbit, such as outside the Space Shuttle or the International Space Station, or on a planetary surface such as Mars or on the moon. Astronauts wear a pressurized suit that provides environmental protection, mobility, life support, and communications while they work in the harsh conditions of a microgravity environment. Exploration missions to the moon and Mars may last many days and will include many types of EVAs; exploration, science, construction and maintenance. The effectiveness and success of these EVA-filled missions is dependent on the ability to perform tasks efficiently. The EVA Physiology, Systems and Performance (EPSP) project will conduct a number of studies to understand human performance during EVA, from a molecular level to full-scale equipment and suit design aspects, with the aim of developing safe and efficient systems for Exploration missions and the Constellation Program. The EPSP project will 1) develop Exploration Mission EVA suit requirements for metabolic and thermal loading, optional center of gravity location, biomedical sensors, hydration, nutrition, and human biomedical interactions; 2) develop validated EVA prebreathe protocols that meet medical, vehicle, and habitat constraints while minimizing crew time and thus increasing EVA work efficiency; and 3) define exploration decompression sickness (DCS) risks, policy, and mission success statistics and develop a DCS risk definition report.

  2. Payload bay activity during first EVA of STS-72 mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-15

    STS072-742-004 (15 Jan. 1996) --- Astronaut Daniel T. Barry, STS-72 mission specialist, tests a Temporary Equipment Restraint Aid (TERA) in the cargo bay of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Endeavour. A reflection of the sun’s rays beam off Endeavour’s aft flight deck window in the “fish-eye” image. Barry was joined by astronaut Leroy Chiao for this first of two extravehicular activities (EVA) on the mission. A good part of the EVA was spent evaluating EVA hardware for future scheduled missions. Astronauts Chiao and Winston E. Scott participated in the second EVA two days later. Photo credit: NASA

  3. Astronaut Dale Gardner holds up for sale sign after EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, having just completed the major portion of his second extravehicular activity (EVA) period in three days, holds up a 'for sale' sign. Astronaut Joseph P. ALlen IV, who also participated in the two EVA's, is reflected in Gardner's helmet visor. A portion of each of two recovered satellites is in the lower right corner, with Westar nearer Discovery's aft.

  4. Astronaut Carl Walz during EVA in Discovery's payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Carl E. Walz reaches for equipment from the provisional stowage assembly (PSA) in Discvoery's cargo bay during a lengthy period of extravehicular activity (EVA). The hatch to Discovery's airlock is open nearby. Sun glare is evident above the orbiter. The picture was taken with a 35mm camera by astronaut James H. Newman, who shared EVA duties with Walz.

  5. A human factors analysis of EVA time requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pate, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering (HFE), also known as Ergonomics, is a discipline whose goal is to engineer a safer, more efficient interface between humans and machines. HFE makes use of a wide range of tools and techniques to fulfill this goal. One of these tools is known as motion and time study, a technique used to develop time standards for given tasks. A human factors motion and time study was initiated with the goal of developing a database of EVA task times and a method of utilizing the database to predict how long an ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) should take. Initial development relied on the EVA activities performed during the STS-61 mission (Hubble repair). The first step of the analysis was to become familiar with EVAs and with the previous studies and documents produced on EVAs. After reviewing these documents, an initial set of task primitives and task time modifiers was developed. Videotaped footage of STS-61 EVAs were analyzed using these primitives and task time modifiers. Data for two entire EVA missions and portions of several others, each with two EVA astronauts, was collected for analysis. Feedback from the analysis of the data will be used to further refine the primitives and task time modifiers used. Analysis of variance techniques for categorical data will be used to determine which factors may, individually or by interactions, effect the primitive times and how much of an effect they have.

  6. Astronaut David Scott practicing for Gemini 8 EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronaut David R. Scott practicing for Gemini 8 extravehicular acitivity (EVA) in bldg 4 of the Manned Spacecraft Center on the air bearing floor. He is wearing the the Hand-Held Maneuvering Unit which he will use during the EVA.

  7. Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cheryl B.; Conger, Bruce C.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Bue, Grant C.; Rouen, Michael N.

    2007-01-01

    An effort was initiated by NASA/JSC in 2001 to develop an Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT) for the sizing of Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) architecture and studies. Its intent was to support space suit development efforts and to aid in conceptual designs for future human exploration missions. Its basis was the Life Support Options Performance Program (LSOPP), a spacesuit and portable life support system (PLSS) sizing program developed for NASA/JSC circa 1990. EVAS_SAT estimates the mass, power, and volume characteristics for user-defined EVAS architectures, including Suit Systems, Airlock Systems, Tools and Translation Aids, and Vehicle Support equipment. The tool has undergone annual changes and has been updated as new data have become available. Certain sizing algorithms have been developed based on industry standards, while others are based on the LSOPP sizing routines. The sizing algorithms used by EVAS_SAT are preliminary. Because EVAS_SAT was designed for use by members of the EVA community, subsystem familiarity on the part of the intended user group and in the analysis of results is assumed. The current EVAS_SAT is operated within Microsoft Excel 2003 using a Visual Basic interface system.

  8. Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cheryl B.; Conger, Bruce C.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Bue, Grant C.; Rouen, Michael N.

    2007-01-01

    An effort was initiated by NASA/JSC in 2001 to develop an Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT) for the sizing of Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) architecture and studies. Its intent was to support space suit development efforts and to aid in conceptual designs for future human exploration missions. Its basis was the Life Support Options Performance Program (LSOPP), a spacesuit and portable life support system (PLSS) sizing program developed for NASA/JSC circa 1990. EVAS_SAT estimates the mass, power, and volume characteristics for user-defined EVAS architectures, including Suit Systems, Airlock Systems, Tools and Translation Aids, and Vehicle Support equipment. The tool has undergone annual changes and has been updated as new data have become available. Certain sizing algorithms have been developed based on industry standards, while others are based on the LSOPP sizing routines. The sizing algorithms used by EVAS_SAT are preliminary. Because EVAS_SAT was designed for use by members of the EVA community, subsystem familiarity on the part of the intended user group and in the analysis of results is assumed. The current EVAS_SAT is operated within Microsoft Excel 2003 using a Visual Basic interface system.

  9. Astronaut Dale Gardner holds up for sale sign after EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, having just completed the major portion of his second extravehicular activity (EVA) period in three days, holds up a 'for sale' sign. Astronaut Joseph P. ALlen IV, who also participated in the two EVA's, is reflected in Gardner's helmet visor. A portion of each of two recovered satellites is in the lower right corner, with Westar nearer Discovery's aft.

  10. Shkaplerov works with EVA Hardware in the SM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-03

    ISS030-E-061158 (3 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko, Expedition 30 flight engineer, works with extravehicular activity (EVA) hardware in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station in preparation for an EVA scheduled for Feb. 16, 2012.

  11. Astronaut David Scott practicing for Gemini 8 EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-02-01

    S66-19284 (1 Feb. 1966) --- Astronaut David R. Scott practicing for Gemini-8 extravehicular activity (EVA) in building 4 of the Manned Spacecraft Center on the air bearing floor. He is wearing the Hand-Held Maneuvering Unit which he will use during the EVA. Photo credit: NASA

  12. Shkaplerov works with EVA Hardware in the SM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-03

    ISS030-E-061157 (3 Feb. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, works with extravehicular activity (EVA) hardware in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station in preparation for an EVA scheduled for Feb. 16, 2012.

  13. Activity during first EVA of STS-72 mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-15

    STS072-305-034 (15 Jan. 1996) --- Astronaut Daniel T. Barry, mission specialist, works in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Endeavour during the first of two extravehicular activities (EVA). Barry was joined by astronaut Leroy Chiao for the EVA. The two joined four other NASA astronauts for a week and a half aboard Endeavour.

  14. Compiling a Comprehensive EVA Training Dataset for NASA Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, M. S.; Murry, J. D.; Lee, L. R.; Wear, M. L.; Van Baalen, M.

    2016-01-01

    Training for a spacewalk or extravehicular activity (EVA) is considered hazardous duty for NASA astronauts. This activity places astronauts at risk for decompression sickness as well as various musculoskeletal disorders from working in the spacesuit. As a result, the operational and research communities over the years have requested access to EVA training data to supplement their studies.

  15. Astronaut hazard during free-flight polar EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. N.

    1985-01-01

    Extravehicular Activity (EVA) during Shuttle flights planned for the late 1980's includes several factors which together may constitute an astronaut hazard. Free-flight EVA is planned whereas prior United States Earth orbit EVA has used umbilical tethers carrying communications, coolant, and oxygen. EVA associated with missions like LANDSAT Retrieval will be in orbits through the auroral oval where charging of spacecraft may occur. The astronaut performing free flight EVA constitutes an independent spacecraft. The astronaut and the Shuttle make up a system of electrically isolated spacecraft with a wide disparity in size. Unique situations, such as the astronaut being in the wake of the Shuttle while traversing an auroral disturbance, could result in significant astronaut and Shuttle charging. Charging and subsequent arc discharge are important because they have been associated with operating upsets and even satellite failure at geosynchronous orbit. Spacecraft charging theory and experiments are examined to evaluate charging for Shuttle size spacecraft in the polar ionosphere.

  16. Mission control activity during STS-61 EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-12-07

    STS61-S-101 (8 Dec 1993) --- Astronaut Gregory J. Harbaugh, spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM), observes as two astronauts work through a lengthy period of extravehicular activity (EVA) in the cargo bay of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour. Seen on the screen in the front of the flight control room, preparing to work with the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) magnetometers, are astronauts F. Story Musgrave and Jeffrey A. Hoffman. Harbaugh stayed busy passing up flight controllers suggestions and directions during the record-breaking battery of in-space servicing sessions. Lead flight director Milt Heflin is partially visible at left edge of frame.

  17. APOLLO 17 - INFLIGHT (1ST EVA)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-12

    S72-55064 (11 Dec. 1972) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan operates the Apollo Lunar Surface Drill during the first Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site, in this black and white reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by the RCA color TV camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle. Cernan is the commander of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission. Astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Apollo 17 Command and Service Modules in lunar orbit while astronaut Cernan and scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module to explore the moon.

  18. APOLLO 17 - INFLIGHT (2ND EVA)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-12

    S72-55166 (12 Dec. 1972) --- Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt loses his balance and heads for a fall during the second Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site, as seen in this black and white reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by the color RCA TV camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle. Schmitt is lunar module pilot of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission. Astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with Apollo 17 Command and Service Modules in lunar orbit while astronauts Schmitt and Eugene A. Cernan, commander, descended in the Lunar Module "Challenger" to explore the moon.

  19. SKYLAB (SL)-3 - TELEVISION (EXTRAVEHICULAR ACTIVITY [EVA])

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-08-27

    S73-33161 (24 Aug. 1973) --- Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, hooks up a 23-foot, two-inch connecting cable for the rate gyro six pack during extravehicular activity (EVA) on Aug. 24, 1973, as seen in this photographic reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by a TV camera aboard the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The rate gyros were mounted inside the Multiple Docking Adapter opposite the Apollo Telescope Mount control and display console. Photo credit: NASA

  20. Behnken and Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065710 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronauts Robert Behnken (right) and Nicholas Patrick, both STS-130 mission specialists, participate in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and Patrick connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  1. Behnken and Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065725 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronauts Robert Behnken (right) and Nicholas Patrick, both STS-130 mission specialists, participate in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and Patrick connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  2. Behnken and Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065714 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronauts Robert Behnken (right) and Nicholas Patrick, both STS-130 mission specialists, participate in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and Patrick connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  3. Reilly on EVA 1 during STS-117

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-06-12

    S117-E-06910 (11 June 2007) --- Astronauts Jim Reilly (center frame) and John "Danny" Olivas (out of frame), both STS-117 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction resumes on the International Space Station. Among other tasks, Reilly and Olivas connected power, data and cooling cables between S1 and S3; released the launch restraints from and deployed the four solar array blanket boxes on S4 and released the cinches and winches holding the photovoltaic radiator on S4.

  4. Reilly on EVA 1 during STS-117

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-06-12

    S117-E-06914 (11 June 2007) --- Astronauts Jim Reilly (center frame) and John "Danny" Olivas (out of frame), both STS-117 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction resumes on the International Space Station. Among other tasks, Reilly and Olivas connected power, data and cooling cables between S1 and S3; released the launch restraints from and deployed the four solar array blanket boxes on S4 and released the cinches and winches holding the photovoltaic radiator on S4. Earth's horizon and the blackness of space provided the backdrop for the scene.

  5. Olivas on EVA 1 during STS-117

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-06-11

    S117-E-06901 (11 June 2007) --- Astronauts Jim Reilly (out of frame) and John "Danny" Olivas (partially obscured, center), both STS-117 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction resumes on the International Space Station. Among other tasks, Reilly and Olivas connected power, data and cooling cables between S1 and S3; released the launch restraints from and deployed the four solar array blanket boxes on S4 and released the cinches and winches holding the photovoltaic radiator on S4. Earth's horizon and a crescent moon are visible at right.

  6. Bowen works electric batteries during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-17

    S132-E-008102 (17 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-132 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 25-minute spacewalk, Bowen and NASA astronaut Garrett Reisman (out of frame), mission specialist, loosened bolts holding six replacement batteries, installed a second antenna for high-speed Ku-band transmissions and adding a spare parts platform to Dextre, a two-armed extension for the station’s robotic arm.

  7. STS-109 MS Grunsfeld during third EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-03-06

    STS109-E-5380 (6 March 2002) --- Astronaut John M. Grunsfeld, payload commander, waves at a crewmate inside Space Shuttle Columbia's crew cabin during a brief break in work on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in the cargo bay of the shuttle during the STS-109 mission's third space walk. The primary purpose of the extravehicular activity (EVA) of astronauts Grunsfeld and Richard M. Linnehan was to replace the Power Control Unit on the giant telescope. The image was recorded with a digital still camera by one of Grunsfeld's crew mates inside Columbia's cabin.

  8. STS-109 MS Grunsfeld during third EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-03-06

    STS109-E-5382 (6 March 2002) --- Astronaut John M. Grunsfeld, payload commander, waves at a crewmate inside Space Shuttle Columbia's crew cabin during a brief break in work on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in the cargo bay of the shuttle during the STS-109 mission's third space walk. The primary purpose of the extravehicular activity (EVA) of astronauts Grunsfeld and Richard M. Linnehan was to replace the Power Control Unit on the giant telescope. The image was recorded with a digital still camera by one of Grunsfeld's crew mates inside Columbia's cabin.

  9. Newman during EVA 3 working on cables

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-12

    S88-E-5144 (12-12-98) --- Astronaut James H. Newman, mission specialist, wraps up extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks as he and fellow mission specialist Jerry L. Ross (out of frame) approach the completion of their third and final scheduled space walk on STS-88. Newman holds onto handrails on the U.S.-built Unity connecting module (foreground). Zarya can be seen beyond Newman, backdropped over ocean waters some 173 nautical miles below. The photo was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) at 21:59:39 GMT, Dec. 12.

  10. Newman during EVA 3 working on cables

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-12

    S88-E-5145 (12-12-98) --- Astronaut James H. Newman, mission specialist, wraps up extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks as he and fellow mission specialist Jerry L. Ross (out of frame) near the completion of their third and final scheduled space walk on STS-88. Newman holds onto handrails on the U.S.-built Unity connecting module (foreground). Zarya can be seen beyond Newman, backdropped over ocean waters some 173 nautical miles below. The photo was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) at 21:59:43 GMT, Dec. 12.

  11. Williams during ISS US EVA 6

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-01-31

    ISS014-E-13061 (31 Jan. 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14 flight engineer, participates in the first of three sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA) in nine days, as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour 55-minute spacewalk, Williams and Michael E. Lopez-Alegria (out of frame), commander and NASA space station science officer, reconfigured one of two cooling loops for the Destiny laboratory module, rearranged electrical connections and secured the starboard radiator of the P6 truss after retraction.

  12. Reilly on EVA 1 during STS-117

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-06-12

    S117-E-06912 (11 June 2007) --- Astronaut Jim Reilly, STS-117 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction continues on the International Space Station. Among other tasks, Reilly and astronaut John "Danny" Olivas (out of frame), connected power, data and cooling cables between S1 and S3; released the launch restraints from and deployed the four solar array blanket boxes on S4 and released the cinches and winches holding the photovoltaic radiator on S4. Earth's horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  13. STS-96 EVA view of Tamara Jernigan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-30

    STS096-330-004 (30 May 1999) --- Astronaut Tamara E. Jernigan, mission specialist, is backdropped over the Aegean Sea as she handles the American-built crane which she helped to install on the International Space Station (ISS) during the May 30th space walk. Jernigan's feet are anchored to a mobile foot restraint connected to the Space Shuttle Discovery's Canadian-built Remote Manipulator System (RMS). Jernigan was joined by astronaut Daniel T. Barry, mission specialist, for the lengthy extravehicular activity (EVA). Parts of Greece, Turkey and the Dardenelles are visible some 171 nautical miles below the docked tandem of Discovery and the ISS.

  14. EVA 3 - P6 truss and arrays

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-10-30

    S120-E-007426 (30 Oct. 2007) --- Astronaut Scott Parazynski, STS-120 mission specialist, participates in the third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 8-minute spacewalk Parazynski and astronaut Doug Wheelock (out of frame), mission specialist, installed the P6 truss segment with its set of solar arrays to its permanent home, installed a spare main bus switching unit on a stowage platform, and performed a few get-ahead tasks. Also, Parazynski inspected the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) to gather comparison data for the starboard rotary joint.

  15. EVA 3 - P6 truss and arrays

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-10-30

    S120-E-007424 (30 Oct. 2007) --- Astronaut Scott Parazynski, STS-120 mission specialist, participates in the third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 8-minute spacewalk Parazynski and astronaut Doug Wheelock (out of frame), mission specialist, installed the P6 truss segment with its set of solar arrays to its permanent home, installed a spare main bus switching unit on a stowage platform, and performed a few get-ahead tasks. Also, Parazynski inspected the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) to gather comparison data for the starboard rotary joint.

  16. EVA 3 - P6 truss and arrays

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-10-30

    S120-E-007428 (30 Oct. 2007) --- Astronaut Scott Parazynski, STS-120 mission specialist, participates in the third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction continues on the International Space Station. During the 7-hour, 8-minute spacewalk Parazynski and astronaut Doug Wheelock (out of frame), mission specialist, installed the P6 truss segment with its set of solar arrays to its permanent home, installed a spare main bus switching unit on a stowage platform, and performed a few get-ahead tasks. Also, Parazynski inspected the port Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) to gather comparison data for the starboard rotary joint.

  17. Stefanyshyn-Piper during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-20

    S126-E-008315 (20 Nov. 2008) --- Astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 45-minute spacewalk, Piper and astronaut Shane Kimbrough (out of frame), mission specialist, continued the process of removing debris and applying lubrication around the starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ), replaced four more of the SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies, relocated two equipment carts and applied lubrication to the station's robotic Canadarm2.

  18. EVA: Visual Analytics to Identify Fraudulent Events.

    PubMed

    Leite, Roger A; Gschwandtner, Theresia; Miksch, Silvia; Kriglstein, Simone; Pohl, Margit; Gstrein, Erich; Kuntner, Johannes

    2017-08-31

    Financial institutions are interested in ensuring security and quality for their customers. Banks, for instance, need to identify and stop harmful transactions in a timely manner. In order to detect fraudulent operations, data mining techniques and customer profile analysis are commonly used. However, these approaches are not supported by Visual Analytics techniques yet. Visual Analytics techniques have potential to considerably enhance the knowledge discovery process and increase the detection and prediction accuracy of financial fraud detection systems. Thus, we propose EVA, a Visual Analytics approach for supporting fraud investigation, fine-tuning fraud detection algorithms, and thus, reducing false positive alarms.

  19. STS-109 MS Grunsfeld during third EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-03-06

    STS109-E-5381 (6 March 2002) --- Astronaut John M. Grunsfeld, payload commander, gives a "thumbs up" signal to crewmates inside Space Shuttle Columbia's crew cabin during a task on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in the cargo bay of the shuttle during the STS-109 mission's third space walk. The primary purpose of the extravehicular activity (EVA) of astronauts Grunsfeld and Richard M. Linnehan was to replace the Power Control Unit on the giant telescope. The image was recorded with a digital still camera by one of Grunsfeld's crew mates inside Columbia's cabin.

  20. The odontological identification of Eva Braun Hitler.

    PubMed

    Keiser-Nielsen, S; Strøm, F

    1983-01-01

    On May 7th-9th, 1945, a team of Russian pathologists autopsied several bodies found in and near the Fuehrer Bunker in Berlin; among them, a female body (No. 13) was later identified as that of Eva Braun Hitler (EBH), mainly by means of a gold bridge from the lower right jaw. A postmortem photograph of this bridge also shows a separate gold filling. Data now available on the dental treatment of EBH have permitted the present authors to substantiate that this gold filling also came from the mouth of EBH. Further speculation about the fate of EBH would henceforth seem professionally unfounded.

  1. Use MACES IVA Suit for EVA Mobility Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    The use of an Intra-Vehicular Activity (IVA) suit for a spacewalk or Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) was evaluated for mobility and usability in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) environment. The Space Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) has been modified (MACES) to integrate with the Orion spacecraft. The first several missions of the Orion MPCV spacecraft will not have mass available to carry an EVA specific suit so any EVA required will have to be performed by the MACES. Since the MACES was not designed with EVA in mind, it was unknown what mobility the suit would be able to provide for an EVA or if a person could perform useful tasks for an extended time inside the pressurized suit. The suit was evaluated in multiple NBL runs by a variety of subjects including crewmembers with significant EVA experience. Various functional mobility tasks performed included: translation, body positioning, carrying tools, body stabilization, equipment handling, and use of tools. Hardware configurations included with and without TMG, suit with IVA gloves and suit with EVA gloves. Most tasks were completed on ISS mockups with existing EVA tools. Some limited tasks were completed with prototype tools on a simulated rocky surface. Major findings include: demonstration of the ability to weigh-out the suit, understanding the need to have subjects perform multiple runs prior to getting feedback, determination of critical sizing factors, and need for adjustment of suit work envelop. The early testing has demonstrated the feasibility of EVA's limited duration and limited scope. Further testing is required with more flight like tasking and constraints to validate these early results. If the suit is used for EVA, it will require mission specific modifications for umbilical management or PLSS integration, safety tether attachment, and tool interfaces. These evaluations are continuing through calendar year 2014.

  2. Adhesion Strength Study of EVA Encapsulants on Glass Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Glick, S. H.

    2003-05-01

    An extensive peel-test study was conducted to investigate the various factors that may affect the adhesion strength of photovoltaic module encapsulants, primarily ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA), on glass substrates of various laminates based on a common configuration of glass/encapsulant/backfoil. The results show that"pure" or"absolute" adhesion strength of EVA-to-glass was very difficult to obtain because of tensile deformation of the soft, semi-elastic EVA layer upon pulling. A mechanically"strong enough" backing foil on the EVA was critical to achieving the"apparent" adhesion strength. Peel test method with a 90-degree-pull yielded similar results to a 180-degree-pull. The 90-degree-pull method better revealed the four stages of delamination failure of the EVA/backfoil layers. The adhesion strength is affected by a number of factors, which include EVA type, formulation, backfoil type and manufacturing source, glass type, and surface priming treatment on the glass surface or on the backfoil. Effects of the glass-cleaning method and surface texture are not obvious. Direct priming treatments used in the work did not improve, or even worsened, the adhesion. Aging of EVA by storage over~5 years reduced notably the adhesion strength. Lower adhesion strengths were observed for the blank (unformulated) EVA and non-EVA copolymers, such as poly(ethylene-co-methacrylate) (PEMA) or poly(ethylene-co-butylacrylate) (PEBA). Their adhesion strengths increased if the copolymers were cross-linked. Transparent fluoropolymer superstrates such as TefzelTM and DureflexTM films used for thin-film PV modules showed low adhesion strengths to the EVA at a level of~2 N/mm.

  3. Effect of EVA on thermal stability, flammability, mechanical properties of HDPE/EVA/Mg(OH)2 composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, R.; Deng, Z. L.; Ma, Y. H.; Chen, X. L.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) is introduced to improve the properties of high-density polyethylene (HDPE)/magnesium hydroxide (MH) composites. The thermal stability, flame retardancy and mechanical properties of HDPE/EVA/MH composites are investigated and discussed. With increasing content of EVA, the limiting oxygen index (LOI) of the composites increases. The thermal stability analysis shows that the initial decomposition temperature begins at a low temperature; however, the residues of the composites at 600°C increase when HDPE is replaced by small amounts of EVA. The early degradation absorbs heat, dilute oxygen and residue. During this process, it protects the matrix inside. Compared with the HDPE/MH and EVA/MH composites, the ternary HDPE/EVA/MH composites exhibit better flame retardancy by increasing the LOI values, and reducing the heat release rate (HRR) and total heat release (THR). With increasing content of EVA, the mechanical properties can also be improved, which is attributed to the good affinity between EVA and MH particles.

  4. The EVA space suit development in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoog, A. Ingemar

    The progress of the European EVA space suit predevelopment activities has resulted in an improved technical reference concept, which will form the basis for a start of the Phase C/D development work in 1992. Technology development work over the last 2 years has resulted in a considerable amount of test data and a better understanding of the characteristics and behaviour of individual parts of the space suit system, in particular in the areas of suits' mobility and life support functions. This information has enabled a consolidation of certain design features on the one hand, but also led to the challenging of some of the design solutions on the other hand. While working towards an improved situation with respect to the main design drivers mass and cost, the technical concept has been improved with respect to functional safety and ease of handling, taking the evolving Hermes spaceplane requirements into consideration. Necessary hardware and functional redundancies have been implemented taking the operational scenario with Hermes and Columbus servicing into consideration. This paper presents the latest design status of the European EVA space suit concept, with particular emphasis on crew safety, comfort and productivity, in the frame of the predevelopment work for the European Space Agency.

  5. STS-112 Astronaut Wolf Participates in EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Anchored to a foot restraint on the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) or Canadarm2, astronaut David A. Wolf, STS-112 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Wolf is carrying the Starboard One (S1) outboard nadir external camera which was installed on the end of the S1 Truss on the International Space Station (ISS). Launched October 7, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, the STS-112 mission lasted 11 days and performed three EVAs. Its primary mission was to install the S1 Integrated Truss Structure and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart to the ISS. The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the Station's complex power system. The S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the International Space Station's railway providing a mobile work platform for future extravehicular activities by astronauts.

  6. STS-112 Astronaut Wolf Participates in EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronaut David A. Wolf, STS-112 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA), a six hour, four minute space walk, in which an exterior station television camera was installed outside of the Destiny Laboratory. Launched October 7, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, the STS-112 mission lasted 11 days and performed three EVA sessions. Its primary mission was to install the Starboard (S1) Integrated Truss Structure and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart to the International Space Station (ISS). The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the Station's complex power system. The S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the International Space Station's railway providing a mobile work platform for future extravehicular activities by astronauts.

  7. Active Solid State Dosimetry for Lunar EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Chen, Liang-Yu.

    2006-01-01

    The primary threat to astronauts from space radiation is high-energy charged particles, such as electrons, protons, alpha and heavier particles, originating from galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), solar particle events (SPEs) and trapped radiation belts in Earth orbit. There is also the added threat of secondary neutrons generated as the space radiation interacts with atmosphere, soil and structural materials.[1] For Lunar exploration missions, the habitats and transfer vehicles are expected to provide shielding from standard background radiation. Unfortunately, the Lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) suit is not expected to afford such shielding. Astronauts need to be aware of potentially hazardous conditions in their immediate area on EVA before a health and hardware risk arises. These conditions would include fluctuations of the local radiation field due to changes in the space radiation field and unknown variations in the local surface composition. Should undue exposure occur, knowledge of the dynamic intensity conditions during the exposure will allow more precise diagnostic assessment of the potential health risk to the exposed individual.[2

  8. Experiments with an EVA Assistant Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burridge, Robert R.; Graham, Jeffrey; Shillcutt, Kim; Hirsh, Robert; Kortenkamp, David

    2003-01-01

    Human missions to the Moon or Mars will likely be accompanied by many useful robots that will assist in all aspects of the mission, from construction to maintenance to surface exploration. Such robots might scout terrain, carry tools, take pictures, curate samples, or provide status information during a traverse. At NASA/JSC, the EVA Robotic Assistant (ERA) project has developed a robot testbed for exploring the issues of astronaut-robot interaction. Together with JSC's Advanced Spacesuit Lab, the ERA team has been developing robot capabilities and testing them with space-suited test subjects at planetary surface analog sites. In this paper, we describe the current state of the ERA testbed and two weeks of remote field tests in Arizona in September 2002. A number of teams with a broad range of interests participated in these experiments to explore different aspects of what must be done to develop a program for robotic assistance to surface EVA. Technologies explored in the field experiments included a fuel cell, new mobility platform and manipulator, novel software and communications infrastructure for multi-agent modeling and planning, a mobile science lab, an "InfoPak" for monitoring the spacesuit, and delayed satellite communication to a remote operations team. In this paper, we will describe this latest round of field tests in detail.

  9. Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Sujit K.; Chaki, T. K.; Tikku, V. K.; Pradhan, N. K.; Bhowmick, A. K.

    1997-10-01

    Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) has been investigated over a range of times, temperatures, stretching, irradiation doses and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) levels. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) and stretched (100% elongation) sample shrinks to a maximum level when kept at 453K temperature for 60 s. The heat shrinkage of samples irradiated with radiation doses of 20, 50, 100 and 150 kGy increases sharply with increasing stretching in the initial stage. Amnesia rating decreases with increasing radiation dose and TMPTMA level as well as gel content. The high radiation dose and TMPTMA level lower the heat shrinkage due to the chain scission. The effect of temperature at which extension is carried out on heat shrinkage is marginal. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) EVA tubes of different dimensions expanded in a laboratory grade tube expander show similar behaviour at 453K and 60 s. The X-ray and DSC studies reveal that the crystallinity increases on stretching due to orientation of chains and it decreases to a considerable extent on heat shrinking. The theoretical and experimental values of heat shrinkage for tubes and rectangular strips are in good accord, when the radiation dose is 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%.

  10. STS-112 Astronaut Wolf Participates in EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronaut David A. Wolf, STS-112 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA), a six hour, four minute space walk, in which an exterior station television camera was installed outside of the Destiny Laboratory. Launched October 7, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, the STS-112 mission lasted 11 days and performed three EVA sessions. Its primary mission was to install the Starboard (S1) Integrated Truss Structure and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart to the International Space Station (ISS). The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the Station's complex power system. The S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the International Space Station's railway providing a mobile work platform for future extravehicular activities by astronauts.

  11. STS-112 Astronaut Wolf Participates in EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Anchored to a foot restraint on the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) or Canadarm2, astronaut David A. Wolf, STS-112 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Wolf is carrying the Starboard One (S1) outboard nadir external camera which was installed on the end of the S1 Truss on the International Space Station (ISS). Launched October 7, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, the STS-112 mission lasted 11 days and performed three EVAs. Its primary mission was to install the S1 Integrated Truss Structure and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart to the ISS. The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the Station's complex power system. The S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the International Space Station's railway providing a mobile work platform for future extravehicular activities by astronauts.

  12. Advanced EVA Suit Camera System Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mock, Kyla

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is developing a new extra-vehicular activity (EVA) suit known as the Advanced EVA Z2 Suit. All of the improvements to the EVA Suit provide the opportunity to update the technology of the video imagery. My summer internship project involved improving the video streaming capabilities of the cameras that will be used on the Z2 Suit for data acquisition. To accomplish this, I familiarized myself with the architecture of the camera that is currently being tested to be able to make improvements on the design. Because there is a lot of benefit to saving space, power, and weight on the EVA suit, my job was to use Altium Design to start designing a much smaller and simplified interface board for the camera's microprocessor and external components. This involved checking datasheets of various components and checking signal connections to ensure that this architecture could be used for both the Z2 suit and potentially other future projects. The Orion spacecraft is a specific project that may benefit from this condensed camera interface design. The camera's physical placement on the suit also needed to be determined and tested so that image resolution can be maximized. Many of the options of the camera placement may be tested along with other future suit testing. There are multiple teams that work on different parts of the suit, so the camera's placement could directly affect their research or design. For this reason, a big part of my project was initiating contact with other branches and setting up multiple meetings to learn more about the pros and cons of the potential camera placements we are analyzing. Collaboration with the multiple teams working on the Advanced EVA Z2 Suit is absolutely necessary and these comparisons will be used as further progress is made for the overall suit design. This prototype will not be finished in time for the scheduled Z2 Suit testing, so my time was

  13. Genomic characterization of two new enterovirus types, EV-A114 and EV-A121.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Jagadish M; Sharma, Deepa K; Saxena, Vinay K; Shetty, Sushmitha A; Qureshi, Tarique Husain I H; Nalavade, Uma P

    2016-12-01

    Enteroviruses cause a variety of illnesses of the gastrointestinal tract, central nervous system and cardiovascular system. Phylogenetic analysis of VP1 sequences has identified 106 different human enteroviruses classified into four enterovirus species within the genus Enterovirus of the family Picornaviridae. It is likely that not all enterovirus types have been discovered. Between September 2013 and October 2014, stool samples of 6274 apparently healthy children of up to 5 years of age residing in Gorakhpur district, Uttar Pradesh, India were screened for enteroviruses. Virus isolates obtained in RD and Hep-2c cells were identified by complete VP1 sequencing. Enteroviruses were isolated from 3042 samples. A total of 87 different enterovirus types were identified. Two isolates with 71 and 74 % nucleotide sequence similarity to all other known enteroviruses were recognized as novel types. In this paper we report identification and complete genome sequence analysis of these two isolates classified as EV-A114 and EV-A121.

  14. Improvement of the performances of modified bituminous concrete with EVA and EVA-waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saoula, S.; Ait Mokhtar, K.; Haddadi, S.; Ghorbel, E.

    2009-11-01

    The improvement of the characteristics of the road flexible pavements is essential in regard to the growth of the traffics and the increasingly large performances of the vehicles. This improvement was made possible by the introduction of new methods and processes of modification of the products. The modification of the bituminous mix can be made in two manners: the first one is the modification of the bitumen binder (process A), the other one consists of the direct addition of a modifier during mixing operation (process B). It should be noted that one of the difficulties in Algeria is the absence of manufacturing units of the modified binders. For this reason, it is recommended to use the process B. In this article, the results of the influence of the modification of a bituminous concrete on its mechanical behaviour have been presented, using laboratory tests by the addition of EVA (Acetate of vinyl and ethylene) and of EVA-waste (waste of sole of shoes).

  15. EVA manipulation and assembly of space structure columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughead, T. E.; Pruett, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    Assembly techniques and hardware configurations used in assembly of the basic tetrahedral cell by A7LB pressure-suited subjects in a neutral bouyancy simulator were studied. Eleven subjects participated in assembly procedures which investigated two types of structural members and two configurations of attachment hardware. The assembly was accomplished through extra-vehicular activity (EVA) only, EVA with simulated manned maneuvering unit (MMU), and EVA with simulated MMU and simulated remote manipulator system (RMS). Assembly times as low as 10.20 minutes per tetrahedron were achieved. Task element data, as well as assembly procedures, are included.

  16. Flight deck activity during EVA 5 on Flight Day 8

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-02-18

    STS082-711-094 (11-21 Feb. 1997) --- From inside the crew cabin, astronaut Steven A. Hawley watches the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) of astronaut Mark C. Lee, payload commander, visible in the background through one of the Space Shuttle Discovery's aft flight deck windows. Actually, Hawley is doing more than watching the EVA to perform servicing work on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). For most of the five days of EVA, Hawley, a veteran of the April 1990 flight which deployed the giant orbiting observatory, controlled the Remote Manipulator System (RMS), on which Lee is standing in this scene.

  17. Astronaut Jack Lousma seen outside Skylab space station during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-08-06

    S73-31976 (5 Aug. 1973) --- Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, is seen outside the Skylab space station in Earth orbit during the Aug. 5, 1973 Skylab 3 extravehicular activity (EVA) in this photographic reproduction taken from a television transmission made by a color TV camera aboard the space station. Scientist-astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, participated in the EVA with Lousma. During the EVA the two crewmen deployed the twin pole solar shield to help shade the Orbital Workshop. Photo credit: NASA

  18. Application of EVA guidelines and design criteria. Volume 1: EVA selection/systems design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, N. E.

    1973-01-01

    Parameters that require consideration by the planners and designers when planning for man to perform functions outside the vehicle are presented in terms of the impact the extravehicular crewmen and major EV equipment items have on the mission, vehicle, and payload. Summary data on man's performance capabilities in the weightless space environment are also provided. The performance data are based on orbital and transearth EVA from previous space flight programs and earthbound simulations, such as water immersion and zero-g aircraft.

  19. Application of EVA guidelines and design criteria. Volume 2: EVA workstation conceptual designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, N. E.

    1973-01-01

    Several EV workstation concepts were developed and are documented. The workstation concepts were developed following a comprehensive analysis of potential EV missions, functions, and tasks as interpreted from NASA and contractor space shuttle and space station studies, mission models, and related reports. The design of a versatile, portable EVA workstation is aimed at reducing the design and development costs for each mission and aiding in the development of on-orbit serviceable payloads.

  20. Augmented robotic device for EVA hand manoeuvres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheson, Eloise; Brooker, Graham

    2012-12-01

    During extravehicular activities (EVAs), pressurised space suits can lead to difficulties in performing hand manoeuvres and fatigue. This is often the cause of EVAs being terminated early, or taking longer to complete. Assistive robotic gloves can be used to augment the natural motion of a human hand, meaning work can be carried out more efficiently with less stress to the astronaut. Lightweight and low profile solutions must be found in order for the assistive robotic glove to be easily integrated with a space suit pressure garment. Pneumatic muscle actuators combined with force sensors are one such solution. These actuators are extremely light, yet can output high forces using pressurised gases as the actuation drive. Their movement is omnidirectional, so when combined with a flexible exoskeleton that itself provides a degree of freedom of movement, individual fingers can be controlled during flexion and extension. This setup allows actuators and other hardware to be stored remotely on the user's body, resulting in the least possible mass being supported by the hand. Two prototype gloves have been developed at the University of Sydney; prototype I using a fibreglass exoskeleton to provide flexion force, and prototype II using torsion springs to achieve the same result. The gloves have been designed to increase the ease of human movements, rather than to add unnatural ability to the hand. A state space control algorithm has been developed to ensure that human initiated movements are recognised, and calibration methods have been implemented to accommodate the different characteristics of each wearer's hands. For this calibration technique, it was necessary to take into account the natural tremors of the human hand which may have otherwise initiated unexpected control signals. Prototype I was able to actuate the user's hand in 1 degree of freedom (DOF) from full flexion to partial extension, and prototype II actuated a user's finger in 2 DOF with forces achieved

  1. Development of an EVA systems cost model. Volume 2: Shuttle orbiter crew and equipment translation concepts and EVA workstation concept development and integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    EVA crewman/equipment translational concepts are developed for a shuttle orbiter payload application. Also considered are EVA workstation systems to meet orbiter and payload requirements for integration of workstations into candidate orbiter payload worksites.

  2. Astronaut Russell Schweickart photographed during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-06

    AS09-19-2994 (6 March 1969) --- Astronaut Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot, is photographed from the Command Module (CM) "Gumdrop" during his extravehicular activity (EVA) on the fourth day of the Apollo 9 Earth-orbital mission. He holds, in his right hand, a thermal sample which he is retrieving from the Lunar Module (LM) exterior. The Command and Service Modules (CSM) and LM "Spider" are docked. Schweickart, wearing an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), is standing in "golden slippers" on the LM porch. Visible on his back are the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) and Oxygen Purge System (OPS). Astronaut James A. McDivitt, Apollo 9 commander, was inside the "Spider". Astronaut David R. Scott, command module pilot, remained at the controls in the CM "Gumdrop".

  3. Astronaut Russell Schweickart photographed during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-06

    AS09-19-2983 (6 March 1969) --- Astronaut Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot, operates a 70mm Hasselblad camera during his extravehicular activity (EVA) on the fourth day of the Apollo 9 Earth-orbital mission. The Command and Service Modules (CSM) and Lunar Module (LM) "Spider" are docked. This view was taken from the Command Module (CM) "Gumdrop". Schweickart, wearing an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), is standing in "golden slippers" on the LM porch. On his back, partially visible, are a Portable Life Support System (PLSS) and an Oxygen Purge System (OPS). Astronaut James A. McDivitt, Apollo 9 commander, was inside the "Spider". Astronaut David R. Scott, command module pilot, remained at the controls in the CM.

  4. Dust Tolerant EVA-Compatible Connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Townsend, Ivan I., III

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to develop connectors (quick disconnects and umbilical systems) that can be repetitively and reliably mated and de-mated during Lunar surface extra-vehicular activities. These standardized interfaces will be required for structural integrity and commodities transfer between linked surface elements. QD's fittings are needed for EVA spacesuit Primary Life Support Systems as well as liquid cooled garment circulation and suit heat rejection. Umbilical electro-mechanical systems (connectors) are needed between discrete surface systems for transfer of air, power, fluid (water), and data must be capable of being operated by extra vehicular astronaut crew members and/or robotic assistants. There exists an urgent need to prevent electro-statically charged dust and debris from clogging and degrading the interface seals and causing leakage and spills of hazardous commodities, contaminating the flowstream, and degrading the mechanisms needed for umbilical connection. Other challenges include modularity, standardization, autonomous operation, and lifetime sealing issues.

  5. Stefanyshyn-Piper during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008067 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Anchored to a Canadarm2 mobile foot restraint, astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Piper and astronaut Steve Bowen (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  6. Stefanyshyn-Piper during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008065 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Anchored to a Canadarm2 mobile foot restraint, astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Piper and astronaut Steve Bowen (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  7. Stefanyshyn-Piper during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-11-18

    S126-E-008069 (18 Nov. 2008) --- Anchored to a Canadarm2 mobile foot restraint, astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper, STS-126 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 52-minute spacewalk, Piper and astronaut Steve Bowen (out of frame), mission specialist, worked to clean and lubricate part of the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joints (SARJ) and to remove two of SARJ's 12 trundle bearing assemblies. The spacewalkers also removed a depleted nitrogen tank from a stowage platform on the outside of the complex and moved it into Endeavour's cargo bay. They also moved a flex hose rotary coupler from the shuttle to the station stowage platform, as well as removing some insulation blankets from the common berthing mechanism on the Kibo laboratory.

  8. Exploration Architecture Options - ECLSS, TCS, EVA Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambliss, Joe; Henninger, Don

    2011-01-01

    Many options for exploration of space have been identified and evaluated since the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) was announced in 2004. The Augustine Commission evaluated human space flight for the Obama administration then the Human Exploration Framework Teams (HEFT and HEFT2) evaluated potential exploration missions and the infrastructure and technology needs for those missions. Lunar architectures have been identified and addressed by the Lunar Surface Systems team to establish options for how to get to, and then inhabit and explore, the moon. This paper will evaluate the options for exploration of space for the implications of architectures on the Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLSS), Thermal Control (TCS), and Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Systems.

  9. APOLLO 17 - INFLIGHT (1ST EVA)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-12

    S72-55065 (11 Dec. 1972) --- Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt is seen anchoring the geophone module with a flag during the first Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site, in the black and white reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by the color RCA TV camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle. Schmitt is the lunar module mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle. Schmitt is the lunar module pilot of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission. Astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Apollo 17 Command and Service Modules in lunar orbit while astronauts Schmitt and Eugene A. Cernan, commander, descended in the Lunar Module to explore the moon. The geophone module is part of the Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment (S-203), a component of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP). Other ALSEP components are visible in the picture.

  10. Evaluation of a Hybrid Elastic EVA Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korona, F. Adam; Akin, David

    2002-01-01

    The hybrid elastic design is based upon an American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) glove designed by at the Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) in 1985. This design uses an elastic restraint layer instead of convolute joints to achieve greater dexterity and mobility during EVA (extravehicular activity). Two pilot studies and a main study were conducted using the hybrid elastic glove and 4000-series EMU (extravehicular activity unit) glove. Data on dexterity performance, joint range of motion, grip strength and perceived exertion was assessed for the EMU and hybrid elastic gloves with correlations to a barehanded condition. During this study, 30 test subjects performed multiple test sessions using a hybrid elastic glove and a 4000- series shuttle glove in a 4.3psid pressure environment. Test results to date indicate that the hybrid elastic glove performance is approximately similar to the performance of the 4000-series glove.

  11. Cassidy and Marshburn during EVA-5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-27

    S127-E-009312 (27 July 2009) --- Astronauts Tom Marshburn (left) and Christopher Cassidy, both STS-127 mission specialists, participate in the mission's fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Marshburn and Cassidy secured multi-layer insulation around the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator known as Dextre, split out power channels for two space station Control Moment Gyroscopes, installed video cameras on the front and back of the new Japanese Exposed Facility and performed a number of “get ahead” tasks, including tying down some cables and installing handrails and a portable foot restraint to aid future spacewalkers.

  12. Cassidy and Marshburn during EVA-5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-27

    S127-E-009372 (27 July 2009) --- Astronauts Tom Marshburn (left) and Christopher Cassidy, both STS-127 mission specialists, participate in the mission's fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Marshburn and Cassidy secured multi-layer insulation around the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator known as Dextre, split out power channels for two space station Control Moment Gyroscopes, installed video cameras on the front and back of the new Japanese Exposed Facility and performed a number of “get ahead” tasks, including tying down some cables and installing handrails and a portable foot restraint to aid future spacewalkers.

  13. Cassidy and Marshburn during EVA-5

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-27

    S127-E-009329 (27 July 2009) --- Astronauts Christopher Cassidy and Tom Marshburn (partially out of frame at left), both STS-127 mission specialists, participate in the mission's fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the four-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Marshburn and Cassidy secured multi-layer insulation around the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator known as Dextre, split out power channels for two space station Control Moment Gyroscopes, installed video cameras on the front and back of the new Japanese Exposed Facility and performed a number of “get ahead” tasks, including tying down some cables and installing handrails and a portable foot restraint to aid future spacewalkers.

  14. Astronaut Noriega During Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In this image, STS-97 astronaut and mission specialist Carlos I. Noriega waves at a crew member inside Endeavor's cabin during the mission's final session of Extravehicular Activity (EVA). Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor on November 30, 2000, the STS-97 mission's primary objective was the delivery, assembly, and activation of the U.S. electrical power system onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The electrical power system, which is built into a 73-meter (240-foot) long solar array structure consists of solar arrays, radiators, batteries, and electronics. The entire 15.4-metric ton (17-ton) package is called the P6 Integrated Truss Segment, and is the heaviest and largest element yet delivered to the station aboard a space shuttle. The electrical system will eventually provide the power necessary for the first ISS crews to live and work in the U.S. segment.

  15. STS-121 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Astronaut Michael E. Fossum, STS-121 mission specialist, used a digital still camera to expose a photo of his helmet visor during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked with the International Space Station (ISS). Also visible in the visor reflections are fellow space walker Piers J. Sellers, mission specialist, Earth's horizon, and a station solar array. During its 12-day mission, this utilization and logistics flight delivered a multipurpose logistics module (MPLM) to the ISS with several thousand pounds of new supplies and experiments. In addition, some new orbital replacement units (ORUs) were delivered and stowed externally on the ISS on a special pallet. These ORUs are spares for critical machinery located on the outside of the ISS. During this mission the crew also carried out testing of Shuttle inspection and repair hardware, as well as evaluated operational techniques and concepts for conducting on-orbit inspection and repair.

  16. EVA Task Timing and Timeline Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looper, Christopher A.; Ney, Zane A.

    2007-01-01

    EVA timeline development occurs using task execution data generated through underwater training and simulation. This project collected task time data during final training events for several Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions and compared like task time data collected during on-orbit execution. Analysis was performed to compare types of activities and times required for each looking specifically for how activities can be accurately trained from a timeline planning perspective. The data revealed two significant aspects of flight timeline planning; Zero-g task times will match training times for activities that can be accurately simulated with appropriate fidelity hardware; and not all activities can be simulated sufficiently to produce training task times that will reflect required zero-g times. An approach for timeline planning utilizing this knowledge is also presented.

  17. Evaluation of a Hybrid Elastic EVA Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korona, F. Adam; Akin, David

    2002-01-01

    The hybrid elastic design is based upon an American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) glove designed by at the Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) in 1985. This design uses an elastic restraint layer instead of convolute joints to achieve greater dexterity and mobility during EVA (extravehicular activity). Two pilot studies and a main study were conducted using the hybrid elastic glove and 4000-series EMU (extravehicular activity unit) glove. Data on dexterity performance, joint range of motion, grip strength and perceived exertion was assessed for the EMU and hybrid elastic gloves with correlations to a barehanded condition. During this study, 30 test subjects performed multiple test sessions using a hybrid elastic glove and a 4000- series shuttle glove in a 4.3psid pressure environment. Test results to date indicate that the hybrid elastic glove performance is approximately similar to the performance of the 4000-series glove.

  18. Exploration Architecture Options - ECLSS, EVA, TCS Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambliss, Joe; Henninger, Don; Lawrence, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Many options for exploration of space have been identified and evaluated since the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) was announced in 2004. Lunar architectures have been identified and addressed in the Lunar Surface Systems team to establish options for how to get to and then inhabit and explore the moon. The Augustine Commission evaluated human space flight for the Obama administration and identified many options for how to conduct human spaceflight in the future. This paper will evaluate the options for exploration of space for the implications of architectures on the Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLSS), ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) and Thermal Control System (TCS) Systems. The advantages and disadvantages of each architecture and options are presented.

  19. Study of space shuttle EVA/IVA support requirements. Volume 2: EVA/IVA tasks, guidelines, and constraints definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, B. W.; Copeland, R. J.; Wood, P. W., Jr.; Cox, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The guidelines for EVA and IVA tasks to be performed on the space shuttle are defined. In deriving tasks, guidelines, and constraints, payloads were first identified from the mission model. Payload requirements, together with man and manipulator capabilities, vehicle characteristics and operation, and safety considerations led to a definition of candidate tasks. Guidelines and constraints were also established from these considerations. Scenarios were established, and screening criteria, such as commonality of EVA and IVA activities, were applied to derive representative planned and unplanned tasks. The whole spectrum of credible contingency situations with a potential requirement for EVA/IVA was analyzed.

  20. A Cabin Air Separator for EVA Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Presently, the Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVAs) conducted from the Quest Joint Airlock on the International Space Station use high pressure, high purity oxygen that is delivered to the Space Station by the Space Shuttle. When the Space Shuttle retires, a new method of delivering high pressure, high purity oxygen to the High Pressure Gas Tanks (HPGTs) is needed. One method is to use a cabin air separator to sweep oxygen from the cabin air, generate a low pressure/high purity oxygen stream, and compress the oxygen with a multistage mechanical compressor. A main advantage to this type of system is that the existing low pressure oxygen supply infrastructure can be used as the source of cabin oxygen. ISS has two water electrolysis systems that deliver low pressure oxygen to the cabin, as well as chlorate candles and compressed gas tanks on cargo vehicles. Each of these systems can feed low pressure oxygen into the cabin, and any low pressure oxygen source can be used as an on-board source of oxygen. Three different oxygen separator systems were evaluated, and a two stage Pressure Swing Adsorption system was selected for reasons of technical maturity. Two different compressor designs were subjected to long term testing, and the compressor with better life performance and more favorable oxygen safety characteristics was selected. These technologies have been used as the basis of a design for a flight system located in Equipment Lock, and taken to Preliminary Design Review level of maturity. This paper describes the Cabin Air Separator for EVA Oxygen (CASEO) concept, describes the separator and compressor technology trades, highlights key technology risks, and describes the flight hardware concept as presented at Preliminary Design Review (PDR)

  1. Astronaut Richard Gordon returns to hatch of spacecraft following EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., pilot for the Gemini 11 space flight, returns to the hatch of the spacecraft following extravehicular activity (EVA). This picture was taken over the Atlantic Ocean at approximately 160 nautical miles above the earth's surface.

  2. Astronauts Harris and Foale ready to egress airlock for EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronauts Bernard A. Harris, Jr., payload commander, (top) and C. Michael Foale, mission specialist, are ready to egress airlock for an extravehicular activity (EVA) during the STS-63 mission on the Space Shuttle Discovery.

  3. Astronaut Dale Gardner rehearses control of MMU during EVA practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, 51-A mission specialist, rehearses control of manned maneuvering unit (MMU) during a practice for an extravehicular activity (EVA). Gardner is in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory at JSC.

  4. EVA robotics for Space Station Freedom: Dextrous Manipulator Development (DEMAND)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert L., II

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: dextrous manipulator development (DMD), projected extravehicular activity (EVA) backlog, potential Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM) tasks, DMD Laboratory FY 1992-94, and program goals.

  5. Wilson at RWS for STS-131 EVA 3 SSRMS Support

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-13

    View of Stephanie Wilson as she works at the Robotics Workstation (RWS) in US Laboratory Destiny as she conducts a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Ammonia Tank Assembly (ATA) retrieval in support of STS-131 EVA 3.

  6. 7. LESLIE WICKMAN, EVA (EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITIES) SPECIALIST, IN SPACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. LESLIE WICKMAN, EVA (EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITIES) SPECIALIST, IN SPACE SUIT AFTER TESTING IN NEUTRAL BUOYANCY TANK. AVERAGE COST OF SUIT IS $1,000,000. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  7. Students Speak With EVA Operations Specialist Glenda Brown

    NASA Image and Video Library

    From NASA’s International Space Station Mission Control Center, EVA Operations Specialist Glenda Brown participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students at Victory Lakes Interm...

  8. New monitoring by thermogravimetry for radiation degradation of EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguski, J.; Przybytniak, G.; Łyczko, K.

    2014-07-01

    The radiation ageing of ethylene vinyl-acetate copolymer (EVA) as the jacket of cable applied in nuclear power plant was carried out by gamma rays irradiation, and the degradation was monitored by a thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). The EVA decomposition rate in air by the isothermal at 400 °C decreased with increase of dose and also with decrease of the dose rate. The behavior of EVA jacket of cable indicated that the decomposition rate at 400 °C was reduced with increase of oxidation. The elongation at break by tensile test for the radiation aged EVA was closely related to the decomposition rate at 400 °C; therefore, the TGA might be applied for a diagnostic technique of the cable degradation.

  9. CREW TRAINING (EXTRAVEHICULAR ACTIVITY [EVA]) - STS-41G - JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1984-07-06

    S84-36956 (1 July 1984) --- Astronaut Robert L. Crippen, 41-G crew commander, prepares his SCUBA mask prior to submerging into the weightless environment training facility's 25 ft. deep pool to observe a simulation exercise for two fellow 41-G crewmembers assigned to an extravehicular activity (EVA) in space. Not pictured are Astronauts Kathryn D. Sullivan and David C. Leestma, mission specialists who will perform the EVA during the eight-day mission scheduled for October of this year.

  10. CDR Korzun prepares to support STS-112 EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-12

    STS112-E-5207 (12 October 2002) --- Cosmonaut Valery Korzun, Expedition Five commander, looks over data relevant to preparations for an approaching spacewalk of the STS-112 mission. Korzun is one of three Rosaviakosmos representatives supporting the joint in-space activities of the shuttle and station crews. Two STS-112 crewmembers were simultaneously preparing for the second scheduled extravehicular activity (EVA). The suiting process and the actual EVA are documented in other Flight Day Six digital photos posted in this series.

  11. Cooperative EVA/Telerobotic Surface Operations in Support of Exploration Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, David L.

    2001-01-01

    The contents include: 1) Planetary Surface Robotics; 2) EVA Difficulties from Apollo; 3) Robotic Capabilities for EVA Support; 4) Astronaut Support Vehicle; 5) Three ASV Preliminary Designs; 6) Small Single-arm Assistant; 7) Dual-arm Assistant; 8) Large EVA Assistant; 9) Lessons Learned-Preliminary Designs; 10) Rover Design Assumptions; 11) Design Requirements-Terrain; 12) Design Requirements; 13) Science Payload; 14) Manipulator Arm; 15) EVA Multiple Robot Cooperation; 16) SSL Rover Body Concept; 17) Advanced EVA Support Rover Concept; 18) Robotic Access to Restricted Sites; 19) Robotic Rescue of EVA crew; and 19) Why Do We Need Humans? This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  12. Planetary Protection Considerations in EVA System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Dean B.; Kosmo, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    very little expression of these anomalies. hardware from the human-occupied area may limit (although not likely eliminate) external materials in the human habitat. Definition of design-to requirements is critical to understanding technical feasibility and costs. The definition of Planetary Protection needs in relation to EVA mission and system element development cost impacts should be considered and interpreted in terms of Plausible Protection criteria. Since EVA operations will have the most direct physical interaction with the Martian surface, PP needs should be considered in the terms of mitigating hardware and operations impacts and costs.

  13. EVA Robotic Assistant Project: Platform Attitude Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickels, Kevin M.

    2003-01-01

    The Robotic Systems Technology Branch is currently working on the development of an EVA Robotic Assistant under the sponsorship of the Surface Systems Thrust of the NASA Cross Enterprise Technology Development Program (CETDP). This will be a mobile robot that can follow a field geologist during planetary surface exploration, carry his tools and the samples that he collects, and provide video coverage of his activity. Prior experiments have shown that for such a robot to be useful it must be able to follow the geologist at walking speed over any terrain of interest. Geologically interesting terrain tends to be rough rather than smooth. The commercial mobile robot that was recently purchased as an initial testbed for the EVA Robotic Assistant Project, an ATRV Jr., is capable of faster than walking speed outside but it has no suspension. Its wheels with inflated rubber tires are attached to axles that are connected directly to the robot body. Any angular motion of the robot produced by driving over rough terrain will directly affect the pointing of the on-board stereo cameras. The resulting image motion is expected to make tracking of the geologist more difficult. This will either require the tracker to search a larger part of the image to find the target from frame to frame or to search mechanically in pan and tilt whenever the image motion is large enough to put the target outside the image in the next frame. This project consists of the design and implementation of a Kalman filter that combines the output of the angular rate sensors and linear accelerometers on the robot to estimate the motion of the robot base. The motion of the stereo camera pair mounted on the robot that results from this motion as the robot drives over rough terrain is then straightforward to compute. The estimates may then be used, for example, to command the robot s on-board pan-tilt unit to compensate for the camera motion induced by the base movement. This has been accomplished in two ways

  14. A Human Factors Analysis of EVA Time Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pate, Dennis W.

    1997-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering (HFE) is a discipline whose goal is to engineer a safer, more efficient interface between humans and machines. HFE makes use of a wide range of tools and techniques to fulfill this goal. One of these tools is known as motion and time study, a technique used to develop time standards for given tasks. During the summer of 1995, a human factors motion and time study was initiated with the goals of developing a database of EVA task times and developing a method of utilizing the database to predict how long an EVA should take. Initial development relied on the EVA activities performed during the STS-61 (Hubble) mission. The first step of the study was to become familiar with EVA's, the previous task-time studies, and documents produced on EVA's. After reviewing these documents, an initial set of task primitives and task-time modifiers was developed. Data was collected from videotaped footage of two entire STS-61 EVA missions and portions of several others, each with two EVA astronauts. Feedback from the analysis of the data was used to further refine the primitives and modifiers used. The project was continued during the summer of 1996, during which data on human errors was also collected and analyzed. Additional data from the STS-71 mission was also collected. Analysis of variance techniques for categorical data was used to determine which factors may affect the primitive times and how much of an effect they have. Probability distributions for the various task were also generated. Further analysis of the modifiers and interactions is planned.

  15. Minimizing EVA Airlock Time and Depress Gas Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Lafuse, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the need and solution for minimizing EVA airlock time and depress gas losses using a new method that minimizes EVA out-the-door time for a suited astronaut and reclaims most of the airlock depress gas. This method consists of one or more related concepts that use an evacuated reservoir tank to store and reclaim the airlock depress gas. The evacuated tank can be an inflatable tank, a spent fuel tank from a lunar lander descent stage, or a backup airlock. During EVA airlock operations, the airlock and reservoir would be equalized at some low pressure, and through proper selection of reservoir size, most of the depress gas would be stored in the reservoir for later reclamation. The benefit of this method is directly applicable to long duration lunar and Mars missions that require multiple EVA missions (up to 100, two-person lunar EVAs) and conservation of consumables, including depress pump power and depress gas. The current ISS airlock gas reclamation method requires approximately 45 minutes of the astronaut s time in the airlock and 1 KW in electrical power. The proposed method would decrease the astronaut s time in the airlock because the depress gas is being temporarily stored in a reservoir tank for later recovery. Once the EVA crew is conducting the EVA, the volume in the reservoir would be pumped back to the cabin at a slow rate. Various trades were conducted to optimize this method, which include time to equalize the airlock with the evacuated reservoir versus reservoir size, pump power to reclaim depress gas versus time allotted, inflatable reservoir pros and cons (weight, volume, complexity), and feasibility of spent lunar nitrogen and oxygen tanks as reservoirs.

  16. Expedition 16 Flight Engineer Tani Performs EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Astronaut Daniel Tani (top center), Expedition 16 flight engineer, participates in the second of five scheduled sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction continues on the International Space Station (ISS). During the 6-hour and 33-minute space walk, Tani and STS-120 mission specialist Scott Parazynski (out of frame), worked in tandem to disconnect cables from the P6 truss, allowing it to be removed from the Z1 truss. Tani also visually inspected the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) and gathered samples of 'shavings' he found under the joint's multilayer insulation covers. The space walkers also outfitted the Harmony module, mated the power and data grapple fixture and reconfigured connectors on the starboard 1 (S1) truss that will allow the radiator on S1 to be deployed from the ground later. The moon is visible at lower center. The STS-120 mission launched from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A at 11:38:19 a.m. (EDT) on October 23, 2007.

  17. Astronaut Sellers Performs STS-112 EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Launched October 7, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, the STS-112 mission lasted 11 days and performed three sessions of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). Its primary mission was to install the Starboard Side Integrated Truss Structure (S1) and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart to the International Space Station (ISS). The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the Station's complex power system. The S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the International Space Station's railway providing a mobile work platform for future extravehicular activities by astronauts. In this photograph, Astronaut Piers J. Sellers uses both a handrail on the Destiny Laboratory and a foot restraint on the Space Station Remote Manipulator System or Canadarm2 to remain stationary while performing work at the end of the STS-112 mission's second space walk. A cloud-covered Earth provides the backdrop for the scene.

  18. Expedition 16 Flight Engineer Tani Performs EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Astronaut Daniel Tani (top center), Expedition 16 flight engineer, participates in the second of five scheduled sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction continues on the International Space Station (ISS). During the 6-hour and 33-minute space walk, Tani and STS-120 mission specialist Scott Parazynski (out of frame), worked in tandem to disconnect cables from the P6 truss, allowing it to be removed from the Z1 truss. Tani also visually inspected the station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) and gathered samples of 'shavings' he found under the joint's multilayer insulation covers. The space walkers also outfitted the Harmony module, mated the power and data grapple fixture and reconfigured connectors on the starboard 1 (S1) truss that will allow the radiator on S1 to be deployed from the ground later. The moon is visible at lower center. The STS-120 mission launched from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A at 11:38:19 a.m. (EDT) on October 23, 2007.

  19. Apollo 15 - Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Panorama

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-08-02

    S71-43943 (2 Aug. 1971) --- Mosaic photographs which compose a 360-degree panoramic view of the Apollo 15 Hadley-Apennine landing site, taken near the close of the third lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) by astronauts David Scott and James Irwin. This group of photographs was designated the Rover "RIP" Pan because the Lunar Roving Vehicle was parked in its final position prior to the two crewmen returning to the Lunar Module. The astronaut taking the pan was standing 325 feet east of the Lunar Module (LM). The Rover was parked about 300 feet east of the LM. This mosaic covers a field of view from about north-northeast to about south. Visible on the horizon from left to right are: Mount Hadley; high peaks of the Apennine Mountains which are farther in the distance than either Mount Hadley or Hadley Delta Mountain; Silver Spur on the Apennine Front; and the eastern portion of Hadley Delta. Note Rover tracks in the foreground. The numbers of the other two views composing the 360-degree pan are S71-43940 and S71-43942.

  20. Apollo 15 - Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Panorama

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-08-02

    S71-43942 (2 Aug. 1971) --- This view is the second of a series of three mosaic photographs which compose a 360-degree panoramic view of the Apollo 15 Hadley-Apennine landing site, taken near the close of the third and final lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) by astronauts David R. Scott, commander, and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot. This group of photographs was designated the Rover "RIP" Pan because the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) was parked in its final position prior to the two crew men returning to the Lunar Module (LM). The astronaut taking the pan was standing about 325 feet east of the LM. The LRV was parked about 300 feet east of the LM. This mosaic covers a field of view from about southeast to about west by northwest. Visible on the horizon from left to right are: Sliver Spur on the Apennine Front; Hadley Delta Mountain and St. George Crater; Bennett Hill; and the LM. The other two views which compose the 360-degree pan are S71-43940 and S71-43943.

  1. Astronaut Sellers Performs STS-112 EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Launched October 7, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, the STS-112 mission lasted 11 days and performed three sessions of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). Its primary mission was to install the Starboard Side Integrated Truss Structure (S1) and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart to the International Space Station (ISS). The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the Station's complex power system. The S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the International Space Station's railway providing a mobile work platform for future extravehicular activities by astronauts. In this photograph, Astronaut Piers J. Sellers uses both a handrail on the Destiny Laboratory and a foot restraint on the Space Station Remote Manipulator System or Canadarm2 to remain stationary while performing work at the end of the STS-112 mission's second space walk. A cloud-covered Earth provides the backdrop for the scene.

  2. STS-33 EVA Prep and Post with Gregory, Blaha, Carter, Thorton, and Musgrave in FFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This video shows the crew in the airlock of the FFT, talking with technicians about the extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. Thornton and Carter put on EVA suits and enter the airlock as the other crew members help with checklists.

  3. Mission Specialists Mario Runco and Greg Harbaugh suiting up for EVA.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Candid view of EVA Mission Specialists Mario Runco and Greg Harbaugh suiting up for EVA in the middeck with the assistance of Mission Specialist Susan Helms (reviewing the operation with a procedural checklist).

  4. Underwater EVA training in the WETF with astronaut Bruce McCandless

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Underwater extravehicular activity (EVA) training in the weightless environment training facility (WETF) with astronaut Bruce McCandless. McCandless, using a one-G version of the manned maneuvering unit (MMU), is simulating an EVA.

  5. Underwater EVA training for the STS 41-G crewmembers Sullivan and Leestma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Underwater EVA training for the STS 41-G mission specialists Kathryn Sullivan and David Leestma. Sullivan and Leestma train on structures in the weightless environment training facility (WETF) for work during an extravehicular activity (EVA).

  6. EVA: GPS-based extended velocity and acceleration determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Dagoberto; Hernandez-Pajares, Manuel; Juan-Zornoza, Jose Miguel; Sanz-Subirana, Jaume; Aragon-Angel, Angela

    2011-06-01

    In this work, a new GPS carrier phase-based velocity and acceleration determination method is presented that extends the effective range of previous techniques. The method is named `EVA', and may find applications in fields such as airborne gravimetry when rough terrain or water bodies make difficult or impractical to set up nearby GPS reference receivers. The EVA method is similar to methods such as Kennedy (Precise acceleration determination from carrier phase measurements. In: Proceedings of the 15th international technical meeting of the satellite division of the Institute of Navigation. ION GPS 2002, Portland pp 962-972, 2002b) since it uses L1 carrier phase observables for velocity and acceleration determination. However, it introduces a wide network of stations and it is independent of precise clock information because it estimates satellite clock drifts and drift rates `on-the-fly', requiring only orbit data of sufficient quality. Moreover, with EVA the solution rate is only limited by data rate, and not by the available precise satellite clocks data rate. The results obtained are more robust for long baselines than the results obtained with the reference Kennedy method. An advantage of being independent of precise clock information is that, beside IGS Final products, also the Rapid, Ultra-Rapid (observed) and Ultra-Rapid (predicted) products may be used. Moreover, the EVA technique may also use the undifferenced ionosphere-free carrier phase combination (LC), overcoming baseline limitations in cases where ionosphere gradients may be an issue and very low biases are required. During the development of this work, some problems were found in the velocity estimation process of the Kennedy method. The sources of the problems were identified, and an improved version of the Kennedy method was used for this research work. An experiment was performed using a light aircraft flying over the Pyrenees, showing that both EVA and the improved Kennedy methods are able to

  7. Russian-American Cooperation in EVA Area (from Russian Perspective)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsygankov, O. S.; Alexandrov, A. P.; Poleschuk, A. F.

    Russian and American extravehicular activity (EVA) specialists started cooperation after Russia entered the ISS Program. Practical work began in the framework of the Mir-NASA Program, when astronauts J. Linenger, M. Foale and D. Wolf were trained in Russia and participated in the EVA on MIR. This was the intercourse of two experiences, two equal schools each formed under specific conditions. The Report studies the peculiarities of national EVA schools, shows the experience in their integration for the ISS purposes. Organizational aspects of the ISS Program to optimize the implementation of the EVA tasks are presented. It gives examples of the cooperation and development of the hardware equally compatible both with EMU and ORLAN-M space suits, impacts of different schools on the operational methods. It presents proposals on the further integration of the Russian and American schools, considers the prerequisites and perspectives of maximally integrated EVA system for the ISS and the possibility of its incorporation in future in to the mission to Mars.

  8. Effects of EVA spacesuit glove on grasping and pinching tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appendino, Silvia; Battezzato, Alessandro; Chen Chen, Fai; Favetto, Alain; Mousavi, Mehdi; Pescarmona, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    The human hand has a wide range of degrees of freedom, allowing a great variety of movements, and is also one of the most sensitive parts of the human body. Due to these characteristics, it is the most important tool for astronauts to perform extravehicular activities (EVA). However, astronauts must wear mandatory EVA equipment to be protected from the harsh conditions in space and this strongly reduces hand performance, in particular as regards dexterity, tactile perception, mobility and fatigue. Several studies have been conducted to determine the influence of the EVA glove on manual capabilities, both in the past and more recently. This study presents experimental data regarding the performance decline occurring in terms of force and fatigue in the execution of grasping and pinching tasks when wearing an EVA glove, in pressurized and unpressurized conditions, compared with barehanded potential. Results show that wearing the unpressurized EVA glove hinders grip and lateral pinch performances, dropping exerted forces to about 50-70%, while it barely affects two- and three-finger pinch performances. On the other hand, wearing the pressurized glove worsens performances in all cases, reducing forces to about 10-30% of barehanded potential. The results are presented and compared with the previous literature.

  9. Thermal processing of EVA encapsulants and effects of formulation additives

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F.J.; Glick, S.H.

    1996-05-01

    The authors investigated the in-situ processing temperatures and effects of various formulation additives on the formation of ultraviolet (UV) excitable chromophores, in the thermal lamination and curing of ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulants. A programmable, microprocessor-controlled, double-bag vacuum laminator was used to study two commercial as formulated EVA films, A9918P and 15295P, and solution-cast films of Elvaxrm (EVX) impregnated with various curing agents and antioxidants. The results show that the actual measured temperatures of EVA lagged significantly behind the programmed profiles for the heating elements and were affected by the total thermal mass loaded inside the laminator chamber. The antioxidant Naugard P{trademark}, used in the two commercial EVA formulations, greatly enhances the formation of UV-excitable, short chromophores upon curing, whereas other tested antioxidants show little effect. A new curing agent chosen specifically for the EVA formulation modification produces little or no effect on chromophore formation, no bubbling problems in the glass/EVX/glass laminates, and a gel content of {approximately}80% when cured at programmed 155{degrees}C for 4 min. Also demonstrated is the greater discoloring effect with higher concentrations of curing-generated chromophores.

  10. The role of EVA on Space Shuttle. [experimental support and maintenance activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the history of Extravehicular Activity (EVA) through the Skylab Program and to outline the expected tasks and equipment capabilities projected for the Space Shuttle Program. Advantages offered by EVA as a tool to extend payload capabilities and effectiveness and economic advantages of using EVA will be explored. The presentation will conclude with some guidelines and recommendations for consideration by payload investigators in establishing concepts and designs utilizing EVA support.

  11. Extravehicular Activity/Air Traffic Control (EVA/ATC) test report. [communication links to the astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomaro, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    During extravehicular activity (EVA), communications between the EVA astronaut and the space shuttle orbiter are maintained by means of transceiver installed in the environmental support system backpack. Onboard the orbiter, a transceiver line replaceable unit and its associated equipment performs the task of providing a communications link to the astronaut in the extravehicular activity/air traffic control (EVA/ATC) mode. Results of the acceptance tests that performed on the system designed and fabricated for EVA/ATC testing are discussed.

  12. STS-64 Mission Onboard Photograph - Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Mark Lee (red stripe on extravehicular activity suit) tests the new backpack called Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER), a system designed for use in the event a crew member becomes untethered while conducting an EVA. The Lidar-In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) is shown in the foreground. The LITE payload employs lidar, which stands for light detection and ranging, a type of optical radar using laser pulses instead of radio waves to study Earth's atmosphere. Unprecedented views were obtained of cloud structures, storm systems, dust clouds, pollutants, forest burning, and surface reflectance. The STS-64 mission marked the first untethered U.S. EVA in 10 years, and was launched on September 9, 1994, aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery.

  13. Enhanced transdermal delivery of loratadine from the EVA matrix.

    PubMed

    Cho, Cheong-Weon; Choi, Jun-Shik; Kim, Seong-Jin; Shin, Sang-Chul

    2009-05-01

    Various enhancers, such as fatty acids (saturated, unsaturated), glycerides, propylene glycols, and non-ionic surfactants, have been incorporated in the loratadine-EVA matrix to increase the rate of skin permeation of loratadine from an EVA matrix. The enhancing effects of these enhancers on the skin permeation of loratadine were evaluated using a modified Keshary-Chien cell fitted with intact excised rat skin. The penetration enhancers showed a higher flux, probably due to the enhancing effect on the skin barrier, the stratum corneum. Among the enhancers used, such as the fatty acids, glycols, propylene glycols, and non-ionic surfactants, linoleic acid showed the best enhancement. For the enhanced transdermal delivery of loratadine, application of an EVA matrix containing a permeation enhancer might be useful in the development of a transdermal drug delivery system.

  14. View of Astronaut Bruc McCandless during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1984-02-11

    S84-27021 (7 Feb 1984) --- Astronaut Bruce McCandless II, 41B mission specialist tests a "cherry-picker" type device during February 7 historical Extravehicular Activity (EVA). The EVA, in which Astronauts McCandless and Robert L. Stewart, two of three STS-41B mission specialists, participated, marked two firsts--initial use of both the Mobile Foot Restraint (MFR) attached to the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm here, and the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) backpack (not seen in this frame). The Challenger was flying with its aft end aimed toward the Earth. This photograph clearly shows where the MFR connects to the end effector of the Canadian-built RMS arm. The two spacewalkers were monitored and photographed by their fellow crewmembers, astronauts Vance D. Brand, commander; Robert L. Gibson, pilot; and Ronald E. McNair, mission specialist. The three remained in the cabin for another EVA session two days later. Photo Credit: NASA

  15. SIMUATION (EXTRAVEHICULAR ACTIVITY [EVA]) - STS-23/51D - JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-04-16

    S85-30878 (15 April 1985) --- Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, left, and Astronaut candidate Mark C. Lee rehearse the deployment of two specially designed flyswatter like tools on the end of the orbiter's remote manipulator system (RMS) arm. Their "dry" run of a planned Discovery STS 51-D extravehicular activity (EVA) is actually not so dry, since it is held in a 25 ft. deep pool, part of the Johnson Space Center's (JSC) weightless environment test facility (WET-F). Astronauts Jeffrey A. Hoffman and S. David Griggs, two 51-D mission specialists, have been assigned the task of April 16's EVA. A rendezvous with the troubled Syncom IV (LEASAT) satellite has been scheduled for the day after the EVA, and an attempt will be made by the arm to trip an important lever on the troubled communications satellite.

  16. Water Pump Development for the EVA PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, Michael; Kurwitz, Cable; Goldman, Jeff; Morris, Kim; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the effort by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) and Honeywell for NASA to design, fabricate, and test a preflight prototype pump for use in the Extravehicular activity (EVA) portable life support subsystem (PLSS). Major design decisions were driven by the need to reduce the pump s mass, power, and volume compared to the existing PLSS pump. In addition, the pump will accommodate a much wider range of abnormal conditions than the existing pump, including vapor/gas bubbles and increased pressure drop when employed to cool two suits simultaneously. A positive displacement, external gear type pump was selected because it offers the most compact and highest efficiency solution over the required range of flow rates and pressure drops. An additional benefit of selecting a gear pump design is that it is self priming and capable of ingesting noncondensable gas without becoming "air locked." The chosen pump design consists of a 28 V DC, brushless, sealless, permanent magnet motor driven, external gear pump that utilizes a Honeywell development that eliminates the need for magnetic coupling. Although the planned flight unit will use a sensorless motor with custom designed controller, the preflight prototype to be provided for this project incorporates Hall effect sensors, allowing an interface with a readily available commercial motor controller. This design approach reduced the cost of this project and gives NASA more flexibility in future PLSS laboratory testing. The pump design was based on existing Honeywell designs, but incorporated features specifically for the PLSS application, including all of the key features of the flight pump. Testing at TEES will simulate the vacuum environment in which the flight pump will operate. Testing will verify that the pump meets design requirements for range of flow rates, pressure rise, power consumption, working fluid temperature, operating time, and restart capability. Pump testing is currently

  17. EVA Glove Sensor Feasbility II Abstract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melone, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The main objectives for the glove project include taking various measurements from human subjects during and after they perform different tasks in the glove box, acquiring data from these tests and determining the accuracy of these results, interpreting and analyzing this data, and using the data to better understand how hand injuries are caused during EVAs.1 Some of these measurements include force readings, temperature readings, and micro-circulatory blood flow.1 The three glove conditions tested were ungloved (a comfort glove was worn to house the sensors), Series 4000, and Phase VI. The general approach/procedure for the glove sensor feasibility project is as follows: 1. Prepare test subject for testing. This includes attaching numerous sensors (approximately 50) to the test subject, wiring, and weaving the sensors and wires in the glove which helps to keep everything together. This also includes recording baseline moisture data using the Vapometer and MoistSense. 2. Pressurizing the glove box. Once the glove box is pressurized to the desired pressure (4.3 psid), testing can begin. 3. Testing. The test subject will perform a series of tests, some of which include pinching a load cell, making a fist, pushing down on a force plate, and picking up metal pegs, rotating them 90 degrees, and placing them back in the peg board. 4. Post glove box testing data collection. After the data is collected from inside the glove box, the Vapometer and MoistSense device will be used to collect moisture data from the subject's hand. 5. Survey. At the conclusion of testing, he/she will complete a survey that asks questions pertaining to comfort/discomfort levels of the glove, glove sizing, as well as offering any additional feedback.

  18. EVA tools and equipment reference book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fullerton, R. K.

    1993-01-01

    This document contains a mixture of tools and equipment used throughout the space shuttle-based extravehicular activity (EVA) program. Promising items which have reached the prototype stage of development are also included, but should not be considered certified ready for flight. Each item is described with a photo, a written discussion, technical specifications, dimensional drawings, and points of contact for additional information. Numbers on the upper left-hand corner of each photo may be used to order specific pictures from NASA and contractor photo libraries. Points of contact were classified as either operational or technical. An operational contact is an engineer from JSC Mission Operations Directorate who is familiar with the basic function and on-orbit use of the tool. A technical contact would be the best source of detailed technical specifications and is typically the NASA subsystem manager. The technical information table for each item uses the following terms to describe the availability or status of each hardware item: Standard - Flown on every mission as standard manifest; Flight specific - Potentially available for flight, not flown every mission (flight certification cannot be guaranteed and recertification may be required); Reference only - Item no longer in active inventory or not recommended for future use, some items may be too application-specific for general use; and Developmental - In the prototype stage only and not yet available for flight. The current availability and certification of any flight-specific tool should be verified with the technical point of contact. Those tools built and fit checked for Hubble Space Telescope maintenance are program dedicated and are not available to other customers. Other customers may have identical tools built from the existing, already certified designs as an optional service.

  19. Shoulder Injuries in US Astronauts Related to EVA Suit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, R. A.; McCulloch, P.; Van Baalen, Mary; Minard, Charles; Watson, Richard; Blatt, T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: For every one hour spent performing extravehicular activity (EVA) in space, astronauts in the US space program spend approximately six to ten hours training in the EVA spacesuit at NASA-Johnson Space Center's Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL). In 1997, NASA introduced the planar hard upper torso (HUT) EVA spacesuit which subsequently replaced the existing pivoted HUT. An extra joint in the pivoted shoulder allows increased mobility but also increased complexity. Over the next decade a number of astronauts developed shoulder problems requiring surgical intervention, many of whom performed EVA training in the NBL. This study investigated whether changing HUT designs led to shoulder injuries requiring surgical repair. Methods: US astronaut EVA training data and spacesuit design employed were analyzed from the NBL data. Shoulder surgery data was acquired from the medical record database, and causal mechanisms were obtained from personal interviews Analysis of the individual HUT designs was performed as it related to normal shoulder biomechanics. Results: To date, 23 US astronauts have required 25 shoulder surgeries. Approximately 48% (11/23) directly attributed their injury to training in the planar HUT, whereas none attributed their injury to training in the pivoted HUT. The planar HUT design limits shoulder abduction to 90 degrees compared to approximately 120 degrees in the pivoted HUT. The planar HUT also forces the shoulder into a forward flexed position requiring active retraction and extension to increase abduction beyond 90 degrees. Discussion: Multiple factors are associated with mechanisms leading to shoulder injury requiring surgical repair. Limitations to normal shoulder mechanics, suit fit, donning/doffing, body position, pre-existing injury, tool weight and configuration, age, in-suit activity, and HUT design have all been identified as potential sources of injury. Conclusion: Crewmembers with pre-existing or current shoulder injuries or certain

  20. Crosscutting Development- EVA Tools and Geology Sample Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2011-01-01

    Exploration to all destinations has at one time or another involved the acquisition and return of samples and context data. Gathered at the summit of the highest mountain, the floor of the deepest sea, or the ice of a polar surface, samples and their value (both scientific and symbolic) have been a mainstay of Earthly exploration. In manned spaceflight exploration, the gathering of samples and their contextual information has continued. With the extension of collecting activities to spaceflight destinations comes the need for geology tools and equipment uniquely designed for use by suited crew members in radically different environments from conventional field geology. Beginning with the first Apollo Lunar Surface Extravehicular Activity (EVA), EVA Geology Tools were successfully used to enable the exploration and scientific sample gathering objectives of the lunar crew members. These early designs were a step in the evolution of Field Geology equipment, and the evolution continues today. Contemporary efforts seek to build upon and extend the knowledge gained in not only the Apollo program but a wealth of terrestrial field geology methods and hardware that have continued to evolve since the last lunar surface EVA. This paper is presented with intentional focus on documenting the continuing evolution and growing body of knowledge for both engineering and science team members seeking to further the development of EVA Geology. Recent engineering development and field testing efforts of EVA Geology equipment for surface EVA applications are presented, including the 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATs) field trial. An executive summary of findings will also be presented, detailing efforts recommended for exotic sample acquisition and pre-return curation development regardless of planetary or microgravity destination.

  1. An EVA Suit Fatigue, Strength, and Reach Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maida, James C.

    1999-01-01

    The number of Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVAs) performed will increase dramatically with the upcoming Space Station assembly missions. It is estimated that up to 900 EVA hours may be required to assemble the Space Station with an additional 200 hours per year for maintenance requirements. Efficient modeling tools will be essential to assist in planning these EVAS. Important components include strength and fatigue parameters, multi-body dynamics and kinematics. This project is focused on building a model of the EVA crew member encompassing all these capabilities. Phase 1, which is currently underway, involves collecting EMU suited and unsuited fatigue, strength and range of motion data, for all major joints of the body. Phase 2 involves processing the data for model input, formulating comparisons between the EMU suits and deriving generalized relationships between suited and unsuited data. Phase 3 will be formulation of a multi-body dynamics model of the EMU capable of predicting mass handling properties and integration of empirical data into the model. Phase 4 will be validation of the model with collected EMU data from the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory at NASA/JSC. Engineers and designers will use tie EVA suit database to better understand the capabilities of the suited individuals. This knowledge will lead to better design of tools and planned operations. Mission planners can use the modeling system and view the animations and the visualizations of the various parameters, such as overall fatigue, motion, timelines, reach, and strength to streamline the timing, duration, task arrangement, personnel and overall efficiency of the EVA tasks. Suit designers can use quantifiable data at common biomechanical structure points to better analyze and compare suit performance.

  2. EVA 2000: A European/Russian space suit concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoog, A. I.; Abramov, I. P.

    1995-07-01

    For the European manned space activities an EVA space suit system was being developed in the frame of the Hermes Space Vehicle Programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The space suit was to serve the needs for all relevant extravehicular activities for the Hermes/Columbus operations planned to begin in 2004. For the present Russian manned space programme the relevant EVAs are performed by the Orlan-DMA semi-rigid space suit. The origin of its development reaches back to the 1970s and has since been adapted to cover the needs for extravehicular activities on Salyut and MIR until today. The latest modification of the space suit, which guaranteed its completely self-contained operation, was made in 1988. However, Russian specialists considered it necessary to start developing an EVA space suit of a new generation, which would have improved performance and would cover the needs by the turn of the century and into the beginning of the next century. Potentially these two suit developments could have a lot in common based on similarities in present concepts. As future manned space activities become more and more an international effort, a safe and reliable interoperability of the different space suit systems is required. Based on the results of the Munich Minister Conference in 1991, the European Space Agency and the Russian Space Agency agreed to initiate a requirements analysis and conceptual design study to determine the feasibility of a joint space suit development, EVA 2000. The design philosophy for the EVA 2000 study was oriented on a space suit system design of: —space suit commonality and interoperability —increased crew productivity and safety —increase in useful life and reduced maintainability —reduced development and production cost. The EVA 2000 feasibility study was performed in 1992, and with the positive conclusions for EVA 2000, this approach became the new joint European/Russian EVA Suit 2000 Development Programme. This paper gives an

  3. STS-64 Extravehicular activity (EVA) training view in WETF

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-08-10

    S94-39762 (August 1994) --- Astronaut Carl J. Meade, STS-64 mission specialist, listens to ground monitors prior to a simulation of a spacewalk scheduled for his September mission. Meade, who shared the rehearsal in Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F) pool with crewmate astronaut Mark C. Lee (out of frame), is equipped with a training version of new extravehicular activity (EVA) hardware called the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. The hardware includes a mobility-aiding back harness and a chest-mounted hand control module. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  4. STS-64 Extravehicular activity (EVA) training view in WETF

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-08-10

    S94-39775 (August 1994) --- Astronaut Carl J. Meade, STS-64 mission specialist, listens to ground monitors during a simulation of a spacewalk scheduled for his September mission. Meade, who shared the rehearsal in the Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F) pool with crewmate astronaut Mark C. Lee, is equipped with a training version of new extravehicular activity (EVA) hardware called the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. The hardware includes a mobility-aiding back harness and a chest-mounted hand control module. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  5. Astronauts Carl Meade and Mark Lee test SAFER during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Backdropped against the darkness of space some 130 nautical miles above Earth, astronaut Mark C. Lee (red stripe on EVA suit) tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. Astronaut Carl J. Meade, tethered to Discovery, at bottom center, got his turn later using the new SAFER hardware. The scen was captured with a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera operated by a fellow crew member in the shirt-sleeve environment of the Space Shuttle Discovery's cabin. Part of the hardware for the Lidar-In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) is in left foreground.

  6. EVA 2000: a European/Russian space suit concept.

    PubMed

    Skoog, A I; Abramov, I P

    1995-07-01

    For the European manned space activities an EVA space suit system was being developed in the frame of the Hermes Space Vehicle Programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The space suit was to serve the needs for all relevant extravehicular activities for the Hermes Columbus operations planned to begin in 2004. For the present Russian manned space programme the relevant EVAs are performed by the Orlan-DMA semi-rigid space suit. The origin of its development reaches back to the 1970s and has since been adapted to cover the needs for extravehicular activities on Salyut and MIR until today. The latest modification of the space suit, which guaranteed its completely self-contained operation, was made in 1988. However, Russian specialists considered it necessary to start developing an EVA space suit of a new generation, which would have improved performance and would cover the needs by the turn of the century and into the beginning of the next century. Potentially these two suit developments could have a lot in common based on similarities in present concepts. As future manned space activities become more and more an international effort, a safe and reliable interoperability of the different space suit systems is required. Based on the results of the Munich Minister Conference in 1991, the European Space Agency and the Russian Space Agency agreed to initiate a requirements analysis and conceptual design study to determine the feasibility of a joint space suit development, EVA 2000. The design philosophy for the EVA 2000 study was oriented on a space suit system design of: space suit commonality and interoperability; increased crew productivity and safety; increase in useful life and reduced maintainability; reduced development and production cost. The EVA 2000 feasibility study was performed in 1992, and with the positive conclusions for EVA 2000, this approach became the new joint European Russian EVA Suit 2000 Development Programme. This paper gives an overview of

  7. EVA crew workstation provisions for Skylab and Space Shuttle missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, N. E.; Saenger, E. L.

    1973-01-01

    A synopsis of scheduled extravehicular activities (EVA) for a nominal Skylab mission is presented with an overview of EV workstation equipment developed for the program. Also included are the unprogrammed extravehicular activities and supporting equipment that was quickly developed and retrofitted in a series of successful operations to salvage the crippled Skylab Cluster during the Skylab 1 Mission. Because EVA appears to be a requirement for the Space Shuttle Program, candidate EV workstations are discussed in terms of effective and economical Shuttle payload servicing and maintenance. Several such concepts, which could provide a versatile, portable EV support system, are presented.

  8. Medical, Psychophysiological, and Human Performance Problems During Extended EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session JP1, the discussion focuses on the following topics: New Developments in the Assessment of the Risk of Decompression Sickness in Null Gravity During Extravehicular Activity; The Dynamic of Physiological Reactions of Cosmonauts Under the Influence of Repeated EVA Workouts, The Russian Experience; Medical Emergencies in Space; The Evolution from 'Physiological Adequacy' to 'Physiological Tuning'; Five Zones of Symmetrical and Asymmetrical Conflicting Temperatures on the Human Body, Physiological Consequences; Human Performance and Subjective Perception in Nonuniform Thermal Conditions; The Hand as a Control System, Implications for Hand-Finger Dexterity During Extended EVA; and Understanding the Skill of Extravehicular Mass Handling.

  9. Astronauts Carl Meade and Mark Lee test SAFER during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Backdropped against the darkness of space some 130 nautical miles above Earth, astronaut Mark C. Lee (red stripe on EVA suit) tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. Astronaut Carl J. Meade, tethered to Discovery, at bottom center, got his turn later using the new SAFER hardware. The scen was captured with a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera operated by a fellow crew member in the shirt-sleeve environment of the Space Shuttle Discovery's cabin. Part of the hardware for the Lidar-In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) is in left foreground.

  10. Electrostatic Discharge Issues in International Space Station Program EVAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.

    2009-01-01

    EVA activity in the ISS program encounters several dangerous ESD conditions. The ISS program has been aggressive for many years to find ways to mitigate or to eliminate the associated risks. Investments have included: (1) Major mods to EVA tools, suit connectors & analytical tools (2) Floating Potential Measurement Unit (3) Plasma Contactor Units (4) Certification of new ISS flight attitudes (5) Teraflops of computation (6) Thousands of hours of work by scores of specialists (7) Monthly management attention at the highest program levels. The risks are now mitigated to a level that is orders of magnitude safer than prior operations

  11. Astronaut Russell Schweickart inside simulator for EVA training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-11

    S68-55391 (11 Dec. 1968) --- Astronaut Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot of the Apollo 9 (Spacecraft 104/Lunar Module 3/Saturn 504) space mission, is seen inside Chamber "A," Space Environment Simulation Laboratory, Building 32, participating in dry run activity in preparation for extravehicular activity which is scheduled in Chamber "A." The purpose of the scheduled training is to familiarize the crewmen with the operation of EVA equipment in a simulated space environment. In addition, metabolic and workload profiles will be simulated on each crewman. Astronauts Schweickart and Alan L. Bean, backup lunar module pilot, are scheduled to receive thermal-vacuum training simulating Earth-orbital EVA.

  12. STS-64 Extravehicular activity (EVA) training view in WETF

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-08-10

    S94-39770 (August 1994) --- Astronaut Carl J. Meade, STS-64 mission specialist, is being submerged prior to an underwater simulation of a spacewalk scheduled for his September mission. Meade, who shared the rehearsal in the Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F) pool with crewmate astronaut Mark C. Lee (partially visible at left), is equipped with a training version of new extravehicular activity (EVA) hardware called the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  13. Astronaut Jack Lousma seen outside Skylab space station during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, is seen outside the Skylab space station in Earth orbit during the August 5, 1973 Skylab 3 extravehicular activity (EVA) in this photographic reproduction taken from a television transmission made by a color TV camera aboard the space station. Lousma is at the Apollo Telescope Mount EVA work station assembling one of the two 55-foot long sectionalized poles for the twin pole solar shield which was deployed to help cool the Orbital Workshop. Part of the Airlock Module's thermal/meteoroid curtain is in the left foreground.

  14. CREW TRAINING (EXTRAVEHICULAR ACTIVITY [EVA]) - STS-41G - JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1984-07-05

    S84-36898 (29 June 1984) --- Astronauts Robert L. Crippen (left) and Jon A. McBride, crew commander and pilot, respectively for NASA's 41-G Space Shuttle mission, await the delivery of self contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) gear prior to their going underwater to observe a simulation of an extravehicular activity (EVA) scheduled for their mission. The EVA will be performed by Astronauts Kathryn D. Sullivan and David C. Leestma, two of three mission specialists named for the seven-member crew. The underwater training took place in the Johnson Space Center's weightless environment training facility (WET-F).

  15. ASTRONAUT KERWIN, JOSEPH P. - EXTRAVEHICULAR ACTIVITY (EVA) - SKYLAB (SL)-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-06-01

    S73-27562 (June 1973) --- Scientist-astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, Skylab 2 science pilot, performs extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Skylab 1 and 2 space station cluster in Earth orbit, as seen in this reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by a TV camera aboard the station. Kerwin is just outside the Airlock Module. Kerwin assisted astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., Skylab 2 commander, during the successful EVA attempt to free the stuck solar array system wing on the Orbital Workshop. Photo credit: NASA

  16. EVA tool preparation for upcoming Hubble Space Telescope servicing spacewalks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-02-12

    S82-E-5002 (12 Feb. 1997) --- On the Space Shuttle Discovery's middeck, STS-82 payload commander Mark C. Lee looks over plan for the first space Extravehicular Activity (EVA) as an unidentified crew mate (right) unstows a piece of related gear. Four of the crew members will perform a series of EVA's to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This photograph (as well as the others in this series) was recorded with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC) late during Discovery's first full day in orbit and downlinked later to flight controllers in Houston, Texas.

  17. Astronaut Dale Gardner holds up for sale sign after EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1984-11-14

    51A-104-049 (14 Nov. 1984) --- Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, having just completed the major portion of his second extravehicular activity (EVA) period in three days aboard the Earth-orbiting Discovery, holds up a for sale sign. Astronaut Joseph P. Allen IV, who also participated in the two EVA, is reflected in Gardner's helmet visor. A portion of each of two recovered satellites is in lower right corner, with Westar nearer Discovery's aft. Dr. Allen, standing on the mobile foot restraint, connected to the remote manipulator system. Photo credit: NASA

  18. Astronaut Ronald Evans photographed during transearth coast EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-17

    AS17-152-23391 (17 Dec. 1972) --- Astronaut Ronald E. Evans is photographed performing extravehicular activity during the Apollo 17 spacecraft's trans-Earth coast. During his EVA, Evans, command module pilot, retrieved film cassettes from the lunar sounder, mapping camera and panoramic camera. The cylindrical object at Evans' left side is the mapping camera cassette. The total time for the trans-Earth EVA was one hour, seven minutes, 18 seconds, starting at ground elapsed time of 257:25 (2:28 p.m.) and ending at G.E.T. of 258:42 (3:35 p.m.) on Sunday, Dec. 17, 1972.

  19. Astronaut Ronald Evans photographed during transearth coast EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-17

    AS17-152-23393 (17 Dec. 1972) --- Astronaut Ronald E. Evans is photographed performing extravehicular activity during the Apollo 17 spacecraft's trans-Earth coast. During his EVA, command module pilot Evans retrieved film cassettes from the Lunar Sounder, Mapping Camera, and Panoramic Camera. The cylindrical object at Evans' left side is the Mapping Camera cassette. The total time for the trans-Earth EVA was one hour seven minutes 18 seconds, starting at ground elapsed time of 257:25 (2:28 p.m.) and ending at ground elapsed timed of 258:42 (3:35 p.m.) on Sunday, Dec. 17, 1972.

  20. Space Station Human Factors Research Review. Volume 1: EVA Research and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Marc M. (Editor); Vykukal, H. C. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    An overview is presented of extravehicular activity (EVA) research and development activities at Ames. The majority of the program was devoted to presentations by the three contractors working in parallel on the EVA System Phase A Study, focusing on Implications for Man-Systems Design. Overhead visuals are included for a mission results summary, space station EVA requirements and interface accommodations summary, human productivity study cross-task coordination, and advanced EVAS Phase A study implications for man-systems design. Articles are also included on subsea approach to work systems development and advanced EVA system design requirements.

  1. EVA Design, Verification, and On-Orbit Operations Support Using Worksite Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagale, Thomas J.; Price, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) design is a very large and complex orbiting structure with thousands of Extravehicular Activity (EVA) worksites. These worksites are used to assemble and maintain the ISS. The challenge facing EVA designers was how to design, verify, and operationally support such a large number of worksites within cost and schedule. This has been solved through the practical use of computer aided design (CAD) graphical techniques that have been developed and used with a high degree of success over the past decade. The EVA design process allows analysts to work concurrently with hardware designers so that EVA equipment can be incorporated and structures configured to allow for EVA access and manipulation. Compliance with EVA requirements is strictly enforced during the design process. These techniques and procedures, coupled with neutral buoyancy underwater testing, have proven most valuable in the development, verification, and on-orbit support of planned or contingency EVA worksites.

  2. Astronaut Richard Gordon practices attaching camera to film EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., prime crew pilot for the Gemini 11 space flight, practices attaching to a Gemini boilerplate a camera which will film his extravehicular activity (EVA) outside the spacecraft. The training exercise is being conducted in the Astronaut Training Building, Kennedy Space Center, Florida.

  3. Reducing cyclone pressure drop with evasés

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cyclones are widely used to separate particles from gas flows and as air emissions control devices. Their cost of operation is proportional to the fan energy required to overcome their pressure drop. Evasés or exit diffusers potentially could reduce exit pressure losses without affecting collection...

  4. Gemini 9 spacecraft during EVA as seen Astronaut Eugene Cernan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-05

    S66-38068 (5 June 1966) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan took this view of the Gemini-9A spacecraft and his umbilical cord (right) over California, Arizona, and Sonora, Mexico, during his extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Gemini-9A mission. Taken during the 32nd revolution of the flight. Photo credit: NASA

  5. Astronaut Alan Bean with subpackages of the ALSEP during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, traverses with the two subpackages of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA). Bean deployed the ALSEP components 300 feet from the Lunar Module (LM). The LM and deployed erectable S-band antenna can be seen in the background.

  6. Commercial Spacewalking: Designing an EVA Qualification Program for Space Tourism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gast, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    In the near future, accessibility to space will be opened to anyone with the means and the desire to experience the weightlessness of microgravity, and to look out upon both the curvature of the Earth and the blackness of space, from the protected, shirt-sleeved environment of a commercial spacecraft. Initial forays will be short-duration, suborbital flights, but the experience and expertise of half a century of spaceflight will soon produce commercial vehicles capable of achieving low Earth orbit. Even with the commercial space industry still in its infancy, and manned orbital flight a number of years away, there is little doubt that there will one day be a feasible and viable market for those courageous enough to venture outside the vehicle and into the void, wearing nothing but a spacesuit, armed with nothing but preflight training. What that Extravehicular Activity (EVA) preflight training entails, however, is something that has yet to be defined. A number of significant factors will influence the composition of a commercial EVA training program, but a fundamental question remains: 'what minimum training guidelines must be met to ensure a safe and successful commercial spacewalk?' Utilizing the experience gained through the development of NASA's Skills program - designed to qualify NASA and International Partner astronauts for EVA aboard the International Space Station - this paper identifies the attributes and training objectives essential to the safe conduct of an EVA, and attempts to conceptually design a comprehensive training methodology meant to represent an acceptable qualification standard.

  7. Astronaut Leestma during an EVA in the aft cargo hold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut David C. Leestma during an extravehicular activity (EVA) in the Challenger's aft cargo hold. He appears to be working on the orbital refueling system (ORS). Behind him can be seen the Get Away Special canisters and part of a cradle for satellites.

  8. Astronaut Mark Lee floats free of tether during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Backdropped against a massive wall of white clouds 130 nautical miles below, astronaut Mark C. Lee floats freely as he tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. The image was exposed with a 35mm camera from the shirt-sleeve environment of the Space Shuttle Discovery.

  9. Astronaut Harrison Schmitt retrieving lunar samples during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Harrison Schmitt, Apollo 17 lunar module pilot, with his adjustable sampling scoop, heads for a selected rock on the lunar surface to retrieve the sample for study. The action was photographed by Apollo 17 crew commander, Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan on the mission's second extravehicular activity (EVA-2), at Station 5 (Camelot Crater) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site.

  10. Television transmission of Astronaut Harrison Schmitt falling during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt loses his balance and heads for a fall during the second Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA-1) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site, in this black and white reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by the RCA color TV camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle. Schmitt is the lunar module pilot.

  11. Astronaut Harrison Schmitt standing next to boulder during third EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt is photographed standing next to a huge, split boulder during the third Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA-3) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site on the Moon. Schmitt is the Apollo 17 lunar module pilot. This picture was taken by Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, commander.

  12. Design, development and evaluation of Stanford/Ames EVA prehensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Larry J.; Aldrich, J.; Leblanc, M.; Sabelman, E.; Schwandt, D.

    1988-01-01

    Space Station operations and maintenance are expected to make unprecedented demands on astronaut EVA. With Space Station expected to operate with an 8 to 10 psi atmosphere (4 psi for Shuttle operations), the effectivness of pressurized gloves is called into doubt at the same time that EVA activity levels are to be increased. To address the need for more frequent and complex EVA missions and also to extend the dexterity, duration, and safety of EVA astronauts, NASA Ames and Stanford University have an ongoing cooperative agreement to explore and compare alternatives. This is the final Stanford/Ames report on manually powered Prehensors, each of which consists of a shroud forming a pressure enclosure around the astronaut's hand, and a linkage system to transfer the motions and forces of the hand to mechanical digits attached to the shroud. All prehensors are intended for attachment to a standard wrist coupling, as found on the AX-5 hard suit prototype, so that realistic tests can be performed under normal and reduced gravity as simulated by water flotation.

  13. Vinogradovs helmet during Ex;pedition 13 EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-02

    ISS013-E-29011 (1 June 2006) --- A close-up view shows the face of cosmonaut Pavel V. Vinogradov, Expedition 13 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, through his helmet visor during the first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) performed by the Expedition 13 crew during their six-month mission. Vinogradov was attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit.

  14. Polarization Processes of Nanocomposite Silicate-EVA and PP Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, Gian Carlo; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Testa, Luigi; Motori, Antonio; Saccani, Andrea; Patuelli, Francesca

    Recent works indicate that polypropylene (PP) and ethylene-vinylacetate (EVA) filled by nanosilicates may present low content of space charge and high electric strength. Investigations are being made to explain nanocomposite behaviour and characterize their electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. In this paper, the results of broad-band dielectric spectroscopy performed on EVA and PP filled by layered nanosized silicates are reported. Isochronal and isothermal curves of complex permittivity, as well as activation energies of the relaxation processes, are presented and discussed. Nanostructuration gives rise to substantial changes in the polarisation and dielectric loss behaviour. While the relaxation process of EVA, associated with glass transition of the material amorphous phase, results unchanged from base to nanostructured material, nanocomposites EVA and PP have shown the rise of a new process at higher temperatures respect to the typical host material processes, as well as a different distribution of relaxation processes. Changes in space charge accumulation in relation to the effectiveness of the purification process performed upon nanostructured materials are also reported: while the dispersion of the clean clays leads to a reduction of the space charge, especially at high fields, an unclean filler gives rise to significant homo-charge accumulation and interfacial polarisation phenomena.

  15. View of STS-121 Astronauts shadows during EVA 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-08

    ISS013-E-49681 (8 July 2006) --- The shadows of astronauts Piers J. Sellers and Michael E. Fossum, STS-121 mission specialists, who are anchored to the Space Shuttle Discovery's Remote Manipulator System/Orbiter Boom Sensor System (RMS/OBSS) foot restraint, are visible against a shuttle's payload bay door during today's session of extravehicular activity (EVA).

  16. Astronaut James Irwin uses scoop during Apollo 15 EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, uses a scoop in making a trench in the lunar soil during Apollo 15 extravehicular activity (EVA). Mount Hadley rises approximately 14,765 feet (about 4,500 meters) above the plain in the background.

  17. EVA: Collaborative Distributed Learning Environment Based in Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheremetov, Leonid; Tellez, Rolando Quintero

    In this paper, a Web-based learning environment developed within the project called Virtual Learning Spaces (EVA, in Spanish) is presented. The environment is composed of knowledge, collaboration, consulting, experimentation, and personal spaces as a collection of agents and conventional software components working over the knowledge domains. All…

  18. Compiling a Comprehensive EVA Training Dataset for NASA Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, M. S.; Murray, J. D.; Lee, L. R.; Wear, M. L.; Van Baalen, M.

    2016-01-01

    Training for a spacewalk or extravehicular activity (EVA) is considered a hazardous duty for NASA astronauts. This places astronauts at risk for decompression sickness as well as various musculoskeletal disorders from working in the spacesuit. As a result, the operational and research communities over the years have requested access to EVA training data to supplement their studies. The purpose of this paper is to document the comprehensive EVA training data set that was compiled from multiple sources by the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) epidemiologists to investigate musculoskeletal injuries. The EVA training dataset does not contain any medical data, rather it only documents when EVA training was performed, by whom and other details about the session. The first activities practicing EVA maneuvers in water were performed at the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) at the Marshall Spaceflight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. This facility opened in 1967 and was used for EVA training until the early Space Shuttle program days. Although several photographs show astronauts performing EVA training in the NBS, records detailing who performed the training and the frequency of training are unavailable. Paper training records were stored within the NBS after it was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1985 and closed in 1997, but significant resources would be needed to identify and secure these records, and at this time LSAH has not pursued acquisition of these early training records. Training in the NBS decreased when the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, opened the Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) in 1980. Early training records from the WETF consist of 11 hand-written dive logbooks compiled by individual workers that were digitized at the request of LSAH. The WETF was integral in the training for Space Shuttle EVAs until its closure in 1998. The Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the Sonny Carter Training Facility near JSC

  19. Astronaut Richard Gordon practices attaching camera to film EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., prime crew pilot for the Gemini 11 space flight, practices attaching to a Gemini boilerplate a camera which will film his extravehicular activity (EVA) outside the spacecraft. The training exercise is being conducted in the Astronaut Training Building, Kennedy Space Center, Florida.

  20. 8. LESLIE WICKMAN, EVA (EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITIES) SPECIALIST, GETTING OUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. LESLIE WICKMAN, EVA (EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITIES) SPECIALIST, GETTING OUT OF SPACE SUIT AFTER TESTING IN NEUTRAL BUOYANCY TANK. AVERAGE COST OF SUIT $1,000,000. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL